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Sample records for sulfate soil analysis

  1. Combination of amplified rDNA restriction analysis and high-throughput sequencing revealed the negative effect of colistin sulfate on the diversity of soil microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Tingli; Sun, Yongxue; Peng, Jinju; Wu, Qun; Ma, Yi; Zhou, Xiaohui

    2018-01-01

    Colistin sulfate is widely used in both human and veterinary medicine. However, its effect on the microbial ecologyis unknown. In this study, we determined the effect of colistin sulfate on the diversity of soil microorganisms by amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) and high-throughput sequencing.ARDRAshowed that the diversity of DNA from soil microorganisms was reduced after soil was treated with colistin sulfate, with the most dramatic reductionobserved after 35days of treatment. High-throughput sequencing showed that the Chao1 and abundance-based coverage estimators (ACE) were reduced in the soils treated with colistin sulfate for 35 dayscompared to those treated with colistin sulfate for 7days. Furthermore, Chao1 and ACE tended to be lower when higher concentration of colistin sulfate was used, suggesting that the microbial abundance is reduced by colistin sulfate in a dose-dependent manner. Shannon index showed that the diversity of soil microorganism was reduced upon treatment with colistin sulfate compared to the untreated control group. Following 7days of treatment, Bacillus, Clostridiumand Sphingomonas were sensitive to all the concentration of colistin sulfate used in this study. Following 35days of treatment, the abundance of Choroplast, Haliangium, Pseudomonas, Lactococcus, and Clostridium was significantly decreased. Our results demonstrated that colistin sulfate especially at high concentration (≥5mg/kg) could alter the population structure of microorganisms and consequently the microbial community function in soil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. [Aluminum forms in acid sulfate soils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Luo, S; Feng, Y

    2000-10-01

    With the method of sequential extraction, the extractable noncrystalline aluminum in Acid Sulfate Soils was fractionized into exchangeable Al (ExAl), absorbed inorganic hydroxy-Al(HyAl), organic complexed Al(OrAl), Fe oxide bound Al (DCBAl), interlayered Al(InAl) and noncrystalline aluminosilicate(NcAl) with average of 1.79, 2.51, 4.17, 4.14, 4.31 and 8.66 g Al2O3.kg-1, respectively. In actual Acid Sulfate Soils, the amount of different forms Al followed the order of NcAl > OrAl > InAl > DCBAl > ExAl > HyAl, but in potential acid sulfate soils, NcAl > InAl > DCBAl > HyAl > OrAl > ExAl. The average of the total extractable noncrystalline Al was 35.57 g Al2O3.kg-1, which covered 25.04% of the total amount of Al in Acid Sulfate Soils. The characteristic of extractable noncrystalline Al in Acid Sulfate Soils was the high proportion of active aluminum, such as ExAl, HyAl and OrAl. All forms of Al were closely related to the corresponding properties and ecological characteristics of Acid Sulfate Soils. The strong acid environment of actual Acid Sulfate Soils induced over-released Al, which transformed to active Al and resulted in Al toxicity.

  3. Supplementing predictive mapping of acid sulfate soil occurrence with Vis-NIR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beucher, Amélie; Peng, Yi; Knadel, Maria

    . Recently, a digital soil mapping approach was assessed to create a predictive map for potential acid sulfate soil occurrence in the wetlands of Jutland (c. 6500 km2; Beucher et al., 2016). An Artificial Neural Networks method was applied using 8000 soil observations and 16 environmental variables...... diagnostic features for hydroxides, clay minerals, iron oxides and iron sulfates which are typically present in acid sulfate soils (Shi et al., 2014). Soil spectroscopy may thus efficiently supplement the mapping of acid sulfate soil occurrence. The present study aims at predicting acid sulfate soil...... instrument (Peng et al., 2015). The spectral data were summarized using principal component analysis (PCA). The first two principal components (PC) explained 99% of the variability in the spectra. Kriging was applied to upgrade PC scores information from point to image scale for further use within the acid...

  4. Genesis and solution chemistry of acid sulfate soils in Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breemen, van N.

    1976-01-01

    To study short-term and long-term chemical processes in periodically flooded acid sulfate soils in the Bangkok Plain and in various smaller coastal plains along the Gulf of Thailand, 16 acid sulfate soils and one non-acid marine soil were examined for distribution of iron-sulfur compounds, elemental

  5. Predictive mapping of the acidifying potential for acid sulfate soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boman, A; Beucher, Amélie; Mattbäck, S

    Developing methods for the predictive mapping of the potential environmental impact from acid sulfate soils is important because recent studies (e.g. Mattbäck et al., under revision) have shown that the environmental hazards (e.g. leaching of acidity) related to acid sulfate soils vary depending...... on their texture (clay, silt, sand etc.). Moreover, acidity correlates, not only with the sulfur content, but also with the electrical conductivity (EC) measured after incubation. Electromagnetic induction (EMI) data collected from an EM38 proximal sensor also enabled the detailed mapping of acid sulfate soils...... over a field (Huang et al., 2014).This study aims at assessing the use of EMI data for the predictive mapping of the acidifying potential in an acid sulfate soil area in western Finland. Different supervised classification modelling techniques, such as Artificial Neural Networks (Beucher et al., 2015...

  6. Calcium-based stabilizer induced heave in Oklahoma sulfate-bearing soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    The addition of lime stabilizers can create problems in soils containing sulfates. In most cases, lime is mixed with expansive soils rendering them non-expansive; however, when a certain amount of sulfate is present naturally in expansive soils, the ...

  7. Aluminum toxicity in acid sulfate soil alleviated with biogenic liming ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low crop yield from acid sulfate soil was caused by high concentrations of aluminum and iron in soil. Aluminum ion which cause root injury at root region inhibits the uptake of the nutrients by the root and lead to nutrient deficiency. Ground magnesium limestones can be applied to overcome this problem but incurred more ...

  8. Effect of sulfate fertilization on soil biota in grassland columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikoyi, Israel; Donohue, John; Fowler, Andrew; Schmalenberger, Achim

    2017-04-01

    Sulfur (S) is an important macronutrient element in plant nutrition as a component of protein, enzymes, enzyme cofactors as well as being the major constituent of the amino acids cysteine and methionine. Organically bound S is the predominant form of S in the soil constituting up to 95% of S in agricultural soils. The most important form of S in terms of plant nutrition is inorganic sulfate which forms only about 5% of the total soil S content. Air pollution was the major source of S (as SO2) for plants, with up to 80% of the S obtained from this source. However, common effects of S limitation on crops such as chlorosis, yield reduction, and decrease in crop quality are becoming increasingly evident as atmospheric S supply has decreased in recent years. Recent research has shown that organically-bound S in soils is also plant-bioavailable, likely due to interconversion of organic S forms to inorganic sulfate by soil microbes. In this study, soil columns were setup in a greenhouse using moderate S (equivalent to Wisconsin S soil availability index of below 30) soils. The columns were planted with Lolium perenne and fertilized with 0 (control), 5 (low), 10 (medium) and 20 (high) kg/ha sulfate S alongside a full complement of other nutrients. Results after 14 weeks of management show a significant decrease (Pnutrition as is often the practice. Further analyses are underway to trace the fate of the applied S, nematode abundance, bacterial diversity and function. Studies like ours are important to feed data into mathematical models on biotic S cycling which serves as predictive tool for fertilizer use in agriculture.

  9. Sulfate adsorption and surface precipitation on a volcanic ash soil (allophanic andisol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Munehide; Makino, Tomoyuki; Hattori, Yasunobu

    2006-08-15

    Sulfate strongly adsorbs on metal oxides and soils with variable charges. However, its surface precipitation has not been clearly evaluated and its adsorption mechanism has been in dispute. In the present study, an allophanic andisol, a typical volcanic ash soil having both negative and positive variable charges, was used to identify the adsorption mechanism of sulfate. Sulfate adsorption isotherms were obtained by a batch method at pH values of 4, 5, 6, and 7 in a wide range of concentrations in an Na-H-SO(4)-OH system. Theoretical isotherms were applied to the measured values for the evaluation. The surface precipitation was detected by the measured adsorption isotherms, and the BET isotherm confirmed the presence of multilayer adsorption. Stronger and weaker adsorption sites were suggested by using the Langmuir isotherm for the monolayer adsorption. The adsorption energies obtained from the Langmuir equation and recent spectroscopic analysis suggested that the stronger adsorption corresponded to an inner-sphere surface complex and that the weaker adsorption corresponded to outer-sphere surface complexation. The BET and Langmuir equations showed three types of adsorption mechanisms for the sulfate adsorption on the soil.

  10. Detailed predictive mapping of acid sulfate soil occurrence using electromagnetic induction data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beucher, Amélie; Boman, A; Mattbäck, S

    Acid sulfate soils are often called the nastiest soils in the world (Dent & Pons, 1995). Releasing a toxic combination of acidity and metals into the recipient watercourses and estuaries, these soils represent a crucial environmental problem. Moreover, these soils can have a considerable economic......).Since acid sulfate soils contain large amounts of soluble salts, they yield strong electromagnetic (EM) anomalies, appearing as diffuse and round-shaped high electrical conductivity (EC) areas. EM induction data collected from an EM38 proximal sensor hence enabled the refined mapping of acid sulfate...

  11. Identification of Syntrophobacteraceae as major acetate-degrading sulfate reducing bacteria in Italian paddy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengfei; Pommerenke, Bianca; Conrad, Ralf

    2018-01-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and acetate is the most important intermediate (average 70%) of the carbon flow to CH4 in paddy fields. Sulfate (e.g., gypsum) application can reduce CH4 emissions up to 70%. However, the effect of gypsum application on acetate degradation and the microbial communities involved are unclear. Therefore, we studied acetate-dependent sulfate reduction in anoxic microcosms of Italian rice paddy soil, combining profiling of 16S rRNA and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrB) genes and transcripts and rRNA based stable isotope probing (SIP) analysis. Methane production was completely inhibited by gypsum in the absence of exogenous acetate. Amended acetate (either 13 C labelled or non-labelled) was stoichiometrically coupled to sulfate reduction or CH4 production. With methyl fluoride in the presence of sulfate, added propionate and butyrate were incompletely oxidized to acetate, which transiently accumulated. After the depletion of propionate and butyrate the accumulated acetate was rapidly consumed. The relative abundance of dsrB and 16S rRNA genes and transcripts from Syntrophobacteraceae (Desulfovirga spp., Syntrophobacter spp. and unclassified Syntrophobacteraceae) increased upon addition of gypsum and acetate. Simultaneously, Syntrophobacteraceae affiliated species were significantly labelled with 13 C. In addition, minor groups like Desulforhabdus spp., Desulfobacca spp. and Desulfotomaculum spp. substantially incorporated 13 C into their nucleic acids. The relative abundance of Desulfovibrio spp. slightly increased upon gypsum amendments. However, 13 C labelling of Desulfovibrio spp. was only moderate. In summary, Syntrophobacteraceae affiliated species were identified as the major acetotrophic sulfate reducers (SRB) in Italian paddy soil. The identification of these SRB as dominant acetate degraders well explained the scenarios of competition between SRB and acetoclastic methanogens as observed in rice paddy soil. © 2017

  12. Tillage and water management for riceland productivity in acid sulfate soils of the Mekong delta, Vietnam.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minh, L.Q.; Tuong, T.P.; Mensvoort, van M.E.F.; Bouma, J.

    1997-01-01

    Acid sulfate soils are characterized by low pH and high concentrations of aluminum, sulfate, iron and hydrogen sulfide. Removal of at least part of these substances is a prerequisite for land use, at least in severely acid soils. In this study, the effectiveness of harrowing and flushing with

  13. Effect of sulfate and carbonate minerals on particle-size distributions in arid soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Dirk; Buck, Brenda J.; Teng, Yuazxin; Robins, Colin; Goldstein, Harland L.

    2014-01-01

    Arid soils pose unique problems during measurement and interpretation of particle-size distributions (PSDs) because they often contain high concentrations of water-soluble salts. This study investigates the effects of sulfate and carbonate minerals on grain-size analysis by comparing analyses in water, in which the minerals dissolve, and isopropanol (IPA), in which they do not. The presence of gypsum, in particular, substantially affects particle-size analysis once the concentration of gypsum in the sample exceeds the mineral’s solubility threshold. For smaller concentrations particle-size results are unaffected. This is because at concentrations above the solubility threshold fine particles cement together or bind to coarser particles or aggregates already present in the sample, or soluble mineral coatings enlarge grains. Formation of discrete crystallites exacerbates the problem. When soluble minerals are dissolved the original, insoluble grains will become partly or entirely liberated. Thus, removing soluble minerals will result in an increase in measured fine particles. Distortion of particle-size analysis is larger for sulfate minerals than for carbonate minerals because of the much higher solubility in water of the former. When possible, arid soils should be analyzed using a liquid in which the mineral grains do not dissolve, such as IPA, because the results will more accurately reflect the PSD under most arid soil field conditions. This is especially important when interpreting soil and environmental processes affected by particle size.

  14. Characterization of sulfate reducing bacteria isolated from urban soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingliang; Wang, Haixia

    2017-05-01

    Sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) was isolated from urban soil and applied for the remediation of heavy metals pollution from acid mine drainage. The morphology and physiological characteristics (e.g. pH and heavy metals tolerance) of SRB was investigated. The SRB was gram-negative bacteria, long rod with slight curve, cell size 0.5× (1.5-2.0) μm. The pH of medium had significant effect on SRB growth and the efficiency of sulfate reduction, and it showed that the suitable pH range was 5-9 and SRB could not survive at pH less than 4. The maximum tolerance of Fe (II), Zn (II), Cd (II), and Cu (II) under acidic condition (pH 5.0) was about 600 mg/L, 150 mg/L, 25 mg/L and 25 mg/L, respectively. The result indicated that SRB isolated in this study could be used for the bioremediation of acid mine drainage (pH>4) within the heavy metals concentrations tolerance.

  15. Isotopically exchangeable Al in coastal lowland acid sulfate soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yvanes-Giuliani, Yliane A.M. [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, UNSW Australia, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Centre Européen de Recherche et d' Enseignement des Géosciences de l' Environnement, Aix-Marseille Université, Aix en Provence (France); Fink, D. [Centre Européen de Recherche et d' Enseignement des Géosciences de l' Environnement, Aix-Marseille Université, Aix en Provence (France); Rose, J. [Institute for Environmental Research, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Waite, T. David [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, UNSW Australia, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Collins, Richard N., E-mail: richard.collins@unsw.edu.au [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, UNSW Australia, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    Periodic discharges of high concentrations of aluminium (Al) causing fish kills and other adverse effects occur worldwide in waterways affected by coastal lowland acid sulfate soils (CLASS). The exchangeability — a metal's ability to readily transfer between the soil solid- and solution-phases — of Al in these soils is therefore of particular importance as it has implications for metal transport, plant availability and toxicity to living organisms. In the present study, the concentrations of isotopically exchangeable Al (E values) were measured in 27 CLASS and compared with common salt extractions (i.e. KCl and CuCl{sub 2}) used to estimate exchangeable soil pools of Al. E values of Al were high in the soils, ranging from 357 to 3040 mg·kg{sup −1}. Exchangeable concentrations estimated using 1 M KCl were consistently lower than measured E values, although a reasonable correlation was obtained between the two values (E = 1.68 × Al{sub KCl}, r{sup 2} = 0.66, n = 25). The addition of a 0.2 M CuCl{sub 2} extraction step improved the 1:1 agreement between extractable and isotopically exchangeable Al concentrations, but lead to significant mobilisation of non-isotopically exchangeable Al in surficial ‘organic-rich’ CLASS having E values < 1000 mg·kg{sup −1}. It was concluded that currently used (i.e. 1 M KCl) methodology severely underestimates exchangeable Al and total actual acidity values in CLASS and should be corrected by a factor similar to the one determined here. - Highlights: • Isotopically exchangeable Al was compared to 1 M KCl or 0.2 M CuCl{sub 2} extractable Al. • 1 M KCl always underestimated isotopically exchangeable Al concentrations. • 0.2 M CuCl{sub 2} mobilised non-isotopically exchangeable Al • 1 M KCl values require correction of ~ 1.7 to reflect exchangeable Al concentrations.

  16. Reflectance spectroscopy of ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites as Mars soil analog materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Pieters, Carlé M.; Burns, Roger G.; Edwards, John O.; Mancinelli, Rocco L.; Fröschl, Heinz

    1995-09-01

    Spectroscopic analyses have shown that smectites enhanced in the laboratory with additional ferric species exhibit important similarities to those of the soils on Mars. Ferrihydrite in these chemically treated smectites has features in the visible to near-infrared region that resemble the energies and band strengths of features in reflectance spectra observed for several bright regions on Mars. New samples have been prepared with sulfate as well, because S was found by Viking to be a major component in the surface material on Mars. A suite of ferrihydrite-bearing and ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites, prepared with variable Fe 3+ and S concentrations and variable pH conditions, has been analyzed using reflectance spectroscopy in the visible and infrared regions, Mössbauer spectroscopy at room temperature and 4 K, differential thermal analysis, and X-ray diffraction. These analyses support the formation of ferrihydrite of variable crystallinity in the ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonites and a combination of schwertmannite and ferrihydrite in the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites. Small quantities of poorly crystalline or nanophase forms of other ferric materials may also be present in these samples. The chemical formation conditions of the ferrihydrite-bearing and ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites influence the character of the low temperature Mössbauer sextets and the visible reflectance spectra. An absorption minimum is observed at 0.88-0.89 μm in spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing samples, and at 0.89-0.92 μm in spectra of the ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonites. Mössbauer spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites indicate variable concentrations of ferrihydrite and schwertmannite in the interlaminar spaces and along grain surfaces. Dehydration under reduced atmospheric pressure conditions induces a greater effect on the adsorbed and interlayer water in ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonite than on the water in ferric

  17. Detailed predictive mapping of acid sulfate soil occurrence using electromagnetic induction data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beucher, Amélie; Boman, A; Mattbäck, S

    Acid sulfate soils are often called the nastiest soils in the world (Dent & Pons 1995). Releasing a toxic combination of acidity and metals into the recipient watercourses and estuaries, these soils represent a crucial environmental problem. Moreover, these soils can have a considerable economic.......e. soil sampling and subsequent pH measurements) has typically been used for acid sulfate soils. Nonetheless, spatial modelling techniques have recently been assessed, demonstrating promising results at catchment or regional extent (Beucher et al. 2014, 2015). Furthermore, electromagnetic induction data...... machine learning approaches will be assessed using soil and environmental data, in particular proximal sensing electromagnetic data collected from a DUALEM. The measurements of the apparent soil electrical conductivity can provide data on the spatial variation of soil salinity, which is associated...

  18. Properties of soils and tree wood tissue across a Lake States sulfate deposition gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis F. Ohmann; David F. Grigal

    1991-01-01

    Presents the soil and tree wood tissue properties (mostly chemical) of the plots that were remeasured and sampled for a study of the relation between forest condition and wet sulfate deposition along the Lake States acidic deposition gradient.

  19. Rapid field detection of sulfate and organic content in soils : technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    In recent years, the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) has experienced problems chemically : stabilizing moderate to high plasticity clay soils with calcium-based additives. Many of the problems are the : result of soluble sulfate minerals i...

  20. Assessment of acid sulfate soil mapping utilizing chemical indicators in recipient waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beucher, A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In Finland, poor water quality and associated ecological damage in the coastal streams related to land use on acid sulfate (a.s. soils has been drawing a considerable amount of attention since the 1950’s. These soils originate from sulfide-bearing marine sediments mostly occurring in the coastal areas located below the highest shoreline of the former Litorina Sea. Of the many previous studies carried out on soil or water data, quite few gathered both and their geographic extent was relatively limited. This study aimed at assessing a.s. soil probability maps using two chemical indicators measured in the recipient waters (i.e. sulfate content and sulfate/chloride ratio for 24 catchments along the Finnish coast. All the available data was compiled for these catchments, which were surveyed using different methods (i.e. conventional mapping and two spatial modeling techniques: fuzzy logic and artificial neural networks. High sulfate contents and sulfate/ chloride ratios measured in these rivers were controlled by a.s. soils in the corresponding catchments. The extent of the most probable areas for a.s. soils in the surveyed catchments correlated with the two chemical indicators measured in the recipient waters, suggesting that the probability maps created with different methods are reliable and comparable. The use of a.s. soil related chemical indicators in water, thus, constitutes a complementary, independent and straightforward tool to assess a.s. soil probability maps.

  1. Analysis of tyrosine-O-sulfation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, J.R.; Sen, J.W.; Johnsen, A.H.

    2008-01-01

    Tyrosine O-sulfation was first described about 50 years ago as a post-translational modification of fibrinogen. In the following 30 years it was considered to be a rare modification affecting only a few proteins and peptides. However, in the beginning of the 1980s tyrosine (Tyr) sulfation was shown...... to be a common modification and since then an increasing number of proteins have been identified as sulfated. The target proteins belong to the classes of secretory, plasma membrane, and lysosomal proteins, which reflects the intracellular localization of the enzymes catalyzing Tyr sulfation, the tyrosylprotein...... sulfotransferases (TPSTs).Traditionally, Tyr sulfation has been analyzed by incorporation of radiolabeled sulfate into target cells followed by purification of the target protein. Subsequently, the protein is degraded enzymatically or by alkaline hydrolysis followed by thin-layer electrophoresis to demonstrate...

  2. Potential for Sulfate Reduction in Mangrove Forest Soils: Comparison between Two Dominant Species of the Americas

    KAUST Repository

    Balk, Melike

    2016-11-18

    Avicennia and Rhizophora are globally occurring mangrove genera with different traits that place them in different parts of the intertidal zone. It is generally accepted that the oxidizing capacity of Avicennia roots is larger than that of Rhizophora roots, which initiates more reduced conditions in the soil below the latter genus. We hypothesize that the more reduced conditions beneath Rhizophora stands lead to more active sulfate-reducing microbial communities compared to Avicennia stands. To test this hypothesis, we measured sulfate reduction traits in soil samples collected from neighboring Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle stands at three different locations in southern Florida. The traits measured were sulfate reduction rates (SRR) in flow-through reactors containing undisturbed soil layers in the absence and presence of easily degradable carbon compounds, copy numbers of the dsrB gene, which is specific for sulfate-reducing microorganisms, and numbers of sulfate-reducing cells that are able to grow in liquid medium on a mixture of acetate, propionate and lactate as electron donors. At the tidal locations Port of the Islands and South Hutchinson Islands, steady state SRR, dsrB gene copy numbers and numbers of culturable cells were higher at the A. germinans than at the R. mangle stands, although not significantly for the numbers at Port of the Islands. At the non-tidal location North Hutchinson Island, results are mixed with respect to these sulfate reduction traits. At all locations, the fraction of culturable cells were significantly higher at the R. mangle than at the A. germinans stands. The dynamics of the initial SRR implied a more in situ active sulfate-reducing community at the intertidal R. mangle stands. It was concluded that in agreement with our hypothesis R. mangle stands accommodate a more active sulfate-reducing community than A. germinans stands, but only at the tidal locations. The differences between R. mangle and A. germinans stands

  3. Soil Remediation of an Arsenic-Contaminated Site With Ferrous Sulfate and Type V Portland Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illera, V.; O'Day, P. A.; Rivera, N.; Root, R.; Rafferty, M. T.; Vlassopoulos, D.

    2005-12-01

    High levels of arsenic are present in a site adjacent to San Francisco Bay (in East Palo Alto, CA) as a consequence of the activity of a former pesticide manufacturing plant. Most of the readily accessible arsenic at the site has been removed by remedial excavation and surface capping. In-situ fixation of residual arsenic was performed close to the source about 10 years ago where arsenic values in capped soils ranged from 500 to 5000 mg kg-1. The fixation method consisted of the addition of ferrous sulfate (3% w/w), type V Portland cement (10% w/w) and water. Both products were mixed with the contaminated soil to a treatment depth between 1.5 and 9 meters. The treated soil was then capped to prevent weathering. This long-term amended soil offers an opportunity to compare the processes that prevent microbial arsenic reduction and control the immobilization of arsenic in the treated soils versus natural soils, and to study the aging effects of arsenic sorption. Solid phase characterization of soil samples from both the field and controlled laboratory experiments were carried out to study the speciation and bioavailability of arsenic and to ascertain the mechanisms of the arsenic immobilization in the treated soil. These methods included physical description by field observations, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy, total elemental concentrations, and solid phase fractionation by sequential extraction. Both synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and XRD measurements were used to determine oxidation state of arsenic and iron and host phases present in the soil. The remedial treatment was successful in immobilizing the arsenic in the contaminated soil, and decreasing its leachability. Measurements taken at short aging times (during the first month) showed that the treatment was effective in reducing leachable arsenic as evidenced by the TCLP wet test (arsenic speciation. The treated soil in both field

  4. Biochar Application in Malaysian Sandy and Acid Sulfate Soils: Soil Amelioration Effects and Improved Crop Production over Two Cropping Seasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theeba Manickam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of biochar as an agricultural soil improvement was tested in acid sulfate and sandy soils from Malaysia, cropped with rice and corn. Malaysia has an abundance of waste rice husks that could be used to produce biochar. Rice husk biochar was produced in a gasifier at a local mill in Kelantan as well as in the laboratory using a controlled, specially designed, top lift up draft system (Belonio unit. Rice husk biochar was applied once to both soils at two doses (2% and 5%, in a pot set up that was carried out for two cropping seasons. Positive and significant crop yield effects were observed for both soils, biochars and crops. The yield effects varied with biochar type and dosage, with soil type and over the cropping seasons. The yield increases observed for the sandy soil were tentatively attributed to significant increases in plant-available water contents (from 4%–5% to 7%–8%. The yield effects in the acid sulfate soil were likely a consequence of a combination of (i alleviation of plant root stress by aluminum (Ca/Al molar ratios significantly increased, from around 1 to 3–5 and (ii increases in CEC. The agricultural benefits of rice husk biochar application to Malaysian soils holds promise for its future use.

  5. Sulfate sorption on rape (Brassica campestris L.) straw biochar, loess soil and a biochar-soil mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Baowei; Nan, Xujun; Xu, Huan; Zhang, Tao; Ma, Fengfeng

    2017-10-01

    The effects of biochar amendment on sulfur behavior in soils are unknown. In this paper, sulfate (SO42-) sorption on rape (Brassica campestris L.) straw biochar produced at 600 °C (BC), loess soil (soil) and a 1:9 (w/w) biochar-soil mixture (BC-soil) was investigated by batch experiments. The effects of contact time, initial SO42- concentration, temperature and solution pH value on sorption were tested. Kinetics, isotherms and thermodynamics for sorption were investigated. Pre- and post-sorption characterizations of BC and soil were respectively studied using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy, respectively. It has been shown that SO42- sorption on three sorbents was well described by pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The sorption isotherms could be fitted using Langmuir and Freundlich models. BC amendment did not increase the sorption capacity of soil for SO42-. The values of ΔG0, ΔH0 and ΔS0 indicated that the nature of sorption was spontaneous, endothermic and feasible. Increasing solution pH value led to a slight reduction in the sorption amount of SO42-. Sulfate was mainly sorbed onto BC through electrostatic interaction, whereas onto the soil via electrostatic interaction and formation of poorly soluble CaSO4. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Mapping acid sulfate soils in Denmark using legacy data and LiDAR-based derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beucher, A; Adhikari, K; Breuning-Madsen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    drainage of areas classified as potential a.s. soilswithout prior permission fromenvironmental authorities. Themapping of these soils was first conducted in the 1980’s.Wetlands, inwhich Danish potential a.s. soils mostly occur,were targeted and the soilswere surveyed through conventional mapping...... of environmental variables. The overall prediction accuracy based on a 30% hold-back validation data reached 70%. Furthermore, the conventional map indicated 32% of the study area (c. 2100 km2) as having a high frequency for potential a.s. soils while the digital map displayed about 46% (c. 3000 km2) as high......Leaching large amounts of acidity and metals into recipient watercourses and estuaries, acid sulfate (a.s.) soils constitute a substantial environmental issue worldwide. Mapping of these soils enables measures to be taken to prevent pollution in high risk areas. In Denmark, legislation prohibits...

  7. Analysis of Saprolegnia parasitica Transcriptome following Treatment with Copper Sulfate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Hu

    Full Text Available Massive infection caused by oomycete fungus Saprolegnia parasitica is detrimental to freshwater fish. Recently, we showed that copper sulfate demonstrated good efficacy for controlling S. parasitica infection in grass carp. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of inhibition of S. parasitica growth by copper sulfate by analyzing the transcriptome of copper sulfate-treated S. parasitica. To examine the mechanism of copper sulfate inhibiting S. parasitica, we utilized RNA-seq technology to compare differential gene expression in S. parasitica treated with or without copper sulfate.The total mapped rates of the reads with the reference genome were 90.50% in the control group and 73.50% in the experimental group. In the control group, annotated splice junctions, partial novel splice junctions and complete novel splice junctions were about 83%, 3% and 14%, respectively. In the treatment group, the corresponding values were about 75%, 6% and 19%. Following copper sulfate treatment, a total 310 genes were markedly upregulated and 556 genes were markedly downregulated in S. parasitica. Material metabolism related GO terms including cofactor binding (33 genes, 1,3-beta-D-glucan synthase complex (4 genes, carboxylic acid metabolic process (40 genes were the most significantly enriched. KEGG pathway analysis also determined that the metabolism-related biological pathways were significantly enriched, including the metabolic pathways (98 genes, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites pathways (42 genes, fatty acid metabolism (13 genes, phenylalanine metabolism (7 genes, starch and sucrose metabolism pathway (12 genes. The qRT-PCR results were largely consistent with the RNA-Seq results.Our results indicate that copper sulfate inhibits S. parasitica growth by affecting multiple biological functions, including protein synthesis, energy biogenesis, and metabolism.

  8. Decomposition of Copper (II) Sulfate Pentahydrate: A Sequential Gravimetric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Arlo D.; Kalbus, Lee H.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an improved experiment of the thermal dehydration of copper (II) sulfate pentahydrate. The improvements described here are control of the temperature environment and a quantitative study of the decomposition reaction to a thermally stable oxide. Data will suffice to show sequential gravimetric analysis. (Author/SA)

  9. Cadmium Immobilization in Soil using Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Stabilized Magnetite Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Farrokhian Firouzi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Some methods of contaminated soils remediation reduces the mobile fraction of trace elements, which could contaminate groundwater or be taken up by soil organisms. Cadmium (Cd as a heavy metal has received much attention in the past few decades due to its potential toxic impact on soil organism activity and compositions. Cadmium is a soil pollutant of no known essential biological functions, and may pose threats to soil-dwelling organisms and human health. Soil contamination with Cd usually originates from mining and smelting activities, atmospheric deposition from metallurgical industries, incineration of plastics and batteries, land application of sewage sludge, and burning of fossil fuels. Heavy metal immobilization using amendments is a simple and rapid method for the reduction of heavy metal pollution. One way of the assessment of contaminated soils is sequential extraction procedure. Sequential extraction of heavy metals in soils is an appropriate way to determine soil metal forms including soluble, exchangeable, carbonate, oxides of iron and manganese, and the residual. Its results are valuable in prediction of bioavailability, leaching rate and elements transformation in contaminated agricultural soils. Materials and Methods The objective of this study was to synthesize magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4 stabilized with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS and to investigate the effect of its different percentages (0, 1, 2.5, 5, and 10% on the different fractions of cadmium in soil by sequential extraction method. The nanoparticles were synthesized following the protocol described by Si et al. (19. The investigations were carried out with a loamy sand topsoil. Before use, the soil was air-dried, homogenized and sieved (

  10. Microbial links between sulfate reduction and metal retention in uranium- and heavy metal-contaminated soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sitte, Jana; Akob, Denise M.; Kaufmann, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) can affect metal mobility either directly by reductive transformation of metal ions, e.g., uranium, into their insoluble forms or indirectly by formation of metal sulfides. This study evaluated in situ and biostimulated activity of SRB in groundwater-influenced soils...... from a creek bank contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides within the former uranium mining district of Ronneburg, Germany. In situ activity of SRB, measured by the 35SO42– radiotracer method, was restricted to reduced soil horizons with rates of 142 ± 20 nmol cm–3 day–1. Concentrations...... of heavy metals were enriched in the solid phase of the reduced horizons, whereas pore water concentrations were low. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) measurements demonstrated that 80% of uranium was present as reduced uranium but appeared to occur as a sorbed complex. Soil-based dsrAB clone...

  11. Mobilization of arsenic on nano-TiO2 in soil columns with sulfate reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ting; Ye, Li; Chan, Tingshan; Jing, Chuanyong

    2017-12-12

    Arsenic (As) remediation in contaminated water using nanoparticles is promising. However, the fate and transport of As associated with nano-adsorbents in natural environment is poorly understood. To investigate the fate of adsorbed As on nano-TiO2 in changed redox condition from oxic to anoxic, we added the As(V)-TiO2 suspension in groundwater to an autoclaved soil column which inoculated a sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfovibrio vulgaris DP4. The dissolved As(V) in effluent increased to 798 μg/L for the biotic column and to 1510 μg/L for the abiotic control, and dissolved As(III) was observed only in biotic column. The total As (dissolved plus particulate) in the biotic column effluent (high to 2.5 mg/L) was substantially higher than the abiotic control (1.5 mg/L). Therefore SRB restrained the release of dissolved As, and facilitated the transport of particulate As. Micro-XRF analysis suggested that the nano-TiO2 with As was mainly retained in the influent front and that its transport was negligible. Our pe-pH calculation and XANES analysis demonstrated that generated secondary iron minerals containing magnetite and mackinawite mainly were responsible for dissolved As retention, and then transported with As as particulate As. The results shed light on the mobilization of adsorbed As on a nano-adsorbent in an anoxic environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Consortia of low-abundance bacteria drive sulfate reduction-dependent degradation of fermentation products in peat soil microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Bela; Knorr, Klaus-Holger; Schreck, Katharina; Tringe, Susannah G; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Loy, Alexander; Pester, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate reduction in peatlands is sustained by a cryptic sulfur cycle and effectively competes with methanogenic degradation pathways. In a series of peat soil microcosms incubated over 50 days, we identified bacterial consortia that responded to small, periodic additions of individual fermentation products (formate, acetate, propionate, lactate or butyrate) in the presence or absence of sulfate. Under sulfate supplementation, net sulfate turnover (ST) steadily increased to 16-174 nmol cm(-3) per day and almost completely blocked methanogenesis. 16S rRNA gene and cDNA amplicon sequencing identified microorganisms whose increases in ribosome numbers strongly correlated to ST. Natively abundant (⩾0.1% estimated genome abundance) species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) showed no significant response to sulfate. In contrast, low-abundance OTUs responded significantly to sulfate in incubations with propionate, lactate and butyrate. These OTUs included members of recognized sulfate-reducing taxa (Desulfosporosinus, Desulfopila, Desulfomonile, Desulfovibrio) and also members of taxa that are either yet unknown sulfate reducers or metabolic interaction partners thereof. Most responsive OTUs markedly increased their ribosome content but only weakly increased in abundance. Responsive Desulfosporosinus OTUs even maintained a constantly low population size throughout 50 days, which suggests a novel strategy of rare biosphere members to display activity. Interestingly, two OTUs of the non-sulfate-reducing genus Telmatospirillum (Alphaproteobacteria) showed strongly contrasting preferences towards sulfate in butyrate-amended microcosms, corroborating that closely related microorganisms are not necessarily ecologically coherent. We show that diverse consortia of low-abundance microorganisms can perform peat soil sulfate reduction, a process that exerts control on methane production in these climate-relevant ecosystems.

  13. Sulfur utilization by rice and Crotalaria juncea from sulfate - 34S applied to the soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trivelin Paulo Cesar Ocheuze

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In tropical soils with intensive agriculture an increasing sulfur deficiency has been verified in several crops. The low available S in these soils is caused by the continuous use of concentrated NPK fertilizers. The objective of this work was to evaluate the utilization by rice (Oriza sativa L. and crotalaria juncea (Crotalaria juncea L. of sulfur applied to the soil, under greenhouse conditions. Pots with 3 kg of an Argisol (Paleudalf were used to test the isotopic technique with the stable isotope 34S, adding a solution of sodium sulfate labeled with 34S (14.30 ± 0.05 atom % of 34S to the soil (70 mg SO4-S per kg-1 of soil 18 days after sowing both species. The shoots of the crotalaria and rice were harvested, respectively on the 72nd and 122nd days after S fertilization. The concentration and the amount of sulfur in the crotalaria were higher than in rice, due to the higher legume requirement for this nutrient. The sulfur requirement and the short time interval between fertilization and harvest of the crotalaria resulted in a small amount of native SO4-S mineralized in the soil and a small quantity of 34SO4 immobilized by soil microorganisms. Thus, the percentage of sulfur in the crotalaria derived from the fertilizer (Sdff was higher than in the rice (%Sdff crotalaria = 91.3 ± 3.5%; %Sdff rice = 66.3 ± 0.8%. The expressive values of %Sdff indicate a low rate of mineralization of SO4-S probably as a consequence of the low available sulfur content in the soil.

  14. Changes and relations of photosynthesis and iron cycling in anoxic paddy soil amended with high concentrations of sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qin; Jia, Rong; Qu, Dong; Li, Ming

    2017-04-01

    Sulfate contamination is an increasingly serious environmental problem related to microbial reduction processes in anoxic paddy soil. This study revealed the changes and interrelations of ferric iron [Fe(III)] reduction, ferrous iron [Fe(II)] oxidation, and oxygenic photosynthesis in an anoxic paddy soil (Fe-accumuli-Stagnic Anthrosols) amended with a range of high sulfate concentrations. Soil slurries mixed with 0 (control), 50, 100, 200, and 400 mmol kg(-1) Na2SO4 were incubated anaerobically under dark and light conditions. The changes in chlorophyll a (Chl a), Fe(II), pH levels, and the chlorophyll absorption spectrum were determined over a 42-day period. Fe(II) concentrations increased with the addition of sulfate under dark conditions, while Fe(III) reduction potential was enhanced by increasing sulfate addition. The effect of light on Fe(II) concentration was observed after 16 days of incubation, when Fe(II) started to decrease markedly in the control. The decrease in Fe(II) slowed with increasing sulfate addition. The concentrations of Chl a increased in all treatments after 16 days of incubation under light conditions. There was a reduction in Chl a accumulation with increasing sulfate at the same incubation time. The absorption peaks of chlorophyll remained shorter than the 700-nm wavelength throughout the incubation period. The pH of all treatments decreased in the first week and then increased thereafter. The pH increased with sulfate addition and light conditions. In conclusion, contamination with high concentrations of sulfate could accelerate Fe(III) reduction while inhibiting oxygenic photosynthesis, which correspondingly slows chemical Fe(II) oxidation in an anoxic paddy soil.

  15. Shotgun lipidomic analysis of chemically sulfated sterols compromises analytical sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casanovas, Albert; Hannibal-Bach, Hans Kristian; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2014-01-01

    Shotgun lipidomics affords comprehensive and quantitative analysis of lipid species in cells and tissues at high-throughput [1 5]. The methodology is based on direct infusion of lipid extracts by electrospray ionization (ESI) combined with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and/or high resolution F...... low ionization efficiency in ESI [7]. For this reason, chemical derivatization procedures including acetylation [8] or sulfation [9] are commonly implemented to facilitate ionization, detection and quantification of sterols for global lipidome analysis [1-3, 10]....

  16. Sulfur-accumulating plants convert sulfate salts from soils into environmentally resilient biominerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Thomas; Reid, Nathan; Stevens, Jason; Dixon, Kingsley

    2016-04-01

    Sulfur-accumulator plants (thiophores), which accumulate atypically high sulfur and calcium concentrations in their aerial biomass, may be suitable for revegetating and phytostabilising reactive sulfur-enriched substrates such as mine tailings, acid-sulfate soils and polluted soils. We present biogeochemical insights on thiophores from the Australian Great Sandy Desert, which accumulate up to 40 times as much sulfur (2-5 %S) versus comparator species. X-ray microanalyses revealed this accumulation relates to peculiar gypsum-like mineralisation throughout their foliage, illustrating a mechanism for sulfate removal from soils and sequestration as sparingly soluble biominerals. However, we did not know whether these species treat the excess Ca/S as a waste to be shed with senescent litter and, if so, how resilient these 'biominerals' are to photo-biodegradation once shed and so to what extent the accumulated elements are recycled back into the reactive/bioavailable sulfate reservoir. To address these questions, we sampled four foliage (phyllode) fractions from ten individuals of the thiophore, Acacia bivenosa: healthy mature phyllodes, senescent phyllodes on the branch, recently shed and older, more degraded ground litter. We selected two thiophores (A. bivenosa and A. robeorum) and a non-thiophore (A. ancistrocarpa) for detailed soil/regolith studies. Samples were collected from trenches bisected by each tree, taken from varying depth (20-500 mm) and distance from the stem (0.1-5 m). Dried foliage was cleaned, sectioned for SEM-EDXS examination and elemental compositions of foliage and soils were determined (microwave-assisted acid digestion + ICP-OES/MS). Each species generated a 'halo' of elevated S/Ca in the soil immediately beneath their crowns, although that of A. ancistrocarpa was of minor magnitude. These anomalies were confined to shallow soil (20-50 mm i.e. influenced by litter), suggesting limited S/Ca re-mobilisation from the litter. Foliar elemental

  17. Evaluation of plant species for use in the control of acid sulfated soils in Paipa, Boyacá

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Angélica Bernal Figueroa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Acid sulfated soils are characterized by high amounts of iron and sulfur, which in presence of air are oxidized and form sulfuric horizons extremely acidic, generating environmental changes ranging from water pollution to problems associated with fertility and crop production, among others. This research was conducted in order to identify suitable plant species to control the acidity of these soils in the town of Paipa, Boyacá, Colombia. A completely randomized experimental design with 6 treatments and 3 replications was implemented in potting shed; there, the response of Beta vulgaris L. (forage beet, Brassica rapa L. (forage turnip and Raphanus sativus L. (forage radish on the acidity of sulfated acid soil, contrasted with a non-sulfated soil, was evaluated, after correction with liming. To assess the effects, pH and exchangeable acidity (H+ + Al+3 cmolc/kg were measured in the two types of soil before and after seeding ; the agronomic response of plants in each treatment was determined at the end of the growing season (120 days after seeding . On acid sulfated soils, species B. rapa, R. sativus and B. vulgaris along with the complementary use of liming as corrective induced a reduction in exchangeable acidity; B. rapa and R. sativus showed better growth potential and resistance, while B. vulgaris was affected in height and root diameter.

  18. Sustainable stabilization of sulfate-bearing soils with expansive soil-rubber technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    The beneficial use of scrap tire rubber mixed with expansive soils is of interest to civil engineering : applications since the swell percent and the swell pressure can be potentially reduced with no deleterious : effect to the shear strength of the ...

  19. Exchangeable and secondary mineral reactive pools of aluminium in coastal lowland acid sulfate soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvanes-Giuliani, Yliane A M; Waite, T David; Collins, Richard N

    2014-07-01

    The use of coastal floodplain sulfidic sediments for agricultural activities has resulted in the environmental degradation of many areas worldwide. The generation of acidity and transport of aluminium (Al) and other metals to adjacent aquatic systems are the main causes of adverse effects. Here, a five-step sequential extraction procedure (SEP) was applied to 30 coastal lowland acid sulfate soils (CLASS) from north-eastern New South Wales, Australia. This enabled quantification of the proportion of aluminium present in 'water-soluble', 'exchangeable', 'organically-complexed', 'reducible iron(III) (oxyhydr)oxide/hydroxysulfate-incorporated' and 'amorphous Al mineral' fractions. The first three extractions represented an average of 5% of 'aqua regia' extractable Al and their cumulative concentrations were extremely high, reaching up to 4000 mg·kg(-1). Comparison of Al concentrations in the final two extractions indicated that 'amorphous Al minerals' are quantitatively a much more important sink for the removal of aqueous Al derived from the acidic weathering of these soils than reducible Fe(III) minerals. Correlations were observed between soil pH, dissolved and total organic carbon (DOC and TOC) and Al concentrations in organic carbon-rich CLASS soil horizons. These results suggest that complexation of Al by dissolved organic matter significantly increases soluble Al concentrations at pH values >5.0. As such, present land management practices would benefit with redefinition of an 'optimal' soil from pH ≥5.5 to ~4.8 for the preservation of aquatic environments adjacent to organic-rich CLASS where Al is the sole or principle inorganic contaminant of concern. Furthermore, it was observed that currently-accepted standard procedures (i.e. 1 M KCl extraction) to measure exchangeable Al concentrations in these types of soils severely underestimate exchangeable Al and a more accurate representation may be obtained through the use of 0.2 M CuCl2. Copyright © 2014

  20. Identifying sources of acidity and spatial distribution of acid sulfate soils in the Anglesea River catchment, southern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Vanessa; Yau, Chin; Kennedy, David

    2015-04-01

    Globally, coastal and estuarine floodplains are frequently underlain by sulfidic sediments. When exposed to oxygen, sulfidic sediments oxidise to form acid sulfate soils, adversely impacting on floodplain health and adjacent aquatic ecoystems. In eastern Australia, our understanding of the formation of these coastal and estuarine floodplains, and hence, spatial distribution of acid sulfate soils, is relatively well established. These soils have largely formed as a result of sedimentation of coastal river valleys approximately 6000 years BP when sea levels were one to two metres higher. However, our understanding of the evolution of estuarine systems and acid sulfate soil formation, and hence, distribution, in southern Australia remains limited. The Anglesea River, in southern Australia, is subjected to frequent episodes of poor water quality and low pH resulting in closure of the river and, in extreme cases, large fish kill events. This region is heavily reliant on tourism and host to a number of iconic features, including the Great Ocean Road and Twelve Apostles. Poor water quality has been linked to acid leakage from mining activities and Tertiary-aged coal seams, peat swamps and acid sulfate soils in the region. However, our understanding of the sources of acidity and distribution of acid sulfate soils in this region remains poor. In this study, four sites on the Anglesea River floodplain were sampled, representative of the main vegetation communities. Peat swamps and intertidal marshes were both significant sources of acidity on the floodplain in the lower catchment. However, acid neutralising capacity provided by carbonate sands suggests that there are additional sources of acidity higher in the catchment. This pilot study has highlighted the complexity in the links between the floodplain, upper catchment and waterways with further research required to understand these links for targeted acid management strategies.

  1. Biochemical and molecular characterization of potential phosphate-solubilizing bacteria in acid sulfate soils and their beneficial effects on rice growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qurban Ali Panhwar

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to determine the total microbial population, the occurrence of growth promoting bacteria and their beneficial traits in acid sulfate soils. The mechanisms by which the bacteria enhance rice seedlings grown under high Al and low pH stress were investigated. Soils and rice root samples were randomly collected from four sites in the study area (Kelantan, Malaysia. The topsoil pH and exchangeable Al ranged from 3.3 to 4.7 and 1.24 to 4.25 cmol(c kg(-1, respectively, which are considered unsuitable for rice production. Total bacterial and actinomycetes population in the acidic soils were found to be higher than fungal populations. A total of 21 phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB including 19 N2-fixing strains were isolated from the acid sulfate soil. Using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, three potential PSB strains based on their beneficial characteristics were identified (Burkholderia thailandensis, Sphingomonas pituitosa and Burkholderia seminalis. The isolated strains were capable of producing indoleacetic acid (IAA and organic acids that were able to reduce Al availability via a chelation process. These PSB isolates solubilized P (43.65% existing in the growth media within 72 hours of incubation. Seedling of rice variety, MR 219, grown at pH 4, and with different concentrations of Al (0, 50 and 100 µM was inoculated with these PSB strains. Results showed that the bacteria increased the pH with a concomitant reduction in Al concentration, which translated into better rice growth. The improved root volume and seedling dry weight of the inoculated plants indicated the potential of these isolates to be used in a bio-fertilizer formulation for rice cultivation on acid sulfate soils.

  2. Nitrous Oxide and Methane Fluxes Following Ammonium Sulfate and Vinasse Application on Sugar Cane Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Debora da S; Alves, Bruno J R; dos Santos, Marco A; Bolonhezi, Denizart; Sant'Anna, Selenobaldo A C; Urquiaga, Segundo; Lima, Magda A; Boddey, Robert M

    2015-09-15

    This study aimed to quantify nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) emission/sink response from sugar cane soil treated with fertilizer nitrogen (N) and vinasse applied separately or in sequence, the latter being investigated with regard to the time interval between applications for a possible effect on emissions. The study was carried out in a traditional area of unburned sugar cane in São Paulo state, Brazil. Two levels of N fertilization (0 and 100 kg N ha(-1)) with no added vinasse and combined with vinasse additions at different times (100 m(-3) ha(-1) at 3 and 15 days after N fertilization) were evaluated. Methane and N2O fluxes were monitored for 211 days. On average, the soil was a sink for CH4, which was not affected by the treatments. Emissions of N2O were induced by N fertilizer and vinasse applications. For ammonium sulfate, 0.6% of the added N was emitted as N2O, while for vinasse, this ranged from 1.0 to 2.2%. Changes in N2O fluxes were detected the day after application of vinasse on the N fertilized areas, but although the emission factor (EF) was 34% greater, the EF was not significantly different from fertilizer N alone. Nevertheless, we recommend to not apply vinasse after N fertilization to avoid boosting N2O emissions.

  3. The stable isotope composition of halite and sulfate of hyperarid soils and its relation to aqueous transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundson, Ronald; Barnes, Jaime D.; Ewing, Stephanie; Heimsath, Arjun; Chong, Guillermo

    2012-12-01

    Halite (NaCl) and gypsum or anhydrite (CaSO4) are water-soluble minerals found in soils of the driest regions of Earth, and only modest attention has been given to the hydrological processes that distribute these salts vertically in soil profiles. The two most notable chloride and sulfate-rich deserts on earth are the Dry Valleys of Antarctica and the Atacama Desert of Chile. While each is hyperarid, they possess very different hydrological regimes. We first show, using previously published S and O isotope data for sulfate minerals, that downward migration of water and sulfate is the primary mechanism responsible for depth profiles of sulfate concentration, and S and O isotopes, in both deserts. In contrast, we found quite different soluble Cl concentration and Cl isotope profiles between the two deserts. For Antarctic soils with an ice layer near the soil surface, the Cl concentrations increase with decreasing soil depth, whereas the ratio of 37Cl/35Cl increases. Based on previous field observations by others, we found that thermally driven upward movement of brine during the winter, described by an advection/diffusion model, qualitatively mimics the observed profiles. In contrast, in the Atacama Desert where rare but relatively large rains drive Cl downward through the profiles, Cl concentrations and 37Cl/35Cl ratios increased with depth. The depth trends in Cl isotopes are more closely explained by a Rayleigh-like model of downward fluid flow. The isotope profiles, and our modeling, reveal the similarities and differences between these two very arid regions on Earth, and are relevant for constraining models of fluid flow in arid zone soil and vadose zone hydrology.

  4. Promoting effect of foliage sprayed zinc sulfate on accumulation of sugar and phenolics in berries of Vitis vinifera cv. Merlot growing on zinc deficient soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chang-Zheng; Liu, Mei-Ying; Meng, Jiang-Fei; Chi, Ming; Xi, Zhu-Mei; Zhang, Zhen-Wen

    2015-02-02

    The effect of foliage sprayed zinc sulfate on berry development of Vitis vinifera cv. Merlot growing on arid zone Zn-deficient soils was investigated over two consecutive seasons, 2013 and 2014. Initial zinc concentration in soil and vines, photosynthesis at three berry developmental stages, berry weight, content of total soluble solids, titratable acidity, phenolics and expression of phenolics biosynthetic pathway genes throughout the stages were measured. Foliage sprayed zinc sulfate showed promoting effects on photosynthesis and berry development of vines and the promotion mainly occurred from veraison to maturation. Zn treatments enhanced the accumulation of total soluble solids, total phenols, flavonoids, flavanols, tannins and anthocyanins in berry skin, decreasing the concentration of titratable acidity. Furthermore, foliage sprayed zinc sulfate could significantly influence the expression of phenolics biosynthetic pathway genes throughout berry development, and the results of expression analysis supported the promotion of Zn treatments on phenolics accumulation. This research is the first comprehensive and detailed study about the effect of foliage sprayed Zn fertilizer on grape berry development, phenolics accumulation and gene expression in berry skin, providing a basis for improving the quality of grape and wine in Zn-deficient areas.

  5. Quantitative Analysis of Sulfate in Water by Indirect EDTA Titration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belle-Oudry, Deirdre

    2008-01-01

    The determination of sulfate concentration in water by indirect EDTA titration is an instructive experiment that is easily implemented in an analytical chemistry laboratory course. A water sample is treated with excess barium chloride to precipitate sulfate ions as BaSO[subscript 4](s). The unprecipitated barium ions are then titrated with EDTA.…

  6. Ionic Liquid Matrix for Direct UV-MALDI-TOF-MS Analysis of Dermatan Sulfate and Chondroitin Sulfate Oligosaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laremore, Tatiana N.; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Polyanionic oligosaccharides such as dermatan sulfate (DS) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) exhibit poor ionization efficiencies and tend to undergo thermal fragmentation through the loss of SO3 under conventional ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (UV-MALDI) conditions. A new ionic liquid matrix (ILM), a guanidinium salt of α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, facilitates direct UV-MALDI mass spectrometric (MS) analysis of underivatized DS and CS oligosaccharides up to a decasaccharide in their common form as sodium salts. The resulting mass spectra show very low extent of fragmentation through an SO3 loss. The new ILM is suitable for MALDI-MS analysis of mixtures containing oligosaccharides with different numbers of sulfo groups. PMID:17297962

  7. Transport Modeling of Modified Magnetite Nanoparticles with Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate in a Saturated Sandy Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Farrokhian Firouzi

    2017-02-01

    . The response curve was followed by analyzing the concentration history of Cl-1 in the effluent. Then, the influent was switched back to the background solution to thoroughly elute the tracer. Following the tracer test, a modified magnetite nanoparticles with sodium dodecyl sulfate was introduced into the column and the nanoparticle breakthrough curves were obtained by measuring the concentration history of total Fe in the effluent. Total iron concentration was analyzed with a flame atomic-absorption spectrophotometer. One site and two site kinetic attachment-detachment models in HYDRUS-1D software were used to predict the nanoparticles transport. Also parameters of model efficiency coefficient (E, root mean square error (RMSE, geometric mean error ratio (GMER, and geometric standard deviation of error ratio (GSDER were used to determine the accuracy of the models. Results and Discussion: SEM measurements demonstrated that the particle size of nanoparticles was about 40-60 nm. The hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient (D for each medium was obtained by fitting the classic 1-D convection–dispersion equation (CDE to the experimental breakthrough data using the CXTFIT code (STANMOD software, USDA. The relative concentration of nanoparticles in comparison with chloride in the collected effluent from soil columns were much lower indicating a strong retention of nanoparticles in studied porous media, thereby attachment, deposition and possibly straining of nanoparticles. Modeling results showed that in all sites of both models (one site and two-site kinetic attachment-detachment models, attachment was rapid and detachment was slow. These attachment kinetic sites may be because of consistent charges of minerals with attachment. Therefore, considering to same attachment-detachment behavior in two sites of two-site kinetic model, it is concluded that the one site kinetic model had eligible estimation of nanoparticles breakthrough curve in the studied sandy soil columns lonely

  8. Sulfation of afimoxifene, endoxifen, raloxifene, and fulvestrant by the human cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULTs: A systematic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Hui

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies demonstrated that sulfate conjugation is involved in the metabolism of three commonly used breast cancer drugs, tamoxifen, raloxifene and fulvestrant. The current study was designed to systematically identify the human cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULTs that are capable of sulfating raloxifene, fulvestrant, and two active metabolites of tamoxifen, afimoxifene and endoxifen. A systematic analysis using 13 known human SULTs revealed SULT1A1 and SULT1C4 as the major SULTs responsible for the sulfation of afimoxifene, endoxifen, raloxifene and fulvestrant. Kinetic parameters of these two human SULTs in catalyzing the sulfation of these drug compounds were determined. Sulfation of afimoxifene, endoxifen, raloxifene and fulvestrant under metabolic conditions was examined using HepG2 human hepatoma cells and MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Moreover, human intestine, kidney, liver, and lung cytosols were examined to verify the presence of afimoxifene/endoxifen/raloxifene/fulvestrant-sulfating activity.

  9. Eliminating aluminum toxicity in an acid sulfate soil for rice cultivation using plant growth promoting bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panhwar, Qurban Ali; Naher, Umme Aminun; Radziah, Othman; Shamshuddin, Jusop; Razi, Ismail Mohd

    2015-02-20

    Aluminum toxicity is widely considered as the most important limiting factor for plants growing in acid sulfate soils. A study was conducted in laboratory and in field to ameliorate Al toxicity using plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB), ground magnesium limestone (GML) and ground basalt. Five-day-old rice seedlings were inoculated by Bacillus sp., Stenotrophomonas maltophila, Burkholderia thailandensis and Burkholderia seminalis and grown for 21 days in Hoagland solution (pH 4.0) at various Al concentrations (0, 50 and 100 μM). Toxicity symptoms in root and leaf were studied using scanning electron microscope. In the field, biofertilizer (PGPB), GML and basalt were applied (4 t·ha-1 each). Results showed that Al severely affected the growth of rice. At high concentrations, the root surface was ruptured, leading to cell collapse; however, no damages were observed in the PGPB inoculated seedlings. After 21 days of inoculation, solution pH increased to >6.0, while the control treatment remained same. Field study showed that the highest rice growth and yield were obtained in the bio-fertilizer and GML treatments. This study showed that Al toxicity was reduced by PGPB via production of organic acids that were able to chelate the Al and the production of polysaccharides that increased solution pH. The release of phytohormones further enhanced rice growth that resulted in yield increase.

  10. Eliminating Aluminum Toxicity in an Acid Sulfate Soil for Rice Cultivation Using Plant Growth Promoting Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qurban Ali Panhwar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum toxicity is widely considered as the most important limiting factor for plants growing in acid sulfate soils. A study was conducted in laboratory and in field to ameliorate Al toxicity using plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB, ground magnesium limestone (GML and ground basalt. Five-day-old rice seedlings were inoculated by Bacillus sp., Stenotrophomonas maltophila, Burkholderia thailandensis and Burkholderia seminalis and grown for 21 days in Hoagland solution (pH 4.0 at various Al concentrations (0, 50 and 100 μM. Toxicity symptoms in root and leaf were studied using scanning electron microscope. In the field, biofertilizer (PGPB, GML and basalt were applied (4 t·ha−1 each. Results showed that Al severely affected the growth of rice. At high concentrations, the root surface was ruptured, leading to cell collapse; however, no damages were observed in the PGPB inoculated seedlings. After 21 days of inoculation, solution pH increased to >6.0, while the control treatment remained same. Field study showed that the highest rice growth and yield were obtained in the bio-fertilizer and GML treatments. This study showed that Al toxicity was reduced by PGPB via production of organic acids that were able to chelate the Al and the production of polysaccharides that increased solution pH. The release of phytohormones further enhanced rice growth that resulted in yield increase.

  11. Harmful algal bloom removal and eutrophic water remediation by commercial nontoxic polyamine-co-polymeric ferric sulfate-modified soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Guofei; Zhong, Jiayou; Song, Lirong; Guo, Chunjing; Gan, Nanqin; Wu, Zhenbin

    2015-07-01

    Harmful algal bloom has posed great threat to drinking water safety worldwide. In this study, soils were combined with commercial nontoxic polyamine poly(epichlorohydrin-dimethylamine) (PN) and polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS) to obtain PN-PFS soils for Microcystis removal and eutrophic water remediation under static laboratory conditions. High pH and temperature in water could enhance the function of PN-PFS soil. Algal removal efficiency increased as soil particle size decreased or modified soil dose increased. Other pollutants or chemicals (such as C, P, and organic matter) in eutrophic water could participate and promote algal removal by PN-PFS soil; these pollutants were also flocculated. During PN-PFS soil application in blooming field samples, the removal efficiency of blooming Microcystis cells exceeded 99 %, the cyanotoxin microcystins reduced by 57 %. Water parameters (as TP, TN, SS, and SPC) decreased by about 90 %. CODMn, PO4-P, and NH4-N also sharply decreased by >45 %. DO and ORP in water improved. Netting and bridging effects through electrostatic attraction and complexation reaction could be the two key mechanisms of Microcystis flocculation and pollutant purification. Considering the low cost of PN-PFS soil and its nontoxic effect on the environment, we proposed that this soil combination could be applied to remove cyanobacterial bloom and remediate eutrophic water in fields.

  12. Distribution of iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria across a coastal acid sulfate soil (CASS environment: implications for passive bioremediation by tidal inundation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chen eLing

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Coastal acid sulfate soils (CASS constitute a serious and global environmental problem. Oxidation of iron sulfide minerals exposed to air generates sulfuric acid with consequently negative impacts on coastal and estuarine ecosystems. Tidal inundation represents one current treatment strategy for CASS, with the aim of neutralizing acidity by triggering microbial iron- and sulfate-reduction and inducing the precipitation of iron-sulfides. Although well-known functional guilds of bacteria drive these processes, their distributions within CASS environments, as well as their relationships to tidal cycling and the availability of nutrients and electron acceptors, are poorly understood. These factors will determine the long-term efficacy of passive CASS remediation strategies. Here we studied microbial community structure and functional guild distribution in sediment cores obtained from ten depths ranging from 0-20 cm in three sites located in the supra-, inter- and sub-tidal segments, respectively, of a CASS-affected salt marsh (East Trinity, Cairns, Australia. Whole community 16S rRNA gene diversity within each site was assessed by 454 pyrotag sequencing and bioinformatic analyses in the context of local hydrological, geochemical and lithological factors. The results illustrate spatial overlap, or close association, of iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in an environment rich in organic matter and controlled by parameters such as acidity, redox potential, degree of water saturation, and mineralization. The observed spatial distribution implies the need for empirical understanding of the timing, relative to tidal cycling, of various terminal electron-accepting processes that control acid generation and biogeochemical iron and sulfur cycling.

  13. Distribution of iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria across a coastal acid sulfate soil (CASS) environment: implications for passive bioremediation by tidal inundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Yu-Chen; Bush, Richard; Grice, Kliti; Tulipani, Svenja; Berwick, Lyndon; Moreau, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Coastal acid sulfate soils (CASS) constitute a serious and global environmental problem. Oxidation of iron sulfide minerals exposed to air generates sulfuric acid with consequently negative impacts on coastal and estuarine ecosystems. Tidal inundation represents one current treatment strategy for CASS, with the aim of neutralizing acidity by triggering microbial iron- and sulfate-reduction and inducing the precipitation of iron-sulfides. Although well-known functional guilds of bacteria drive these processes, their distributions within CASS environments, as well as their relationships to tidal cycling and the availability of nutrients and electron acceptors, are poorly understood. These factors will determine the long-term efficacy of “passive” CASS remediation strategies. Here we studied microbial community structure and functional guild distribution in sediment cores obtained from 10 depths ranging from 0 to 20 cm in three sites located in the supra-, inter- and sub-tidal segments, respectively, of a CASS-affected salt marsh (East Trinity, Cairns, Australia). Whole community 16S rRNA gene diversity within each site was assessed by 454 pyrotag sequencing and bioinformatic analyses in the context of local hydrological, geochemical, and lithological factors. The results illustrate spatial overlap, or close association, of iron-, and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in an environment rich in organic matter and controlled by parameters such as acidity, redox potential, degree of water saturation, and mineralization. The observed spatial distribution implies the need for empirical understanding of the timing, relative to tidal cycling, of various terminal electron-accepting processes that control acid generation and biogeochemical iron and sulfur cycling. PMID:26191042

  14. Chemical analysis of simulated high level waste glasses to support stage III sulfate solubility modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is sponsoring an international, collaborative project to develop a fundamental model for sulfate solubility in nuclear waste glass. The solubility of sulfate has a significant impact on the achievable waste loading for nuclear waste forms within the DOE complex. These wastes can contain relatively high concentrations of sulfate, which has low solubility in borosilicate glass. This is a significant issue for low-activity waste (LAW) glass and is projected to have a major impact on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Sulfate solubility has also been a limiting factor for recent high level waste (HLW) sludge processed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The low solubility of sulfate in glass, along with melter and off-gas corrosion constraints, dictate that the waste be blended with lower sulfate concentration waste sources or washed to remove sulfate prior to vitrification. The development of enhanced borosilicate glass compositions with improved sulfate solubility will allow for higher waste loadings and accelerate mission completion.The objective of the current scope being pursued by SHU is to mature the sulfate solubility model to the point where it can be used to guide glass composition development for DWPF and WTP, allowing for enhanced waste loadings and waste throughput at these facilities. A series of targeted glass compositions was selected to resolve data gaps in the model and is identified as Stage III. SHU fabricated these glasses and sent samples to SRNL for chemical composition analysis. SHU will use the resulting data to enhance the sulfate solubility model and resolve any deficiencies. In this report, SRNL provides chemical analyses for the Stage III, simulated HLW glasses fabricated by SHU in support of the sulfate solubility model development.

  15. Solid-solution partitioning and thionation of diphenylarsinic acid in a flooded soil under the impact of sulfate and iron reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Meng [Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes and Ecological Remediation, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Tu, Chen [Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes and Ecological Remediation, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003 (China); Hu, Xuefeng; Zhang, Haibo [Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes and Ecological Remediation, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Lijuan [Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Wei, Jing [Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes and Ecological Remediation, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003 (China); Li, Yuan [Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes and Ecological Remediation, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Luo, Yongming, E-mail: ymluo@yic.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes and Ecological Remediation, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003 (China); Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Christie, Peter [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2016-11-01

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) is a major organic arsenic (As) compound derived from abandoned chemical weapons. The solid-solution partitioning and transformation of DPAA in flooded soils are poorly understood but are of great concern. The identification of the mechanisms responsible for the mobilization and transformation of DPAA may help to develop effective remediation strategies. Here, soil and Fe mineral incubation experiments were carried out to elucidate the partitioning and transformation of DPAA in anoxic (without addition of sulfate or sodium lactate) and sulfide (with the addition of sulfate and sodium lactate) soil and to examine the impact of sulfate and Fe(III) reduction on these processes. Results show that DPAA was more effectively mobilized and thionated in sulfide soil than in anoxic soil. At the initial incubation stages (0–4 weeks), 6.7–74.5% of the total DPAA in sulfide soil was mobilized likely by sorption competition with sodium lactate. At later incubation stage (4–8 weeks), DPAA was almost completely released into the solution likely due to the near-complete Fe(III) reduction. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) results provide further direct evidence of elevated DPAA release coupled with Fe(III) reduction in sulfide environments. The total DPAA fraction decreased significantly to 24.5% after two weeks and reached 3.4% after eight weeks in sulfide soil, whereas no obvious elimination of DPAA occurred in anoxic soil at the initial two weeks and the total DPAA fraction decreased to 10.9% after eight weeks. This can be explained in part by the enhanced mobilization of DPAA and sulfate reduction in sulfide soil compared with anoxic soil. These results suggest that under flooded soil conditions, Fe(III) and sulfate reduction significantly promote DPAA mobilization and thionation, respectively, and we suggest that it is essential to consider both sulfate and Fe(III) reduction to further our understanding of the environmental fate of

  16. Nitrification exhibits Haldane kinetics in an agricultural soil treated with ammonium sulfate or dairy-waste compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koper, Teresa E; Stark, John M; Habteselassie, Mussie Y; Norton, Jeanette M

    2010-11-01

    An agricultural soil was treated with dairy-waste compost, ammonium-sulfate fertilizer or no added nitrogen (control) and planted to silage corn for 6 years. The kinetics of nitrification were determined in laboratory-shaken slurry assays with a range of substrate concentrations (0-20 mM NH(4)(+)) over a 24-h period for soils from the three treatments. Determined concentrations of substrate and product were fit to Michaelis-Menten and Haldane models. For all the treatments, the Haldane model was a better fit, suggesting that significant nitrification inhibition may occur in soils under high ammonium conditions similar to those found immediately after fertilization or waste applications. The maximum rate of nitrification (V(max)) was significantly higher for the fertilized and compost-treated soils (1.74 and 1.50 mmol N kg(-1) soil day(-1)) vs. control soil (0.98 mmol kg(-1) soil day(-1)). The K(m) and K(i) values were not significantly different, with average values of 0.02 and 27 mM NH(4)(+), respectively. Our results suggest that both N sources increased nitrifier community size, but did not shift the nitrifier community structure in ways that influenced enzyme affinity or sensitivity to ammonium. The K(m) values are comparable to those determined directly in other soils, but are substantially lower than those from most pure cultures of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. No claim to original US government works.

  17. Experimental Study on the Feasibility of Using Water Glass and Aluminum Sulfate to Treat Complications in High Liquid Limit Soil Subgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-hui Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility of using water glass and aluminum sulfate to treat high liquid limit soil subgrade diseases is studied through laboratory experiments, and the following results were observed. After improving the high liquid limit clay with water glass and aluminum sulfate, the liquid limit decreases, the plastic limit increases, and the plasticity index decreases. Compared with untreated soil, the clay content of the improved soil decreases, while the silt and coarse contents increase. The absolute and relative expansion rates of the improved soil are both lower than those of the untreated soil. With the same number of dry and wet cycles, the decreased degrees of cohesion and internal friction angle of the improved soil are, respectively, one-half and one-third of those of the untreated soil. After three dry and wet cycles, the California bearing ratio (CBR of the untreated soil does not meet the requirements of specifications. However, after being cured for seven days and being subjected to three dry and wet cycles, the CBR of the improved soil, with 4% water glass solution and 0.4% aluminum sulfate, meets the requirements of specifications.

  18. An interesting biochar effect that suppressed dechlorination of pentachlorophenol while promoted iron/sulfate reduction and methanogenesis in flooded soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yan; Zhu, Min

    2017-04-01

    Biochar has received increasing attention for its many environmental impacts in recent years, but there is still a lack of comprehensive understanding of its effects on the fate of reducible organic pollutants and soil biogeochemical processes under anaerobic environments. In this study, anaerobic batch experiments were conducted to explore the effect of biochar on reductive transformation of PCP and other soil redox processes in anaerobic incubation environment. Results showed that biochar had little impact on the system Eh and pH, both of which decreased gradually to a stable value during the incubation. Dissimilatory iron reduction and sulfate reduction were significantly enhanced following biochar addition, with the promoting effect more prominent in the treatment with 1% (w/w) than that with 5% biochar added. In addition, biochar accelerated the formation of carbon dioxide and methane, but there was no difference in the final content of these two greenhouse gases at the end of incubation between biochar amended and control treatments. Unexpectedly, compared to biochar-free controls, the reductively dechlorinated degradation of PCP was inhibited following biochar addition, with the inhibition extent increased with the increase of biochar amount. These revealed an interesting biochar effect that suppressed the dechlorination of PCP, but promoted the iron/sulfate reduction and accelerated the methanogenesis. It might be simultaneously mediated by the functional microbial groups that responded sensitively to the addition of biochar and/or PCP, including the potential dechlorinators, the potential iron/sulfate reducers, and the typical methanogenic archaea. Specific function of biochar as electron shuttle was also likely involved in underpinning this interesting effect, since biochar would be capable of splitting the limited electrons from the inferior electron acceptors (in our case, the PCP) to the dominant more competitive ones (in our case, Fe(III) and SO42

  19. Effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on mineralization and mobility of nonylphenol and sodium dodecyl sulfate in agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillotte, Julia; Marschner, Bernd; Stumpe, Britta

    2014-05-01

    Nanotechnology is one of the major scientific research fields in this decade. One of the most wide-spread nanomaterials are carbon based nanoparticles (CNPs) which are increasingly be used in industry. Several studies shows that CNPs are interacting with other chemical compounds and organic pollutants in the environment. It is assumed that the interactions between CNPs and organic pollutants are affected by solution and aggregate behavior. Based on the knowledge of the behavior of CNPs and organic pollutants in aquatic systems the interactions of CNPs and organic pollutants in agricultural soils have to be studied. As organic pollutants two environmental substances, nonylphenol (NP) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were selected as model substances. They occur frequently in aqueous systems and also show different solubility behavior. As CNP representatives, two different multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) were selected. They differed either in length or outer diameter. Conclusions therefrom are to be closed the influence of length and diameter of the sorption capacity of different organic pollutants. In addition, two agricultural soils (sandy and silty soil) and one forest soil (sandy soil) were chosen. Mineralization and sorption experiments were conducted to provide information about the degradation of organic pollutants in presence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in soils. To analyze the CNPs mineralization potential, peroxidase activity was measured. Further extraction experiments were conducted to detect the extractable part of organic pollutants. The results show that the surface area of the MWNT has a significant impact on the sorption behav-ior of NP and SDS in soils. The sorption of NP and SDS is much higher than without MWNT. However, the properties of the organic pollutants (different water solubility and hydrophobicity) are equally important and should be noted. The degradation of both pollutants is influenced by MWNT. Due to the strong sorption of

  20. Sulfation of afimoxifene, endoxifen, raloxifene, and fulvestrant by the human cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULTs): A systematic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Ying; Luo, Lijun; Zhang, Lingtian; Kurogi, Katsuhisa; Zhou, Chunyang; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Liu, Ming-Cheh

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that sulfate conjugation is involved in the metabolism of three commonly used breast cancer drugs, tamoxifen, raloxifene and fulvestrant. The current study was designed to systematically identify the human cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULTs) that are capable of sulfating raloxifene, fulvestrant, and two active metabolites of tamoxifen, afimoxifene and endoxifen. A systematic analysis using 13 known human SULTs revealed SULT1A1 and SULT1C4 as the major SULTs responsible for the sulfation of afimoxifene, endoxifen, raloxifene and fulvestrant. Kinetic parameters of these two human SULTs in catalyzing the sulfation of these drug compounds were determined. Sulfation of afimoxifene, endoxifen, raloxifene and fulvestrant under metabolic conditions was examined using HepG2 human hepatoma cells and MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Moreover, human intestine, kidney, liver, and lung cytosols were examined to verify the presence of afimoxifene/endoxifen/raloxifene/fulvestrant-sulfating activity. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular analysis of the metabolic rates of discrete subsurface populations of sulfate reducers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miletto, M.; Williams, K.H.; N' Guessan, A.L.; Lovley, D.R.

    2011-04-01

    Elucidating the in situ metabolic activity of phylogenetically diverse populations of sulfate-reducing microorganisms that populate anoxic sedimentary environments is key to understanding subsurface ecology. Previous pure culture studies have demonstrated that transcript abundance of dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase genes is correlated with the sulfate reducing activity of individual cells. To evaluate whether expression of these genes was diagnostic for subsurface communities, dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase gene transcript abundance in phylogenetically distinct sulfate-reducing populations was quantified during a field experiment in which acetate was added to uranium-contaminated groundwater. Analysis of dsrAB sequences prior to the addition of acetate indicated that Desulfobacteraceae, Desulfobulbaceae, and Syntrophaceae-related sulfate reducers were the most abundant. Quantifying dsrB transcripts of the individual populations suggested that Desulfobacteraceae initially had higher dsrB transcripts per cell than Desulfobulbaceae or Syntrophaceae populations, and that the activity of Desulfobacteraceae increased further when the metabolism of dissimilatory metal reducers competing for the added acetate declined. In contrast, dsrB transcript abundance in Desulfobulbaceae and Syntrophaceae remained relatively constant, suggesting a lack of stimulation by added acetate. The indication of higher sulfate-reducing activity in the Desulfobacteraceae was consistent with the finding that Desulfobacteraceae became the predominant component of the sulfate-reducing community. Discontinuing acetate additions resulted in a decline in dsrB transcript abundance in the Desulfobacteraceae. These results suggest that monitoring transcripts of dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase genes in distinct populations of sulfate reducers can provide insight into the relative rates of metabolism of different components of the sulfate-reducing community and their ability to respond to

  2. The effect of chloride and sulfate ions on the adsorption of Cd2+ on clay and sandy loam Egyptian soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hefnawy, Mohamed E; Selim, Elmetwaly M; Assaad, Faiz F; Ismail, Ali I

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption of Cd(2+) on two types of Egyptian soils: clay (alluvial) and sandy loam (calcareous), was studied. Effect of changing the matrix electrolyte type and concentration was used to mimic the natural soil salts. Kinetics and thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption were calculated at two different electrolyte concentrations: 0.05 N and 0.15 N. The adsorption was described by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Results showed that lower concentration of the NaCl or Na2SO4 electrolytes (0.05 N) had higher adsorption capacity. Also, the maximum adsorption of cadmium when using sulfate counter ion is about two to three times higher than that when using chloride (544 μg/g for alluvial soil and 170 μg/g for calcareous soil when using 0.05 N). Using NaCl as matrix electrolyte, Freundlich isotherms showed bi-linear fits that probably mean a two energy level adsorption. This might be explained by either the competition of Cd(2+) with Na(+) or its complexation with Cl(-).

  3. The Effect of Chloride and Sulfate Ions on the Adsorption of Cd2+ on Clay and Sandy Loam Egyptian Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed E. EL-Hefnawy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption of Cd2+ on two types of Egyptian soils: clay (alluvial and sandy loam (calcareous, was studied. Effect of changing the matrix electrolyte type and concentration was used to mimic the natural soil salts. Kinetics and thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption were calculated at two different electrolyte concentrations: 0.05 N and 0.15 N. The adsorption was described by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Results showed that lower concentration of the NaCl or Na2SO4 electrolytes (0.05 N had higher adsorption capacity. Also, the maximum adsorption of cadmium when using sulfate counter ion is about two to three times higher than that when using chloride (544 μg/g for alluvial soil and 170 μg/g for calcareous soil when using 0.05 N. Using NaCl as matrix electrolyte, Freundlich isotherms showed bi-linear fits that probably mean a two energy level adsorption. This might be explained by either the competition of Cd2+ with Na+ or its complexation with Cl−.

  4. Donnan membrane speciation of Al, Fe, trace metals and REEs in coastal lowland acid sulfate soil-impacted drainage waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Adele M.; Xue, Youjia [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Kinsela, Andrew S. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Institute for Environmental Research (IER), Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Wilcken, Klaus M. [Institute for Environmental Research (IER), Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Collins, Richard N., E-mail: richard.collins@unsw.edu.au [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2016-03-15

    Donnan dialysis has been applied to forty filtered drainage waters collected from five coastal lowland acid sulfate soil (CLASS) catchments across north-eastern NSW, Australia. Despite having average pH values < 3.9, 78 and 58% of Al and total Fe, respectively, were present as neutral or negatively-charged species. Complementary isotope dilution experiments with {sup 55}Fe and {sup 26}Al demonstrated that only soluble (i.e. no colloidal) species were present. Trivalent rare earth elements (REEs) were also mainly present (> 70%) as negatively-charged complexes. In contrast, the speciation of the divalent trace metals Co, Mn, Ni and Zn was dominated by positively-charged complexes and was strongly correlated with the alkaline earth metals Ca and Mg. Thermodynamic equilibrium speciation calculations indicated that natural organic matter (NOM) complexes dominated Fe(III) speciation in agreement with that obtained by Donnan dialysis. In the case of Fe(II), however, the free cation was predicted to dominate under thermodynamic equilibrium, whilst our results indicated that Fe(II) was mainly present as neutral or negatively-charged complexes (most likely with sulfate). For all other divalent metals thermodynamic equilibrium speciation calculations agreed well with the Donnan dialysis results. The proportion of Al and REEs predicted to be negatively-charged was also grossly underestimated, relative to the experimental results, highlighting possible inaccuracies in the stability constants developed for these trivalent Me(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}{sup −} and/or Me–NOM complexes and difficulties in modeling complex environmental samples. These results will help improve metal mobility and toxicity models developed for CLASS-affected environments, and also demonstrate that Australian CLASS environments can discharge REEs at concentrations an order of magnitude greater than previously reported. - Highlights: • CLASS discharge large amounts of metals and their speciation is poorly

  5. Global analysis of neuronal phosphoproteome regulation by chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panpan Yu

    Full Text Available Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs are major components of the extracellular matrix which mediate inhibition of axonal regeneration after injury to the central nervous system (CNS. Several neuronal receptors for CSPGs have recently been identified; however, the signaling pathways by which CSPGs restrict axonal growth are still largely unknown. In this study, we applied quantitative phosphoproteomics to investigate the global changes in protein phosphorylation induced by CSPGs in primary neurons. In combination with isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ labeling, strong cation exchange chromatography (SCX fractionation, immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC and LC-MS/MS, we identified and quantified 2214 unique phosphopeptides corresponding to 1118 phosphoproteins, with 118 changing significantly in abundance with CSPG treatment. The proteins that were regulated by CSPGs included key components of synaptic vesicle trafficking, axon guidance mediated by semaphorins, integrin signaling, cadherin signaling and EGF receptor signaling pathways. A significant number of the regulated proteins are cytoskeletal and related proteins that have been implicated in regulating neurite growth. Another highly represented protein category regulated by CSPGs is nucleic acid binding proteins involved in RNA post-transcriptional regulation. Together, by screening the overall phosphoproteome changes induced by CSPGs, this data expand our understanding of CSPG signaling, which provides new insights into development of strategies for overcoming CSPG inhibition and promoting axonal regeneration after CNS injury.

  6. The influence of zinc sulfate on neonatal jaundice: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Wu, De; Wang, Baotian; Bu, Xiaosong; Tang, Jiulai

    2018-05-01

    Zinc sulfate may be a promising approach to treat neonatal jaundice. However, the results remain controversial. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy and safety of zinc sulfate on hyperbilirubinemia among neonates. PubMed, EMbase, Web of science, EBSCO, Cochrane library databases, Ovid, BMJ database, and CINAHL were systematically searched. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effect of zinc sulfate versus placebo on the prevention of jaundice in neonates were included. Two investigators independently searched articles, extracted data, and assessed the quality of included studies. The primary outcomes were total serum bilirubin (TSB) on three days and seven days, the incidence of hyperbilirubinemia. Meta-analysis was performed using random- or fixed-effect models. Five RCTs involving 645 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, compared with placebo, zinc sulfate supplementation failed to significantly reduce TSB on three days (mean difference (MD) = 0.09 mg/dL; 95% confidence interval (CI) = -0.49 to 0.67; p = .77), TSB on seven days (MD = -0.37 mg/dL; 95% CI = -98 to 0.25; p = .25) as well as the incidence of hyperbilirubinemia (OR = 1.14; 95% CI = 0.74 to 1.76; p = .56). Zinc sulfate showed no influence on phototherapy requirement (OR = 0.90; 95% CI = 0.41 to 1.98; p = .79), but resulted in significantly decreased duration of phototherapy (MD = -16.69 h; 95% CI = -25.09 to -8.3 h; p < .0001). Zinc sulfate could not reduce the TSB on three days and seven days, the incidence of hyperbilirubinemia and phototherapy requirement, but lead to significantly decreased duration of phototherapy.

  7. Response of the sulfate-reducing community to the re-establishment of estuarine conditions in two contrasting soils: a mesocosm approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miletto, M.; Loeb, R.; Antheunisse, A.M.; Bodelier, P.L.E.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    We studied the response of the sulfate-reducing prokaryote (SRP) communities to the experimental variation of salinity and tide in an outdoor mesocosm setup. Intact soil monoliths were collected at two areas of the Haringvliet lagoon (The Netherlands): one sampling location consisted of agricultural

  8. Facile analysis of contents and compositions of the chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate hybrid chain in shark and ray tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Naoko; Horai, Sawako; Tamura, Jun-ichi

    2016-04-07

    The chondroitin sulfate (CS)/dermatan sulfate (DS) hybrid chain was extracted from specific tissues of several kinds of sharks and rays. The contents and sulfation patterns of the CS/DS hybrid chain were precisely analyzed by digestion with chondroitinases ABC and AC. All samples predominantly contained the A- and C-units. Furthermore, all samples characteristically contained the D-unit. Species-specific differences were observed in the contents of the CS/DS hybrid chain, which were the highest in Mako and Blue sharks and Sharpspine skates, but were lower in Hammerhead sharks. Marked differences were observed in the ratio of the C-unit/A-unit between sharks and rays. The contents of the CS/DS hybrid chain and the ratio of the C-unit/A-unit may be related to an oxidative stress-decreasing ability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. EFISIENSI ENERGI DAN PRODUKSI PADA USAHATANI PADI DI LAHAN SULFAT MASAM POTENSIAL (Efficiency of Production and Energy on Rice Farming in Acid Sulphate Soil Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudirman Umar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Tidal swamp land is a potential land to overcome in the future national food security as a result of land conversion.  Generally, in farming system, farmer labor in used from land preparation till postharvest.  Experiment was conducted at experimental station of Belandean, Barito Kuala regency, South Kalimantan in April until September 2009.  The object of experiment was to evaluate distribution and consumption of energy for managing farming system on acid sulphate soil potential with introduction technology at dry season.  Energy consumption was analyzed on all steps of production process.  Result of analysis showed that rice cultivation on potential acid sulphate soil utilized physical energy (man power without tractor and power thresher as 253,116.80-195,170.55 k.cal ha-1.  Total energy for managing one hectare of that area was 274.858,90 k.cal ha-1 with introduction technology or 1.41 times more than by farmer technology.  Comparing with total of cost production, cost of man power with introduction technology was 56,92 %.  In production process, by applying input of physical and chemical cost, produced  energy output as 20,799,900 k.cal ha-1 and Rp 14,325,000 of cost output or increased as 48.15 %.  Based those input and output of energy was obtained production efficiency as 9,02% and 9,73 % for introduction and farmer technology. On farming system in potensial tidal swamp the energy input and production increased 1.54 and 1.15 times by addition introduction technology.  Result of evaluation showed that utilization production capital becoming more increase utilization of purun tikus (eleocharis dulcis, ameliorant and one way flow, production technology input increased as 54.31%. Keywords: Energy, acid sulphate land, rice ABSTRAK Lahan rawa pasang surut merupakan lahan alternatif yang potensial untuk mengatasi kekurangan pangan akibat menciutnya lahan subur yang telah beralih fungsi ke penggunaan non pertanian sehingga petani pun

  10. Applying Limestone or Basalt in Combination with Bio-Fertilizer to Sustain Rice Production on an Acid Sulfate Soil in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qurban Ali Panhwar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to determine the efficacy of applying ground magnesium limestone (GML or ground basalt in combination with bio-fertilizer to sustain rice production on an acid sulfate soil in Malaysia. Soils from Kelantan Plains, Malaysia, were treated with GML, ground basalt, bio-fertilizer, GML + bio-fertilizer, and ground basalt + bio-fertilizer (4 t·ha−1 each. Results showed that soil fertility was improved by applying the soil amendments. GML and basalt contain some Zn and Cu; thus, application of these amendments would increase their contents in the soil needed for the healthy growth of rice. Basalt applied in combination with bio-fertilizer appeared to be the best agronomic option to improve the fertility of acid sulfate soils for sustainable rice production in the long run. In addition to increasing Ca, Mg, Zn, and Cu reserves in the soil, water pH increased and precipitated Al3+ and/or Fe2+. Ground basalt is cheaper than GML, but basalt dissolution in the acidic soil was slow. As such, its ameliorative effects could only be seen significantly from the second season onwards. The specially-formulated bio-fertilizer for alleviating the infertility of acid sulfate soil could also enhance rice growth. The use of the bio-fertilizer fortified with N2-fixing bacteria is a green technology that would help reduce NO3− and/or NO2− pollution and reduce the cost of rice production. The phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB present in the bio-fertilizer not only increased the available P, but also helped release organic acids that would inactivate Al3+ and/or Fe2+ via the process of chelation.

  11. The fate of sulfate in acidified pig slurry during storage and following application to cropped soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jørgen; Sørensen, Peter; Elsgaard, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Received for publication June 18, 2007. Acidification of slurry with sulfuric acid is a recent agricultural practice that may serve a double purpose: reducing ammonia emission and ensuring crop sulfur sufficiency. We investigated S transformations in untreated and acidified pig slurry stored for up...... to 11 mo at 2, 10, or 20°C. Furthermore, the fertilizer efficiency of sulfuric acid in acidified slurry was investigated in a pot experiment with spring barley. The sulfate content from acidification with sulfuric acid was relatively stable and even after 11 mo of storage the majority was in the plant...... sulfur-containing compounds and investigations are needed into the relationship between odor development and the C and S composition of the slurry....

  12. Amount of organic matter required to induce sulfate reduction in sulfuric material after re-flooding is affected by soil nitrate concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chaolei; Mosley, Luke M; Fitzpatrick, Rob; Marschner, Petra

    2015-03-15

    Acid sulfate soils (ASS) with sulfuric material can be remediated through microbial sulfate reduction stimulated by adding organic matter (OM) and increasing the soil pH to >4.5, but the effectiveness of this treatment is influenced by soil properties. Two experiments were conducted using ASS with sulfuric material. In the first experiment with four ASS, OM (finely ground mature wheat straw) was added at 2-6% (w/w) and the pH adjusted to 5.5. After 36 weeks under flooded conditions, the concentration of reduced inorganic sulfur (RIS) and pore water pH were greater in all treatments with added OM than in the control without OM addition. The RIS concentration increased with OM addition rate. The increase in RIS concentration between 4% and 6% OM was significant but smaller than that between 2% and 4%, suggesting other factors limited sulfate reduction. In the second experiment, the effect of nitrate addition on sulfate reduction at different OM addition rates was investigated in one ASS. Organic matter was added at 2 and 4% and nitrate at 0, 100, and 200 mg nitrate-N kg(-1). After 2 weeks under flooded conditions, soil pH and the concentration of FeS measured as acid volatile sulfur (AVS) were lower with nitrate added at both OM addition rates. At a given nitrate addition rate, pH and AVS concentration were higher at 4% OM than at 2%. It can be concluded that sulfate reduction in ASS at pH 5.5 can be limited by low OM availability and high nitrate concentrations. Further, the inhibitory effect of nitrate can be overcome by high OM addition rates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessment of soil quality parameters using multivariate analysis in the Rawal Lake watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdous, Shahana; Begum, Shaheen; Yasmin, Azra

    2016-09-01

    Soil providing a wide array of ecosystem services is subjected to quality deterioration due to natural and anthropogenic factors. Most of the soils in Pakistan have poor status of available plant nutrients and cannot support optimum levels of crop productivity. The present study statistically analyzed ten soil quality parameters in five subwatersheds (Bari Imam, Chattar, Rumli, Shahdra, and Shahpur) of the Rawal Lake. Analysis of variance (ANOVA), cluster analysis (CA), and principal component analysis (PCA) were performed to evaluate correlation in soil quality parameters on spatiotemporal and vertical scales. Soil organic matter, electrical conductivity, nitrates, and sulfates were found to be lower than that required for good quality soil. Soil pH showed significant difference (p analysis resulted in three major factors contributing 76 % of the total variance. For factor 1, temperature, sand, silt, clay, and nitrates had the highest factor loading values (>0.75) and indicated that these were the most influential parameters of first factor or component. Cluster analysis separated five sampling sites into three statistically significant clusters: I (Shahdra-Bari Imam), II (Chattar), and III (Shahpur-Rumli). Among the five sites, Shahdra was found to have good quality soil followed by Bari Imam. The present study illustrated the usefulness of multivariate statistical approaches for the analysis and interpretation of complex datasets to understand variations in soil quality for effective watershed management.

  14. Microzonation Analysis of Cohesionless and Cohesive Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Choy Soon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban seismic risk is a continuous worldwide issue, numerous researchers are putting great effort in dealing with how to minimise the level of the threat. The only way to minimise the social and economic consequences caused but the seismic risk is through comprehensive earthquake scenario analysis such as ground response analysis. This paper intends to examine the characteristic of shear wave velocity and peak ground acceleration on cohesionless and cohesiveness soil. In order to examine the characteristic of shear wave velocity and peak ground acceleration on cohesionless and cohesiveness soil, ground response analysis was performed using Nonlinear Earthquake Site Response Analysis (NERA and Equivalent-linear Earthquake Site Response Analysis (EERA. The value of ground acceleration was initially high at bedrock and vanishes during the propagation process. It is thus, the measured acceleration at surface is therefore much lower as compare to at bedrock. Result shows that seismic waves can travel faster in harder soil as compared to softer soil. Cohesive soil contributes more to the shaking amplification than cohesionless soil such as sand and harder soil. This is known as local site effect. The typical example is the Mexico Earthquake that happened in 1985. As conclusion, peak ground acceleration for cohesive soil is higher than in cohesionless soil.

  15. Isolation of endosulfan sulfate-degrading Rhodococcus koreensis strain S1-1 from endosulfan contaminated soil and identification of a novel metabolite, endosulfan diol monosulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Koji; Kawashima, Fujimasa [Department of Applied Biology and Chemistry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 1-1-1 Sakuragaoka, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo, 156-8502 (Japan); Organochemicals Division, National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences, 3-1-3 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8604 (Japan); Takagi, Kazuhiro, E-mail: ktakagi@affrc.go.jp [Department of Applied Biology and Chemistry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 1-1-1 Sakuragaoka, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo, 156-8502 (Japan); Organochemicals Division, National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences, 3-1-3 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8604 (Japan); Kataoka, Ryota [Department of Environmental Science, University of Yamanashi, 41-4-37 Takeda, Kofu, Yamanashi (Japan); Kotake, Masaaki [Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Aoba-ku, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan); Kiyota, Hiromasa [Graduate School of Environmental & Life Science, Okayama University, 1-1-1 Tsushima-naka, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Yamazaki, Kenichi [Organochemicals Division, National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences, 3-1-3 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8604 (Japan); Sakakibara, Futa [Organochemicals Division, National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences, 3-1-3 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8604 (Japan); The Japan Society for the Promotion of Science(JSPS), 1-8 Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Okada, Sanae [Department of Applied Biology and Chemistry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 1-1-1 Sakuragaoka, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo, 156-8502 (Japan)

    2016-05-13

    An aerobic endosulfan sulfate-degrading bacterium, Rhodococcus koreensis strain S1-1, was isolated from soil to which endosulfan had been applied annually for more than 10 years until 2008. The strain isolated in this work reduced the concentration of endosulfan sulfate (2) from 12.25 μM to 2.11 μM during 14 d at 30 °C. Using ultra performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectroscopy (UPLC-ESI-MS), a new highly water-soluble metabolite possessing six chlorine atoms was found to be endosulfan diol monosulfate (6), derived from 2 by hydrolysis of the cyclic sulfate ester ring. The structure of 6 was elucidated by chemical synthesis of the candidate derivatives and by HR-MS and UPLC-MS analyses. Therefore, it was suggested that the strain S1-1 has a new metabolic pathway of 2. In addition, 6 was expected to be less toxic among the metabolites of 1 because of its higher water-solubility. -- Highlights: •A novel endosulfan sulfate-degrading bacterium was isolated and named strain S1-1. •Strain S1-1 degraded endosulfan sulfate into a novel metabolite endosulfan diol monosulfate. •Endosulfan diol monosulfate showed higher polarity than other known metabolites of endosulfan. •We proposed the plausible metabolic pathway of endosulfan in terms of organic chemistry.

  16. Substitution of Ammonium Sulfate Fertilizer on Upland Sugarcane Cultivation and Its Effects on Plant Growth, Nutrient Content and Soil Chemical Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Nurhidayati, Nurhidayati; Basit, Abdul; Sunawan, Sunawan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research was to compare the effect of substitution of Ammonium Sulfate (AS) fertilizer on sugarcane growth, nutrient content, and soil chemical properties. This research was conducted on up-land of sugarcane plantation in Tegalweru village, Dau district, Malang regency. This study tested ten treatments consisting of three treatments using AS fertilizer, six treatments using AS substitute fertilizers that used combination of Urea, Gypsum, and bio-compost and one control (no f...

  17. FEM analysis of soil-pipe interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkov, P.; Chun, Wu; Burkov, V.; Burkova, S.

    2017-07-01

    One of the most important factors of the pipeline buckling is soil distortion. The paper presents the model of the stress-strain state of the pipeline simulated with ANSYS software package and the finite element model of soil-pipe interaction. The analysis of soil distortions nearby the pipeline and its passive resistance is presented herein with due regard for the different pipe depths.

  18. Agronomic performance of green cane fertilized with ammonium sulfate in a coastal tableland soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Pessim Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The recent approach of eliminating the usage of fire for sugarcane harvesting resulted in managing the crop on a trashblanketed soil, to which a proper recommendation of N fertilization is lacking, a problem that remains in the coastal tablelands of the Espírito Santo State, Brazil. This study aimed at evaluating the effect of increasing N rates on stalk and sugar yields and the N use efficiency by the crop. The experimental area planted with sugarcane, at the first ratoon, is located in Linhares, Espírito Santo State. The treatments consisted of N rates varying from 80 to 160 kg N∙ha−1 as ammonium sulphate, and a control without N, in a completely randomized blocks experimental design. Stalk yield increased with the N rate, and fitting the results to a quadratic function suggests no response to fertilizer rates above 130 kg N∙ha−1. The highest margin of agricultural contribution was obtained at the rate of 100 kg N∙ha−1. The N use efficiency decreased from almost 49 to 38%, when the N rate increased from 100 to 160 kg N∙ha−1. There was no effect of increasing N rates on the sugar concentration, although the sugar yield response was positive and strongly influenced by the stalk production. Results showed the importance of reassessing the adequate N rate for maximizing yield in green cane production systems.

  19. Conformational Analysis of the Oligosaccharides Related to Side Chains of Holothurian Fucosylated Chondroitin Sulfates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey G. Gerbst

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Anionic polysaccharides fucosylated chondroitin sulfates (FCS from holothurian species were shown to affect various biological processes, such as metastasis, angiogenesis, clot formation, thrombosis, inflammation, and some others. To understand the mechanism of FCSs action, knowledge about their spatial arrangement is required. We have started the systematic synthesis, conformational analysis, and study of biological activity of the oligosaccharides related to various fragments of these types of natural polysaccharides. In this communication, five molecules representing distinct structural fragments of chondroitin sulfate have been studied by means of molecular modeling and NMR. These are three disaccharides and two trisaccharides containing fucose and glucuronic acid residues with one sulfate group per each fucose residue or without it. Long-range C–H coupling constants were used for the verification of the theoretical models. The presence of two conformers for both linkage types was revealed. For the Fuc–GlA linkage, the dominant conformer was the same as described previously in a literature as the molecular dynamics (MD average in a dodechasaccharide FCS fragment representing the backbone chain of the polysaccharide including GalNAc residues. This shows that the studied oligosaccharides, in addition to larger ones, may be considered as reliable models for Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR studies to reveal pharmacophore fragments of FCS.

  20. Results of mineral, chemical, and sulfate isotopic analyses of water, soil, rocks, and soil extracts from the Pariette Draw Watershed, Uinta Basin, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Jean M.; Tuttle, Michele L.W.; Fahy, Juli W.

    2015-08-06

    In 2010, Utah Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) Division of Water Quality (UDWQ, 2010) determined that water quality in Pariette Draw was in violation of Federal and State water quality criteria for total dissolved solids (TDS), selenium (Se), and boron (B). The measure of total dissolved solids is the sum of all the major ion concentrations in solution and in this case, the dominant ions are sodium (Na) and sulfate (SO4), which can form salts like thenardite (Na2SO4) and mirabilite (Na2SO4⋅H2O). The Utah Department of Environmental Quality (2010) classified the contamination as natural background and from nonpoint sources related to regional lithology and irrigation practices. Although the daily loads of the constituents of concern and water chemistry have been characterized for parts of the watershed, little is known about the controls that bedrock and soil mineralogy have on salt, Se, and B storage and the water-rock interactions that influence the mobility of these components in ground and surface waters. Studies in the Uncompahgre River watershed in Colorado by Tuttle and others (2014a, 2014b) show that salt derived from weathering of shale in a semiarid climate is stored in a variety of minerals that contribute solutes to runoff and surface waters based on a complex set of conditions such as water availability, geomorphic position (for example, topography controls the depth of salt accumulation in soils), water-table fluctuations, redox conditions, mineral dissolution kinetics, ion-exchange reactions, and secondary mineral formation. Elements like Se and B commonly reside in soluble salt phases, so knowledge of the behavior of salt minerals also sheds light on the behavior of associated contaminants.

  1. Effects and safety of magnesium sulfate on propofol-induced injection pain, a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Mengzhu; Zhao, Xiang; Zhang, Lingling; Niu, Xiaoyin; Guo, Ting; Yang, Bowen; Liu, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Propofol is the most widely used drug in the induction of general anesthesia, however its disadvantages of injection pain has always been a problem for clinical anesthetists. Many strategies have been proposed and magnesium sulfate is one of them. This is the first meta-analysis studies evaluating effects of magnesium sulfate pretreatment for preventing propofol-induced injection pain. Methods: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Google scholar and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Rev...

  2. Mercury bioaccumulation and bioaccumulation factors for Everglades mosquitofish as related to sulfate: a re-analysis of Julian II (2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollman, Curtis D; Axelrad, Donald M

    2014-11-01

    The Everglades, an ecosystem of international significance, has elevated biota mercury levels representing risk to human and wildlife consumers of fish. Given the critical role of sulfate in the methylation of mercury, and because there is a significant agricultural contribution, one potential means of reducing these mercury levels is reducing Everglades sulfate inputs. Julian II (Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 90:329-332, 2013) conducted regression modeling of the relationship between surface water sulfate concentrations and Gambusia spp. mercury bioconcentration factors across the major hydrologic subunits of the Everglades, and used those results to draw conclusions about the role of sulfate in the cycling of mercury in the Everglades. We however demonstrate a number of fundamental problems with the analysis, interpretation and conclusions. As a result, we strongly caution against using the results of Julian II (Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 90:329-332, 2013) to formulate management decisions regarding mitigation of the Everglades mercury problem.

  3. Reflectance spectroscopy for soil analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over the last three decades or more, researchers have estimated soil properties using visible and near infrared (VNIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), with varying results. This presentation reviews the history and state-of –the art of VNIR-DRS, including relative estimation accuracy for var...

  4. Effects and safety of magnesium sulfate on propofol-induced injection pain, a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengzhu; Zhao, Xiang; Zhang, Lingling; Niu, Xiaoyin; Guo, Ting; Yang, Bowen; Liu, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Propofol is the most widely used drug in the induction of general anesthesia, however its disadvantages of injection pain has always been a problem for clinical anesthetists. Many strategies have been proposed and magnesium sulfate is one of them. This is the first meta-analysis studies evaluating effects of magnesium sulfate pretreatment for preventing propofol-induced injection pain. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Google scholar and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Review databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated the prophylactic effect of magnesium sulfate on propofol injection pain. Meta-analyses were performed using RevMan 5.3 software. Five RCTs involving 545 participants were included. Magnesium sulfate allows more patients experiencing no pain or mild pain during propofol injection ([RR] 2.70, 95% [CI] 1.10-6.64, P=0.03, 2.12,95% CI 1.46-3.08, P magnesium sulfate group and placebo group in moderate pain (RR 0.22, 95% CI 0.05-0.97, P=0.05). Our meta-analysis suggested that pretreatment with magnesium sulfate intravenously before injecting propofol allow more patients to experiencing no pain during propofol injection and can reduce the intensity of injection pain effectively without causing any adverse effect.

  5. FACE Analysis as a Fast and Reliable Methodology to Monitor the Sulfation and Total Amount of Chondroitin Sulfate in Biological Samples of Clinical Importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenia Karousou

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs due to their hydrophilic character and high anionic charge densities play important roles in various (pathophysiological processes. The identification and quantification of GAGs in biological samples and tissues could be useful prognostic and diagnostic tools in pathological conditions. Despite the noteworthy progress in the development of sensitive and accurate methodologies for the determination of GAGs, there is a significant lack in methodologies regarding sample preparation and reliable fast analysis methods enabling the simultaneous analysis of several biological samples. In this report, developed protocols for the isolation of GAGs in biological samples were applied to analyze various sulfated chondroitin sulfate- and hyaluronan-derived disaccharides using fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis (FACE. Applications to biologic samples of clinical importance include blood serum, lens capsule tissue and urine. The sample preparation protocol followed by FACE analysis allows quantification with an optimal linearity over the concentration range 1.0–220.0 µg/mL, affording a limit of quantitation of 50 ng of disaccharides. Validation of FACE results was performed by capillary electrophoresis and high performance liquid chromatography techniques.

  6. Analysis of anabolic androgenic steroids as sulfate conjugates using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzeppa, S; Heinrich, G; Hemmersbach, P

    2015-01-01

    Improvements in doping analysis can be effected by speeding up analysis time and extending the detection time. Therefore, direct detection of phase II conjugates of doping agents, especially anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS), is proposed. Besides direct detection of conjugates with glucuronic acid, the analysis of sulfate conjugates, which are usually not part of the routine doping control analysis, can be of high interest. Sulfate conjugates of methandienone and methyltestosterone metabolites have already been identified as long-term metabolites. This study presents the synthesis of sulfate conjugates of six commonly used AAS and their metabolites: trenbolone, nandrolone, boldenone, methenolone, mesterolone, and drostanolone. In the following these sulfate conjugates were used for development of a fast and easy analysis method based on sample preparation using solid phase extraction with a mixed-mode sorbent and detection by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). Validation demonstrated the suitability of the method with regard to the criteria given by the technical documents of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). In addition, suitability has been proven by successful detection of the synthesized sulfate conjugates in excretion urines and routine doping control samples. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Calibrating Nonlinear Soil Material Properties for Seismic Analysis Using Soil Material Properties Intended for Linear Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spears, Robert Edward [Idaho National Laboratory; Coleman, Justin Leigh [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-08-01

    Seismic analysis of nuclear structures is routinely performed using guidance provided in “Seismic Analysis of Safety-Related Nuclear Structures and Commentary (ASCE 4, 1998).” This document, which is currently under revision, provides detailed guidance on linear seismic soil-structure-interaction (SSI) analysis of nuclear structures. To accommodate the linear analysis, soil material properties are typically developed as shear modulus and damping ratio versus cyclic shear strain amplitude. A new Appendix in ASCE 4-2014 (draft) is being added to provide guidance for nonlinear time domain SSI analysis. To accommodate the nonlinear analysis, a more appropriate form of the soil material properties includes shear stress and energy absorbed per cycle versus shear strain. Ideally, nonlinear soil model material properties would be established with soil testing appropriate for the nonlinear constitutive model being used. However, much of the soil testing done for SSI analysis is performed for use with linear analysis techniques. Consequently, a method is described in this paper that uses soil test data intended for linear analysis to develop nonlinear soil material properties. To produce nonlinear material properties that are equivalent to the linear material properties, the linear and nonlinear model hysteresis loops are considered. For equivalent material properties, the shear stress at peak shear strain and energy absorbed per cycle should match when comparing the linear and nonlinear model hysteresis loops. Consequently, nonlinear material properties are selected based on these criteria.

  8. Systematic Analysis of Pharmaceutical Preparations of Chondroitin Sulfate Combined with Glucosamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Gustavo R C; Piquet, Adriana A; Glauser, Bianca F; Tovar, Ana M F; Pereira, Mariana S; Vilanova, Eduardo; Mourão, Paulo A S

    2017-04-01

    Glycosaminoglycans are carbohydrate-based compounds widely employed as nutraceuticals or prescribed drugs. Oral formulations of chondroitin sulfate combined with glucosamine sulfate have been increasingly used to treat the symptoms of osteoarthritis and osteoarthrosis. The chondroitin sulfate of these combinations can be obtained from shark or bovine cartilages and hence presents differences regarding the proportions of 4- and 6-sulfated N-acetyl β-d-galactosamine units. Herein, we proposed a systematic protocol to assess pharmaceutical batches of this combination drug. Chemical analyses on the amounts of chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine in the batches were in accordance with those declared by the manufacturers. Anion-exchange chromatography has proven more effective than electrophoresis to determine the type of chondroitin sulfate present in the combinations and to detect the presence of keratan sulfate, a common contaminant found in batches prepared with shark chondroitin sulfate. 1D NMR spectra revealed the presence of non-sulfated instead of sulfated glucosamine in the formulations and thus in disagreement with the claims declared on the label. Moreover, 1D and 2D NMR analyses allowed a precise determination on the chemical structures of the chondroitin sulfate present in the formulations. The set of analytical tools suggested here could be useful as guidelines to improve the quality of this medication.

  9. Experiment Analysis of Concrete’s Mechanical Property Deterioration Suffered Sulfate Attack and Drying-Wetting Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Tian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of concrete deterioration in sodium sulfate solution is investigated. The macroperformance was characterized via its apparent properties, mass loss, and compressive strength. Changes in ions in the solution at different sulfate attack periods were tested by inductively coupled plasma (ICP. The damage evolution law, as well as analysis of the concrete’s meso- and microstructure, was revealed by scanning electron microscope (SEM and computed tomography (CT scanning equipment. The results show that the characteristics of concrete differed at each sulfate attack period; the drying-wetting cycles generally accelerated the deterioration process of concrete. In the early sulfate attack period, the pore structure of the concrete was filled with sulfate attack products (e.g., ettringite and gypsum, and its mass and strength increased. The pore size and porosity decreased while the CT number increased. As deterioration progressed, the swelling/expansion force of products and the salt crystallization pressure of sulfate crystals acted on the inner wall of the concrete to accumulate damage and accelerate deterioration. The mass and strength of concrete sharply decreased. The number and volume of pores increased, and the pore grew more quickly resulting in initiation and expansion of microcracks while the CT number decreased.

  10. Glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate in the repair of osteochondral defects in dogs - clinical-radiographic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Barros Eleotério

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Among the proposed treatments to repair lesions of degenerative joint disease (DJD, chondroprotective nutraceuticals composed by glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate are a non-invasive theraphy with properties that favors the health of the cartilage. Although used in human, it is also available for veterinary use with administration in the form of nutritional supplement independent of prescription, since they have registry only in the Inspection Service, which does not require safety and efficacy testing. The lack of such tests to prove efficacy and safety of veterinary medicines required by the Ministry of Agriculture and the lack of scientific studies proving its benefits raises doubts about the efficiency of the concentrations of such active substances. In this context, the objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a veterinary chondroprotective nutraceutical based on chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine in the repair of osteochondral defects in lateral femoral condyle of 48 dogs, through clinical and radiographic analysis. The animals were divided into treatment group (TG and control group (CG, so that only the TG received the nutraceutical every 24 hours at the rate recommended by the manufacturer. The results of the four treatment times (15, 30, 60 and 90 days showed that the chondroprotective nutraceutical, in the rate, formulation and administration at the times used, did not improve clinical signs and radiologically did not influence in the repair process of the defects, since the treated and control groups showed similar radiographic findings at the end of the treatments.

  11. Analysis of the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan core protein (CSPGCP) gene in achondroplasia and pseudoachondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, J E; Doege, K; Yamada, Y; Pyeritz, R E; Graham, J M; Moeschler, J B; Pauli, R M; Hecht, J T; Francomano, C A

    1991-01-01

    Achondroplasia and pseudoachondroplasia are autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasias resulting in short-limbed dwarfism. Histologic and ultrastructural studies of the cartilage in pseudoachondroplasia and in homozygous achondroplasia have suggested a structural abnormality in chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG), a major structural protein in the extra-cellular matrix. The gene encoding CSPG core protein (CSPGCP) is thus a logical "candidate gene" for analysis in these conditions. cDNA probes encoding CSPGCP were used to identify restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) in DNA from a panel of control individuals. No gross alterations at the CSPGCP locus were noted in DNA from 37 individuals with achondroplasia and 5 individuals with pseudoachondroplasia. In addition, allelic frequencies of the RFLPs were not significantly different among controls and patients with either condition. In one three-generation family with achondroplasia, close linkage of the CSPGCP locus and the skeletal dysplasia was excluded using a Bgl II polymorphism. Similarly, in a three-generation family with pseudoachondroplasia, the CSPGCP gene was not tightly linked to the disease phenotype. These results indicate that mutations at the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan core protein locus do not cause achondroplasia or pseudoachondroplasia in these families. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1670752

  12. Analysis of soil temperature harmonics and filtering characteristics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The incident solar energy determines the periodic variation of the soil temperatures and the attenuation with depth. Harmonic analysis of soil ... The results show that the soil behaves like an energy filter and an electrical analogue was modeled to simulate the filtering characteristics of the soil. It was found that the soil acts as ...

  13. [Preparation of soil candidate reference materials for the analysis of organochlorine pesticides in soils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dandan; Tian, Wen; Feng, Yuepeng; Liu, Haiping; Qiu, Henan; Wu, Zhongxiang

    2010-05-01

    The preparation method of new soil candidate certified reference materials (CRM) for the analysis of organochlorine pesticides in soils has been developed. The soil sample was dried, ground, homogenized and packed. After Soxhlet extraction and Florisil purification, the organochlorine pesticides in soil candidate were further determined using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results showed that the soil collected from Shenyang was an ideal soil candidate material for organochlorine pesticide analysis. This method established a foundation for the development of soil reference materials for the analysis of organochlorine pesticides.

  14. Chondroitin Sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a complex with iron for treating iron-deficiency anemia. Chondroitin sulfate is available as an eye drop ... chondroitin sulfate together with xanthan gum (PRO-148, Laboratorios Sophia, SA de CV, Guadalajara, Mexico) four times ...

  15. Sulfate Salts in Gasoline and Ethanol Fuels -- Historical Perspective and Analysis of Available Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, Robert L. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Alleman, Teresa [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yanowitz, Janet [Ecoengineering, Inc., Sharonville, OH (United States)

    2017-09-21

    This report reviews the chemistry of sulfate salts dissolved in ethanol and gasoline, potential sources of sulfate salts in ethanol and gasoline, the history of consumer vehicle issues with sulfate salt deposits in the early 2000s, and the corresponding changes to the denatured fuel ethanol specification. Recommendations for future research are provided. During a period of rapid market expansion in 2004-05, issues were reported with vehicles running on E10 provided by certain suppliers in some markets. It was commonly believed that these vehicle problems were caused by sulfate salts precipitating from the fuel. Investigators identified sodium sulfate, and in one case also ammonium sulfate, as the predominate salts found in the engines. Several stakeholders believed the issue was excess sulfate ions in the ethanol portion of the E10, and in 2005 the ASTM specification for ethanol (D4806) was modified to include a 4-part per million (ppm) limit on sulfate ions. While there have been no further reports of consumer vehicle issues, the recently approved increase of ethanol in gasoline from 10 to 15 volume percent has resulted in renewed interest in the sulfate ion concentration in fuel ethanol. This report reviews published data on the solubility of sulfate salts in ethanol. The possible sources of sulfate anions and charge balancing cations (such as sodium) in fuel ethanol and petroleum derived blendstocks are discussed. Examination of historical information on the consumer vehicle issues that occurred in 2004-2005 reveals that a source of sodium or ammonium ions, required for the formation of the observed insoluble salts, was never identified. Recommendations for research to better understand sulfate salt solubility issues in ethanol, hydrocarbon blendstocks, and ethanol-gasoline blends are presented.

  16. The Effect of Chloride and Sulfate Ions on the Adsorption of Cd 2+ on Clay and Sandy Loam Egyptian Soils

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohamed E. EL-Hefnawy; Elmetwaly M. Selim; Faiz F. Assaad; Ali I. Ismail

    2014-01-01

      Adsorption of Cd2+ on two types of Egyptian soils: clay (alluvial) and sandy loam (calcareous), was studied. Effect of changing the matrix electrolyte type and concentration was used to mimic the natural soil salts...

  17. The Effect of Chloride and Sulfate Ions on the Adsorption of Cd2+on Clay and Sandy Loam Egyptian Soils

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    EL-Hefnawy, Mohamed E; Selim, Elmetwaly M; Assaad, Faiz F; Ismail, Ali I

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption of Cd2+ on two types of Egyptian soils: clay (alluvial) and sandy loam (calcareous), was studied. Effect of changing the matrix electrolyte type and concentration was used to mimic the natural soil salts...

  18. The effect of chloride and sulfate ions on the adsorption of Cd2+ on clay and sandy loam Egyptian soils

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    El-Hefnawy, Mohamed E; Selim, Elmetwaly M; Assaad, Faiz F; Ismail, Ali I

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption of Cd(2+) on two types of Egyptian soils: clay (alluvial) and sandy loam (calcareous), was studied. Effect of changing the matrix electrolyte type and concentration was used to mimic the natural soil salts...

  19. Effects and Safety of Magnesium Sulfate on Neuroprotection: A Meta-analysis Based on PRISMA Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xianling; Xue, Yan; Tian, Quan; Sun, Rong; An, Ruifang

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the evidence of effects and safety of magnesium sulfate on neuroprotection for preterm infants who had exposure in uteri. We searched electronic databases and bibliographies of relevant papers to identify studies comparing magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) with placebo or other treatments in patients at high risk of preterm labor and reporting effects and safety of MgSO4 for antenatal infants. Then, we did this meta-analysis based on PRISMA guideline. The primary outcomes included fatal death, cerebral palsy (CP), intraventricular hemorrhage, and periventricular leukomalacia. Secondary outcomes included various neonatal and maternal outcomes. Ten studies including 6 randomized controlled trials and 5 cohort studies, and involving 18,655 preterm infants were analyzed. For the rate of moderate to severe CP, MgSO4 showed the ability to reduce the risk and achieved statistically significant difference (odd ratio [OR] 0.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.42-0.89, P = 0.01). The comparison of mortality rate between the MgSO4 group and the placebo group only presented small difference clinically, but reached no statistical significance (OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.77-1.11, P = 0.39). Summarily, the analysis of adverse effects on babies showed no margin (P > 0.05). Yet for mothers, MgSO4 exhibited obvious side-effects, such as respiratory depression, nausea and so forth, but there exited great heterogeneity. MgSO4 administered to women at high risk of preterm labor could reduce the risk of moderate to severe CP, without obvious adverse effects on babies. Although there exit many unfavorable effects on mothers, yet they may be lessened through reduction of the dose of MgSO4 and could be tolerable for mothers. So MgSO4 is both beneficial and safety to be used as a neuroprotective agent for premature infants before a valid alternative was discovered.

  20. Alterations of lead speciation by sulfate from addition of flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) in two contaminated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is the first study to evaluate the potential application of FGDG as an in situ Pb stabilizer in contaminated soils with two different compositions and to explain the underlying mechanisms. A smelter Pb contaminated soil (SM-soil), rich in ferrihydrite bound Pb (FH-Pb), ceru...

  1. Titanium Mass-balance Analysis of Paso Robles Soils: Elemental Gains and Losses as Affected by Acid Alteration Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Brad; Ming, Douglas W.

    2010-01-01

    The Columbia Hills soils have been exposed to aqueous alteration in alkaline [1] as well as acid conditions [2,3]. The Paso Robles class soils are bright soils that possess the highest S concentration of any soil measured on Mars [2]. Ferric-sulfate detection by Moessbauer analysis indicated that acid solutions were involved in forming these soils [4]. These soils are proposed to have formed by alteration of nearby rock by volcanic hydrothermal or fumarolic activity. The Paso Robles soils consist of the original Paso Robles-disturbed-Pasadena (PR-dist), Paso Robles- PasoLight (PR-PL), Arad-Samra, Arad-Hula, Tyrone- Berker Island1 and Tyrone-MountDarwin [2 ,3. ]Chemical characteristics indicate that the PR-dist and PR-PL soils could be derived from acid weathering of local Wishstone rocks while the Samra and Hula soils are likely derived from local Algonquin-Iroquet rock [3]. The Paso Robles soils were exposed to acidic sulfur bearing fluids; however, little else is known about the chemistry of the alteration fluid and its effects on the alteration of the proposed parent materials. The objectives of this work are to conduct titanium normalized mass-balance analysis to1) assess elemental gains and losses from the parent materials in the formation of the Paso Robles soils and 2) utilize this information to indicate the chemical nature of the alteration fluids.

  2. Soiling and degradation analysis of solar mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delord, Christine; Blaise, Anthony; Fernandez-García, Aránzazu; Martínez-Arcos, Lucía; Sutter, Florian; Reche-Navarro, Tomás Jesús

    2016-05-01

    The degradation and the soiling of the mirrors are dependent of the solar field and the mirrors technologies, the local climate, the meteorological events, the O&M tasks and the human activities around the site. In the frame of the European project SFERA II, the SODAM project has been the opportunity to compare the soiling and the degradation mechanisms on a Fresnel solar field installed in the South of France and on a parabolic-through solar field installed in the South of Spain. The analysis of the soiling has shown equivalent maximum weekly reflectance loss due to soiling in both sites but a double mean weekly reflectance loss in Spain respect to France, as well as typical meteorological events to be taken into account to adapt the cleaning strategies. Among the meteorological parameters mainly influencing the soiling, the study has revealed the effect of the rain and of the DNI. In parallel, the analysis of the degradation mechanisms has highlighted a common chalking of the protective back paint layers due to the irradiation. This chalking being associated to a leaching of the paint layers in the site of Cadarache due to the high presence of liquid water. A difference in the speed of corrosion of the silver layer has been also noticed, leading to a difference in the mechanisms of delamination of the paints layers.

  3. Numerical analysis of granular soil fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbahn, L.; Huhn, K.

    2012-04-01

    grain shapes. So, ideal round or stick- and plate-shaped grains were utilized to represent natural silts or clays to test two end-members. To quantify texture influences on soil strength, physical parameters, e.g. soil resistance, were calculated during deformation process. Furthermore, fabric analysis during shear reveals new information on detailed pore space regarding distribution and shape of voids. For this, a three-dimensional visualization of pore space is realized with the Visualization Toolkit (VTK) that allows the volume calculation and hence a quantification of single voids with progressive deformation. As a result, imaging of particle contact distribution and particle orientations within samples show significant changes with ongoing strain such as strong variations in material fabric and particle re-organization and therewith significant structural changes. These findings confirm that in general grain shape and its factor of soil fabric is not negligible for soil resistance and hence soil strength. This is notably affected by the deformation behavior of granular matter. With the broad investigation of the three most important factors that specify fabric behavior, this study attains a comprehensive view evaluating the impact of fabric on soil strength.

  4. Situational analysis of facilitators and barriers to availability and utilization of magnesium sulfate for eclampsia and severe preeclampsia in the public health system in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Lotufo, F?tima Aparecida; Parpinelli, Mary Angela; Osis, Maria Jos?; Surita, Fernanda Garanhani; Costa, Maria Laura; Cecatti, Jos? Guilherme

    2016-01-01

    Background Eclampsia is the main cause of maternal death in Brazil. Magnesium sulfate is the drug of choice for seizure prevention and control in the management of severe preeclampsia and eclampsia. Despite scientific evidence demonstrating its effectiveness and safety, there have been delays in managing hypertensive disorders, including timely access to magnesium sulfate. To conduct a general situational analysis on availability and use of magnesium sulfate for severe preeclampsia and eclamp...

  5. Ferrous sulfate supplementation causes significant gastrointestinal side-effects in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Tolkien

    Full Text Available The tolerability of oral iron supplementation for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia is disputed.Our aim was to quantify the odds of GI side-effects in adults related to current gold standard oral iron therapy, namely ferrous sulfate.Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs evaluating GI side-effects that included ferrous sulfate and a comparator that was either placebo or intravenous (i.v. iron. Random effects meta-analysis modelling was undertaken and study heterogeneity was summarised using I2 statistics.Forty three trials comprising 6831 adult participants were included. Twenty trials (n = 3168 had a placebo arm and twenty three trials (n = 3663 had an active comparator arm of i.v. iron. Ferrous sulfate supplementation significantly increased risk of GI side-effects versus placebo with an odds ratio (OR of 2.32 [95% CI 1.74-3.08, p<0.0001, I2 = 53.6%] and versus i.v. iron with an OR of 3.05 [95% CI 2.07-4.48, p<0.0001, I2 = 41.6%]. Subgroup analysis in IBD patients showed a similar effect versus i.v. iron (OR = 3.14, 95% CI 1.34-7.36, p = 0.008, I2 = 0%. Likewise, subgroup analysis of pooled data from 7 RCTs in pregnant women (n = 1028 showed a statistically significant increased risk of GI side-effects for ferrous sulfate although there was marked heterogeneity in the data (OR = 3.33, 95% CI 1.19-9.28, p = 0.02, I2 = 66.1%. Meta-regression did not provide significant evidence of an association between the study OR and the iron dose.Our meta-analysis confirms that ferrous sulfate is associated with a significant increase in gastrointestinal-specific side-effects but does not find a relationship with dose.

  6. Ferrous sulfate supplementation causes significant gastrointestinal side-effects in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolkien, Zoe; Stecher, Lynne; Mander, Adrian P; Pereira, Dora I A; Powell, Jonathan J

    2015-01-01

    The tolerability of oral iron supplementation for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia is disputed. Our aim was to quantify the odds of GI side-effects in adults related to current gold standard oral iron therapy, namely ferrous sulfate. Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating GI side-effects that included ferrous sulfate and a comparator that was either placebo or intravenous (i.v.) iron. Random effects meta-analysis modelling was undertaken and study heterogeneity was summarised using I2 statistics. Forty three trials comprising 6831 adult participants were included. Twenty trials (n = 3168) had a placebo arm and twenty three trials (n = 3663) had an active comparator arm of i.v. iron. Ferrous sulfate supplementation significantly increased risk of GI side-effects versus placebo with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.32 [95% CI 1.74-3.08, p<0.0001, I2 = 53.6%] and versus i.v. iron with an OR of 3.05 [95% CI 2.07-4.48, p<0.0001, I2 = 41.6%]. Subgroup analysis in IBD patients showed a similar effect versus i.v. iron (OR = 3.14, 95% CI 1.34-7.36, p = 0.008, I2 = 0%). Likewise, subgroup analysis of pooled data from 7 RCTs in pregnant women (n = 1028) showed a statistically significant increased risk of GI side-effects for ferrous sulfate although there was marked heterogeneity in the data (OR = 3.33, 95% CI 1.19-9.28, p = 0.02, I2 = 66.1%). Meta-regression did not provide significant evidence of an association between the study OR and the iron dose. Our meta-analysis confirms that ferrous sulfate is associated with a significant increase in gastrointestinal-specific side-effects but does not find a relationship with dose.

  7. Study of thermochemical sulfate reduction mechanism using compound specific sulfur isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshoulam, Alexander; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Said Ahmad, Ward; Deev, Andrei; Sessions, Alex L.; Tang, Yongchun; Adkins, Jess F.; Liu, Jinzhong; Gilhooly, William P.; Aizenshtat, Zeev; Amrani, Alon

    2016-09-01

    The sulfur isotopic fractionation associated with the formation of organic sulfur compounds (OSCs) during thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) was studied using gold-tube pyrolysis experiments to simulate TSR. The reactants used included n-hexadecane (n-C16) as a model organic compound with sulfate, sulfite, or elemental sulfur as the sulfur source. At the end of each experiment, the S-isotopic composition and concentration of remaining sulfate, H2S, benzothiophene, dibenzothiophene, and 2-phenylthiophene (PT) were measured. The observed S-isotopic fractionations between sulfate and BT, DBT, and H2S in experimental simulations of TSR correlate well with a multi-stage model of the overall TSR process. Large kinetic isotope fractionations occur during the first, uncatalyzed stage of TSR, 12.4‰ for H2S and as much as 22.2‰ for BT. The fractionations decrease as the H2S concentration increases and the reaction enters the second, catalyzed stage. Once all of the oxidizable hydrocarbons have been consumed, sulfate reduction ceases and equilibrium partitioning then dictates the fractionation between H2S and sulfate (∼17‰). Experiments involving sparingly soluble CaSO4 show that during the second catalytic phase of TSR the rate of sulfate reduction exceeds that of sulfate dissolution. In this case, there is no apparent isotopic fractionation between source sulfate and generated H2S, as all of the available sulfate is effectively reduced at all reaction times. When CaSO4 is replaced with fully soluble Na2SO4, sulfate dissolution is no longer rate limiting and significant S-isotopic fractionation is observed. This supports the notion that CaSO4 dissolution can lead to the apparent lack of fractionation between H2S and sulfate produced by TSR in nature. The S-isotopic composition of individual OSCs record information related to geochemical reactions that cannot be discerned from the δ34S values obtained from bulk phases such as H2S, oil, and sulfate minerals, and

  8. Sulfation of 6-Gingerol by the Human Cytosolic Sulfotransferases: A Systematic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lijun; Mei, Xue; Xi, Yuecheng; Zhou, Chunyang; Hui, Ying; Kurogi, Katsuhisa; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Liu, Ming-Cheh

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the presence of the sulfated form of 6-gingerol, a major pharmacologically active component of ginger, in plasma samples of normal human subjects who were administered 6-gingerol. The current study was designed to systematically identify the major human cytosolic sulfotransferase enzyme(s) capable of mediating the sulfation of 6-gingerol. Of the 13 known human cytosolic sulfotransferases examined, six (SULT1A1, SULT1A2, SULT1A3, SULT1B1, SULT1C4, SULT1E1) displayed significant sulfating activity toward 6-gingerol. Kinetic parameters of SULT1A1, SULT1A3, SULT1C4, and SULT1E1 that showed stronger 6-gingerol-sulfating activity were determined. Of the four human organ samples tested, small intestine and liver cytosols displayed considerably higher 6-gingerol-sulfating activity than those of the lung and kidney. Moreover, sulfation of 6-gingerol was shown to occur in HepG2 human hepatoma cells and Caco-2 human colon adenocarcinoma cells under the metabolic setting. Collectively, these results provided useful information relevant to the metabolism of 6-gingerol through sulfation both in vitro and in vivo. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Biocorrosive activity analysis of the oil pipeline soil in the Khanty-Mansiysk Autonomous Region of Ugra and the Krasnodar Territory of the Russian Federation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnokova, M. G.; Shalay, V. V.; Kriga, A. S.

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the biocorrosive activity of oil pipeline soil in the Khanty-Mansiysk Autonomous Region of Yugra and the Krasnodar Territory of the Russian Federation, due to the action of a complex of factors and analysis of sulfate-reducing and thionic bacteria content. The number of bacteria in the sulfur cycle (autotrophic thionic and sulfate-reducing bacteria), the total concentration of sulfur and iron in soil samples adjacent to the surface of underground pipelines, the specific electrical resistivity of the soil was determined. A criterion for the biocorrosive activity of the soil (CBA) was established. The study of the biocorrosive activity of the soil has established its features in the area of the oil pipeline construction in the compared territories. In the soil of the Krasnodar Territory pipeline, aggressive samples were recorded in 5.75% of cases, samples with moderate aggressiveness (49.43%), with weak soil aggressiveness (42.53% of cases), and samples with potential aggressiveness (2.30%). On the territory of the Khanty-Mansiysk Autonomous Region of Yugra, samples with weak soil aggressiveness prevailed (55.17% of cases), with moderate aggressiveness (34.5% of cases). When carrying out multiple regression analysis in the system of variables "factors of soil biocorrosive activity", informative data of modeling the indicator "the content of thiobacteria in soil" was established. The results of the research show the need for dynamic monitoring and the development of preventive measures to prevent biocorrosion.

  10. HABA-based ionic liquid matrices for UV-MALDI-MS analysis of heparin and heparan sulfate oligosaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybylski, Cedric; Gonnet, Florence; Bonnaffé, David; Hersant, Yael; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Daniel, Regis

    2010-02-01

    Polysulfated carbohydrates such as heparin (HP) and heparan sulfate (HS) are not easily amenable to usual ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (UV-MALDI)-MS analysis due to the thermal lability of their O- and N-SO(3) moieties, and their poor ionization efficiency with common crystalline matrices. Recently, ionic liquid matrices showed considerable advantages over conventional matrices for MALDI-MS of acidic compounds. Two new ionic liquid matrices (ILMs) based on the combination of 2-(4-hydroxyphenylazo)benzoic acid (HABA) with 1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidine and spermine were evaluated in the study herein. Both ILMs were successfully applied to the analysis of synthetic heparin oligosaccharides of well-characterized structures as well as to heparan sulfate-derived oligosaccharides from enzymatic depolymerization. HABA-based ILMs showed improved signal-to-noise ratio as well as a decrease of fragmentation/desulfation processes and cation exchange. Sulfated oligosaccharides were detected with higher sensitivity than usual crystalline matrices, and their intact fully O- and N-sulfated species [M-Na](-) were easily observed on mass spectra. MALDI-MS characterization of challenging analytes such as heparin octasaccharide carrying 8-O and 4 N-sulfo groups, and heparin octadecasulfated dodecasaccharide was successfully achieved.

  11. Control of sulfate concentration by miR395-targeted APS genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Ai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur nutrition is crucial for plant growth and development, as well as crop yield and quality. Inorganic sulfate in the soil is the major sulfur source for plants. After uptake, sulfate is activated by ATP sulfurylase, and then gets assimilated into sulfur-containing metabolites. However, the mechanism of regulation of sulfate levels by ATP sulfurylase is unclear. Here, we investigated the control of sulfate levels by miR395-mediated regulation of APS1/3/4. Sulfate was over-accumulated in the shoots of miR395 over-expression plants in which the expression of the APS1, APS3, and APS4 genes was suppressed. Accordingly, reduced expression of miR395 caused a decline of sulfate concentration. In agreement with these results, over-expression of the APS1, APS3, and APS4 genes led to the reduction of sulfate levels. Differential expression of these three APS genes in response to sulfate starvation implied that they have different functions. Further investigation revealed that the regulation of sulfate levels mediated by miR395 depends on the repression of its APS targets. Unlike the APS1, APS3, and APS4 genes, which encode plastid-localized ATP sulfurylases, the APS2 gene encodes a cytosolic version of ATP sulfurylase. Genetic analysis indicated that APS2 has no significant effect on sulfate levels. Our data suggest that miR395-targeted APS genes are key regulators of sulfate concentration in leaves.

  12. Study of thermochemical sulfate reduction mechanism using compound specific sulfur isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshoulam, Alexander; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Ahmad, Ward Said; Deev, Andrei; Sessions, Alex L.; Tang, Yongchun; Adkins, Jess F.; Liu, Jinzhong; Gilhooly, William P.; Aizenshtat, Zeev; Amrani, Alon

    2016-01-01

    The sulfur isotopic fractionation associated with the formation of organic sulfur compounds (OSCs) during thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) was studied using gold-tube pyrolysis experiments to simulate TSR. The reactants used included n-hexadecane (n-C16) as a model organic compound with sulfate, sulfite, or elemental sulfur as the sulfur source. At the end of each experiment, the S-isotopic composition and concentration of remaining sulfate, H2S, benzothiophene, dibenzothiophene, and 2-phenylthiophene (PT) were measured. The observed S-isotopic fractionations between sulfate and BT, DBT, and H2S in experimental simulations of TSR correlate well with a multi-stage model of the overall TSR process. Large kinetic isotope fractionations occur during the first, uncatalyzed stage of TSR, 12.4‰ for H2S and as much as 22.2‰ for BT. The fractionations decrease as the H2S concentration increases and the reaction enters the second, catalyzed stage. Once all of the oxidizable hydrocarbons have been consumed, sulfate reduction ceases and equilibrium partitioning then dictates the fractionation between H2S and sulfate (∼17‰).

  13. Comparison of Formocresol and Ferric Sulfate Pulpotomy in Primary Molars: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fallahinejad Ghajari

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Several studies have compared ferric sulfate and formocresol pulpotomy in primary molars. The results of these studies, however, could not be compared due to differencesin evaluated outcomes (clinical, radiographic, or histologic and follow up duration.The aim of the present study was a systematic review of similar studies and a metaanalysis of their results to provide the latest evidence on the issue.Materials and Methods: Web-based search was done in EMBASE,Cochrane, Pubmed,Google Scholar, IranMedex, Scientific Citation Index (SCI, and Scopus index databases.A hand search also was conducted in scientific and research dental journals approved by the Ministry of Health and Medical Education of Iran. Eight randomized clinical trial articles were selected. Clinical success, clinical and radiographic success (total success rate were assessed as outcome variables. Peto test served for data analysis.Results: The clinical success of formocresol pulpotomy was comparable to that of ferric sulfate (P=0.574. In addition, the difference between total success rate of the two methods in different studies was insignificant (P=0.42.Conclusion: No significant difference existed between the total success rate of formocresol and ferric sulfate pulpotomy, and ferric sulfate can be an appropriate alternative for formocresol.

  14. Component analysis and heavy metal adsorption ability of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from sulfate reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Zheng-Bo; Li, Qing; Li, Chuan-chuan; Chen, Tian-hu; Wang, Jin

    2015-10-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) play an important role in the treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). In this paper, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was used as the test strain to explore the effect of heavy metals on the components and adsorption ability of EPS. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analysis results showed that heavy metals did not influence the type of functional groups of EPS. Potentiometric titration results indicated that the acidic constants (pKa) of the EPS fell into three ranges of 3.5-4.0, 5.9-6.7, and 8.9-9.8. The adsorption site concentrations of the surface functional groups also increased. Adsorption results suggested that EPS had a specific binding affinity for the dosed heavy metal, and that EPS extracted from the Zn(2+)-dosed system had a higher binding affinity for all heavy metals. Additionally, Zn(2+) decreased the inhibitory effects of Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) on the SRB. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A concise method for mine soils analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkler, S.; Wildeman, T.; Robinson, R.; Herron, J.

    1999-07-01

    A large number of abandoned hard rock mines exist in Colorado and other mountain west states, many on public property. Public pressure and resulting policy changes have become a driving force in the reclamation of these sites. Two of the key reclamation issues for these sites in the occurrence of acid forming materials (AFMs) in mine soils, and acid mine drainage (AMD) issuing from mine audits. An AMD treatment system design project for the Forest Queen mine in Colorado's San Juan mountains raised the need for a simple, useable method for analysis of mine land soils, both for suitability as a construction material, and to determine the AFM content and potential for acid release. The authors have developed a simple, stepwise, go - no go test for the analysis of mine soils. Samples were collected from a variety of sites in the Silverton, CO area, and subjected to three tiers of tests including: paste pH, Eh, and 10% HCl fizz test; then total digestion in HNO{sub 3}/HCl, neutralization potential, exposure to meteoric water, and toxicity content leaching procedure (TCLP). All elemental analyses were performed with an inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) spectrometer. Elimination of samples via the first two testing tiers left two remaining samples, which were subsequently subjected to column and sequential batch tests, with further elemental analysis by ICP. Based on these tests, one sample was chosen for suitability as a constructing material for the Forest Queen treatment system basins. Further simplification, and testing on two pairs of independent soil samples, has resulted in a final analytical method suitable for general use.

  16. Comparative Analysis of Termiteria and Surrounding Soil Properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative Analysis of Termiteria and Surrounding Soil Properties in the University of Agriculture, Makurdi, Nigeria. IS Eneji, R Sha'Ato, SE Ejembi. Abstract. Variations in the properties of termitaria and their surrounding soil properties within the University of Agriculture Makurdi were investigated using routine soil analysis ...

  17. Collaborative, Nondestructive Analysis of Contaminated Soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dai, Z. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Davidson, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Eppich, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lindvall, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Parsons-Davis, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ramon, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Roberts, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sharp, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Turin, H. J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); LaMont, S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zidi, T. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (COMENA), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Belamri, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (COMENA), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bounatiro, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (COMENA), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Benbouzid, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (COMENA), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Fellouh, A. S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (COMENA), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Idir, T. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (COMENA), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Larbah, Y. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (COMENA), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Moulay, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (COMENA), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Noureddine, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (COMENA), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Rahal, B. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (COMENA), Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2017-12-14

    This report summarizes a joint nondestructive analysis exercise that LLNL, LANL, and COMENA discussed through a collaborative meeting in July 2017. This work was performed as one part of a collaboration with Algeria under Action Sheet 7: “Technical Cooperation and Assistance in Nuclear Forensics”. The primary intent of this exercise was for US and Algerian participants to jointly share results of nondestructive analyses (NDA) of a contaminated soil sample provided by the Algerians and to discuss key observations and analytical approaches. While the two samples were analyzed blind at LLNL and LANL, the soil samples were revealed after the exercise to have a common origin, and to have originated as an IAEA soil sample (IAEA-326, Bojanowski et al., 2001) provided to COMENA as part of a previous exercise. Comparative analysis revealed common findings between the laboratories, and also emphasized the need for standardized operating procedures to improve inter-comparability and confidence in conclusions. Recommended handling practices in the presence of sample heterogeneities were also discussed. This exercise provided an opportunity to demonstrate nuclear forensics analytical capabilities at COMENA, LANL, and LLNL, and identified areas that could benefit from future technical exchanges. Plans were made for a follow-on joint exercise in 2018, involving destructive analyses of the CUP-2 uranium ore concentrate standard.

  18. SMEX05 Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN) Data: Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains measurements taken during the Soil Moisture Experiment 2005 (SMEX05) from 10 June 2005 through 03 July 2005 at Soil Climate Analysis Network...

  19. SMEX03 Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN): Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains measurements taken during the Soil Moisture Experiment 2003 (SMEX03) from 1 June 2003 to 31 July 2003 from sensors at Soil Climate Analysis...

  20. SMEX03 Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN): Alabama

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains measurements taken during the Soil Moisture Experiment 2003 (SMEX03) from 1 June 2003 to 31 July 2003 from sensors at 10 Soil Climate Analysis...

  1. The Effect of Chloride and Sulfate Ions on the Adsorption of Cd 2+ on Clay and Sandy Loam Egyptian Soils

    OpenAIRE

    EL-Hefnawy, Mohamed E.; Selim, Elmetwaly M.; Assaad, Faiz F.; Ismail, Ali I.

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption of Cd2+ on two types of Egyptian soils: clay (alluvial) and sandy loam (calcareous), was studied. Effect of changing the matrix electrolyte type and concentration was used to mimic the natural soil salts. Kinetics and thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption were calculated at two different electrolyte concentrations: 0.05 N and 0.15 N. The adsorption was described by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Results showed that lower concentration of the NaCl or Na2SO4 electrolytes (0....

  2. Situational analysis of facilitators and barriers to availability and utilization of magnesium sulfate for eclampsia and severe preeclampsia in the public health system in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotufo, Fátima Aparecida; Parpinelli, Mary Angela; Osis, Maria José; Surita, Fernanda Garanhani; Costa, Maria Laura; Cecatti, José Guilherme

    2016-08-30

    Eclampsia is the main cause of maternal death in Brazil. Magnesium sulfate is the drug of choice for seizure prevention and control in the management of severe preeclampsia and eclampsia. Despite scientific evidence demonstrating its effectiveness and safety, there have been delays in managing hypertensive disorders, including timely access to magnesium sulfate. To conduct a general situational analysis on availability and use of magnesium sulfate for severe preeclampsia and eclampsia in the public health system. A situational analysis was conducted with two components: a documental analysis on information available at the official websites on the policy, regulation and availability of the medication, plus a cross sectional study with field analysis and interviews with local managers of public obstetric health services in Campinas, in the southeast of Brazil. We used the fishbone cause and effect diagram to organize study components. Interviews with managers were held during field observations using specific questionnaires. There was no access to magnesium sulfate in primary care facilities, obstetric care was excluded from urgency services and clinical protocols for professional guidance on the adequate use of magnesium sulfate were lacking in the emergency mobile care service. Magnesium sulfate is currently only administered in referral maternity hospitals. The lack of processes that promote the integration between urgency/emergency care and specialized obstetric care possibly favors the untimely use of magnesium sulfate and contributes to the high maternal morbidity/mortality rates.

  3. Magnesium sulfate for postoperative complications in children undergoing tonsillectomies: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Min; Li, Xiang-Kui; Peng, Yu

    2017-02-01

    Previous systematical reviews showed that systemic magnesium decreased postoperative pain and reduced morphine use without any reported serious adverse effects in adults. However, studies in children yielded different results. So we conducted a systematic review to evaluate the impact of magnesium sulfate on postoperative complications in children undergoing tonsillectomies. The PubMed, EMbase via OVID, CENTRAL, and WHO ICTRP were searched to identify randomized controlled trials that addressed the effect of magnesium for postoperative pain, agitation, and complications in children undergoing tonsillectomies. Two reviewers screened titles and abstracts for eligibility and assessed the quality of the included studies. The meta-analysis was performed using RevMan 5.3. Ten randomized controlled trials involving 665 participates published between 2003 and 2015 were included. Eight studies showed no different effect on pain scores between MgSO4 and control groups. Two studies showed significant lower emergence agitation incidence in MgSO4 group (pooled OR = 0.18, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.48, P = 0.0006). Five studies showed rescue analgesia was reduced in MgSO4 group (RR = 0.53, 95% CI 0.31 to 0.91, P = 0.02). Laryngospasm was founded lower in MgSO4 group (OR = 0.36, 95% CI 0.13 to 0.96, P = 0.04). Postoperative nausea and vomiting was found no difference between two groups (OR = 1.23, 95% CI 0.70 to 2.18, P = 0.47). Unlike the studies in adults, this review shows there is no statistically significant effect of perioperative use of magnesium in the postoperative pain control in children undergoing tonsillectomies. But it seems has benefits in reducing rescue analgesia, emergence agitation incidence, and laryngospasm. © 2016 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. Soil Retaining Structures : Development of models for structural analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, K.J.

    2000-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is the development of models for the structural analysis of soil retaining structures. The soil retaining structures being looked at are; block revetments, flexible retaining walls and bored tunnels in soft soil. Within this context typical structural behavior of these

  5. Spatial Analysis of Soil Fertility Using Geographical Information ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The research evaluated soil fertility condition of River Otamiri watershed in southeastern Nigeria in relation to topographic heterogeneity using GIS technique. GPS was used to determine the geodetic coordinate of the sampling points and site elevation. Soil samples were collected and analyzed using standard soil analysis ...

  6. Sulfide response analysis for sulfide control using a pS electrode in sulfate reducing bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villa Gomez, D.K.; Cassidy, J.; Keesman, K.J.; Sampaio, R.M.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2014-01-01

    Step changes in the organic loading rate (OLR) through variations in the influent chemical oxygen demand (CODin) concentration or in the hydraulic retention time (HRT) at constant COD/SO4 2- ratio (0.67) were applied to create sulfide responses for the design of a sulfide control in sulfate reducing

  7. Analysis of sulfate resistance in concrete based on artificial neural networks and USBR4908-modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Hodhod

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the available tests that can be used to evaluate concrete sulfate resistance is USBR4908. However, there are deficiencies in this test method. This study focuses on the ANN as an alternative approach to evaluate the sulfate expansion. Three types of cement combined with FA or SF, along with variable W/B were study by USBR4908. ANN model were developed by five input parameters, W/B, cement content, FA or SF, C3A, and exposure duration; output parameter is determined as expansion. Back propagation algorithm was employed for the ANN training; a Tansig function was used as the nonlinear transfer function. It was clear that the ANN models give high prediction accuracy. In addition, The engineer can avoid the use of the borderline 2.5–5% C3A content in severe sulfate environments and borderline 6–8% C3A content in moderate sulfate environments, specially with W/B ratio greater than 0.45.

  8. Analysis of sperm antigens by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel/protein blot radioimmunobinding method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C.Y.G. (Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada); Huang, Y.S.; Hu, P.C.; Gomel, V.; Menge, A.C.

    1982-06-01

    A radioimmunobinding method based on the blotting of renatured proteins from sodium dodecyl sulfate gels on to nitrocellulose filter papers was developed to analyze the sperm antigens that elicit serum anti-sperm antibodies. In rabbits, serum anti-sperm antibodies were raised by immunization with homologous epididymal spermatozoa mixed with complete Freund's adjuvant. The raised antisera from either male or female rabbits were shown to react with three major sperm protein bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels with the corresponding molecular weights of about 70,000 +/- 5000, 14,000, and 13,000, respectively. In humans, the monoclonal antibodies against human sperm were raised by a hybridoma technique. Out of six independent hybrid cell lines that were generated, three of them were shown to secrete immunoglobulins that react with the same two protein bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels, which have the approximate molecular weight of 10,000. The same procedure was also used to analyze human serum samples that were shown to contain anti-sperm antibodies by the known techniques. Unique sperm antigens that elicit anti-sperm antibodies in humans were identified and correlated. The results of this study suggest that sodium dodecyl sulfate gel/protein blot radioimmunobinding method may be a sensitive and useful tool for the study of sperm antigens that elicit autoimmune responses and their association with human infertility.

  9. Confirmation of Soluble Sulfate at the Phoenix Landing Site: Implications for Martian Geochemistry and Habitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kounaves, S. P.; Hecht, M. H.; Kapit, J.; Quinn, R. C.; Catling, D. C.; Clark, B. C.; Ming, D. W.; Gospodinova, K.; Hredzak, P.; McElhoney, K.; hide

    2010-01-01

    Over the past several decades, elemental sulfur in martian soils and rocks has been detected by a number of missions using X-ray spectroscopy [1-3]. Optical spectroscopy has also provided evidence for widespread sulfates on Mars [4,5]. The ubiquitous presence of sulfur in soils has been interpreted as a widely distributed sulfate mineralogy [6]. However, direct confirmation as to the identity and solubility of the sulfur species in martian soil has never been obtained. One goal of the Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) [7] on board the 2007 Phoenix Mars Lander [8] was to determine soluble sulfate in the martian soil. The WCL received three primary samples. Each sample was added to 25 mL of leaching solution and analysed for solvated ionic species, pH, and conductivity [9,10]. The analysis also showed a discrepancy between charge balance, ionic strength, and conductivity, suggesting unidentified anionic species.

  10. Temperature-dependent analysis of thermal motion, disorder and structures of tris(ethylenediamine)zinc(II)sulfate and tris(ethylenediamine)copper(II) sulfate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, S.; Parois, P.J.A.; Bürgi, H.-B.; Lutz, M.

    2011-01-01

    The crystal structures of the title compounds have been determined in the temperature range 140–290 K for the zinc complex, and 190–270 K for the copper complex. The two structures are isostructural in the trigonal space group P 331c with the sulfate anion severely disordered on a site with 32 (D3)

  11. Comparative analysis of black carbon in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Michael W. I.; Skjemstad, Jan O.; Czimczik, Claudia I.; Glaser, Bruno; Prentice, Ken M.; Gelinas, Yves; Kuhlbusch, Thomas A. J.

    2001-03-01

    Black carbon (BC), produced by incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and vegetation, occurs ubiquitously in soils and sediments. BC exists as a continuum from partly charred material to highly graphitized soot particles, with no general agreement on clear-cut boundaries of definition or analysis. In a comparative analysis, we measured BC forms in eight soil samples by six established methods. All methods involved removal of the non-BC components from the sample by thermal or chemical means or a combination of both. The remaining carbon, operationally defined as BC, was quantified via mass balance, elemental composition or by exploiting benzenecarboxylic acids as molecular markers or applying 13C MAS NMR (magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy. BC concentrations measured for individual samples vary over 2 orders of magnitude (up to a factor of 571). One possible explanation for this wide range of results is that the individual BC methods rely on operational definitions with clear-cut but different boundaries and developed for specific scientific questions, whereas BC represents a continuum of materials with widely contrasting physicochemical properties. Thus the methods are inherently designed to analytically determine different parts of the continuum, and it is crucial to know how measurements made by different techniques relate to each other. It is clear from this preliminary comparative analysis that a collection of BC reference materials should be established as soon as possible 1 ) to ensure long-term intralaboratory and interlaboratory data quality and 2) to facilitate comparative analyses between different analytical techniques and scientific approaches

  12. The role of Soil Water Retention Curve in slope stability analysis in unsaturated and heterogeneous soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antinoro, Chiara; Arnone, Elisa; Noto, Leonardo V.

    2015-04-01

    The mechanisms of rainwater infiltration causing slope instability had been analyzed and reviewed in many scientific works. Rainwater infiltration into unsaturated soil increases the degree of saturation, hence affecting the shear strength properties and thus the probability of slope failure. It has been widely proved that the shear strength properties change with the soil water suction in unsaturated soils; therefore, the accuracy to predict the relationship between soil water content and soil water suction, parameterized by the soil-water characteristic curve, has significant effects on the slope stability analysis. The aim of this study is to investigate how the characterization of SWRC of differently structured unsaturated soils affects the slope stability on a simple infinite slope. In particular, the unimodal and bimodal distributions of the soil pore size were compared. Samples of 40 soils, highly different in terms of structure and texture, were collected and used to calibrate two bimodal SWRCs, i.e. Ross and Smettem (1993) and Dexter et al., (2008). The traditional unimodal van Genuchten (1980) model was also applied for comparison. Slope stability analysis was conducted in terms of Factor of Safety (FS) by applying the infinite slope model for unsaturated soils. In the used formulation, the contribution of the suction effect is tuned by a parameter 'chi' in a rate proportional to the saturation conditions. Different parameterizations of this term were also compared and analyzed. Results indicated that all three SWRC models showed good overall performance in fitting the sperimental SWRCs. Both the RS and DE models described adequately the water retention data for soils with a bimodal behavior confirmed from the analysis of pore size distribution, but the best performance was obtained by DE model confirmed. In terms of FS, the tree models showed very similar results as soil moisture approached to the saturated condition; however, within the residual zone

  13. Chemistry of atmospheric precipitation in the north-central united states: Influence of sulfate, nitrate, ammonia and calcareous soil particulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munger, James William

    The supply of alkaline soil dust and gaseous NH 3 available to neutralize anthropogenic acids in the atmosphere controls the acidity of precipitation in the north-central United States. Major ions and trace metals were determined in precipitation-event and snow-core samples from sites along a 600 km transect from the North Dakota prairie to the forests of northeastern Minnesota, collected during the period April 1978-June 1979. Acidity increased 4-fold from west to east as the effect of alkaline dust and NH 3 decreased with increasing distance from the cultivated prairie; calcium and Mg 2+ decreased 2 to 3-fold across the transect. However, minimum concentrations of NH 4+ and SO 42- were observed at Itasca, the central site. Natural emissions of these elements were important in the west, while anthropogenic emissions were responsible for the higher concentrations in the east. Wet deposition of H + decreased 8-fold and deposition of NO 3- and SO 42- decreased 1.5 to 2-fold from Hovland in the east to Tewaukon in the west. Wet deposition of the metal cations increased from Hovland to Tewaukon. Dry deposition followed a similar trend. Winter snow cover and freezing temperatures, which decreased airborne soil dust and the evolution of NH 3 from the prairie soils, led to an increase in precipitation acidity at all sites. The acid increase was accompanied by a decrease in alkaline metal cations, especially Ca 2+, and in NH 4+. At Hovland SO 42- and NO 3- also increased during the winter. The occurrence of snow events at Tewaukon that were appreciably more acid than the snowpack accumulated there indicates that snow was neutralized after it fell by alkaline dust entrained in resuspended snow, or deposited separately. Winter inputs of acid are especially important because they are released during a short period in the spring. Over half of the acid input at Hovland occurred during the winter. Precipitation inputs of P and N probably benefit nutrient-poor ecosystems in the

  14. Soil Plasticity Model for Analysis of Collapse Load on Layers Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Nujid Masyitah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural soil consist of soil deposits which is a soil layer overlying a thick stratum of another soil. The bearing capacity of layered soil studies have been conducted using different approach whether theoretical, experimental and combination of both. Numerical method in computer programme has become a powerful tool in solving complex geotechnical problems. Thus in numerical modelling, stress-strain soil behaviour is well predicted, design and interpreted using appropriate soil model. It is also important to identify parameters and soil model involve in prediction real soil problem. The sand layer overlaid clay layer soil is modelled with Mohr-Coulomb and Drucker-Prager criterion. The bearing capacity in loaddisplacement analysis from COMSOL Multiphysics is obtained and presented. In addition the stress distribution and evolution of plastic strain for each thickness ratio below centre of footing are investigated. The results indicate the linear relation on load-displacement which have similar trend for both soil models while stress and plastic strain increase as thickness ratio increase.

  15. Acid-Sulfate Alteration at Gusev Crater and Across Mars: High-SiO2 Residues and Ferric Sulfate Precipitates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, R. V.; Catalano, J. G.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Schroeder, C.; Gellert, R.; Clark, B. C.; Ming, D. W.; Yen, A. S.; Arvidson, R. E.; Cohen, B. A.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit ended its mission in Gusev crater on sol 2210 after it had become stuck in a deposit of fined-grained and sulfate rich soil with dust covered solar panels unfavorably pointed toward the sun. Final analysis of remaining data from Spirit's Moessbauer spectrometer (Fe redox and mineralogy) for sols 1529 through 2071 is now complete. We focus here on chemical (APXS) and MB data for targets having high-SiO2 or high-SO3 and process link the targets through mixing and geochemical modelling to an acid-sulfate system centered at Home Plate, which is considered to be a hydrovolcanic complex.

  16. Simulation-based Analysis of the Differences in the Removal Rate of Chlorides, Nitrates and Sulfates by Electrokinetic Desalination Treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paz-Garcia, Juan Manuel; Johannesson, Björn; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Due to their abundance in the natural environment, chloride, nitrate and sulfate salts are considered the main responsible for the salt-induced decay processes in building materials and sculptures. Electro-desalination techniques, enhanced with carbonated clay buffer poultice placed between...... than chlorides and nitrates. A physicochemical model for electrochemically-induced reactive-transport processes is described and used for a theoretical analysis of the influence of the chemical interactions on the removal rate of the target ions. Simulations for the electro-desalination of a brick...

  17. Conceptual designs for in situ analysis of Mars soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckay, C. P.; Zent, A. P.; Hartman, H.

    1991-01-01

    A goal of this research is to develop conceptual designs for instrumentation to perform in situ measurements of the Martian soil in order to determine the existence and nature of any reactive chemicals. Our approach involves assessment and critical review of the Viking biology results which indicated the presence of a soil oxidant, an investigation of the possible application of standard soil science techniques to the analysis of Martian soil, and a preliminary consideration of non-standard methods that may be necessary for use in the highly oxidizing Martian soil. Based on our preliminary analysis, we have developed strawman concepts for standard soil analysis on Mars, including pH, suitable for use on a Mars rover mission. In addition, we have devised a method for the determination of the possible strong oxidants on Mars.

  18. Pyrosequencing analysis of source water switch and sulfate-induced bacterial community transformation in simulated drinking water distribution pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Shi, Baoyou; Zhang, Weiyu; Cui, Jing; Guo, Jianbo; Wang, Dongsheng; Wu, Nan; Liu, Xinyuan

    2017-12-01

    Inter-basin water transfer and source water switching will be increasingly launched due to significant population increase and the shortage of the local water resources in cities around the world. Source water switch may cause physiochemical and microbiological de-stabilization of pipe material, biofilms, and loose deposits in drinking water distribution system (DWDS). Great sulfate alteration during source water switch had been deemed as the main cause of a red water case that occurred in a northern China city. To ascertain the relationship between water quality changing and bacterial communities of biofilms in DWDS and possible bacteria risk in a red water case, water quality changing experiments in simulated DWDSs were conducted for approximately 2 years. Twenty-five corrosion scale samples and eight water samples collected from pipe harvest sites or during experimental periods were analyzed for their bacterial community composition by 454-pyrosequencing technology. Taxonomy results together with redundancy analysis (RDA) or canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis all indicated that bacterial community of samples with groundwater (GW) or surface water (SW) supply history and their variations under high sulfate water were rather different owing to different water source histories and the original pipe scale characteristics. Potential opportunistic pathogens: Burkholderia, Escherichia-Shigella, Mycobacterium, Serratia, Ralstonia, Novosphingobium, Flavobacterium, Sphingomonas, and Sphingopyxis were observed in scale or water samples.

  19. Barium Sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... uses a computer to put together x-ray images to create cross-sectional or three dimensional pictures of the inside of the body). Barium sulfate is in a class of medications called radiopaque contrast media. It works by coating the esophagus, stomach, or ...

  20. An Overview of Soil Models for Earthquake Response Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halida Yunita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Earthquakes can damage thousands of buildings and infrastructure as well as cause the loss of thousands of lives. During an earthquake, the damage to buildings is mostly caused by the effect of local soil conditions. Depending on the soil type, the earthquake waves propagating from the epicenter to the ground surface will result in various behaviors of the soil. Several studies have been conducted to accurately obtain the soil response during an earthquake. The soil model used must be able to characterize the stress-strain behavior of the soil during the earthquake. This paper compares equivalent linear and nonlinear soil model responses. Analysis was performed on two soil types, Site Class D and Site Class E. An equivalent linear soil model leads to a constant value of shear modulus, while in a nonlinear soil model, the shear modulus changes constantly,depending on the stress level, and shows inelastic behavior. The results from a comparison of both soil models are displayed in the form of maximum acceleration profiles and stress-strain curves.

  1. Sulfide response analysis for sulfide control using a pS electrode in sulfate reducing bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Gomez, D K; Cassidy, J; Keesman, K J; Sampaio, R; Lens, P N L

    2014-03-01

    Step changes in the organic loading rate (OLR) through variations in the influent chemical oxygen demand (CODin) concentration or in the hydraulic retention time (HRT) at constant COD/SO4(2-) ratio (0.67) were applied to create sulfide responses for the design of a sulfide control in sulfate reducing bioreactors. The sulfide was measured using a sulfide ion selective electrode (pS) and the values obtained were used to calculate proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller parameters. The experiments were performed in an inverse fluidized bed bioreactor with automated operation using the LabVIEW software version 2009(®). A rapid response and high sulfide increment was obtained through a stepwise increase in the CODin concentration, while a stepwise decrease to the HRT exhibited a slower response with smaller sulfide increment. Irrespective of the way the OLR was decreased, the pS response showed a time-varying behavior due to sulfide accumulation (HRT change) or utilization of substrate sources that were not accounted for (CODin change). The pS electrode response, however, showed to be informative for applications in sulfate reducing bioreactors. Nevertheless, the recorded pS values need to be corrected for pH variations and high sulfide concentrations (>200 mg/L). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparative Analysis of Termiteria and Surrounding Soil

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Magashi

    2013-06-01

    Jun 1, 2013 ... Variations in the properties of termitaria and their surrounding soil properties within the University of ... and animals. Keywords: AAS, Heavy metals, Makurdi, Soils, Termites. INTRODUCTION. Termites are eusocial insects that live in colonies composed of individuals from ... Also, termite's effects resulted in.

  3. NIRS as an alternative to conventional soil analysis for Greenland soils (focus on SOC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knadel, Maria; Ogric, Mateja; Adhikari, Kabindra

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is an important soil property. It is the main constituents of soil organic matter and a good indicator of soil quality. The estimation and mapping of SOC content could be used to select potential agricultural areas in the Arctic areas. However, conventional analysis of SOC...... are time consuming and expensive. They involve a lot of sample preparation, and chemicals and are destructive. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in the range between 400 and 2500 nm is an alternative method for SOC analysis. It is fast and non-destructive. The aims of this study where to test...... the feasibility of using NIRS to estimate SOC content on a landscape and field scale in Greenland. Partial Least squares regression models were built to correlated soil spectra and their reference SOC data to develop calibration models. Very good predictive ability for both landscape and field scale were obtained...

  4. Formation of particulate sulfate and nitrate over the Pearl River Delta in the fall: Diagnostic analysis using the Community Multiscale Air Quality model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Momei; Wang, Xuesong; Hu, Yongtao; Huang, Xiaofeng; He, Lingyan; Zhong, Liuju; Song, Yu; Hu, Min; Zhang, Yuanhang

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, fine particulate matter (PM) pollution and visibility degradation have become severe air quality issues in China. In this study, PM2.5 pollution over the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region during January, April, August, and November 2009 was simulated using the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. An in-depth diagnostic analysis, focused on November 2009, was also conducted to reveal the patterns of sulfate and nitrate distribution, and to identify the main factors that influence the formation of sulfate and nitrate under typical meteorological conditions. The CMAQ model reasonably reproduced the observed concentrations, but showed better performance for January and November than it did for April and August, for which there was light-moderate underestimation of SO2, NOx, O3, PM10, and PM2.5 concentrations, and slight overestimation of daily 8-h maximum concentrations of O3. Utilizing a sulfate tracking technique, it was found that on nearly 20 days in November 2009, characterized by northeasterly winds, cross-boundary transport contributed to >75% of the total sulfate budget, while local gas phase oxidation and primary emissions averaged 10% and 8%, respectively. Aqueous sulfate typically contributed less than 1% of the total sulfate budget, except when the winds were directed from the sea and high humidity favored aqueous oxidation, and the percentage contribution reached up to 46%. NH3 was generally sufficient to fully neutralize H2SO4; however, the formation of nitrate over the PRD was limited by the availability of NH3.

  5. Interlaboratory Comparetive Studies of Soil/Plant Analysis Methods ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The information on analytical techniques that are used for soil and plant analyses in different agricultural laboratories of Kenya was gathered and compiled in table forms. Performance of six laboratories was compaired for different elements and parameters of soil and plant samples. Chemical analysis of identical samples ...

  6. Bacteriological analysis of spent engine oil contaminated soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The bacteriological analysis of soil contaminated with spent engine oil (SEO) planted with cowpea was investigated. The aim of this study was to detect the microbial degradation of SEO in soil and how it affects the microbial activity and the effects of SEO on the growth of cowpea. SEO collected from a mechanic workshop in ...

  7. Spatial Analysis of Soil Erosion in Swaziland | Manyatsi | UNISWA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper a spatial analysis was undertaken to identify the impact of the factors controlling soil erosion: land management systems, stocking pressure, soil erodibility, average slope of the land, and mean annual rainfall. A binary classification was applied to a broad land cover classes map produced from image ...

  8. Economic analysis of soil and associated nutrient loss from gully ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. A study on the economic analysis of soil and associated nutrients conceded to gully erosion at six sublocations within Mubi area, Adamawa state during the 2007 and 2008 wet seasons. Soil and nutrient loss parameters that related to water erosion were studied in the field, alongside determination of some relevant ...

  9. Soil texture analysis by laser diffraction - standardization needed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Ingeborg; Palviainen, M.; Kjønaas, O. Janne

    2017-01-01

    Soil texture is a central soil quality property. Laser diffraction (LD) for determination of particle size distribution (PSD) is now widespread due to easy analysis and low cost. However, pretreatment methods and interpretation of the resulting soil PSD’s are not standardized. Comparison of LD data...... and many newer; ISO 13320:2009). PSD uncertainty caused by pretreatments and PSD bias caused by plate-shaped clay particles still calls for more method standardization work. If LD is used more generally, new pedotransfer functions for other soil properties (e.g water retention) based on sieving...

  10. Does incorporating collagen and chondroitin sulfate matrix in implant surfaces enhance osseointegration? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellesarian, S V; Malignaggi, V R; Kellesarian, T V; Bashir Ahmed, H; Javed, F

    2018-02-01

    Implant surface modification has been used to improve osseointegration. However, evidence regarding improved new bone formation (NBF) and osseointegration with the use of collagen-chondroitin sulfate (CS) matrix coated implants remains unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of collagen-CS matrix coating on the osseointegration of implants. The focused question was "Does the incorporation of collagen-CS matrix in implant surfaces influence osseointegration?" To answer the question, indexed databases were searched up to July 2017 using various combinations of the key words "collagen", "chondroitin sulfate", "osseointegration", and "implants". The initial literature search identified 497 articles, of which 18 reporting experimental studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Thirteen of the studies included (72%) reported that implants coated with a collagen-CS matrix presented higher NBF, bone-to-implant contact, and/or bone volume density. The strength of this observation was supported by meta-analysis results. Nevertheless, the results should be interpreted with caution due to the lack of standardization regarding the dosage formulation of collagen-CS, short-term follow-up, and lack of assessment of confounders. On experimental grounds, the incorporation of collagen-CS matrix into implant surfaces appears to promote osseointegration. From a clinical perspective, the results from animal models support phase I studies in healthy humans. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Analysis of two precipitation methods on the yield, structural features and activity of sulfated polysaccharides from Gracilaria cornea (Rhodophyta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Basto Souza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The global demand for natural products from seaweeds has increased worldwide; however, no description of the use of isoamly alcohol (IAA for obtaining of sulfated polysaccharides (SPs has been reported. We investigated the efficiency of two precipitation methods (M in obtaining SPs from the red seaweed Gracilaria cornea. SPs enzymatically isolated were concentrated with cetylpyridinium chloride (M I or IAA (M II and extracts were examined with regard to their yield, structural features and in vitro effects on the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT using normal human plasma and standard heparin (193 IU mg-1. Yield difference reached 12.99%. Quantitative determination of sulfate was similar between the two methods (̴ 26%, but extracts revealed different pattern on charge density by agarose gel electrophoresis. Whereas both extracts revealed as agarocolloids, alternative M II was also efficient for lipids, proteins and nucleic acids according to the infrared analysis. Extracts had virtually no effect on APPT (1.95 and 2 IU mg-1 for M I and M II, respectively. The results revealed IAA as an alternative solvent for obtaining SPs from the red seaweed G. cornea, depending on the industry’ usage criterion.

  12. Elements of Constitutive Modelling and Numerical Analysis of Frictional Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Kim Parsberg

    of a constitutive model for soil is based on a profound knowledge of the soil behaviour upon loading. In the present study it is attempted to get a better understanding of the soil behaviour bv performing a number of triaxial compression tests on sand. The stress-strain behaviour of sand depends strongly......This thesis deals with elements of elasto-plastic constitutive modelling and numerical analysis of frictional soils. The thesis is based on a number of scientific papers and reports in which central characteristics of soil behaviour and applied numerical techniques are considered. The development...... and subsequently dilates during shear. The change in the volumetric behaviour of the soil skeleton is commonly referred to as the characteristic state. The stress ratio corresponding to the characteristic state is independent of the mean normal effective stress and the relative density, but depends on the stress...

  13. The impact of soil compaction on runoff - a meta analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogger, Magdalena; Blöschl, Günter

    2016-04-01

    Soil compaction caused by intensive agricultural practices is known to influence runoff processes at the local scale and is often speculated to have an impact on flood events at much larger scales. Due to the complex and diverse mechanisms related to soil compaction, the key processes influencing runoff at different scales are still poorly understood. The impacts of soil compaction are, however, not only investigated by hydrologists, but also by agricultural scientists since changes in the soil structure and water availability have a direct impact on agricultural yield. Results from these studies are also of interest to hydrologists. This study presents a meta analysis of such agricultural studies with the aim to analyse and bring together the results related to runoff processes. The study identifies the most important parameters used to describe soil compaction effects and compares the observed impacts under different climatic and soil conditions. The specific type of agricultural practice causing the soil compaction is also taken into account. In a further step the results of this study shall be used to derive a toy model for scenario analysis in order to identify the potential impacts of soil compaction on runoff processes at larger scales then the plot scale.

  14. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Uncomplexed Highly Sulfated Oligosaccharides Using Ionic Liquid Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laremore, Tatiana N.; Murugesan, Saravanababu; Park, Tae-Joon; Avci, Fikri Y.; Zagorevski, Dmitri V.; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Direct UV matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometric analysis of uncomplexed, underivatized, highly sulfated oligosaccharides has been carried out using ionic liquids as matrices. Under conventionally used MALDI time-of-flight experimental conditions, uncomplexed polysulfated oligosaccharides do not produce any signal. We report that 1-methylimidazolium α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate and butylammonium 2,5-dihydroxybenzoate ionic liquid matrices allow the detection of picomole amounts of the sodium salts of a disaccharide, sucrose octasulfate, and an octasulfated pentasaccharide, Arixtra. The experimental results indicate that both analytes undergo some degree of thermal fragmentation with a mass loss corresponding to cleavage of O–SO3Na bonds in the matrix upon laser irradiation, reflecting lability of sulfo groups. PMID:16536411

  15. Microwave soil moisture measurements and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, R. W.; Howell, T. A.; Nieber, J. L.; Vanbavel, C. H. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    An effort to develop a model that simulates the distribution of water content and of temperature in bare soil is documented. The field experimental set up designed to acquire the data to test this model is described. The microwave signature acquisition system (MSAS) field measurements acquired in Colby, Kansas during the summer of 1978 are pesented.

  16. Modelling Analysis of Sewage Sludge Amended Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, P. B.; Carlsen, L.; Vikelsøe, J.

    The topic is risk assessment of sludge supply to agricultural soil in relation to xenobiotics. A large variety of xenobiotics arrive to the wastewater treatment plant in the wastewater. Many of these components are hydrophobic and thus will accumulate in the sludge solids and are removed from...

  17. Temporal and spatial analysis of clinical and molecular parameters in dextran sodium sulfate induced colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutao Yan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, including mainly ulcerative colitis (UC and Crohn's disease (CD, are inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract caused by an interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Murine colitis model induced by Dextran Sulfate Sodium (DSS is an animal model of IBD that is commonly used to address the pathogenesis of IBD as well as to test efficacy of therapies. In this study we systematically analyzed clinical parameters, histological changes, intestinal barrier properties and cytokine profile during the colitic and recovery phase. METHODS: C57BL/6 mice were administered with 3.5% of DSS in drinking water for various times. Clinical and histological features were determined using standard criteria. Myeloperoxidase (MPO activity, transepithelial permeability and proinflammatory mediators were determined in whole colon or proximal and distal parts of colon. RESULTS: As expected after administration of DSS, mice manifest loss of body weight, shortening of colon length and bloody feces. Histological manifestations included shortening and loss of crypts, infiltration of lymphocytes and neutrophil, symptoms attenuated after DSS withdrawal. The MPO value, as inflammation indicator, also increases significantly at all periods of DSS treatment, and even after DSS withdrawal, it still held at very high levels. Trans-mucosal permeability increased during DSS treatment, but recovered to almost control level after DSS withdrawal. The production of proinflammatory mediators by colonic mucosa were enhanced during DSS treatment, and then recovered to pre-treated level after DSS withdrawal. Finally, enhanced expression of proinflammatory mediators also revealed a different profile feature in proximal and distal parts of the colon. CONCLUSION: Experimental colitis induced by DSS is a good animal model to study the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis and intervention against IBD, especially UC.

  18. Sensitivity analysis and calibration of a soil carbon model (SoilGen2 in two contrasting loess forest soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Y. Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To accurately estimate past terrestrial carbon pools is the key to understanding the global carbon cycle and its relationship with the climate system. SoilGen2 is a useful tool to obtain aspects of soil properties (including carbon content by simulating soil formation processes; thus it offers an opportunity for both past soil carbon pool reconstruction and future carbon pool prediction. In order to apply it to various environmental conditions, parameters related to carbon cycle process in SoilGen2 are calibrated based on six soil pedons from two typical loess deposition regions (Belgium and China. Sensitivity analysis using the Morris method shows that decomposition rate of humus (kHUM, fraction of incoming plant material as leaf litter (frecto and decomposition rate of resistant plant material (kRPM are the three most sensitive parameters that would cause the greatest uncertainty in simulated change of soil organic carbon in both regions. According to the principle of minimizing the difference between simulated and measured organic carbon by comparing quality indices, the suited values of kHUM, (frecto and kRPM in the model are deduced step by step and validated for independent soil pedons. The difference of calibrated parameters between Belgium and China may be attributed to their different vegetation types and climate conditions. This calibrated model allows more accurate simulation of carbon change in the whole pedon and has potential for future modeling of carbon cycle over long timescales.

  19. Significant role of organic sulfur in supporting sedimentary sulfate reduction in low-sulfate environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhraee, Mojtaba; Li, Jiying; Katsev, Sergei

    2017-09-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate reduction (DSR) is a major carbon mineralization pathway in aquatic sediments, soils, and groundwater, which regulates the production of hydrogen sulfide and the mobilization rates of biologically important elements such as phosphorus and mercury. It has been widely assumed that water-column sulfate is the main sulfur source to fuel this reaction in sediments. While this assumption may be justified in high-sulfate environments such as modern seawater, we argue that in low-sulfate environments mineralization of organic sulfur compounds can be an important source of sulfate. Using a reaction-transport model, we investigate the production of sulfate from sulfur-containing organic matter for a range of environments. The results show that in low sulfate environments (50%) of sulfate reduction. In well-oxygenated systems, porewater sulfate profiles often exhibit sub-interface peaks so that sulfate fluxes are directed out of the sediment. Our measurements in Lake Superior, the world's largest lake, corroborate this conclusion: offshore sediments act as sources rather than sinks of sulfate for the water column, and sediment DSR is supported entirely by the in-sediment production of sulfate. Sulfate reduction rates are correlated to the depth of oxygen penetration and strongly regulated by the supply of reactive organic matter; rate co-regulation by sulfate availability becomes appreciable below 500 μM level. The results indicate the need to consider the mineralization of organic sulfur in the biogeochemical cycling in low-sulfate environments, including several of the world's largest freshwater bodies, deep subsurface, and possibly the sulfate-poor oceans of the Early Earth.

  20. Analysis of static and dynamic pile-soil-jacket behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azadi, Mohammad Reza Emami

    1998-12-31

    In the offshore industry, recent extreme storms, severe earthquakes and subsidence of the foundation of jacket platforms have shown that new models and methods must take into account the jacket- pile-soil foundation interaction as well as the non-linear dynamic performance/loading effects. This thesis begins with a review of the state of art pile-soil interaction model, recognizing that most existing pile-soil models have been established based on large diameter pile tests on specific sites. The need for site independent and mechanistic pile-soil interaction models led to the development of new (t-z) and (p-y) disk models. These are validated using the available database from recent large diameter pile tests in the North Sea and Gulf of Mexico. The established static disk models are applied for non-linear static analysis of the jacket-pile-soil system under extreme wave loading. Dynamic pile-soil interaction is studied and a new disk-cone model is developed for the non-linear and non-homogeneous soils. This model is applied to both surface and embedded disks in a soil layer with non-linear properties. Simplified non-linear as well as more complex analysis methods are used to study the dynamic response of the jacket platform under extreme sea and seismic loading. Ductility spectra analysis is introduced and used to study the dynamic performance of the jacket systems near collapse. Case studies are used to illustrate the effects of structural, foundation failure characteristics as well as dynamic loading effects on the overall performance of the jacket-pile-soil systems near ultimate collapse. 175 refs., 429 figs., 70 tabs.

  1. Galvanic Cell Type Sensor for Soil Moisture Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Pramod; Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari Chattanahalli; Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Paswan, Bhuneshwar; Raja Kottaichamy, Alagar; Makri Nimbegondi Kotresh, Harish; Thotiyl, Musthafa Ottakam

    2015-07-21

    Here we report the first potentiometric sensor for soil moisture analysis by bringing in the concept of Galvanic cells wherein the redox energies of Al and conducting polyaniline are exploited to design a battery type sensor. The sensor consists of only simple architectural components, and as such they are inexpensive and lightweight, making it suitable for on-site analysis. The sensing mechanism is proved to be identical to a battery type discharge reaction wherein polyaniline redox energy changes from the conducting to the nonconducting state with a resulting voltage shift in the presence of soil moisture. Unlike the state of the art soil moisture sensors, a signal derived from the proposed moisture sensor is probe size independent, as it is potentiometric in nature and, hence, can be fabricated in any shape or size and can provide a consistent output signal under the strong aberration conditions often encountered in soil moisture analysis. The sensor is regenerable by treating with 1 M HCl and can be used for multiple analysis with little read out hysteresis. Further, a portable sensor is fabricated which can provide warning signals to the end user when the moisture levels in the soil go below critically low levels, thereby functioning as a smart device. As the sensor is inexpensive, portable, and potentiometric, it opens up avenues for developing effective and energy efficient irrigation strategies, understanding the heat and water transfer at the atmosphere-land interface, understanding soil mechanics, forecasting the risk of natural calamities, and so on.

  2. Transient Analysis of Monopile Foundations Partially Embedded in Liquefied Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barari, Amin; Bayat, Mehdi; Meysam, Saadati

    2015-01-01

    design of offshore monopiles. Different seismic loads, such as those experienced in the Kobe, Santa Cruz, Loma Prieta, Kocaeli, and Morgan Hill earthquakes, are analyzed. The pore water pressure development, relative displacements, soil skeleton deformation and monopile bending moment are obtained...... Lagrangian Analysis of Continua (FLAC), which captured the fundamental mechanisms of the monopiles in saturated granular soil. The effects of inertia and the kinematic flow of soil are investigated separately, to highlight the importance of considering the combined effect of these phenomena on the seismic...

  3. Practical Soil-Shallow Foundation Model for Nonlinear Structural Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moussa Leblouba

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil-shallow foundation interaction models that are incorporated into most structural analysis programs generally lack accuracy and efficiency or neglect some aspects of foundation behavior. For instance, soil-shallow foundation systems have been observed to show both small and large loops under increasing amplitude load reversals. This paper presents a practical macroelement model for soil-shallow foundation system and its stability under simultaneous horizontal and vertical loads. The model comprises three spring elements: nonlinear horizontal, nonlinear rotational, and linear vertical springs. The proposed macroelement model was verified using experimental test results from large-scale model foundations subjected to small and large cyclic loading cases.

  4. Experimental and theoretical analysis of cracking in drying soils

    OpenAIRE

    Lakshmikantha, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    The thesis focuses on the experimental and theoretical aspects of the process of cracking in drying soils. The results and conclusions were drawn from an exhaustive experimental campaign characterised by innovative multidisciplinary aspects incorporating Fracture Mechanics and classical Soil mechanics, aided with image analysis techniques. A detailed study of the previous works on the topic showed the absence of large scale fully monitored laboratory tests, while the existing studies were per...

  5. Digital gene expression profiling analysis of duodenum transcriptomes in SD rats administered ferrous sulfate or ferrous glycine chelate by gavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Zhao; Fang, Shenglin; Hu, Qiaoling; Huang, Danping; Feng, Jie

    2016-11-30

    The absorption of different iron sources is a trending research topic. Many studies have revealed that organic iron exhibits better bioavailability than inorganic iron, but the concrete underlying mechanism is still unclear. In the present study, we examined the differences in bioavailability of ferrous sulfate and ferrous glycinate in the intestines of SD rats using Illumina sequencing technology. Digital gene expression analysis resulted in the generation of almost 128 million clean reads, with expression data for 17,089 unigenes. A total of 123 differentially expressed genes with a |log2(fold change)| >1 and q-value < 0.05 were identified between the FeSO4 and Fe-Gly groups. Gene Ontology functional analysis revealed that these genes were involved in oxidoreductase activity, iron ion binding, and heme binding. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis also showed relevant important pathways. In addition, the expression patterns of 9 randomly selected genes were further validated by qRT-PCR, which confirmed the digital gene expression results. Our study showed that the two iron sources might share the same absorption mechanism, and that differences in bioavailability between FeSO4 and Fe-Gly were not only in the absorption process but also during the transport and utilization process.

  6. Developing SASSA: a Soil Analysis Support System for Archaeologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Wilson

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available There is constant pressure on field archaeologists to be familiar with the core concepts of a diverse range of specialist disciplines. Soils and sediments are an integral part of archaeological sites, and soil and sedimentary analyses applied to archaeological questions are now recognised as an important branch of geoarchaeology. However, the teaching of soils in archaeology degrees is variable and many archaeologists complain they lack the confidence and skills to describe and interpret properly the deposits they excavate. SASSA (Soil Analysis Support System for Archaeologists is a free-to-use, internet-based system designed to familiarise archaeologists with the concepts and possibilities offered by the scientific study of soils and sediments associated with archaeological sites. The aims of SASSA are: ◦To provide soils training specifically for archaeologists, suitable for either a university or workplace setting. ◦To provide a freely accessible soils and archaeology knowledge base for archaeologists working in either the office or the field. ◦To support archaeologists describing and interpreting soils in the field. ◦To enhance understanding of the types of archaeological questions that soil analysis can help to address. ◦To initiate dialogue between archaeologists, geoarchaeologists, and soil scientists in order to encourage the thoughtful application of soil analyses to archaeological questions. SASSA consists of two core components: a knowledge base and a field tool. The 'front-end' of the website is the knowledge base; this uses wiki technology to allow users to add their own content and encourage dialogue between archaeologists and geoarchaeologists. The field tool uses an XML data structure and decision-tree support system to guide the user through the process of describing and interpreting soils and sediments. SASSA is designed for use on both 'static' (PC and 'mobile' (PDA and laptop hardware in order to provide in situ

  7. Assessing soil compaction on Forest Inventory & Analysis phase 3 field plots using a pocket penetrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael C. Amacher; Katherine P. O' Neill

    2004-01-01

    Soil compaction is an important indicator of soil quality, yet few practical methods are available to quantitatively measure this variable. Although an assessment of the areal extent of soil compaction is included as part of the soil indicator portion of the Forest Inventory & Analysis (FIA) program, no quantitative measurement of the degree of soil compaction...

  8. Direct analysis of sialylated or sulfated glycosphingolipids and other polar and neutral lipids using TLC-MS interfaces[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyejung; Zhou, Ying; Costello, Catherine E.

    2014-01-01

    Gangliosides and sulfatides (STs) are acidic glycosphingolipids (GSLs) that have one or more sialic acids or sulfate substituents, in addition to neutral sugars, attached to the C-1 hydroxyl group of the ceramide long chain base. TLC is a widely employed and convenient technique for separation and characterization of GSLs. When TLC is directly coupled to MS, it provides both the molecular mass and structural information without further purification. Here, after development of the TLC plates, the structural analyses of acidic GSLs, including gangliosides and STs, were investigated using the liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA™) and CAMAG TLC-MS interfaces coupled to an ESI QSTAR Pulsar i quadrupole orthogonal TOF mass spectrometer. Coupling TLC with ESI-MS allowed the acquisition of high resolution mass spectra of the acidic GSLs with high sensitivity and mass accuracy, without the loss of sialic acid residues that frequently occurs during low-pressure MALDI MS. These systems were then applied to the analysis of total lipid extracts from bovine brain. This allowed profiling of many different lipid classes, not only gangliosides and STs, but also SMs, neutral GSLs, and phospholipids. PMID:24482490

  9. Direct analysis of sialylated or sulfated glycosphingolipids and other polar and neutral lipids using TLC-MS interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyejung; Zhou, Ying; Costello, Catherine E

    2014-04-01

    Gangliosides and sulfatides (STs) are acidic glycosphingolipids (GSLs) that have one or more sialic acids or sulfate substituents, in addition to neutral sugars, attached to the C-1 hydroxyl group of the ceramide long chain base. TLC is a widely employed and convenient technique for separation and characterization of GSLs. When TLC is directly coupled to MS, it provides both the molecular mass and structural information without further purification. Here, after development of the TLC plates, the structural analyses of acidic GSLs, including gangliosides and STs, were investigated using the liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA™) and CAMAG TLC-MS interfaces coupled to an ESI QSTAR Pulsar i quadrupole orthogonal TOF mass spectrometer. Coupling TLC with ESI-MS allowed the acquisition of high resolution mass spectra of the acidic GSLs with high sensitivity and mass accuracy, without the loss of sialic acid residues that frequently occurs during low-pressure MALDI MS. These systems were then applied to the analysis of total lipid extracts from bovine brain. This allowed profiling of many different lipid classes, not only gangliosides and STs, but also SMs, neutral GSLs, and phospholipids.

  10. Racial/ethnic disparities in magnesium sulfate neuroprotection: a subgroup analysis of a multicenter randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilchez, Gustavo; Dai, Jing; Kumar, Komal; Mundy, David; Kontopoulos, Eftichia; Sokol, Robert J

    2017-10-04

    Despite known racial disparities in obstetrics, as well as differences in magnesium pharmacodynamics according to race, the effect of race/ethnicity in magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) use during pregnancy has not been studied. Whether some mothers are at increased risk of side effects, or infants at decreased neuroprotective effects is unknown. We analyze the effect of race/ethnicity in maternal/infant outcomes after MgSO4 neuroprotection. Subgroup analysis of a multicenter clinical trial (BEAM trial) where pregnant women at risk of preterm birth were randomized to either MgSO4 or placebo. For this study, nonanomalous singleton pregnancies were studied. The effect of race in maternal/neonatal outcomes after MgSO4 was analyzed with Breslow-Day and multifactorial ANOVA. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) of complications according to race. 922 MgSO4 and 972 placebo cases were included (45.0% African-American, 36.2% Caucasian, 17.8% Hispanics, and 1.0% Asians). Interaction analysis showed a significant effect of race/ethnicity (p = .043). Hispanics presented the highest frequency (88.3%, p effects [OR(95%CI) = 6.6 (1.3-33.8)]. Hispanics present increased risk of magnesium toxicity compared to other racial/ethnic groups. Whether specific racial/ethnic groups require closer surveillance for early signs of magnesium toxicity needs to be further explored.

  11. Molecular analysis of the spatio-temporal distribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in Camargue (France) hypersaline microbial mat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourçans, Aude; Ranchou-Peyruse, Anthony; Caumette, Pierre; Duran, Robert

    2008-07-01

    The spatio-temporal distribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the microbial mat of Camargue (Salins-de-Giraud, France) was investigated by molecular approaches at both microscale spatial resolution and different taxonomic organization levels. The vertical distribution of the SRB populations was correlated with oxygen and sulfide microgradient fluctuations. Comparisons of Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) fingerprints showed distinct locations of some operational taxonomic units at daytime and at night (4:00 or 15:00 hours) revealing important differences on the structures of the bacterial communities. When oxygen penetrates the mat, SRB migration was observed either downward to reach deeper anoxic zones to escape oxygen or upward to reach oxic surface zones. When no migration was observed, both metabolism switches and aggregate formations were suspected. These behaviors allowed the aerotolerant SRB to deal with oxygen. The analysis of the Desulfococcus-Desulfonema-Desulfosarcina T-RFLP profiles revealed up-migrating populations related to both Desulfonema sp. and Desulfosarcina variabilis. T-RFLP profiles combined with 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid gene library analysis of the Desulfobacter group revealed two distinct populations: a population related to the recently described Desulfotignum genus migrating upward during the night and a population of a new species of the Desulfobacter uniformly located throughout the mat independent of the period. Thus, the identification of the new oxygen-tolerant SRB will provide the basis for understanding the physiological adaptations to oxygen.

  12. Martian Soil Ready for Robotic Laboratory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander scooped up this Martian soil on the mission's 11th Martian day, or sol, after landing (June 5, 2008) as the first soil sample for delivery to the laboratory on the lander deck. The material includes a light-toned clod possibly from crusted surface of the ground, similar in appearance to clods observed near a foot of the lander. This approximately true-color view of the contents of the scoop on the Robotic Arm comes from combining separate images taken by the Robotic Arm Camera on Sol 11, using illumination by red, green and blue light-emitting diodes on the camera. The scoop loaded with this sample was poised over an open sample-delivery door of Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer at the end of Sol 11, ready to be dumped into the instrument on the next sol. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  13. Sulfated fucan from marine alga inhibits HeLa cells infection by HTLV-1 free particles: semi-quantitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria T. V. Romanos

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A sulfated fucan from Laminaria abyssalis marine alga prevented the interaction of HTLV-1 particles, purified from the MT-2 cell line, with HeLa cells. The infection obtained using a concentrated virus suspension was detected only by amplification of the newly synthesized HTLV-1 proviral cDNA by the nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The sulfated polysaccharide was not toxic to the cells at a concentration of 100 µg/mL and prevented infection by the viral particles when added to the cell monolayers. The proviral cDNA was only detected when the sulfated polysaccharide was added to the cells three hours post-infection, indicating that the inhibitory activity occurred in the initial stages of virus-cell interaction. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, the ability of a sulfated fucan from marine algae to inhibit virus transmission through free virus particles.

  14. Performance of CSTR-EGSB-SBR system for treating sulfate-rich cellulosic ethanol wastewater and microbial community analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Lili; Zhang, Zhaohan; Yu, Yanling; Ambuchi, John Justo; Feng, Yujie

    2017-06-01

    Performance and microbial community composition were evaluated in a two-phase anaerobic and aerobic system treating sulfate-rich cellulosic ethanol wastewater (CEW). The system was operated at five different chemical oxygen demand (COD)/SO42- ratios (63.8, 26.3, 17.8, 13.7, and 10.7). Stable performance was obtained for total COD removal efficiency (94.5%), sulfate removal (89.3%), and methane production rate (11.5 L/day) at an organic loading rate of 32.4 kg COD/(m3·day). The acidogenic reactor made a positive contribution to net VFAs production (2318.1 mg/L) and sulfate removal (60.9%). Acidogenic bacteria (Megasphaera, Parabacteroides, unclassified Ruminococcaceae spp., and Prevotella) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (Butyrivibrio, Megasphaera) were rich in the acidogenic reactor. In the methanogenic reactor, high diversity of microorganisms corresponded with a COD removal contribution of 83.2%. Moreover, methanogens (Methanosaeta) were predominant, suggesting that these organisms played an important role in the acetotrophic methanogenesis pathway. The dominant aerobic bacteria (Truepera) appeared to have been responsible for the COD removal of the SBR. These results indicate that dividing the sulfate reduction process could effectively minimize sulfide toxicity, which is important for the successful operation of system treating sulfate-rich CEW.

  15. Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emily Moghaddas; Ken Hubbert

    2014-01-01

    When managing for resilient forests, each soil’s inherent capacity to resist and recover from changes in soil function should be evaluated relative to the anticipated extent and duration of soil disturbance. Application of several key principles will help ensure healthy, resilient soils: (1) minimize physical disturbance using guidelines tailored to specific soil types...

  16. Image Analysis to Estimate Mulch Residue in Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Moreno

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mulching is used to improve the condition of agricultural soils by covering the soil with different materials, mainly black polyethylene (PE. However, problems derived from its use are how to remove it from the field and, in the case of it remaining in the soil, the possible effects on it. One possible solution is to use biodegradable plastic (BD or paper (PP, as mulch, which could present an alternative, reducing nonrecyclable waste and decreasing the environmental pollution associated with it. Determination of mulch residues in the ground is one of the basic requirements to estimate the potential of each material to degrade. This study has the goal of evaluating the residue of several mulch materials over a crop campaign in Central Spain through image analysis. Color images were acquired under similar lighting conditions at the experimental field. Different thresholding methods were applied to binarize the histogram values of the image saturation plane in order to show the best contrast between soil and mulch. Then the percentage of white pixels (i.e., soil area was used to calculate the mulch deterioration. A comparison of thresholding methods and the different mulch materials based on percentage of bare soil area obtained is shown.

  17. Acid Sulfate Alteration on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.

    2016-01-01

    A variety of mineralogical and geochemical indicators for aqueous alteration on Mars have been identified by a combination of surface and orbital robotic missions, telescopic observations, characterization of Martian meteorites, and laboratory and terrestrial analog studies. Acid sulfate alteration has been identified at all three landing sites visited by NASA rover missions (Spirit, Opportunity, and Curiosity). Spirit landed in Gusev crater in 2004 and discovered Fe-sulfates and materials that have been extensively leached by acid sulfate solutions. Opportunity landing on the plains of Meridiani Planum also in 2004 where the rover encountered large abundances of jarosite and hematite in sedimentary rocks. Curiosity landed in Gale crater in 2012 and has characterized fluvial, deltaic, and lacustrine sediments. Jarosite and hematite were discovered in some of the lacustrine sediments. The high elemental abundance of sulfur in surface materials is obvious evidence that sulfate has played a major role in aqueous processes at all landing sites on Mars. The sulfate-rich outcrop at Meridiani Planum has an SO3 content of up to 25 wt.%. The interiors of rocks and outcrops on the Columbia Hills within Gusev crater have up to 8 wt.% SO3. Soils at both sites generally have between 5 to 14 wt.% SO3, and several soils in Gusev crater contain around 30 wt.% SO3. After normalization of major element compositions to a SO3-free basis, the bulk compositions of these materials are basaltic, with a few exceptions in Gusev crater and in lacustrine mudstones in Gale crater. These observations suggest that materials encountered by the rovers were derived from basaltic precursors by acid sulfate alteration under nearly isochemical conditions (i.e., minimal leaching). There are several cases, however, where acid sulfate alteration minerals (jarosite and hematite) formed in open hydrologic systems, e.g., in Gale crater lacustrine mudstones. Several hypotheses have been suggested for the

  18. Soil analysis based on sa,ples withdrawn from different volumes: correlation versus calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucian Weilopolski; Kurt Johnsen; Yuen. Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Soil, particularly in forests, is replete with spatial variation with respect to soil C. Th e present standard chemical method for soil analysis by dry combustion (DC) is destructive, and comprehensive sampling is labor intensive and time consuming. Th ese, among other factors, are contributing to the development of new methods for soil analysis. Th ese include a near...

  19. Preliminary analysis of distributed in situ soil moisture measurements

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    L. Brocca

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface soil moisture content is highly variable in both space and time. Remote sensing can provide an effective methodology for mapping surface moisture content over large areas but ground based measurements are required to test its reliability and to calibrate retrieval algorithms. Recently, we had the opportunity to design and perform an experiment aimed at jointly acquiring measurements of surface soil water content at various locations and remotely sensed hyperspectral data. The area selected for the experiment is located in central Umbria and it extends for 90km2. For the area, detailed lithological and multi-temporal landslide inventory maps were available. We identified eight plots where measurements of soil water content were made using a Time Domain Reflectometer (TDR. The plots range in size from 100m2 to 600m2, and cover a variety of topographic and morphological settings. The TDR measurements were conducted during four days, on 5 April, 15 April, 2 May and 3 May 2004. On 3 May the NERC airborne CASI 2 acquired the hyperspectral data. Preliminary analysis concerning the matching between the landslides and the soil moisture were reported. Statistical and geostatistical analysis investigating the spatial-temporal soil moisture distribution were performed. These results will be compared with the data of surface temperature obtained from the remotely sensed hyperspectral sensor.

  20. Fluorescent microscopy approaches of quantitative soil microbial analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Konstantin; Polyanskaya, Lubov

    2015-04-01

    hybridization method (FISH). This approach was used for evaluation of contribution of each gram-negative bactera group. No significant difference between the main soil gram-negative bacterial groups (phylum Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes) was found both under anaerobic and anaerobic conditions in chernozem in the topsoil. Thus soil gram-negative bacteria play an important ecological role in natural polymer degradation as common group of microorganisms. Another approach with using cascade filtration technique for bacterial population density estimation in chernozem was compared to classical method of fluorescent microscopy. Quantification of soil bacteria with cascade filtration provided by filters with different diameters and filtering of soil suspension in fixed amount. In comparison to the classical fluorescent microscopy method the modification with filtration of soil suspension provided to quantify more bacterial cells. Thus biomass calculation results of soil bacteria by using classical fluorescent microscopy could be underestimated and combination with cascade filtration technique allow to avoid potential experimental error. Thereby, combination and comparison of several fluorescent microscopy methods modifications established during the research provided miscellaneous approaches in soil bacteria quantification and analysis of ecological roles of soil microorganisms.

  1. Soil carbon analysis using gamma rays induced by neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agronomy is a research field where various physics concepts and experimental methods are widely used, particularly in agro-chemistry and soil elemental analysis. The evolution of methodology and instrumentation of nuclear physics combined with the availability of not highly expensive commercial prod...

  2. Integrated transcriptome, proteome and physiology analysis of Epinephelus coioides after exposure to copper nanoparticles or copper sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Long, Xiaohua; Chen, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yuanrui; Liu, Zhaopu; Han, Shiqun; Yan, Shaohua

    2017-03-01

    Copper nanoparticles (Cu-NPs) are components in numerous commercial products, but little is known about the mechanisms of their toxicity to marine fish. Here, we investigated physiology, transcriptome and proteome in Epinephelus coioides after exposure to Cu as Cu-NPs or copper sulfate (CuSO4). Aggregation, oxidation and dissolution of Cu-NPs occurred after suspension in seawater within 24 h. Cu-NPs had similar types of the histology and hematological effects as CuSO4 on E. coioides, but toxicity of Cu-NPs seems more severe than that of CuSO4. Venn diagram analyses revealed 1428 and 2239 genes with significantly altered regulation in, respectively, CuSO4 and Cu-NPs treatments; of these, 911 genes were common to both treatments. A total of 354 and 140 proteins with significantly altered regulation were identified in, respectively, CuSO4 and Cu-NPs treatments; of these, 75 proteins were common to both treatments. A total of 11,417 transcripts and 3210 proteins were assigned to gene ontology terms, clusters of orthologous groups and Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes. Correlation analysis of gene and protein expressions revealed that 21 differentially expressed proteins had their regulation changed in the same direction in both Cu-NPs and CuSO4 treatments. Those genes and proteins could be used as targets for subsequent analysis, regardless of the Cu form. Among those proteins, one of the most notable changes was in proteins related to lipid transport and metabolism. This study provides an enhanced understanding of E. coioides responses to Cu-NPs or CuSO4.

  3. Analysis of soil hydraulic erosion model based on convolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xue-Xiong

    2017-11-01

    Soil erosion is a very complicated process. This paper uses convolution theory, through the runoff and sediment data of economic forest area natural rainfall conditions of southeast coastal area collected, and divided into several micro slope unit, using convolution model, slope soil erosion analysis. The simulated values were verified with the measured values, the results show that the simulated values and measured values of the average relative error is 40%, the effective model coefficient is 0.614; the simulation value had a significant linear relationship with rainfall and runoff.

  4. Adequacy of laser diffraction for soil particle size analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Peter; Aumann, Colin; Chia, Kohleth; O'Halloran, Nick; Chandra, Subhash

    2017-01-01

    Sedimentation has been a standard methodology for particle size analysis since the early 1900s. In recent years laser diffraction is beginning to replace sedimentation as the prefered technique in some industries, such as marine sediment analysis. However, for the particle size analysis of soils, which have a diverse range of both particle size and shape, laser diffraction still requires evaluation of its reliability. In this study, the sedimentation based sieve plummet balance method and the laser diffraction method were used to measure the particle size distribution of 22 soil samples representing four contrasting Australian Soil Orders. Initially, a precise wet riffling methodology was developed capable of obtaining representative samples within the recommended obscuration range for laser diffraction. It was found that repeatable results were obtained even if measurements were made at the extreme ends of the manufacturer's recommended obscuration range. Results from statistical analysis suggested that the use of sample pretreatment to remove soil organic carbon (and possible traces of calcium-carbonate content) made minor differences to the laser diffraction particle size distributions compared to no pretreatment. These differences were found to be marginally statistically significant in the Podosol topsoil and Vertosol subsoil. There are well known reasons why sedimentation methods may be considered to 'overestimate' plate-like clay particles, while laser diffraction will 'underestimate' the proportion of clay particles. In this study we used Lin's concordance correlation coefficient to determine the equivalence of laser diffraction and sieve plummet balance results. The results suggested that the laser diffraction equivalent thresholds corresponding to the sieve plummet balance cumulative particle sizes of soil particle size analysis, and the empirical results of this study, suggest that deployment of laser diffraction as a standard test procedure can provide

  5. Emerging techniques for soil analysis via mid-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linker, R.; Shaviv, A.

    2009-04-01

    Transmittance and diffuse reflectance (DRIFT) spectroscopy in the mid-IR range are well-established methods for soil analysis. Over the last five years, additional mid-IR techniques have been investigated, and in particular: 1. Attenuated total reflectance (ATR) Attenuated total reflectance is commonly used for analysis of liquids and powders for which simple transmittance measurements are not possible. The method relies on a crystal with a high refractive index, which is in contact with the sample and serves as a waveguide for the IR radiation. The radiation beam is directed in such a way that it hits the crystal/sample interface several times, each time penetrating a few microns into the sample. Since the penetration depth is limited to a few microns, very good contact between the sample and the crystal must be ensured, which can be achieved by working with samples close to water saturation. However, the strong absorbance of water in the mid-infrared range as well as the absorbance of some soil constituents (e.g., calcium carbonate) interfere with some of the absorbance bands of interest. This has led to the development of several post-processing methods for analysis of the spectra. The FTIR-ATR technique has been successfully applied to soil classification as well as to determination of nitrate concentration [1, 6-8, 10]. Furthermore, Shaviv et al. [12] demonstrated the possibility of using fiber optics as an ATR devise for direct determination of nitrate concentration in soil extracts. Recently, Du et al. [5] showed that it is possible to differentiate between 14N and 15N in such spectra, which opens very promising opportunities for developing FTIR-ATR based methods for investigating nitrogen transformation in soils by tracing changes in N-isotopic species. 2. Photo-acoustic spectroscopy Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is based on absorption-induced heating of the sample, which produces pressure fluctuations in a surrounding gas. These fluctuations are

  6. Evaluation of safe bearing capacity of soil foundation by using numerical analysis method

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    Abdoullah Namdar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The soil mechanic laboratory results help in accurate soil foundation design and enhancement failure mitigation. The mixing soil design has been used in many geotechnical engineering for soil improvement. In this paper, several types of soil foundations have been made from mixed soil. The bearing capacity of soil foundations by using mixed soil parameters and change footing dimensions have been calculated. 180 footings, placed on 15 soil foundation types have been designed. It is assumed the underground water has not effect to bearing capacity of soil foundation. The results of numerical analysis and mixed soils technique have been combined. The numerical analysis has supported mixed soil design, and introduced an appropriate result for soil foundation design. The effects of mixed soil on depth and width of footing have been compared. The mixed soil design influenced numerical analysis result, and economically, soil foundation design helps to select the appropriate dimensions of footings. The result of numerical analysis supports geotechnical and structural engineering codes, predicts structural stability with different age, natural hazard and prevention as well as it is useful in understanding safe bearing capacity of soil foundation behavior.

  7. Multifractal analysis of 2D gray soil images

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Torres, Ivan; Losada, Juan Carlos; Heck, Richard; Tarquis, Ana M.

    2015-04-01

    Soil structure, understood as the spatial arrangement of soil pores, is one of the key factors in soil modelling processes. Geometric properties of individual and interpretation of the morphological parameters of pores can be estimated from thin sections or 3D Computed Tomography images (Tarquis et al., 2003), but there is no satisfactory method to binarized these images and quantify the complexity of their spatial arrangement (Tarquis et al., 2008, Tarquis et al., 2009; Baveye et al., 2010). The objective of this work was to apply a multifractal technique, their singularities (α) and f(α) spectra, to quantify it without applying any threshold (Gónzalez-Torres, 2014). Intact soil samples were collected from four horizons of an Argisol, formed on the Tertiary Barreiras group of formations in Pernambuco state, Brazil (Itapirema Experimental Station). The natural vegetation of the region is tropical, coastal rainforest. From each horizon, showing different porosities and spatial arrangements, three adjacent samples were taken having a set of twelve samples. The intact soil samples were imaged using an EVS (now GE Medical. London, Canada) MS-8 MicroCT scanner with 45 μm pixel-1 resolution (256x256 pixels). Though some samples required paring to fit the 64 mm diameter imaging tubes, field orientation was maintained. References Baveye, P.C., M. Laba, W. Otten, L. Bouckaert, P. Dello, R.R. Goswami, D. Grinev, A. Houston, Yaoping Hu, Jianli Liu, S. Mooney, R. Pajor, S. Sleutel, A. Tarquis, Wei Wang, Qiao Wei, Mehmet Sezgin. Observer-dependent variability of the thresholding step in the quantitative analysis of soil images and X-ray microtomography data. Geoderma, 157, 51-63, 2010. González-Torres, Iván. Theory and application of multifractal analysis methods in images for the study of soil structure. Master thesis, UPM, 2014. Tarquis, A.M., R.J. Heck, J.B. Grau; J. Fabregat, M.E. Sanchez and J.M. Antón. Influence of Thresholding in Mass and Entropy Dimension of 3-D

  8. Analytical reliability analysis of soil-water characteristic curve

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    Johari A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Soil Water Characteristic Curve (SWCC, also known as the soil water-retention curve, is an important part of any constitutive relationship for unsaturated soils. Deterministic assessment of SWCC has received considerable attention in the past few years. However the uncertainties of the parameters which affect SWCC dictate that the problem is of a probabilistic nature rather than being deterministic. In this research, a Gene Expression Programming (GEP-based SWCC model is employed to assess the reliability of SWCC. For this purpose, the Jointly Distributed Random Variables (JDRV method is used as an analytical method for reliability analysis. All input parameters of the model which are initial void ratio, initial water content, silt and clay contents are set to be stochastic and modelled using truncated normal probability density functions. The results are compared with those of the Monte Carlo (MC simulation. It is shown that the initial water content is the most effective parameter in SWCC.

  9. The Analysis of Soil Resistance During Screw Displacement Pile Installation

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    Krasinski Adam

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The application of screw displacement piles (SDP is still increasing due to their high efficiency and many advantages. However, one technological problem is a serious disadvantage of those piles. It relates to the generation of very high soil resistance during screw auger penetration, especially when piles are installed in non-cohesive soils. In many situations this problem causes difficulties in creating piles of designed length and diameter. It is necessary to find a proper method for prediction of soil resistance during screw pile installation. The analysis of screw resistances based on model and field tests is presented in the paper. The investigations were carried out as part of research project, financed by the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education. As a result of tests and analyses the empirical method for prediction of rotation resistance (torque during screw auger penetration in non-cohesive subsoil based on CPT is proposed.

  10. Phylogenetic analysis on the soil bacteria distributed in karst forest

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    JunPei Zhou

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic composition of bacterial community in soil of a karst forest was analyzed by culture-independent molecular approach. The bacterial 16S rRNA gene was amplified directly from soil DNA and cloned to generate a library. After screening the clone library by RFLP, 16S rRNA genes of representative clones were sequenced and the bacterial community was analyzed phylogenetically. The 16S rRNA gene inserts of 190 clones randomly selected were analyzed by RFLP and generated 126 different RFLP types. After sequencing, 126 non-chimeric sequences were obtained, generating 113 phylotypes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the bacteria distributed in soil of the karst forest included the members assigning into Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Planctomycetes, Chloroflexi (Green nonsulfur bacteria, Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobia, Nitrospirae, Actinobacteria (High G+C Gram-positive bacteria, Firmicutes (Low G+C Gram-positive bacteria and candidate divisions (including the SPAM and GN08.

  11. Effects of nitrate and water on the oxygen isotopic analysis of barium sulfate precipitated from water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Janet E.; Böhlke, John Karl; Mroczkowski, Stanley J.

    2008-01-01

    BaSO4 precipitated from mixed salt solutions by common techniques for SO isotopic analysis may contain quantities of H2O and NO that introduce errors in O isotope measurements. Experiments with synthetic solutions indicate that δ18O values of CO produced by decomposition of precipitated BaSO4 in a carbon reactor may be either too low or too high, depending on the relative concentrations of SO and NO and the δ18O values of the H2O, NO, and SO. Typical δ18O errors are of the order of 0.5 to 1‰ in many sample types, and can be larger in samples containing atmospheric NO, which can cause similar errors in δ17O and Δ17O. These errors can be reduced by (1) ion chromatographic separation of SO from NO, (2) increasing the salinity of the solutions before precipitating BaSO4 to minimize incorporation of H2O, (3) heating BaSO4under vacuum to remove H2O, (4) preparing isotopic reference materials as aqueous samples to mimic the conditions of the samples, and (5) adjusting measured δ18O values based on amounts and isotopic compositions of coexisting H2O and NO. These procedures are demonstrated for SO isotopic reference materials, synthetic solutions with isotopically known reagents, atmospheric deposition from Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, USA, and sulfate salt deposits from the Atacama Desert, Chile, and Mojave Desert, California, USA. These results have implications for the calibration and use of O isotope data in studies of SO sources and reaction mechanisms.

  12. Soil organic carbon covariance with soil water content; a geostatistical analysis in cropland fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manns, H. R.; Berg, A. A.; von Bertoldi, P.

    2013-12-01

    Soil texture has traditionally represented the rate of soil water drainage influencing soil water content (WC) in the soil characteristic curves, hydrological models and remote sensing field studies. Although soil organic carbon (OC) has been shown to significantly increase the water holding capacity of soil in individual field studies, evidence is required to consider soil OC as a significant factor in soil WC variability at the scale of a remote sensing footprint (25 km2). The relationship of soil OC to soil WC was evaluated over 50 fields during the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) soil WC field sampling campaign over southern Manitoba, Canada. On each field, soil WC was measured at 16 sample points, at 100 m spacing to 5 cm depth with Stevens hydra probe sensors on 16 sampling dates from June 7 to July 19, 2012. Soil cores were also taken at sampling sites on each field, each sampling day, to determine gravimetric moisture, bulk density and particle size distribution. On 4 of the sampling dates, soil OC was also determined by loss on ignition on the dried soil samples from all fields. Semivariograms were created from the field mean soil OC and field mean surface soil WC sampled at midrow, over all cropland fields and averaged over all sampling dates. The semivariogram models explained a distinct relationship of both soil OC and WC within the soil over a range of 5 km with a Gaussian curve. The variance in soil that soil OC and WC have in common was a similar Gaussian curve in the cross variogram. Following spatial interpolation with Kriging, the spatial maps of soil OC and WC were also very similar with high covariance over the majority of the sampling area. The close correlation between soil OC and WC suggests they are structurally related in the soil. Soil carbon could thus assist in improving downscaling methods for remotely sensed soil WC and act as a surrogate for interpolation of soil WC.

  13. Spectral variations in rocks and soils containing ferric iron hydroxide and(or) sulfate minerals as seen by AVIRIS and laboratory spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, Barnaby W.

    2004-01-01

    Analysis of Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data covering the Big Rock Candy Mountain area of the Marysvale volcanic field, west-central Utah, identified abundant rocks and soils bearing jarosite, goethite, and chlorite associated with volcanic rocks altered to propylitic grade during the Miocene (2321 Ma). Propylitically-altered rocks rich in pyrite associated with the relict feeder zones of convecting, shallow hydrothermal systems are currently undergoing supergene oxidation to natrojarosite, kaolinite, and gypsum. Goethite coatings are forming at the expense of jarosite where most pyrite has been consumed through oxidation in alluvium derived from pyrite-bearing zones. Spectral variations in the goethite-bearing rocks that resemble variations found in reference library samples of goethites of varying grain size were observed in the AVIRIS data. Rocks outside of the feeder zones have relatively low pyrite content and are characterized by chlorite, epidote, and calcite, with local copper-bearing quartz-calcite veins. Iron-bearing minerals in these rocks are weathering directly to goethite. Laboratory spectral analyses were applied to samples of iron-bearing rock outcrops and alluvium collected from the area to determine the accuracy of the AVIRIS-based mineral identification. The accuracy of the iron mineral identification results obtained by analysis of the AVIRIS data was confirmed. In general, the AVIRIS analysis results were accurate in identifying medium-grained goethite, coarse-grained goethite, medium- to coarse-grained goethite with trace jarosite, and mixtures of goethite and jarosite. However, rock fragments from alluvial areas identified as thin coatings of goethite with the AVIRIS data were found to consist mainly of medium- to coarse-grained goethite based on spectral characteristics in the visible and near-infrared. To determine if goethite abundance contributed to the spectral variations observed in goethite-bearing rocks

  14. Stability Analysis of Methane Hydrate-Bearing Soils Considering Dissociation

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    Hiromasa Iwai

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the methane hydrate dissociation process may lead to unstable behavior such as large ground deformations, uncontrollable gas production, etc. A linear instability analysis was performed in order to investigate which variables have a significant effect on the onset of the instability behavior of methane hydrate-bearing soils subjected to dissociation. In the analysis a simplified viscoplastic constitutive equation is used for the soil sediment. The stability analysis shows that the onset of instability of the material system mainly depends on the strain hardening-softening parameter, the degree of strain, and the permeability for water and gas. Then, we conducted a numerical analysis of gas hydrate-bearing soil considering hydrate dissociation in order to investigate the effect of the parameters on the system. The simulation method used in the present study can describe the chemo-thermo-mechanically coupled behaviors such as phase changes from hydrates to water and gas, temperature changes and ground deformation. From the numerical results, we found that basically the larger the permeability for water and gas is, the more stable the simulation results are. These results are consistent with those obtained from the linear stability analysis.

  15. Analysis of the inhibitory effects of chloropicrin fumigation on nitrification in various soil types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dongdong; Wang, Qiuxia; Li, Yuan; Ouyang, Canbin; Guo, Meixia; Cao, Aocheng

    2017-05-01

    Chloropicrin retards the conversion of ammonia to nitrite during the nitrification process in soil. In our study, the dynamic effect of chloropicrin fumigation on soil nitrification was evaluated in five different soil types to identify relationships between soil properties and the effect of fumigation on nitrification. Chloropicrin significantly inhibited nitrification in all soils; however, the recovery of nitrification varied greatly between the soils. Following chloropicrin fumigation, nitrification recovered to the control level in all soils, except in the acidic Guangxi soil. Nitrification recovered faster in fumigated sandy loam Beijing soil than in the other four fumigated soils. Soil texture and pH were two important factors that influenced chloropicrin's inhibitory effect on nitrification. An S-shaped function was fitted to soil NO3(-)-N content to assess the nitrification recovery tendency in different soils. The time taken to reach maximum nitrification (tmax) ranged from 2.4 to 3.0 weeks in all unfumigated soils. Results demonstrated that tmax was greater in all fumigated soils than in untreated soils. Correlation calculations showed that tmax was strongly correlated to soil texture. The correlation analysis results indicated that the recovery rate of nitrification after chloropicrin fumigation is much faster in sandy loam soil than silty loam soil. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Comparative analysis of different measurement techniques for characterizing soil surface roughness in agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Agirre, Alex; Álvarez-Mozos, Jesús; Valle, José Manuel; Rodríguez, Álvaro; Giménez, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    Soil surface roughness can be defined as the variation in soil surface elevations, and as such, it is a key element in hydrology and soil erosion processes. In agricultural soils, roughness is mainly an anthropic factor determined by the type of tillage and management. Roughness is also a property with a high spatial variability, since the same type of tillage can result in surfaces with different roughness depending on the physical characteristics of the soil and atmospheric conditions. In order to quantify roughness and to parameterize its role in different processes, different measurement techniques have been used and several parameters have been proposed in the literature. The objective of this work is to evaluate different measurement techniques and assess their accuracy and suitability for quantifying surface roughness in agricultural soils. With this aim, a comparative analysis of three roughness measurement techniques has been carried out; (1) laser profilometer, (2) convergent photogrammetry and (3) terrestrial laser scanner. Roughness measurements were done in 3 experimental plots (5x5 meters) with different tillage treatments (representing different roughness conditions) obtained with typical agricultural tools. The laser profilometer registered vertically the distance from a reference bar down to the surface. It had a vertical accuracy of 1.25 mm, a sampling interval of 5 mm and a total length profile of 5 m. Eight profiles were taken per plot, four in parallel to tillage direction and four in perpendicular. Convergent photogrammetry consisted of 20-30 images taken per plot from a height of 5-10 m above ground (using an elevation platform), leading to point clouds of ~25 million points per plot. Terrestrial laser scanner measurements were taken from the four sides of each plot at a measurement height of ~1.75 m above ground. After orientating and corregistering the four scans, point clouds of ~60 million points were obtained per plot. The comparative

  17. Genetic analysis reveals diversity and genetic relationship among Trichoderma isolates from potting media, cultivated soil and uncultivated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sadi, Abdullah M; Al-Oweisi, Fatma A; Edwards, Simon G; Al-Nadabi, Hamed; Al-Fahdi, Ahmed M

    2015-07-28

    Trichoderma is one of the most common fungi in soil. However, little information is available concerning the diversity of Trichoderma in soil with no previous history of cultivation. This study was conducted to investigate the most common species and the level of genetic relatedness of Trichoderma species from uncultivated soil in relation to cultivated soil and potting media. A total of 24, 15 and 13 Trichoderma isolates were recovered from 84 potting media samples, 45 cultivated soil samples and 65 uncultivated soil samples, respectively. Analysis based on the internal transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and the translation elongation factor gene (EF1) indicated the presence of 9 Trichoderma species: T. harzianum (16 isolates), T. asperellum (13), T. citrinoviride (9), T. orientalis (3), T. ghanense (3), T. hamatum (3), T. longibrachiatum (2), T. atroviride (2), and T. viride (1). All species were found to occur in potting media samples, while five Trichoderma species were recovered from the cultivated soils and four from the uncultivated soils. AFLP analysis of the 52 Trichoderma isolates produced 52 genotypes and 993 polymorphic loci. Low to moderate levels of genetic diversity were found within populations of Trichoderma species (H = 0.0780 to 0.2208). Analysis of Molecular Variance indicated the presence of very low levels of genetic differentiation (Fst = 0.0002 to 0.0139) among populations of the same Trichoderma species obtained from the potting media, cultivated soil and uncultivated soil. The study provides evidence for occurrence of Trichoderma isolates in soil with no previous history of cultivation. The lack of genetic differentiation among Trichoderma populations from potting media, cultivated soil and uncultivated soil suggests that some factors could have been responsible for moving Trichoderma propagules among the three substrates. The study reports for the first time the presence of 4 Trichoderma species in Oman: T

  18. Forensic Comparison of Soil Samples Using Nondestructive Elemental Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uitdehaag, Stefan; Wiarda, Wim; Donders, Timme; Kuiper, Irene

    2017-07-01

    Soil can play an important role in forensic cases in linking suspects or objects to a crime scene by comparing samples from the crime scene with samples derived from items. This study uses an adapted ED-XRF analysis (sieving instead of grinding to prevent destruction of microfossils) to produce elemental composition data of 20 elements. Different data processing techniques and statistical distances were evaluated using data from 50 samples and the log-LR cost (Cllr ). The best performing combination, Canberra distance, relative data, and square root values, is used to construct a discriminative model. Examples of the spatial resolution of the method in crime scenes are shown for three locations, and sampling strategy is discussed. Twelve test cases were analyzed, and results showed that the method is applicable. The study shows how the combination of an analysis technique, a database, and a discriminative model can be used to compare multiple soil samples quickly. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  19. Analysis of partitioning of organic compounds and proteins in aqueous polyethylene glycol-sodium sulfate aqueous two-phase systems in terms of solute-solvent interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Nuno R; Ferreira, Luisa A; Madeira, Pedro P; Teixeira, José A; Uversky, Vladimir N; Zaslavsky, Boris Y

    2015-10-09

    Partition behavior of nine small organic compounds and six proteins was examined in poly(ethylene glycol)-8000-sodium sulfate aqueous two-phase systems containing 0.5M osmolyte (sorbitol, sucrose, trehalose, TMAO) and poly(ethylene glycol)-10000-sodium sulfate system, all in 0.01M sodium phosphate buffer, pH 6.8. The differences between the solvent properties of the coexisting phases (solvent dipolarity/polarizability, hydrogen bond donor acidity, and hydrogen bond acceptor basicity) were characterized with solvatochromic dyes using the solvatochromic comparison method. Differences between the electrostatic properties of the phases were determined by analysis of partitioning of sodium salts of dinitrophenylated (DNP-) amino acids with aliphatic alkyl side-chain. It was found out that the partition coefficient of all compounds examined (including proteins) may be described in terms of solute-solvent interactions. The results obtained in the study show that solute-solvent interactions of nonionic organic compounds and proteins in polyethylene glycol-sodium sulfate aqueous two-phase system differ from those in polyethylene glycol-dextran system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Analysis of the Blasting Compaction on Gravel Soil

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    Qingwen Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The settlement control is critical for the safety of road based on high filled embankment. The traditional construction methods have the characteristic with less soil thickness compacted at a time. There are many advantages to compact the gravel soil with blasting. The cavity in soil is formed by blasting and its fillings to form a composite foundation for the embankment. The field data show this composite foundation can meet the requirement of loading and settlement control with less construction time. In geotechnical blasting, the high temperature due to blasting will swell the material around, so its worthy to do the coupled analysis with thermal mechanics (TM and blasting compaction in the high filled embankment. In this paper, a 3D model is built with FLAC3D to simulate a single hole to predict the range and degree of thermal propagation. Then, the thermal strains got from the model are used to estimate the displacement of surrounding soil to predict the degree of compaction and optimize the distribution of blast holes in plan.

  1. Analysis of Microbial Diversity in Soil under Ginger Cultivation

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    Yiqing Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ginger is a perennial monocotyledonous herb, which can be used as both a vegetable and a medicinal plant. However, it is susceptible to various plant pathogens. Microbial diversity in soil is related closely to the health and productivity of plant crops including ginger. In the current study, we compared microbial diversity from soil samples under ginger cultivation (disease incidence of >50% [relatively unhealthy sample] versus disease incidence of <10% [relatively healthy sample]. The bacterial and fungal taxa were analyzed by Illumina-based sequencing, with 16S and ITS identification, respectively. Both bacterial and fungal OTUs were significantly more in the healthy soil sample than the unhealthy sample. Moreover, the dominant bacterial and fungal genera were detected to be different in each sample. Rhodanobacter and Kaistobacter were the dominant bacterial genera in the healthy sample, while Rhodoplanes and Bradyrhizobium were the dominant genera in the unhealthy sample. For fungal analysis, Cladosporium, Cryptococcus, and Tetracladium were the dominant genera in the healthy sample, while Lecanicillium, Pochonia, and Rhodotorula were the dominant genera in the unhealthy sample. Collectively, the basic information of microbial diversity in ginger soil is helpful for elucidating the ginger-microbe interactions and potentially selecting suitable plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and biocontrol agents for ginger production.

  2. Analysis of the response of soil water to climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauenroth, W.K.I.; Burke, K.I.C.; Coffin, D.P. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States))

    1994-06-01

    We used a daily time step soil water model to investigate the potential effects of changes in temperature and precipitation on soil water dynamics in the central grassland region of the U.S.. We collected 20-years of driving variable data from each of 300 USGS weather stations throughout the region. Simulations were run for each station and the results were entered into a GIS database for analysis and display. Soil water patterns under current climatic conditions reflected the large scale west-east precipitation and south-north temperature gradients. Bare soil evaporation accounted for a large proportion of water loss in the driest areas and was replaced by canopy interception in the wettest areas. Transpiration water loss reflected the regional pattern of net primary production, highest in the warm and wet areas and lowest in the warm and dry areas. Increased temperature affected both evaporation and transpiration losses largely by increasing the length of time when evaporative demand of the atmospheric was high. Increases and decreases in precipitation affected water supply directly. Interactions between changes in elevated temperature and increased or decreased precipitation depended upon the balance of changes in water supply and demand.

  3. Molecular Analysis of the Diversity of Sulfate-Reducing and Sulfur-Oxidizing Prokaryotes in the Environment, Using aprA as Functional Marker Gene▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Birte; Kuever, Jan

    2007-01-01

    The dissimilatory adenosine-5′-phosposulfate reductase is a key enzyme of the microbial sulfate reduction and sulfur oxidation processes. Because the alpha- and beta-subunit-encoding genes, aprBA, are highly conserved among sulfate-reducing and sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes, they are most suitable for molecular profiling of the microbial community structure of the sulfur cycle in environment. In this study, a new aprA gene-targeting assay using a combination of PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis is presented. The screening of sulfate-reducing and sulfur-oxidizing reference strains as well as the analyses of environmental DNA from diverse habitats (e.g., microbial mats, invertebrate tissue, marine and estuarine sediments, and filtered hydrothermal water) by the new primer pair revealed an improved microbial diversity coverage and less-pronounced template-to-PCR product bias in direct comparison to those of the previously published primer set (B. Deplancke, K. R. Hristova, H. A. Oakley, V. J. McCracken, R. Aminov, R. I. Mackie, and H. R. Gaskins, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 66:2166-2174, 2000). The concomitant molecular detection of sulfate-reducing and sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes was confirmed. The new assay was applied in comparison with the 16S rRNA gene-based analysis to investigate the microbial diversity of the sulfur cycle in sediment, seawater, and manganese crust samples from four study sites in the area of the Lesser Antilles volcanic arc, Caribbean Sea (Caribflux project). The aprA gene-based approach revealed putative sulfur-oxidizing Alphaproteobacteria of chemolithoheterotrophic lifestyle to have been abundant in the nonhydrothermal sediment and water column. In contrast, the sulfur-based microbial community that inhabited the surface of the volcanic manganese crust was more complex, consisting predominantly of putative chemolithoautotrophic sulfur oxidizers of the Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. PMID:17921272

  4. Molecular analysis of the diversity of sulfate-reducing and sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes in the environment, using aprA as functional marker gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Birte; Kuever, Jan

    2007-12-01

    The dissimilatory adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate reductase is a key enzyme of the microbial sulfate reduction and sulfur oxidation processes. Because the alpha- and beta-subunit-encoding genes, aprBA, are highly conserved among sulfate-reducing and sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes, they are most suitable for molecular profiling of the microbial community structure of the sulfur cycle in environment. In this study, a new aprA gene-targeting assay using a combination of PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis is presented. The screening of sulfate-reducing and sulfur-oxidizing reference strains as well as the analyses of environmental DNA from diverse habitats (e.g., microbial mats, invertebrate tissue, marine and estuarine sediments, and filtered hydrothermal water) by the new primer pair revealed an improved microbial diversity coverage and less-pronounced template-to-PCR product bias in direct comparison to those of the previously published primer set (B. Deplancke, K. R. Hristova, H. A. Oakley, V. J. McCracken, R. Aminov, R. I. Mackie, and H. R. Gaskins, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 66:2166-2174, 2000). The concomitant molecular detection of sulfate-reducing and sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes was confirmed. The new assay was applied in comparison with the 16S rRNA gene-based analysis to investigate the microbial diversity of the sulfur cycle in sediment, seawater, and manganese crust samples from four study sites in the area of the Lesser Antilles volcanic arc, Caribbean Sea (Caribflux project). The aprA gene-based approach revealed putative sulfur-oxidizing Alphaproteobacteria of chemolithoheterotrophic lifestyle to have been abundant in the nonhydrothermal sediment and water column. In contrast, the sulfur-based microbial community that inhabited the surface of the volcanic manganese crust was more complex, consisting predominantly of putative chemolithoautotrophic sulfur oxidizers of the Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria.

  5. Metagenomic analysis of a Southern Maritime Antarctic soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Anthony Pearce

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Our current understanding of Antarctic soils is derived from direct culture on selective media, biodiversity studies based on clone library construction and analysis, quantitative PCR amplification of specific gene sequences and the application of generic microarrays for microbial community analysis. Here, we investigated the biodiversity and functional potential of a soil community at Mars Oasis on Alexander Island in the southern Maritime Antarctic, by applying 454 pyrosequencing technology to a metagenomic library constructed from soil genomic DNA. The results suggest that the commonly cited range of phylotypes used in clone library construction and analysis of 78-730 OTUs (de-replicated to 30-140 provides low coverage of the major groups present (~5%. The vast majority of functional genes (>77% were for structure, carbohydrate metabolism and DNA/RNA processing and modification. This study suggests that prokaryotic diversity in Antarctic terrestrial environments appears to be limited at the generic level, with Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria being common. Cyanobacteria were surprisingly under-represented at 2.6% of sequences, although ~1% of the genes identified were involved in CO2 fixation. At the sequence level there appeared to be much greater heterogeneity, and this might be due to high divergence within the relatively restricted lineages which have successfully colonized Antarctic terrestrial environments.

  6. Mercury in Fish from a Sulfate-Amended Wetland Mesocosm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, S.M.

    2003-05-29

    This study used an experimental model of a constructed wetland to evaluate the risk of mercury methylation when the soil is amended with sulfate. The model was planted with Schoenoplectus californicus, and the sediments were varied during construction to provide a control and two levels of sulfate treatment.

  7. Evaluating zinc isotope fractionation under sulfate reducing conditions using a flow-through cell and in situ XAS analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamieson-Hanes, Julia H.; Shrimpton, Heather K.; Veeramani, Harish; Ptacek, Carol J.; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Newville, Matthew; Blowes, David W. (Glasgow); (UC); (Waterloo)

    2017-04-01

    A flow-through cell experiment was conducted to evaluate Zn isotope fractionation during ZnS precipitation under microbially-mediated sulfate-reducing conditions. Synthetic groundwater containing 0.90 mM Zn was pumped through a cell containing creek sediment that was biostimulated to promote sulfate reducing conditions. Real-time, in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was applied at the Zn K-edge to collect spectra via a Kapton® window in the front of the cell over the course of the experiment. Aqueous effluent samples were collected and analysed to determine concentrations of anions and cations, and Zn isotope ratios. The flow rate was increased step-wise during the experiment to modify the residence time and produce changes in the extent of sulfate reduction, which in turn controlled the extent of ZnS precipitation. Greater enrichment in the heavier isotope in the aqueous phase relative to the input solution was associated with more extensive Zn removal. A Rayleigh curve was fit to the isotope data, where ε = -0.27 ± 0.06‰ (2σ). Evaluation of Zn isotope fractionation under controlled flow conditions is critical to improve the efficacy of this powerful analytical technique when applied to natural systems or remediation projects in the field.

  8. Soil [N] modulates soil C cycling in CO2-fumigated tree stands : A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieleman, W. I J; Luyssaert, S.; Rey, A.; de Angelis, P.; Barton, C. V M; Broadmeadow, M. S J; Broadmeadow, S. B.; Chigwerewe, K. S.; Crookshanks, M.; Dufrêne, E.; Jarvis, P.G.; Kasurinen, A.; Kellomäki, S.; Le Dantec, V.; Liberloo, M.; Marek, M.; Medlyn, B.E.; Pokornỳ, R.; Scarascia-Mugnozza, G.; Temperton, V. M.; Tingey, D.; Urban, O.; Ceulemans, R.; Janssens, Ivan A.

    2010-01-01

    Under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations, soil carbon (C) inputs are typically enhanced, suggesting larger soil C sequestration potential. However, soil C losses also increase and progressive nitrogen (N) limitation to plant growth may reduce the CO2 effect on soil C inputs with time. We

  9. An Historical Perspective on the Theory and Practice of Soil Mechanical Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, W. P.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Traces the history of soil mechanical analysis. Evaluates this history in order to place current concepts in perspective, from both a research and teaching viewpoint. Alternatives to traditional separation techniques for use in soils teaching laboratories are discussed. (TW)

  10. SMEX02 Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN) Station 2031, Ames, Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This work is part of the Soil Moisture Experiment (SMEX) project. This data set provides data from various sensors on the Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN)...

  11. Crystal-Chemical Analysis of Soil at Rocknest, Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, S. M.; Downs, R. T.; Blake, D. F.; Bish, D. L.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Yen, A. S.; Chipera, S. J.; Treiman, A. H.; Vaniman, D. T.; hide

    2013-01-01

    The CheMin instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity performed X-ray diffraction analysis on Martian soil [1] at Rocknest in Gale Crater. In particular, crystalline phases from scoop 5 were identified and analyzed with the Rietveld method [2]. Refined unit-cell parameters are reported in Table 1. Comparing these unit-cell parameters with those in the literature provides an estimate of the chemical composition of the crystalline phases. For instance, Fig. 1 shows the Mg-content of Fa-Fo olivine as a function of the b unit-cell parameter using literature data. Our refined b parameter is indicated by the black triangle.

  12. A multisite and multi-model analysis of random errors in soil CO2 efflux across soil water conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueva, A.; Bahn, M.; Pumpanen, J.; Vargas, R.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change is suggested to influence patterns of precipitation and water availability around the world and these changes are likely to alter ecosystem carbon fluxes. An important component of the ecosystem carbon balance is the efflux of CO2 from soils to the atmosphere, which is strongly influenced by soil moisture and temperature. The increasing application of automated systems is resulting in growing datasets of continuous measurements, which offer the possibility of a consistent uncertainty analysis. Recently, soil CO2 efflux has been frequently estimated from soil CO2 profiling by using the gradient flux method, which is based on the Fick's first law of diffusion, reporting only the measure value, without taking in account systematic and random errors. Improvements in technology and constant equipment calibration can minimize systematic errors; therefore we focused on random errors whose characteristics are generally unknown for soil CO2 efflux. Here, we characterized random errors in soil CO2 effluxes determined with two approaches based on the gradient flux method to calculate soil CO2 efflux in three different types of ecosystems across different soil water conditions. Results showed that random errors tend to differ between approaches. While the two tested models have a similar representation of physical process and input parameters, random errors are distributed differently across the different ranges of soil water content. Differences between random errors are likely to be larger in extreme conditions of soil water content (i.e., dry and wet) suggesting the need for improvement in understanding the biophysical process driving soil CO2 efflux under these conditions.

  13. Analysis of microbiological and physiochemical properties of top soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of disposing municipal waste on soil was evaluated by analyzing the microbiological and enzyme activity of soil samples at three different locations, from five municipal waste dumpsites and compared with soil samples from a farmland which serves as the control. Soil microbial load, physicochemical parameters ...

  14. Neutron-stimulated gamma ray analysis of soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chapter will discuss methods to use gamma rays to measure elements in soil. In regard to land management, there is a need to develop a non-destructive, non-contact, in-situ method of determining soil elements distributed in a soil volume or on soil surface. A unique method having all of above ...

  15. [Factors affecting activation and transference of soil colloidal phosphorus and related analysis technologies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Liang, Xin-qiang; Fu, Chao-dong; Zhu, Si-rui; Zhang, Yi-xiang; Ji, Yuan-jing

    2015-04-01

    Colloids play a key role in the transference process of phosphorus (P) in soil. Activation and transference of soil colloidal phosphorus have great effect on soil P pool and the surrounding water quality. This paper summarized the current studies on soil colloidal P, discussing the effects of the various factors (e. g., soil physical and chemical properties, fertilization, rainfall and soil amendments) on the transference of soil colloidal P. Some advanced analysis technologies (e.g., flow field-flow fractionation, transmission electron microscope-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, X-ray absorption near-edge structure and nuclear magnetic resonance) and methods of reducing soil colloidal P were also involved. This review would provide important information on the mechanism of soil colloidal P transference.

  16. Fractal analysis of extra-embryonic vessels of chick embryos under the effect of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Lins Borba, Fernanda Katharine; Felix, Giovanni Loos Queiroz; Costa, Edbhergue Ventura Lola; Silva, Lisie; Dias, Paulo Fernando; de Albuquerque Nogueira, Romildo

    2016-05-01

    Like heparan sulfate proteoglycans, some monosaccharides and glycosaminoglycans, such as sulfated glucosamine (GS) and chondroitin (CS), integrate the vascular extracellular matrix and may influence vascular endothelial cell growth. To assess the effects of these substances on blood vessel formation, we used the chick yolk sac membrane (YSM) model and fractal geometry quantification, which provided an objective in vivo method for testing potential agents that promote vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. An image processing method was developed to evaluate YSM capillary vessels after they were implanted in a methylcellulose disk of GS or CS at a concentration between 0.001-0.1mg/disk (performed on 2-day old embryos). This method resulted in a binary image of the microvascular network (white vessels on a black background). Fractal box-counting (DBC) and information (DINF) dimensions were used to quantify the activity of GS and CS in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. YSM treated with GS (0.001-0.1mg) and CS (0.03-0.1mg) showed an increase in fractal dimensions that corresponded to vitelline vessel growth compared to the control group (vehicle), with GS displaying higher fractal dimension values. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. SPATIAL ANALYSIS OF SOIL IN COIMBATORE FOR GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING PURPOSES

    OpenAIRE

    Gandhimathi. A.; Arumairaj. P. D; Lakshmi Priya. L; Meenambal. T.

    2010-01-01

    An adequate knowledge of the soil at a site proposed for a new structure is essential. The selection of type of foundation and its performance depend on the characteristics of underlying soil. The depth at which the foundation can be laid, the allowable bearing pressure of soil and swell potential of the soil are the three important parameters carried out to asses the general suitability of the site for construction. A Soil Characteristics Prediction Model(SCPM) is developed to estimate the a...

  18. Hyperspectral Imaging Analysis for the Classification of Soil Types and the Determination of Soil Total Nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengyao Jia

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil is an important environment for crop growth. Quick and accurately access to soil nutrient content information is a prerequisite for scientific fertilization. In this work, hyperspectral imaging (HSI technology was applied for the classification of soil types and the measurement of soil total nitrogen (TN content. A total of 183 soil samples collected from Shangyu City (People’s Republic of China, were scanned by a near-infrared hyperspectral imaging system with a wavelength range of 874–1734 nm. The soil samples belonged to three major soil types typical of this area, including paddy soil, red soil and seashore saline soil. The successive projections algorithm (SPA method was utilized to select effective wavelengths from the full spectrum. Pattern texture features (energy, contrast, homogeneity and entropy were extracted from the gray-scale images at the effective wavelengths. The support vector machines (SVM and partial least squares regression (PLSR methods were used to establish classification and prediction models, respectively. The results showed that by using the combined data sets of effective wavelengths and texture features for modelling an optimal correct classification rate of 91.8%. could be achieved. The soil samples were first classified, then the local models were established for soil TN according to soil types, which achieved better prediction results than the general models. The overall results indicated that hyperspectral imaging technology could be used for soil type classification and soil TN determination, and data fusion combining spectral and image texture information showed advantages for the classification of soil types.

  19. Shortwave radiative forcing, rapid adjustment, and feedback to the surface by sulfate geoengineering: analysis of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project G4 scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashimura, Hiroki; Abe, Manabu; Watanabe, Shingo; Sekiya, Takashi; Ji, Duoying; Moore, John C.; Cole, Jason N. S.; Kravitz, Ben

    2017-03-01

    This study evaluates the forcing, rapid adjustment, and feedback of net shortwave radiation at the surface in the G4 experiment of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project by analysing outputs from six participating models. G4 involves injection of 5 Tg yr-1 of SO2, a sulfate aerosol precursor, into the lower stratosphere from year 2020 to 2069 against a background scenario of RCP4.5. A single-layer atmospheric model for shortwave radiative transfer is used to estimate the direct forcing of solar radiation management (SRM), and rapid adjustment and feedbacks from changes in the water vapour amount, cloud amount, and surface albedo (compared with RCP4.5). The analysis shows that the globally and temporally averaged SRM forcing ranges from -3.6 to -1.6 W m-2, depending on the model. The sum of the rapid adjustments and feedback effects due to changes in the water vapour and cloud amounts increase the downwelling shortwave radiation at the surface by approximately 0.4 to 1.5 W m-2 and hence weaken the effect of SRM by around 50 %. The surface albedo changes decrease the net shortwave radiation at the surface; it is locally strong (˜ -4 W m-2) in snow and sea ice melting regions, but minor for the global average. The analyses show that the results of the G4 experiment, which simulates sulfate geoengineering, include large inter-model variability both in the direct SRM forcing and the shortwave rapid adjustment from change in the cloud amount, and imply a high uncertainty in modelled processes of sulfate aerosols and clouds.

  20. LandSoil, a model for evaluating soil erosion on mid-term agricultural landscape evolution: Sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampalini, R.; Cheviron, B.; Follain, S.; Le Bissonnais, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Soil-landscape evolution modelling is a widespread research topic; many models have been developed to analyse space-time dynamics in soil redistribution processes. Such modelling presumes both to use precision input data and affordable models able to model different land use scenarios and climatic variations. Based on this context, we tested the LandSoil model (Landscape design for Soil conservation under soil use and climate change) for sensitivity analysis. This model is designed for the analysis of agricultural landscape evolution at a fine spatial resolution scale [1-10 meters] and a mid-term temporal scale [10-100 years]. It is spatially distributed, event-based, and considers water and tillage erosion processes. Specificity of the model is to have dynamic representation of the agricultural landscape with a monthly representation of soil surface properties and to account for the climate component directly in rainfall events. Sensitivity analysis (SA) is a classical tool for the evaluation of the model's reaction to the different input variables. We investigated local SA of the model to rainfall inputs, related hydrological fluxes and specific erosion parameters responsible for diffusion and concentrated soil erosion. Tests analysed multiple combinations of rain amounts and intensities, as well as different runoff conditions within the soil parameter space using the one-at-a-time and Latin-Hypercube resampling methods. Sensitivity to spatial distributions of erosion parameters was calculated as an index of numerical spread of soil loss results obtained at the outlet of virtual catchment endowed with a fixed flow network. The study furnished a ranking of the parameters' sensitivity and provides evidence that some discontinuities in response are due to the non-linearity in parameterisations.

  1. FTIR and ESEM Analysis of soil moisture Microscopic conservation feature with liquid membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Jian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquid membrane applied in soil has a good soil moisture conservation and evaporation suppression performance. Application of spectrum analysis technology to understand its structure and micro morphological characteristics will be help to reveal the soil moisture conservation mechanism of liquid membrane. In this paper, we used the three types of liquid membrane as the research object based on the laboratory preparation, with infrared spectrometer (FTIR and environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM as the means, analysis the soil moisture mechanism of liquid membrane. The results showed that the -OH between the CMC and PVA generated intermolecular hydrogen bonds, the formation of hydrogen bonds between molecules of the two components strengthened the two-phase’s compatibility, increasing the liquid membrane’s effective groups and forming a dense mesh structure.ESEM observation showed that liquid membrane can effectively cementing soil particles, generating the soil-membrane structure, reducing soil moisture to evaporate, improve soil moisture conservation performance.

  2. Soil-specific limitations for access and analysis of soil microbial communities by metagenomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lombard, Nathalie; Prestat, Emmanuel; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Simonet, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    Metagenomics approaches represent an important way to acquire information on the microbial communities present in complex environments like soil. However, to what extent do these approaches provide us with a true picture of soil microbial diversity? Soil is a challenging environment to work with.

  3. [Relationships between soil and rocky desertification in typical karst mountain area based on redundancy analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jian; Liao, Hong-Kai; Li, Juan; Chen, Cai-Yun

    2012-06-01

    Redundancy analysis (RDA) was employed to reveal the relationships between soil and rocky desertification through vegetation investigation and analysis of soil samples collected in typical karst mountain area of southwest Guizhou Province. The results showed that except TP, TK and ACa, all other variables including SOC, TN, MBC, ROC, DOC, available nutrients and basal respiration showed significant downward trends during the rocky desertification process. RDA results showed significant correlations between different types of desertification and soil variables, described as non-degraded > potential desertification > light desertification > moderate desertification > severe desertification. Moreover, RDA showed that using SOC, TN, AN, and BD as soil indicators, 74.4% of the variance information on soil and rocky desertification could be explained. Furthermore, the results of correlation analysis showed that soil variables were significantly affected by surface vegetation. Considering the ecological function of the aboveground vegetation and the soil quality, Zanthoxylum would be a good choice for restoration of local vegetation in karst mountain area.

  4. Soils as an indicator of forest health: a guide to the collection, analysis, and interpretation of soil indicator data in the Forest Inventory and Analysis program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katherine P O' Neill; Michael C. Amacher; Charles H. Perry

    2005-01-01

    Documents the types of data collected as part of the Forest Inventory and Analysis soil indicator, the field and laboratory methods used, and the rationale behind these data collection procedures. Guides analysts and researchers on incorporating soil indicator data into reports and research studies.

  5. The ceric sulfate dosimeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergbakke, Erling

    1970-01-01

    The process employed for the determination of absorbed dose is the reduction of ceric ions to cerous ions in a solution of ceric sulfate and cerous sulfate in 0.8N sulfuric acid: Ce4+→Ce 3+ The absorbed dose is derived from the difference in ceric ion concentration before and after irradiation...

  6. Advanced Seismic Fragility Modeling using Nonlinear Soil-Structure Interaction Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolisetti, Chandu [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Coleman, Justin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Talaat, Mohamed [Simpson-Gupertz & Heger, Waltham, MA (United States); Hashimoto, Philip [Simpson-Gupertz & Heger, Waltham, MA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The goal of this effort is to compare the seismic fragilities of a nuclear power plant system obtained by a traditional seismic probabilistic risk assessment (SPRA) and an advanced SPRA that utilizes Nonlinear Soil-Structure Interaction (NLSSI) analysis. Soil-structure interaction (SSI) response analysis for a traditional SPRA involves the linear analysis, which ignores geometric nonlinearities (i.e., soil and structure are glued together and the soil material undergoes tension when the structure uplifts). The NLSSI analysis will consider geometric nonlinearities.

  7. Proteomic analysis of acute responses to copper sulfate stress in larvae of the brine shrimp, Artemia sinica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qian; Wu, Changgong; Dong, Bo; Li, Fuhua; Liu, Fengqi; Xiang, Jianhai

    2010-03-01

    Proteomics was used to reveal the differential protein expression profiles of acute responses to copper sulfate exposure in larvae of Artemia sinica. Fourteen differentially displayed protein spots were detected and seven of them were identified. Three spots were up-expressed and identified: actin, heat shock protein 70, and chaperone subunit 1; three down-regulated proteins were identified: arginine kinase, elongation factor-2, and glycine-rich protein; and a newly expressed protein was identified as peroxiredoxin. The study indicates the involvement of all the differentially expressed proteins in the early responses of protein expression, and in the survival of A. sinica in the presence of copper and other heavy metals; the findings improve understanding of the organism’s adaptive responses and resistance.

  8. Heparan sulfate biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Multhaupt, Hinke A B; Couchman, John R

    2012-01-01

    Heparan sulfate is perhaps the most complex polysaccharide known from animals. The basic repeating disaccharide is extensively modified by sulfation and uronic acid epimerization. Despite this, the fine structure of heparan sulfate is remarkably consistent with a particular cell type. This suggests...... that the synthesis of heparan sulfate is tightly controlled. Although genomics has identified the enzymes involved in glycosaminoglycan synthesis in a number of vertebrates and invertebrates, the regulation of the process is not understood. Moreover, the localization of the various enzymes in the Golgi apparatus has......-quality resolution of the distribution of enzymes. The EXT2 protein, which when combined as heterodimers with EXT1 comprises the major polymerase in heparan sulfate synthesis, has been studied in depth. All the data are consistent with a cis-Golgi distribution and provide a starting point to establish whether all...

  9. Soil residue analysis and degradation of saflufenacil as affected by moisture content and soil characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Edinalvo R; Senseman, Scott A; Haney, Richard L; Guice, John B; McCauley, Garry N

    2013-12-01

    Saflufenacil dissipation in soils under different moisture conditions is not available in the scientific literature. The objective of this study was to evaluate saflufenacil degradation and persistence in soils from rice regions under field capacity (non-flooded) and saturated (flooded) conditions. The accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) residue analytical method developed to conduct the study resulted in recovery greater than 80% for the combinations of soils and moisture conditions. Saflufenacil degradation was faster at field capacity for all soils, except for Morey soil. Herbicide half-life was 28.6, 15.0 and 23.1 days under field capacity treatments and 58.8, 36.9 and 79.7 under saturated conditions for Nada, Crowley and Gilbert soils respectively. A half-life no longer than 80 days was observed for the combination of soils and moisture treatments. An ASE method was developed and used to extract saflufenacil from soil samples. Half-life averaged among soils was 59 and 33 days for saturated and field capacity respectively. Saflufenacil persistence in the environment was 2-3 times longer under flooded conditions for most of the soils studied. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. SMEX03 Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN): Georgia

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains measurements taken during the Soil Moisture Experiment 2003 (SMEX03) from 1 June 2003 to 31 July 2003 from sensors at the Soil Climate...

  11. Analysis on soil compressibility changes of samples stabilized with lime

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elena-Andreea CALARASU; Cornelia - Florentina DOBRESCU

    2016-01-01

    .... Taking into account the major significance of soil compressibility on construction durability and safety, the soil stabilization with a binder like lime is considered one of the most used and traditional methods...

  12. Analysis on soil compressibility changes of samples stabilized with lime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena-Andreea CALARASU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to manage and control the stability of buildings located on difficult foundation soils, several techniques of soil stabilization were developed and applied worldwide. Taking into account the major significance of soil compressibility on construction durability and safety, the soil stabilization with a binder like lime is considered one of the most used and traditional methods. The present paper aims to assess the effect of lime content on soil geotechnical parameters, especially on compressibility ones, based on laboratory experimental tests, for several soil categories in admixture with different lime dosages. The results of this study indicate a significant improvement of stabilized soil parameters, such as compressibility and plasticity, in comparison with natural samples. The effect of lime stabilization is related to an increase of soil structure stability by increasing the bearing capacity.

  13. Temporal changes of soil physic-chemical properties at different soil depths during larch afforestation by multivariate analysis of covariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Mei; Wang, Wen-Jie; Chen, Huanfeng; Zhang, Zhonghua; Mao, Zijun; Zu, Yuan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Soil physic-chemical properties differ at different depths; however, differences in afforestation-induced temporal changes at different soil depths are seldom reported. By examining 19 parameters, the temporal changes and their interactions with soil depth in a large chronosequence dataset (159 plots; 636 profiles; 2544 samples) of larch plantations were checked by multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA). No linear temporal changes were found in 9 parameters (N, K, N:P, available forms of N, P, K and ratios of N: available N, P: available P and K: available K), while marked linear changes were found in the rest 10 parameters. Four of them showed divergent temporal changes between surface and deep soils. At surface soils, changing rates were 262.1 g·kg−1·year−1 for SOM, 438.9 mg·g−1·year−1 for C:P, 5.3 mg·g−1·year−1 for C:K, and −3.23 mg·cm−3·year−1 for bulk density, while contrary tendencies were found in deeper soils. These divergences resulted in much moderated or no changes in the overall 80-cm soil profile. The other six parameters showed significant temporal changes for overall 0–80-cm soil profile (P: −4.10 mg·kg−1·year−1; pH: −0.0061 unit·year−1; C:N: 167.1 mg·g−1·year−1; K:P: 371.5 mg·g−1 year−1; N:K: −0.242 mg·g−1·year−1; EC: 0.169 μS·cm−1·year−1), but without significant differences at different soil depths (P > 0.05). Our findings highlight the importance of deep soils in studying physic-chemical changes of soil properties, and the temporal changes occurred in both surface and deep soils should be fully considered for forest management and soil nutrient balance. PMID:24772281

  14. Image analysis of dye stained patterns in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogner, Christina; Trancón y Widemann, Baltasar; Lange, Holger

    2013-04-01

    Quality of surface water and groundwater is directly affected by flow processes in the unsaturated zone. In general, it is difficult to measure or model water flow. Indeed, parametrization of hydrological models is problematic and often no unique solution exists. To visualise flow patterns in soils directly dye tracer studies can be done. These experiments provide images of stained soil profiles and their evaluation demands knowledge in hydrology as well as in image analysis and statistics. First, these photographs are converted to binary images classifying the pixels in dye stained and non-stained ones. Then, some feature extraction is necessary to discern relevant hydrological information. In our study we propose to use several index functions to extract different (ideally complementary) features. We associate each image row with a feature vector (i.e. a certain number of image function values) and use these features to cluster the image rows to identify similar image areas. Because images of stained profiles might have different reasonable clusterings, we calculate multiple consensus clusterings. An expert can explore these different solutions and base his/her interpretation of predominant flow mechanisms on quantitative (objective) criteria. The complete workflow from reading-in binary images to final clusterings has been implemented in the free R system, a language and environment for statistical computing. The calculation of image indices is part of our own package Indigo, manipulation of binary images, clustering and visualization of results are done using either build-in facilities in R, additional R packages or the LATEX system.

  15. Subcritical water extractor for Mars analog soil analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Grunthaner, Frank J; Patrick, Steven B; Yung, Pun To

    2008-06-01

    Abstract Technologies that enable rapid and efficient extraction of biomarker compounds from various solid matrices are a critical requirement for the successful implementation of in situ chemical analysis of the martian regolith. Here, we describe a portable subcritical water extractor that mimics multiple organic solvent polarities by tuning the dielectric constant of liquid water through adjustment of temperature and pressure. Soil samples, collected from the Yungay region of the Atacama Desert (martian regolith analogue) in the summer of 2005, were used to test the instrument's performance. The total organic carbon was extracted from the samples at concentrations of 0.2-55.4 parts per million. The extraction data were compared to the total organic carbon content in the bulk soil, which was determined via a standard analytical procedure. The instrument's performance was examined over the temperature range of 25-250 degrees C at a fixed pressure of 20.7 MPa. Under these conditions, water remains in a subcritical fluid state with a dielectric constant varying between approximately 80 (at 25 degrees C) and approximately 30 (at 250 degrees C).

  16. Analysis on Soil Seed Bank Diversity Characteristics and Its Relation with Soil Physical and Chemical Properties after Substrate Addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mengxuan; Lv, Lingyue; Li, Hongyuan; Meng, Weiqing; Zhao, Na

    2016-01-01

    Considered as an essential measure in the application of soil seed bank (SSB) projects, the mixing of substrate and surface soil can effectively improve soil condition. This research is aimed at exploring the diversity characteristics of SSBs and the relationships between SSBs and soil properties. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) was adopted to describe the ordination of SSBs on soil properties' gradients; multiple linear regressions were adopted to analyze the relationship between average growth height and soil properties, density and soil properties. Experimental groups of mixed substrate (the mixture of organic and inorganic substrates) had high diversity indexes, especially the Shannon-Wiener Index compared with those of single substrate. Meanwhile, a higher number of species and increased density were also noted in those of mixed substrate. The best test group, No.16, had the highest diversity indexes with a Shannon-Wiener of 1.898, Simpson of 0.633 and Pielou of 0.717, and also showed the highest density of 14000 germinants /m2 and 21 species. In addition, an improvement of the soil's chemical and physical properties was noted when the substrates were mixed. The mixed substrate of turfy soil and perlite could effectively enhance the soil moisture content, whilst a mixed substrate of rice husk carbon and vermiculite could improve the content of available potassium (AK) and phosphorus (AP) and strengthen soil fertility. The germinated plants also reflected obvious regularities of ordination on soil factor gradients. Three distinct cluster groups were presented, of which the first cluster was distributed in an area with a relatively higher content of AK and AP; the second cluster was distributed at places with relatively higher soil moisture content; and the third cluster of plants didn't show any obvious relationship with soil physical and chemical properties. Through CCA analysis, AK and AP were considered the most important soil factors to influence

  17. The potential of lacquer-peel soil profiles for palaeo-geochemical analysis using XRF analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnoldussen, Stijn; van Os, B.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the suitability of hand-held XRF analysis to extract palaeo-geochemical information from lacquer-peel soil sections that have been taken to document pedological information at geological and archaeological sites. This not only allows the study of sections from archaeological and

  18. Evaluating Soil Moisture and Textural Relationships Using Regression Analysis,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    atmosphere, without adding any more water. 6 Daniel Hillel, Soil and Water, Physical Properties and Processes, Acedemic Press, New York, 1971. 7P. J. Salter...the time-consuming efforts associated with tile growth and stress of a standard plant in the soils under consideration. The soil water retained at

  19. application of multilinear regression analysis in modeling of soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Windows User

    shown in Table 6. Basically, there are two soil classification systems often use for engineering purposes. The Unified Soil Classification System (USCS) which is basically, used for virtually all geotechnical engineering work except road construction and highway, but the AASHTO soil classification system is used for both.

  20. Analysis of soil chemical parameters of an uncleaned crude oil spill ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis of soil chemical parameters of an uncleaned crude oil spill site at Biara was carried out. Soil samples were collected at 0 -15 cm and 15 – 30 cm soil depths from both polluted and unpolluted sites for analysis. Significant increase in high total hydrocarbon content (1015±80.5 – 1150±90.1 mg/kg) in polluted site was ...

  1. Remote analysis of planetary soils: X-ray diffractometer development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    A system is described suitable for remote low power mineralogical analysis of lunar, planetary, or asteroid soils. It includes an X-ray diffractometer, fluorescence spectrometer, and sample preparation system. A one Curie Fe-55 source provides a monochromatic X-ray beam of 5.9 keV. Seeman-Bohlin or focusing geometry is employed in the camera, allowing peak detection to proceed simultaneously at all angles and obviating the need for moving parts. The detector system is an array of 500-600 proportional counters with a wire-spacing of 1 mm. An electronics unit comprising preamplifier, postamplifier, window discriminators, and storage flipflops requiring only 3.5 milliwatts was designed and tested. Total instrument power is less than 5 watts. Powder diffraction patterns using a flat breadboard multiwire counter were recorded.

  2. Analysis of soil radon data in earthquake precursory studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Prasad Jaishi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Soil radon data were recorded at two selected sites along Mat fault in Mizoram (India, which lies in the highest seismic zone in India. The study was carried out during July 2011 to May 2013 using LR-115 Type II films. Precursory changes in radon concentration were observed prior to some earthquakes that occurred around the measuring sites. Positive correlation was found between the measured radon data and the seismic activity in the region. Statistical analysis of the radon data together with the meteorological parameters was done using Multiple Regression Method. Results obtained show that the method employed was useful for removing the effect of meteorological parameters and to identify radon maxima possibly caused by seismic activity.

  3. Soil quality, theory and applications. a critical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Buondonno

    Full Text Available In its common meaning, the concept of “soil quality” is based on evaluating criteria that are subjective and “anthropocentric” rather than objective and “pedocentric”. Several “desirable” or “undesirable” soil conditions and characteristics are considered from the human point of view, disregarding the pedogenetic features. Such an approach perilously leads to support the idea of a “pedogenetic discrimination”, which a priori privileges “superior” vs. “inferior” soils, thus discrediting a large part of soil Subgroups, Great Groups, Suborders, and even whole taxonomic Orders. So, a number of soil functions, such as genic reserve guarantee of space-temporal bio-diversity, environmental good cradle of civilization, foundation of the landscape, as well as upholder of man heritage, are neglected at all. If “quality” only concerned rich and fertile soils, there would be the great and looming risk to definitively take “poor” soils away from agriculture, landscape and global pedological reserve. It is necessary to reconsider the concept of “soil quality” as “soil functionality”, that is to say “aptitude of soil to express its own potential”, bringing out the essential environmental, socio-economic and cultural soil roles on the basis of the inherent conditions and characteristics arising from its peculiar pedogenetic history.

  4. Challenges in Bulk Soil Sampling and Analysis for Vapor Intrusion Screening of Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    This draft Engineering Issue Paper discusses technical issues with monitoring soil excavations for VOCs and describes options for such monitoring as part of a VI pathway assessment at sites where soil excavation is being considered or used as part of the remedy for VOC-contaminat...

  5. Community structure analysis of soil ammonia oxidizers during vegetation restoration in southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yueming; He, Xunyang; Liang, Shichu; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiangbi; Feng, Shuzheng; Su, Yirong

    2014-03-01

    Soil ammonia oxidizers play a critical role in nitrogen cycling and ecological restoration. The composition and structure of soil ammonia oxidizers and their impacting factors were studied in four typical ecosystem soils, tussock (T), shrub (S), secondary forest (SF), and primary forest (PF), during vegetation restoration in the Karst region of Southwest China. The composition and structure of the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) communities were characterized by sequencing the amoA and arch-amoA genes, respectively. The diversity of soil ammonia oxidizers (except in S) and plant Shannon diversity index gradually increased with vegetation restoration, and the ammonia oxidizer communities differed significantly (p soils. AOB Nitrosospira cluster 3b only appeared in PF and SF soils, while Nitrosospira cluster 3a species were found in all soils. Changes in AOB paralleled the changes in soil ammonium content that occurred with vegetation restoration. Redundancy analysis showed that the distribution of dominant AOB species was linked to pH, soil urease activity, and soil C/N ratio, whereas the distribution of dominant AOA species was mainly influenced by litter nitrogen content and C/N ratio. These results suggested that the composition and structure of the AOB community were more sensitive to changes in vegetation and soil ammonium content, and may be an important indicator of nitrogen availability in Karst ecosystem soils. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Using soil function evaluation in multi-criteria decision analysis for sustainability appraisal of remediation alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volchko, Yevheniya; Norrman, Jenny; Rosén, Lars; Bergknut, Magnus; Josefsson, Sarah; Söderqvist, Tore; Norberg, Tommy; Wiberg, Karin; Tysklind, Mats

    2014-07-01

    Soil contamination is one of the major threats constraining proper functioning of the soil and thus provision of ecosystem services. Remedial actions typically only address the chemical soil quality by reducing total contaminant concentrations to acceptable levels guided by land use. However, emerging regulatory requirements on soil protection demand a holistic view on soil assessment in remediation projects thus accounting for a variety of soil functions. Such a view would require not only that the contamination concentrations are assessed and attended to, but also that other aspects are taking into account, thus addressing also physical and biological as well as other chemical soil quality indicators (SQIs). This study outlines how soil function assessment can be a part of a holistic sustainability appraisal of remediation alternatives using multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA). The paper presents a method for practitioners for evaluating the effects of remediation alternatives on selected ecological soil functions using a suggested minimum data set (MDS) containing physical, biological and chemical SQIs. The measured SQIs are transformed into sub-scores by the use of scoring curves, which allows interpretation and the integration of soil quality data into the MCDA framework. The method is demonstrated at a study site (Marieberg, Sweden) and the results give an example of how soil analyses using the suggested MDS can be used for soil function assessment and subsequent input to the MCDA framework. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Forensic confirmatory analysis of ethyl sulfate--a new marker for alcohol consumption--by liquid-chromatography/electrospray ionization/tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresen, Sebastian; Weinmann, Wolfgang; Wurst, Friedrich Martin

    2004-11-01

    Ethyl sulfate (EtS)--a new direct marker for ethanol intake besides ethyl glucuronide (EtG) and others--was detected in urine samples by electrospray ionization tandem mass-spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). Ethyl sulfate sodium salt was used for method development, yielding a precursor [M - H]- m/z 125 and product ions m/z 97 [HSO4]- and m/z 80 [SO3]-. Pentadeuterated EtS (D5-EtS) was synthesized by esterification of sulfuric acid with anhydrous hexadeutero ethanol ([M - H]- m/z 130, product ions m/z 98 [DSO4]- and m/z 80 [SO3]-). After addition of D5-EtS and D5-EtG, urine samples were analyzed by direct injection into the gradient LC-MS/MS system. Analysis was performed in accordance with forensic guidelines for confirmatory analysis using one precursor and two product ions. EtS has been detected (in addition to EtG) in the urine samples of nine volunteers after drinking sparkling wine containing between 9 and 49 g of ethanol. Both EtS and EtG could be detected up to 36 h after consumption of alcohol. The excretion profile was found to be similar to that of EtG. No EtS was found in teetotalers' urine samples. Method validation parameters are presented. EtS was stable in urine upon storage up to twenty days at room temperature. In addition to EtG, EtS can be used to detect recent alcohol consumption, thus providing a second marker for the time range of up to approximately one day after elimination of ethanol from urine samples. The determination of EtS can be used in addition to EtG as proof of ethanol consumption in workplace monitoring programs.

  8. Evaluation of PLS, LS-SVM, and LWR for quantitative spectroscopic analysis of soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil testing requires the analysis of large numbers of samples in laboratory that are often time consuming and expensive. Mid-infrared spectroscopy (mid-IR) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) are fast, non-destructive, and inexpensive analytical methods that have been used for soil analysis, in l...

  9. Application of the pulsed fast/thermal neutron method for soil elemental analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil science is a research field where physic concepts and experimental methods are widely used, particularly in agro-chemistry and soil elemental analysis. Different methods of analysis are currently available. The evolution of nuclear physics (methodology and instrumentation) combined with the ava...

  10. Dust emission parameterization scheme over the MENA region: Sensitivity analysis to soil moisture and soil texture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherboudj, Imen; Beegum, S. Naseema; Marticorena, Beatrice; Ghedira, Hosni

    2015-10-01

    The mineral dust emissions from arid/semiarid soils were simulated over the MENA (Middle East and North Africa) region using the dust parameterization scheme proposed by Alfaro and Gomes (2001), to quantify the effect of the soil moisture and clay fraction in the emissions. For this purpose, an extensive data set of Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity soil moisture, European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting wind speed at 10 m height, Food Agricultural Organization soil texture maps, MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, and erodibility of the soil surface were collected for the a period of 3 years, from 2010 to 2013. Though the considered data sets have different temporal and spatial resolution, efforts have been made to make them consistent in time and space. At first, the simulated sandblasting flux over the region were validated qualitatively using MODIS Deep Blue aerosol optical depth and EUMETSAT MSG (Meteosat Seciond Generation) dust product from SEVIRI (Meteosat Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager) and quantitatively based on the available ground-based measurements of near-surface particulate mass concentrations (PM10) collected over four stations in the MENA region. Sensitivity analyses were performed to investigate the effect of soil moisture and clay fraction on the emissions flux. The results showed that soil moisture and soil texture have significant roles in the dust emissions over the MENA region, particularly over the Arabian Peninsula. An inversely proportional dependency is observed between the soil moisture and the sandblasting flux, where a steep reduction in flux is observed at low friction velocity and a gradual reduction is observed at high friction velocity. Conversely, a directly proportional dependency is observed between the soil clay fraction and the sandblasting flux where a steep increase in flux is observed at low friction velocity and a gradual increase is

  11. Comparative analysis of metagenomes of Italian top soil improvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigliucci, Federica; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Tozzoli, Rosangela; Michelacci, Valeria; Morabito, Stefano

    2017-05-01

    Biosolids originating from Municipal Waste Water Treatment Plants are proposed as top soil improvers (TSI) for their beneficial input of organic carbon on agriculture lands. Their use to amend soil is controversial, as it may lead to the presence of emerging hazards of anthropogenic or animal origin in the environment devoted to food production. In this study, we used a shotgun metagenomics sequencing as a tool to perform a characterization of the hazards related with the TSIs. The samples showed the presence of many virulence genes associated to different diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes as well as of different antimicrobial resistance-associated genes. The genes conferring resistance to Fluoroquinolones was the most relevant class of antimicrobial resistance genes observed in all the samples tested. To a lesser extent traits associated with the resistance to Methicillin in Staphylococci and genes conferring resistance to Streptothricin, Fosfomycin and Vancomycin were also identified. The most represented metal resistance genes were cobalt-zinc-cadmium related, accounting for 15-50% of the sequence reads in the different metagenomes out of the total number of those mapping on the class of resistance to compounds determinants. Moreover the taxonomic analysis performed by comparing compost-based samples and biosolids derived from municipal sewage-sludges treatments divided the samples into separate populations, based on the microbiota composition. The results confirm that the metagenomics is efficient to detect genomic traits associated with pathogens and antimicrobial resistance in complex matrices and this approach can be efficiently used for the traceability of TSI samples using the microorganisms' profiles as indicators of their origin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Soil Stress-Strain Behavior: Measurement, Modeling and Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Ling, Hoe I; Leshchinsky, Dov; Koseki, Junichi; A Collection of Papers of the Geotechnical Symposium in Rome

    2007-01-01

    This book is an outgrowth of the proceedings for the Geotechnical Symposium in Roma, which was held on March 16 and 17, 2006 in Rome, Italy. The Symposium was organized to celebrate the 60th birthday of Prof. Tatsuoka as well as honoring his research achievement. The publications are focused on the recent developments in the stress-strain behavior of geomaterials, with an emphasis on laboratory measurements, soil constitutive modeling and behavior of soil structures (such as reinforced soils, piles and slopes). The latest advancement in the field, such as the rate effect and dynamic behavior of both clay and sand, behavior of modified soils and soil mixtures, and soil liquefaction are addressed. A special keynote paper by Prof. Tatsuoka is included with three other keynote papers (presented by Prof. Lo Presti, Prof. Di Benedetto, and Prof. Shibuya).

  13. Model analysis of mechanisms controlling pneumatic soil vapor extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høier, Camilla Kruse; Sonnenborg, Torben Obel; Jensen, Karsten Høgh

    2009-01-01

    The efficiency of traditional soil venting or soil vapor extraction (SVE) highly depends on the architecture of the subsurface because imposed advective air flow tends to bypass low-permeable contaminated areas. Pneumatic SVE is a technique developed to enhance remediation efficiency of heterogen......The efficiency of traditional soil venting or soil vapor extraction (SVE) highly depends on the architecture of the subsurface because imposed advective air flow tends to bypass low-permeable contaminated areas. Pneumatic SVE is a technique developed to enhance remediation efficiency...... of heterogeneous soils by enforcing large fluctuating pressure fronts through the contaminated area. Laboratory experiments have suggested that pneumatic SVE considerably improves the recovery rate from low-permeable units. We have analyzed the experimental results using a numerical code and quantified...... level the pneumatic venting technology is superior to the traditional technique, and that the method is particularly efficient in cases where large permeability contrasts exist between soil units in the subsurface....

  14. Direct Sulfation of Limestone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Guilin; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Wedel, Stig

    2007-01-01

    The direct sulfation of limestone was studied in a laboratory fixed-bed reactor. It is found that the direct sulfation of limestone involves nucleation and crystal grain growth of the solid product (anhydrite). At 823 K and at low-conversions (less than about 0.5 %), the influences of SO2, O-2...... and CO2 on the direct sulfation of limestone corresponds to apparent reaction orders of about 0.2, 0.2 and -0.5, respectively. Water is observed to promote the sulfation reaction and increase the apparent reaction orders of SO2 and O-2. The influence of O-2 at high O-2 concentrations (> about 15...... %) becomes negligible. In the temperature interval from 723 K to 973 K, an apparent activation energy of about 104 kJ/mol is observed for the direct sulfation of limestone. At low temperatures and low conversions, the sulfation process is most likely under mixed control by chemical reaction and solid...

  15. Image Analysis and Classification Based on Soil Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Based on Soil Strength Co ld R eg io ns R es ea rc h an d En gi ne er in g La bo ra to ry Ariana M. Sopher, Sally A. Shoop, Jesse M...delineation, forestry, geology , and landslide potential. However, image classification for physical properties of surface soils, such as strength or...wetland delineation, forestry, geology , and landslide potential. However, image classification for physical properties of surface soils, such as

  16. Distribution of nitrogen ammonium sulfate ({sup 15}N) soil-plant system in a no-tillage crop succession; Distribuicao do nitrogenio do sulfato de amonio ({sup 15}N) no sistema solo-planta, em uma sucessao de culturas, sob sistema plantio direto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Flavia Carvalho da Silva, E-mail: flcsfernandes@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Maringa - Campus de Umuarama, PR (Brazil); Libardi, Paulo Leonel, E-mail: pllibard@esalq.usp.br [Departamento de Engenharia de Biossistemas, Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2012-05-15

    the n use by maize (Zea mays, l.) is affected by n-fertilizer levels. this study was conducted using a sandy-clay texture soil (Hapludox) to evaluate the efficiency of n use by maize in a crop succession, based on {sup 15}N labeled ammonium sulfate (5.5 atom %) at different rates, and to assess the residual fertilizer effect in two no-tillage succession crops (signal grass and corn). Two maize crops were evaluated, the first in the growing season 2006, the second in 2007, and brachiaria in the second growing season. The treatments consisted of n rates of 60, 120 and 180 kg ha{sup -1}in the form of labeled {sup 15}N ammonium sulfate. This fertilizer was applied in previously defined subplots, only to the first maize crop (growing season 2006). The variables total accumulated n; fertilizer-derived n in corn plants and pasture; fertilizer-derived n in the soil; and recovery of fertilizer-n by plants and soil were evaluated.The highest uptake of fertilizer n by corn was observed after application of 120 kg ha{sup -1}N and the residual effect of n fertilizer on subsequent corn and brachiaria was highest after application of 180 kg ha{sup -1}N. After the crop succession, soil n recovery was 32, 23 and 27 % for the respective applications of 60, 120 and 180 kg ha{sup -1}N. (author)

  17. Growth performance and root transcriptome remodeling of Arabidopsis in response to Mars-like levels of magnesium sulfate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M Visscher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Martian regolith (unconsolidated surface material is a potential medium for plant growth in bioregenerative life support systems during manned missions on Mars. However, hydrated magnesium sulfate mineral levels in the regolith of Mars can reach as high as 10 wt%, and would be expected to be highly inhibitory to plant growth. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Disabling ion transporters AtMRS2-10 and AtSULTR1;2, which are plasma membrane localized in peripheral root cells, is not an effective way to confer tolerance to magnesium sulfate soils. Arabidopsis mrs2-10 and sel1-10 knockout lines do not mitigate the growth inhibiting impacts of high MgSO(4.7H(2O concentrations observed with wildtype plants. A global approach was used to identify novel genes with potential to enhance tolerance to high MgSO(4.7H(2O (magnesium sulfate stress. The early Arabidopsis root transcriptome response to elevated concentrations of magnesium sulfate was characterized in Col-0, and also between Col-0 and the mutant line cax1-1, which was confirmed to be relatively tolerant of high levels of MgSO(4.7H(2O in soil solution. Differentially expressed genes in Col-0 treated for 45 min. encode enzymes primarily involved in hormone metabolism, transcription factors, calcium-binding proteins, kinases, cell wall related proteins and membrane-based transporters. Over 200 genes encoding transporters were differentially expressed in Col-0 up to 180 min. of exposure, and one of the first down-regulated genes was CAX1. The importance of this early response in wildtype Arabidopsis is exemplified in the fact that only four transcripts were differentially expressed between Col-0 and cax1-1 at 180 min. after initiation of treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results provide a solid basis for the understanding of the metabolic response of plants to elevated magnesium sulfate soils; it is the first transcriptome analysis of plants in this environment. The results foster

  18. Growth performance and root transcriptome remodeling of Arabidopsis in response to Mars-like levels of magnesium sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visscher, Anne M; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Kirst, Matias; Guy, Charles L; Schuerger, Andrew C; Ferl, Robert J

    2010-08-23

    Martian regolith (unconsolidated surface material) is a potential medium for plant growth in bioregenerative life support systems during manned missions on Mars. However, hydrated magnesium sulfate mineral levels in the regolith of Mars can reach as high as 10 wt%, and would be expected to be highly inhibitory to plant growth. Disabling ion transporters AtMRS2-10 and AtSULTR1;2, which are plasma membrane localized in peripheral root cells, is not an effective way to confer tolerance to magnesium sulfate soils. Arabidopsis mrs2-10 and sel1-10 knockout lines do not mitigate the growth inhibiting impacts of high MgSO(4).7H(2)O concentrations observed with wildtype plants. A global approach was used to identify novel genes with potential to enhance tolerance to high MgSO(4).7H(2)O (magnesium sulfate) stress. The early Arabidopsis root transcriptome response to elevated concentrations of magnesium sulfate was characterized in Col-0, and also between Col-0 and the mutant line cax1-1, which was confirmed to be relatively tolerant of high levels of MgSO(4).7H(2)O in soil solution. Differentially expressed genes in Col-0 treated for 45 min. encode enzymes primarily involved in hormone metabolism, transcription factors, calcium-binding proteins, kinases, cell wall related proteins and membrane-based transporters. Over 200 genes encoding transporters were differentially expressed in Col-0 up to 180 min. of exposure, and one of the first down-regulated genes was CAX1. The importance of this early response in wildtype Arabidopsis is exemplified in the fact that only four transcripts were differentially expressed between Col-0 and cax1-1 at 180 min. after initiation of treatment. The results provide a solid basis for the understanding of the metabolic response of plants to elevated magnesium sulfate soils; it is the first transcriptome analysis of plants in this environment. The results foster the development of Mars soil-compatible plants by showing that cax1 mutants exhibit

  19. Analysis of Soil Structure Turnover with Garnet Particles and X-Ray Microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlüter, Steffen; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2017-04-01

    Matter turnover in soil is tightly linked to soil structure which governs the heterogeneous distribution of habitats, reaction sites and pathways in soil. Thereby, the temporal dynamics of soil structure alteration is deemed to be important for essential ecosystem functions of soil but very little is known about it. A major reason for this knowledge gap is the lack of methods to study soil structure turnover directly at microscopic scales. Here we devise a conceptual approach and an image processing workflow to study soil structure turnover by labeling some initial state of soil structure with small garnet particles and tracking their fate with X-ray microtomography. The particles adhere to aggregate boundaries at the beginning of the experiment but gradually change their position relative to the nearest pore as structure formation progresses and pores are destructed or newly formed. A new metric based on the contact distances between particles and pores is proposed that allows for a direct quantification of soil structure turnover rates. The methodology is tested for two case studies: (1) soil compaction of a silty loam soil in steps of 1.1, 1.3 and 1.5 g/cm3 and (2) wetting/drying cycles at different bulk densities in the same soil. We demonstrate that the analysis of mean contact distances provides genuinely new insights about changing diffusion pathways that cannot be inferred neither from conventional pore space attributes (porosity, mean pore size, pore connectivity) nor from deformation analysis with digital image correlation. This structure labeling approach to quantify soil structure turnover provides a direct analogy to stable isotope labeling for the analysis of matter turnover and can be readily combined with each other.

  20. Surface water sulfate dynamics in the northern Florida Everglades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongqing; Waldon, Michael G; Meselhe, Ehab A; Arceneaux, Jeanne C; Chen, Chunfang; Harwell, Matthew C

    2009-01-01

    Sulfate contamination has been identified as a serious environmental issue in the Everglades ecosystem. However, it has received less attention compared to P enrichment. Sulfate enters the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge), a remnant of the historic Everglades, in pumped stormwater discharges with a mean concentration of approximately 50 mg L(-1), and marsh interior concentrations at times fall below a detection limit of 0.1 mg L(-1). In this research, we developed a sulfate mass balance model to examine the response of surface water sulfate in the Refuge to changes in sulfate loading and hydrological processes. Meanwhile, sulfate removal resulting from microbial sulfate reduction in the underlying sediments of the marsh was estimated from the apparent settling coefficients incorporated in the model. The model has been calibrated and validated using long-term monitoring data (1995-2006). Statistical analysis indicated that our model is capable of capturing the spatial and temporal variations in surface water sulfate concentrations across the Refuge. This modeling work emphasizes the fact that sulfate from canal discharge is impacting even the interior portions of the Refuge, supporting work by other researchers. In addition, model simulations suggest a condition of sulfate in excess of requirement for microbial sulfate reduction in the Refuge.

  1. Analysis of field-scale spatial correlations and variations of soil nutrients using geostatistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruimin; Xu, Fei; Yu, Wenwen; Shi, Jianhan; Zhang, Peipei; Shen, Zhenyao

    2016-02-01

    Spatial correlations and soil nutrient variations are important for soil nutrient management. They help to reduce the negative impacts of agricultural nonpoint source pollution. Based on the sampled available nitrogen (AN), available phosphorus (AP), and available potassium (AK), soil nutrient data from 2010, the spatial correlation, was analyzed, and the probabilities of the nutrient's abundance or deficiency were discussed. This paper presents a statistical approach to spatial analysis, the spatial correlation analysis (SCA), which was originally developed for describing heterogeneity in the presence of correlated variation and based on ordinary kriging (OK) results. Indicator kriging (IK) was used to assess the susceptibility of excess of soil nutrients based on crop needs. The kriged results showed there was a distinct spatial variability in the concentration of all three soil nutrients. High concentrations of these three soil nutrients were found near Anzhou. As the distance from the center of town increased, the concentration of the soil nutrients gradually decreased. Spatially, the relationship between AN and AP was negative, and the relationship between AP and AK was not clear. The IK results showed that there were few areas with a risk of AN and AP overabundance. However, almost the entire study region was at risk of AK overabundance. Based on the soil nutrient distribution results, it is clear that the spatial variability of the soil nutrients differed throughout the study region. This spatial soil nutrient variability might be caused by different fertilizer types and different fertilizing practices.

  2. Development of soil-structure interaction analysis method (II) - Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S. P.; Ko, H. M.; Park, H. K. and others [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-02-15

    This project includes following six items : free field analysis for the determination of site input motions, impedance analysis which simplifies the effects of soil-structure interaction by using lumped parameters, soil-structure interaction analysis including the material nonlinearity of soil depending on the level of strains, strong geometric nonlinearity due to the uplifting of the base, seismic analysis of underground structure such as varied pipes, seismic analysis of liquid storage tanks. Each item contains following contents respectively : state-of-the-art review on each item and data base construction on the past researches, theoretical review on the technology of soil-structure interaction analysis, proposing preferable technology and estimating the domestic applicability, proposing guidelines for evaluation of safety and analysis scheme.

  3. Mathematical Model and Analysis of Negative Skin Friction of Pile Group in Consolidating Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Gangqiang Kong; Hanlong Liu; Qing Yang; Robert Y. Liang; Hang Zhou

    2013-01-01

    In order to calculate negative skin friction (NSF) of pile group embedded in a consolidating soil, the dragload calculating formulas of single pile were established by considering Davis one-dimensional nonlinear consolidation soils settlement and hyperbolic load-transfer of pile-soil interface. Based on effective influence area theory, a simple semiempirical mathematical model of analysis for predicting the group effect of pile group under dragload was described. The accuracy and reliability ...

  4. Soil nitrous oxide emissions following crop residue addition: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huaihai; Li, Xuechao; Hu, Feng; Shi, Wei

    2013-10-01

    Annual production of crop residues has reached nearly 4 billion metric tons globally. Retention of this large amount of residues on agricultural land can be beneficial to soil C sequestration. Such potential impacts, however, may be offset if residue retention substantially increases soil emissions of N(2)O, a potent greenhouse gas and ozone depletion substance. Residue effects on soil N(2)O emissions have gained considerable attention since early 1990s; yet, it is still a great challenge to predict the magnitude and direction of soil N(2)O emissions following residue amendment. Here, we used a meta-analysis to assess residue impacts on soil N(2)O emissions in relation to soil and residue attributes, i.e., soil pH, soil texture, soil water content, residue C and N input, and residue C : N ratio. Residue effects were negatively associated with C : N ratios, but generally residue amendment could not reduce soil N(2)O emissions, even for C : N ratios well above ca. 30, the threshold for net N immobilization. Residue effects were also comparable to, if not greater than, those of synthetic N fertilizers. In addition, residue effects on soil N(2)O emissions were positively related to the amounts of residue C input as well as residue effects on soil CO(2) respiration. Furthermore, most significant and stimulatory effects occurred at 60-90% soil water-filled pore space and soil pH 7.1-7.8. Stimulatory effects were also present for all soil textures except sand or clay content ≤10%. However, inhibitory effects were found for soils with >90% water-filled pore space. Altogether, our meta-analysis suggests that crop residues played roles beyond N supply for N(2)O production. Perhaps, by stimulating microbial respiration, crop residues enhanced oxygen depletion and therefore promoted anaerobic conditions for denitrification and N(2)O production. Our meta-analysis highlights the necessity to connect the quantity and quality of crop residues with soil properties for predicting

  5. The chemical analysis of soils for identification of dispersivity

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maharaj, A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The dispersivity of clay soils in water and its influence on the stability of engineered structures has been a topic of serious concern in civil projects for many years. One of the main problems is the difficulty in positively identifying such soils...

  6. Analysis, fate and effects of the antibiotic sulfadiazine in soil.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schauss, K.; Focks, A.; Heuer, H.; Kotzerke, A.; Schmitt, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831042; Thiele-Bruhn, S.; Smalla, K.; Wilke, B.M.; Matthies, M.

    2009-01-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge about the interplay between fate and effects of the antibiotic sulfadiazine in soil ecosystems. In applying manure from antibiotic-treated animals to arable soils, sulfadiazine can reach the environment, but fate and transformation processes and the

  7. Preface, Soil Science: A step-by-step analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book provides step-by-step procedures for soil professionals, without a lot of background theory. Chapters are targeted toward agricultural and environmental consultants, producers, students, teachers, government, and industry. Applied soil scientists gave input through a survey, which guided t...

  8. 511 Spatial Analysis of Soil Fertility Using Geographical Information ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-07-21

    Jul 21, 2011 ... Abstract. The research evaluated soil fertility condition of River Otamiri watershed in southeastern Nigeria in relation to topographic heterogeneity using GIS technique. GPS was used to determine the geodetic coordinate of the sampling points and site elevation. Soil samples were collected and analyzed.

  9. Functional genomic analysis identifies indoxyl sulfate as a major, poorly dialyzable uremic toxin in end-stage renal disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Jhawar

    Full Text Available Chronic renal failure is characterized by progressive renal scarring and accelerated arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease despite what is considered to be adequate hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. In rodents with reduced renal mass, renal scarring has been attributed to poorly filtered, small protein-bound molecules. The best studied of these is indoxyl sulfate (IS.We have attempted to establish whether there are uremic toxins that are not effectively removed by hemodialysis. We examined plasma from patients undergoing hemodialysis, employing global gene expression in normal human renal cortical cells incubated in pre- and post- dialysis plasma as a reporter system. Responses in cells incubated with pre- and post-dialysis uremic plasma (n = 10 were compared with responses elicited by plasma from control subjects (n = 5. The effects of adding IS to control plasma and of adding probenecid to uremic plasma were examined. Plasma concentrations of IS were measured by HPLC (high pressure liquid chromatography.Gene expression in our reporter system revealed dysregulation of 1912 genes in cells incubated with pre-dialysis uremic plasma. In cells incubated in post-dialysis plasma, the expression of 537 of those genes returned to baseline but the majority of them (1375 remained dysregulated. IS concentration was markedly elevated in pre- and post-dialysis plasma. Addition of IS to control plasma simulated more than 80% of the effects of uremic plasma on gene expression; the addition of probenecid, an organic anion transport (OAT inhibitor, to uremic plasma reversed the changes in gene expression.These findings provide evidence that hemodialysis fails to effectively clear one or more solutes that effect gene expression, in our reporter system, from the plasma of patients with uremia. The finding that gene dysregulation was simulated by the addition of IS to control plasma and inhibited by addition of an OAT inhibitor to uremic plasma identifies IS

  10. Methylmercury formation in a wetland mesocosm amended with sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, S M; King, J K; Gladden, J B; Chandler, G T; Newman, L A

    2004-01-15

    This study used an experimental model to evaluate methylmercury accumulation when the soil of a constructed wetland is amended with sulfate. The model was planted with Schoenoplectus californicus and designed to reduce wastestream metals and metal-related toxicity. The soil was varied during construction to provide a control and two sulfate treatments which were equally efficient at overall mercury and copper removal. After an initial stabilization period, methylmercury concentrations in porewater were up to three times higher in the sulfate-treated porewater (0.5-1.6 ng/L) than in the control (<0.02-0.5 ng/L). Mean percent methylmercury was 9.0% in the control with 18.5 and 16.6% in the low- and high-sulfate treatments, respectively. Methylmercury concentrations measured in mesocosm surface water did not reflect the differences between the control and the sulfate treatments that were noted in porewater. The mean bulk sediment methylmercury concentration in the top 6 cm of the low-sulfate treatment (2.33 ng/g) was significantly higher than other treatment means which ranged from 0.96 to 1.57 ng/g. Total mercury in sediment ranged from 20.8 to 33.4 ng/g, with no differences between treatments. Results suggest that the non-sulfate-amended control was equally effective in removing metals while keeping mercury methylation low.

  11. Preliminary Analysis on Matric Suction for Barren Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, A. T. S.; Fazlina, M. I. S.; Aziman, M.; Fairus, Y. M.; Azman, K.; Hazreek, Z. A. M.

    2016-11-01

    Most research conducted on slope failures can broadly be attributed to the convergence of three factors, i.e. rainfall, steepness of slope, and soil geological profile. The mechanism of the failures is mainly due to the loss of matric suction of soils by rainwater. When rainwater infiltrates into the slopes, it will start to saturate the soil, i.e., reduce the matric suction. A good understanding of landslide mechanisms and the characteristics of unsaturated soil and rock in tropical areas is crucial in landslide hazard formulation. Most of the slope failures in unsaturated tropical residual soil in Malaysia are mainly due to infiltration, especially during intense and prolonged rainfall, which reduces the soil matric suction and hence decreases the stability of the slope. Therefore, the aim of this research is to determine the matric suction for barren soil and to model an unsaturated slope with natural rainfall to evaluate the effects of matric suction on rainfall intensity. A field test was carried out using the Watermark Soil Moisture Sensor to determine the matric suction. The sensor was connected to a program called SpecWare 9 Basic which also used Data Logging Rain gauge Watermark 1120 to measure the intensity and duration of rainfall. This study was conducted at the Research Centre for Soft Soil which is a new Research and Development (R & D) initiative by Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, Parit Raja. Field observation showed that the highest daily suction was recorded during noon while the lowest suction was obtained at night and early morning. The highest matric suction for loose condition was 31.0 kPa while the highest matric suction for compacted condition was 32.4 kPa. The results implied that the field suction variation was not only governed by the rainfall, but also the cyclic evaporation process. The findings clearly indicated that the changes in soil suction distribution patterns occurred due to different weather conditions.

  12. McMaster Mesonet soil moisture dataset: description and spatio-temporal variability analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Kornelsen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces and describes the hourly, high-resolution soil moisture dataset continuously recorded by the McMaster Mesonet located in the Hamilton-Halton Watershed in Southern Ontario, Canada. The McMaster Mesonet consists of a network of time domain reflectometer (TDR probes collecting hourly soil moisture data at six depths between 10 cm and 100 cm at nine locations per site, spread across four sites in the 1250 km2 watershed. The sites for the soil moisture arrays are designed to further improve understanding of soil moisture dynamics in a seasonal climate and to capture soil moisture transitions in areas that have different topography, soil and land cover. The McMaster Mesonet soil moisture constitutes a unique database in Canada because of its high spatio-temporal resolution. In order to provide some insight into the dominant processes at the McMaster Mesonet sites, a spatio-temporal and temporal stability analysis were conducted to identify spatio-temporal patterns in the data and to suggest some physical interpretation of soil moisture variability. It was found that the seasonal climate of the Great Lakes Basin causes a transition in soil moisture patterns at seasonal timescales. During winter and early spring months, and at the meadow sites, soil moisture distribution is governed by topographic redistribution, whereas following efflorescence in the spring and summer, soil moisture spatial distribution at the forested site was also controlled by vegetation canopy. Analysis of short-term temporal stability revealed that the relative difference between sites was maintained unless there was significant rainfall (> 20 mm or wet conditions a priori. Following a disturbance in the spatial soil moisture distribution due to wetting, the relative soil moisture pattern re-emerged in 18 to 24 h. Access to the McMaster Mesonet data can be provided by visiting www.hydrology.mcmaster.ca/mesonet.

  13. Source and pathway analysis of lead and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Lisbon urban soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho Reis, Amélia Paula; Shepherd, Thomas; Nowell, Geoff; Cachada, Anabela; Duarte, Armando Costa; Cave, Mark; Wragg, Joanna; Patinha, Carla; Dias, Ana; Rocha, Fernando; da Silva, Eduardo Ferreira; Sousa, António Jorge; Prazeres, Cátia; Batista, Maria João

    2016-12-15

    One hundred soil samples were collected from urban spaces, in Lisbon, Portugal, in two surveys that were carried out in consecutive years, to assess the potential adverse human health effects following exposure to potentially toxic elements and organic compounds in the urban soils. The study hereby described follows on from the earlier work of the authors and aims at performing a source-pathway-fate analysis of lead (Pb) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the urban soils in order to increase current knowledge on factors influencing exposure of the population. Various techniques were combined to achieve the proposed goal. Geogenic and anthropogenic sources were apportioned by means of Pb isotope mixing models. Isotope data was further coupled with geographic information system mapping to assess local mixed sources of Pb and PAHs. Unleaded vehicle exhaust and cement production show the largest relative contribution to the total soil-Pb, but their respective importance depends on factors such as location and urban landscape. The primary sources of PAHs to the urban soils are probably air and land traffic. Multivariate analysis was used to investigate which soil properties could influence mobility and fate of the contaminants. Whilst principal components analysis indicates carbonates and other calcium phases as probable factors controlling the dispersion of Pb in the urban soils, the linear models obtained from stepwise multiple regression analysis show that soil phosphorous (P) and manganese (Mn) are good predictors of the total soil Pb content. No robust model was obtained for the PAHs, impeding identifying environmental factors most likely to influence their dispersion in the urban soils. The solid-phase distribution study provided critical information to untangle the, at a first glance, contradictory results obtained by the multivariate analysis. Carbonates and other calcium phases, having these a probable anthropogenic origin, are soil components

  14. Analysis of Soil Structure Turnover with Garnet Particles and X-Ray Microtomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlüter, Steffen; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Matter turnover in soil is tightly linked to soil structure which governs the heterogeneous distribution of habitats, reaction sites and pathways in soil. Thereby, the temporal dynamics of soil structure alteration is deemed to be important for essential ecosystem functions of soil but very little is known about it. A major reason for this knowledge gap is the lack of methods to study soil structure turnover directly at microscopic scales. Here we devise a conceptual approach and an image processing workflow to study soil structure turnover by labeling some initial state of soil structure with small garnet particles and tracking their fate with X-ray microtomography. The particles adhere to aggregate boundaries at the beginning of the experiment but gradually change their position relative to the nearest pore as structure formation progresses and pores are destructed or newly formed. A new metric based on the contact distances between particles and pores is proposed that allows for a direct quantification of soil structure turnover rates. The methodology is tested for a case study about soil compaction of a silty loam soil during stepwise increase of bulk density (ρ = {1.1, 1.3, 1.5} g/cm3). We demonstrate that the analysis of mean contact distances provides genuinely new insights about changing diffusion pathways that cannot be inferred neither from conventional pore space attributes (porosity, mean pore size, pore connectivity) nor from deformation analysis with digital image correlation. This structure labeling approach to quantify soil structure turnover provides a direct analogy to stable isotope labeling for the analysis of matter turnover and can be readily combined with each other.

  15. Analysis of Soil Structure Turnover with Garnet Particles and X-Ray Microtomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Schlüter

    Full Text Available Matter turnover in soil is tightly linked to soil structure which governs the heterogeneous distribution of habitats, reaction sites and pathways in soil. Thereby, the temporal dynamics of soil structure alteration is deemed to be important for essential ecosystem functions of soil but very little is known about it. A major reason for this knowledge gap is the lack of methods to study soil structure turnover directly at microscopic scales. Here we devise a conceptual approach and an image processing workflow to study soil structure turnover by labeling some initial state of soil structure with small garnet particles and tracking their fate with X-ray microtomography. The particles adhere to aggregate boundaries at the beginning of the experiment but gradually change their position relative to the nearest pore as structure formation progresses and pores are destructed or newly formed. A new metric based on the contact distances between particles and pores is proposed that allows for a direct quantification of soil structure turnover rates. The methodology is tested for a case study about soil compaction of a silty loam soil during stepwise increase of bulk density (ρ = {1.1, 1.3, 1.5} g/cm3. We demonstrate that the analysis of mean contact distances provides genuinely new insights about changing diffusion pathways that cannot be inferred neither from conventional pore space attributes (porosity, mean pore size, pore connectivity nor from deformation analysis with digital image correlation. This structure labeling approach to quantify soil structure turnover provides a direct analogy to stable isotope labeling for the analysis of matter turnover and can be readily combined with each other.

  16. Analysis of Manganese in Soil Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongcheng, J.; Jiang, H.; Benchi, J.; Dong, L.

    2017-03-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to measure spectral characteristics and to perform quantitative analysis of the concentration of manganese in soil, an issue of great concern for precision agriculture. For the analysis, soil samples were compressed into pellets and a pulsed Nd:YAG laser was employed to produce the plasma in air at atmospheric pressure. Using this approach, we analyzed the time evolution of spectral characteristics and their dependence on the laser pulse energy. A calibration curve was constructed using reference sandy soil samples collected from a farm. An internal standard curve was used to improve the accuracy of the LIBS metrology for soil analyses. The results of this analysis demonstrated the usefulness of this method for analyzing the concentration of manganese in soil.

  17. Impact of Plant Functional Types on Coherence Between Precipitation and Soil Moisture: A Wavelet Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qi; Hao, Yonghong; Stebler, Elaine; Tanaka, Nobuaki; Zou, Chris B.

    2017-12-01

    Mapping the spatiotemporal patterns of soil moisture within heterogeneous landscapes is important for resource management and for the understanding of hydrological processes. A critical challenge in this mapping is comparing remotely sensed or in situ observations from areas with different vegetation cover but subject to the same precipitation regime. We address this challenge by wavelet analysis of multiyear observations of soil moisture profiles from adjacent areas with contrasting plant functional types (grassland, woodland, and encroached) and precipitation. The analysis reveals the differing soil moisture patterns and dynamics between plant functional types. The coherence at high-frequency periodicities between precipitation and soil moisture generally decreases with depth but this is much more pronounced under woodland compared to grassland. Wavelet analysis provides new insights on soil moisture dynamics across plant functional types and is useful for assessing differences and similarities in landscapes with heterogeneous vegetation cover.

  18. Syndecan heparan sulfate proteoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomes, Angélica Maciel; Sinkeviciute, Dovile; Multhaupt, Hinke A.B.

    2016-01-01

    Virtually all animal cells express heparan sulfate proteoglycans on the cell surface and in the extracellular matrix. Syndecans are a major group of transmembrane proteoglycans functioning as receptors that mediate signal transmission from the extracellular microenvironment to the cell. Their hep......Virtually all animal cells express heparan sulfate proteoglycans on the cell surface and in the extracellular matrix. Syndecans are a major group of transmembrane proteoglycans functioning as receptors that mediate signal transmission from the extracellular microenvironment to the cell....... Their heparan sulfate chains, due to their vast structural diversity, interact with a wide array of ligands including potent regulators of adhesion, migration, growth and survival. Frequently, ligands interact with cell surface heparan sulfate in conjunction with high affinity receptors. The consequent...... signaling can therefore be complex, but it is now known that syndecans are capable of independent signaling. This review is divided in two sections, and will first discuss how the assembly of heparan sulfate, the anabolic process, encodes information related to ligand binding and signaling. Second, we...

  19. Analysis of factors controlling soil phosphorus loss with surface runoff in Huihe National Nature Reserve by principal component and path analysis methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jing; Su, Derong; Lv, Shihai; Diao, Zhaoyan; Bu, He; Wo, Qiang

    2018-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) loss with surface runoff accounts for the P input to and acceleration of eutrophication of the freshwater. Many studies have focused on factors affecting P loss with surface runoff from soils, but rarely on the relationship among these factors. In the present study, rainfall simulation on P loss with surface runoff was conducted in Huihe National Nature Reserve, in Hulunbeier grassland, China, and the relationships between P loss with surface runoff, soil properties, and rainfall conditions were examined. Principal component analysis and path analysis were used to analyze the direct and indirect effects on P loss with surface runoff. The results showed that P loss with surface runoff was closely correlated with soil electrical conductivity, soil pH, soil Olsen P, soil total nitrogen (TN), soil total phosphorus (TP), and soil organic carbon (SOC). The main driving factors which influenced P loss with surface runoff were soil TN, soil pH, soil Olsen P, and soil water content. Path analysis and determination coefficient analysis indicated that the standard multiple regression equation for P loss with surface runoff and each main factor was Y = 7.429 - 0.439 soil TN - 6.834 soil pH + 1.721 soil Olsen-P + 0.183 soil water content (r = 0.487, p < 0.01, n = 180). Soil TN, soil pH, soil Olsen P, and soil water content and the interactions between them were the main factors affecting P loss with surface runoff. The effect of physical and chemical properties of undisturbed soils on P loss with surface runoff was discussed, and the soil water content and soil Olsen P were strongly positive influences on the P loss with surface runoff.

  20. The soil indicator of forest health in the Forest Inventory and Analysis Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael C. Amacher; Charles H. Perry

    2010-01-01

    Montreal Process Criteria and Indicators (MPCI) were established to monitor forest conditions and trends to promote sustainable forest management. The Soil Indicator of forest health was developed and implemented within the USFS Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program to assess condition and trends in forest soil quality in U.S. forests regardless of ownership. The...

  1. Radiological analysis of soil samples taken by Greenpeace in Niger (Arlit and Akokan sector)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    The companies SOMAIR and COMINAK, subsidiaries of the AREVA group, are mining uranium deposits in northern Niger. In the course of a mission carried out in November 2009, a Greenpeace International team made radiation measurements in situ and took soil samples. This report includes the results of the soil analysis conducted in CRIIRAD's laboratory, along with a brief commentary

  2. Analysis Results for Lunar Soil Simulant Using a Portable X-Ray Fluorescence Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothe, R. E.

    2006-01-01

    Lunar soil will potentially be used for oxygen generation, water generation, and as filler for building blocks during habitation missions on the Moon. NASA s in situ fabrication and repair program is evaluating portable technologies that can assess the chemistry of lunar soil and lunar soil simulants. This Technical Memorandum summarizes the results of the JSC 1 lunar soil simulant analysis using the TRACeR III IV handheld x-ray fluorescence analyzer, manufactured by KeyMaster Technologies, Inc. The focus of the evaluation was to determine how well the current instrument configuration would detect and quantify the components of JSC-1.

  3. Ammonium sulfate preparation from phosphogypsum waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Hakim T. Kandil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Egyptian phosphogypsum waste is treated using sulfuric acid prior the ammonium sulfate production. The relevant factors that would affect the removal efficiencies of some impurities are studied. The optimum conditions of the treatment are 8 M sulfuric acid solution and 1/4 solid/liquid ratio for 30 min contact time at 80 °C. Moreover, the optimum conditions of the ammonium sulfate preparation are 10 g of the suspended impure or purified phosphogypsum in 40 ml of 3% ammonium sulfate solution (as initiator, 1/4 solid/liquid ratio at pH7 at an addition of an excess ammonium carbonate, and 150 rpm stirring speed for 4.0 h contact time at 55 °C as well as the 5 mg of barium chloride is added to remove the radium in the ammonium sulfate product. Finally, the ammonium sulfate is crystallized and the chemical analysis of the product shows 20% nitrogen and 23.6% sulfur. Therefore, the purity of the obtained ammonium sulfate is 95% from the purified phosphogypsum.

  4. Soil infiltration based on bp neural network and grey relational analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Juan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Soil infiltration is a key link of the natural water cycle process. Studies on soil permeability are conducive for water resources assessment and estimation, runoff regulation and management, soil erosion modeling, nonpoint and point source pollution of farmland, among other aspects. The unequal influence of rainfall duration, rainfall intensity, antecedent soil moisture, vegetation cover, vegetation type, and slope gradient on soil cumulative infiltration was studied under simulated rainfall and different underlying surfaces. We established a six factor-model of soil cumulative infiltration by the improved back propagation (BP-based artificial neural network algorithm with a momentum term and self-adjusting learning rate. Compared to the multiple nonlinear regression method, the stability and accuracy of the improved BP algorithm was better. Based on the improved BP model, the sensitive index of these six factors on soil cumulative infiltration was investigated. Secondly, the grey relational analysis method was used to individually study grey correlations among these six factors and soil cumulative infiltration. The results of the two methods were very similar. Rainfall duration was the most influential factor, followed by vegetation cover, vegetation type, rainfall intensity and antecedent soil moisture. The effect of slope gradient on soil cumulative infiltration was not significant.

  5. [Heavy metal pollution characteristics and ecological risk analysis for soil around Haining electroplating industrial park].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiong-Hui; Weng, Shan; Fang, Jing; Huang, Jia-Lei; Lu, Fang-Hua; Lu, Yu-Hao; Zhang, Hong-Ming

    2014-04-01

    The pollution status and potential ecological risks of heavy metal in soils around Haining electroplating industrial park were studied. Hakanson index approach was used to assess the ecological hazards of heavy metals in soils. Results showed that average concentrations of six heavy metals (Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, Cd and Cr) in the soils were lower than the secondary criteria of environmental quality standard for soils, indicating limited harmful effects on the plants and the environment in general. Though the average soil concentrations were low, heavy metal concentrations in six sampling points located at the side of road still exceeded the criteria, with excessive rate of 13%. Statistic analysis showed that concentrations of Cu and Cd in roadside soils were significantly higher than those in non-roadside soils, indicating that the excessive heavy metal accumulations in the soil closely related with traffic transport. The average potential ecological hazard index of soils around Haining electroplating industrial park was 46.6, suggesting a slightly ecological harm. However, the potential ecological hazard index of soils with excessive heavy metals was 220-278, suggesting the medium ecological hazards. Cd was the most seriously ecological hazard factor.

  6. Image Analysis to Estimate Mulch Residual on Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Valencia, Carmen; Moreno Valencia, Marta; Tarquis, Ana M.

    2014-05-01

    Organic farmers are currently allowed to use conventional polyethylene mulch, provided it is removed from the field at the end of the growing or harvest season. To some, such use represents a contradiction between the resource conservation goals of sustainable, organic agriculture and the waste generated from the use of polyethylene mulch. One possible solution is to use biodegradable plastic or paper as mulch, which could present an alternative to polyethylene in reducing non-recyclable waste and decreasing the environmental pollution associated with it. Determination of mulch residues on the ground is one of the basic requisites to estimate the potential of each material to degrade. Determination the extent of mulch residue on the field is an exhausting job while there is not a distinct and accurate criterion for its measurement. There are several indices for estimation the residue covers while most of them are not only laborious and time consuming but also impressed by human errors. Human vision system is fast and accurate enough in this case but the problem is that the magnitude must be stated numerically to be reported and to be used for comparison between several mulches or mulches in different times. Interpretation of the extent perceived by vision system to numerals is possible by simulation of human vision system. Machine vision comprising image processing system can afford these jobs. This study aimed to evaluate the residue of mulch materials over a crop campaign in a processing tomato (Solanum lycopersicon L.) crop in Central Spain through image analysis. The mulch materials used were standard black polyethylene (PE), two biodegradable plastic mulches (BD1 and BD2), and one paper (PP1) were compared. Meanwhile the initial appearance of most of the mulches was sort of black PE, at the end of the experiment the materials appeared somewhat discoloured, soil and/or crop residue was impregnated being very difficult to completely remove them. A digital camera

  7. Software for micromorphometric characterization of soil pores obtained from 2-D image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Cooper

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Studies of soil porosity through image analysis are important to an understanding of how the soil functions. However, the lack of a simplified methodology for the quantification of the shape, number, and size of soil pores has limited the use of information extracted from images. The present work proposes a software program for the quantification and characterization of soil porosity from data derived from 2-D images. The user-friendly software was developed in C++ and allows for the classification of pores in terms of size, shape, and combinations of size and shape. Using raw data generated by image analysis systems, the software calculates the following parameters for the characterization of soil porosity: total area of pore (Tap, number of pores, pore shape, pore shape and pore area, and pore shape and equivalent pore diameter (EqDiam. In this paper, the input file with the raw soil porosity data was generated using the Noesis Visilog 5.4 image analysis system; however other image analysis programs can be used, in which case, the input file requires a standard format to permit processing by this software. The software also shows the descriptive statistics (mean, standard deviation, variance, and the coefficient of variation of the parameters considering the total number of images evaluated. The results show that the software is a complementary tool to any analysis of soil porosity, allowing for a precise and quick analysis.

  8. Heritability and clinical determinants of serum indoxyl sulfate and p-cresyl sulfate, candidate biomarkers of the human microbiome enterotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liesbeth Viaene

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Indoxyl sulfate and p-cresyl sulfate are unique microbial co-metabolites. Both co-metabolites have been involved in the pathogenesis of accelerated cardiovascular disease and renal disease progression. Available evidence suggests that indoxyl sulfate and p-cresyl sulfate may be considered candidate biomarkers of the human enterotype and may help to explain the link between diet and cardiovascular disease burden. OBJECTIVE AND DESIGN: Information on clinical determinants and heritability of indoxyl sulfate and p-cresyl sulfate serum is non-existing. To clarify this issue, the authors determined serum levels of indoxyl sulfate and p-cresyl sulfate in 773 individuals, recruited in the frame of the Flemish Study on Environment, Genes and Health Outcomes (FLEMENGHO study. RESULTS: Serum levels of indoxyl sulfate and p-cresyl sulfate amounted to 3.1 (2.4-4.3 and 13.0 (7.4-21.5 μM, respectively. Regression analysis identified renal function, age and sex as independent determinants of both co-metabolites. Both serum indoxyl sulfate (h2 = 0.17 and p-cresyl sulfate (h2 = 0.18 concentrations showed moderate but significant heritability after adjustment for covariables, with significant genetic and environmental correlations for both co-metabolites. LIMITATIONS: Family studies cannot provide conclusive evidence for a genetic contribution, as confounding by shared environmental effects can never be excluded. CONCLUSIONS: The heritability of indoxyl sulfate and p-cresyl sulfate is moderate. Besides genetic host factors and environmental factors, also renal function, sex and age influence the serum levels of these co-metabolites.

  9. Heat and water transport in soils and across the soil-atmosphere interface: 2. Numerical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fetzer, Thomas; Vanderborght, Jan; Mosthaf, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    evaporation decreases from parts of the heterogeneous soil surface, lateral flow and transport processes in the free flow and in the porous medium generate feedbacks that enhance evaporation from wet surface areas. In the second set of simulations, we assume that the vertical fluxes do not vary considerably...... on how vapor transport in the air phase and the interaction at the interface between the free flow and porous medium were represented or parameterized. However, simulated cumulative evaporation losses from initially wet soil profiles were very similar between model concepts and mainly controlled...

  10. Characterization of soil chemical properties of strawberry fields using principal component analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gláucia Oliveira Islabão

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the largest strawberry-producing municipalities of Rio Grande do Sul (RS is Turuçu, in the South of the State. The strawberry production system adopted by farmers is similar to that used in other regions in Brazil and in the world. The main difference is related to the soil management, which can change the soil chemical properties during the strawberry cycle. This study had the objective of assessing the spatial and temporal distribution of soil fertility parameters using principal component analysis (PCA. Soil sampling was based on topography, dividing the field in three thirds: upper, middle and lower. From each of these thirds, five soil samples were randomly collected in the 0-0.20 m layer, to form a composite sample for each third. Four samples were taken during the strawberry cycle and the following properties were determined: soil organic matter (OM, soil total nitrogen (N, available phosphorus (P and potassium (K, exchangeable calcium (Ca and magnesium (Mg, soil pH (pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC at pH 7.0, soil base (V% and soil aluminum saturation(m%. No spatial variation was observed for any of the studied soil fertility parameters in the strawberry fields and temporal variation was only detected for available K. Phosphorus and K contents were always high or very high from the beginning of the strawberry cycle, while pH values ranged from very low to very high. Principal component analysis allowed the clustering of all strawberry fields based on variables related to soil acidity and organic matter content.

  11. Dynamic Analysis of Wind Turbines Including Soil-Structure Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harte, M.; Basu, B.; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2012-01-01

    blades and includes the effect of centrifugal stiffening due to rotation. The foundation of the structure is modeled as a rigid gravity based foundation with two DOF whose movement is related to the surrounding soil by means of complex impedance functions generated using cone model. Transfer functions...... for displacement of the turbine system are obtained and the modal frequencies of the combined turbine-foundation system are estimated. Simulations are presented for the MDOF turbine structure subjected to wind loading for different soil stiffness conditions. Steady state and turbulent wind loading, developed using...... blade element momentum theory and the Kaimal spectrum, have been considered. Soil stiffness and damping properties acquired from DNV/Risø standards are used as a comparison. The soil-structure interaction is shown to affect the response of the wind turbine. This is examined in terms of the turbine...

  12. [Morphometric analysis of bacteria associated with soil Myriapoda].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzev, V S; Byzov, B A

    2006-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the average cell size of bacteria associated with the digestive tract of soil Myriapoda was 0.65 microm in diameter, 1.36 microm in length, and 0.60 microm3 in volume. An example of Myriapoda illustrated that the intestinal tract bacteria of soil invertebrates shared the following features: (1) a high density level in this habitat; (2) existence mostly in the form of vegetative cells; (3) a cell size significantly smaller than that of bacteria functioning in soil; (4) a cell size closer to the lower limits of the size range characteristic for bacterial cultures grown in laboratory media. All this suggests that the bacterial community of the digestive tract differs from the typical soil community not only in composition, but also in a higher level of physiological activity.

  13. 50-Minute Experiment: Soil Analysis for High School Chemistry Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruch, Gerard, Ed.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Lists equipment and materials needed and procedures for analyzing soil, in which secondary school students experience practical applications to acid-base reactions, pH, oxidation-reduction, precipitation and solubility. (CS)

  14. Impact of roots, mycorrhizas and earthworms on soil physical properties as assessed by shrinkage analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milleret, R.; Le Bayon, R.-C.; Lamy, F.; Gobat, J.-M.; Boivin, P.

    2009-07-01

    SummarySoil biota such as earthworms, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and plant roots are known to play a major role in engineering the belowground part of the terrestrial ecosystems, thus strongly influencing the water budget and quality on earth. However, the effect of soil organisms and their interactions on the numerous soil physical properties to be considered are still poorly understood. Shrinkage analysis allows quantifying a large spectrum of soil properties in a single experiment, with small standard errors. The objectives of the present study were, therefore, to assess the ability of the method to quantify changes in soil properties as induced by single or combined effects of leek roots ( Allium porrum), AMF ( Glomus intraradices) and earthworms ( Allolobophora chlorotica). The study was performed on homogenised soil microcosms and the experiments lasted 35 weeks. The volume of the root network and the external fungal hyphae was measured at the end, and undisturbed soil cores were collected. Shrinkage analysis allowed calculating the changes in soil hydro-structural stability, soil plasma and structural pore volumes, soil bulk density and plant available water, and structural pore size distributions. Data analysis revealed different impacts of the experimented soil biota on the soil physical properties. At any water content, the presence of A. chlorotica resulted in a decrease of the specific bulk volume and the hydro-structural stability around 25%, and in a significant increase in the bulk soil density. These changes went with a decrease of the structural pore volumes at any pore size, a disappearing of the thinnest structural pores, a decrease in plant available water, and a hardening of the plasma. On the contrary, leek roots decreased the bulk soil density up to 1.23 g cm -3 despite an initial bulk density of 1.15 g cm -3. This increase in volume was accompanied with a enhanced hydro-structural stability, a larger structural pore volume at any

  15. Reference values for soil structural degradation evaluation: an approach using shrinkage analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannes, Alice; Weisskopf, Peter; Schulin, Rainer; Boivin, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    Introduction Diagnosis of soil compaction and other soil structural degradation require reference threshold values defining non-degraded soil structure versus degraded soil structure. Large-scale application, e.g. for soil protection regulation, require accurate, cost-efficient and robust methods providing meaningful information with respect to soil quality. The shrinkage curve analysis (ShC)(Braudeau et al., 2004) does not only provide relevant parameters for soil functions such as water and air content of structural porosity but also holds promises to fulfil these requirements. Our objective was to test the potential of ShC analysis to define reference values for soil structural degradation at Swiss scale. Material and Methods Agricultural soils of the most common soil order on the Swiss plateau, namely cambi-luvisol, were sampled. Undisturbed samples were collected from topsoil at 200 locations from spring 2012 to fall 2014 on a large area (240 km) across Switzerland. Three types of soil managements were represented, namely permanent pasture (PP), conventional tillage and no-till. Only soils showing no evidence of structural degradation, as assessed visually and according to a VESS score smaller than 3 (Ball et al., 2007), were sampled. Compaction, erosion, waterlogging and poor degradation of organic matter were criteria to discard sampling locations. The undisturbed soil samples were analysed for SOC, texture, CEC and ShC, from which a set of parameters defining the soil porosities and hydrostructural stability was obtained. Results and Discussion The texture properties were similar between the different soil management, with clay content ranging from 10 to 35%. SOC content ranged from 0.5 to 4.5% and was significantly larger in average for PP, though the ranges were largely overlapping amongst the 3 soil managements. ShC parameters were found to be highly determined by SOC, with the R2 of the regressions usually over 70%, regardless of soil management, large

  16. Selection of the Methods of Soil Analysis for Phyto-available Arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Junghwan; Lee, Dan-Bi; Kim, Kwon-Rae; Kim, Won-Il; Kim, Kye-Hoon

    2016-04-01

    Arsenic (As) is a trace element of major public health concern. Many of As contaminated agricultural lands in the Republic of Korea (ROK) are located at the areas nearby abandoned mines. Therefore, management of contaminated agricultural lands is important for safe crop cultivation. In ROK, soils contaminated with As have managed according to the As concentration determined after aqua regia digestion (total As). Many soil scientists reported that management of As in soils by phyto-available As is more effective than that by total As for safety of the crop cultivation point-of-view since As concentration in crops has a significant correlation with phyto-available As. Therefore, this study was carried out to select method of soil analysis for phyto-available As. For that purpose, five extracting solutions (0.1M Ca(NO?), 0.1M (NH?)?HPO?), 0.5M EDTA, Mehlich 3, 0.5M NaHCO?) were examined with 35 soil samples used for cultivation of three crops (bean, red pepper, rice). Correlation analysis was conducted between phyto-available As concentrations in soils and As concentration in edible part of the crops. Results of the correlation analysis showed that phyto-available As concentrations in soils using Mehlich 3 solution and As concentrations in edible part of red pepper and rice were significantly correlated. For soils used for bean cultivation, Mehlich 3 (R

  17. Deep soil carbon dynamics are driven more by soil type than by climate: a worldwide meta-analysis of radiocarbon profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Jordane A; Hatté, Christine; Balesdent, Jérôme; Parent, Éric

    2015-11-01

    The response of soil carbon dynamics to climate and land-use change will affect both the future climate and the quality of ecosystems. Deep soil carbon (>20 cm) is the primary component of the soil carbon pool, but the dynamics of deep soil carbon remain poorly understood. Therefore, radiocarbon activity (Δ14C), which is a function of the age of carbon, may help to understand the rates of soil carbon biodegradation and stabilization. We analyzed the published 14C contents in 122 profiles of mineral soil that were well distributed in most of the large world biomes, except for the boreal zone. With a multivariate extension of a linear mixed-effects model whose inference was based on the parallel combination of two algorithms, the expectation-maximization (EM) and the Metropolis-Hasting algorithms, we expressed soil Δ14C profiles as a four-parameter function of depth. The four-parameter model produced insightful predictions of soil Δ14C as dependent on depth, soil type, climate, vegetation, land-use and date of sampling (R2=0.68). Further analysis with the model showed that the age of topsoil carbon was primarily affected by climate and cultivation. By contrast, the age of deep soil carbon was affected more by soil taxa than by climate and thus illustrated the strong dependence of soil carbon dynamics on other pedologic traits such as clay content and mineralogy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. No-tillage lessens soil CO2 emissions the most under arid and sandy soil conditions: results from a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Khatab; Chivenge, Pauline; Ciais, Philippe; Chaplot, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    The management of agroecosystems plays a crucial role in the global carbon cycle with soil tillage leading to known organic carbon redistributions within soils and changes in soil CO2 emissions. Yet, discrepancies exist on the impact of tillage on soil CO2 emissions and on the main soil and environmental controls. A meta-analysis was conducted using 46 peer-reviewed publications totaling 174 paired observations comparing CO2 emissions over entire seasons or years from tilled and untilled soils across different climates, crop types and soil conditions with the objective of quantifying tillage impact on CO2 emissions and assessing the main controls. On average, tilled soils emitted 21 % more CO2 than untilled soils, which corresponded to a significant difference at P 3 %). Finally, nitrogen fertilization and crop residue management had little effect on the CO2 responses of soils to no-tillage. These results suggest no-tillage is an effective mitigation measure of carbon dioxide losses from dry land soils. They emphasize the importance of including information on soil factors such as texture, aggregate stability and organic carbon content in global models of the carbon cycle.

  19. Transcriptomic Analysis of Soil Grown T. aestivum cv. Root to Reveal the Changes in Expression of Genes in Response to Multiple Nutrients Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Gupta

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Deficiency of necessary macronutrients, i.e., Potassium (K, Magnesium (Mg, Nitrogen (N, Phosphorus (P, and Sulfate (S in the soil leads to a reduction in plant growth and yield, which is a result of changes in expression level of various genes. This study was performed to identify the differentially expressed genes and its associated metabolic pathways occurred in soil grown wheat root samples excavated from the control and treated fields. To identify the difference in gene expression levels due to deficiency of the said nutrients, a transcriptomic, meta-analysis was performed on array expression profile data. A set of 435 statistically significant probes encoding 398 Nutrient Deficiency Response Genes (NRGs responding at-least one nutrients deficiency (ND were identified. Out of them 55 NRGs were found to response to minimum two ND. Singular Enrichment Analysis (SEA predicts ontological based classifications and functional analysis of NRGs in different cellular/molecular pathways involved in root development and growth. Functional annotation and reaction mechanism of differentially expressed genes, proteins/enzymes in the different metabolic pathway through MapMan analysis were explored. Further the meta-analysis was performed to revels the active involvement each NRGs in distinct tissues and their comparative potential expression analysis in different stress conditions. The study results in exploring the role of major acting candidate genes such as Non-specific serine/threonine protein kinase, Xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase, Peroxides, Glycerophosphoryl diester phosphodiesterase, S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase proenzyme, Dehydrin family proteins, Transcription factors, Membrane Proteins, Metal binding proteins, Photosystem proteins, Transporter and Transferase associated in different metabolic pathways. Finally, the differences of transcriptional responses in the soil-grown root of T. aestivum cv. and in-vitro grown model plants

  20. The analysis on of the effect of urea, iron sulfate and vermicompost fertilizers on the growth characteristics and yield of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. The city Darreh Gaz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mahdiyeh zomorrodi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To study the effect of vermicompost and urea and iron sulfate fertilizers on the growth characteristics and yield of sunflower seed (Helianthus annuus L. an pediment was conducted in Darreh Gaz located in Khorasan Razavi province in 2012. Factorial experiment in a randomized complete block design with three factors and three repetition. In this experiment three levels of urea (50; 150 and 250 kg per hectare as the first factor and two level of vermicompost (7 tons per hectare consumption and non-consumption as the second factor and two iron sulfate (80 kilogram per hectare consumption and non- consumption were considered as the third factor. The results showed that the effect of urea × vermicompost treatment combination on stem height, head diameter, stem dry weight and yield was significantly at one percent probability level. The treatment combination of 250 kg. ha-1 × iron sulfate× vermicompost increased plant height, head diameter, petiole dry weight. Vermicompost × iron sulfate treatment combination on the dry weight’s leaf, petiole, stem and head were the highest significant (p≤0.01. The application of vermicompost × iron sulfate treatment combination resulted in the highest rate of stem diameter, leaf dry weight and stem the highest yield belonged to 250 kg.ha-1 × vermicompost. Iron sulfate use different amounts of urea fertilizer redact yield. The lowest yield of 250 kg.ha-1× iron sulfate was related to treatment combination. So it seems that the combined application of organic vermicompost fertilizer and urea and iron sulfate fertilizers on the growth and yield of sunflower Darreh Gaz can be effective in improving properties.

  1. Digital image analysis techniques for fiber and soil mixtures : technical summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-05-01

    This project used to innovative technologies of digital image analysis for the characterization of a material currently being considered for broad use at DOTD. The material under consideration is a mixture of fiber and soil for use in the stabilizati...

  2. Soil and sediment analysis Modoc National Wildlife Refuge Alturas Modoc County California

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report presents the results of the soil and sediment analysis activities performed at Modoc National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge), located in Alturas, Modoc County,...

  3. Static Analysis of the Interaction Among Soil, Slab and Piles in Pile-Slab Structure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xiao Hong; Gong Xiaoping; Yang Song

    2013-01-01

    .... A three-dimensional finite element model including train, track and pile-slab structure is established so as to make a systemic mechanical analysis of the slab, piles and subgrade soil in pile-slab structure...

  4. Assessment of current AASHTO LRFD methods for static pile capacity analysis in Rhode Island soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    This report presents an assessment of current AASHTO LRFD methods for static pile capacity analysis in Rhode : Island soils. Current static capacity methods and associated resistance factors are based on pile load test data in sands : and clays. Some...

  5. Computational analysis of human N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase enzyme: an update in genotype-phenotype correlation for Morquio A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olarte-Avellaneda, Sergio; Rodríguez-López, Alexander; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos Javier; Barrera, Luis Alejandro

    2014-11-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IV A (MPS IV A) is a lysosomal storage disease produced by the deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS) enzyme. Although genotype-phenotype correlations have been reported, these approaches have not enabled to establish a complete genotype-phenotype correlation, and they have not considered a ligand-enzyme interaction. In this study, we expanded the in silico evaluation of GALNS mutations by using several bioinformatics tools. Tertiary GALNS structure was modeled and used for molecular docking against galactose-6-sulfate, N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate, keratan sulfate, chondroitin-6-sulfate, and the artificial substrate 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-galactopyranoside-6-sulfate. Furthermore, we considered the evolutionary residue conservation, change conservativeness, position within GALNS structure, and the impact of amino acid substitution on the structure and function of GALNS. Molecular docking showed that amino acids involved in ligand interaction correlated with those observed in other human sulfatases, and mutations within the active cavity reduced affinity of all evaluated ligands. Combination of several bioinformatics approaches allowed to explaine 90% of the missense mutations affecting GALNS, and the prediction of the phenotype for another 21 missense mutations. In summary, we have shown for the first time a docking evaluation of natural and artificial ligands for human GALNS, and proposed an update in genotype-phenotype correlation for Morquio A, based on the use of multiple parameters to predict the disease severity.

  6. Soil hydrophysical characteristics in the Nitra river basin (Slovakia: Their monitoring, analysis, online publishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Igaz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on the purpose made, or local monitoring of areal unit of the Nitra river basin (Slovakia, Central EU with total area 4501 km2 in order to obtain the inputs on soil, moisture and hydrophysical characteristics of the given area. In this study, there was evaluated the share of individual soil texture classes in the Nitra river basin on the basis of map records and its comparison with the soil samples taken from the 111 selected sites. Soil samples were taken from two depths of soil profile (15-20 cm, 40-45 cm. The sites were chosen according to the percentage representation of individual soil texture classes. Based on the identification of sampling points localization and following analysis of granularity ratio, it can be concluded that the grain composition from the soil samplings does not correspond fully with the map records. Subsequently, drainage branches of moisture retention curves were measured for all sites Obtained hydrophysical data were enabled on the web-portal. With the use of OpenGeo Suite software, version 4.0.2 and its components Geoserver and Geoexplorer, the data on soil characteristics were published online at: http://fzki.uniag.sk/02FacultyStructure/02Departments/KBH/02Research/Hydrophysics.Thus, information about the soil characteristics in the basin is available to specialists.

  7. Aluminum Sulfate 18 Hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) of the chemical, aluminum sulfate 18 hydrate, is presented. The profile lists physical and harmful properties, exposure limits, reactivity risks, and symptoms of major exposure for the benefit of teachers and students using the chemical in the laboratory.

  8. Detecting the effects of coal mining, acid rain, and natural gas extraction in Appalachian basin streams in Pennsylvania (USA) through analysis of barium and sulfate concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xianzeng; Wendt, Anna; Li, Zhenhui; Agarwal, Amal; Xue, Lingzhou; Gonzales, Matthew; Brantley, Susan L

    2017-10-13

    To understand how extraction of different energy sources impacts water resources requires assessment of how water chemistry has changed in comparison with the background values of pristine streams. With such understanding, we can develop better water quality standards and ecological interpretations. However, determination of pristine background chemistry is difficult in areas with heavy human impact. To learn to do this, we compiled a master dataset of sulfate and barium concentrations ([SO4], [Ba]) in Pennsylvania (PA, USA) streams from publically available sources. These elements were chosen because they can represent contamination related to oil/gas and coal, respectively. We applied changepoint analysis (i.e., likelihood ratio test) to identify pristine streams, which we defined as streams with a low variability in concentrations as measured over years. From these pristine streams, we estimated the baseline concentrations for major bedrock types in PA. Overall, we found that 48,471 data values are available for [SO4] from 1904 to 2014 and 3243 data for [Ba] from 1963 to 2014. Statewide [SO4] baseline was estimated to be 15.8 ± 9.6 mg/L, but values range from 12.4 to 26.7 mg/L for different bedrock types. The statewide [Ba] baseline is 27.7 ± 10.6 µg/L and values range from 25.8 to 38.7 µg/L. Results show that most increases in [SO4] from the baseline occurred in areas with intensive coal mining activities, confirming previous studies. Sulfate inputs from acid rain were also documented. Slight increases in [Ba] since 2007 and higher [Ba] in areas with higher densities of gas wells when compared to other areas could document impacts from shale gas development, the prevalence of basin brines, or decreases in acid rain and its coupled effects on [Ba] related to barite solubility. The largest impacts on PA stream [Ba] and [SO4] are related to releases from coal mining or burning rather than oil and gas development.

  9. Multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis in examining scaling properties of the spatial patterns of soil water storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Biswas

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge about the scaling properties of soil water storage is crucial in transferring locally measured fluctuations to larger scales and vice-versa. Studies based on remotely sensed data have shown that the variability in surface soil water has clear scaling properties (i.e., statistically self similar over a wider range of spatial scales. However, the scaling property of soil water storage to a certain depth at a field scale is not well understood. The major challenges in scaling analysis for soil water are the presence of localized trends and nonstationarities in the spatial series. The objective of this study was to characterize scaling properties of soil water storage variability through multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MFDFA. A field experiment was conducted in a sub-humid climate at Alvena, Saskatchewan, Canada. A north-south transect of 624-m long was established on a rolling landscape. Soil water storage was monitored weekly between 2002 and 2005 at 104 locations along the transect. The spatial scaling property of the surface 0 to 40 cm depth was characterized using the MFDFA technique for six of the soil water content series (all gravimetrically determined representing soil water storage after snowmelt, rainfall, and evapotranspiration. For the studied transect, scaling properties of soil water storage are different between drier periods and wet periods. It also appears that local controls such as site topography and texture (that dominantly control the pattern during wet states results in multiscaling property. The nonlocal controls such as evapotranspiration results in the reduction of the degree of multiscaling and improvement in the simple scaling. Therefore, the scaling property of soil water storage is a function of both soil moisture status and the spatial extent considered.

  10. Biochar reduces N2O emissions from soils: A meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirrmann, Michael; Cayuela, Maria Luz; Fuertes-Mendizábal, Teresa; Estavillo, José-María; Ippolito, Jim; Spokas, Kurt; Novak, Jeff; Kammann, Claudia; Wrage-Mönnig, Nicole; Borchard, Nils

    2017-04-01

    Global efforts to mitigate climate change and to increase food security are challenging. Technologies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture while increasing crop yields simultaneously are not well characterized for their efficiency. For instance, biochar used to sequester carbon and to increase crop yields also alters the soil nitrogen cycle. This in turn affects N2O emissions from soil, where N2O has a higher global warming potential than emitted CO2. However, the mechanisms of biochar regarding the N2O emission process are not well understood due to complex interactions between soil organic and inorganic materials and their impact on the physical soil structure. To further understand the complex relationship, a single experimental study may not provide critical answers. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis by reviewing literature published between 2010 and 2016 that focused on N2O emission from soils amended with biochars. A meta-analysis is a quantitative technique that allows estimating an overall treatment effect from many divergent research experiments. In our case, we included 92 publications that contained a total of 437 comparisons between biochar treated soils and biochar non-treated soils. We used a random effects model and bootstrapping with 1000 intervals to estimate the general percentage increase or decrease of N2O emission through biochar amendment. Our results showed that biochar treatment leads to a significant decrease of N2O emissions between 33% and 45%. This promising result highlights the need to increase investigations to more fully assess (i) the multitude of mechanisms involved in the observed N2O emission reductions such as soil pH changes, alterations in the soil microbial community and soil N cycling, a shift in the ratio of denitrifier end products (N2O/(N2O+N2) ratio) or nitrate capture by biochar particles, and (ii) the impact of biochar characteristics, soil properties and land use types on the multiple mechanisms

  11. Removal of Sulfate Ion From AN-107 by Evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GJ Lumetta; GS Klinger; DE Kurath; RL Sell; LP Darnell; LR Greenwood; CZ Soderquist; MJ Steele; MW Urie; JJ Wagner

    2000-08-02

    Hanford low-activity waste solutions contain sulfate, which can cause accelerated corrosion of the vitrification melter and unacceptable operating conditions. A method is needed to selectively separate sulfate from the waste. An experiment was conducted to evaluate evaporation for removing sulfate ion from Tank AN-107 low-activity waste. Two evaporation steps were performed. In the first step, the volume was reduced by 55% while in the second step, the liquid volume was reduced another 22%. Analysis of the solids precipitated during these evaporations revealed that large amounts of sodium nitrate and nitrite co-precipitated with sodium sulfate. Many other waste components precipitated as well. It can be concluded that sulfate removal by precipitation is not selective, and thus, evaporation is not a viable option for removing sulfate from the AN-107 liquid.

  12. Immobilization of calcium sulfate contained in demolition waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambroise, J. [Laboratoire Genie Civil et Ingenierie Environnementale (LGCIE), Institut National des Sciences Appliquees de Lyon, Domaine Scientifique de la Doua, Batiment J. Tuset, 12, Avenue des Arts, 69 621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Pera, J. [Laboratoire Genie Civil et Ingenierie Environnementale (LGCIE), Institut National des Sciences Appliquees de Lyon, Domaine Scientifique de la Doua, Batiment J. Tuset, 12, Avenue des Arts, 69 621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)], E-mail: Jean.Pera@insa-lyon.fr

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a laboratory study undertaken to examine the treatment of demolition waste containing calcium sulfate by means of calcium sulfoaluminate clinker (CSA). The quantity of CSA necessary to entirely consume calcium sulfate was determined. Using infrared spectrometry analysis and X-ray diffraction, it was shown that calcium sulfate was entirely consumed when the ratio between CSA and calcium sulfate was 4. Standard sand was polluted by 4% calcium sulfate. Two solutions were investigated: {center_dot}either global treatment of sand by CSA, {center_dot}or immobilization of calcium sulfate by CSA, followed by the introduction of this milled mixture in standard sand. Regardless of the type of treatment, swelling was almost stabilized after 28 days of immersion in water.

  13. Integrated Analysis of Climate, Soil, Topography and Vegetative Growth in Iberian Viticultural Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Helder; Malheiro, Aureliano C.; Moutinho-Pereira, José; Cardoso, Rita M.; Soares, Pedro M. M.; Cancela, Javier J.; Pinto, Joaquim G.; Santos, João A.

    2014-01-01

    The Iberian viticultural regions are convened according to the Denomination of Origin (DO) and present different climates, soils, topography and management practices. All these elements influence the vegetative growth of different varieties throughout the peninsula, and are tied to grape quality and wine type. In the current study, an integrated analysis of climate, soil, topography and vegetative growth was performed for the Iberian DO regions, using state-of-the-art datasets. For climatic assessment, a categorized index, accounting for phenological/thermal development, water availability and grape ripening conditions was computed. Soil textural classes were established to distinguish soil types. Elevation and aspect (orientation) were also taken into account, as the leading topographic elements. A spectral vegetation index was used to assess grapevine vegetative growth and an integrated analysis of all variables was performed. The results showed that the integrated climate-soil-topography influence on vine performance is evident. Most Iberian vineyards are grown in temperate dry climates with loamy soils, presenting low vegetative growth. Vineyards in temperate humid conditions tend to show higher vegetative growth. Conversely, in cooler/warmer climates, lower vigour vineyards prevail and other factors, such as soil type and precipitation acquire more important roles in driving vigour. Vines in prevailing loamy soils are grown over a wide climatic diversity, suggesting that precipitation is the primary factor influencing vigour. The present assessment of terroir characteristics allows direct comparison among wine regions and may have great value to viticulturists, particularly under a changing climate. PMID:25251495

  14. Integrated analysis of climate, soil, topography and vegetative growth in Iberian viticultural regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helder Fraga

    Full Text Available The Iberian viticultural regions are convened according to the Denomination of Origin (DO and present different climates, soils, topography and management practices. All these elements influence the vegetative growth of different varieties throughout the peninsula, and are tied to grape quality and wine type. In the current study, an integrated analysis of climate, soil, topography and vegetative growth was performed for the Iberian DO regions, using state-of-the-art datasets. For climatic assessment, a categorized index, accounting for phenological/thermal development, water availability and grape ripening conditions was computed. Soil textural classes were established to distinguish soil types. Elevation and aspect (orientation were also taken into account, as the leading topographic elements. A spectral vegetation index was used to assess grapevine vegetative growth and an integrated analysis of all variables was performed. The results showed that the integrated climate-soil-topography influence on vine performance is evident. Most Iberian vineyards are grown in temperate dry climates with loamy soils, presenting low vegetative growth. Vineyards in temperate humid conditions tend to show higher vegetative growth. Conversely, in cooler/warmer climates, lower vigour vineyards prevail and other factors, such as soil type and precipitation acquire more important roles in driving vigour. Vines in prevailing loamy soils are grown over a wide climatic diversity, suggesting that precipitation is the primary factor influencing vigour. The present assessment of terroir characteristics allows direct comparison among wine regions and may have great value to viticulturists, particularly under a changing climate.

  15. Integrated Analysis of Climate, Soil, Topography and Vegetative Growth in Iberian Viticultural Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Helder; Malheiro, Aureliano C.; Moutinho-Pereira, José; Cardoso, Rita M.; Soares, Pedro M. M.; Cancela, Javier J.; Pinto, Joaquim G.; Santos, João A.

    2015-04-01

    The Iberian viticultural regions are convened according to the Denomination of Origin (DO) and present different climates, soils, topography and management practices. All these elements influence the vegetative growth of different varieties throughout the peninsula, and are tied to grape quality and wine type. In the current study, an integrated analysis of climate, soil, topography and vegetative growth was performed for the Iberian DO regions, using state-of-the-art datasets. For climatic assessment, a categorized index, accounting for phenological/thermal development, water availability and grape ripening conditions was computed. Soil textural classes were established to distinguish soil types. Elevation and aspect (orientation) were also taken into account, as the leading topographic elements. A spectral vegetation index was used to assess grapevine vegetative growth and an integrated analysis of all variables was performed. The results showed that the integrated climate-soil-topography influence on vine performance is evident. Most Iberian vineyards are grown in temperate dry climates with loamy soils, presenting low vegetative growth. Vineyards in temperate humid conditions tend to show higher vegetative growth. Conversely, in cooler/warmer climates, lower vigour vineyards prevail and other factors, such as soil type and precipitation acquire more important roles in driving vigour. Vines in prevailing loamy soils are grown over a wide climatic diversity, suggesting that precipitation is the primary factor influencing vigour. The present assessment of terroir characteristics allows direct comparison among wine regions and may have great value to viticulturists, particularly under a changing climate.

  16. Analysis of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes in soils by headspace and gas chromatography/flame ionization detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurandir Pereira Pinto

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The constituents of gasoline: benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX are frequently found in soils due to leaks in fuel storage tanks and they present chronic toxicity. In this work it was developed and validated a methodology of BTEX analysis in soil by gas chromatography/ flame ionization detector and static headspace. The recovery of BTEX in soil samples was evaluated using soils with different textures (sandy and loamy. The analysis method showed good resolution, in a low time of analysis (less than 30 minutes. Limits of quantification of 0.05 mg Kg¯¹ soil for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes are below the guiding values that range from 0.15 to 95 mg Kg¯¹ soil, established to determine soil quality. It was verified that the methodology enables the use of this method for BTEX analysis of soil samples for passive environmental identification of gas stations.

  17. NMR metabolomics for soil analysis provide complementary, orthogonal data to MIR and traditional soil chemistry approaches--a land use study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochfort, Simone; Ezernieks, Vilnis; Mele, Pauline; Kitching, Matt

    2015-09-01

    The present study was designed to analyse soils by different methodologies to determine the range of traits that could be investigated for the study of environmental soil samples. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1) H NMR) was employed for metametabolomic analysis of soils from agricultural systems (managed) or from soils in a native state (remnant). The metabolomic methodologies employed (grinding and extraction with sonication) are capable of breaking up cell walls and so enabled characterisation of both extracellular and intracellular components of soil. Diffuse mid-infrared spectroscopy (MIR) data was obtained for the same sample sets, and in addition, elemental composition was determined by conventional laboratory chemical testing methods. Also investigated was the antibiotic activity of the soil extracts. Resilient or suppressive soils are valued in the agricultural setting as they convey disease resistance (against bacterial and fungal pathogens) to crop plants. In order to test if any such biological activity could be detected in the soils, the extracts were tested against the bacteria Bacillus subtilis. Several extracts showed strong growth inhibition against the bacteria with the most active clustered together in principle component analysis (PCA) of the metabolomic data. The study showed that the NMR metabolomic approach corresponds more accurately to land use and biochemical properties potentially associated with suppression, while MIR data correlated well to inorganic chemical analysis. Thus, the study demonstrates the utility in combining these spectroscopic methods for soil analysis. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Acid Sulfate Alteration in Gusev Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Catalano, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Spirit landed on the Gusev Crater plains west of the Columbia Hills in January, 2004, during the Martian summer (sol 0; sol = 1 Martian day = 24 hr 40 min). Spirit explored the Columbia Hills of Gusev Crater in the vicinity of Home Plate at the onset on its second winter (sol approximately 900) until the onset of its fourth winter (sol approximately 2170). At that time, Spirit became mired in a deposit of fined-grained and sulfate-rich soil with dust-covered solar panels and unfavorable pointing of the solar arrays toward the sun. Spirit has not communicated with the Earth since sol 2210 (January, 2011). Like its twin rover Opportunity, which landed on the opposite side of Mars at Meridiani Planum, Spirit has an Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) instrument for chemical analyses and a Moessbauer spectrometer (MB) for measurement of iron redox state, mineralogical speciation, and quantitative distribution among oxidation (Fe(3+)/sigma Fe) and coordination (octahedral versus tetrahedral) states and mineralogical speciation (e.g., olivine, pyroxene, ilmenite, carbonate, and sulfate). The concentration of SO3 in Gusev rocks and soils varies from approximately 1 to approximately 34 wt%. Because the APXS instrument does not detect low atomic number elements (e.g., H and C), major-element oxide concentrations are normalized to sum to 100 wt%, i.e., contributions of H2O, CO2, NO2, etc. to the bulk composition care not considered. The majority of Gusev samples have approximately 6 plus or minus 5 wt% SO3, but there is a group of samples with high SO3 concentrations (approximately 30 wt%) and high total iron concentrations (approximately 20 wt%). There is also a group with low total Fe and SO3 concentrations that is also characterized by high SiO2 concentrations (greater than 70 wt%). The trend labeled "Basaltic Soil" is interpreted as mixtures in variable proportions between unaltered igneous material and oxidized and SO3-rich basaltic

  19. Analysis of the bacterial community changes in soil for septic tank effluent treatment in response to bio-clogging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, J Y; Zhu, N W; Zhao, K; Wu, L; Hu, Y H

    2011-01-01

    Soil columns were set up to survey the bacterial community in the soil for septic tank effluent treatment. When bio-clogging occurred in the soil columns, the effluent from the columns was in poorer quality. To evaluate changes of the soil bacterial community in response to bio-clogging, the bacterial community was characterized by DNA gene sequences from soil samples after polymerase chain reaction coupled with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis process. Correspondence analysis showed that Proteobacteria related bacteria were the main bacteria within the soil when treating septic tank effluent. However, Betaproteobacteria related bacteria were the dominant microorganisms in the normal soil, whereas Alphaproteobacteria related bacteria were more abundant in the clogged soil. This study provided insight into changes of the soil bacterial community in response to bio-clogging. The results can supply some useful information for the design and management of soil infiltration systems.

  20. Applicability of soil-structure interaction analysis methods for earthquake loadings (V)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S. P.; Ko, H. M.; Kim, J. K.; Yoon, J. Y.; Chin, B. M.; Yang, T. S.; Park, J. Y.; Cho, J. R.; Ryu, H. [Korea Electrical Engineering and Science Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-15

    The ultimate goals of this research are to cultivate the capability of accurate 551 analysis and to develop the effective soil-structure interaction analysis method and computer program by comparing analysis results obtained in Lotung/Hualien lS5T project. In this research, the scope of this study is to establish the method of soil-structure interaction analysis using hyperlement and to develop a computer program of 551 analysis, to do parametric study for the comprehension of the characteristics and the applicability of hyper elements and to verify the validity and the applicability of this method(or program) through the analysis of seismic response of Hualien lS5T project. In this study, we verified the validity and the efficiency of the soil-structure interaction analysis method using hyper elements and developed computer programs using hyper elements. Based on the I-dimensional wave propagation theory, we developed a computer program of free-field analysis considering the primary non-lineriry of seismic responses. And using this program, we computed the effective ground earthquake motions of soil regions. The computer programs using hyper elements can treat non-homogeneity of soil regions very easily and perform the analysis quickly by the usage of the analytical solutions in horizontal direction. 50 this method would be very efficient and practical method.

  1. Elemental analysis of soil and hair sample by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Yong Sam; Quraishi, Shamshad Begum; Moon, Jong Hwa; Kim, Sun Ha; Baek, Sung Yeoil; Kang, Sang Hoon; Lim, Jong Myoung; Cho, Hyun Je; Kim, Young Jin

    2004-03-01

    Myanmar soil sample was analyzed by using the instrumental neutron activation analysis. The elemental concentrations in the sample, altogether 34 elements, Al As, Ba, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Ga, Gd, Hf, Ir, K, La, Lu, Mn, Na, Nd, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Th, Ti, V, Yb, Zn and Zr were determined. The concentration of 17 elements (Al, Au, Br, Ca, Cl, Cr, Cu, Co, Fe, Hg, K, Na, Mn, Mg, Sb, Se, Zn) in human hair samples were determined by INAA For quality control of analytical method, certified reference material was used.

  2. Georelational analysis of soil type, soil salt content, landform, and land use in the Yellow River Delta, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hongliang; Liu, Gaohuan; Kearney, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The Yellow River Delta, one of China's three major river deltas, is becoming a major region for the development of agriculture and fisheries. Protecting the delicate ecology of newly formed aquatic systems as well as the evolution of soils, natural vegetation, and fauna on older upland environments in the delta is a priority in planning for the wise use of the delta's resources for future agricultural development. In this article, we use a Geographic Information System (GIS) to analyze relationships between land-use/ land-cover characteristics in the Dongying municipality, one of the most intensely developed areas of the delta, and spatial variations in soil salinity and landforms. This analysis reveals that soil salt content decreases from regionally high values in isolated depressions to relatively moderate values in embanked former back swamps, with the lowest values occurring in abandoned river courses. Comparing the present land use on this soil salinity-landform pattern shows that it is basically at odds with general concepts of land suitability for agricultural utilization of saline soils. Crop-based agriculture in the region is probably overdeveloped, whereas more appropriate agricultural development, like cattle and forest production, is underrepresented. Future development should focus on converting farmland in embanked former back swamps and abandoned river courses into grasslands and forests. Crop-based agriculture (up to 151,000 ha) could be planned at the low-salinity terrace uplands and flood plains. The article provides guidelines for decision-makers regarding agricultural land use and wetland protection in the Yellow River Delta.

  3. The influence of Alpine soil properties on shallow movement hazards, investigated through factor analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Stanchi

    2012-06-01

    shallow soil movements involving the upper soil horizons. We assessed a great number of soil properties that are known to be related to vulnerability to the main hazards present in the area. These properties were evaluated at the two depths and a factor analysis was performed to simplify the dataset interpretation, and to hypothesise the most decisive parameters that were potentially related to vulnerability. The factors (soil structure, aggregation, consistency, texture and parent material, cation exchange complex and other chemical properties were a first step towards identifying soil quality indexes in the studied environment.

  4. Animating the biodynamics of soil thickness using process vector analysis: a dynamic denudation approach to soil formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. L.; Domier, J. E. J.; Johnson, D. N.

    2005-04-01

    This paper expands the dynamic denudation framework of landscape evolution by providing new process insights and details on how soil and its signature morphological feature, the biomantle, form and function in the environment. We examine soils and their biomantles from disparate parts of the world, from the tropics through midlatitudes and hyperarid through perhumid, a range that exhibits varying environments for, and of, life. We then explicate the process pathways that cause soils to thicken and thin, and to even disappear, then reform. We do this by examining thickness relationships, where soil thickness st and biomantle thickness bt are functions of upbuilding u and deepening d minus removal r processes, hence st/bt= f( u+ d- r). Upbuilding has two subsets, u1, which includes all exogenous (allochthonous—outside) mineral and/or organic inputs to the soil system, and u2, which includes all endogenous (autochthonous—in situ) processes and productions, including weathering. Exogenous u1 inputs include eolian and slopewash inputs (sedimentations) of mineral and organic materials, mass wasting accumulations and the like. Endogenous u2 processes and productions include the sum of in situ bioturbations, biosynthetic productions, organic accumulations, biovoid productions, weathering and volume increases caused by their sum. Endogenous upbuildings, which dominantly occur in the biomantle, are basically biodynamic bd processes and productions, hence u2=bd. Therefore, if exogenous upbuildings u1 are minimal or zero, then biomantle thickness bt is expressed by bt= f( u2- r) or bt= f(bd- r). Drawing on these relationships, we employ a graphic-conceptual device called process vector analysis in a digital animation (see supplementary materials or cf. https://netfiles.uiuc.edu/jdomier/www/temp/biomantle.html) that illustrates the main pathways that form both Earth's soil and its unique epidermis, the biomantle. We then discuss the main elements of the animation using

  5. To Identify the Important Soil Properties Affecting Dinoseb Adsorption with Statistical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiqing Guan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigating the influences of soil characteristic factors on dinoseb adsorption parameter with different statistical methods would be valuable to explicitly figure out the extent of these influences. The correlation coefficients and the direct, indirect effects of soil characteristic factors on dinoseb adsorption parameter were analyzed through bivariate correlation analysis, and path analysis. With stepwise regression analysis the factors which had little influence on the adsorption parameter were excluded. Results indicate that pH and CEC had moderate relationship and lower direct effect on dinoseb adsorption parameter due to the multicollinearity with other soil factors, and organic carbon and clay contents were found to be the most significant soil factors which affect the dinoseb adsorption process. A regression is thereby set up to explore the relationship between the dinoseb adsorption parameter and the two soil factors: the soil organic carbon and clay contents. A 92% of the variation of dinoseb sorption coefficient could be attributed to the variation of the soil organic carbon and clay contents.

  6. Trace element analysis of soil type collected from the Manjung and central Perak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azman, Muhammad Azfar, E-mail: m-azfar@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Hamzah, Suhaimi; Rahman, Shamsiah Abdul; Elias, Md Suhaimi; Abdullah, Nazaratul Ashifa; Hashim, Azian; Shukor, Shakirah Abd; Kamaruddin, Ahmad Hasnulhadi Che [Blok 18, Makmal Analisis Kimia (Aca/Bas), Agensi Nuklear Malaysia, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    Trace elements in soils primarily originated from their parent materials. Parents’ material is the underlying geological material that has been undergone different types of chemical weathering and leaching processes. Soil trace elements concentrations may be increases as a result of continuous input from various human activities, including power generation, agriculture, mining and manufacturing. This paper describes the Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) method used for the determination of trace elements concentrations in part per million (ppm) present in the terrestrial environment soil in Perak. The data may indicate any contamination of trace elements contributed from human activities in the area. The enrichment factors were used to check if there any contamination due to the human activities (power plants, agricultural, mining, etc.) otherwise the values would serve as a baseline data for future study. The samples were collected from 27 locations of different soil series in the area at two different depths: the top soil (0-15cm) and the sub soil (15-30cm). The collected soil samples were air dried at 60°C and passed through 2 µm sieve. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) has been used for the determination of trace elements. Samples were activated in the Nuclear Malaysia TRIGA Mark II reactor followed by gamma spectrometric analysis. By activating the stable elements in the samples, the elements can be determined from the intensities of gamma energies emitted by the respected radionuclides.

  7. Trace element analysis of soil type collected from the Manjung and central Perak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azman, Muhammad Azfar; Hamzah, Suhaimi; Rahman, Shamsiah Abdul; Elias, Md Suhaimi; Abdullah, Nazaratul Ashifa; Hashim, Azian; Shukor, Shakirah Abd; Kamaruddin, Ahmad Hasnulhadi Che

    2015-04-01

    Trace elements in soils primarily originated from their parent materials. Parents' material is the underlying geological material that has been undergone different types of chemical weathering and leaching processes. Soil trace elements concentrations may be increases as a result of continuous input from various human activities, including power generation, agriculture, mining and manufacturing. This paper describes the Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) method used for the determination of trace elements concentrations in part per million (ppm) present in the terrestrial environment soil in Perak. The data may indicate any contamination of trace elements contributed from human activities in the area. The enrichment factors were used to check if there any contamination due to the human activities (power plants, agricultural, mining, etc.) otherwise the values would serve as a baseline data for future study. The samples were collected from 27 locations of different soil series in the area at two different depths: the top soil (0-15cm) and the sub soil (15-30cm). The collected soil samples were air dried at 60°C and passed through 2 µm sieve. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) has been used for the determination of trace elements. Samples were activated in the Nuclear Malaysia TRIGA Mark II reactor followed by gamma spectrometric analysis. By activating the stable elements in the samples, the elements can be determined from the intensities of gamma energies emitted by the respected radionuclides.

  8. Analysis and interpretation of specific ethanol metabolites, ethyl sulfate, and ethyl glucuronide in sewage effluent for the quantitative measurement of regional alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Malcolm J; Langford, Katherine H; Mørland, Jørg; Thomas, Kevin V

    2011-09-01

    The quantitative measurement of urinary metabolites in sewage streams and the subsequent estimation of consumption rates of the parent compounds have previously been demonstrated for pharmaceuticals and narcotics. Ethyl sulfate and ethyl glucuronide are excreted in urine following the ingestion of alcohol, and are useful biomarkers for the identification of acute alcohol consumption. This study reports a novel ion-exchange-mediated chromatographic method for the quantitative measurement of ethyl sulfate and ethyl glucuronide in sewage effluent, and presents a novel calculation method for the purposes of relating the resulting sewage concentrations with rates of alcohol consumption in the region. A total of 100 sewage samples covering a 25-day period were collected from a treatment plant servicing approximately 500,000 people, and analyzed for levels of ethyl sulfate and ethyl glucuronide. The resulting data were then used to estimate combined alcohol consumption rates for the region, and the results were compared with alcohol related sales statistics for the same region. Ethyl glucuronide was found to be unstable in sewage effluent. Ethyl sulfate was stable and measurable in all samples at concentrations ranging from 16 to 246 nM. The highest concentrations of the alcohol biomarker were observed during weekend periods. Sixty one percent of the total mass of ethyl sulfate in sewage effluent corresponds to alcohol consumption on Friday and Saturday. Sales statistics for alcohol show that consumption in the region is approximately 6,750 kg/d. The quantity of ethyl sulfate passing through the sewage system is consistent with consumption of 4,900 to 7,800 kg/d.   Sewage epidemiology assessments of ethyl sulfate can provide accurate estimates of community alcohol consumption, and detailed examination of the kinetics of this biomarker in sewage streams can also identify time-dependent trends in alcohol consumption patterns. 2011 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  9. Soil Classification based on their Chemical Composition using Principal Component Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamolchanok Panishkan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Principal component analysis (PCA, was used to group of 54 soil samples collected from different agricultural locations in the western part of Thailand. Soil chemical compositions were measured by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM and Energy Dispersive X-ray Microanalysis (EDX. The basic result indicated decreased amount of O, Si, Al, Fe, C, K, Mg, Ca, Ti and Na. The first three principal components were used and accounted for 44.0%, 19.5% and 15.0% of total variation of the data, respectively. Score plots of first three principal components were used to map with soil textures classified as clay, clay loam and medium loam. The results showed some relationships between chemical contents and soil textures. PCA was shown to be a useful tool for soil texture classification based on their chemical compositions.

  10. Correcting rainfall using satellite-based surface soil moisture retrievals: The Soil Moisture Analysis Rainfall Tool (SMART)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, W. T.; van den Berg, M. J.; Huffman, G. J.; Pellarin, T.

    2011-08-01

    Recently, Crow et al. (2009) developed an algorithm for enhancing satellite-based land rainfall products via the assimilation of remotely sensed surface soil moisture retrievals into a water balance model. As a follow-up, this paper describes the benefits of modifying their approach to incorporate more complex data assimilation and land surface modeling methodologies. Specific modifications improving rainfall estimates are assembled into the Soil Moisture Analysis Rainfall Tool (SMART), and the resulting algorithm is applied outside the contiguous United States for the first time, with an emphasis on West African sites instrumented as part of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis experiment. Results demonstrate that the SMART algorithm is superior to the Crow et al. baseline approach and is capable of broadly improving coarse-scale rainfall accumulations measurements with low risk of degradation. Comparisons with existing multisensor, satellite-based precipitation data products suggest that the introduction of soil moisture information from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer via SMART provides as much coarse-scale (3 day, 1°) rainfall accumulation information as thermal infrared satellite observations and more information than monthly rain gauge observations in poorly instrumented regions.

  11. X-ray spectrometry and X-ray microtomography techniques for soil and geological samples analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubala-Kukuś, A.; Banaś, D.; Braziewicz, J. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, ul. Świetokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Holycross Cancer Center, ul. Artwińskiego 3, 25-734 Kielce (Poland); Dziadowicz, M.; Kopeć, E. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, ul. Świetokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Majewska, U. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, ul. Świetokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Holycross Cancer Center, ul. Artwińskiego 3, 25-734 Kielce (Poland); Mazurek, M.; Pajek, M.; Sobisz, M.; Stabrawa, I. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, ul. Świetokrzyska 15, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Wudarczyk-Moćko, J. [Holycross Cancer Center, ul. Artwińskiego 3, 25-734 Kielce (Poland); Góźdź, S. [Holycross Cancer Center, ul. Artwińskiego 3, 25-734 Kielce (Poland); Institute of Public Health, Jan Kochanowski University, IX Wieków Kielc 19, 25-317 Kielce (Poland)

    2015-12-01

    A particular subject of X-ray fluorescence analysis is its application in studies of the multielemental sample of composition in a wide range of concentrations, samples with different matrices, also inhomogeneous ones and those characterized with different grain size. Typical examples of these kinds of samples are soil or geological samples for which XRF elemental analysis may be difficult due to XRF disturbing effects. In this paper the WDXRF technique was applied in elemental analysis concerning different soil and geological samples (therapeutic mud, floral soil, brown soil, sandy soil, calcium aluminum cement). The sample morphology was analyzed using X-ray microtomography technique. The paper discusses the differences between the composition of samples, the influence of procedures with respect to the preparation of samples as regards their morphology and, finally, a quantitative analysis. The results of the studies were statistically tested (one-way ANOVA and correlation coefficients). For lead concentration determination in samples of sandy soil and cement-like matrix, the WDXRF spectrometer calibration was performed. The elemental analysis of the samples was complemented with knowledge of chemical composition obtained by X-ray powder diffraction.

  12. Correlation analysis of the natural radionuclides in soil and indoor radon in Vojvodina, Province of Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkapic, S; Maletić, D; Vasin, J; Bikit, K; Mrdja, D; Bikit, I; Udovičić, V; Banjanac, R

    2017-01-01

    The most dominant source of indoor radon is the underlying soil, so the enhanced levels of radon are usually expected in mountain regions and geology units with high radium and uranium content in surface soils. Laboratory for radioactivity and dose measurement, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad has rich databases of natural radionuclides concentrations in Vojvodina soil and also of indoor radon concentrations for the region of Vojvodina, Northern Province of Serbia. In this paper we present the results of correlative and multivariate analysis of these results and soil characteristics in order to estimate the geogenic radon potential. The correlative and multivariate analysis were done using Toolkit for Multivariate Analysis software package TMVA package, within ROOT analysis framework, which uses several comparable multivariate methods for our analysis. The evaluation ranking results based on the best signal efficiency and purity, show that the Boosted Decision Trees (BDT) and Multi Layer Preceptor (MLP), based on Artificial Neural Network (ANN), are multivariate methods which give the best results in the analysis. The BDTG multivariate method shows that variables with the highest importance are radio-nuclides activity on 30 cm depth. Moreover, the multivariate regression methods give a good approximation of indoor radon activity using full set of input variables. On several locations in the city of Novi Sad the results of indoor radon concentrations, radon emanation from soil, gamma spectrometry measurements of underlying soil and geology characteristics of soil were analyzed in detail in order to verify previously obtained correlations for Vojvodina soil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of fullerenes in soils samples collected in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carboni, Andrea; Helmus, Rick; Emke, Erik; van den Brink, Nico; Parsons, John R; Kalbitz, Karsten; de Voogt, Pim

    2016-12-01

    Fullerenes are carbon based nanoparticles that may enter the environment as a consequence of both natural processes and human activities. Although little is known about the presence of these chemicals in the environment, recent studies suggested that soil may act as a sink. The aim of the present work was to investigate the presence of fullerenes in soils collected in The Netherlands. Samples (n = 91) were taken from 6 locations and analyzed using a new developed LC-QTOF-MS method. The locations included highly trafficked and industrialized as well as urban and natural areas. In general, C60 was the most abundant fullerene found in the environment, detected in almost a half of the samples and at concentrations in the range of ng/kg. Other fullerenes such as C70 and an unknown structure containing a C60 cage were detected to a lower extent. The highest concentrations were found in the proximity of combustion sites such as a coal power plant and an incinerator, suggesting that the nanoparticles were unintentionally produced during combustions processes and reached the soil through atmospheric deposition. Consistent with other recent studies, these results show that fullerenes are widely present in the environment and that the main route for their entrance may be due to human activities. These data will be helpful in the understanding of the distribution of fullerenes in the environment and for the study of their behavior and fate in soil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Soil Studies: Applying Acid-Base Chemistry to Environmental Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Donna M.; Sterling, Donna R.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory activities for chemistry students focus attention on the use of acid-base chemistry to examine environmental conditions. After using standard laboratory procedures to analyze soil and rainwater samples, students use web-based resources to interpret their findings. Uses CBL probes and graphing calculators to gather and analyze data and…

  15. Analysis of CL-20 in Environmental Matrices: Water and Soil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Larson, Steven

    2001-01-01

    ... technologies for the treatment of contaminated soils and waters. Analytical techniques for the detection of 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazatetracyclo5 .5.0.05,9.03,11dodecane (CL-20...

  16. Analysis of ethyl sulfate in raw wastewater for estimation of alcohol consumption and its correlation with drugs of abuse in the city of Barcelona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastroianni, Nicola; Lopez de Alda, Miren; Barcelo, Damia

    2014-09-19

    The increasing, generalized consumption of alcohol, especially among young people, generates great concern in our society due to its negative consequences on public health and safety. Besides the traditional, official methods employed for estimation of alcohol consumption, the monitoring of ethyl sulfate (EtS), a urinary biomarker of alcohol ingestion, in raw wastewater has been recently proposed as an additional tool to estimate alcohol use at community level through the so-called sewage epidemiology approach. In the presented study, a fast and reliable analytical method based on ion-pair liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has been optimized and further applied to the analysis of EtS in seven 24h composite samples collected along one week at the inlet of a large sewage treatment plant (STP) located in the Barcelona area. EtS was measured in the entire set of analysed samples, with concentrations ranging from 5.5 to 33μg/L, which correspond to an absolute alcohol consumption of around 11,000 (Wednesday) to 25,000 (Sunday) kg/day. The average per capita absolute alcohol consumption calculated was 18mL/day/inhabitant. Moreover, the levels of EtS measured throughout the week showed high correlation with those of some recreational illicit drugs and metabolites, namely, cocaethylene (r(2)=0.9391, n=5), benzoylecgonine (r(2)=0.9252, n=7), ecstasy (r(2)=0.8950, n=7), amphetamine (r(2)=0.8707, n=7) and cocaine (r(2)=0.6425, n=7), measured in the same samples. This study confirms that the analysis of EtS in raw wastewater can be a useful tool for the estimation of alcohol consumption in an anonymous, fast and economic way, and indicates that consumption of alcohol and some illicit drugs occurs often together. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Soil Phosphorus Gains and Losses with Afforestation: A Meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, D.; Deng, Q.; Xiang, Y.; Yu, C. L.; Hui, D.; Jackson, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Afforestation, the planting of trees on previously non-forested land, is commonly practiced around the world to provide wood, reduce erosion, and restore degraded agricultural land. Although afforestation has the potential to meet these objectives while increasing carbon uptake, its net impact on the soil depends on environmental conditions and land-use history. Availability of vital plant nutrients, such as phosphorus (P), may be altered by afforestation, but prior work has largely focused on soil carbon, and changes in soil P had not been quantitatively reviewed. We conducted a literature meta-analysis of changes in total and plant-available soil P with afforestation, compiling 49 studies representing 186 independent forest stands on five continents. Over the full dataset, mean concentration of plant-available phosphorus (mg kg-1 soil) increased by 22.7% with afforestation (bootstrapped 95% confidence interval = [15.1%, 30.7%]), while mean concentration of total phosphorus decreased by 13.5% (95% CI = [-18.4%, -8.6%]). These data reflect trends in upper mineral soil horizons, with sampling depths clustered around 20 cm and few studies reporting data below 50 cm. Differences in prior land use partially explain the substantial variation in effect size, with larger increases in available P and smaller decreases in total P when trees were planted on degraded soils. Trends in both available and total P were also enhanced with increasing time since afforestation, suggesting that changes in soil P concentrations are driven by cumulative processes rather than site preparation and planting. Our meta-analysis suggests that 1. afforestation can transform phosphorus into more plant-accessible forms, while potentially depleting total soil stocks of P, and 2. land-use history, more than climate or species planted, determines the effects of afforestation on soils' ability to meet the nutrient needs of vegetation.

  18. Some considerations on the washout of sulfate from stack plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard K. Peters

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the contribution to rainwater sulfate concentration by precipitation scavenging of gaseous SO2 and sulfate containing aerosols is presented. Aspects, such as the proper choice of mean raindrop diameter, are discussed in detail, and guidelines for their use are explored. Sample calculations are provided in which emissions...

  19. Classification of Effective Soil Depth by Using Multinomial Logistic Regression Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C. H.; Chan, H. C.; Chen, B. A.

    2016-12-01

    Classification of effective soil depth is a task of determining the slopeland utilizable limitation in Taiwan. The "Slopeland Conservation and Utilization Act" categorizes the slopeland into agriculture and husbandry land, land suitable for forestry and land for enhanced conservation according to the factors including average slope, effective soil depth, soil erosion and parental rock. However, sit investigation of the effective soil depth requires a cost-effective field work. This research aimed to classify the effective soil depth by using multinomial logistic regression with the environmental factors. The Wen-Shui Watershed located at the central Taiwan was selected as the study areas. The analysis of multinomial logistic regression is performed by the assistance of a Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The effective soil depth was categorized into four levels including deeper, deep, shallow and shallower. The environmental factors of slope, aspect, digital elevation model (DEM), curvature and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) were selected for classifying the soil depth. An Error Matrix was then used to assess the model accuracy. The results showed an overall accuracy of 75%. At the end, a map of effective soil depth was produced to help planners and decision makers in determining the slopeland utilizable limitation in the study areas.

  20. The affect of industrial activities on zinc in alluvial Egyptian soil determined using neutron activation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Sabour, M F; Abdel-Basset, N

    2002-07-01

    Thirty-two surface (0-20 cm) soil samples were collected from different locations in Egypt representing non-polluted, moderately and highly polluted soils. The aim of this study was to evaluate total Zn content in alluvial soils of Nile Delta in Egypt by using the delayed neutron activation analysis technique (DNAA), in the irradiation facilities of the first Egyptian research reactor (ET-RR-1). The gamma-ray spectra were recorded with a hyper pure germanium detection system. The well resolved gamma-ray peak at 1116.0 keV was efficiently used for 65Zn content determination. Zn content in non-polluted soil samples ranged between 74.1 and 103.8 ppm with an average of 98.5 +/- 5.1 ppm. Zn content in moderately polluted soils ranged between 136.0 and 232.5 ppm with an average of 180.1 +/- 32.6 ppm. The highest Zn levels ranging from 240.0 and 733.0 ppm with an average of 410.3 +/- 54.4 ppm, were observed in soil samples collected from, either highly polluted agricultural soils exposed to prolonged irrigation with industrial wastewater or surface soil samples from industrial sites.

  1. On the Validation of a Numerical Model for the Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luis Palomino Tamayo

    Full Text Available Abstract Modeling and simulation of mechanical response of structures, relies on the use of computational models. Therefore, verification and validation procedures are the primary means of assessing accuracy, confidence and credibility in modeling. This paper is concerned with the validation of a three dimensional numerical model based on the finite element method suitable for the dynamic analysis of soil-structure interaction problems. The soil mass, structure, structure's foundation and the appropriate boundary conditions can be represented altogether in a single model by using a direct approach. The theory of porous media of Biot is used to represent the soil mass as a two-phase material which is considered to be fully saturated with water; meanwhile other parts of the system are treated as one-phase materials. Plasticity of the soil mass is the main source of non-linearity in the problem and therefore an iterative-incremental algorithm based on the Newton-Raphson procedure is used to solve the nonlinear equilibrium equations. For discretization in time, the Generalized Newmark-β method is used. The soil is represented by a plasticity-based, effective-stress constitutive model suitable for liquefaction. Validation of the present numerical model is done by comparing analytical and centrifuge test results of soil and soil-pile systems with those results obtained with the present numerical model. A soil-pile-structure interaction problem is also presented in order to shown the potentiality of the numerical tool.

  2. Grapevine water absorption in different soils. A spatio-temporal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brillante, Luca; Bois, Benjamin; Lévêque, Jean; Mathieu, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    Hillslope vineyards show complex water dynamics between soil and plants. To gain further insight of this relationship, 8 grapevine plots were monitored during two vintages (2011-2013), on Corton Hill, Burgundy, France. Grapevine water status was monitored weekly by surveying water potential, and at harvest, using δ13C analysis of grape juice. Soil volumetric humidity was also measured weekly, using TDR probes. A pedotransfer function was developed to transform Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) into Soil Volume Water and therefore to spatialise and describe variations in space and time in the Fraction of Transpirable Soil Water (FTSW). During the two years of monitoring, grapevines experienced great variation in water status, which ranged from low to substantial water deficit. With this freshly developed method, it was possible to observe differences in water absorption pattern by roots, in different soils, and at different depth. Great heterogeneity was observed, both laterally and vertically in grapevine water absorption. The contribution of each soil region to plant water status varies according to grapevine water status. It is different between day and night and depends from soil characteristics. It is to our knowledge the first time that water absorption by grapevine is revealed in space (2D) and time, and has therefore allowed a deeper comprehension of plant and soil dynamics in grapevine.

  3. Soil texture and climatc conditions for biocrust growth limitation: a meta analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Thomas; Subbotina, Mariia

    2015-04-01

    Along with afforestation, attempts have been made to combat desertification by managing soil crusts, and is has been reported that recovery rates of biocrusts are dependent on many factors, including the type, severity, and extent of disturbance; structure of the vascular plant community; conditions of adjoining substrates; availability of inoculation material; and climate during and after disturbance (Belnap & Eldridge 2001). Because biological soil crusts are known to be more stable on and to prefer fine substrates (Belnap 2001), the question arises as to how successful crust management practices can be applied to coarser soil. In previous studies we observed similar crust biomasses on finer soils under arid and on coarser soils under temperate conditions. We hypothesized that the higher water holding capacity of finer substrates would favor crust development, and that the amount of silt and clay in the substrate that is required for enhanced crust development would vary with changes in climatic conditions. In a global meta study, climatic and soil texture threshold values promoting BSC growth were derived. While examining literature sources, it became evident that the amount of studies to be incorporated into this meta analysis was reversely related to the amount of common environmental parameters they share. We selected annual mean precipitaion, mean temperature and the amount of silt and clay as driving variables for crust growth. Response variable was the "relative crust biomass", which was computed per literature source as the ratio between each individual crust biomass value of the given study to the study maximum value reported. We distinguished lichen, green algal, cyanobacterial and moss crusts. To quantify threshold conditions at which crust biomass responded to differences in texture and climate, we (I) determined correlations between bioclimatic variables, (II) calculated linear models to determine the effect of typical climatic variables with soil

  4. Calibration and analysis of soil carbon efflux estimates with closed chambers at Forsmark and Laxemar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagesson, Torbern (Dept. of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Analysis, Lund Univ., Lund (SE))

    2006-08-15

    The Forsmark and the Laxemar investigation areas are examined by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. for a possible construction of a deep repository for nuclear waste. In the case of a future leakage of waste, the radioactive isotopes could end up in the ecosystems above the repository. The fate of the radionuclides and their possible radiological impacts are then highly determined by ecosystem carbon cycling. An important part of the carbon cycling is the soil carbon effluxes, and in the investigation areas soil carbon effluxes have been examined with the closed chamber technique. This paper is divided into two parts. Firstly, there were problems with the equipment measuring the soil carbon dioxide efflux, and the first part is a description of the problem, how it was corrected and its possible causes. The second part is a manual in how to analyse data and calculate annual estimates of soil carbon efflux. The field measurement by the EGM-4 is just an occasional estimate of the soil carbon efflux at a certain spot and at a certain point in time. To make an interpretation of the measurements, it is essential to analyse the data and to temporally extrapolate them. It is necessary to prepare the raw data for the analysis. The problems with the EGM-4 doing the measurements at the Forsmark and the Laxemar investigation area makes it necessary to correct the data taken up by this EGM-4. The data should also be separated into soil respiration and gross primary production (GPP). Soil carbon dioxide effluxes should be changed to soil carbon effluxes. Soil carbon effluxes are strongly controlled by abiotic factors; temperature is the main factor to influence soil respiration and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and air temperature are the main factors to influence GPP. Regression with soil respiration against temperature and with GPP against PAR or temperature can therefore be done. These equations can then be used on datasets with temperature and PAR

  5. LASL bismuth sulfate thermochemical hydrogen cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, K.E.; Jones, W.M.; Peterson, C.L.

    1980-01-01

    The LASL bismuth sulfate cycle is one of a generic class of solid sulfate cycles in which a metal sulfate is substituted for sulfuric acid in a hybrid (partly electrochemical) cycle. This technique avoids the serious materials and heat penalty problems associated with the handling of concentrated acid solutions, and if the electrolyzer is operated at acid concentrations below 50% it may, in principle, lead to a lower cell voltage with subsequent energy savings. Experiment verification of all steps in the cycle has been obtained, particularly for the decomposition of normal bismuth sulfate and lower bismuth oxysulfates. For the substance, Bi/sub 2/O/sub 3/ 2SO/sub 3/, an endothermic requirement of 172 kJ/mol was obtained, which is considerably less than that for other metal sulfate systems. A rotary kiln was used for continuous experiments and our results show decomposition of this compound to Bi/sub 2/O/sub 3/ SO/sub 3/ in under 8 minutes residence time at 1023 K. Preliminary analysis of the cycle's energy balance shows an overall thermal efficiency of greater than 50% when the maximum cycle reaction temperature is 1500 K. The cycle has potential for hydrogen production when coupled with an energy source such as solar or fusion energy.

  6. The Performance and Mechanism Analysis of Cement Pastes Added to Aluminum Sulfate-Based Low-Alkali Setting Accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingdong Lv

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We proposed a type of low-alkali liquid state setting accelerator, named HLSA; it was environmentally friendly product. To investigate the temperature adaptation and cement flexibilities of HLSA, the setting time and strength development properties of cement with HLSA were discussed in this paper. The effects of HLSA on hydration process, hydration products, and microstructure were studied by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, scanning electron microscope (SEM, and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP. The results show that four typical 42.5-grade ordinary Portland cement types with 6–8% HLSA could satisfy the first-grade requirements according to JC477-2005 even at a lower temperature (e.g., 10°C. Further, the percentage ratio of 28 d compressive strength of cement with 6–8% HLSA was over 90%; the XRD diffraction peak of AFt integrated area of cement with 7% HLSA was 3818 at 5 min of hydration; SEM observation revealed that AFt crystals were filled in the pore of cement at 28 d of hydration; the temperature adaptation and cement flexibilities of HLSA were excellent; the cement with HLSA coagulating in a short time attributed to promoting the formation of abundant AFt and the hydration of C3S.

  7. Application of Statistical Method of Path Analysis to Describe Soil Biological Indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kooch

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Among the collection of natural resources in the world, soil is considered as one of the most important components of the environment. Protect and improve the properties of this precious resource, requires a comprehensive and coordinated action that only through a deep understanding of quantitative (not only recognition of the quality the origin, distribution and functionality in a natural ecosystem is possible. Many researchers believe that due to the quick reactions of soil organisms to environmental changes, soil biological survey to estimate soil quality is more important than the chemical and physical properties. For this reason, in many studies the nitrogen mineralization and microbial respiration indices are regarded. The aim of the present study were to study the direct and indirect effects of soil physicochemical characteristics on the most important biological indicators (nitrogen mineralization and microbial respiration, which has not been carefully considered up to now. This research is the first study to provide evidence to the future planning and management of soil sciences. Materials and Methods: For this, a limitation of 20 ha area of Experimental Forest Station of Tarbiat Modares University was considered. Fifty five soil samples, from the top 15 cm of soil, were taken, from which bulk density, texture, organic C, total N, cation exchange capacity (CEC, nitrogen mineralization and microbial respiration were determined at the laboratory. The data stored in Excel as a database. To determine the relationship between biological indices and soil physicochemical characteristics, correlation analysis and factor analysis using principal component analysis (PCA were employed. To investigate all direct and indirect relationships between biological indices and different soil characteristics, path analysis (path analysis was used. Results and Discussion: Results showed significant positive relations between biological indices

  8. The analysis of soil cores polluted with certain metals using the Box-Cox transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloun, Milan; Sánka, Milan; Nemec, Pavel; Krítková, Sona; Kupka, Karel

    2005-09-01

    To define the soil properties for a given area or country including the level of pollution, soil survey and inventory programs are essential tools. Soil data transformations enable the expression of the original data on a new scale, more suitable for data analysis. In the computer-aided interactive analysis of large data files of soil characteristics containing outliers, the diagnostic plots of the exploratory data analysis (EDA) often find that the sample distribution is systematically skewed or reject sample homogeneity. Under such circumstances the original data should be transformed. The Box-Cox transformation improves sample symmetry and stabilizes spread. The logarithmic plot of a profile likelihood function enables the optimum transformation parameter to be found. Here, a proposed procedure for data transformation in univariate data analysis is illustrated on a determination of cadmium content in the plough zone of agricultural soils. A typical soil pollution survey concerns the determination of the elements Be (16 544 values available), Cd (40 317 values), Co (22 176 values), Cr (40 318 values), Hg (32 344 values), Ni (34 989 values), Pb (40 344 values), V (20 373 values) and Zn (36 123 values) in large samples.

  9. On the evaporation of ammonium sulfate solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drisdell, Walter S.; Saykally, Richard J.; Cohen, Ronald C.

    2009-07-16

    Aqueous evaporation and condensation kinetics are poorly understood, and uncertainties in their rates affect predictions of cloud behavior and therefore climate. We measured the cooling rate of 3 M ammonium sulfate droplets undergoing free evaporation via Raman thermometry. Analysis of the measurements yields a value of 0.58 {+-} 0.05 for the evaporation coefficient, identical to that previously determined for pure water. These results imply that subsaturated aqueous ammonium sulfate, which is the most abundant inorganic component of atmospheric aerosol, does not affect the vapor-liquid exchange mechanism for cloud droplets, despite reducing the saturation vapor pressure of water significantly.

  10. Mathematical Model and Analysis of Negative Skin Friction of Pile Group in Consolidating Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangqiang Kong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to calculate negative skin friction (NSF of pile group embedded in a consolidating soil, the dragload calculating formulas of single pile were established by considering Davis one-dimensional nonlinear consolidation soils settlement and hyperbolic load-transfer of pile-soil interface. Based on effective influence area theory, a simple semiempirical mathematical model of analysis for predicting the group effect of pile group under dragload was described. The accuracy and reliability of mathematical models built in this paper were verified by practical engineering comparative analysis. Case studies were studied, and the prediction values were found to be in good agreement with those of measured values. Then, the influences factors, such as, soil consolidation degree, the initial volume compressibility coefficient, and the stiffness of bearing soil, were analyzed and discussed. The results show that the mathematical models considering nonlinear soil consolidation and group effect can reflect the practical NSF of pile group effectively and accurately. The results of this paper can provide reference for practical pile group embedded in consolidating soil under NSF design and calculation.

  11. Determination of bare soil and its seasonal variation using image analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pulido Fernandez, M.; Lavado Contador, J. F.; Schnabel, S.; Gomez Gutierrez, A.

    2009-07-01

    Bare soil is of outstanding interest as an indicator of land degradation because it is strongly related with water erosion, particularly in low-vegetated areas as those typical of the Mediterranean rangelands. In areas with high livestock densities, erosion can ultimately get to a partial or total soil loss, particularly at the beginning of the rainy season, when the surface cover is reduce after the dry summer period. Therefore, it is necessary to develop accurate methods allowing the quantification of soil exposed areas and their temporal dynamics. The main goal of this work is the determination of bare soil surface using aerial orthophotomaps and the analysis of the changes resulting from the analysis and classification of images corresponding to two contrasting seasons (summer and spring). (Author) 6 refs.

  12. Dynamics of soil water evaporation during soil drying: laboratory experiment and numerical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jiangbo; Zhou, Zhifang

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory and numerical experiments were conducted to investigate the evolution of soil water evaporation during a continuous drying event. Simulated soil water contents and temperatures by the calibrated model well reproduced measured values at different depths. Results show that the evaporative drying process could be divided into three stages, beginning with a relatively high evaporation rate during stage 1, followed by a lower rate during transient stage and stage 2, and finally maintaining a very low and constant rate during stage 3. The condensation zone was located immediately below the evaporation zone in the profile. Both peaks of evaporation and condensation rate increased rapidly during stage 1 and transition stage, decreased during stage 2, and maintained constant during stage 3. The width of evaporation zone kept a continuous increase during stages 1 and 2 and maintained a nearly constant value of 0.68 cm during stage 3. When the evaporation zone totally moved into the subsurface, a dry surface layer (DSL) formed above the evaporation zone at the end of stage 2. The width of DSL also presented a continuous increase during stage 2 and kept a constant value of 0.71 cm during stage 3.

  13. EFFECT OF MAGNESIUM SULFATE (A LAXATIVE) ON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These effects were found to be significant (P<0.05). Eye care practitioners should advise their patients to desist from abusing laxatives and other over-the-counter drugs and should consider its effects during analysis of visual test finding for effective patient care. Magnesium sulfate, Laxatives, Accommodation, Convergence, ...

  14. Characterization of field compaction using shrinkage analysis and visual soil examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannes, Alice; Keller, Thomas; Weisskopf, Peter; Schulin, Rainer; Boivin, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    Visual field examination of soil structure can be very useful in extension work, because it is easy to perform, does not require equipment or lab analyses and the result is immediately available. The main limitations of visual methods are subjectivity and variation with field conditions. To provide reliable reference information, methods for objective and quantitative assessment of soil structure quality are still necessary. Soil shrinkage analysis (ShA) (Braudeau et al., 2004) provides relevant parameters for soil functions that allow precise and accurate assessment of soil compaction. To test it, we applied ShA to samples taken from a soil structure observatory (SSO) set up in 2014 on a loamy soil in Zurich, Switzerland to quantify the structural recovery of compacted agricultural soil. The objective in this presentation is to compare the ability of a visual examination method and ShA to assess soil compaction and structural recovery on the SSO field plots. Eighteen undisturbed soil samples were taken in the topsoil (5-10 cm) and 9 samples in the subsoil (30-35 cm) of compacted plots and control. Each sample went through ShA, followed by a visual examination of the sample and analysis of soil organic carbon and texture. ShA combines simultaneous shrinkage with water retention measurements and, in addition to soil properties such as bulk density, coarse and fine porosity, also provides information on hydrostructural stability and plasma and structural porosity. For visual examination the VESS method of Ball et al. (2007) was adapted to core samples previously equilibrated at -100 hPa matric potential. The samples were randomly and anonymously scored to avoid subjectivity and were equilibrated to insure comparable conditions. Compaction decreased the total specific volume, as well as air and water content at all matric potentials. Structural porosity was reduced, while plasma porosity remained unchanged. Compaction also changed the shape of the shrinkage curve: (i

  15. Application of fluorescent microscopy and cascade filtration methods for analysis of soil microbial community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Konstantin; Pinchuk, Irina; Gorodnichev, Roman; Polyanskaya, Lubov

    2016-04-01

    Methods establishment of soil microbial cells size estimation called from the importance of current needs of research in microbial ecology. Some of the methods need to be improved for more detailed view of changes happen in microbiome of terrestrial ecosystems. The combination of traditional microscopy methods, fluorescence and filtration in addition to cutting-edge DNA analysis gives a wide range of the approaches for soil microbial ecologists in their research questions. In the most of the cases the bacterial cells size is limited of the natural conditions such as lack of nutrients or stress factors due to heterogeneity of soil system. In the samples of soils, lakes and rivers sediments, snow and rain water the bacterial cells were detected minimally of 0.2 microns. We established the combination of the cascade filtration and fluorescent microscopy for complex analysis of different terrestrial ecosystems and various soil types. Our modification based on the use of successively filtered soil suspension for collection of microbes by the membrane pores decrease. Combination with fluorescence microscopy and DNA analysis via FISH method gave the presentation of microbial interactions and review of ecological strategies of soil microorganisms. Humus horizons of primitive arctic soil were the most favorable for bacterial growth. Quantified biomass of soil bacteria depends on the dominance of cells with specific dimensions caused of stress factors. The average bacterial size of different soil varied from 0.23 to 0.38 microns, however in humus horizons of arctic soil we detected the contrast dominance of the bigger bacterial cells sized of 1.85 microns. Fungi in this case contributed to increase the availability of organic matter for bacteria because the fungal mycelium forms the appreciable part of microbial biomass of primitive arctic soil. The dominant content of bigger bacterial cells in forest and fallow soil as well as the opposite situation in arable soils caused

  16. Analysis of black soil environment based on Arduino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Zhang, Y. F.; Wu, C. H.; Wang, J. F.

    2017-05-01

    As everyone knows, the black soil of Heilongjiang bred rice is famous in the world. How to use networking technology to detection the growth environment of Heilongjiang rice, and expands it to the local planting environment to our country is the most important topic. However, the growth environment of rice is complex. In current research, some importnat factors such as carbon dioxide, oxygen, temperature and humidity, pH value and microbial content in black soil that affect the growth of plants are selected, and a kind of black land based on data acquisition and transmission system based on the Arduino development environment and the mechanism construction of Kingview has been realized. The collected data was employed to establish the simulation environment for the growth of rice in Heilongjiang. It can be applied to stimulate the rice growing environment of Heilongjiang province, and gives a improvement of rice quality in other areas. Keywords: Arduino; Kingview; living environment

  17. A probabilistic analysis of the dynamic response of monopile foundations: Soil variability and its consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, M.; Andersen, L.V.; Ibsen, L.B.

    2015-01-01

    -analytical impedance functions of a monopile embedded in a stochastic linear viscoelastic soil layer, fully coupled aero-hydro-elastic simulations are conducted in the nonlinear multi-body code Hawc2. The probabilistic analysis accounts for the uncertainty of soil properties (e.g. damping and stiffness) and relies...... properties. Lognormal and Gumbel distributed modal damping and accumulated side-side fatigue damage equivalent moments with a coefficient of variation of 30% and 8%, respectively, are observed....

  18. The Preparation and Analysis of Soil Compost Material for Inorganic and Explosive Constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-10-01

    in the composting process and their effects on the decomposition of soil explosives. Inorganic Analysis In these studies a sample of uncontaminated... composting to decompose explosives such as TNT, HMX, and RDX in contaminated soils and sediments is an effective remediation procedure. In previous studies... COMPOST MATERIAL FOR INORGANIC AND EXPLOSIVE CONSTITUENTS Prepared For: U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, 21010

  19. Soil management for vegetable growing in the Philippine uplands: A bio-economic analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Akhter, Sanzida; Kenneth M. Menz

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Soil nutrient loss due to soil erosion and removal in harvest with traditional farming methods where farmers do not use any fertilisers threatens the sustainability of vegetable productions in the Philippine uplands. Consequently, poor farmers are losing incomes due to declining yields. The situation is reaching crisis point. A bio-economic analysis is used in this research to investigate the economic returns in terms of gross and net annual income over time for upland farmers from a...

  20. [Use of Remote Sensing for Crop and Soil Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsen, Chris J.

    1997-01-01

    The primary agricultural objective of this research is to determine what soil and crop information can be verified from remotely sensed images during the growing season. Specifically: (1) Elements of crop stress due to drought, weeds, disease and nutrient deficiencies will be documented with ground truth over specific agricultural sites and (2) Use of remote sensing with GPS and GIS technology for providing a safe and environmentally friendly application of fertilizers and chemicals will be documented.

  1. Sampling and analysis of alien materials in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liphard, K.G.

    1987-02-01

    For the determination of alien materials in soil, sampling is the decisive step. After minute planning, samples can be obtained by probing, boring or abrasion. Some types of substances can be verified by advance sampling, partly already in the field. Inorganic substances present as anions or cations are eluted and determined with water, heavy metals are determined after preparing a number of solutions by spectroscopic methods. Organic alien substances are extracted with solvents and, as a rule, analysed by chromatography.

  2. Computational analysis of difenoconazole interaction with soil chitinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlǎdoiu, D. L.; Filimon, M. N.; Ostafe, V.; Isvoran, A.

    2015-01-01

    This study focusses on the investigation of the potential binding of the fungicide difenoconazole to soil chitinases using a computational approach. Computational characterization of the substrate binding sites of Serratia marcescens and Bacillus cereus chitinases using Fpocket tool reflects the role of hydrophobic residues for the substrate binding and the high local hydrophobic density of both sites. Molecular docking study reveals that difenoconazole is able to bind to Serratia marcescens and Bacillus cereus chitinases active sites, the binding energies being comparable.

  3. Analysis of Eh Condition and Evolutional Trend of Paddy Soils in a Toposequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    javad seyedmohammadi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Paddy soils are important and the base of agriculture in Guilan province. It is necessary to recognize these soils for understanding of their limitations and optimum use. Unsaturated soil submerging is the cause of collection of chemical and electrochemical process that has significant effects on soil fertility. Eh, rH and pH are important indexes that are used to investigate oxidation and reduction condition in submerged soils and have abundant effects on activity and sorption rate of nutrients. Decrease of Eh and rH in poorly drainage of paddy soils affects availability and solubility of nutrient. Different Fe forms are used for analysis of soils evolution trend and submerging influences on changes of Fe forms. The aim of the present study was conducted to investigate the effect of redox potential changes on soil characteristics and analysis of soils evolutional trend in different physiographic units. Materials and Methods: The study area with 40000ha (at the east of Rasht city is located between 49° 31' to 49° 45' E longitude and 37° 7' to 37° 27' N latitude in North of Guilan Province, Northern Iran, in the southern coast of the Caspian sea with different water table depth. The climate of the region is very humid with the mean annual precipitation of 1293.6 mm. The mean annual temperature is 15.8°C. The soil moisture and temperature regimes are Aquic, Udicand Thermic, respectively. The parent materials are derived from river sediments. The soils formed on the plateaues and upper terraces, river alluvial plain and lowland physiographic units were classified as Inceptisols and the soils formed on coastal plain physiographic unit as Entisols. Air-dried soil samples were crushed and passed through a 2mm sieve. Particle-size distribution, organic carbon and cation exchange capacity were determined by hydrometric, wet oxidation and ammonium acetate methods, respectively. Eh by Eh electrode, total iron, free iron and amorphous

  4. Assessing earthworm and sewage sludge impacts on microbiological and biochemical soil quality using multivariate analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanye Jafari Vafa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Land application of organic wastes and biosolids such as municipal sewage sludge has been an important and attractive practice for improving different properties of agricultural soils with low organic matter content in semi-arid regions, due to an increase of soil organic matter level and fertility. However, application of this organic waste may directly or indirectly affect soil bio-indicators such as microbial and enzymatic activities through a change in the activity of other soil organisms such as earthworms. Earthworms are the most important soil saprophagous fauna and much of the faunal biomass is attributed to the presence of these organisms in the soil. Therefore, it is crucial to evaluate the effect of earthworm activity on soil microbial and biochemical attributes, in particularly when soils are amended with urban sewage sludge. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the earthworm effects on biochemical and microbiological properties of a calcareous soil amended with municipal sewage sludge using Factor Analysis (FA. Materials and Methods: In the present study, the experimental treatments were sewage sludge (without and with 1.5% sewage sludge as the first factor and earthworm (no earthworm, Eiseniafoetida from epigeic group, Allolobophracaliginosa from endogeic group and a mixture of the two species as the second factor. The study was setup as 2×4 full factorial experiment arranged in a completely randomized design with three replications for each treatment under greenhouse conditions over 90 days. A calcareous soil from the 0-30 cm layer with clay loam texture was obtained from a farmland field under fallow without cultivation history for ten years. The soil was air-dried and passed through a 2-mm sieve for the experiment. Sewage sludge as the soil organic amendment was collected from Wastewater Treatment Plant in Shahrekord. Sewage sludge was air-dried and grounded to pass through a 1-mm sieve for a uniform mixture

  5. Does agricultural crop diversity enhance soil microbial biomass and organic matter dynamics? A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, M D; Tiemann, L K; Grandy, A S

    2014-04-01

    Our increasing dependence on a small number of agricultural crops, such as corn, is leading to reductions in agricultural biodiversity. Reductions in the number of crops in rotation or the replacement of rotations by monocultures are responsible for this loss of biodiversity. The belowground implications of simplifying agricultural plant communities remain unresolved; however, agroecosystem sustainability will be severely compromised if reductions in biodiversity reduce soil C and N concentrations, alter microbial communities, and degrade soil ecosystem functions as reported in natural communities. We conducted a meta-analysis of 122 studies to examine crop rotation effects on total soil C and N concentrations, and the faster cycling microbial biomass C and N pools that play key roles in soil nutrient cycling and physical processes such as aggregate formation. We specifically examined how rotation crop type and management practices influence C and N dynamics in different climates and soil types. We found that adding one or more crops in rotation to a monoculture increased total soil C by 3.6% and total N by 5.3%, but when rotations included a cover crop (i.e., crops that are not harvested but produced to enrich the soil and capture inorganic N), total C increased by 8.5% and total N 12.8%. Rotations substantially increased the soil microbial biomass C (20.7%) and N (26.1%) pools, and these overwhelming effects on microbial biomass were not moderated by crop type or management practices. Crop rotations, especially those that include cover crops, sustain soil quality and productivity by enhancing soil C, N, and microbial biomass, making them a cornerstone for sustainable agroecosystems.

  6. [Investigation and analysis of heavy metal pollution related to soil-Panax notoginseng system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu; Mi, Yan-Hua; Lin, Xin; Liu, Da-Hui; Zeng, Min; Chen, Xiao-Yan

    2014-07-01

    In this study, five heavy metals contamination of soil and different parts of Panax notoginseng in the plantation area was investigated. Analysis of heavy metals correlation between the planting soil and P. notoginseng; and the absorption and accumulation characteristics and translocation of soil heavy metals by P. notoginseng plants was revealed. Through field investigation and laboratory analytical methods, analysis of China's 30 different soil P. notoginseng origin and content of heavy metals in five different parts of the P. notoginseng plant content of heavy metals. The results revealed that the soil heavy metals should not be neglected in the plantation area Referring to the national soil quality standards (GB15608-1995), the excessive degree of soil heavy metals pollution showed Hg > As > Cd > Cr in the plantation area, and Pb content of soil was in the scope of the standard. Refer to 'Green Industry Standards for Import and Export of Medical Plants and Preparations', the excessive degree of heavy metals content of P. notoginseng plants showed As > Pb > Cr > Cd, and Hg content of plants was in the scope of the standard. Concentrations of five heavy metals of underground parts of P. notoginseng plants are higher than aboveground, and heavy metals elements are more concentrated in the root, followed by the rhizome of P. notoginseng plants. Heavy metal accumulation characteristics of the different parts of the P. notoginseng of the overall performance is the root > the rhizome > the root tuber > leaves > stems. From the point of view BCF value analysis of various parts of the P. notoginseng plants to absorb heavy metals in soil, BCF values of all samples were less than 1, description P. notoginseng not belong Hyperaccumulator. From the view of transportation and related analysis of the soil-P. notoginseng systems, the rhizome of P. notoginseng and the content of As and Cr in soil was significantly correlated, the root of P. notoginseng and the content of Cd in

  7. Recent patterns of sulfate variability in pristine streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lins, H.F.

    1986-01-01

    Systematic modes of spatial and temporal variation in a 13-y record of stream sulfate from a nationwide network of headwater sampling stations are defined using principal components. Based on the undisturbed nature of the sampling network, it is suggested that these modes of stream sulfate variability are analogues for variations in acid deposition. Three statistically significant components, accounting for approximately 50% of the total stream sulfate variance, are identified. Analysis of component loadings and scores indicates that a major transition occurred in the early 1970s when stream sulfate concentrations in the northeast changed from persistently above mean levels to persistently below. At the same time concentrations of sulfate in Gulf and Southeast Atlantic coast streams shifted from persistently below to persistently above mean concentrations. Significantly, these changes occurred contemporaneously with regional trends in sulfate emissions which can generally be characterized as decreasing in the northeast and increasing in the southeast.Systematic modes of spatial and temporal variation in a 13-y record of stream sulfate from a nationwide network of headwater sampling stations are defined using principal components. Based on the undisturbed nature of the sampling network, it is suggested that these modes of stream sulfate variability are analogues for variations in acid deposition. Three statistically significant components, accounting for approximately 50% of the total stream sulfate variance, are identified. Analysis of component loadings and scores indicates that a major transition occurred in the early 1970s when stream sulfate concentrations in the northeast changed from persistently above mean levels to persistently below. At the same time concentrations of sulfate in Gulf and Southeast Atlantic coast streams shifted from persistently below to persistently above mean concentrations.

  8. Sulfate, chloride and fluoride retention in Andosols exposed to volcanic acid emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delmelle, Pierre; Delfosse, Thomas; Delvaux, Bruno

    2003-12-01

    The continuous emissions of SO{sub 2}, HCl and HF by Masaya volcano, Nicaragua, represent a substantial source of atmospheric S-, Cl- and F-containing acid inputs for local ecosystems. We report on the effects of such acid depositions on the sulfate, chloride and fluoride contents in soils (0-40 cm) from two distinct transects located downwind from the volcano. The first transect corresponds to relatively undifferentiated Vitric Andosols, and the second transect to more weathered Eutric Andosols. These soils are exposed to various rates of volcanogenic acid addition, with the Vitric sites being generally more affected. Prolonged acid inputs have led to a general pH decrease and reduced exchangeable base cation concentrations in the Andosols. The concentrations of 0.5 M NH{sub 4}F- and 0.016 M KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}-extractable sulfate (NH{sub 4}F-S and KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}-S, respectively) indicate that volcanic S addition has increased the inorganic sulfate content of the Vitric and Eutric soils at all depths. In this process, the rate of sulfate accumulation is also dependent on soil allophane contents. For all soils, NH{sub 4}F extracted systematically more (up to 40 times) sulfate than KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}. This difference suggests sulfate incorporation into an aluminum hydroxy sulfate phase, whose contribution to total inorganic sulfate in the Vitric and Eutric Andosols is estimated from {approx}34 to 95% and {approx}65 to 98%, respectively. The distribution of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}-extractable chloride in the Vitric and Eutric Andosols exposed to volcanic Cl inputs reveals that added chloride readily migrates through the soil profiles. In contrast, reaction of fluoride with Al and Fe oxyhydroxides and allophanes is an important sink mechanism in the Masaya Andosols exposed to airborne volcanic F. Fluoride dominates the anion distribution in all soil horizons, although F is the least concentrated element in the volcanic emissions and depositions. The soil anion

  9. [Soil Heavy Metal Spatial Distribution and Source Analysis Around an Aluminum Plant in Baotou].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lian-ke; Li, Hai-peng; Huang, Xue-min; Li, Yu-mei; Jiao, Kun-ling; Sun, Peng; Wang, Wei-da

    2016-03-15

    The soil with 500 m distance from an aluminum plant in Baotou was studied. A total of 64 soil samples were taken from the 0-5 cm, 5-20 cm, 20-40 cm and 40-60 cm layers, and the contents of Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Cd, Ni and Mn were tested, respectively. The correlation analysis and principal component analysis were used to identify the sources of these heavy metals in soils. The results suggested that the contents of Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Cd, Ni and Mn in study area were 32.9, 50.35, 69.92, 43.78, 0.54, 554.42 and 36.65 mg · kg⁻¹ respectively. All seven heavy metals tested were overweight compared with the background values of soil in Inner Mongolia. The spatial distribution of heavy metals showed that the horizontal distribution of heavy metals was obviously enriched in the southwest, while in vertical distribution, the heavy metal content (0 to 5 cm) was highest in the surface soil, and the heavy metal content decreased with increasing depth and tended to be stabilized when the depth was over 20 cm. Source analysis showed that the source of Cu, Zn, Cr and Mn might be influenced by the aluminum plant and the surrounding industrial activity. The source of Pb and Cd might be mainly related to road transportation. The source of Ni may be affected by agricultural activities and soil parent material together.

  10. Network analysis reveals that bacteria and fungi form modules that correlate independently with soil parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Menezes, Alexandre B; Prendergast-Miller, Miranda T; Richardson, Alan E; Toscas, Peter; Farrell, Mark; Macdonald, Lynne M; Baker, Geoff; Wark, Tim; Thrall, Peter H

    2015-08-01

    Network and multivariate statistical analyses were performed to determine interactions between bacterial and fungal community terminal restriction length polymorphisms as well as soil properties in paired woodland and pasture sites. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) revealed that shifts in woodland community composition correlated with soil dissolved organic carbon, while changes in pasture community composition correlated with moisture, nitrogen and phosphorus. Weighted correlation network analysis detected two distinct microbial modules per land use. Bacterial and fungal ribotypes did not group separately, rather all modules comprised of both bacterial and fungal ribotypes. Woodland modules had a similar fungal : bacterial ribotype ratio, while in the pasture, one module was fungal dominated. There was no correspondence between pasture and woodland modules in their ribotype composition. The modules had different relationships to soil variables, and these contrasts were not detected without the use of network analysis. This study demonstrated that fungi and bacteria, components of the soil microbial communities usually treated as separate functional groups as in a CCA approach, were co-correlated and formed distinct associations in these adjacent habitats. Understanding these distinct modular associations may shed more light on their niche space in the soil environment, and allow a more realistic description of soil microbial ecology and function. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Effects of straw carbon input on carbon dynamics in agricultural soils: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Lu, Meng; Cui, Jun; Li, Bo; Fang, Changming

    2014-05-01

    Straw return has been widely recommended as an environmentally friendly practice to manage carbon (C) sequestration in agricultural ecosystems. However, the overall trend and magnitude of changes in soil C in response to straw return remain uncertain. In this meta-analysis, we calculated the response ratios of soil organic C (SOC) concentrations, greenhouse gases (GHGs) emission, nutrient contents and other important soil properties to straw addition in 176 published field studies. Our results indicated that straw return significantly increased SOC concentration by 12.8 ± 0.4% on average, with a 27.4 ± 1.4% to 56.6 ± 1.8% increase in soil active C fraction. CO2 emission increased in both upland (27.8 ± 2.0%) and paddy systems (51.0 ± 2.0%), while CH4 emission increased by 110.7 ± 1.2% only in rice paddies. N2 O emission has declined by 15.2 ± 1.1% in paddy soils but increased by 8.3 ± 2.5% in upland soils. Responses of macro-aggregates and crop yield to straw return showed positively linear with increasing SOC concentration. Straw-C input rate and clay content significantly affected the response of SOC. A significant positive relationship was found between annual SOC sequestered and duration, suggesting that soil C saturation would occur after 12 years under straw return. Overall, straw return was an effective means to improve SOC accumulation, soil quality, and crop yield. Straw return-induced improvement of soil nutrient availability may favor crop growth, which can in turn increase ecosystem C input. Meanwhile, the analysis on net global warming potential (GWP) balance suggested that straw return increased C sink in upland soils but increased C source in paddy soils due to enhanced CH4 emission. Our meta-analysis suggested that future agro-ecosystem models and cropland management should differentiate the effects of straw return on ecosystem C budget in upland and paddy soils. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. BRACHIARIA IN SELENIUM-CONTAMINATED SOIL UNDER SULPHUR SOURCE APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia de Abreu Faria

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT High contents of plant-available selenium in the soil in the form of selenate, resulting from natural or anthropogenic action, jeopardizes agricultural areas and requires research for solutions to establish or re-establish agricultural or livestock operation, avoiding the risk of poisoning of plants, animals and humans. The purpose was to evaluate sulfur sources in the form of sulfate, e.g., ammonium sulfate, calcium sulfate, ferric sulfate, in the remediation of tropical soils anthropogenically contaminated with Se under the tropical forage grass Brachiaria brizantha (Hochst. ex A. Rich. Stapf cv. Marandu. More clayey soils are less able to supply plants with Se, which influences the effects of S sources, but it was found that high soil Se concentrations negatively affected forage biomass production, regardless of the soil. Of the tested S sources, the highly soluble ammonium sulfate and ferric sulfate reduced plant Se uptake and raised the available sulfur content in the soil.

  13. Dermatan sulfate in tunicate phylogeny: Order-specific sulfation pattern and the effect of [→4IdoA(2-Sulfateβ-1→3GalNAc(4-Sulfateβ-1→] motifs in dermatan sulfate on heparin cofactor II activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugahara Kazuyuki

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously, we have reported the presence of highly sulfated dermatans in solitary ascidians from the orders Phlebobranchia (Phallusia nigra and Stolidobranchia (Halocynthia pyriformis and Styela plicata. Despite the identical disaccharide backbone, consisting of [→4IdoA(2Sβ-1→3GalNAcβ-1→], those polymers differ in the position of sulfation on the N-Acetyl galactosamine, which can occur at carbon 4 or 6. We have shown that position rather than degree of sulfation is important for heparin cofactor II activity. As a consequence, 2,4- and 2,6-sulfated dermatans have high and low heparin cofactor II activities, respectively. In the present study we extended the disaccharide analysis of ascidian dermatan sulfates to additional species of the orders Stolidobranchia (Herdmania pallida, Halocynthia roretzi and Phlebobranchia (Ciona intestinalis, aiming to investigate how sulfation evolved within Tunicata. In addition, we analysed how heparin cofactor II activity responds to dermatan sulfates containing different proportions of 2,6- or 2,4-disulfated units. Results Disaccharide analyses indicated a high content of disulfated disaccharide units in the dermatan sulfates from both orders. However, the degree of sulfation decreased from Stolidobranchia to Phlebobranchia. While 76% of the disaccharide units in dermatan sulfates from stolidobranch ascidians are disulfated, 53% of disulfated disaccharides are found in dermatan sulfates from phlebobranch ascidians. Besides this notable difference in the sulfation degree, dermatan sulfates from phlebobranch ascidians contain mainly 2,6-sulfated disaccharides whereas dermatan sulfate from the stolidobranch ascidians contain mostly 2,4-sulfated disaccharides, suggesting that the biosynthesis of dermatan sulfates might be differently regulated during tunicates evolution. Changes in the position of sulfation on N-acetylgalactosamine in the disaccharide [→4IdoA(2-Sulfateβ-1→3GalNAcβ-1

  14. Thermal volatilization (TV) of different hyperarid Mars like-soils from the Atacama Desert: Implications for the analysis of the Phoenix Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia-Silva, J. E.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; McKay, C. P.

    2008-09-01

    in the center of platinum coil filament pyrolizer probe. Then sample into de quartz tube was subjected to a thermal treatment from 30°C to 1200°C with a heating rate of 20°C/min. The resulting volatiles evolved from the sample were carried away by helium and transferred into a HP quadrupole mass spectrometer operating in electron ionization mode at 70 eV with a resolution of 1m/z. The mass analyzer was scanned from 10 to 200 m/z at a rate 5.3 scans per second. The nominal sensitivity of the mass analyzer is 0.02 ppb of hexachlorobenzene. Blanks were prepared with no soil added. As expected, there were significant differences in the evolved gas behaviors between soils samples depending of the soil matrix under similar heating conditions. First, the samples belonging to the most arid environments (PE001, PE389) had significant differences compared with less arid soils (PE378, PE386). Carbon in hyperarid soils, in the form of CO2 (ion 44 m/z) began its release to 330±30°C, while the less arid soils to 245±45°C. Volatile ions released from soils during TV-MS analysis were analyzed searching organics fragments. Soil type VI (PE-001), which contains ~11.4 ppm organic C, showed the release of the following mass fragments: 18, 44, 48, 64, and 66. Sources for the release of CO2 in TV analysis of soils comes to oxidation of organic matter (600ºC). Mass 18 originates from water releasing in the course of dehydration processes that is bound in soil minerals, and from oxidation of organics in different temperatures depending the mineral fraction in the soil. The masses 48, 64, and 66 have similar thermal properties, beginning to be released at ~370°C and continue to rise up to 1200°C. These masses are due to the decomposition of sulfates into SO+, SO2 +, and S34O2 +. Mass 66 is detected only if the abundance of mass 64 is very high. TV traces from soils type V (PE-276), type I (PE-361), and type II (PE-388), which contain low organics concentrations (3-23 ppm of organic

  15. Heat and water transport in soils and across the soil-atmosphere interface: 2. Numerical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fetzer, Thomas; Vanderborght, Jan; Mosthaf, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    evaluate the consequences of these simplifications and parameterizations. Two sets of simulations were performed. The first set investigates lateral variations in vertical fluxes, which emerge from both homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media, and their importance to capturing evaporation behavior. When...... evaporation decreases from parts of the heterogeneous soil surface, lateral flow and transport processes in the free flow and in the porous medium generate feedbacks that enhance evaporation from wet surface areas. In the second set of simulations, we assume that the vertical fluxes do not vary considerably...... in the simulation domain and represent the system using one-dimensional models which also consider dynamic forcing of the evaporation process, for example, due to diurnal variations in net radiation. Simulated evaporation fluxes subjected to dynamic forcing differed considerably between model concepts depending...

  16. Analysis of soil microbial communities based on amplicon sequencing of marker genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schöler, Anne; Jacquiod, Samuel; Vestergaard, Gisle

    2017-01-01

    The use of cultivation independent methods has revolutionized soil biology in the last decades. Most popular approaches are based on directly extracted DNA from soil and subsequent analysis of PCR-amplified marker genes by next-generation sequencing. While these high-throughput methods offer novel...... possibilities over cultivation-based approaches, several key points need to be considered to minimize potential biases during library preparation and downstream bioinformatic analysis. This opinion paper highlights crucial steps that should be considered for accurate analysis and data interpretation....

  17. An Application of Discriminant Analysis to Pattern Recognition of Selected Contaminated Soil Features in Thin Sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribeiro, Alexandra B.; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    1997-01-01

    qualitative microprobe results: present elements Al, Si, Cr, Fe, As (associated with others). Selected groups of calibrated images (same light conditions and magnification) submitted to discriminant analysis, in order to find a pattern of recognition in the soil features corresponding to contamination already...... concentrations of contaminants are indicated by chemical wet analysis, these contaminants must occur directly in the solid phase. Thin sections of soil aggregates were scanned for Cu, Cr and As using an electron microprobe, and qualitative analysis was made on selected areas. Microphotographs of thin sections...

  18. Multivariate analysis of the chemical properties of the eroded brown soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Alejandro Villazón Gómez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The work was carried out with the data obtained of 30 profiles of Brown soils classified according to the effect of erosion. With the objective of determining, by means of a multivariate analysis, the effect of the erosion on the chemicals properties of the Brown soils was carried out a Discriminant and Principals Components Analysis. It was evaluated the chemicals variables pH in water, pH in KCl, organic matter, calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium and S, T and V values. The Multivariate Analysis allowed establishing that magnesium is the only chemical property that evidence contraposition with the other variables, due to the harmful effect that this base exerts on the soil aggregates, which can accelerate or stressing the action of the erosive processes in the Brown soils. In the Principals Components Analysis, then components represented by the influence of the soil reaction, the absorbing complex and magnesium accumulate 78.75 % of the variance. The Discriminant Analysis explains the 97.06 % of the total of the variation in the two first axes, with the 93.33 % of good classification, with all the groups conformed by the categories of erosion well told apart among themselves.

  19. Analysis of heavy metal sources in soil using kriging interpolation on principal components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Hoehun; Olson, James R; Bian, Ling; Rogerson, Peter A

    2014-05-06

    Anniston, Alabama has a long history of operation of foundries and other heavy industry. We assessed the extent of heavy metal contamination in soils by determining the concentrations of 11 heavy metals (Pb, As, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Mn, Hg, Ni, V, and Zn) based on 2046 soil samples collected from 595 industrial and residential sites. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was adopted to characterize the distribution of heavy metals in soil in this region. In addition, a geostatistical technique (kriging) was used to create regional distribution maps for the interpolation of nonpoint sources of heavy metal contamination using geographical information system (GIS) techniques. There were significant differences found between sampling zones in the concentrations of heavy metals, with the exception of the levels of Ni. Three main components explaining the heavy metal variability in soils were identified. The results suggest that Pb, Cd, Cu, and Zn were associated with anthropogenic activities, such as the operations of some foundries and major railroads, which released these heavy metals, whereas the presence of Co, Mn, and V were controlled by natural sources, such as soil texture, pedogenesis, and soil hydrology. In general terms, the soil levels of heavy metals analyzed in this study were higher than those reported in previous studies in other industrial and residential communities.

  20. Comparative statistical analysis of chrome and vegetable tanning effluents and their effects on related soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Saadia R; Shah, Munir H; Shaheen, Nazia

    2009-09-30

    Two tanning units of Pakistan, namely, Kasur and Mian Channun were investigated with respect to the tanning processes (chrome and vegetable, respectively) and the effects of the tanning agents on the quality of soil in vicinity of tanneries were evaluated. The effluent and soil samples from 16 tanneries each of Kasur and Mian Channun were collected. The levels of selected metals (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Cr, Mn, Co, Cd, Ni, Pb and Zn) were determined by using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer under optimum analytical conditions. The data thus obtained were subjected to univariate and multivariate statistical analyses. Most of the metals exhibited considerably higher concentrations in the effluents and soils of Kasur compared with those of Mian Channun. It was observed that the soil of Kasur was highly contaminated by Na, K, Ca and Mg emanating from various processes of leather manufacture. Furthermore, the levels of Cr were also present at much enhanced levels than its background concentration due to the adoption of chrome tanning. The levels of Cr determined in soil samples collected from the vicinity of Mian Channun tanneries were almost comparable to the background levels. The soil of this city was found to have contaminated only by the metals originating from pre-tanning processes. The apportionment of selected metals in the effluent and soil samples was determined by a multivariate cluster analysis, which revealed significant differences in chrome and vegetable tanning processes.

  1. Regional investigations of soil and overburden analysis and plant uptake of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, L.P.

    1984-01-01

    Regional studies on the bioavailability of metals at native and disturbed sites were conducted over the past seven years by the USGS. The work was concentrated in the Fort Union, Powder River, and Green River coal resource regions where measures of extractable metals in soils were found to have limited use in predicting metal levels in plants. Correlations between Cu, Fe, and Zn in plants and extractable (DTPA, EDTA, and oxalate) or total levels in native A- and C-horizons of soil were occasionally significant. A simple linear model is generally not adequate, however, in estimating element uptake by plants. Prediction capabilities were improved when a number of soil chemical and physical parameters were included as independent variables in a stepwise linear multiple regression analysis; however, never more than 54% of the total variability in the data was explained by the equations for these metals. Soil pH was the most important variable relating soil chemistry to plant chemistry. This relation was always positive and apparently a response to soil levels of metal carbonates and not Fe and Mn oxides. Studies that compared the metal uptake by rehabilitation species to extractable (DTPA) metal levels in mice soils produced similar results. ?? 1984 Science and Technology Letters.

  2. Spatio temporal analysis of microbial habitats in soil-root interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eickhorst, Thilo; Schmidt, Hannes

    2017-04-01

    Microbial habitats in soils are formed by the arrangement and availability of inorganic and organic compounds. They can be characterized by physico-chemical parameters and the resulting colonization by microorganisms. Areas being preferably colonized are known as microbial hot spots which can be found in (bio)pores within the aggregatusphere or in the rhizosphere. The latter is directly influenced by plants i.e. the growth and activity of plant roots which has an influence on physico-chemical dynamics in the rhizosphere and can even shape plants' root microbiome. As microbial communities play an important role in nutrient cycling their response in soil-root interfaces is of great importance. Especially in complex systems such as paddy soils used for the cultivation of wetland rice the analysis of spatio-temporal aspects is important to get knowledge about their influence on the microbial dynamics in the respective habitats. But also other spatial variations on larger scales up to landscape scale may have an impact on the soil microorganisms in their habitats. This PICO presentation will introduce a set of techniques which are useful to analyze both the physico-chemical characteristics of microbial habitats and the microbial colonization and dynamics in soil-root interfaces. Examples will be given on various studies from rice cultivation in different paddy soils up to an European transect representing rhizosphere soils of selected plant species.

  3. Numerical investigation of soil and buried structures using finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Shirzad Shahrivar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Today the important of studying soil effect on behavior of soil  contacted structures such as foundations, piles,  retaining wall and other similar structures is so much that neglecting of soil-structure interaction effect can cause to untrue results. In this paper soil-structure interaction simulation was done by using Finite element method analysis with ABAQUS version 6.13-14.The results has been presented based on pile function in contact with soil, vertical stresses in soil and structures, pore pressure in drained and undrained condition and underground water level.Final conclusions revealed that pore pressure effect is not uniform on all parts of pile and amount of pore pressure increment in top elements is lower than down elements of  pile.Further it was proven that average amount of vertical stress on end of pile is    of this stress on top of the pile. thus it was concluded that 70% of pile bearing capacity is depend on friction of soil and pile contact surface.

  4. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Qualitative Analysis of Metals in Simulated Martian Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowry, Curtis; Milofsky, Rob; Collins, William; Pimentel, Adam S.

    2017-01-01

    This laboratory introduces students to laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the analysis of metals in soil and rock samples. LIBS employs a laser-initiated spark to induce electronic excitation of metal atoms. Ensuing atomic emission allows for qualitative and semiquantitative analysis. The students use LIBS to analyze a series of…

  5. Genome-Wide Expression Analysis of Human In Vivo Irritated Epidermis: Differential Profiles Induced by Sodium Lauryl Sulfate and Nonanoic Acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Anders; Andersen, Klaus E; Clemmensen, Ole

    2010-01-01

    the differential molecular events induced in the epidermis by different irritants, we collected sequential biopsies ((1/2), 4, and 24 hours after a single exposure and at day 11 after repeated exposure) from human volunteers exposed to either sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) or nonanoic acid (NON). Gene expression...

  6. Crystal structure of tris(piperidinium hydrogen sulfate sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara J. Lukianova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the title molecular salt, 3C5H12N+·HSO4−·SO42−, each cation adopts a chair conformation. In the crystal, the hydrogen sulfate ion is connected to the sulfate ion by a strong O—H...O hydrogen bond. The packing also features a number of N—H...O hydrogen bonds, which lead to a three-dimensional network structure. The hydrogen sulfate anion accepts four hydrogen bonds from two cations, whereas the sulfate ion, as an acceptor, binds to five separate piperidinium cations, forming seven hydrogen bonds.

  7. Investigation of Chlorosis in Peach Trees Growing in the Tokat Region Using Soil and Plant Analysis and the Effects of Soil Moisture on the Determination of the Amounts of DTPA-exractable Fe, Cu, Zn and Mn

    OpenAIRE

    Karaman, M.Rüştü

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was the fertility analysis of soil and leaf samples collected from areas under ohlorotic and healty peach trees, and the determination of the periodical relationship between the soil properties and nutrition status of trees. The effects of soil moisture on the amounts of DTPA-extractable Fe, Cu, Zn and Mn in soil collected from these areas were also determined by incubation study. The plant and soil analysis conducted at two different stages of the growing season showed ...

  8. Soil Particle Size Analysis by Laser Diffractometry: Result Comparison with Pipette Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šinkovičová, Miroslava; Igaz, Dušan; Kondrlová, Elena; Jarošová, Miriam

    2017-10-01

    Soil texture as the basic soil physical property provides a basic information on the soil grain size distribution as well as grain size fraction representation. Currently, there are several methods of particle dimension measurement available that are based on different physical principles. Pipette method based on the different sedimentation velocity of particles with different diameter is considered to be one of the standard methods of individual grain size fraction distribution determination. Following the technical advancement, optical methods such as laser diffraction can be also used nowadays for grain size distribution determination in the soil. According to the literature review of domestic as well as international sources related to this topic, it is obvious that the results obtained by laser diffractometry do not correspond with the results obtained by pipette method. The main aim of this paper was to analyse 132 samples of medium fine soil, taken from the Nitra River catchment in Slovakia, from depths of 15-20 cm and 40-45 cm, respectively, using laser analysers: ANALYSETTE 22 MicroTec plus (Fritsch GmbH) and Mastersizer 2000 (Malvern Instruments Ltd). The results obtained by laser diffractometry were compared with pipette method and the regression relationships using linear, exponential, power and polynomial trend were derived. Regressions with the three highest regression coefficients (R2) were further investigated. The fit with the highest tightness was observed for the polynomial regression. In view of the results obtained, we recommend using the estimate of the representation of the clay fraction (Soil Survey done in Slovakia) in soil is the determinant for soil type specification, we recommend using the derived relationships in soil science when the soil texture analysis is done according to laser diffractometry. The advantages of laser diffraction method comprise the short analysis time, usage of small sample amount, application for the various

  9. Analysis of a Least-Squares Soil Moisture Retrieval Algorithm from L-band Passive Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Monerris

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS mission of the European Space Agency (ESA, launched on November 2009, is an unprecedented initiative to globally monitor surface soil moisture using a novel 2-D L-band interferometric radiometer concept. Airborne campaigns and ground-based field experiments have proven that radiometers operating at L-band are highly sensitive to soil moisture, due to the large contrast between the dielectric constant of soil minerals and water. Still, soil moisture inversion from passive microwave observations is complex, since the microwave emission from soils depends strongly on its moisture content but also on other surface characteristics such as soil type, soil roughness, surface temperature and vegetation cover, and their contributions must be carefully de-coupled in the retrieval process. In the present study, different soil moisture retrieval configurations are examined, depending on whether prior information is used in the inversion process or not. Retrievals are formulated in terms of vertical (Tvv and horizontal (Thh polarizations separately and using the first Stokes parameter (TI , over six main surface conditions combining dry, moist and wet soils with bare and vegetation-covered surfaces. A sensitivity analysis illustrates the influence that the geophysical variables dominating the Earth’s emission at L-band have on the precision of the retrievals, for each configuration. It shows that, if adequate constraints on the ancillary data are added, the algorithm should converge to more accurate estimations. SMOS-like brightness temperatures are also generated by the SMOS End-to-end Performance Simulator (SEPS to assess the retrieval errors produced by the different cost function configurations. Better soil moisture retrievals are obtained when the inversion is constrained with prior information, in line with the sensitivity study, and more robust estimates are obtained using TI than using Tvv and Thh. This

  10. Analysis of shallow landslides and soil erosion induced by rainfall over large areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuomo, Sabatino; Della Sala, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Due to heavy rainstorms, steep hillslopes may be affected by either shallow landslides or soil superficial erosion (Acharya et al., 2011), which originate different flow-like mass movements in adjacent or overlapping source areas (Cascini et al., 2013). Triggering analysis (Cascini et al., 2011) is a relevant issue for hazard assessment that is, in turn, the first step of risk analysis procedures (Fell et al., 2008). Nevertheless, the available approaches separately consider shallow landslides and soil erosion. Specifically, quantitative models for landslides triggering analysis allow simulating the physical processes leading to failure such as pore water pressure increase and soil shear mobilization and provide estimates of the amount of material potentially involved; however, success of quantitative methods must be carefully evaluated in complex geological setting as recently outlined (Sorbino et al., 2010) and further applications to real case histories are straightforward. On the other hand, a wide range of models exist for soil erosion analysis, which differ in terms of complexity, processes considered and data required for the model calibration and practical applications; in particular, quantitative models can estimate the source areas and the amount of eroded soil through empirical relationships or mathematical equations describing the main physical processes governing soil erosion (Merritt et al., 2003). In this work a spatially distributed analysis is proposed for testing the potentialities of two available models to respectively investigate the spatial occurrence of first-time shallow landslides and superficial soil erosion repeatedly occurring in a large test area of the Southern Italy. Both analyses take into account the seasonal variation of soil suction, rainfall characteristics and soil cover use (Cuomo and Della Sala, 2013). The achieved results show that the source areas of shallow landslides strongly depend on rainfall intensity and duration and

  11. Bioreactor performance and functional gene analysis of microbial community in a limited-oxygen fed bioreactor for co-reduction of sulfate and nitrate with high organic input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xi-jun; Chen, Chuan; Wang, Ai-jie; Yu, Hao; Zhou, Xu; Guo, Hong-liang; Yuan, Ye; Lee, Duu-jong; Zhou, Jizhong; Ren, Nan-qi

    2014-08-15

    Limited-oxygen mediated synergistic relationships between sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) and sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (SOB, including nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria NR-SOB) were predicted to simultaneously remove contaminants of nitrate, sulfate and high COD, and eliminate sulfide generation. A lab-scale experiment was conducted to examine the impact of limited oxygen on these oxy-anions degradation, sulfide oxidation and associated microbial functional responses. In all scenarios tested, the reduction of both nitrate and sulfate was almost complete. When limited-oxygen was fed into bioreactors, S(0) formation was significantly improved up to ∼ 70%. GeoChip 4.0, a functional gene microarray, was used to determine the microbial gene diversity and functional potential for nitrate and sulfate reduction, and sulfide oxidation. The diversity of the microbial community in bioreactors was increased with the feeding of limited oxygen. Whereas the intensities of the functional genes involved in sulfate reduction did not show a significant difference, the abundance of the detected denitrification genes decreased in limited oxygen samples. More importantly, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria may alter their populations/genes in response to limited oxygen potentially to function more effectively in sulfide oxidation, especially to elemental sulfur. The genes fccA/fccB from nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB), such as Paracoccus denitrificans, Thiobacillus denitrificans, Beggiatoa sp., Thiomicrospira sp., and Thioalkalivibrio sp., were more abundant under limited-oxygen condition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Machine-assisted analysis of Landsat data in the study of crop-soils relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draeger, William C.

    1976-01-01

    To date, relatively few studies have dealt with crop-soil interactions as they affect the appearance of agricultural areas on Landsat imagery, and hence crop and soil classification or the analysis of agricultural land use.The Image 100, a computer-based data analysis system which allows an interpreter to interact directly and rapidly with Landsat computer compatible tape data, provided a tool to assist in the evaluation of the extent and significance of these interactions. Used with timely and accurate ground data, the system made possible a determination of the variability in crop spectral appearance, from soil type to soil type, as recorded on Landsat data. Information was provided in the form of spectral distribution histrograms for each crop-soil class on each Landsat band. Several crop categories in a test area in  rookings County, South Dakota, were classified using training fields that were selected to be representative of each major crop-soil class. Accuracies in each case, on a total acreage basis, were greater than 90 percent.

  13. Exploration of geo-mineral compounds in granite mining soils using XRD pattern data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koteswara Reddy, G.; Yarakkula, Kiran

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the major minerals present in granite mining waste and agricultural soils near and away from mining areas. The mineral exploration of representative sub-soil samples are identified by X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD) pattern data analysis. The morphological features and quantitative elementary analysis was performed by Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersed Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS).The XRD pattern data revealed that the major minerals are identified as Quartz, Albite, Anorthite, K-Feldspars, Muscovite, Annite, Lepidolite, Illite, Enstatite and Ferrosilite in granite waste. However, in case of agricultural farm soils the major minerals are identified as Gypsum, Calcite, Magnetite, Hematite, Muscovite, K-Feldspars and Quartz. Moreover, the agricultural soils neighbouring mining areas, the minerals are found that, the enriched Mica group minerals (Lepidolite and Illite) the enriched Orthopyroxene group minerals (Ferrosilite and Enstatite). It is observed that the Mica and Orthopyroxene group minerals are present in agricultural farm soils neighbouring mining areas and absent in agricultural farm soils away from mining areas. The study demonstrated that the chemical migration takes place at agricultural farm lands in the vicinity of the granite mining areas.

  14. Multivariate analysis of soil moisture and runoff dynamics for better understanding of catchment moisture state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graeff, Thomas; Bronstert, Axel; Cunha Costa, Alexandre; Zehe, Erwin

    2010-05-01

    Soil moisture is a key state that controls runoff formation, infiltration and portioning of radiation into latent and sensible heat flux. The experimental characterisation of near surface soil moisture patterns and their controls on runoff formation is, however, still largely untapped. Using an intelligent sampling strategy of two TDR clusters installed in the head water of the Wilde Weißeritz catchment (Eastern Ore Mountains, Germany), we investigated how well "the catchment state" may be characterised by means of distributed soil moisture data observed at the field scale. A grassland site and a forested site both located on gentle slopes were instrumented with two Spatial TDR clusters (STDR) that consist of 39 and 32 coated TDR probes of 60 cm length. The interplay of soil moisture and runoff formation was interrogated using discharge data from three nested catchments: the Becherbach with a size of 2 km², the Rehefeld catchment (17 km²) and the superordinate Ammelsdorf catchment (49 km²). Multiple regression analysis and information theory including observations of groundwater levels, soil moisture and rainfall intensity were employed to predict stream flow. On the small scale we found a strong correlation between the average soil moisture and the runoff coefficients of rainfall-runoff events, which almost explains as much variability as the pre-event runoff. There was, furthermore, a strong correlation between surface soil moisture and subsurface wetness. With increasing catchment size, the explanatory power of soil moisture reduced, but it was still in a good accordance to the former results. Combining those results with a recession analysis of soil moisture and discharge we derived a first conceptual model of the dominant runoff mechanisms operating in these catchments, namely subsurface flow, but also by groundwater. The multivariate analysis indicated that the proposed sampling strategy of clustering TDR probes in typical functional units is a promising

  15. 3D Bearing Capacity of Structured Cells Supported on Cohesive Soil: Simplified Analysis Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Galván Sergio Antonio

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a simplified analysis method to compute the bearing capacity of structured cell foundations subjected to vertical loading and supported in soft cohesive soil is proposed. A structured cell is comprised by a top concrete slab structurally connected to concrete external walls that enclose the natural soil. Contrary to a box foundation it does not include a bottom slab and hence, the soil within the walls becomes an important component of the structured cell. This simplified method considers the three-dimensional geometry of the cell, the undrained shear strength of cohesive soils and the existence of structural continuity between the top concrete slab and the surrounding walls, along the walls themselves and the walls structural joints. The method was developed from results of numerical-parametric analyses, from which it was found that structured cells fail according to a punching-type mechanism.

  16. Brief Overview of Using Nonlinear Seismology in Analysis of the Soil Deposits Effects on Structure Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florin Balan, Stefan; Apostol, Bogdan Felix; Ionescu, Constantin

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of the paper is to show the great influence of nonlinear seismology in the analysis of the soil deposit response. Some elements about nonlinear seismology, the complexity of the seismic phenomenon are presented, and how we perceive seismic input for constructions at the surface of the earth. Further is presented the nonlinear behaviour of soil deposits during strong earthquakes as it results from resonant column tests (in laboratory) and from the spectral amplification factors (in situ records). The resonance phenomenon between natural period of a structure and soil deposit during strong earthquakes is analysed. All these studies have in common nonlinear behaviour of the soil deposit during strong earthquakes, in fact, the site where a new construction is built or an old one is rehabilitated and needs an optional assessment for mitigation seismic risk. All these studies stand up in supporting nonlinear seismology, the seismology of the XXI-st century.

  17. Vinasse fertirrigation alters soil resistome dynamics: an analysis based on metagenomic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Lucas P P; Alves, Rafael F; Dellias, Marina T F; Navarrete, Acacio A; Basso, Thiago O; Tsai, Siu M

    2017-01-01

    Every year around 300 Gl of vinasse, a by-product of ethanol distillation in sugarcane mills, are flushed into more than 9 Mha of sugarcane cropland in Brazil. This practice links fermentation waste management to fertilization for plant biomass production, and it is known as fertirrigation. Here we evaluate public datasets of soil metagenomes mining for changes in antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) of soils from sugarcane mesocosms repeatedly amended with vinasse. The metagenomes were annotated using the ResFam database. We found that the abundance of open read frames (ORFs) annotated as ARGs changed significantly across 43 different families ( p -value < 0.05). Co-occurrence network analysis revealed distinct patterns of interactions among ARGs, suggesting that nutrient amendment to soil microbial communities can impact on the coevolutionary dynamics of indigenous ARGs within soil resistome.

  18. Geostatistical and multivariate statistical analysis of heavily and manifoldly contaminated soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Kristin; Einax, Jürgen W; Simeonov, Vasil; Tsakovski, Stefan

    2010-04-01

    The surroundings of the former Kremikovtzi steel mill near Sofia (Bulgaria) are influenced by various emissions from the factory. In addition to steel and alloys, they produce different products based on inorganic compounds in different smelters. Soil in this region is multiply contaminated. We collected 65 soil samples and analyzed 15 elements by different methods of atomic spectroscopy for a survey of this field site. Here we present a novel hybrid approach for environmental risk assessment of polluted soil combining geostatistical methods and source apportionment modeling. We could distinguish areas with heavily and slightly polluted soils in the vicinity of the iron smelter by applying unsupervised pattern recognition methods. This result was supported by geostatistical methods such as semivariogram analysis and kriging. The modes of action of the metals examined differ significantly in such a way that iron and lead account for the main pollutants of the iron smelter, whereas, e.g., arsenic shows a haphazard distribution. The application of factor analysis and source-apportionment modeling on absolute principal component scores revealed novel information about the composition of the emissions from the different stacks. It is possible to estimate the impact of every element examined on the pollution due to their emission source. This investigation allows an objective assessment of the different spatial distributions of the elements examined in the soil of the Kremikovtzi region. The geostatistical analysis illustrates this distribution and is supported by multivariate statistical analysis revealing relations between the elements.

  19. Analysis of Bacillus thuringiensis Population Dynamics and Its Interaction With Pseudomonas fluorescens in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Ruiz, Norma Elena; Sansinenea-Royano, Estibaliz; Cedillo-Ramirez, Maria Lilia; Marsch-Moreno, Rodolfo; Sanchez-Alonso, Patricia; Vazquez-Cruz, Candelario

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bacillus thuringiensis is the most successful biological control agent, however, studies so far have shown that B. thuringiensis is very sensitive to environmental factors such as soil moisture and pH. Ultraviolet light from the sun had been considered as the main limiting factor for its persistence in soil and it has recently been shown that the antagonism exerted by other native soil organisms, such as Pseudomonas fluorescens, is a determining factor in the persistence of this bacterium under in vitro culture conditions. Objectives: The aim of the present investigation was to analyze the population dynamics of B. thuringiensis and its interaction with P. fluorescens using microbiological and molecular methods in soil, under different conditions, and to determinate the effect of nutrients and moisture on its interaction. Materials and Methods: The monitoring was performed by microbiological methods, such as viable count of bacteria, and molecular methods such as Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and hybridization, using the direct extraction of DNA from populations of inoculated soil. Results: The analysis of the interaction between B. thuringiensis and P. fluorescens in soil indicated that the disappearance of B. thuringiensis IPS82 is not dependent on the moisture but the composition of nutrients that may be affecting the secretion of toxic compounds in the environment of P. fluorescens. The results showed that the recovered cells were mostly spores and not vegetative cells in all proved treatments. The molecular methods were effective for monitoring bacterial population inoculated in soil. Conclusions: Bacillus thuringiensis is very sensitive to the interaction of P. fluorescens, however is capable to survive in soil due to its capacity of sporulate. Some of the cells in the form of spores germinated and folded slightly and remained in a constant cycle of sporulation and germination. This confirms that B. thuringiensis IPS82 can germinate, grow and

  20. Analysis of Bacillus thuringiensis Population Dynamics and Its Interaction With Pseudomonas fluorescens in Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Ruiz, Norma Elena; Sansinenea-Royano, Estibaliz; Cedillo-Ramirez, Maria Lilia; Marsch-Moreno, Rodolfo; Sanchez-Alonso, Patricia; Vazquez-Cruz, Candelario

    2015-09-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is the most successful biological control agent, however, studies so far have shown that B. thuringiensis is very sensitive to environmental factors such as soil moisture and pH. Ultraviolet light from the sun had been considered as the main limiting factor for its persistence in soil and it has recently been shown that the antagonism exerted by other native soil organisms, such as Pseudomonas fluorescens, is a determining factor in the persistence of this bacterium under in vitro culture conditions. The aim of the present investigation was to analyze the population dynamics of B. thuringiensis and its interaction with P. fluorescens using microbiological and molecular methods in soil, under different conditions, and to determinate the effect of nutrients and moisture on its interaction. The monitoring was performed by microbiological methods, such as viable count of bacteria, and molecular methods such as Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and hybridization, using the direct extraction of DNA from populations of inoculated soil. The analysis of the interaction between B. thuringiensis and P. fluorescens in soil indicated that the disappearance of B. thuringiensis IPS82 is not dependent on the moisture but the composition of nutrients that may be affecting the secretion of toxic compounds in the environment of P. fluorescens. The results showed that the recovered cells were mostly spores and not vegetative cells in all proved treatments. The molecular methods were effective for monitoring bacterial population inoculated in soil. Bacillus thuringiensis is very sensitive to the interaction of P. fluorescens, however is capable to survive in soil due to its capacity of sporulate. Some of the cells in the form of spores germinated and folded slightly and remained in a constant cycle of sporulation and germination. This confirms that B. thuringiensis IPS82 can germinate, grow and sporulate in soil.

  1. A meta-analysis of soil microbial biomass responses to forest disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Robin Holden

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Climate warming is likely to increase the frequency and severity of forest disturbances, with uncertain consequences for soil microbial communities and their contribution to ecosystem C dynamics. To address this uncertainty, we conducted a meta-analysis of 139 published soil microbial responses to forest disturbances. These disturbances included abiotic (fire, harvesting, storm and biotic (insect, pathogen disturbances. We hypothesized that soil microbial biomass would decline following forest disturbances, but that abiotic disturbances would elicit greater reductions in microbial biomass than biotic disturbances. In support of this hypothesis, across all published studies, disturbances reduced soil microbial biomass by an average of 29.4%. However, microbial responses differed between abiotic and biotic disturbances. Microbial responses were significantly negative following fires, harvest, and storms (48.7%, 19.1%, and 41.7% reductions in microbial biomass, respectively. In contrast, changes in soil microbial biomass following insect infestation and pathogen-induced tree mortality were non-significant, although biotic disturbances were poorly represented in the literature. When measured separately, fungal and bacterial responses to disturbances mirrored the response of the microbial community as a whole. Changes in microbial abundance following disturbance were significantly positively correlated with changes in microbial respiration. We propose that the differential effect of abiotic and biotic disturbances on microbial biomass may be attributable to differences in soil disruption and organic C removal from forests among disturbance types. Altogether, these results suggest that abiotic forest disturbances may significantly decrease soil microbial abundance, with corresponding consequences for microbial respiration. Further studies are needed on the effect of biotic disturbances on forest soil microbial communities and soil C dynamics.

  2. Soil characterisation by bacterial community analysis for forensic applications: A quantitative comparison of environmental technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habtom, Habteab; Demanèche, Sandrine; Dawson, Lorna; Azulay, Chen; Matan, Ofra; Robe, Patrick; Gafny, Ron; Simonet, Pascal; Jurkevitch, Edouard; Pasternak, Zohar

    2017-01-01

    The ubiquity and transferability of soil makes it a resource for the forensic investigator, as it can provide a link between agents and scenes. However, the information contained in soils, such as chemical compounds, physical particles or biological entities, is seldom used in forensic investigations; due mainly to the associated costs, lack of available expertise, and the lack of soil databases. The microbial DNA in soil is relatively easy to access and analyse, having thus the potential to provide a powerful means for discriminating soil samples or linking them to a common origin. We compared the effectiveness and reliability of multiple methods and genes for bacterial characterisation in the differentiation of soil samples: ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA), terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) of the rpoB gene, and five methods using the 16S rRNA gene: phylogenetic microarrays, TRFLP, and high throughput sequencing with Roche 454, Illumina MiSeq and IonTorrent PGM platforms. All these methods were also compared to long-chain hydrocarbons (n-alkanes) and fatty alcohol profiling of the same soil samples. RISA, 16S TRFLP and MiSeq performed best, reliably and significantly discriminating between adjacent, similar soil types. As TRFLP employs the same capillary electrophoresis equipment and procedures used to analyse human DNA, it is readily available for use in most forensic laboratories. TRFLP was optimized for forensic usage in five parameters: choice of primer pair, fluorescent tagging, concentrating DNA after digestion, number of PCR amplifications per sample and number of capillary electrophoresis runs per PCR amplification. This study shows that molecular microbial ecology methodologies are robust in discriminating between soil samples, illustrating their potential usage as an evaluative forensic tool. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Observed Soil Moisture-Precipitation Feedback in Illinois: A Systematic Analysis over Different Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van De Giesen, N.; Duerinck, H. M.; van der Ent, R.

    2016-12-01

    The lack of understanding on the soil moisture-precipitation feedback mechanisms remains a large source of uncertainty for land-atmosphere coupled models. Previous observation-based studies on the soil moisture-precipitation feedback in Illinois have shown contradictory results. This paper extends earlier research by providing a more holistic analysis considering different scales based on an 11-yr (2003-13) hourly soil moisture dataset, which makes it possible to revisit the disputed hypothesis on the correlation between warm-season soil moisture and subsequent precipitation. This study finds a strong positive correlation between late spring/early summer state-average soil moisture at the root-zone depths and subsequent state-average summer precipitation. On the daily to weekly time scale, however, no relation is found. Moreover, regional analysis suggests that precipitation variability over central Illinois can be best explained by the soil moisture variability in northwest Illinois. Using a back-trajectory method [Water Accounting Model-2 layers (WAM-2layers)] from May to July, the evaporative sources of precipitation in Illinois are identified. The pattern of the source regions shows little interannual variability, while the strength of the sources changes significantly and the Gulf of Mexico contributes more during wet years. However, strong influences (teleconnections) of sea surface temperatures on the subsequent precipitation variability in Illinois are not found on a seasonal scale. The long time scale of the soil moisture-precipitation correlation and the weak influences of SSTs and climate indices may suggest that precipitation variability in spring/summer in Illinois is mostly related to continental-scale soil moisture-precipitation feedback.

  4. Sulfhaemoglobinaemia caused by ferrous sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbas, Laith; Warsame, Mohamed; Omar, Mohannad Abu; Zafar, Yousaf; Howell, Gregory

    2017-06-13

    A 78-year-old man was referred from his primary care clinic to the emergency department due to bluish discolouration of his lips and decreased oxygen saturation on pulse oximetry. The patient was asymptomatic. Physical exam was normal except for lip cyanosis. A CT pulmonary angiogram was negative for pulmonary embolism. Arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis with co-oximetry showed low oxyhaemoglobin, normal partial pressure of oxygen and methaemoglobinaemia, but an unexplained 'gap' in total haemoglobin saturation. This gap was felt to be due to sulfhaemoglobinaemia. After a thorough review of his medications, ferrous sulfate was stopped which resulted in resolution in patient's cyanosis and normalisation of his ABG after 7 weeks. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. 2-Amino-4-hydroxyethylaminoanisole sulfate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jakob T; Andersen, Klaus E

    2016-01-01

    positive patch test reactions to the coupler 2-amino-4-hydroxyethylaminoanisole sulfate 2% pet. from 2005 to 2014. METHODS: Patch test results from the Allergen Bank database for eczema patients patch tested with 2-amino-4-hydroxyethylaminoanisole sulfate 2% pet. from 2005 to 2014 were reviewed. RESULTS......: A total of 902 dermatitis patients (154 from the dermatology department and 748 from 65 practices) were patch tested with amino-4-hydroxyethylaminoanisole sulfate 2% pet. from 2005 to 2014. Thirteen (1.4%) patients had a positive patch test reaction. Our results do not indicate irritant reactions....... CONCLUSIONS: 2-Amino-4-hydroxyethylaminoanisole sulfate is a new but rare contact allergen....

  6. Regional analysis of groundwater phosphate concentrations under acidic sandy soils: Edaphic factors and water table strongly mediate the soil P-groundwater P relation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabilde, Lisa; De Neve, Stefaan; Sleutel, Steven

    2017-12-01

    Historic long-term P application to sandy soils in NW-Europe has resulted in abundant sorption, saturation and eventually leaching of P from soil to the groundwater. Although many studies recognize the control of site-specific factors like soil texture and phosphate saturation degree (PSD), the regional-scaled relevance of effects exerted by single factors controlling P leaching is unclear. Very large observational datasets of soil and groundwater P content are furthermore required to reveal indirect controls of soil traits through mediating soil variables. We explored co-variation of phreatic groundwater orthophosphate (o-P) concentration and soil factors in sandy soils in Flanders, Belgium. Correlation analyses were complemented with an exploratory model derived using 'path analysis'. Data of oxalate-extractable Al, Fe, P and pH KCl , phosphate sorption capacity (PSC) and PSD in three depth layers (0-30, 30-60, 60-90 cm), topsoil SOC, % clay and groundwater depth (fluctuation) were interpolated to predict soil properties on exact locations of a very extensive net of groundwater monitoring wells. The mean PSD was only poorly correlated to groundwater o-P concentration, indicating the overriding control of other factors in the transport of P to the groundwater. A significant (P soil pH and groundwater table depth than by PSD indicates the likely oversimplification of the latter index to measure the long-term potential risk of P leaching. Accounting for controls on leaching not included in PSD via an alternative index, however, seems problematic as in Flanders for example groundwater o-P turned out to be higher in finer textured soils or soils with higher pedogenic Fe content, probably because of their lower pedogenic Al content and higher soil pH. Path analysis of extensive soil and groundwater datasets seems a viable way to identify prime local determinants of soil P leaching and could be further on used for 'ground-truthing' more complex P-migration simulation

  7. A novel method for RNA extraction from Andosols using casein and its application to amoA gene expression study in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Nagaoka, Kazunari; Hayatsu, Masahito; Sakai, Yoriko; Tago, Kanako; Asakawa, Susumu; Fujii, Takeshi

    2012-11-01

    The lack of a universal method to extract RNA from soil hinders the progress of studies related to nitrification in soil, which is an important step in the nitrogen cycle. It is particularly difficult to extract RNA from certain types of soils such as Andosols (volcanic ash soils), which is the dominant agricultural soil in Japan, because of RNA adsorption by soil. To obtain RNA from these challenging soils to study the bacteria involved in nitrification, we developed a soil RNA extraction method for gene expression analysis. Autoclaved casein was added to an RNA extraction buffer to recover RNA from soil, and high-quality RNA was successfully extracted from eight types of agricultural soils that were significantly different in their physicochemical characteristics. To detect bacterial ammonia monooxygenase subunit A gene (amoA) transcripts, bacterial genomic DNA and messenger RNA were co-extracted from two different types of Andosols during incubation with ammonium sulfate. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analyses of amoA in soil microcosms revealed that only few amoA, which had the highest similarities to those in Nitrosospira multiformis, were expressed in these soils after treatment with ammonium sulfate, although multiple amoA genes were present in the soil microcosms examined.

  8. Direct methods of soil-structure interaction analysis for earthquake loadings (III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, J. B.; Lee, S. R.; Kim, J. M.; Park, K. R.; Choi, J. S.; Oh, S. B. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-06-15

    In this study, direct methods for seismic analysis of soil-structure interaction system have been studied. A computer program 'KIESSI-QK' has been developed based on the finite element technique coupled with infinite element formulation. A substructuring method isolating the displacement solution of near field soil region was adopted. The computer program developed was verified using a free-field site response problem. The post-correlation analysis for the forced vibration tests after backfill of the Hualien LSST project has been carried out. The seismic analyses for the Hualien and Lotung LSST structures have been also performed utilizing the developed computer program 'KIESSI-QK'.

  9. Soil Carbon Variability and Change Detection in the Forest Inventory Analysis Database of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, A. M.; Nater, E. A.; Dalzell, B. J.; Perry, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    The USDA Forest Service's Forest Inventory Analysis (FIA) program is a national effort assessing current forest resources to ensure sustainable management practices, to assist planning activities, and to report critical status and trends. For example, estimates of carbon stocks and stock change in FIA are reported as the official United States submission to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. While the main effort in FIA has been focused on aboveground biomass, soil is a critical component of this system. FIA sampled forest soils in the early 2000s and has remeasurement now underway. However, soil sampling is repeated on a 10-year interval (or longer), and it is uncertain what magnitude of changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) may be detectable with the current sampling protocol. We aim to identify the sensitivity and variability of SOC in the FIA database, and to determine the amount of SOC change that can be detected with the current sampling scheme. For this analysis, we attempt to answer the following questions: 1) What is the sensitivity (power) of SOC data in the current FIA database? 2) How does the minimum detectable change in forest SOC respond to changes in sampling intervals and/or sample point density? Soil samples in the FIA database represent 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm depth increments with a 10-year sampling interval. We are investigating the variability of SOC and its change over time for composite soil data in each FIA region (Pacific Northwest, Interior West, Northern, and Southern). To guide future sampling efforts, we are employing statistical power analysis to examine the minimum detectable change in SOC storage. We are also investigating the sensitivity of SOC storage changes under various scenarios of sample size and/or sample frequency. This research will inform the design of future FIA soil sampling schemes and improve the information available to international policy makers, university and industry partners, and the public.

  10. Effect of train vibration on settlement of soil: A numerical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiong, Kah-Yong; Ling, Felix Ngee-Leh; Talib, Zaihasra Abu

    2017-10-01

    The drastic development of transit system caused the influence of ground-borne vibrations induced by train on ground settlement became concern problem nowadays. The purpose of this study is to investigate soil settlement caused by train vibration. To facilitate this study, computer simulation of soil dynamic response using commercial finite element package - PLAXIS 2D was performed to simulate track-subgrade system together with dynamic train load under three different conditions. The results of simulation analysis established the facts that the soil deformation increased with raising in water level. This phenomenon happens because the increasing water level not only induced greater excess pore water pressure but also reduced stiffness of soil. Furthermore, the simulation analysis also deduced that the soil settlement was reduced by placing material with high stiffness between the subgrade and the ballast layer since material with high stiffness was able to dissipate energy efficiently due to its high bearing capacity, thus protecting the subgrade from deteriorating. The simulation analysis result also showed that the soil dynamic response increased with the increase in the speed of train and a noticeable amplification in soil deformation occurred as the train speed approaches the Rayleigh wave velocity of the track subgrade system. This is due to the fact that dynamic train load depend on both the self-weight of the train and the dynamic component due to inertial effects associated with the train speed. Thus, controlling the train speeds under critical velocity of track-subgrade system is able to ensure the safety of train operation as it prevents track-ground resonance and dramatic ground.

  11. Thermal analysis to derive energetic quality parameters of soil organic matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peikert, Benjamin; Schaumann, Gabriele Ellen

    2014-05-01

    Many studies have dealt with thermal analysis for characterisation of soil and soil organic matter. It is a versatile tool assessing various physicochemical properties of the sample during heating and/or cooling. Especially the combination of different detection methods is highly promising. In this contribution, we will discuss the combination of thermogravimetry (TGA) with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in one single thermal analysis device. TGA alone helps distinguishment of soil and soil organic matter fractions with respect to their resistance towards combustion and allows a quantitative assignment of thermolabile and recalcitrant OM fractions. Combination with DSC in the same device, allows determination of energy transformation during the combustion process. Therefore, it becomes possible to determine not only the calorific value of the organic matter, but also of its fractions. We will show the potential of using the calorific values of OM fractions as quality parameter - exemplified for the analysis of soils polluted with organic matter from the olive oil production. The pollution history of these samples is largely unknown. As expected, TGA indicated a relative enrichment of the labile carbon fraction in contaminated samples with respect to the controls. The calorific values of the thermolabile and the recalcitrant fractions differ from each other, and those of the recalcitrant fractions of the polluted samples were higher than of those of the unpolluted controls. Further analyses showed correlation of the calorific value of this fraction with soil water repellency and the carbon isotopic ratio. The synthesis of our current data suggests that the content of thermolabile fraction, the isotopic ratio and calorific value of the recalcitrant fraction are useful indicators for characterizing the degree of decomposition of OMW organic matter. In this contribution, we will further discuss the potential of using the energetic parameters a quality

  12. Analysis of Coaxial Soil Cell in Reflection and Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Lascano

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurement of moisture content is a prime requirement in hydrological, geophysical and biogeochemical research as well as for material characterization and process control. Within these areas, accurate measurements of the surface area and bound water content is becoming increasingly important for providing answers to many fundamental questions ranging from characterization of cotton fiber maturity, to accurate characterization of soil water content in soil water conservation research to bio-plant water utilization to chemical reactions and diffusions of ionic species across membranes in cells as well as in the dense suspensions that occur in surface films. In these bound water materials, the errors in the traditional time-domain-reflectometer, “TDR”, exceed the range of the full span of the material’s permittivity that is being measured. Thus, there is a critical need to re-examine the TDR system and identify where the errors are to direct future research. One promising technique to address the increasing demands for higher accuracy water content measurements is utilization of electrical permittivity characterization of materials. This technique has enjoyed a strong following in the soil-science and geological community through measurements of apparent permittivity via time-domain-reflectometery as well in many process control applications. Recent research however, is indicating a need to increase the accuracy beyond that available from traditional TDR. The most logical pathway then becomes a transition from TDR based measurements to network analyzer measurements of absolute permittivity that will remove the adverse effects that high surface area soils and conductivity impart onto the measurements of apparent permittivity in traditional TDR applications. This research examines the theoretical basis behind the coaxial probe, from which the modern TDR probe originated from, to provide a basis on which to perform absolute

  13. A meta-analysis of soil salinization effects on nitrogen pools, cycles and fluxes in coastal ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Minghua; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Vereecken, Harry; Brüggemann, Nicolas

    2017-03-01

    Salinity intrusion caused by land subsidence resulting from increasing groundwater abstraction, decreasing river sediment loads and increasing sea level because of climate change has caused widespread soil salinization in coastal ecosystems. Soil salinization may greatly alter nitrogen (N) cycling in coastal ecosystems. However, a comprehensive understanding of the effects of soil salinization on ecosystem N pools, cycling processes and fluxes is not available for coastal ecosystems. Therefore, we compiled data from 551 observations from 21 peer-reviewed papers and conducted a meta-analysis of experimental soil salinization effects on 19 variables related to N pools, cycling processes and fluxes in coastal ecosystems. Our results showed that the effects of soil salinization varied across different ecosystem types and salinity levels. Soil salinization increased plant N content (18%), soil NH4(+) (12%) and soil total N (210%), although it decreased soil NO3(-) (2%) and soil microbial biomass N (74%). Increasing soil salinity stimulated soil N2 O fluxes as well as hydrological NH4(+) and NO2(-) fluxes more than threefold, although it decreased the hydrological dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) flux (59%). Soil salinization also increased the net N mineralization by 70%, although salinization effects were not observed on the net nitrification, denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium in this meta-analysis. Overall, this meta-analysis improves our understanding of the responses of ecosystem N cycling to soil salinization, identifies knowledge gaps and highlights the urgent need for studies on the effects of soil salinization on coastal agro-ecosystem and microbial N immobilization. Additional increases in knowledge are critical for designing sustainable adaptation measures to the predicted intrusion of salinity intrusion so that the productivity of coastal agro-ecosystems can be maintained or improved and the N losses and pollution of the natural

  14. Estimation of soil coverage of chopped pruning residues in olive orchards by image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Jiménez-Jiménez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Residue chopping from orchard pruning is becoming a common practice in conservation agriculture after the establishment of eco-conditionality policies in the European Union. This type of residue is used to protect the soil from erosion and improve the water balance and fertility of soils by improving the organic matter content. However, no studies have evaluated the influence of pruning residues and size on soil coverage. This study examines the effect of different treatments on pruning residue soil coverage in an olive orchard (cv. Picual. Treatments consisted of two quantities of pruning residues, specifically, high (2.04 kg m-2 and low (1.02 kg m-2, and two chopping speeds, low (2.4 km h-1 and high (3.2 km h-1. The different treatments were evaluated by image analysis and pixel counting to determine the soil cover percentage, size, number and distribution of the pruning residues after chopping. After chopping, the soil cover percentage was 39% higher in the high quantity pruning residue treatments but was not significantly influenced by the chopping speed. The size and number of lignified residues was quantified via pixel counting. In the high quantity pruning residue treatments, the number of large lignified residues (> 6 cm2 was higher, and the number of pruning residues smaller than 2 cm2 was lower, when compared with low quantity pruning residue treatments. The high chopping speed treatments produced more smaller-sized pruning residues.

  15. Reconstruction of soil surface temperature via Fourier analysis to quantify surface energy fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Gabriele; Wollschläger, Ute; Roth, Kurt

    2010-05-01

    Quantifying the surface energy and water balance is a prerequisite for understanding the complex interplay between the atmospheric and terrestrial part of the earth. Therefore, it is necessary to estimate the partitioning of the incoming solar energy into ground heat flux, latent and sensible heat. The amount of evaporating water can be measured by the expensive and elaborated eddy-covariance method, but in general measurements of surface fluxes are difficult to obtain. This is why they are often determined from more theoretical approaches based on energy budget calculations at the soil surface. To compute, e.g., the latent heat portion, this indirect methods, like Penman-Monteith, make use of various atmospheric quantities, but usually lack information about the temperature right at the soil surface which therefore needs to be approximated. We investigate synthetic and field measured soil temperature data via Fourier analysis to extract the frequency information of temperature readings in different depths. This allows us to determine the apparent thermal soil diffusivity and to project back all frequency components from within the soil profile towards the surface. This yields a reconstruction of the temperature at the upper soil boundary which can directly be used to calculate the energy balance at the interface to the atmosphere. We will present the performance of the projection for synthetic data for which the method could be validated very well. Assumptions and approximations made will be discussed. Furthermore, we will demonstrate its application to field-measured data from our test site next to Heidelberg, Germany.

  16. Analysis of predictors related to soil contamination in recreational areas of Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagiu, C; Pica, E M; Querol, X; Botezan, C S

    2015-12-01

    Soil contamination in recreational areas can considerably affect children's health, as they are the segment of the population most sensitive to anthropogenic contamination. Soil contamination in recreational areas is influenced by a number of factors such as type and age of the recreational area, nearby traffic intensity, proximity to industrial areas, presence of vegetation, level of usage, treated wood structures, and the extent of maintenance operations carried out in the area. These can most often be observed during a simple site visit. The purpose of the present research is to analyze to which extent the presence of these factors can trigger an alarm signal, highlighting soil contamination in urban recreational areas. In this regard, soil contamination was scaled using the integrated pollution index applied on nine distinctive contaminants (As, Cu, Cd, Zn, Pb, Hg, Co, Ni, Mg) identified using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Multiple linear regression analysis was performed in order to assess predictors of soil contamination. The research was carried out in a number of 88 recreational areas, parks, and playgrounds from 19 Romanian cities, revealing the fact that proximity to industrial areas and intensive traffic had statistically significant effects on soil contamination. Furthermore, it was observed that in 78 out of the 88 analyzed locations, the concentrations of contaminants exceeded the guidelines established through national legislation, thus confirming the presumption that high concentrations of contaminants exist in the parks and playgrounds of Romania.

  17. A neural network model for estimating soil phosphorus using terrain analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Keshavarzi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Artificial neural network (ANN model was developed and tested for estimating soil phosphorus (P in Kouhin watershed area (1000 ha, Qazvin province, Iran using terrain analysis. Based on the soil distribution correlation, vegetation growth pattern across the topographically heterogeneous landscape, the topographic and vegetation attributes were used in addition to pedologic information for the development of ANN model in area for estimating of soil phosphorus. Totally, 85 samples were collected and tested for phosphorus contents and corresponding attributes were estimated by the digital elevation model (DEM. In order to develop the pedo-transfer functions, data linearity was checked, correlated and 80% was used for modeling and ANN was tested using 20% of collected data. Results indicate that 68% of the variation in soil phosphorus could be explained by elevation and Band 1 data and significant correlation was observed between input variables and phosphorus contents. There was a significant correlation between soil P and terrain attributes which can be used to derive the pedo-transfer function for soil P estimation to manage nutrient deficiency. Results showed that P values can be calculated more accurately with the ANN-based pedo-transfer function with the input topographic variables along with the Band 1.

  18. Ancient coins: cluster analysis applied to find a correlation between corrosion process and burial soil characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Although it is well known that any material degrades faster when exposed to an aggressive environment as well as that "aggressive" cannot be univocally defined as depending also on the chemical-physical characteristics of material, few researches on the identification of the most significant parameters influencing the corrosion of metallic object are available. A series of ancient coins, coming from the archaeological excavation of Palazzo Valentini (Rome) were collected together with soils, both near and far from them, and then analysed using different analytical techniques looking for a correlation between the corrosion products covering the coins and the chemical-physical soil characteristics. The content of soluble salts in the water-bearing stratum and surfacing in the archaeological site, was also measured. The obtained results stress the influence of alkaline soils on formation of patina. Cerussite, probably due to the circulation of water in layers rich in marble and plaster fragments, was the main corrosion product identified by X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Copper, lead and vanadium were found in soil surrounding coins. By measuring conductivity, pH and soluble salts content of the washing solutions from both coins and soils, we could easily separate coins coming from different stratigraphic units of the site. Data were treated by cluster and multivariate analysis, revealing a correlation between part of the coins and the nearby soil samples. PMID:22594444

  19. The use of MP-AES for analysis major and micronutrients in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonutare, Tonu; Rodima, Ako; Künnapas, Allan; Kõlli, Raimo; Albre, Imbi

    2016-04-01

    The ICP with OES or MS detectors is today the most common multielement technigues for soil element analysis. Although the micro-plasma has been available for decades, there were no commercially available instruments on the market. The situation changed in 2011 when the Agilent 4100 MP-AES appeared. The use of nitrogen plasma of the MP-AES provides reduction in the operational and maintenance costs compared to ICP and therefore makes it very perspective for soil analysis. The nitrogen microwave excited plasma has diferent properties compared to ICP argon plasma and this cause the specific behaviour of elements during the excitation. Here we present the results and optimal instrumental parameters for determination of soil nutrients (K, Ca, Mg, Fe and Zn) by MP-AES.

  20. Soil salinity detection from satellite image analysis: an integrated approach of salinity indices and field data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshed, Md Manjur; Islam, Md Tazmul; Jamil, Raihan

    2016-02-01

    This paper attempts to detect soil salinity from satellite image analysis using remote sensing and geographic information system. Salinity intrusion is a common problem for the coastal regions of the world. Traditional salinity detection techniques by field survey and sampling are time-consuming and expensive. Remote sensing and geographic information system offer economic and efficient salinity detection, monitoring, and mapping. To predict soil salinity, an integrated approach of salinity indices and field data was used to develop a multiple regression equation. The correlations between different indices and field data of soil salinity were calculated to find out the highly correlated indices. The best regression model was selected considering the high R (2) value, low P value, and low Akaike's Information Criterion. About 20% variation was observed between the field data and predicted EC from the satellite image analysis. The precision of this salinity detection technique depends on the accuracy and uniform distribution of field data.

  1. Y-12 site-specific earthquake response analysis and soil liquefaction assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, S.B.; Hunt, R.J.; Manrod, W.E. III

    1995-09-29

    A site-specific earthquake response analysis and soil liquefaction assessment were performed for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The main purpose of these studies was to use the results of the analyses for evaluating the safety of the performance category -1, -2, and -3 facilities against the natural phenomena seismic hazards. Earthquake response was determined for seven (7), one dimensional soil columns (Fig. 12) using two horizontal components of the PC-3 design basis 2000-year seismic event. The computer program SHAKE 91 (Ref. 7) was used to calculate the absolute response accelerations on top of ground (soil/weathered shale) and rock outcrop. The SHAKE program has been validated for horizontal response calculations at periods less than 2.0 second at several sites and consequently is widely accepted in the geotechnical earthquake engineering area for site response analysis.

  2. Artificial neural network for on-site quantitative analysis of soils using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Haddad, J. [Univ. Bordeaux, LOMA, UMR 5798, F-33400 Talence (France); CNRS, LOMA, UMR 5798, F-33400 Talence (France); Villot-Kadri, M.; Ismaël, A.; Gallou, G. [IVEA Solution, Centre Scientifique d' Orsay, Bât 503, 91400 Orsay (France); Michel, K.; Bruyère, D.; Laperche, V. [BRGM, Service Métrologie, Monitoring et Analyse, 3 avenue Claude Guillemin, B.P 36009, 45060 Orléans Cedex (France); Canioni, L. [Univ. Bordeaux, LOMA, UMR 5798, F-33400 Talence (France); CNRS, LOMA, UMR 5798, F-33400 Talence (France); Bousquet, B., E-mail: bruno.bousquet@u-bordeaux1.fr [Univ. Bordeaux, LOMA, UMR 5798, F-33400 Talence (France); CNRS, LOMA, UMR 5798, F-33400 Talence (France)

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, due to environmental concerns, fast on-site quantitative analyses of soils are required. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy is a serious candidate to address this challenge and is especially well suited for multi-elemental analysis of heavy metals. However, saturation and matrix effects prevent from a simple treatment of the LIBS data, namely through a regular calibration curve. This paper details the limits of this approach and consequently emphasizes the advantage of using artificial neural networks well suited for non-linear and multi-variate calibration. This advanced method of data analysis is evaluated in the case of real soil samples and on-site LIBS measurements. The selection of the LIBS data as input data of the network is particularly detailed and finally, resulting errors of prediction lower than 20% for aluminum, calcium, copper and iron demonstrate the good efficiency of the artificial neural networks for on-site quantitative LIBS of soils. - Highlights: ► We perform on-site quantitative LIBS analysis of soil samples. ► We demonstrate that univariate analysis is not convenient. ► We exploit artificial neural networks for LIBS analysis. ► Spectral lines other than the ones from the analyte must be introduced.

  3. Mechanisms and Effectivity of Sulfate Reducing Bioreactors ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mining-influenced water (MIW) is the main environmental challenges associated with the mining industry. Passive MIW remediation can be achieved through microbial activity in sulfate-reducing bioreactors (SRBRs), but their actual removal rates depend on different factors, one of which is the substrate composition. Chitinous materials have demonstrated high metal removal rates, particularly for the two recalcitrant MIW contaminants Zn and Mn, but their removal mechanisms need further study. We studied Cd, Fe, Zn, and Mn removal in bioactive and abiotic SRBRs to elucidate the metal removal mechanisms and the differences in metal and sulfate removal rates using a chitinous material as substrate. We found that sulfate-reducing bacteria are effective in increasing metal and sulfate removal rates and duration of operation in SRBRs, and that the main mechanism involved was metal precipitation as sulfides. The solid residues provided evidence of the presence of sulfides in the bioactive column, more specifically ZnS, according to XPS analysis. The feasibility of passive treatments with a chitinous substrate could be an important option for MIW remediation. Mining influenced water (MIW) remediation is still one of the top priorities for the agency because it addresses the most important environmental problem associated with the mining industry and that affects thousands of communities in the U.S. and worldwide. In this paper, the MIW bioremediation mechanisms are studied

  4. Key Process Uncertainties in Soil Carbon Dynamics: Comparing Multiple Model Structures and Observational Meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulman, B. N.; Moore, J.; Averill, C.; Abramoff, R. Z.; Bradford, M.; Classen, A. T.; Hartman, M. D.; Kivlin, S. N.; Luo, Y.; Mayes, M. A.; Morrison, E. W.; Riley, W. J.; Salazar, A.; Schimel, J.; Sridhar, B.; Tang, J.; Wang, G.; Wieder, W. R.

    2016-12-01

    Soil carbon (C) dynamics are crucial to understanding and predicting C cycle responses to global change and soil C modeling is a key tool for understanding these dynamics. While first order model structures have historically dominated this area, a recent proliferation of alternative model structures representing different assumptions about microbial activity and mineral protection is providing new opportunities to explore process uncertainties related to soil C dynamics. We conducted idealized simulations of soil C responses to warming and litter addition using models from five research groups that incorporated different sets of assumptions about processes governing soil C decomposition and stabilization. We conducted a meta-analysis of published warming and C addition experiments for comparison with simulations. Assumptions related to mineral protection and microbial dynamics drove strong differences among models. In response to C additions, some models predicted long-term C accumulation while others predicted transient increases that were counteracted by accelerating decomposition. In experimental manipulations, doubling litter addition did not change soil C stocks in studies spanning as long as two decades. This result agreed with simulations from models with strong microbial growth responses and limited mineral sorption capacity. In observations, warming initially drove soil C loss via increased CO2 production, but in some studies soil C rebounded and increased over decadal time scales. In contrast, all models predicted sustained C losses under warming. The disagreement with experimental results could be explained by physiological or community-level acclimation, or by warming-related changes in plant growth. In addition to the role of microbial activity, assumptions related to mineral sorption and protected C played a key role in driving long-term model responses. In general, simulations were similar in their initial responses to perturbations but diverged over

  5. The effects of ant nests on soil fertility and plant performance: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farji-Brener, Alejandro G; Werenkraut, Victoria

    2017-07-01

    Ants are recognized as one of the major sources of soil disturbance world-wide. However, this view is largely based on isolated studies and qualitative reviews. Here, for the first time, we quantitatively determined whether ant nests affect soil fertility and plant performance, and identified the possible sources of variation of these effects. Using Bayesian mixed-models meta-analysis, we tested the hypotheses that ant effects on soil fertility and plant performance depend on the substrate sampled, ant feeding type, latitude, habitat and the plant response variable measured. Ant nests showed higher nutrient and cation content than adjacent non-nest soil samples, but similar pH. Nutrient content was higher in ant refuse materials than in nest soils. The fertilizer effect of ant nests was also higher in dry habitats than in grasslands or savannas. Cation content was higher in nests of plant-feeding ants than in nests of omnivorous species, and lower in nests from agro-ecosystems than in nests from any other habitat. Plants showed higher green/root biomass and fitness on ant nests soils than in adjacent, non-nest sites; but plant density and diversity were unaffected by the presence of ant nests. Root growth was particularly higher in refuse materials than in ant nest soils, in leaf-cutting ant nests and in deserts habitats. Our results confirm the major role of ant nests in influencing soil fertility and vegetation patterns and provide information about the factors that mediate these effects. First, ant nests improve soil fertility mainly through the accumulation of refuse materials. Thus, different refuse dump locations (external or in underground nest chambers) could benefit different vegetation life-forms. Second, ant nests could increase plant diversity at larger spatial scales only if the identity of favoured plants changes along environmental gradients (i.e. enhancing β-diversity). Third, ant species that feed on plants play a relevant role fertilizing soils

  6. [Monitoring and SWOT analysis of Ascaris eggs pollution in soil of rural China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hui-hui; Zhou, Chang-hai; Zang, Wei; Zhang, Xue-qiang; Chen, Ying-dan

    2014-06-01

    To understand the status of Ascaris eggs pollution in soil at national monitoring spots of soil-transmitted nematodiasis, so as to provide the evidence for making countermeasures and evaluating the control effect. Ten households were selected from each of the 22 national monitoring spots annually according to the National Surveillance Program of Soil-Transmitted Nematodiasis (Trial), and the soil samples from vegetable gardens, toilet periphery, courtyards and kitchens were collected and examined by using the modified floatation test with saturated sodium nitrate. Fertilized or unfertilized eggs as well as live or dead fertilized eggs were discriminated and identified. In addition, a SWOT analysis of monitoring of Ascaris eggs pollution in the soil of rural China was carried out. A total of 1 090 households were monitored in 22 monitoring spots from 2006 to 2010. The total detection rate of Ascaris eggs in the soil was 30.73%, and the detection rates of fertilized, unfertilized and live fertilized eggs were 13.21%, 26.42% and 20.28%, respectively. The total detection rates of Ascaris eggs in the vegetable garden, toilet periphery, courtyard and kitchen were 16.51%, 13.49%, 14.22% and 10.73% respectively. The SWOT analysis demonstrated that the monitoring work had both advantages and disadvantages, and was faced with opportunities as well as threats. The pollution status of Ascaris eggs in the soil is still quite severe at some national monitoring spots, and the counter-measures such as implementing hazard-free treatment of stool, improving water supply and sanitation and reforming environment should be taken to protect people from being infected.

  7. Comparative metaproteomic analysis on consecutively Rehmannia glutinosa-monocultured rhizosphere soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linkun Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The consecutive monoculture for most of medicinal plants, such as Rehmannia glutinosa, results in a significant reduction in the yield and quality. There is an urgent need to study for the sustainable development of Chinese herbaceous medicine. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Comparative metaproteomics of rhizosphere soil was developed and used to analyze the underlying mechanism of the consecutive monoculture problems of R. glutinosa. The 2D-gel patterns of protein spots for the soil samples showed a strong matrix dependency. Among the spots, 103 spots with high resolution and repeatability were randomly selected and successfully identified by MALDI TOF-TOF MS for a rhizosphere soil metaproteomic profile analysis. These proteins originating from plants and microorganisms play important roles in nutrient cycles and energy flow in rhizospheric soil ecosystem. They function in protein, nucleotide and secondary metabolisms, signal transduction and resistance. Comparative metaproteomics analysis revealed 33 differentially expressed protein spots in rhizosphere soil in response to increasing years of monoculture. Among them, plant proteins related to carbon and nitrogen metabolism and stress response, were mostly up-regulated except a down-regulated protein (glutathione S-transferase involving detoxification. The phenylalanine ammonia-lyase was believed to participate in the phenylpropanoid metabolism as shown with a considerable increase in total phenolic acid content with increasing years of monoculture. Microbial proteins related to protein metabolism and cell wall biosynthesis, were up-regulated except a down-regulated protein (geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase functioning in diterpenoid synthesis. The results suggest that the consecutive monoculture of R. glutinosa changes the soil microbial ecology due to the exudates accumulation, as a result, the nutrient cycles are affected, leading to the retardation of plant growth and

  8. Multisubstrate isotope labeling and metagenomic analysis of active soil bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verastegui, Y; Cheng, J; Engel, K; Kolczynski, D; Mortimer, S; Lavigne, J; Montalibet, J; Romantsov, T; Hall, M; McConkey, B J; Rose, D R; Tomashek, J J; Scott, B R; Charles, T C; Neufeld, J D

    2014-07-15

    Soil microbial diversity represents the largest global reservoir of novel microorganisms and enzymes. In this study, we coupled functional metagenomics and DNA stable-isotope probing (DNA-SIP) using multiple plant-derived carbon substrates and diverse soils to characterize active soil bacterial communities and their glycoside hydrolase genes, which have value for industrial applications. We incubated samples from three disparate Canadian soils (tundra, temperate rainforest, and agricultural) with five native carbon ((12)C) or stable-isotope-labeled ((13)C) carbohydrates (glucose, cellobiose, xylose, arabinose, and cellulose). Indicator species analysis revealed high specificity and fidelity for many uncultured and unclassified bacterial taxa in the heavy DNA for all soils and substrates. Among characterized taxa, Actinomycetales (Salinibacterium), Rhizobiales (Devosia), Rhodospirillales (Telmatospirillum), and Caulobacterales (Phenylobacterium and Asticcacaulis) were bacterial indicator species for the heavy substrates and soils tested. Both Actinomycetales and Caulobacterales (Phenylobacterium) were associated with metabolism of cellulose, and Alphaproteobacteria were associated with the metabolism of arabinose; members of the order Rhizobiales were strongly associated with the metabolism of xylose. Annotated metagenomic data suggested diverse glycoside hydrolase gene representation within the pooled heavy DNA. By screening 2,876 cloned fragments derived from the (13)C-labeled DNA isolated from soils incubated with cellulose, we demonstrate the power of combining DNA-SIP, multiple-displacement amplification (MDA), and functional metagenomics by efficiently isolating multiple clones with activity on carboxymethyl cellulose and fluorogenic proxy substrates for carbohydrate-active enzymes. Importance: The ability to identify genes based on function, instead of sequence homology, allows the discovery of genes that would not be identified through sequence alone. This

  9. Reducing soil phosphorus fertility brings potential long-term environmental gains: A UK analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withers, Paul J. A.; Hodgkinson, Robin A.; Rollett, Alison; Dyer, Chris; Dils, Rachael; Collins, Adrian L.; Bilsborrow, Paul E.; Bailey, Geoff; Sylvester-Bradley, Roger

    2017-05-01

    Soil phosphorus (P) fertility arising from historic P inputs is a major driver of P mobilisation in agricultural runoff and increases the risk of aquatic eutrophication. To determine the environmental benefit of lowering soil P fertility, a meta-analysis of the relationship between soil test P (measured as Olsen-P) and P concentrations in agricultural drainflow and surface runoff in mostly UK soils was undertaken in relation to current eutrophication control targets (30-35 µg P L-1). At agronomic-optimum Olsen P (16-25 mg kg-1), concentrations of soluble reactive P (SRP), total dissolved P (TDP), total P (TP) and sediment-P (SS-P) in runoff were predicted by linear regression analysis to vary between 24 and 183 µg L-1, 38 and 315 µg L-1, 0.2 and 9.6 mg L-1, and 0.31 and 3.2 g kg-1, respectively. Concentrations of SRP and TDP in runoff were much more sensitive to changes in Olsen-P than were TP and SS-P concentrations, which confirms that separate strategies are required for mitigating the mobilisation of dissolved and particulate P forms. As the main driver of eutrophication, SRP concentrations in runoff were reduced on average by 60 µg L-1 (71%) by lowering soil Olsen-P from optimum (25 mg kg-1) to 10 mg kg-1. At Olsen-P concentrations below 12 mg kg-1, dissolved hydrolysable P (largely organic) became the dominant form of soluble P transported. We concluded that maintaining agronomic-optimum Olsen-P could still pose a eutrophication risk, and that a greater research focus on reducing critical soil test P through innovative agro-engineering of soils, crops and fertilisers would give long-term benefits in reducing the endemic eutrophication risk arising from legacy soil P. Soil P testing should become compulsory in priority catchments suffering, or sensitive to, eutrophication to ensure soil P reserves are fully accounted for as part of good fertiliser and manure management.

  10. Physically-based failure analysis of shallow layered soil deposits over large areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuomo, Sabatino; Castorino, Giuseppe Claudio; Iervolino, Aniello

    2014-05-01

    In the last decades, the analysis of slope stability conditions over large areas has become popular among scientists and practitioners (Cascini et al., 2011; Cuomo and Della Sala, 2013). This is due to the availability of new computational tools (Baum et al., 2002; Godt et al., 2008; Baum and Godt, 2012; Salciarini et al., 2012) - implemented in GIS (Geographic Information System) platforms - which allow taking into account the major hydraulic and mechanical issues related to slope failure, even for unsaturated soils, as well as the spatial variability of both topography and soil properties. However, the effectiveness (Sorbino et al., 2010) of the above methods it is still controversial for landslides forecasting especially depending on the accuracy of DTM (Digital Terrain Model) and for the chance that distinct triggering mechanisms may occur over large area. Among the major uncertainties, layering of soil deposits is of primary importance due to soil layer conductivity contrast and differences in shear strength. This work deals with the hazard analysis of shallow landslides over large areas, considering two distinct schematizations of soil stratigraphy, i.e. homogeneous or layered. To this purpose, the physically-based model TRIGRS (Baum et al., 2002) is firstly used, then extended to the case of layered deposit: specifically, a unique set of hydraulic properties is assumed while distinct soil unit weight and shear strength are considered for each soil layer. Both models are applied to a significant study area of Southern Italy, about 4 km2 large, where shallow deposits of air-fall volcanic (pyroclastic) soils have been affected by several landslides, causing victims, damages and economic losses. The achieved results highlight that soil volume globally mobilized over the study area highly depends on local stratigraphy of shallow deposits. This relates to the depth of critical slip surface which rarely corresponds to the bedrock contact where cohesionless coarse

  11. Analysis of Foundation of Tall R/C Chimney Incorporating Flexibility of Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayalekshmi, B. R.; Jisha, S. V.; Shivashankar, R.

    2017-09-01

    Three dimensional Finite Element (FE) analysis was carried out for 100 and 400 m high R/C chimneys having piled annular raft and annular raft foundations considering the flexibility of soil subjected to across-wind load. Stiffness of supporting soil and foundation were varied to evaluate the significance of Soil-Structure Interaction (SSI). The integrated chimney-foundation-soil system was analysed by finite element software ANSYS based on direct method of SSI assuming linear elastic material behaviour. FE analyses were carried out for two cases of SSI namely, (1) chimney with annular raft foundation and (2) chimney with piled annular raft foundation. The responses in raft such as bending moments and settlements were evaluated for both the cases and compared to those obtained from the conventional method of analysis of annular raft foundation. It is found that the responses in raft vary considerably depending on the stiffness of the underlying soil and the stiffness of foundation. Piled raft foundations are better suited for tall chimneys to be constructed in loose or medium sand.

  12. Hardware Design of Tuber Electrical Resistance Tomography System Based on the Soil Impedance Test and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Shuyi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hardware design of tuber electrical resistance tomography (TERT system is one of the key research problems of TERT data acquisition system. The TERT system can be applied to the tuber growth process monitoring in agriculture, i.e., the TERT data acquisition system can realize the real imaging of tuber plants in soil. In TERT system, the imaging tuber and soil multiphase medium is quite complexity. So, the impedance test and analysis of soil multiphase medium is very important to the design of sensitive array sensor subsystem and signals processing circuits. In the paper, the soil impedance test experimental is described and the results are analysed. The data acquisition hardware system is designed based on the result of soil medium impedance test and analysis. In the hardware design, the switch control chip ADG508, the instrumentation amplifier AD620 and programmable amplifier AD526 are employed. In the meantime, the phase locked loop technique for signal demodulation is introduced. The initial data collection is given and discussed under the conditions of existing plant tuber and no existing plant tuber. Conclusions of the hardware design of TERT system are presented.

  13. Chondroitin sulfate N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase-1 (CSGalNAcT-1) involved in chondroitin sulfate initiation: Impact of sulfation on activity and specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulberti, Sandrine; Jacquinet, Jean-Claude; Chabel, Matthieu; Ramalanjaona, Nick; Magdalou, Jacques; Netter, Patrick; Coughtrie, Michael W H; Ouzzine, Mohamed; Fournel-Gigleux, Sylvie

    2012-04-01

    Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) assembly initiates through the formation of a linkage tetrasaccharide region serving as a primer for both chondroitin sulfate (CS) and heparan sulfate (HS) chain polymerization. A possible role for sulfation of the linkage structure and of the constitutive disaccharide unit of CS chains in the regulation of CS-GAG chain synthesis has been suggested. To investigate this, we determined whether sulfate substitution of galactose (Gal) residues of the linkage region or of N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) of the disaccharide unit influences activity and specificity of chondroitin sulfate N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase-1 (CSGalNAcT-1), a key glycosyltransferase of CS biosynthesis. We synthesized a series of sulfated and unsulfated analogs of the linkage oligosaccharide and of the constitutive unit of CS and tested these molecules as potential acceptor substrates for the recombinant human CSGalNAcT-1. We show here that sulfation at C4 or C6 of the Gal residues markedly influences CSGalNAcT-1 initiation activity and catalytic efficiency. Kinetic analysis indicates that CSGalNAcT-1 exhibited 3.6-, 1.6-, and 2.2-fold higher enzymatic efficiency due to lower K(m) values toward monosulfated trisaccharides substituted at C4 or C6 position of Gal1, and at C6 of Gal2, respectively, compared with the unsulfated oligosaccharide. This highlights the critical influence of Gal substitution on both CSGalNAcT-1 activity and specifity. No GalNAcT activity was detected toward sulfated and unsulfated analogs of the CS constitutive disaccharide (GlcA-β1,3-GalNAc), indicating that CSGalNAcT-1 was involved in initiation but not in elongation of CS chains. Our results strongly suggest that sulfation of the linkage region acts as a regulatory signal in CS chain initiation.

  14. Scenario analysis of Agro-Environment measure adoption for soil erosion protection in Sicilian vineyard (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novara, Agata; Gristina, Luciano; Fantappiè, Maria; Costantini, Edoardo

    2014-05-01

    carbon content of the topsoil (averaged on the first 50 cm of soil depth) with the table published by Stone and Hilborn (2012). The slope-length and slope gradient (LS) factors were derived from the Digital Terrain Model of Sicily (20 x 20 m) using the formulas proposed by Wischmeier and Smith (1978), and revised by McCool et al. (1987 and 1989). The C factor were applied according previous studies in the same area and ranged among 0.22 and 0.12 and less than 0.10 using permanent species able to reduce erosion rate up to 90% (Gristina et al., 2006; Novara et al. 2011). The scenario analysis of the soil erosion reduction after the adoption of AEM could be used by policy makers as a base for the evaluation of the Payment for Ecosystem Service (PES) to be paid to farmers through the future Agro-Ecosystem measures incentives. Gristina, L., Bagarello, V., Ferro, V., Poma, I., 2006. Cover and management factor for Sicilian vineyard systems. In: 14th International Soil conservation Organization Conference—Water Management and Soil Conservation in Semi-arid Environments, 14-19 May 2006, Marrakech, Marocco (ISCO2006), pp. 1-4. A Novara, L Gristina, SS Saladino, A Santoro, A Cerda 2011 Soil erosion assessment on tillage and alternative soil managements in a Sicilian vineyard. Soil and Tillage Research 117, 140-147

  15. Multivariate analysis of toxicological and environmental properties of soil nematicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Moreno, Sara; Alonso-Prados, Elena; Alonso-Prados, J Luis; García-Baudín, José M

    2009-01-01

    In intensive agriculture, the use of pesticides and soil fumigants is necessary to produce economically viable crops worldwide. However, this practice may involve undesirable effects on human health and the environment. In 1995, methyl bromide was restricted by the Montreal Protocol because of possible ozone depletion. The objective of this study was to compare intrinsic environmental and toxicological properties of 11 active substances with nematicidal properties, some of them recognized as methyl bromide alternatives. Four groups of active substances were discriminated by a series of principal component analyses (PCAs): (a) high toxicity to non-target fauna, humans and animals and medium persistence in the environment (cadusafos, ethoprophos and fenamiphos); (b) high toxicity to humans, animals and non-target fauna and high persistence (carbofuran and fosthiazate); (c) low toxicity to non-target fauna, humans and animals and low persistence (carbosulfan, benfuracarb and oxamyl); (d) low toxicity to humans, animals and non-target fauna and medium persistence in the environment (1,3-dichloropropene, chloropicrin and methyl bromide). Evaluating the multiple aspects of toxicological and environmental properties of active substances through PCA is proposed as a helpful tool for initially comparing the complex toxicological behaviour of active substances as plant protection products.

  16. Uncertainty analysis on simple mass balance model to calculate critical loads for soil acidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbin Li; Steven G. McNulty

    2007-01-01

    Simple mass balance equations (SMBE) of critical acid loads (CAL) in forest soil were developed to assess potential risks of air pollutants to ecosystems. However, to apply SMBE reliably at large scales, SMBE must be tested for adequacy and uncertainty. Our goal was to provide a detailed analysis of uncertainty in SMBE so that sound strategies for scaling up CAL...

  17. Finite Element Limit Analysis of Active Earth Pressure in Nonhomogeneous soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyman Hamidi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Limit analysis is a useful method to calc1ulate bearing capacity of footings, earth pressure of retaining walls, stability of slopes and excavations. In recent years, many efforts have been focused on stability problems of geotechnical structures with the limit analysis method. The limit analysis method includes the upper and lower bound theorems. By using the two theorems, the range, in which the true solution falls, can be found. In this paper upper bound finite element limit analysis is used for calculate active earth force on retaining walls in non-homogeneous soils. Elements with linear strain rates cause to eliminate the necessity of velocity discontinuities between the elements. Nonlinear programming based on second order cone programming (SOCP ,which has good conformity with Mohr-Coulomb criterion used in this paper. The sensitivity of active earth force against backfill surcharge (q, soil layers cohesion (Ci, soil layers unit weight (γi and friction angle between soil and wall (δi is surveyed.

  18. ANALYSIS OF FERRIC AND FERROUS IONS IN SOIL EXTRACTS BY ION CHROMATOGRAPHY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A method using ion chromatography (IC) for the analysis of ferrous (Fe 2+) and ferric (Fe 3+) ions in soil extracts has been developed. This method uses an ion exchange column with detection at 520 nm after post-column derivatization. Selectivity is achieved by using an anionic...

  19. Analysis of Fluorotelomer Alcohols in Soils: Optimization of Extraction and Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article describes the development of an analytical method for the determination of fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs) in soil. The sensitive and selective determination of the telomer alcohols was performed by extraction with mthyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and analysis of the ext...

  20. Elemental Analysis and Comparison of Bulk Soil Using LA-ICP-MS and LIBS methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almirall, J.

    2012-04-01

    Elemental analysis methods utilizing Laser ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) were developed and used in the characterization of soil samples from the US and Canada as part of a comprehensive forensic evaluation of soils. A LA-ICP-MS method was recently optimized for analysis and comparison between different soil samples in an environmental forensic application [1,2] and LIBS has recently attracted the interest of analytical chemists and forensic laboratories as a simpler, lower cost alternative to the more established analytical methods. In developing a LIBS method, there are many parameters to consider, including laser wavelength, spectral resolution, sensitivity, and matrix effects. The first LIBS method using a 266 nm laser for forensic soil analysis has also been recently reported by our group [3]. The results of an inter-laboratory comparison involving thirteen (13) laboratories conducting bulk elemental analysis by various methods are also reported. The aims of the inter-laboratory tests were: a) to evaluate the inter-laboratory performance of three methods (LA-ICP-MS, µXRF and LIBS) in terms of accuracy (bias), precision (relative standard deviation, RSD) and sensitivity using standard reference materials (SRMs); b) to evaluate the newly released NIST SRM 2710a, which supersedes 2710; and c) to evaluate the utility of LIBS as an alternative technique to LA-ICP-MS and µXRF for bulk analysis of soils. Each sample and standard was homogenized in a high-speed ball mill and pressed into pellets. Participants were instructed to measure the following elements: 7Li, 25Mg, 27Al, 42Ca, 45Sc, 47,49Ti, 51V, 55Mn, 88Sr, 137Ba, 206,207,208 Pb (LA-ICP-MS); Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Sr, Zr, Pb (µXRF); Ba, Cr, Cu, Fe, Li, Mg, Mn, Pb, Sr, Ti, Zr (LIBS). For both LIBS and µXRF, the choice of appropriate spectral lines was determined by the user, optimizing for linearity, sensitivity and precision

  1. Spatial analysis of soil salinity and soil structural stability in a semiarid region of New South Wales, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odeh, Inakwu O A; Onus, Alex

    2008-08-01

    Salt-affected soils are a major threat to agriculture especially in the semiarid regions of the world. The effective management of these soils requires adequate understanding of not only how water and, hence, solutes are transported within the soil, but also how soil salinity and sodicity spatially interact to determine soil structural breakdown. For sustainable agricultural production, information on quantitative soil quality, such as salinity, is required for effective land management and environmental planning. In this study, quantitative methods for mapping indicators of soil structural stability, namely salinity and sodicity, were developed to assess the effect of these primary indicators on soil structural breakdown. The current levels of soil salinity, as measured by electrical conductivity (EC) of the soil/water suspension, soil sodicity, represented by exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP), and aggregate stability, were assessed. Remote sensing, geographical information system (GIS), and geostatistical techniques--primarily regression-kriging and indicator-kriging--were used to spatially predict the soil sodicity and salinity. The patterns of salinity (EC) and sodicity (ESP>5%) were identified. The effect of land use on these soil quality indicators was found to be minimal. Co-spatial patterns were elucidated between sodic soils (defined by ESP>5%) and highly probable mechanically dispersive soils predicted from indicator-kriging of ASWAT scores. It was established that the incorporation of EC with ESP into an objective index, called electrolyte stability index (ESI=ESP/EC), gave a good indication of soil dispersion, although the threshold ESI value below which effective structural breakdown might occur is 0.025, which is twice as small as the expected 0.05. The discrepancies between ESI and ASWAT scores suggest that other soil factors than salinity and sodicity are affecting soil structural breakdown. This calls for further investigation. The study

  2. Application of a new purification method of West-Kazakhstan chestnut soil microbiota DNA for metagenomic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergaliev, N. Kh.; Kakishev, M. G.; Zhiengaliev, A. T.; Volodin, M. A.; Andronov, E. E.; Pinaev, A. G.

    2015-04-01

    A method for the extraction of soil microbial DNA has been tested on chestnut soils (Kastanozems) of the West Kazakhstan region. The taxonomic analysis of soil microbiome libraries has shown that the phyla Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria constitute the largest part of microbial communities in the analyzed soils. The Archaea form an appreciable part of the microbiome in the studied samples. In the underdeveloped dark chestnut soil, their portion is higher than 11%. This is of interest, as the proportion of Archaea in the soil communities of virgin lands usually does not exceed 5%. In addition to the phyla mentioned above, there are representatives of the phyla Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadales, Planctomycetes, and Verrucomicrobia, which are all fairly common in soil communities.

  3. Direct methods of soil-structure interaction analysis for earthquake loadings(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Chung Bang; Lee, S. R.; Kim, J. M.; Park, K. L.; Oh, S. B.; Choi, J. S.; Kim, Y. S. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-15

    In this study, methods for 3-D soil-structure interaction analysis have been studied. They are 3-D axisymmetric analysis method, 3-D axisymmetric finite element method incorporating infinite elements, and 3-D boundary element methods. The computer code, named as 'KIESSI - PF', has been developed which is based on the 3-D axisymmetric finite element method coupled with infinite element method. It is able to simulate forced vibration test results of a soil-structure interaction system. The Hualien FVT post-correlation analysis before backfill and the blind prediction analysis after backfill have been carried out using the developed computer code 'KIESSI - PF'.

  4. Damage modelling in concrete subject to sulfate attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Cefis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider the mechanical effect of the sulfate attack on concrete. The durability analysis of concrete structures in contact to external sulfate solutions requires the definition of a proper diffusion-reaction model, for the computation of the varying sulfate concentration and of the consequent ettringite formation, coupled to a mechanical model for the prediction of swelling and material degradation. In this work, we make use of a two-ions formulation of the reactive-diffusion problem and we propose a bi-phase chemo-elastic damage model aimed to simulate the mechanical response of concrete and apt to be used in structural analyses.

  5. Organic sulfur oxidation to sulfate in soil samples for total sulfur determination by turbidimetry Oxidação do enxofre orgânico a sulfato em amostras de solo para determinação de enxofre total por turbidimetria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexssandra Luiza Rodrigues Molina Rossete

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur in the soil occurs in two basic forms, organic and inorganic S. The organic form accounts for 95 % of S in most soils. The effectiveness of organic S to oxidate to sulfate was evaluated for total S determination in soil samples by wet (acid and dry-ash (alkaline oxidation methods. To evaluate the wet method and the possible use as a reference when evaluating the dry method proposed here, a reference standard from the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST was used (Montana Soil - NIST 2710. The dry-ash oxidation process with alkaline oxidizing agents is one of the simplest oxidation methods of organic S to the sulfate form and was compared with the wet process. The objective of the study was to develop a dry method that would be easy to apply and allow the complete conversion of organic S to sulfate in soil samples and later detection by turbidimetry. The effectiveness of organic S oxidation to sulfate was evaluated by means of three alkaline oxidation mixtures: NaHCO3 + Ag2O, Eschka mixture (17 % Na2CO3, 66 % MgO, and 17 % K2CO3, and NaHCO3 + CuO. The procedure to quantify the sulfate concentration was based on the reaction with barium chloride and turbidimetric detection. Sulfur quantification in the standard sample by the wet method proved adequate, precise and accurate. It should also be pointed out that no significant differences were found (95 % reliability between the wet and dry processes (NaHCO3 and Ag2O oxidation mixture in six different Brazilian soils. The proposed dry method can therefore be used in the preparation of soil samples for total S determination.O S no solo pode ocorrer como S-orgânico e S-inorgânico, sendo a forma orgânica responsável por 95 % do S na maioria dos solos. A eficiência da oxidação do S-orgânico a sulfato, na determinação de S-total em amostras de solo, foi avaliada com o emprego de métodos de oxidação por via úmida (ácida e via seca (alcalina. Com o propósito de

  6. Evaluation of safe bearing capacity of soil foundation by using numerical analysis method

    OpenAIRE

    Abdoullah Namdar; Xiong Feng

    2014-01-01

    The soil mechanic laboratory results help in accurate soil foundation design and enhancement failure mitigation. The mixing soil design has been used in many geotechnical engineering for soil improvement. In this paper, several types of soil foundations have been made from mixed soil. The bearing capacity of soil foundations by using mixed soil parameters and change footing dimensions have been calculated. 180 footings, placed on 15 soil foundation types have been designed. It is ...

  7. Metagenomic analysis of soil and freshwater from zoo agricultural area with organic fertilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylan K Meneghine

    Full Text Available Microbial communities drive biogeochemical cycles in agricultural areas by decomposing organic materials and converting essential nutrients. Organic amendments improve soil quality by increasing the load of essential nutrients and enhancing the productivity. Additionally, fresh water used for irrigation can affect soil quality of agricultural soils, mainly due to the presence of microbial contaminants and pathogens. In this study, we investigated how microbial communities in irrigation water might contribute to the microbial diversity and function of soil. Whole-metagenomic sequencing approaches were used to investigate the taxonomic and the functional profiles of microbial communities present in fresh water used for irrigation, and in soil from a vegetable crop, which received fertilization with organic compost made from animal carcasses. The taxonomic analysis revealed that the most abundant genera were Polynucleobacter (~8% relative abundance and Bacillus (~10% in fresh water and soil from the vegetable crop, respectively. Low abundance (0.38% of cyanobacterial groups were identified. Based on functional gene prediction, denitrification appears to be an important process in the soil community analysed here. Conversely, genes for nitrogen fixation were abundant in freshwater, indicating that the N-fixation plays a crucial role in this particular ecosystem. Moreover, pathogenicity islands, antibiotic resistance and potential virulence related genes were identified in both samples, but no toxigenic genes were detected. This study provides a better understanding of the community structure of an area under strong agricultural activity with regular irrigation and fertilization with an organic compost made from animal carcasses. Additionally, the use of a metagenomic approach to investigate fresh water quality proved to be a relevant method to evaluate its use in an agricultural ecosystem.

  8. Assessing soil surface roughness decay during simulated rainfall by multifractal analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Vidal Vázquez

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding and describing the spatial characteristics of soil surface microrelief are required for modelling overland flow and erosion. We employed the multifractal approach to characterize topographical point elevation data sets acquired by high resolution laser scanning for assessing the effect of simulated rainfall on microrelief decay. Three soil surfaces with different initial states or composition and rather smooth were prepared on microplots and subjected to successive events of simulated rainfall. Soil roughness was measured on a 2×2 mm2 grid, initially, i.e. before rain, and after each simulated storm, yielding a total of thirteen data sets for three rainfall sequences. The vertical microrelief component as described by the statistical index random roughness (RR exhibited minor changes under rainfall in two out of three study cases, which was due to the imposed wet initial state constraining aggregate breakdown. The effect of cumulative rainfall on microrelief decay was also assessed by multifractal analysis performed with the box-count algorithm. Generalized dimension, Dq, spectra allowed characterization of the spatial variation of soil surface microrelief measured at the microplot scale. These Dq spectra were also sensitive to temporal changes in soil surface microrelief, so that in all the three study rain sequences, the initial soil surface and the surfaces disturbed by successive storms displayed great differences in their degree of multifractality. Therefore, Multifractal parameters best discriminate between successive soil stages under a given rain sequence. Decline of RR and multifractal parameters showed little or no association.

  9. Instrumental neutron activation analysis of soil and sediment samples from Siwa Oasis, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Wael M.; Ali, Khaled; El-Samman, Hussein M.; Frontasyeva, Marina V.; Gundorina, Svetlana F.; Duliu, Octavian G.

    2015-07-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis was used to study geochemical peculiarities of the Siwa Oasis in the Western Egyptian Desert. A total of 34 elements were determined in soil and sediment samples (Na, Mg, Al, Cl, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr, Sb, I, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Eu, Tb, Dy, Tm, Yb, Hf, Ta, Th, and U). For data interpretation Cluster analysis was applied. Comparison with the available literature data was carried out.

  10. Detection of toxin genes and RAPD analysis of bacillus cereus isolates from different soil types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savic Dejana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to detect genes for enterotoxins (hbla, entFM and bceT and for emetic toxin (cer, to determine antibiotic resistance, and to estimate intraspecies diversity in B. cereus isolates by RAPD analysis. B. cereus was identified in 12 out of 117 indigenous Bacillus spp. using the classical microbiological methods and PCR. All isolates were resistant to penicillin and ampicillin, two to tetracyclin and four to trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole. Also, all isolates produced inducible penicillinases and β-lactamase. Toxin genes were detected with PCR. EntFM and cer genes were present in all isolates, hbla in all, but two, and bceT in none. RAPD analysis was performed with four different primers, two of them designed for this study. The intraspecies diversity revealed 10 different patterns at the 90% similarity level. Two separate clusters were formed regardless of a soil type or utilization. The detection of genes encoding toxins in all B. cereus isolates indicated these bacteria as potentially pathogenic and seriously for human health. Regardless of a soil type or utilization, the RAPD analysis showed high intraspecies heterogeneity in B. cereus isolates. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to analyse the presence of entero- and emetic toxin genes and genetic heterogeneity in B. cereus isolates from different soil types and different soil utilization in Serbia. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR37006

  11. Comparative Analysis for Polluted Agricultural Soils with Arsenic, Lead, and Mercury in Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarto-Ramirez, Mario; Santos-Santos, Elvira; Gavilan-Garcia, Arturo; Castro-Diaz, Jose; Gavilan-Garcia, Irma Cruz; Rosiles, Rene; Suarez, Sara

    2004-03-31

    The use of mercury in Mexico has been associated with the mining industry of Zacatecas. This activity has polluted several areas currently used for agriculture. The main objective of this study was to investigate the heavy metal concentration (Hg, As and Pb) in soil of Guadalupe Zacatecas in order to justify a further environmental risk assessment in the site. A 2X3 km grid was used for the sampling process and 20 soil samples were taken. The analysis was developed using EPA SW 846: 3050B/6010B method for arsenic and metals and EPA SW 846: 7471A for total mercury. It was concluded that there are heavy metals in agricultural soils used for corn and bean farming. For this it is required to make an environmental risk assessment and a bioavailability study in order to determine if there's a risk for heavy metals bioaccumulation in animals or human beings or metal lixiviation to aquifers.

  12. A meta-analysis of soil carbon stock change following afforestation in Northern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárcena, Teresa G.; Vesterdal, Lars; Kiær, Lars P.; Marta Stefánsdóttir, Helena; Gundersen, Per; Sigurdsson, Bjarni D.

    2013-04-01

    Studies of soil organic carbon (SOC) stock change after afforestation have shown different patterns in terms of magnitude, direction (gain, loss or no change) and duration. Due to data shortage at regional or national scales, global datasets have commonly been evaluated by meta-analysis to address the effects of land-use changes on SOCs. Few syntheses on afforestation effects have been conducted at more constrained spatial scales where the influence of site-specific factors is smaller. Here, we present a meta-analysis of relative change in SOC within the Northern European region (including 123 observations), which has not been well represented in previous syntheses. Effect sizes were determined by log response ratios (RR) for each control-afforested pair. The first objective was to quantify effects of afforestation on SOC stocks in forest floors and mineral soils (0-10 cm and 0-20/30 cm). We tested the influence of different former land use classes, such as croplands and grasslands, forest age and forest type on the estimated SOC stock changes. The second objective was to address the influence of study design. SOC stock estimates from control/afforested plots have an implicit spatial dependency according to the experimental approach used (e.g. paired site studies, chronosequences sharing a common control site and repeated sampling design), however, this has not been accounted for in meta-analyses of afforested soils. In addition, changes in SOC stocks (in 0-10 cm) were expressed on equivalent soil mass and equivalent soil volume to estimate possible differences in effect size originating from these two SOC accounting methods. Preliminary results indicate an overall positive effect of afforestation on SOC accumulation with age, supported by the oldest age classes (>30 years). This effect was enhanced when the forest floor was included in the total SOC stock, in particular for coniferous forests, highlighting the importance of this layer in soil C sequestration

  13. Laboratory and Airborne BRDF Analysis of Vegetation Leaves and Soil Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Georgi T.; Gatebe, Charles K.; Butler, James J.; King, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory-based Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) analysis of vegetation leaves, soil, and leaf litter samples is presented. The leaf litter and soil samples, numbered 1 and 2, were obtained from a site located in the savanna biome of South Africa (Skukuza: 25.0degS, 31.5degE). A third soil sample, number 3, was obtained from Etosha Pan, Namibia (19.20degS, 15.93degE, alt. 1100 m). In addition, BRDF of local fresh and dry leaves from tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera) and acacia tree (Acacia greggii) were studied. It is shown how the BRDF depends on the incident and scatter angles, sample size (i.e. crushed versus whole leaf,) soil samples fraction size, sample status (i.e. fresh versus dry leaves), vegetation species (poplar versus acacia), and vegetation s biochemical composition. As a demonstration of the application of the results of this study, airborne BRDF measurements acquired with NASA's Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) over the same general site where the soil and leaf litter samples were obtained are compared to the laboratory results. Good agreement between laboratory and airborne measured BRDF is reported.

  14. Microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin in soil by compound-specific stable isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zemin; Shen, Xiaoli; Zhang, Xi-Chang; Liu, Weiping; Yang, Fangxing

    2015-09-15

    To assess microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin in soil, attenuation of alpha-cypermethrin was investigated by compound-specific stable isotope analysis. The variations of the residual concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios of alpha-cypermethrin were detected in unsterilized and sterilized soils spiked with alpha-cypermethrin. After an 80 days' incubation, the concentrations of alpha-cypermethrin decreased to 0.47 and 3.41 mg/kg in the unsterilized soils spiked with 2 and 10 mg/kg, while those decreased to 1.43 and 6.61 mg/kg in the sterilized soils. Meanwhile, the carbon isotope ratios shifted to -29.14 ± 0.22‰ and -29.86 ± 0.33‰ in the unsterilized soils spiked with 2 and 10 mg/kg, respectively. The results revealed that microbial degradation contributed to the attenuation of alpha-cypermethrin and induced the carbon isotope fractionation. In order to quantitatively assess microbial degradation, a relationship between carbon isotope ratios and residual concentrations of alpha-cypermethrin was established according to Rayleigh equation. An enrichment factor, ϵ = -1.87‰ was obtained, which can be employed to assess microbial degradation of alpha-cypermethrin. The significant carbon isotope fractionation during microbial degradation suggests that CSIA is a proper approach to qualitatively detect and quantitatively assess the biodegradation during attenuation process of alpha-cypermethrin in the field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Drive tube 60009 - A chemical study of magnetic separates of size fractions from five strata. [lunar soil analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, D. P.; Jacobs, J. W.; Brannon, J. C.; Brown, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    Each bulk soil and both the magnetic and nonmagnetic components of the 90-150 micron and below 20 micron fractions of five soils from drive tube 60009 were analyzed. Samples were analyzed for FeO, Na2O, Sc, Cr, Co, Ni, Hf, Ta, Th, La, Ce, Sm, Eu, Tb, Yb, and Lu by neutron activation analysis. Several samples were fused and analyzed for major elements by electron microprobe analysis. Compositional variations are not systematically related to depth. The compositions of the five soils studied are well explained by a two-component mixing model whose end members are a submature Apollo 16-type soil and an extremely immature anorthositic material similar to 60025. There is evidence that the anorthositic component had received a small amount of exposure before these soils were mixed. After mixing, the soils received little exposure suggesting mixing and deposition on a rapid time scale.

  16. Microbial colonization in diverse surface soil types in Surtsey and diversity analysis of its subsurface microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marteinsson, V.; Klonowski, A.; Reynisson, E.; Vannier, P.; Sigurdsson, B. D.; Ólafsson, M.

    2015-02-01

    Colonization of life on Surtsey has been observed systematically since the formation of the island 50 years ago. Although the first colonisers were prokaryotes, such as bacteria and blue-green algae, most studies have been focused on the settlement of plants and animals but less on microbial succession. To explore microbial colonization in diverse soils and the influence of associated vegetation and birds on numbers of environmental bacteria, we collected 45 samples from different soil types on the surface of the island. Total viable bacterial counts were performed with the plate count method at 22, 30 and 37 °C for all soil samples, and the amount of organic matter and nitrogen (N) was measured. Selected samples were also tested for coliforms, faecal coliforms and aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. The subsurface biosphere was investigated by collecting liquid subsurface samples from a 181 m borehole with a special sampler. Diversity analysis of uncultivated biota in samples was performed by 16S rRNA gene sequences analysis and cultivation. Correlation was observed between nutrient deficits and the number of microorganisms in surface soil samples. The lowest number of bacteria (1 × 104-1 × 105 cells g-1) was detected in almost pure pumice but the count was significantly higher (1 × 106-1 × 109 cells g-1) in vegetated soil or pumice with bird droppings. The number of faecal bacteria correlated also to the total number of bacteria and type of soil. Bacteria belonging to Enterobacteriaceae were only detected in vegetated samples and samples containing bird droppings. The human pathogens Salmonella, Campylobacter and Listeria were not in any sample. Both thermophilic bacteria and archaea 16S rDNA sequences were found in the subsurface samples collected at 145 and 172 m depth at 80 and 54 °C, respectively, but no growth was observed in enrichments. The microbiota sequences generally showed low affiliation to any known 16S rRNA gene sequences.

  17. Microbial colonisation in diverse surface soil types in Surtsey and diversity analysis of its subsurface microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marteinsson, V.; Klonowski, A.; Reynisson, E.; Vannier, P.; Sigurdsson, B. D.; Ólafsson, M.

    2014-09-01

    Colonisation of life on Surtsey has been observed systematically since the formation of the island 50 years ago. Although the first colonisers were prokaryotes, such as bacteria and blue-green algae, most studies have been focusing on settlement of plants and animals but less on microbial succession. To explore microbial colonization in diverse soils and the influence of associate vegetation and birds on numbers of environmental bacteria, we collected 45 samples from different soils types on the surface of the island. Total viable bacterial counts were performed with plate count at 22, 30 and 37 °C for all soils samples and the amount of organic matter and nitrogen (N) was measured. Selected samples were also tested for coliforms, faecal coliforms aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. The deep subsurface biosphere was investigated by collecting liquid subsurface samples from a 182 m borehole with a special sampler. Diversity analysis of uncultivated biota in samples was performed by 16S rRNA gene sequences analysis and cultivation. Correlation was observed between N deficits and the number of microorganisms in surface soils samples. The lowest number of bacteria (1 × 104-1 × 105 g-1) was detected in almost pure pumice but the count was significant higher (1 × 106-1 × 109 g-1) in vegetated soil or pumice with bird droppings. The number of faecal bacteria correlated also to the total number of bacteria and type of soil. Bacteria belonging to Enterobacteriaceae were only detected in vegetated and samples containing bird droppings. The human pathogens Salmonella, Campylobacter and Listeria were not in any sample. Both thermophilic bacteria and archaea 16S rDNA sequences were found in the subsurface samples collected at 145 m and 172 m depth at 80 °C and 54 °C, respectively, but no growth was observed in enrichments. The microbiota sequences generally showed low affiliation to any known 16S rRNA gene sequences.

  18. Gas-Phase Analysis of the Complex of Fibroblast GrowthFactor 1 with Heparan Sulfate: A Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry (TWIMS) and Molecular Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuejie; Singh, Arunima; Xu, Yongmei; Zong, Chengli; Zhang, Fuming; Boons, Geert-Jan; Liu, Jian; Linhardt, Robert J.; Woods, Robert J.; Amster, I. Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) regulate several cellular developmental processes by interacting with cell surface heparan proteoglycans and transmembrane cell surface receptors (FGFR). The interaction of FGF with heparan sulfate (HS) is known to induce protein oligomerization, increase the affinity of FGF towards its receptor FGFR, promoting the formation of the HS-FGF-FGFR signaling complex. Although the role of HS in the signaling pathways is well recognized, the details of FGF oligomerization and formation of the ternary signaling complex are still not clear, with several conflicting models proposed in literature. Here, we examine the effect of size and sulfation pattern of HS upon FGF1 oligomerization, binding stoichiometry and conformational stability, through a combination of ion mobility (IM) and theoretical modeling approaches. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMMS) of FGF1 in the presence of several HS fragments ranging from tetrasaccharide (dp4) to dodecasaccharide (dp12) in length was performed. A comparison of the binding stoichiometry of variably sulfated dp4 HS to FGF1 confirmed the significance of the previously known high-affinity binding motif in FGF1 dimerization, and demonstrated that certain tetrasaccharide-length fragments are also capable of inducing dimerization of FGF1. The degree of oligomerization was found to increase in the presence of dp12 HS, and a general lack of specificity for longer HS was observed. Additionally, collision cross-sections (CCSs) of several FGF1-HS complexes were calculated, and were found to be in close agreement with experimental results. Based on the (CCSs) a number of plausible binding modes of 2:1 and 3:1 FGF1-HS are proposed.

  19. Performance of a reciprocal shaker in mechanical dispersion of soil samples for particle-size analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thayse Aparecida Dourado

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The dispersion of the samples in soil particle-size analysis is a fundamental step, which is commonly achieved with a combination of chemical agents and mechanical agitation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of a low-speed reciprocal shaker for the mechanical dispersion of soil samples of different textural classes. The particle size of 61 soil samples was analyzed in four replications, using the pipette method to determine the clay fraction and sieving to determine coarse, fine and total sand fractions. The silt content was obtained by difference. To evaluate the performance, the results of the reciprocal shaker (RSh were compared with data of the same soil samples available in reports of the Proficiency testing for Soil Analysis Laboratories of the Agronomic Institute of Campinas (Prolab/IAC. The accuracy was analyzed based on the maximum and minimum values defining the confidence intervals for the particle-size fractions of each soil sample. Graphical indicators were also used for data comparison, based on dispersion and linear adjustment. The descriptive statistics indicated predominantly low variability in more than 90 % of the results for sand, medium-textured and clay samples, and for 68 % of the results for heavy clay samples, indicating satisfactory repeatability of measurements with the RSh. Medium variability was frequently associated with silt, followed by the fine sand fraction. The sensitivity analyses indicated an accuracy of 100 % for the three main separates (total sand, silt and clay, in all 52 samples of the textural classes heavy clay, clay and medium. For the nine sand soil samples, the average accuracy was 85.2 %; highest deviations were observed for the silt fraction. In relation to the linear adjustments, the correlation coefficients of 0.93 (silt or > 0.93 (total sand and clay, as well as the differences between the angular coefficients and the unit < 0.16, indicated a high correlation between the

  20. An inverse analysis reveals limitations of the soil-CO2 profile method to calculate CO2 production and efflux for well-structured soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Corre

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Soil respiration is the second largest flux in the global carbon cycle, yet the underlying below-ground process, carbon dioxide (CO2 production, is not well understood because it can not be measured in the field. CO2 production has frequently been calculated from the vertical CO2 diffusive flux divergence, known as "soil-CO2 profile method". This relatively simple model requires knowledge of soil CO2 concentration profiles and soil diffusive properties. Application of the method for a tropical lowland forest soil in Panama gave inconsistent results when using diffusion coefficients (D calculated based on relationships with soil porosity and moisture ("physically modeled" D. Our objective was to investigate whether these inconsistencies were related to (1 the applied interpolation and solution methods and/or (2 uncertainties in the physically modeled profile of D. First, we show that the calculated CO2 production strongly depends on the function used to interpolate between measured CO2 concentrations. Secondly, using an inverse analysis of the soil-CO2 profile method, we deduce which D would be required to explain the observed CO2 concentrations, assuming the model perception is valid. In the top soil, this inversely modeled D closely resembled the physically modeled D. In the deep soil, however, the inversely modeled D increased sharply while the physically modeled D did not. When imposing a constraint during the fit parameter optimization, a solution could be found where this deviation between the physically and inversely modeled D disappeared. A radon (Rn mass balance model, in which diffusion was calculated based on the physically modeled or constrained inversely modeled D, simulated observed Rn profiles reasonably well. However, the CO2 concentrations which corresponded to the constrained inversely modeled D were too small compared to the measurements. We suggest that, in well-structured soils, a missing description of steady state CO2

  1. Soil carbon stock change following afforestation in Northern Europe: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárcena, T G; Kiær, L P; Vesterdal, L; Stefánsdóttir, H M; Gundersen, P; Sigurdsson, B D

    2014-08-01

    Northern Europe supports large soil organic carbon (SOC) pools and has been subjected to high frequency of land-use changes during the past decades. However, this region has not been well represented in previous large-scale syntheses of land-use change effects on SOC, especially regarding effects of afforestation. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis of SOC stock change following afforestation in Northern Europe. Response ratios were calculated for forest floors and mineral soils (0-10 cm and 0-20/30 cm layers) based on paired control (former land use) and afforested plots. We analyzed the influence of forest age, former land-use, forest type, and soil textural class. Three major improvements were incorporated in the meta-analysis: analysis of major interaction groups, evaluation of the influence of nonindependence between samples according to study design, and mass correction. Former land use was a major factor contributing to changes in SOC after afforestation. In former croplands, SOC change differed between soil layers and was significantly positive (20%) in the 0-10 cm layer. Afforestation of former grasslands had a small negative (nonsignificant) effect indicating limited SOC change following this land-use change within the region. Forest floors enhanced the positive effects of afforestation on SOC, especially with conifers. Meta-estimates calculated for the periods 30 years since afforestation revealed a shift from initial loss to later gain of SOC. The interaction group analysis indicated that meta-estimates in former land-use, forest type, and soil textural class alone were either offset or enhanced when confounding effects among variable classes were considered. Furthermore, effect sizes were slightly overestimated if sample dependence was not accounted for and if no mass correction was performed. We conclude that significant SOC sequestration in Northern Europe occurs after afforestation of croplands and not grasslands, and changes are small within a

  2. Sulfate threshold target to control methylmercury levels in wetland ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, J.; Naja, G.M.; Dziuba, C.; Rivero, R.G.; Orem, W.

    2011-01-01

    Sulfate contamination has a significant environmental implication through the stimulation of toxic hydrogen sulfide and methylmercury (MeHg) production. High levels of MeHg are a serious problem in many wetland ecosystems worldwide. In the Florida Everglades, it has been demonstrated that increasing MeHg occurrence is due to a sulfate contamination problem. A promising strategy of lowering the MeHg occurrence is to reduce the amount of sulfate entering the ecosystem. High surface water sulfate concentrations in the Everglades are mainly due to discharges from the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA) canals. Water and total sulfur mass balances indicated that total sulfur released by soil oxidation, Lake Okeechobee and agricultural application were the major sources contributing 49,169, 35,217 and 11,775mtonsyear-1, respectively. Total sulfur loads from groundwater, levees, and atmospheric deposition contributed to a lesser extent: 4055; 5858 and 4229mtonsyear-1, respectively. Total sulfur leaving the EAA into Water Conservation Areas (WCAs) through canal discharge was estimated at 116,360mtonsyear-1, and total sulfur removed by sugarcane harvest accounted for 23,182mtonsyear-1. Furthermore, a rise in the mineral content and pH of the EAA soil over time, suggested that the current rates of sulfur application would increase as the buffer capacity of the soil increases. Therefore, a site specific numeric criterion for sulfate of 1mgL-1 was recommended for the protection of the Everglades; above this level, mercury methylation is enhanced. In parallel, sulfide concentrations in the EAA exceeded the 2??gL-1 criterion for surface water already established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Sulfate, chloride and fluoride retention in Andosols exposed to volcanic acid emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmelle, Pierre; Delfosse, Thomas; Delvaux, Bruno

    2003-01-01

    The continuous emissions of SO(2), HCl and HF by Masaya volcano, Nicaragua, represent a substantial source of atmospheric S-, Cl- and F-containing acid inputs for local ecosystems. We report on the effects of such acid depositions on the sulfate, chloride and fluoride contents in soils (0-40 cm) from two distinct transects located downwind from the volcano. The first transect corresponds to relatively undifferentiated Vitric Andosols, and the second transect to more weathered Eutric Andosols. These soils are exposed to various rates of volcanogenic acid addition, with the Vitric sites being generally more affected. Prolonged acid inputs have led to a general pH decrease and reduced exchangeable base cation concentrations in the Andosols. The concentrations of 0.5 M NH(4)F- and 0.016 M KH(2)PO(4)-extractable sulfate (NH(4)F-S and KH(2)PO(4)-S, respectively) indicate that volcanic S addition has increased the inorganic sulfate content of the Vitric and Eutric soils at all depths. In this process, the rate of sulfate accumulation is also dependent on soil allophane contents. For all soils, NH(4)F extracted systematically more (up to 40 times) sulfate than KH(2)PO(4). This difference suggests sulfate incorporation into an aluminum hydroxy sulfate phase, whose contribution to total inorganic sulfate in the Vitric and Eutric Andosols is estimated from approximately 34 to 95% and approximately 65 to 98%, respectively. The distribution of KH(2)PO(4)-extractable chloride in the Vitric and Eutric Andosols exposed to volcanic Cl inputs reveals that added chloride readily migrates through the soil profiles. In contrast, reaction of fluoride with Al and Fe oxyhydroxides and allophanes is an important sink mechanism in the Masaya Andosols exposed to airborne volcanic F. Fluoride dominates the anion distribution in all soil horizons, although F is the least concentrated element in the volcanic emissions and depositions. The soil anion distribution reflects preferential retention

  4. Multifractal and Singularity Maps of soil surface moisture distribution derived from 2D image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumbrera, Ramiro; Millán, Humberto; Martín-Sotoca, Juan Jose; Pérez Soto, Luis; Sanchez, Maria Elena; Tarquis, Ana Maria

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture distribution usually presents extreme variation at multiple spatial scales. Image analysis could be a useful tool for investigating these spatial patterns of apparent soil moisture at multiple resolutions. The objectives of the present work were (i) to describe the local scaling of apparent soil moisture distribution and (ii) to define apparent soil moisture patterns from vertical planes of Vertisol pit images. Two soil pits (0.70 m long × 0.60 m width × 0.30 m depth) were excavated on a bare Mazic Pellic Vertisol. One was excavated in April/2011 and the other pit was established in May/2011 after 3 days of a moderate rainfall event. Digital photographs were taken from each Vertisol pit using a Kodak™ digital camera. The mean image size was 1600 × 945 pixels with one physical pixel ≈373 μm of the photographed soil pit. For more details see Cumbrera et al. (2012). Geochemical exploration have found with increasingly interests and benefits of using fractal (power-law) models to characterize geochemical distribution, using the concentration-area (C-A) model (Cheng et al., 1994; Cheng, 2012). This method is based on the singularity maps of a measure that at each point define areas with self-similar properties that are shown in power-law relationships in Concentration-Area plots (C-A method). The C-A method together with