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Sample records for sulfate resisting cement

  1. Sulfate resistance of nanosilica contained Portland cement mortars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batilov, Iani B.

    Soils, sea water and ground water high in sulfates are commonly encountered hostile environments that can attack the structure of concrete via chemical and physical mechanisms which can lead to costly repairs or replacement. Sulfate attack is a slow acting deteriorative phenomenon that can result in cracking, spalling, expansion, increased permeability, paste-to-aggregate bond loss, paste softening, strength loss, and ultimately, progressive failure of concrete. In the presented research study, Portland cement (PC) mortars containing 1.5% to 6.0% nanosilica (nS) cement replacement by weight were tested for sulfate resistance through full submersion in sodium sulfate to simulate external sulfate attack. Mortars with comparable levels of cement replacement were also prepared with microsilica (mS). Three cement types were chosen to explore nS' effectiveness to reduce sulfate expansion, when paired with cements of varying tricalcium aluminate (C3A) content and Blaine fineness, and compare it to that of mS. Mortars were also made with combined cement replacement of equal parts nS and mS to identify if they were mutually compatible and beneficial towards sulfate resistance. Besides sulfate attack expansion of mortar bars, the testing program included investigations into transport and microstructure properties via water absorption, sulfate ion permeability, porosimetry, SEM with EDS, laser diffraction, compressive strength, and heat of hydration. Expansion measurements indicated that mS replacement mortars outperformed both powder form nS, and nS/mS combined replacement mixtures. A negative effect of the dry nS powder replacement attributed to agglomeration of its nanoparticles during mixing negated the expected superior filler, paste densification, and pozzolanic activity of the nanomaterial. Agglomerated nS was identified as the root cause behind poor performance of nS in comparison to mS for all cement types, and the control when paired with a low C3A sulfate resistant

  2. Evaluation of sulfate resistance of cement mortars containing black rice husk ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatveera, B; Lertwattanaruk, P

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, black rice husk ashes (BRHAs), which are agrowastes from an electricity generating power plant and a rice mill, were ground and used as a partial cement replacement. The durability of mortars under sulfate attack including expansion and compressive strength loss were investigated. For parametric study, BRHA were used as a Portland cement Type 1 replacement at the levels of 0%, 10%, 30%, and 50% by weight of binder. The water-to-binder ratios were 0.55 and 0.65. For the durability of mortar exposed to sulfate attack, 5% sodium sulfate (Na2SO4) and magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) solutions were used. As a result, when increasing the percentage replacement of BRHA, the expansion and compressive strength loss of mortar decreased. At the replacement levels of 30% and 50% of BRHA, the expansion of the mortars was less than those mixed with sulfate-resistant cement. However, the expansion of the mortars exposed to Na2SO4 was more than those exposed to MgSO4. Increasing the replacement level of BRHA tends to reduce the compressive strength loss of mortars exposed to Na2SO4 attack. In contrary, under MgSO4 attack, when increasing the replacement level of BRHA, the compressive strength loss increases from 0% to 50% in comparison to Portland cement mortar. Results show that ground BRHA can be applied as a pozzolanic material to concrete and also improve resistance to sodium sulfate attack, but it can impair resistance to magnesium sulfate attack.

  3. Accelerated test for measuring sulfate resistance of hydraulic cements for Caltrans LLPRS program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-04-01

    Many California soils are rich in sulfates, which can have deleterious effects on the cements used in rigid pavements. Field experience has demonstrated that sulfate attack usually manifests itself in the form of loss of adhesion and strength. In ord...

  4. Sulfate resistance evaluation of the cement with fly ash (using the Koch & Steinegger method

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    Irassar, Edgardo F.

    1988-12-01

    Full Text Available The increase of active mineral admixtures consumption in contemporaneous cementiceous materials has stablished revision of some test methods. In the evaluation of blended cement durability, many accelerated tests of large application in portland cements become unvalid, because they don't allow to value the improvements produced by pozzolan materials. Koch-Steinegger Method appears as the most appropiate to evaluate sulfate resistance of cement with active mineral admixtures. In this paper are presented the results obtained with this test in the evaluation of an ordinary portland cement (CPN and one resisting sulfates (CPARS, with low calcium fly ash addition. Fly ash is incorporated with three fineness (280, 420 and 480 m2/Kg Blaine. The results show that this addition improves sulfate resistance of CPN and in minor way of ARS cement. Fly ash influences evolution of mechanical strength in water and chemical resistance at first ages.

    El aumento del consumo de las adiciones minerales activas en los materiales cementíceos contemporáneos ha determinado la revisión de algunos métodos de ensayo utilizados para determinar sus propiedades. En la evaluación de la durabilidad de los cementos compuestos, muchos ensayos de corta duración (de gran aplicación en cementos portland dejan de tener validez, pues no permiten evaluar las mejoras que producen los materiales puzolánicos. El método propuesto por KOCH & STEINEGGER (1960 aparece como uno de los más apropiados para determinar el comportamiento de cementos con adiciones minerales activas frente al ataque de sulfatos. En este trabajo se presentan los resultados alcanzados con ente ensayo en la determinación del comportamiento de un cemento portland normal (CRN y uno resistente a los sulfatos (CPARS, adicionados con ceniza volante de bajo contenido en óxido de calcio. La ceniza se incorpora con tres finuras (280, 420 y 480 m2/kg —Blaine—. Estos

  5. Puzzolanic cements of greater resistance at the attack of selenitic waters than the high sulfate resistance portland cements, and viceverse

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    Talero, Rafael

    1987-09-01

    Full Text Available This work confirms the certainty of the predictions of useful service given by Kaluosek and al. for the sulphate resistant portland cements (type V, USA, subject to severe selenitic attack. Two sulphate resistant portland cements, were tested by means of the Le Chatelier Anstett method. The tarts were destroyed at ages of three years, having detected in them the presence of thaumasite by XRD. Even so, the impossibility and possibility thaumasite formation was confirmed in pozzolanic cements tarts, which either had or did not have adequate amount of pozzolana (diatomite for such purpose.

    Este trabajo confirman las predicciones de vida útil dadas por Kalousek y colaboradores, para los cementos portland de elevada resistencia al ataque de los iones sulfato (tipo V, USA, sometidos a un severo ataque selenitoso. Se ensayaron dos cementos portland de elevada resistencia al ataque del yeso, mediante el ensayo de Le Chatelier-Anstett. Sus tortas correspondientes se destruyeron a la edad de tres años, habiéndose detectado en las mismas la presencia de thaumasita por DRX. Asimismo se confirmó la imposibilidad y posibilidad de formación de thaumasita en tortas de cementos puzolánicos, los cuales tenían, o no, respectivamente, una adecuada cantidad de puzolana (diatomita para tales fines.

  6. Sulfate and acid resistant concrete and mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction and other applications, which hardenable mixtures demonstrate significant levels of acid and sulfate resistance while maintaining acceptable compressive strength properties. The acid and sulfate hardenable mixtures of the invention containing fly ash comprise cementitious materials and a fine aggregate. The cementitous materials may comprise fly ash as well as cement. The fine aggregate may comprise fly ash as well as sand. The total amount of fly ash in the hardenable mixture ranges from about 60% to about 120% of the total amount of cement, by weight, whether the fly ash is included as a cementious material, fine aggregate, or an additive, or any combination of the foregoing. In specific examples, mortar containing 50% fly ash and 50% cement in cementitious materials demonstrated superior properties of corrosion resistance.

  7. Corrosion resistant cemented carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a corrosion resistant cemented carbide composite. It comprises: a granular tungsten carbide phase, a semi-continuous solid solution carbide phase extending closely adjacent at least a portion of the grains of tungsten carbide for enhancing corrosion resistance, and a substantially continuous metal binder phase. The cemented carbide composite consisting essentially of an effective amount of an anti-corrosion additive, from about 4 to about 16 percent by weight metal binder phase, and with the remaining portion being from about 84 to about 96 percent by weight metal carbide wherein the metal carbide consists essentially of from about 4 to about 30 percent by weight of a transition metal carbide or mixtures thereof selected from Group IVB and of the Periodic Table of Elements and from about 70 to about 96 percent tungsten carbide. The metal binder phase consists essentially of nickel and from about 10 to about 25 percent by weight chromium, the effective amount of an anti-corrosion additive being selected from the group consisting essentially of copper, silver, tine and combinations thereof

  8. Nanofunctionalized zirconia and barium sulfate particles as bone cement additives

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    Riaz Gillani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Riaz Gillani1, Batur Ercan1, Alex Qiao3, Thomas J Webster1,21Division of Engineering, 2Department of Orthopaedics, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 3G3 Technology Innovations, LLC, Pittsford, NY, USAAbstract: Zirconia (ZrO2 and barium sulfate (BaSO4 particles were introduced into a methyl methacrylate monomer (MMA solution with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA beads during polymerization to develop the following novel bone cements: bone cements with unfunctionalized ZrO2 micron particles, bone cements with unfunctionalized ZrO2 nanoparticles, bone cements with ZrO2 nanoparticles functionalized with 3-(trimethoxysilylpropyl methacrylate (TMS, bone cements with unfunctionalized BaSO4 micron particles, bone cements with unfunctionalized BaSO4 nanoparticles, and bone cements with BaSO4 nanoparticles functionalized with TMS. Results demonstrated that in vitro osteoblast (bone-forming cell densities were greater on bone cements containing BaSO4 ceramic particles after four hours compared to control unmodified bone cements. Osteoblast densities were also greater on bone cements containing all of the ceramic particles after 24 hours compared to unmodified bone cements, particularly those bone cements containing nanofunctionalized ceramic particles. Bone cements containing ceramic particles demonstrated significantly altered mechanical properties; specifically, under tensile loading, plain bone cements and bone cements containing unfunctionalized ceramic particles exhibited brittle failure modes whereas bone cements containing nanofunctionalized ceramic particles exhibited plastic failure modes. Finally, all bone cements containing ceramic particles possessed greater radio-opacity than unmodified bone cements. In summary, the results of this study demonstrated a positive impact on the properties of traditional bone cements for orthopedic applications with the addition of unfunctionalized and TMS functionalized ceramic nanoparticles

  9. Physical and microstructural aspects of sulfate attack on ordinary and limestone blended Portland cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Thomas; Lothenbach, Barbara; Romer, Michael; Neuenschwander, Juerg; Scrivener, Karen

    2009-01-01

    The consequences of external sulfate attack were investigated by traditional test methods, i.e. length and mass change, as well as by a newly developed, surface sensitive ultrasonic method, using Leaky Rayleigh waves (1 MHz). The macroscopic changes are discussed and compared with thermodynamic calculations and microstructural findings (SEM/EDS). The results show that the main impact of limestone additions on resistance to sulfate degradation are physical - i.e. addition of a few percent in Portland cement reduces the porosity and increases the resistance of Portland cement systems to sulfate; but higher addition of 25% increase porosity and lower resistance to sulfate. The kinetics of degradation were dramatically affected by the solution concentration (4 or 44 g Na 2 SO 4 /l) and the higher concentration also resulted in the formation of gypsum, which did not occur at the low concentration. However the pattern of cracking was similar in both cases and it appears that gypsum precipitates opportunistically in pre-formed cracks so it is not considered as making a significant contribution to the degradation. At 8 deg. C limited formation of thaumasite occurred in the surface region of the samples made from cement with limestone additions. This thaumasite formation led to loss of cohesion of the paste and loss of material from the surface of the samples. However thaumasite formation was always preceded by expansion and cracking of the samples due to ettringite formation and given the very slow kinetics of thaumasite formation it was probably facilitated by the opening up of the structure due to ettringite induced cracking. The expansion of the samples showed a steady stage, followed by a rapidly accelerating stage, with destruction of the samples. The onset of the rapidly accelerating stage occurred when the thickness of the cracked surface layer reached about 1-1.5 mm-10-15% of the total specimen thickness (10 mm).

  10. Effects of fibers on expansive shotcrete mixtures consisting of calcium sulfoaluminate cement, ordinary Portland cement, and calcium sulfate

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    H. Yu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The mining industry often uses shotcrete for ground stabilization. However, cracking within shotcrete is commonly observed, which delays production schedules and increases maintenance costs. A possible crack reduction method is using expansive shotcrete mixture consisting of calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSA, ordinary Portland cement (OPC, and calcium sulfate (CS to reduce shrinkage. Furthermore, fibers can be added to the mixture to restrain expansion and impede cracking. The objective of this paper is to study the effects of nylon fiber, glass fiber, and steel fiber on an expansive shotcrete mixture that can better resist cracking. In this study, parameters such as density, water absorption, volume of permeable voids, unconfined compressive strength (UCS, splitting tensile strength (STS, and volume change of fiber-added expansive mixtures were determined at different time periods (i.e. the strengths on the 28th day, and the volume changes on the 1st, 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th days. The results show that addition of fibers can improve mixture durability, in the form of decreased water absorption and reduced permeable pore space content. Moreover, the expansion of the CSA-OPC-CS mixture was restrained up to 50% by glass fiber, up to 43% by nylon fiber, and up to 28% by steel fiber. The results show that the STS was improved by 57% with glass fiber addition, 43% with steel fiber addition, and 38% with nylon fiber addition. The UCS was also increased by 31% after steel fiber addition, 26% after nylon fiber addition, and 16% after glass fiber addition. These results suggest that fiber additions to the expansive shotcrete mixtures can improve durability and strengths while controlling expansion. Keywords: Shotcrete, Restrained expansion, Fibers, Calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSA, Ordinary Portland cement (OPC, Calcium sulfate (CS

  11. Research on A3 steel corrosion behavior of basic magnesium sulfate cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Sainan; Wu, Chengyou; Yu, Hongfa; Jiang, Ningshan; Zhang, Wuyu

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, Tafel polarization technique is used to study the corrosion behavior of A3 steel basic magnesium sulfate, and then analyzing the ratio of raw materials cement, nitrites rust inhibitor and wet-dry cycle of basic magnesium sulfate corrosion of reinforced influence, and the steel corrosion behavior of basic magnesium sulfate compared with magnesium oxychloride cement and Portland cement. The results show that: the higher MgO/MgSO4 mole ratio will reduce the corrosion rate of steel; Too high and too low H2O/MgSO4 mole ratio may speed up the reinforcement corrosion effect; Adding a small amount of nitrite rust and corrosion inhibitor, not only can obviously reduce the alkali type magnesium sulfate in the early hydration of cement steel bar corrosion rate, but also can significantly reduce dry-wet circulation under the action of alkali type magnesium sulfate cement corrosion of reinforcement effect. Basic magnesium sulfate cement has excellent ability to protect reinforced, its long-term corrosion of reinforcement effect and was equal to that of Portland cement. Basic magnesium sulfate corrosion of reinforced is far below the level in the MOC in the case.

  12. Spectroscopy of Loose and Cemented Sulfate-Bearing Soils: Implications for Duricrust on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Christopher D.; Mustard, John F.

    2002-07-01

    The goal of this work is to determine the spectroscopic properties of sulfate in martian soil analogs over the wavelength range 0.3 to 25 μm (which is relevant to existing and planned remotely sensed data sets for Mars). Sulfate is an abundant component of martian soil (up to 9% SO 3 by weight) and apparently exists as a particulate in the soil but also as a cement. Although previous studies have addressed the spectroscopic identity of sulfates on Mars, none have used laboratory mixtures of materials with sulfates at the abundances measured by landed spacecraft, nor have any works considered the effect of salt-cementation on spectral properties of soil materials. For this work we created mixtures of a palagonitic soil (JSC Mars-1) and sulfates (MgSO 4 and CaSO 4·2H 2O). The effects of cementation were determined and separated from the effects of packing and hydration by measuring the samples as loose powders, packed powders, cemented materials, and disaggregated materials. The results show that the presence of particulate sulfate is best observed in the 4-5 μm region. Soils cemented with sulfate exhibit a pronounced restrahlen band between 8 and 9 μm as well as well-defined absorptions in the 4-5 μm region. Cementation effects are distinct from packing effects and disaggregation of cemented samples rapidly diminishes the strength of the restrahlen bands. The results of this study show that sulfate in loose materials is more detectable in the near infrared (4-5 μm) than in the thermal infrared (8-9 μm). However, cemented materials are easily distinguished from loose mixtures in the thermal infrared because of the high values of their absorption coefficient in this region. Together these results suggest that both wavelength regions are important for determining the spatial extent and physical form of sulfates on the surface of Mars.

  13. Durability of blended cements in contact with sulfate-bearing ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerden, S.L.; Majumdar, A.J.; Walton, P.L.

    1990-01-01

    In the concept of radioactive waste disposal developed in the UK (United Kingdom), OPC (ordinary portland cement) blended with pulverized fuel ash or ground granulated blastfurnace slag is being considered for encapsulation of waste forms, as a material for backfilling and sealing a repository, and for concrete in repository construction. This paper describes a laboratory study of the long term durability of such cements in contact with sulfate-bearing ground water under accelerated exposure conditions. Mineralogical analysis of the cements over the exposure period, carried out with the aid of scanning electron microscope observations and x-ray diffraction studies, provides an indication of the stability of cementitious phases exposed to an aggressive environment. It is shown that for intact cement blocks there is minimal interaction between cement and sulfate-bearing ground water. Sulfate minerals produced by the reaction are accommodated in voids in the cement with no adverse effect on the cement structure. However, crystallization of C-S-H and sulfate minerals along cracks in hardened cement specimens causes expansion of fracture surfaces resulting in a more accessible route for ground water intrusion and radionuclide migration. The reaction of cement with ground water is greatly accelerated by the use of powdered material. Ettringite formed in the reaction is found to be unstable under these conditions. The mineralogical assemblage after exposure for 1 year is calcite, hydrotalcite, C-S-H and quartz

  14. Surface Corrosion and Microstructure Degradation of Calcium Sulfoaluminate Cement Subjected to Wet-Dry Cycles in Sulfate Solution

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    Wuman Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydration products of calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA cement are different from those of Portland cement. The degradation of CSA cement subjected to wet-dry cycles in sulfate solution was studied in this paper. The surface corrosion was recorded and the microstructures were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results show that SO42-, Na+, Mg2+, and Cl− have an effect on the stability of ettringite. In the initial period of sulfate attack, salt crystallization is the main factor leading to the degradation of CSA cement specimens. The decomposition and the carbonation of ettringite will cause long-term degradation of CSA cement specimens under wet-dry cycles in sulfate solution. The surface spalling and microstructure degradation increase significantly with the increase of wet-dry cycles, sulfate concentration, and water to cement ratio. Magnesium sulfate and sodium chloride reduce the degradation when the concentration of sulfate ions is a constant value.

  15. Development of a degradable cement of calcium phosphate and calcium sulfate composite for bone reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, H; Wei, J; Liu, C S

    2006-01-01

    A new type of composite bone cement was prepared and investigated by adding calcium sulfate (CS) to calcium phosphate cement (CPC). This composite cement can be handled as a paste and easily shaped into any contour, which can set within 5-20 min, the setting time largely depending on the liquid-solid (L/S) ratio; adding CS to CPC had little effect on the setting time of the composite cements. No obvious temperature increase and pH change were observed during setting and immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). The compressive strength of the cement decreased with an increase in the content of CS. The degradation rate of the composite cements increased with time when the CS content was more than 20 wt%. Calcium deficient apatite could form on the surface of the composite cement because the release of calcium into SBF from the dissolution of CS and the apatite of the cement induced the new apatite formation; increasing the content of CS in the composite could improve the bioactivity of the composite cements. The results suggested that composite cement has a reasonable setting time, excellent degradability and suitable mechanical strength and bioactivity, which shows promising prospects for development as a clinical cement

  16. Influence of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles on the Sulfate Attack upon Ordinary Portland Cement and Slag-Blended Mortars

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    Atta-ur-Rehman

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanoparticles on the sulfate attack resistance of ordinary Portland cement (OPC and slag-blended mortars were investigated. OPC and slag-blended mortars (OPC:Slag = 50:50 were made with water to binder ratio of 0.4 and a binder to sand ratio of 1:3. TiO2 was added as an admixture as 0%, 3%, 6%, 9% and 12% of the binder weight. Mortar specimens were exposed to an accelerated sulfate attack environment. Expansion, changes in mass and surface microhardness were measured. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS, X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Thermogravimetry Analysis (TGA and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC tests were conducted. The formation of ettringite and gypsum crystals after the sulfate attack were detected. Both these products had caused crystallization pressure in the microstructure of mortars and deteriorated the mortars. Our results show that the addition of nano-TiO2 accelerated expansion, variation in mass, loss of surface microhardness and widened cracks in OPC and slag-blended mortars. Nano-TiO2 containing slag-blended mortars were more resistant to sulfate attack than nano-TiO2 containing OPC mortars. Because nano-TiO2 reduced the size of coarse pores, so it increased crystallization pressure due to the formation of ettringite and gypsum thus led to more damage under sulfate attack.

  17. Experimental and numerical study on cement paste degradation under external sulfate attack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, X.; Copuroglu, O.; Schlangen, H.E.J.G.; Han, N; Xing, F; Saouma, V.; Bolander, J.; Landis, E.

    2016-01-01

    External sulfate attack is one of the situations that may cause gradual but severe damage in cementitious materials, which may lead to cracking, increased permeability and strength loss. In this paper, thin-walled hollow cement paste cylinders with a wall thickness of 2.5mm were made considering the

  18. Laboratory Electrical Resistivity Studies on Cement Stabilized Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokesh, K. N.; Jacob, Jinu Mary

    2017-01-01

    Electrical resistivity measurement of freshly prepared uncured and cured soil-cement materials is done and the correlations between the factors controlling the performance of soil-cement and electrical resistivity are discussed in this paper. Conventional quality control of soil-cement quite often involves wastage of a lot of material, if it does not meet the strength criteria. In this study, it is observed that, in soil-cement, resistivity follows a similar trend as unconfined compressive strength, with increase in cement content and time of curing. Quantitative relations developed for predicting 7-day strength of soil-cement mix, using resistivity of the soil-cement samples at freshly prepared state, after 1-hour curing help to decide whether the soil-cement mix meets the desired strength and performance criteria. This offers the option of the soil-cement mix to be upgraded (possibly with additional cement) in its fresh state itself, if it does not fulfil the performance criteria, rather than wasting the material after hardening. PMID:28540364

  19. Mechanism of Hg(II) Immobilization in Sediments by Sulfate-Cement Amendment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Susana; Vlassopoulos, Dimitri; O'Day, Peggy A

    2016-04-01

    Reactive amendments such as Portland and super-sulfate cements offer a promising technology for immobilizing metalloid contaminants such as mercury (Hg) in soils and sediments through sequestration in less bioavailable solid forms. Tidal marsh sediments were reacted with dissolved Hg(II) in synthetic seawater and fresh water solutions, treated with Portland cement and FeSO 4 amendment, and aged for up to 90 days. Reacted solids were analyzed with bulk sequential extraction methods and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microscopy, and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Hg L III - and S K-edge. In amended sediments, XRD, SEM and sulfur K-edge XANES indicated formation of gypsum in seawater experiments or ettringite-type (Ca 6 Al 2 (SO 4 ) 3 (OH) 12 . 26H 2 O) phases in fresh water experiments, depending on the final solution pH (seawater ∼8.5; freshwater ∼10.5). Analysis of Hg EXAFS spectra showed Cl and Hg ligands in the first- and second-coordination shells at distances characteristic of a polynuclear chloromercury(II) salt, perhaps as a nanoparticulate phase, in both seawater and fresh water experiments. In addition to the chloromercury species, a smaller fraction (∼20-25%) of Hg was bonded to O atoms in fresh water sample spectra, suggesting the presence of a minor sorbed Hg fraction. In the absence of amendment treatment, Hg sorption and resistance to extraction can be accounted for by relatively strong binding by reduced S species present in the marsh sediment detected by S XANES. Thermodynamic calculations predict stable aqueous Hg-Cl species at seawater final pH, but higher final pH in fresh water favors aqueous Hg-hydroxide species. The difference in Hg coordination between aqueous and solid phases suggests that the initial Hg-Cl coordination was stabilized in the cement hydration products and did not re-equilibrate with the bulk solution with aging. Collectively, results suggest physical encapsulation of Hg as a

  20. Improvement of in vitro physicochemical properties and osteogenic activity of calcium sulfate cement for bone repair by dicalcium silicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chun-Cheng; Wang, Chien-Wen; Hsueh, Nai-Shuo; Ding, Shinn-Jyh

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Dicalcium silicate can improve osteogenic activity of calcium sulfate cement. • The higher the calcium sulfate content, the shorter the setting time in the composite cement. • The results were useful for designing calcium-based cement with optimal properties. -- Abstract: An ideal bone graft substitute should have the same speed of degradation as formation of new bone tissue. To improve the properties of calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) featured for its rapid resorption, a low degradation material of dicalcium silicate (DCS) was added to the CSH cement. This study examined the effect of DCS (20, 40, 60 and 80 wt%) on the in vitro physicochemical properties and osteogenic activities of the calcium-based composite cements. The diametral tensile strength, porosity and weight loss of the composite cements were evaluated before and after soaking in a simulated body fluid (SBF). The osteogenic activities, such as proliferation, differentiation and mineralization, of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) seeded on cement surfaces were also examined. As a result, the greater the DCS amount, the higher the setting time was in the cement. Before soaking in SBF, the diametral tensile strength of the composite cements was decreased due to the introduction of DCS. On 180-day soaking, the composite cements containing 20, 40, 60 and 80 wt% DCS lost 80%, 69%, 61% and 44% in strength, respectively. Regarding in vitro bioactivity, the DCS-rich cements were covered with clusters of apatite spherulites after soaking for 7 days, while there was no formation of apatite spherulites on the CSH-rich cement surfaces. The presence of DCS could reduce the degradation of the CSH cements, as evidenced in the results of weight loss and porosity. More importantly, DCS may promote effectively the cell proliferation, proliferation and mineralization. The combination of osteogenesis of DCS and degradation of CSH made the calcium-based composite cements an attractive choice for

  1. A study on super-sulfated cement using Dinh Vu phosphogypsum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Nguyen Ngoc

    2018-04-01

    Super-sulfated cement (SSC) is a newly developed unburnt cementitious material. It is a kind of environmental-friendly cementitious material due to its energy-saving, carbon emission reducing, and waste-utilization. It mainly composes of phosphogysum (PG) and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GFS), with a small amount of cement. In Vietnam, the Diammonium Phosphate DAP – Dinh Vu fertilizer plant in Dinh Vu industrial zone in the northern port city of Hai Phong – has discharged millions of tons of solid waste containing gypsum after 9 years of operation. The waste has changed the color of the water, eroded metal and destroyed fauna and floral systems in the surrounding area. Notably, according to the environmental impact assessment, the gypsum landfill area is supposed to be 13 hectares and the storage time reaches up to five years. This paper presents the experimental results on SSC using a high amount of Dinh Vu phosphogypsum and GFS in comparison with those of ordinary Portland cement (PC). The results show that the setting time of SSC is much longer than that of Portland cement but the compressive strength of SSC can be obtained 45-50 MPa at the age of 28 days, similar to that of the control sample using 100% PC40, and 69MPa at the age of 90 days. This value even exceeds the compressive strength of the PC40 cement.

  2. Individual and combined effects of chloride, sulfate, and magnesium ions on hydrated Portland-cement paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poole, T.S.; Wakeley, L.D.; Young, C.L.

    1994-03-01

    Ground water with a high concentration of magnesium ion is known to cause deterioration to portland cement concretes. A proposed mechanism for this deterioration process published previously involves an approximate 1:1 replacement of Ca ions by Mg ions in the crystalline phases of hydrated cement. The current study was undertaken to determine which ions, among magnesium, chloride, and sulfate, cause deterioration; whether their deleterious action is individual or interdependent; and to relate this mechanism of deterioration to the outlook for a 100-yr service life of concretes used in mass placements at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Loss of Ca ion by cement pastes was found to be strongly related to the concentration of Mg ion in simulated ground-water solutions in which the paste samples were aged. This was true of both salt- containing and conventional cement pastes. No other ion in the solutions exerted a strong effect on Ca loss. Ca ion left first from calcium hydroxide in the pastes, depleting all calcium hydroxide by 60 days. Some calcium silicate hydrate remained even after 90 days in the solutions with the highest concentration of Mg ion, while the paste samples deteriorated noticeably. The results indicated a mechanism that involves dissolution of Ca phases and transport of Ca ions to the surface of the sample, followed by formation of Mg-bearing phases at this reaction surface rather than directly by substitution within the microstructure of hydrated cement. Given that calcium hydroxide and calcium silicate hydrate are the principal strength-giving phases of hydrated cement, this mechanism indicates the likelihood of significant loss of integrity of a concrete exposed to Mg-bearing ground water at the WIPP. The rate of deterioration ultimately will depend on Mg-ion concentration, the microstructure materials of the concrete exposed to that groundwater, and the availability of brine

  3. Corrosion-resistant Foamed Cements for Carbon Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama T.; Gill, S.; Pyatina, T., Muraca, A.; Keese, R.; Khan, A.; Bour, D.

    2012-12-01

    The cementitious material consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate designed as an alternative thermal-shock resistant cement for the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) wells was treated with cocamidopropyl dimethylamine oxide-based compound as foaming agent (FA) to prepare numerous air bubble-dispersed low density cement slurries of and #61603;1.3 g/cm3. Then, the foamed slurry was modified with acrylic emulsion (AE) as corrosion inhibitor. We detailed the positive effects of the acrylic polymer (AP) in this emulsion on the five different properties of the foamed cement: 1) The hydrothermal stability of the AP in 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cements; 2) the hydrolysis-hydration reactions of the slurry at 85 and #61616;C; 3) the composition of crystalline phases assembled and the microstructure developed in autoclaved cements; 4) the mechanical behaviors of the autoclaved cements; and, 5) the corrosion mitigation of carbon steel (CS) by the polymer. For the first property, the hydrothermal-catalyzed acid-base interactions between the AP and cement resulted in Ca-or Na-complexed carboxylate derivatives, which led to the improvement of thermal stability of the AP. This interaction also stimulated the cement hydration reactions, enhancing the total heat evolved during cement’s curing. Addition of AP did not alter any of the crystalline phase compositions responsible for the strength of the cement. Furthermore, the AP-modified cement developed the porous microstructure with numerous defect-free cavities of disconnected voids. These effects together contributed to the improvement of compressive-strength and –toughness of the cured cement. AP modification of the cement also offered an improved protection of CS against brine-caused corrosion. There were three major factors governing the corrosion protection: 1) Reducing the extents of infiltration and transportation of corrosive electrolytes through the cement layer deposited on the underlying CS

  4. Analysis of sulfate resistance in concrete based on artificial neural networks and USBR4908-modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Hodhod

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the available tests that can be used to evaluate concrete sulfate resistance is USBR4908. However, there are deficiencies in this test method. This study focuses on the ANN as an alternative approach to evaluate the sulfate expansion. Three types of cement combined with FA or SF, along with variable W/B were study by USBR4908. ANN model were developed by five input parameters, W/B, cement content, FA or SF, C3A, and exposure duration; output parameter is determined as expansion. Back propagation algorithm was employed for the ANN training; a Tansig function was used as the nonlinear transfer function. It was clear that the ANN models give high prediction accuracy. In addition, The engineer can avoid the use of the borderline 2.5–5% C3A content in severe sulfate environments and borderline 6–8% C3A content in moderate sulfate environments, specially with W/B ratio greater than 0.45.

  5. Improved workability of injectable calcium sulfate bone cement by regulation of self-setting properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zonggang, E-mail: chenzg@sdu.edu.cn [National Glycoengineering Research Center, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, Huanye [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Liu, Xi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lian, Xiaojie [College of Mechanics, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Guo, Zhongwu [National Glycoengineering Research Center, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Jiang, Hong-Jiang [Wendeng Hospital of Traditional Chinese Orthopedics and Traumatology, Shandong 264400 (China); Cui, Fu-Zhai, E-mail: cuifz@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-04-01

    Calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) powder as an injectable bone cement was prepared by hydrothermal synthesis of calcium sulfate dihydrate (CSD). The prepared materials showed X-ray diffraction peaks corresponding to the CSH structure without any secondary phases, implying complete conversion from CSD phase to CSH phase. Thermogravimetric (TG) analyses showed the crystal water content of CSH was about 6.0% (wt.), which is near to the theoretic crystal water value of CSH. From scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs, sheet crystal structure of CSD was observed to transform into rod-like crystal structure of CSH. Most interesting and important of all, CSD as setting accelerator was also introduced into CSH powder to regulate self-setting properties of injectable CSH paste, and thus the self-setting time of CSH paste can be regulated from near 30 min to less than 5 min by adding various amounts of setting accelerator. Because CSD is not only the reactant of preparing CSH but also the final solidified product of CSH, the setting accelerator has no significant effect on the other properties of materials, such as mechanical properties. In vitro biocompatibility and in vivo histology studies have demonstrated that the materials have good biocompatibility and good efficacy in bone regeneration. All these will further improve the workability of CSH in clinic applications. Highlights: ► Calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) can be an injectable bone cement. ► CSH was produced by hydrothermal synthesis of calcium sulfate dihydrate (CSD). ► CSD was introduced into CSH powder to regulate self-setting properties of CSH. ► Setting accelerator has no significant effect on the other properties of materials. ► Injectable CSH has good biocompatibility and good efficacy in bone regeneration.

  6. Improved workability of injectable calcium sulfate bone cement by regulation of self-setting properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zonggang; Liu, Huanye; Liu, Xi; Lian, Xiaojie; Guo, Zhongwu; Jiang, Hong-Jiang; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2013-01-01

    Calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) powder as an injectable bone cement was prepared by hydrothermal synthesis of calcium sulfate dihydrate (CSD). The prepared materials showed X-ray diffraction peaks corresponding to the CSH structure without any secondary phases, implying complete conversion from CSD phase to CSH phase. Thermogravimetric (TG) analyses showed the crystal water content of CSH was about 6.0% (wt.), which is near to the theoretic crystal water value of CSH. From scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs, sheet crystal structure of CSD was observed to transform into rod-like crystal structure of CSH. Most interesting and important of all, CSD as setting accelerator was also introduced into CSH powder to regulate self-setting properties of injectable CSH paste, and thus the self-setting time of CSH paste can be regulated from near 30 min to less than 5 min by adding various amounts of setting accelerator. Because CSD is not only the reactant of preparing CSH but also the final solidified product of CSH, the setting accelerator has no significant effect on the other properties of materials, such as mechanical properties. In vitro biocompatibility and in vivo histology studies have demonstrated that the materials have good biocompatibility and good efficacy in bone regeneration. All these will further improve the workability of CSH in clinic applications. Highlights: ► Calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) can be an injectable bone cement. ► CSH was produced by hydrothermal synthesis of calcium sulfate dihydrate (CSD). ► CSD was introduced into CSH powder to regulate self-setting properties of CSH. ► Setting accelerator has no significant effect on the other properties of materials. ► Injectable CSH has good biocompatibility and good efficacy in bone regeneration

  7. Green options for anti-sulfate of slag cement concrete containing pozzolans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Chien-Jou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study mainly adopted densified mixture design algorithm (DMDA with pozzolans (fly ash and slag, different fineness slag cement (1:1; MF40 and HF40 and Type I cement (E40 to construct the mixtures for w/cm=0.40, and applied ACI 211.1R and Type II cement as control group (CII40, w/c=0.40. Life cycle inventory of LEED suggested by PCA for cementitious materials (kg/m3 contained cement use, CO2 emission, raw materials, energy consumption, compressive strength, and immersed in different concentration Na2SO4 solution. Results showed cement content, CO2 emission, raw materials and energy consumption for E40, MF40 and HF40, with respect to CII40, were 14% ∼ 26%, 14% ∼ 26%, 13% ∼ 26% and 17%∼28%. At 28 days, compressive strength(all mixtures were greater than 41MPa. Repeatedly 25 cycles, specimens immersed in 5000ppm Na2SO4 solution and oven-dried at 105°C, the exterior had no damage, and weight loss (n and pulse velocity change (nv were less than -1% and -5%. But in saturated Na2SO4 solution, the n and nv were ranged from - 0.91% (E40 to -2.62% (MF40 and -6.7% (E40 to -10.9% (MF40. The exterior had been obviously scaling (chalking or spalling at the second (CII40, the fifth (MF40 and HF40 and the ninth cycle (E40. The comprehensive evaluation of green options for anti-sulfate indicated that the merits of all mixtures were respectively E40 > HF40 > MF40 > CII40.

  8. Influence of Portland Cement Class on the Corrosion Rate of Steel Reinforcement in Cement Mortar Caused by Penetrating Chloride and Sulfate from the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bikić, F.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of portland cement class on the corrosion rate of steel reinforcement in cement mortar caused by penetrating chloride or sulfate from the environment in already hardened cement mortar is investigated in this paper. Three classes of portland cement have been used for the tests, PC 35, PC 45 and PC 55. Cylindrical samples of cement mortar with steel reinfor- cement in the middle were treated 6 months at room temperature in the following solutions: w(SO42- = 2.1 % and w(Cl- = 5 %. Two techniques have been used for testing corrosion rate of steel reinforcement in cement mortar: Tafel extrapolation technique and potentiodynamic polarization technique. Investigations were conducted by potentiostat/galvanostat Princeton Applied Research 263A-2 with the software PowerCORR®. The results of both techniques indi-cate the most active corrosion of steel reinforcement in the samples prepared from cement PC 35 in both treated solutions, while the lowest corrosion of the steel reinforcement was observed in cement samples prepared from cement PC 55. This conclusion was drawn by analyzing the results shown in Figs. 1–4. Comparing corrosion current density of samples, working electrodes, Figs. 1 and 2, Table 2, the results show the most stable corrosion of steel reinforcement in samples prepared from cement PC 55, and the most active corrosion in samples prepared from ce- ment PC 35. The most active corrosion in samples prepared from cement PC 35 is evident from the positions of the open circuit potentials whose values are less for samples prepared from cement PC 35 in both the treated solution, Figs. 1 and 2, Table 2. Comparison of the anodic polarization curves of the working electrodes in both the treated solutions, Figs. 3 and 4, also shows that the intensity of corrosion is the largest for the working electrodes prepared from cement PC 35 and the smallest for the working electrodes prepared from cement PC 55. Investigation results should be

  9. Biocompatibility and setting time of CPM-MTA and white Portland cement clinker with or without calcium sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramante, Clovis Monteiro; Kato, Marcia Magro; Assis, Gerson Francisco de; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro; Bernardineli, Norberti; Moraes, Ivaldo Gomes de; Garcia, Roberto Brandão; Ordinola-Zapata, Ronald; Bramante, Alexandre Silva

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the biocompatibility and the setting time of Portland cement clinker with or without 2% or 5% calcium sulfate and MTA-CPM. Twenty-four mice (Rattus norvegicus) received subcutaneously polyethylene tubes filled with Portland cement clinker with or without 2% or 5% calcium sulfate and MTA. After 15, 30 and 60 days of implantation, the animals were killed and specimens were prepared for microscopic analysis. For evaluation of the setting time, each material was analyzed using Gilmore needles weighing 113.5 g and 456.5 g, according to the ASTM specification Number C266-08 guideline. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test for setting time and Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn test for biocompatibility at 5% significance level. Histologic observation showed no statistically significant difference of biocompatibility (p>0.05) among the materials in the subcutaneous tissues. For the setting time, clinker without calcium sulfate showed the shortest initial and final setting times (6.18 s/21.48 s), followed by clinker with 2% calcium sulfate (9.22 s/25.33 s), clinker with 5% calcium sulfate (10.06 s/42.46 s) and MTA (15.01 s/42.46 s). All the tested materials showed biocompatibility and the calcium sulfate absence shortened the initial and final setting times of the white Portland cement clinker.

  10. The effects of temperature on the leaching behavior of cement waste forms: The cement/sodium sulfate system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuhrmann, M.; Pietrzak, R.; Heiser, J.; Franz, E.M.; Colombo, P.

    1989-10-01

    The leaching mechanisms of simulated low-level radioactive waste forms are being determined as support for development of an accelerated leach test. Two approaches are being used: (1) comparisons of leaching data with results of a model that describes diffusion from a finite cylinder, and (2) observation of the leaching process at temperatures between 20 degree C and 65 degree C. To provide results that can be used for modeling, leaching at elevated temperatures must change neither the leaching mechanism nor the structural controls of leaching such as the porosity. Releases of 137 Cs, 85 Sr, calcium, sodium and potassium from portland cement containing sodium sulfate, as a simulated evaporator sludge, have been determined under a variety of experimental conditions. Data from the leach tests were compared to model results for diffusion from the finite cylinder. While most leaching appears to be diffusion controlled, notable exceptions occur. For all samples activation energies ranging between 6 and 11 Kcal/mole have been calculated from the relationship of the effective diffusion coefficient to increasing temperature, close to the expected value of 5 Kcal/mole for diffusion. 11 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Arsenic Encapsulation Using Portland Cement With Ferrous Sulfate/Lime And Terra-BondTM Technologies - Microcharacterization And Leaching Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    This work reports the results of an investigation on the treatment and encapsulation of arsenic-containing materials by Portland cement with ferrous sulfate and lime (PFL) and Terra-BondTM, a commercially available patented technology. The arsenic materials treated we...

  12. A new acoustic method to determine the setting time of calcium sulfate bone cement mixed with antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, J J; Brayford, M J; Laycock, P A

    2014-08-01

    A new method is described which can be used to determine the setting times of small amounts of high value bone cements. The test was developed to measure how the setting times of a commercially available synthetic calcium sulfate cement (Stimulan, Biocomposites, UK) in two forms (standard and Rapid Cure) varies with the addition of clinically relevant antibiotics. The importance of being able to accurately quantify these setting times is discussed. The results demonstrate that this new method, which is shown to correlate to the Vicat needle, gives reliable and repeatable data with additional benefits expressed in the article. The majority of antibiotics mixed were found to retard the setting reaction of the calcium sulfate cement.

  13. A new acoustic method to determine the setting time of calcium sulfate bone cement mixed with antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, J J; Brayford, M J; Laycock, P A

    2014-01-01

    A new method is described which can be used to determine the setting times of small amounts of high value bone cements. The test was developed to measure how the setting times of a commercially available synthetic calcium sulfate cement (Stimulan, Biocomposites, UK) in two forms (standard and Rapid Cure) varies with the addition of clinically relevant antibiotics. The importance of being able to accurately quantify these setting times is discussed. The results demonstrate that this new method, which is shown to correlate to the Vicat needle, gives reliable and repeatable data with additional benefits expressed in the article. The majority of antibiotics mixed were found to retard the setting reaction of the calcium sulfate cement. (paper)

  14. Increased corrosion resistance of basalt reinforced cement compositions with nanosilica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    URKHANOVA Larisa Alekseevna

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Disperse fiber reinforcement is used to improve deformation and shrinkage characteristics, flexural strength of concrete. Basalt roving and thin staple fiber are often used as mineral fibers. The paper considers the problems of using thin basalt fiber produced by centrifugal-blow method. Evaluation of the corrosion resistance of basalt fiber as part of the cement matrix was performed. Nanodispersed silica produced by electron beam accelerator was used to increase corrosion resistance of basalt fiber.

  15. Increased corrosion resistance of basalt reinforced cement compositions with nanosilica

    OpenAIRE

    URKHANOVA Larisa Alekseevna; LKHASARANOV Solbon Aleksandrovich; ROZINA Victoria Yevgenievna; BUYANTUEV Sergey Lubsanovich; BARDAKHANOV Sergey Prokopievich

    2014-01-01

    Disperse fiber reinforcement is used to improve deformation and shrinkage characteristics, flexural strength of concrete. Basalt roving and thin staple fiber are often used as mineral fibers. The paper considers the problems of using thin basalt fiber produced by centrifugal-blow method. Evaluation of the corrosion resistance of basalt fiber as part of the cement matrix was performed. Nanodispersed silica produced by electron beam accelerator was used to increase corrosion resistance of ba...

  16. Immobilization of Hg(II) by Coprecipitation in Sulfate-Cement Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Uptake and molecular speciation of dissolved Hg during formation of Al- or Fe-ettringite-type and high-pH phases were investigated in coprecipitation and sorption experiments of sulfate-cement treatments used for soil and sediment remediation. Ettringite and minor gypsum were identified by XRD as primary phases in Al systems, whereas gypsum and ferrihydrite were the main products in Hg–Fe precipitates. Characterization of Hg–Al solids by bulk Hg EXAFS, electron microprobe, and microfocused-XRF mapping indicated coordination of Hg by Cl ligands, multiple Hg and Cl backscattering atoms, and concentration of Hg as small particles. Thermodynamic predictions agreed with experimental observations for bulk phases, but Hg speciation indicated lack of equilibration with the final solution. Results suggest physical encapsulation of Hg as a polynuclear chloromercury(II) salt in ettringite as the primary immobilization mechanism. In Hg–Fe solids, structural characterization indicated Hg coordination by O atoms only and Fe backscattering atoms that is consistent with inner-sphere complexation of Hg(OH)20 coprecipitated with ferrihydrite. Precipitation of ferrihydrite removed Hg from solution, but the resulting solid was sufficiently hydrated to allow equilibration of sorbed Hg species with the aqueous solution. Electron microprobe XRF characterization of sorption samples with low Hg concentration reacted with cement and FeSO4 amendment indicated correlation of Hg and Fe, supporting the interpretation of Hg removal by precipitation of an Fe(III) oxide phase. PMID:22594782

  17. Acidic Attack Resistance of Cement Mortar Treated with Alkaline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Nazhat Sabeeh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The negative effect of acidic attack on the properties of concrete and cement mortar is a topic of increasing significance in the recent years. Many attempts has occurred to mitigate this negative impact by improving the properties of concrete and increase resistance to acids by using additives. The present study includes treatment of sand by alkaline material and examine the effect of treatment on cement mortar resistance towards hydrochloric and sulfuric acid. Results show that sand treatment by alkaline material significantly enhance mortar ability to resist acids. In terms of loss weight, the maximum weight rate gain was 25.54% for specimens immersed in Hydrochloric acid with water cement ratio 40%. For specimens immersed in HCl, the average gain in compressive strength is (20.15-19.433% for w/c (40-45% respectively. The average gain in modulus of rupture toward the influence of H2SO4 is (18.37–17.99% for w/c (40-45%, respectively.

  18. Biphasic calcium sulfate dihydrate/iron-modified alpha-tricalcium phosphate bone cement for spinal applications: in vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlad, M D; Lopez, J; Torres, R; Barraco, M; Fernandez, E; Valle, L J; Poeata, I

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the cytocompatibility of new 'iron-modified/alpha-tricalcium phosphate (IM/α-TCP) and calcium sulfate dihydrate (CSD)' bone cement (IM/α-TCP/CSD-BC) intended for spinal applications has been approached. The objective was to investigate by direct-contact osteoblast-like cell cultures (from 1 to 14 days) the in vitro cell adhesion, proliferation, morphology and cytoskeleton organization of MG-63 cells seeded onto the new cements. The results were as follows: (a) quantitative MTT-assay and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that cell adhesion, proliferation and viability were not affected with time by the presence of iron in the cements; (b) double immunofluorescent labeling of F-actin and α-tubulin showed a dynamic interaction between the cell and its porous substrates sustaining the locomotion phenomenon on the cements' surface, which favored the colonization, and confirming the biocompatibility of the experimental cements; (c) SEM-cell morphology and cytoskeleton observations also evidenced that MG-63 cells were able to adhere, to spread and to attain normal morphology on the new IM/α-TCP/CSD-BC which offered favorable substratum properties for osteoblast-like cells proliferation and differentiation in vitro. The results showed that these new iron-modified cement-like biomaterials have cytocompatible features of interest not only as possible spinal cancellous bone replacement biomaterial but also as bone tissue engineering scaffolds.

  19. Influence of sulfates on chloride diffusion and chloride-induced reinforcement corrosion in limestone cement materials at low temperature

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sotiriadis, Konstantinos; Rakanta, E.; Mitzithra, M. E.; Batis, G.; Tsivilis, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 8 (2017), č. článku 04017060. ISSN 0899-1561 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : limestone cement * chloride diffusion * reinforcement corrosion * sulfate attack * low temperature Subject RIV: JN - Civil Engineering OBOR OECD: Composites (including laminates, reinforced plastics, cermets, combined natural and synthetic fibre fabrics Impact factor: 1.644, year: 2016 http://ascelibrary.org/doi/abs/10.1061/%28ASCE%29MT.1943-5533.0001895

  20. Observation on the role of osteoporotic vertebra augmented with calcium sulfate cement in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Xuesong; Shi Qin; Zhang Zhiming; Geng Dechun; Mao Haiqing; Chen Chunmao; Wang Genlin; Yang Huilin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To observe the biomechanical and histological performance of calcium sulfate cement (CSC) in osteoporotic vertebral bodies. Methods: Bone voids were created in L 2 ∼ L 5 vertebras of twelve female osteoporotic mature sheep. CSC and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) were injected into one bone voids randomly, L 1 and L 6 vertebrae served as the normal control. Six sheep were sacrificed at the 2nd week and the 24th week after operation respectively. Overall observation,biomechanical test and undecalcified bone histology analyses were performed. Results: Biomechanical analysis showed that the vertebrae could be augmented by CSC and PMMA. The biomechanical properties of the vertebrae augmented with CSC were weakened more than that in the PMMA and normal group at the 2nd week, increased significantly at the 24th week. Histological observation showed that CSC was mostly absorbed at the 24th week, mature bone trabecula was seen in the defect area. Conclusion: The osteoporotic vertebrae can be augmented instantly by CSC. As time goes on, CSC can promote bone remodeling, and enhance the vertebrae. It is an alternation for vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty. (authors)

  1. Corrosion resistance of cement brick on an organo-mineral base in a hydrogen sulfide medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potapov, A G; Belousov, G A; Pustovalov, V I; Skorikov, B M

    1981-01-01

    Results are presented of strength tests of cement brick made of different types of cement as a function of the composition of the mixing liquid and storage conditions. It is established that cement brick made of cement on a cinder base mixed in hydrogen sulfide water possesses the highest corrosive resistance to hydrogen sulfide attack. A marked increase in corrosion resistance is observed in cement brick on an organo-mineral base. Results of industrial tests of organo-mineral grouting mortar in a hydrogen sulfide medium are demonstrated.

  2. Standard Test Method for Abrasive Wear Resistance of Cemented

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of abrasive wear resistance of cemented carbides. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as the standard. The SI equivalents of inch-pound units are in parentheses and may be approximate. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  3. Effect of sodium sulphate attack on the resistance to flexion, formation of expansive compounds and microcracking in cement paste; Efeito do ataque por sulfato de sodio na resistencia a flexao, formacao de compostos expansivos e microfissuracao de pastas de cimento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Rui Barbosa de; John, Vanderlei Moacyr; Cincotto, Maria Alba [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica], e-mail: rui.souza@poli.usp.br, e-mail: vanderley.john@poli.usp.br, e-mail: maria.cincotto@poli.usp.br; Simao, Cristina Aiex [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES). Gerencia de Tecnologia e Engenharia de Poco], e-mail: caies@petrobras.com.br

    2008-06-15

    The main objective of this research is to study the common methods for evaluating cement reactivity to sulfate attack. Resistance to sulfate attack was measured by determining the flexural strength in cement paste samples with exposure to Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution (45,426 ppm of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}), at a high temperature (55 deg C). The results of flexural strength showed that the resistance increases due to the attack because the products fill the pores. (author)

  4. Evaluating performance-based test and specifications for sulfate resistance in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-12-01

    This research project involved an experimental evaluation of the sulfate resistance of various concretes and mortars for the purpose of establishing performance-based specifications for the durability of concrete against sulfate attack. The research ...

  5. Frost Resistance and Permeability of Cement Stabilized Gravel used as Filling Material for Pearl-Chain Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Mia Schou Møller; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Hertz, Kristian Dahl

    2014-01-01

    several requirements on its moisture properties. In this paper the frost resistance, the liquid water permeability and the water vapour permeability of cement stabilized gravel are examined for two different cement contents. It is found that a small increase in cement content from 4% to 5% increases...... the 28-days compressive strength from 6.2 MPa to 12.3 MPa. The frost resistance of cement stabilized gravel with 5% cement content is better than for cement stabilized gravel with 4% cement content. The liquid water permeability coefficient and the water vapour permeability coefficient are significantly...

  6. Immobilisation of strontium, nickel and iodide by a sulphate-resisting Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieland, E.; Tits, J.; Spieler, P.; Dobler, J.-P.

    1998-01-01

    The interaction of Sr(II), Ni(II) and I(-I) with sulphate-resisting Portland cement was investigated under highly alkaline conditions. Batch-sorption studies were performed by contacting HTS cement (haute teneur en silice, sulphate-resisting Portland cement, Lafarge, France) with artificial cement pore water (ACW). The composition of ACW was 0.18 M KOH, 0.114 M NaOH and 1.2 mM Ca(OH) 2 . 85 Sr, 63 Ni and 125 I were used as tracers. In the experiments with Sr(II) and Ni(II), isosaccharinic acid (ISA) was added to ACW at 10 -5 M to 10 -2 M in order to study the effect of complexing ligands on radionuclide retention. The stability of the tracer solutions and the cement suspensions were first assessed. Moreover, the inventory of the stable elements were determined in cement and cement pore water. We then studied the kinetics of the radionuclide-cement interaction process and measured the dependence of the distribution ratio (R d ) on the concentration of ISA and on the concentration of cement particles (S:L ratio). In the case of 63 Ni and 125 I a strong decrease in the distribution ratio (R d ) with increasing S:L ratio was observed. There is strong indication that the inventory of the stable fraction of an element present in cement pore water accounts for the retention of the radioisotope fraction. The results further indicate that phase transformations may occur in non-pre-equilibrated cement systems (non-equilibrium conditions) which affect 63 Ni uptake by HTS cement. The distribution ratios measured on HTS cement were compared with values obtained from measurements on important cement components (portlandite, CSH/C(A)SH-phases)

  7. Mechanical Properties and Decay Resistance of Hornbeam Cement Bonded Particleboards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonios N. Papadopoulos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cement bonded particleboards were manufactured from hornbeam (Carpinus betulus L. wood particles. Hydration tests were carried out to determine the inhibitory index in order to characterise wood-cement compatibility. The results revealed that the mixture of hornbeam-cement can be classified as moderate inhibition. Two wood: cement ratios were applied in this study, namely, 1 : 3 and 1 : 4, for the board manufacture. It was found that an increase of cement-wood ratio resulted in an improvement in all properties examined, except MOR. All properties of the boards made from 1 : 4 wood: cement ratio surpassed the minimum requirements set forth by the building type HZ code. Boards were exposed to brown and white rot fungi, Coniophora puteana, and Trametes versicolor, respectively. Overall, both fungi failed to attack the cement-bonded boards.

  8. Study of the relation between hydrated portland cement composition and leaching resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, van R.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    1998-01-01

    The present paper addresses cement compositions that have an optimal resistance against acid attack and hence, low leaching rates and optimal waste containment. To this end a shrinking core leaching model is used that describes the leaching of metals from a cement sample. This process is directly

  9. Study of hydrated Portland cement composition in regard to leaching resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, van R.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    1997-01-01

    The present paper addresses cement compositions that have an optimal resistance against acid attack and hence, low leaching rates and optimal waste containment. To this end a shrinking core leaching model is used that describes the leaching of metals from a cement sample. This process is directly

  10. Effects of chemical and mineral additives and the water/cement ratio on the thermal resistance of Portland cement concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesar, Leandro Cesar Dias; Morelli, Arnaldo C.; Baldo, Joao Baptista

    1998-01-01

    The exposure of Portland concrete to high temperatures (>250 deg C) can damage drastically the microstructural integrity of the material. Since the water/cement ratio as well as the inclusion of superplasticizers and mineral additives (silica fume) can alter constitutively and micro structurally the material, in this work it was investigated per effect of these additions on the damage resistance of portland concrete after exposure to high temperatures. (author)

  11. Cermet cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, J W

    1990-01-01

    Cermet ionomer cements are sintered metal/glass powders, which can be made to react with poly(acids). These new cements are significantly more resistant to abrasion than regular glass ionomer cements and are widely accepted as core build-up materials and lining cements. They can strengthen teeth and provide the clinician with an opportunity to treat early dental caries.

  12. Experience of successful treatment of patients with metronidazole-resistant Trichomonas vaginalis with zinc sulfate: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Mi Byun

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: Although the exact role of zinc sulfate in metronidazole-resistant trichomoniasis is not clear, our patients experienced a therapeutic effect with zinc sulfate douche treatment. We therefore recommend zinc sulfate douche as an option for the treatment of metronidazole-resistant vaginal trichomoniasis.

  13. Synthesis of Portland cement and calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement for sustainable development and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Irvin Allen

    -belite cement that contained medium C4A3 S¯ and C2S contents showed good dimensional stability, sulfate resistance, and compressive strength development and was considered the optimum phase composition for calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement in terms of comparable performance characteristics to portland cement. Furthermore, two calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement clinkers were successfully synthesized from natural and waste materials such as limestone, bauxite, flue gas desulfurization sludge, Class C fly ash, and fluidized bed ash proportioned to the optimum calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement synthesized from reagent-grade chemicals. Waste materials composed 30% and 41% of the raw ingredients. The two calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cements synthesized from natural and waste materials showed good dimensional stability, sulfate resistance, and compressive strength development, comparable to commercial portland cement.

  14. Wind-blown sandstones cemented by sulfate and clay minerals in Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milliken, R. E.; Ewing, R. C.; Fischer, W. W.; Hurowitz, J.

    2014-02-01

    Gale Crater contains Mount Sharp, a ~5 km thick stratigraphic record of Mars' early environmental history. The strata comprising Mount Sharp are believed to be sedimentary in origin, but the specific depositional environments recorded by the rocks remain speculative. We present orbital evidence for the occurrence of eolian sandstones within Gale Crater and the lower reaches of Mount Sharp, including preservation of wind-blown sand dune topography in sedimentary strata—a phenomenon that is rare on Earth and typically associated with stabilization, rapid sedimentation, transgression, and submergence of the land surface. The preserved bedforms in Gale are associated with clay minerals and elsewhere accompanied by typical dune cross stratification marked by bounding surfaces whose lateral equivalents contain sulfate salts. These observations extend the range of possible habitable environments that may be recorded within Gale Crater and provide hypotheses that can be tested in situ by the Curiosity rover payload.

  15. EFFECTS OF MINERAL ADMIXTURE ON THE CARBONIC ACID LEACHING RESISTANCE OF CEMENT-BASED MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Dong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to reveal the degradation process and deterioration mechanism of cement-based materials, this paper analyzes the effects of carbonic acid leaching on the mechanical strength of mortars, as well as relative mass loss, microstructure, and composition of various cement pastes. The results indicate that cement pastes containing less than 20 % fly ash have higher carbonic acid leaching resistance than cement pastes without fly ash. However, after carbonic acid leaching, the compressive strength of the samples with fly ash is lower than that of the cement pastes without fly ash. The leaching resistance is good for samples cured at an early age before leaching. Carbonic acid leaching proceeds from the paste surface to the interior. The incorporation of an appropriate amount of slag powder helps to increase the density of the paste. Due to the pozzolanic activity of fly ash at late-stage leaching, a mixture of fly ash (≤ 20 % and slag powder (≤ 20 % effectively improves carbonic acid leaching resistance. The products of early-stage leaching were mainly CaCO₃ and small amounts of SiO₂ and Fe₂O₃. The C-S-H phase at the paste surface suffered serious damage after long periods of leaching, and the main products of leaching were SiO₂ and Fe₂O₃.

  16. Radiaton-resistant electrical insulation on the base of cement binders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanas'ev, V.V.; Korenevskij, V.V.; Pisachev, S.Yu.

    1985-01-01

    The problems of designing radiation-resistant electrical insulations on the base of BATs and Talum cements for the UNK magnets operating under constant and pulse modes are discussed. The data characterizing dielectrical ad physico-mechanical properties of 25 various compositions are given. Two variants of manufacturing coils are considered: solid and with the use of asbestos tape impregnated with aluminous cement solution. The data obtained testify to the fact that the advantages of insulation on Talum cement are raised radiation resistance, high strength (particularly compression strength), weak porosity, high elasticity modulus and high thermal conductivity. BATs cement insulation is characterized by high radiation resistance, absence of shrinkage, rather low elasticity modulus and high dielectrical characteristics under normal conditions. The qualities of the solid insulation variant are its high technological effectiveness and posibility to fill up the spaces of complex configuration. In case of using as solid insulation Talum cement, however special measures for moisture removal are required. The advantage of insulation on the base of the asbestos tape is its reliability. For complex configuration magnets, however to realize is such insulation somewhat difficult

  17. Fracture resistance of aluminium oxide and lithium disilicate-based crowns using different luting cements: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wahadni, Ahed M; Hussey, David L; Grey, Nicholas; Hatamleh, Muhanad M

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the fracture resistance of two types of ceramic crowns cemented with two different cements. Forty premolar crowns were fabricated using lithium-disilicate (IPS Empress-2) and glass-infiltrated aluminium-oxide (In-Ceram) ceramic systems. The crowns were divided into four groups (n=10) with Group 1 (IPS Empress-2) and Group 2 (In-Ceram) cemented with glass ionomer cement. Group 3 (IPS Empress-2) and Group 4 (In-Ceram) were cemented with resin cement. Crowns were tested in a universal testing machine at a compressive-load speed of 10 mm/min. Fracture modes were grouped into five categories. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni post-hoc tests were used to detect statistical significances (p0.05) on fracture resistance within each ceramic system tested. In-Ceram crowns cemented with either glass ionomer or resin cements exhibited a statistically significantly higher fracture-resistance than IPS Empress-2 crowns (pEmpress-2 and In-Ceram crowns was not affected by the type of cement used for luting. Both In-Ceram and IPS Empress-2 crowns can be successfully luted with the cements tested with In-Ceram exhibiting higher fracture resistance than IPS Empress-2.

  18. A Novel Injectable Magnesium/Calcium Sulfate Hemihydrate Composite Cement for Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanchuan Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. A novel injectable magnesium/calcium sulfate hemihydrate (Mg/CSH composite with improved properties was reported here. Methods. Composition, setting time, injectability, compressive strength, and bioactivity in simulated body fluid (SBF of the Mg/CSH composite were evaluated. Furthermore, the cellular responses of canine bone marrow stromal cells (cBMSCs and bone formation capacity after the implantation of Mg/CSH in tibia defects of canine were investigated. Results. Mg/CSH possessed a prolonged setting time and markedly improved injectability and mechanical property p<0.05. Mg/CSH samples showed better degradability than CSH in SBF after 21 days of soaking p<0.05. Moreover, the degrees of cell attachment, proliferation, and capability of osteogenic differentiation on the Mg/CSH specimens were higher than those on CSH, without significant cytotoxicity and with the increased proliferation index, ALP activity, and expression levels of integrin β1 and Coll I in cBMSCs p<0.05. Mg/CSH enhanced the efficiency of new bone formation at the tibia defect area, including the significantly elevated bone mineral density, bone area fraction, and Coll I expression level p<0.05. Conclusions. The results implied that this new injectable bone scaffold exhibited promising prospects for bone repair and had a great potential in bone tissue engineering.

  19. Influence of Blended Cements with Calcareous Fly Ash on Chloride Ion Migration and Carbonation Resistance of Concrete for Durable Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinicki, Michał A; Jóźwiak-Niedźwiedzka, Daria; Gibas, Karolina; Dąbrowski, Mariusz

    2016-01-02

    The objective of this paper is to examine the possible use of new blended cements containing calcareous fly ash in structural concrete, potentially adequate for structural elements of nuclear power plants. The investigation included five new cements made with different contents of non-clinker constituents: calcareous fly ash, siliceous fly ash, ground granulated blastfurnace slag, and a reference cement-ordinary Portland cement. The influence of innovative cements on the resistance of concrete to chloride and carbonation exposure was studied. Additionally, an evaluation of the microstructure was performed using optical microscopy on concrete thin sections. Test results revealed a substantial improvement of the resistance to chloride ion penetration into concrete containing blended cements. The resistance was higher for increased clinker replacement levels and increased with curing time. However, concrete made with blended cements exhibited higher depth of carbonation than the Portland cement concrete, except the Portland-fly ash cement with 14.3% of calcareous fly ash. The thin sections analysis confirmed the values of the carbonation depth obtained from the phenolphthalein test. Test results indicate the possible range of application for new cements containing calcareous fly ash.

  20. Fracture resistance of metal-free composite crowns-effects of fiber reinforcement, thermal cycling, and cementation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Franziska; Eickemeyer, Grit; Rammelsberg, Peter

    2004-09-01

    The improved mechanical properties of contemporary composites have resulted in their extensive use for the restoration of posterior teeth. However, the influence of fiber reinforcement, cementation technique, and physical stress on the fracture resistance of metal-free crowns is unknown. This in vitro study evaluated the effect of fiber reinforcement, physical stress, and cementation methods on the fracture resistance of posterior metal-free Sinfony crowns. Ninety-six extracted human third molars received a standardized tooth preparation: 0.5-mm chamfer preparation and occlusal reduction of 1.3 to 1.5 mm. Sinfony (nonreinforced crowns, n=48) and Sinfony-Vectris (reinforced crowns, n=48) crowns restoring original tooth contour were prepared. Twenty-four specimens of each crown type were cemented, using either glass ionomer cement (GIC) or resin cement. Thirty-two crowns (one third) were stored in humidity for 48 hours. Another third was exposed to 10,000 thermal cycles (TC) between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C. The remaining third was treated with thermal cycling and mechanical loading (TCML), consisting of 1.2 million axial loads of 50 N. The artificial crowns were then vertically loaded with a steel sphere until failure occurred. Significant differences in fracture resistance (N) between experimental groups were assessed by nonparametric Mann-Whitney U-test (alpha=.05). Fifty percent of the Sinfony and Sinfony-Vectris crowns cemented with glass ionomer cement loosened after thermal cycling. Thermal cycling resulted in a significant reduction in the mean fracture resistance for Sinfony crowns cemented with GIC, from 2037 N to 1282 N (P=.004). Additional fatigue produced no further effects. Fiber reinforcement significantly increased fracture resistance, from 1555 N to 2326 N (P=.001). The minimal fracture resistance was above 600 N for all combinations of material, cement and loading. Fracture resistance of metal-free Sinfony crowns was significantly increased by

  1. Influences of doping mesoporous magnesium silicate on water absorption, drug release, degradability, apatite-mineralization and primary cells responses to calcium sulfate based bone cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Zhengrong; Wang, Sicheng; Weng, Weizong; Chen, Xiao; Cao, Liehu; Wei, Jie; Shin, Jung-Woog; Su, Jiacan

    2017-01-01

    In this study, composite cements containing mesoporous magnesium silicate (m-MS) and calcium sulfate (CS) were fabricated. The results revealed that the setting time of the m-MS/CS composite cements (m-MSC) slightly prolonged with the increase of m-MS content while the compressive strength suffered a little loss. The doping of m-MS improved the water absorption, drug release (vancomycin) and degradability of the m-MSC in Tris-HCl solution (pH = 7.4). In addition, addition of m-MS facilitated the apatite-mineralization of m-MSC in simulated body fluid (SBF), indicating good bioactivity. For cell cultural experiments, the results revealed that the m-MSC promoted the cells adhesion and proliferation, and improved the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of MC3T3-E1 cells, revealing good cytocompatibility. It could be suggested that the m-MSC might be promising cements biomaterials for bone tissue regeneration. - Highlights: • The mesoporous magnesium silicate and calcium sulfate composite was fabricated. • The composite possessed good water absorption and drug release of vancomycin. • The bioactive composite could enhance the in vivo apatite formation in SBF. • The composite promoted cell adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation.

  2. Influences of doping mesoporous magnesium silicate on water absorption, drug release, degradability, apatite-mineralization and primary cells responses to calcium sulfate based bone cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Zhengrong [Department of Trauma Orthopaedics, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); The Department of Orthopaedics, Jing' an District Centre Hospital of Shanghai (Huashan Hospital Fudan University Jing' An Branch), 200040 (China); Wang, Sicheng [Department of Trauma Orthopaedics, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Department of Orthopaedics, Zhongye Hospital, Shanghai 200941 (China); Weng, Weizong; Chen, Xiao; Cao, Liehu [Department of Trauma Orthopaedics, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wei, Jie [Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Shin, Jung-Woog [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Inje University, Gimhae, 621749 (Korea, Republic of); Su, Jiacan, E-mail: jiacansu@sina.com [Department of Trauma Orthopaedics, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2017-06-01

    In this study, composite cements containing mesoporous magnesium silicate (m-MS) and calcium sulfate (CS) were fabricated. The results revealed that the setting time of the m-MS/CS composite cements (m-MSC) slightly prolonged with the increase of m-MS content while the compressive strength suffered a little loss. The doping of m-MS improved the water absorption, drug release (vancomycin) and degradability of the m-MSC in Tris-HCl solution (pH = 7.4). In addition, addition of m-MS facilitated the apatite-mineralization of m-MSC in simulated body fluid (SBF), indicating good bioactivity. For cell cultural experiments, the results revealed that the m-MSC promoted the cells adhesion and proliferation, and improved the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of MC3T3-E1 cells, revealing good cytocompatibility. It could be suggested that the m-MSC might be promising cements biomaterials for bone tissue regeneration. - Highlights: • The mesoporous magnesium silicate and calcium sulfate composite was fabricated. • The composite possessed good water absorption and drug release of vancomycin. • The bioactive composite could enhance the in vivo apatite formation in SBF. • The composite promoted cell adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation.

  3. Influence of Blended Cements with Calcareous Fly Ash on Chloride Ion Migration and Carbonation Resistance of Concrete for Durable Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał A. Glinicki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to examine the possible use of new blended cements containing calcareous fly ash in structural concrete, potentially adequate for structural elements of nuclear power plants. The investigation included five new cements made with different contents of non-clinker constituents: calcareous fly ash, siliceous fly ash, ground granulated blastfurnace slag, and a reference cement—ordinary Portland cement. The influence of innovative cements on the resistance of concrete to chloride and carbonation exposure was studied. Additionally, an evaluation of the microstructure was performed using optical microscopy on concrete thin sections. Test results revealed a substantial improvement of the resistance to chloride ion penetration into concrete containing blended cements. The resistance was higher for increased clinker replacement levels and increased with curing time. However, concrete made with blended cements exhibited higher depth of carbonation than the Portland cement concrete, except the Portland-fly ash cement with 14.3% of calcareous fly ash. The thin sections analysis confirmed the values of the carbonation depth obtained from the phenolphthalein test. Test results indicate the possible range of application for new cements containing calcareous fly ash.

  4. Leaf structural traits of tropical woody species resistant to cement dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira-Silva, Advanio Inácio; Pereira, Eduardo Gusmão; Modolo, Luzia Valentina; Paiva, Elder Antonio Sousa

    2016-08-01

    Cement industries located nearby limestone outcrops in Brazil have contributed to the coating of cement dust over native plant species. However, little is known about the extent of the response of tropical woody plants to such environmental pollutant particularly during the first stages of plant development and establishment. This work focused on the investigation of possible alterations in leaf structural and ultrastructural traits of 5-month-old Guazuma ulmifolia Lam. (Malvaceae), 6-month-old Myracrodruon urundeuva Allemão (Anacardiaceae), and 9-month-old Trichilia hirta L. (Meliaceae) challenged superficially with cement dust during new leaf development. Leaf surface of plants, the soil or both (leaf plus soil), were treated (or not) for 60 days, under controlled conditions, with cement dust at 2.5 or 5.0 mg cm(-2). After exposure, no significant structural changes were observed in plant leaves. Also, no plant death was recorded by the end of the experiment. There was also some evidence of localized leaf necrosis in G. ulmifolia and T. hirta, leaf curling in M. urundeuva and T. hirta, and bulges formation on epidermal surface of T. hirta, after cement dust contact with plant shoots. All species studied exhibited stomata obliteration while T. hirta, in particular, presented early leaf abscission, changes in cellular relief, and organization and content of midrib cells. No significant ultrastructural alterations were detected under the experimental conditions studied. Indeed, mesophyll cells presented plastids with intact membrane systems. The high plant survival rates, together with mild morphoanatomic traits alterations in leaves, indicate that G. ulmifolia is more resistant to cement dust pollutant, followed by M. urundeuva and T. hirta. Thus, the three plant species are promising for being used to revegetate areas impacted by cement industries activities.

  5. A thermodynamic approach to the hydration of sulphate-resisting Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lothenbach, Barbara; Wieland, Erich

    2006-01-01

    A thermodynamic approach is used to model changes in the hydrate assemblage and the composition of the pore solution during the hydration of calcite-free and calcite-containing sulphate-resisting Portland cement CEM I 52.5 N HTS. Modelling is based on thermodynamic data for the hydration products and calculated hydration rates for the individual clinker phases, which are used as time-dependent input parameters. Model predictions compare well with the composition of the hydrate assemblage as observed by TGA and semi-quantitative XRD and with the experimentally determined compositions of the pore solutions. The calculations show that in the presence of small amounts of calcite typically associated with Portland cement, C-S-H, portlandite, ettringite and calcium monocarbonate are the main hydration products. In the absence of calcite in the cement, however, siliceous hydrogarnet instead of calcium monocarbonate is observed to precipitate. The use of a higher water-to-cement ratio for the preparation of a calcite-containing cement paste has a minor effect on the composition of the hydrate assemblage, while it significantly changes the composition of the pore solution. In particular, lower pH value and higher Ca concentrations appear that could potentially influence the solubility and uptake of heavy metals and anions by cementitious materials

  6. Resistance to acid attack of portland cement mortars produced with red mud as a pozzolanic additive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balbino, Thiago Gabriel Ferreira; Fortes, Gustavo Mattos; Lourenco, Rafaela Roberta; Rodrigues, Jose de Anchieta

    2011-01-01

    Portland cement structures are usually exposed to aggressive environments, which requires the knowledge of the performance of these materials under deleterious conditions. In this study, it was evaluated the resistance to acid attack of mortars that contain ordinary (CPI) and compost (CPII-Z) Portland cements, adding to the first red mud (RB) as a pozzolanic additive in different conditions: without calcination, calcined at 400 ° C and at 600 ° C. The specimens were subjected to HCl and H 2 SO 4 solutions, both with concentration of 1.0 Mol L -1 for 28 days, monitoring the weight loss and leached material nature by atomic emission inductively coupled plasma (ICP). The hydration products were studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) of the hydrated cement pastes. It was observed a reduction of portlandite amount in the RB containing cement pastes, indicating a possible pozzolanic activity of the red mud. The mortars prepared with RB were more resistant to HCl, while that ones with calcined RB present a better performance in H 2 SO 4 attack. (author)

  7. Fracture Resistance of Lithium Disilicate Ceramics Bonded to Enamel or Dentin Using Different Resin Cement Types and Film Thicknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojpaibool, Thitithorn; Leevailoj, Chalermpol

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the influence of cement film thickness, cement type, and substrate (enamel or dentin) on ceramic fracture resistance. One hundred extracted human third molars were polished to obtain 50 enamel and 50 dentin specimens. The specimens were cemented to 1-mm-thick lithium disilicate ceramic plates with different cement film thicknesses (100 and 300 μm) using metal strips as spacers. The cements used were etch-and-rinse (RelyX Ultimate) and self-adhesive (RelyX U200) resin cements. Compressive load was applied on the ceramic plates using a universal testing machine, and fracture loads were recorded in Newtons (N). Statistical analysis was performed by multiple regression (p enamel showed the highest mean fracture load (MFL; 1591 ± 172.59 N). The RelyX Ultimate groups MFLs were significantly higher than the corresponding RelyX U200 groups (p enamel (p enamel. Reduced resin film thickness could reduce lithium disilicate restoration fracture. Etch-and-rinse resin cements are recommended for cementing on either enamel or dentin, compared with self-adhesive resin cement, for improved fracture resistance. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  8. Results of the freeze resistance test, swelling index and coefficient of permeability of finegrained mining waste reinforced with cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morman, Justyna

    2018-04-01

    The article presents the result of laboratory tests for mining waste with grain size of 0 to 2 mm stabilized with cement. Used for stabilization of cement CEM I 42.5 R and blast furnace cement CEM III / A 42.5N - LH / HSR / NA and a plasticizer sealant. Cement was added to the mining waste test in the proportions of 5 - 8% in relation to the skeleton's weight. For the cemented samples, the freeze resistance test, swelling index, coefficient of permeability and pH of water leachate were tested. The addition of a cement binder resulted in diminishing the water permeability of mining waste and limiting the leaching of fine particles from the material.

  9. Well technologies for CO2 geological storage: CO2-resistant cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barlet-Gouedard, V.; Rimmele, G.; Porcherie, O.; Goffe, B.

    2007-01-01

    Storing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) underground is considered the most effective way for long-term safe and low-cost CO 2 sequestration. This recent application requires long-term well-bore integrity. A CO 2 leakage through the annulus may occur much more rapidly than geologic leakage through the formation rock, leading to economic loss, reduction of CO 2 storage efficiency, and potential compromise of the field for storage. The possibility of such leaks raises considerable concern about the long-term well-bore isolation and the durability of hydrated cement that is used to isolate the annulus across the producing/injection intervals in CO 2 -storage wells. We propose a new experimental procedure and methodology to study reactivity of CO 2 -Water-Cement systems in simulating the interaction of the set cement with injected supercritical CO 2 under downhole conditions. The conditions of experiments are 90 deg. C under 280 bars. The evolution of mechanical, physical and chemical properties of Portland cement with time is studied up to 6 months. The results are compared to equivalent studies on a new CO 2 -resistant material; the comparison shows significant promise for this new material. (authors)

  10. Effect of fly ash composition on the sulfate resistance of concrete[Includes the CSCE forum on professional practice and career development : 1. international engineering mechanics and materials specialty conference : 1. international/3. coastal, estuarine and offshore engineering specialty conference : 2. international/8. construction specialty conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhole, R.D.; Thomas, M.D.A. [New Brunswick Univ., Fredericton, NB (Canada); Folliard, K.J.; Drimalas, T. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Studies have shown that low-calcium Class F fly ashes obtained from burning coal in power stations can increase the sulfate resistance of Portland cement concrete. In many cases the sulfate resistance of concrete containing high-calcium Class C fly ash can be reduced compared to concrete without fly ash, due to the presence of crystalline C3A in the fly ash and calcium aluminate in the glass. This study investigated the differences in the glass composition and sulfate resistance of fly ashes with a range of calcium contents. The objective was to determine whether the behaviour of high-calcium fly ashes could be improved by blending with low-calcium fly ash. The sulfate resistance of cementitious systems consisting of a Type I Portland cement blended with Class F and Class C fly ashes of varying composition was evaluated by monitoring the length change of mortar bars stored in 5 per cent sodium sulfate solution. Scanning electron microscopy and electron dispersive X-ray analysis were used to characterize the glass phases of the fly ashes. The position occupied by the glass when plotted on a CaO-SiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ternary was identified as belonging to one of the fields occupied by the mineral phases mullite, anorthosite or gehlenite. The glass showed a transition from alumino-silicate in Class F fly ash to a calcium alumino-silicate or mixed calcium-aluminate/alumino-silicate in Class C fly ashes with higher calcium contents. Fly ashes with high amounts of calcium-aluminate glass had reduced sulfate resistance when tested in mortars. Blends of Class C and Class F fly ashes had better sulfate resistance than mixes made with only Class C fly ash. A relationship was established between the calcium oxide content of the blended fly ash and sulfate resistance of mortar. 8 refs., 5 tabs., 10 figs.

  11. Tantalum oxide and barium sulfate as radiopacifiers in injectable calcium phosphate-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) cements for monitoring in vivo degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Jan Willem M; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C G; Bronkhorst, Ewald M; Meijer, Gert J; Jansen, John A

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring the degradation of calcium phosphate-based bone substitute materials in vivo by means of noninvasive techniques (e.g., radiography) is often a problem due to the chemical resemblance of those substitutes with the mineral phase of bone. In the view of that, the present study aimed at enhancing the radiopacity of calcium phosphate cement enriched with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (CPC-PLGA) microspheres, by adding tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) or the more traditional radiopacifier barium sulfate (BaSO4). The radiopacifying capacity of these radiopacifiers was first evaluated in vitro by microcomputed tomography (μCT). Thereafter, both radiopacifiers were tested in vivo using a distal femoral condyle model in rabbits, with subsequent ex vivo μCT analysis in parallel with histomorphometry. Addition of either one of the radiopacifiers proved to enhance radiopacity of CPC-PLGA in vitro. The in vivo experiment showed that both radiopacifiers did not induce alterations in biological performance compared to plain CPC-PLGA, hence both radiopacifiers can be considered safe and biocompatible. The histomorphometrical assessment of cement degradation and bone formation showed similar values for the three experimental groups. Interestingly, μCT analysis showed that monitoring cement degradation becomes feasible upon incorporation of either type of radiopacifier, albeit that BaSO4 showed more accuracy compared to Ta2O5. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley Company.

  12. Statistical analysis of electrical resistivity as a tool for estimating cement type of 12-year-old concrete specimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Morales-Napoles, O.; Pacheco, J.

    2012-01-01

    Statistical tests on values of concrete resistivity can be used as a fast tool for estimating the cement type of old concrete. Electrical resistivity of concrete is a material property that describes the electrical resistance of concrete in a unit cell. Influences of binder type, water-to-binder

  13. Influence of recycled fine aggregates on the resistance of mortars to magnesium sulfate attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung-Tae

    2009-01-01

    The influence of recycled fine aggregates, which had been reclaimed from field-demolished concretes, on the resistance of mortar specimens to magnesium sulfate attack was investigated. Mortar specimens were prepared with recycled fine aggregates at different replacement levels (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of natural fine aggregate by mass). The mortar specimens were exposed to 4.24% magnesium sulfate solution for about 1 year at ambient temperature, and regularly monitored for visual appearance, compressive strength loss and expansion. Additionally, in order to identify products of magnesium sulfate attack, mortar samples incorporating 0%, 25% and 100% replacement levels of the recycled fine aggregates were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. Experimental results confirmed that the use of recycled fine aggregates up to a maximum 50% replacement level is effective under severe magnesium sulfate environment, irrespective of type of recycled fine aggregates. However, the worse performance was observed in mortar specimens incorporating 100% replacement level. It was found that the water absorption of recycled fine aggregates affected deterioration of mortar specimens, especially at a higher replacement level. XRD results indicated that the main cause of deterioration of the mortar specimens was primarily due to the formation of gypsum and thaumasite by magnesium sulfate attack. In addition, it appeared that the conversion of C-S-H into M-S-H by the attack probably influenced mechanical deterioration of mortar specimens with recycled fine aggregates.

  14. A comparison of resistance to fracture among four commercially available forms of hydroxyapatite cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lee; Guerra, Aldo Benjamin; Bidros, Rafi Sirop; Trahan, Christopher; Baratta, Richard; Metzinger, Stephen Eric

    2005-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite cement is a relatively new biomaterial that has found widespread use in craniomaxillofacial surgery. Despite its common usage, complication rates as high as 32% have been reported. When failed implants are removed, implant fracture has been cited as a potential cause of failure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate resistance to fracture among 4 commercially available hydroxyapatite cement formulations. The materials tested included Norian Craniofacial Repair System (carbonated apatite cement) (AO North America, Devon, PA), Norian CRS Fast Set Putty (carbonated apatite cement) (AO North America), BoneSource (hydroxyapatite cement) (Stryker Leibinger, Portage, MI), and Mimix (hydroxyapatite cement) (Walter Lorenz Surgical, Inc, Jacksonville, FL). To ensure consistency, all materials were embedded in acrylic wells. Each material was placed into a well 2.54 cm in diameter and 0.953 cm in thickness. The materials were prepared per manufacturer specifications. All materials were incubated at 37.0 degrees C, in 6% CO2, 100% humidity for 36 hours. Using the Bionix MTS Test System, a 12-mm-diameter probe applied incremental force to the center of the disk at a rate of 0.1 mm per second. The transmitted force was measured using a Bionix MTS Axial-Torsional Load Transducer for each disk. The force which resulted in fracture was recorded for each material. Ten disks of each material were processed by this method, for a total of 40 disks. The significance of resistance to fracture for the 4 compounds was analyzed using 1-way analysis of variance with post hoc Scheffe method. Mean fracture force with related P values was plotted for direct comparison of group outcomes. Material type contributed significantly to variance in fracture force for the biomaterials studied. Norian CRS required the greatest mean fracture force (1385 N, SD+/-292 N), followed by Norian CRS Fast Set Putty (1143 N, SD+/-193 N). Mimix required a mean fracture force of 740 N, SD+/-79 N

  15. Corrosion Resistance of Calcium Aluminate Cement Concrete Exposed to a Chloride Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ann, Ki Yong; Cho, Chang-Geun

    2014-01-28

    The present study concerns a development of calcium aluminate cement (CAC) concrete to enhance the durability against an externally chemically aggressive environment, in particular, chloride-induced corrosion. To evaluate the inhibition effect and concrete properties, CAC was partially mixed with ordinary Portland cement (OPC), ranging from 5% to 15%, as a binder. As a result, it was found that an increase in the CAC in binder resulted in a dramatic decrease in the setting time of fresh concrete. However, the compressive strength was lower, ranging about 20 MPa, while OPC indicated about 30-35 MPa at an equivalent age. When it comes to chloride transport, there was only marginal variation in the diffusivity of chloride ions. The corrosion resistance of CAC mixture was significantly enhanced: its chloride threshold level for corrosion initiation exceeded 3.0% by weight of binder, whilst OPC and CAC concrete indicated about 0.5%-1.0%.

  16. [Comparative investigation of compressive resistance of glass-cermet cements used as a core material in post-core systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoy, E; Cetiner, S; Koçak, F

    1989-09-01

    In post-core applications, addition to the cast designs restorations that are performed on fabrication posts with restorative materials are being used. To improve the physical properties of glass-ionomer cements that are popular today, glass-cermet cements have been introduced and those materials have been proposed to be an alternative restorative material in post-core applications. In this study, the compressive resistance of Ketac-Silver as a core material was investigated comparatively with amalgam and composite resins.

  17. BLENDED CALCIUM ALUMINATE-CALCIUM SULFATE CEMENT-BASED GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

    2011-03-10

    The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout which has a pH greater than 12.4. In addition, blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement compositions can be formulated such that the primary cementitious phase is a stable crystalline material. A less alkaline material (pH {<=} 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts [Wiersma, 2009a and b, Wiersma, 2010, and Serrato and Langton, 2010]. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere [Griffin, 2010, Stefanko, 2009 and Wiersma, 2009 and 2010, Bobbitt, 2010, respectively]. Radiolysis calculations are also provided in a separate document [Reyes-Jimenez, 2010].

  18. Long-term chloride migration coefficient in slag cement-based concrete and resistivity as an alternative test method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noort, R.; Hunger, M.; Spiesz, P.R.

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on investigations of the resistivity and chloride migration coefficient (DRCM) obtained in the accelerated Rapid Chloride Migration test for slag cement-based concretes. Determinations of the resistivity and DRCM were performed on 47 different concrete compositions, up to the

  19. The influence of Cr and Al pack cementation on low carbon steel to improve oxidation resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetya, Didik; Sugiarti, Eni; Destyorini, Fredina; Thosin, Kemas Ahmad Zaini

    2012-06-01

    Pack chromizing and aluminizing has been widely used for many years to improve hot temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance of metals. The coating process involves packing the steel in a powder mixture which contain aluminum and chromium source, and inert filler (usually alumina), and halide activator NH4Cl. Al and Cr were deposited onto carbon steel by pack cementation process using elemental Al and Cr powder as Al and Cr source, whereas NiCo alloys codeposited by electrodeposition. The position of Al and Cr could be under or over Ni-Co alloys deposited. Pack cementation was heated on dry inert gas at temperature 800 °C about 5 hours and 20 minute for Cr and Al respectively. Al and Cr was successfully deposited. Laying down effect of Al and Cr onto carbon steel whether up and down toward NiCo alloys coating have affected to oxidation resistance. The pack aluminizing as top layer given best resitance to restrain excessive oxide scale, in contrast pack chromizing reveal bad oxidation resistance, moreover occured spallation on layer.

  20. Low-shrink airfield cement concrete with respect to thermal resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linek Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents theoretical background to the occurrence and propagation of imposed thermal load deep inside the structure of airfield pavement. The standard composition of low-shrink cement concrete intended for airfield pavements was presented. The influence of recurring temperature changes on the extent of shrinkage deformations was assessed. The obtained lab test results, combined with observations and analysis of changes of the hardened concrete microstructure, allowed the authors to draw conclusions. It was proven that the suggested concrete mix composition makes it possible to obtain the concrete type of better developed internal microstructure. More micro air voids and reduced distance between the voids were proven, which provides increased frost resistance of concrete. The change of size, structure and quantity of the hydration products in the cement matrix and better developed contact sections resulted in the improvement of the mechanical parameters of hardened concrete. Low-shrink concrete in all analysed cases proved to have increased resistance to the variable environmental conditions. Increased concrete resistance is identified through reduced registered shrinkage deformations and growth of mechanical parameters of concrete. Low-shrink concrete used for airfield structure guarantees extended time of reliable pavement operation.

  1. The applicability of alkaline-resistant glass fiber in cement mortar of road pavement: Corrosion mechanism and performance analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Xiaochun

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The main technical requirements of road pavement concrete are high flexural strength and fatigue durability. Adding glass fiber into concrete could greatly increase flexural strength and wearing resistance of concrete. However, glass fiber has the great potential of corrosion during the cement hydration, which will directly affect the long-term performance and strength stability. In this paper, accelerated corrosion experiments have been done to find out the corrosion mechanism and property of alkali-resistant glass fiber in cement mortar. The applicability and practicability of alkaline-resistant glass fiber in road concrete have been illustrated in the analysis of flexural strength changing trend of cement mortar mixed with different proportions of activated additives to protect the corrosion of glass fiber by cement mortar. The results have shown that a 30% addition of fly ash or 10% addition of silica fume to cement matrix could effectively improve the corrosion resistance of alkali-resistant glass fiber. The optimal mixing amount of alkali-resistant glass fiber should be about 1.0 kg/m3 in consideration of ensuring the compressive strength of reinforced concrete in road pavement. The closest-packing method has been adopted in the mixture ratio design of alkali-resistant glass fiber reinforced concrete, not only to reduce the alkalinity of the cement matrix through large amount addition of activated additives but also to greatly enhance the flexural performance of concrete with the split pressure ratio improvement of 12.5–16.7%. The results suggested a prosperous application prospect for alkaline-resistant glass fiber reinforced concrete in road pavement.

  2. Formation and oxidation resistance of NbSi2 coatings on niobium by pack cementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ming; Song Lixin; Le Jun; Zhang Xiaowei; Pei Baogen; Hu Xingfang

    2005-01-01

    NbSi 2 coatings were formed on niobium by halide-activated pack cementation process. The as-coated niobium samples were oxidized in air up to 1723 K by thermogravimetry method. The surface and cross-sectional morphology, phase composition and element distribution of the NbSi 2 coatings before and after oxidation were characterized by SEM, XRD and EPMA. The results show that the as-formed coatings consist of single phase of hexagonal NbSi 2 and the oxidation resistance of pure niobium can be greatly improved by pack siliconizing. (orig.)

  3. Assessment of hydration process and mechanical properties of cemented paste backfill by electrical resistivity measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenbin; Tian, Xichun; Cao, Peiwang

    2018-04-01

    Cemented paste backfill (CPB) is an emerging mine backfill technique that allows environmentally hazardous tailings to return to the underground openings or stopes, thereby maximising the safety, efficiency and productivity of operation. Uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) is one of the most commonly used parameters for evaluating the mechanical performance of CPB; the prediction of the UCS of CPB structures from early to advanced ages is of great practical importance. This study aims to investigate the predictability of the UCS of CPB during the hydration process based on electrical resistivity (ER) measurement. For this purpose, the samples prepared at different cement-to-tailing ratios and solid contents were subjected to the ER test during the whole hydration process and UCS tests at 3, 7, 28 days of curing periods. The effect of cement-to-tailing ratio and solid content on the ER and UCS of CPB samples was obtained; the UCS values were correlated with the corresponding ER data. Microstructural analysis was also performed on CPB samples to understand the effect of microstructure on the ER data. The result shows that the ER of CPB decreases first and then increases with the speed which is faster in the previous part than the latter. The ER and UCS of CPB samples increased with increasing cement-to-tailing ratio and solid content and curing periods. A logarithmic relationship is established for each mixture in order to predict the UCS of CPB based on ER. Scanning electron microscope analyses have revealed that the microstructure of the CPB changes with the age from the initial floc to honeycomb, and eventually to the compact clumps. The ER properties of CPB samples were highly associated with their respective microstructural properties. The major output of this study is that ER test is effectively capable for a preliminary prediction of the UCS of CPB.

  4. Relative permeability of fractured wellbore cement: an experimental investigation using electrical resistivity monitoring for moisture content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, W.; Rod, K. A.; Strickland, C. E.

    2016-12-01

    Permeability is a critical parameter needed to understand flow in subsurface environments; it is particularly important in deep subsurface reservoirs where multiphase fluid flow is common, such as carbon sequestration and geothermal reservoirs. Cement is used in the annulus of wellbores due to its low permeable properties to seal aquifers, reducing leaks to adjacent strata. Extreme subsurface environments of CO2 storage and geothermal production conditions will eventually reduce the cement integrity, propagating fracture networks and increasing the permeability for air and/or water. To date, there have been no reproducible experimental investigations of relative permeability in fractured wellbore cement published. To address this gap, we conducted a series of experiments using fractured Portland cement monoliths with increasing fracture networks. The monolith cylinder sides were jacketed with heavy-duty moisture-seal heat-shrink tubing, then fractured using shear force applied via a hydraulic press. Fractures were generated with different severity for each of three monoliths. Stainless steel endcaps were fixed to the monoliths using the same shrink-wrapped jacket. Fracture characteristics were determined using X-ray microtomography and image analysis. Flow controllers were used to control flow of water and air to supply continuous water or water plus air, both of which were delivered through the influent end cap. Effluent air flow was monitored using a flow meter, and water flow was measured gravimetrically. To monitor the effective saturation of the fractures, a RCON2 concrete bulk electrical resistivity test device was attached across both endcaps and a 0.1M NaNO3 brine was used as the transport fluid to improve resistivity measurements. Water content correlated to resistivity measurements with a r2 > 0.96. Data from the experiments was evaluated using two relative permeability models, the Corey-curve, often used for modeling relative permeability in porous media

  5. Intestinal mucosal mast cells from rats infected with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis contain protease-resistant chondroitin sulfate di-B proteoglycans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, R.L.; Lee, T.D.G.; Seldin, D.C.; Austen, K.F.; Befus, A.D.; Bienenstock, J.

    1986-01-01

    Rats infected with the helminth Nippostrongylus brasiliensis were injected i.p. with 2 mCi of [ 35 S] sulfate on days 13, 15, 17, and 19 after infection. The intestines were removed from animals on day 20 or 21 after infection, the intestinal cells were obtained by collagenase treatment and mechanical dispersion of the tissue, and the 35 S-labeled mucosal mast cells (MMC) were enriched to 60 to 65% purity by Percoll centrifugation. The isolated proteoglycans were of approx. 150,000 m.w., were resistant to pronase degradation, and contained highly sulfated chondroitin sulfate side chains. The presence in normal mammalian cells of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that contain a high percentage of the unusual disulfated di-B disaccharide has not been previously reported. The rat intestinal MMC proteoglycans are the first chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that have been isolated from an enriched populations of normal mast cells. They are homologous to the chondroitin sulfate-rich proteoglycans of the transformed rat basophilic leumekia-1 cell and the cultured interleukin 3-dependent mouse bone marrow-derived mast cell, in that these chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans are all highly sulfated, protease-resistant proteoglycans

  6. Improved anticoagulant effect of fucosylated chondroitin sulfate orally administered as gastro-resistant tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Roberto J C; Sucupira, Isabela D; Oliveira, Stephan Nicollas M C G; Santos, Gustavo R C; Mourão, Paulo A S

    2017-04-03

    Fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FucCS) is a potent anticoagulant polysaccharide extracted from sea cucumber. Its anticoagulant activity is attributed to the presence of unique branches of sulfated fucose. Although this glycosaminoglycan exerts an antithrombotic effect following oral administration, high doses are necessary to achieve the maximum effect. The diminished activity of FucCS following oral administration is likely due to its degradation in the gastrointestinal tract and its limited ability to cross the intestinal cell membranes. The latter aspect is particularly difficult to overcome. However, gastro-resistant tablet formulation may help limit the degradation of FucCS in the gastrointestinal tract. In the present work, we found that the oral administration of FucCS as gastro-resistant tablets produces a more potent and prolonged anticoagulant effect compared with its administration as an aqueous solution, with no significant changes in the bleeding tendency or arterial blood pressure. Experiments using animal models of arterial thrombosis initiated by endothelial injury demonstrated that FucCS delivered as gastro-protective tablets produced a potent antithrombotic effect, whereas its aqueous solution was ineffective. However, there was no significant difference between the effects of FucCS delivered as gastro-resistant tablets or as aqueous solution in a venous thrombosis model, likely due to the high dose of thromboplastin used. New oral anticoagulants tested in these experimental models for comparison showed significantly increased bleeding tendencies. Our study provides a framework for developing effective oral anticoagulants based on sulfated polysaccharides from marine organisms. The present results suggest that FucCS is a promising oral anticoagulant.

  7. Durability of Gamma Irradiated Polymer Impregnated Blended Cement Pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, M.M.; Abdel-Rahman, H.A.; Younes, M.M.

    2010-01-01

    This study is focusing on durability and performance of the neat blended cement paste as well as those of the polymer-impregnated paste towards seawater and various concentrations of magnesium sulfate solutions up to 6 months of curing. The neat blended cement paste is prepared by a partial substitution of ordinary Portland cement with 5% of active rice husk ash (RHA). These samples were cured under tap water for 7 days. Similar samples were impregnated with unsaturated polyester resin (UPE) and subjected to various doses of gamma rays ranging from 10 to 50 kGy. The results showed that the irradiated impregnated specimens gave higher values of compressive strength than the neat blended cement paste specimens. On immersing the neat blended cement specimens and polymer impregnated specimens especially that irradiated at 30 kGy in seawater and different concentrations of magnesium sulfate solutions up to 6 months of curing, the results showed that the polymer impregnated blended cement (OPC-RHA-UPE) paste have a good resistance towards aggressive media as compared to the neat blended cement (OPC-RHA) paste. The results also indicated that the sea water has a greater corrosive effect than the magnesium sulfate solutions. These results were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP)

  8. Arabidopsis thaliana resistance to fusarium oxysporum 2 implicates tyrosine-sulfated peptide signaling in susceptibility and resistance to root infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunping Shen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In the plant Arabidopsis thaliana, multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs, including RFO2, account for the strong resistance of accession Columbia-0 (Col-0 and relative susceptibility of Taynuilt-0 (Ty-0 to the vascular wilt fungus Fusarium oxysporum forma specialis matthioli. We find that RFO2 corresponds to diversity in receptor-like protein (RLP genes. In Col-0, there is a tandem pair of RLP genes: RFO2/At1g17250 confers resistance while RLP2 does not. In Ty-0, the highly diverged RFO2 locus has one RLP gene conferring weaker resistance. While the endogenous RFO2 makes a modest contribution to resistance, transgenic RFO2 provides strong pathogen-specific resistance. The extracellular leucine-rich repeats (eLRRs in RFO2 and RLP2 are interchangeable for resistance and remarkably similar to eLRRs in the receptor-like kinase PSY1R, which perceives tyrosine-sulfated peptide PSY1. Reduced infection in psy1r and mutants of related phytosulfokine (PSK receptor genes PSKR1 and PSKR2 shows that tyrosine-sulfated peptide signaling promotes susceptibility. The related eLRRs in RFO2 and PSY1R are not interchangeable; and expression of the RLP nPcR, in which eLRRs in RFO2 are replaced with eLRRs in PSY1R, results in constitutive resistance. Counterintuitively, PSY1 signaling suppresses nPcR because psy1r nPcR is lethal. The fact that PSK signaling does not similarly affect nPcR argues that PSY1 signaling directly downregulates the expression of nPcR. Our results support a speculative but intriguing model to explain RFO2's role in resistance. We propose that F. oxysporum produces an effector that inhibits the normal negative feedback regulation of PSY1R, which stabilizes PSY1 signaling and induces susceptibility. However, RFO2, acting as a decoy receptor for PSY1R, is also stabilized by the effector and instead induces host immunity. Overall, the quantitative resistance of RFO2 is reminiscent of the better-studied monogenic resistance traits.

  9. Effect of MTA and Portland Cement on Fracture Resistance of Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Forghani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. It is important to evaluate the effects of endodontic materials on tooth structures to avoid endodontic treatment failure. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of mineral trioxide aggregates (MTA and Portland cement (PC on fracture resistance of dentin. Materials and methods. Thirty-six freshly extracted human single-rooted premolar teeth were selected. The crowns were removed and the roots were randomly divided into two experimental groups and one control group. The root samples were longitudinally divided into two halves and a dentin bar (2×2×10 mm was cut from each root section for short-term (2 weeks and long-term (12 weeks evaluations. The root sections in the experimental groups were exposed to MTA or PC, while keeping the control group specimens in physiologic saline. The fracture resistance of each specimen was measured using an Instron testing machine. The results were statistically analyzed using ANOVA, a post hoc Tukey test and paired ttest at 5% significance level. Results. The fracture resistance of MTA-treated specimens significantly increased between 2 and 12 weeks (P0.05. Conclusion. The results showed that MTA increased the fracture resistance of root dentin, while PC had no significant effect on dentin fracture resistance.

  10. Hydrated Ordinary Portland Cement as a Carbonic Cement: The Mechanisms, Dynamics, and Implications of Self-Sealing and CO2 Resistance in Wellbore Cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guthrie, George Drake Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pawar, Rajesh J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carey, James William [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Karra, Satish [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harp, Dylan Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Viswanathan, Hari S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2017-07-28

    This report analyzes the dynamics and mechanisms of the interactions of carbonated brine with hydrated Portland cement. The analysis is based on a recent set of comprehensive reactive-transport simulations, and it relies heavily on the synthesis of the body of work on wellbore integrity that we have conducted for the Carbon Storage Program over the past decade.

  11. Effect of metakaolin on external sulfate attack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramlochan, T.; Thomas, M. [Toronto Univ., Dept. of Civil Engineering, ON (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    The effect of high reactivity metakaolin (HRM) on the sulfate resistance of mortars was studied. Mortar bars with three cements of varying C{sub 3}A content were used for the experiment. After a six month exposure to a 5 per cent solution of sodium sulfate, mortar bars incorporating any level of HRM as a partial replacement for a high-C{sub 3}A was considered 'moderately sulfate resistant'; mortar bars with HRM and a moderate or low C{sub 3}A content as 'high sulfate resistant'. It was also determined that for long term sulfate resistance 15 per cent HRM or more may be required, depending on the C{sub 3}A content. The performance of HRM was found to be significantly influenced by the water-cementitious material ratio, and in turn, by permeability, suggesting that HRM might increase sulfate resistance more by lowering the permeability of the concrete than by any chemical action. 7 refs., 4 tabs., 7 figs.

  12. Microbial resistance related to antibiotic-loaded bone cement: a historical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Lucy C; Baker, Paul; Holleyman, Richard; Deehan, David

    2017-12-01

    The use of antibiotic-loaded bone cement (ALBC) has a range of indications for use in orthopaedics. It has the advantage of delivering high loads of antibiotics to a targeted site, thereby avoiding the side effects associated with systemic administration. However, there is concern that the use of ALBC may precipitate the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This review focuses on (1) the published research using both animal and human models examining the association between ALBC and the induction of microbial resistance (2) the mechanisms by which antimicrobial resistance develop (3) the research pertaining to specific classes of antibiotics commonly used in orthopaedic practice (4) the recent developments in calcium sulphate beads, nanoparticles and chitosan, as alternative antimicrobial treatments for periprosthetic joint infections. The literature for and against a link between ALBC and the development of microbiological resistance is reviewed and presented. It is concluded that further research is needed to develop a defined set of indications for the use of ALBC in the management of periprosthetic joint infection. In addition, further research into alternative antimicrobial therapies in this area should be encouraged.

  13. physico-chemical studies on polymer impregnated blending cement mortar composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Rahman, H.A.

    2001-01-01

    as the increasing of the demand on a specific performance characteristics in concrete such as improved strength, low heat, sulfate resistance, improved impermeability and certain other applications. some of the industrial waste materials such as the blast-furnace slag, silica fume and fly ash were mixed with the cement clinker to produce blended cement . the use of these materials modifies the strength, pore structure and permeability of hardened cement mortar or concrete. the incorporation of blast furnace slag and silica fume in the hardened blended cement mortar or concrete is a common practice recently due to technological, economical and environmental benefits

  14. Preparation and physical characterization of calcium sulfate cement/silica-based mesoporous material composites for controlled release of BMP-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan H

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Honglue Tan,1 Shengbing Yang,2 Pengyi Dai,1 Wuyin Li,1 Bing Yue2 1Luoyang Orthopedics and Traumatology Institution, Luoyang Orthopedic-Traumatological Hospital, Luoyang, 2Shanghai Key Laboratory of Orthopedic Implants, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Abstract: As a commonly used implant material, calcium sulfate cement (CSC, has some shortcomings, including low compressive strength, weak osteoinduction capability, and rapid degradation. In this study, silica-based mesoporous materials such as SBA-15 were synthesized and combined with CSC to prepare CSC/SBA-15 composites. The properties of SBA-15 were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms. SBA-15 was blended into CSC at 0, 5, 10, and 20 wt%, referred to as CSC, CSC-5S (5% mass ratio, CSC-10S (10% mass ratio, and CSC-20S (20% mass ratio, respectively. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and compression tests were used to determine the structure and mechanical properties of the composites, respectively. The formation of hydroxyapatite on composite surfaces was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction after soaking in simulated body fluid. BMP-2 was loaded into the composites by vacuum freeze-drying, and its release characteristics were detected by Bradford protein assay. The in vitro degradation of the CSC/SBA-15 composite was investigated by measuring weight loss. The results showed that the orderly, nanostructured, mesoporous SBA-15 possessed regular pore size and structure. The compressive strength of CSC/SBA-15 increased with the increase in SBA-15 mass ratio, and CSC-20S demonstrated the maximum strength. Compared to CSC, hydroxyapatite that formed on the surfaces of CSC/SBA-15 was uniform and compact. The degradation rate of CSC/SBA-15 decreased with increasing

  15. Washout resistance of fast-setting pozzolan cement under various root canal irrigants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ga-Yeon Jang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Fast-setting pozzolan cement (Endocem, Maruchi was recently developed. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of various root canal irrigants on the washout of Endocem in comparison to the previously marketed mineral trioxide aggregate (ProRoot; Dentsply in a furcal perforation model. Materials and Methods ProRoot and Endocem were placed into acrylic molds on moist Oasis. Each mold was then immediately exposed to either physiologic saline, 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl, or 2% chlorhexidine (CHX under gentle shaking for five minutes. Washout testing was performed by scoring scanning electron microscope (SEM images. Results Endocem exhibited higher washout resistance compared to ProRoot, especially in the NaOCl group. Conclusions These results suggest that Endocem can be considered a useful repair material for furcal perforation, especially in a single-visit scenario.

  16. Investigations on diffusion-controlled transformations in creep resistant steels and graded cemented carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prat Borquez, Orlando

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work was to simulate diffusion-controlled transformations on engineering alloys designed by the author and his colleagues. The main challenge of the work is to adapt the existing DICTRA models to the experimental processing and working conditions investigated, as well as to find the adequate boundary conditions for the description of the diffusion-controlled transformations governing the microstructure formation and evolution, in order to obtain reliable simulation results. The simulations were compared with experimental results of the microstructure evolution by scanning electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Two groups of materials were investigated. The first group was 9-12% Cr heat resistant alloys. These alloys are particularly interesting because the microstructure evolves during working conditions. Different compositions were designed in order to form different kinds and amounts of precipitates. For the designed 9-12% Cr creep steels the coarsening of MX and M 23 C 6 particles was modeled by applying the coarsening model implemented in DICTRA. The cell method of DICTRA was applied to investigate the kinetics of the Laves phase growth on 9-12% Cr alloys. The particular objectives of these investigations were: a) to determine the coarsening rate of precipitates, b) to investigate the influence of alloying element on the growth rate of the Laves phase, c) to determine the influence of the M 23 C 6 formation on the growth kinetics of the Laves phase, d) to determine the growth mechanism at the interface of the Laves phase (i.e. up-hill diffusion), e) to investigate the effect of the cell size on the simulation kinetics of Laves phase. The second group of materials was cemented carbides. They are used as cutting tools or wear parts in the automotive, aircraft and mining industry among others. The wear performance of cemented carbides (hardmetals and cermets) can be largely improved by applying wear

  17. The influence of alkali-free and alkaline shotcrete accelerators within cement systems Influence of the temperature on the sulfate attack mechanisms and damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paglia, C.; Wombacher, F.; Boehni, H.

    2003-01-01

    The resistance to sulfate attack of mixtures accelerated with alkali-free and alkaline accelerators was found to be mainly influenced by the Al 3+ and SO 4 2- added via the admixtures. Microstructural observations showed decalcification and disintegration of the CSH gel, which acted as an additional Ca 2+ supplier as compared to the CH for ettringite formation. The CSH decalcification was mainly observed with a homogeneous distribution of the alkali-free admixture. The disintegration of the CSH gel increased the porosity and allowed more sulfate solution to penetrate into the specimens. This process promoted the swelling of the specimens and directly contributed to the expansion, explaining the lack of a direct relationship between the ettringite formation and the expansion. Moreover, the CSH gel disintegration, typical for MgSO 4 attack, also occurred with Na 2 SO 4 solutions and depending on the aluminate-sulfate distribution and the extent of the CSH gel disintegration, different damage types were detected. At higher temperatures (65 deg. C) the damage was mainly controlled by the growth, the rearrangement and the thermal stability of ettringite

  18. Compatibility of hydrogarnet, Ca3Al2(SiO4)x(OH)4(3−x), with sulfate and carbonate-bearing cement phases: 5–85 °C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okoronkwo, Monday Uchenna; Glasser, Fredrik Paul

    2016-01-01

    The stable existence of hydrogarnet in Portland cement compositions cured at temperatures below 55 °C has long been predicted from application of equilibrium thermodynamics. However hydrogarnet is not often reported in hydrated commercial Portland cements. The substitutions (SO 4 –CO 3 –OH) in AFm have previously been shown to stabilise AFm to higher temperatures and raise the temperature at which AFm converts to Si-free hydrogarnet, C 3 AH 6 . But unanswered question remains about the compatibility of AFm and AFm solid solutions with Si-substituted hydrogarnet, Ca 3 Al 2 (SiO 4 ) x (OH) 4(3 − x) . Phase relations of C 3 AH 6 and Ca 3 Al 2 (SiO 4 ) x (OH) 4(3 − x) at sulfate and carbonate activities conditioned respectively by (gypsum and SO 4 -AFt) and (calcite and CO 3 -AFt) have been determined experimentally in the range 5–85 °C. The results confirm the instability of Si-free hydrogarnet with carbonate and sulfate-bearing cement phases, but do indicate that a range of silica-substituted hydrogarnet solid solutions are stable under conditions likely to be encountered in blended cement systems.

  19. Sulfur polymer cement concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, H.H.; McBee, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    Sulfur-based composite materials formulated using sulfur polymer cement (SPC) and mineral aggregates are described and compared with conventional portland cement based materials. Materials characteristics presented include mechanical strength, chemical resistance, impact resistance, moisture permeation, and linear shrinkage during placement and curing. Examples of preparation and placement of sulfur polymer cement concrete (SC) are described using commercial scale equipment. SC applications presented are focused into hostile chemical environments where severe portland cement concrete (PCC) failure has occurred

  20. Sulfate and Chloride Resistance of High Fluidity Concrete including Fly Ash and GGBS for NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Jea Myoung; Cho, Myung Sug

    2010-01-01

    Fly ash mixed concrete has been used for NPP concrete structures in Korea in order to prevent aging and improve durability since the Shin.Kori no.1,2 in 2005. Concentrated efforts to develop technology for the streamlining of construction work and to affect labor savings have been conducted in construction. The application of high fluidity concrete for nuclear power plants has been the research subject with the aim of further rationalization of construction works. Since high fluidity concrete can have the characteristics of high density and high strength without compaction. However, high fluidity concrete can cause thermal cracking by heat of hydration. For this reason, the amount of pozzolan binder should be increased in high fluidity concrete for nuclear power plants. In this study, the resistance of high fluidity concrete on sulfate and chloride was compared with that of the concrete currently using for nuclear power plants

  1. Effects on Setting, Strength, Moisture Resistance and Linear Changes of Sorel’s Cement on Mixing Portland Cement as an Additive

    OpenAIRE

    Mathur, Ritu; Chandrawat, M. P. S.; Sharma, Sanjay K.

    2009-01-01

    Magnesium oxysulphate cement (MOC, Magnesia / Sorel’s Cement), discovered by Sorel S.T. in 1867 and has versatile cementing characteristics. It is prepared by the reaction of magnesium sulphate with magnesia in aqueous solution. Dolomite is used as inert filler to absorb the heat evolved during the exothermic formations of oxysulphate cement. Additives play an important role to modify the properties of Sorel’s cement by nullifying the harmful effects of the impurities present in the matrix...

  2. Resistance against bacterial leakage of four luting agents used for cementation of complete cast crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmener, Osvaldo; Pameijer, Cornelis H; Hernández, Sandra

    2014-02-01

    To assess the sealing properties of four luting materials used for cementation of full cast crowns. 40 human premolars were prepared with a chamfer finish line. Stone dies were fabricated and copings were waxed, invested and cast in gold. Ten samples (n = 10) were randomly assigned to four groups. In two groups, resin modified glass-ionomer cements were used, ACTIVA BioACTIVE-CEMENT/BASE/LINER and FujiCem2; the third group received the self-adhesive resin cement Embrace WetBond, while the fourth group served as control with a zinc phosphate cement. After cementation, excess cement was removed followed by bench-set for 10 minutes. All samples were stored in water at 37 degrees C and subjected to thermal cycling (x2000 between 5 and 55 degrees C). Subsequently the occlusal surface was reduced exposing the dentin. After sterilization the specimens were subjected to bacterial microleakage with E. faecalis in a dual chamber apparatus for a period of 60 days. Bacterial leakage was checked daily. Data were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meyer survival test. Significant pairwise differences were analyzed using the Log Rank test and the Fishers' exact test at P < 0.05. ACTIVA BioACTIVE-CEMENT/BASE/LINER, FujiCem2 and Embrace WetBond showed the lowest microleakage scores and differed statistically significantly (P < 0.05) from zinc phosphate cement.

  3. Development of low radio-activated cement. Characteristics of cement and clinker that decreased liquid phase content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichitsubo, Koki

    2008-01-01

    Low radio-activated cement was developed by decreasing the parent elements of radionuclides in the materials. The characteristics of products, decreasing method of Na, Eu and Co in cement, design, tests, evaluation, and analysis of low radio-activated cement clinker are reported. In order to decrease the content of Na, Eu and Co, the raw materials have to include natural materials such as limestone and silica stone. The production method is the same as white cement. The low radio-activated cement produced by rotary kiln showed 4.9% C 3 A, 1.1% C 4 AF, 26.9% C 3 S and 61.0% C 2 S, which values were standardized by the Japanese Industrial Standards (JIS) of low temperature Portland cement. Another product that decreased a little more liquid phase content showed 4.0% C 3 A, 1.0% C 4 AF, 32.3% C 3 S and 56.5% C 2 S, which was standardized by JIS of sulfate resisting Portland cement. In the case of decommissioning reactor constructed by the low radio-activated cement, the whole amount of waste cement will be no more than the clearance level. (S.Y.)

  4. FY 1974 Report on results of Sunshine Project. Research and development of cement serviceable under geothermal conditions; 1974 nendo chinetsu kankyoka de shiyo kanona cement kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1975-03-30

    Researches are conducted for the (research and development of cement serviceable under geothermal conditions). The research items include (1) surveys on test apparatuses, (2) basic surveys on cement, additives and cement slurry, (3) R and D of cement, and (4) researches on cement additives and slurry. For the item (1), bright prospects are obtained that US's Chandler can supply a thickening time tester serviceable at up to 750 degrees F and 40,000 psi, and a cement curing device serviceable at up to 750 degrees F and 5,000 psi. For the item (2), the surveys are conducted on the existing techniques for curing reactions and chemical resistance of cement at elevated temperature and pressure. For the item (3), the researches are conducted to develop cement resistant to heat and sulfates for geothermal development purposes, where portland cement and mixed portland cement are used as the bases which are incorporated with silica powder. As a result, it is found that the optimum Ca/SiO{sub 2} and CaO/SiO{sub 2}+Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} molar ratios are around 1.0 to 0.9 and 0.9 to 0.8, respectively. For the item (4), the tests are conducted to determine adequate conditions of conductor pipe cementing and cement slurry for 1,500m deep geothermal wells, and the standard composition is established. (NEDO)

  5. FY 1974 Report on results of Sunshine Project. Research and development of cement serviceable under geothermal conditions; 1974 nendo chinetsu kankyoka de shiyo kanona cement kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1975-03-30

    Researches are conducted for the (research and development of cement serviceable under geothermal conditions). The research items include (1) surveys on test apparatuses, (2) basic surveys on cement, additives and cement slurry, (3) R and D of cement, and (4) researches on cement additives and slurry. For the item (1), bright prospects are obtained that US's Chandler can supply a thickening time tester serviceable at up to 750 degrees F and 40,000 psi, and a cement curing device serviceable at up to 750 degrees F and 5,000 psi. For the item (2), the surveys are conducted on the existing techniques for curing reactions and chemical resistance of cement at elevated temperature and pressure. For the item (3), the researches are conducted to develop cement resistant to heat and sulfates for geothermal development purposes, where portland cement and mixed portland cement are used as the bases which are incorporated with silica powder. As a result, it is found that the optimum Ca/SiO{sub 2} and CaO/SiO{sub 2}+Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} molar ratios are around 1.0 to 0.9 and 0.9 to 0.8, respectively. For the item (4), the tests are conducted to determine adequate conditions of conductor pipe cementing and cement slurry for 1,500m deep geothermal wells, and the standard composition is established. (NEDO)

  6. Chemical, Mechanical, and Durability Properties of Concrete with Local Mineral Admixtures under Sulfate Environment in Northwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Qingke; Zhou, Changjun; Shu, Xiang; He, Qiang; Huang, Baoshan

    2014-05-13

    Over the vast Northwest China, arid desert contains high concentrations of sulfate, chloride, and other chemicals in the ground water, which poses serious challenges to infrastructure construction that routinely utilizes portland cement concrete. Rapid industrialization in the region has been generating huge amounts of mineral admixtures, such as fly ash and slags from energy and metallurgical industries. These industrial by-products would turn into waste materials if not utilized in time. The present study evaluated the suitability of utilizing local mineral admixtures in significant quantities for producing quality concrete mixtures that can withstand the harsh chemical environment without compromising the essential mechanical properties. Comprehensive chemical, mechanical, and durability tests were conducted in the laboratory to characterize the properties of the local cementitious mineral admixtures, cement mortar and portland cement concrete mixtures containing these admixtures. The results from this study indicated that the sulfate resistance of concrete was effectively improved by adding local class F fly ash and slag, or by applying sulfate resistance cement to the mixtures. It is noteworthy that concrete containing local mineral admixtures exhibited much lower permeability (in terms of chloride ion penetration) than ordinary portland cement concrete while retaining the same mechanical properties; whereas concrete mixtures made with sulfate resistance cement had significantly reduced strength and much increased chloride penetration comparing to the other mixtures. Hence, the use of local mineral admixtures in Northwest China in concrete mixtures would be beneficial to the performance of concrete, as well as to the protection of environment.

  7. Chloride Diffusion and Acid Resistance of Concrete Containing Zeolite and Tuff as Partial Replacements of Cement and Sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Ehsan; Tang, Waiching; Cui, Hongzhi

    2017-03-31

    In this paper, the properties of concrete containing zeolite and tuff as partial replacements of cement and sand were studied. The compressive strength, water absorption, chloride ion diffusion and resistance to acid environments of concretes made with zeolite at proportions of 10% and 15% of binder and tuff at ratios of 5%, 10% and 15% of fine aggregate were investigated. The results showed that the compressive strength of samples with zeolite and tuff increased considerably. In general, the concrete strength increased with increasing tuff content, and the strength was further improved when cement was replaced by zeolite. According to the water absorption results, specimens with zeolite showed the lowest water absorption values. With the incorporation of tuff and zeolite, the chloride resistance of specimens was enhanced significantly. In terms of the water absorption and chloride diffusion results, the most favorable replacement of cement and sand was 10% zeolite and 15% tuff, respectively. However, the resistance to acid attack reduced due to the absorbing characteristic and calcareous nature of the tuff.

  8. The effect of modified hydrotalcites on mechanical properties and chloride penetration resistance in cement mortar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Z.; Fischer, H.; Polder, R.B.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, two types of modified hydrotalcites (MHT) were incorporated into cement mortars with two dosage levels (replacing 5% and 10% cement by mass). Designated testing programme including strength test, porosity test, and rapid chloride migration and diffusion test were employed to

  9. Effect of Nanosilica Particle Size on the Water Permeability, Abrasion Resistance, Drying Shrinkage, and Repair Work Properties of Cement Mortar Containing Nano-SiO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sattawat Haruehansapong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the effect of nanosilica particle sizes on durability properties and repair work properties of cement mortar containing nanosilica (NS. Three different NS particle sizes of 12, 20, and 40 nm were used and compared with those of cement mortar without NS and cement mortar with silica fume (SF. Interesting results were obtained in which the particle size of NS affected directly the abrasion resistance and water permeability. NS with particle size of 40 nm is the optimum size and gave the highest abrasion resistance and water permeability. For repair work properties, cement mortars containing NS (12 and 20 nm and SF experienced higher drying shrinkage than that of cement mortar without NS and then presented cracking behavior and debonding between the cement mortars and concrete substrate. Cement mortar containing 40 nm of NS gave the lowest drying shrinkage, the lowest crack number, and the highest adhesive strength. These results indicate that the particle size of NS affected not only the durability properties but also the repair work properties of cement mortar.

  10. Characterization of sodium dodecyl sulfate-resistant proteolytic activity in the hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrococcus furiosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumentals, I.I.; Robinson, A.S.; Kelly, R.M. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1990-07-01

    Cell extracts from Pyrococcus furiosus were found to contain five proteases, two of which (S66 and S102) are resistant to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) denaturation. Cell extracts incubated at 98{degree}C in the presence of 1% SDS for 24 h exhibited substantial cellular proteolysis such that only four proteins could be visualized by amido black-Coomassie brilliant blue staining of SDS-polyacrylamide gels. The SDS-treated extract retained 19% of the initial proteolytic activity as represented by two proteases, S66 (66 kilodaltons (kDa)) and S102 (102 kDa). Immunoblot analysis with guinea pig sera containing antibodies against protease S66 indicated that S66 is related neither to S102 nor to the other proteases. The results of this analysis also suggest that S66 might be the hydrolysis product of a 200-kDa precursor which does not have proteolytic activity. The 24-h SDS-treated extract showed unusually thermostable proteolytic activity; the measured half-life at 98{degree}C was found to be 33 h. Proteases S66 and S102 were also resistant to denaturation by 8 M urea, 80 mM dithiothreitol, and 5% {beta}-mercaptoethanol. Purified protease S66 was inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and diisopropyl fluorophosphate but not by EDTA, ethylene glycol-bis({beta}-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N{prime},N{prime}-tetraacetic acid, or iodoacetic acid. These results indicate that S66 is a serine protease. Amino acid ester hydrolysis studies showed that protease S66 was hydrolytically active towards N-benzoyl-L-arginine ethyl ester.

  11. Spectroscopic investigation of Ni speciation in hardened cement paste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vespa, M; Dähn, R; Grolimund, D; Wieland, E; Scheidegger, A M

    2006-04-01

    Cement-based materials play an important role in multi-barrier concepts developed worldwide for the safe disposal of hazardous and radioactive wastes. Cement is used to condition and stabilize the waste materials and to construct the engineered barrier systems (container, backfill, and liner materials) of repositories for radioactive waste. In this study, Ni uptake by hardened cement paste has been investigated with the aim of improving our understanding of the immobilization process of heavy metals in cement on the molecular level. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) coupled with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) techniques were used to determine the local environment of Ni in cement systems. The Ni-doped samples were prepared at two different water/cement ratios (0.4, 1.3) and different hydration times (1 hour to 1 year) using a sulfate-resisting Portland cement. The metal loadings and the metal salts added to the system were varied (50 up to 5000 mg/kg; NO3(-), SO4(2-), Cl-). The XAS study showed that for all investigated systems Ni(ll) is predominantly immobilized in a layered double hydroxide (LDH) phase, which was corroborated by DRS measurements. Only a minor extent of Ni(ll) precipitates as Ni-hydroxides (alpha-Ni(OH)2 and beta-Ni(OH)2). This finding suggests that Ni-Al LDH, rather than Ni-hydroxides, is the solubility-limiting phase in the Ni-doped cement system.

  12. Characterisation of Ba(OH){sub 2}–Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–blast furnace slag cement-like composites for the immobilisation of sulfate bearing nuclear wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mobasher, Neda; Bernal, Susan A.; Hussain, Oday H. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Apperley, David C. [Solid-State NMR Group, Department of Chemistry, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Kinoshita, Hajime [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Provis, John L., E-mail: j.provis@sheffield.ac.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Soluble sulfate ions in nuclear waste can have detrimental effects on cementitious wasteforms and disposal facilities based on Portland cement. As an alternative, Ba(OH){sub 2}–Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–blast furnace slag composites are studied for immobilisation of sulfate-bearing nuclear wastes. Calcium aluminosilicate hydrate (C–A–S–H) with some barium substitution is the main binder phase, with barium also present in the low solubility salts BaSO{sub 4} and BaCO{sub 3}, along with Ba-substituted calcium sulfoaluminate hydrates, and a hydrotalcite-type layered double hydroxide. This reaction product assemblage indicates that Ba(OH){sub 2} and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} act as alkaline activators and control the reaction of the slag in addition to forming insoluble BaSO{sub 4}, and this restricts sulfate availability for further reaction as long as sufficient Ba(OH){sub 2} is added. An increased content of Ba(OH){sub 2} promotes a higher degree of reaction, and the formation of a highly cross-linked C–A–S–H gel. These Ba(OH){sub 2}–Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–blast furnace slag composite binders could be effective in the immobilisation of sulfate-bearing nuclear wastes.

  13. Fracture resistance of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing ceramic crowns cemented on solid abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stona, Deborah; Burnett, Luiz Henrique; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2015-07-01

    Because no information was found in the dental literature regarding the fracture resistance of all-ceramic crowns using CEREC (Sirona) computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) system on solid abutments, the authors conducted a study. Sixty synOcta (Straumann) implant replicas and regular neck solid abutments were embedded in acrylic resin and randomly assigned (n = 20 per group). Three types of ceramics were used: feldspathic, CEREC VITABLOCS Mark II (VITA); leucite, IPS Empress CAD (Ivoclar Vivadent); and lithium disilicate, IPS e.max CAD (Ivoclar Vivadent). The crowns were fabricated by the CEREC CAD-CAM system. After receiving glaze, the crowns were cemented with RelyX U200 (3M ESPE) resin cement under load of 1 kilogram. For each ceramic, one-half of the specimens were subjected to the fracture resistance testing in a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1 millimeter per minute, and the other half were subjected to the fractured resistance testing after 1,000,000 cyclic fatigue loading at 100 newtons. According to a 2-way analysis of variance, the interaction between the material and mechanical cycling was significant (P = .0001). According to a Tukey test (α = .05), the fracture resistance findings with or without cyclic fatigue loading were as follows, respectively: CEREC VITABLOCKS Mark II (405 N/454 N) was statistically lower than IPS Empress CAD (1169 N/1240 N) and IPS e.max CAD (1378 N/1025 N) (P Empress CAD and IPS e.max CAD did not differ statistically (P > .05). According to a t test, there was no statistical difference in the fracture resistance with and without cyclic fatigue loading for CEREC VITABLOCS Mark II and IPS Empress CAD (P > .05). For IPS e.max CAD, the fracture resistance without cyclic fatigue loading was statistically superior to that obtained with cyclic fatigue loading (P Empress CAD and IPS e.max CAD showed higher fracture resistance compared with CEREC VITABLOCS Mark II. The cyclic

  14. The confused world of sulfate attack on concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neville, Adam

    2004-01-01

    External sulfate attack is not completely understood. Part I identifies the issues involved, pointing out disagreements, and distinguishes between the mere occurrence of chemical reactions of sulfates with hydrated cement paste and the damage or deterioration of concrete; only the latter are taken to represent sulfate attack. Furthermore, sulfate attack is defined as deleterious action involving sulfate ions; if the reaction is physical, then, it is physical sulfate attack that takes place. The discussion of the two forms of sulfate attack leads to a recommendation for distinct nomenclature. Sulfate attack on concrete structures in service is not widespread, and the amount of laboratory-based research seems to be disproportionately large. The mechanisms of attack by different sulfates--sodium, calcium, and magnesium--are discussed, including the issue of topochemical and through-solution reactions. The specific aspects of the action of magnesium sulfate are discussed, and the differences between laboratory conditions and field exposure are pointed out. Part II discusses the progress of sulfate attack and its manifestations. This is followed by a discussion of making sulfate-resisting concrete. One of the measures is to use Type V cement, and this topic is extensively discussed. Likewise, the influence of w/c on sulfate resistance is considered. The two parameters are not independent of one another. Moreover, the cation in the sulfate salt has a strong bearing on the efficiency of the Type V cement. Recent interpretations of the Bureau of Reclamation tests, both long term and accelerated, are evaluated, and it appears that they need reworking. Part III reviews the standards and guides for the classification of the severity of exposure of structures to sulfates and points out the lack of calibration of the various classes of exposure. A particular problem is the classification of soils because much depends on the extraction ratio of sulfate in the soil: there is a

  15. Can Electrical Resistance Tomography be used for imaging unsaturated moisture flow in cement-based materials with discrete cracks?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyl, Danny; Rashetnia, Reza; Seppänen, Aku; Pour-Ghaz, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Previously, it has been shown that Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) can be used for monitoring moisture flow in undamaged cement-based materials. In this work, we investigate whether ERT could be used for imaging three-dimensional (3D) unsaturated moisture flow in cement-based materials that contain discrete cracks. Novel computational methods based on the so-called absolute imaging framework are developed and used in ERT image reconstructions, aiming at a better tolerance of the reconstructed images with respect to the complexity of the conductivity distribution in cracked material. ERT is first tested using specimens with physically simulated cracks of known geometries, and corroborated with numerical simulations of unsaturated moisture flow. Next, specimens with loading-induced cracks are imaged; here, ERT reconstructions are evaluated qualitatively based on visual observations and known properties of unsaturated moisture flow. Results indicate that ERT is a viable method of visualizing 3D unsaturated moisture flow in cement-based materials with discrete cracks. - Highlights: • 3D EIT is developed to visualize water ingress in cracked mortar. • Mortar with different size discrete cracks are used. • The EIT results are corroborated with numerical simulations. • EIT results accurately show the temporal and spatial variation of water content. • EIT is shown to be a viable method to monitor flow in cracks and matrix.

  16. Estimation of Frost Resistance of the Tile Adhesive on a Cement Based with Application of Amorphous Aluminosilicates as a Modifying Additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovna Loganina, Valentina; Vladimirovna Zhegera, Christina

    2017-10-01

    In the article given information on the possibility of using amorphous aluminosilicates as a modifying additive in the offered tile cement adhesive. In the article, the data on the preparation of an additive based on amorphous aluminosilicates, on its microstructure and chemical composition. Presented information on the change in the porosity of cement stone when introduced of amorphous aluminosilicates in the his composition. The formulation of a dry building mix on a cement base is proposed with use of an additive based on amorphous aluminosilicates as a modifying additive. Recipe of dry adhesive mixes include Portland cement M400, mineral aggregate in proportion fraction 0.63-0.315:0.315-0.14 respectively 80:20 (%) and filling density of 1538.2 kg/m3, a plasticizer Kratasol, redispersible powder Neolith P4400 and amorphous alumnosilicates. The developed formulation can be used as a tile adhesive for finishing walls of buildings and structure with tiles. Presented results of the evaluation of frost resistance of adhesives based on cement with using of amorphous aluminosilicates as a modifying additive. Installed the mark on the frost resistance of tile glue and frost resistance of the contact zone of adhesive. Established, that the adhesive layer based on developed formulation dry mixture is crack-resistant and frost-resistant for conditions city Penza and dry humidity zone - zone 3 and climatic subarea IIB (accordance with Building codes and regulations 23-01-99Ȋ) cities Russia’s.

  17. Feasibility of sulfate-calcined eggshells for removing pathogenic bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes from landfill leachates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Mao; Sun, Mingming; Chen, Xu; Feng, Yanfang; Wan, Jinzhong; Liu, Kuan; Tian, Da; Liu, Manqiang; Wu, Jun; Schwab, Arthur P; Jiang, Xin

    2017-05-01

    High abundance of human pathogen and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in landfill leachate has become an emerging threat against human health. Therefore, sulfate- and calcination-modified eggshells as green agricultural bioresource were applied to test the feasibility of removing pathogenic bacteria and ARGs from leachate. The highest removal of Escherichia coli (E. coil) and gentamycin resistant gene (gmrA) from artificial contaminated landfill leachate was achieved by the application of eggshell with combined treatment of sulfate and calcination. The 16S and gmrA gene copies of E. coil declined significantly from 1.78E8±8.7E6 and 4.12E8±5.9E6 copies mL -1 to 1.32E7±2.6E6 and 2.69E7±7.2E6 copies mL -1 , respectively, within 24h dynamic adsorption equilibrium process (ppathogenic bacteria and ARGs (tet, sul, erm, qnr, and ampC) indicated its great efficiency to purify landfill leachates. This study demonstrated that sulfate-calcined eggshells can be an environmentally-friendly and highly efficient bioadsorbent to the management of reducing dissemination risk of pathogen and ARGs in landfill leachate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Strength and wear resistance of a dental glass-ionomer cement with a novel nanofilled resin coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohbauer, Ulrich; Krämer, Norbert; Siedschlag, Gustavo; Schubert, Edward W; Lauerer, Brigitte; Müller, Frank A; Petschelt, Anselm; Ebert, Johannes

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the influence of different resin coating protocols on the fracture strength and wear resistance of a commercial glass-ionomer cement (GIC). A new restorative concept [Equia (GC Europe)] has been introduced as a system application consisting of a condensable GIC (Fuji IX GP Extra) and a novel nanofilled resin coating material (G-Coat Plus). Four-point fracture strength (FS, 2 x 2 x 25 mm, 14-day storage, distilled water, 37 degrees C) were produced and measured from three experimental protocols: no coating GIC (Group 1), GIC coating before water contamination (Group 2), GIC coating after water contamination (Group 3). The strength data were analyzed using Weibull statistics. Three-body wear resistance (Group 1 vs. Group 2) was measured after each 10,000 wear cycles up to a total of 200,000 cycles using the ACTA method. GIC microstructure and interfaces between GIC and coating materials were investigated under SEM and CLSM. The highest FS of 26.1 MPa and the most homogenous behavior (m = 7.7) has been observed in Group 2. The coated and uncoated GIC showed similar wear resistance until 90,000 cycles. After 200,000 wear cycles, the coated version showed significantly higher wear rate (ANOVA, P< 0.05). The coating protocol has been shown to determine the GIC fracture strength. Coating after water contamination and air drying is leading to surface crack formation thus significantly reducing the FS. The resin coating showed a proper sealing of GIC surface porosities and cracks. In terms of wear, the coating did not improve the wear resistance of the underlying cement as similar or higher wear rates have been measured for Group 1 versus Group 2.

  19. Properies of binder systems containing cement, fly ash, and limestone powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krittiya Kaewmanee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Fly ash and limestone powder are two major widely available cement replacing materials in Thailand. However, the current utilization of these materials is still not optimized due to limited information on properties of multi-binder systems. This paper reports on the mechanical and durability properties of mixtures containing cement, fly ash, and limestone powder as single, binary, and ternary binder systems. The results showed that a single binder system consisting of only cement gave the best carbonation resistance. A binary binder system with fly ash exhibited superior performances in long-term compressive strength and many durability properties except carbonation and magnesium sulfate resistances, while early compressive strength of a binary binder system with limestone powder was excellent. The ternary binder system, taking the most benefit of selective cement replacing materials, yielded, though not the best, satisfactory performances in almost all properties. Thus, the optimization of binders can be achieved through a multi-binder system.

  20. Evaluation of the fracture resistance of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing monolithic crowns prepared in different cement thicknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagsoz, N Polat; Yanıkoglu, N

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fracture resistance of monolithic computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) crowns that are prepared with different cement thickness. For this investigation, a human maxillary premolar tooth was selected. Master model preparation was performed with a demand bur under water spray. Master die was taken to fabricate 105 epoxy resin replicas. The crowns were milled using a CEREC 4 CAD/CAM system (Software Version, 4.2.0.57192). CAD/CAM crowns were made using resin nanoceramic, feldspathic glass ceramic, lithium disilicate, and leucite-reinforced ceramics. Each group was subdivided into three groups in accordance with three different cement thicknesses (30, 90, and 150 μm). Crowns milled out. Then RelyX ™ U200 was used as a luting agent to bond the crowns to the prepared samples. After one hour cementations, the specimens were stored in water bath at 37°C for 1 week before testing. Seven unprepared and unrestored teeth were kept and tested as a control group. A universal test machine was used to assume the fracture resistance of all specimens. The compressive load (N) that caused fracture was recorded for each specimen. Fracture resistance data were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA and two-factor interaction modeling test (α = 0.001). There are statistically significant differences between fracture resistances of CAD/CAM monolithic crown materials (P cement thickness is not statistically significant for fracture resistance of CAD/CAM monolithic crowns (P > 0.001). CAD/CAM monolithic crown materials affected fracture resistance. Cement thickness (30, 90, and 150 μm) was not effective on fracture resistance of CAD/CAM monolithic crowns.

  1. Study on strength estimation of soil cement used in the embedded pile method by electrical resistivity measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochida, Y.; Sakurai, Y.; Indra, H.; Karimi, A. L.

    2017-11-01

    Problems caused by poor quality control and quality assurance of the pre-boring embedded pile construction, such as on domestic apartment house is still occurring nowadays. An adequate consideration for invisible risks inside or below the ground is important in pile foundation construction therefore the demand for advanced and reliable quality assurance is increase in the future. In this research, to understand the quality of the construction at early stage, the compressive strength of cement-soil mixture of pile construction after 28 days is estimated using electrical resistivity value of the mixture. More accurate measurement for electrical resistivity value is conducted by inserting the electrodes without using potassium chloride solution as a catalyst. The result showed that there is a certain tendency in the electric resistivity value at the early age regarding to the type of soil (sand, clay) mixed in. The most accurate estimation was achieved from the electric resistivity value at the first day and several days onwards, and from the compressive strength after 3 days.

  2. Sulfated Zirconia as Alkali-Resistant Support for Catalytic NOx Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The use of bio-fuels as alternatives to traditional fossil fuels has attracted much attention recent years since bio-fuels belong to a family of renewable types of energy sources and do not contribute to the green-house effect. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with ammonia as reductant ...... interact with potassium stronger than active metal species. Among potential carriers, sulfated zirconia is of high interest because its acidic and textural properties can be modified by varying preparation conditions....

  3. Preparation of metal-resistant immobilized sulfate reducing bacteria beads for acid mine drainage treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingliang; Wang, Haixia; Han, Xuemei

    2016-07-01

    Novel immobilized sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) beads were prepared for the treatment of synthetic acid mine drainage (AMD) containing high concentrations of Fe, Cu, Cd and Zn using up-flow anaerobic packed-bed bioreactor. The tolerance of immobilized SRB beads to heavy metals was significantly enhanced compared with that of suspended SRB. High removal efficiencies of sulfate (61-88%) and heavy metals (>99.9%) as well as slightly alkaline effluent pH (7.3-7.8) were achieved when the bioreactor was fed with acidic influent (pH 2.7) containing high concentrations of multiple metals (Fe 469 mg/L, Cu 88 mg/L, Cd 92 mg/L and Zn 128 mg/L), which showed that the bioreactor filled with immobilized SRB beads had tolerance to AMD containing high concentrations of heavy metals. Partially decomposed maize straw was a carbon source and stabilizing agent in the initial phase of bioreactor operation but later had to be supplemented by a soluble carbon source such as sodium lactate. The microbial community in the bioreactor was characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing of partial 16S rDNA genes. Synergistic interaction between SRB (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans) and co-existing fermentative bacteria could be the key factor for the utilization of complex organic substrate (maize straw) as carbon and nutrients source for sulfate reduction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Corrosion rate of rebars from linear polarization resistance and destructive analysis in blended cement concrete after chloride loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Peelen, W.H.A.; Bertolini, L.; Guerriere, M.

    2002-01-01

    Concrete specimens with various binders including Portland cement, fly ash, blast furnace slag and composite cement and three water-to-cement ratios were subjected to cyclic wetting with salt solution and drying. Specimens contained six mild steel bars at two cover depths and two activated titanium

  5. Acute intraoperative reactions during the injection of calcium sulfate bone cement for the treatment of unicameral bone cysts: a review of four cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nystrom, Lukas; Raw, Robert; Buckwalter, Joseph; Morcuende, Jose A

    2008-01-01

    Unicameral bone cysts can predispose patients to pathologic fracture and deformities of growth. Treatment options vary from continuous decompression with transcortical placement of a cannulated screw to percutaneous aspiration and injection of medical-grade calcium sulfate. From 2005 to 2007, we treated 22 patients with unicameral bone cysts using aspiration and injection of calcium sulfate. Three patients experienced acute laryngospasm and one patient developed tachyarrhythmia, temporarily, associated with injection of calcium sulfate. All reactions occurred in patients under age 18 without predisposing risk factors and resolved spontaneously with supportive care. Although the mechanism is unclear, we hypothesize that these reactions are either due to the nociceptive stimulus of the calcium sulfate injection or a systemic calcium bolus. Clinicians using this product for this indication should be aware that such reactions may occur. We suggest endotracheal intubation and communication to the anesthesiologist about the time of the injection in preparation for these idiopathic responses. Further research is necessary to determine exactly how this reaction occurs and how it can be avoided.

  6. Effectiveness of 5-Pyrrolidone-2-carboxylic Acid and Copper Sulfate Pentahydrate Association against Drug Resistant Staphylococcus Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Governa, Paolo; Miraldi, Elisabetta; De Fina, Gianna; Biagi, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial resistance is an ongoing challenge for pharmacotherapy and pharmaceutical chemistry. Staphylococcus aureus is the bacterial species which makes it most difficult to treat skin and soft tissue infections and it is seen in thousands of hospitalization cases each year. Severe but often underrated infectious diseases, such as complicated nasal infections, are primarily caused by MRSA and S. epidermidis too. With the aim of studying new drugs with antimicrobial activity and effectiveness on drug resistant Staphylococcus strains, our attention in this study was drawn on the activity of a new association between two natural products: 5-pyrrolidone-2-carboxylic acid (PCA), naturally produced by certain Lactobacillus species, and copper sulfate pentahydrate (CS). The antimicrobial susceptibility test was conducted taking into account 12 different Staphylococcus strains, comprising 6 clinical isolates and 6 resistant strains. PCA 4%, w/w, and CS 0.002%, w/w, association in distilled water solution was found to have bactericidal activity against all tested strains. Antimicrobial kinetics highlighted that PCA 4%, w/w, and CS 0.002% association could reduce by 5 log10 viable bacterial counts of MRSA and oxacillin resistant S. epidennidis in less than 5 and 3 minutes respectively. Microscopic investigations suggest a cell wall targeting mechanism of action. Being very safe and highly tolerated, the natural product PCA and CS association proved to be a promising antimicrobial agent to treat Staphylococcus related infections.

  7. Freeze-Thaw Performance and Moisture-Induced Damage Resistance of Base Course Stabilized with Slow Setting Bitumen Emulsion-Portland Cement Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Shojaei Baghini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Freeze-thaw (FT cycles and moisture susceptibility are important factors influencing the geotechnical characteristics of soil-aggregates. Given the lack of published information on the behavior of cement-bitumen emulsion-treated base (CBETB under environmental conditions, especially freezing and thawing, this study investigated the effects of these additives on the CBETB performance. The primary goal was to evaluate the resistance of CBETB to moisture damage by performing FT, Marshall conditioning, and AASHTO T-283 tests and to evaluate the long-term stripping susceptibility of CBETB while also predicting the liquid antistripping additives to assess the mixture’s durability and workability. Specimens were stabilized with Portland cement (0%–6%, bitumen emulsion (0%–5%, and Portland cement-bitumen emulsion mixtures and cured for 7 days, and their short- and long-term performances were studied. Evaluation results of both the Marshall stability ratio and the tensile strength ratio show that the additions of additives increase the resistance of the mixtures to moisture damage. Results of durability tests performed for determining the resistance of compacted specimens to repeated FT cycles indicate that the specimen with the 4% cement-3% bitumen emulsion mixture significantly improves water absorption, volume changes, and weight losses. This indicates the effectiveness of this additive as a road base stabilizer with excellent engineering properties for cold regions.

  8. Corrosion of metal containers containing cemented radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffo, G.S.; Farina, S.B.; Schulz, F.M.; Marotta, F

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear activities generate different kinds of radioactive wastes. In the case of Argentina, wastes classified as low and medium level are conditioned in metal drums for final disposal in a repository whose design is based on the use of multiple and independent barriers. Nuclear energy plants generate a large volume of mid-level radioactive wastes, consisting mainly of ion-exchange resins contaminated by fission products. Other contaminated products such as gloves, papers, clothing, rubber and plastic tubing, can be incinerated and the ashes from the combustion also constitute wastes that must be disposed of. These wastes (resins and ashes) must be immobilized in order to avoid the release of radionuclides into the environment. The wastes usually undergo a process of cementing to immobilize them. This work aims to systematically study the process of degradation by corrosion of the steel drums in contact with the cemented resins and with the ashes cemented with the addition of different types and concentrations of aggressive compounds (chloride and sulfate). The specimens are configured so that the parameters of interest for the steel in contact with the cemented materials can be measured. The variables of corrosion potential, electric resistivity of the matrix and polarization resistance (PR) were monitored and show that the presence of chloride increases the susceptibility to corrosion of the drum steel that is in contact with the cement resin matrix

  9. Development of high-performance blended cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zichao

    2000-10-01

    This thesis presents the development of high-performance blended cements from industrial by-products. To overcome the low-early strength of blended cements, several chemicals were studied as the activators for cement hydration. Sodium sulfate was discovered as the best activator. The blending proportions were optimized by Taguchi experimental design. The optimized blended cements containing up to 80% fly ash performed better than Type I cement in strength development and durability. Maintaining a constant cement content, concrete produced from the optimized blended cements had equal or higher strength and higher durability than that produced from Type I cement alone. The key for the activation mechanism was the reaction between added SO4 2- and Ca2+ dissolved from cement hydration products.

  10. Radioactive waste cementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soriano B, A.

    1996-01-01

    This research was carried out to develop the most adequate technique to immobilize low and medium-activity radioactive waste. different brands of national cement were used, portland and pozzolanic cement. Prismatic and cylindrical test tubes were prepared with different water/cement (W/C) relationship. Additives such a as clay and bentonite were added in some other cases. Later, the properties of these test tubes were evaluated. Properties such as: mechanical resistance, immersion resistance, lixiviation and porosity resistance. Cement with the highest mechanical resistance values, 62,29 MPa was pozzolanic cement for a W/C relationship of 0,35. It must be mentioned that the other types of cements reached a mechanical resistance over 10 MPa, a value indicated by the international standards for transportation and storage of low and medium-activity radioactive waste at a superficial level. However, in the case of immersion resistance, Sol cement (portland type I) with a W/C relationship of 0,35 reached a compression resistance over 61,92 MPa; as in the previous cases, the other cements reached a mechanical resistance > 10 MPa. Regarding porosity, working with W/C relationships = 0,35 0,40 and 0,45, without additives and with additives, the percentage of porosity found for all cements is lower than 40% percentage indicated by international standards. With regard to the lixiviation test, pozzolanic cement best retained Cesium-137 and Cobalt-60, and increased its advantages when bentonite was added, obtaining a lixiviation rate of 2,02 x E-6 cm/day. Sol cement also improved its properties when bentonite was added and obtained a lixiviation rate of 2,84 x E-6 cm/day for Cesium-137. However, Cobalt-60 is almost completely retained with the 3 types of cement with or without additives, reaching the limits indicated by the international standards for the lixiviation rate of beta-gamma emitter < 5,00E-4 cm/day. Characterizing the final product involves the knowledge of its

  11. Barium aluminate cement: its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozdz, M.; Wolek, W.

    1975-01-01

    The technology of manufacturing barium aluminate cement from barium sulfate and alumina, using a rotary kiln for firing the clinker is described. The method of granulation of the homogenized charge was used. Conditions of using the ''to mud'' method in industry were indicated. The physical and chemical properties of barium aluminate cement are determined and the quality of several batches of cement prepared on a semi-industrial scale and their suitability for making highly refractory concretes are tested. The optimal composition of the concretes is determined as a function of the mixing water and barium aluminate cement contents. Several experimental batches of concretes were used in the linings of furnaces in the steel industry. The suitability of these cements for use in fields other than steelmaking is examined. It is established that calcium aluminate cement has certain limited applications [fr

  12. Use of Biomass as a Sustainable and Green Fuel with Alkali-Resistant DeNOx Catalysts based on Sulfated or Tungstated Zirconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due-Hansen, Johannes; Fehrmann, Rasmus; Christensen, Claus H.

    poisons is the use of supports with highly acidic properties, which would interact stronger with potassium than the vanadium species. Among those, sulfated and tungstated zirconica appears very attractive, since their surface acidity can be tuned in a wide range by varying the preparation procedure, WOX......, sulfated, and tungstated zirconia were prepared and tested. The influence of potassium additives on the acidity and activity was studied and the results were compared with traditional V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalyst. Resistance of the catalysts towards poisoning with potassium was found to depend dramatically...... on the crystallinity and surface acidity of the support used. Better resistance of the samples based on sulfated and tungstated zirconia seems to be connected with the fact that a significant part of the potassium on the surface of the catalyst preferentially interact with strong acid sites of the support thus...

  13. Microstructural and Microanalytical Study on Concrete Exposed to the Sulfate Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Fang; Beixing, Li; Jiangang, Yin; Xiaolu, Yuan

    2017-11-01

    Microstructural properties have been examined to investigate the effect of mineral admixtures on the sulfate resistance of concrete. Concrete and cement paste specimens made with ordinary Portland cement (OPC) or ordinary Portland cement incorporating 20% fly ash (FA) or 30% ground blast furnace slag (GBFS), were made and exposed to 250 cycles of the cyclic sulfate environment. Microstructural and Microanalytical study was conducted by means of x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). Results indicate that the pore structure of concrete after sulfate exposure possesses the fractal feature. The OPC concrete presents more complex pore internal surface, higher porosity and less micro-pores than the concrete incorporating fly ash and GBFS. Portlandite in OPC concrete and OPC-FA concrete is mainly converted to gypsum; while for OPC-GBFS concrete, both gypsum and ettringite are formed. In the cyclic sulfate environment, repeated hydration and dehydration of sulfates produce the expansive stress in pores, aggravating the demolishment of concrete structure.

  14. Studies on sulfate attack: Mechanisms, test methods, and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhanam, Manu

    The objective of this research study was to investigate various issues pertaining to the mechanism, testing methods, and modeling of sulfate attack in concrete. The study was divided into the following segments: (1) effect of gypsum formation on the expansion of mortars, (2) attack by the magnesium ion, (3) sulfate attack in the presence of chloride ions---differentiating seawater and groundwater attack, (4) use of admixtures to mitigate sulfate attack---entrained air, sodium citrate, silica fume, and metakaolin, (5) effects of temperature and concentration of the attack solution, (6) development of new test methods using concrete specimens, and (7) modeling of the sulfate attack phenomenon. Mortar specimens using portland cement (PC) and tricalcium silicate (C 3S), with or without mineral admixtures, were prepared and immersed in different sulfate solutions. In addition to this, portland cement concrete specimens were also prepared and subjected to complete and partial immersion in sulfate solutions. Physical measurements, chemical analyses and microstructural studies were performed periodically on the specimens. Gypsum formation was seen to cause expansion of the C3S mortar specimens. Statistical analyses of the data also indicated that the quantity of gypsum was the most significant factor controlling the expansion of mortar bars. The attack by magnesium ion was found to drive the reaction towards the formation of brucite. Decalcification of the C-S-H and its subsequent conversion to the non-cementitious M-S-H was identified as the mechanism of destruction in magnesium sulfate attack. Mineral admixtures were beneficial in combating sodium sulfate attack, while reducing the resistance to magnesium sulfate attack. Air entrainment did not change the measured physical properties, but reduced the visible distress of the mortars. Sodium citrate caused a substantial reduction in the rate of damage of the mortars due to its retarding effect. Temperature and

  15. Effects of the addition of micro silica on the durability of mortars exposed to the sodium sulfate attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasser, C.; Meriam, M.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a detailed experimental study on the sulfate attack of mortars of self compacting concrete, and the effectiveness of employs micro silica and limestone fillers in the minimization of the damage resulting from such an attack. The test solution used to supply the sulfate ions and the cations was the sodium sulfate solution 4.5%. The solution saturated with lime was employed as the reference solution. The main variables investigated in the study were the type of cement and mineral addition. The expansion measured on p rims of mortar of (40x40x160) millimeters was employed to estimate their durability after exposure to the sodium sulfate solution attack during 91 days-Specimens of mortars were visually examined to assess the extent of deterioration due to the sulfate attack. The x-ray diffraction was used to evaluate the microstructural nature of the sulfate attack. The test results proved that the use of micro silica had a beneficial effect on the expansion due to the sodium sulfate attack. While mortars with limestone filler have undergoes degradation even with the use of cement resistant to sulfates. (authors).

  16. An affinity adsorption media that mimics heparan sulfate proteoglycans for the treatment of drug-resistant bacteremia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrea, Keith R.; Ward, Robert S.

    2016-06-01

    Removal of several drug-resistant bacteria from blood by affinity adsorption onto a heparin-functional media is reported. Heparin is a chemical analogue of heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans, found on transmembrane proteins of endothelial cells. Many blood-borne human pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, parasites, and fungi have been reported to target HS as an initial step in their pathogenesis. Here, we demonstrate the binding and removal of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Extended-Spectrum Betalactamase Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL), and two Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (both CRE Escherichia coli and CRE K. pneumoniae) using 300 μm polyethylene beads surface modified with end-point-attached heparin. Depending on the specific bacteria, the amount removed ranged between 39% (ESBL) and 99.9% (CRE). The total amount of bacteria adsorbed ranged between 2.8 × 105 and 8.6 × 105 colony forming units (CFU) per gram of adsorption media. Based on a polymicrobial challenge which showed no competitive binding, MRSA and CRE apparently utilize different binding sequences on the immobilized heparin ligand. Since the total circulating bacterial load during bacteremia seldom exceeds 5 × 105 CFUs, it appears possible to significantly reduce bacterial concentration in infected patients by multi-pass recirculation of their blood through a small extracorporeal affinity filter containing the heparin-functional adsorption media. This 'dialysis-like therapy' is expected to improve patient outcomes and reduce the cost of care, particularly when there are no anti-infective drugs available to treat the infection.

  17. High-temperature Corrosion Resistance of Composite Coating Prepared by Micro-arc Oxidation Combined with Pack Cementation Aluminizing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUANG Zu-jiang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Al2O3 ceramic film was obtained by micro-arc oxidation (MAO process on Al/C103 specimen, which was prepared by pack cementation aluminizing technology on C103 niobium alloy. With the aid of XRD and SEM equipped with EDS, chemical compositions and microstructures of the composite coatings before and after high-temperature corrosion were analyzed. The behavior and mechanism of the composite coatings in high-temperature oxidation and hot corrosion were also investigated. The results indicate that oxidation mass gain at 1000℃ for 10h of the Al/C103 specimen is 6.98mg/cm2, and it is 2.89mg/cm2 of the MAO/Al/C103 specimen. However, the mass gain of MAO/Al/C103 specimen (57.52mg/cm2 is higher than that of Al/C103 specimen (28.08mg/cm2 after oxidation 20h. After hot corrosion in 75%Na2SO4 and 25%NaCl at 900℃ for 50h, the mass gain of Al/C103 and MAO/Al/C103 specimens are 70.54mg/cm2 and 55.71mg/cm2 respectively, Al2O3 and perovskite NaNbO3 phases are formed on the surface; the diffusion of molten salt is suppressed, due to part of NaNbO3 accumulated in the MAO micropores. Therefore, MAO/Al/C103 specimen exhibits better hot corrosion resistance.

  18. Resistance to bond degradation between dual-cure resin cements and pre-treated sintered CAD-CAM dental ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Raquel; Monticelli, Francesca; Osorio, Estrella; Toledano, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the bond stability of resin cements when luted to glass-reinforced alumina and zirconia CAD/CAM dental ceramics. Study design: Eighteen glass-infiltrated alumina and eighteen densely sintered zirconia blocks were randomly conditioned as follows: Group 1: No treatment; Group 2: Sandblasting (125 µm Al2O3-particles); and Group 3: Silica-coating (50 µm silica-modified Al2O3-particles). Composite samples were randomly bonded to the pre-treated ceramic surfaces using different resin cements: Subgroup 1: Clearfil Esthetic Cement (CEC); Subgroup 2: RelyX Unicem (RXU); and Subgroup 3: Calibra (CAL). After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into 1 ± 0.1 mm2 sticks. One-half of the beams were tested for microtensile bond strength (MTBS). The remaining one-half was immersed in 10 % NaOCl aqueous solution (NaOClaq) for 5 h before testing. The fracture pattern and morphology of the debonded surfaces were assessed with a field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM). A multiple ANOVA was conducted to analyze the contributions of ceramic composition, surface treatment, resin cement type, and chemical challenging to MTBS. The Tukey test was run for multiple comparisons (p ceramic interfacial longevity depended on cement selection rather than on surface pre-treatments. The MDP-containing and the self-adhesive resin cements were both suitable for luting CAD/CAM ceramics. Despite both cements being prone to degradation, RXU luted to zirconia or untreated or sandblasted alumina showed the most stable interfaces. CAL experimented spontaneous debonding in all tested groups. Key words:CAD/CAM ceramic, alumina, zirconia, resin cement, surface pre-treatment, sandblasting, silica-coating, chemical aging, bond degradation, microtensile bond strength. PMID:22322517

  19. Double-blind, randomized crossover study of intravenous infusion of magnesium sulfate versus 5% dextrose on depressive symptoms in adults with treatment-resistant depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi, Syed M A; Atlas, Steven E; Qadir, Sidra; Musselman, Dominique; Goldberg, Sharon; Woolger, Judi M; Corredor, Raul; Abbas, Muhammad H; Arosemena, Leopoldo; Caccamo, Simone; Campbell, Carmen S G; Farooqi, Ashar; Gao, Jinrun; Konefal, Janet; Lages, Lucas C; Lantigua, Laura; Lopez, Johanna; Padilla, Vanessa; Rasul, Ammar; Ray, Anna M; Simões, Herbert G; Tiozzo, Eduard; Lewis, John E

    2017-03-01

    Treatment-resistant depression patients are more likely to suffer from comorbid physical and mental disorders, experience marked and protracted functional impairment, and incur higher health-care costs than non-affected individuals. Magnesium sulfate is a treatment option that may offer great potential for patients with treatment-resistant depression based on prior work in animals and humans. Twelve subjects with mild or moderate treatment-resistant depression were randomized into a double-blind crossover trial to receive an infusion of 4 g of magnesium sulfate in 5% dextrose or placebo infusion of 5% dextrose with a 5-day washout in between the 8-day intervention period. Subjects were assessed before and after the intervention for serum and urine magnesium, lipid panel, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. We found a difference in serum magnesium from day 2 to 8 (pre-infusion) (P < 0.002) and from baseline to day 8 (P < 0.02). No changes were noted on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression or the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 24 h post-treatment, but as serum magnesium increased from baseline to day 7, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 decreased from baseline to day 7 (P = 0.02). Magnesium sulfate did not significantly affect depression 24 h post-infusion, but other results were consistent with the literature. The association between changes in serum magnesium and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 supports the idea that magnesium sulfate may be used to address treatment-resistant depression, an ongoing medical challenge. © 2016 The Authors Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2016 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  20. Resistance to fracture of endodontically treated premolars restored with glass ionomer cement or acid etch composite resin: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Ranga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Due to the weakness of endodontically treated posterior teeth requires more strengthened restoration to withstand occlusal forces. The purpose of the present study was to determine and compare the resistance to fracture of endodontically treated maxillary 1 st premolars restored with different materials in mesio-occluso-distal (MOD cavity preparations. Materials and Methods: MOD cavity preparations in 80 endodontically treated maxillary 1 st premolars were restored using four different methods. Fiber rings were filled with stone plaster and the teeth were placed into the plaster up to the level of cemento-enamel junction. The teeth were grouped according to restorative method, mounted in an Instrom T.T. machine, and the buccal walls subjected to a slowly increasing compressive force until fracture occurred. Result: The force of fracture of the walls of each tooth was recorded and the results in the various groups compared. All teeth fractured in a similar manner irrespective of the restorative method used. Conclusion: The resistance to the fracture of the teeth was the same when they were stored with glass ionomer cement as a base over which composite resin was placed. When the entire cavities were filled with glass ionomer cement, the resistance to fracture of the teeth decreased significantly compared with the acid etch resin technique.

  1. Mechano-Physical Properties and Microstructure of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Cement Paste after Thermal Load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeląg, Maciej

    2017-09-11

    The article presents the results obtained in the course of a study on the use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for the modification of a cement matrix. Carbon nanotubes were introduced into a cement paste in the form of an aqueous dispersion in the presence of a surfactant (SDS-sodium dodecyl sulfate), which was sonicated. The selected physical and mechanical parameters were examined, and the correlations between these parameters were determined. An analysis of the local microstructure of the modified cement pastes has been carried out using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray microanalysis (EDS). In addition, the effect of carbon nanotubes on the change in characteristics of the cementitious material exposed to the sudden, short-term thermal load, was determined. The obtained material was characterized by a much lower density than a traditional cement matrix because the phenomenon of foaming occurred. The material was also characterized by reduced durability, higher shrinkage, and higher resistance to the effect of elevated temperature. Further research on the carbon nanotube reinforced cement paste, with SDS, may contribute to the development of a modified cement binder for the production of a lightweight or an aerated concrete.

  2. Mechano-Physical Properties and Microstructure of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Cement Paste after Thermal Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The article presents the results obtained in the course of a study on the use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for the modification of a cement matrix. Carbon nanotubes were introduced into a cement paste in the form of an aqueous dispersion in the presence of a surfactant (SDS—sodium dodecyl sulfate), which was sonicated. The selected physical and mechanical parameters were examined, and the correlations between these parameters were determined. An analysis of the local microstructure of the modified cement pastes has been carried out using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray microanalysis (EDS). In addition, the effect of carbon nanotubes on the change in characteristics of the cementitious material exposed to the sudden, short-term thermal load, was determined. The obtained material was characterized by a much lower density than a traditional cement matrix because the phenomenon of foaming occurred. The material was also characterized by reduced durability, higher shrinkage, and higher resistance to the effect of elevated temperature. Further research on the carbon nanotube reinforced cement paste, with SDS, may contribute to the development of a modified cement binder for the production of a lightweight or an aerated concrete. PMID:28891976

  3. Influence of time addition of superplasticizers on the rheological properties of fresh cement pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiad, Ismail

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that the fluidity and the fluidity loss of fresh cement pastes are affected by the kind and the time of addition of organic admixtures. The influence of the time addition of two chemical admixtures, namely, melamine formaldehyde sulfonate (MFS) and naphthalene formaldehyde sulfonate (NFS), on the rheological properties of ordinary Portland and sulfate-resisting cement pastes through the first 120 min of hydration was investigated. The admixture addition was delayed by 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 min. Shear stress and apparent viscosity of the cement pastes were determined at different shear rates (3-146 s -1 ) and hydration times of 30, 60, 90, and 120 min. The concentration of Ca 2+ and the combined water content of the cement pastes were determined after 120 min. Yield stress and plastic viscosity values were also determined by using the Bingham model. The results show that an increase in the addition time of the admixture reduces the shear stress, the yield stress, and the plastic viscosity of the cement pastes at the early ages (15 min) as well as at later early ages (120 min). The optimum delaying time of admixture addition is found to be 10-15 min. This time does not depend on the cement and superplasticizer type

  4. Deicer scaling resistance of concrete mixtures containing slag cement. Phase 2 : evaluation of different laboratory scaling test methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    With the use of supplementary cementing materials (SCMs) in concrete mixtures, salt scaling tests such as ASTM C672 have been found to be overly aggressive and do correlate well with field scaling performance. The reasons for this are thought to be b...

  5. Evaluation Some Properties of NanoMetakaolin or Rice Husk Ash Cement Mortar and its Resistance to Elevated Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jassim Atiya Alwan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to find the optimum value of some properties like compressive, flexural strength of blended cement mortar by nanometakaolin ( NMK or rice husk ash (RHA and to evaluate the effect of high temperature on these properties. The ordinary Portland cement(OPC of mortar was partially substituted by NMK or RHA of 5,10,15 and 20% by weight of cement. (108 control and blended specimens were casted and tested at ambient temperature (33 ºC for compressive and flexural strength for 28 and 90 days. Another (270 of the control and blended specimens were casted and cured for 90 days and exposed to elevated temperature of a gradual increase in temperature up to 200 ºC,300 ºC, 400 ºC,600 ºC and 800 ºC for two hours in an electrical furnace and they were under the same previous tests. The test results at ambient temperature indicate that the optimum compressive and flexural strength was with ratio of 15% NMK cement replacement in mortar for 28 and 90 days but for RHA was ratio of 10% for 28 days and 15% of cement weight in mortar for 90 days compared to control specimens. The results of exposing control and blended specimens of (90 days to elevated temperature showed that the optimum strength for control and the best MK replacement ratio were found at 200 ºC, and the best RHA replacement ratio specimens was found at 300 ºC. It is also found that exposing the mortar to more than these temperatures destroyed its strength and it was detrimental to its properties.

  6. Fracture and Fatigue Resistance of Cemented versus Fused CAD-on Veneers over Customized Zirconia Implant Abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossair, Shereen Ahmed; Aboushelib, Moustafa N; Morsi, Tarek Salah

    2015-01-05

    To evaluate the fracture mechanics of cemented versus fused CAD-on veneers on customized zirconia implant abutments. Forty-five identical customized CAD/CAM zirconia implant abutments (0.5 mm thick) were prepared and seated on short titanium implant abutments (Ti base). A second scan was made to fabricate 45 CAD-on veneers (IPS Empress CAD, A2). Fifteen CAD-on veneers were cemented on the zirconia abutments (Panavia F2.0). Another 15 were fused to the zirconia abutments using low-fusing glass, while manually layered veneers served as control (n = 15). The restorations were subjected to artificial aging (3.2 million cycles between 5 and 10 kg in a water bath at 37°C) before being axially loaded to failure. Fractured specimens were examined using scanning electron microscopy to detect fracture origin, location, and size of critical crack. Stress at failure was calculated using fractography principles (alpha = 0.05). Cemented CAD-on restorations demonstrated significantly higher (F = 72, p CAD-on and manually layered restorations. Fractographic analysis of fractured specimens indicated that cemented CAD-on veneers failed due to radial cracks originating from the veneer/resin interface. Branching of the critical crack was observed in the bulk of the veneer. Fused CAD-on veneers demonstrated cohesive fracture originating at the thickest part of the veneer ceramic, while manually layered veneers failed due to interfacial fracture at the zirconia/veneer interface. Within the limitations of this study, cemented CAD-on veneers on customized zirconia implant abutments demonstrated higher fracture than fused and manually layered veneers. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  7. Solidification of low-level radioactive wastes in masonry cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, H.; Colombo, P.

    1987-03-01

    Portland cements are widely used as solidification agents for low-level radioactive wastes. However, it is known that boric acid wastes, as generated at pressurized water reactors (PWR's) are difficult to solidify using ordinary portland cements. Waste containing as little as 5 wt % boric acid inhibits the curing of the cement. For this purpose, the suitability of masonry cement was investigated. Masonry cement, in the US consists of 50 wt % slaked lime (CaOH 2 ) and 50 wt % of portland type I cement. Addition of boric acid in molar concentrations equal to or less than the molar concentration of the alkali in the cement eliminates any inhibiting effects. Accordingly, 15 wt % boric acid can be satisfactorily incorporated into masonry cement. The suitability of masonry cement for the solidification of sodium sulfate wastes produced at boiling water reactors (BWR's) was also investigated. It was observed that although sodium sulfate - masonry cement waste forms containing as much as 40 wt % Na 2 SO 4 can be prepared, waste forms with more than 7 wt % sodium sulfate undergo catastrophic failure when exposed to an aqueous environment. It was determined by x-ray diffraction that in the presence of water, the sulfate reacts with hydrated calcium aluminate to form calcium aluminum sulfate hydrate (ettringite). This reaction involves a volume increase resulting in failure of the waste form. Formulation data were identified to maximize volumetric efficiency for the solidification of boric acid and sodium sulfate wastes. Measurement of some of the waste form properties relevant to evaluating the potential for the release of radionuclides to the environment included leachability, compression strengths and chemical interactions between the waste components and masonry cement. 15 refs., 19 figs., 9 tabs

  8. Cement Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledge about the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including...... an overview of cement production, selected cement properties, and clinker phase relations. An extended summary of laboratory-scale investigations on clinkerization reactions, the most important reactions in cement production, is provided. Clinker formations by solid state reactions, solid−liquid and liquid......−liquid reactions are discussed, as are the influences of particles sizes on clinker phase formation. Furthermore, a mechanism for clinker phase formation in an industrial rotary kiln reactor is outlined....

  9. Nanoparticulate fillers improve the mechanical strength of bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomoll, Andreas H; Fitz, Wolfgang; Scott, Richard D; Thornhill, Thomas S; Bellare, Anuj

    2008-06-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA-) based bone cement contains micrometer-size barium sulfate or zirconium oxide particles to radiopacify the cement for radiographic monitoring during follow-up. Considerable effort has been expended to improve the mechanical qualities of cements, largely through substitution of PMMA with new chemical structures. The introduction of these materials into clinical practice has been complicated by concerns over the unknown long-term risk profile of these new structures in vivo. We investigated a new composite with the well characterized chemical composition of current cements, but with nanoparticles instead of the conventional, micrometer-size barium sulfate radiopacifier. In this study, we replaced the barium sulfate microparticles that are usually present in commercial PMMA cements with barium sulfate nanoparticles. The resultant "microcomposite" and "nanocomposite" cements were then characterized through morphological investigations such as ultra-small angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Mechanical characterization included compression, tensile, compact tension, and fatigue testing. SEM and USAXS showed excellent dispersion of nanoparticles. Substitution of nanoparticles for microparticles resulted in a 41% increase in tensile strain-to-failure (p = 0.002) and a 70% increase in tensile work-of-fracture (p = 0.005). The nanocomposite cement also showed a two-fold increase in fatigue life compared to the conventional, microcomposite cement. In summary, nanoparticulate substitution of radiopacifiers substantially improved the in vitro mechanical properties of PMMA bone cement without changing the known chemical composition.

  10. Corrosion resistance of sodium sulfate coated cobalt-chromium-aluminum alloys at 900 C, 1000 C, and 1100 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, G. J.

    1979-01-01

    The corrosion of sodium sulfate coated cobalt alloys was measured and the results compared to the cyclic oxidation of alloys with the same composition, and to the hot corrosion of compositionally equivalent nickel-base alloys. Cobalt alloys with sufficient aluminum content to form aluminum containing scales corrode less than their nickel-base counterparts. The cobalt alloys with lower aluminum levels form CoO scales and corrode more than their nickel-base counterparts which form NiO scales.

  11. Ensaio mecânico da resistência ao impacto do cimento ósseo puro e associado a duas drogas anestésicas locais Mechanical essay of impact resistance of acrylic bone cement used singly or the cement in combination with two local anesthetic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Giordano

    2007-07-01

    resistência entre os cimentos Simplex® e Biomecânica® para as medicações lidocaína (p = 0,13 e bupivacaína (p = 0,63. No cimento Simplex®, a associação com a bupivacaína apresentou resistência significativamente maior do que com a lidocaína e o polímero puro (p = 0,001 e p = 0,012, respectivamente. Não existe diferença significativa na resistência entre a lidocaína e o polímero puro para o cimento Simplex® (p = 0,39. No cimento Biomecânica®, a associação com a bupivacaína apresentou resistência significativamente maior do que com a lidocaína e o polímero puro (p = 0,0001 e p = 0,0001, respectivamente. Não existe diferença significativa na resistência entre a lidocaína e o polímero puro para o cimento Biomecânica® (p = 0,37. CONCLUSÃO: Nas condições estudadas, não há redução significativa da resistência ao impacto na combinação de cimento ortopédico com anestésicos locais.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the mechanical behavior of cement-local anesthetic combinations in vitro. METHODS: Two bone cements were tested (Simplex® and Biomecânica® with two anesthetic drugs (lidocaine and bupivacaine. Anesthetic drugs were added in powder form. The authors compared six groups based on the association between the cement and the drugs. Two grams of anesthetic were mixed with 40 g of acrylic cement powder. 60 prismatic molds were made, measuring 5 x 120 x 30 mm (n = 30 and 5 x 60 x 30 mm (n = 30. The molds were tested on a pendulum impact resistance apparatus. Statistical analysis was performed to verify the effect of bone cement (Simplex® and Biomecânica® and the medication (lidocaine, bupivacaine, and no combination on the strength of the molds, with a level of significance alpha = 5%. RESULTS: Statistical comparison showed a significant influence of the medication on bone strength (p = 0.0001. Tukey multiple comparison test demonstrated better strength with bupivacaine. CONCLUSION: Cement-bone combination does not harm the strength

  12. Evaluation of nitric and acetic acid resistance of cement mortars containing high-volume black rice husk ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatveera, B; Lertwattanaruk, P

    2014-01-15

    This paper presents the performance of cement mortar containing black rice husk ash (BRHA) under nitric and acetic acid attacks. The BRHA, collected from an electrical generating power plant that uses rice husk as fuel, was ground using a grinding machine. The compressive strength loss, weight loss, and expansion of mortars under nitric and acetic acid attack were investigated. The test results of BRHA properties in accordance with the ASTM C 618 standard found that the optimal grinding time was 4 h as this achieved a Blaine fineness of 5370 cm(2)/g. For parametric study, BRHA were used as a Portland cement Type 1 replacement at the levels of 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, and 50% by weight of binder. The water-to-binder ratios were 0.55, 0.60, and 0.65. From test results, when the percentage replacements of BRHA in cement increased, it was observed that the strength loss and weight loss of mortars containing BRHA under acetic acid attack were higher than those of the mortars against nitric acid attack. It was found that, of the various BHRA mortars, the strength loss and weight loss due to nitric and acetic acid attacks were the lowest in the mortar with 10% BRHA replacement. For 10%, 20% and 30% BRHA replacements, the rate of expansion of the BRHA mortar decreased when compared with the control mortar. For the mortars with other percentage replacements of BRHA, the rate of expansion increased. Furthermore, the effective water-to-binder ratios of control and BRHA mortars were the primary factor for determining the durability of mortar mixed with BRHA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of structural behaviour and corrosion resistant of austenitic AISI 304 and duplex AISI 2304 stainless steel reinforcements embedded in ordinary Portland cement mortars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, E.; Cobo, A.; Bastidas, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical and structural behaviour of two stainless steels reinforcements, with grades austenitic EN 1.4301 (AISI 304) and duplex EN 1.4362 (AISI 2304) have been studied, and compared with the conventional carbon steel B500SD rebar. The study was conducted at three levels: at rebar level, at section level and at structural element level. The different mechanical properties of stainless steel directly influence the behaviour at section level and structural element level. The study of the corrosion behaviour of the two stainless steels has been performed by electrochemical measurements, monitoring the corrosion potential and the lineal polarization resistance (LPR), of reinforcements embedded in ordinary Portland cement (OPC) mortar specimens contaminated with different amount of chloride over one year time exposure. Both stainless steels specimens embedded in OPC mortar remain in the passive state for all the chloride concentration range studied after one year exposure. (Author) 26 refs.

  14. Oxidation-resistant Ge-doped silicide coating on Cr-Cr2Nb alloys by pack cementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yirong

    1997-01-01

    The halide-activated pack cementation process was modified to produce a Ge-doped silicide diffusion coating on Cr-Cr 2 Nb alloys in a single processing step. The morphology and composition of the coating depended both on the pack composition and processing schedule and also on the composition and microstructure of the substrate. Higher Ge content in the pack suppressed the formation of CrSi 2 and reduced the growth kinetics of the coating. Ge was not homogeneously distributed in the coatings. Under cyclic and isothermal oxidation conditions, the Ge-doped silicide coating protected the Cr-Nb alloys from significant oxidation and from pesting by the formation of a Ge-doped silica film. (orig.)

  15. Sulfur Release from Cement Raw Materials during Solid Fuel Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Rooma; Larsen, Morten B.; Glarborg, Peter

    2011-01-01

    During combustion of solid fuels in the material inlet end of cement rotary kilns, local reducing conditions can occur and cause decomposition of sulfates from cement raw materials. Decomposition of sulfates is problematic because it increases the gas-phase SO2 concentration, which may cause...... deposit formation in the kiln system. SO2 release from cement raw materials during combustion of solid fuels has been studied experimentally in a high temperature rotary drum. The fuels were tire rubber, pine wood, petcoke, sewage sludge, and polypropylene. The SO2 release from the raw materials...

  16. The sulfated laminarin triggers a stress transcriptome before priming the SA- and ROS-dependent defenses during grapevine's induced resistance against Plasmopara viticola.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Gauthier

    Full Text Available Grapevine (Vitis vinifera is susceptible to many pathogens which cause significant losses to viticulture worldwide. Chemical control is available, but agro-ecological concerns have raised interest in alternative methods, especially in triggering plant immunity by elicitor treatments. The β-glucan laminarin (Lam and its sulfated derivative (PS3 have been previously demonstrated to induce resistance in grapevine against downy mildew (Plasmopara viticola. However, if Lam elicits classical grapevine defenses such as oxidative burst, pathogenesis-related (PR-proteins and phytoalexin production, PS3 triggered grapevine resistance via a poorly understood priming phenomenon. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular mechanisms of the PS3-induced resistance. For this purpose we studied i the signaling events and transcriptome reprogramming triggered by PS3 treatment on uninfected grapevine, ii grapevine immune responses primed by PS3 during P. viticola infection. Our results showed that i PS3 was unable to elicit reactive oxygen species (ROS production, cytosolic Ca(2+ concentration variations, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK activation but triggered a long lasting plasma membrane depolarization in grapevine cells, ii PS3 and Lam shared a common stress-responsive transcriptome profile that partly overlapped the salicylate- (SA and jasmonate-(JA-dependent ones. After P. viticola inoculation, PS3 specifically primed the SA- and ROS-dependent defense pathways leading to grapevine induced resistance against this biotroph. Interestingly pharmacological approaches suggested that the plasma membrane depolarization and the downstream ROS production are key events of the PS3-induced resistance.

  17. Resistência à compressão do solo-cimento com substituição parcial do cimento Portland por resíduo cerâmico moído Compressive strength of soil-cement with partial replacement of the Portland cement by crushed ceramic waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivanildo Dallacort

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho, apresenta-se o estudo experimental da resistência à compressão do solo-cimento, com substituição parcial do cimento Portland por resíduo cerâmico moído. Para tanto, foram ensaiados 81 espécimenes cilíndricos desse material à compressão, em que parte do cimento foi substituída por material cerâmico moído. Realizou-se uma programação fatorial, na qual três variáveis foram selecionadas para estudo: o teor de material ligante (cimento + resíduo cerâmico, a umidade do solo e o teor de resíduo cerâmico adicionado. É apresentado um estudo estatístico através de análise de variância da massa específica do material e da resistência a compressão. Tal estudo permitiu concluir-se que substituições de 25 e 57% do teor de cimento por material cerâmico podem produzir blocos de solo-cimento com resistências superiores a 2 MPa, com teor de material ligante de 6 e 8%, respectivamente.In this paper, an experimental study of the compressive strength of soil-cement with partial replacement of the Portland cement by crushed ceramic waste is presented and discussed. For this, eighty-one cylindrical specimens of soil-cement were tested, where part of cement percentage was replaced by crushed ceramic waste. The experiment was conducted in factorial design and three variables were selected and studied: the binding material content (cement + ceramic waste, soil moisture content and the ratio of ceramic waste. A statistical study using variance analysis of the specific mass and compressive strength of the material is presented. This study concluded that replacement ratios of 25 and 57% of the Portland cement by crushed ceramic material can be used to fabricate soil-cement bricks with strength higher than 2 MPa, for a binding material content of 6 and 8% respectively.

  18. Analysis of the mechanical resistance and porosity of a composite cement with EVA and reinforced with piacava fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, R.M.; Dominguez, D.S.; Alvim, R.C.; Iglesias, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, a lot of solid waste material is discarded into the environment. One of these residues is the EVA (Ethyl Vinyl Acetate) which has the footwear industry, as its main consumer. Studies are focused on the reusing of these materials, particularly in the civil construction, where is used as an aggregate in the production of light mortars. Due to the specific characteristics of lightweight concrete, is necessary to reinforce these materials. The palm Attalea Funifera Martius, known as piacava, may be an excellent alternative as a reinforcement element in light cement mixes. In this work, it's verified the mechanical strength of a composite lightweight cementitious with EVA and reinforced with Piacava fibers, also, the porosity of the new material was measured. To evaluate the mechanical properties of this new material was made mechanical tests and verified the importance of vegetal fibers as the material reinforcing. For the compound porosity evaluation, samples were studied using microcomputer tomography (μTC). With images processing techniques we identify and quantify the pores. The processing digital images through μTC showed up as a non-destructive method for efficient and acceptable results. (author)

  19. Impact of colistin sulfate treatment of broilers on the presence of resistant bacteria and resistance genes in stored or composted manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Devendec, Laetitia; Mourand, Gwenaelle; Bougeard, Stéphanie; Léaustic, Julien; Jouy, Eric; Keita, Alassane; Couet, William; Rousset, Nathalie; Kempf, Isabelle

    2016-10-15

    The application of manure may result in contamination of the environment with antimicrobials, antimicrobial-resistant bacteria, resistance genes and plasmids. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of the administration of colistin and of manure management on (i) the presence of colistin-resistant Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and (ii) the prevalence of various antimicrobial resistance genes in feces and in composted or stored manure. One flock of chickens was treated with colistin at the recommended dosage and a second flock was kept as an untreated control. Samples of feces, litter and stored or composted manure from both flocks were collected for isolation and determination of the colistin-susceptibility of E. coli, K. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa and quantification of genes coding for resistance to different antimicrobials. The persistence of plasmids in stored or composted manure from colistin-treated broilers was also evaluated by plasmid capturing experiments. Results revealed that colistin administration to chickens had no apparent impact on the antimicrobial resistance of the dominant Enterobacteriaceae and P. aeruginosa populations in the chicken gut. Composting stimulated an apparently limited decrease in genes coding for resistance to different antimicrobial families. Importantly, it was shown that even after six weeks of composting or storage, plasmids carrying antimicrobial resistance genes could still be transferred to a recipient E. coli. In conclusion, composting is insufficient to completely eliminate the risk of spreading antimicrobial resistance through chicken manure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. TECHNOLOGY AND EFFICIENCY OF PEAT ASH USAGE IN CEMENT CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Liakhevich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main ways to improve physical and mechanical properties of cement concrete is an introduction of ash obtained due to burning of fossil fuels into concrete mix. The concrete mixes with ash are characterized by high cohesion, less water gain and disintegration. At the same time the concrete has high strength, density, water resistance, resistance to sulfate corrosion. The aim of this paper is to explore the possibility to use peat ash and slag of peat enterprises of the Republic of Belarus in the concrete for improvement of its physical and mechanical properties and characteristics of peat ash, slag, micro-silica, cement, superplasticizing agent. Compositions and technology for preparation of concrete mixes have been developed and concrete samples have been have been fabricated and tested in the paper. It has been shown that the concrete containing ash, slag obtained due to burning of peat in the industrial installations of the Usiazhsky and Lidsky Peat Briquette Plants and also MK-85-grade micro-silica NSPKSAUsF-1-grade superplasticizing agent have concrete tensile strength within 78–134 MPa under axial compression and 53 MPa – for the control composition. This index is 1.5–2.5 times more than for the sample containing no additives.The usage of peat ash, slag together with MK-85-grade micro-silica and NSPKSAUsF-1-grade superplasticizing agent for fabrication of concrete and reinforced bridge and tunnel structures will provide the following advantages: reduction of cross-sectional area of structures while maintaining their bearing capacity due to higher value of tensile strength in case of axial compression; higher density, waterand gas tightness due to low water cement ratio; high resistance to aggressive environment due to lower content of capillary pores that ensures bridge structure longevity; achievement of environmental and social impacts.

  1. Radiopacity of portland cement associated with different radiopacifying agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Húngaro Duarte, Marco Antonio; de Oliveira El Kadre, Guâniara D'arc; Vivan, Rodrigo Ricci; Guerreiro Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Tanomaru Filho, Mário; de Moraes, Ivaldo Gomes

    2009-05-01

    This study evaluated the radiopacity of Portland cement associated with the following radiopacifying agents: bismuth oxide, zinc oxide, lead oxide, bismuth subnitrate, bismuth carbonate, barium sulfate, iodoform, calcium tungstate, and zirconium oxide. A ratio of 20% radiopacifier and 80% white Portland cement by weight was used for analysis. Pure Portland cement and dentin served as controls. Cement/radiopacifier and dentin disc-shaped specimens were fabricated, and radiopacity testing was performed according to the ISO 6876/2001 standard for dental root sealing materials. Using Insight occlusal films, the specimens were radiographed near to a graduated aluminum stepwedge varying from 2 to 16 mm in thickness. The radiographs were digitized and radiopacity compared with the aluminum stepwedge using Digora software (Orion Corporation Soredex, Helsinki, Finland). The radiographic density data were converted into mmAl and analyzed statistically by analysis of variance and Tukey-Kramer test (alpha = 0.05). The radiopacity of pure Portland cement was significantly lower (p cement/radiopacifier mixtures were significantly more radiopaque than dentin and Portland cement alone (p cement/bismuth oxide and Portland cement/lead oxide presented the highest radiopacity values and differed significantly from the other materials (p cement/zinc oxide presented the lowest radiopacity values of all mixtures (p cement as radiopacifying agents. However, the possible interference of the radiopacifiers with the setting chemistry, biocompatibility, and physical properties of the Portland cement should be further investigated before any clinical recommendation can be done.

  2. The effects of large scale processing on caesium leaching from cemented simulant sodium nitrate waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.J.; Brown, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of large scale processing on the properties of cemented simulant sodium nitrate waste have been investigated. Leach tests have been performed on full-size drums, cores and laboratory samples of cement formulations containing Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), Sulphate Resisting Portland Cement (SRPC) and a blended cement (90% ground granulated blast furnace slag/10% OPC). In addition, development of the cement hydration exotherms with time and the temperature distribution in 220 dm 3 samples have been followed. (author)

  3. CEMENT SLURRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS CEMENTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available During a well cementing special place belongs to the cement slurry design. To ensure the best quality of cementing, a thorough understanding of well parameters is essential, as well as behaviour of cement slurry (especially at high temperatures and application of proven cementing techniques. Many cement jobs fail because of bad job planning. Well cementing without regarding what should be accomplished, can lead to well problems (channels in the cement, unwanted water, gas or fluid production, pipe corrosion and expensive well repairs. Cementing temperature conditions are important because bot-tomhole circulating temperatures affect slurry thickening time, arheology, set time and compressive strength development. Knowing the actual temperature which cement encounters during placement allows the selection of proper cementing materials for a specific application. Slurry design is affected by well depth, bottom hole circulating temperature and static temperature, type or drilling fluid, slurry density, pumping time, quality of mix water, fluid loss control, flow regime, settling and free water, quality of cement, dry or liquid additives, strength development, and quality of the lab cement testing and equipment. Most Portland cements and Class J cement have shown suitable performances in geot-hermal wells. Cement system designs for geothermal wells differ from those for conventional high temperature oil and gas wells in the exclusive use of silica flour instead of silica sand, and the avoidance of fly ash as an extender. In this paper, Portland cement behaviour at high temperatures is described. Cement slurry and set cement properties are also described. Published in literature, the composition of cement slurries which were tested in geothermal conditions and which obtained required compressive strength and water permeability are listed. As a case of our practice geothermal wells Velika Ciglena-1 and Velika Ciglena-la are described.

  4. Combined effect of nano-SiO2 and nano-Fe2O3 on compressive strength, flexural strength, porosity and electrical resistivity in cement mortars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanjuán, M.A.; Argiz, C.; Gálvez, J.C.; Reyes, E.

    2018-01-01

    The compressive strength, flexural strength, porosity and electrical resistivity properties of cement mortars with nano-Fe2O3 and nano-SiO2 are studied. Amorphous silica is the main component of pozzolanic materials due to its reaction with calcium hydroxide formed from calcium silicate (C3S and C2S) hydration. The pozzolanic reaction rate is not only proportional to the amount of amorphous silica but also to the surface area available for reaction. Subsequently, fine nano-Fe2O3 and nano-SiO2 particles in mortars are expected to improve mortar performance. The experimental results showed that the compressive strength of mortars with nano-Fe2O3 and nano-SiO2 particles were lower than those obtained with the reference mortar at seven and 28 days. It was shown that the nano-particles were not able to enhance mechanical strength on every occasion. The continuous microstructural progress monitored by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) measurements, pore-size distribution (PSD), total porosity and critical pore diameter also confirmed such results. [es

  5. Combined effect of nano-SiO2 and nano-Fe2O3 on compressive strength, flexural strength, porosity and electrical resistivity in cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Sanjuán

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The compressive strength, flexural strength, porosity and electrical resistivity properties of cement mortars with nano-Fe2O3 and nano-SiO2 are studied. Amorphous silica is the main component of pozzolanic materials due to its reaction with calcium hydroxide formed from calcium silicate (C3S and C2S hydration. The pozzolanic reaction rate is not only proportional to the amount of amorphous silica but also to the surface area available for reaction. Subsequently, fine nano-Fe2O3 and nano-SiO2 particles in mortars are expected to improve mortar performance. The experimental results showed that the compressive strength of mortars with nano-Fe2O3 and nano-SiO2 particles were lower than those obtained with the reference mortar at seven and 28 days. It was shown that the nano-particles were not able to enhance mechanical strength on every occasion. The continuous microstructural progress monitored by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP measurements, pore-size distribution (PSD, total porosity and critical pore diameter also confirmed such results.

  6. Lunar cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosto, William N.

    1992-01-01

    With the exception of water, the major oxide constituents of terrestrial cements are present at all nine lunar sites from which samples have been returned. However, with the exception of relatively rare cristobalite, the lunar oxides are not present as individual phases but are combined in silicates and in mixed oxides. Lime (CaO) is most abundant on the Moon in the plagioclase (CaAl2Si2O8) of highland anorthosites. It may be possible to enrich the lime content of anorthite to levels like those of Portland cement by pyrolyzing it with lunar-derived phosphate. The phosphate consumed in such a reaction can be regenerated by reacting the phosphorus product with lunar augite pyroxenes at elevated temperatures. Other possible sources of lunar phosphate and other oxides are discussed.

  7. Barium Sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... uses a computer to put together x-ray images to create cross-sectional or three dimensional pictures of the inside of the body). Barium sulfate is in a class of medications called radiopaque contrast media. It works by coating the esophagus, stomach, or ...

  8. The role of chemical admixtures in the formation of the structure of cement stone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sopov Viktor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of sulfates and carbonates of potassium and sodium on the character of the formation of the microstructure of cement stone was studied. The role of cations in the structure formation of cement stone is shown. The efficiency of chemical additives, hardening accelerators, was estimated from the ratio of the volumes of gel and capillary micropores. The ratio of gel and capillary pores allows to determine the efficiency coefficient of the action of chemical additives. It is shown that the potassium carbonate for Portland cement is the most effective additive for hardening in terms of microstructure modification, and potassium sulfate for slag Portland cement.

  9. STOCHASTIC MODELING OF COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH OF PHOSPHORUS SLAG CONTENT CEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Allahverdi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the common methods for quick determination of compressive strength as one of the most important properties for assessment of cement quality is to apply various modeling approaches. This study is aimed at finding a model for estimating the compressive strength of phosphorus slag content cements. For this purpose, the compressive strengths of chemically activated high phosphorus slag content cement prepared from phosphorus slag (80 wt.%, Portland cement (14 wt.% and a compound chemical activator containing sodium sulfate and anhydrite (6 wt.% were measured at various Blaine finenesses and curing times. Based on the obtained results, a primary stochastic model in terms of curing time and Blaine fineness has been developed. Then, another different dataset was used to incorporate composition variable including weight fractions of phosphorus slag, cement, and activator in the model. This model can be effectively used to predict the compressive strength of phosphorus slag content cements at various Blaine finenesses, curing times, and compositions.

  10. Impacts of human activities on distribution of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes and antibiotic resistance genes in marine coastal sediments of Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Feng; Li, Bing; Yang, Ying; Deng, Yu; Qiu, Jian-Wen; Li, Xiangdong; Leung, Kenneth My; Zhang, Tong

    2016-09-01

    Sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRPs) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in sediments could be biomarkers for evaluating the environmental impacts of human activities, although factors governing their distribution are not clear yet. By using metagenomic approach, this study investigated the distributions of SRPs and ARGs in marine sediments collected from 12 different coastal locations of Hong Kong, which exhibited different pollution levels and were classified into two groups based on sediment parameters. Our results showed that relative abundances of major SRP genera to total prokaryotes were consistently lower in the more seriously polluted sediments (P-value human impacts. Moreover, a unimodel distribution pattern for SRPs along with the pollution gradient was observed. Although total ARGs were enriched in sediments from the polluted sites, distribution of single major ARG types could be explained neither by individual sediment parameters nor by corresponding concentration of antibiotics. It supports the hypothesis that the persistence of ARGs in sediments may not need the selection of antibiotics. In summary, our study provided important hints of the niche differentiation of SRPs and behavior of ARGs in marine coastal sediment. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Cementification for radioactive waste including high-concentration sodium sulfate and high-concentration radioactive nuclide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Shinya; Sato, Tatsuaki; Sasoh, Michitaka; Sakurai, Jiro; Takada, Takao

    2005-01-01

    For the cementification of radioactive waste that has large concentrations of sodium sulfate and radioactive nuclide, a way of fixation for sulfate ion was studied comprising the pH control of water in contact with the cement solid, and the removal of the excess water from the cement matrix to prevent hydrogen gas generation with radiolysis. It was confirmed that the sulfate ion concentration in the contacted water with the cement solid is decreased with the formation of ettringite or barium sulfate before solidification, the pH value of the pore water in the cement solid can control less than 12.5 by the application of zeolite and a low-alkali cement such as alumina cement or fly ash mixed cement, and removal of the excess water from the cement matrix by heating is possible with aggregate addition. Consequently, radioactive waste including high-concentration sodium sulfate and high-concentration radioactive nuclide can be solidified with cementitious materials. (author)

  12. A study of oxidation resistant coating on TiAl alloys by Cr evaporation and pack cementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Dong Ju; Jung, Hwan Gyo; Kim, Kyoo Young

    2002-01-01

    A Cr+Al-type composite coating is applied to improve the properties of aluminide coating layers, AiAl 3 , formed on TiAl alloys. This method is performed by Cr evaporation on the TiAl-XNb(X= 1,6at%) substrate followed by pack aluminizing. The coating layer formed by the composite coating process consists of the outer layer of Al 4 Cr and the inner layer of TiAl 3 regardless of the Nb content. however, these coating layers are transformed to Ti(Al,Cr) 3 layers with Ll 2 structures during oxidation. In particular, as Nb content increases, the grain size of the inner TiAl 3 layer becomes smaller and the diffusion rate of Cr increases after oxidation. Faster formation of a Ti(Al,Cr) 3 layer with an Ll 2 structure through Nb addition is more effective to improve cracking resistance at the beginning of oxidation of TiAl alloys. However, growth of Ti(Al,Cr) 3 formed on the coating layer becomes slower as the Nb content in the coating layer is increased. As a result, the addition of a large amount of Nb to composite coating layer is not desirable due to poor ductility of the coating layer. A Ti(Al,Cr) 3 layer with an Ll 2 structure developed during oxidation showed much better ductility compared with other coating layers

  13. Assessment the potential of using Carbon nanotubes reinforcements for improving the tensile/flexural strength and fracture toughness of Portland cement paste for damage resistant concrete transportation infrastructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    The focus of this study was on exploring the use of nanotechnology-based nano-filaments, such as carbon : nanotubes (CNTs) and nanofibers (CNFs), as reinforcement in improving the mechanical properties of Portland : cement paste as a construction mat...

  14. THERMOCHEMISTRY OF INTERACTION REACTIONS FOR SODIUM AND ALUMINUM SULPHATES WITH COMPONENTS OF HYDRATING PORTLAND CEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. I. Yukhnevskiy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical additives are widely used in the technology of concrete with the purpose to solve various problems and sulphate-containing additives-electrolytes are also used as accelerators for setting and hardening of cement. Action mechanism of additive accelerators for setting and hardening of cement is rather complicated and can not be considered as well-established. An influence of sulfate-containing additives such as sodium sulfate is reduced to acceleration of cement silicate phase hydration by increasing ionic strength of the solution. In addition to it, exchange reactions of anion additive with portlandite phase (Ca(OH2 and aluminate phases of hardening cement have a significant effect on hardening process that lead to formation of readily soluble hydroxides and hardly soluble calcium salts. The influence of sulfate-containing additives on properties of water cement paste and cement stone is quite diverse and depends on salt concentration and cation type. For example, the action of the aluminum sulphate additive becomes more complicated if the additive is subjected to hydrolysis in water, which is aggravated in an alkaline medium of the water cement paste. Formation of hydrolysis products and their reaction with aluminate phases and cement portlandite lead to a significant acceleration of setting. Thus, despite the similarity of additives ensuring participation of anions in the exchange reactions, the mechanism of their influence on cement setting and hardening varies rather significantly. The present paper considers peculiar features concerning the mechanism of interaction of sodium and aluminum sulfate additives in cement compositions from the viewpoint of thermochemistry. Thermochemical equations for reactions of sulfate-containing additives with phases of hydrated cement clinker have been given in the paper. The paper contains description how to calculate thermal effects of chemical reactions and determine an influence of the formed

  15. Steam oxidation resistance of Ni-aluminide/Fe-aluminide duplex coatings formed on creep resistant ferritic steels by low temperature pack cementation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, Z.D.; Zeng, D.; Zhu, C.Y.; Rose, S.R.; Datta, P.K.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The Ni 2 Al 3 /Fe 2 Al 5 duplex coating on ferritic steel is resistant against steam oxidation at 650 o C. → The coating shows evidence of enhanced thermal stability. → The enhanced thermal stability of the coating is facilitated by thermodynamic constraints. → The lifetime of the coating can be enhanced by controlling the layer structure of the coating. - Abstract: Steam oxidation resistance and thermal stability were studied at 650 o C for a coating with an outer Ni 2 Al 3 layer and an inner Fe 2 Al 5 layer formed on P92 steel surface. The parabolic rate law of oxidation was obeyed only in less than 2000 h with positive deviations occurring at longer oxidation times. The outer layer of the coating was transformed to NiAl during oxidation, but it remained stable once it was formed. The mechanisms for the enhanced thermal stability were discussed and a simple approach to enhancing the lifetime of the coating was proposed.

  16. Study on cementation of simulated radioactive borated liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Qina; Li Junfeng; Wang Jianlong

    2010-01-01

    To compare sulfoaluminate cement with ordinary Portland cement on their cementation of radioactive borated liquid waste and to provide more data for formula optimization, simulated radioactive borated liquid waste were solidified by the two cements. 28 d compressive strength and strength losses after water/freezing/irradiation resistance tests were investigated. Leaching test and X-ray diffraction analysis were also conducted. The results show that it is feasible to solidify borated liquid wastes with sulfoaluminate cement and ordinary Portland cement with formulas used in the study. The 28 d compressive strengths, strength losses after tests and simulated nuclides leaching rates of the solidified waste forms meet the demand of GB 14569.1-93. The sulfoaluminate cement formula show better retention of Cs + than ordinary Portland cement formula. Boron, in form of B (OH) 4 - , incorporate in ettringite as solid solutions. (authors)

  17. Sulfates on Mars: TES Observations and Thermal Inertia Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, C. D.; Mustard, J. F.

    2001-05-01

    The high resolution thermal emission spectra returned by the TES spectrometer on the MGS spacecraft have allowed the mapping of a variety of minerals and rock types by different sets of researchers. Recently, we have used a linear deconvolution approach to compare sulfate-palagonite soil mixtures created in the laboratory with Martian surface spectra. This approach showed that a number of areas on Mars have spectral properties that match those of sulfate-cemented soils (but neither loose powder mixtures of sulfates and soils nor sand-sized grains of disaggregated crusted soils). These features do not appear to be caused by atmospheric or instrumental effects and are thus believed to be related to surface composition and texture. The distribution and physical state of sulfate are important pieces of information for interpreting surface processes on Mars. A number of different mechanisms could have deposited sulfate in surface layers. Some of these include evaporation of standing bodies of water, aerosol deposition of volcanic gases, hydrothermal alteration from groundwater, and in situ interaction between the atmosphere and soil. The areas on Mars with cemented sulfate signatures are spread across a wide range of elevations and are generally large in spatial scale. Some of the areas are associated with volcanic regions, but many are in dark red plains that have previously been interpreted as duricrust deposits. Our current work compares the distribution of sulfate-cemented soils as mapped by the spectral deconvolution approach with thermal inertia maps produced from both Viking and MGS-TES. Duricrust regions, interpreted from intermediate thermal inertia values, are large regions thought to be sulfate-cemented soils similar to coherent, sulfate-rich materials seen at the Viking lander sites. Our observations of apparent regions of cemented sulfate are also large in spatial extent. This scale information is important for evaluating formation mechanisms for the

  18. Performance of portland limestone cements: Cements designed to be more sustainable that include up to 15% limestone addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Timothy J.

    where the limestone was blended (i.e., not interground) as needed, enabling variation of the size of the limestone particles. In addition, one of the commercially produced OPCs and PLCs were used with fly ash. A series of standardized tests were run to assess the physical effects of intergrinding limestone in portland cement, the effect of limestone presence and method of inclusion on the hydration reaction, and the associated mechanical and transport properties of concretes made with these limestone cements. The second phase of the study used a commercially produced OPC, a PLC, and a PLC-slag all made from the same parent clinker to quantify the early age shrinkage and cracking potential. The study presents a series of tests that quantify the fundamental origins of shrinkage in cementitious materials to elucidate the differences between PLC and OPC. The bulk shrinkage of these systems is then quantified under free and restrained conditions to provide an assessment of the susceptibility for cracking in portland limestone cements. The results of the first phase of this thesis showed that in general the PLC and OPC systems have similar hydration, set, and mechanical performance. Transport properties in this study show behavior that is +/- 30% of the conventional OPC system depending on the system. Literature has shown similar freeze-thaw resistance when these materials are used in properly air entrained mixtures, and the results for PLC systems with fly ash show added performance. Based on these results it appears that PLC that meets ASTM C595/AASHTO M234 should be able to be used interchangeably with OPC, while it should also be noted that the investigation of the influence of salts and sulfates on PLCs is still ongoing and should be monitored. The results of the second phase of this thesis showed that while the PLCs are finer, this comes primarily by reducing the very large particles (clinker particles greater than 30 microns) using advanced separator technology and

  19. Conditioning of radioactive waste solutions by cementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vejmelka, P.; Rudolph, G.; Kluger, W.; Koester, R.

    1992-02-01

    For the cementation of the low and intermediate level evaporator concentrates resulting from the reprocessing of spent fuel numerous experiments were performed to optimize the waste form composition and to characterize the final waste form. Concerning the cementation process, properties of the waste/cement suspension were investigated. These investigations include the dependence of viscosity, bleeding, setting time and hydration heat from the waste cement slurry composition. For the characterization of the waste forms, the mechanical, thermal and chemical stability were determined. For special cases detailed investigations were performed to determine the activity release from waste packages under defined mechanical and thermal stresses. The investigations of the interaction of the waste forms with aqueous solutions include the determination of the Cs/Sr release, the corrosion resistance and the release of actinides. The Cs/Sr release was determined in dependence of the cement type, additives, setting time and sample size. (orig./DG) [de

  20. Possibilities of using aluminate cements in high-rise construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaddo, Maria

    2018-03-01

    The article describes preferable ways of usage of alternative binders for high-rise construction based on aluminate cements. Possible areas of rational use of aluminate cements with the purpose of increasing the service life of materials and the adequacy of the durability of materials with the required durability of the building are analyzed. The results of the structure, shrinkage and physical and mechanical properties of concrete obtained from dry mixes on the base of aluminate cements for self-leveling floors are presented. To study the shrinkage mechanism of curing binders and to evaluate the role of evaporation of water in the development of shrinkage was undertaken experiment with simple unfilled systems: gypsum binder, portland cement and «corrosion resistant high alumina cement + gypsum». Principle possibility of binder with compensated shrinkage based on aluminate cement, gypsum and modern superplasticizers was defined, as well as cracking resistance and corrosion resistance provide durability of the composition.

  1. Parameters of Alumina Cement and Portland Cement with Addition of Chalcedonite Meal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwa, Anna

    2017-10-01

    Aluminous cement is a quick binder with special properties. It is used primarily to make non-standard monolithic components exposed to high temperatures, + 1300°C. It is also a component of adhesives and mortars. It has a very short setting time. It is characterized by rapid increase in mechanical strength and resistance to aggressive sulphates. It can be used in reinforced concrete structures. Laying of concrete, construction mortar made of alumina cement can be carried out even at temperatures of -10°C. This article discusses a comparison of the parameters of hardened mortar made of alumina cement GÓRKAL 40 and Portland cement CEM I 42.5R. The mortars contain an addition of chalcedonite meal with pozzolanic properties, with particle size of less than 0.063μm. The meal was added in amounts of 5% and 20% of cement weight. Chalcedonite meal used in the laboratory research is waste material, resulting from chalcedonite aggregate mining. It has the same properties as the rock from which it originates. We have compared the parameters of hardened mortar i.e. compressive strength, water absorption and capillarity. The addition of 20% chalcedonite meal to mortars made from aluminous cement will decrease durability by 6.1% relative to aluminous cement mortar without addition of meal. Considering the results obtained during the absorbency tests, it can be stated that the addition of chalcedonite meal reduces weight gains in mortars made with cement CEM I 42.5 R and alumina cement. Use of alumina cement without addition of meal in mortars causes an increase of mass by 248% compared to Portland cement mortars without additions, in the absorption tests. The addition of chalcedonite meal did not cause increased weight gain in the capillary action tests. For the alumina cement mortars, a lesser weight gains of 24.7% was reported, compared to the Portland cement mortar after 28 days of maturing.

  2. Transportation of ions through cement based materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterji, S.

    1994-01-01

    Transportation of ions, both anions and cations, through cement based materials is one of the important processes in their durability and as such has been studied very extensively. It has been studied from the point of view of the reinforcement corrosion, alkali-silica reaction, sulfate attack on cement and concrete, as well as in the context of the use of the cement based materials in the disposal of nuclear waste. In this paper the fundamental equations of diffusion, i.e. Fick's two equations, Nernst and Nernst-Planck equations have been collected. Attention has been drawn to the fact that Fick's two equations are valid for non-ionic diffusants and that for ions the relevant equations are those of Nernst and Nernst-Planck. The basic measurement techniques have also been commented upon

  3. The AFm phase in Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matschei, T.; Lothenbach, B.; Glasser, F.P.

    2007-01-01

    The AFm phase of Portland cements refers to a family of hydrated calcium aluminates based on the hydrocalumite-like structure of 4CaO.Al 2 O 3 .13-19 H 2 O. However OH - may be replaced by SO 4 2- and CO 3 2- . Except for limited replacement (50 mol%, maximum) of sulfate by hydroxide, these compositions do not form solid solutions and, from the mineralogical standpoint, behave as separate phases. Therefore many hydrated cements will contain mixtures of AFm phases. AFm phases have been made from precursors and experimentally-determined phase relationships are depicted at 25 deg. C. Solubility data are reported and thermodynamic data are derived. The 25 deg. C stability of AFm phases is much affected by the nature of the anion: carbonate stabilises AFm and displaces OH and SO 4 at species activities commonly encountered in cement systems. However in the presence of portlandite, and as carbonate displaces sulfate in AFm, the reaction results in changes in the amount of both portlandite and ettringite: specimen calculations are presented to quantify these changes. The scheme of phase balances enables calculation of the mineralogical balances of a hydrated cement paste with greater accuracy than hitherto practicable

  4. Influence of Basalt Mesh Induced Increase of Heterogeneity of Cement Composites with Dispersed Fibers on Its Resistance under Near-Field Blast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zíma, J.; Foglar, M.

    2017-09-01

    This paper describes the influence of multiple basalt meshes in the cement composite specimens on the damage induced by near-field blast. Experimental measurements performed in the Boletice military area in 2014 and 2015 are evaluated by numerical simulations. The evaluation of the results is mainly focused on the stress propagation in the cement composite with dispersed fibers, the propagation of the overpressure caused by the blast and velocity of the ejected parts from the specimen. The influence of the presence and position of the basalt meshes in the specimen on its damage induced by delamination is also examined.

  5. Correlating cement characteristics with rheology of paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikan, H.; Justnes, H.; Winnefeld, F.; Figi, R.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of cement characteristics such as cement fineness and clinker composition on the 'flow resistance' measured as the area under the shear stress-shear rate flow curve has been investigated. Three different types of plasticizers namely naphthalene sulphonate-formaldehyde condensate, polyether grafted polyacrylate, and lignosulphonate have been tested in this context on 6 different cements. The flow resistance correlated well with the cement characteristic (Blaine.{d.cC 3 A + [1 - d].C 3 S}) where the factor d represents relative reactivity of cubic C 3 A and C 3 S while cC 3 A and C 3 S represent the content of these minerals. It was found to be either a linear or exponential function of the combined cement characteristic depending on plasticizer type and dosage. The correlation was valid for a mix of pure cement and cement with fly ash, limestone filler (4%), as well as pastes with constant silica fume dosage, when the mineral contents were determined by Rietveld analysis of X-ray diffractograms

  6. Development of an Improved Cement for Geothermal Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trabits, George [Trabits Group, LLC, Wasilla, AK (United States)

    2015-04-20

    After an oil, gas, or geothermal production well has been drilled, the well must be stabilized with a casing (sections of steel pipe that are joined together) in order to prevent the walls of the well from collapsing. The gap between the casing and the walls of the well is filled with cement, which locks the casing into place. The casing and cementing of geothermal wells is complicated by the harsh conditions of high temperature, high pressure, and a chemical environment (brines with high concentrations of carbon dioxide and sulfuric acid) that degrades conventional Portland cement. During the 1990s and early 2000s, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) provided support for the development of fly-ash-modified calcium aluminate phosphate (CaP) cement, which offers improved resistance to degradation compared with conventional cement. However, the use of CaP cements involves some operational constraints that can increase the cost and complexity of well cementing. In some cases, CaP cements are incompatible with chemical additives that are commonly used to adjust cement setting time. Care must also be taken to ensure that CaP cements do not become contaminated with leftover conventional cement in pumping equipment used in conventional well cementing. With assistance from GTO, Trabits Group, LLC has developed a zeolite-containing cement that performs well in harsh geothermal conditions (thermal stability at temperatures of up to 300°C and resistance to carbonation) and is easy to use (can be easily adjusted with additives and eliminates the need to “sterilize” pumping equipment as with CaP cements). This combination of properties reduces the complexity/cost of well cementing, which will help enable the widespread development of geothermal energy in the United States.

  7. Prediction of chloride ingress and binding in cement paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Mette Rica; Nielsen, Erik Pram; Herforth, Duncan

    2007-01-01

    This paper summarizes recent work on an analytical model for predicting the ingress rate of chlorides in cement-based materials. An integral part of this is a thermodynamic model for predicting the phase equilibria in hydrated Portland cement. The model’s ability to predict chloride binding...... in Portland cement pastes at any content of chloride, alkalis, sulfates and carbonate was verified experimentally and found to be equally valid when applied to other data in the literature. The thermodynamic model for predicting the phase equilibria in hydrated Portland cement was introduced into an existing...... Finite Difference Model for the ingress of chlorides into concrete which takes into account its multi-component nature. The “composite theory” was then used to predict the diffusivity of each ion based on the phase assemblage present in the hydrated Portland cement paste. Agreement was found between...

  8. Durability of cermet ionomer cement conditioned in different media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Din, I M

    1992-01-01

    The glass ionomer cement has exhibited significant adhesion to hard tooth structures, and good cariostatic properties. The sintering of the silver alloy powder and glass ionomer cement "cermet cement" has provided additional improvement in the physical properties of the restorative material. These were flexural resistance, wear resistance, increased radio-opacity, hardness and porosity. The improvement in the physical properties of the cermet glass cements has provided an extension in their clinical use as core build up, lining for inlays, amalgam and composite restoratives, fissure filling, restoration of primary teeth, class II tunnel preparation, treatment of root caries and repair of defective metal margins in crown and inlays.

  9. Producing cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, E G

    1923-09-12

    A process and apparatus are described for producing Portland cement in which pulverized shale is successively heated in a series of inclined rotary retorts having internal stirrers and oil gas outlets, which are connected to condensers. The partially treated shale is removed from the lowermost retort by a conveyor, then fed separately or conjointly into pipes and thence into a number of vertically disposed retorts. Each of these retorts may be fitted interiorly with vertical arranged conveyors which elevate the shale and discharge it over a lip, from whence it falls to the bottom of the retorts. The lower end of each casing is furnished with an adjustable discharge door through which the spent shale is fed to a hopper, thence into separate trucks. The oil gases generated in the retorts are exhausted through pipes to condensers. The spent shale is conveyed to a bin and mixed while hot with ground limestone. The admixed materials are then ground and fed to a rotary kiln which is fired by the incondensible gases derived from the oil gases obtained in the previous retorting of the shale. The calcined materials are then delivered from the rotary kiln to rotary coolers. The waste gases from the kiln are utilized for heating the retorts in which the ground shale is heated for the purpose of extracting therefrom the contained hydrocarbon oils and gases.

  10. Use sulfoferritic cements in construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samchenko, Svetlana V.; Zorin, Dmitriy A.

    2018-03-01

    Currently, high-rise construction has received increasing attention around the world. In the big cities under construction is less space and one solution is the high-rise construction. However, high-rise buildings use special requirements, such as strength, thermal insulation, wind load and others. When concrete is exposed to continuous loads by wind or to mechanical loads, it undergoes abrasion. Resistance to this process depends on the characteristics of materials that the concrete and finishing seams are made of. Research on increasing impact and abrasion resistance of calcium sulfoferrite-based cement stone from the perspective of formation of cement stone structure will be instrumental in developing durable materials for application in high-rise construction.

  11. Comparison of modified sulfur cement and hydraulic cement for encapsulation of radioactive and mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-01-01

    The majority of solidification/stabilization systems for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed waste, both in the commercial sector and at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, utilize hydraulic cement (such as portland cement) to encapsulate waste materials and yield a monolithic solid waste form for disposal. Because hydraulic cement requires a chemical hydration reaction for setting and hardening, it is subject to potential interactions between elements in the waste and binder that can retard or prevent solidification. A new and innovative process utilizing modified sulfur cement developed by the US Bureau of Mines has been applied at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the encapsulation of many of these problem wastes. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material, and as such, it can be heated above its melting point, combined with dry waste products to form a homogeneous mixture, and cooled to form a monolithic solid product. Under sponsorship of the DOE, research and development efforts at BNL have successfully applied the modified sulfur cement process for treatment of a range of LLWs including sodium sulfate salts, boric acid salts, and incinerator bottom ash and for mixed waste contaminated incinerator fly ash. Process development studies were conducted to determine optimal waste loadings for each waste type. Property evaluation studies were conducted to test waste form behavior under disposal conditions by applying relevant performance testing criteria established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (for LLW) and the Environmental Protection Agency (for hazardous wastes). Based on both processing and performance considerations, significantly greater waste loadings were achieved using modified sulfur cement when compared with hydraulic cement. Technology demonstration of the modified sulfur cement encapsulation system using production-scale equipment is scheduled for FY 1991

  12. Asphalt cement poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... petroleum material that hardens when it cools. Asphalt cement poisoning occurs when someone swallows asphalt. If hot ... found in: Road paving materials Roofing materials Tile cements Asphalt may also be used for other purposes.

  13. Radioactivity of bone cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, M.A.; Winkler, R.; Ascherl, R.; Lenz, E.

    1993-01-01

    A total of 14 samples of different types of bone cement from five different manufacturers were examined for their radioactivity. Each of the investigated bone cements showed a low radioactivity level, i.e. between [de

  14. Ultrafine portland cement performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Argiz

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available By mixing several binder materials and additions with different degrees of fineness, the packing density of the final product may be improved. In this work, ultrafine cement and silica fume mixes were studied to optimize the properties of cement-based materials. This research was performed in mortars made of two types of cement (ultrafine Portland cement and common Portland cement and two types of silica fume with different particle-size distributions. Two Portland cement replacement ratios of 4% and 10% of silica fume were selected and added by means of a mechanical blending method. The results revealed that the effect of the finer silica fume mixed with the coarse cement enhances the mechanical properties and pore structure refinement at a later age. This improvement is somewhat lower in the case of ultrafine cement with silica fume.

  15. SO2 Release as a Consequence of Alternative Fuel Combustion in Cement Rotary Kiln Inlets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortada Mut, Maria del Mar; Nørskov, Linda Kaare; Glarborg, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The combustion of alternative fuels in direct contact with the bed material of the rotary kiln may cause local reducing conditions and, subsequently, decomposition of sulfates from cement raw materials, increasing the SO2 concentration in the gas phase. The decomposition of sulfates increases...... the sulfur circulation and may be problematic because high sulfur circulation can cause sticky material buildup, affecting the process operation of the cement kiln system. The SO2 release from cement raw materials during combustion of pine wood and tire rubber has been studied experimentally in a high...

  16. Tensile bond strength of glass fiber posts luted with different cements Resistência à tração de pinos de fibra de vidro cimentados com diferentes materiais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson Bonfante

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Proper selection of the luting agent is fundamental to avoid failure due to lack of retention in post-retained crowns. The objective of this study was to investigate the tensile bond strength and failure mode of glass fiber posts luted with different cements. Glass fiber posts were luted in 40 mandibular premolars, divided into 4 groups (n = 10: Group 1 - resin-modified glass ionomer RelyX Luting; Group 2 - resin-modified glass ionomer Fuji Plus; Group 3 - resin cement RelyX ARC; Group 4 - resin cement Enforce. Specimens were assessed by tensile strength testing and light microscopy analysis for observation of failure mode. The tensile bond strength values of each group were compared by ANOVA and Tukey test. The significance level was set at 5%. The failure modes were described as percentages. The following tensile strength values were obtained: Group 1 - 247.6 N; Group 2 - 256.7 N; Group 3 - 502.1 N; Group 4 - 477.3 N. There was no statistically significant difference between Groups 1 and 2 or between Groups 3 and 4, yet the resin cements presented significantly higher tensile bond strength values than those presented by the glass ionomer cements. Group 1 displayed 70% of cohesive failures, whereas Groups 2, 3 and 4 exhibited 70% to 80% of adhesive failures at the dentin-cement interface. We concluded that resin cements and glass ionomer cements are able to provide clinically sufficient retention of glass fiber posts, and that glass ionomer cements may be especially indicated when the application of adhesive techniques is difficult.A seleção adequada do agente cimentante é essencial para evitar falhas por perda de retenção em coroas retidas por núcleos. O objetivo deste estudo foi investigar a resistência à tração e o tipo de falha de pinos de fibra de vidro cimentados com diferentes materiais. Cimentaram-se pinos de fibra de vidro em 40 pré-molares inferiores, divididos em 4 grupos (n = 10: Grupo 1 - ionômero de vidro modificado

  17. Cement for oil well developed from ordinary cement: characterization physical, chemical and mineralogical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, D.N.S.; Neves, G. de A.; Chaves, A.C.; Mendonca, A.M.G.D.; Lima, M.S. de; Bezerra, U.T.

    2012-01-01

    This work aims to characterize a new type of cement produced from the mixture of ordinary Portland cement, which can be used as an option in the cementing of oil wells. To enable this work we used the method of lineal programming for the new cement composition, then conducted tests to characterize through particle size analysis by laser diffraction, chemical analysis by EDX, TGA, X-ray diffraction, time grip, resistance to compression. The overall result showed that the new cement had made low-C3A, takes more time to the CPP, thermal stability up to 500 ° C, the kinetics of hydration and low levels of major components consistent with the specifications of ABNT. (author)

  18. Role of sulfates on highway heave in Lake County, Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Samples from borings in areas of heave on Route 2, Lake County, OH were analyzed for the amount, mineral form, : and distribution of sulfates. In addition, samples of non-stabilized (NSS) and cement-stabilized (CSS) soils from : three stations along ...

  19. Sulfate adsorption on goethite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rietra, R P.J.J.; Hiemstra, T; Riemsdijk, W.H. van

    1999-10-15

    Recent spectroscopic work has suggested that only one surface species of sulfate is dominant on hematite. Sulfate is therefore a very suitable anion to test and develop adsorption models for variable charge minerals. The authors have studied sulfate adsorption on goethite covering a large range of sulfate concentrations, surface coverages, pH values, and electrolyte concentrations. Four different techniques were used to cover the entire range of conditions. For characterization at low sulfate concentrations, below the detection limit of sulfate with ICP-AES, the authors used proton-sulfate titrations at constant pH. Adsorption isotherms were studied for the intermediate sulfate concentration range. Acid-base titrations in sodium sulfate and electromobility were used for high sulfate concentrations. All the data can be modeled with one adsorbed species if it is assumed that the charge of adsorbed sulfate is spatially distributed in the interface. The charge distribution of sulfate follows directly from modeling the proton-sulfate adsorption stoichoimemtry sine this stoichiometry is independent of the intrinsic affinity constant of sulfate. The charge distribution can be related to the structure of the surface complex by use of the Pauling bond valence concept and is in accordance with the microscopic structure found by spectroscopy. The intrinsic affinity constant follows from the other measurements. Modeling of the proton-ion stoichoimetry with the commonly used 2-pK models, where adsorbed ions are treated as point charges, is possible only if at least two surface species for sulfate are used.

  20. High-Temperature Release of SO2 from Calcined Cement Raw Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Rooma; Larsen, Morten B.; Glarborg, Peter

    2011-01-01

    During combustion of alternative fuels in the material inlet end of cement rotary kilns, local reducing conditions may occur and cause reductive decomposition of sulfates from calcined cement raw materials. Decomposition of sulfates is problematic because it increases the gas-phase SO2...... concentration, which may cause deposit formation in the kiln system. In this study, the release of sulfur from calcined cement raw materials under both oxidizing and reducing conditions is investigated. The investigations include thermodynamic equilibrium calculations in the temperature interval of 800–1500 °C...... and experiments in a tube furnace reactor in the temperature interval of 900–1100 °C. The investigated conditions resemble actual conditions in the material inlet end of cement rotary kilns. It was found that the sulfates CaSO4, K2SO4, and Na2SO4 were all stable under oxidizing conditions but began to decompose...

  1. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary of Halliburton Energy Services (HES) and BJ Services historical performance data for lightweight cement applications. These data are analyzed and compared to ULHS cement and foamed cement performances. Similar data is expected from Schlumberger, and an analysis of this data will be completed in the following phases of the project. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was completed to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS and foamed cement. This protocol is presented and discussed. Results of further testing of ULHS cements are presented along with an analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project. Finally, a list of relevant literature on lightweight cement performance is compiled for review during the next quarter

  2. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Issues, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements, and Task 8: Develop Field ULHS Cement Blending and Mixing Techniques. Results reported this quarter include: preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; laboratory tests comparing ULHS slurries to foamed slurries and sodium silicate slurries for two different applications; and initial laboratory studies with ULHS in preparation for a field job

  3. Hydration Experiments and Physical Observations at 193 K and 243 K for Mg-Sulfates Relevant to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Chipera, S. J.; Carey, J. W.

    2006-03-01

    Hydration of kieserite and amorphous Mg-sulfate at 243 K progresses along simple pathways involving only hexahydrite and kieserite. Kieserite forms a duricrust-like cement, but the anhydrous precursor does not.

  4. Influence of Internal Sulfate Attack on Some Properties of High Strength Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Mahdi Fawzi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important problems that faces the concrete industry in Iraq is the deterioration due to internal sulfate attack , since it reduces the compressive strength and increases the expansion of concrete. Consequently, the concrete structure may be damage .The effects of total and total effective sulfate contents on high strength concrete (HSC have been studied in the present study. The research studied the effect of sulfate content in cement , sand and gravel , as well as comparing the total sulfate content with the total effective SO3 content. Materials used were divided into two groups of SO3 in cement ,three groups of SO3 in sand ,and two groups of SO3 in gravel. The results show that considering the total effective sulfate content is better than the total content of sulfates since the effect of sulfate in each constituent of concrete, depends on it's granular size .The smaller the particle size of the material the more effective is the sulfate in it. Therefore, it is recommended to follow the Iraqi specification for total effective sulfate content, because it gives more flexibility to the use of sand and gravel with higher sulfate content. The results of compressive strength at 90-days show that the effect of total effective SO3 content of ( 2.647% , 2.992% , 3.424% that correspond to total sulfate of ( 3.778%, 3.294%, 4.528% decrease the compressive strength by (7.53%, 11.44%, 14.59% respectively.

  5. Creep and fatigue behavior of a novel 2-component paste-like formulation of acrylic bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köster, Ulrike; Jaeger, Raimund; Bardts, Mareike; Wahnes, Christian; Büchner, Hubert; Kühn, Klaus-Dieter; Vogt, Sebastian

    2013-06-01

    The fatigue and creep performance of two novel acrylic bone cement formulations (one bone cement without antibiotics, one with antibiotics) was compared to the performance of clinically used bone cements (Osteopal V, Palacos R, Simplex P, SmartSet GHV, Palacos R+G and CMW1 with Gentamicin). The preparation of the novel bone cement formulations involves the mixing of two paste-like substances in a static mixer integrated into the cartridge which is used to apply the bone cement. The fatigue performance of the two novel bone cement formulations is comparable to the performance of the reference bone cements. The creep compliance of the bone cements is significantly influenced by the effects of physical ageing. The model parameters of Struik's creep law are used to compare the creep behavior of different bone cements. The novel 2-component paste-like bone cement formulations are in the group of bone cements which exhibit a higher creep resistance.

  6. Possibilities of special cements in ceramic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capmas, A.; Bier, T.A.

    1993-01-01

    About 25 years ago, the only way to have confinement material for high temperature applications was to prepare a ceramic by sintering or fusion at high temperature. A new technology came, with the production of Low Cement Castables. This new product was obtained by a careful choice of the granulometry of the aggregates, an optimization of the defloculation of fine particles, including the cement (Calcium Aluminate Cement) and the addition of silica fume. Silica fume brought two improvements: a) a fluidifying effect, due partly to the low sensitivity of viscosity to pH, and partly to the geometric effect of the nicely spherical particle, b) a chemical effect, brought by the reaction of silica and Calcium Aluminate Cement to give a coherent zeolithic structure, through which water could escape during the first firing. From a ceramist point of view, it is interesting to understand how this components, nearly colloidal system mixed in water can be heated up to ceramization without any noticeable change in mechanical characteristics and shrinkage. From a more practical point of view, it is also interesting to realize that some characteristics, usually attributed only to ceramics, also apply with low cement castables technology: high compressive strength, flexural strength, corrosion resistance, abrasion resistance, impact resistance. (orig.)

  7. Experimental study of chloride diffusivity in unsaturated ordinary Portland cement mortar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.; Ye, G.; Santhanam, M.

    2017-01-01

    Experiments are carried out to investigate the chloride diffusivity in partially saturated ordinary Portland cement mortars with water-to-cement (w/c) ratios of 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6. Based on resistivity measurement and Nernst-Einstein equation, the chloride diffusivities of cement mortars at various

  8. Absorption Characteristics of Cement Combination Concrete Containing Portland Cement, fly ash, and Metakaolin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folagbade S.O.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The resistance to water penetration of cement combination concretes containing Portland cement (PC, fly ash (FA, and metakaolin (MK have been investigated at different water/cement (w/c ratios, 28-day strengths, and depths of water penetration using their material costs and embodied carbon-dioxide (eCO2 contents. Results revealed that, at equal w/c ratio, eCO2 content reduced with increasing content of FA and MK. MK contributed to the 28-day strengths more than FA. Compared with PC, FA reduced cost and increased the depth of water penetration, MK increased cost and reduced the depth of water penetration, and their ternary combinations become beneficial. At equal strengths and levels of resistance to water penetration, most of the cement combination concretes are more environmentally compatible and costlier than PC concrete. Only MK binary cement concretes with 10%MK content or more and ternary cement concretes at a total replacement level of 55% with 10%MK content or more have higher resistance to water penetration than PC concrete.

  9. Evaluation of an injectable bioactive borate glass cement to heal bone defects in a rabbit femoral condyle model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Xu [Institute of Bioengineering and Information Technology Materials, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Center for Human Tissues and Organs Degeneration, Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Science, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Huang, Wenhai [Institute of Bioengineering and Information Technology Materials, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang, Yadong, E-mail: zhangyadong6@126.com [Department of Spine Surgery, Shanghai East Hospital, School of Medicine, Tongji University, Shanghai 200120 (China); Huang, Chengcheng; Yu, Zunxiong; Wang, Lei; Liu, Wenlong; Wang, Ting [Center for Human Tissues and Organs Degeneration, Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Science, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Zhou, Jie; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Nai; Wang, Deping [Institute of Bioengineering and Information Technology Materials, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Pan, Haobo, E-mail: hb.pan@siat.ac.cn [Center for Human Tissues and Organs Degeneration, Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Science, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Rahaman, Mohamed N., E-mail: rahaman@mst.edu [Department of Spine Surgery, Shanghai East Hospital, School of Medicine, Tongji University, Shanghai 200120 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409-0340 (United States)

    2017-04-01

    There is a need for synthetic biomaterials to heal bone defects using minimal invasive surgery. In the present study, an injectable cement composed of bioactive borate glass particles and a chitosan bonding solution was developed and evaluated for its capacity to heal bone defects in a rabbit femoral condyle model. The injectability and setting time of the cement in vitro decreased but the compressive strength increased (8 ± 2 MPa to 31 ± 2 MPa) as the ratio of glass particles to chitosan solution increased (from 1.0 g ml{sup −1} to 2.5 g ml{sup −1}). Upon immersing the cement in phosphate-buffered saline, the glass particles reacted and converted to hydroxyapatite, imparting bioactivity to the cement. Osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells showed enhanced proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity when incubated in media containing the soluble ionic product of the cement. The bioactive glass cement showed a better capacity to stimulate bone formation in rabbit femoral condyle defects at 12 weeks postimplantation when compared to a commercial calcium sulfate cement. The injectable bioactive borate glass cement developed in this study could provide a promising biomaterial to heal bone defects by minimal invasive surgery. - Highlights: • New class of injectable bone cement composed of bioactive borate glass particles and chitosan bonding phase was created. • The cement is biocompatible and bioactive, and has a much lower temperature increase during setting than PMMA cement. • The cement has a more controllable degradation rate and higher strength over a longer time than calcium sulfate cement. • The cement showed a better ability to heal bone defects than calcium sulfate over a twelve-week implantation period.

  10. Experimental Study on Artificial Cemented Sand Prepared with Ordinary Portland Cement with Different Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongliang Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Artificial cemented sand test samples were prepared by using ordinary Portland cement (OPC as the cementing agent. Through uniaxial compression tests and consolidated drained triaxial compression tests, the stress-strain curves of the artificial cemented sand with different cementing agent contents (0.01, 0.03, 0.05 and 0.08 under various confining pressures (0.00 MPa, 0.25 MPa, 0.50 MPa and 1.00 MPa were obtained. Based on the test results, the effect of the cementing agent content (Cv on the physical and mechanical properties of the artificial cemented sand were analyzed and the Mohr-Coulomb strength theory was modified by using Cv. The research reveals that when Cv is high (e.g., Cv = 0.03, 0.05 or 0.08, the stress-strain curves of the samples indicate a strain softening behavior; under the same confining pressure, as Cv increases, both the peak strength and residual strength of the samples show a significant increase. When Cv is low (e.g., Cv = 0.01, the stress-strain curves of the samples indicate strain hardening behavior. From the test data, a function of Cv (the cementing agent content with c′ (the cohesion force of the sample and Δϕ′ (the increment of the angle of shearing resistance is obtained. Furthermore, through modification of the Mohr-Coulomb strength theory, the effect of cementing agent content on the strength of the cemented sand is demonstrated.

  11. Experimental Study on Artificial Cemented Sand Prepared with Ordinary Portland Cement with Different Contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongliang; Liu, Xinrong; Liu, Xianshan

    2015-07-02

    Artificial cemented sand test samples were prepared by using ordinary Portland cement (OPC) as the cementing agent. Through uniaxial compression tests and consolidated drained triaxial compression tests, the stress-strain curves of the artificial cemented sand with different cementing agent contents (0.01, 0.03, 0.05 and 0.08) under various confining pressures (0.00 MPa, 0.25 MPa, 0.50 MPa and 1.00 MPa) were obtained. Based on the test results, the effect of the cementing agent content ( C v ) on the physical and mechanical properties of the artificial cemented sand were analyzed and the Mohr-Coulomb strength theory was modified by using C v . The research reveals that when C v is high (e.g., C v = 0.03, 0.05 or 0.08), the stress-strain curves of the samples indicate a strain softening behavior; under the same confining pressure, as C v increases, both the peak strength and residual strength of the samples show a significant increase. When C v is low (e.g., C v = 0.01), the stress-strain curves of the samples indicate strain hardening behavior. From the test data, a function of C v (the cementing agent content) with c ' (the cohesion force of the sample) and Δϕ' (the increment of the angle of shearing resistance) is obtained. Furthermore, through modification of the Mohr-Coulomb strength theory, the effect of cementing agent content on the strength of the cemented sand is demonstrated.

  12. Evaluation of four biodegradable, injectable bone cements in an experimental drill hole model in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Génot, Oliver R; Nuss, Katja; Galuppo, Larry; Fulmer, Mark; Jacobson, Evan; Kronen, Peter; Zlinszky, Kati; Auer, Jörg A

    2013-09-01

    Four cement applications were tested in this investigation. Two dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD-brushite) hydraulic cements, an apatite hydraulic fiber loaded cement, and a calcium sulfate cement (Plaster of Paris) were implanted in epiphyseal and metaphyseal cylindrical bone defects in sheep. The in vivo study was performed to assess the biocompatibility and bone remodeling of four cement formulations. After time periods of 2, 4, and 6 months, the cement samples were clinically and histologically evaluated. Histomorphometrically, the amount of new bone formation, fibrous tissue, and bone marrow and the area of remaining cement were measured. In all specimens, no signs of inflammation were detectable either macroscopically or microscopically. Cements differed mainly in their resorption time. Calcium sulfate was already completely resorbed at 2 months and showed a variable amount of new bone formation and/or fibrous tissue in the original drill hole over all time periods. The two DCPD cements in contrast were degraded to a large amount at 6 months, whereas the apatite was almost unchanged over all time periods. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Equilibrium leaching of toxic elements from cement stabilized soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voglar, Grega E; Leštan, Domen

    2013-02-15

    The toxicity characteristics leaching procedure (TCLP) is commonly used to assess the efficiency of solidification/stabilization (S/S) of pollutants in wastes, despite recent objections to this method. In this study, formulations of 7, 10, 15 and 20% (w/w) of calcium aluminate cement (CAC) and sulfate resistant Portland cement (SRC) were used for S/S of soil from brownfield contaminated with 43,149, 10,115, 7631, 6130, 90, 82 mg kg(-1) of Zn, Pb, Cu, As, Cd and Ni, respectively. CAC produced S/S soil monoliths of higher mechanical strength (up to 7.65 N mm(-2)). Mass-transfer analysis indicated surface wash-off as a mechanism of toxic elements release, and equilibrium leaching as a crucial parameter of S/S efficiency assessment. In the expected range of field soil pH after S/S (pH 7-9), the TCLP gave markedly different results than the multi-point pH equilibrium leaching method (using nine targeted pH values): up to 2953-, 94-, 483-, 1.3-, 27- and 1.5-times more Zn, Pb, Cu, As, Cd and Ni, respectively, was determined in the TCLP leachate. S/S with CAC reduced leachability of toxic elements more effectively than SRC. Our results indicate that, under given field conditions, the TCLP significantly underrates the efficiency of S/S of contaminated soil with cementitious binders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Kinetics of strength gain of biocidal cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodin Aleksandr Ivanovich

    Full Text Available Biocorrosion becomes the determinative durability factor of buildings and constructions. Damages of construction materials caused by bacteria, filamentous fungi, actinomycetes constitute a serious danger to the constructions of a building or a structure and to the health of people. Biodeteriorations are typical both in old and new constructions. A great quantity of destruction factors of industrial and residential buildings under the influence of microorganisms was established in practice. Providing products and constructions based on concretes fungicidal and bactericidal properties is an important direction of modern construction material science. The most efficient way to solve this task is creation of biocidal cements. The article presents the results of experimental studies of kinetic dependences of strength gain by biocidal cements by physico-mechanical and physico-chemical analysis methods. The identical velocity character of initial hydration of the developed compositions of biocidal cements is set, as well as a more calm behavior of hardening processes at later terms. It has been established that the compositions of biocidal cements modified by sodium sulfate and sodium fluoride possess the greatest strength.

  15. Effect of supplementary cementing materials on the concrete corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejia de Gutierrez, R.

    2003-01-01

    Failure of concrete after a period of years, less than the life expected for which it was designed, may be caused by the environment to which it has been exposed or by a variety of internal causes. The incorporation of supplementary materials has at the Portland cement the purpose of improving the concrete microstructure and also of influence the resistance of concrete to environmental attacks. Different mineral by-products as ground granulated blast furnaces slag (GGBS), silica fume (SF), meta kaolin (MK), fly ash (FA) and other products have been used as supplementary cementing materials. This paper is about the behavior of concrete in the presence of mineral additions. Compared to Portland cements, blended cements show lower heat of hydration, lower permeability, greater resistance to sulphates and sea water. These blended cements find the best application when requirements of durability are regarded as a priority specially on high performance concrete: (Author) 11 refs

  16. Biocompatibility of calcium phosphate bone cement with optimised mechanical properties: an in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Iwan; Nelson, John; Schatton, Wolfgang; Dunne, Nicholas J; Buchanan, Fraser; Clarke, Susan A

    2016-12-01

    This work establishes the in vivo performance of modified calcium phosphate bone cements for vertebroplasty of spinal fractures using a lapine model. A non-modified calcium phosphate bone cement and collagen-calcium phosphate bone cements composites with enhanced mechanical properties, utilising either bovine collagen or collagen from a marine sponge, were compared to a commercial poly(methyl methacrylate) cement. Conical cement samples (8 mm height × 4 mm base diameter) were press-fit into distal femoral condyle defects in New Zealand White rabbits and assessed after 5 and 10 weeks. Bone apposition and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity around cements were assessed. All implants were well tolerated, but bone apposition was higher on calcium phosphate bone cements than on poly(methyl methacrylate) cement. Incorporation of collagen showed no evidence of inflammatory or immune reactions. Presence of positive tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining within cracks formed in calcium phosphate bone cements suggested active osteoclasts were present within the implants and were actively remodelling within the cements. Bone growth was also observed within these cracks. These findings confirm the biological advantages of calcium phosphate bone cements over poly(methyl methacrylate) and, coupled with previous work on enhancement of mechanical properties through collagen incorporation, suggest collagen-calcium phosphate bone cement composite may offer an alternative to calcium phosphate bone cements in applications where low setting times and higher mechanical stability are important.

  17. Advanced cementation concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.G.

    1989-10-01

    The purpose of this programme of work was to investigate whether improvements could be made to existing formulations for cement suitable for the immobilization of intermediate level radioactive waste. Two additives were selected, microsilica and limestone flour. Improvements to the cement were only slight. (author)

  18. Preparation of hydraulic cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1921-08-28

    A process for the preparation of hydraulic cement by the use of oil-shale residues is characterized in that the oil-shale refuse is mixed with granular basic blast-furnace slag and a small amount of portland cement and ground together.

  19. Low force cementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, P R

    1996-07-01

    The marginal adaptation of full coverage restorations is adversely affected by the introduction of luting agents of various minimum film thicknesses during the cementation process. The increase in the marginal opening may have long-term detrimental effects on the health of both pulpal and periodontal tissues. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of varying seating forces (2.5, 12.5, 25 N), venting, and cement types on post-cementation marginal elevation in cast crowns. A standardized cement space of 40 microns was provided between a machined gold crown and a stainless steel die. An occlusal vent was placed that could be opened or closed. The post-cementation crown elevation was measured, following the use of two commercially available capsulated dental cements (Phosphacap, and Ketac-cem Applicap). The results indicate that only the combination of Ketac-Cem Applicap and crown venting produced post-cementation crown elevation of less than 20 microns when 12.5 N seating force was used. Higher forces (25 N) and venting were required for comparable seating when using Phosphacap (19 microns). The amount of force required to allow maximum seating of cast crowns appears to be cement specific, and is reduced by effective venting procedures.

  20. Cementation process study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H.H.; Han, K.W.; Ahn, S.J.; Choi, K.S.; Lee, M.W.; Ryu, Y.K.

    1985-01-01

    In the cementation process study, in 1984, design of the waste treatment simulator was finished for the first step. We can experience not only the operation of solidification system but the design and construction of comming large scale plant through the design of cementation process. (Author)

  1. Solidification of radioactive waste in a cement/lime mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, H.; Colombo, P.

    1984-01-01

    The suitability of a cement/lime mixture for use as a solidification agent for different types of wastes was investigated. This work includes studies directed towards determining the wasted/binder compositional field over which successful solidification occurs with various wastes and the measurement of some of the waste from properties relevant to evaluating the potential for the release of radionuclides to the environment. In this study, four types of low-level radioactive wastes were simulated for incorporation into a cement/lime mixture. These were boric acid waste, sodium sulfate wastes, aion exchange resins and incinerator ash. 7 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  2. Cementation of the solid radioactive waste with polymer-cement solutions using the method of impregnation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbunova, O.

    2015-01-01

    Cementation of solid radioactive waste (SRW), i.e. inclusion of solid radioactive waste into cement matrix without cavities - is one of the main technological processes used for conditioning low and intermediate level radioactive waste. At FSUE 'Radon' the industrialized method of impregnation has been developed and since 2003 has been using for cementation of solid radioactive waste. The technology is that the polymer-cement solution, having high penetrating properties, is supplied under pressure through a tube to the bottom of the container in which solid radioactive waste has preliminarily been placed. The polymer-cement solution is evenly moving upwards through the channels between the particles of solid radioactive waste, fills the voids in the bulk volume of the waste and hardens, forming a cement compound, the amount of which is equal to the original volume. The aim of the investigation was a selection of a cement solution suitable for SRW impregnation (including fine particles) without solution depletion and bottom layers stuffing. It has been chosen a polymer: PHMG (polyhexamethylene-guanidine), which is a stabilizing and water-retaining component of the cement solution. The experiments confirm that the polymer increases the permeability of the cement solution by a 2-2.5 factor, the viscosity by a 1.2 factor, the stability of the consistency by a 1.5-1.7 factor, and extends the operating range of the W/C ratio to 0.5-1.1. So it is possible to penetrate a volume of SRW bigger by a 1.5-2.0 factor. It has been proved, that PHMG polymer increases strength and frost-resistance of the final compounds by a 1.8-2.7 factor, and contributes to fast strength development at the beginning of hardening and it decreases Cs-137 leashing rate by a 1.5-2 factor

  3. Properties and durability of metakaolin blended cements: mortar and concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas, Rafik

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the effect of metakaolin, a pozzolan, on concrete performance. Compressive and splitting tensile strength were found for specimens cured for up to 360 and 90 days, respectively. Changes were recorded in the compressive strength of specimens exposed to salt (chloride and sulfatechloride solutions, and chloride penetration and binding capacity were measured. The findings were compared to the results for concrete prepared with ordinary Portland (OPC and moderate heat of hydration (Type II cement. MK was found to have a very positive effect on 28-day concrete strength, due to microstructure improvement of the hydrated cement. Replacing cement with metakaolin effectively raised concrete resistance to chloride attack. Concrete containing metakaolin proved to be substantially more durable in sulfate-chloride environment.

    En este trabajo se estudia el efecto del metacaolín sobre las prestaciones del hormigón. Las probetas curadas a 360 y 90 días se sometieron a ensayos de resistencia a compresión y de tracción indirecta respectivamente. Se hizo un seguimiento de la resistencia a la compresión de los materiales ante el ataque de sales (soluciones de cloruro y de sulfato-cloruro y, se midió la penetración de cloruros y la capacidad de los hormigones de inmovilizar estos iones. Los resultados se compararon con los obtenidos con hormigones elaborados con cemento pórtland ordinario (OPC y, con cemento de calor de hidratación moderado (tipo II. El MK resultó influir muy positivamente en la resistencia del hormigón a 28 días debido a la mejora de la microestructura del cemento hidratado. La sustitución de cemento por metacaolín aumentó la resistencia del hormigón al ataque de cloruros. El hormigón con metacaolín demostró ser más duradero en entornos de sulfato-cloruro que los hormigones elaborados con OPC o con cemento de tipo II. Los perfiles de concentración de cloruros a distintas profundidades y la

  4. Antibiotic-Loaded Synthetic Calcium Sulfate Beads for Prevention of Bacterial Colonization and Biofilm Formation in Periprosthetic Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlin, R. P.; Brayford, M. J.; Webb, J. S.; Cooper, J. J.; Aiken, S. S.

    2014-01-01

    Periprosthetic infection (PI) causes significant morbidity and mortality after fixation and joint arthroplasty and has been extensively linked to the formation of bacterial biofilms. Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), as a cement or as beads, is commonly used for antibiotic release to the site of infection but displays variable elution kinetics and also represents a potential nidus for infection, therefore requiring surgical removal once antibiotics have eluted. Absorbable cements have shown improved elution of a wider range of antibiotics and, crucially, complete biodegradation, but limited data exist as to their antimicrobial and antibiofilm efficacy. Synthetic calcium sulfate beads loaded with tobramycin, vancomycin, or vancomycin-tobramycin dual treatment (in a 1:0.24 [wt/wt] ratio) were assessed for their abilities to eradicate planktonic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus epidermidis relative to that of PMMA beads. The ability of the calcium sulfate beads to prevent biofilm formation over multiple days and to eradicate preformed biofilms was studied using a combination of viable cell counts, confocal microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy of the bead surface. Biofilm bacteria displayed a greater tolerance to the antibiotics than their planktonic counterparts. Antibiotic-loaded beads were able to kill planktonic cultures of 106 CFU/ml, prevent bacterial colonization, and significantly reduce biofilm formation over multiple days. However, established biofilms were harder to eradicate. These data further demonstrate the difficulty in clearing established biofilms; therefore, early preventive measures are key to reducing the risk of PI. Synthetic calcium sulfate loaded with antibiotics has the potential to reduce or eliminate biofilm formation on adjacent periprosthetic tissue and prosthesis material and, thus, to reduce the rates of periprosthetic infection. PMID:25313221

  5. In-situ Mechanical Manipulation of Wellbore Cements as a Solution to Leaky Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupresan, D.; Radonjic, M.; Heathman, J.

    2013-12-01

    Wellbore cement provides casing support, zonal isolation, and casing protection from corrosive fluids, which are essential for wellbore integrity. Cements can undergo one or more forms of failure such as debonding at cement/formation and cement/casing interface, fracturing and defects within cement matrix. Failures and defects within cement will ultimately lead to fluids migration, resulting in inter-zonal fluid migration and premature well abandonment. There are over 27,000 abandoned oil and gas wells only in The Gulf of Mexico (some of them dating from the late 1940s) with no gas leakage monitoring. Cement degradation linked with carbon sequestration can potentially lead to contamination of fresh water aquifers with CO2. Gas leaks can particularly be observed in deviated wells used for hydraulic fracking (60% leakage rate as they age) as high pressure fracturing increases the potential for migration pathways. Experimental method utilized in this study enables formation of impermeable seals at interfaces present in a wellbore by mechanically manipulating wellbore cement. Preliminary measurements obtained in bench scale experiments demonstrate that an impermeable cement/formation and cement/casing interface can be obtained. In post-modified cement, nitrogen gas flow-through experiments showed complete zonal isolation and no permeability in samples with pre-engineered microannulus. Material characterization experiments of modified cement revealed altered microstructural properties of cement as well as changes in mineralogical composition. Calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH), the dominant mineral in hydrated cement which provides low permeability of cement, was modified as a result of cement pore water displacement, resulting in more dense structures. Calcium hydroxide (CH), which is associated with low resistance of cement to acidic fluids and therefore detrimental in most wellbore cements, was almost completely displaced and/or integrated in CSH as a result of

  6. Cementation of wastes with boric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tello, Cledola C.O.; Haucz, Maria Judite A.; Alves, Lilian J.L.; Oliveira, Arno H.

    2000-01-01

    In nuclear power plants (PWR) are generated wastes, such as concentrate, which comes from the evaporation of liquid radioactive wastes, and spent resins. Both have boron in their composition. The cementation process is one of the options to solidify these wastes, but the boron has a negative effect on the setting of the cement mixture. In this paper are presented the experiments that are being carried out in order to overcome this problem and also to improve the efficiency of the process. Simulated wastes were cemented using additives (clays, admixtures etc.). In the process and product is being evaluated the effect of the amount, type and addition order of the materials. The mixtures were selected in accordance with their workability and incorporated waste. The solidified products are monolithic without free water with a good mechanical resistance. (author)

  7. Rare earth sulfates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komissarova, L.N.; Shatskij, V.M.; Pokrovskij, A.N.; Chizhov, S.M.; Bal'kina, T.I.; Suponitskij, Yu.L.

    1986-01-01

    Results of experimental works on the study of synthesis conditions, structure and physico-chemical properties of rare earth, scandium and yttrium sulfates, have been generalized. Phase diagrams of solubility and fusibility, thermodynamic and crystallochemical characteristics, thermal stability of hydrates and anhydrous sulfates of rare earths, including normal, double (with cations of alkali and alkaline-earth metals), ternary and anion-mixed sulfates of rare earths, as well as their adducts, are considered. The state of ions of rare earths, scandium and yttrium in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions is discussed. Data on the use of rare earth sulfates are given

  8. Seepage/Cement Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, D.

    2000-01-01

    The Development Plan (CRWMS M andO 1999a) pertaining to this task defines the work scopes and objectives for development of various submodels for the Physical and Chemical Environment Abstraction Model for TSPA-LA. The Development Plan (CRWMS M andO 1999a) for this specific task establishes that an evaluation be performed of the chemical reactions between seepage that has entered the drift and concrete which might be used in the repository emplacement drifts. The Development Plan (CRWMS M andO 1999a) then states that the potential effects of these water/grout reactions on chemical conditions in the drift be assessed factoring in the influence of carbonation and the relatively small amount of grout. This task is also directed at: (1) developing a conceptualization of important cement/seepage interactions and potential impacts on EBS performance, (2) performing a screening analysis to assess the importance of cement/seepage interactions. As the work progresses and evolves on other studies, specifically the Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment (P andCE) Model (in progress), many of the issues associated with items 1 and 2, above, will be assessed. Such issues include: (1) Describing the mineralogy of the specified cementitious grout and its evolution over time. (2) Describing the composition of the water before contacting the grout. (3) Developing reasonable upper-bound estimates for the composition of water contacting grout, emphasizing pH and concentrations for anions such as sulfate. (4) Evaluating the equilibration of cement-influenced water with backfill and gas-phase CO 2 . (5) Developing reasonable-bound estimates for flow rate of affected water into the drift. The concept of estimating an ''upper-bound'' range for reaction between the grout and the seepage, particularly in terms of pH is based on equilibrium being established between the seepage and the grout. For example, this analysis can be based on equilibrium being established as

  9. The influence of compound admixtures on the properties of high-content slag cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongxu, L.; Xuequan, W.; Jinlin, S.; Yujiang, W.

    2000-01-01

    Based on the activation theory of alkali and sulfate, the influence of compound admixtures on the properties of high-content slag cement was studied by testing the strength, pore structure, hydrates, and microstructure, Test results show that compound admixtures can obviously improve the properties of high-content slag cement. The emphasis of the present research is two-fold: substituting gypsum with anhydrite and calcining gypsum. These both can improve early and later performance.

  10. Microbial-influenced cement degradation: Literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, R.D.; Hamilton, M.A.; McConnell, J.W. Jr.

    1993-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission stipulates that disposed low-level radioactive waste (LLW) be stabilized. Because of apparent ease of use and normal structural integrity, cement has been widely used as a binder to solidify LLW. However, the resulting waste forms are sometimes susceptible to failure due to the actions of waste constituents, stress, and environment. This report reviews literature which addresses the effect of microbiologically influenced chemical attack on cement-solidified LLW. Groups of microorganisms are identified, which are capable of metabolically converting organic and inorganic substrates into organic and mineral acids. Such acids aggressively react with concrete and can ultimately lead to structural failure. Mechanisms inherent in microbial-influenced degradation of cement-based material are the focus of this report. This report provides sufficient evidence of the potential for microbial-influenced deterioration of cement-solidified LLW to justify the enumeration of the conditions necessary to support the microbiological growth and population expansion, as well as the development of appropriate tests necessary to determine the resistance of cement-solidified LLW to microbiological-induced degradation that could impact the stability of the waste form

  11. Reinforcing of Cement Composites by Estabragh Fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merati, A. A.

    2014-04-01

    The influence of Estabragh fibres has been studied to improve the performance characteristics of the reinforced cement composites. The concrete shrinkage was evaluated by counting the number of cracks and measuring the width of cracks on the surface of concrete specimens. Although, the Estabragh fibres lose their strength in an alkali environment of cement composites, but, the ability of Estabragh fibres to bridge on the micro cracks in the concrete matrix causes to decrease the width of the cracks on the surface of the concrete samples in comparison with the plain concrete. However, considering the mechanical properties of specimens such as bending strength and impact resistance, the specimens with 0.25 % of Estabragh fibre performed better in all respects compared to the physical and mechanical properties of reinforced cement composite of concrete. Consequently, by adding 0.25 % of Estabragh fibres to the cement composite of concrete, a remarkable improvement in physical and mechanical properties of fibre-containing cement composite is achieved.

  12. Modified pavement cement concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botsman, L. N.; Ageeva, M. S.; Botsman, A. N.; Shapovalov, S. M.

    2018-03-01

    The paper suggests design principles of pavement cement concrete, which covers optimization of compositions and structures at the stage of mixture components selection due to the use of plasticizing agents and air-retaining substances that increase the viability of a concrete mixture. It also demonstrates advisability of using plasticizing agents together with air-retaining substances when developing pavement concrete compositions, which provides for the improvement of physical and mechanical properties of concrete and the reduction of cement binding agent consumption thus preserving strength indicators. The paper shows dependences of the main physical-mechanical parameters of concrete on cement consumption, a type and amount of additives.

  13. Tympanoplasty with ionomeric cement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Grøntved, A M

    2000-01-01

    with isolated erosion of the long incus process have been treated with a new surgical technique in which the ossicular chain was rebuilt with ionomeric cement. The results in hearing performance (mean pure-tone average (PTA) 0.5, 1 and 2 kHz) were evaluated pre- and post-surgery, and compared to those...... of > 10 dB, in 4 there was a slight improvement and in 2 a decline. The difference was not statistically significant. Hearing improvement using ionomeric cement in type II tympanoplasty was satisfactory. Reconstruction of the ossicular chain with ionomeric cement is recommended, as the procedure is easy...

  14. The ceric sulfate dosimeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergbakke, Erling

    1970-01-01

    The process employed for the determination of absorbed dose is the reduction of ceric ions to cerous ions in a solution of ceric sulfate and cerous sulfate in 0.8N sulfuric acid: Ce4+→Ce 3+ The absorbed dose is derived from the difference in ceric ion concentration before and after irradiation...

  15. the Danish cement industry

    OpenAIRE

    la Cour, Lisbeth Funding; Møllgård, Peter

    2001-01-01

    We test econometrically whether the sole Danish producer of cement holds a dominant position in the Danish market for (grey) cement. In import penetration tests, we find that its pricing and quantity decisions are independent of import price and quantity, implying that it can act to a considerable extent independently of its competitors. We also test whether it can act independently of its customers and find that its demand is inelastic with respect to its price. It thus holds a dominant posi...

  16. Radiobiological waste treatment-ashing treatment and immobilization with cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shengtao, Feng; Li, Gong; Li, Cheng; Benli, Wang; Lihong, Wang [China Inst. for Radiation Protection, Taiyuan, Shanxi (China)

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the results of the study on the treatment of radioactive biological waste in the China Institute for Radiation Protection (CIRP). The possibility of radiobiological waste treatment was investigated by using a RAF-3 type rapid ashing apparatus together with the immobilization of the resulted ash. This rapid ashing apparatus, developed by CIRP, is usually used for pretreatment of samples prior to chemical analysis and physical measurements. The results show that it can ash 3 kg of animal carcasses a batch, the ashing time is 5-7 h and the ash content is less than 4 wt%. The ashing temperature not exceeding 450 deg. C was used without any risk of high losses of radionuclides. The ash from the rapid ashing apparatus was demonstrated to be immobilized with ordinary silicate cement. The optimum cement/ash/water formulation of the cemented waste form was 35 {+-} 5 wt% cement, 29 {+-} 2 wt% water, and 36 {+-} 6 wt% ash. The performance of the waste form was in compliance with the technical requirements except for impact resistance. Mixing additives in immobilization formulations can improve the performance of the cemented ash waste form. The additives chosen were DH{sub 4A} flow promoter as a cement additive and vermiculite or zeolite as a supplement. The recommended formulation, i.e. an improved formulation of the cemented ash waste form is that additives DH{sub 4A} flow promoter and vermiculite (or zeolite) are added on the ground of optimum cement/ash/water formulation of the cemented waste form, the dosage of water, DH{sub 4A} and vermiculite (or zeolite) is 70 wt%, 0.5 wt% and {<=} 5 wt% of the cement dosage, respectively. The cemented ash waste forms obtained meet all the requirements for disposal. (author). 12 refs, 7 figs, 13 tabs.

  17. Radiobiological waste treatment-ashing treatment and immobilization with cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Shengtao; Gong Li; Cheng Li; Wang Benli; Wang Lihong

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the results of the study on the treatment of radioactive biological waste in the China Institute for Radiation Protection (CIRP). The possibility of radiobiological waste treatment was investigated by using a RAF-3 type rapid ashing apparatus together with the immobilization of the resulted ash. This rapid ashing apparatus, developed by CIRP, is usually used for pretreatment of samples prior to chemical analysis and physical measurements. The results show that it can ash 3 kg of animal carcasses a batch, the ashing time is 5-7 h and the ash content is less than 4 wt%. The ashing temperature not exceeding 450 deg. C was used without any risk of high losses of radionuclides. The ash from the rapid ashing apparatus was demonstrated to be immobilized with ordinary silicate cement. The optimum cement/ash/water formulation of the cemented waste form was 35 ± 5 wt% cement, 29 ± 2 wt% water, and 36 ± 6 wt% ash. The performance of the waste form was in compliance with the technical requirements except for impact resistance. Mixing additives in immobilization formulations can improve the performance of the cemented ash waste form. The additives chosen were DH 4A flow promoter as a cement additive and vermiculite or zeolite as a supplement. The recommended formulation, i.e. an improved formulation of the cemented ash waste form is that additives DH 4A flow promoter and vermiculite (or zeolite) are added on the ground of optimum cement/ash/water formulation of the cemented waste form, the dosage of water, DH 4A and vermiculite (or zeolite) is 70 wt%, 0.5 wt% and ≤ 5 wt% of the cement dosage, respectively. The cemented ash waste forms obtained meet all the requirements for disposal. (author). 12 refs, 7 figs, 13 tabs

  18. Hydration of Portland cement with additions of calcium sulfoaluminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Saoût, Gwenn; Lothenbach, Barbara; Hori, Akihiro; Higuchi, Takayuki; Winnefeld, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The effect of mineral additions based on calcium aluminates on the hydration mechanism of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) was investigated using isothermal calorimetry, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, solid state nuclear magnetic resonance and pore solution analysis. Results show that the addition of a calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSA) to the OPC does not affect the hydration mechanism of alite but controls the aluminate dissolution. In the second blend investigated, a rapid setting cement, the amorphous calcium aluminate reacts very fast to ettringite. The release of aluminum ions strongly retards the hydration of alite but the C–S–H has a similar composition as in OPC with no additional Al to Si substitution. As in CSA–OPC, the aluminate hydration is controlled by the availability of sulfates. The coupling of thermodynamic modeling with the kinetic equations predicts the amount of hydrates and pore solution compositions as a function of time and validates the model in these systems.

  19. Heparan sulfate biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Multhaupt, Hinke A B; Couchman, John R

    2012-01-01

    Heparan sulfate is perhaps the most complex polysaccharide known from animals. The basic repeating disaccharide is extensively modified by sulfation and uronic acid epimerization. Despite this, the fine structure of heparan sulfate is remarkably consistent with a particular cell type. This suggests...... that the synthesis of heparan sulfate is tightly controlled. Although genomics has identified the enzymes involved in glycosaminoglycan synthesis in a number of vertebrates and invertebrates, the regulation of the process is not understood. Moreover, the localization of the various enzymes in the Golgi apparatus has......-quality resolution of the distribution of enzymes. The EXT2 protein, which when combined as heterodimers with EXT1 comprises the major polymerase in heparan sulfate synthesis, has been studied in depth. All the data are consistent with a cis-Golgi distribution and provide a starting point to establish whether all...

  20. Ageing of Dry Cement Mixes for Finishing Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronius VEKTARIS

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Dry building mixes, stored in the air, absorb water vapor and CO2 gas and ageing because properties of binding materials, mostly Portland cement, deteriorate after its prehydration and carbonation. In this paper the ageing singularities of dry cement mixes for finishing purposes and additives for retarding this process has been determinated. Ordinary and quickly hardening Portland cements absorb H2O and CO2 more than white cement – about 70 % – 75 % and 30 % – 38 % per month of innitial mass, respectively. White cement is more resistant to prehydration and carbonation, because it contains less C3A, C4AF and alkali, characterized initial activity. Dry mixes with white cement, although slower, but still worse after stored. Influence of routine dry mortar mixes ingredients and additives (methyl cellulose, pigments, sand and lime on prehydration properties of the mixes for finishing purpose is not substantial. Significant positive influence comes from the addition of fatty acid salts (zinc stearate or sodium oleate. The dry cement mixes for finishing purpose has been recomended to hydrophobisate with one of these additives, adding about 1 % by weight of cement during preducing mixes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.3.5243

  1. Ageing of Dry Cement Mixes for Finishing Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronius VEKTARIS

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Dry building mixes, stored in the air, absorb water vapor and CO2 gas and ageing because properties of binding materials, mostly Portland cement, deteriorate after its prehydration and carbonation. In this paper the ageing singularities of dry cement mixes for finishing purposes and additives for retarding this process has been determinated. Ordinary and quickly hardening Portland cements absorb H2O and CO2 more than white cement – about 70 % – 75 % and 30 % – 38 % per month of innitial mass, respectively. White cement is more resistant to prehydration and carbonation, because it contains less C3A, C4AF and alkali, characterized initial activity. Dry mixes with white cement, although slower, but still worse after stored. Influence of routine dry mortar mixes ingredients and additives (methyl cellulose, pigments, sand and lime on prehydration properties of the mixes for finishing purpose is not substantial. Significant positive influence comes from the addition of fatty acid salts (zinc stearate or sodium oleate. The dry cement mixes for finishing purpose has been recomended to hydrophobisate with one of these additives, adding about 1 % by weight of cement during preducing mixes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.3.5243

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of a Novel Desulfobacteraceae Member from a Sulfate-Reducing Bioreactor Metagenome

    OpenAIRE

    Almstrand, Robert; Pinto, Ameet J.; Figueroa, Linda A.; Sharp, Jonathan O.

    2016-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria are important players in the global sulfur cycle and of considerable commercial interest. The draft genome sequence of a sulfate-reducing bacterium of the family Desulfobacteraceae, assembled from a sulfate-reducing bioreactor metagenome, indicates that heavy-metal? and acid-resistance traits of this organism may be of importance for its application in acid mine drainage mitigation.

  3. Characterization of polymer-modified cement as a solidification agent for the radwaste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Young-Yong; Kwak, Kyung-Kil; Hong, Dae-Seok; Ryu, Woo-Seog

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Polymer-modified cement (PMC) by modification with water-based resins. ► Determination of the optimized polymer content. ► Evaluation of the improved chemical resistance of the PMC. ► Decrease of the amount of ions released into the demineralized water. ► Highly improved property for the nuclide diffusivity at the Co-60. - Abstract: Polymer-modified cement can be produced by partially replacing cement hydrate binders in ordinary Portland cement with polymeric compounds. It is known that the addition of the polymer to the cement paste leads to improved quality, which would be expected to have a high chemical resistance. In order to investigate the application as a solidification agent for the radwaste, polymer-modified cement specimens, by modification with water-based resins, were prepared according to the polymer content from 0% to 30%. The optimized polymer content in the cement pastes was then determined through the compressive strength and the porosity test. Finally, the improved chemical resistance of the polymer-modified cement with the optimized polymer content was evaluated by the thermal cycling, the immersion, and the leaching tests. From the test results, the amount of ions released into the water showed lower values of about 20% at the polymer-modified cement. Especially, a highly improved nuclide diffusivity of Co-60 was observed in the polymer-modified cement.

  4. Compressive strength of different brands of cement (OPC) in province of Sindh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaskheli, G.B.; Kumar, A.; Sheikh, A.

    2009-01-01

    OPC (Ordinary Portland Cement) is the most common type of cement used in construction industry. Three major brands of OPC are normal OPC, SRC (Sulphate Resisting Cement) and SC (Slag Cement). It is seen that the variation in constituents of cement may cause serious effects on the quality of cement. Thus the motivation of this research is to study the basic properties (consistency, setting time, and fineness), compressive strength (cement mortar and concrete cubes) and modulus of elasticity of all the OPC brands (OPC, SRC and SC) manufactured in Sindh. In total 10 cement factories, altogether 21 different brands of cement, were studied in the light of BS and ASTM Code specifications. In total 126 mortar cubes (1:3), 252 concrete cubes (126 for 3000 psi mix design and remaining for 5000 psi) and 126 concrete cylinders (6 for the each brand of cement pertaining to 3000 psi and 5000 psi mix design) were manufactured and tested. Experimental results demonstrated that all the cement brands fulfilled the BS and ASTM Code requirements for (i) basic properties (ii) compressive strength of mortar cubes at 3 and 28 days curing age (iii) compressive strength of concrete cubes at 28 days curing age, and (iv) modulus of elasticity. Some of the cements did not fulfill the BS and ASTM Code requirements for compressive strength of concrete cubes at 7 days curing age. (author)

  5. Assessment of radon and thoron exhalation from Indian cement samples using smart radon and thoron monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, B.K.; Sapra, B.K; Agarwal, T.K.; Babu, D.A.R.

    2015-01-01

    It has been established that primarily, there exist two important sources that contribute to indoor radon/thoron namely, the exhalation from ground and building materials. The contribution from ground, although significant, is treated as a case of existing exposure. Then, the only source that can be controlled during the construction is the choice of building materials. Cement is an important building material used in the construction of houses and buildings in India. The housing sector is the largest cement consumer with 53% of the total Indian cement demand followed by the infrastructure sector. India with a production capacity of 165 million tones (MT) (in 2007), was the second largest cement producer in the world after China. The industry produces various types of cement like ordinary portland cement (OPC), Portland pozzolana cement (PPC), portland slag cement (PSC), rapid hardening portland cement (RHPC), sulphate resistant cement (SRC) and white cement (WC). Several studies have been undertaken on cement in various countries because it is commonly used in bulk quantities in the construction of houses and other civil structures. However, detailed information regarding the radon and thoron exhalation into indoor air from various types of cements produced in India is scarce. In the present work, an attempt has been made to systematically determine the radon and thoron exhalation from 50 cement samples (17 OPC, 15 PPC, 04 PSC, 06 RHPC, 04 WC and 04 SRC). The data thus obtained is used to calculate the indoor radon and thoron source term and the contributed inhalation dose based on a model room structure. The measured values of radon and thoron exhalation from cement samples were comparable with the reported values in other countries. This study showed that the cement samples used in civil constructions do not pose any radiological hazard to the Indian population. (author)

  6. Fabrication of Phosphate Cement with High Integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jae Hwan; Lee, Chang Hwa; Heo, Cheol Min; Jeon, Min Ku; Kang, Kweon Ho

    2011-01-01

    As the development of industrial society has accelerated, hazardous wastes are generated as well. According to the 1986 statistics of U.S.A, each person made 40 tons of waste in America that year. Treatment of radioactive waste is one of the most important and serious problems related to waste treatments, because its radioactivity and decaying heat have harmful effects to human and environment for a long time. Nuclear developed countries have used conventional method of treatment such as vitrification or cementation in order to stabilize and solidify radioactive waste. Although the former guarantees the formation of high leaching resistant and durable waste form, it requires several hundred (or even more than one thousand) temperature to melt glass frit. This process generates secondary waste volatilized, as well as being non-economical. Cement technology played a role of immobilizing low and middle class wastes. It has advantages of low temperature setting, low cost, easy process, etc. The alkalinity of ordinary cement, however, constrains the utility of cement to the solidification of alkaline waste. In addition, leachability and mechanical strength of cements are not quite appropriate for the stabilization of high level waste. In this regard, chemically bonded phosphate cement(CBPC), which sets by an acid-base reaction, is a potentially expectable material for immobilization of radioactive waste. CBPC not only sets at room temperature, but also encapsulates various isotopes chemically. The performance of CBPC can be enhanced by the addition of fly ash, sand, wollastonite, etc. This study aims at fabricating the CBPC containing fly ash with high integrity. Morphology, microstructure, and compressive strength are evaluated using SEM, and digital compressing machine

  7. Compressive strength of glass ionomer cements using different specimen dimensions Resistência à compressão de cimentos de ionômero de vidro utilizando-se diferentes tamanhos de corpos-de-prova

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Mallmann

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the compressive strength of two glass ionomer cements, a conventional one (Vitro Fil® - DFL and a resin-modified material (Vitro Fil LC® - DFL, using two test specimen dimensions: One with 6 mm in height and 4 mm in diameter and the other with 12 mm in height and 6 mm in diameter, according to the ISO 7489:1986 specification and the ANSI/ADA Specification No. 66 for Dental Glass Ionomer Cement, respectively. Ten specimens were fabricated with each material and for each size, in a total of 40 specimens. They were stored in distilled water for 24 hours and then subjected to a compressive strength test in a universal testing machine (EMIC, at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The data were statistically analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test (5%. Mean compressive strength values (MPa were: 54.00 ± 6.6 and 105.10 ± 17.3 for the 12 mm x 6 mm sample using Vitro Fil and Vitro Fil LC, respectively, and 46.00 ± 3.8 and 91.10 ± 8.2 for the 6 mm x 4 mm sample using Vitro Fil and Vitro Fil LC, respectively. The resin-modified glass ionomer cement obtained the best results, irrespective of specimen dimensions. For both glass ionomer materials, the 12 mm x 6 mm matrix led to higher compressive strength results than the 6 mm x 4 mm matrix. A higher variability in results was observed when the glass ionomer cements were used in the larger matrices.Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar a resistência à compressão de dois cimentos de ionômero de vidro, um convencional (Vitro Fil® - DFL e outro modificado por resina (Vitro Fil LC® - DFL, utilizando-se dois tamanhos de amostras: uma com 6 mm de altura e 4 mm de diâmetro e outra com 12 mm de altura e 6 mm de diâmetro, seguindo-se a especificação 7489:1986 da ISO e a especificação n. 66 da ANSI/ADA para Cimento Dental de Ionômero de Vidro, respectivamente. Foram confeccionados 10 corpos-de-prova (CP de cada material para cada tamanho de amostra, totalizando

  8. Cement for Oil Well Cementing Operations in Ghana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael

    For Portland cement to qualify as oil well cement, the chemical and physical properties must meet ..... Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University,. Stanford, California, pp. ... Construction”, PhD Thesis, Kwame Nkrumah. University of Science ...

  9. Diamond dispersed cemented carbide produced without using ultra high pressure equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriguchi, H.; Tsuzuki, K.; Ikegaya, A.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a composite material of dispersed diamond particles in cemented carbide without using ultra high pressure equipment. The developed diamond dispersed cemented carbide combines the excellent properties of cemented carbide with diamond and also provides 1.5 times improved fracture toughness over that of cemented carbide. They also show 10 times higher wear resistance over that of cemented carbide in a wear resistance test against bearing steel, and 5 times greater grindability than diamond compacts. Because ultra high pressure equipment is not used to produce the developed material, large compacts over 100 mm in diameter can be manufactured. The developed material showed 10-25 times higher wear resistance in real use as wear-resistant tools such as centerless blades and work-rests. (author)

  10. Assessment of cement durability in repository environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, E.G.A.; Vicente, R.; Isiko, V.L.K.; Miyamoto, H.; Marumo, J.T.; Gobbo, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    The present research aimed at investigating the durability of cement paste under nuclear waste repository conditions using accelerated tests. Cement paste samples are examined after being exposed to the environmental conditions that are expected to prevail in the repository environment and the results are compared with those obtained with unexposed specimens or specimens exposed to reference conditions. The following exposure conditions were selected: a) Immersion in salt solution, distilled water, or kept in dry storage; b) Room temperature (20 C. degrees) or high temperature (60 C. degrees); c) Immersion time of 30 days or 60 days (not for dry storage); d) Irradiation to a dose of (400 kGy) or background radiation (0 kGy). After exposure to the stressing conditions, the effects of each factor on the cement paste samples were observed by changes in their characteristics. Compressive strength tests were performed on all samples and some of them were investigated in terms of changes in mineralogy by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). With the results obtained so far it was possible to point out the following conclusions. First, after a period of immersion in water, cement paste samples further hydrated and presented higher mechanical resistance, as expected. Secondly, dry storage did not allow a complete hydration as a consequence of pore water evaporation. High temperatures intensified this process and led to the ettringite decomposition to meta-ettringite. Thirdly, higher temperature accelerated hydration kinetics and promoted higher mechanical resistance in samples kept under immersion. Fourthly, the irradiation dose applied was unable to change the mineralogy of cement paste samples and fifthly, no statistically significant differences were observed between 30 or 60 days exposure time, for the test conditions

  11. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fred Sabins

    2001-10-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses tasks performed in the fourth quarter as well as the other three quarters of the past year. The subjects that were covered in previous reports and that are also discussed in this report include: Analysis of field laboratory data of active cement applications from three oil-well service companies; Preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; Summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; and Comparison of compressive strengths of ULHS systems using ultrasonic and crush methods Results reported from the fourth quarter include laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems--foamed and sodium silicate slurries. These comparison studies were completed for two different densities (10.0 and 11.5 lb/gal) and three different field application scenarios. Additional testing included the mechanical properties of ULHS systems and other lightweight systems. Studies were also performed to examine the effect that circulation by centrifugal pump during mixing has on breakage of ULHS.

  12. SYNTHESIS OF EXPANDER TO PREVENT CONTRACTION OF CEMENT STONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elenova Aurika Almazovna

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article contains the results of studies of the use of additives containing crystallization components significantly affecting the curing of cement, improving the structure of cement stone and concrete. The crystalline component is obtained using the rotary-pulse unit, which provides not only the grinding of agents, but their interaction with each other as well in order to accelerate the hydration and structure formation in cement stone. The degree, and kinetics of hydration, the composition of hydrated phases, the structure of the additives and cement stone was studied using the following methods: x-ray diffraction (XRD, differential thermal analysis (DTA, scanning electron microscope (SEM. Mechanical properties of cement were determined by standard methods and techniques. The expander produced by means of hydrodynamic activation of the sulfoaluminate clinker (SAC consists of ettringite and hydrated calcium silicates, which are characterized by high dispersion rate (less than 10 µm and reactivity as the seed for the crystallization of hydrated compounds. The introduction of the ultrafine additives of the crystalline SAC (within 1-5% was discovered to cause expansion of the cement stone. Implementation of the additives increases cement hydration and contributes to the formation of active centers of crystallization that lead to the fast formation of ettringite, hydrated calcium aluminates and calcium silicates. The activated crystalline additive provides for significant reduction of porosity, initial curing, and high strength of cement stone. In addition, the additive is an expansive component, forming needle-like crystals of ettringite during hydration. These microcrystals grow in the capillaries of cement stone, filling them, and create conditions for improving the crack resistance of cement concrete.

  13. Ferrous Sulfate (Iron)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are allergic to ferrous sulfate, any other medications tartrazine (a yellow dye in some processed foods and ... in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from ...

  14. Holothurian Fucosylated Chondroitin Sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor H. Pomin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FucCS is a structurally distinct glycosaminoglycan found in sea cucumber species. It has the same backbone composition of alternating 4-linked glucuronic acid and 3-linked N-acetyl galactosamine residues within disaccharide repeating units as regularly found in mammalian chondroitin sulfates. However, FucCS has also sulfated fucosyl branching units 3-O-linked to the acid residues. The sulfation patterns of these branches vary accordingly with holothurian species and account for different biological actions and responses. FucCSs may exhibit anticoagulant, antithrombotic, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antiviral, and pro-angiogenic activities, besides its beneficial effects in hemodialysis, cellular growth modulation, fibrosis and hyperglycemia. Through an historical overview, this document covers most of the science regarding the holothurian FucCS. Both structural and medical properties of this unique GAG, investigated during the last 25 years, are systematically discussed herein.

  15. DHEA-sulfate test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DHEA sulfate may be due to: Adrenal gland disorders that produce lower than normal amounts of adrenal hormones, including adrenal insufficiency and Addison disease The pituitary gland not producing normal amounts of its hormones ( hypopituitarism ) ...

  16. Direct Sulfation of Limestone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Guilin; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Wedel, Stig

    2007-01-01

    The direct sulfation of limestone was studied in a laboratory fixed-bed reactor. It is found that the direct sulfation of limestone involves nucleation and crystal grain growth of the solid product (anhydrite). At 823 K and at low-conversions (less than about 0.5 %), the influences of SO2, O-2...... and CO2 on the direct sulfation of limestone corresponds to apparent reaction orders of about 0.2, 0.2 and -0.5, respectively. Water is observed to promote the sulfation reaction and increase the apparent reaction orders of SO2 and O-2. The influence of O-2 at high O-2 concentrations (> about 15...... %) becomes negligible. In the temperature interval from 723 K to 973 K, an apparent activation energy of about 104 kJ/mol is observed for the direct sulfation of limestone. At low temperatures and low conversions, the sulfation process is most likely under mixed control by chemical reaction and solid...

  17. Calcium phosphate cement scaffolds with PLGA fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcellos, Letícia Araújo; dos Santos, Luís Alberto

    2013-04-01

    The use of calcium phosphate-based biomaterials has revolutionized current orthopedics and dentistry in repairing damaged parts of the skeletal system. Among those biomaterials, the cement made of hydraulic grip calcium phosphate has attracted great interest due to its biocompatibility and hardening "in situ". However, these cements have low mechanical strength compared with the bones of the human body. In the present work, we have studied the attainment of calcium phosphate cement powders and their addition to poly (co-glycolide) (PLGA) fibers to increase mechanical properties of those cements. We have used a new method that obtains fibers by dripping different reagents. PLGA fibers were frozen after lyophilized. With this new method, which was patented, it was possible to obtain fibers and reinforcing matrix which furthered the increase of mechanical properties, thus allowing the attainment of more resistant materials. The obtained materials were used in the construction of composites and scaffolds for tissue growth, keeping a higher mechanical integrity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. CEMENT BONDED COMPOSITES – A MECHANICAL REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Frybort

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the last years promising cement bonded wood composites for structural purposes have evolved. Durability, toughness, high dimen-sional stability, resistance against environmental influences such as biodegradation or weathering but also availability of the raw material as well as economic factors are features which can make cement-bonded composites superior to conventionally bonded composites. This paper reviews the relationship of diverse parameters, including density and particle size on mechanical and physical properties of cement bonded composites, based on published sources from the last 60 years. For general and recent information about bonding mechanisms, compatibility and setting problems, determination and improvement of compatibility, the used raw materials as well as accelerators are discussed. The main part deals with failure mechanisms in connection with several production parameters. Furthermore, the influence of particle size and geometry, orientation of the particles, cement-wood ratio and the effect of accelerators and treatment of the particles on modulus of elasticity, modulus of rupture as well as thickness swelling are discussed.

  19. Concrete = aggregate, cement, water?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelinek, J.

    1990-01-01

    Concrete for the Temelin nuclear power plant is produced to about 70 different formulae. For quality production, homogeneous properties of aggregates, accurate proportioning devices, technological discipline and systematic inspections and tests should be assured. The results are reported of measuring compression strength after 28 days for different concrete samples. The results of such tests allow reducing the proportion of cement, which brings about considerable savings. Reduction in cement quantities can also be achieved by adding ash to the concrete mixes. Ligoplast, a plasticizer addition is used for improving workability. (M.D). 8 figs

  20. Technology Roadmaps: Cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    To support its roadmap work focusing on key technologies for emissions reductions, the International Energy Agency (IEA) also investigated one particular industry: cement. Cement production includes technologies that are both specific to this industry and those that are shared with other industries (e.g., grinding, fuel preparation, combustion, crushing, transport). An industry specific roadmap provides an effective mechanism to bring together several technology options. It outlines the potential for technological advancement for emissions reductions in one industry, as well as potential cross-industry collaboration.

  1. Reducing cement's CO2 footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing process for Portland cement causes high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. However, environmental impacts can be reduced by using more energy-efficient kilns and replacing fossil energy with alternative fuels. Although carbon capture and new cements with less CO2 emission are still in the experimental phase, all these innovations can help develop a cleaner cement industry.

  2. Cement Mason's Curriculum. Instructional Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendirx, Laborn J.; Patton, Bob

    To assist cement mason instructors in providing comprehensive instruction to their students, this curriculum guide treats both the skills and information necessary for cement masons in commercial and industrial construction. Ten sections are included, as follow: related information, covering orientation, safety, the history of cement, and applying…

  3. Cementation of liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremenkov, V.

    2004-01-01

    The cementation methods for immobilisation of radioactive wastes are discussed in terms of methodology, chemistry and properties of the different types of cements as well as the worldwide experience in this field. Two facilities for cementation - DEWA and MOWA - are described in details

  4. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2016-08-16

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  5. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Floyd, III, William C.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Vericella, John J.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2017-03-14

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  6. Thermal and Electrical Characterization of the Carbon Nanofibers Based Cement Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka ŚLOSARCZYK

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the influence of chemical modification of vapor grown carbon nanofibers (VGCnFs on the thermal and electrical properties of the cement composites. The surface modification of nanofibers was performed by means of ozone and nitric acid treatments. It was shown that the oxidized carbon nanofibers surface plays an important role in shaping the mechanical and especially electrical properties of cement composite. For cement matrix modified with carbon nanofibers subjected to oxidized treatment, the slightly increase of cement paste resistivity was observed. It confirms the better adhesion of carbon nanofibers to cement paste. However, independently of carbon nanofibers modification, the occurrence of VGCnFs in cement paste increased the electrical conductivity of the composite in comparison to the cement paste without fibers. The obtained values of electrical resistivity were comparable with values of cement composites modified with 4 mm long carbon fibers. Moreover, it was shown that the chemical modification of carbon nanofibers surface does not influence on the thermal properties of cement composites. In case of cement paste with unmodified and modified carbon nanofibers, the Seebeck voltage was proportional to the temperature difference and was independent of the oxidation degree of carbon nanofibers.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.2.14993

  7. The mechanical effect of the existing cement mantle on the in-cement femoral revision.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, Parnell

    2012-08-01

    Cement-in-cement revision hip arthroplasty is an increasingly popular technique to replace a loose femoral stem which retains much of the original cement mantle. However, some concern exists regarding the retention of the existing fatigued and aged cement in such cement-in-cement revisions. This study investigates whether leaving an existing fatigued and aged cement mantle degrades the mechanical performance of a cement-in-cement revision construct.

  8. Gas migration through cement slurries analysis: A comparative laboratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arian Velayati

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cementing is an essential part of every drilling operation. Protection of the wellbore from formation fluid invasion is one of the primary tasks of a cement job. Failure in this task results in catastrophic events, such as blow outs. Hence, in order to save the well and avoid risky and operationally difficult remedial cementing, slurry must be optimized to be resistant against gas migration phenomenon. In this paper, performances of the conventional slurries facing gas invasion were reviewed and compared with modified slurry containing special gas migration additive by using fluid migration analyzer device. The results of this study reveal the importance of proper additive utilization in slurry formulations. The rate of gas flow through the slurry in neat cement is very high; by using different types of additives, we observe obvious changes in the performance of the cement system. The rate of gas flow in neat class H cement was reported as 36000 ml/hr while the optimized cement formulation with anti-gas migration and thixotropic agents showed a gas flow rate of 13.8 ml/hr.

  9. Tensile bond strength between different glass ionomer cement and composite resin using three adhesive systems Avaliação da resistência de união interfacial entre diferentes cimentos de ionômero de vidro e resina composta, usando três sistemas adesivos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Dias

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the tensile bond strength (TBS among a Composite Resin (Filtek Z250 and six conventional Glass Ionomer Cements, three used for lining (Bioglass F, Vidrion F and Glass Ionomer L.C. and three for restorations (Ketac Fil, Vidrion R and Glass Ionomer type II etched and non etched, using three adhesive systems (Single Bond, Bond 1 and Stae. Thirty-six groups were made, ten samples for each group, totalizing 360 specimens. There were significant differences on TBS among groups. Group 31 (Glass Ionomer Cement type II showed the highest TBS (9.65 MPa in comparison to other tested groups. Group 16 (Glass Ionomer L.C presented the lowest TBS (2.72 MPa in comparison to all the other groups. Therefore, it can be concluded that the acid etching of the Glass Ionomer Cement is not necessary. Foi avaliada, ">in vitro, a resistência de união, por tração, entre uma Resina Composta micro-híbrida (Filtek Z-250 e seis Cimentos de Ionômero de Vidro (CIV convencionais: três utilizados para base/forramento (Bioglass F, Vidrion F e Glass Ionomer Lining Cement e três para restauração (Ketac Fil, Vidrion R e Glass Ionomer Cement type II, sem e com condicionamento ácido ortofosfórico a 37%, usando três sistemas adesivos (Single Bond, Bond 1 e Stae. Foram confeccionados 36 grupos de 10 corpos-de-prova cada, totalizando 360 espécimes. Para análise estatística, foi utilizado o teste de Tukey-Kramer. Dentre os três CIV de base/forramento, os grupos 2 e 5 (Bioglass F apresentaram valores mais altos de adesividade à resina (7,24 e 6,03 MPa respectivamente. Quanto aos três CIV de restauração, todos apresentaram maior resistência de união, superior aos de base/forramento, sendo que o Glass Ionomer Cement type II (Grupo 31 e Vidrion R apresentaram maior força de adesão (9,65 e 7,47 MPa à resina composta. O grupo 16 (Glass Ionomer L.C. mostrou menor adesividade à resina (2,72 MPa. Houve diferenças significantes

  10. Predicting the durability of Portland cement systems in aggressive environments--Laboratory validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maltais, Y.; Samson, E.; Marchand, J.

    2004-01-01

    Portland cement systems are often exposed to severe environments, and their long-term performance is of concern. The main results of a comprehensive investigation of deterioration processes that may affect the behavior of Portland cement systems exposed to chemically aggressive environments is presented. As part of this investigation, well-cured cement paste discs were fully characterized and exposed to deionized water and sodium sulfate solutions. Degradation experiments were conducted under saturated and unsaturated conditions. At the end of the exposure period, microstructural alterations were investigated by microprobe analyses, scanning electron microscope observations and energy-dispersive X-ray analyses. Test results provide information on the basic aspects of various degradation phenomena, such as decalcification and external sulfate attack. Experimental results were also compared with results obtained by a numerical model. The analysis reveals that the intricate microstructural features of the degraded samples could be accurately reproduced by the model

  11. Optimization and characterization of a cemented ultimate-storage product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, H.

    1981-12-01

    The U- and Pu-containing packaging wastes can be homogeneously cemented after a washing and fragmentation process. Both finely crushed and coarsely fragmented raw wastes yield products with sufficient mechanical stability. The processability limit of the coarsely fragmented raw waste using cement paste or mortar is largely determined by the cellulose content, which is not to exceed 1.3% by weight in the end waste. Of 9 binders studied, the most corrosion-resistant products were obtained with blast-furnace slag cement, whereas poured concrete and Maxit are much less resistant in five-component brine. In the cemented product, hydrolysis of plasticizers (DOP) from plastics (PVC) occurs, leading to release of 2-ethyl-hexanol. This reaction occurs to a much lower degree with blast-furnace slag cement than with all other binders studied. The binder chosen for further tests consists of blast-furnace slag cement, concrete fluidizer and a stabilizer, and is processed at a W/C ratio of 0.43.

  12. Shrinkage Module of Soil Samples with Different Cement Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohannad Sabry

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The differences in soil's body mass during shrinkage over time have changes in soil physical properties which provide an important reason to check the design of underground foundations in expansive soils. In this paper, a state-of-art of the soil heat stress-strain relationship prediction methods is checked using soil engineering laboratory experiments and Matlab R2013b numerical modelling. The shrinkage of soils with different cement content of (0%, 2%, 4%, 6% and 8% with the same water content of 20 percent in room temperature for 24 hours, are critically reviewed in terms of their predictive shrinkage along with their strengths and flexural behaviour. The review highlights the prediction methods present to determine the effect of heat stress on the shrinkage of soil samples with different cement content after classifying the soils into clay, silt and sand depending on their particle size using sieve and hydrometer experiments. The results of the soil engineering laboratory experiments showed that as the cement content increases, the shrinkage of soil decreases as a result of increased elasticity in soil. The numerical analysis using finite element method in Matlab R2013b shows that as the cement content increases the displacement in the soil sample decreases and that the soil sample with 8% cement content has more resistance to shrinkage and less displacement than the soil with 6% cement, which has less resistance to heat stresses and more displacement.

  13. Biogeochemical interactions between of coal mine water and gas well cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliver, D. M.; Gardiner, J. B.; Kutchko, B. G.; Hakala, A.; Spaulding, R.; Tkach, M. K.; Ross, D.

    2017-12-01

    Unconventional natural gas wells drilled in Northern Appalachia often pass through abandoned coal mines before reaching the Marcellus or Utica formations. Biogeochemical interactions between coal mine waters and gas well cements have the potential to alter the cement and compromise its sealing integrity. This study investigates the mineralogical, geochemical, and microbial changes of cement cores exposed to natural coal mine waters. Static reactors with Class H Portland cement cores and water samples from an abandoned bituminous Pittsburgh coal mine simulated the cement-fluid interactions at relevant temperature for time periods of 1, 2, 4, and 6 weeks. Fluids were analyzed for cation and anion concentrations and extracted DNA was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and shotgun sequencing. Cement core material was evaluated via scanning electron microscope. Results suggest that the sampled coal mine water altered the permeability and matrix mineralogy of the cement cores. Scanning electron microscope images display an increase in mineral precipitates inside the cement matrix over the course of the experiment. Chemistry results from the reaction vessels' effluent waters display decreases in dissolved calcium, iron, silica, chloride, and sulfate. The microbial community decreased in diversity over the 6-week experiment, with Hydrogenophaga emerging as dominant. These results provide insight in the complex microbial-fluid-mineral interactions of these environments. This study begins to characterize the rarely documented biogeochemical impacts that coal waters may have on unconventional gas well integrity.

  14. Cementation of Nuclear Graphite Using Geopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girke, N.A.; Steinmetz, H-J.; Bukaemsky, A.; Bosbach, D.; Hermann, E.; Griebel, I.

    2016-01-01

    Geopolymers are solid aluminosilicate materials usually formed by alkali hydroxide or alkali silicate activation of solid precursors such as coal fly ash, calcined clay and/or metallurgical slag. Today the primary application of geopolymer technology is in the development of alternatives to Portland-based cements. Variations in the ratio of aluminium to silicon, and alkali to silicon or addition of structure support, produce geopolymers with different physical and mechanical properties. These materials have an amorphous three-dimensional structure that gives geopolymers certain properties, such as fire and acid resistance, low leach rate, which make them an ideal substitute for ordinary Portland cement (OPC) in a wide range of applications especially in conditioning and storage of radioactive waste. Therefore investigations have been initiated on how and to which amount graphite as a hydrophobic material can be mixed with cement or concrete to form stable waste products and which concretes fulfil the necessary specifications best. As a result, geopolymers have been identified as a promising matrix for graphite containing nuclear wastes. With geopolymers, both favourable properties in the cementation process and a high long time structural stability of the products can be achieved. Investigations include: • direct mixing of graphite with geopolymers with or without sand as a mechanically stabilizing medium; • production of cement-graphite granulates as intermediate products and embedding of these granulates in geopolymer; • coating of formed graphite pieces with geopolymer.The report shows that carbon in the form of graphite can both be integrated with different grain size spectra as well as shaped in the hydraulic binder geopolymer and meets the requirements for a stable long-term immobilisation. (author)

  15. Root perforations treatment using mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Neto, José Dias da; Brito, Rafael Horácio de; Schnaider, Taylor Brandão; Gragnani, Alfredo; Engelman, Mírian; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2010-12-01

    Clinical, radiological and histological evaluation of root perforations treated with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) or Portland cements, and calcium sulfate barrier. One molar and 11 premolar teeth of a male mongrel dog received endodontic treatment and furcations were perforated with a high-speed round bur and treated with a calcium sulfate barrier. MTA, Portland cement type II (PCII) and type V (PCV), and white Portland cement (WPC) were used as obturation materials. The teeth were restored with composite resin and periapical radiographs were taken. The animal was euthanized 120 days post-surgery for treatment evaluation. Right lower first premolar (MTA), right lower third premolar (PCV), left lower second premolar (MTA), and right lower second premolar (WPC): clinically normal, slightly radio-transparent area on the furcation, little inflammatory infiltrate, and new-bone formation. Left lower third premolar (PCII), right upper first premolar (WPC), right upper third premolar (PCII), and left upper first molar (PCV): clinically normal, radiopaque area on the furcation, and new-bone formation. Right upper second premolar (MTA), left upper second premolar (WPC), left upper third premolar (PCII): presence of furcation lesion, large radiolucent area, and intense inflammatory infiltrate. All obturation materials used in this study induced new-bone formation.

  16. Structural degradation of acrylic bone cements due to in vivo and simulated aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Kerry F; Ries, Michael D; Pruitt, Lisa A

    2003-05-01

    Acrylic bone cement is the primary load-bearing material used for the attachment of orthopedic devices to adjoining bone. Degradation of acrylic-based cements in vivo results in a loss of structural integrity of the bone-cement-prosthesis interface and limits the longevity of cemented orthopedic implants. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of in vivo aging on the structure of the acrylic bone cement and to develop an in vitro artificial aging protocol that mimics the observed degradation. Three sets of retrievals are examined in this study: Palacos brand cement retrieved from hip replacements, and Simplex brand cement retrieved from both hip and knee replacement surgeries. In vitro aging is performed using oxidative and acidic environments on three acrylic-based cements: Palacos, Simplex, and CORE. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are used to examine the evolution of molecular weight and chemical species within the acrylic cements due to both in vivo and simulated aging. GPC analysis indicates that molecular weight is degraded in the hip retrievals but not in the knee retrievals. Artificial aging in an oxidative environment best reproduces this degradation mechanism. FTIR analysis indicates that there exists a chemical evolution within the cement due to in vivo and in vitro aging. These findings are consistent with scission-based degradation schemes in the cement. Based on the results of this study, a pathway for structural degradation of acrylic bone cement is proposed. The findings from this investigation have broad applicability to acrylic-based cements and may provide guidance for the development of new bone cements that resist degradation in the body. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The DHEA-sulfate depot following P450c17 inhibition supports the case for AKR1C3 inhibition in high risk localized and advanced castration resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamae, Daniel; Mostaghel, Elahe; Montgomery, Bruce; Nelson, Peter S; Balk, Steven P; Kantoff, Philip W; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Penning, Trevor M

    2015-06-05

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Treatment of localized high-risk disease and de novo metastatic disease frequently leads to relapse. These metastatic castration resistant prostate cancers (mCRPC) claim a high mortality rate, despite the extended survival afforded by the growing armamentarium of androgen deprivation, radiation and immunotherapies. Here, we review two studies of neoadjuvant treatment of high-risk localized prostate cancer prior to prostatectomy, the total androgen pathway suppression (TAPS) trial and the neoadjuvant abiraterone acetate (AA) trial. These two trials assessed the efficacy of the non-specific P450c17 inhibitor, ketoconazole and the specific P450c17 inhibitor, AA, to inhibit tissue and serum androgen levels. Furthermore, a novel and validated stable isotope dilution liquid chromatography electrospray ionization selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry assay was used to accurately quantify adrenal and gonadal androgens in circulation during the course of these trials. The adrenal androgens, Δ(4)-androstene-3,17-dione, dehydroepiandrosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate were significantly reduced in the patients receiving ketoconazole or AA compared to those who did not. However, in both trials, a significant amount of DHEA-S (∼20 μg/dL) persists and thus may serve as a depot for intratumoral conversion to the potent androgen receptor ligands, testosterone (T) and 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). The final step in conversion of Δ(4)-androstene-3,17-dione and 5α-androstanedione to T and DHT, respectively, is catalyzed by AKR1C3. We therefore present the case that in the context of the DHEA-S depot, P450c17 and AKR1C3 inhibition may be an effective combinatorial treatment strategy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Compressive Strength, Chloride Permeability, and Freeze-Thaw Resistance of MWNT Concretes under Different Chemical Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated compressive strength, chloride penetration, and freeze-thaw resistance of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT concrete. More than 100 cylindrical specimens were used to assess test variables during sensitivity observations, including water-cement ratios (0.75, 0.5, and 0.4 and exposure to chemical agents (including gum arabic, propanol, ethanol, sodium polyacrylate, methylcellulose, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and silane. To determine the adequate sonication time for MWNT dispersal in water, the compressive strengths of MWNT concrete cylinders were measured after sonication times ranging from 2 to 24 minutes. The results demonstrated that the addition of MWNT can increase the compressive strength of concrete by up to 108%. However, without chemical treatment, MWNT concretes tend to have poor freeze-thaw resistance. Among the different chemical treatments, MWNT concrete treated with sodium polyacrylate has the best compressive strength, chloride resistance, and freeze-thaw durability.

  19. Compressive strength, chloride permeability, and freeze-thaw resistance of MWNT concretes under different chemical treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingang; Rhee, Inkyu; Wang, Yao; Xi, Yunping

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated compressive strength, chloride penetration, and freeze-thaw resistance of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) concrete. More than 100 cylindrical specimens were used to assess test variables during sensitivity observations, including water-cement ratios (0.75, 0.5, and 0.4) and exposure to chemical agents (including gum arabic, propanol, ethanol, sodium polyacrylate, methylcellulose, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and silane). To determine the adequate sonication time for MWNT dispersal in water, the compressive strengths of MWNT concrete cylinders were measured after sonication times ranging from 2 to 24 minutes. The results demonstrated that the addition of MWNT can increase the compressive strength of concrete by up to 108%. However, without chemical treatment, MWNT concretes tend to have poor freeze-thaw resistance. Among the different chemical treatments, MWNT concrete treated with sodium polyacrylate has the best compressive strength, chloride resistance, and freeze-thaw durability.

  20. Mineral resource of the month: hydraulic cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2012-01-01

    Hydraulic cements are the binders in concrete and most mortars and stuccos. Concrete, particularly the reinforced variety, is the most versatile of all construction materials, and most of the hydraulic cement produced worldwide is portland cement or similar cements that have portland cement as a basis, such as blended cements and masonry cements. Cement typically makes up less than 15 percent of the concrete mix; most of the rest is aggregates. Not counting the weight of reinforcing media, 1 ton of cement will typically yield about 8 tons of concrete.

  1. Cement-latex grouting mortar for cementing boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kateev, I S; Golyshkina, L A; Gorbunova, I V; Kurochkin, B M; Vakula, Ya V

    1980-01-01

    The need for the development of cement-latex grouting mortar for the purpose of separating strata when reinforcing boreholes at deposits in the Tatar Associated SSR is evaluated. Results of studies of the physical and mechanical properties of cement-latex grouting mortar systems (mortar plus brick) are presented. Formulas for preparing cement-latex grouting mortor are evaluated and results of industrial tests of such mortars shown.

  2. US cement industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nisbet, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the cement and concrete industry, and provides data on energy use and carbon dioxide emissions. The potential impact of an energy tax on the industry is briefly assessed. Opportunities identified for reducing carbon dioxide emissions include improved energy efficiency, alternative fuels, and alternative materials. The key factor in determining CO{sub 2} emissions is the level of domestic production. The projected improvement in energy efficiency and the relatively slow growth in domestic shipments indicate that CO{sub 2} emissions in 2000 should be about 5% above the 1990 target. However, due to the cyclical nature of cement demand, emissions will probably be above target levels during peak demand and below target levels during demand troughs. 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Mechanical, material, and antimicrobial properties of acrylic bone cement impregnated with silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slane, Josh; Vivanco, Juan; Rose, Warren; Ploeg, Heidi-Lynn; Squire, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Prosthetic joint infection is one of the most serious complications that can lead to failure of a total joint replacement. Recently, the rise of multidrug resistant bacteria has substantially reduced the efficacy of antibiotics that are typically incorporated into acrylic bone cement. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are an attractive alternative to traditional antibiotics resulting from their broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and low bacterial resistance. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to incorporate metallic silver nanoparticles into acrylic bone cement and quantify the effects on the cement's mechanical, material and antimicrobial properties. AgNPs at three loading ratios (0.25, 0.5, and 1.0% wt/wt) were incorporated into a commercial bone cement using a probe sonication technique. The resulting cements demonstrated mechanical and material properties that were not substantially different from the standard cement. Testing against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis using Kirby-Bauer and time-kill assays demonstrated no antimicrobial activity against planktonic bacteria. In contrast, cements modified with AgNPs significantly reduced biofilm formation on the surface of the cement. These results indicate that AgNP-loaded cement is of high potential for use in primary arthroplasty where prevention of bacterial surface colonization is vital. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Response of a PGNAA setup for pozzolan-based cement concrete specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, A.A.; Garwan, M.A.; Maslehuddin, M.; Nagadi, M.M.; Al-Amoudi, O.S.B.; Raashid, M.

    2010-01-01

    Pozzolanic materials are added to Portland cement concrete to increase its durability, particularly corrosion-resistance. In this study the elemental composition of a pozzolanic cement concrete was measured non-destructively utilizing an accelerator-based Prompt Gamma Ray Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) setup. The optimum size of the pozzolanic cement concrete specimen was obtained through Monte Carlo simulations. The simulation results were experimentally verified through the γ-ray yield measurement from the pozzolanic cement concrete specimens as a function of their radii. The concentration of the pozzolanic material in the cement concrete specimens was evaluated by measuring γ-ray yield for calcium and iron from pozzolanic cement concrete specimens containing 5-80 wt% pozzolan. A good agreement was noted between the experimental values and the Monte Carlo simulation results, indicating an excellent response of the KFUPM accelerator-based PGNAA setup for pozzolan based concrete.

  5. Response of a PGNAA setup for pozzolan-based cement concrete specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqvi, A.A. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: aanaqvi@kfupm.edu.sa; Garwan, M.A. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Maslehuddin, M. [Center for Engineering Research, Research Institute, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Nagadi, M.M. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Amoudi, O.S.B. [Department of Civil Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Raashid, M. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2010-04-15

    Pozzolanic materials are added to Portland cement concrete to increase its durability, particularly corrosion-resistance. In this study the elemental composition of a pozzolanic cement concrete was measured non-destructively utilizing an accelerator-based Prompt Gamma Ray Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) setup. The optimum size of the pozzolanic cement concrete specimen was obtained through Monte Carlo simulations. The simulation results were experimentally verified through the {gamma}-ray yield measurement from the pozzolanic cement concrete specimens as a function of their radii. The concentration of the pozzolanic material in the cement concrete specimens was evaluated by measuring {gamma}-ray yield for calcium and iron from pozzolanic cement concrete specimens containing 5-80 wt% pozzolan. A good agreement was noted between the experimental values and the Monte Carlo simulation results, indicating an excellent response of the KFUPM accelerator-based PGNAA setup for pozzolan based concrete.

  6. Chemical environment in cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.B.; Angus, M.J.; McCulloch, C.E.; Macphee, D.; Rahman, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    The alkalinity of Portland cements is responsible for precipitation and low solubility of many radwastes species. The sources of alkalinity are evaluated and two chemical models, based on experimental and theoretical data presented enabling the effect of blending agents (PFA, silica fume, etc.) to be evaluated and the alkalinity of the system at longer ages predicted. The data take the form of a solubility model which is applicable to non-heat generating wastes. 7 refs., 10 figs

  7. Kinetic modeling of cement slurry synthesized with Henna extract in oil well acidizing treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Aghajafari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Acidizing treatment in petroleum reservoirs is a short-term and viable strategy to preserve the productivity of a well. There is a major concern for the degradation of cement sheath integrity, leading to poor zonal isolation and environmental issues. Therefore, it is essential to understand how the cement behaves when attacked by hydrochloric acid. In this study, a cement slurry by incorporation of the Henna extract, as an environmentally friendly cement additive, was synthesized as a potential solution to solve this problem. The characteristics of the treated cement slurry were compared with a reference slurry (w/c = 0.44 which is composed of only cement and water. A kinetic study was carried out to evaluate the adsorption behavior of the cement slurries exposed to an acid solution with 0.1 M HCl in a range of 25 to 55 °C conditions. The features of the cement slurries were evaluated by multiple analytical techniques such as XRD, FTIR, TG, and DSC analysis. From the experimental data, it is concluded that the second-order Lagergren kinetic model revealed to be the best in describing kinetic isotherms taken, because the margin between experimental and calculated values was minor for this model. The results of the characterization and HCl interaction kinetic studies underlined the prominent protective role of Henna extract-modified cement slurry in the enhancement of the cement resistance against acid attack and utilization in environmentally favorable oil well acidizing treatments.

  8. Carbonate cementation in the late glacial outwash and beach deposits in northern Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maris Rattas

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The sedimentary environments, morphology and formation of carbonate cement in the late glacial glaciofluvial outwash and beach deposits in northern Estonia are discussed. Cementation is observed in well-drained, highly porous carbonaceous debris-rich gravel and sand-forming, resistant ledges in otherwise unconsolidated sediments. The cemented units occur as laterally continuous layers or as isolated lenticular patches with thicknesses from a few centimetres to 3 m. The cement is found in two main morphologies: (1 cement crusts or coatings around detrital grains and (2 massive cement almost entirely filling interparticle pores and intraparticle voids. It is exclusively composed of low-Mg calcite with angular equant to slightly elongated rhombohedral and scalenohedral or prismatic crystals, which indicate precipitation from meteoric or connate fresh surface (glacial lake water and/or near-surface groundwater under low to moderate supersaturation and flow conditions. The absence of organic structures within the cement suggests that cementation is essentially inorganic. The cement exhibits both meteoric vadose and phreatic features and most probably occurred close to the vadose–phreatic interface, where the conditions were transitional and/or fluctuating. Cementation has mainly taken place by CO2-degassing in response to fluctuations in groundwater level and flow conditions, controlled by the Baltic Ice Lake water level, and seasonal cold and/or dry climate conditions.

  9. Performance of Cement Containing Laterite as Supplementary Cementing Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Bukhari, Z. S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of different industrial waste, by-products or other materials such as ground granulated blast furnace slag, silica fume, fly ash, limestone, and kiln dust, etc. as supplemen- tary cementing materials has received considerable attention in recent years. A study has been conducted to look into the performance of laterite as Supplementary Cementing Materials (SCM. The study focuses on compressive strength performance of blended cement containing different percentage of laterite. The cement is replaced accordingly with percentage of 2 %, 5 %, 7 % and 10 % by weight. In addition, the effect of use of three chemically different laterites have been studied on physical performance of cement as in setting time, Le-Chatlier expansion, loss on ignition, insoluble residue, free lime and specifically compressive strength of cement cubes tested at the age of 3, 7, and 28 days. The results show that the strength of cement blended with laterite as SCM is enhanced. Key words: Portland cement, supplementary cementing materials (SCM, laterite, compressive strength KUI – 6/2013 Received January 4, 2012 Accepted February 11, 2013

  10. Resistência mecânica de compósitos cimentícios leves utilizando resíduos industriais e fibras de sisal Mechanical resistence of lightweight cement composites utilizing industrial residues and fibers of sisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nivaldo T. de Arruda Filho

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A valorização de materiais alternativos incorporados com resíduos como opção ao convencional deve possibilitar a geração de um produto com qualidade, estética, produtividade e com potencial de reduzir impactos da poluição ambiental. Este trabalho foi realizado com o objetivo de desenvolver elementos construtivos para forro e divisórias, a partir de matrizes cimentícias com incorporação de resíduos industriais (resíduo cerâmico, etil vinil acetato - EVA e fibras de sisal. Desenvolveram-se técnicas de moldagem em matrizes cimentícias autoadensáveis e se avaliou a resistência mecânica dos novos compósitos. Uma placa com resíduos de EVA foi produzida e, através de trabalhos de reologia, encontrou-se a pasta matriz de revestimento desta placa, com teor adequado de adições pozolânicas e aditivo superplastificante. Avaliaram-se as resistências mecânicas das placas, da pasta matriz de revestimento encontrada, com e sem adição de fibras, e do novo compósito formado pela união desses dois elementos. Utilizou-se a técnica de alinhamento de fibras com o intuito de incrementar resistência ao novo compósito leve. A adição da matriz com fibras alinhadas melhorou a resistência a flexão do novo compósito.The appreciation of alternative materials incorporated in waste as an option to conventional material should enable to generate a product with quality, aesthetics, productivity and reduce the potential impacts of environmental pollution. This study aims to develop constructive elements for ceilings and walls from cementitious matrix incorporating industrial waste (ceramic waste, ethyl vinyl acetate - EVA and sisal fibers. Moulding techniques to produce self-compacting cementitious matrices were developed and the strength of the new composites were evaluated. A plate with EVA waste was produced and through rheology studies, a matrix plaster for coating of plate surface was found, with appropriate content of pozzolanic and

  11. Sulfate metabolism. I. Sulfate uptake and redistribution of acid rain sulfate by edible plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallam, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    Sulfur is the major component of polluted air in industrialized societies. Atmospheric sulfur is converted to sulfuric acid through a series of chemical reactions which can eventually reenter many ecosystems. When edible plants are grown in soils containing varying amounts of sulfate, the roots take up and transport inorganic sulfate to the stems and leaves. The sulfate taken up by the roots and the amount transported to the stem and leaves was found to be a function of the concentration of sulfate in the soil. Inorganic sulfate taken up by a corn plant seedling can be rapidly converted to organic sulfate by the root system. Nine days after one of a pair of pea plants was inoculated with artificial acid rain sulfate (dilute H 2 35 SO 4 ) it was found that the sulfate was translocated not only in the inoculated plant, but also to the uninoculated pea plant in the same container. Also, when the leaves of a mature potato plant were inoculated with artificial acid rain sulfate it was found that the sulfate was translocated into the edible potatoes. Fractionation of the potatoes showed that most of the sulfate was water soluble of which 30% was inorganic sulfate and 70% was in the form of organic sulfur. One third of the non-water soluble translocated acid rain sulfate was equally divided between lipid and non-lipid organic sulfur of the potato. 9 references, 2 figures, 5 tables

  12. Evaluation of ternary blended cements for use in transportation concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, Amanda Louise

    This thesis investigates the use of ternary blended cement concrete mixtures for transportation structures. The study documents technical properties of three concrete mixtures used in federally funded transportation projects in Utah, Kansas, and Michigan that used ternary blended cement concrete mixtures. Data were also collected from laboratory trial batches of ternary blended cement concrete mixtures with mixture designs similar to those of the field projects. The study presents the technical, economic, and environmental advantages of ternary blended cement mixtures. Different barriers of implementation for using ternary blended cement concrete mixtures in transportation projects are addressed. It was concluded that there are no technical, economic, or environmental barriers that exist when using most ternary blended cement concrete mixtures. The technical performance of the ternary blended concrete mixtures that were studied was always better than ordinary portland cement concrete mixtures. The ternary blended cements showed increased durability against chloride ion penetration, alkali silica reaction, and reaction to sulfates. These blends also had less linear shrinkage than ordinary portland cement concrete and met all strength requirements. The increased durability would likely reduce life cycle costs associated with concrete pavement and concrete bridge decks. The initial cost of ternary mixtures can be higher or lower than ordinary portland cement, depending on the supplementary cementitious materials used. Ternary blended cement concrete mixtures produce less carbon dioxide emissions than ordinary portland cement mixtures. This reduces the carbon footprint of construction projects. The barriers associated with implementing ternary blended cement concrete for transportation projects are not significant. Supplying fly ash returns any investment costs for the ready mix plant, including silos and other associated equipment. State specifications can make

  13. Modified sulfur cement solidification of low-level wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-10-01

    This topical report describes the results of an investigation on the solidification of low-level radioactive wastes in modified sulfur cement. The work was performed as part of the Waste Form Evaluation Program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Low-Level Waste Management Program. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material developed by the US Bureau of Mines. Processing of waste and binder was accomplished by means of both a single-screw extruder and a dual-action mixing vessel. Waste types selected for this study included those resulting from advanced volume reduction technologies (dry evaporator concentrate salts and incinerator ash) and those which remain problematic for solidification using contemporary agents (ion exchange resins). Process development studies were conducted to ascertain optimal process control parameters for successful solidification. Maximum waste loadings were determined for each waste type and method of processing. Property evaluation testing was carried out on laboratory scale specimens in order to compare with waste form performance for other potential matrix materials. Waste form property testing included compressive strength, water immersion, thermal cycling and radionuclide leachability. Recommended waste loadings of 40 wt. % sodium sulfate and boric acid salts and 43 wt. % incinerator ash, which are based on processing and performance considerations, are reported. Solidification efficiencies for these waste types represent significant improvements over those of hydraulic cements. Due to poor waste form performance, incorporation of ion exchange resin waste in modified sulfur cement is not recommended.

  14. Modified sulfur cement solidification of low-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    This topical report describes the results of an investigation on the solidification of low-level radioactive wastes in modified sulfur cement. The work was performed as part of the Waste Form Evaluation Program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Low-Level Waste Management Program. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material developed by the US Bureau of Mines. Processing of waste and binder was accomplished by means of both a single-screw extruder and a dual-action mixing vessel. Waste types selected for this study included those resulting from advanced volume reduction technologies (dry evaporator concentrate salts and incinerator ash) and those which remain problematic for solidification using contemporary agents (ion exchange resins). Process development studies were conducted to ascertain optimal process control parameters for successful solidification. Maximum waste loadings were determined for each waste type and method of processing. Property evaluation testing was carried out on laboratory scale specimens in order to compare with waste form performance for other potential matrix materials. Waste form property testing included compressive strength, water immersion, thermal cycling and radionuclide leachability. Recommended waste loadings of 40 wt. % sodium sulfate and boric acid salts and 43 wt. % incinerator ash, which are based on processing and performance considerations, are reported. Solidification efficiencies for these waste types represent significant improvements over those of hydraulic cements. Due to poor waste form performance, incorporation of ion exchange resin waste in modified sulfur cement is not recommended

  15. Influence of relationship water/cement upon the processing of cements with pozzolana in standard mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gener Rizo, M.

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The processing of standard mortar is completed following different methods in accordance with the country, but they exist two fundamental tendecies, the ISO and the ASTM. The cuban norm for mechanic-physic tests is based in ISO, and so they use a constant relationship water/cement in the processing of standard mortar a great problem concerning the cement users when they tested those mixed with puzzolanes, because they don't take care of the bigger water needs of those materials. In this work we present an study of the behaviour of Pozzolanic Portland cements (PP-250 elaborates with a fix and changeable relationship water/cement, obtained starting from the fluidity of the pure Portland cement. (P-350 The results obtained shows that the mechanical resistance decreased in cement mortars PP-250 realised with changeable relationship water/cement. So we recommend the adoption of an optional procedure to elaborate a quality mortar with pozzolana cements.

    La elaboración del mortero normalizado se realiza internacionalmente por diferentes métodos, pero existen dos tendencias fundamentales, la enunciada por ISO y por ASTM. La norma cubana de ensayos físico-mecánicos de cemento se basa en la norma ISO, por lo que para la elaboración del mortero normalizado se utiliza una relación agua/cemento constante. Esto ha provocado discrepancias con los usuarios del cemento, especialmente cuando se ensayan los cementos que contienen puzolanas, ya que se plantea que no se tiene en cuenta la mayor demanda de agua de estos materiales. En el presente trabajo se presenta un estudio del comportamiento de cementos Portland Puzolánicos (PP-250 elaborados con una relación agua/ cemento fija y variable, lograda a partir de la fluidez de la pasta de cemento Portland puro (P-350. Los resultados obtenidos indican que se producen disminuciones en la resistencia mecánica en los morteros de cemento PP-250 elaborados con agua/ cemento variable y recomienda la

  16. Remotely sensed detection of sulfates on Mars: Laboratory measurements and spacecraft observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Christopher David

    Visible, near-infrared, and mid-infrared spectroscopic measurements were made of physically realistic analogs of Martian soil containing silicates and sulfates. These measurements indicate that the physical structure of soil will control its spectroscopic properties. Orbital measurements from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) identified features similar to those seen in the laboratory mixtures. Maps were made of this sulfate-cemented soil which indicated that the presence of this material is not geographically controlled and hints at an origin for duricrust in atmosphere-surface interactions. Further confirmation comes from combining data from TES and the Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (ISM). This data shows a congruence between sulfate spectral features and water features. The likely form of the mappable sulfate in Martian soils is therefore a cemented mixture of hydrated sulfate mixed with silicates and oxides derived from crustal rocks. The combination of ISM and TES spectra in particular and spectra from multiple wavelength regimes in general also is an excellent technique for addressing other problems of interest regarding the geology of Mars. A number of topics including rock coatings in Syrtis Major and the nature of low albedo rock assemblages are addressed. Syrtis Major is found to behave differently in the thermal and near infrared, likely indicating that the spectral features are not related to simple coatings but perhaps processes like penetrative oxidation. TES Type I rocks are found to be high in pyroxene, but TES Type II rocks do not have a correlation with pyroxene. Spectral mixing trends indicate that dust and rock are the dominant two variables in surface composition on a large scale. A smaller mixing trend involves the physical breakup of sulfate-cemented soils into a loose, fine-grained, but still hydrated form. In all, this work provides strong evidence for the global identification and distribution of sulfate minerals in the Martian soil.

  17. Properties of cement based composites modified using diatomaceous earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorný, Jaroslav; Pavlíková, Milena; Záleská, Martina; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2017-07-01

    Diatomite belongs among natural materials rich on amorphous silica (a-SiO2). When finely milled, it can potentially substitute part of cement binder and positively support formation of more dense composite structure. In this connection, two types of diatomaceous earth applied as a partial substitution of 5, 10, 15, and 20 mass% of Portland cement in the composition of cement paste were studied. In the tested mixtures with cement blends, the amount of batch water remained same, with water/binder ratio 0.5. For fresh paste mixtures, initial and final setting times were measured. First, hardened pastes cured 28 days in water were characterized by their physical properties such as bulk density, matrix density and open porosity. Then, their mechanical and thermophysical parameters were assessed. Obtained results gave clear evidence of setting time shortening for pastes with diatomite what brought negative effect with respect to the impaired workability of fresh mixtures. On the other hand, there was observed strength improvement for mixtures containing diatomite with higher amount of SiO2. Here, the increase in mechanical resistivity was distinct up to 15 mass% of cement replacement. Higher cement substitution by diatomite resulted in an increase in porosity and thus improvement of thermal insulation properties.

  18. Stability of reinforced cemented backfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, R.J.; Stone, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    Mining with backfill has been the subject of several international meetings in recent years and a considerable research effort is being applied to improve both mining economics and ore recovery by using backfill for ground support. Classified mill tailings sands are the most commonly used backfill material but these fine sands must be stabilized before full ore pillar recovery can be achieved. Normal portland cement is generally used for stabilization but the high cost of cement prohibits high cement usage. This paper considers the use of reinforcements in cemented fill to reduce the cement usage. It is concluded that strong cemented layers at typical spacings of about 3 meters in a low cement content bulk fill can reinforce the fill and reduce the overall cement usage. Fibre reinforcements introduced into strong layers or into bulk fills are also known to be effective in reducing cement usage. Some development work is needed to produce the ideal type of anchored fibre in order to realize economic gains from fibre-reinforced fills

  19. Fracture strengths of chair‑side‑generated veneers cemented with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-09

    Jun 9, 2014 ... Group 1), CAD/CAM‑fabricated veneers cemented with a glass fiber ... specimens were tested with a universal testing machine after thermal cycling treatment. ... The purpose of the current in vitro study is to determine the ..... fracture resistance of fiber reinforced cups‑replacing composite restorations.

  20. Methods and Production of Cementation Materials for Immobilisation into Waste Form. Research of Cementation Processes for Specific Liquid Radioactive Waste Streams of Radiochemical Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhanov, L.P.

    2013-01-01

    In the near future Russian Federation is planning to use industrial cementation facilities at two radiochemical combines - PA 'Mayak' and Mountain Chemical Combine. Scope of the research within the IAEA CRP contact No. 14176 included the development of cementation processes for specfic liquid radioactive waste streams that are present in these enterprisers. The research on cementation of liquid waste from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing at PA 'Mayak' allowed obtaining experimental data characterizing the technological process and basic characteristics of the produced cement compounds (e.g. mechanical strength, water resistance, frost resistance, flowability, etc.) immobilizing different streams of waste (e.g. hydrated-salt sludges, filter material pulps, mixture of hydrated salt slurries and filter material pulps, tritium liquid waste). Determined optimum technological parameters will allow industrial scale production of cement compound with required quality and higher flowability that is necessary for providing uniform filling of compartments of storage facilities at these sites. The research has been also carried out for the development of cementation technology for immobilization of pulps from storage tanks of Mountain Chemical Combine radiochemical plant. Cementation of such pulps is a difficult technological task because pulps are of complex chemical composition (e.g. hydroxides of manganese, iron, nickel, etc., as well as silicon oxide) and a relatively high activity. The research of cementation process selection for these pulps included studies of the impact of sorbing additive type and content on cement compounds leachability, flowability, impact of cement compound age to its mechanical strength, heat generation of cement compounds and others. The research results obtained allowed testing of cementation facility with a pulse type mixer on the full-scale. Use of such mixer for pulp cementation makes possible to prepare a homogeneous cement compound with the

  1. Compressive and diametral tensile strength of glass ionomer cements Resistência à compressão e à tração diametral de cimentos de ionômero de vidro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Bresciani

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare, in different periods of time, the compressive and diametral tensile strength of a traditional high viscous glass ionomer cement: Fuji IX (GC Corporation, with two new Brazilian GIC's: Vitro-Molar (DFL and Bioglass R (Biodinamica, all indicated for the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART technique. Fifteen disk specimens (6.0mm diameter x 3.0mm height for the diametral tensile strength (DTS test and fifteen cylindrical specimens (6.0mm diameter x 12.0mm height for the compressive strength (CS test were made of each GIC. Specimens were stored in deionized water at 37º C and 100% of humidity in a stove until testing. Five specimens of each GIC were submitted to CS and DTS test in each period, namely 1 hour, 24 hours and 7 days. The specimens were tested in a testing machine (Emic at a crosshead speed of 1.0mm/min for CS and 0.5mm/min for the DTS test until failure occurred. The data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (alpha=0.05. The mean CS values ranged from 42.03 to 155.47MPa and means DTS from 5.54 to 13.72 MPa, with test periods from 1h to 7 days. The CS and DTS tests showed no statistically significant difference between Fuji IX and Vitro Molar, except for CS test at 1-hour period. Bioglass R had lowest mean value for CS of the cements tested. In DTS test Bioglass R presented no statistically significant differences when compared with all others tested GICs at 1-hour period and Bioglass R presented no difference at 24-hour and 7-day periods when compared to Vitro-Molar. Further studies to investigate other physical properties such as fracture toughness and wear resistance, as well as chemical composition and biocompatibility, are now needed to better understand the properties of these new Brazilian GIC's.Comparou-se a Resistência à Compressão (RC e à Tração Diametral (TD de um cimento de ionômero de vidro de alta viscosidade [Fuji IX (GC Corporation] e de dois novos cimentos

  2. Using dehydrated cement paste as new type of cement additive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, R.; Shui, Z.H.; Dong, J

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study, including evaluation and modification, on using dehydrated cement paste (DCP) as a new type of cement additive. After a series of processes, normal DCP (N-DCP) was produced as before and a modified form of DCP (M-DCP) was produced as well. The cementitious

  3. Dissolution of sulfate scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hen, J.

    1991-11-26

    This patent describes a composition for the removal of sulfate scale from surfaces. It comprises: an aqueous solution of about 0.1 to 1.0 molar concentration of an aminopolycarboxylic acid (APCA) containing 1 to 4 amino groups or a salt thereof, and about 0.1 to 1.0 molar concentration of a second component which is diethylenetriaminepenta (methylenephosphonic acid) (DTPMP) or a salt thereof, or aminotri (methylenephosphonic acid) (ATMP) or a salt thereof as an internal phase enveloped by a hydrocarbon membrane phase which is itself emulsified in an external aqueous phase, the hydrocarbon membrane phase continuing a complexing agent weaker for the cations of the sulfate scale than the APCA and DTPMP or ATMP, any complexing agent for the cations in the external aqueous phase being weaker than that in the hydrocarbon membrane phase.

  4. Radioimmunoassay of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, J.G.H.; Furlanetto, R.P.; Russo, E.M.K.; Noguti, K.O.; Chacra, A.R.

    1980-01-01

    The development of a radioimmunological method for the measurement of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate in serum is described. For the immunization of rabbits, a DHA-3-hemissuccinate-bovine serum albumin conjugate was synthetized and a highly specific anti-serum was produced. The method developed requires only simple dilution prior to assay and the normal values for the different age groups were determined in 146 normal individuals. (Author) [pt

  5. Sulfation of chondroitin. Specificity, degree of sulfation, and detergent effects with 4-sulfating and 6-sulfating microsomal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugumaran, G.; Silbert, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    Microsomal preparations from chondroitin 6-sulfate-producing chick embryo epiphyseal cartilage, and from chondroitin 4-sulfate-producing mouse mastocytoma cells, were incubated with UDP-[14C]glucuronic acid and UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine to form non-sulfated proteo[14C]chondroitin. Aliquots of the incubations were then incubated with 3'-phosphoadenylylphosphosulfate (PAPS) in the presence or absence of various detergents. In the absence of detergents, there was good sulfation of this endogenous proteo[14C]chondroitin by the original microsomes from both sources. Detergents, with the exception of Triton X-100, markedly inhibited sulfation in the mast cell system but not in the chick cartilage system. These results indicate that sulfation and polymerization are closely linked on cell membranes and that in some cases this organization can be disrupted by detergents. When aliquots of the original incubation were heat inactivated, and then reincubated with new microsomes from chick cartilage and/or mouse mastocytoma cells plus PAPS, there was no significant sulfation of this exogenous proteo[14C] chondroitin with either system unless Triton X-100 was added. Sulfation of exogenous chondroitin and chondroitin hexasaccharide was compared with sulfation of endogenous and exogenous proteo[14C]chondroitin. Sulfate incorporation into hexasaccharide and chondroitin decreased as their concentrations (based on uronic acid) approached that of the proteo[14C]chondroitin. At the same time, the degree of sulfation in percent of substituted hexosamine increased. However, the degree of sulfation did not reach that of the endogenous proteo[14C]chondroitin. Hexasaccharide and chondroitin sulfation were stimulated by the presence of Triton X-100. However, in contrast to the exogenous proteo[14C]chondroitin, there was some sulfation of hexasaccharide and chondroitin in the absence of this detergent

  6. Biomass for green cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cumming, R. [Lafarge Canada Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Lafarge examined the use of waste biomass products in its building materials and provided background information on its operations. Cement kiln infrastructure was described in terms of providing access to shipping, rail and highways; conveying and off-loading equipment; having large storage facilities; and, offering continuous monitoring and stack testing. The presentation identified the advantages and disadvantages of a few different biomass cases such as coal; scrap tires; non-recyclable household waste; and processed biomass. A chart representing landfill diversion rates was presented and the presentation concluded with a discussion of energy recovery and recycling. 1 tab., figs.

  7. Use of cement in concrete according to European standard EN 206-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Müller

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The manufacture of cements with several main constituents (blended cements is of particular importance with regard to reducing climatically relevant CO2 emissions in the cement industry. A wide variety of common cement products exists in the different EU Member States. They match local manufacturing conditions, throughout meeting particular climatic or other local conditions, including building practices. In general, all cements conforming to European Cement Standard EN 197-1 are suitable for the manufacture of concrete according to European Concrete Standard EN 206-1. Depending on the area of application, however, differences related to the cement type may possibly have to be taken into account to ensure the durability of the concretes manufactured with these cements. These regulations were laid down in National Application Documents (NADs to EN 206-1 dependent upon the exposure classes that a structural element is assigned to. This paper deals with the overall concept of EN 206-1 with regard to concrete durability. It gives an overview of the cement types used in Europe and the areas of application of cements conforming to EN 197-1 in concrete conforming to EN 206-1 and various national annexes. The option of combining several main constituents makes blended cements particularly well suited for combining the advantages of individual main constituents, and thus for developing these cements into even more robust systems. This process requires an integrated assessment of all requirements to be met by cements during manufacture and application. From a technical perspective these include the strength formation potential as well as good workability of the concrete and, in particular, the durability of the concrete made from these cements. The effects that the main constituents have with regard to properties relevant to durability can be utilized in particular in cements made from a combination of limestone/blastfurnace slag or limestone/fly ash as

  8. Process of preparing hydraulic cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1919-12-11

    A process of preparing hydraulic cement from oil shale or shale coke is characterized in that the oil shale or shale coke after the distillation is burned long and hot to liberate the usual amount of carbonic acid and then is fine ground to obtain a slow hardening hydraulic cement.

  9. Health hazards of cement dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meo, Sultan A.

    2004-01-01

    ven in the 21st century, millions of people are working daily in a dusty environment. They are exposed to different types of health hazards such as fume, gases and dust, which are risk factors in developing occupational disease. Cement industry is involved in the development of structure of this advanced and modern world but generates dust during its production. Cement dust causes lung function impairment, chronic obstructive lung disease, restrictive lung disease, pneumoconiosis and carcinoma of the lungs, stomach and colon. Other studies have shown that cement dust may enter into the systemic circulation and thereby reach the essentially all the organs of body and affects the different tissues including heart, liver, spleen, bone, muscles and hairs and ultimately affecting their micro-structure and physiological performance. Most of the studies have been previously attempted to evaluate the effects of cement dust exposure on the basis of spirometry or radiology, or both. However, collective effort describing the general effects of cement dust on different organ and systems in humans or animals, or both has not been published. Therefore, the aim of this review is to gather the potential toxic effects of cement dust and to minimize the health risks in cement mill workers by providing them with information regarding the hazards of cement dust. (author)

  10. Ceramic microspheres for cementing applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2011-01-01

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing ceramic microspheres from industrial slag. The microspheres have a particle size of about 38 microns to about 150 microns. The microspheres are used to create a cement slurry having a density of at least about 11 lbs/g. The resultant cement slurry may then be

  11. Ceramic microspheres for cementing applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing ceramic microspheres from industrial slag. The microspheres have a particle size of about 38 microns to about 150 microns. The microspheres are used to create a cement slurry having a density of at least about 11 lbs/g. The resultant cement slurry may then be

  12. Ceramic microspheres for cementing applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    A method and apparatus for manufacturing ceramic microspheres from industrial slag. The microspheres have a particle size of about 38 microns to about 150 microns. The microspheres are used to create a cement slurry having a density of at least about 11 lbs/g. The resultant cement slurry may then be

  13. Enhanced sulfate reduction with acidogenic sulfate-reducing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Aijie; Ren Nanqi; Wang Xu; Lee Duujong

    2008-01-01

    Sulfate reduction in a continuous flow, acidogenic reactor using molasses wastewater as the carbon source was studied at varying chemical oxygen demand/sulfate (COD/SO 4 2- ) ratios. At a critical COD/SO 4 2- ratio of 2.7, neither COD nor sulfate were in excess for extra production of ethanol or acetate in the reactor. An acetic-type microbial metabolism was established with sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) significantly consuming hydrogen and volatile fatty acids produced by acidogenic bacteria and hydrogen producing acetogens in degrading COD, thereby yielding sulfate removal rate >94.6%. A low critical COD/SO 4 2- ratio of 1.6 was also observed with the enriched ASRB population in reactor which overcomes the barrier to the treatment capability of sulfate-laden wastewater treatment with limited COD supply

  14. Microstructural Properties of Cement Paste and Mortar Modified by Low Cost Nanoplatelets Sourced from Natural Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piao Huang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials have been widely used in cement-based materials. Graphene has excellent properties for improving the durability of cement-based materials. Given its high production budget, it has limited its wide potential for application in the field of engineering. Hence, it is very meaningful to obtain low cost nanoplatelets from natural materials that can replace graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs The purpose of this paper is to improve the resistance to chloride ion penetration by optimizing the pore structure of cement-based materials, and another point is to reduce investment costs. The results illustrated that low cost CaCO3 nanoplatelets (CCNPs were successfully obtained under alkali treatment of seashell powder, and the chloride ion permeability of cement-based materials significantly decreased by 15.7% compared to that of the control samples when CCNPs were incorporated. Furthermore, the compressive strength of cement pastes at the age of 28 days increased by 37.9% than that of the plain sample. Improvement of performance of cement-based materials can be partly attributed to the refinement of the pore structure. In addition, AFM was employed to characterize the nanoplatelet thickness of CCNPs and the pore structures of the cement-based composites were analyzed by MIP, respectively. CCNPs composite cement best performance could lay the foundation for further study of the durability of cement-based materials and the application of decontaminated seashells.

  15. Behaviour of cementitious materials: sulfates and temperature actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbarulo, Remi

    2002-09-01

    The research work presented in this Ph.D. thesis is related to the nuclear waste underground repository concept. Concrete could be used in such a repository, and would be subjected to variations of temperature in presence of sulfate, a situation that could induce expansion of concrete. The research was lead in three parts: an experimental study of the possibility of an internal sulfate attack on mortars; an experimental study and modeling of the chemical equilibriums of the CaO-SiO 2 -Al 2 O 3 -SO 3 -H 2 O system; and a modeling of the mechanisms of internal and external sulfate attacks, and the effect of temperature. The results show that mortars can develop expansions after a steam-cure during hydration, but also when a long steam-cure is applied to one-year-old mortars, which is a new point. Ettringite precipitation can be considered as responsible for these expansions. The experimental study of the CaO-SiO 2 -Al 2 O 3 -SO 3 -H 2 O system clarified the role of Calcium Silicate Hydrates (C-S-H) on chemical equilibriums of cementitious materials. Sulfate sorption on C-S-H has been studied in detail. The quantity of sulfate bound to the C-S-H mainly depends on the sulfate concentration in solution, on the Ca/Si ratio of the C-S-H and is not significantly influenced by temperature. Aluminium inclusion in the C-S-H seems to be a significant phenomenon. Temperature increases the calcium sulfo-aluminate solubilities and thus increases sulfates concentration in solution. A modeling of the chemical system is proposed. Simulations of external sulfate attack (15 mmol/L of Na 2 SO 4 ) predict ettringite precipitation at 20 and 85±C. Simulation of internal sulfate attack was performed at a local scale (a hydrated cement grain). An initial inhomogeneity can lead, after a thermal curing at 85±C, to ettringite precipitation in zones originally free from ettringite. This new-formed ettringite could be the origin of the expansions. (author) [fr

  16. Study of the Peak Shear Strength of a Cement-Filled Hard Rock Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Cheng-Xue; Sun, Fu-Ting

    2018-03-01

    The peak shear strength of a cement-filled hard rock joint is studied by theoretical analysis and laboratory testing. Based on the concept of the shear resistance angle, by combining the statistical method and fractal theory, three new parameters are proposed to characterize the three-dimensional joint morphology, reflecting the effects of the average roughness, multi-scale asperities and the dispersion degree of the roughness distribution. These factors are independent of the measurement scale, and they reflect the anisotropy of the joint roughness. Compressive shear tests are conducted on cement-filled joints. Because joints without cement can be considered special cement-filled joints in which the filling degree of cement is zero, they are also tested. The cement-filled granite joint fails primarily along the granite-cement interfaces. The filling degree of cement controls the joint failure and affects its mechanical behaviour. With a decrease in the filling degree of cement, the joint cohesion decreases; however, the dilatancy angle and the basic friction angle of the interface increase. As the filling degree approaches zero, the cohesion approaches zero, while the dilatancy angle and the basic friction angle increase to those of the joint without cement. A set of formulas is proposed to evaluate the peak shear strength of the joints with and without cement. The formulas are shown to be reasonable by comparison with the tested peak shear strength, and they reflect the anisotropy of the strength. This research deepens the understanding of cement-filled joints and provides a method to evaluate their peak shear strength.

  17. Fabrication of Novel Biodegradable α-Tricalcium Phosphate Cement Set by Chelating Capability of Inositol Phosphate and Its Biocompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiisa Konishi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP cement based on the chelate-setting mechanism of inositol phosphate (IP6 was developed. This paper examined the effect of the milling time of α-TCP powder on the material properties of the cement. In addition, biocompatibility of the result cement in vitro using osteoblasts and in vivo using rabbit models will be studied as well. The α-TCP powders were ballmilled using ZrO2 beads in pure water for various durations up to 270 minutes, with a single-phase α-TCP obtained at ballmilling for 120 minutes. The resulting cement was mostly composed of α-TCP phase, and the compressive strength of the cement was 8.5±1.1 MPa, which suggested that the cements set with keeping the crystallite phase of starting cement powder. The cell-culture test indicated that the resulting cements were biocompatible materials. In vivo studies showed that the newly formed bones increased with milling time at a slight distance from the cement specimens and grew mature at 24 weeks, and the surface of the cement was resorbed by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-(TRAP-positive osteoclast-like cells until 24 weeks of implantation. The present α-TCP cement is promising for application as a novel paste-like artificial bone with biodegradability and osteoconductivity.

  18. SUSTENTAÇÃO DE ESMALTE COM IONÔMEROS DE VIDRO E RESINA COMPOSTA: EFEITO NA RESISTÊNCIA À FRATURA DAS CÚSPIDES DE DENTES RESTAURADOS SUPPORTING ENAMEL WITH GLASS IONOMER CEMENT AND COMPOSITE RESIN: EFFECT ON FRACTURE RESISTANCE OF CUSPS OF RESTORED TEETH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Stefano SECCO

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo determinou a resistência e o tipo de fratura do esmalte suportado pelos materiais restauradores ionômeros de vidro convencional e modificado por resina e resina composta, bem como a influência dessa técnica restauradora na resistência das cúspides dos dentes. A remoção da estrutura dental para o preparo de cavidades tipo classe II e a presença de esmalte socavado diminuiram significativamente a resistência das cúspides dos dentes em relação ao dente hígido (p This study determined the resistance to fracture and its pattern for enamel supported with conventional and modified glass ionomer cements, and composite resin restorative materials, as well as the influence of these restorative techniques on cuspal strength of teeth. Removal of dental structure by class II cavity preparations and unsupported enamel had decreased significantly the cuspal strength in relation to healthy teeth (p < 0.01. Restorative materials used to support enamel reduced the fracture rate of restored cusps, but did not increase the fracture resistance values statistically. All tested groups presented alterations in the fracture pattern

  19. Syndecan heparan sulfate proteoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomes, Angélica Maciel; Sinkeviciute, Dovile; Multhaupt, Hinke A.B.

    2016-01-01

    discuss how, in partial catabolic processes, new roles for HSPGs emerge that affect cell behavior. Examples from tumor studies are emphasized, since HSPGs may be altered in composition and distribution and may also represent targets for the development of new therapeutics....... signaling can therefore be complex, but it is now known that syndecans are capable of independent signaling. This review is divided in two sections, and will first discuss how the assembly of heparan sulfate, the anabolic process, encodes information related to ligand binding and signaling. Second, we...

  20. High Performance Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites 6 HPFRCC 6

    CERN Document Server

    Reinhardt, Hans; Naaman, A

    2012-01-01

    High Performance Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites (HPFRCC) represent a class of cement composites whose stress-strain response in tension undergoes strain hardening behaviour accompanied by multiple cracking, leading to a high strain prior to failure. The primary objective of this International Workshop was to provide a compendium of up-to-date information on the most recent developments and research advances in the field of High Performance Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites. Approximately 65 contributions from leading world experts are assembled in these proceedings and provide an authoritative perspective on the subject. Special topics include fresh and hardening state properties; self-compacting mixtures; mechanical behavior under compressive, tensile, and shear loading; structural applications; impact, earthquake and fire resistance; durability issues; ultra-high performance fiber reinforced concrete; and textile reinforced concrete. Target readers: graduate students, researchers, fiber producers, desi...

  1. Immobilization of citric acid solutions in portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Valdir M.; Rzyski, Barbara M.

    1997-01-01

    Decontamination processes by using citric acid on certain items used in the nuclear area, can result in large volumes of liquid wastes with low activity or effluents, contaminated with uranium and some elements dangerous to the environment. A great number of installations that have decontamination processes adopt the zero discharge philosophy. So, one of the forms to isolate the solutions is by reducing its volume through the evaporation process. The generated must can be neutralized and encapsulated or immobilized in Portland cement. This work propose a chemical technique to destroy the citric acid in the decontamination solutions instead of neutralization and, depending on the installation convenience, a direct cement immobilization of these solutions or of the evaporation mud. The results obtained in this work involve data about the workability, setting time and mechanical resistance, after 28 days of sealed cure, for samples with water-cement ratios of 4, 0.5 and 0.6, by weight. (author). 5 refs., 2 tabs

  2. THE INFLUENCE OF CO2 ON WELL CEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon capture and storage is one way to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Underground gas storage operations and CO2 sequestration in aquifers relay on both the proper wellbore construction and sealing properties of the cap rock. CO2 injection candidates may be new wells or old wells. In both cases, the long-term wellbore integrity (up to 1 000 years is one of the key performance criteria in the geological storage of CO2. The potential leakage paths are the migration CO2 along the wellbore due to poor cementation and flow through the cap rock. The permeability and integrity of the set cement will determine how effective it is in preventing the leakage. The integrity of the cap rock is assured by an adequate fracture gradient and by sufficient set cement around the casing across the cap rock and without a micro-annulus. CO2 storage in underground formations has revived the researc of long term influence of the injected CO2 on Portland cements and methods for improving the long term efficiency of the wellbore sealant. Some researchers predicted that set cement will fail when exposed to CO2 leading to potential leakage to the atmosphere or into underground formations that may contain potable water. Other researchers show set cement samples from 30 to 50 year-old wells (CO2 EOR projects that have maintained sealing integrity and prevented CO2 leakage, in spite of some degree of carbonation. One of reasons for the discrepancy between certain research lab tests and actual field performance measurements is the absence of standard protocol for CO2 resistance-testing devices, conditions, or procedures. This paper presents potential flow paths along the wellbore, CO2 behaviour under reservoir conditions, and geochemical alteration of hydrated Portland cement due to supercritical CO2 injection.

  3. Resistência à remoção por tração de coroas totais metálicas cimentadas em dentes com e sem reconstrução coronária Tensile strength of metal crowns cemented on dental and buildup surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Batista FRANCO

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar a resistência à remoção por tração de coroas totais metálicas cimentadas com o cimento de ionômero de vidro Ketac-Cem (ESPE em dentes adequadamente preparados, com e sem o pré-tratamento dentinário com o ácido poliacrílico a 40%, assim como sobre dentes previamente reconstruídos com o cimento ionomérico Vitremer (3M. Para efeito de comparação, empregou-se o cimento de fosfato de zinco (SS White. Foram selecionados 50 dentes humanos (primeiros pré-molares superiores sendo os mesmos fixados em bases cilíndricas de resina acrílica poliestirênica e divididos em 5 grupos de 10 elementos cada. Após a cimentação, os espécimes foram termociclados nas temperaturas de 5ºC, 37ºC e 55ºC e posteriormente acoplados à máquina de ensaios universal (Kratos, para a realização dos testes de resistência à tração. Os resultados obtidos foram submetidos a ANOVA, observando-se diferença estatística significante ao nível de 5% entre as diferentes condições estudadas. Com relação aos dentes sem reconstrução, verificou-se um resultado superior para o cimento Ketac-Cem quando da utilização do ácido poliacrílico. Para os grupos reconstruídos com o Vitremer, não observou-se diferença estatística significante entre os dois agentes cimentantes. A reconstrução coronária não prejudicou a retentividade das coroas totais metálicas.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the tensile strength of metal crowns cemented with Ketac-Cem (ESPE glass ionomer cement, on teeth properly prepared with and without previous treatment of 40% polyacrylic acid, as well as on built-up teeth reconstructed with Vitremer (3M ionomer cement. For comparison purposes, zinc phosphate cement (SS White was also employed. Fifty upper pre-molar human teeth were selected, embedded in epoxy resin, and divided into 5 groups of 10 elements each. After cementing, the specimens were submitted to thermocycling at 5

  4. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027) into...

  5. 2-Amino-4-hydroxyethylaminoanisole sulfate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jakob T; Andersen, Klaus E

    2016-01-01

    positive patch test reactions to the coupler 2-amino-4-hydroxyethylaminoanisole sulfate 2% pet. from 2005 to 2014. METHODS: Patch test results from the Allergen Bank database for eczema patients patch tested with 2-amino-4-hydroxyethylaminoanisole sulfate 2% pet. from 2005 to 2014 were reviewed. RESULTS......: A total of 902 dermatitis patients (154 from the dermatology department and 748 from 65 practices) were patch tested with amino-4-hydroxyethylaminoanisole sulfate 2% pet. from 2005 to 2014. Thirteen (1.4%) patients had a positive patch test reaction. Our results do not indicate irritant reactions....... CONCLUSIONS: 2-Amino-4-hydroxyethylaminoanisole sulfate is a new but rare contact allergen....

  6. Influence of the microstructure of WC-Co cemented carbides on the fracture toughness and abrasive wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zum Gahr, K.H.; Fischer, A.

    1981-01-01

    Fracture toughness and abrasive wear resistance of WC-Co cemented carbides were investigated by using the indentation cracking test (Palmqvist test) and the pin-on-disk method respectively. Size distribution of tungsten carbides and means free path between them were found to be important microstructural parameters related to the mechanical behavior. Results showed that selection of cemented carbides for heavy wear loading is complicated by contradictory influence of microstructural parameters on fracture toughness and abrasion resistance. Knowledge of the relation between microstructure and resistance to fracture or wear is necessary for optimum use of cemented carbides. (orig.) [de

  7. A cement based syntactic foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guoqiang; Muthyala, Venkata D.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a cement based syntactic foam core was proposed and experimentally investigated for composite sandwich structures. This was a multi-phase composite material with microballoon dispersed in a rubber latex toughened cement paste matrix. A trace amount of microfiber was also incorporated to increase the number of mechanisms for energy absorption and a small amount of nanoclay was added to improve the crystal structure of the hydrates. Three groups of cement based syntactic foams with varying cement content were investigated. A fourth group of specimens containing pure cement paste were also prepared as control. Each group contained 24 beam specimens. The total number of beam specimens was 96. The dimension of each beam was 30.5 cm x 5.1 cm x 1.5 cm. Twelve foam specimens from each group were wrapped with plain woven 7715 style glass fabric reinforced epoxy to prepare sandwich beams. Twelve cubic foam specimens, three from each group, with a side length of 5.1 cm, were also prepared. Three types of testing, low velocity impact test and four-point bending test on the beam specimens and compression test on the cubic specimens, were conducted to evaluate the impact energy dissipation, stress-strain behavior, and residual strength. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was also used to examine the energy dissipation mechanisms in the micro-length scale. It was found that the cement based syntactic foam has a higher capacity for dissipating impact energy with an insignificant reduction in strength as compared to the control cement paste core. When compared to a polymer based foam core having similar compositions, it was found that the cement based foam has a comparable energy dissipation capacity. The developed cement based syntactic foam would be a viable alternative for core materials in impact-tolerant composite sandwich structures

  8. What is the cementation exponent? A new differential interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, P. W. J.

    2009-04-01

    Between 1950 and 2002 the total volume of reserves discovered has run to over 1500 Bbbl. for oil and 7.5 Tcf. for gas. Over half of these resources has already been produced, and has driven the global economy for the last fifty years. All of the assessments of the volume of hydrocarbon reserves were made using Archie's relationships (1942). It would be difficult, therefore, to overestimate the impact of either the petrophysical techniques or Archie's relationships on the worldwide economy. Archie's laws link the electrical resistivity of a rock to its porosity, to the resistivity of the water that saturates its pores, and to the fractional saturation of the pore space with the water, and are used to calculate the hydrocarbon saturation of the reservoir rock from which the reserves are then calculated. Archie's laws contain two exponents, m and n, which Archie called the cementation exponent and the saturation exponent, respectively. The conductivity of the hydrocarbon saturated rock is highly sensitive to changes in either exponent. However, despite the importance of the cementation exponent, few petrophysicists, commercial or academic, are able to describe its real physical meaning. The purpose of this contribution is to investigate the elusive physical meaning of the cementation exponent. We review the traditional interpretation of the cementation exponent and consider the extension of Archie's first law to two conducting phases. Consequently, we develop a new differential interpretation of the cementation exponent that is based on a new definition for the connectedness of the conducting phases in a porous medium. In this interpretation the connectedness of a porous medium is defined as the availability of pathways for transport, where the connectedness is the inverse of the formation resistivity factor, G = σo σw = 1 F (and may also be called the conductivity formation factor). Porosity is defined as the fractional amount of pore space in the usual manner

  9. Crown and bridge cements: clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunek, Sabiha S; Powers, John M

    2012-12-01

    Cement selection can be confusing because factors such as substrate, the type of restoration, and patient needs must be considered. Some substrates require additional treatment before cementation. This article describes the most commonly used traditional crown and bridge cements (GI and RMGI) used for metal and metal-ceramic restorations, and resin cements used for all-ceramic restorations. Advantages, disadvantages, indications, and contraindications of cements have been reviewed. Recommended uses of cements for metal, ceramic, and laboratory composite restorations have been presented. General guidelines for surface treatment ot silica- and zirconia-based restorations when using resin cements have been discussed.

  10. Morpholine-4-carboxamidinium sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Tiritiris

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title salt, 2C5H12N3O+·SO42−, comprises two cations and one sulfate ion. In both cations, the C, N and O atoms of the morpholine rings are disordered over two sets of sites, with refined occupancies of 0.849 (3:0.151 (3 for cation I and 0.684 (4:0.316 (4 for cation II. The C—N bond lengths in both central C3N units of the carboxamidinium ions range between 1.253 (12 and 1.362 (5 Å, indicating a degree of double-bond character. The central C atoms are bonded to the three N atoms in a nearly ideal trigonal–planar geometry and the positive charges are delocalized in both CN3 planes. The crystal structure is stabilized by a three-dimensional network of N—H...O hydrogen bonds between the cations and the sulfate ion. Scheme tiny font, charges and delocalized bonds almost invisible

  11. Cement/slag chemistry studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.P.; Macphee, D.; Atkins, M.; Beckley, N.; Carson, S.O.; Wilding, C.R.; McHugh, G.

    1988-01-01

    The performance of cement-based matrices intended for radwaste immobilization is assessed. The long-term performance of the matrix is characterized by thermodynamic evaluation of experimental data. The results are presented in a general form, amenable to a range of specific formulations. The interaction of specific radwaste components with cements has been studied, using Iodine as an example. It occurs as both I - and IO 3 - species, but these differ sharply in sorption characteristics. The effect of ionizing radiation of the pH and E h of cement matrices is reported. (author)

  12. Cements in Radioactive Waste Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.P.

    2013-01-01

    The use of cement and concrete to immobilise radioactive waste is complicated by the wide- ranging nature of inorganic cementing agents available as well as the range of service environments in which cement is used and the different functions expected of cement. For example, Portland cement based concretes are widely used as structural materials for construction of vaults and tunnels. These constructions may experience a long pre-closure performance lifetime during which they are required to protect against collapse and ingress of water: strength and impermeability are key desirable characteristics. On the other hand, cement and concrete may be used to form backfills, ranging in permeability. Permeable formulations allow gas readily to escape, while impermeable barriers retard radionuclide transport and reduce access of ground water to the waste. A key feature of cements is that, while fresh, they pass through a fluid phase and can be formed into any shape desired or used to infiltrate other materials thereby enclosing them into a sealed matrix. Thereafter, setting and hardening is automatic and irreversible. Where concrete is used to form structural elements, it is also natural to use cement in other applications as it minimises potential for materials incompatibility. Thus cement- mainly Portland cement- has been widely used as an encapsulant for storage, transport and as a radiation shield for active wastes. Also, to form and stabilise structures such as vaults and silos. Relative to other potential matrices, cement also has a chemical immobilisation potential, reacting with and binding with many radionuclides. The chemical potential of cements is essentially sacrificial, thus limiting their performance lifetime. However performance may also be required in the civil engineering sense, where strength is important, so many factors, including a geochemical description of service conditions, may require to be assessed in order to predict performance lifetime. The

  13. Cements in Radioactive Waste Disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glasser, F. P. [University of Aberdeen, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-15

    The use of cement and concrete to immobilise radioactive waste is complicated by the wide- ranging nature of inorganic cementing agents available as well as the range of service environments in which cement is used and the different functions expected of cement. For example, Portland cement based concretes are widely used as structural materials for construction of vaults and tunnels. These constructions may experience a long pre-closure performance lifetime during which they are required to protect against collapse and ingress of water: strength and impermeability are key desirable characteristics. On the other hand, cement and concrete may be used to form backfills, ranging in permeability. Permeable formulations allow gas readily to escape, while impermeable barriers retard radionuclide transport and reduce access of ground water to the waste. A key feature of cements is that, while fresh, they pass through a fluid phase and can be formed into any shape desired or used to infiltrate other materials thereby enclosing them into a sealed matrix. Thereafter, setting and hardening is automatic and irreversible. Where concrete is used to form structural elements, it is also natural to use cement in other applications as it minimises potential for materials incompatibility. Thus cement- mainly Portland cement- has been widely used as an encapsulant for storage, transport and as a radiation shield for active wastes. Also, to form and stabilise structures such as vaults and silos. Relative to other potential matrices, cement also has a chemical immobilisation potential, reacting with and binding with many radionuclides. The chemical potential of cements is essentially sacrificial, thus limiting their performance lifetime. However performance may also be required in the civil engineering sense, where strength is important, so many factors, including a geochemical description of service conditions, may require to be assessed in order to predict performance lifetime. The

  14. Effect of water curing duration on strength behaviour of portland composite cement (PCC) mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caronge, M. A.; Tjaronge, M. W.; Hamada, H.; Irmawaty, R.

    2017-11-01

    Cement manufacturing of Indonesia has been introduced Portland Composite Cement (PCC) to minimize the rising production cost of cement which contains 80% clinker and 20% mineral admixture. A proper curing is very important when the cement contains mineral admixture materials. This paper reports the results of an experimental study conducted to evaluate the effect of water curing duration on strength behaviour of PCC mortar. Mortar specimens with water to cement ratio of (W/C) 0.5 were casted. Compressive strength, flexural strength and concrete resistance were tested at 7, 28 and 91 days cured water. The results indicated that water curing duration is essential to continue the pozzolanic reaction in mortar which contributes to the development of strength of mortar made with PCC.

  15. Strength and Deformability of Fiber Reinforced Cement Paste on the Basis of Basalt Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury Barabanshchikov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The research object of the paper is cement paste with the particulate reinforcement of basalt fiber. Regardless of fibers’ length at the same fiber cement mix workability and cement consumption equality compressive solidity of the specimens is reduced with increasing fiber content. This is due to the necessity to increase the water-cement ratio to obtain a given workability. The flexural stability of the specimens with increasing fiber content increments in the same conditions. There is an optimum value of the fibers’ dosage. That is why stability has a maximum when crooking. The basaltic fiber particulate reinforcement usage can abruptly increase the cement paste level limiting extensibility, which is extremely important in terms of crack resistance.

  16. Integrated approach for investigating the durability of self-consolidating concrete to sulfate attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassuoni, Mohamed Tamer F.

    tests, the combined sulfate attack tests captured performance risks and complex damage mechanisms associated with the SCC pore structure and constituent materials. Sodium sulfate attack with wetting-drying cycles and/or partial immersion under temperate-hot conditions synergistically caused significant damage to specimens, especially to quaternary cementitious systems having very fine pore structure, due to the build-up of salt crystals and sulfate reaction products. The deleterious effects of sulfate reaction products and salt crystallization on all cementitious systems were more severe under the combined sodium sulfate and freezing-thawing exposure, with a potential of sudden brittle failure. Laboratory experiments in the current work documented evidence for the occurrence of thaumasite sulfate attack (TSA) in cementitious systems containing limestone filler, not only under cold but also under temperate-hot conditions, which made specimens more vulnerable to damage in the combined sulfate attack tests. The field-like combined exposure of sodium sulfate, cyclic environments and flexural loading had synergistic effects on SCC specimens and caused the coexistence of multiple-complex degradation mechanisms (sulfate attack, TSA, stress-corrosion, salt crystallization, surface scaling and corrosion of surface steel fibres) depending on the mixture design variables. The current thesis demonstrates that relying only on sulfate immersion tests to evaluate the performance of cement-based materials can be risky. It also shows that linear and deterministic modeling of the performance of concrete structures under external sulfate attack is unrealistic. Fuzzy and adaptive-neuro fuzzy inference systems developed in the current thesis accurately and rationally predicted the serviceability, deterioration in engineering properties and time to failure of the SCC mixtures under the various sulfate attack exposure regimes adopted in the integrated testing approach. A durability evaluation

  17. Does cement mantle thickness really matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Caruana, J.

    2008-01-01

    The thickness of the cement mantle around the femoral component of total hip replacements is a contributing factor to aseptic loosening and revision. Nevertheless, various designs of stems and surgical tooling lead to cement mantles of differing thicknesses. This thesis is concerned with variability in cement thickness around the Stanmore Hip, due to surgical approach, broach size and stem orientation, and its effects on stress and cracking in the cement. The extent to which cement mantle thi...

  18. Achievement of 900kgf/cm[sup 2] super workable high strength concrete with belite portland cement. (elevator building of cement silo in Chichibu cement). Part 1. ; Development of cement for super workable high strength concrete. Ko belite kei cement de 900kgf/cm[sup 2] wo tassei (Chichibu cement cement sairo no elevaor to). 1. ; Koryudo kokyodo concrete yo no cement no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, M.; Fukaya, Y.; Nawa, T. (Chichibu Cement Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-08-01

    This paper describes the features of high belite Portland cement which can make the super workable high strength concrete, and the properties of concrete using this. The super workable concrete is required an excellent segregation resistance property as well as high flow property. Since the high belite Portland cement contains a small amount of C[sub 3]S in the clinker, the amounts of C[sub 3]A and C[sub 4]AF can be reduced without hindering the calcination of clinker. Additionally, since it contains a large amount of C[sub 2]S with low heat of hydration, an increase in the temperature of members can be suppressed. 'Chichibu High Flow Cement' having characteristics of this high belite Portland cement was developed for the super workable high strength concrete. The concrete using the High Flow Cement exhibited the maximum flow value of 70cm. It also exhibited the strength of 1,075 kgf/cm[sup 2] at the age of 91 days, and 1,100 kgf/cm[sup 2] at the age of 14 days under insulating. 4 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Effect of barium-coated halloysite nanotube addition on the cytocompatibility, mechanical and contrast properties of poly(methyl methacrylate) cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jammalamadaka, Uday; Tappa, Karthik; Weisman, Jeffery A; Nicholson, James Connor; Mills, David K

    2017-01-01

    Halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) were investigated as a platform for tunable nanoparticle composition and enhanced opacity in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) bone cement. Halloysite has been widely used to increase the mechanical properties of various polymer matrices, in stark contrast to other fillers such as barium sulfate that provide opacity but also decrease mechanical strength. The present work describes a dry deposition method for successively fabricating barium sulfate nanoparticles onto the exterior surface of HNTs. A sintering process was used to coat the HNTs in barium sulfate. Barium sulfate-coated HNTs were then added to PMMA bone cement and the samples were tested for mechanical strength and tailored opacity correlated with the fabrication ratio and the amount of barium sulfate-coated HNTs added. The potential cytotoxic effect of barium-coated HNTs in PMMA cement was also tested on osteosarcoma cells. Barium-coated HNTs were found to be completely cytocompatible, and cell proliferation was not inhibited after exposure to the barium-coated HNTs embedded in PMMA cement. We demonstrate a simple method for the creation of barium-coated nanoparticles that imparted improved contrast and material properties to native PMMA. An easy and efficient method for coating clay nanotubes offers the potential for enhanced imaging by radiologists or orthopedic surgeons.

  20. Alkali-activated blast furnace slag-zeolite cements and concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakhimov, R.; Rakhimova, N.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work has been the study of alkali-activated slag-zeolite cements and concretes based on them. Various compositions have been tested and some characteristics such as the compressive strength have been measured versus zeolite additions. A table lists the specific surface area and particle size distributions of different cements. The conclusions of the study are the following. First, alkali-activated slag cements and concretes based on them are effective for immobilization of radioactive wastes and the production of building structures, designed for high radiation load. Secondly, zeolite-containing mineral additions are able to increase the immobilization capacity and radiation resistance of alkali-activated blast furnace slag cements and concretes. Thirdly, the efficiency of different zeolite-containing additions - 10% to increase alkali-activated blast furnace slag-zeolite cement strength was established. It is with alkaline components of water-glass, sodium carbonate, sodium sulphate. Fourth, the effective way of introducing zeolite additions in alkali-activated blast furnace slag-zeolite cement is inter-grinding of the slag and addition. Increase in strength of alkali-activated blast furnace slag-zeolite cement stone is 40% higher than that of the stone of a mixture of separately milled components. Fifth, Alkali-activated blast furnace slag-zeolite cements with zeolite-containing additions with a compressive strength of 10.1 to 140 MPa; alkali-activated blast furnace slag-zeolite cements mortars with compressive strength from 35.2 to 97.7 MPa; alkali-activated blast furnace slag-zeolite cements concretes with compressive strength up to 84.5 MPa and frost resistant up to 800 cycles were obtained

  1. Alternative Fuels in Cement Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Boberg

    The substitution of alternative for fossil fuels in cement production has increased significantly in the last decade. Of these new alternative fuels, solid state fuels presently account for the largest part, and in particular, meat and bone meal, plastics and tyre derived fuels (TDF) accounted...... for the most significant alternative fuel energy contributors in the German cement industry. Solid alternative fuels are typically high in volatile content and they may differ significantly in physical and chemical properties compared to traditional solid fossil fuels. From the process point of view......, considering a modern kiln system for cement production, the use of alternative fuels mainly influences 1) kiln process stability (may accelerate build up of blockages preventing gas and/or solids flow), 2) cement clinker quality, 3) emissions, and 4) decreased production capacity. Kiln process stability...

  2. Durability of Cement Composites Reinforced with Sisal Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jianqiang

    understanding of degradation mechanisms, two approaches are proposed to mitigate the degradation of sisal fiber in the cement matrix. In order to relieve the aggressive environment of hydrated cement, cement substitution by a combination of metakaolin and nanoclay, and a combination of rice husk ash and limestone are studied. Both metakaolin and nanoclay significantly optimize the cement hydration, while the combination of these two supplementary cementitious materials validates their complementary and synergistic effect at different stages of aging. The presented approaches effectively reduce the calcium hydroxide content and the alkalinity of the pore solution, thereby mitigating the fiber degradation and improving both the initial mechanical properties and durability of the fiber-cement composites. The role of rice husk ash in cement modification is mainly as the active cementitious supplementary material. In order to improve the degradation resistance of sisal fiber itself, two novel, simple, and economical pretreatments of the fibers (thermal and sodium carbonate treatment) are investigated. Both thermal treatment and Na 2CO3 treatment effectively improve the durability of sisal fiber-reinforced concrete. The thermal treatment achieves improvement of cellulose's crystallization, which ensures the initial strength and improved durability of sisal fiber. A layer consisting of calcium carbonate sediments, which protects the internals of a fiber from the strong alkali pore solution, is formed and filled in pits and cavities on the Na2CO3 treated sisal fiber's surface.

  3. Calcium Aluminate Cement Hydration Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matusinović, T.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium aluminate cement (AC is a very versatile special cement used for specific applications. As the hydration of AC is highly temperature dependent, yielding structurally different hydration products that continuously alter material properties, a good knowledge of thermal properties at early stages of hydration is essential. The kinetics of AC hydration is a complex process and the use of single mechanisms models cannot describe the rate of hydration during the whole stage.This paper examines the influence of temperature (ϑ=5–20 °C and water-to-cement mass ratio (mH /mAC = 0.4; 0.5 and 1.0 on hydration of commercial iron-rich AC ISTRA 40 (producer: Istra Cement, Pula, Croatia, which is a part of CALUCEM group, Figs 1–3. The flow rate of heat generation of cement pastes as a result of the hydration reactions was measured with differential microcalorimeter. Chemically bonded water in the hydrated cement samples was determined by thermo-gravimetry.Far less heat is liberated when cement and water come in contact for the first time, Fig. 1, than in the case for portland cement (PC. Higher water-to-cement ratio increases the heat evolved at later ages (Fig. 3 due to higher quantity of water available for hydration. A significant effect of the water-to-cement ratio on the hydration rate and hydration degree showed the importance of water as being the limiting reactant that slows down the reaction early. A simplified stoichiometric model of early age AC hydration (eq. (8 based on reaction schemes of principal minerals, nominally CA, C12A7 and C4AF (Table 1, was employed. Hydration kinetics after the induction period (ϑ < 20 °C had been successfully described (Fig. 4 and Table 2 by a proposed model (eq. (23 which simultaneously comprised three main mechanisms: nucleation and growth, interaction at phase boundary, and mass transfer. In the proposed kinetic model the nucleation and growth is proportional to the amount of reacted minerals (eq

  4. Rheological measurements on cement grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, M.J.

    1986-06-01

    This report describes the techniques which have been developed at Winfrith for assessing the rheological properties of cement grouts. A discussion of the theory of rheology and its application to cement is given and the methodology for calibrating a special paddle measuring system for a commercial viscometer is described. The use of the system for determining flow curves, equilibrium viscosity, viscosity as a function of shearing time and structure changes is also discussed. (author)

  5. High-level radioactive waste incorporation into (special) cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, D.M.; Gouda, G.R.

    1978-01-01

    A feasibility study has demonstrated that very strong, durable, relatively impermeable cylinders may be prepared by hot pressing combinations of cements with simulated radioactive waste solids. While the properties have not been studied exhaustively, the results suggest an optional method for immobilization and isolation of radioactive waste. Samples prepared with calcium aluminate cements appeared to have properties superior to those with Portland cements. Four simulated radioactive waste compositions having high rare-earth oxide contents, and some containing a large excess of NaNO 3 , were studied. Modest temperatures [423 to 673 K (150 to 400 0 C)] were used for hot pressing at pressures from 178 to 345 MPa. Dense strong very low porosity specimens resulted when mixtures containing from 10 to 50% waste were hot pressed, incorporating also a small percentage of water. In addition, high-strength cement cylinders were prepared with the waste solid (approximately 20 wt% waste) in a separate core and were very resistant to leaching by water near its boiling point. With this configuration, even the NaNO 3 -containing wastes were resistant to leaching by water

  6. Successful field implementation of novel cementing solution for ISC wells : case histories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meher, R.K.; Suyan, K.M.; Dasgupta, D. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Dubai (United Arab Emirates)]|[Oil and Natural Gas Corp. Ltd., Tel Bhavan, Dehradun (India); Deodhar, S.; Sharma, V.; Jain, V.K. [Oil and Natural Gas Corp. Ltd., Tel Bhavan, Dehradun (India)

    2008-10-15

    Cementation of in-situ combustion (ISC) wells is challenging since wells are frequently associated with weak and unconsolidated formation. However, cement rise up to surface is desired to prevent casing failure. Moreover, the cement sheath is also required to withstand extreme stresses due to high temperature cycling experienced during in-situ combustion process. In response to the problem of inadequate placement time and flash setting, Portland cement-silica blends were used for cementation of ISC wells in India instead of alumina cement blends. However, the use of the cement-silica blends has resulted in insufficient cement rise because of losses during cementation. The cured cement failed to contain the strength and permeability in course of ISC process causing charge of sub-surface shallower layers. This paper discussed the development and implementation of a non-alumina based thermally stable lightweight lead slurry and a ductile high temperature resistance tail slurry for mitigating these problems. The paper provided details of the study as well as four successful case histories. The cementing practice for ISC wells around the world was first described and illustrated. Next, the paper outlined the formulation of thermally stable tail slurry through laboratory studies. Slurry parameters of the tail slurry were presented, including slurry weight; thickening time; fluid loss; free fluid; and rheology. The paper also reviewed a study of compressive strength and permeability of thermal slurry; slurry parameters of the lightweight lead slurry; and study of compressive strength and permeability of lightweight thermal slurry. 8 refs., 4 tabs., 12 figs.

  7. Properties of cement-fly ash grout admixed with bentonite, silica fume, or organic fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, W.H.

    1997-01-01

    A detailed laboratory study was conducted to investigate the properties of cement-fly ash grout mixtures as barriers for isolation of hazardous and low-level radioactive wastes. In the grout studied, fly ash was used to replace 30 percent by mass of cement. Three additives including bentonite, silica fume, and polypropylene fiber were used individually in the grout mixes to improve the properties of the grouts in different aspects. The flowability, bleeding, and setting time of freshly mixed grouts were determined; and the unconfined compressive strength, pore size distribution, and water permeability were determined for hardened grouts at various curing durations up to 120 days. Finally, the durability of cement-fly ash grouts was carefully examined in terms of the changes in their physical properties after different levels of exposure to sulfate attack and wet-dry cycles

  8. INTRACELLULAR SYNTHESIS OF CHONDROITIN SULFATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziewiatkowski, Dominic D.

    1962-01-01

    In autoradiograms of slices of costal cartilage, incubated for 4 hours in a salt solution containing S35-sulfate and then washed extensively and dehydrated, about 85 per cent of the radioactivity was assignable to the chondrocytes. From alkaline extracts of similarly prepared slices of cartilage, 64 to 83 per cent of the total sulfur-35 in the slices was isolated as chondroitin sulfate by chromatography on an anion-exchange resin. In view of the estimate that only about 15 per cent of the radioactivity was in the matrix, the isolation of 64 to 83 per cent of the total sulfur-35 as chondroitin sulfate is a strong argument that the chondrocytes are the loci in which chondroitin sulfate(s) is synthesized. PMID:13888910

  9. Characterization of some etalon matrices obtained by cement conditioning of the radioactive sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicu, M.; Mihai, F.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work was to establish new ways of investigation of some compounds which are important for studying physico-mechanical mechanisms, nature and structure of the intermediate and final products oc curing in reactions of the technological conditioning processes of the radioactive wastes by cementation after their treatment by precipitation or sorption process. Cement conditioning is, presently, the most used technology for the low and intermediate level waste treatment. Besides many advantages it also presents some disadvantages which limit the utilization area depending, firstly, on the chemical composition of the conditioned radioactive waste. In this work, the influence of different iron precipitates on cement structure is studied and assessed by changes in phase composition and mechanical resistance. Using mechanical resistance data, X-rays diffraction spectra and Moessbauer spectroscopy for iron precipitates and cement-iron precipitate samples, we obtained an image concerning chemical reactions and modifications which appear when iron precipitate is included in cement, between major components of cement and the added one. Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-rays diffraction were proved to be very useful to establish composition and structure of iron compounds used in treatment technology by chemical precipitation. Precipitation mechanism may be elucidated only by a thoroughgoing study of intermediate compounds obtained in successive precipitation phases. Depending on precipitation procedure, initial iron cations and order of adding of reactants, it was observed that the structure of finally obtained precipitates is different. Obtained results at compression tests on cement-iron precipitate samples are similarly with those obtained for reference cement matrix. These results demonstrate that iron precipitate in the sample with precipitate/cement ratio of 1/2 does not influence the mechanical resistance of the obtained matrix The presented results are in

  10. Cement pulmonary embolism after vertebroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifuentes Giraldo, Walter Alberto; Lamúa Riazuelo, José Ramón; Gallego Rivera, José Ignacio; Vázquez Díaz, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the use of vertebral cementing techniques for vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty has spread for the treatment of pain associated with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. This is also associated with the increased incidence of complications related with these procedures, the most frequent being originated by leakage of cementation material. Cement can escape into the vertebral venous system and reach the pulmonary circulation through the azygous system and cava vein, producing a cement embolism. This is a frequent complication, occurring in up to 26% of patients undergoing vertebroplasty but, since most patients have no clinical or hemodynamical repercussion, this event usually goes unnoticed. However, some serious, and even fatal cases, have been reported. We report the case of a 74-year-old male patient who underwent vertebroplasty for persistent pain associated with osteoporotic L3 vertebral fracture and who developed a cement leak into the cava vein and right pulmonary artery during the procedure. Although he developed a pulmonary cement embolism, the patient remained asymptomatic and did not present complications during follow-up. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. Calcium Orthophosphate Cements and Concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Dorozhkin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In early 1980s, researchers discovered self-setting calcium orthophosphate cements, which are a bioactive and biodegradable grafting material in the form of a powder and a liquid. Both phases form after mixing a viscous paste that after being implanted, sets and hardens within the body as either a non-stoichiometric calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA or brushite, sometimes blended with unreacted particles and other phases. As both CDHA and brushite are remarkably biocompartible and bioresorbable (therefore, in vivo they can be replaced with newly forming bone, calcium orthophosphate cements represent a good correction technique for non-weight-bearing bone fractures or defects and appear to be very promising materials for bone grafting applications. Besides, these cements possess an excellent osteoconductivity, molding capabilities and easy manipulation. Furthermore, reinforced cement formulations are available, which in a certain sense might be described as calcium orthophosphate concretes. The concepts established by calcium orthophosphate cement pioneers in the early 1980s were used as a platform to initiate a new generation of bone substitute materials for commercialization. Since then, advances have been made in the composition, performance and manufacturing; several beneficial formulations have already been introduced as a result. Many other compositions are in experimental stages. In this review, an insight into calcium orthophosphate cements and concretes, as excellent biomaterials suitable for both dental and bone grafting application, has been provided.

  12. Biological properties of biphasic tricalcium phosphate bioceramics/calcium sulfate bone cement porous three-dimensional scaffolds%双相钙磷生物陶瓷/硫酸钙骨水泥多孔三维支架的生物性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭迎赟; 白石; 廖运茂

    2014-01-01

    背景:随着组织工程技术的发展,多孔生物陶瓷被越来越多的运用到骨缺损的修复中,当前的研究主要集中在这种生物陶瓷的合成及其各项性能的评价。  目的:研究一种新型骨水泥的制备方法并测定其理化性能及与成骨细胞的生物相容性。  方法:共沉淀法制备双相钙磷生物陶瓷粉体,利用胶体团聚成颗粒,烧结后得到颗粒状、多孔羟基磷灰石/磷酸三钙生物陶瓷,并按不同比例与高纯度医用半水硫酸钙混合制备钙磷陶瓷/硫酸钙骨水泥。  结果与结论:X 射线衍射证实合成物质为双相钙磷陶瓷,颗粒状双相钙磷陶瓷具有多孔网状结构,骨水泥在3 min内保持可塑状态,固化时间为15 min,固化温度为36.5℃,压缩强度最高为5.82 MPa,MTT毒性级为0级,成骨细胞在材料表面生长良好。%BACKGROUND:With the development of tissue engineering, porous bioceramics are more and more used to repair bone defects. Current research focuses on the biological synthesis of this bioceramics and its performance evaluation. OBJECTIVE:To discuss the preparation of a new kind of bone cement and to determine its physicochemical properties and biocompatibility with osteoblasts. METHODS:Biphasic tricalcium phosphate powders were prepared using co-precipitation method. The powder was turned into granular stuff by arabic gum. After sintering, porous hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate bioceramics were harvested, and then mixed with alpha-hemihydrate to prepare the bone cement. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:X-ray diffraction confirmed that the synthetic substance was a kind of biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic having a porous structure. The bone cement could be in the plastic state within 3 minutes. The curing time was 15 minutes, and the curing temperature was 36.5℃. The maximum compression strength was 5.82 MPa, and the MTT toxicity was level 0. Osteoblasts could grew wel on the

  13. The effect of different surfactants/plastisizers on the electrical behavior of CNT nano-modified cement mortars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla, P. T.; Alafogianni, P.; Tragazikis, I. K.; Exarchos, D. A.; Dassios, K.; Barkoula, N.-M.; Matikas, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    Cement-based materials have in general low electrical conductivity. Electrical conductivity is the measure of the ability of the material to resist the passage of electrical current. The addition of a conductive admixture such as Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) in a cement-based material increases the conductivity of the structure. This research aims to characterize nano-modified cement mortars with MWCNT reinforcements. Such nano-composites would possess smartness and multi-functionality. Multifunctional properties include electrical, thermal and piezo-electric characteristics. One of these properties, the electrical conductivity, was measured using a custom made apparatus that allows application of known D.C. voltage on the nano-composite. In this study, the influence of different surfactants/plasticizers on CNT nano-modified cement mortar specimens with various concentrations of CNTs (0.2% wt. cement CNTs - 0.8% wt. cement CNTs) on the electrical conductivity is assessed.

  14. The use of mexican cements in the low and medium radioactive wastes confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badillo A, V.E.; Almazan T, M.G.; Alonso V, G.; Palacios H, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    Inside the relative mark to the radioactive waste confinement, minerals of great fixation capacity like clays, apatites and diverse oxides are studied as matrixes, components and/or additives of the active barriers that separate the barrier geologic and the nuclear wastes. In this case, the cements intervene in those different stages of the waste management, since its are used for the immobilization of radioactive waste in the container, for the production of containers as well as filler of the spaces among the containers of the vaults, and also as engineering barrier and construction material in the civil work. For the above mentioned, it is particularly useful to characterize the Portland cements with at least 97% of clinker, since they are most recommended for this type of applications. Presently investigation work is carried out a preliminary chemical characterization, based on the mineralogical composition, of the Portland Mexican cement. Results are shown by the X-ray Diffraction technique when immobilizing a rich solution in sulfates to 5%, using two Portland commercial cements APASCO and TOLTECA, without observing the significant appearance of new phases. The cements besides incorporating the chemical species in the breast of the matrix, are also present as barriers of civil engineering in the facilities located only some meters deep for the storage of radioactive waste of low and intermediate level, for that the study of the radionuclides fixation, in the cements is of supreme importance to evaluate the safety of a nuclear repository with the help of cements; the retention of the iodine-131 in a limited interval of pH in the commercial APASCO and TOLTECA it was studied, being observed a scarce retention of this homologous of fission products, what indicates the necessity to use additives to improve the retention properties of the Mexican commercial cements for some radionuclides. (Author)

  15. Reinforcement of cement-based matrices with graphite nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq, Muhammad Maqbool

    Cement-based materials offer a desirable balance of compressive strength, moisture resistance, durability, economy and energy-efficiency; their tensile strength, fracture energy and durability in aggressive environments, however, could benefit from further improvements. An option for realizing some of these improvements involves introduction of discrete fibers into concrete. When compared with today's micro-scale (steel, polypropylene, glass, etc.) fibers, graphite nanomaterials (carbon nanotube, nanofiber and graphite nanoplatelet) offer superior geometric, mechanical and physical characteristics. Graphite nanomaterials would realize their reinforcement potential as far as they are thoroughly dispersed within cement-based matrices, and effectively bond to cement hydrates. The research reported herein developed non-covalent and covalent surface modification techniques to improve the dispersion and interfacial interactions of graphite nanomaterials in cement-based matrices with a dense and well graded micro-structure. The most successful approach involved polymer wrapping of nanomaterials for increasing the density of hydrophilic groups on the nanomaterial surface without causing any damage to the their structure. The nanomaterials were characterized using various spectrometry techniques, and SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy). The graphite nanomaterials were dispersed via selected sonication procedures in the mixing water of the cement-based matrix; conventional mixing and sample preparation techniques were then employed to prepare the cement-based nanocomposite samples, which were subjected to steam curing. Comprehensive engineering and durability characteristics of cement-based nanocomposites were determined and their chemical composition, microstructure and failure mechanisms were also assessed through various spectrometry, thermogravimetry, electron microscopy and elemental analyses. Both functionalized and non-functionalized nanomaterials as well as different

  16. Comparison between three glass fiber post cementation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliau, Guido; Piccoli, Luca; Di Carlo, Stefano; Pompa, Giorgio; Besharat, Laith Konstantinos; Dolci, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to compare the traditional cement systems with those of the latest generation, to assess if indeed these could represent of viable substitutes in the cementation of indirect restorations, and in the specific case of endodontic posts. The assessment of the validity of the cementing methods was performed according to the test of the push-out, conducted on sections obtained from the roots of treated teeth. The samples were divided into three groups. Group A (10 samples): etching for 30 seconds with 37% orthophosphoric acid (Superlux-Thixo-etch-DMG) combined with a dual-curing adhesive system (LuxaBond-Total Etch-DMG), dual-cured resin-composite cement (LuxaCore-DMG) and glass fiber posts (LuxaPost-DMG). Group B (10 samples): self-adhesive resin cement (Breeze-Pentron Clinical) and glass fiber posts (LuxaPost-DMG). Group C (10 samples): 3 steps light-curing, self-etching, self-conditioning bonding agent (Contax-Total-etch-DMG), dual-cured resin-composite cement (LuxaCore-DMG) and glass fiber posts (LuxaPost-DMG). The survey was conducted by examining the breaking resistance of the post-cement-tooth complex, subjected to a mechanical force. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS Inc. ver. 13.0, Chicago, IL, USA. Group A values of bond strenth ranged from a minimum of 10.14 Mpa to a maximum value of 14.73 Mpa with a mean value of 12.58 Mpa. In Group B the highest value of bond strength was 6.54 Mpa and the minimum 5.55 Mpa. The mean value of the bond strength for the entire group was 6.58 Mpa. In Group C the highest bond strength was 6.59 Mpa whereas the lowest bond strength was 4.84 Mpa. Mean value of the bond strength of Group C was calculated at 5.7 Mpa. Etching with orthophosphoric acid combined with a dual-curing adhesive system and a dual-cured resin-composite cement was the technique that guaranteed the highest bond strength. Lowest bond strength values were obtained when dual self-adhesive cement was used.

  17. Influence of chemical composition of civil construction waste in the cement paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, G.A.; Andrade, A.C.D.; Souza, J.M.M.; Evangelista, A.C.J.; Almeida, V.C.

    2009-01-01

    The construction and demolition waste when disposed inappropriately might cause serious public health problems. Its reutilization focusing on the development of new products using simple production techniques, assuring a new product life cycle and not damaging the environment is inserted in sustainable concept. The aim of this work was identifying the characteristics of types of waste generated in a residential reform (glassy ceramic and fill dirt leftovers) verifying separately its influence on cement pastes mechanical behavior. Cement pastes + wastes were prepared in 25% and 50% proportions with an approximately 0,35 water/cement relation and, glue time determination, water absorption, resistance to compression and X-ray fluorescence assays were taken. The results indicate that the chemical composition of the waste causes changes in the behavior of cement pastes, reflecting on their resistance to compression. (author)

  18. Low pH Cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven

    2007-05-01

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit ≤ 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio ≤ 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  19. Low pH Cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven [Quintessa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit {<=} 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio {<=} 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  20. Development of cement material using inorganic additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyohara, Masumitsu; Satou, Tatsuaki; Wada, Mikio; Ishii, Tomoharu; Matsuo, Kazuaki.

    1997-01-01

    Inorganic admixtures to enhance the fluidity of cement material was developed. These admixtures turned into easy to immobilize the miscellaneous radioactive waste using cement material. It was found that the ζ potential of cement particles was directly proportional to the content of the inorganic admixtures in cement paste and the particles of cement were dispersed at the high ζ potential. The condensed sodium phosphate, which was the main component of the inorganic admixtures, retarded the dissolution of Ca 2+ ion from the cement, and generated the colloids by incorporating dissolved Ca 2+ ion. The cement material containing the inorganic admixtures was found to have the same mechanical strength and adsorption potential of radionuclides in comparison to normal cement materials. It was confirmed that the cement material containing the inorganic admixture was effectively filled gaps of miscellaneous radioactive waste. (author)

  1. Evaluation of structural behaviour and corrosion resistant of austenitic AISI 304 and duplex AISI 2304 stainless steel reinforcements embedded in ordinary Portland cement mortars; Evaluacion del comportamiento estructural y de resistencia a la corrosion de armaduras de acero inoxidable austenitico AISI 304 y duplex AISI 2304 embebidas en morteros de cemento Portland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, E.; Cobo, A.; Bastidas, D. M.

    2012-07-01

    The mechanical and structural behaviour of two stainless steels reinforcements, with grades austenitic EN 1.4301 (AISI 304) and duplex EN 1.4362 (AISI 2304) have been studied, and compared with the conventional carbon steel B500SD rebar. The study was conducted at three levels: at rebar level, at section level and at structural element level. The different mechanical properties of stainless steel directly influence the behaviour at section level and structural element level. The study of the corrosion behaviour of the two stainless steels has been performed by electrochemical measurements, monitoring the corrosion potential and the lineal polarization resistance (LPR), of reinforcements embedded in ordinary Portland cement (OPC) mortar specimens contaminated with different amount of chloride over one year time exposure. Both stainless steels specimens embedded in OPC mortar remain in the passive state for all the chloride concentration range studied after one year exposure. (Author) 26 refs.

  2. Microbial Preservation in Sulfates in the Haughton Impact Structure Suggests Target in Search for Life on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, J.; Osinski, G. R.; Lee, P.; Cockell, C. S.

    2005-01-01

    Microbes in Haughton Crater Sulfates: Impact craters are of high interest in planetary exploration because they are viewed as possible sites for evidence of life [1]. Hydrothermal systems in craters are particularly regarded as sites where primitive life could evolve. Evidence from the Miocene Haughton impact structure shows that crater hydrothermal deposits may also be a preferred site for subsequent colonization and hence possible extant life: Hydrothermal sulfates at Haughton are colonized by viable cyanobacteria [2]. The Haughton impact structure, Devon Island, Canadian High Arctic, is a 24 km-diameter crater of mid-Tertiary age. The structure preserves an exceptional record of impact-induced hydrothermal activity, including sulfide, and sulfate mineralization [3]. The target rocks excavated at the site included massive gypsum-bearing carbonate rocks of Ordovician age. Impact-remobilized sulfates occur as metre-scale masses of intergrown crystals of the clear form of gypsum selenite in veins and cavity fillings within the crater s impact melt breccia deposits [4]. The selenite is part of the hydrothermal assemblage as it was precipitated by cooling hot waters that were circulating as a result of the impact. Remobilization of the sulfate continues to the present day, such that it occurs in soil crusts (Fig. 1) including sandy beds with a gypsum cement. The sulfate-cemented beds make an interesting comparison with the sulfate-bearing sandy beds encountered by the Opportunity MER [5]. The selenite crystals are up to 0.3 m in width, of high purity, and transparent. They locally exhibit frayed margins where cleavage surfaces have separated. This exfoliation may be a response to freeze-thaw weathering. The selenite contains traces of rock detritus, newly precipitated gypsum, and microbial colonies. The rock detritus consists of sediment particles which penetrated the opened cleavages by up to 2cm from the crystal margins. Some of the detritus is cemented into place

  3. THE USE OF SISAL FIBRE AS REINFORCEMENT IN CEMENT BASED COMPOSITES

    OpenAIRE

    Tolêdo Filho,Romildo Dias; Joseph,Kuruvilla; Ghavami,Khosrow; England,George Leslie

    1999-01-01

    ABSTRACT The inclusion of fibre reinforcement in concrete, mortar and cement paste can enhance many of the engineering properties of the basic materials, such as fracture toughness, flexural strength and resistance to fatigue, impact, thermal shock and spalling. In recent years, a great deal of interest has been created worldwide on the potential applications of natural fibre reinforced, cement based composites. Investigations have been carried out in many countries on various mechanical prop...

  4. Resistência a compressão de tijolos de solo-cimento fabricados com o montículo do cupim Cornitermes cumulans (Kollar, 1832 Resistance the compression of manufactured cement bricks ground with the wooded hill of termite Cornitermes cumulans (Kollar, 1832

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Queiroz Corrêa de Albuquerque

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se neste trabalho, comparar a resistência à compressão de tijolos de solo-cimento fabricados com o montículo do cupim Cornitermes cumulans (Kollar, 1832, com tijolos que utilizaram como matéria prima um NEOSSOLO QUARTZARÊNICO (EMBRAPA, 1999, ambos submetidos a duas idades de cura (07 ou 28 dias. O experimento foi montado em delineamento inteiramente casualizado, em esquema fatorial 2x2, sendo analisados dois cofatores: a matéria prima base e a idade de cura. Os ensaios físicos e mecânicos obedeceram às prescrições das normas da Associação Brasileira de Normas Técnicas NBR-8492 (ABNT, 1982 e NBR-8491 (ABNT, 1984. Concluiu-se que a resistência à compressão dos tijolos foi maior com o aumento das idades de cura. O tratamento T4 apresentou maior valor de resistência à compressão, não diferindo estatisticamente dos tratamentos T2 e T1. Os tijolos fabricados com o montículo do cupim C. cumulans (Kollar, 1832 apresentaram diminuição da absorção de água com o aumento das idades de cura, o que normalmente corresponde a um maior aumento da resistência à compressão, ao contrário dos que utilizaram o NEOSSOLO QUARTZARÊNICO (EMBRAPA, 1999.The aim of this research was to compare the compressive strength of ground-cement bricks manufactured with the wooded hill of termite Cornitermes cumulans (Kollar, 1832, to bricks that they were used as quartzaremico raw material one NEOSSOLO QUARTZARÊNICO (EMBRAPA, 1999, both submitted to two ages of cure (07 or 28 days. The experiment was performed in entirely randomized delineation, in factorial project 2x2, being analyzed two cofactors: the raw material base and age of cure. The physical and mechanical assays obeyed the lapsing of the norm of the Brazilian Association of Technical Rules NBR-8492 (ABNT, 1982 and NBR-8491 (ABNT, 1984. One concluded that the compressive strength of the bricks was bigger with the increase of the ages of cure. The T4 treatment presented bigger

  5. Polymer-cement interactions towards improved wellbore cement fracture sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckingham, B. S.; Iloejesi, C.; Minkler, M. J.; Schindler, A. K.; Beckingham, L. E.

    2017-12-01

    Carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) in deep geologic formations is a promising means of reducing point source emissions of CO2. In these systems, CO2 is captured at the source and then injected to be utilized (eg. in enhanced oil recovery or as a working fluid in enhanced geothermal energy plants) or stored in geologic formations such as depleted oil and gas reservoirs or saline aquifers. While CCUS in subsurface systems could aid in reducing atmospheric CO2 emissions, the potential for CO2 leakage from these systems to overlying formations remains a major limitation and poses a significant risk to the security of injected CO2. Thus, improved materials for both initial wellbore isolation and repairing leakage pathways that develop over time are sought. One approach for the repair of cement fractures in wellbore (and other) systems is the injection of polymer materials into the fracture with a subsequent environmentally dependent (temperature, pressure, pH, etc.) densification or solidification. Here, we aim to investigate novel polymer materials for use to repair leaking wellbores in the context of CCUS. We synthesize and fully characterize a series of novel polymer materials and utilize a suite of analysis techniques to examine polymer-cement interactions at a range of conditions (namely temperature, pressure and pH). Initial findings will be leveraged to design novel polymer materials for further evaluation in polymer-cement composite cores, cement fracture healing, and the aging behavior of healed cements.

  6. Suitability of alumina cements for the cementation of boreholes under corrosive conditions, especially at the press fitting of CO{sub 2}; Eignung von Tonerdezementen fuer die Bohrlochzementierung unter korrosiven Bedingungen, insbesondere bei CO{sub 2}-Einpressung. Literaturstudie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plank, J.; Sieber, R. (comps.) [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Bauchemie

    2011-07-15

    Calcium aluminate cements, also called aluminate cements, are special cements based on calcium aluminates. In construction (especially in dry-mix mortars), they are valued for their remarkably higher acid and corrosion resistance compared to Portland cement. Their high temperature resistance especially qualifies them for refractory cements which are used e.g. as liners in cement rotary kilns. The worldwide production of calcium aluminate cements adds up to about 3 million tons. In oil well cementing, calcium aluminate cements have first been used at the beginning of the 90ies, in fact initially for geothermal wells. Applications in permafrost soils as well as fire-flooding wells came later. The reason for the use in geothermal wells. Applications in permafrost soils as well as fire-flooding wells came later. The reason for the use in geothermal wells were severe problems with API Portland cements affected by hot, carbonic acid rich formation brines. With support from the companies Unocal and Halliburton, the Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA) developed a special cement based on 60 parts by weight of calcium aluminate cement and 40 parts ASTM class F fly ash. This binder is notably CO{sub 2} resistant when mixed with a 25 wt.% Na-polyphosphate solution. Laboratory tests and field applications conclude that this cement is resistant to CO{sub 2} corrosion at temperatures up to 300 C for over 20 years. In 1997, for the first time numerous geothermal wells have been cemented using this cement. They are intact to this day. When this cement hardens at room temperature, amorphous reaction products are formed and the reaction is incomplete. However, at higher temperatures hydroxyapatite, boehmite, Na-P-zeolite, analcime or katoite are formed as crystalline reaction products. The CO{sub 2} resistance of this cement is due to specific chemical reactions. In contact with hot alkaline carbonate solutions, analcime converts to cancrinite, and CO{sub 2} is incorporated into

  7. Surface metallurgy of cemented carbide tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, K.L.; Kashyap, S.C.; Rao, T.V.; Rajagopalan, S.; Srivastava, P.K.

    1983-01-01

    Transition metal carbides, owing to their high melting point, hardness and wear resistance, are potential candidates for specific application in rockets, nuclear engineering equipment and cutting tools. Tungsten carbide sintered with a binder (either cobalt metal or a mixture of Co + TiC and/or TaC(NbC)) is used for cutting tools. The surface metallurgy of several commercially available cemented carbide tools was studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques. The tool surfaces were contaminated by adsorbed oxygen up to a depth of nearly 0.3 μm causing deterioration of the mechanical properties of the tools. Studies of fractured samples indicated that the tool surfaces were prone to oxygen adsorption. The fracture path passes through the cobalt-rich regions. The ineffectiveness of a worn cutting tool is attributed to the presence of excessive iron from the steel workpiece and carbon and oxygen in the surface layers of the tool. The use of appropriate hard coatings on cemented carbide tools is suggested. (Auth.)

  8. Heparan sulfate and cell division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porcionatto M.A.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Heparan sulfate is a component of vertebrate and invertebrate tissues which appears during the cytodifferentiation stage of embryonic development. Its structure varies according to the tissue and species of origin and is modified during neoplastic transformation. Several lines of experimental evidence suggest that heparan sulfate plays a role in cellular recognition, cellular adhesion and growth control. Heparan sulfate can participate in the process of cell division in two distinct ways, either as a positive or negative modulator of cellular proliferation, or as a response to a mitogenic stimulus.

  9. Advanced technologies of production of cemented carbides and composite materials based on them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarenko, V.; Pavlotskaya, E.; Martynova, L.; Epik, I.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents new technological processes of production of W, WC and (Ti, W)C powders, cemented carbides having a controlled carbon content, high-strength nonmagnetic nickel-bonded cemented carbides, cemented carbide-based composites having a wear-resistant antifriction working layer as well as processes of regeneration of cemented carbide waste. It is shown that these technological processes permit radical changes in the production of carbide powders and products of VK, TK, VN and KKhN cemented carbides. The processes of cemented carbide production become ecologically acceptable and free of carbon black, the use of cumbersome mixers is excluded, the power expenditure is reduced and the efficiency of labor increases. It becomes possible to control precisely the carbon content within a two-phase region -carbide-metal. A high wear resistance of parts of friction couples which are lubricated with water, benzine, kerosene, diesel fuel and other low-viscosity liquids, is ensured with increased strength and shock resistance. (author)

  10. Final report on the safety assessment of sodium cetearyl sulfate and related alkyl sulfates as used in cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiume, Monice; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Klaassen, Curtis D; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Alan Andersen, F

    2010-05-01

    Sodium cetearyl sulfate is the sodium salt of a mixture of cetyl and stearyl sulfate. The other ingredients in this safety assessment are also alkyl salts, including ammonium coco-sulfate, ammonium myristyl sulfate, magnesium coco-sulfate, sodium cetyl sulfate, sodium coco/hydrogenated tallow sulfate, sodium coco-sulfate, sodium decyl sulfate, sodium ethylhexyl sulfate, sodium myristyl sulfate, sodium oleyl sulfate, sodium stearyl sulfate, sodium tallow sulfate, sodium tridecyl sulfate, and zinc coco-sulfate. These ingredients are surfactants used at concentrations from 0.1% to 29%, primarily in soaps and shampoos. Many of these ingredients are not in current use. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel previously completed a safety assessment of sodium and ammonium lauryl sulfate. The data available for sodium lauryl sulfate and ammonium lauryl sulfate provide sufficient basis for concluding that sodium cetearyl sulfate and related alkyl sulfates are safe in the practices of use and concentration described in the safety assessment.

  11. Thermogravimetric analysis of phase transitions in cement compositions mixed by sodium silicate solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedosov Sergey Viktorovich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of the capability to modify cement by mechanical activation of sodium silicate water solution. Admixtures or blends of binding agents were employed for modifying concrete properties. The liquid glass is applied to protect from chemically or physically unfavorable environmental impacts, such as acidic medium and high temperature. The sodium silicate is a high-capacity setting accelerator. The increasing of the liquid glass proportion in the mix leads to the degradation of the cement paste plasticity and for this reason it is necessary to reduce the amount of liquid glass in the cement paste. The activation of dilute water solution of sodium silicate into rotary pulsating apparatus directly before tempering of the cement paste is an effective way to decrease mass fraction of liquid glass in the cement paste. The results of the combined influence of liquid glass and mechanical activation on physicochemical processes taking place in cement stone are represented in this research. Thermogravimetric analysis was used in order to study cement blends. Thermogravimetric analysis of modified cement stone assays was performed by thermo analyzer SETARAM TGA 92-24. The results of the analysis of phase transition taking place under high-temperature heating of cement stone modified by the mechanical activation of the water solution of the sodium silicate were introduced. Thermograms of cement stone assays were obtained at different hardening age. The comparison of these thermograms allows us to come to a conclusion on the formation and the retention during long time of a more dense structure of the composite matrix mixed by the mechanical activation of sodium silicate water solution. The relation between the concrete composition and its strength properties was stated. Perhaps, the capability of modified concrete to keep calcium ions in sparingly soluble hydrosilicates leads to the increase in its durability and corrosion resistance.

  12. A modified PMMA cement (Sub-cement) for accelerated fatigue testing of cemented implant constructs using cadaveric bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Race, Amos; Miller, Mark A; Mann, Kenneth A

    2008-10-20

    Pre-clinical screening of cemented implant systems could be improved by modeling the longer-term response of the implant/cement/bone construct to cyclic loading. We formulated bone cement with degraded fatigue fracture properties (Sub-cement) such that long-term fatigue could be simulated in short-term cadaver tests. Sub-cement was made by adding a chain-transfer agent to standard polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement. This reduced the molecular weight of the inter-bead matrix without changing reaction-rate or handling characteristics. Static mechanical properties were approximately equivalent to normal cement. Over a physiologically reasonable range of stress-intensity factor, fatigue crack propagation rates for Sub-cement were higher by a factor of 25+/-19. When tested in a simplified 2 1/2-D physical model of a stem-cement-bone system, crack growth from the stem was accelerated by a factor of 100. Sub-cement accelerated both crack initiation and growth rate. Sub-cement is now being evaluated in full stem/cement/femur models.

  13. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  14. 76 FR 76760 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-08

    ... and Cement Clinker From Japan Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject... duty order on gray Portland cement and cement clinker from Japan would be likely to lead to... and Cement Clinker from Japan: Investigation No. 731- TA-461 (Third Review). By order of the...

  15. Seating load parameters impact on dental ceramic reinforcement conferred by cementation with resin-cements.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Addison, Owen

    2010-09-01

    Cementation of all-ceramic restorations with resin-cements has been demonstrated to reduce the incidence of fracture in service. The aim was to investigate the influence of loading force and loading duration applied during cementation on the reinforcement conferred by a resin-cement on a leucite reinforced glass-ceramic.

  16. Investigating the Influence of Waste Basalt Powder on Selected Properties of Cement Paste and Mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobiszewska, Magdalena; Beycioğlu, Ahmet

    2017-10-01

    Concrete is the most widely used man-made construction material in civil engineering applications. The consumption of cement and thus concrete, increases day by day along with the growth of urbanization and industrialization and due to new developments in construction technologies, population growing, increasing of living standard. Concrete production consumes much energy and large amounts of natural resources. It causes environmental, energy and economic losses. The most important material in concrete production is cement. Cement industry contributes to production of about 7% of all CO2 generated in the world. Every ton of cement production releases nearly one ton of CO2 to atmosphere. Thus the concrete and cement industry changes the environment appearance and influences it very much. Therefore, it has become very important for construction industry to focus on minimizing the environmental impact, reducing energy consumption and limiting CO2 emission. The need to meet these challenges has spurred an interest in the development of a blended Portland cement in which the amount of clinker is reduced and partially replaced with mineral additives - supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs). Many researchers have studied the possibility of using another mineral powder in mortar and concrete production. The addition of marble dust, basalt powder, granite or limestone powder positively affects some properties of cement mortar and concrete. This paper presents an experimental study on the properties of cement paste and mortar containing basalt powder. The basalt powder is a waste emerged from the preparation of aggregate used in asphalt mixture production. Previous studies have shown that analysed waste used as a fine aggregate replacement, has a beneficial effect on some properties of mortar and concrete, i.e. compressive strength, flexural strength and freeze resistance also. The present study shows the results of the research concerning the modification of cement

  17. Early-age hydration and volume change of calcium sulfoaluminate cement-based binders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaunsali, Piyush

    Shrinkage cracking is a predominant deterioration mechanism in structures with high surface-to-volume ratio. One way to allay shrinkage-induced stresses is to use calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cement whose early-age expansion in restrained condition induces compressive stress that can be utilized to counter the tensile stresses due to shrinkage. In addition to enhancing the resistance against shrinkage cracking, CSA cement also has lower carbon footprint than that of Portland cement. This dissertation aims at improving the understanding of early-age volume change of CSA cement-based binders. For the first time, interaction between mineral admixtures (Class F fly ash, Class C fly ash, and silica fume) and OPC-CSA binder was studied. Various physico-chemical factors such as the hydration of ye'elimite (main component in CSA cement), amount of ettringite (the main phase responsible for expansion in CSA cement), supersaturation with respect to ettringite in cement pore solution, total pore volume, and material stiffness were monitored to examine early-age expansion characteristics. This research validated the crystallization stress theory by showing the presence of higher supersaturation level of ettringite, and therefore, higher crystallization stress in CSA cement-based binders. Supersaturation with respect to ettringite was found to increase with CSA dosage and external supply of gypsum. Mineral admixtures (MA) altered the expansion characteristics in OPC-CSA-MA binders with fixed CSA cement. This study reports that fly ash (FA) behaves differently depending on its phase composition. The Class C FA-based binder (OPC-CSA-CFA) ceased expanding beyond two days unlike other OPC-CSA-MA binders. Three factors were found to govern expansion of CSA cement-based binders: 1) volume fraction of ettringite in given pore volume, 2) saturation level of ettringite, and 3) dynamic modulus. Various models were utilized to estimate the macroscopic tensile stress in CSA cement

  18. STUDY ON POZZOLANA ACTIVITY OF WHEAT STRAW ASH AS POTENTIAL ADMIXTURE FOR BLENDED CEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondrej Jankovsky

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Wheat straw ash coming from combustion of packed wheat straw was studied as a potential pozzolana active admixture for blended cements. X-Ray fluorescence, X-Ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to examine chemical and mineralogical composition, morphology and elemental distribution of a raw untreated ash. Due to high carbon content, the wheat straw ash was thermally treated for 2 hours at 700 °C and analyzed again using the same analytic techniques. Thermal treatment process was monitored using simultaneous thermal analysis and Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy. The pozzolana activity was assessed using Chapelle and Frattini tests. In the next step, wheat straw ash was used for preparation of blended cement pastes. The content of ash in the blends was 10, 15, and 20% by mass. For the hardened pastes, basic physical properties, mechanical parameters, and pore size distribution were measured. For fresh past mixes, workability was tested. Moreover, leachability of chlorides, nitrates, sulfates and alkalis from paste samples was studied. The experimentally obtained data pointed to the high pozzolana activity of wheat straw ash and sufficient mechanical properties of cement pastes with the ash content up to 20 mass% of cement. In summary, the analyzed waste product from biomass combustion was found to be applicable as a part of cement-based blended binder providing economic and environmental benefits for concrete industry.

  19. Influence of MWCNT/surfactant dispersions on the mechanical properties of Portland cement pastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, B.; Quintero, J. H.; Arias, Y. P.; Mendoza-Reales, O. A.; Ochoa-Botero, J. C.; Toledo-Filho, R. D.

    2017-12-01

    This work studies the reinforcing effect of Multi Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT) on cement pastes. A 0.35% solid concentration of MWCNT in powder was dispersed in deionized water with sodium dodecyl sulfate (cationic surfactant), cetylpyridinium chloride (anionic surfactant) and triton X-100 (amphoteric surfactant) using an ultrasonic tip processor. Three concentrations of each surfactant (1mM, 10mM and 100mM) were tested, and all samples were sonicated until an adequate dispersion degree was obtained. Cement pastes with additions of carbon nanotubes of 0.15% by mass of cement were produced in two steps; first the dispersions of MWCNT were combined with the mixing water using an ultrasonic tip processor to guarantee homogeneity, and then cement was added and mixed until a homogeneous paste was obtained. Direct tensile strength, apparent density and open porosity of the pastes were measured after 7 days of curing. It was found that the MWCNT/surfactants dispersions decrease the mechanical properties of the cement based matrix due to an increased porosity caused by the presence of surfactants.

  20. Cement radwaste solidification studies third annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.J.; James, J.M.; Lee, D.J.; Smith, D.L.; Walker, A.T.

    1982-03-01

    This report summarises cement radwaste studies carried out at AEE Winfrith during 1981 on the encapsulation of medium and low active waste in cement. During the year more emphasis has been placed on the work which is directly related to the solidification of SGHWR active sludge. Information has been obtained on the properties of 220 dm 3 drums of cemented waste. The use of cement grouts for the encapsulation of solid items has also been investigated during 1981. (U.K.)

  1. Characterization of cement-stabilized Cd wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maria Diez, J.; Madrid, J.; Macias, A.

    1996-01-01

    Portland cement affords both physical and chemical immobilization of cadmium. The immobilization has been studied analyzing the pore fluid of cement samples and characterizing the solid pastes by X-ray diffraction. The influence of cadmium on the cement hydration and on its mechanical properties has been also studied by isothermal conduction calorimetry and by the measure of strength and setting development. Finally, the effect of cement carbonation on the immobilization of cadmium has been analyzed

  2. Substantial global carbon uptake by cement carbonation

    OpenAIRE

    Xi, Fengming; Davis, Steven J.; Ciais, Philippe; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Guan, Dabo; Pade, Claus; Shi, Tiemao; Syddall, Mark; Lv, Jie; Ji, Lanzhu; Bing, Longfei; Wang, Jiaoyue; Wei, Wei; Yang, Keun-Hyeok; Lagerblad, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Calcination of carbonate rocks during the manufacture of cement produced 5% of global CO2 emissions from all industrial process and fossil-fuel combustion in 20131, 2. Considerable attention has been paid to quantifying these industrial process emissions from cement production2, 3, but the natural reversal of the process—carbonation—has received little attention in carbon cycle studies. Here, we use new and existing data on cement materials during cement service life, demolition, and secondar...

  3. Cementation of nuclear graphite using geo-polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girke, N.A.; Steinmetz, H.J.; Bukaemsky, A.; Bosbach, D.; Hermann, E.; Griebel, I.

    2012-01-01

    Geo-polymers are solid aluminosilicate materials usually formed by alkali hydroxide or alkali silicate activation of solid precursors such as coal fly ash, calcined clay and/or metallurgical slag. Today the primary application of geo-polymer technology is in the development of alternatives to Portland-based cements. Variations in the ratio of aluminium to silicon, and alkali to silicon or addition of structure support, produce geo-polymers with different physical and mechanical properties. These materials have an amorphous three-dimensional structure that gives geo-polymers certain properties, such as fire and acid resistance, low leach rate, which make them an ideal substitute for ordinary Portland cement (OPC) in a wide range of applications especially in conditioning and storage of radioactive waste. Therefore investigations have been initiated about how and to which amount graphite as a hydrophobic material can be mixed with cement or concrete to form stable waste products and which concretes fulfill the specifications at best. As result geo-polymers have been identified as a promising matrix for graphite containing nuclear wastes. With geo-polymers both favorable properties in the cementation process and a high long time structural stability of the products can be achieved. (authors)

  4. Natural gamma-emitting radionuclides in egyptian cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Arabi, A.M.; Abbady, A.; El Kamel, A.H.; Nosier, A.; Moustafa, A.

    2005-01-01

    Samples of cement manufactured in Egypt and the various raw materials, which compose the product, have been analyzed using gamma-spectroscopy, in order to determine the concentration of natural radionuclides and associated radiological hazard. The mean of specific activity due to all the three radionuclides (226 R a, 232 T h and 40 K ) were found to be 20±4 , 11± 2, 320 ± 18 (gypsum), 41 ±8, 27± 5, 410± 27 (clay), 58 ± 11, 18 3, 321± 20 (Iron ore) and 37.6 ± 6, 11.8 ± 3, 178.6 ± 15 Bq.kg-1 (Portland cement), respectively. 40 K concentration could not be detected in Slag; limestone; Sulphate resistant cement; Clinker and White cement, while the mean activity concentrations of 226 R a and 232 T h are 239 ± 16, 48.7 ± 7; 31.5 ±5, 10 ± 2; 47 ± 7, 20 ± 4; 23 ± 5, 10.4 ± 3 and 23 ± 5, 11 ±3 Bq.kg-1, respectively. The measured activity concentrations of these natural radionuclides were compared with data of some countries. The present values are in the same range and sometimes less than those in other countries

  5. Natural gamma-emitting radionuclides in egyptian cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Arabi, A.M.; Abbady, A.; El-Kamel, A.H.; Nosier, A.; Moustafa, A.

    2005-01-01

    Samples of cement manufactured in Egypt and the various raw materials, which compose the product, have been analyzed using gamma-spectroscopy, in order to determine the concentration of natural radionuclides and associated radiological hazard. The mean of specific activity due to all the three radionuclides (226 R a, 232 T h and 40 K ) were found to be 20 ± 4 , 11 ± 2, 320 ± 18 (gypsum), 41 ± 8, 27 ± 5, 410 ± 27 (clay), 58 ± 11, 18 3, 321 ± 20 (Iron ore) and 37.6 ± 6, 11.8 ± 3, 178.6 ± 15 Bq.kg-1 (Portland cement), respectively. 40 K concentration could not be detected in Slag; limestone; Sulphate resistant cement; Clinker and White cement, while the mean activity concentrations of 226 R a and 232 T h are 239 ± 16, 48.7 ± 7; 31.5 ± 5, 10 ± 2; 47 3 ± 7, 20 ± 4; 23 ± 5, 10.4 ± 3 and 23 ± 5, 11 ± 3 Bq.kg-1, respectively. The measured activity concentrations of these natural radionuclides were compared with data of some countries. The present values are in the same range and sometimes less than those in other countries

  6. Cementation unit for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellamano, Jose Claudio; Vicente, Roberto; Lima, Jose Rodrigues de

    2001-01-01

    This communication describes the waste cementation process and facility developed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN. The process is based on 200 litres batch operation, in drum mixing, with continuous cement feeding. The equipment is a single recoverable helicoidal mixer and a turning table that allows the drum to rotate during the mixing operation, simulating a planetary mixer. The facility was designed to treat contact handled liquids and wet solid wastes, but can be adapted for shielded equipment and remote operation. (author)

  7. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns or...

  8. Cement production from coal conversion residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, L.D.; Clavenna, L.R.; Eakman, J.M.; Nahas, N.C.

    1981-01-01

    Cement is produced by feeding residue solids containing carbonaceous material and ash constituents obtained from converting a carbonaceous feed material into liquids and/or gases into a cement-making zone and burning the carbon in the residue solids to supply at least a portion of the energy required to convert the solids into cement

  9. Multicomponent modelling of Portland cement hydration reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ukrainczyk, N.; Koenders, E.A.B.; Van Breugel, K.

    2012-01-01

    The prospect of cement and concrete technologies depends on more in depth understanding of cement hydration reactions. Hydration reaction models simulate the development of the microstructures that can finally be used to estimate the cement based material properties that influence performance and

  10. Characterization of different types of ceramic waste and its incorporation to the cement paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, G.A.; Evangelista, A.C.J.; Almeida, V.C. de

    2009-01-01

    The porcelain tike is a product resulting from the technological development of ceramic plating industry. Its large acceptation by the consumer market is probably linked with certain properties, such as low porosity, high mechanical resistance, facility in maintenance, besides being a material of modern and versatile characteristics. The aim of this work was characterizing the different ceramic wastes (enameled and porcelain tike) and evaluating its influence on the mechanical behavior in cement pastes. The wastes were characterized through the determination of its chemical composition, size particle distribution and X-ray diffraction. Cement pastes + wastes were prepared in 25% and 50% proportions and glue time determination, water absorption and resistance to compression assays were taken. The results indicate that although the wastes don't show any variation in the elementary chemical composition, changes in the cement paste behavior related to the values of resistance to compression were observed. (author)

  11. Study on cold weather concreting using low-heat cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hama, Yukio; Ryu Koto; Tomosawa, Fuminori

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, properties of frost damage at early age and strength development and thermal crack were studied, for purposes of application to the mass concrete of low-heat cement in cold weather, by means of concrete experiments and temperature analysis by finite element method. The experiments and the analysis result showed that the strength for resistance to frost damage at early age was 5N/mm 2 , the concrete strength correction value in terms of curing temperature was calculated approximately, and was effective in the resistance of thermal crack. And then, the application ranges of construction procedures were investigated. (author)

  12. Formulation study on immobilization of spent ion exchange resins in polymer cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Lili; Lin Meiqiong; Bao Liangjin; Fan Xianhua

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a formulation of cement-solidified spent radioactive ion exchange resin form. The solidified form consists of a sort of composite cement, epoxide resin emulsion, and spent ion exchange resins. The composite cement is made up of quick-setting sulphoaluminate cement, silica powder, zeolite, and fly ash in the proportion 1:0.05:0.10:0.05. Sixteen combinations of composite cement, epoxide resin emulsion and mixed anion-cation exchange resins are selected according to a three-factors-four-levels normal design table with the compression strength as the evaluation criterion. The resulted formulation is as follows: the mass ratio of polymer emulsion to composite cement is 0.55:1, the loading of mixed anion-cation exchange resins is 0.3, and the anionic-to-cationic exchange resins ratio is 2:1. The polymer cement solidified forms were tested after 28 d curing for Cs + and Sr 2+ leaching rates, pH and conductivity of the leaching water, and radiation-resistant property in addition to their compressive strength. The measurement results indicate that the performance of thus prepared solidified forms can meet the requirements of the National Standard GB14569.1-93 for near earth's surface disposal of low radioactive waste. (authors)

  13. Dextroamphetamine sulfate provided quick relief of severe post-partum depression that was recalcitrant to standard antidepressants and psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Check, J H; Jaffe, A

    2017-01-01

    To determine if dextroamphetamine sulfate could improve symptoms of post-partum depression. A woman with severe post-partum depression that was resistant to standard antidepressant therapy and psychotherapy was treated with dextroamphetamine sulfate extended release capsules 15 mg/day. A quick and complete abrogation of the depression ensued along with improvement of migraine headaches, insomnia, and chronic fatigue. Dextr6amphetamine sulfate should be considered as a treatment modality for post-partum depression.

  14. The Use of Micro and Nano Particulate Fillers to Modify the Mechanical and Material Properties of Acrylic Bone Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slane, Joshua A.

    Acrylic bone cement (polymethyl methacrylate) is widely used in total joint replacements to provide long-term fixation of implants. In essence, bone cement acts as a grout by filling in the voids left between the implant and the patient's bone, forming a mechanical interlock. While bone cement is considered the `gold standard' for implant fixation, issues such as mechanical failure of the cement mantle (aseptic loosening) and the development of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) still plague joint replacement procedures and often necessitate revision arthroplasty. In an effort to address these failures, various modifications are commonly made to bone cement such as mechanical reinforcement with particles/fibers and the addition of antibiotics to mitigate PJI. Despite these attempts, issues such as poor particle interfacial adhesion, inadequate drug release, and the development of multidrug resistant bacteria limit the effectiveness of bone cement modifications. Therefore, the overall goal of this work was to use micro and nanoparticles to enhance the properties of acrylic bone cement, with particular emphasis placed on improving the mechanical properties, cumulative antibiotic release, and antimicrobial properties. An acrylic bone cement (Palacos R) was modified with three types of particles in various loading ratios: mesoporous silica nanoparticles (for mechanical reinforcement), xylitol microparticles (for increased antibiotic release), and silver nanoparticles (as an antimicrobial agent). These particles were used as sole modifications, not in tandem with one another. The resulting cement composites were characterized using a variety of mechanical (macro to nano, fatigue, fracture, and dynamic), imaging, chemical, thermal, biological, and antimicrobial testing techniques. The primary outcomes of this dissertation demonstrate that: (1) mesoporous silica, as used in this work, is a poor reinforcement phase for acrylic bone cement, (2) xylitol can significantly

  15. Synthesis and characterization of cement slurries additives with epoxy resins - kinetics, thermodynamic and calorimetric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, A.M.G.; Andrade Junior, M.A.S.; Cestari, A.R.; Vieira, E.F.S.

    2010-01-01

    Cement has been used in the world, presenting a wide versatility. However, due to its chemical nature, it is subject to several types of chemical damages, especially for agents of acidic nature. With the purpose of increase its life-time, new cement slurries have been modified with the addition of specific additives. The objective of this work is to modify cement slurries with epoxy resins, which promote higher resistance of those materials in relation to acid attacks. Three cement slurries were synthesized with epoxy resins and a standard slurries, which was composed by cement and water. After 30 days of hydration, the samples were characterized by XDR, FTIR and thermal analysis (TG and DSC). The hydration processes of the cement slurries were studied by heat-conduction microcalorimetry. A kinetic study of HCl interaction with the new slurries were performed by the batch methodology at 25, 35, 45 e 55 deg C. It was verified that the addition of the polymers delayed the processes of hydration of the slurries, decreasing the flow of heat released as a function of the amount of added resin and, increased the resistance of those slurries to the acid attack. (author)

  16. Evaluation of the Compressive Strength of Cement-Spent Resins Matrix Mixed with Bio char

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalina Laili; Muhamad Samudi Yasir; Zalina Laili; Mohd Abdul Wahab; Nur Azna Mahmud; Nurfazlina Zainal Abidin

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of compressive strength of cement-spent resins matrix mixed with bio char was investigated. In this study, bio char with different percentage (5 %, 8 %, 11 % 14 % and 18 %) was used as alternative admixture material for cement solidification of spent resins. Some properties of the physical and chemical of spent resins and bio char were also investigated. The performance of cemented spent resins with the addition of bio char was evaluated based on their compressive strength and the water resistance test. The compressive strength was evaluated at three different curing periods of 7, 14 and 28 days, while 4 weeks of immersion in distilled water was chosen for water resistance test. The result indicated that the compressive strength at 7, 14 and 28 days of curing periods were above the minimum criterion for example > 3.45 MPa of acceptable level for cemented waste form. Statistical analysis showed that there was no significant relationship between the compressive strength of the specimen and the percentage of bio char content. Result from the water resistance test showed that only one specimen that contained of 5 % of bio char failed the water resistance test due to the high of spent resins/ bio char ratio. The compressive strength of cement solidified spent resins was found increased after the water resistance test indicating further hydration occurred after immersed in water. The results of this study also suggest that the specimen with 8 %, 11 %, 14 % and 18 % of bio char content were resistance in water and suitable for the leaching study of radionuclides from cement-bio char-spent resins matrix. (author)

  17. Evaluating the freeze-thaw durability of portland cement-stabilized-solidified heavy metal waste using acoustic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Korchi, T.; Gress, D.; Baldwin, K.; Bishop, P.

    1989-01-01

    The use of stress wave propagation to assess freeze-thaw resistance of portland cement solidified/stabilized waste is presented. The stress wave technique is sensitive to the internal structure of the specimens and would detect structural deterioration independent of weight loss or visual observations. The freeze-thaw resistance of a cement-solidified cadmium waste and a control was evaluated. The control and cadmium wastes both showed poor freeze-thaw resistance. However, the addition of cadmium and seawater curing increased the resistance to more cycles of freezing and thawing. This is attributed to microstructural changes

  18. Chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate sulfatases from mammals and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shumin; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Li, Fuchuan

    2016-12-01

    Sulfatases that specifically catalyze the hydrolysis of the sulfate groups on chondroitin sulfate (CS)/dermatan sulfate (DS) poly- and oligosaccharides belong to the formylglycine-dependent family of sulfatases and have been widely found in various mammalian and bacterial organisms. However, only a few types of CS/DS sulfatase have been identified so far. Recently, several novel CS/DS sulfatases have been cloned and characterized. Advanced studies have provided significant insight into the biological function and mechanism of action of CS/DS sulfatases. Moreover, further studies will provide powerful tools for structural and functional studies of CS/DS as well as related applications. This article reviews the recent progress in CS/DS sulfatase research and is expected to initiate further research in this field.

  19. Electrically conductive Portland cement concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    There is a need for an effective, simple-to-install secondary anode system for use in the cathodic protection of reinforced concrete bridge decks. In pursuit of such a system, carbon fibers and carbon black were incorporated in portland cement concre...

  20. Polymer reinforcement of cement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swamy, R.N.

    1979-01-01

    In the last couple of decades several cement- and concrete-based composites have come into prominence. Of these, cement-polymer composites, like cement-fibre composites, have been recognised as very promising, and considerable research and development on their properties, fabrication methods and application are in progress. Of the three types of concrete materials which incorporate polymers to form composites, polymer impregnated concrete forms a major development in which hardened concrete is impregnated with a liquid monomer which is subsequently polymerized to form a rigid polymer network in the pores of the parent material. In this first part of the extensive review of the polymer reinforcement of cement systems, the process technology of the various monomer impregnation techniques and the properties of the impregnated composite are assessed critically. It is shown that the high durability and superior performance of polymer impregnated concrete can provide an economic and competitive alternative in in situ strengthening, and in other areas where conventional concrete can only at best provide adequate performance. The review includes a section on radiation-induced polymerization. (author)

  1. Fatigue crack propagation of acrylic bone cements. Influence of the radio-opaque agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginebra, M. P.; Albuixech, L.; Fernandez-Barragan, E.; Gil, F. J.; Planell, J. A.; San Roman, J.; Vazquez, B.

    2001-01-01

    In this work the 2,5-diiodo-8-quinolyl methacrylate (IHQM), is proposed as a new radiopaque agent. The addition of the iodine containing methacrylate provided a statistically significant increase in the tensile strength, fracture toughness and ductility, with respect to the barium sulphate containing cement. This effect was attributed to the fact that the use of a radiopaque monomer eliminated the porosity associated to the barium sulphate particles. However, since fatigue resistance is one of the main properties required to ensure a good long-term performance of permanent pros these, as is the case of acrylic bone cements, it is important to compare the fatigue properties of this new bone cement formulation with the radiolucent and the BaSO 4 containing bone cements. The results show that the absence of inorganic particles with no matrix adhesion plays a negative role when the fatigue crack propagation is considered. (Author) 26 refs

  2. Influence of temperature on the synthesis of calcining cement α--tricalcium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, R.S.; Thurmer, M.B.; Coelho, W.T.; Fernandes, J.M.; Santos, L.A.

    2011-01-01

    The calcium phosphate cement (CFCs) bone substitutes are of great potential use in medical and dental. However, one of the great difficulties of using this type of cement is its low mechanical strength due to the presence of undesirable phases, such as beta-tricalcium phosphate. The step of obtaining this compound is done at high temperature by solid state reaction. With the aim of obtaining calcium phosphate cements more resistant, we studied the conditions for obtaining an alpha-TCP at temperatures of 1300, 1400 and 1500 ° C with time 2h calcination. The samples were analyzed for crystalline phases, density, porosity and mechanical strength. The results show that the synthesis parameters studied strongly influence the obtained phases and the mechanical properties of cement. (author)

  3. [Cement augmentation on the spine : Biomechanical considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, J P; Weiser, L; Kueny, R A; Huber, G; Rueger, J M; Lehmann, W

    2015-09-01

    Vertebral compression fractures are the most common osteoporotic fractures. Since the introduction of vertebroplasty and screw augmentation, the management of osteoporotic fractures has changed significantly. The biomechanical characteristics of the risk of adjacent fractures and novel treatment modalities for osteoporotic vertebral fractures, including pure cement augmentation by vertebroplasty, and cement augmentation of screws for posterior instrumentation, are explored. Eighteen human osteoporotic lumbar spines (L1-5) adjacent to vertebral bodies after vertebroplasty were tested in a servo-hydraulic machine. As augmentation compounds we used standard cement and a modified low-strength cement. Different anchoring pedicle screws were tested with and without cement augmentation in another cohort of human specimens with a simple pull-out test and a fatigue test that better reflects physiological conditions. Cement augmentation in the osteoporotic spine leads to greater biomechanical stability. However, change in vertebral stiffness resulted in alterations with the risk of adjacent fractures. By using a less firm cement compound, the risk of adjacent fractures is significantly reduced. Both screw augmentation techniques resulted in a significant increase in the withdrawal force compared with the group without cement. Augmentation using perforated screws showed the highest stability in the fatigue test. The augmentation of cement leads to a significant change in the biomechanical properties. Differences in the stability of adjacent vertebral bodies increase the risk of adjacent fractures, which could be mitigated by a modified cement compound with reduced strength. Screws that were specifically designed for cement application displayed greatest stability in the fatigue test.

  4. Semi-synthesis of chondroitin sulfate-E from chondroitin sulfate-A

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Chao; Solakyildirim, Kemal; Yang, Bo; Beaudet, Julie M.; Weyer, Amanda; Linhardt, Robert J.; Zhang, Fuming

    2012-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate-E (chondroitin-4, 6-disulfate) was prepared from chondroitin sulfate-A (chondroitin-4 - sulfate) by regioselective sulfonation, performed using trimethylamine sulfur trioxide in formamide under argon. The structure of semi-synthetic chondroitin sulfate-E was analyzed by PAGE, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, 2D NMR and disaccharide analysis and compared with natural chondroitin sulfate-E. Both semi-synthetic and natural chondroitin sulfate-E were each biotinylated and immobilized on BIAco...

  5. CO2 Capture by Cement Raw Meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar; Lin, Weigang; Illerup, Jytte Boll

    2013-01-01

    The cement industry is one of the major sources of CO2 emissions and is likely to contribute to further increases in the near future. The carbonate looping process has the potential to capture CO2 emissions from the cement industry, in which raw meal for cement production could be used...... as the sorbent. Cyclic experiments were carried out in a TGA apparatus using industrial cement raw meal and synthetic raw meal as sorbents, with limestone as the reference. The results show that the CO2 capture capacities of the cement raw meal and the synthetic raw meal are comparable to those of pure limestone...... that raw meal could be used as a sorbent for the easy integration of the carbonate looping process into the cement pyro process for reducing CO2 emissions from the cement production process....

  6. Leaching of tritium from a cement composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzuru, Hideo; Ito, Akihiko

    1978-10-01

    Leaching of tritium from cement composites into an aqueous phase has been studied to evaluate the safety of incorporation of the tritiated liquid waste into cement. Leaching tests were performed by the method recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The Leaching fraction was measured as functions of waste-cement ratio (Wa/C), temperature of leachant and curing time. The tritium leachability of cement in the long term test follows the order: alumina cement portland cement slag cement. The fraction of tritium leached increases with increasing Wa/C and temperature and decreasing curing period. A deionized water as a leachant gives a slightly higher leachability than synthetic sea water. The amount leached of tritium from a 200 l drum size specimen was estimated on the basis of the above results. (author)

  7. Chondroitin Sulfate Perlecan Enhances Collagen Fibril Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, A. J.; Johnson, A. E.; Mörgelin, M.

    2006-01-01

    in collagen type II fibril assembly by perlecan-null chondrocytes. Cartilage perlecan is a heparin sulfate or a mixed heparan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. The latter form binds collagen and accelerates fibril formation in vitro, with more defined fibril morphology and increased fibril diameters...... produced in the presence of perlecan. Interestingly, the enhancement of collagen fibril formation is independent on the core protein and is mimicked by chondroitin sulfate E but neither by chondroitin sulfate D nor dextran sulfate. Furthermore, perlecan chondroitin sulfate contains the 4,6-disulfated...... disaccharides typical for chondroitin sulfate E. Indeed, purified glycosaminoglycans from perlecan-enriched fractions of cartilage extracts contain elevated levels of 4,6-disulfated chondroitin sulfate disaccharides and enhance collagen fibril formation. The effect on collagen assembly is proportional...

  8. Cement for oil well developed from ordinary cement: characterization physical, chemical and mineralogical; Cimento para poco de petroleo desenvolvido a partir de cimento comum: caracterizacao fisica, quimica e mineralogica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, D.N.S.; Neves, G. de A.; Chaves, A.C.; Mendonca, A.M.G.D.; Lima, M.S. de [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil); Bezerra, U.T., E-mail: daninascimento.eng@gmail.com [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Paraiba (IFPB), Campina Grande, PB (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    This work aims to characterize a new type of cement produced from the mixture of ordinary Portland cement, which can be used as an option in the cementing of oil wells. To enable this work we used the method of lineal programming for the new cement composition, then conducted tests to characterize through particle size analysis by laser diffraction, chemical analysis by EDX, TGA, X-ray diffraction, time grip, resistance to compression. The overall result showed that the new cement had made low-C3A, takes more time to the CPP, thermal stability up to 500 ° C, the kinetics of hydration and low levels of major components consistent with the specifications of ABNT. (author)

  9. Effect of barium-coated halloysite nanotube addition on the cytocompatibility, mechanical and contrast properties of poly(methyl methacrylate cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jammalamadaka U

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Uday Jammalamadaka,1 Karthik Tappa,1 Jeffery A Weisman,1 James Connor Nicholson,2 David K Mills1,3 1Center for Biomedical Engineering and Rehabilitation Science, 2Nanosystems Engineering, 3The School of Biological Sciences, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA, USA Abstract: Halloysite nanotubes (HNTs were investigated as a platform for tunable nanoparticle composition and enhanced opacity in poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA bone cement. Halloysite has been widely used to increase the mechanical properties of various polymer matrices, in stark contrast to other fillers such as barium sulfate that provide opacity but also decrease mechanical strength. The present work describes a dry deposition method for successively fabricating barium sulfate nanoparticles onto the exterior surface of HNTs. A sintering process was used to coat the HNTs in barium sulfate. Barium sulfate-coated HNTs were then added to PMMA bone cement and the samples were tested for mechanical strength and tailored opacity correlated with the fabrication ratio and the amount of barium sulfate-coated HNTs added. The potential cytotoxic effect of barium-coated HNTs in PMMA cement was also tested on osteosarcoma cells. Barium-coated HNTs were found to be completely cytocompatible, and cell proliferation was not inhibited after exposure to the barium-coated HNTs embedded in PMMA cement. We demonstrate a simple method for the creation of barium-coated nanoparticles that imparted improved contrast and material properties to native PMMA. An easy and efficient method for coating clay nanotubes offers the potential for enhanced imaging by radiologists or orthopedic surgeons. Keywords: barium, bone cement, halloysite, imaging, PMMA, sintering

  10. Polymer-Cement Mortar with Quarry Waste as Sand Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Gómez-Balbuena

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The activities of carved Quarry extraction generate problems of landscape pollution such is the case of solid waste discharged into open land dumps in central Mexico. This article presents the technological application of this solid waste in a new polymeric material with properties similar to those of a traditional mortar. It is concluded that the polymeric material uses low amounts of cement with respect to the traditional mortar, and it is elaborated with the recycled quarry as they are presented in its granulometry. The polymer used favored a low water/cement ratio (0.3 which did not allow to decrease resistance due to the fine nature of the materials (residues and cement in addition to maintaining the workability of the material. The quarry residue was classified as silt with low plasticity and was characterized by X-ray diffraction and Fluorescence to identify 76% of SiO2, which is why it was used as a stone aggregate even though the fines content was approximately 93%. The maximum compression resistance obtained at 28 days were 8 Mpa with the polymer/solid ratios of 0.10, water/solids of 0.30, and quarry/solids of 0.67. Linear equations were analyzed for more representative values with R squared adjustment.

  11. Cement based grouts - longevity laboratory studies: leaching behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onofrei, M.; Gray, M.; Roe, L.

    1991-12-01

    This report describes a series of laboratory tests carried out to determine the possible leaching behaviour of cement-based grouts in repository environments. A reference high-performance cement-based grout, comprised of Canadian Type 50 (U.S. Type V) Sulphate Resisting Portland Cement, silica fume, potable water and superplasticizer, and a commercially available cement grout were subjected to leaching in distilled water and three simulated groundwaters of different ionic strength. Hardened, monolithic specimens of the grout were leached in static, pulsed-flow and continuous flow conditions at temperatures from 10 degrees C to 150 degrees C for periods of up to 56 days. The changes in concentration of ions in the leachants with time were determined and the changes in the morphology of the surfaces of the grout specimens were examined using electron microscopy. After a review of possible mechanisms of degradation of cement-based materials, the data from these experiments are presented. The data show that the grouts will leach when in contact with water through dissolution of more soluble phases. Comparison of the leaching performance of the two grouts indicates that, while there are some minor differences, they behaved quite similarly. The rate of the leaching processes were found to tend to decrease with time and to be accompanied by precipitation and/or growth of an assemblage of secondary alteration phases (i.e., CaCO 3 , Mg(OH) 2 ). The mechanisms of leaching depended on the environmental conditions of temperature, groundwater composition and water flow rate. Matrix dissolution occurred. However, in many of the tests leaching was shown to be limited by the precipitated/reaction layers which acted as protective surface coatings. (37 refs.) (au)

  12. Through BHA (Bottom Hole Assembly) cementing with proprietary cementing technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanguy, Charles ' Joey' ; Mueller, Dan T. [BJ Services Company, Houston, TX (United States); Garrett, J.C. [Palm Energy Partners, LLC, Metairie, LA (United States)

    2004-07-01

    There are many problems that can arise when drilling into sub-normally pressured or naturally fractured zones. Lost circulation is one problem that is commonly encountered while drilling oil and gas wells. Lost circulation can lead to increased costs associated with drilling due to rig time, spreadsheet costs, and expensive mud system losses. Cement is one of the most effective treatment options, although it is not normally considered the first option because most operators are forced to trip out of the wellbore and utilize a squeeze packer. This is not always a viable option because of potential well control issues associated with the hydrostatic pressure reduction due to the losses of the whole mud. One treatment option that is commonly overlooked is pumping cement slurries through the bottom hole assembly and drill bit. This is generally not attempted for a variety of reasons. These reasons include: I Concern about 'squeezing off' of the cement in the bit II Lack of potential quality control associated with mixing 'on the fly' III Lack of the ability to test the actual mixed slurry samples The use of a pre-mixed, storable cement slurry has eliminated the concerns associated with pumping cement slurries through mud motors, MWD tools, BHA's, and drill bits. This advanced cement technology has been successfully utilized while reducing the risks associated with these lost circulation treatments. In addition, this technology has eliminated the costs associated with using a squeeze packer and the rig time required for several trips out of the wellbore. The paper will describe the premixed slurry properties and QA/QC procedures that are required for successful through the bit operations. This paper will also provide case histories of successful through the bit operation, as well as background information leading to the treatments. The case histories include successful through the bit remediation of severe lost circulation zones and as well the

  13. Analysis of the mechanical resistance and porosity of a composite cement with EVA and reinforced with piacava fibers; Analise da resistencia mecanica e porosidade de um composito cimenticio leve com EVA e reforcado com fibras de piacava

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, R.M.; Dominguez, D.S.; Alvim, R.C.; Iglesias, S.M., E-mail: regilan@hotmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz (UESC), Ilheus, BA (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Nowadays, a lot of solid waste material is discarded into the environment. One of these residues is the EVA (Ethyl Vinyl Acetate) which has the footwear industry, as its main consumer. Studies are focused on the reusing of these materials, particularly in the civil construction, where is used as an aggregate in the production of light mortars. Due to the specific characteristics of lightweight concrete, is necessary to reinforce these materials. The palm Attalea Funifera Martius, known as piacava, may be an excellent alternative as a reinforcement element in light cement mixes. In this work, it's verified the mechanical strength of a composite lightweight cementitious with EVA and reinforced with Piacava fibers, also, the porosity of the new material was measured. To evaluate the mechanical properties of this new material was made mechanical tests and verified the importance of vegetal fibers as the material reinforcing. For the compound porosity evaluation, samples were studied using microcomputer tomography (μTC). With images processing techniques we identify and quantify the pores. The processing digital images through μTC showed up as a non-destructive method for efficient and acceptable results. (author)

  14. Smart cement modified with iron oxide nanoparticles to enhance the piezoresistive behavior and compressive strength for oil well applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vipulanandan, C; Mohammed, A

    2015-01-01

    In this study, smart cement with a 0.38 water-to-cement ratio was modified with iron oxide nanoparticles (NanoFe 2 O 3 ) to have better sensing properties, so that the behavior can be monitored at various stages of construction and during the service life of wells. A series of experiments evaluated the piezoresistive smart cement behavior with and without NanoFe 2 O 3 in order to identify the most reliable sensing properties that can also be relatively easily monitored. Tests were performed on the smart cement from the time of mixing to a hardened state behavior. When oil well cement (Class H) was modified with 0.1% of conductive filler, the piezoresistive behavior of the hardened smart cement was substantially improved without affecting the setting properties of the cement. During the initial setting the electrical resistivity changed with time based on the amount of NanoFe 2 O 3 used to modify the smart oil well cement. A new quantification concept has been developed to characterize the smart cement curing based on electrical resistivity changes in the first 24 h of curing. Addition of 1% NanoFe 2 O 3 increased the compressive strength of the smart cement by 26% and 40% after 1 day and 28 days of curing respectively. The modulus of elasticity of the smart cement increased with the addition of 1% NanoFe 2 O 3 by 29% and 28% after 1 day and 28 days of curing respectively. A nonlinear curing model was used to predict the changes in electrical resistivity with curing time. The piezoresistivity of smart cement with NanoFe 2 O 3 was over 750 times higher than the unmodified cement depending on the curing time and nanoparticle content. Also the nonlinear stress–strain and stress–change in resistivity relationships predicated the experimental results very well. Effects of curing time and NanoFe 2 O 3 content on the model parameters have been quantified using a nonlinear model. (paper)

  15. Analysis of cement-treated clay behavior by micromechanical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang , Dong-Mei; Yin , Zhenyu; Hicher , Pierre Yves; Huang , Hong-Wei

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Experimental results show the significant influence of cement content on the mechanical properties of cement-treated clays. Cementation is produced by mixing a certain amount of cement with the saturated clay. The purpose of this paper is to model the cementation effect on the mechanical behavior of cement-treated clay. A micromechanical stress-strain model is developed considering explicitly the cementation at inter-cluster contacts. The inter-cluster bonding and debo...

  16. Influence of storage times on bond strength of resin cements to root canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Coêlho Bandéca

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The resin cements are responsible to retention of the indirect materials decreasing marginal leakage, increasing failure resistance compared with conventional cementation. The cementation within root canal is very hard due unfavorable conditions regarding the application of adhesive techniques caused by inadequate access. Therefore, considering the possibility to decrease steps of cementation, this study was performed to evaluate the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX TM U100, 3M ESPE and resin cement combined with self-ecthing adhesive system (Panavia® F 2.0, Kuraray light-cured with Quartz Tungsten Halogen (QTH following storage at 37 °C immediately after light-curing, 24 and 48 hours and 7 days. The root canals were prepared to receive the glass fiber post in the depth of 10 mm, irrigated with 17% EDTA and NaOCl, rinsed with distilled water and dried using paper points. The roots were perpendicularly sectioned into approximately 1 mm thick sections, obtaining ninety-six slices (n = 12. The slices were trimmed using a cylindrical diamond bur in the proximal surfaces until it touched the post and attached into a device, which were mounted on a strength tester (Bisco and loaded in tension at a speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure occurred at specimens. The analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests showed significant statistical differences (P .05. The resin cements 24 and 48 hours after light-curing were statistically similar among themselves (P > .05. The both resin cement showed similar bond strength into root canal on different storage times. The highest bond strength values of the resin cements were showed 7 days after curing.

  17. The Immobilisation of Krom and Stronsium Waste Using Natural Fiber Reinforced Cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susetyo Haria Putero; Nunung Prabaningrum; Widya Rosita

    2007-01-01

    Cementation of hazardous liquid waste is one of the methods to minimize its detrimental effect on the environmental quality and human health. This research purpose was to study the effect of natural fiber composition and temperature on quality of the cement block reinforced by coconut (Cocos nucifera) fiber and bamboo (Bambusa vulgaris) fiber. This research was pursued by adsorbing stronsium waste and krom using zeolite. Thirteen percent volume of zeolite was mixed with 0.3 of water/cement ratio. Composition of natural fiber was varied by 0.00v/o, 0.05v/o, 0.10v/o, 0.25v/o, 0.50v/o, 0.75v/o and 1.00v/o. The cement blocks produced were heated at 0℃, 50℃, 100℃, 150℃, 200℃ and 250℃ for 10 minutes and then determined their compressive strength and leaching rate. The optimum composition of natural fiber causing increasing of mechanical strength has been founded at 0.50% v/o of fiber. On that composition the axial force resistance of fiber is higher than the radial one. The hydration reaction completely works when cement block is heated until certain temperature that results in the increasing of its compressive strength. However, the compressive strength of cement block heated up to 250℃ is still beyond the standard. Based on its compressive strength, the bamboo (Bambusa vulgaris) fiber is more feasible than coconut (Cocos nucifera) fiber for reinforcing cement block. Heating just influences on the physics properties of cement block. But, the ability of block cement to immobilize a matter is affected by properties of matters. (author)

  18. Cemented materials in the LLW and MLW Spanish disposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guerrero, A.

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available BWR and PWR cemented matrices to confine low and medium simulated liquid radioactive wastes have been submitted to the leaching process in de-ionized water at 20ºC and 40ºC, to obtain the medium leachability index (L and the effective diffusion coefficient (De of different ions. Otherwise, it has been studied the associated expansion of the backfilling mortar of the concrete containers of the Spanish repository of these wastes, due to a possible attack of the sulfate ions coming from the cemented matrices.

    Matrices cementicias confinantes tipo BWR y PWR de residuos simulados de baja y media radiactividad se han sometido a procesos de lixiviación en agua desionizada a 20ºC y 40ºC, obteniéndose los índices medios de lixiviación (L y el coeficiente de difusión efectiva (De de algunos iones. Por otra parte, se ha estudiado la expansión asociada a un mortero de relleno constitutivo del depósito de almacenamiento de los residuos, por posible ataque de los iones SO4-2 procedentes de las matrices.

  19. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baquerizo, Luis G., E-mail: luis.baquerizoibarra@holcim.com [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Matschei, Thomas [Innovation, Holcim Technology Ltd., CH-5113 Holderbank (Switzerland); Scrivener, Karen L. [Laboratory of Construction Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars [Building Materials, Lund University, Box 124, 221 000 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions.

  20. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na 2 SO 4 –H 2 O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions

  1. Stabilization and solidification of Pb in cement matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gollmann, Maria A.C.; Silva, Marcia M. da; Santos, Joao H. Z. dos; Masuero, Angela B.

    2010-01-01

    Pb was incorporated to a series of cement matrices, which were submitted to different cure time and pH. Pb content leached to aqueous solution was monitored by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The block resistance was evaluated by unconfined compressive strength at 7 and 28 ages. Data are discussed in terms of metal mobility along the cement block monitored by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry. The Pb incorporated matrices have shown that a long cure time is more suitable for avoiding metal leaching. For a longer cure period the action of the metal is higher and there is a decreasing in the compressive strength. The XRF analyses show that there is a lower Ca concentration in the matrix in which Pb was added. (author)

  2. Feasibility of using ceramic furnace wastes in cement composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazzan, J.V.; Sanches, A.O.; Akasaki, J.L.; Malmonge, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the region of Epitacio-SP President is classified as Paulista West Center in the production of ceramic tiles and bricks. However, as these industries have also generated environmental impacts in the production process with the generation of waste, the construction industries presents as great potential to absorb a large portion of these materials, called Pozzolans. In this sense, the research aims to study the characterization of Ceramic Furnace Wastes (CFC) and the evaluation of their reactivity. Mortar specimens were molded with different waste percentages in partial replacement of Portland cement, for analysis of compressive strength and capillary water absorption test. The characterization results show that important properties can be obtained by the preparation conditions of ashes, besides obtaining resistant activity index higher than expected by technical standards when using the material in replacement of Portland cement. (author)

  3. Sulfate reduction in freshwater peatlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oequist, M.

    1996-12-31

    This text consist of two parts: Part A is a literature review on microbial sulfate reduction with emphasis on freshwater peatlands, and part B presents the results from a study of the relative importance of sulfate reduction and methane formation for the anaerobic decomposition in a boreal peatland. The relative importance of sulfate reduction and methane production for the anaerobic decomposition was studied in a small raised bog situated in the boreal zone of southern Sweden. Depth distribution of sulfate reduction- and methane production rates were measured in peat sampled from three sites (A, B, and C) forming an minerotrophic-ombrotrophic gradient. SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} concentrations in the three profiles were of equal magnitude and ranged from 50 to 150 {mu}M. In contrast, rates of sulfate reduction were vastly different: Maximum rates in the three profiles were obtained at a depth of ca. 20 cm below the water table. In A it was 8 {mu}M h{sup -1} while in B and C they were 1 and 0.05 {mu}M h{sup -1}, respectively. Methane production rates, however, were more uniform across the three nutrient regimes. Maximum rates in A (ca. 1.5 {mu}g d{sup -1} g{sup -1}) were found 10 cm below the water table, in B (ca. 1.0 {mu}g d{sup -1} g{sup -1}) in the vicinity of the water table, and in C (0.75 {mu}g d{sup -1} g{sup -1}) 20 cm below the water table. In all profiles both sulfate reduction and methane production rates were negligible above the water table. The areal estimates of methane production for the profiles were 22.4, 9.0 and 6.4 mmol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, while the estimates for sulfate reduction were 26.4, 2.5, and 0.1 mmol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, respectively. The calculated turnover times at the sites were 1.2, 14.2, and 198.7 days, respectively. The study shows that sulfate reducing bacteria are important for the anaerobic degradation in the studied peatland, especially in the minerotrophic sites, while methanogenic bacteria dominate in ombrotrophic sites Examination

  4. Sulfate reduction in freshwater peatlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oequist, M.

    1996-01-01

    This text consist of two parts: Part A is a literature review on microbial sulfate reduction with emphasis on freshwater peatlands, and part B presents the results from a study of the relative importance of sulfate reduction and methane formation for the anaerobic decomposition in a boreal peatland. The relative importance of sulfate reduction and methane production for the anaerobic decomposition was studied in a small raised bog situated in the boreal zone of southern Sweden. Depth distribution of sulfate reduction- and methane production rates were measured in peat sampled from three sites (A, B, and C) forming an minerotrophic-ombrotrophic gradient. SO 4 2- concentrations in the three profiles were of equal magnitude and ranged from 50 to 150 μM. In contrast, rates of sulfate reduction were vastly different: Maximum rates in the three profiles were obtained at a depth of ca. 20 cm below the water table. In A it was 8 μM h -1 while in B and C they were 1 and 0.05 μM h -1 , respectively. Methane production rates, however, were more uniform across the three nutrient regimes. Maximum rates in A (ca. 1.5 μg d -1 g -1 ) were found 10 cm below the water table, in B (ca. 1.0 μg d -1 g -1 ) in the vicinity of the water table, and in C (0.75 μg d -1 g -1 ) 20 cm below the water table. In all profiles both sulfate reduction and methane production rates were negligible above the water table. The areal estimates of methane production for the profiles were 22.4, 9.0 and 6.4 mmol m -2 d -1 , while the estimates for sulfate reduction were 26.4, 2.5, and 0.1 mmol m -2 d -1 , respectively. The calculated turnover times at the sites were 1.2, 14.2, and 198.7 days, respectively. The study shows that sulfate reducing bacteria are important for the anaerobic degradation in the studied peatland, especially in the minerotrophic sites, while methanogenic bacteria dominate in ombrotrophic sites Examination paper. 67 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  5. Acid Sulfate Alteration on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.

    2016-01-01

    A variety of mineralogical and geochemical indicators for aqueous alteration on Mars have been identified by a combination of surface and orbital robotic missions, telescopic observations, characterization of Martian meteorites, and laboratory and terrestrial analog studies. Acid sulfate alteration has been identified at all three landing sites visited by NASA rover missions (Spirit, Opportunity, and Curiosity). Spirit landed in Gusev crater in 2004 and discovered Fe-sulfates and materials that have been extensively leached by acid sulfate solutions. Opportunity landing on the plains of Meridiani Planum also in 2004 where the rover encountered large abundances of jarosite and hematite in sedimentary rocks. Curiosity landed in Gale crater in 2012 and has characterized fluvial, deltaic, and lacustrine sediments. Jarosite and hematite were discovered in some of the lacustrine sediments. The high elemental abundance of sulfur in surface materials is obvious evidence that sulfate has played a major role in aqueous processes at all landing sites on Mars. The sulfate-rich outcrop at Meridiani Planum has an SO3 content of up to 25 wt.%. The interiors of rocks and outcrops on the Columbia Hills within Gusev crater have up to 8 wt.% SO3. Soils at both sites generally have between 5 to 14 wt.% SO3, and several soils in Gusev crater contain around 30 wt.% SO3. After normalization of major element compositions to a SO3-free basis, the bulk compositions of these materials are basaltic, with a few exceptions in Gusev crater and in lacustrine mudstones in Gale crater. These observations suggest that materials encountered by the rovers were derived from basaltic precursors by acid sulfate alteration under nearly isochemical conditions (i.e., minimal leaching). There are several cases, however, where acid sulfate alteration minerals (jarosite and hematite) formed in open hydrologic systems, e.g., in Gale crater lacustrine mudstones. Several hypotheses have been suggested for the

  6. Electrical Properties of Cement-Based Composites with Carbon Nanotubes, Graphene, and Graphite Nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Doo-Yeol; You, Ilhwan; Lee, Seung-Jung

    2017-05-08

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of the carbon-based nanomaterial type on the electrical properties of cement paste. Three different nanomaterials, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), graphite nanofibers (GNFs), and graphene (G), were incorporated into the cement paste at a volume fraction of 1%. The self-sensing capacity of the cement composites was also investigated by comparing the compressive stress/strain behaviors by evaluating the fractional change of resistivity (FCR). The electrical resistivity of the plain cement paste was slightly reduced by adding 1 vol % GNFs and G, whereas a significant decrease of the resistivity was achieved by adding 1 vol % MWCNTs. At an identical volume fraction of 1%, the composites with MWCNTs provided the best self-sensing capacity with insignificant noise, followed by the composites containing GNFs and G. Therefore, the addition of MWCNTs was considered to be the most effective to improve the self-sensing capacity of the cement paste. Finally, the composites with 1 vol % MWCNTs exhibited a gauge factor of 113.2, which is much higher than commercially available strain gauges.

  7. Electrical Properties of Cement-Based Composites with Carbon Nanotubes, Graphene, and Graphite Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doo-Yeol Yoo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of the carbon-based nanomaterial type on the electrical properties of cement paste. Three different nanomaterials, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, graphite nanofibers (GNFs, and graphene (G, were incorporated into the cement paste at a volume fraction of 1%. The self-sensing capacity of the cement composites was also investigated by comparing the compressive stress/strain behaviors by evaluating the fractional change of resistivity (FCR. The electrical resistivity of the plain cement paste was slightly reduced by adding 1 vol % GNFs and G, whereas a significant decrease of the resistivity was achieved by adding 1 vol % MWCNTs. At an identical volume fraction of 1%, the composites with MWCNTs provided the best self-sensing capacity with insignificant noise, followed by the composites containing GNFs and G. Therefore, the addition of MWCNTs was considered to be the most effective to improve the self-sensing capacity of the cement paste. Finally, the composites with 1 vol % MWCNTs exhibited a gauge factor of 113.2, which is much higher than commercially available strain gauges.

  8. The cement recycling of the earthquake disaster debris by Hachinohe Cement Co., Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    A tremendous quantity of earthquake disaster debris and tsunami sediment was resulted by the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011. Hachinohe Cement Co., Ltd., a Sumitomo Osaka Cement subsidiary, was the first cement industry company to receive and process such waste materials outside of their usual prefecture area, while the company is performing their treatment and recycling services locally in Hachinohe City and Aomori Prefecture. This report provides an explanation about the recycling mechanism of waste materials and by-products in cement manufacturing process, and introduces an example of actual achievements for the disaster debris treatment by utilizing the cement recycling technologies at the Hachinohe Cement Plant. (author)

  9. Using biological and physico-chemical test methods to assess the role of concrete mixture design in resistance to microbially induced corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Mitchell Wayne

    Concrete is the most widely used material for construction of wastewater collection, storage, and treatment infrastructure. The chemical and physical characteristics of hydrated portland cement make it susceptible to degradation under highly acidic conditions. As a result, some concrete wastewater infrastructure may be susceptible to a multi-stage degradation process known as microbially induced corrosion, or MIC. MIC begins with the production of aqueous hydrogen sulfide (H2S(aq)) by anaerobic sulfate reducing bacteria present below the waterline. H2S(aq) partitions to the gas phase where it is oxidized to sulfuric acid by the aerobic sulfur oxidizing bacteria Thiobacillus that resides on concrete surfaces above the waterline. Sulfuric acid then attacks the cement paste portion of the concrete matrix through decalcification of calcium hydroxide and calcium silica hydrate coupled with the formation of expansive corrosion products. The attack proceeds inward resulting in reduced service life and potential failure of the concrete structure. There are several challenges associated with assessing a concrete's susceptibility to MIC. First, no standard laboratory tests exist to assess concrete resistance to MIC. Straightforward reproduction of MIC in the laboratory is complicated by the use of microorganisms and hydrogen sulfide gas. Physico-chemical tests simulating MIC by immersing concrete specimens in sulfuric acid offer a convenient alternative, but do not accurately capture the damage mechanisms associated with biological corrosion. Comparison of results between research studies is difficult due to discrepancies that can arise in experimental methods even if current ASTM standards are followed. This thesis presents two experimental methods to evaluate concrete resistance to MIC: one biological and one physico-chemical. Efforts are made to address the critical aspects of each testing method currently absent in the literature. The first method presented is a new test

  10. Sulfate Transporters in Dissimilatory Sulfate Reducing Microorganisms: A Comparative Genomics Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeliki Marietou

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The first step in the sulfate reduction pathway is the transport of sulfate across the cell membrane. This uptake has a major effect on sulfate reduction rates. Much of the information available on sulfate transport was obtained by studies on assimilatory sulfate reduction, where sulfate transporters were identified among several types of protein families. Despite our growing knowledge on the physiology of dissimilatory sulfate-reducing microorganisms (SRM there are no studies identifying the proteins involved in sulfate uptake in members of this ecologically important group of anaerobes. We surveyed the complete genomes of 44 sulfate-reducing bacteria and archaea across six phyla and identified putative sulfate transporter encoding genes from four out of the five surveyed protein families based on homology. We did not find evidence that ABC-type transporters (SulT are involved in the uptake of sulfate in SRM. We speculate that members of the CysP sulfate transporters could play a key role in the uptake of sulfate in thermophilic SRM. Putative CysZ-type sulfate transporters were present in all genomes examined suggesting that this overlooked group of sulfate transporters might play a role in sulfate transport in dissimilatory sulfate reducers alongside SulP. Our in silico analysis highlights several targets for further molecular studies in order to understand this key step in the metabolism of SRMs.

  11. Pressure cycling induced modification of a cemented carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beste, U.; Engqvist, H.; Jacobson, S.

    2001-01-01

    The wear of cemented carbide rock drill buttons is due to a complex mixture of mechanisms. One important of such mechanism is the surface fatigue that occurs due to the percussive conditions of rock drilling. To isolate the effects of this mechanism, a mechanical pressure cycling test has been performed on a cemented carbide with 11 % Co and 2 μm WC grain size. The test was ended after 60000 pressure cycles. No signs of fatigue crack nucleation were found. The changes in hardness, fracture toughness, erosion resistance, magnetical coercivity and thermal shock resistance were measured. The microstructure of the sample was investigated with x-ray diffraction, plus scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The fracture toughness decreased 14 % due to the pressure cycling while the hardness did not change. In addition, the thermal shock resistance and the erosion resistance decreased. The magnetical coercivity increased 90 % indicating significant phase transformations or high defect density in the Co binder phase. The TEM revealed no deformation of the WC phase, but important alterations of the Co phase. The Co phase was transformed from fcc into a new unidentified phase, characterized by atomic inter planar distance present in fcc and hcp plus an unfamiliar distance of 2.35 Aa. This phase is suggested to be due to a more complex stacking sequence of the close-packed planes than in hcp or fcc. (author)

  12. Implications of Earth analogs to Martian sulfate-filled Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, R. M.; Powers, D. W.

    2017-12-01

    Sulfate-filled fractures in fine-grained sediments on Mars are interpreted to be the result of fluid movement during deep burial. Fractures in the Dewey Lake (aka Quartermaster) Formation of southeastern New Mexico and west Texas are filled with gypsum that is at least partially synsedimentary. Sulfate in the Dewey Lake takes two principal forms: gypsum cement and gypsum (mainly fibrous) that fills fractures ranging from horizontal to vertical. Apertures are mainly mm-scale, though some are > 1 cm. The gypsum is antitaxial, fibrous, commonly approximately perpendicular to the wall rock, and displays suture lines and relics of the wall rock. Direct evidence of synsedimentary, near-surface origin includes gypsum intraclasts, intraclasts that include smaller intraclasts that contain gypsum clasts, intraclasts of gypsum with suture lines, gypsum concentrated in small desiccation cracks, and intraclasts that include fibrous gypsum-filled fractures that terminate at the eroded clast boundary. Dewey Lake fracture fillings suggest that their Martian analogs may also have originated in the shallow subsurface, shortly following the deposition of Martian sediments, in the presence of shallow aquifers.

  13. Concrete research using blended cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, W.B.

    2001-01-01

    Concrete research increasingly involves the use of mixes containing one or more of the supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs), often in conjunction with chemical admixtures. The influence of materials is commonly evaluated on the basis of water/ cement or water/ binder ratio and SCM content as a percentage of total binder, with dosage level of chemical admixture varied to maintain workability. As a result, more than one variable is introduced at a time and the objectives of the research may not be achieved. The significance of water/ cement ratio and addition rates of admixtures are examined from a practical standpoint with suggestions for more appropriate means of evaluation of the influence of individual materials. Copyright (2001) The Australian Ceramic Society

  14. The density of cement phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balonis, M.; Glasser, F.P.

    2009-01-01

    The densities of principal crystalline phases occurring in Portland cement are critically assessed and tabulated, in some cases with addition of new data. A reliable and self-consistent density set for crystalline phases was obtained by calculating densities from crystallographic data and unit cell contents. Independent laboratory work was undertaken to synthesize major AFm and AFt cement phases, determine their unit cell parameters and compare the results with those recorded in the literature. Parameters were refined from powder diffraction patterns using CELREF 2 software. A density value is presented for each phase, showing literature sources, in some cases describing limitations on the data, and the weighting attached to numerical values where an averaging process was used for accepted data. A brief discussion is made of the consequences of the packing of water to density changes in AFm and AFt structures.

  15. Influence of Ba2+ and Sr2+ ions on the hydration process of portland cement and blended cements

    OpenAIRE

    Živanović, B. M.; Petrašinović, Lj.; Milovanović, T.; Karanović, Lj.; Krstanović, I.

    1987-01-01

    This study concerns the influence of the concentration of Sr2+ and Ba2+ ions in mortar batch waters upon the hydration process of various Portland and additive cements. An increase in the mechanical resistence of said cements is observed, after 28 days, when the concentration of Ba2+ and Sr2+ ions in the mortar batch waters increases. This suggests a possible microstructural explanation of said phenomenon.En el presente trabajo se estudia la influencia de la concentración de los iones Sr2+ y...

  16. Sulfate transport in toad skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Simonsen, K

    1988-01-01

    1. In short-circuited toad skin preparations exposed bilaterally to NaCl-Ringer's containing 1 mM SO2(-4), influx of sulfate was larger than efflux showing that the skin is capable of transporting sulfate actively in an inward direction. 2. This active transport was not abolished by substituting...... apical Na+ for K+. 3. Following voltage activation of the passive Cl- permeability of the mitochondria-rich (m.r.) cells sulfate flux-ratio increased to a value predicted from the Ussing flux-ratio equation for a monovalent anion. 4. In such skins, which were shown to exhibit vanishingly small leakage...... conductances, the variation of the rate coefficient for sulfate influx (y) was positively correlated with the rate coefficient for Cl- influx (x), y = 0.035 x - 0.0077 cm/sec (r = 0.9935, n = 15). 5. Addition of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine to the serosal bath of short...

  17. Glass ionomer cement: literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Sérgio Spezzia

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: In the dental area preventive actions occur in an attempt to avoid the installation of caries, a disease that has an increased prevalence in the population and which is a Public Health problem. Some resources are used for such, such as: performing early diagnosis and the option for conservative treatments of minimal intervention. The glass ionomer cement (CIV), coming from its beneficial characteristics that meet current trends, is closely related to the precepts of Preventive a...

  18. WHITE CEMENT IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Y.C.P RAMANA BABU; B.SAI DOONDI; N. M .V .VAMSI KRISHNA; K.PRASANTHI

    2013-01-01

    India is one among the fast developing countries in the world in the areas of Infrastructure. Now a day, Carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) are the temporary atmospheric pollutants in the environment chiefly emitted from the fuel burning vehicles and street lights which lead to global warming and pose a major threat tothe survival and sustainable development. This paper deals with the principal purpose of use of white cement in pavement design which will take care of the Green hous...

  19. Modernization of Byuzmeyinsky Cement Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    With an objective of saving energy and reducing greenhouse gas emission, investigations and discussions were given on a modernization project for Byuzmeyinsky Cement Factory, the only cement factory in Turkmenistan. Byuzmeyinsky Cement Factory uses the wet process which consumes a large amount of energy, is inferior in production efficiency and quality, and discharging a great amount of greenhouse effect gas. The present project will execute change of the raw material crusher into a vertical roll mill for one of the four wet kilns, and change of the facilities for raw material powder mixing and storing and clinker manufacturing into dry-type facilities using the NSP system. As a result of the discussions, the energy saving effect would be 86,321 tons of crude oil equivalent annually, and the greenhouse gas emission reducing effect would be 224,467 t-CO2 annually. The total fund amount required for the project is estimated to be 90,211,000 dollars. With regard to the profitability, the internal financial profit rate would be 9.71% after tax, and the ROE would be 18.62%, whereas the project is considered feasible. (NEDO)

  20. A Twofold Comparison between Dual Cure Resin Modified Cement and Glass Ionomer Cement for Orthodontic Band Cementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, Hanaa El; Elhiny, Omnia; Salem, Ghada; Abdelrahman, Ahmed; Attia, Mazen

    2016-12-15

    To test the solubility of dual cure resin modified resin cement in a food simulating solution and the shear bond strength compared to conventional Glass ionomer cement. The materials tested were self-adhesive dual cure resin modified cement and Glass Ionomer (GIC). Twenty Teflon moulds were divided into two groups of tens. The first group was injected and packed with the modified resin cement, the second group was packed with GIC. To test the solubility, each mould was weighed before and after being placed in an analytical reagent for 30 days. The solubility was measured as the difference between the initial and final drying mass. To measure the Shear bond strength, 20 freshly extracted wisdom teeth were equally divided into two groups and embedded in self-cure acrylic resin. Four mm sections of stainless steel bands were cemented to the exposed buccal surfaces of teeth under a constant load of 500 g. Shear bond strength was measured using a computer controlled materials testing machine and the load required to deband the samples was recorded in Newtons. GIC showed significantly higher mean weight loss and an insignificant lower Shear bond strength, compared to dual cure resin Cement. It was found that dual cure resin modified cement was less soluble than glass ionomer cement and of comparable bond strength rendering it more useful clinically for orthodontic band cementation.

  1. 21 CFR 184.1261 - Copper sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Copper sulfate. 184.1261 Section 184.1261 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1261 Copper sulfate. (a) Copper sulfate (cupric sulfate, CuSO4·5H2O, CAS... the reaction of sulfuric acid with cupric oxide or with copper metal. (b) The ingredient must be of a...

  2. Periodate Oxidation for Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans, with Special Reference to the Position of Extra Sulfate Groups in Chondroitin Polysulfates, Chondroitin Sulfate D and Chondroitin Sulfate K

    OpenAIRE

    Seno, Nobuko; Murakami, Keiko; Shibusawa, Haru

    1981-01-01

    The optimum conditions for periodate oxidation of sulfated disaccharides were investigated to determine the position of extra sulfate groups on the saturated disulfated disaccharides obtained from chondroitin polysulfates, chondroitin sulfates D and K. Under the conditions: 2mM saturated disulfated disaccharide with 20mM sodium periodate at 37°in the dark, the uronic acid residue in the disulfated disaccharide from chondroitin sulfate D was rapidly and completely destroyed, whereas that in th...

  3. Characterization and application of automated in-vacuum PIXE/EBS system for direct analysis of chloride and sulfate ions attack in cementitious materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihawy, M. S.; Alwazzeh, M.; Abbas, K.

    2018-01-01

    Ion beam analysis (IBA) techniques (Particle Induced X-ray Emission, PIXE and Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry, EBS), were applied to investigate chloride and sulfate ions diffusion into laboratory prepared mortar samples. Development and characterization of an automated in-vacuum macro PIXE/EBS system is thoroughly discussed. Depth profile information of both chloride and sulfate ions in laboratory prepared mortar samples, after immersion in sea water for nine months, was rapidly and easily obtained at fairly low cost and with standardless analysis, demonstrating the value of the application of IBA to elemental depth profiling in cementitious materials. Chloride and sulfate depth profiles were obtained for two sets of mortar samples, one prepared with different water/cement (W/C) ratios and the other with different sand/cement (S/C) ratios. Results showed higher diffusion rates of both chloride and sulfate ions when both ratios are increased. Additionally, the W/C ratio has a stronger influence in both sulfate and chloride penetration than the S/C ratio, and chloride ions penetrate faster than sulfates. Advantages and limitations of applying IBA techniques in this investigation are discussed. The comparison between PIXE and other X-ray based analytical techniques, namely X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and energy and wavelength dispersive X-rays (EDX/WDX), as well as other traditional wet chemical methods is reviewed, and industrial applications are discussed.

  4. Use of Incineration Solid Waste Bottom Ash as Cement Mixture in Cement Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, N. H.; Abdullah, M. M. A. B.; Jin, T. S.; Kadir, A. A.; Tugui, C. A.; Sandu, A. V.

    2017-06-01

    Incineration solid waste bottom ash was use to examine the suitability as a substitution in cement production. This study enveloped an innovative technology option for designing new equivalent cement that contains incineration solid waste bottom ash. The compressive strength of the samples was determined at 7, 14, 28 and 90 days. The result was compared to control cement with cement mixture containing incineration waste bottom ash where the result proved that bottom ash cement mixture able achieve its equivalent performance compared to control cement which meeting the requirement of the standards according to EN 196-1. The pozzolanic activity index of bottom ash cement mixture reached 0.92 at 28 days and 0.95 at 90 and this values can be concluded as a pozzolanic material with positive pozzolanic activity. Calcium hydroxide in Portland cement decreasing with the increasing replacement of bottom ash where the reaction occur between Ca(OH)2 and active SiO2.

  5. Natural cement as the precursor of Portland cement: Methodology for its identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varas, M.J.; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.

    2005-01-01

    When cements appeared in the 19th century, they took the place of traditional binding materials (lime, gypsum, and hydraulic lime) which had been used until that time. Early cements can be divided into two groups, natural and artificial (Portland) cements. Natural cements were introduced first, but their widespread usage was short-lived as they were quickly replaced by artificial cements (Portland), still the most important and predominant today. The main differences between natural and artificial cements arise during the manufacturing process. The final properties of the cements are greatly influenced by differences in the raw materials and burning temperatures employed. The aim of this paper is to assess the efficiency of traditional analytical techniques (petrographic microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR)) used to differentiate natural and artificial cements

  6. Effects of cement particle size distribution on performance properties of Portland cement-based materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentz, D.P.; Garboczi, E.J.; Haecker, C.J.; Jensen, O.M.

    1999-10-01

    The original size, spatial distribution, and composition of Portland cement particles have a large influence on hydration kinetics, microstructure development, and ultimate properties of cement-based materials. In this paper, the effects of cement particle size distribution on a variety of performance properties are explored via computer simulation and a few experimental studies. Properties examined include setting time, heat release, capillary porosity percolation, diffusivity, chemical shrinkage, autogenous shrinkage, internal relative humidity evolution, and interfacial transition zone microstructure. The effects of flocculation and dispersion of the cement particles in the starting microstructures on resultant properties are also briefly evaluated. The computer simulations are conducted using two cement particle size distributions that bound those commonly in use today and three different water-to-cement ratios: 0.5, 0.3, and 0.246. For lower water-to-cement ratio systems, the use of coarser cements may offer equivalent or superior performance, as well as reducing production costs for the manufacturer.

  7. Cement replacement materials. Properties, durability, sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramezanianpour, Ali Akbar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this book is to present the latest findings in the properties and application of Supplementary Cementing Materials and blended cements currently used in the world in concrete. Sustainability is an important issue all over the world. Carbon dioxide emission has been a serious problem in the world due to the greenhouse effect. Today many countries agreed to reduce the emission of CO2. Many phases of cement and concrete technology can affect sustainability. Cement and concrete industry is responsible for the production of 7% carbon dioxide of the total world CO2 emission. The use of supplementary cementing materials (SCM), design of concrete mixtures with optimum content of cement and enhancement of concrete durability are the main issues towards sustainability in concrete industry.

  8. The cement solidification systems at LANL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veazey, G.W.

    1990-01-01

    There are two major cement solidification systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Both are focused primarily around treating waste from the evaporator at TA-55, the Plutonium Processing Facility. The evaporator receives the liquid waste stream from TA-55's nitric acid-based, aqueous-processing operations and concentrates the majority of the radionuclides in the evaporator bottoms solution. This is sent to the TA-55 cementation system. The evaporator distillate is sent to the TA-50 facility, where the radionuclides are precipitated and then cemented. Both systems treat TRU-level waste, and so are operated according to the criteria for WIPP-destined waste, but they differ in both cement type and mixing method. The TA-55 systems uses Envirostone, a gypsum-based cement and in-drum prop mixing; the TA-50 systems uses Portland cement and drum tumbling for mixing

  9. Characterization of experimental cements with endodontic goal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, A.M.X.; Sousa, W.J.B.; Oliveira, E.D.C.; Carrodeguas, R.G.; Fook, M.V. Lia; Universidade Estadual da Paraiba

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to characterize experimental endodontic cements using as comparative parameter MTA cement. Two experimental endodontic cements were assessed: one based on 95% tri-strontium aluminate and 5% gypsum (CE1) and another based on 50% Sr_3Al_2O_6 and 50% non-structural white cement (CE2). Experimental cements were manipulated and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), coupled to EDS mode, X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. Data analysis demonstrated that the particles of the materials used presented varied shapes and sizes, with similar elements and crystalline behavior. However, CE1 presented increased mass loss. Experimental cements presents similarities to MTA, nevertheless, further studies are encourage to determinate comparative properties with the commercially material. (author)

  10. Modelling porewater chemistry in hydrated Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berner, U.R.

    1987-01-01

    Extensive employment of concrete is foreseen in radioactive waste repositories. A prerequisite for modelling the interactions between concrete and formation waters is characterization of the concrete system. Available experimental data from high pressure squeezing of cement pore-water indicate that, besides the high pH due to alkali hydroxide dissolution, cement composition itself influences the solubility determining solid phases. A model which simulates the hydration of Portland cement assuming complete hydration of the main clinker minerals is presented. The model also includes parameters describing the reactions between the cement and blending agents. Comparison with measured pore-water data generally gives a consistent picture and, as expected, the model gives correct predictions for pure Portland cements. For blended cements, the required additional parameters can, to some extent, be derived from pore-water analysis. 14 references, 1 figure, 4 tables

  11. Chemistry of cements for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, P.; Glasser, F.P.

    1992-01-01

    In recent times the nuclear industry has thrown up challenges which cannot be met by the application of conventional civil and materials engineering knowledge. The contributions in this volume investigate all aspects of cement performance. The scope of the papers demonstrates the current balance of activities which have as their objective the elucidation of kinetics and immobilization, determining material interactions and of assessing future performance. The papers reflect the varied goals of the sponsors who include national governments, the Commission of the European Communities and the nuclear industries. In six parts attention is paid to the durability of cement and concrete in repository environment; interactions between cement, waste components and ground water; properties and performance of cement materials; leach behavior and mechanisms, diffusional properties of cement and concrete, including porosity-permeability relationships; and thermodynamics of cementitious systems and modelling of cement performance

  12. 21 CFR 582.5230 - Calcium sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium sulfate. 582.5230 Section 582.5230 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5230 Calcium sulfate. (a) Product. Calcium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1643 - Potassium sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... hydroxide or potassium carbonate. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the “Food Chemicals Codex... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium sulfate. 184.1643 Section 184.1643 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1643 Potassium sulfate. (a) Potassium sulfate (K2SO4, CAS Reg...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium sulfate. 184.1443 Section 184.1443 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4·7H2O, CAS... magnesium oxide, hydroxide, or carbonate with sulfuric acid and evaporating the solution to crystallization...

  15. EFFECT OF MAGNESIUM SULFATE (A LAXATIVE) ON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use with little success . Magnesium sulfate also known as Epsom salt or bitter salt is a hydrate salt with a chemical name of magnesium sulfate heptahydrate . Chemical formula is MgSO. 7HO and trade name is. Andrews liver salt. Dried magnesium sulfate is an osmotic laxative or a saline laxative that acts by increasing the.

  16. 21 CFR 582.5443 - Magnesium sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium sulfate. 582.5443 Section 582.5443 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5443 Magnesium sulfate. (a) Product. Magnesium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  17. Modeling and minimization of barium sulfate scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan W. Rudie; Peter W. Hart

    2006-01-01

    The majority of the barium present in the pulping process exits the digester as barium carbonate. Barium carbonate dissolves in the bleach plant when the pH drops below 7 and, if barium and sulfate concentrations are too high, begins to precipitate as barium sulfate. Barium is difficult to control because a mill cannot avoid this carbonate-to-sulfate transition using...

  18. 21 CFR 582.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum sulfate. 582.1125 Section 582.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  19. 21 CFR 182.1125 - Aluminum sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum sulfate. 182.1125 Section 182.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1125 Aluminum sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  20. The mechanical effect of the existing cement mantle on the in-cement femoral revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Parnell; Lennon, Alexander B; Kenny, Patrick J; O'Reilly, Peter; Prendergast, Patrick J

    2012-08-01

    Cement-in-cement revision hip arthroplasty is an increasingly popular technique to replace a loose femoral stem which retains much of the original cement mantle. However, some concern exists regarding the retention of the existing fatigued and aged cement in such cement-in-cement revisions. This study investigates whether leaving an existing fatigued and aged cement mantle degrades the mechanical performance of a cement-in-cement revision construct. Primary cement mantles were formed by cementing a polished stem into sections of tubular steel. If in the test group, the mantle underwent conditioning in saline to simulate ageing and was subject to a fatigue of 1 million cycles. If in the control group no such conditioning or fatigue was carried out. The cement-in-cement procedure was then undertaken. Both groups underwent a fatigue of 1 million cycles subsequent to the revision procedure. Application of a Mann-Whitney test on the recorded subsidence (means: 0.51, 0.46, n=10+10, P=0.496) and inducible displacement (means: 0.38, 0.36, P=0.96) revealed that there was no statistical difference between the groups. This study represents further biomechanical investigation of the mechanical behaviour of cement-in-cement revision constructs. Results suggest that pre-revision fatigue and ageing of the cement may not be deleterious to the mechanical performance of the revision construct. Thus, this study provides biomechanical evidence to back-up recent successes with this useful revision technique. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Sustainable Development of the Cement Industry and Blended Cements to Meet Ecological Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Sobolev, Konstantin

    2003-01-01

    The world production of cement has greatly increased in the past 10 years. This trend is the most significant factor affecting technological development and the updating of manufacturing facilities in the cement industry. Existing technology for the production of cement clinker is ecologically damaging; it consumes much energy and natural resources and also emits pollutants. A new approach to the production of blended or high-volume mineral additive (HVMA) cement helps to improve its ecologi...

  2. Pulmonary Cement Embolism following Percutaneous Vertebroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümran Toru

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous vertebroplasty is a minimal invasive procedure that is applied for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral fractures. During vertebroplasty, the leakage of bone cement outside the vertebral body leads to pulmonary cement embolism, which is a serious complication of this procedure. Here we report a 48-year-old man who was admitted to our hospital with dyspnea after percutaneous vertebroplasty and diagnosed as pulmonary cement embolism.

  3. Use of thermodynamic chemical potential diagrams (µCaO, µCO2 to understand the weathering of cement by a slightly carbonated water Uso de diagramas de potencial químico termodinâmico (µCaO, µCO2 para o entendimento da resistência do cimento à água levemente carbonatada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Blandine

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Cement is a ubiquitous material that may suffer hazardous weathering. The chemical weathering of cement in natural environment is mostly characterized by the leaching of CaO and the addition of CO2. The different weathering zones that develop at the expense of the cement may be predicted by the help of chemical potential phase diagrams; these diagrams simulate the behaviour of systems open to some chemical elements. Some components have a so-called inert status, that is to say the system is closed for these components, their amount in the system remains constant; some other components have a mobile status, that is to say these components can be exchanged with the outside of the system, their amount can vary from one sample zone to another. The mobile components are represented in the model by their chemical potentials (linked to their concentrations that are variable in the external environment. The main features of the weathering of a cement system open to CaO and CO2 are predicted in a phase diagram with µCaO et µCO2 as diagram axes. From core to rim, one observes the disappearance of portlandite, ettringite and calcium monosulfoaluminate, the precipitation of calcite and amorphous silica, the modification of the composition of the CSH minerals (hydrated calcium silicates that see a decrease of their c/s ratio (CaO/SiO2 from the core to the rim of the sample. For the CSH minerals, we have separated their continuous solid solution into three compositions defined by different CaO/SiO2 ratios and called phases 1, 2 and 3: CaO = 0.8, 1.1, 1.8 respectively for one mole of SiO2 knowing that H2O varies in the three compositions.Cimento é um material de ampla utilização que pode ser sujeito a modificação pelo tempo. A modificação química do cimento em meio natural é principalmente caracterizada por lixiviação de CaO e adição de CO2. As diferentes zonas de resistência que se desenvolvem às custas do cimento podem ser previstas com os

  4. Modeling the degradation of Portland cement pastes by biogenic organic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Windt, Laurent; Devillers, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Reactive transport models can be used to assess the long-term performance of cement-based materials subjected to biodegradation. A bioleaching test (with Aspergillus niger fungi) applied to ordinary Portland cement pastes during 15 months is modeled with HYTEC. Modeling indicates that the biogenic organic acids (acetic, butyric, lactic and oxalic) strongly accelerate hydrate dissolution by acidic hydrolysis whilst their complexation of aluminum has an effect on the secondary gel stability only. The deepest degradation front corresponds to portlandite dissolution and decalcification of calcium silicate hydrates. A complex pattern of sulfate phases dissolution and precipitation takes place in an intermediate zone. The outermost degraded zone consists of alumina and silica gels. The modeling accurateness of calcium leaching, pH evolution and degradation thickness is consistently enhanced whilst considering increase of diffusivity in the degraded zones. Precipitation of calcium oxalate is predicted by modeling but was hindered in the bioleaching reactor.

  5. Effect of Palmyra Palm Leaf Ash on Cement Stabilization of Makurdi Shale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amos Yala IORLIAM

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Makurdi Shale was treated with palmyra palm leaf ash (PPLA and cement to assess its suitability as a material in construction of flexible pavement. Classification, Compaction, Consistency, California bearing ratio (CBR and Unconfined compressive strength (UCS tests, were conducted on the shale specimen treated with, cement and PPLA in a combined incremental order of 2% up to 10% of cement and 2% up to 14% of PPLA of dry weight of soil sample respectively. Results of tests showed that Makurdi shale is an A-7-6, high plasticity (CH and high swell potential soil by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO, Unified Soil Classification System (USCS and Nigerian Building and Road Research Institute (NBRRI classification systems respectively. The plasticity index (PI reduced from 30.5% for untreated Makurdi shale to 4% at 10% cement +14% PPLA contents. The maximum soaked CBR and 7 day UCS values of 92% and 1041 kN/m2 were obtained at 10% cement+14 % PPLA contents respectively. From the results, Makurdi shale treated with a combination of 10%cement+14% PPFA with a soaked CBR value of 92 %, 7 day UCS value of 1041 kN/m2 and 82 % value of resistance to loss in strength, satisfied the requirement for sub-base specification. It is therefore recommended for use as sub-base materials in flexible pavement.

  6. Application of washed MSWI fly ash in cement composites: long-term environmental impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenzhou; Tian, Sicong; Liu, Lili; Wang, Xidong; Zhang, Zuotai

    2018-04-01

    In the present study, long-term environmental impacts of compact and ground cement composites, in which 30 wt.% of cement was replaced by washed municipal solid wastes incineration (MSWI) fly ash, were investigated for use in building industry. Consecutive leaching tests over a time span of 180 days were performed in acid water, deionized water, and saline water, respectively, with the accumulative concentration of different elements determined in the leachate. Different leaching behaviors are observed among different potential toxic elements (PTEs). For instance, higher concentrations of V in the leachate were observed from the compact cement composites than those from the ground ones. The concentration of Ba in the leachate increased with the decrease of particle size of the cement composites, and an initial increase in the leaching efficiency of Sn was followed by a clear decline with the leaching time. In addition, kinetic study revealed that the leaching behaviors of potential toxic elements follow a second-order model. The results demonstrated that the addition of washed MSWI fly ash into cement can contribute to the attrition resistance, indicating that the washed MSWI fly ash could be a promising alternative for cement as supplementary building materials.

  7. Characterisation of chloride transport and reinforcement corrosion in concrete under cyclic wetting and drying by electrical resistivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Peelen, W.H.A.

    2002-01-01

    Concrete prisms were made with four cement types including cements with fly ash and/or blast furnace slag and three waterto- cement (w/c) ratios. Chloride penetration and corrosion of rebars were stimulated by subjecting prisms to cyclic loading with salt solution and drying. Concrete resistivity,

  8. Microbial fuel cell based on electroactive sulfate-reducing biofilm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelov, Anatoliy; Bratkova, Svetlana; Loukanov, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Regulation and management of electricity generation by variation of residence time. ► Design of microbial fuel cell based on electroactive biofilm on zeolite. ► Engineering solution for removing of the obtained elemental sulfur. - abstract: A two chambered laboratory scale microbial fuel cell (MFC) has been developed, based on natural sulfate-reducing bacterium consortium in electroactive biofilm on zeolite. The MFC utilizes potassium ferricyanide in the cathode chamber as an electron acceptor that derives electrons from the obtained in anode chamber H 2 S. The molecular oxygen is finally used as a terminal electron acceptor at cathode compartment. The generated power density was 0.68 W m −2 with current density of 3.2 A m −2 at 150 Ω electrode resistivity. The hydrogen sulfide itself is produced by microbial dissimilative sulfate reduction process by utilizing various organic substrates. Finally, elemental sulfur was identified as the predominant final oxidation product in the anode chamber. It was removed from MFC through medium circulation and gathering in an external tank. This report reveals dependence relationship between the progress of general electrochemical parameters and bacterial sulfate-reduction rate. The presented MFC design can be used for simultaneous sulfate purification of mining drainage wastewater and generation of renewable electricity

  9. Tritium sorption by cement and subsequent release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, F.; Tanaka, S.; Yamawaki, M.

    1994-01-01

    In a fusion reactor or tritium handling facilities, contamination of concrete by tritium and subsequent release from it to the reactor or experimental rooms is a matter of problem for safety control of tritium and management of operational environment. In order to evaluate these tritium behavior, interaction of tritiated water with concrete or cement should be clarified. In the present study, HTO sorption and subsequent release from cement were studied by combining various experimental methods. From the basic studies on tritium-cement interactions, it has become possible to evaluate tritium uptake by cement or concrete and subsequent tritium release behavior as well as tritium removing methods from them

  10. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.G.; Jolliffe, C.B.; Lee, D.J.

    1990-09-01

    The removal of activity from spent decontaminating solutions eg LOMI can be achieved using organic ion exchange resins. These resins can be successfully immobilised in cement based matrices. The optimum cement system contained 10% ordinary Portland cement 84% gg blast furnace slag, 6% microsilica with a water cement ratio of 0.5 and a dry resin loading of 36% with respect to total weight. This formulation was successfully scaled up to 200 litres giving a product with acceptable compressive strength, dimensional stability and elastic modulus. Storage of samples under water appears to have no detrimental effects on the product's properties. (author)

  11. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.G.; Jolliffe, C.B.; Lee, D.J.

    1990-09-01

    The removal of activity from spent decontaminating solutions eg LOMI can be achieved using organic ion exchange resins. These resins can be successfully immobilised in cement based matrices. The optimum cement system contained 10% ordinary Portland cement, 84% gg blast furnace slag, 6% microsilica with a water cement ratio of 0.5 and a dry resin loading of 36% with respect to total weight. This formulation was successfully scaled up to 200 litres giving a product with acceptable compressive strength, dimensional stability and elastic modulus. Storage of samples under water appears to have no detrimental effects on the products' properties. (author)

  12. Use of rubber crumbs in cement concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longvinenko, A. A.

    2018-03-01

    Rubber crumb obtained from worn out tires has been increasingly used over the last 15-20 years, especially in manufacture of asphalt and cement concrete mixtures. This review pays principal attention to application of the rubber crumb to cement concrete mixtures. Use of the rubber crumb in cement concrete is not as successful as in asphalt concrete mixtures, due to incompatibility problems linked to chemical composition and a significant difference in rigidity between the rubber crumb and concrete mixture aggregates. Different methods are proposed and studied to mitigate the adverse influence and increase the beneficial effects of the rubber crumb when added to cement concrete.

  13. Controls on Cementation in a Chalk Reservoir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meireles, Leonardo Teixeira Pinto; Hussein, A.; Welch, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we identify different controls on cementation in a chalk reservoir. Biot’s coefficient, a measure of cementation, stiffness and strength in porous rocks, is calculated from logging data (bulk density and sonic Pwave velocity). We show that Biot’s coefficient is correlated...... that some degree of pore filling cementation occurred in Kraka (Alam, 2010). Lack of correlation between Biot’s coefficient and Gamma Ray (GR) indicates that the small amount of clay present is generally located in the pore space, thus not contributing to frame stiffness. While there was no compositional...... control on cementation via clay, we could infer that stratigraphy impacts on the diagenetic process....

  14. Immobilisation of radwaste in cement based matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.P.; Macphee, D.; Atkins, M.; Pointer, C.; Cowie, J.; Wilding, C.R.; Mattingley, N.J.; Evans, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    The solubilities and influence on cement pH are reported for calcium aluminate and aluminosulphate hydrates. The solubility of Ca(OH) 2 is reported to 700 bars. Polymerization of C-S-H is investigated by NMR. Specific interactions of U 6+ and iodine (I - , IO 3 - ) with cement components are described. The impact of radiation on cements and the influence of higher temperature are documented. The role of dissolved Ca and CO 2 in groundwaters as dissolution media for cements are reported. (author)

  15. Integer programming of cement distribution by train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indarsih

    2018-01-01

    Cement industry in Central Java distributes cement by train to meet daily demand in Yogyakarta and Central Java area. There are five destination stations. For each destination station, there is a warehouse to load cements. Decision maker of cement industry have a plan to redesign the infrastructure and transportation system. The aim is to determine how many locomotives, train wagons, and containers and how to arrange train schedules with subject to the delivery time. For this purposes, we consider an integer programming to minimize the total of operational cost. Further, we will discuss a case study and the solution the problem can be calculated by LINGO software.

  16. Prediction of hydroxyl concentrations in cement pore water using a numerical cement hydration model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, van R.J.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, a 3D numerical cement hydration model is used for predicting alkali and hydroxyl concentrations in cement pore water. First, this numerical model is calibrated for Dutch cement employing both chemical shrinkage and calorimetric experiments. Secondly, the strength development of some

  17. Evaluation of cement thixotropy for the cement of oil wells in areas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... economical for cementing job operations in wells with loss zones. The results also show that the effect of LHF is positive, since in addition to his contribution to long term performances, especially the durability of hardened concrete, it improves the thixotropy of cement made of plaster. Keywords: cementing; lost circulation; ...

  18. Water-soluble ions measured in fine particulate matter next to cement works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, N.; Yubero, E.; Nicolás, J. F.; Crespo, J.; Pastor, C.; Carratalá, A.; Santacatalina, M.

    2011-04-01

    PM2.5 samples were collected for one year in a suburban area close to an industrial complex formed by two cement factories and some quarries in southeastern Spain. Samples were analyzed by ion chromatography to determine the concentrations of major inorganic ions: Cl -, NO 3-, SO 42-, Na +, NH 4+, K +, Mg 2+ and Ca 2+. The average PM2.5 concentration (17.6 μg m -3) was within the interval reported for other Mediterranean suburban environments. Concentration peaks were registered during both winter and summer, concurrently with maxima levels of nitrate and sulfate, due to stagnation conditions and African dust episodes, respectively. Sulfate was found to be a main contributor to PM2.5 aerosol mass (4.2 μg m -3, 24%), followed by nitrate and ammonium (1.5 μg m -3, 9% each one). Correlation analyses demonstrated that fine sulfate was present as (NH 4) 2SO 4, CaSO 4 and Na 2SO 4 since ammonium concentrations were not high enough to neutralize both anions. The mean concentration of calcium (1.0 μg m -3), an element commonly found in the coarse fraction, was higher than those found in other locations of the Mediterranean basin. Additionally, the lowest levels were registered during summer, in contrast with previous findings. This was attributed to resuspension and transport of mineral dust from the neighboring quarries and cement plants during fall and winter, which was supported by the results of the CPF analysis. Atmospheric levels of potassium and chloride (0.28 and 0.51 μg m -3 annual average, respectively) also seemed to be affected by cement works, as suggested by correlation and CPF analyses. In the case of Cl -, a marked seasonality was observed, with mean winter concentrations considerably higher than summer ones, indicating a clear prevalence of anthropogenic sources over sea spray emissions.

  19. Concretes with high mechanical resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauny, Pierre.

    1973-01-01

    Description is given of a method for manufacturing concretes with high mechanical resistance in compression, obtained by mixing gravels highly resistant to compression, sand and cement in an aqueous medium. Use is made of sands of porous ceramics, such as terra-cotta, of a grain size from 0,1 to 5mm, the pore diameter of which is from 0.5 to 15 microns, chosen so as to be slighty bigger than the crystals of the cement used. This can be applied to the pre-stressed structures used in the nuclear field [fr

  20. Geotechnical Properties of Clayey Soil Stabilized with Cement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    2017-12-31

    Dec 31, 2017 ... ... to investigate the different effects of cement-sawdust ash and cement on a ... Keywords: Cement, Saw dust, strength test subgrade material, highway construction ... characteristics of lateritic soil stabilized with sawdust ash.

  1. The characterization of cement waste form for final disposal of decommissioning concrete wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yoon-ji; Lee, Ki-Won; Min, Byung-Youn; Hwang, Doo-Seong; Moon, Jei-Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Decommissioning concrete waste recycling and disposal. • Compressive strength of cement waste form. • Characteristic of thermal resistance and leaching of cement waste form. - Abstract: In Korea, the decontamination and decommissioning of KRR-1, 2 at KAERI have been under way. The decommissioning of the KRR-2 was finished completely by 2011, whereas the decommissioning of KRR-1 is currently underway. A large quantity of slightly contaminated concrete waste has been generated from the decommissioning projects. The concrete wastes, 83ea of 200 L drums, and 41ea of 4 m 3 containers, were generated in the decommissioning projects. The conditioning of concrete waste is needed for final disposal. Concrete waste is conditioned as follows: mortar using coarse and fine aggregates is filled with a void space after concrete rubble pre-placement into 200 L drums. Thus, this research developed an optimizing mixing ratio of concrete waste, water, and cement, and evaluated the characteristics of a cement waste form to meet the requirements specified in the disposal site specific waste acceptance criteria. The results obtained from a compressive strength test, leaching test, and thermal cycling test of cement waste forms conclude that the concrete waste, water, and cement have been suggested as an optimized mixing ratio of 75:15:10. In addition, the compressive strength of the cement waste form was satisfied, including a fine powder up to a maximum of 40 wt% in concrete debris waste of about 75%. According to the scale-up test, the mixing ratio of concrete waste, water, and cement is 75:10:15, which meets the satisfied compressive strength because of an increase in the particle size in the waste

  2. Studies on cement matrix materials used at the Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant for radwaste conditioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragolici, Felicia; Lungu, Laura; Nicu, Mihaela; Rotarescu, Gheorghe; Turcanu, Corneliu

    2003-01-01

    The research activities performed by Department of Radioactive Waste Management is focused on the treatment of LLAW products obtained by chemical precipitation and on the conditioning of these products by cementation. The individual mechanisms implied in the chemical precipitation processes are directly dependent on the precipitate properties and structure, which in turn are connected with the initial system composition and the precipitation procedure, i.e. reagent concentration, rate and orders of chemical addition, mixing rate and time and ageing conditions. In case of conditioning by cementation, the chemical nature and proportion of the sludges or concentrates affect both the hydrolysis of the initial cement components and the reactions of metastable hydration constituents, as well as the mechanical strength and chemical resistance of the hardened cemented matrix.Generally, the study of the precipitation products and their behaviour during cementation and the long-term disposal is extremely difficult because of the system complexity (phase composition and structure) and the lack of the non-destructive analytical methods. The experience accumulated by the countries who advanced nuclear programmes in military and socio-economic fields and which produced important volumes of radioactive wastes, leads us to study some of mineral additives to be used in the conditioning and disposal technology. Is well known that some mineral additives can diminish the leaching rate of the radionuclides in the disposal environment.The studies have the purpose to obtain the most propitious mixture of cement-bentonite and cement-volcanic tuff, which have the mechanical properties similar to the cement paste used for the conditioning of radioactive waste.Taking into account the characteristics of these mineral binders, namely a very good plasticity and capacity of adsorption, which lead at the decrease of porosity, the mixture is planned to be used in the future, at the Radioactive

  3. THE USE OF SISAL FIBRE AS REINFORCEMENT IN CEMENT BASED COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romildo Dias Tolêdo Filho

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The inclusion of fibre reinforcement in concrete, mortar and cement paste can enhance many of the engineering properties of the basic materials, such as fracture toughness, flexural strength and resistance to fatigue, impact, thermal shock and spalling. In recent years, a great deal of interest has been created worldwide on the potential applications of natural fibre reinforced, cement based composites. Investigations have been carried out in many countries on various mechanical properties, physical performance and durability of cement based matrices reinforced with naturally occurring fibres including sisal, coconut, jute, bamboo and wood fibres. These fibres have always been considered promising as reinforcement of cement based matrices because of their availability, low cost and low consumption of energy. In this review, the general properties of the composites are described in relation to fibre content, length, strength and stiffness. A chronological development of sisal fibre reinforced, cement based matrices is reported and experimental data are provided to illustrate the performance of sisal fibre reinforced cement composites. A brief description on the use of these composite materials as building products has been included. The influence of sisal fibres on the development of plastic shrinkage in the pre-hardened state, on tensile, compressive and bending strength in the hardened state of mortar mixes is discussed. Creep and drying shrinkage of the composites and the durability of natural fibres in cement based matrices are of particular interest and are also highlighted. The results show that the composites reinforced with sisal fibres are reliable materials to be used in practice for the production of structural elements to be used in rural and civil construction. This material could be a substitute asbestos-cement composite, which is a serious hazard to human and animal health and is prohibited in industrialized countries. The

  4. Effect of chondroitin sulfate on osteogenetic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneiders, Wolfgang; Rentsch, Claudia; Rehberg, Sebastian; Rein, Susanne; Zwipp, Hans; Rammelt, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) has anti-inflammatory properties and increases the regeneration ability of injured bone. In different in vivo investigations on bone defects the addition of CS to calcium phosphate bone cement has lead to an enhanced bone remodeling and increased new bone formation. The goal of this study was to evaluate the cellular effects of CS on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). In cell culture experiments hMSCs were incubated on calcium phosphate bone cements with and without CS and cultivated in a proliferation and an osteogenetic differentiation media. Alkaline phosphatase and the proliferation rate were determined on days 1, 7 and 14. Concerning the proliferation rates, no significant differences were detected. On days 1, 7 and 14 a significantly higher activity of alkaline phosphatase, an early marker of osteogenesis, was detected around CS modified cements in both types of media. The addition of CS leads to a significant increase of osteogenetic differentiation of hMSCs. To evaluate the influence of the osteoconductive potency of CS in twelve adult male Wistar rats, the interface reaction of cancellous bone to a nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite cement containing type I collagen (CDHA/Coll) without and with CS (CDHA/Coll/CS) was evaluated. Cylindrical implants were inserted press-fit into a defect of the tibial head. 28 days after the operation the direct bone contact and the percentage of newly formed bone were significantly higher on CDHA/Coll/CS-implants (p < 0.05). The addition of CS appears to enhance new bone formation on CDHA/Coll-composites in the early stages of bone healing. Possible mechanisms are discussed. - Highlights: ► The influence of chondroitin sulfate (CS) on bone metabolism was evaluated. ► CS leads to a significant increase of osteogenetic differentiation of hMSCs. ► In small animal investigation CS seems to enhance osteogenesis in bone healing.

  5. Effect of chondroitin sulfate on osteogenetic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneiders, Wolfgang, E-mail: schneidersw@gmx.de; Rentsch, Claudia; Rehberg, Sebastian; Rein, Susanne; Zwipp, Hans; Rammelt, Stefan

    2012-10-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) has anti-inflammatory properties and increases the regeneration ability of injured bone. In different in vivo investigations on bone defects the addition of CS to calcium phosphate bone cement has lead to an enhanced bone remodeling and increased new bone formation. The goal of this study was to evaluate the cellular effects of CS on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). In cell culture experiments hMSCs were incubated on calcium phosphate bone cements with and without CS and cultivated in a proliferation and an osteogenetic differentiation media. Alkaline phosphatase and the proliferation rate were determined on days 1, 7 and 14. Concerning the proliferation rates, no significant differences were detected. On days 1, 7 and 14 a significantly higher activity of alkaline phosphatase, an early marker of osteogenesis, was detected around CS modified cements in both types of media. The addition of CS leads to a significant increase of osteogenetic differentiation of hMSCs. To evaluate the influence of the osteoconductive potency of CS in twelve adult male Wistar rats, the interface reaction of cancellous bone to a nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite cement containing type I collagen (CDHA/Coll) without and with CS (CDHA/Coll/CS) was evaluated. Cylindrical implants were inserted press-fit into a defect of the tibial head. 28 days after the operation the direct bone contact and the percentage of newly formed bone were significantly higher on CDHA/Coll/CS-implants (p < 0.05). The addition of CS appears to enhance new bone formation on CDHA/Coll-composites in the early stages of bone healing. Possible mechanisms are discussed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The influence of chondroitin sulfate (CS) on bone metabolism was evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CS leads to a significant increase of osteogenetic differentiation of hMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In small animal investigation CS seems to enhance osteogenesis in bone healing.

  6. Physical-mechanical properties of glass ionomer cements indicated for atraumatic restorative treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonifacio, C.C.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Raggio, D.P.; Werner, A.; de Carvalho, R.C.R.; van Amerongen, W.E.

    2009-01-01

    Background:  This study evaluated mechanical properties of glass ionomer cements (GICs) used for atraumatic restorative treatment. Wear resistance, Knoop hardness (Kh), flexural (Fs) and compressive strength (Cs) were evaluated. The GICs used were Riva Self Cure (RVA), Fuji IX (FIX), Hi Dense (HD),

  7. Mechanical, electrical and microstructural properties of cement-based materials in conditions of stray current flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanto, A.; Koleva, D.A.; Copuroglu, O.; Van Beek, C.; Van Breugel, K.

    2013-01-01

    This investigation presents a comparative study on mechanical properties, electrical resistivity and microstructure of mortar under DC current, compared to mortar in rest (no current) conditions. Monitoring was performed from 24h after casting until 84 days of cement hydration. A current density

  8. Regeneration of sulfated metal oxides and carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubble, Bill R.; Siegel, Stanley; Cunningham, Paul T.

    1978-03-28

    Alkali metal or alkaline earth metal carbonates such as calcium carbonate and magnesium carbonate found in dolomite or limestone are employed for removal of sulfur dioxide from combustion exhaust gases. The sulfated carbonates are regenerated to oxides through use of a solid-solid reaction, particularly calcium sulfide with calcium sulfate to form calcium oxide and sulfur dioxide gas. The regeneration is performed by contacting the sulfated material with a reductant gas such as hydrogen within an inert diluent to produce calcium sulfide in mixture with the sulfate under process conditions selected to permit the sulfide-sulfate, solid-state reaction to occur.

  9. Effect of power toothbrushing on simulated wear of dental cement margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Marsha A; Bayne, Stephen C; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2007-01-01

    Power toothbrushes (PTBs), in combination with abrasive dentifrices, may encourage wear of dental cements at crown margins. The objective of this in vitro simulation was to control the clinical variables associated with PTB use and measure the potential side effects of PTBs with mild and abrasive dentifrices. Four PTBs ( Braun-Oral-B-Professional Care at 150 g brushing force, Sonicare-Elite at 90 g, Colgate-Actibrush at 200 g and Crest-Spinbrush-Pro at 250 g) and 2 dentifrices mixed 1:1 with tap water (Mild= Colgate-Total, Colgate-Palmolive; Abrasive= Close-up, Chesebrough-Ponds) versus tap water alone (control) were used to abrade 2 cements (Fleck's Mizzy Zinc Phosphate [ZP]; 3M-ESPE Unicem universal cement [UC]) using cement-filled slots (160 m wide) cut into wear-resistant ceramic blocks. A custom fixture controlled PTB/block alignment, PTB loads, and other testing variables. Wear was measured (3 profilometer traces/slot, 5 slots/block/group, baseline to 5-year differences) and analyzed (3-way ANOVA, p PTBs and both dentifrices. Brushing with water showed no effects (pPTBs. Pooled 5y-wear levels for ZP for both dentifrices approximately 21 microm /5y) were similar to values for current-day posterior composite materials. Combinations of PTBs with mild and abrasive dentifrices produced significant wear with ZP but not UC; thus, resin-composite cements seem to represent a better choice for wear resistance.

  10. A medicated polycarboxylate cement to prevent complications in composite resin therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Y.; Shintani, H.; Yamaki, M.

    1990-01-01

    Preparative treatment is the preferred method to protect the dentin and pulp from complications in composite resin therapy. This study investigated the in vivo effects of the polycarboxylate cement containing zinc fluoride and tannic acid in composite resin restorations. Scanning electron micrographs established that the composite resin failed to contact the axial wall. The gaps varied from 10 to 60 microns. However, this polycarboxylate cement was shown to provide excellent adaptation to dentin when used as a base and its chemical adhesion allowed it to make close contact with the unetched dentin. The newly developed electron probe x-ray microanalyzer revealed that the in vivo penetration of fluoride and zinc occurred through the dentinal tubules. When this polycarboxylate cement was used, the orifices of dentinal tubules were partially occluded, possibly with the smear layer fixed by tannic acid. In addition, by releasing the components, this polycarboxylate cement adds acid resistance to dentin and increases the resistance of dentin collagen to proteolytic enzymes. As such this polycarboxylate cement offers advantages as a base to composite resin therapy

  11. Study of radon diffusion from RHA-modified ordinary Portland cement using SSNTD technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narula, A.K.; Goyal, S.K.; Chauhan, R.P.; Chakarvarti, S.K.

    2013-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient of radon is a very important factor in estimating the rate of indoor radon inflow. The aim of this work is to develop and assess the potential of radon resistant construction materials in residential buildings. Of late, rice husk ash (RHA) has been used as a component in cement. The X-ray diffraction of RHA indicates that the RHA contains mainly amorphous materials while the X-ray fluorescence analysis shows that the major percentage of it is composed of silica. The amorphous silica present in the RHA is responsible for the pozzolonic activity of the ash. The results of the present study indicate that the RHA when mixed with cement initially reduces radon diffusion coefficient, followed by enhancement when the percentage of RHA is increased above 30% by weight. - Highlights: ► Radon diffusion coefficient has been measured in Portland cement with different percentage of rice husk ash (RHA). ► The mixing of RHA to cement changes the radon diffusion coefficient. ► The mixture of cement and RHA can be used to make building materials more resistant to radon entry through diffusion

  12. On the Utilization of Pozzolanic Wastes as an Alternative Resource of Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rezaul Karim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, as a supplement of cement, the utilization of pozzolanic materials in cement and concrete manufacturing has increased significantly. This study investigates the scope to use pozzolanic wastes (slag, palm oil fuel ash and rice husk ash as an alkali activated binder (AAB that can be used as an alternative to cement. To activate these materials, sodium hydroxide solution was used at 1.0, 2.5 and 5.0 molar concentration added into the mortar, separately. The required solution was used to maintain the flow of mortar at 110% ± 5%. The consistency and setting time of the AAB-paste were determined. Mortar was tested for its flow, compressive strength, porosity, water absorption and thermal resistance (heating at 700 °C and investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The experimental results reveal that AAB-mortar exhibits less flow than that of ordinary Portland cement (OPC. Surprisingly, AAB-mortars (with 2.5 molar solution achieved a compressive strength of 34.3 MPa at 28 days, while OPC shows that of 43.9 MPa under the same conditions. Although water absorption and porosity of the AAB-mortar are slightly high, it shows excellent thermal resistance compared to OPC. Therefore, based on the test results, it can be concluded that in the presence of a chemical activator, the aforementioned pozzolans can be used as an alternative material for cement.

  13. Conditioning of inorganic ion exchangers based on cerium (IV) antimonate in cement matrix. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, H.F.; Zakareia, N.; El-Dessouky, M.I.; Abo-Mosallem, N.M.; EL-Naggar, I.M.

    1996-01-01

    The use of inorganic adsorbents for treatment of aqueous radioactive waste has many advantages; namely; better resistance to chemical action, thermal stability, compatibility with immobilization matrices and resistance to radiation. Inorganic ion exchangers process many properties which make them more suitable for rad waste treatment than organic exchange resins. Inorganic ion exchange materials can be immobilized using cement matrix to obtain good solidified waste form. In this work, the removal of radioactive nuclides from radioactive waste is carried out by chemical in-situ precipitation. The addition of cerium (IV) antimonate (cesb) to cement mixture enhances the compressive strength more than plain cement. Waste package containing cesb increased the compressive strength relative to original ordinary portland cement (OPC) matrix for waste products immersed in tap water for one month. The compressive strength increases in the order; st Ce Sb> mix Ce Sb> Na Ce Sb> Co Ce Sb> Cs Ce Sb> OPC> Eu Ce Sb> Ce Sb; (mix refers to all the radionuclides used here). The cumulative leached fractions of 60 Co and 134 Cs decreased for solidified waste products containing Ce Sb in comparison to plain