WorldWideScience

Sample records for suburban baltimore maryland

  1. Evaluation of the National Land Database for Hydrologic Applications in Urban And Suburban Baltimore, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monica Lipscomb Smith; Weiqi Zhou; Mary Cadenasso; J. Morgan Grove; Lawrence. Band

    2010-01-01

    We compared the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) 2001 land cover, impervious, and canopy data products to land cover data derived from 0.6-m resolution three-band digital imagery and ancillary data. We conducted this comparison at the 1 km2, 9 km2, and gauged watershed scales within the Baltimore Ecosystem Study to...

  2. The campus at the University of Maryland at Baltimore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, R M

    1994-09-01

    The University of Maryland at Baltimore (UMAB) is an urban professional school campus. Its 36 acres include 39 buildings, both historic and new. The campus fabric is marked by diversity. The new facilities master plan was developed to reflect the strategic planning process for the campus. Design guidelines are intended to create a common theme while still encouraging each building to have a unique identity. The new Health Sciences Library/Information Services building will sit diagonally from Davidge Hall, built in 1812 and the symbolic center of the campus.

  3. 2011 Information Systems Summit 2 Held in Baltimore, Maryland on April 4-6, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-04

    SECURE AGILE DEVELOPMENT · Mr. Jeff Payne, CEO and Founder, Coveros, Inc. LEAN AND KANBAN · Mr. Mike Cox, Senior Consultant, Net...Maryland Suite: Annapolis LEAN AND KANBAN Mr. Mike Cox, Senior Consultant, Net Objectives TRACK B Maryland Suite: Baltimore 4:15 pm - 5:15 pm THANK...Innovation to Transform Army Intel 14 Agile © copyright 2011. Net Objectives, Inc. Lean and Kanban Michael Cox Vice President and Senior

  4. Urban Waters and the Patapsco Watershed/Baltimore Region (Maryland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patapsco Watershed / Baltimore Area of the Urban Waters Federal Partnership (UWFP) reconnects urban communities with their waterways by improving coordination among federal agencies and collaborating with community-led efforts.

  5. Effects of catastrophic events on transportation system management and operations : Howard Street tunnel fire Baltimore City, Maryland -- July 18, 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-07-01

    This report documents the actions taken by transportation agencies in response to the tunnel fire in Baltimore, Maryland on July 18, 2001, and is part of a larger effort to examine the impacts of catastrophic events on transportation system facilitie...

  6. Contaminant levels and toxicity of sediments and water of Baltimore Harbor and Back River, Maryland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, D.T.; Jacobs, F.; Mehrotra, N.

    1995-01-01

    The Patapsco and Back River Watershed drains the Baltimore metropolitan area, Maryland's most heavily industrialized and urbanized region. Due to the intensive development and industrialization of the Baltimore metropolitan area over the past 250 years, high levels of contaminants have been discharged into Baltimore Harbor on the Patapsco River and into the Back River. Pollutants historically discharged include heavy metals, petroleum hydrocarbons, pesticides, cyanide, sewage, other organic chemicals, and nutrients. Sources have included industrial and municipal discharges, sewerage overflows, urban runoff, and leaks and spills from vessels and on-land facilities. The Maryland Department of the Environment undertook this study of ambient conditions as part of a developing strategy to assess and improve conditions in the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries. Past studies were compiled, evaluated, and synthesized to identify the areas of degraded conditions and contaminants of possible concern. Sediment contaminant levels were assessed using historical sediment chemistry data, Effects Range Low and Median concentrations (ER-L and ER-M) as toxicological benchmarks, and a sum of toxicity units approach for multiple contaminants. Data on toxicity testing and biological monitoring was compared to sediment and water quality data. Fish tissue data were used to examine bioaccumulated chemicals. A computerized Geographical Information System (GIS) was used to manipulate and display complex geographical data. The final identification of areas and chemicals of potential concern relied on a syntheses of these results as well as information on present and past contaminant loadings

  7. Railroad special investigation report : Maryland Transit Administration light rail vehicle accidents at the Baltimore-Washington International Airport transit station near Baltimore, Maryland, February 13 and August 15, 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-12-11

    In 2000, the Maryland Transit Administration experienced two similar accidents in the same location just 6 months apart. Both accidents involved the failure of a light rail vehicle train to stop at the designated stopping point at the Baltimore-Washi...

  8. Incineration in low-level radioactive waste management at the University of Maryland at Baltimore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooley, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    The selection of an incinerator by the University of Maryland at Baltimore was carried out under a demonstration grant from the Department of Energy (DOE). The system selected is a 300 lb per hour dual-chambered, controlled air incinerator. The cost of the unit was $130,000, excluding installation. The interior is lined with high temperature brick rather than a castable refractory. The burners in the upper and lower chambers are ''oversized'' to insure responsive temperature control of 2.5 million Btu/h in the upper chamber and 1.3 million Btu/h in the lower. The prescribed operating temperatures are 1900 to 2100 0 F in the upper chamber and 900 to 1200 0 F in the lower chamber. The system has a rated capacity of 300 lbs/h of type IV, pathological waste, but operational experience has limited our feed rate to 150 lbs/h

  9. A community care initiative: Maryland and Hopkins students take to the streets in Baltimore City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCary, J; Schainker, E; Liu, P

    1999-01-01

    Medical students from University of Maryland and Johns Hopkins University, with a grant from the Maryland Chapter of the American College of Physicians, held a free health fair in a Baltimore City neighborhood. The goals were to heighten awareness of common health problems, learn more about a medically underserved community, and increase access to primary care services in that community. The students planned booths to offer information and screening on 19 common health topics. Fair organizers worked with a local clinic, People's Community Health Center, and a neighborhood development organization, the Safe and Smart Center, to create an event that would engage and educate people on relevant issues. Approximately 100 medical students participated in the event and 350 people attended the fair. An optional survey filled out by fair participants revealed that a diverse group of people attended the event. Comments about the day from medical students and fair participants show that the event was enjoyable and offered a tremendous learning opportunity for both groups. This paper also discusses problems that arose during the planning stages as well as suggestions for those interested in planning a similar event.

  10. Maryland Cleaning & Abatement Services Corp. Information Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryland Cleaning & Abatement Services Corp. (the Company) is located in Baltimore, Maryland. The settlement involves renovation activities conducted at property constructed prior to 1978, located in Baltimore, Maryland.

  11. Watersheds in Baltimore, Maryland: understanding and application of integrated ecological and social processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward T.A. Pickett; Kenneth T. Belt; Michael F. Galvin; Peter M. Groffman; J. Morgan Grove; Donald C. Outen; Richard V. Pouyat; William P. Stack; Mary L. Cadenasso

    2007-01-01

    The Water and Watersheds program has made significant and lasting contributions to the basic understanding of the complex ecological system of Baltimore, MD. Funded at roughly the same time as the urban Long- Term Ecological Research (LTER) project in Baltimore, the Water and Watersheds grant and the LTER grant together established the Baltimore Ecosystem Study (BES)...

  12. Impacts of cowbird parasitism on wood thrushes and other neotropical migrants in suburban Maryland forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowell, B.A.; Fallon, J.E.; Robbins, C.S.; Dawson, D.K.; Fallon, F.W.; Smith, James N.M.; Cook, Terry L.; Rothstein, Stephen I.; Robinson, Scott K.; Sealy, Spencer G.

    2000-01-01

    During 1988-1993, we monitored nests of neotropical migrant birds in seven suburban Maryland forests to compare parasitism and predation rates in forests of different areas. Of 1,122 nests monitored, 672 were of Wood Thrush, the most commonly found nesting species. Study sites were forests that ranged in size from 21 ha to more than 1,300 ha in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain regions of Maryland within 50 km of Washington, D.C. Parasitism rates of Wood Thrush nests varied greatly among sites, ranging from 0% (29 nests in 1990-1992) in a site in extensive forest to 68% (31 nests 1992-1993) in a 21-ha, selectively logged old-growth forest. A sudden increase in parasitism from 9% (102 nests 1990-1991) to 35% (125 nests 1992-1993) in a 23-ha old-growth forest was noteworthy. The surrounding environment at this site is changing from rural to residential. Wood Thrush parasitism rates dropped as the breeding season progressed, but peaks of parasitism coincided with peaks of nesting activity. Parasitism rates for Hooded Warblers (88% of 17 nests-all sites) were most alarming. High predation rates were a much greater factor in low productivity for Wood Thrushes than parasitism.

  13. Nitrogen input from residential lawn care practices in suburban watersheds in Baltimore county, MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely L. Law; Lawrence E. Band; J. Morgan. Grove

    2004-01-01

    A residential lawn care survey was conducted as part of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study, a Long-term Ecological Research project funded by the National Science Foundation and collaborating agencies, to estimate the nitrogen input to urban watersheds from lawn care practices. The variability in the fertilizer N application rates and the factors affecting the application...

  14. Sediment contributions from floodplains and legacy sediments to Piedmont streams of Baltimore County, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Mitchell; Miller, Andrew; Baker, Matthew; Gellis, Allen C.

    2015-01-01

    Disparity between watershed erosion rates and downstream sediment delivery has remained an important theme in geomorphology for many decades, with the role of floodplains in sediment storage as a common focus. In the Piedmont Province of the eastern USA, upland deforestation and agricultural land use following European settlement led to accumulation of thick packages of overbank sediment in valley bottoms, commonly referred to as legacy deposits. Previous authors have argued that legacy deposits represent a potentially important source of modern sediment loads following remobilization by lateral migration and progressive channel widening. This paper seeks to quantify (1) rates of sediment remobilization from Baltimore County floodplains by channel migration and bank erosion, (2) proportions of streambank sediment derived from legacy deposits, and (3) potential contribution of net streambank erosion and legacy sediments to downstream sediment yield within the Mid-Atlantic Piedmont.We calculated measurable gross erosion and deposition rates within the fluvial corridor along 40 valley segments from 18 watersheds with drainage areas between 0.18 and 155 km2 in Baltimore County, Maryland. We compared stream channel and floodplain morphology from lidar-based digital elevation data collected in 2005 with channel positions recorded on 1:2400 scale topographic maps from 1959–1961 in order to quantify 44–46 years of channel change. Sediment bulk density and particle size distributions were characterized from streambank and channel deposit samples and used for volume to mass conversions and for comparison with other sediment sources.Average annual lateral migration rates ranged from 0.04 to 0.19 m/y, which represented an annual migration of 2.5% (0.9–4.4%) channel width across all study segments, suggesting that channel dimensions may be used as reasonable predictors of bank erosion rates. Gross bank erosion rates varied from 43 to 310 Mg/km/y (median = 114) and

  15. 2011 Agile (Scrum) Workshop Held in Baltimore, Maryland on November 14-15, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Untitled Document 2011agile.html[3/23/2016 10:24:57 AM] Files are in Adobe format. Download the newest version from Adobe. 2011 AGILE ( SCRUM ...2750 HYATT REGENCY BALTIMORE u BALTIMORE, MD EVENT #2750 AGILE ( SCRUM ) WORKSHOP Sponsored by the C4ISR Division of NDIA AGILE ( SCRUM ) WORKSHOP...practices in DoD. AGILE ( SCRUM ) WORKSHOP NOVEMBER 14-15, 2011 GREG SHARP Software Development Team Lead, USAF PEX Mr. Greg Sharp is a Soft- ware

  16. Space Physics Strategy-Implementation Study. Volume 1. Goals, objectives, strategy. Report of Workshop 1. Held in Baltimore, Maryland on January 22-26, 1990 (second edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    This is the report of Workshop 1, January 22-26, 1990, Baltimore, Maryland. The document includes the Report of the Cosmic and Heliospheric Panel, Report of the Ionosphere-Thermosphere-Mesosphere Panel, Report of the Magnetospheric Physics Panel, Report of the Solar Physics Panel, Report of the Theory Panel

  17. Maryland environmental public health tracking outreach with Spanish-speaking persons living in Baltimore city or county.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braggio, John T; Mitchell, Clifford S; Fierro-Luperini, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    The 2000 Pew reports became the impetus for the National Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) Program, but there was no mention that Spanish-speaking persons are at increased risk of exposure to environmental hazards. To undertake successful EPHT outreach on Spanish-speaking persons (Hispanics), it is necessary to better understand their environmental health profile and barriers to health care access. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey questions were administered orally in Spanish to Spanish-speaking study participants. Volunteers were tested at a non-for-profit social service and referral agency in Baltimore. To control for acculturation, only Spanish-speaking persons who had lived in the United States for less than 10 years were selected. Responses to 40 BRFSS survey questions asked during the assessment and completion of 3 intervention activities. This study provides new information about Spanish-speaking persons, most of whom (85.3%) would not have been included in the landline administration of the BRFSS survey. Although 29.9% of the participants reported indoor pesticide use and another 9.2% reported outdoor pesticide use, lifetime (3.5%) and current (1.2%) asthma prevalence was significantly lower than asthma prevalence reported by Maryland Hispanics and all Maryland residents. There were significantly lower cholesterol screening (21.5%) and a significantly higher prevalence of diabetes (12.5%) in Spanish-speaking participants than in Maryland Hispanics and all Maryland residents. Among study participants, only 7.8% had health insurance and 39.9% reported that they could not see a doctor. Of the 3 outreach efforts completed, the most promising one involved asking Spanish-English-speaking health care professionals to distribute Spanish comic books about pesticides exposures and health outcomes in community settings where Spanish-only speakers and children were found. The effectiveness of passive and community-based EPHT

  18. A Summer Health Program for African-American High School Students in Baltimore, Maryland: Community Partnership for Integrative Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Beverly; Bowden, Brandin; McCullagh, Molly; Diehl, Alica; Chissell, Zachary; Rodriguez, Rebecca; Berman, Brian M; D Adamo, Christopher R

    Physical inactivity, poor nutrition, and chronic stress threaten the health of African-American youth in urban environments. Conditions often worsen in summer with diminished access to healthy foods and safe venues for physical activity. A public-private partnership was formed to develop and evaluate an integrative health intervention entitled "Mission Thrive Summer" (MTS). The MTS setting was an urban farm and adjacent school in a low-income community in Baltimore, Maryland. The intervention included farming, nutrition education, cooking, physical activity, yoga, mindfulness, and employment. Mixed-methods outcomes evaluation was conducted. Quantitative measures included accelerometry and self-reported health behaviors, using the Child and Adolescent Mindfulness Measure, Perceived Stress Scale, Physical Activity Questionnaire for Adolescents (PAQA), CDC Youth Risk Behavior Survey, and Block Kids Food Screener (BKFS). Outcomes were compared pre- and post-intervention using paired t-tests. Qualitative evaluation was based on participant and parent interviews. In total, 36 African-American 9th- and 10th-grade students joined MTS (17 in 2013, 26 in 2014, and 7 participating both years). In total, 88% of participants completed MTS. Accelerometry revealed that participants took 7158 steps and burned 544 calories per day during MTS. Participants experienced statistically significant improvements in self-reported physical activity (PAQA) and dietary habits (BKFS). Surveys did not detect changes in stress or mindfulness (P > .05). Qualitative data demonstrated new knowledge and skills, increased self-efficacy, health behavior change, and program enjoyment. MTS was feasible among African-American high school students in Baltimore. Mixed-methods outcomes evaluation provided preliminary evidence of health behavior change during the summer and at follow-up. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Skills for Healthy Adult Relationships at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County: Program Development and Preliminary Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifian, Chandra E; Murphy, Christopher M; Barry, Robin A; Herman, Bruce

    2016-08-01

    The present study examines the development and preliminary pilot findings of Skills for Healthy Adult Relationships at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (SHARe@UMBC)-an intimate partner violence prevention program for college students. SHARe@UMBC is based on an integrative cognitive-behavioral model of communication and emotion regulation in close interpersonal relationships. There were four aims of the present study: first, to describe program development; second, to examine program acceptability and participant satisfaction; third, to examine the extent to which participants acquired relationship skills and their level of confidence in using those skills; and fourth, to examine perpetration and victimization of physical, sexual, and psychological aggression. These aims utilized data collected before program initiation, immediately after program completion, and at a follow-up 9 to 15 months after program completion. Findings from two pilot groups (15 students in total; eight women and seven men) indicated high ratings of program acceptability and satisfaction, reductions in negative communication, improvements in confidence using conflict management strategies with romantic partners and peers, and confidence initiating new romantic relationships. In addition, large effect sizes were observed for confidence providing emotional support to a romantic partner and self-disclosure with peers. Participants reported no incidents of physical, sexual, or psychological aggression perpetration or victimization at follow-up. Pilot implementation and initial uncontrolled results are encouraging and provide support for initiating a more extensive controlled investigation of program efficacy.

  20. Pharmacy-level barriers to implementing expedited partner therapy in Baltimore, Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jennifer Z; Diniz, Clarissa P; Coleman, Jenell S

    2018-02-02

    Addressing record high rates of Chlamydia trachomatis incidence in the United States requires the utilization of effective strategies, such as expedited partner therapy, to reduce reinfection and further transmission. Expedited partner therapy, which can be given as a prescription or medication, is a strategy to treat the sexual partners of index patients diagnosed with a sexually transmitted infection without prior medical evaluation of the partners. There are multiple steps in the prescription-expedited partner therapy cascade, and we sought to identify pharmacy-level barriers to implementing prescription-expedited partner therapy for Chlamydia trachomatis treatment. We used spatial analysis and ArcGIS, a geographic information system, to map and assess geospatial access to pharmacies within Baltimore, MD, neighborhoods with the highest rates of Chlamydia trachomatis (1180.25-4255.31 per 100,000 persons). Expedited partner therapy knowledge and practices were collected via a telephone survey of pharmacists employed at retail pharmacies located in these same neighborhoods. Cost of antibiotic medication in US dollars was collected. Census tracts with the highest Chlamydia trachomatis incidence rates had lower median pharmacy density than other census tracts (26.9 per 100,000 vs 31.4 per 100,000, P strategies that do not depend on partners physically accessing a pharmacy merit consideration. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Proximity to vacant buildings is associated with increased fire risk in Baltimore, Maryland, homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachterle, Stephen E; Bishai, David; Shields, Wendy; Stepnitz, Rebecca; Gielen, Andrea C

    2012-04-01

    Fires and burns are a leading cause of unintentional injury death in the USA. Although it has been anecdotally reported that vacant dwellings are at a higher risk for fire, the association between vacancy and fire risk at the individual household level has not been empirically measured. In this cross-sectional study, geocoded residential vacant properties (VP) and fire events are analysed in Baltimore City at the census tract level and the individual household level. On average, a 10% increase in the proportion of vacancies in a census tract was associated with a 9.9% increase in fires (95% CI: 5% to 15%). Random-effects Poisson models, controlling for housing and neighbourhood conditions, found contagion effects. The risk of fire in an occupied dwelling increased by 8% (95% CI: 1% to 10%) for every vacant structure within 10 m, and the risk of fire decreased by half (95% CI: 45% to 62%) for every km between an occupied dwelling and vacant building. Close proximity to VP was associated with trash fires within dwellings (p=0.039) and structure fires (p=0.012). We believe that this is the first study to demonstrate increased risk posed by nearby VP at the household level, confirming earlier ecological analyses of the role of VP as strong correlates of home fires. Measurement of this risk can motivate property owners, policy makers and insurers to invest in risk reduction measures that include building maintenance and trash removal.

  2. Baltimore 10 x 20 NTMS area, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia: data report (abbreviated)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fay, W.M.

    1981-07-01

    This abbreviated data report presents results of ground water, surface water, and stream sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Baltimore 1 0 x 2 0 NTMS quadrangle. Surface sediment samples were collected at 993 sites. Ground water samples were collected at 777 sites. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, for uranium and 8 other elements in ground water, and for uranium and 9 other elements in surface water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented. Data from ground water sites include: (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), (2) physical measurements, where applicable (water temperature, well description, etc.), and (3) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include: (1) stream water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity and alkalinity), and (2) elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulated. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements and for U/Th and U/Hf ratios are included on the microfiche. Key data from stream water sites include: (1) water quality measurements (pH, conductivity and alkalinity) and (2) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Uranium concentrations in the sediments that were above detection limits ranged from up to 38.7 ppM. The samples with high uranium values also have high thorium values, suggesting that most of the uranium is held within resistate minerals. The north-northeast trend of the geologic units is clearly reflected in the data

  3. Results of the indoor radiological survey at the W.R. Grace Co., Curtis Bay site, Baltimore, Maryland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Foley, R.D.; Johnson, C.A.

    1989-07-01

    The W.R. Grace Company, Davison Chemical Division, conducted developmental research and extraction of thorium from monazite ore at its Curtis Bay facility in Baltimore, Maryland, during the 1950s under contract to the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). Only one of the numerous buildings on the site was used for these operations. A 1979 aerial survey of the site for the Department of Energy (DOE) indicated that a comprehensive ground survey was required to determine whether or not any contamination remained from the AEC activities in that building. A radiological scoping survey performed later that year for DOE by a team from the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Health and Safety Research Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), disclosed surface contamination (alpha) levels in excess of DOE criteria on all five levels of the building. As a result of this finding, two additional surveys were performed in 1986 by ORNL at the request of DOE to evaluate any present or potential health risk. They are detailed in this report. The results of the 1986 surveys revealed several areas having elevated levels of radiation as a result of significant quantities of thorium on some building surfaces such as floors and ceiling beams. Most areas were small spots and in locations of low occupancy; thus, the possibility for significant exposure to workers was judged to be low. To confirm this evaluation, annual radiation exposure estimates for workers frequenting the few, larger contaminated areas on the site were derived using ORNL survey data and occupancy factors provided by the W.R. Grace Company. Estimates ranged from 27 to 41 mrem/yr or a maximum of 41% of the basic dose limit of 100 mrem/yr for members of the general public. 2 refs., 14 figs., 8 tabs

  4. PREVALENCE AND CORRELATES OF STREET-OBTAINED BUPRENORPHINE USE AMONG CURRENT AND FORMER INJECTORS IN BALTIMORE, MARYLAND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genberg, Becky L.; Gillespie, Mirinda; Schuster, Charles R.; Johanson, Chris-Ellyn; Astemborski, Jacquie; Kirk, Gregory D.; Vlahov, David; Mehta, Shruti H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives There are few systematic assessments of street-obtained buprenorphine use from community-based samples in the United States. The objective of this study was to characterize the prevalence, correlates, and reasons for street-obtained buprenorphine use among current and former injection drug users (IDUs) in Baltimore, Maryland. Methods In 2008, participants of the ALIVE (AIDS Linked to the IntraVenous Experience) study, a community-based cohort of IDUs, were administered a survey on buprenorphine. Street-obtained buprenorphine represented self-reported use of buprenorphine obtained from the street or a friend in the prior three months. Results 602 respondents were predominantly male (65%), African-American (91%), and 30% were HIV-positive. Overall, nine percent reported recent street-obtained buprenorphine use, and only 2% reported using to get high. Among active opiate users, 23% reported recent use of street-obtained buprenorphine. Use of buprenorphine prescribed by a physician, injection and non-injection drug use, use of street-obtained methadone and prescription opiates, homelessness, and opioid withdrawal symptoms were positively associated, while methadone treatment, health insurance, outpatient care, and HIV-infection were negatively associated with recent street-obtained buprenorphine use in univariate analysis. After adjustment, active injection and heroin use were positively associated with street-obtained buprenorphine use. Ninety-one percent reported using street-obtained buprenorphine to manage withdrawal symptoms. Conclusions While 9% reported recent street-obtained buprenorphine use, only a small minority reported using buprenorphine to get high, with the majority reporting use to manage withdrawal symptoms. There is limited evidence of diversion of buprenorphine in this sample and efforts to expand buprenorphine treatment should continue with further monitoring. PMID:24018232

  5. The relationship between drug use settings, roles in the drug economy, and witnessing a drug overdose in Baltimore, Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latkin, Carl A; Edwards, Catie; Davey-Rothwell, Melissa A; Yang, Cui; Tobin, Karin E

    2018-02-12

    There has been a dramatic increase in drug overdose deaths in the United States. In the current study, the authors examined factors associated with witnessing a drug overdose. A sample of 450 substance users in Baltimore, Maryland, were recruited for a behavioral intervention and were administered a survey. Multinomial logistic regression models were used to compare participants who never witnessed a drug overdose with those who witnessed one in the prior 6 months and those who witnessed an overdose over 6 months ago. Most (58%) participants were male, 40% experienced homelessness in the prior 6 months, 63% reported a history of heroin injecting, 84% had snorted heroin, 75% reported witnessing a drug overdose, and 38% experienced an overdose. In multinomial logistic regression models, witnessing an overdose in the past 6 months was associated with number of different types of places where drugs were used (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.34), history of experiencing an overdose (aOR = 1.80), injecting heroin and/or speedball (aOR = 1.78), and snorting heroin (aOR = 1.54). Witnessing an overdose more than 6 months ago was associated with number of different places where drugs were used (aOR = 1.25), history of experiencing an overdose (aOR = 1.61), snorting heroin (aOR = 1.42), and injecting heroin or speedball (aOR = 1.47). These data suggest that people who engage in more public and frequent drug use, and hence are more likely to witness an overdose, should be targeted for interventions to prevent and treat drug overdose.

  6. Allocation of petroleum feedstock: Baltimore Gas and Electric Company, Sollers Point SNG Plant, Sollers Point, Baltimore County, Maryland. Final environmental impact statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liverman, James L.

    1978-04-01

    An allocation of naphtha feedstock up to 2,186,000 barrels per year to Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (BG and E) to operate its synthetic natural gas (SNG) facility is being considered. The allocation would enable BG and E to produce 10,800,000 mcf of SNG during a 180 day period. Operation of the plant at design capacity is expected to result in annual pollution emissions as follows: 626.4 tons of sulfur oxides, 168.5 tons of nitrogen oxides and 21.6 tons of particulate matter. Incremental emissions due to plant operations relative to existing emissions in Baltimore County are less than 1%. All Federal and State air quality standards should be met. Treated effluent is to be discharged into the Patapasco River where the environmental impacts are not expected to be significant. The SNG facility has been designed to be in compliance with all applicable Federal, State and local effluent standards. Water consumption requirements of 335,000 gallons per day are not expected to significantly tax the area's water resources. Sound generated by the SNG facility will be inaudible or imperceptible. All other operational impacts on land use, population, visual quality, roadways, community facilities and services and ecological systems were judged to be minimal. Environmental impacts resulting from various alternatives ranging from full allocation through denial of an allocation are discussed.

  7. George Peabody and Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Franklin

    1994-01-01

    One of a collection of articles on self-made millionaire and educational philanthropist George Peabody examines the history of his work in Maryland and with the Maryland Historical Society. Peabody always sought to enrich Maryland's culture, and his most important gift to Maryland was the Peabody Institute of Baltimore. (SM)

  8. Health assessment of free-living eastern box turtles (Terrapene carolina carolina) in and around the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore 1996-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovicz, Laura; Bronson, Ellen; Barrett, Kevin; Deem, Sharon L

    2015-03-01

    Health data for free-living eastern box turtles (Terrapene carolina carolina) at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore were analyzed. One hundred and eighteen turtles were captured on or near zoo grounds over the course of 15 yr (1996-2011), with recapture of many individuals leading to 208 total evaluations. Of the 118 individuals, 61 were male, 50 were female, and 7 were of undetermined sex. Of the 208 captures, 188 were healthy, and 20 were sick or injured. Complete health evaluations were performed on 30 turtles with physical examination records, complete blood counts (CBCs), and plasma biochemistry profiles. Eight animals were sampled more than once, yielding 40 total samples for complete health evaluations of these 30 individuals. The 40 samples were divided into healthy (N=29) and sick (N=11) groups based on clinical findings on physical examination. Samples from healthy animals were further divided into male (N=17) and female (N= 12) groups. CBC and biochemistry profile parameters were compared between sick and healthy groups and between healthy males and females. Sick turtles had lower albumin, globulin, total protein (TP), calcium, phosphorous, sodium, and potassium than healthy animals. Sick turtles also had higher heterophil to lymphocyte ratios. Healthy female turtles had higher leukocyte count, eosinophil count, total solids, TP, globulin, cholesterol, calcium, and phosphorous than healthy males. Banked plasma from all 40 samples was tested for antibodies to Mycoplasma agassizii and Mycoplasma testudineum via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. One sample from a clinically healthy female was antibody positive for M. agassizii; none were positive for M. testudineum. This study provides descriptive health data for eastern box turtles and CBC and biochemistry profile information for T. carolina carolina at and near the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore. It also reports low serologic evidence of exposure to mycoplasmosis.

  9. Solute-specific patterns and drivers of urban stream chemistry revealed by long-term monitoring in Baltimore, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisinger, A. J.; Woytowitz, E.; Majcher, E.; Rosi, E. J.; Groffman, P.

    2017-12-01

    Urban streams receive a myriad of chemical inputs from the surrounding landscape due to altered lithology (asphalt, concrete), leaky sewage infrastructure, and other human activities (road salt, fertilizer, industrial wastes, wastewater effluent), potentially leading to multiple chemical stressors occurring simultaneously. To evaluate potential drivers of water chemistry change, we used approximately 20 years of weekly water chemistry monitoring data from streams in the Baltimore Ecosystem Study (BES) to quantify trends of annual loads and flow-weighted concentrations for multiple solutes of interest, including nitrate (NO3-), phosphate (PO43-), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), chloride (Cl-), and sulfate (SO42-) and subsequently examined various gray and green infrastructure characteristics at the watershed scale. For example, we quantified annual volume and duration of reported sanitary sewer overflows (SSO) and cumulative storage volume and area of various best management practices (BMPs). Site- and solute-specific trends differed, but across our monitoring network we found evidence for decreasing annual export for multiple solutes. Additionally, we found that changes in gray- and green-infrastructure characteristics were related to changes in water quality at our most downstream (most urban) monitoring site. For example, annual NO3- loads increased with longer cumulative SSO duration, whereas annual PO43- and TP loads decreased with a cumulative BMP area in the watershed. Further, we used same long-term water chemistry data and multivariate analyses to investigate whether urban streams have unique water chemistry fingerprints representing the multiple chemical stressors at a given site, which could provide insight into sources and impacts of water-quality impairment. These analyses and results illustrate the major role gray and green infrastructure play in influencing water quality in urban environments, and illustrate that focusing on a variety of

  10. Factors affecting long-term trends in surface-water quality in the Gwynns Falls watershed, Baltimore City and County, Maryland, 1998–2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majcher, Emily H.; Woytowitz, Ellen L.; Reisinger, Alexander J.; Groffman, Peter M.

    2018-03-30

    Factors affecting water-quality trends in urban streams are not well understood, despite current regulatory requirements and considerable ongoing investments in gray and green infrastructure. To address this gap, long-term water-quality trends and factors affecting these trends were examined in the Gwynns Falls, Maryland, watershed during 1998–2016 in cooperation with Blue Water Baltimore. Data on water-quality constituents and potential factors of influence were obtained from multiple sources and compiled for analysis, with a focus on data collected as part of the National Science Foundation funded Long-Term Ecological Research project, the Baltimore Ecosystem Study.Variability in climate (specifically, precipitation) and land cover can overwhelm actions taken to improve water quality and can present challenges for meeting regulatory goals. Analysis of land cover during 2001–11 in the Gwynns Falls watershed indicated minimal change during the study time frame; therefore, land-cover change is likely not a factor affecting trends in water quality. However, a modest increase in annual precipitation and a significant increase in winter precipitation were apparent in the region. A higher proportion of runoff producing storms was observed in the winter and a lower proportion in the summer, indicating that climate change may affect water quality in the watershed. The increase in precipitation was not reflected in annual or seasonal trends of streamflow in the watershed. Nonetheless, these precipitation changes may exacerbate the inflow and infiltration of water to gray infrastructure and reduce the effectiveness of green infrastructure. For streamflow and most water-quality constituents examined, no discernable trends were noted over the timeframe examined. Despite the increases in precipitation, no trends were observed for annual or seasonal discharge at the various sites within the study area. In some locations, nitrate, phosphate, and total nitrogen show downward

  11. Early Opportunities Research Partnership Between Howard University, University of Maryland Baltimore County and NASA Goddard for Engaging Underrepresented STEM Students in Earth and Space Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, P.; Venable, D. D.; Hoban, S.; Demoz, B.; Bleacher, L.; Meeson, B. W.; Farrell, W. M.

    2017-12-01

    Howard University, University of Maryland Baltimore County and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) are collaborating to engage underrepresented STEM students and expose them to an early career pathway in NASA-related Earth & Space Science research. The major goal is to instill interest in Earth and Space Science to STEM majors early in their academic careers, so that they become engaged in ongoing NASA-related research, motivated to pursue STEM careers, and perhaps become part of the future NASA workforce. The collaboration builds on a program established by NASA's Dynamic Response of the Environments of Asteroids, the Moon and the moons of Mars (DREAM2) team to engage underrepresented students from Howard in summer internships. Howard leveraged this program to expand via NASA's Minority University Research and Education Project (MUREP) funding. The project pairs Howard students with GSFC mentors and engages them in cutting-edge Earth and Space Science research throughout their undergraduate tenure. The project takes a multi-faceted approach, with each year of the program specifically tailored to each student's strengths and addressing their weaknesses, so that they experience a wide array of enriching research and professional development activities that help them grow both academically and professionally. During the academic year, the students are at Howard taking a full load of courses towards satisfying their degree requirements and engaging in research with their GSFC mentors via regular telecons, e-mail exchanges, video chats & on an average one visit per semester to GSFC for an in-person meeting with their research mentor. The students extend their research with full-time summer internships at GSFC, culminating in a Capstone Project and Senior Thesis. As a result, these Early Opportunities Program students, who have undergone rigorous training in the Earth and Space Sciences, are expected to be well-prepared for graduate school and the NASA workforce.

  12. Spatial distribution of metals in soils in Baltimore, Maryland: role of native parent material, proximity to major roads, housing age and screening guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    I.D. Yesilonis; R.V. Pouyat; N.K. Neerchal

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the spatial distribution of heavy metal above-background (anthropic) contents of Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Ti, V, and Zn in Baltimore City surface soils and related these levels to potential contaminating sources. Composite soil samples (0?10 cm depth) were digested using a nitric and hydrochloric extraction technique. Slightly more than 10% of...

  13. Interaction between urbanization and climate variability amplifies watershed nitrate export in Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, S.S.; Groffman, P.M.; Band, L.E.; Shields, C.A.; Morgan, R.P.; Palmer, Margaret A.; Belt, K.T.; Swan, C.M.; Findlay, S.E.G.; Fisher, G.T.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated regional effects of urbanization and land use change on nitrate concentrations in approximately 1,000 small streams in Maryland during record drought and wet years in 2001-2003. We also investigated changes in nitrate-N export during the same time period in 8 intensively monitored small watersheds across an urbanization gradient in Baltimore, Maryland. Nitrate-N concentrations in Maryland were greatest in agricultural streams, urban streams, and forest streams respectively. During the period of record drought and wet years, nitrate-N exports in Baltimore showed substantial variation in 6 suburban/urban streams (2.9-15.3 kg/ha/y), 1 agricultural stream (3.4-38.9 kg/ha/y), and 1 forest stream (0.03-0.2 kg/ ha/y). Interannual variability was similar for small Baltimore streams and nearby well-monitored tributaries and coincided with record hypoxia in Chesapeake Bay. Discharge-weighted mean annual nitrate concentrations showed a variable tendency to decrease/increase with changes in annual runoff, although total N export generally increased with annual runoff. N retention in small Baltimore watersheds during the 2002 drought was 85%, 99%, and 94% for suburban, forest, and agricultural watersheds, respectively, and declined to 35%, 91%, and 41% during the wet year of 2003. Our results suggest that urban land use change can increase the vulnerability of ecosystem nitrogen retention functions to climatic variability. Further work is necessary to characterize patterns of nitrate-N export and retention in small urbanizing watersheds under varying climatic conditions to improve future forecasting and watershed scale restoration efforts aimed at improving nitrate-N retention. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  14. Experiences of structural vulnerability among exotic dancers in Baltimore, Maryland: Co-occurring social and economic antecedents of HIV/STI risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, Meredith L; Footer, Katherine H A; Lim, Sahnah; Kerrigan, Deanna; Sherman, Susan G

    2017-12-01

    Women who grow up in economic scarcity often face limited opportunities for upward mobility, as a result of challenges securing stable housing, quality education, and steady employment. Chronic instability may limit the capacity of women to protect themselves against HIV/STI-related harm when engaging in sexual activity or drug use. Characterizing the structural contexts that facilitate HIV/STI risk among women are critical to effective design and implementation of drug and sexual harm reduction interventions. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were completed with 25 female exotic dancers working in Baltimore City and County exotic dance clubs July 2014-May 2015. Using thematic analysis, interviews were examined to understand the nature of structural vulnerability experienced by dancers during their early lives through the initial months of exotic dancing, including an examination of the roles of drug use and social relationships in engagement of sexual risk behavior. Dancers depicted early experiences of social and economic disadvantage, which accumulated through early adulthood. Substance use emerged as an important subject for the majority of women, operating cyclically as both precursor to and product of accumulating social and economic hardship. Dancers revealed social strategies that buffered the effects of structural vulnerability and minimized exposure to workplace-related drug and sexual harms. This study provides insight on an understudied group of at-risk women with a unique demographic profile. Findings illustrate how the effects of structural vulnerability, substance abuse, social strategies, and opportunities for economic gain through sexual services in the workplace converge to produce varying levels of HIV/STI risk among exotic dancers. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. The effect of neighborhood deprivation and residential relocation on long-term injection cessation among injection drug users (IDUs) in Baltimore, Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genberg, Becky L; Gange, Stephen J; Go, Vivian F; Celentano, David D; Kirk, Gregory D; Latkin, Carl A; Mehta, Shruti H

    2011-11-01

    To determine the incidence of long-term injection cessation and its association with residential relocation and neighborhood deprivation. ALIVE (AIDS Linked to the Intravenous Experience) is a prospective cohort with semi-annual follow-up since 1988. Multi-level discrete time-to-event models were constructed to investigate individual and neighborhood-level predictors of long-term injection cessation. Baltimore, USA. A total of 1697 active injectors from ALIVE with at least eight semi-annual study visits. Long-term injection cessation was defined as 3 consecutive years without self-reported injection drug use. A total of 706 (42%) injectors achieved long-term cessation (incidence=7.6 per 100 person-years). After adjusting for individual-level factors, long-term injection cessation was 29% less likely in neighborhoods in the third quartile of deprivation [hazard ratio (HR)=0.71, 95% CI: 0.53, 0.95) and 43% less likely in the highest quartile of deprivation (HR=0.57, 95% CI: 0.43, 0.76) compared to the first quartile. Residential relocation was associated with increased likelihood of long-term injection cessation (HR=1.55, 95% CI: 1.31, 1.82); however, the impact of relocation varied depending on the deprivation in the destination neighborhood. Compared to those who stayed in less deprived neighborhoods, relocation from highly deprived to less deprived neighborhoods had the strongest positive impact on long-term injection cessation (HR=1.96, 95% CI: 1.50, 2.57), while staying in the most deprived neighborhoods was detrimental (HR=0.76, 95% CI: 0.63, 0.93). Long-term cessation of injection of opiates and cocaine occurred frequently following a median of 9 years of injection and contextual factors appear to be important. Our findings suggest that improvements in the socio-economic environment may improve the effectiveness of cessation programs. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  16. Maryland's Yankee Friend--George Peabody, Esq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Franklin

    1994-01-01

    One of several articles on George Peabody examines his history as a self-made millionaire, focusing on his years working in Maryland and the cultural legacy that he left the state (including the Peabody Institute of Baltimore, Johns Hopkins University, Peabody Conservatory of Music, and Peabody Library of Baltimore). (SM)

  17. Road Bridges and Culverts, MDTA Culverts, Culverts on John F. Kennedy Highway (I95), Baltimore Harbor Tunnel Throughway, Francis Scott Key Bridge, Bay bridge, Nice Bridge, Published in 2010, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Maryland Transportation Authority.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — Road Bridges and Culverts dataset current as of 2010. MDTA Culverts, Culverts on John F. Kennedy Highway (I95), Baltimore Harbor Tunnel Throughway, Francis Scott Key...

  18. Suburban socialities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oldrup, Helene Hjorth

    2009-01-01

    Suburban and residential areas have often been associated with everyday, routine and family relations, and this article explores how everyday life and sociality are changing in suburban areas in the context of what is variously called the post-industrial and borderless city. The article suggests...... that such areas can be seen as under-appreciated in our evaluation of what constitutes the quality of city life. The article develops a social practice perspective drawing on Goffman, and is based on empirical work carried out in two newly-built suburban areas in greater Copenhagen. Approximately twenty residents...... from young families were interviewed and asked to take photos. These residents all had middleclass, but different educational backgrounds. The analysis shows that residents want to maintain a sense of the city, seeking different ways of doing so, and hence continuing to being cosmopolitan. At the same...

  19. 76 FR 4284 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; Tulkoff Food Products, Inc. (Dehydrated Garlic), Baltimore...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    ... Status; Tulkoff Food Products, Inc. (Dehydrated Garlic), Baltimore, MD Pursuant to its authority under..., has made application to the Board for authority to establish a special-purpose subzone at the garlic... garlic products at the Tulkoff Food Products, Inc., facility located in Baltimore, Maryland (Subzone 74C...

  20. 40 CFR 81.28 - Metropolitan Baltimore Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.28 Section 81.28 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.28 Metropolitan Baltimore Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Baltimore Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Maryland) consists of the territorial area...

  1. Impact Studies at Merced College and the Community College of Baltimore County. NCPR Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, Evan; Cullinan, Dan; Cerna, Oscar; Safran, Stephanie; Richman, Phoebe

    2012-01-01

    The Learning Communities Demonstration is a national research project that is testing the effectiveness of learning communities in six community colleges across the United States: Merced College in California; The Community College of Baltimore County (CCBC) in Baltimore, Maryland; Hillsborough Community College in Tampa, Florida; Houston…

  2. Building Teacher Quality in Baltimore City Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2010

    2010-01-01

    At the request of the Education Reform Project of the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland, the National Council on Teacher Quality undertook an analysis of the teacher policies in the Baltimore City Public Schools. Its analysis looks at the teachers' contract, school board rules and state laws. It also collected personnel data from the…

  3. 77 FR 6963 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Preconstruction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    ... the Maryland SIP; therefore, our limited approval corrects deficiencies in the Maryland SIP and... application or any deficiency in the application or information submitted.'' See 40 CFR 51.166(q)(1). However...). In Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. v. Dept. of Health & Mental Hygiene, 284 Md. 216, 225-26 (1979), the...

  4. 2008 City of Baltimore Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In the spring of 2008, the City of Baltimore expressed an interest to upgrade the City GIS Database with mapping quality airborne LiDAR data. The City of Baltimore...

  5. Learning Communities for Students in Developmental English: Impact Studies at Merced College and the Community College of Baltimore County. NCPR Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, Evan; Cullinan, Dan; Cerna, Oscar; Safran, Stephanie; Richman, Phoebe

    2012-01-01

    The Learning Communities Demonstration is a national research project that is testing the effectiveness of learning communities in six community colleges across the United States: Merced College in California; The Community College of Baltimore County (CCBC) in Baltimore, Maryland; Hillsborough Community College in Tampa, Florida; Houston…

  6. Effects of Maryland's law banning Saturday night special handguns on crime guns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernick, J S; Webster, D W; Hepburn, L M

    1999-12-01

    To determine the effects of a 1988 Maryland law that banned "Saturday night special" handguns on the types of guns used in crime. To determine if controls on the lawful market for handguns affect the illegal market as well. Baltimore, Maryland, and 15 other US cities participating in a crime gun tracing project. Cross sectional comparison of the proportion of crime guns that are banned by the Maryland law, comparing Baltimore, MD with 15 other cities outside of Maryland. Multivariate linear regression analysis to determine if observed differences between Baltimore and 15 other cities are explained by demographic or regional differences among the cities rather than Maryland's law. Among crime guns, a gun banned by Maryland's law is more than twice as likely (relative risk (RR) 2.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.0 to 2.5) to be the subject of a crime gun trace request in 15 other cities combined, than in Baltimore. Among homicide guns, a crime especially relevant for public safety, a comparable difference (RR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1 to 4.2) was observed. The proportion of Baltimore's crime guns that are banned is 12 percentage points lower than would be expected based on its demographic and regional characteristics alone. Among crime guns purchased after 1990, a much smaller proportion in Baltimore are banned models than in 15 other cities. Maryland's law has reduced the use of banned Saturday night specials by criminals in Baltimore. Contrary to the claims of some opponents of gun control laws, regulation of the lawful market for firearms can also affect criminals.

  7. Effects of Maryland's law banning Saturday night special handguns on crime guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernick, J.; Webster, D.; Hepburn, L.

    1999-01-01

    Objectives—To determine the effects of a 1988 Maryland law that banned "Saturday night special" handguns on the types of guns used in crime. To determine if controls on the lawful market for handguns affect the illegal market as well. Setting—Baltimore, Maryland, and 15 other US cities participating in a crime gun tracing project. Methods—Cross sectional comparison of the proportion of crime guns that are banned by the Maryland law, comparing Baltimore, MD with 15 other cities outside of Maryland. Multivariate linear regression analysis to determine if observed differences between Baltimore and 15 other cities are explained by demographic or regional differences among the cities rather than Maryland's law. Results—Among crime guns, a gun banned by Maryland's law is more than twice as likely (relative risk (RR) 2.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.0 to 2.5) to be the subject of a crime gun trace request in 15 other cities combined, than in Baltimore. Among homicide guns, a crime especially relevant for public safety, a comparable difference (RR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1 to 4.2) was observed. The proportion of Baltimore's crime guns that are banned is 12 percentage points lower than would be expected based on its demographic and regional characteristics alone. Among crime guns purchased after 1990, a much smaller proportion in Baltimore are banned models than in 15 other cities. Conclusions—Maryland's law has reduced the use of banned Saturday night specials by criminals in Baltimore. Contrary to the claims of some opponents of gun control laws, regulation of the lawful market for firearms can also affect criminals. PMID:10628912

  8. Integrative approaches to investigating human-natural systems: the Baltimore ecosystem study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary L. Cadenasso; Steward T.A. Pickett; Morgan J. Grove; Morgan J. Grove

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the research approaches used to study metropolitan Baltimore (Maryland, USA) as an ecological system. The urban ecosystem is a complex of biophysical, social, and built components, and is studied by an interdisciplinary teamof biological, social, and physical scientists, and urban designers. Ecology ?of? themetropolis is addressed...

  9. 2006 Rare Neuroimmunological Disorders Symposium; Sheraton Inner Harbor, Baltimore, MD, July 20-23, 2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerr, DA; Antel, JP; Arnold, DL

    2007-01-01

    On July 20-22nd 2006, the second International Rare Neuroimmunologic Disorders Symposium was held in Baltimore, Maryland. The purpose of this symposium was to bring together diverse groups interested in immune-mediated disorders of the nervous system. The symposium was not disease-specific but at...

  10. California Dreams in Southeast Baltimore: Using Technology in a Challenging School Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slekar, Timothy D.

    2000-01-01

    Provides an example of how two teachers in the Baltimore (Maryland) City Schools utilized the Internet to help students make a connection with their community. Describes a unit that focuses on the use of Tupac Shakur's rap "California Dream" in order to motivate the students to take pride in their community. (CMK)

  11. Suburban Black Lives Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis-McCoy, R. L'Heureux

    2018-01-01

    This article explores the range of experiences and meanings of Black life in suburban space. Drawing from educational, historical, and sociological literatures, I argue that an underconsideration of suburban space has left many portraits of educational inequality incomplete. The article outlines the emergence of American suburbs and the formation…

  12. Suburban development in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Danielsen, Claus

    2013-01-01

    In this paper I focus on current projects and activities aiming at renewal and revitalisation of Danish suburban areas. In the last five years several activities have been initiated in order to discuss possibilities and strategies for the future development of the suburban areas in Denmark. A Thi...

  13. Phosphorus retention in stormwater control structures across streamflow in urban and suburban watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent studies have shown that stormwater control measures (SCMs) are less effective at retaining phosphorus (P) than nitrogen. We compared P retention between two urban/suburban SCMs and their adjacent restored stream reaches at the Baltimore Long-Term Ecological Study (LTER) s...

  14. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, BALTIMORE CITY, MARYLAND

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  15. Landscape, vegetation characteristics, and group identity in an urban and suburban watershed: why the 60s matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher G. Boone; Mary L. Cadenasso; J. Morgan Grove; Kirsten Schwarz; Geoffrey L. Buckley

    2010-01-01

    As highly managed ecosystems, urban areas should reflect the social characteristics of their managers, who are primarily residents. Since landscape features develop over time, we hypothesize that present-day vegetation should also reflect social characteristics of past residents. Using an urban-to-suburban watershed in the Baltimore Metropolitan Region, this paper...

  16. New Suburban Stories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dines, M.; Vermeulen, T.J.V.

    2013-01-01

    Exploring fiction, film and art from across the USA, South America, Asia, Europe and Australia, New Suburban Stories brings together new research from leading international scholars to examine cultural representations of the suburbs, home to a rapidly increasing proportion of the world's population.

  17. Achieving a healthy zoning policy in Baltimore: results of a health impact assessment of the TransForm Baltimore zoning code rewrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson Thornton, Rachel L; Greiner, Amelia; Fichtenberg, Caroline M; Feingold, Beth J; Ellen, Jonathan M; Jennings, Jacky M

    2013-11-01

    The social determinants of health (SDH) include factors apart from genes and biology that affect population health. Zoning is an urban planning tool that influences neighborhood built environments. We describe the methods and results of a health impact assessment (HIA) of a rezoning effort in Baltimore, Maryland, called TransForm Baltimore. We highlight findings specific to physical activity, violent crime, and obesity. We conducted a multistage HIA of TransForm Baltimore using HIA practice guidelines. Key informant interviews identified focus areas for the quantitative assessment. A literature review and a zoning code analysis evaluated potential impacts on neighborhood factors including physical activity, violent crime, and obesity. We estimated potential impacts in high- and low-poverty neighborhoods. The findings resulted in recommendations to improve the health-promoting potential of TransForm Baltimore. Mixed-use and transit-oriented development were key goals of TransForm Baltimore. Health impacts identified by stakeholders included walkability and healthy communities. For Baltimore residents, we estimated that (1) the percentage of people living in districts allowing mixed-use and off-premise alcohol outlets would nearly triple, (2) 18% would live in transit-oriented development zones, and (3) all residents would live in districts with new lighting and landscaping guidelines. Limiting the concentration of off-premise alcohol outlets represented an opportunity to address health promotion. Changes to Baltimore's zoning code could improve population health including decreasing violent crime. HIAs are an important platform for applying SDH to public health practice. This HIA specifically linked municipal zoning policy with promoting healthier neighborhoods.

  18. 2007 Maryland Adolescent Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryland State Department of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Periodically, Maryland's sixth, eighth, tenth, and twelfth graders are surveyed to determine the nature, extent, and trend of alcohol, tobacco, and other drug (ATOD) use among adolescents. The "2007 Maryland Adolescent Survey (MAS)" presents the latest findings regarding ATOD use by Maryland's adolescents and compares State and local…

  19. 77 FR 73313 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; The 2002 Base Year...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ... (i.e., point, area, nonroad mobile and on-road mobile). The 2002 emissions inventory was based on... Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; The 2002 Base Year Inventory for the Baltimore, MD... approve the fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) 2002 base year emissions inventory portion of the State of...

  20. B-More Baltimore! Teacher Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrea, Lester C.; And Others

    This grades 7-9 unit is part of the series of population education materials for Baltimore public schools. Focusing on urban studies, the unit traces the historical growth of Baltimore and examines recent trends affecting the city, while projecting possible solutions to enhance its quality of life. Although specifically focusing on Baltimore as a…

  1. Preliminary assessment of the prospects for use of refuse-derived fuel in Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz, W.C.; Shyer, J.; Edgecomb, K.

    1979-02-01

    The deployment problems of refuse derived fuel (RDF) production in Maryland are examined. Problems experienced by the pyrolysis plant in Baltimore City and the resource recovery plant in Baltimore County are cited. Maryland's municipal solid waste problems are discussed with emphasis on the major components of the municipal solid waste stream, e.g., volume, composition, and location; collection methods used; present and long-range disposal methods; and regulations and ordinances. The generic social and legal constraints to RDF production are described. The problems of RDF technology deployment in Maryland, i.e., county and state RDF energy potential, institutional barriers to RDF production and use, remitting requirements for new RDF production and use facilities, water quality issues of RDF production and use, air quality issues of RDF production and use, and recommendations for initiating RDF production and use are discussed.

  2. A Survey of Cognitive Style in Maryland Ninth-Graders: I. Achievement Motivation, Productivity. Report No. 60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antwisle, Doris R.; Greenberger, Ellen

    In a survey of ninth graders in and around Baltimore, Maryland, in the spring of 1968, several cognitive style variables were measured. The sample of students was divided by sex, IQ level, and residential locus. This report discusses achievement motivation and productivity (the number of words written in achievement motivation stories). The…

  3. "EC to go" takes off at Maryland sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-01

    Baltimore-based Planned Parenthood of Maryland and the Baltimore City Health Department have joined forces in "EC to Go," which distributes free emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) through the seven affiliate sites of Planned Parenthood and the three family planning centers of the city. The distribution program was started in October 1999 and funds were provided by an undisclosed area foundation. Although the program is still in its infancy, it has recorded some 800 prescriptions of ECPs in the last fiscal year, and 600 prescriptions have been logged in just the first 6 months of the current fiscal year. To inform the public about the program, Planned Parenthood developed newspaper advertisements, a 60-second radio spot, and coupon distributions, all of which emphasize the fact that emergency contraception is a higher dose of birth control, which can prevent pregnancy if taken within 72 hours of unprotected sex.

  4. MARYLAND ROBOTICS CENTER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Maryland Robotics Center is an interdisciplinary research center housed in the Institute for Systems Research (link is external)within the A. James Clark School...

  5. Race, Apology, and Public Memory at Maryland's Hospital for the 'Negro' Insane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zosha Stuckey

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available To respond to a recent demand of the ACLU of Maryland, and to augment theories from Disability Incarcerated (2014 about the convergence of race, disability, and due process (or lack thereof, this essay analyzes the extent to which racism informed the creation of Maryland's Hospital for the 'Negro' Insane (Crownsville Hospital. In order to understand the extent of racism in Crownsville's earlier years, I will take into account 14 categories within conditions of confinement from 1921-1928 and compare them to the nearby, white asylum. Ultimately, the hospital joins the ranks of separate and unequal (Plessy vs. Ferguson institutions founded alongside a rhetoric of fear that the Baltimore Sun daily paper deemed "a Black invasion" of the city of Baltimore. Even more, I add to public memory of this racialized space invoking the rhetorical frame, as Kendall Phillips advises, of responsibility and apology (versus absolution within the context of present-day racial justice movements.

  6. Changes In Hospital Utilization Three Years Into Maryland's Global Budget Program For Rural Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Eric T; Hatfield, Laura A; McWilliams, J Michael; Chernew, Michael E; Done, Nicolae; Gerovich, Sule; Gilstrap, Lauren; Mehrotra, Ateev

    2018-04-01

    In a substantial shift in payment policy, the State of Maryland implemented a global budget program for acute care hospitals in 2010. Goals of the program include controlling hospital use and spending. Eight rural hospitals entered the program in 2010, while urban and suburban hospitals joined in 2014. Prior analyses, which focused on urban and suburban hospitals, did not find consistent evidence that Maryland's program had contributed to changes in hospital use after two years. However, these studies were limited by short follow-up periods, may have failed to isolate impacts of Maryland's payment change from other state trends, and had limited generalizability to rural settings. To understand the effects of Maryland's global budget program on rural hospitals, we compared changes in hospital use among Medicare beneficiaries served by affected rural hospitals versus an in-state control population from before to after 2010. By 2013-three years after the rural program began-there were no differential changes in acute hospital use or price-standardized hospital spending among beneficiaries served by the affected hospitals, versus the within-state control group. Our results suggest that among Medicare beneficiaries, global budgets in rural Maryland hospitals did not reduce hospital use or price-standardized spending as policy makers had anticipated.

  7. "Chartering" Maryland's Future: Is There an Expanded Role for National Charter Management Organizations in Our Schools? The Abell Report. Volume 28, No. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell Foundation, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, a handful of high performing public charter schools have developed in Baltimore, but the need for high quality educational offerings, particularly for low-income students, remains high. "'Chartering' Maryland's Future: Is There an Expanded Role for National Charter Management Organizations in Our Schools?" considers…

  8. Suburban areas and urban life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melgaard, Bente

    Danish suburbs are facing major challenges trying to coping with demographic changes, with structural changes in retail businesses and especially with sustainability-related challenges that have to do with cutting back on energy consumption for heating and transportation. Also climate changes...... and counteracting the segregation of the suburbs into sharply socially-separated residential areas are major challenges. Therefore, in these years the post-war era’s suburban areas are being revitalized and the suburb urban life and urban qualities are concepts, which are often brought up in this context....... In this paper I will explore the concepts “suburb” and “urban life”. More than half of the Danish population live in suburban areas, and the majority of suburbs were built in a short and hectic period in the years from 1960 to 1975 and in conformity with the functionalist ideals that gave rise to a number...

  9. High prevalence of overweight and obesity in homeless Baltimore children and their caregivers: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Kathleen B; Garrett, Beth; Hampsey, Jenifer; Thompson, Douglas

    2007-03-07

    In the past, nutritional deficiencies were common among homeless families. Because obesity is currently a major public health issue in the United States, it is possible that obesity has supplanted nutritional deficiencies as the "new malnutrition" of the homeless. To perform a pilot study to determine the nutritional status of homeless caregivers and their children in the Baltimore City, Maryland. Determination of weight, height, and body mass index (BMI) (weight in kg/height in m2) of all subjects and correlation with demographic variables. Six homeless shelters and transitional houses in Baltimore City. Thirty-one caregivers and 60 children. Relationship between caregiver BMI and child BMI and comparison of our data to National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) norms. Forty-two percent of the children (25 of 60) had a BMI-for-age classifying them as at risk for overweight (18%) or overweight (23%). None were underweight. One hundred percent of girls and 88% of boys under age 7 years were in the normal range for BMI. There were no caregivers in the underweight range for BMI. Seventy-seven percent were either overweight (26%) or obese (51%). When the weight categories of the largely African-American homeless Baltimore caregivers and their children were compared with national data from NHANES 1999-2002 for both African-American poor and nonpoor adult females and children, the Baltimore subjects had the lowest proportion in the healthy range and the highest proportion in the obese (adults) and overweight (children) categories. Caregiver BMI correlated with child BMI: r = 0.43, P = .0002. Our data suggest that overweight and obesity are the major forms of malnutrition in homeless families.

  10. Maryland's Forests 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    T.W. Lister; J.L Perdue; C.J. Barnett; B.J. Butler; S.J. Crocker; G.M. Domke; D. Griffith; M.A. Hatfield; C.M. Kurtz; A.J. Lister; R.S. Morin; W.K. Moser; M.D. Nelson; C.H. Perry; R.J. Piva; R. Riemann; R. Widmann; C.W. Woodall

    2011-01-01

    The first full annual inventory of Maryland's forests reports approximately 2.5 million acres of forest land, which covers 40 percent of the State's land area and with a total volume of more than 2,100 cubic feet per acre. Nineteen percent of the growing-stock volume is yellow-poplar, followed by red maple (13 percent) and loblolly pine (10 percent). All...

  11. Baltimore Eesti Selts - 75 / Vilve Ladon ; fotod: Fred Ise

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ladon, Vilve

    2010-01-01

    Baltimore Eesti Majas tähistati 2. okt. 2010 Baltimore Eesti Seltsi aastapäeva. Eesti suursaatkonna esimene sekretär poliitilistes küsimustes Aap Neljas edastas president Toomas Hendrik Ilvese tervituse

  12. AM, administrative software ease complex Maryland job

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troch, S.J.; Agnes, D.C.; Catonzaro, J.S.; Oberlechner, L.E.

    1995-01-01

    A gas distribution looping project, in three segments that traversed a complete range of installation and alignment issues, recently was completed by Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. (BG and E) in northern Maryland. The major projects unit in the company's gas system engineering and design section was responsible for total oversight of the three projects. This included design, engineering, permitting, right-of-way acquisition, construction, testing and restoration, as well as liaison with other company divisions. A specially selected subcontractor team was organized to provide the latest technology. A project management system, comprised mainly of personal computer applications, was implemented to provide: engineering and design coordination; accurate interface among easement, real estate acquisition data, plats, surveys, permitting and design documents; accurate right-of-way identification; data storage and accessibility of all real estate information for use in design and budgeting; an interface of environmental conditions with topography and design; a computer database that is compatible with existing computer libraries and industry-available software, for producing drawings. Controls for projects costs, budget and schedule were provided by the project management system. This was accomplished by interaction of four data systems: real estate, accounting/budget, geographical information system (GIS), global positioning system (GPS). Construction progress was monitored with a scheduling application that ultimately provided justification for contractor progress payments. The amount of pipe laid in any given time span, as documented by field inspector reports, was entered into the scheduling application. The scheduling software calculated the percent completed and provided information for monitoring progress

  13. Suburban Racial Segregation as a Nonecological Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, John R.; Stearns, Linda Brewster

    1981-01-01

    Examines the relationships between class, ethnicity, and the natural community life cycle and determines how these factors bear on the racial composition of suburban communities. Suggests that the variables associated with the ecological life cycle model are not significant predictors of change in suburban racial composition. (Author/APM)

  14. 76 FR 72374 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Baltimore Nonattainment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-23

    ... arithmetic mean concentration, as determined in accordance with 40 CFR part 50, appendix N, is less than or... requirements of Section 12(d) of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 (15 U.S.C. 272...

  15. 2010 Global Maritime Information Sharing Symposium Held in Baltimore, Maryland on September 14-16, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    policy makers • Want a constructive policy • Not opposed to an ocean policy Who We Are • Agriculture • Aquaculture • Chemicals • Coal • Commercial...Armed or Not?  Guard Service  South Africa  Mozambique – 13 day delay  Disembarkation Issues  East African Countries 1 Maritime Security Sector

  16. H10632: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Upper Chesapeake Bay - Baltimore Harbor, Maryland, 1995-09-21

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  17. Broadening participation in Natural Sciences and Mathematics at the University of Maryland Baltimore County

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rous, Philip

    2013-03-01

    Over the past two decades, UMBC has undertaken a series of efforts to broaden participation in the natural sciences and mathematics, beginning with the establishment of the Meyerhoff program. Using as examples the multiple initiatives that followed, and with a focus on the challenge of increasing access and success of all students who enter as both freshmen and transfer students, I will describe a model of culture change that we have employed repeatedly to understand and guide our efforts in broadening participation. Particular attention will be paid to the concept of cultural capital, the role of innovators and the challenge of scaling small-scale innovations towards institutional change. Supported by the National Science Foundation and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

  18. Data and methods comparing social structure and vegetation structure of urban neighborhoods in Baltimore, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Morgan Grove; Mary L. Cadenasso; William R., Jr. Burch; Steward T. Pickett; Kirsten Schwarz; Jarlath O' Neil-Dunne; Matthew Wilson; Austin Troy; Christopher Boone

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in remote sensing and the adoption of geographic information systems (GIS) have greatly increased the availibility of high-resolution spatial and attribute data for examing the relationship between social and vegetation structure in urban areas. There are several motivations for understanding this relationship. First, the United States has experienced a...

  19. H10823: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Northern Chesapeake Bay - Baltimore Harbor, Maryland, 1998-11-13

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  20. 77 FR 52135 - Hamilton Bank, Baltimore, Maryland; Approval of Conversion Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of the Comptroller of the Currency [OCC Charter Number 701904... August 13, 2012, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) approved the application of Hamilton... calling (212) 790-4055. Dated: August 21, 2012. By the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. Stephen...

  1. H10790: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Northern Chesapeake Bay - Baltimore Harbor, Maryland, 1998-06-30

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  2. 77 FR 30208 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Baltimore Nonattainment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ... the specific requirements for the number and location of Federal Reference Method (FRM), Federal... has not been determined to be a population-oriented site representative of many such locations... Air Monitoring Station (SLAMS) Networks,'' in http://www.epa.gov/ttn/airs/airsaqs/memos/Use%20of%20PM2...

  3. Maryland ESI: NESTS (Nest Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for raptors in Maryland. Vector points in this data set represent bird nesting sites. Species-specific...

  4. Maryland ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, anadromous, and freshwater fish species in Maryland. Vector polygons in this data...

  5. Changes in Incidence and Antifungal Drug Resistance in Candidemia: Results From Population-Based Laboratory Surveillance in Atlanta and Baltimore, 2008–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Angela Ahlquist; Farley, Monica M.; Harrison, Lee H.; Stein, Betsy; Hollick, Rosemary; Lockhart, Shawn R.; Magill, Shelley S.; Derado, Gordana; Park, Benjamin J.; Chiller, Tom M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Candidemia is common and associated with high morbidity and mortality; changes in population-based incidence rates have not been reported. Methods We conducted active, population-based surveillance in metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, and Baltimore City/County, Maryland (combined population 5.2 million), during 2008–2011. We calculated candidemia incidence and antifungal drug resistance compared with prior surveillance (Atlanta, 1992–1993; Baltimore, 1998–2000). Results We identified 2675 cases of candidemia with 2329 isolates during 3 years of surveillance. Mean annual crude incidence per 100 000 person-years was 13.3 in Atlanta and 26.2 in Baltimore. Rates were highest among adults aged ≥65 years (Atlanta, 59.1; Baltimore, 72.4) and infants (aged candidemia epidemiology over the past 2 decades. Adults aged ≥65 years replaced infants as the highest incidence group; adjusted incidence has declined significantly in infants. Use of antifungal prophylaxis, improvements in infection control, or changes in catheter insertion practices may be contributing to these declines. Further surveillance for antifungal resistance and efforts to determine effective prevention strategies are needed. PMID:22893576

  6. 78 FR 41898 - Safety Zone; Fireworks Display, Baltimore Harbor; Baltimore, MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    ... of the United States and may have potential for negative impact on the safety or other interest of... announced by a later notice in the Federal Register. B. Basis and Purpose The National Football League, of... Baltimore Harbor, vessel traffic will be able to transit safely around the safety zone. 2. Impact on Small...

  7. Community-Academic Partnership to Investigate Low Birth Weight Deliveries and Improve Maternal and Infant Outcomes at a Baltimore City Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Elizabeth M; Strobino, Donna; Sherrod, Leslie; Webb, Mary Catherine; Anderson, Caroline; White, Jennifer Arice; Atlas, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Purpose Mercy Medical Center (MMC), a community hospital in Baltimore Maryland, has undertaken a community initiative to reduce low birth weight (LBW) deliveries by 10 % in 3 years. MMC partnered with a School of Public Health to evaluate characteristics associated with LBW deliveries and formulate collaborations with obstetricians and community services to improve birth outcomes. Description As part of the initiative, a case control study of LBW was undertaken of all newborns weighing strategy to address pregnant women at risk of LBW infants is to improve the intake and referral system to better triage women to appropriate services in the community. Meetings were held with community organizations and feedback was operationalized into collaboration strategies which can be jointly implemented. Conclusion Education sessions with providers about the referral system are one ongoing strategy to improve birth outcomes in Baltimore City, as well as provision of timely home visits by nurses to high-risk women.

  8. School Privatization's First Big Test: EAI in Baltimore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lois C.; Leak, Lawrence E.

    1996-01-01

    An independent study of Baltimore City's Tesseract schools analyzes why the privately managed program failed. Results showed no gains on Comprehensive Test of Basic Skills scores. Baltimore was paying about 11% more per student than in comparison schools. EAI has succeeded in establishing the supremacy of Wednesday afternoons for staff development…

  9. IT’S TIME FOR SUBURBAN STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А С Бреславский

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The sector of sociology of the Institute for Mongolian, Buddhist and Tibetan Studies of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences organized the All-Russian scientific seminar “What do We Know about Contemporary Russian Suburbs?” on June 2-3, 2017. Based on the seminar results, the collection of papers with the same title was published. The idea of the meeting was to allow the experts to discuss the regional diversity of the suburbs of Russian cities, the scale, sources, directions and conse-quences of the Russian suburbanization. Despite considerable prospects for theoretical and empirical analysis, this field of social research is still ignored by Russian scientists, which determines serious problems in con-ducting comparative and generalizing studies to ensure a broader understanding of the nature of the Russian suburbanization. Developing a common research field, setting research aims and hypotheses, summarizing international discussions on suburban studies, search for optimal concepts and approaches to the analysis of the Russian suburbanization, developing new methods for studying suburbs and adaptation of the existing ones, critical analysis of sources, collecting and systematization of regional data, generalization, typologies and comparative analysis of regional cases, discussing the results of today’s studies - these are just some issues set by the experts in the suburban studies.

  10. Maryland motor carrier program performance enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Using the inspection summary data (24-1 reports) from SHA for years 2006 to 2010 and inspection and violation : files of Motor Carrier Management Information System (MCMIS) for the same years, the Maryland State Police : (MSP) and Maryland Transporta...

  11. Evaluation of the status of anurans on a refuge in suburban Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brander, S.M.; Royle, J. Andrew; Eames, M.

    2007-01-01

    Because many anurans have well-defined breeding seasons and male anurans produce loud advertisement calls, surveys of these breeding choruses are believed to provide a dependable means of monitoring population trends. The Patuxent Research Refuge initiated such a calling survey in the spring of 1997, which uses volunteers to collect anuran (frog and toad) calling survey data. The primary goal of initiating the calling surveys at the Patuxent Refuge was to obtain baseline information on anuran populations, such as species occurrence, frequency of occurrence, and relative abundance over time. In this paper, we used the calling survey data to develop models for the ?proportion of area occupied? by individual anuran species, a method in which analysis is focused on the proportion of sites that are occupied by a species, instead of the number of individuals present in the population. This type of analysis is ideal for use in large-scale monitoring programs focused on species that are difficult to count, such as anurans or birds. We considered models for proportion of area occupied that allow for imperfect detection (that is, a species may be present but go undetected during sampling) by incorporating parameters that describe detection probability and the response of detection probability to various environmental and sampling covariates. Our results indicate that anuran populations on the Patuxent Research Refuge have high rates of occupancy compared to areas nearby and that extinction and colonization rates are stable. The potential uses for ?proportion of area occupied? analyses are far-reaching and will allow for more accurate quantification of data and better-informed management decisions for calling surveys on a larger scale.

  12. Standards for School Guidance Programs in Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore. Div. of Compensatory, Urban, and Supplementary Programs.

    This brochure is a checklist to rate school compliance with the standards for school guidance programs in Maryland, which were developed by the Maryland State Department of Education. The first set of standards addresses the philosophy and goals of school guidance programs in Maryland and the extent to which program goals and objectives are…

  13. 77 FR 1430 - Maryland Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-10

    ... involves provisions to Maryland's program to regulate coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) and, specifically... (Administrative Record No. 588-008). Maryland added regulations to regulate coal combustion byproducts and to..., beneficial use, or other use of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) within the State of Maryland. In total...

  14. Phosphorus Retention in Stormwater Control Structures across Streamflow in Urban and Suburban Watersheds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuiwang Duan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that stormwater control measures (SCMs are less effective at retaining phosphorus (P than nitrogen. We compared P retention between two urban/suburban SCMs and their adjacent free-flowing stream reaches at the Baltimore Long-Term Ecological Study (LTER site, and examined changes in P retention in SCMs across flow conditions. Results show that, when compared with free-flowing stream reaches, the SCMs had significantly lower dissolved oxygen (%DO and higher P concentrations, as well as lower mean areal retention rates and retention efficiencies of particulate P (PP. In all the SCMs, concentrations of total dissolved phosphorus (TDP consistently exhibited inverse correlations with %DO that was lower during summer base flows. Particulate phosphorus (PP concentrations peaked during spring high flow period in both streams and in-line pond/SCMs, but they were also higher during summer base flows in suburban/urban SCMs. Meanwhile, PP areal retention rates and retention efficiencies of the SCMs changed from positive (indicating retention during high flows to negative (indicating release during low flows, while such changes across flow were not observed in free-flowing stream reaches. We attribute the changing roles of SCMs from a PP sink to a PP source to changes in SCM hydrologic mass balances, physical sedimentation and biogeochemical mobilization across flows. This study demonstrates that in suburban/urban SCMs, P retained during high flow events can be released during low flows. Cultivation of macrophytes and/or frequent sediment dredging may provide potential solutions to retaining both P and nitrogen in urban SCMs.

  15. Landscape Architecture in Contemporary Danish Suburban Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roden, Tina Maria

    2013-01-01

    development can shift from one of relatively superficiality to one of more structural influence. The paper first positions landscape urbanism in the context of urban landscapes; then it introduces the current Danish debate on suburbia and sustainability; Finally, the paper reflects upon two urban design...... to evaluate and re-think the both loved and criticised suburbia and its incompatibility in relation to the current environmental and climate prospects, these projects suggest that a landscape orientated approach to (sub)urban development can provide more adaptive and flexible frameworks to meet...... the indeterminacy of the future. KEYWORDS: Suburban development, landscape urbanism, landscape architecture, sustainability...

  16. Residential Energy Efficiency Potential: Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Eric J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-16

    Energy used by Maryland single-family homes that can be saved through cost-effective improvements. Prepared by Eric Wilson and Noel Merket, NREL, and Erin Boyd, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis.

  17. Boots on the Ground: Maryland

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-10-24

    In this podcast, we talk to CDC public health advisor Artensie Flowers to see how her work with the Maryland State Health Department increases local health preparedness and response.  Created: 10/24/2013 by Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (PHPR).   Date Released: 10/24/2013.

  18. Maryland controlled fusion research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griem, H.R.; Liu, C.S.

    1989-07-01

    In recent years, members of the Maryland Plasma Theory Group have made significant contributions to the national fusion theory programs, and, in many cases, these theoretical developments helped to interpret experimental results and to design new experimental programs. In the following, we summarize the technical progress in four major areas: density limit disruptions and sawteeth in tokamaks; anomalous transport in tokamaks; L/H Transition in tokamaks; and magnetic reconnection in compact torus and REP. 9 refs

  19. Policing the Void: Recreation, Social Inclusion and the Baltimore Police Athletic League

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob J. Bustad

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we explore the relationship between public recreation policy and planning and the transformation of urban governance in the context of the Police Athletic League centers in Baltimore, Maryland. In light of contemporary discussions of the role of youth programs for sport and physical activity within post-industrial cities, the origination, development, and eventual demise of Baltimore’s network of Police Activity League centers is an instructive, if disheartening, saga. It illustrates the social and political rationales mobilized in justifying recreation policy and programming, the framing of sport and physical activity as preventative measures towards crime and juvenile delinquency, and the precarity of such initiatives given the efficiency-driven orthodoxies of neoliberal urban entrepreneurialism (Harvey, 1989. This analysis emphasizes how the PAL centers were designed to ‘fill the void’ left by a declining system of public recreation, thereby providing an example of a recreation program as part of the “social problems industry” (Pitter & Andrews 1997.

  20. The Maryland Assisted Living Study: prevalence, recognition, and treatment of dementia and other psychiatric disorders in the assisted living population of central Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Adam; Samus, Quincy M; Steele, Cynthia D; Baker, Alva S; Harper, Michael G; Brandt, Jason; Rabins, Peter V; Lyketsos, Constantine G

    2004-10-01

    To obtain a direct estimate of the prevalence of dementia and other psychiatric disorders in residents of assisted living (AL) in Central Maryland, and their rates of recognition and treatment. Comprehensive review of history and cognitive and neuropsychiatric evaluations using widely accepted instruments in a randomized cohort of AL residents, stratified by facility size. An expert multidisciplinary consensus panel determined diagnoses and appropriateness of treatment. Twenty-two (10 large and 12 small) randomly selected AL facilities in the city of Baltimore and seven Maryland counties. One hundred ninety-eight volunteers who were residents of AL, 75% were aged 80 and older, and 78% were female. Potential participants were randomly chosen by room number. There was a 67% participation rate. Overall rate of dementia, noncognitive active psychiatric disorders, and recognition and adequate treatment of dementia and psychiatric disorders, as determined by consensus panel. Two-thirds (67.7%) of participants had dementia diagnosable according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (81% small facilities and 63% large). Family or caregivers recognized 78% to 80% of dementias. Seventy-three percent of dementias were adequately evaluated, and 52% were adequately treated. Of the 26.3% of participants who had an active noncognitive psychiatric disorder, 58% to 61% were recognized and 52% adequately treated. Dementia and psychiatric disorders are common in AL and have suboptimal rates of recognition and treatment. This may contribute to morbidity and interfere with the ability of residents to age in place.

  1. Incorporation of water-use summaries into the StreamStats web application for Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, Kernell G.; Horn, Marilee A.; Nardi, Mark R.; Tessler, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Approximately 25,000 new households and thousands of new jobs will be established in an area that extends from southwest to northeast of Baltimore, Maryland, as a result of the Federal Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) process, with consequent new demands on the water resources of the area. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Maryland Department of the Environment, has extended the area of implementation and added functionality to an existing map-based Web application named StreamStats to provide an improved tool for planning and managing the water resources in the BRAC-affected areas. StreamStats previously was implemented for only a small area surrounding Baltimore, Maryland, and it was extended to cover all BRAC-affected areas. StreamStats could provide previously published streamflow statistics, such as the 1-percent probability flood and the 7-day, 10-year low flow, for U.S. Geological Survey data-collection stations and estimates of streamflow statistics for any user-selected point on a stream within the implemented area. The application was modified for this study to also provide summaries of water withdrawals and discharges upstream from any user-selected point on a stream. This new functionality was made possible by creating a Web service that accepts a drainage-basin delineation from StreamStats, overlays it on a spatial layer of water withdrawal and discharge points, extracts the water-use data for the identified points, and sends it back to StreamStats, where it is summarized for the user. The underlying water-use data were extracted from the U.S. Geological Survey's Site-Specific Water-Use Database System (SWUDS) and placed into a Microsoft Access database that was created for this study for easy linkage to the Web service and StreamStats. This linkage of StreamStats with water-use information from SWUDS should enable Maryland regulators and planners to make more informed decisions on the use of water resources in the BRAC area, and

  2. Lead in wild blackberries from suburban roadsides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J.G.

    1979-01-01

    A mean lead content of 0.79 mg kg/sup -1/ was found for wild blackberries from roadside hedgerows in a suburban area of Glasgow. This represents a five-fold enhancement in lead content relative to blackberries from non-roadside environments and can be attributed to the emission of lead-containing compounds from car exhaust. Washing typically removed less than or equal to 0.1 mg kg/sup -1/. However, M.A.F.F. (1975) recommended limits for lead in fresh food (1 mg kg/sup -1/) and canned fruits and preserves (2 mg kg/sup -1/) were not, in general, exceeded.

  3. School Climate and Academic Achievement in Suburban Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulak, Tracey N.

    2016-01-01

    School climate research has indicated a relationship between the climate of a school and academic achievement. The majority of explanatory models have been developed in urban schools with less attention given to suburban schools. Due to the process of formation of suburban schools, there is a likelihood these campuses differ from the traditional…

  4. Increasing Poverty: How Do Leaders in One Suburban District Respond?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Jennifer Dawn

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the question of how suburban school district leaders in one large Midwestern school district respond to increasing student poverty. The purpose of this study was to determine how suburban school district leaders respond to increasing student poverty in their decision making and actions. Data for this study came from one…

  5. Non-ghetto gays: a sociological study of suburban homosexuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, F R

    1987-01-01

    This ethnographic study is focused upon the lifestyles of white, suburban, middle-class homosexuals. Interview data on some two dozen individuals obtained in the spring of 1982 was increasingly supplemented and supplanted by continued field observation and other techniques of data-gathering through the summer of 1985. The data on the coming-out experiences were largely congruent with models of homosexual identity formation, especially those of Plummer (1975) and Troiden (1979). As expected, older subjects generally progressed through coming-out stages at a slower pace than their younger counterparts. The middle-class orientation and the suburban socio-cultural environment were also seen as inhibiting homosexual identity formation. The advent of AIDS seemed to have little obvious impact on behavior until the last months of the study. Suburban homosexuals in this study were strongly oriented to their work and career-building, to suburban home ownership, and to obtaining a long-term love relationship with another male. Suburban homosexuals were also strongly individualistic and assimilationist, rather than oriented towards collective action or organizational membership based on shared sexual identity. While the fortunes of the two friendship groups differed, friendship bonds among suburban homosexuals compare favorably with male friendships in the general population. The findings in this study suggest that suburban homosexuals, like many other Americans, are finding suburban life increasingly attractive and that the lure of large cities and gay ghettos has faded.

  6. Trends in emissions and concentrations of air pollutants in the lower troposphere in the Baltimore/Washington airshed from 1997 to 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. He

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Trends in the composition of the lower atmosphere (0–1500 m altitude and surface air quality over the Baltimore/Washington area and surrounding states were investigated for the period from 1997 to 2011. We examined emissions of ozone precursors from monitors and inventories as well as ambient ground-level and aircraft measurements to characterize trends in air pollution. The US EPA Continuous Emissions Monitoring System (CEMS program reported substantial decreases in emission of summertime nitrogen oxides (NOx from power plants, up to ∼80% in the mid-Atlantic States. These large reductions in emission of NOx are reflected in a sharp decrease of ground-level concentrations of NOx starting around 2003. The decreasing trend of tropospheric column CO observed by aircraft is ∼0.8 Dobson unit (DU per year, corresponding to ∼35 ppbv yr−1 in the lower troposphere (the surface to 1500 m above ground level. Satellite observations of long-term, near-surface CO show a ∼40% decrease over western Maryland between 2000 and 2011; the same magnitude is indicated by aircraft measurements above these regions upwind of the Baltimore/Washington airshed. With decreasing emissions of ozone precursors, the ground-level ozone in the Baltimore/Washington area shows a 0.6 ppbv yr−1 decrease in the past 15 yr. Since photochemical production of ozone is substantially influenced by ambient temperature, we introduce the climate penalty factor (CPF into the trend analysis of long-term aircraft measurements. After compensating for inter-annual variations in temperature, historical aircraft measurements indicate that the daily net production of tropospheric ozone over the Baltimore/Washington area decreased from ∼20 ppbv day−1 in the late 1990s to ∼7 ppbv day−1 in the early 2010s during ozone season. A decrease in the long-term column ozone is observed as ∼0.2 DU yr−1 in the lowest 1500 m, corresponding to an improvement of ∼1.3 ppbv yr−1. Our

  7. Civic Engagement and Gentrification Issues in Metropolitan Baltimore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durington, Matthew; Maddox, Camee; Ruhf, Adrienne; Gass, Shana; Schwermer, Justin

    2009-01-01

    Since the fall of 2006 a number of Towson University students concentrating in the discipline of anthropology have been part of a civic engagement and service-learning project focusing on an historic African-American community in Baltimore. While the focus of the research project concentrates on the processes of gentrification, individual student…

  8. Accountable Talk: "Real" Conversations in Baltimore City Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmann, Chloe

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the fundamental disconnect between discourses of accountability in education policy and their interpretation on the ground by parents. Based on data from two sites in Baltimore--district-led teacher training and a community facing school restructuring--I argue that both parents and education professionals consider…

  9. Finding Opportunity: Darcy Cahill--Baltimore County Public Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Library Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Three months after Darcy Cahill was promoted to head the Randallstown branch of the Baltimore County Public Library (BCPL), at 6 a.m. on a Saturday morning, the branch suffered a devastating fire. When firefighters finally contained the blaze, she was shocked to see the building drenched and in disarray. This article gives a detailed description…

  10. Suburbanization and sustainability in metropolitan Moscow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Robert J; Nigmatullina, Liliya

    2011-01-01

    Although Soviet-era urban-growth controls produced relatively sustainable metropolitan development patterns, low-density suburban sprawl has accelerated markedly in modern Russia. Distinctive features of Moscow's development history are its greenbelt, which dates from 1935 and is becoming increasingly fragmented, proliferation of satellite cities at the urban fringe, conversion of seasonal dachas into full-time residences, the very exclusive Rublevo Uspenskoe Highway development, and today's crippling traffic congestion. The recent economic crisis has slowed development and actually increased the supply of “economy-class” single-family homes, for which there is much pent-up desire but insufficient credit availability to meet the demand. A renewed commitment to sustainability's triple bottom line—environmental quality, equity, and economic prosperity—will require greater government transparency and fairness, stronger planning controls, and an expanded public transportation system.

  11. Prevalence of refractive error among preschool children in an urban population: the Baltimore Pediatric Eye Disease Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Lydia; Friedman, David S; Repka, Michael X; Katz, Joanne; Ibironke, Josephine; Hawes, Patricia; Tielsch, James M

    2009-04-01

    To determine the age-specific prevalence of refractive errors in white and African-American preschool children. The Baltimore Pediatric Eye Disease Study is a population-based evaluation of the prevalence of ocular disorders in children aged 6 to 71 months in Baltimore, Maryland. Among 4132 children identified, 3990 eligible children (97%) were enrolled and 2546 children (62%) were examined. Cycloplegic autorefraction was attempted in all children with the use of a Nikon Retinomax K-Plus 2 (Nikon Corporation, Tokyo, Japan). If a reliable autorefraction could not be obtained after 3 attempts, cycloplegic streak retinoscopy was performed. Mean spherical equivalent (SE) refractive error, astigmatism, and prevalence of higher refractive errors among African-American and white children. The mean SE of right eyes was +1.49 diopters (D) (standard deviation [SD] = 1.23) in white children and +0.71 D (SD = 1.35) in African-American children (mean difference of 0.78 D; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67-0.89). Mean SE refractive error did not decline with age in either group. The prevalence of myopia of 1.00 D or more in the eye with the lesser refractive error was 0.7% in white children and 5.5% in African-American children (relative risk [RR], 8.01; 95% CI, 3.70-17.35). The prevalence of hyperopia of +3 D or more in the eye with the lesser refractive error was 8.9% in white children and 4.4% in African-American children (RR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.35-0.68). The prevalence of emmetropia (refractive errors are uncommon in this population of urban preschool children. There was no evidence for a myopic shift over this age range in this cross-sectional study. A small proportion of preschool children would likely benefit from refractive correction, but few have had this prescribed.

  12. Proceedings of the Annual Symposium on Frequency Control (42nd) Held in Baltimore, Maryland on 1-3 June 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-03

    a four-point mount may be designated in Control and Synthesis , U. Surrey, pp. 67-73, 1987. brief as AI(4)-cut. 7. A. Ballato and M. Mizan, IEEE Trans...half-widths of the crystal was asymetrical , asymmetry of inclination of the Y-axis of the crystal. the lower amplitudes occurring on the half-width...Y. Toudic, B. Boulogne, J.C. Jumas, A. Zarka, J.C. Doukhan Proc. Symp. Freq. Control and Synthesis P 314 (1987) (15) J. D~taint, A. Zarka, B. Capelle

  13. National Computer Security Conference (15th) held in Baltimore, Maryland on October 13-16, 1992. Volume 1: Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-10-16

    6] T.F. Keefe and W.T. Tsai. Multiversion concur- rency control for multilevel secure database sys- tems. In Proc. 1990 Symposium on Research in...Security and Privacy, pages 369-383, Oakland, CA, May 1990. IEEE Computer Society. [7] W.T. Maimone and I.B. Greenberg. Single- level multiversion

  14. National Information Systems Security Conference (19th) held in Baltimore, Maryland on October 22-25, 1996. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-10-25

    data must venture outside the cozy confines of its safe haven. This model’s analogies are mostly military: the image is that of an information...dish, or sophisticated phone system. (The Atlanta Constitution/The Atlanta Journal). Nichols later died in prison under mysterious circumstances. New...parameter. [D AT A96] Logins could be affected if password expiration logic is faulty. Application software could mysteriously stop if license period

  15. Annual International Conference on Aging Aircraft (2nd) Held in Baltimore, Maryland on 3-5 October 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-02-01

    Barkhausen Spectroscopy Ultrasonic Plate & Surface Wave Phase Propagation Thermography With External Heating Thermoelasticity With External Stimulus...aircraft. One of the things that we’ve embraced at One of these technologies is thermogra- Langley is the use of modeling to give some phy. Thermography has...point out that there are ergonomic rate, those cases where good, acceptable, effec- methods that can be used to overcome this tive goods are rejected

  16. National Computer Security Conference (15th) held in Baltimore, Maryland on October 13-16, 1992. Volume 2: Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-10-16

    essential in order to build systems that are more economical , functional, or aesthetically pleasing than their predecessors. Moreover, we learn more... essential to widespread user acceptance of MLS systems. RELATED WQR* Many researchers have addressed aspects of these problems. Biba14 and Clark and...processes, discovering that policies may conflict and that policies about policies may be necessary.23 Moffet and Sloman explored management

  17. Aquatic Plant Control Research Program: Proceedings Annual Meeting (28th) Held in Baltimore, Maryland on November 15-18, 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-01

    resultsCommnity as osmsPhysical size adds ’ realism ’ Contained pond communities Large-scale Community Ponds Difficult to manipulate Long-term Lake/reservoir...used in propriate degree of realism without too great Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) a sacrifice in time or research funds, sponsored studies of...34 neoclassical " ) approach to- and Jamaica were recently introduced. wards biological control technology in aquatic Pieterse (1981) suggested that it was

  18. Proceedings of the Annual Symposium on Frequency Control (44th) Held in Baltimore, Maryland on 23-25 May 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    in Quartz Using the Raman Effect," J. Phys. Chem. Solids, Vol. 31, pp. 2275-2279, 1970. [51] E. Bertagnolli, E. Kitlinger, and J. Tichy ...CONTROL IN CHEXICAL ETCHING OF QUARTZ CRYSTAL BLANKS Franz L. Sauerland Transat Corp. 31000 Bainbridge Road Solon, Ohio 44139 ABSTRACT The etch rate

  19. Effects-based spatial assessment of contaminated estuarine sediments from Bear Creek, Baltimore Harbor, MD, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, Sharon E; Unger, Michael A; McGee, Beth L; Yonkos, Lance T

    2017-10-01

    Estuarine sediments in regions with prolonged histories of industrial activity are often laden to significant depths with complex contaminant mixtures, including trace metals and persistent organic pollutants. Given the complexity of assessing risks from multi-contaminant exposures, the direct measurement of impacts to biological receptors is central to characterizing contaminated sediment sites. Though biological consequences are less commonly assessed at depth, laboratory-based toxicity testing of subsurface sediments can be used to delineate the scope of contamination at impacted sites. The extent and depth of sediment toxicity in Bear Creek, near Baltimore, Maryland, USA, was delineated using 10-day acute toxicity tests with the estuarine amphipod Leptocheirus plumulosus, and chemical analysis of trace metals and persistent organic pollutants. A gradient of toxicity was demonstrated in surface sediments with 21 of 22 tested sites differing significantly from controls. Effects were most pronounced (100% lethality) at sites proximate to a historic industrial complex. Sediments from eight of nine core samples to depths of 80 cm were particularly impacted (i.e., caused significant lethality to L. plumulosus) even in locations overlain with relatively non-toxic surface sediments, supporting a conclusion that toxicity observed at the surface (top 2 cm) does not adequately predict toxicity at depth. In seven of nine sites, toxicity of surface sediments differed from toxicity at levels beneath by 28 to 69%, in five instances underestimating toxicity (28 to 69%), and in two instances overestimating toxicity (44 to 56%). Multiple contaminants exceeded sediment quality guidelines and correlated positively with toxic responses within surface sediments (e.g., chromium, nickel, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), total petroleum hydrocarbon). Use of an antibody-based PAH biosensor revealed that porewater PAH concentrations also increased with depth at most sites. This

  20. Policing, Community Fragmentation, and Public Health: Observations from Baltimore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Marisela B

    2016-04-01

    Studies show that policing, when violent, and community fragmentation have a negative impact on health outcomes. This current study investigates the connection of policing and community fragmentation and public health. Using an embedded case study analysis, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 African-American female and male residents, ages 21-64 years of various neighborhoods of high arrest rates and health and socioeconomic depravation in Baltimore City, MD. Baltimore residents' perceptions of policing, stress, community fragmentation, and solutions are presented. Analysis of the perceptions of these factors suggests that violent policing increases community fragmentation and is a public health threat. Approaches to address this public health threat are discussed.

  1. Greater Baltimore Open Air: an Internet of Things (IoT) approach to citizen science and community-driven climate, air quality, and urban heat island monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, A.; Kelley, C.; Azdoud, Y.; Ambikapathi, R.; Hobson, M.; Lehman, A.; Ghugare, P.; He, C.; Zaitchik, B. F.; Waugh, D.; McCormack, M.; Baja, K.

    2017-12-01

    Anthropogenic activities alter the urban surface and surface atmosphere, generating heat and pollutants that have known detrimental impacts on health. Monitoring these environmental variables in urban environments is made difficult by the spatial heterogeneity of urban environments, meaning that two nearby locations may have significantly different temperatures, humidities, or gas concentrations. Thus, urban monitoring often requires more densely placed monitors than current standards or budgets allow. Recent advances in low-cost sensors and Internet of Things (IoT) enabled hardware offer possible solutions. We present an autonomous wireless, open-source, IoT-enabled environmental monitor called a WeatherCube, developed for the Greater Baltimore Open Air project, funded in part by the EPA SmartCity Challenge. The WeatherCube is suitable for urban monitoring and capable of measuring meteorological variables (temperature and humidity) as well as air quality (ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide). The WeatherCube devices were built in collaboration with Johns Hopkins University, local government, and community members, including through an innovative job training program. Monitors are hosted by community partners and libraries throughout Baltimore city and surrounding communities. We present the first wave of data collected by the Greater Baltimore Open Air project and compare it to data collected by the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE). Additionally, we will provide an overview of our experience engaging with the local makers, citizen scientists, and environmental groups to improve their urban environmental monitoring. By developing low-cost devices tailored for urban environmental monitoring, we present an innovative model for both conducting research and community outreach.

  2. Measles, social media and surveillance in Baltimore City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Katherine E; Wen, Leana S

    2017-09-01

    Baltimore City was faced with two potential measles outbreaks in 2015. Both cases occurred in the wake of national media attention paid to the Disneyland outbreaks of the same year. A comparative case study approach was used applying qualitative data to elicit best practices in infectious disease protocols in the age of social media. The research also used search engine data from Google Trends to track constituent engagement over time. Across the two case studies, the Baltimore City Health Department identified a number of best practices to inform the public via social media and minimize levels of misinformation and panic. These practices included clarity in messaging across platforms and public health jurisdictions; pre-emptor alerts of potential measles cases to control and shape the media messaging; and targeted, in-person outreach to engage groups in a culturally competent manner. The Baltimore City Health Department's response drew out a critical need for re-examining infectious disease protocols in the age of social media (e.g. contact notification, quarantine, media sensitivity) and anti-vaccination movements that pose new obstacles to government intervention. The benefits and challenges of greater connectivity between providers, patients, and public health officers are discussed. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Visualizing and Understanding Socio-Environmental Dynamics in Baltimore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitchik, B. F.; Omeara, K.; Guikema, S.; Scott, A.; Bessho, A.; Logan, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    The City of Baltimore, like any city, is the sum of its component neighborhoods, institutions, businesses, cultures, and, ultimately, its people. It is also an organism in its own right, with distinct geography, history, infrastructure, and environments that shape its residents even as it is shaped by them. Sometimes these interactions are obvious but often they are not; while basic economic patterns are widely documented, the distribution of socio-spatial and environmental connections often hides below the surface, as does the potential that those connections hold. Here we present results of a collaborative initiative on the geography, design, and policy of socio-environmental dynamics of Baltimore. Geospatial data derived from satellite imagery, demographic databases, social media feeds, infrastructure plans, and in situ environmental networks, among other sources, are applied to generate an interactive portrait of Baltimore City's social, health, and well-being dynamics. The layering of data serves as a platform for visualizing the interconnectedness of the City and as a database for modeling risk interactions, vulnerabilities, and strengths within and between communities. This presentation will provide an overview of project findings and highlight linkages to education and policy.

  4. Project-based Modules from two STEM Learning Teams in Howard County, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, L. N.; Bradley, L. A.

    2011-12-01

    In 2009, two Maryland school districts-Howard County Public School System and Prince George's County Public Schools-and the Goddard Space Flight Center of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) partnered with the National Commission on Teaching and America's Future (NCTAF) to develop NASA 21st Century Learning Studios. In 2010, NCTAF expanded the program to include Learning Studios at two additional Maryland school districts (Anne Arundel County Public Schools and Baltimore County Public Schools), partnering with the United States Naval Academy and the University of Maryland. Overall, the focus of these Learning Studios is to combine the expertise of scientists with that of educators through Learning Teams to improve teaching and learning in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields, while delivering project-based modules to be implemented in other school districts. The focus of this paper is to summarize the experience and outcomes from two Learning Teams from the Howard County Public School System. STEM Learning Teams were established at Centennial High School and Hammond High School in Maryland. Each Team worked together for two years to create interdisciplinary units of study for their students with a focus on Earth Science. To maximize student interest, teachers worked with NASA scientists five times a year to develop four learning modules using practical examples and incorporating real scientific observations. A weathering and erosion module challenges students to collect appropriate field observations and determine erosion and deposition rates in a nearby lake. A plate tectonics module requires students to use measures of plate motion from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to estimate rates of convergence in southern Asia. A third module for lessons in climate change requires students to find open source climate data, determine changes in the atmosphere and estimate anthropogenic impacts. A follow

  5. 76 FR 13112 - Maryland Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ... to regulate coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) and to establish requirements pertaining to the... revisions would add regulations to the Maryland program to regulate coal combustion byproducts and to..., beneficial use, or other use of coal combustion byproducts (CCB) within the State. In total, these...

  6. Sun exposure patterns of urban, suburban, and rural children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodekær, Mette; Petersen, Bibi; Philipsen, Peter Alshede

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sun exposure is the main etiology of skin cancer. Differences in skin cancer incidence have been observed between rural and urban populations. OBJECTIVES: As sun exposure begins in childhood, we examined summer UVR exposure doses and sun behavior in children resident in urban, suburban......, and rural areas. METHODS: Personal, electronic UVR dosimeters and sun behavior diaries were used during a summer (3.5 months) by 150 children (4-19 years of age) resident in urban, suburban, and rural areas. RESULTS: On school/kindergarten days rural children spent more time outdoors and received higher UVR...... doses than urban and suburban children (rural: median 2.3 h per day, median 0.9 SED per day, urban: median 1.3 h per day, median 0.3 SED per day, suburban: median 1.5 h per day, median 0.4 SED per day) (p ≤ 0.007). Urban and suburban children exhibited a more intermittent sun exposure pattern than rural...

  7. Optimization Model for Headway of a Suburban Bus Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to relatively low passenger demand, headways of suburban bus route are usually longer than those of urban bus route. Actually it is also difficult to balance the benefits between passengers and operators, subject to the service standards from the government. Hence the headway of a suburban bus route is usually determined on the empirical experience of transport planners. To cope with this problem, this paper proposes an optimization model for designing the headways of suburban bus routes by minimizing the operating and user costs. The user costs take into account both the waiting time cost and the crowding cost. The feasibility and validity of the proposed model are shown by applying it to the Route 206 in Jiangning district, Nanjing city of China. Weightages of passengers’ cost and operating cost are further discussed, considering different passenger flows. It is found that the headway and objective function are affected by the weightages largely.

  8. Comparing sleep disorders in urban and suburban adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur'aini Nur'aini

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Sleep disturbances commonly occur in adolescents. Socioeconomic levels, lifestyle, and urban or suburban environments influence the sleep patterns of adolescents. The modernization process in urban environments is marked by the development of information technology media, and the lack of parental monitoring potentially influencing adolescent sleep disturbances. Sleep disturbances may affect children's physical growth, as well as their emotional, cognitive, and social development. Objective To assess for sleep disorders in urban and suburban adolescents, and to determine the factors that influence the prevalence of sleep disturbances. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 12 to 15-year-old junior high school students in urban (n=350 and suburban (n=350 environments in the city of Medan, North Sumatera. The study was undertaken from May to June 2010 using the Sleep Disorders Scale for Children (SDSC, a set of questionnaires. The SDSC was filled out by parents based on what they remembered about their children's sleep patterns in the prior 6 months. Results In the urban group, there were 133 (38.0% subjects with sleep disturbances, 182 (52.0% were borderline, and 35 (10.0% were normal. In the suburban group, there were 132 (37.7% subjects with sleep disturbances, 180 (51.4% were borderline, and 38 (10.9% were normal. The most influential factors for sleep disturbances in urban and suburban youth were environmental noise (P=0.001 and consuming beverages that contain caffeine (P=0.001. There were three types of sleep disorders that significantly found more in urban adolescents: disorders of initiating and maintaining sleep, disorders of excessive somnolence, and sleep hyperhidrosis. Conclusion The prevalence of sleep disturbances do not differ between urban and suburban adolescents. Howevet; there are significant differences in the types of sleep disorders experienced. The most influential factors on sleep disturbance in both

  9. EVALUATION OF HUMAN SETTLEMENT INFLUENCE ON SUBURBAN TRAFFIC FLOW DENSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Horbachov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Study results of the human settlement influence on the traffic flow density in suburban service of international, national and regional roads of Ukraine are presented. The possibility of an adequate description of suburban traffic flows in the vicinity of large cities is established, depending on the city population and link remoteness from the city center. The possibility is determined on the basis of obtained models to define the prognosis value of the intensity and specific maintenance of freight and passenger transport flows.

  10. Basic conditions of innovative development of Volgograd suburban zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beljaev Mihail Konstantinovich

    2015-03-01

    The article identified and described the factors in the development of modern suburban zones at the macro level (international conditions, changing the types and sources of economic growth, changing the types of socio-economic systems; at the meso level (state socio-economic policy, regional socio-economic policy, the policy of local self-government; at the micro level (natural, production, research, educational, investment, infrastructure, administrative, labor, cultural-historical and information potentials. The main competitive advantages of Volgograd suburban zone are the natural and cultural-historical conditions, the main problems are organizational management, investment, research factors of development.

  11. Suburban Development - in Search of the Language of the Suburbs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melgaard, Bente

    Several Danish suburbs are facing major challenges that endeavour to cope with (among other factors) counteracting the segregation of suburbs into socially sharply separated residential areas. Therefore, these years see the post-war era’s suburban areas being revitalized and urban life, urban...... qualities and community are being discussed in relation to the suburbs.In the process of re-imagining the suburb it is important to analyse which factors could counteract segregation. Therefore, different types of suburban public spaces are mapped, with the purpose of exploring the design and the everyday...... up the discussion and the cultural mind- set related to the development of the Danish suburb....

  12. Normative data for the Maryland CNC Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendel, Lisa Lucks; Mustain, William D; Magro, Jessica

    2014-09-01

    The Maryland consonant-vowel nucleus-consonant (CNC) Test is routinely used in Veterans Administration medical centers, yet there is a paucity of published normative data for this test. The purpose of this study was to provide information on the means and distribution of word-recognition scores on the Maryland CNC Test as a function of degree of hearing loss for a veteran population. A retrospective, descriptive design was conducted. The sample consisted of records from veterans who had Compensation and Pension (C&P) examinations at a Veterans Administration medical center (N = 1,760 ears). Audiometric records of veterans who had C&P examinations during a 10 yr period were reviewed, and the pure-tone averages (PTA4) at four frequencies (1000, 2000, 3000, and 4000 Hz) were documented. The maximum word-recognition score (PBmax) was determined from the performance-intensity functions obtained using the Maryland CNC Test. Correlations were made between PBmax and PTA4. A wide range of word-recognition scores were obtained at all levels of PTA4 for this population. In addition, a strong negative correlation between the PBmax and the PTA4 was observed, indicating that as PTA4 increased, PBmax decreased. Word-recognition scores decreased significantly as hearing loss increased beyond a mild hearing loss. Although threshold was influenced by age, no statistically significant relationship was found between word-recognition score and the age of the participants. RESULTS from this study provide normative data in table and figure format to assist audiologists in interpreting patient results on the Maryland CNC test for a veteran population. These results provide a quantitative method for audiologists to use to interpret word-recognition scores based on pure-tone hearing loss. American Academy of Audiology.

  13. Suburban fragmentation versus mobilities : is suburbanism opposed to urbanism ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Charmes

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The suburban way of life is tending towards a rejection of tangible confrontation with otherness so that other people – should they be different – become politically invisible. This is at any rate what the critical literature surmises about the growing desire of suburbanites to live amongst their own and sometimes even behind the safe and reassuring walls of gated communities. However appealing this analysis might be, it seems nonetheless rather partial. Suburban populations are increasingly mobile and their everyday horizon is less and less reduced to the immediate perimeter of the neighbourhood. Indeed, how can one interpret the social specialization of residential areas as a sign of “enclavism” when all the statistics available indicate that mobility has become a constitutive factor of people’s way of life and the neighbourhood has all but lost its existential weight?Based on exploratory work, this paper aims to deconstruct the criticism articulated around the opposition of “suburbanism” and “urbanism” by emphasising the effects of the various forms of mobility and showing that they complement the proliferation of homogeneous neighbourhoods. In order to achieve this goal, the paper analyses the culture of people living at the periphery of two large French cities (Paris and Lyon. The arguments given are based both on the existing literature and on research the author carried out in France (Charmes, 2005.As a result of the analysis conducted, it becomes apparent that the increase in mobilities and the social homogenisation of neighbourhoods can be linked in other ways than the one suggested by the critical literature. On the one hand, contemporary residential areas are not as neutral and sterile as they appear to be. Relationships between neighbours and interactions with people from the surroundings constitute at least an embryonic experience of otherness. Residential areas can therefore be conceived as “transition spaces

  14. Haemoglobin genotype in a sub-urban commercial community in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We examined 510 healthy people aged, 2 years to 60 years, to ascertain the predominance of sickle cell disease and trait among the sub-urban population of Nnewi and environs. The subjects were selected randomly from volunteers of two primary schools and secondary schools as well as from a market community in ...

  15. Mapping the Postcolonial across Urban and Suburban College Access Geographies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dache-Gerbino, Amalia

    2017-01-01

    In US cities, a domino effect of concentrating poverty and suburbanizing wealth shapes discourses of local higher education access for residents of color. How the racialization of space mirrors colonial binaries of Good/Evil, Black/White and Civilized/Uncivilized is part and parcel to understanding city and county geographies surrounding college…

  16. Sustainable School Improvement: Suburban Elementary Principals' Capacity Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Alison J.

    2017-01-01

    The increase of intense pressures to ensure long-term education reforms have created a challenge for school leaders as they direct and nurture the abilities of others. The purpose of this research was to understand and describe suburban elementary principals' practices and perceptions as change leaders related to capacity building through the…

  17. Outside and inside noise exposure in urban and suburban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwight E. Bishop; Myles A. Simpson

    1977-01-01

    In urban and suburban areas of the United States (away from major airports), the outdoor noise environment usually depends strongly on local vehicular traffic. By relating traffic flow to population density, a model of outdoor noise exposure has been developed for estimating the cumulative 24-hour noise exposure based upon the population density of the area. This noise...

  18. Social and economic behavior shift in the suburban society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harianto, S.; Imron, A.; Setiawan, K. G.; Sadewo, F. X. S.

    2018-01-01

    One of the changes in the suburban area is marked by changes in land conversion, from agriculture pattern to non-farming pattern, which also affects changes in people’s livelihoods and occupation such as a craftsman and shoe trader. Using a qualitative approach, this study focuses to examine how changes in social and economic behavior of suburban communities as a result of urban development. This study founded that there was a change of livelihood in village people occupation from farmers to craftsmen and slippers traders. These changes have an impact on changing patterns of social relationships such as social interaction, social awareness, and social solidarity. In addition, the increase in income of village residents also impact on lifestyle changes such as diet and entertainment. Thus it can be concluded that urban development has an impact on suburban societies in social relations and income generation. The results of this study can be used as a reference for the city government and district governments in arranging the layout and build prosperity of the community suburban.

  19. A Qualitative Exploration of Trajectories among Suburban Users of Methamphetamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeri, Miriam Williams; Harbry, Liam; Gibson, David

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this exploratory study was to gain a better understanding of methamphetamine use among suburban users. We know very little about the mechanisms of initiation and trajectory patterns of methamphetamine use among this under-researched and hidden population. This study employed qualitative methods to examine the drug career of suburban…

  20. Black Grade 9 learners in historically white suburban schools and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Black Grade 9 learners in historically white suburban schools and their experience of integration. P. Erasmus. Abstract. Any school that denies that intercultural and interracial differences exist and that lacks effective accommodation strategies for all its learners could thwart learners' feelings of truly belonging to the school.

  1. Is there a suburban sleeping sickness in Libreville? | Kohagne ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The transmission of sleeping sickness occurs primarily in rural areas, and exposed populations are those living from rural activities such as agriculture, fishing, animal husbandry or hunting. However, urban and suburban foci are more and more reported in T. b. gambiense areas. In Libreville town, sleeping ...

  2. Analysis of pellets from a suburban Common Kestrel Falco ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The diet of a Common Kestrel Falco tinnunculus in a suburban area of Algiers at El Harrach was determined by pellet analysis over two years. In both years, the hybrid sparrow (Passer domesticus x P. hispaniolensis) was the main prey item, based on relative frequency (22.3% and 58.7% in 1999 and 2000, respectively).

  3. Computerized Tomographic Findings In Stroke: A Sub-urban ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stroke is a common neurological disorder and a second leading cause of death as well as a major cause of morbidity in Nigeria. It is thus important to find out the local pattern in a sub-urban tertiary hospital like ours to redefine the types as well as recent trends to inform the clinicians on improved management strategy.

  4. Nurses' Interest in Independently Initiating End-of-Life Conversations and Palliative Care Consultations in a Suburban, Community Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Ambereen K; Wilks, Steven; Cheng, M Jennifer; Baker, Karen; Berger, Ann

    2018-03-01

    Patients who receive early palliative care consults have clinical courses and outcomes more consistent with their goals. Nurses have been shown to be advocates for early palliative care involvement and are able to lead advanced care planning discussions. The purpose of this study was to assess whether after a brief educational session, nurses at a suburban, community hospital could demonstrate knowledge of palliative care principles, would want to independently initiate end-of-life conversations with patients and families, and would want to place specialty palliative care consults. Four 1 hour presentations were made at 4 nursing leadership council meetings from November through December 2015. Anonymous pre- and post-presentation surveys were distributed and collected in person. Setting/Participant: Nonprofit, suburban, community hospital in Maryland. Participants were full-time or part-time hospital employees participating in a nursing leadership council who attended the presentation. We compared responses from pre- and post-presentation surveys. Fifty nurses (19 departments) completed pre-presentation surveys (100% response rate) and 49 nurses completed post-presentation surveys (98% response rate). The average score on 7 index questions increased from 71% to 90%. After the presentations, 86% strongly agreed or agreed that nurses should be able to independently order a palliative care consult and 88% strongly agreed or agreed with feeling comfortable initiating an end-of-life conversation. Brief educational sessions can teach palliative care principles to nurses. Most participants of the study would want to be able to directly consult palliative care and would feel comfortable initiating end-of-life conversations after this educational session.

  5. Science for life: a conversation with Nobel laureate David Baltimore. Interview by Barbara J Culliton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltimore, David

    2006-01-01

    As a man with equal interests in science and science policy, David Baltimore has been at the forefront of many of the important debates that have shaped science since the 1970s. Very much engaged in the initial discussions about the use of recombinant DNA technology, Baltimore had a front-row seat as the biotechnology industry developed. He was also a major player in the decision that resulted in funding of the Human Genome Project by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Baltimore discusses biotechnology, science education, and the need for a strong dialogue among scientists and scholars in the health policy community.

  6. Photo Gallery for Anacostia Watershed (Washington, DC/Maryland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anacostia Watershed (Washington, DC/Maryland) of the Urban Waters Federal Partnership (UWFP) reconnects urban communities with their waterways by improving coordination among federal agencies and collaborating

  7. Invertebrates Collected on and around Carroll Island, Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    INVERTEBRATES, *MARYLAND, *WATER POLLUTION, TEST FACILITIES, TEST FACILITIES, ECOLOGY, CHESAPEAKE BAY, WATER POLLUTION, AIR POLLUTION, ANNELIDA, MOLLUSCA, PROTOZOA, ARTHROPODA , CRUSTACEA, ARACHNIDA, PLANKTON, WORMS.

  8. A method for evaluating transport energy consumption in suburban areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marique, Anne-Francoise, E-mail: afmarique@ulg.ac.be; Reiter, Sigrid, E-mail: Sigrid.Reiter@ulg.ac.be

    2012-02-15

    Urban sprawl is a major issue for sustainable development. It represents a significant contribution to energy consumption of a territory especially due to transportation requirements. However, transport energy consumption is rarely taken into account when the sustainability of suburban structures is studied. In this context, the paper presents a method to estimate transport energy consumption in residential suburban areas. The study aimed, on this basis, at highlighting the most efficient strategies needed to promote awareness and to give practical hints on how to reduce transport energy consumption linked to urban sprawl in existing and future suburban neighborhoods. The method uses data collected by using empirical surveys and GIS. An application of this method is presented concerning the comparison of four suburban districts located in Belgium to demonstrate the advantages of the approach. The influence of several parameters, such as distance to work places and services, use of public transport and performance of the vehicles, are then discussed to allow a range of different development situations to be explored. The results of the case studies highlight that traveled distances, and thus a good mix between activities at the living area scale, are of primordial importance for the energy performance, whereas means of transport used is only of little impact. Improving the performance of the vehicles and favoring home-work give also significant energy savings. The method can be used when planning new areas or retrofitting existing ones, as well as promoting more sustainable lifestyles regarding transport habits. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method allows to assess transport energy consumption in suburban areas and highlight the best strategies to reduce it. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Home-to-work travels represent the most important part of calculated transport energy consumption. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy savings can be achieved by

  9. Risk Factors Associated with Childhood Strabismus: The Multi-Ethnic Pediatric Eye Disease and Baltimore Pediatric Eye Disease Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Susan; Varma, Rohit; Tarczy-Hornoch, Kristina; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Lin, Jesse; Wen, Ge; Wei, Jolyn; Borchert, Mark; Azen, Stan; Torres, Mina; Tielsch, James M.; Friedman, David S.; Repka, Michael X.; Ibironke, Joanne Katz Josephine; Giordano, Lydia

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate risk factors associated with esotropia or exotropia in infants and young children. Design Population-based cross-sectional prevalence study. Participants Population-based samples of 9970 children ages 6 to 72 months from California and Maryland. Methods Participants were preschool African-American, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white children participating in the Multiethnic Pediatric Eye Disease Study and the Baltimore Eye Disease Study. Data were obtained by parental interview and ocular examination. Odd ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated to evaluate the association of demographic, behavioral, and clinical risk factors with esotropia and exotropia. Main Outcome Measures Odds ratios (ORs) for various risk factors associated with esotropia or exotropia diagnosis based on cover testing. Results In multivariate logistic regression analysis, esotropia was independently associated with prematurity, maternal smoking during pregnancy, older preschool age (48–72 months), anisometropia, and hyperopia. There was a severity-dependent association of hyperopia with the prevalence of esotropia, with ORs increasing from 6.4 for 2.00 Diopters (D) to strabismus, female sex, astigmatism (OR 2.5 for 1.50 to <2.50 D, and 5.9 for ≥ 2.5 D of astigmatism), and aniso-astigmatism in the J0 component (OR ≥ 2 for J0 aniso-astigmatism ≥ 0.25 D). Conclusions Prematurity and maternal smoking during pregnancy are associated with a higher risk of having esotropia and exotropia. Refractive error is associated in a severity-dependent manner to the prevalence of esotropia and exotropia. Because refractive error is correctable, these risk associations should be considered when developing guidelines for the screening and management of refractive error in infants and young children children. PMID:21856012

  10. National Marine Fisheries Service Grain Size Data from the Baltimore Canyon Trough

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Grain size analyses produced by Robert Reid of the NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service for the NOAA/BLM Outer Continental Shelf Mid-Atlantic Project, Baltimore...

  11. Modeling and imaging land-cover influences on air-temperature in and near Baltimore, MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon Heisler; Alexis Ellis; David J. Nowak; Ian. Yesilonis

    2015-01-01

    Over the course of 1681 hours between May 5 and September 30, 2006, air temperatures measured at the 1.5-m height at seven sites in and near the city of Baltimore, MD were used to empirically model Δ Tˆ R-p , the difference in air temperature between a site in downtown Baltimore and the six other sites. Variables in the...

  12. Maryland controlled fusion research program. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This renewal proposal describes the University of Maryland research program on Magnetic Fusion Energy for a three-year period beginning January 1, 1986. This program consists of five tasks: (I) Plasma Theory; (II) Electron Cyclotron Emission Diagnostics for Mirror Machines; (III) Electron Cyclotron Emission Diagnostics on TFTR; (IV) Atomic Physics; and (V) Magnetic Field Measurement by Ion Beams. The four separate tasks of continuing research (Tasks I to IV) and the new experimental task (Task V) are described in detail. The task descriptions contain estimated budgets for CY 86, 87, and 88

  13. Occurrence of Trypanosoma cruzi in Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, C.M.; Bruce, J.I.

    1962-01-01

    During 1954-1960, 2005 mammals of 18 species collected at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Maryland, were examined for trypanosomes. T. cruzi was found in 10 raccoons between October 31 and November 30. Infection occurred in 2 percent of all raccoons sampled, and in 11.3 percent of the 80 raccoons sampled in November. Examination was by direct smears, stained smears and cultures of heart blood. Although, in previous studies, at least two experimentally infected raccoons exhibited extended parasitemia (14 and 8 weeks), no such continuing parasitemia was observed in the natural infections. No trypanosomes were found in any of the other mammals examined.

  14. Violence in Rural, Suburban, and Urban Schools in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Kalen; McDonald, Catherine C; D'Alonzo, Bernadette A; Tam, Vicky; Wiebe, Douglas J

    2018-01-01

    School violence is a public health issue with direct and collateral consequences that has academic and social impacts for youth. School violence is often considered a uniquely urban problem, yet more research is needed to understand how violence in rural and suburban schools may be similar or different from urban counterparts. Using school violence data from a state with urban, suburban, and rural counties, we explored the landscape of school violence in Pennsylvania (PA) through mapping, descriptive statistics, and factor analysis. Results show school violence is not solely an urban problem. Schools in all county types and across grade levels deal with violence to varying degrees, and the majority of schools across county types experience low levels of violence. Types of violence experienced by PA schools loaded onto three factors, suggesting that targeted interventions may be better suited to addressing school violence.

  15. School Segregation and Disparities in Urban, Suburban, and Rural Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, John R; Burdick-Will, Julia

    2017-11-01

    Much of the literature on racial and ethnic educational inequality focuses on the contrast between Black and Hispanic students in urban areas and white suburban students. This study extends past research on school segregation and racial/ethnic disparities by highlighting the importance of rural areas and regional variation. Although schools in rural America are disproportionately white, they nevertheless are like urban schools, and disadvantaged relative to suburban schools, in terms of poverty and test performance. The group most affected by rural school disadvantage is Native Americans, who are a small share of students nationally but much more prominent and highly disadvantaged in rural areas, particularly in some parts of the country. These figures suggest a strong case for including rural schools in the continuing conversation about how to deal with unfairness in public education.

  16. The NASA/Baltimore Applications Project (BAP). Computer aided dispatch and communications system for the Baltimore Fire Department: A case study of urban technology application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, A. L.

    1981-01-01

    An engineer and a computer expert from Goddard Space Flight Center were assigned to provide technical assistance in the design and installation of a computer assisted system for dispatching and communicating with fire department personnel and equipment in Baltimore City. Primary contributions were in decision making and management processes. The project is analyzed from four perspectives: (1) fire service; (2) technology transfer; (3) public administration; and (5) innovation. The city benefitted substantially from the approach and competence of the NASA personnel. Given the proper conditions, there are distinct advantages in having a nearby Federal laboratory provide assistance to a city on a continuing basis, as is done in the Baltimore Applications Project.

  17. Aesthetic values and the perception of suburban landscapes

    OpenAIRE

    Jaszczak, Agnieszka Aleksandra; Szücz, Linda; Dreksler, Beata

    2012-01-01

    Every suburban area is individual in character, which results primarily from the location, the extent of a given town, the industrialisation processes as well as economic and social significance. The protection of landscape values, especially in those areas which are slightly changed, is an essential landscape planning issue. The main goal of this research study is to analyse the historical and current situation of the Kerstlingeröder Feld suburb in Göttingen (Lower Saxony, Ger...

  18. Maryland's Model Policy to Address Bullying, Harassment, or Intimidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryland State Department of Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    In accordance with the provisions of Section 7-424.1 of the Education Article of the Annotated Code of Maryland, the Maryland State Board of Education has developed and adopted a Model Policy to address bullying, harassment, or intimidation. This report presents the Model Policy, which is organized into the following eight points: (1) Prohibition…

  19. 77 FR 69643 - Maryland; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-20

    ... determined that the emergency conditions in the State of Maryland resulting from Hurricane Sandy beginning on... State of Maryland have been designated as adversely affected by this declared emergency: Emergency..., Disaster Housing Assistance to Individuals and Households In Presidentially Declared Disaster Areas; 97.049...

  20. 76 FR 60851 - Maryland; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... determined that the emergency conditions in certain areas of the State of Maryland resulting from Hurricane... State of Maryland have been designated as adversely affected by this declared emergency: The counties of... Assistance (DUA); 97.046, Fire Management Assistance Grant; 97.048, Disaster Housing Assistance to...

  1. Nutrient fluxes from coastal California catchments with suburban development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melack, J. M.; Leydecker, A.; Beighley, E.; Robinson, T.; Coombs, S.

    2005-12-01

    Numerous streams originate in the mountains fringing California's coast and transport nutrients into coastal waters. In central California, these streams traverse catchments with land covers including chaparral, grazed grasslands, orchards, industrial agriculture and suburban and urban development. Fluvial nutrient concentrations and fluxes vary as a function of these land covers and as a function of considerable fluctuations in rainfall. As part of a long-term investigation of mobilization and fluvial transport of nutrients in catchments bordering the Santa Barbara Channel we have intensively sampled nutrient concentrations and measured discharge during storm and base flows in multiple catchments and subcatchments. Volume-weighted mean concentrations of nitrate generally ranged from 5 to 25 micromolar in undeveloped areas, increased to about 100 micromolar for suburban and most agricultural catchments, and were in excess of 1000 micromolar in catchments with greenhouse-based agriculture. Phosphate concentrations ranged from 2 to 20 micromolar among the catchments. These data are used to examine the premise that the suburbanized portion of the catchments is the primary source of nutrients to the streams.

  2. Perceived Risk of Developing Cancer in a Suburban Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasi, Hafizah; Md Isa, Zaleha; Azhar Shah, Shamsul

    2018-02-26

    Objective: To determine the perceived risk of developing cancer in a suburban community in Malaysia. Methods: A cross sectional study using a simple random sampling was conducted among residents aged 18 years old and above (n=520) who had never been diagnosed with cancer, in selected households in a suburban area of Pahang state in Malaysia. The study instruments were a validated questionnaire on risk perception, an automatic blood pressure monitor, a weighing scale and a measuring tape. Data were analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 20.0 and the p value was taken at p history of cancer (adjusted OR of 4.80; 95% CI = 1.45-15.82) (p=0.010) among this population. Conclusion: The perceived risk of developing cancer in the selected suburban community of Pahang state in Malaysia is low as compared to that for other non-communicable diseases in this country, whilst the perceived severity was higher than for other diseases. Thus, considering the importance of correct perceptions for behavioral changes, more health education and promotion is needed to make the community better aware of the actual threat of cancer. Creative Commons Attribution License

  3. The impact of a Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities service program in Maryland, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Dakheel-Ali, Maha; Frank, Julia K

    2010-06-01

    Most older adults prefer to age in place and it is therefore vital to support them in maintaining a high quality of life in their place of residence. Many Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities (NORCs) have implemented services to fulfill a range of needs of their residents. Community Partners (CP) provided 58 NORC residents in six apartment buildings within two suburban neighborhoods in Maryland with health and social work services, activities and transportation services. Participants were compared with 70 residents who did not receive these services. Residents were assessed prior to initiation of services (e.g. transportation, social work and recreation) and after service usage through a membership program. Members had significantly increased satisfaction with recreational activities and social life in the community as well as significant decreases in depressed affect. Members' self-reports showed that they were more likely to get out of the house, felt less isolated, and were happier since joining CP activities. This study is unique in examining the impact of utilization of a variety of services for older persons, while comparing these individuals to a local group of community-dwelling older persons who are without NORC services.

  4. Russian Specifics of Dacha Suburbanization Process: Case Study of the Moscow Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Valer’evich Rusanov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Topical issues related to the planning of urban agglomerations development include registration and analysis of changes in suburban areas in the process of socio-economic development. It is manifest, among other things, in urbanization, which in relation to larger cities is replaced by suburbanization. Suburbanization process has been developing to the greatest extent in North America and Western Europe. Scientific research confirms that the majority of large urban agglomerations are in the stage of suburbanization. The pace of suburbanization in the world is different – the authorities of individual countries, regions or cities often take measures to limit or simplify it: they reconstruct central cities, set limits to the construction in peripheral areas, etc. In Russia, the process of suburbanization started to develop rapidly only after the socio-economic transformation of the 1990s that led to the emergence of the free market of housing and land. The aim of the present work is to determine the specifics of suburbanization in Russia on the example of the Moscow Region. Suburbanization in Russia is mainly seasonal; therefore, the paper examines suburbanization specific for Russia and related to the distribution of population and its economic activities in the organized summer house settlements in suburban areas, i.e. in dachas. A kind of this activity popular in Russia is gardening and vegetable and fruit farming in the settlements located on specially designated lands. The paper examines the factors determining suburbanization in the Moscow Region, and demonstrates the influence of these factors taking two key areas as examples. Scientific novelty of the work consists in the fact that it clarifies the content of suburbanization factors as applied to the Moscow Region; in addition, it considers the development of dacha-related suburbanization, highlights its characteristics on the example of the Moscow Region, examines current distribution

  5. Whole grain intake: The Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maras, Janice E; Newby, P K; Bakun, Peter J; Ferrucci, Luigi; Tucker, Katherine L

    2009-02-01

    Our objective was to identify major dietary sources of whole grains and to describe the construction of a database of whole grain content of foods. Dietary information was collected with 7-d food records from men and women in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, mean age 62.1 +/- 16.0 years, who participated in the dietary assessment portion of the study (n = 1516), and estimates of whole grain intake were obtained from a newly developed database. The Pyramid Servings database and 1994-1996 Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals (CSFII) recipe ingredients database were then used to calculate both servings and gram weights of whole grain intakes. Mean intakes of whole grains, refined grains, and total grains, as well as frequency of intake for major whole grain food groups and whole grain content for each group, were calculated. Top contributors of whole grains were ready-to-eat breakfast cereals (made with whole grain as well as bran), hot breakfast cereals (made with whole grain), multi-grain bread, and whole wheat bread. While more research is needed to better understand the benefits of whole grains, the development of research tools, including databases to accurately assess whole grain intake, is a critical step in completing such research.

  6. Use of communication techniques by Maryland dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maybury, Catherine; Horowitz, Alice M; Wang, Min Qi; Kleinman, Dushanka V

    2013-12-01

    Health care providers' use of recommended communication techniques can increase patients' adherence to prevention and treatment regimens and improve patient health outcomes. The authors conducted a survey of Maryland dentists to determine the number and type of communication techniques they use on a routine basis. The authors mailed a 30-item questionnaire to a random sample of 1,393 general practice dentists and all 169 members of the Maryland chapter of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. The overall response rate was 38.4 percent. Analysis included descriptive statistics, analysis of variance and ordinary least squares regression analysis to examine the association of dentists' characteristics with the number of communication techniques used. They set the significance level at P communication techniques and 3.6 of the seven basic techniques, whereas pediatric dentists reported using a mean of 8.4 and 3.8 of those techniques, respectively. General dentists who had taken a communication course outside of dental school were more likely than those who had not to use the 18 techniques (P techniques (P communication course outside of dental school were more likely than those who had not to use the 18 techniques (P techniques (P communication techniques that dentists used routinely varied across the 18 techniques and was low for most techniques. Practical Implications. Professional education is needed both in dental school curricula and continuing education courses to increase use of recommended communication techniques. Specifically, dentists and their team members should consider taking communication skills courses and conducting an overall evaluation of their practices for user friendliness.

  7. Updating Maryland's sea-level rise projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesch, Donald F.; Atkinson, Larry P.; Boicourt, William C.; Boon, John D.; Cahoon, Donald R.; Dalrymple, Robert A.; Ezer, Tal; Horton, Benjamin P.; Johnson, Zoe P.; Kopp, Robert E.; Li, Ming; Moss, Richard H.; Parris, Adam; Sommerfield, Christopher K.

    2013-01-01

    With its 3,100 miles of tidal shoreline and low-lying rural and urban lands, “The Free State” is one of the most vulnerable to sea-level rise. Historically, Marylanders have long had to contend with rising water levels along its Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic Ocean and coastal bay shores. Shorelines eroded and low-relief lands and islands, some previously inhabited, were inundated. Prior to the 20th century, this was largely due to the slow sinking of the land since Earth’s crust is still adjusting to the melting of large masses of ice following the last glacial period. Over the 20th century, however, the rate of rise of the average level of tidal waters with respect to land, or relative sea-level rise, has increased, at least partially as a result of global warming. Moreover, the scientific evidence is compelling that Earth’s climate will continue to warm and its oceans will rise even more rapidly. Recognizing the scientific consensus around global climate change, the contribution of human activities to it, and the vulnerability of Maryland’s people, property, public investments, and natural resources, Governor Martin O’Malley established the Maryland Commission on Climate Change on April 20, 2007. The Commission produced a Plan of Action that included a comprehensive climate change impact assessment, a greenhouse gas reduction strategy, and strategies for reducing Maryland’s vulnerability to climate change. The Plan has led to landmark legislation to reduce the state’s greenhouse gas emissions and a variety of state policies designed to reduce energy consumption and promote adaptation to climate change.

  8. The Housing Pattern and Entrepreneurship in Polish Suburban Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyniuk-Peczek, Justyna; Peczek, Grzegorz; Martyniuk, Olga

    2017-10-01

    Housing stimulates the development of SMEs (small and medium enterprises) in the suburbs. The multidisciplinary research in fields of urban planning and economics, carried out by the Authors, confirms this trend. The purpose of this paper is to present the multidisciplinary results of the research on the determinants of SME localization in the suburban areas of Gdansk, Gdynia and Sopot (the Metropolitan Area Gdansk-Gdynia-Sopot - MAGGS). Many of researchers attach great significance to the term of urban sprawl. Most authors agree that this phenomenon is multidimensional. It also varies in the global perspective. The conducted research showed that urban sprawl in Poland had a positive impact on the development of entrepreneurship, leading to a situation when the SME location quotient (LQ) in some suburban areas is higher, in comparison to the core city itself. The communities characterized by an LQ significantly higher than in the core city have been identified by Authors as ‘entrepreneurship nests’. To identify the research problem, a two-pronged research in the fields of urban and architectural design as well as economics was adopted. The charter of suburban landscape was determined by site analysis and through a study of the architectural form. The results confirmed that more than 80% of the parcels, which encompass economic activity, also exhibit a residential function. Our study confirms that urban sprawl, with its characteristic housing patterns, stimulates business activity in the suburbs. According to our results, this phenomenon is not only determined by financial factors, but also results from social and spatial reasons.

  9. Integrated Rolling Stock Planning for Suburban Passenger Trains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlacius, Per

    A central issue for operators of passenger trains is providing sufficient number of seats while minimising operating costs. This process must be conducted taking a large number of practical, railway oriented requirements into account. Because of this complexity, a stepwise solution was previously...... used, the result being the loss of optimality. The talk will present a new, integrated rolling stock planning model in which the many requirements are handled all at the same time. Preliminary results from DSB S-tog, the suburban train operator of the City of Copenhagen will also be presented....

  10. A comprehensive engineering analysis of motorcycle crashes in Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    The goal of this study was to identify recurring or common road characteristics of motorcycle crashes : in Maryland from 1998 to 2007. Motorcycle crash data was obtained from the National Highway : Traffic Safety Administrations Crash Outcome Data...

  11. Emerald ash borer dispersal in Maryland: go forth young pest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris Sargent; Dick Bean; Michael Raupp; Alan J. Sawyer

    2009-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire), an exotic invasive pest from Asia, was introduced into Maryland in April 2003 via infested nursery stock shipped from Michigan to a nursery in southern...

  12. Ocean City, Maryland Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Ocean City, Maryland Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model....

  13. Maryland ESI: M_MAMMAL (Marine Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for seals, whales, porpoise, and dolphin in Maryland. Vector polygons in this data set represent marine...

  14. Perspectives on Obesity and Its Treatment: Health Care Providers and the General Public in Rural West Virginia and Urban Baltimore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menez, Steven; Cheskin, Lawrence; Geller, Gail

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine and compare the perspectives of the general public and health care providers (HCPs) on obesity and its treatment in rural West Virginia (WV) and Baltimore, MD. Method: Surveys were completed in both locations by the general public (WV: "n" = 200; Baltimore: "n" = 171) and HCPs (WV: "n" = 25;…

  15. Youth Apprenticeship: A Hopeful Approach for Improving Outcomes for Baltimore Youth. The Abell Report. Volume 28, No. 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, Robert I.; Packer, Arnold

    2015-01-01

    Youth transitions to rewarding careers remain a critical problem for America's current and future workforce. In Baltimore, where only one in five graduates of Baltimore City Public Schools matriculates to a four-year college and the unemployment rate for 16 to 19 year-olds is over 40 percent, opportunities to gain meaningful training and work…

  16. Education of Non-European Ancestry Immigrant Students in Suburban High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shodavaram, Mary P.; Jones, Lisa A.; Weaver, Laurie R.; Marquez, Judith A.; Ensle, Anne L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine suburban high school teachers' beliefs about non-European ancestry immigrant students; more specifically, suburban teachers' beliefs regarding the impact of students' cultural backgrounds on academic performance were examined. Non-European ancestry immigrant students are those students whose ancestral…

  17. Moving on Up: Urban to Suburban Translocation Experiences of High-Achieving Black American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaoqi; Seeberg, Vilma; Malone, Larissa

    2017-01-01

    Minority suburbanization has been a fast growing demographic shift in the United States during the first decade of the 21st century. This article examines the tapestry of the suburbanization experience of a group of high-achieving Black American students and their families as told by them. Departing from the all too common, deficit orientation…

  18. Influence patterns of transportation parameters in suburban traffic on fatigue of passengers during bus waiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Тетяна Михайлівна Григорова

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The change of transport fatigue of suburban traffic passengers during waiting transport waiting is investigated. The results of the processing site examinations allow defining the regularities of the influence of parameters of transportation process of passengers to change index activity of regulatory systems in passenger waiting at stopping points of suburban traffic. The discovered patterns were mathematically formalized

  19. 77 FR 46803 - Notice of Receipt of Petition for Decision That Nonconforming 2005 Chevrolet Suburban Multi...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-06

    ...-0095, Notice 1] Notice of Receipt of Petition for Decision That Nonconforming 2005 Chevrolet Suburban... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) of a petition for a decision that 2005 Chevrolet... (the U.S.-certified version of the 2005 Chevrolet Suburban MPV) and they are capable of being readily...

  20. A Survey of the Characteristics and Perceptions of Urban and Suburban Secondary Instrumental Music Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Kate R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey and compare the characteristics and perceptions of randomly selected urban and suburban (N=20) secondary instrumental music teachers in the Chicago area. Descriptive analysis of the demographic data demonstrated the following: suburban participants had higher levels of educational attainment than their urban…

  1. Physical and biological responses of streams to suburbanization of historically agricultural watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris L. Burcher; E.F. Benfield

    2006-01-01

    We investigated whether suburbanization influenced the physical and biological characteristics of ten 3rd-0r 4th-order streams that drain historically agricultural watersheds in the southern Appalachians near Asheville, North Carolina. Five watersheds had areas of recent suburban development proximal to stream sites, and 5...

  2. Tumor prevalence and biomarkers of exposure in brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) from Back River, Furnace Creek, and Tuckahoe River, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkney, A.E.; Harshbarger, J.C.; May, E.B.; Melancon, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Brown bullheads (Ameiurus nebulosus) were collected from 2 locations near Baltimore, Maryland, Back River and Furnace Creek, and 1 (reference) location, Tuckahoe River, to compare the prevalence of tumors (liver and skin) and visible skin lesions (fin erosion and abnormal barbels). Cytochrome P450 activity measured as ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase, biliary PAH-like fluorescent metabolites, and fillet contaminant concentrations were determined as indicators of exposure in a randomly selected subset of the fish. There were no significant differences in liver tumor prevalence: Back River = 8% (4/50), Furnace Creek = 0% (0/50), and Tuckahoe River = 2.6% (1/39; p = 0.20, extension of Fishers exact test). Skin tumor prevalence was as follows: Furnace Creek = 12% (6/50), Back River = 8% (4/50), and Tuckahoe River = 0% (0/39; p = 0.063). In the Back River fish, there was a 40% (20/50) prevalence of fin erosion and a 28% (14/50) prevalence of abnormal (shortened, clubbed, or missing) barbels. Fin erosion was not observed in the other collections, and only 10% (5/50) of the Furnace Creek fish had abnormal barbels (p tumors, fin erosion, and abnormal barbels.

  3. Suburbanizing Segregation? Changes in Racial/Ethnic Diversity and the Geographic Distribution of Metropolitan School Segregation, 2002-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroub, Kori J.; Richards, Meredith P.

    2017-01-01

    Background: While postwar suburban migration established suburbs as relatively affluent, homogeneous white enclaves distinct from the urban core, recent waves of suburbanization and exurbanization have been spurred largely by rapid growth in the nonwhite population. While these increases in suburban racial/ethnic diversity represent a significant…

  4. Beyond the Comfort Zone: Betsy Diamant-Cohen--Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Library Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    What have librarians got to do with brain research? Much more than most librarians realize, says Betsy Diamant-Cohen, Children's Programming Specialist at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore. Her original plan was to be a social worker, but it was suggested that she could be equally effective in improving lives as a librarian--while having a…

  5. The relationship between residential yard management and neighborhood crime: An analysis from Baltimore City and County

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin Troy; Ashley Nunery; Morgan Grove

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the relationship between crime and indicators of residential yard management in Baltimore City and County. Data came from a survey we conducted of over one thousand front yards that included more than 40 indicators relating to lawns, trees, shrubs, beds and other features. These indicators were related to point counts of crime at the 150 m scale using a...

  6. 76 FR 1362 - Safety Zone; Ice Conditions for the Baltimore Captain of Port Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-10

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Ice Conditions for the Baltimore Captain of Port Zone AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... of these four methods. See the ``Public Participation and Request for Comments'' portion of the... shape in the ``Actions'' column. If you submit your comments by mail or hand delivery, submit them in an...

  7. Beyond urban legends: an emerging framework of urban ecology, as illustrated by the Baltimore Ecosystem Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward T.A. Pickett; Mary L. Cadenasso; J. Morgan Grove; Peter M. Groffman; Lawrence E. Band; Christopher G. Boone; William R., Jr. Burch; Susan B. Grimmond; John Hom; Jennifer C. Jenkins; Neely L. Law; Charles H. Nilon; Richard V. Pouyat; Katalin Szlavecz; Paige S. Warren; Matthew A. Wilson

    2008-01-01

    The emerging discipline of urban ecology is shifting focus from ecological processes embedded within cities to integrative studies of large urban areas as biophysical-social complexes. Yet this discipline lacks a theory. Results from the Baltimore Ecosystem Study, part of the Long Term Ecological Research Network, expose new assumptions and test existing assumptions...

  8. Investigating the Occupational Challenges of Corner Store Workers Operating in Baltimore City Food Deserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceryes, Caitlin A; Flamm, Laura; Fitzgerald, Sheila

    2017-02-01

    A qualitative pilot study was conducted in Baltimore City with the aim of documenting specific occupational safety challenges of small-scale urban retailers, or "corner store" owners. Semistructured interviews with a small sample ( n = 4) revealed significant challenges for owners and workers, and revealed potential areas for occupational health intervention.

  9. A long view of polluting industry and environmental justice in Baltimore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher G. Boone; Michail Fragkias; Geoffrey L. Buckley; J. Morgan. Grove

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the density of polluting industry by neighborhoods in Baltimore over the long term, from 1950 to 2010, to determine if high pollution burdens correspond spatially with expected demographic and housing variables predicted in the environmental justice literature. For 1960-1980 we use data on heavy industry from Dun and Bradstreet directories and for...

  10. Strategies for Student Attendance and School Climate in Baltimore's Community Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Rachel E.; Connolly, Faith

    2017-01-01

    In 2012, the Community School Engagement Strategy was adopted by the Family League of Baltimore as a way to address historical racial and structural inequalities that have produced unequal educational outcomes among the city's children and youth. The goals of community schools include integrating health and social supports for children and their…

  11. Property values, parks, and crime: a hedonic analysis in Baltimore, MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin Troy; J. Morgan Grove

    2008-01-01

    While urban parks are generally considered to be a positive amenity, past research suggests that some parks are perceived as a neighborhood liability. Using hedonic analysis of property data in Baltimore, MD, we attempted to determine whether crime rate mediates how parks are valued by the housing market. Transacted price was regressed against park proximity, area-...

  12. UNDERSTANDING VISITOR EXPERIENCES AND MOTIVATIONS IN SUBURBAN TAIPEI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiung-Tzu Lucetta TSAI

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This research is aimed to cultivate higher-qualified human resources within the tourism field and provide plaining and developing direction based on the understanding of tourism features in San-ying area. There is a growing research interest in understanding the individual consumer's preferences, as well as management approaches of experiences and therefore, it has explored the understanding of the many different facets of experiences in tourism and hispitality business in suburban Taipei in particular the impact of the Sanxia and Yingge area. There is an attempt to examine the service quality of tourist attractions, moreover, the perceptions and travel experiences of tourists who visit Sanxia and Yingge area. Tourism and hospitality business in Sanxia and Yingge area present culture images and this study has discussed how this has influenced tourists' experiences, motivation and consumer behavior during their visit.

  13. Pseudo natural colour aerial imagery for urban and suburban mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Due to their near-infrared data channel, digital airborne four-channel imagers provide a potentially good discrimination between vegetation and human-made materials, which is very useful in automated mapping. Due to their red, green and blue data channels, they also provide natural colour images......, which are very useful in traditional (manual) mapping. In this paper, an algorithm is described which provides an approximation to the spectral capabilities of the four-channel imagers by using a colour-infrared aerial photo as input. The algorithm is tailored to urban/suburban surroundings, where...... the quality of the generated (pseudo) natural colour images are fully acceptable for manual mapping. This brings the combined availability of near-infrared and (pseudo) natural colours within reach for mapping projects based on traditional photogrammetry, which is valuable since traditional analytical cameras...

  14. B'More Healthy: Retail Rewards--design of a multi-level communications and pricing intervention to improve the food environment in Baltimore City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budd, Nadine; Cuccia, Alison; Jeffries, Jayne K; Prasad, Divya; Frick, Kevin D; Powell, Lisa; Katz, Fred A; Gittelsohn, Joel

    2015-03-24

    Low-income black residents of Baltimore City have disproportionately higher rates of obesity and chronic disease than other Maryland residents. Increasing the availability and affordability of healthy food are key strategies to improve the food environment and can lead to healthier diets. This paper describes B'More Healthy: Retail Rewards (BHRR), an intervention that tests the effectiveness of performance-based pricing discounts and health communications, separately and combined, on healthy food purchasing and consumption among low-income small store customers. BHRR is 2x2 factorial design randomized controlled trial. Fifteen regular customers recruited from each of 24 participating corner stores in Baltimore City were enrolled. Food stores were randomized to 1) pricing intervention, 2) communications intervention, 3) combined intervention, or 4) control. Pricing stores were given a 10-30% price discount on selected healthier food items, such as fresh fruits, frozen vegetables, and baked chips, at the point of purchase from two food wholesale stores during the 6-month trial. Storeowners agreed to pass on the discount to the consumer to increase demand for healthy food. Communications stores received visual and interactive materials to promote healthy items, including signage, taste tests, and refrigerators. Primary outcome measures include consumer food purchasing and associated psychosocial variables. Secondary outcome measures include consumer food consumption, store sales, and associated storeowner psychosocial factors. Process evaluation was monitored throughout the trial at wholesaler, small store, and consumer levels. This is the first study to test the impact of performance-based pricing and communications incentives in small food stores, an innovative strategy to encourage local wholesalers and storeowners to share responsibility in creating a healthier food supply by stocking, promoting, and reducing costs of healthier foods in their stores. Local food

  15. 2011 Joint Program Executive Office for Chemical and Biological Defense Advance Planning Briefing for Industry (APBI) Held in Baltimore, Maryland on September 7-9, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-09

    Retardant Materials – Reduced Lens Fogging /Distortion – Increased Field-of-View and Field-of-Regard – Reduce interference with operational platforms and...DETECTOR KIT $66.48 90,000 $5,983,200 6665-01-463-4278 M18A3 DETECTOR KIT $681.00 1440 $980,640 6665-01-134-0885 M272 WATER TEST KIT $396.00 2,160...Characterization Serum Repository Ecosystem Disease Burden Agent Genomics Remote Sensing, In Vivo Dx NAMRU-6 – Peru , Iquitos VIEWS-11-023.ppt Diagnostic

  16. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (81st, Baltimore, Maryland, August 5-8, 1998). Mass Communication and Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Mass Communication and Society section of the Proceedings contains the following 19 papers: "Talk Radio as Forum and Companion: Listener Attitudes and Uses and Gratifications in Austin, Texas" (John Beatty); "'Willingness to Censor': Developing a Quantitative Measurement across Speech Categories and Types of Media"…

  17. National Computer Security Conference Proceedings (12th): Information Systems Security: Solutions for Today - Concepts for Tomorrow Held in Baltimore, Maryland on 10-13 October 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-13

    Jotiv read Alice write AC L File Alpha Figiire 4: A file’s ACL and ari ACL’g ACL. 8 Auithiextivation (In1 tile following "liscussionls We luse as anl... forgot the real requirement for anti-aircraft guns. (26] References [1] "’Very Serious Losses’ as the Navy Spy Scandel Spreads, Officials Assess the

  18. Social Desirability Bias and Prevalence of Sexual HIV Risk Behaviors Among People Who Use Drugs in Baltimore, Maryland: Implications for Identifying Individuals Prone to Underreporting Sexual Risk Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Amrita; Tobin, Karin; Davey-Rothwell, Melissa; Latkin, Carl A

    2017-07-01

    The role of social desirability bias (SDB) in self-reported HIV risk behaviors continues to be problematic. This study examined whether SDB was associated with self-reported, via audio computer assisted self-interviewing, sexual risk behaviors among people who use drugs. The present study was conducted among 559 participants who reported having a recent sexual partner at their 6-month visit of a longitudinal study. Robust Poisson regression was used to model the association between SDB and five risk behaviors. Analyses were stratified by gender and partner type. Higher scores of SDB were associated with decreased reporting of selling sex and having more than one sexual partner. Higher SDB scores were associated with increased reporting of always using condoms during oral, vaginal, and anal sex. Gender-specific differences were observed. The inclusion of a measure of SDB in data collection, along with other strategies, can be used to both identify and reduce self-report biases.

  19. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (81st, Baltimore, Maryland, August 5-8, 1998). Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Advertising section of the Proceedings contains the following 18 papers: "The Birth of Adwatches: Political Advertising Becomes Front-Page News" (Jennifer Greer); "A Cross-Cultural Comparison of the Effects of Source Credibility on Attitudes and Behavioral Intentions" (Kak Yoon, Choong Hyun Kim, and Min-Sun Kim);…

  20. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (81st, Baltimore, Maryland, August 5-8, 1998). Qualitative Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Qualitative Studies section of the Proceedings contains the following 10 papers: "An Alternative to Alternative Media'" (James Hamilton); "A Critical Assessment of News Coverage of the Ethical Implications of Genetic Testing" (David A. Craig); "Earth First! and the Boundaries of Postmodern Environmental…

  1. NOAA Office for Coastal Management Coastal Inundation Digital Elevation Model: Baltimore/Washington Weather Forecast Office (LWX WFO) - Maryland (West of Chesapeake Bay)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data were created as part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Office for Coastal Management's efforts to create an online mapping viewer...

  2. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (81st, Baltimore, Maryland, August 5-8, 1998). Visual Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Visual Communication section of the Proceedings contains the following 12 papers: "The Limits of Copyright Protection for the Use of Visual Works in Motion Pictures, Print Media, and Pop Art in the 1990s" (Andy Bechtel and Arati Korwar); "Afterthoughts on the Representational Strategies of the FSA Documentary" (Edgar…

  3. Proceedings of the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program Meeting for Era of Hope, Held in Baltimore, Maryland on 25-28 June 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Piper Cancer Center; and Scottsdale Healthcare. P5-15: REGRESSION ON MEDIAN RESIDUAL LIFE Jong-Hyeon Jeong,1 Sin-Ho Jung ,2 and Hanna Bandos1...a similar inhibitory archetype , antibody inhibitors provide an opportunity to develop divergent mechanisms of inhibition from a single scaffold... Jung Moon,1 Chuan-Yuan Li,2 Ines Batinic-Haberle,1 and Mark W. Dewhirst1 1Duke University Medical Center and 2University of Colorado Denver, Health

  4. Proceedings of the IREAPS Technical Symposium (8th) held in Baltimore, Maryland on September 15-17, 1981 (The National Shipbuilding Research Program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    a rock ! The scientists alleged that the turtle had been observed regularly, passionately attacking the rock (which, to some degree, resembled a sea...DC 20362 Robert L. Milner Industrial Engineer Tosh Nomura Naval Architect John Rosborough Naval Architect Vincent Santomarino Naval Architect Lewis

  5. Unity in Diversity: Results of a Randomized Clinical Culturally Tailored Pilot HIV Prevention Intervention Trial in Baltimore, Maryland, for African American Men Who Have Sex with Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Karin; Kuramoto, Satoko J.; German, Danielle; Fields, Errol; Spikes, Pilgrim S.; Patterson, Jocelyn; Latkin, Carl

    2013-01-01

    Unity in Diversity was a randomized controlled trial of a culturally tailored HIV prevention intervention for African American men who have sex with men. The intervention condition was six group-based sessions and one individual session. The control condition was a single-session HIV prevention review. Participants were aged 18 years or older,…

  6. Rural, suburban, and urban differences in factors that impact physician adherence to clinical preventive service guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoong, Elaine C; Gibbert, Wesley S; Garbutt, Jane M; Sumner, Walton; Brownson, Ross C

    2014-01-01

    Rural-urban disparities in provision of preventive services exist, but there is sparse research on how rural, suburban, or urban differences impact physician adherence to clinical preventive service guidelines. We aimed to identify factors that may cause differences in adherence to preventive service guidelines among rural, suburban, and urban primary care physicians. This qualitative study involved in-depth semistructured interviews with 29 purposively sampled primary care physicians (10 rural, 10 suburban, 9 urban) in Missouri. Physicians were asked to describe barriers and facilitators to clinical preventive service guideline adherence. Using techniques from grounded theory analysis, 2 coders first independently conducted content analysis then reconciled differences in coding to ensure agreement on intended meaning of transcripts. Patient epidemiologic differences, distance to health care services, and care coordination were reported as prominent factors that produced differences in preventive service guideline adherence among rural, suburban, and urban physicians. Epidemiologic differences impacted all physicians, but rural physicians highlighted the importance of occupational risk factors in their patients. Greater distance to health care services reduced visit frequency and was a prominent barrier for rural physicians. Care coordination among health care providers was problematic for suburban and urban physicians. Patient resistance to medical care and inadequate access to resources and specialists were identified as barriers by some rural physicians. The rural, suburban, or urban context impacts whether a physician will adhere to clinical preventive service guidelines. Efforts to increase guideline adherence should consider the barriers and facilitators unique to rural, suburban, or urban areas. © 2013 National Rural Health Association.

  7. The Regulation and Improvement of Suburban Landless Peasants’ Community in the Charge of the Government

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinsong Zhang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Suburban landless peasants’ communities are both the transfiguration in the passive urbanization and transformation in the leading of governments. The specificity of suburban landless peasants community-generated determines the specificity in governing. The deficiency of well governance mechanisms, the scarcity of citizen spirit, the low level of self-organization and the deficiency of social capital in suburban landless peasants’ community in the charge of the government bring about a serious of developing dilemma. The regulation and improvement of government should embark on reconstructive governance mechanisms, straighten out organizational system; Cultivating citizen spirit, promoting public participation; Remodeling social capital, tamping autonomy foundation.

  8. Review of urban and suburban experiences of animal breeding as an alternative of food security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Ernesto Seija Flórez

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The urban and suburban animal production in tropical countries is a valid strategy to improve human nutrition, family consumption, income generation, savings and living conditions. Through case studies experiences of breeding animal (pigs, aquaculture, dairy, poultry, rabbits and bees were reviewed in some cities around the world to help in solving problems of food supply in urban and suburban areas. It should highlight the constraints (political, legal, health and environmental and intervention strategies to find solutions to problems. It was concluded that the positive experiences from around the world can introduce considerations of sustainability in urban and suburban animal breeding.

  9. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Maryland. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2012 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Maryland.

  10. Bioassay of Surface Quality/Chesapeake Bay, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-02-01

    High Quaility Diversity L - Low Quality 1.9 b• Principio ( 1.787)H Byrd(1.734)1i 1.71 Fork(.630)I- 1. Little Byrd(l.549)H I Parnunkey(L545)]i "Elk... Principio Creek- Cecil Co., MD HQ 19. (MR) Morgan Run- Carrol Co., MD LQ 20. (HR) Herring Run- Baltimore Co., MD HQ 21. (PX) Patuxent Creek- Howard

  11. Ambulatory practice variation in Maryland: Implications for Medicaid cost management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Mary; Steinwachs, Donald; Harlow, Jennifer; Fox, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Simulation modeling with data from the Maryland Medicaid Management Information System has provided an opportunity to examine policy options and assess their likely impact on savings before program decisions were made. Analysis of a large sample of the Maryland Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) Medicaid subpopulation confirms that a significant difference in utilization and cost to Medicaid exists between usual sources of care for AFDC clients even after controlling for patient demographics and case-mix differences. Findings indicate that savings from reduced use of hospital outpatient departments may offset increases of as much as 40–50 percent in physician fees under certain assumptions. PMID:10113498

  12. Lead levels in Maryland construction workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokas, R K; Simmens, S; Sophar, K; Welch, L S; Liziewski, T

    1997-02-01

    A cross-sectional study of unionized construction workers not currently known to be performing lead work was conducted. Participants completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire obtaining information about demographics, work history, other possible sources of lead exposure and health status (including hypertension, noise-induced hearing loss and renal disease). Blood was then obtained via venipuncture for whole blood lead level, hematocrit and free erythrocyte protoporphyrin determination. Two hundred and sixty-four Maryland construction workers had median whole blood lead determinations of 7 micrograms/dl and mean values of 8.0 micrograms/dl, with a skewed distribution ranging from 2 to 30 micrograms/dl. None were currently engaged in known lead work. Blood lead levels were significantly higher for the 124 who had 'ever' worked in demolition (8.8 micrograms/dl vs. 7.2 micrograms/dl, p = .004), and for the 79 who had ever burned paint and metal and welded on outdoor structures compared to the 48 who had done none of these activities (8.6 micrograms/dl vs. 6.8 micrograms/dl, p = .01). The 58 workers who had ever had workplace lead monitoring performed had higher lead levels (9.7 vs. 7.5 micrograms/dl, p = .003). Blood lead levels increased with age, and cigarette smoking. African Americans (N = 68) had higher lead levels (9.1 vs. 7.5 micrograms/dl, p = .01). There were only two women in the study, one with a lead level of 21 micrograms/dl and one, 7 micrograms/dl. Blood lead levels did not predict either systolic or diastolic blood pressure in this population. However, there was a significant interaction between race and lead as predictors of blood pressure, with blacks demonstrating a trend-significant correlation, and whites showing a nonsignificant but negative association. Demolition and hotwork on outdoor structures are known to cause acute episodes of lead poisoning. They also appear to cause slight but persistent increases in blood lead levels. Future

  13. Preparation and Retention of the Early Childhood Care and Education Workforce in Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Elisa L.; Zheng, Xiaying; Sunderman, Gail L.; Henneberger, Angela K.; Stapleton, Laura M.; Woolley, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing awareness of the vital developmental implications of the care and education of young children has led to efforts in Maryland to advance early childhood care and education (ECCE). To that end, Maryland has consolidated ECCE services into one division of the Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) and developed a number of…

  14. The geographic epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis disease in Baltimore, 1971-1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obasanjo, Olugbenga Olufemi

    Given the reemergence of Tuberculosis (TB) in the United States (U.S.) in the 1980s and 1990s, several strategies have emerged to combat the disease. A successful tool has been Directly Observed Therapy (DOT). Chaulk, et al. showed that DOT was responsible for the maintaining the decline in TB rates in Baltimore through the corresponding period of an upswing in rates nationally. In this study, we measure the impact of DOT on the geographic pattern of TB in Baltimore. We used Geographical Information System (GIS) methods to compare the geographic patterns of TB in Baltimore before and after the introduction of DOT in the city. We identified both predictors of TB, and differences in geographic units in Baltimore over time. We measured the impact of the introduction of DOT and Rifampin on various treatment outcomes for TB at about the same time. Despite the drop in numbers of TB cases, the spatial distribution of cases generally remained unchanged until 1995. This was confirmed by the fact that similar predictors were identified in all of the years that were analyzed. However, higher proportions of TB cases were found among blacks and females in more recent years. Death rates have increased significantly while corresponding relapse rates and the mean length of therapy have declined significantly. Rifampin was associated with a longer length of therapy before DOT, but with a shorter duration of therapy following the introduction of DOT. In all of the years analyzed, losses to follow-up (LTFU) do not differ from those completing therapy and are not spatially clustered relative to those completing therapy. DOT has been effective in reducing the numbers of TB cases in Baltimore city-wide without an emphasis on so-called "high-risk" patients for LTFU. Thus, any declines in TB case rates are not due to a decline in a particular group or geographic sector of the city. Universal DOT is effective and does not cause a geographic clustering of difficult-to-reach patients. This

  15. An assessment of transit ridership: increased suburban to urban public transportation options in Houston, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    Suburban development is occurring near urban areas across America. Often these communities are : separated by large masses of land with no linkage to the urban core. Referred to as urban sprawl, this type : of development causes a challenge for trans...

  16. SIMULATION OF SUBURBAN DEVELOPMENT FEATURES BASED ON SCENARIOS IN THE EASTERN SIDE OF IASI CITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEXANDRA BLĂGEANU

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Simulation of suburban development features based on scenarios in the eastern side of Iasi city Suburbanization, a complex process well-developed pre-eminently after the fall of communism, is characterized by a spontaneous, sometimes ambiguous, evolution comparatively to the urban planning specific to the former period. The phenomenon, typical to large cities, has known different stages that were enforced by local factors, creating, thus, an uncertain, chaotic and hard to control suburban fringe. This approach highlights the features of the named process; the first step is aimed to identify some urban models by analyzing those administrative units which are into a continuous motion, namely the communes Barnova, Miroslava and Valea Lupului. Based on the urban blueprints identified in the first part of the approach, will be imagined/built scenarios which will predict the rhythm of suburban expansion in two chosen communes located in the eastern side of Iasi city.

  17. Suburban poverty, public transit, economic opportunities, and social mobility : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-30

    Recent demographic trends suggest an increasing suburbanization of poor populations. Given that poor : households are often unable to afford increasing housing prices in many urban areas they are increasingly : moving to the suburbs. At the same time...

  18. Anticaries effect of atraumatic restorative treatment with fissure sealants in suburban districts of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertuĝrul Ercan

    2009-06-01

    Conclusion: These results clearly show that the ART-GIS procedure can be used as a preventive method in rural and/or suburban areas where other preventive approaches are neither available nor economical.

  19. Analysis and Comparison of 24 GHz cmWave Radio Propagation in Urban and Suburban Scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez, Ignacio; Portela Lopes de Almeida, Erika; Abreu, Renato

    2016-01-01

    path loss analysis. The paper also highlights the potential of using beam combining techniques in order to improve cell-edge coverage by 17% and 37% in the urban and suburban scenarios, respectively. Outdoor-to-indoor propagation was also investigated, finding an average penetration loss of 6.5 d......This paper presents a measurement-based comparison of cm-wave propagation in urban and suburban scenarios at 24 GHz with transmitter antennas located above rooftop level. Different sets of directional measurements, exploring the full azimuth and the range from -30 to +30 degrees in elevation, were...... as compared to the urban case. Increased spatial multipath, in average 1.23 times higher, is observed in the suburban scenario, mainly due to the strong presence of vegetation. This results in reduced suburban NLOS path loss exponents (3.4) in comparison to the urban scenario (3.7), as detailed in the outdoor...

  20. Enduring Consequences From the War on Drugs: How Policing Practices Impact HIV Risk Among People Who Inject Drugs in Baltimore City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flath, Natalie; Tobin, Karin; King, Kelly; Lee, Alexandra; Latkin, Carl

    2017-07-03

    Neighborhood-level characteristics, including police activity, are associated with HIV and Hepatitis C injection risk-behaviors among people who inject drugs (PWID). However, the pathways through which these neighborhood perceptions shape individual-level HIV risk behaviors are unclear. This study helps to explain perceived behaviors between perceived neighborhood police activity and HIV injection risk behavior (i.e., injection syringe/tool sharing in the previous 6 months). A sample of (n = 366) PWIDs who self-reported recent use were recruited using community-based outreach methods in Baltimore, Maryland. Neighborhood police perceptions were assessed by asking participants whether they would (1) be more likely to ask others to share injection tools in the context of heightened police activity and (2) be less likely to carry syringes with them due to fear of arrest. Poisson regression with robust variance was used to identify statistical relationships. Recent police encounters, frequency of heroin injection, and sociodemographic characteristics were controlled for in the model. Neighborhood police perceptions shaped injection-risk behavior. Half of the sample (49%) reported an aversion of carrying personal syringes, due to fear of arrest. Those who agreed they would be more likely to ask others to share injection equipment in the context of heightened police activity were more likely to share syringes (21% vs. 3%, p <.01). Adjusted models showed that syringe sharing was independently associated with asking to borrow equipment in neighborhoods with perceived heightened police activity (aPR: 2.22, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.7, 3.0). This study sheds light on how police perceptions may influence injection risk behavior. While these relationships require further elucidation, this study suggests that public health interventions aiming to reduce HIV risk would benefit from improving community-police relationships.

  1. Forecasted electric power demands for the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company. Volume 1 and Volume 2. Documentation manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estomin, S.L.; Beach, J.E.; Goldsmith, J.V.

    1991-05-01

    The two-volume report presents the results of an econometric forecast of peak load and electric power demand for the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (BG ampersand E) through the year 2009. Separate energy sales models were estimated for residential sales in Baltimore City, residential sales in the BG ampersand E service area excluding Baltimore City, commercial sales, industrial sales, streetlighting sales, and Company use plus losses. Econometric equations were also estimated for electric space heating and air conditioning saturation in Baltimore City and in the remainder of the BG ampersand E service territory. In addition to the energy sales models and the electric space conditioning saturation models, econometric models of summer and winter peak demand on the BG ampersand E system were estimated

  2. Diversities of phthalate esters in suburban agricultural soils and wasteland soil appeared with urbanization in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Shaofei; Ji Yaqin; Liu Lingling; Chen Li; Zhao Xueyan; Wang Jiajun; Bai Zhipeng; Sun Zengrong

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of six priority phthalic acid esters (PAEs) in suburban farmland, vegetable, orchard and wasteland soils of Tianjin were obtained with gas chromatography-mass spectrometer analysis in 2009. Results showed that total PAEs varied from 0.05 to 10.4 μg g −1 , with the median value as 0.32 μg g −1 . Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate and di-n-butyl phthalate are most abundant species. PAEs concentrations for the four types of soils exhibited decreasing order as vegetable soil > wasteland soil > farmland soil > orchard soil. PAEs exhibited elevated levels in more developed regions when compared with other studies. The agricultural plastic film could elevate the PAEs contents in soils. Principal component analysis indicated the emission from cosmetics and personal care products and plasticizers were important sources for PAEs in suburban soils in Tianjin. The higher PAEs contents in wasteland soils from suburban area should be paid more attention owing to large amounts of solid wastes appeared with the ongoing urbanization. - Highlights: ► PAEs levels in four types of soils in suburban area of Tianjin were studied. ► Vegetable soil and wasteland soil exhibited higher PAEs concentrations. ► PAEs in wasteland soils from suburban area of cities in China should be paid attention. - (1) Vegetable soil and wasteland soil exhibited higher PAEs concentrations; (2) PAEs in wasteland soils from suburban area of cities in China should be paid attention.

  3. Characterization and source apportionment of volatile organic compounds in urban and suburban Tianjin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Meng; Lu, Xueqiang; Zhao, Chunsheng; Ran, Liang; Han, Suqin

    2015-03-01

    Tianjin is the third largest megacity and the fastest growth area in China, and consequently faces the problems of surface ozone and haze episodes. This study measures and characterizes volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are ozone precursors, to identify their possible sources and evaluate their contribution to ozone formation in urban and suburban Tianjin, China during the HaChi (Haze in China) summer campaign in 2009. A total of 107 species of ambient VOCs were detected, and the average concentrations of VOCs at urban and suburban sites were 92 and 174 ppbv, respectively. Of those, 51 species of VOCs were extracted to analyze the possible VOC sources using positive matrix factorization. The identified sources of VOCs were significantly related to vehicular activities, which specifically contributed 60% to urban and 42% to suburban VOCs loadings in Tianjin. Industrial emission was the second most prominent source of ambient VOCs in both urban and suburban areas, although the contribution of industry in the suburban area (36%) was much higher than that at the urban area (16%). We conclude that controlling vehicle emissions should be a top priority for VOC reduction, and that fast industrialization and urbanization causes air pollution to be more complex due to the combined emission of VOCs from industry and daily life, especially in suburban areas.

  4. Patient satisfaction with community pharmacy: comparing urban and suburban chain-pharmacy populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malewski, David F; Ream, Aimrie; Gaither, Caroline A

    2015-01-01

    Patient satisfaction with pharmaceutical care can be a strong predictor of medication and other health-related outcomes. Less understood is the role that location of pharmacies in urban or suburban environments plays in patient satisfaction with pharmacy and pharmacist services. The purpose of this study was to serve as a pilot examining urban and suburban community pharmacy populations for similarities and differences in patient satisfaction. Community pharmacy patients were asked to self-administer a 30-question patient satisfaction survey. Fifteen questions addressed their relationship with the pharmacist, 10 questions addressed satisfaction and accessibility of the pharmacy, and five questions addressed financial concerns. Five urban and five suburban pharmacies agreed to participate. Data analysis included descriptive statistics and chi-square analysis. Most patients reported high levels of satisfaction. Satisfaction with pharmacist relationship and service was 70% or higher with no significant differences between locations. There were significant differences between the urban and suburban patients regarding accessibility of pharmacy services, customer service and some patient/pharmacist trust issues. The significant differences between patient satisfaction in the suburban and urban populations warrant a larger study with more community pharmacies in other urban, suburban and rural locations to better understand and validate study findings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Consumer Preferences for Coconut Shell Charcoal in Suburban Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitri Yandri

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Suburbs in Indonesia are not only characterized by the presence of residential areas, but also trading activities. These activities exist in order to support the needs of residents for goods and/or services. The complicated process that involves pull and push factors causes the suburbs to be well-known as economically potential areas, especially for micro, small, medium and large enterprises. One example of the trading subsectors is restaurants, both micro enterprises with traditional management and franchises patterns with professional management. Most of these restaurants provide barbequed menus which consume shell coconut charcoal. Then the question arises, is the quality of those commodity is the only reason for the restaurants in using it? This paper presents the elaboration of the research on consumer preferences in a suburban area of the consumption of coconut shell charcoal. By using the Fishbein Model, it is concluded that the aspect of belief and price attribute are in the first rank, which shows that those commodity is an expensive fuel, while the second rank is quality. The rest are models and after-sales service, respectively. From the aspect of evaluation, the respondents believe that quality is in the first rank that should be improved in the future. The second is price and the rest are after-sales service, packaging and models, respectively.

  6. Consumer Preferences for Coconut Shell Charcoal in Suburban Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitri Yandri

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Suburbs in Indonesia are not only characterized by the presence of residential areas, but also trading activities. These activities exist in order to support the needs of residents for goods and/or services. The complicated process that involves pull and push factors causes the su-burbs to be well-known as economically potential areas, especially for micro, small, medium and large enterprises. One example of the trading subsectors is restaurants, both micro enterprises with traditional management and franchises patterns with professional management. Most of these restaurants provide barbequed menus which consume shell coconut charcoal. Then the question arises, is the quality of those commodity is the only reason for the restaurants in using it? This paper presents the elaboration of the research on consumer preferences in a suburban area of the consumption of coconut shell charcoal. By using the Fishbein Model, it is concluded that the aspect of belief and price attribute are in the first rank, which shows that those commodity is an expensive fuel, while the second rank is quality. The rest are models and after-sales service, respectively. From the aspect of evaluation, the respondents believe that quality is in the first rank that should be improved in the future. The second is price and the rest are after-sales service, packaging and models, respectively.

  7. Evolution of patinas on copper exposed in a suburban area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Masamitsu; Toyoda, Etsuko; Handa, Takao; Ichino, Toshihiro; Kuwaki, Nobuo; Higashi, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Tohru

    2007-01-01

    Copper plates were exposed under sheltered outdoor conditions for up to one year, starting in September 2001 in Musashino City, Tokyo, a suburban area. Following various periods of exposure, the patinas on the plates were characterized to investigate their evolution by using X-ray fluorescence analysis, X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy. The difference in the roles of sulfur and chlorine in the early stages of copper patination were identified by analyzing the depth profiles of these two elements. Sulfur was found on top of the patina as cupric sulfates such as posnjakite (Cu 4 SO 4 (OH) 6 . H 2 O) or brochantite (Cu 4 SO 4 (OH) 6 ). Brochantite appeared only after 12 months of exposure. In contrast, chlorine was found on the surface after only one month of exposure. It gradually penetrated the patina as the exposure period lengthened, forming copper chloride complexes. Chloride ions accumulated at the patina/copper interface, forming nantokite (CuCl), which promoted corrosion

  8. Critical Chemistry Education in a Private, Suburban High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Patrick; Mensah, Felicia Moore

    2018-01-01

    This critical ethnography documents how a group of 25 students and their teacher/researcher in a suburban, private school setting, the vast majority from the dominant cultural background, engaged with and enacted a critical chemistry education together. Critical chemistry education contextualizes chemistry in socially relevant issues and problematizes participants' conceptual frameworks for understanding the intersections between chemistry and our capitalist society by identifying the shortcomings of traditional scientific language to sufficiently interrogate privilege and oppression. Qualitative data from teacher/researcher field notes and journal, classroom video transcripts, questionnaires, focus group interviews, and student artifacts document that while it is difficult for the teacher/researcher and the students of this setting to reflect upon their own positions of privilege, together they interpreted and made meaning of their experience by (1) developing the ability to critically analyze the products of science for the potential of oppression, (2) developing an understanding of inequity in science, and (3) evaluating and respecting diverse knowledge bases. Based on the findings, we suggest students should be encouraged to problematize socially situated science issues related to settings close to their own communities, students should participate in structured and purposeful journaling to improve their metacognition and critical reflexivity, and critical pedagogues must be explicit with students in their Marxist-based interpretation of the global capitalist super structure.

  9. Digital Learning Compass: Distance Education State Almanac 2017. Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Julia E.; Seaman, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    This brief report uses data collected under the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) Fall Enrollment survey to highlight distance education data in the state of Maryland. The sample for this analysis is comprised of all active, degree-granting…

  10. Local sources of black walnut recommended for planting in Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silas Little; Calvin F. Bey; Daniel McConaughy

    1974-01-01

    After 5 years, local black walnut seedlings were taller than those of 12 out-of-state sources in a Maryland planting. Seedlings from south-of-local sources out grew trees from northern sources. Genetic influence on height was expressed early--with little change in ranking of sources after the third year.

  11. Where Do You Go from Nowhere: Homelessness in Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health and Welfare Council of Central Maryland, Inc., Baltimore.

    This report assesses the extent of homelessness in Maryland. Data are provided in the following areas: (1) the number of homeless people; (2) causes of homelessness; (3) distribution of the homeless and characteristics of those sheltered; (4) shelter beds available; (5) what is needed to address the problems of homelessness; (6) the extent of the…

  12. Forest wildlife habitat statistics for Maryland and Delaware--1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert T. Brooks; Dawn M. DiGiovanni; Dawn M. DiGiovanni

    1989-01-01

    A statistical report on the forest wildlife habitat survey of Maryland and Delaware (1986). Findings are displayed in 11 8 tables covering forest area, landscape pattern, mast potential, standing dead and cavity trees; and understory woody-stemmed vegetation. Data are presented at county and/or unit and state levels of resolution.

  13. Tax-Credit Scholarships in Maryland: Forecasting the Fiscal Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlob, Brian

    2010-01-01

    This study seeks to inform the debate over a proposal in Maryland to give tax credits to businesses for contributions to organizations that provide scholarships to K-12 private schools or which contribute to innovative educational programs in the public schools. The study constructs a model to determine the fiscal impact of a tax-credit…

  14. Classroom Breakfast: Helping Maryland Students Make the Grade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Sheila G.; Kerry, Kimberly

    In Fall 1998, the Maryland State Department of Education and six local school systems started a pilot program to evaluate the impact of serving breakfast to students in the classroom as part of the school day. Students in participating schools have an opportunity to eat breakfast in their classroom each day at no charge, regardless of family…

  15. Bioeconomic analysis of Maryland's Chesapeake Bay oyster fishery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present paper deals with the surplus production models of Verhulst-Schaefer and Gompertz-Fox that are applied to the Maryland's Chesapeake Bay oyster fishery to investigate the sustainability properties of the stock and management of the fishery. The basic objective of this paper is to illustrate the way in which long ...

  16. 77 FR 71813 - Maryland; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... resulting from Hurricane Sandy during the period of October 26 to November 4, 2012, is of sufficient... following areas of the State of Maryland have been designated as adversely affected by this major disaster...; 97.048, Disaster Housing Assistance to Individuals and Households in Presidentially Declared Disaster...

  17. Risk Factors for Apical Periodontitis Sub-Urban Adult Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oginni, A O; Adeleke, A A; Mejabi, M O; Sotunde, O A

    2015-06-01

    To assess the risk factors of apical periodontitis (AP) in a Nigerian sub-urban adult population and to compare the findings with those previously reported for various population groups. The study was based on a full mouth radiographic survey of 285 patients. Patients' age ranged from 18-60 years. All teeth were assessed individually and data recorded for caries, fractured / cracked teeth, root fillings, and tooth restorations. The gender, smoking habit, and frequency of dental visit were also recorded. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of AP in the individual. The prevalence of AP was 74.4%. The average number of teeth with AP per patient was 2.8 (range 1-5). AP was found to be more prevalent among people 40- 49 years old (87.2%). Primary carious lesions, fractured / cracked teeth, root fillings and coronal fillings were associated with the incidence of AP in the individual. Fractured teeth had a higher risk of developing AP than carious teeth. The presence of root fillings and coronal restorations were also associated with the development of AP. Smoking (OR=3.82; CI=2.17-6.75) and irregular dental visit (OR=6.73; CI=3.75-12.06) were statistically significant risk factors for developing AP. Gender was not a risk factor for AP (OR=0.86; CI=0.50-1.46). The prevalence of AP among adult Nigerians is slightly higher than reported figures for many Western societies. Fractured/cracked teeth had a higher risk of developing AP than carious teeth; hence patients with fractured / cracked teeth should seek treatment early to prevent the development of AP.

  18. 77 FR 37039 - Delegation of Authority to the State of Maryland To Implement and Enforce Additional or Revised...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-20

    ...On April 16, 2012, EPA sent the State of Maryland (Maryland) a letter acknowledging that Maryland's delegation of authority to implement and enforce National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) and New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) had been updated, as provided for under previously approved delegation mechanisms. To inform regulated facilities and the public of Maryland's updated delegation of authority to implement and enforce NESHAP and NSPS, EPA is making available a copy of EPA's letter to Maryland through this notice.

  19. 78 FR 40391 - Special Local Regulations; Dinghy Poker Run, Middle River; Baltimore County, Essex, MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-05

    ... Run event. On July 27, 2013, the Norris Lane Foundation of Abingdon, Maryland, is sponsoring the... reduce burden. 10. Protection of Children From Environmental Health Risks We have analyzed this rule under Executive Order 13045, Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks...

  20. Chromite and other mineral deposits in serpentine rocks of the Piedmont Upland, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Delaware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearre, Nancy C.; Heyl, Allen V.

    1960-01-01

    The Piedmont Upland in Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Delaware is about 160 miles long and at the most 50 miles wide. Rocks that underlie the province are the Baltimore gneiss of Precambrian age and quartzite, gneiss, schist, marble, phyllite, and greenstone, which make up the Glenarm series of early Paleozoic (?) age. These are intruded by granitic, gabbroic, and ultramaflc igneous rocks. Most of the ultramaflc rocks, originally peridotite, pyroxenite, and dunite, have been partly or completely altered to serpentine and talc; they are all designated by the general term serpentine. The bodies of serpentine are commonly elongate and conformable with the enclosing rocks. Many have been extensively quarried for building, decorative, and crushed stone. In addition, chromite, titaniferous magnetite, rutile, talc and soapstone, amphibole asbestos, magnesite, sodium- rich feldspar (commercially known as soda spar), and corundum have been mined or prospected for in the serpentine. Both high-grade massive chromite and lower grade disseminated chromite occur in very irregular and unpredictable form in the serpentine, and placer deposits of chromite are in and near streams that drain areas underlain by serpentine. A group of unusual minerals, among them kammererite, are typical associates of high-grade massive chromite but are rare in lower grade deposits. Chromite was first discovered in the United States at Bare Hills, Md., around 1810. Between 1820 and 1850, additional deposits were discovered and mined in Maryland and Pennsylvania, including the largest deposit of massive chromite ever found in the United States the Wood deposit, in the State Line district. A second period of extensive chromite mining came during the late 1860's and early 1870's. Production figures are incomplete and conflicting. Estimates from the available data indicate that the aggregate production from 27 of 40 known mines before 1900 totaled between 250,000 and 280,000 tons of lode-chromite ore

  1. Community violence exposure and severe posttraumatic stress in suburban American youth: risk and protective factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfving-Gupta, Sandra; Lindblad, Frank; Stickley, Andrew; Schwab-Stone, Mary; Ruchkin, Vladislav

    2015-04-01

    The psychological effects of community violence exposure among inner-city youth are severe, yet little is known about its prevalence and moderators among suburban middle-class youth. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of community violence exposure among suburban American youth, to examine associated posttraumatic stress and to evaluate factors related to severe vs. less severe posttraumatic stress, such as co-existing internalizing and externalizing problems, as well as the effects of teacher support, parental warmth and support, perceived neighborhood safety and conventional involvement in this context. Data were collected from 780 suburban, predominantly Caucasian middle-class high-school adolescents in the Northeastern US during the Social and Health Assessment (SAHA) study. A substantial number of suburban youth were exposed to community violence and 24% of those victimized by community violence developed severe posttraumatic stress. Depressive symptoms were strongly associated with higher levels and perceived teacher support with lower levels of posttraumatic stress. Similar to urban youth, youth living in suburban areas in North American settings may be affected by community violence. A substantial proportion of these youth reports severe posttraumatic stress and high levels of comorbid depressive symptoms. Teacher support may have a protective effect against severe posttraumatic stress and thus needs to be further assessed as a potential factor that can be used to mitigate the detrimental effects of violence exposure.

  2. Suburban immigrants to wildlands disrupt honest signaling in ultra-violet plumage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Tringali

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Urbanization changes habitat in a multitude of ways, including altering food availability. Access to human-provided food can change the relationship between body condition and honest advertisements of fitness, which may result in changes to behavior, demography, and metapopulation dynamics. We compared plumage color, its relationship with body condition and feather growth, and use as signal of dominance between a suburban and a wildland population of Florida Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens. Although plumage color was not related to body condition at either site, suburban birds had plumage with a greater proportion of total reflectance in the ultra-violet (UV and peak reflectance at shorter wavelengths. Despite the use of plumage reflectance as a signal of dominance among individuals in the wildlands, we found no evidence of status signaling at the suburban site. However, birds emigrating from the suburban site to the wildland site tended to be more successful at acquiring breeder status but less successful at reproducing than were immigrants from an adjacent wildland site, suggesting that signaled and realized quality differ. These differences in signaling content among populations could have demographic effects at metapopulation scales and may represent an evolutionary trap whereby suburban immigrants are preferred as mates even though their reproductive success relative to effort is lower.

  3. Maryland power plants and the environment: A review of the impacts of power plants and transmission lines on Maryland's natural resources. Biannually report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    The report, published biannually by Maryland's Power Plant Research Program, is a summary of current information related to environmental impacts associated with electric power generation in Maryland. Topics discussed in detail include: Power Supply and Demand; Air Quality; Surface and Groundwater Impacts; Terrestrial Impacts; Radiological Impacts; and Acid Deposition

  4. Trichomonad infection in mourning doves, Zenaidura macroura, in Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, L.N.; Herman, C.M.

    1961-01-01

    During the 10-year period 1950-1960 the incidence of Trichomonas gallinae among several series of mourning doves shot or trapped in Maryland has varied from zero to 12 1/2 percent. Prior to 1959, all isolations of T. gallinae from doves during such surveys had been from birds with well-developed lesions. In 1959, trichomonads were demonstrated in three of 54 normal hunter-killed doves examined in Howard County. The incidence of trichomonad infection among doves which were submitted to the laboratory because they were obviously diseased was much higher. Of 44 clinically ill doves submitted during the period 1950-1960,25 were found to be infected with T. gallinae. In the Maryland area the incidence of trichomonad infection among mourning doves appears to be low, but when infection does occur it is usually due to a pathogenic strain which produces a typical fatal canker.

  5. (p,2p) experiments at the University of Maryland cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, P.G.

    1976-11-01

    Some of the (p,2p) work which has been carried out at the Maryland Cyclotron is discussed. A brief introduction to the (p,2p) reaction is presented, and the types of experimental techniques utilized in (p,2p) studies are discussed. A brief introduction is given to the various theoretical treatments presently available to analyze (p,2p) reaction data. Secondly, experimental and theoretical studies of (p,2p) on d, 3 He, and 4 He carried out by the Maryland group are presented. Thirdly, (p,2p) results are discussed for 6 Li, 7 Li, and 12 C at 100 MeV. Fourthly, the effects of distortion on the experimental data are considered by presenting theoretical calculations for 12 C and 40 Ca at various bombarding energies

  6. BREAKFAST HABIT AND ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE AMONG SUBURBAN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putu Ayu Widyanti

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Academic performance is affected by a numbers of factors. Age, gender, nutritional status, and breakfast habits are some factors that have relation with academic performance. Nutritional statues among school children still to be concerned. Breakfast habit is important thing to do before school to maintain enough calories to study and work well. The aim of this study was to determine the association of breakfast habits and academic performance especially in suburban elementary school children. An analytic cross sectional study conducted in children aged 6-12 years who studied at SD 1 Taro, Gianyar regency, Bali. There were 178 students participated in this study. We found 3 factors associated with academic performance i.e. breakfast, gender, and age with OR=2.56 (95% CI 1.16 to 5.66, P=0.02; OR=0.32 (95% CI 0.15 to 0.70, P=0.04; OR=6.52 (95% CI 2.73 to 15.53, P<0.0001, respectively. We conclude there was an association between breakfast habits and academic performance. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  7. Suburban landscape assessment applied to urban planning. Case study in Barcelona Metropolitan Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Serrano Giné

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Urban fringes set complex landscapes, in transition from rural to natural and urban, with fuzzy boundaries in mutual interdependence. The European Landscape Convention gives notorious importance to everyday landscapes, including those of suburban character. Few landscape evaluation researches are done in suburban areas, which is surprising considering its importance and abundance. This paper shows a methodology, yield on geographical information systems (GIS, for landscape assessment of suburban areas, useful in urban planning. Its main interest lies in a double assessment, which considers both landscape quality and landscape fragility, applied systematically. The procedure is applied in Muntanyes d’Ordal in the metropolitan area of Barcelona (Spain, an area with pronounced regional strengths and contrasted landscape values. Results are of important applicability and indicate a predominance of mean values, both for landscape quality and landscape fragility.

  8. Behavioral and familial correlates of episodic heroin abuse among suburban adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathus, S A; Fichner-Rathus, L; Siegel, L J

    1977-08-01

    Behavioral and familial correlates of predominantly White, suburban heroin abusers were investigated to determine whether such abuse was self-contained experimentation or suggestive of generalized personality disorders and impaired family relationships. Twenty of 296 male high school students recruited from 10 middle-class suburban schools had engaged in episodic heroin abuse. Of 29 antisocial behaviors other than heroin abuse assessed, heroin abusers engaged in 16 significantly more frequently. Heroin abusers found their fathers to be significantly less nice, honest, strong, and kind than did nonabusers, according to semantic differential technique. They found themselves to be significantly less strong than did nonabusers, suggesting failure to model themselves after adequately coping fathers. Heroin abusers also found their mothers to be significantly less fair, honest, and valuable than did nonabusers. It was concluded that episodic heroin abuse among suburban adolescents is suggestive both of generalized antisocial behavior and of impaired family relationships.

  9. Sprawl and your health : what is the suburban dream costing you

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenniak, T.

    2002-03-01

    This paper described the link between environmental decline and suburban sprawl and cautioned that Edmontonians should pay particular attention to the definite health costs associated with this burdened lifestyle. This paper suggested that although the suburban dream seemed to be a solution to a high-pressure, technology-driven culture, suburban sprawl is actually contributing to both social and environmental problems. Sprawl has caused us to lose many of the benefits of city life such as places of employment, medical services, meeting places, shops and restaurants, which created cities in the first place. Sprawl contributes to increased dependency on the automobile. The impact that sprawl has on traffic patterns, toxic emissions, and traffic psychology was discussed, as well as the impact that a sedentary lifestyle has on the health of both adults and children. 30 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs., 1 append.

  10. Computer access and Internet use by urban and suburban emergency department customers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Michael C; Klemt, Ryan; Merlis, Jennifer; Kopinski, Judith E; Hirshon, Jon Mark

    2012-07-01

    Patients are increasingly using the Internet (43% in 2000 vs. 70% in 2006) to obtain health information, but is there a difference in the ability of urban and suburban emergency department (ED) customers to access the Internet? To assess computer and Internet resources available to and used by people waiting to be seen in an urban ED and a suburban ED. Individuals waiting in the ED were asked survey questions covering demographics, type of insurance, access to a primary care provider, reason for their ED visit, computer access, and ability to access the Internet for health-related matters. There were 304 individuals who participated, 185 in the urban ED and 119 in the suburban ED. Urban subjects were more likely than suburban to be women, black, have low household income, and were less likely to have insurance. The groups were similar in regard to average age, education, and having a primary care physician. Suburban respondents were more likely to own a computer, but the majority in both groups had access to computers and the Internet. Their frequency of accessing the Internet was similar, as were their reasons for using it. Individuals from the urban ED were less willing to schedule appointments via the Internet but more willing to contact their health care provider via e-mail. The groups were equally willing to use the Internet to fill prescriptions and view laboratory results. Urban and suburban ED customers had similar access to the Internet. Both groups were willing to use the Internet to access personal health information. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Investigating the safety impact of roadway network features of suburban arterials in Shanghai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuesong; Yuan, Jinghui; Schultz, Grant G; Fang, Shouen

    2018-02-02

    With rapid changes in land use development along suburban arterials in Shanghai, there is a corresponding increase in traffic demand on these arterials. To accommodate the local traffic needs of high accessibility and efficiency, an increased number of signalized intersections and accesses have been installed. However, the absence of a defined hierarchical road network, together with irregular signal spacing and access density, tends to deteriorate arterial safety. Previous studies on arterial safety were generally based on a single type of road entity, either intersection or roadway segment, and they analyzed the safety contributing factors (e.g. signal density and access density) on only that type of road entity, while these suburban arterial characteristics could significantly influence the safety performance of both intersections and roadway segments. Macro-level safety modeling was usually applied to investigate the relationships between zonal crash frequencies and demographics, road network features, and traffic characteristics, but the previous researchers did not consider the specific arterial characteristics of signal density and access density. In this study, a new modeling strategy was proposed to analyze the safety impacts of zonal roadway network features (i.e., road network patterns and road network density) along with the suburban arterial characteristics of signal density and access density. Bayesian Conditional Autoregressive Poisson Log-normal models were developed for suburban arterials in 173 traffic analysis zones in the suburban area of Shanghai. Results identified that the grid pattern road network with collector roads parallel to arterials was associated with fewer crashes than networks without parallel collectors. On the other hand, lower road network density, higher signal density and higher access density tended to increase the crash occurrence on suburban arterials. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Responding to the Effects of Extreme Heat: Baltimore City's Code Red Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    Heat response plans are becoming increasingly more common as US cities prepare for heat waves and other effects of climate change. Standard elements of heat response plans exist, but plans vary depending on geographic location and distribution of vulnerable populations. Because heat events vary over time and affect populations differently based on vulnerability, it is difficult to compare heat response plans and evaluate responses to heat events. This article provides an overview of the Baltimore City heat response plan, the Code Red program, and discusses the city's response to the 2012 Ohio Valley/Mid Atlantic Derecho, a complex heat event. Challenges with and strategies for evaluating the program are reviewed and shared.

  13. Heroin Use, HIV-Risk, and Criminal Behavior in Baltimore: Findings from Clinical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Robert P; Kelly, Sharon M; Gryczynski, Jan; Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; O'Grady, Kevin E; Jaffe, Jerome H

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews research conducted in Baltimore over the past 15 years, examining the following: (1) What factors differentiate heroin-addicted individuals who enter methadone treatment from those who do not? (2) How difficult is gaining access to methadone treatment? (3) What are effective ways to overcome barriers to treatment entry? (4) Why do so many methadone patients drop out of treatment prematurely? (5) What are the added benefits of counseling when coupled with methadone or buprenorphine treatment? (6) Does increasing access to treatment have an impact on overdose deaths? Specific recommendations are made for policymakers concerned with addressing heroin addiction.

  14. Análisis de Clima Organizacional de Baltimore Spice C.A.S.A.

    OpenAIRE

    Wong Carranza, Henry Paul

    2004-01-01

    Tesis de maestría -- Universidad de Costa Rica. Posgrado en Administración y Dirección de Empresas. Maestría Profesional en Administración y Dirección de Empresas con énfasis en Gerencia, 2004 El objetivo general del trabajo es realizar un diagnóstico de los elementos que inciden e impactan negativamente en el desempeño del clima organizacional de Baltimore Spice C.A.S.A., que se ven reflejados directa e indirectamente en el rendimiento de los colaboradores en el nivel operativo. La organi...

  15. Characteristics of Prepared Food Sources in Low-Income Neighborhoods of Baltimore City

    OpenAIRE

    LEE, SEUNG HEE; ROWAN, MEGAN T.; POWELL, LISA M.; NEWMAN, SARA; KLASSEN, ANN CARROLL; FRICK, KEVIN D.; ANDERSON, JENNIFER; GITTELSOHN, JOEL

    2010-01-01

    The food environment is associated with obesity risk and diet-related chronic diseases. Despite extensive research conducted on retail food stores, little is known about prepared food sources (PFSs). We conducted an observational assessment of all PFSs (N = 92) in low-income neighborhoods in Baltimore. The most common PFSs were carry-outs, which had the lowest availability of healthy food choices. Only a small proportion of these carry-outs offered healthy sides, whole wheat bread, or entrée ...

  16. Development of a record retention and retrieval system for the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, H.L.

    1976-01-01

    The records associated with the design and construction of a nuclear power plant have increased in both volume and complexity. Baltimore Gas and Electric Company chose to retain and make available these records by using microfilm and a computer-generated index system. The technique of filming, data assembly, and controlled distribution of this material to various locations within the Company was developed and implemented. The index system has been designed to locate information and to provide a basis for searches of the data base for special information

  17. Eating Habits and Food Preferences of Elementary School Students in Urban and Suburban Areas of Daejeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Suk; Lee, Je-Hyuk; Kim, Myung-Hee

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the dietary habits and food preferences of elementary school students. The survey was conducted by means of a questionnaire distributed to 4th and 5th grade elementary school students (400 boys and 400 girls) in urban and suburban areas of Daejeon. The results of this study were as follows: male students in urban areas ate breakfast, unbalanced diets, and dairy products more frequently than male students in suburban areas (p foods. Overall, there were distinct differences in the eating habits and food preferences of elementary school students according to the place of residence.

  18. Intimate relationship status variations in violence against women: urban, suburban, and rural differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennison, Callie Marie; DeKeseredy, Walter S; Dragiewicz, Molly

    2013-11-01

    Woman abuse varies across intimate relationship categories (e.g., marriage, divorce, separation). However, it is unclear whether relationship status variations in violence against women differ across urban, suburban, and rural areas. We test the hypothesis that rural females, regardless of their intimate partner relationship status, are at higher risk of intimate violence than their urban and suburban counterparts. Results indicate that marital status is an important aspect of the relationship between intimate victimization and geographic area and that rural divorced and separated females are victimized at rates exceeding their urban counterparts.

  19. Eating Habits and Food Preferences of Elementary School Students in Urban and Suburban Areas of Daejeon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Suk; Lee, Je-Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the dietary habits and food preferences of elementary school students. The survey was conducted by means of a questionnaire distributed to 4th and 5th grade elementary school students (400 boys and 400 girls) in urban and suburban areas of Daejeon. The results of this study were as follows: male students in urban areas ate breakfast, unbalanced diets, and dairy products more frequently than male students in suburban areas (p eating habits and food preferences of elementary school students according to the place of residence. PMID:26251838

  20. Contested Cowboys: Ethnic Mexican Charros and the Struggle for Suburban Public Space in 1970s Los Angeles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraclough, Laura R.

    2012-01-01

    While most studies of Mexican American suburbanization since the 1970s focus on the transformation of residential (private) space, it is in suburban public space that some of the most important struggles over belonging and rights have occurred. This article builds a theoretical framework to analyze the relationships between public space,…

  1. A Case Study on the Spatial Conceptualization Abilities for Sixth Grade Elementary Students from Urban, Suburban and Remote Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Jen Yi; Liu, Chuan Hsi

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate and compare the spatial conceptualization performance for sixth grade elementary school students from urban, suburban and remote schools in Taiwan. This study involved 27, 25, and 26 sixth grade students from one remote indigenous school in eastern Taiwan, one suburban indigenous school in…

  2. Racial Diversity in the Suburbs: How Race-Neutral Responses to Demographic Change Perpetuate Inequity in Suburban School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diem, Sarah; Welton, Anjalé D.; Frankenberg, Erica; Jellison Holme, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Suburbs across the US are experiencing dramatic demographic shifts, yet there is little research available on how suburban school districts are dealing with these changes. In this article, we examine the discourses surrounding race and demographic change in three suburban school districts that have been undergoing rapid demographic changes and…

  3. Effects of Baltimore's Safe Streets Program on gun violence: a replication of Chicago's CeaseFire Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Daniel W; Whitehill, Jennifer Mendel; Vernick, Jon S; Curriero, Frank C

    2013-02-01

    Chicago's CeaseFire program is an evidence-based public health approach to preventing gun violence. Baltimore is one of many US cities attempting to replicate the program. We compared changes in the number of homicide and nonfatal shooting incidents per month in four intervention neighborhoods with changes in high-crime comparison areas (police posts) without the intervention, while controlling for several measures of police activity and baseline levels of homicide and nonfatal shootings. In South Baltimore there were large program-related reductions in homicide and nonfatal shooting incidents. Among three East Baltimore program sites, the program was associated with a reduction of homicides in one area, a reduction in nonfatal shootings in another area, and a simultaneous increase in homicides and decrease in nonfatal shootings in another area. In some instances, program effects extended to neighborhoods bordering the intervention areas. Program-related reductions in homicides appear to be linked with conflict mediations conducted by program outreach workers.

  4. The Baltimore Youth Ammunition Initiative: A Model Application of Local Public Health Authority in Preventing Gun Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Nancy L.; Vernick, Jon S.; Beilenson, Peter L.; Mair, Julie S.; Lindamood, Melisa M.; Teret, Stephen P.; Webster, Daniel W.

    2005-01-01

    In 2002, the Baltimore City Health Department, in collaboration with the Baltimore Police Department and the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research, launched the Youth Ammunition Initiative. The initiative addressed Baltimore’s problem of youth gun violence by targeting illegal firearm ammunition sales to the city’s young people. The initiative included undercover “sting” investigations of local businesses and issuance of health department violation and abatement notices. Intermediate results included the passage of 2 Baltimore city council ordinances regulating ammunition sales and reducing the number of outlets eligible to sell ammunition. Although it is too early to assess effects on violent crime, the intervention could theoretically reduce youth violence by interrupting one source of ammunition to youths. More important, the initiative can serve as a policy model for health commissioners seeking to become more active in gun violence prevention efforts. PMID:15855448

  5. 77 FR 52784 - 2012 Temporary Closure of I-395 Just South of Conway Street in the City of Baltimore to Vehicular...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ... Accommodate the Construction and Operation of the Baltimore Grand Prix AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration.... The closure is requested to accommodate the construction and operation of the Baltimore Grand Prix... to attract 160,000 spectators over a 3-4 day period, not including the event organizer workforce and...

  6. Bioaerosol emissions from a suburban yard waste composting facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hryhorczuk, D; Curtis, L; Scheff, P; Chung, J; Rizzo, M; Lewis, C; Keys, N; Moomey, M

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess worker and community exposure to bioaerosols emitted from a suburban yard waste composting facility in northern Illinois, USA. Characterization of on- and off-site viable bioaerosols was undertaken through a total of 288 on- and off-site Andersen samples conducted over 10 sampling days. A total of 46 dust samples and 38 Kramer-Collins spore samples were also collected in this period. Evaluation of the impact of the facility on community bioaerosol concentrations was undertaken by comparing on- and off-site measurements by sampling locations, wind direction, and site activity. On-site concentrations of total spores, Aspergillus/Penicillium spores, total bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, actinomycetes, total particulates, endotoxin, and beta-1,3 glucans were higher than off-site concentrations. Total fungal spores averaged 13,451 spores/m3 (range 5,223-26,067) on-site and 8,772 spores/m3 (range 243-18,276) off-site. Viable bacterial airborne concentrations (in cfu/m3) averaged 11,879 on-site (range 480-78,880) and 3,204 off-site (range 160-17,600). Mean levels of endotoxins (in ng/m3) were 1.94 on-site (range 0.12-6.06) and 0.14 off-site (range 0.01-0.41). Mean levels of beta-1,3 glucans (in ng/m3) were 2.17 on-site (range 0.12-14.45) and 0.24 off-site (range 0.01-0.78). Mean total viable fungi, on the other hand, were higher off-site than on-site (8,651 vs 3,068 cfu/m3). On-site concentrations of total bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, and actinomycetes demonstrated a statistically significant pattern of decreasing concentration with distance from pile and higher downwind vs upwind concentrations. Mean on-site concentrations of viable bacteria, viable fungi, and endotoxins were significantly higher during periods of activity compared to periods of no activity. Off-site concentrations of bacteria were also significantly higher during periods of activity compared to no activity

  7. The water-quality monitoring program for the Baltimore reservoir system, 1981-2007—Description, review and evaluation, and framework integration for enhanced monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koterba, Michael T.; Waldron, Marcus C.; Kraus, Tamara E.C.

    2011-01-01

    The City of Baltimore, Maryland, and parts of five surrounding counties obtain their water from Loch Raven and Liberty Reservoirs. A third reservoir, Prettyboy, is used to resupply Loch Raven Reservoir. Management of the watershed conditions for each reservoir is a shared responsibility by agreement among City, County, and State jurisdictions. The most recent (2005) Baltimore Reservoir Watershed Management Agreement (RWMA) called for continued and improved water-quality monitoring in the reservoirs and selected watershed tributaries. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a retrospective review of the effectiveness of monitoring data obtained and analyzed by the RWMA jurisdictions from 1981 through 2007 to help identify possible improvements in the monitoring program to address RWMA water-quality concerns. Long-term water-quality concerns include eutrophication and sedimentation in the reservoirs, and elevated concentrations of (a) nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) being transported from the major tributaries to the reservoirs, (b) iron and manganese released from reservoir bed sediments during periods of deep-water anoxia, (c) mercury in higher trophic order game fish in the reservoirs, and (d) bacteria in selected reservoir watershed tributaries. Emerging concerns include elevated concentrations of sodium, chloride, and disinfection by-products (DBPs) in the drinking water from both supply reservoirs. Climate change and variability also could be emerging concerns, affecting seasonal patterns, annual trends, and drought occurrence, which historically have led to declines in reservoir water quality. Monitoring data increasingly have been used to support the development of water-quality models. The most recent (2006) modeling helped establish an annual sediment Total Maximum Daily Load to Loch Raven Reservoir, and instantaneous and 30-day moving average water-quality endpoints for chlorophyll-a (chl-a) and dissolved oxygen (DO) in Loch Raven and Prettyboy

  8. Preferences for healthy carryout meals in low-income neighborhoods of Baltimore city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Jayne K; Lee, Seung Hee; Frick, Kevin D; Gittelsohn, Joel

    2013-03-01

    The nutrition environment is associated with risk of obesity and other diet-related chronic diseases. In Baltimore's low-income areas, carryouts (locally prepared-food sources that offer food "to go") are a common source of food, but they lack a variety of healthy options for purchase. To evaluate individuals' preferences of healthy combination meals sold at carryouts and to identify successful intervention methods to promote healthier foods in carryouts in low-income communities in Baltimore. The study estimated the relationship between combinations of healthier entrées (turkey club, grilled chicken), beverages (diet coke, bottled water), side dishes (watermelon, side salad), price points ($5.00, $7.50), and labeling on consumers' combination meal decisions using a forced-choice conjoint analysis. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine how individuals value different features in combination meals sold in carryouts. There was a statistically significant difference between customer preference for the two entrées, with a turkey club sandwich being preferred over a grilled chicken sandwich (p = .02). Carryout customers (n = 50) preferred water to diet soda (p success of environmental nutrition interventions.

  9. From Kisiizi to Baltimore: cultivating knowledge brokers to support global innovation for community engagement in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibe, Chidinma A; Basu, Lopa; Gooden, Rachel; Syed, Shamsuzzoha B; Dadwal, Viva; Bone, Lee R; Ephraim, Patti L; Weston, Christine M; Wu, Albert W

    2018-02-09

    Reverse Innovation has been endorsed as a vehicle for promoting bidirectional learning and information flow between low- and middle-income countries and high-income countries, with the aim of tackling common unmet needs. One such need, which traverses international boundaries, is the development of strategies to initiate and sustain community engagement in health care delivery systems. In this commentary, we discuss the Baltimore "Community-based Organizations Neighborhood Network: Enhancing Capacity Together" Study. This randomized controlled trial evaluated whether or not a community engagement strategy, developed to address patient safety in low- and middle-income countries throughout sub-Saharan Africa, could be successfully applied to create and implement strategies that would link community-based organizations to a local health care system in Baltimore, a city in the United States. Specifically, we explore the trial's activation of community knowledge brokers as the conduit through which community engagement, and innovation production, was achieved. Cultivating community knowledge brokers holds promise as a vehicle for advancing global innovation in the context of health care delivery systems. As such, further efforts to discern the ways in which they may promote the development and dissemination of innovations in health care systems is warranted. Trial Registration Number: NCT02222909 . Trial Register Name: Reverse Innovation and Patient Engagement to Improve Quality of Care and Patient Outcomes (CONNECT). Date of Trial's Registration: August 22, 2014.

  10. Teacher Identity and EL-Focused Professional Learning in a Suburban Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGriff, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Suburban middle schools have been affected by a growing enrollment of English language learners and by the need to demonstrate that this population of students is meeting prescribed academic proficiency benchmarks. These developments necessitate cogent, English learner--focused professional learning across content areas. Using Gee's perspective on…

  11. Gender, Race, and Justifications for Group Exclusion: Urban Black Students Bussed to Affluent Suburban Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ispa-Landa, Simone

    2013-01-01

    Relational theories of gender conceptualize masculinity and femininity as mutually constitutive. Using a relational approach, I analyzed ethnographic and interview data from male and female black adolescents in Grades 8 through 10 enrolled in ''Diversify,'' an urban-to-suburban racial integration program ("n" = 38).…

  12. A Comparison of Urban, Suburban, and Rural Principal Leadership Skills by Campus Student Achievement Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Susan; Winn, Pam; Erwin, John

    2011-01-01

    Because of the importance of developing highly skilled school leaders, statewide assessments of 784 Texas public school administrators were compared in a causal-comparison study to determine how leadership skills varied by type of campus (urban, suburban and rural) and by campus student achievement ratings. Data were collected from a 2006-2008…

  13. Sewage disposal methods in a sub-urban community in Edo state ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The sewage disposal method of household members in any community is an important determinant of their health status. This community based descriptive, cross-sectional study assessed the sewage disposal methods and factors associated with its practice among residents of Oluku a sub-urban community in Edo State, ...

  14. Health Care In The Suburbs: An Analysis Of Suburban Poverty And Health Care Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnake-Mahl, Alina S; Sommers, Benjamin D

    2017-10-01

    There are 16.9 million Americans living in poverty in the suburbs-more than in cities or rural communities. Despite recent increases in suburban poverty, the perception of the suburbs as areas of uniform affluence remains, and there has been little research into health care barriers experienced by people living in these areas. The objectives of this study were to compare patterns of insurance coverage and health care access in suburban, urban, and rural areas using national survey data from 2005 to 2015 and to compare outcomes by geography before and after the Affordable Care Act took effect. We found that nearly 40 percent of the uninsured population lived in suburban areas. Though unadjusted rates of health care access were better in suburban areas, compared to urban and rural communities, this advantage was greatly reduced after income and other demographics are accounted for. Overall, a substantial portion of the US population residing in the suburbs lacked health insurance and experienced difficulties accessing care. Increased policy attention is needed to address these challenges for vulnerable populations living in the suburbs. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  15. Suburbanization in small towns - case study Modřice near Brno

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaishar, Antonín; Zapletalová, Jana

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 10, - (2007), s. 112-116 ISSN 1224-4112 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3086301 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : Suburbanization * small towns Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography

  16. Change of municipal finances due to suburbanization as a development challenge on the example of Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smutek Jan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article summarizes the results of a study of the impact of suburbanization on the budgets of Polish gminas existing in the zones of influence of big cities. The study covers the 2001-2010 period and examines the zone of influence of 12 most important cities, following the National Spatial Development Concept 2030. Revenues, and therefore expenditures of gminas, are increasing due to the process of suburbanization. That growth is concentrated in a relatively small number of administrative units. One of the most important results is the increase in gminas’ income from their shares in PIT. The second consists in higher incomes from the property taxes, mostly on commercial property. Higher incomes on assets are concentrated in the areas that were formerly developed. Transfer incomes are lower in suburbanizing areas. Suburbanization results in higher expenditure on transport (mostly road infrastructure and lower on education (postponement of investments, and social assistance. Higher expenditures on housing are concentrated in the areas that were developed in the past.

  17. An Evaluation of the Antibullying Program at a Public Suburban High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Brian

    2014-01-01

    This project study addressed the problem of harassment, intimidation, and bullying (HIB) at a public suburban high school in the Northeast United States. The study school implemented the Anti-bullying Program in September 2011, yet no evaluation had been conducted on whether the program was meeting its goals. Two conceptual frameworks that drove…

  18. Development and implementation of ultra-thin concrete road technology for suburban streets in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Louw, MR

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Louw, FC Rust, AO Bergh and AH McKay DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATIONN OF ULTRA- THIN CONCRETE ROAD TECHNOLOGY FOR SUBURBAN STREETS IN SOUTH AFRICA MR Louw, FC Rust, AO Bergh and AH McKay CSIR, Republic of South Africa rlouw...

  19. Promoting and developing a trail network across suburban, rural, and urban communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schasberger, Michele G; Hussa, Carol S; Polgar, Michael F; McMonagle, Julie A; Burke, Sharon J; Gegaris, Andrew J

    2009-12-01

    The Wyoming Valley Wellness Trails Partnership received an Active Living by Design grant late in 2003 for a project centered on a growing trail network linking urban, suburban, and rural communities in northeast Pennsylvania, a former coal region, in order to increase physical activity among residents. The partnership conducted research, collected information, created promotional documents, worked with partners on events and programs, and participated in trail planning. Local trail organizations continued planning and construction toward developing a trail network. Other partners spearheaded policy change in schools and worksites and worked toward downtown revitalization. The partnership assisted these efforts by providing a forum in which organizations could meet. The partnership became a central resource for information about local parks, trails, and outdoor recreational activities. The partnership increased awareness and use of recreational facilities. Trail partners constructed 22 miles of walking and biking trails. The partnership took advantage of an allied effort that created organizational capacity for wellness in schools and worksites. Messages promoting social and entertainment benefits of physical activity were more successful than those promoting health benefits. The existence of multiple small, independent trail organizations can help advance trail development through concurrent development efforts. Urban, suburban, and rural residents' conceptions of walkability may differ. Trails provide options for recreational and transportation-related physical activity across urban, suburban, and rural landscapes that are supported by all constituents. Trail builders can be strong allies in bringing active living to suburban and rural places.

  20. The middle classes and the remaking of the suburban family community: evidence from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsten, L.; Lupi, T.; de Stigter-Speksnijder, M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents data on everyday life in three recently built Dutch suburban areas constructed under the Vinex national urban planning policy. Its focus is on family households and today’s division of work and care, social life and neighbourhood activism. The results show that suburbs are no

  1. Suburban Youth Gangs and Public Policy: An Alternative to the War on Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Evan

    1996-01-01

    Discusses problem-solving strategies designed to diffuse the power of suburban youth gangs. Argues against using the metaphor of "war" to combat youth violence and outlines the dimensions of a comprehensive policy that emphasizes prevention, prosecution, and placement. Suggests what local governments can do to solve this problem. (RJM)

  2. Suburban Opposition to District Reorganization: The 1968 Spainhower Commission and Metropolitan Kansas City and St. Louis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Donna; Rury, John L.

    2014-01-01

    The 1968 Spainhower Commission planned extensive changes in the organization of public education in Missouri, proposing larger, comprehensive districts throughout the state. Intended to increase efficiency and reduce inequities, its reform proposals spurred widespread opposition from both rural and suburban communities. In the suburbs hostility…

  3. Factors determining the plant species diversity and species composition in a suburban landscape

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čepelová, B.; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 4 (2012), s. 336-346 ISSN 0169-2046 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP505/10/0593; GA ČR GD206/08/H049 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : suburban landscape * species diversity * species composition Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.314, year: 2012

  4. Bee fauna and floral abundance within lawn-dominated suburban yards in Springfield, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susannah B. Lerman; J. Milam

    2016-01-01

    Private yards comprise a significant component of urban lands, with managed lawns representing the dominant land cover. Lawns blanket>163,000 km2 of the United States, and 50% of urban and suburban areas. When not treated with herbicides, lawns have the capacity to support a diversity of spontaneous (e.g., not planted) flowers, with the...

  5. An evaluation of the accuracy and performance of lightweight GPS collars in a suburban environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L Adams

    Full Text Available The recent development of lightweight GPS collars has enabled medium-to-small sized animals to be tracked via GPS telemetry. Evaluation of the performance and accuracy of GPS collars is largely confined to devices designed for large animals for deployment in natural environments. This study aimed to assess the performance of lightweight GPS collars within a suburban environment, which may be different from natural environments in a way that is relevant to satellite signal acquisition. We assessed the effects of vegetation complexity, sky availability (percentage of clear sky not obstructed by natural or artificial features of the environment, proximity to buildings, and satellite geometry on fix success rate (FSR and location error (LE for lightweight GPS collars within a suburban environment. Sky availability had the largest affect on FSR, while LE was influenced by sky availability, vegetation complexity, and HDOP (Horizontal Dilution of Precision. Despite the complexity and modified nature of suburban areas, values for FSR (mean= 90.6% and LE (mean = 30.1 m obtained within the suburban environment are comparable to those from previous evaluations of GPS collars designed for larger animals and within less built-up environments. Due to fine-scale patchiness of habitat within urban environments, it is recommended that resource selection methods that are not reliant on buffer sizes be utilised for selection studies.

  6. Teacher Perspectives of Whole Brain Teaching in a Suburban Middle School: A Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanHosen, Wendy

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this program evaluation case study was to seek the perceptions of a group of teachers based on their experience with Whole Brain Teaching strategies at a suburban middle school. Perceptions and factors that lead to teacher use of the strategies were explored with the intention of informing stakeholders of whether teachers view these…

  7. Concussion Knowledge and Reporting Behavior Differences between High School Athletes at Urban and Suburban High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Jessica; Covassin, Tracey; Nogle, Sally; Gould, Daniel; Kovan, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    Background: We determined differences in knowledge of concussion and reporting behaviors of high school athletes attending urban and suburban high schools, and whether a relationship exists between underreporting and access to an athletic trainer in urban schools. Methods: High school athletes (N = 715) from 14 high schools completed a validated…

  8. Do coyotesCanis latransinfluence occupancy of prey in suburban forest fragments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brandon M; Cove, Michael V; Lashley, Marcus A; Jackson, Victoria L

    2016-02-01

    With the extirpation of apex predators from many North American systems, coyotes Canis latrans have become the de facto top predator and are ubiquitous members of most ecosystems. Keystone predators aid in maintaining ecosystem function by regulating the mammal community through direct predation and instilling the landscape of fear, yet the value of coyotes regulating systems to this capacity is understudied and likely variable across environments. Since coyotes are common in the Midwestern United States, we utilized camera traps and occupancy analyses to assess their role in regulating the distribution of mammalian herbivores in a fragmented suburban ecosystem. Forest cover was a strong positive predictor of white-tailed deer Odocoileus virginianus detection, while coyote occurrence had a negative effect. Coyotes exerted a negative effect on squirrel ( Sciurus spp.) and eastern cottontail rabbit Sylvilagus floridanus occurrence, while urban cover was a positive predictor for the prey species' occurrence. These results suggest all 3 species behaviorally avoid coyotes whereby deer seek denser forest cover and squirrels and cottontails mitigate risk by increasing use of urban areas. Although previous studies reveal limited influence of coyote on the rest of the carnivore guild in suburban systems, we suggest coyotes play an important role in regulating the herbivorous mammals and hence may provide similar ecological benefits in urban/suburban forest fragments through trophic cascades. Furthermore, since hunting may not be allowed in urban and suburban habitats, coyotes might also serve as the primary regulator of nuisance species occurring at high abundance such as white-tailed deer and squirrels.

  9. Between Hosts and Guests: Conditional Hospitality and Citizenship in an American Suburban School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Roozbeh

    2018-01-01

    This article utilizes the idea of hospitality to explore how educative practices contribute to the making of citizens at Light Falls High School (LHS), a suburban American secondary school that professes a strong commitment to racial equity and global awareness. The data are derived from an ethnographic case study which took place in 2013-2014. I…

  10. Creating Home-School Partnerships: Examining Urban and Suburban Teachers' Practices, Challenges, and Educational Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindin, Alisa; Mueller, Mary

    2016-01-01

    This study examines suburban and urban teachers' family involvement practices, challenges they face in involving families, and their educational needs. A questionnaire was administered to 89 teachers. Data were coded using a constant comparative analysis. Codes were analyzed to determine the number of teachers whose responses fell into each…

  11. Ethno-Political effects of suburbanization in the Vilnius urban region : An analysis of voting behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ubareviciene, R.; Burneika, D.; Van Ham, M.

    2015-01-01

    We use electoral data to analyze the ethno-political consequences that may arise from the fact that the region surrounding the city of Vilnius is dominated by residents with a Polish identity, while those who move to the suburbs are mainly ethnic Lithuanians. In the suburban ring we found increasing

  12. Shopping malls as catalyst for sub-urban development in Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The concentration of population in major cities is usually the consequence of the concentration of employment opportunities, goods and services in such cities. These goods and services act as pull factors to the regional population, especially from the suburban or rural areas, to densely populated cities. The resulting ...

  13. The Poor Little Rich District: The Effects of Suburbanization on a Rural School and Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howley, Aimee; Carnes, Marilyn; Eldridge, Anita; Huber, Donna; Lado, Longun Moses; Kotler, Ruth; Turner, Maryalice

    2005-01-01

    Contextualized in relationship to other case studies about rural districts that have experienced population growth and decline as well as in relationship to the small sociological literature on "boom towns," this study considered the dynamics that seem to be interfering with one previously rural and now suburbanizing district's ability to address…

  14. Prevalence of Amblyopia and Strabismus in White and African-American Children Aged 6 through 71 Months: The Baltimore Pediatric Eye Disease Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, David S.; Repka, Michael X.; Katz, Joanne; Giordano, Lydia; Ibironke, Josephine; Hawse, Patricia; Tielsch, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the age-specific prevalence of strabismus in White and African-American children aged 6 through 71 months and of amblyopia in White and African-American children aged 30 through 71 months. Design Cross-sectional population-based study. Participants White and African-American children aged 6 through 71 months in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. Among 4,132 children identified, 3,990 eligible children (97%) were enrolled and 2,546 children (62%) were examined. Methods Parents or guardians of eligible participants underwent an in-home interview and were scheduled for a detailed eye examination including optotype visual acuity and measurement of ocular deviations. Strabismus was defined as a heterotropia at near or distance fixation. Amblyopia was assessed in those children aged 30 through 71 months who were able to perform optotype testing at 3 meters. Main Outcome Measures The proportions of children aged 6 through 71 months with strabismus and of children aged 30 through 71 months with amblyopia. Results Manifest strabismus was found in 3.3% of White and 2.1% of African American children (relative prevalence (RP) 1.61, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.97, 2.66). Esotropia and exotropia each accounted for close to half of all strabismus in both groups. Only one case of strabismus was found among 84 White children 6 through 11 months of age. Rates were higher in children 60 through 71 months of age (5.8% for Whites and 2.9% for African Americans (RP: 2.05, 95% CI: 0.79, 5.27). Amblyopia was present in 12 (1.8%) White and 7 (0.8%) African American children (RP: 2.23, 95% CI: 0.88, 5.62). Only one child had bilateral amblyopia. Conclusions Manifest strabismus affected 1 in 30 White and 1 in 47 African-American preschool aged children. The prevalence of amblyopia was under 2% in both Whites and African-Americans. National population projections suggest that there are approximately 677,000 cases of manifest strabismus among children 6–71 months

  15. Bird community response to filter strips in Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, P.J.; Dively, G.P.; Gill, D.E.; Rewa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Filter strips are strips of herbaceous vegetation planted along agricultural field margins adjacent to streams or wetlands and are designed to intercept sediment, nutrients, and agrichemicals. Roughly 16,000 ha of filter strips have been established in Maryland through the United States Department of Agriculture's Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program. Filter strips often represent the only uncultivated herbaceous areas on farmland in Maryland and therefore may be important habitat for early-successional bird species. Most filter strips in Maryland are planted to either native warm-season grasses or cool-season grasses and range in width from 10.7 m to 91.4 m. From 2004 to 2007 we studied the breeding and wintering bird communities in filter strips adjacent to wooded edges and non-buffered field edges and the effect that grass type and width of filter strips had on bird community composition. We used 5 bird community metrics (total bird density, species richness, scrub-shrub bird density, grassland bird density, and total avian conservation value), species-specific densities, nest densities, and nest survival estimates to assess the habitat value of filter strips for birds. Breeding and wintering bird community metrics were greater in filter strips than in non-buffered field edges but did not differ between cool-season and warm-season grass filter strips. Most breeding bird community metrics were negatively related to the percent cover of orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata) in ???1 yr. Breeding bird density was greater in narrow (60 m) filter strips. Our results suggest that narrow filter strips adjacent to wooded edges can provide habitat for many bird species but that wide filter strips provide better habitat for grassland birds, particularly obligate grassland species. If bird conservation is an objective, avoid planting orchardgrass in filter strips and reduce or eliminate orchardgrass from filter strips through management practices. Copyright ?? 2011 The

  16. Stream Phosphorus Dynamics Along a Suburbanizing Gradient in Southern Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, T. P.

    2017-12-01

    While it is well known that urban streams are subject to impaired water quality relative to natural analogues, far less research has been directed at stream water quality during the process of (sub-) urbanization. This study determines the role of housing construction activities in Brampton, Canada on the concentration and flux of phosphorus (P) of a headwater stream. Prior to development the stream was engineered with a riffle-pool sequence, riparian plantings, and a floodplain corridor that was lined with sediment fencing. Stream sites were sampled daily over a period of six months at locations representing varying stages of subdivision completion (upper site -active construction; middle site -finished construction and natural vegetation; lower site -finished construction and active construction). A nearby urban stream site developed ten years prior to this study was selected as a reference site. There were no differences in total phosphorus (TP) levels or flux between the suburbanizing and urban streams; however, the forms of P differed between sites. The urban stream TP load was dominated by particulate phosphorus (PP) while suburbanizing stream P was mainly in the dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) form. The importance of DOP to TP flux increased with the onset of the growing season. TP levels in all stream segments frequently exceeded provincial water quality guidelines during storm events but were generally low during baseflow conditions. During storm events PP and total suspended solid levels in the suburbanizing stream reached levels of the urban stream due to sediment fence failure at several locations along the construction-hillslope interface. Along the suburbanizing gradient, the hydrological connection to a mid-reach zone of no-construction activity / fallow field and native forest resulted in significantly lower P levels than the upper suburbanizing stream site. This suggests that stream channel design features as well as timing of construction

  17. Spatial-temporal variation of ecosystem water use efficiency in Beijing’s suburban region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, F.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X. C.; Yuan, S. B.; Lu, N.; Yan, N. Na

    2017-08-01

    Suburban ecosystem has multiple functions such as soil conservation and water regulation, which are critical for the welfare of human beings in the city. Water use efficiency (WUE) is an important indicator of ecosystem function that represents the amount of productivity per unit mass of evapotranspiration (ET). Improving WUE of suburban ecosystem is significant to climate regulation by carbon sequestration and water consumption, especially for cities with severe water shortage like Beijing, the capital of China. Based on remote sensing data, this paper examined the spatial and temporal variations in WUE in Beijing’s suburban region from 2002 to 2010. The results showed that the average annual WUE was 0.868 g C mm-1 m-2. It has large spatial variation with the minimum of 0.500 g C mm-1 m-2 in the Miyun District. During the study periods, the area with significant increasing trend of WUE was 63.2% of the total suburban region. In terms of ecosystem type, the value of WUE was following the sequence, deciduous coniferous forest (0.921g C mm-1 m-2) > mixed forest (0.887g C mm-1 m-2) > deciduous broadleaf forest (0.884 g C mm-1 m-2) > shrubland (0.860 g C mm-1 m-2) > evergreen coniferous forest (0.836 g C mm-1 m-2) > grassland (0.830 g C mm-1 m-2). As ET was similar among the ecosystems, the difference in WUE was mainly due to the discrepancy of NPP. We found that NPP significantly correlated with the diversity of ecosystem type (represented by Shannon-Wiener index). Our results suggest that ecological engineering construction, scientific ecosystem type selection, ecosystem diversity improvement and drought-resistant species cultivation are conductive to improve ecosystem WUE in Beijing’s suburban region.

  18. The Maryland self-referral law: history and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadri, Rehan; Rekhi, Satinder S; Zeman, Robert K; Blumberg, Albert; Tu, Raymond K

    2014-08-01

    Many previous studies have shown that nonradiologist physicians who can refer advanced MRI and CT examinations to themselves or within their practices use these modalities at a much higher rate than those who refer their examinations to unaffiliated radiology facilities. This led Maryland to pass a unique self-referral law in 1993 to directly address self-referred advanced imaging. The authors discuss the politics and economics of self-referral and provide a comprehensive review of the creation, progression, and impact of this landmark law. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Dermocystidium sp. infection in Blue Ridge Sculpin captured in Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazer, Vicki; Hitt, Nathaniel P.; Snyder, Craig D.; Snook, Erin; Adams, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Raised pale cysts were observed on Blue Ridge Sculpin Cottus caeruleomentum during stream fish community surveys in Catoctin Mountain Park, Maryland. When examined histologically, preserved sculpin exhibited multiple cysts containing spherical endospores with a refractile central body characteristic of Dermocystidiumspp. Cysts were not observed on the gills or internally. The portion of the watershed in which affected sculpin were observed contained lower than expected numbers of sculpin, raising concerns about the population effects of this infection. A nearby stream lacked sculpin even though they are common in this region, further suggesting the possibility of regional effects. This is the first report of a Dermocystidium infecting any fish species in the eastern United States.

  20. Special Year held at the University of Maryland

    CERN Document Server

    1988-01-01

    The papers in this volume reflect the richness and diversity of the subject of dynamics. Some are lectures given at the three conferences (Ergodic Theory and Topological Dynamics, Symbolic Dynamics and Coding Theory and Smooth Dynamics, Dynamics and Applied Dynamics) held in Maryland between October 1986 and March 1987; some are work which was in progress during the Special Year, and some are work which was done because of questions and problems raised at the conferences. In addition, a paper of John Milnor and William Thurston, versions of which had been available as notes but not yet published, is included.

  1. Hydropower production from bridges in urban or suburban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucciarelli, Tullio; Sammartano, Vincenzo; Sinagra, Marco; Morreale, Gabriele; Ferreira, Teresa

    2015-04-01

    A new technology for hydropower production from rivers crossing urban or suburban areas is proposed, based on the use of Cross-Flow turbines having its axis horizontal and normal to the flow direction. A large part of the river cross-section could be covered by the turbine cross-section and this would generate a small, but consistent jump between the water levels of the inlet and the outlet sections. The turbine should be anchored to a pre-existing bridge and the total length of its axis should be of the same order of the bridge length. Due to the large axis extension, it should be possible to easily attain a gross power similar to the power produced with a more traditional installation, based on weirs or barrages, if single jumps of few tens of centimeters were added over a large number of bridges. If the bridges were set in urbanized areas, the production of electricity would be located close to its consumption, according to the smart grid requirements, and the hydrological basin at the bridge section (along with the corresponding discharge) would be greater than the basin of traditional plants located in more upstream locations. The maximum water level to be attained in the upstream section of the bridge should be the minimum among the following ones: 1) the level corresponding to the maximum flood allowed by the surrounding infra-structures, 2) the level corresponding to the maximum force allowed by the bridge structures. The resulting upstream water level hydrographs should be compatible with the river suspended and bed load equilibrium and with the requirement of the aquatic living population. The system should include a mechanism able to raise the turbine completely out of the water level, if required, for maintenance or other purposes. The complete lifting of the turbine could be used to: a) reconstruct the natural river bed profile during floods, b) allow the navigation or fish movements during some periods of the year, or even some hours of the day. A

  2. Maryland power plants and the environment. A review of the impacts of power plants and transmission lines on Maryland's natural resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Power Plant Research Program (PPRP) is required by Maryland law to review and evaluate the potential impacts to Maryland's environment from the construction and operation of electric power generating and transmission systems. PPRP summarizes these evaluations every other year in a document known as the Cumulative Environmental Impact Report (CEIR). This volume represents the tenth edition (CEIR-10), and it summarizes the current state of knowledge which PPRP has gained from more than 25 years of continuous monitoring of power plant impacts in Maryland. PPRP conducts a range of research and monitoring projects on the topics addressed in this CEIR and many other issues as well. In fact, PPRP publishes a Bibliography every year that lists the general and site-specific power plant related reports that PPRP has produced since the early 1970s

  3. Physical growth of children in urban, suburban and rural mainland China: a study of 20 years change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zong, Xinnan; Zhang, Jing; Zhu, Zonghan

    2011-02-01

    To describe secular trends on physical growth of children in China during the year of 1985-2005 and to analyze the urban-suburban-rural difference and its change. The measurements of height, weight and chest circumference obtained from two serial national cross-sectional surveys for children aged 0 to 7 years in China were used to analyze the secular trends, and the growth differences among urban, suburban and rural children were compared. The average weight and height for both boys and girls from urban, suburban and rural areas have significantly increased in most age groups during the past 20 years; The average chest circumference increased slightly, ranging from 0.0 to 2.0 cm. From 1985 to 2005, the urban-suburban difference in height had become smaller, and that in weight showed similar trend for children under 3 years old but became larger after 3 years old; the suburban-rural difference both in height and weight became larger after 6 months old. The increment per decade in height was the greatest in the suburban group while the greatest increment in weight was the urban group. Positive secular trends were observed among urban, suburban and rural areas in Chinese children under 7 years old during the 1980s and the 2000s, reflecting a rapid socio-economic development in China.

  4. Mobility and Active Ageing in Suburban Environments: Findings from In-Depth Interviews and Person-Based GPS Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitler, Elisabeth; Buys, Laurie; Aird, Rosemary; Miller, Evonne

    2012-01-01

    Background. Governments face a significant challenge to ensure that community environments meet the mobility needs of an ageing population. Therefore, it is critical to investigate the effect of suburban environments on the choice of transportation and its relation to participation and active ageing. Objective. This research explores if and how suburban environments impact older people's mobility and their use of different modes of transport. Methods. Data derived from GPS tracking, travel diaries, brief questionnaires, and semistructured interviews were gathered from thirteen people aged from 56 to 87 years, living in low-density suburban environments in Brisbane, Australia. Results. The suburban environment influenced the choice of transportation and out-of-home mobility. Both walkability and public transportation (access and usability) impact older people's transportation choices. Impracticality of active and public transportation within suburban environments creates car dependency in older age. Conclusion. Suburban environments often create barriers to mobility, which impedes older people's engagement in their wider community and ability to actively age in place. Further research is needed to develop approaches towards age-friendly suburban environments which will encourage older people to remain active and engaged in older age.

  5. 77 FR 61513 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; The 2002 Base Year...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-10

    ..., on-road mobile sources, and biogenic sources. The pollutants that comprise the inventory are nitrogen... Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; The 2002 Base Year Emissions Inventory for the... fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) 2002 base year emissions inventory portion of the Maryland State...

  6. 75 FR 953 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; 2002 Base Year Emission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-07

    .... The budgets are identical to the projected 2008 on-road mobile source emission inventories. Because... Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; 2002 Base Year Emission Inventory, Reasonable... Maryland State Implementation Plan (SIP) to meet the 2002 base year emissions inventory, the reasonable...

  7. The National Higher Education and Workforce Initiative: Strategy in Action: Building the Cybersecurity Workforce in Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Business-Higher Education Forum, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Business-Higher Education Forum (BHEF) has achieved particular success in operationalizing the National Higher Education and Workforce Initiative (HEWI) in Maryland around cybersecurity. Leveraging its membership of corporate CEOs, university presidents, and government agency leaders, BHEF partnered with the University System of Maryland to…

  8. In the Public Interest: Law, Government, and Media. Maryland Women's History Resource Packet--1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryland State Commission for Women, Baltimore.

    Designed to be used for National Women's History Week (March 2-8), this 1986 Maryland women's history resource packet centers around Maryland women who have made significant volunteer and career contributions in the areas of government, law, and the public interest media. The packet begins with suggested student activity lists and activity sheets…

  9. Maryland's Strategic Forest Lands Assessment--Using Indicators and Models for Decision Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. L. Horan; J. C. Wolf

    2006-01-01

    Sustaining healthy, ecologically functional, and economically viable forests is an increasing challenge in Maryland due to relentless urban development. Forests that once occupied more than 90 percent of Maryland’s landscape today cover only 41 percent of the land. As forests become more fragmented and parcelized they begin to lose their ability to provide important...

  10. 30 CFR 920.25 - Approval of Maryland abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Funds. August 19, 1993 December 9, 1994 Chapter 1 of Plan—Project Ranking & Selection. [62 FR 9945, Mar... reclamation plan amendments. 920.25 Section 920.25 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE MARYLAND § 920.25 Approval of Maryland abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. The...

  11. Change in Practice in Maryland: Student Learning Objectives and Teacher and Principal Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotnik, William J.; Bugler, Daniel; Liang, Guodong

    2015-01-01

    The Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) is guiding and supporting the implementation of a new Teacher and Principal Evaluation (TPE) system in all school districts throughout the state. The system includes measures of both professional practice and student growth. Because the historical and current practice in Maryland is one of local…

  12. 77 FR 39938 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Regional Haze State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... and modeling for this source demonstrated that it may impact visibility at one or more Class I areas... exception of a single unit at one EGU, the Maryland HAA covers more units at each source than just BART... sources and all of the BART-eligible units with the exception of Chalk Point Unit 3. Because the Maryland...

  13. 75 FR 74712 - Planet Energy (Maryland) Corp.; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. ER11-2168-000] Planet Energy (Maryland) Corp.; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request for Blanket... proceeding, of Planet Energy (Maryland) Corp.'s application for market-based rate authority, with an...

  14. 77 FR 42686 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; the 2002 Base Year...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ... Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; the 2002 Base Year Inventory AGENCY: Environmental... matter (PM 2.5 ) 2002 base year emissions inventory portion of the Maryland State Implementation Plan... National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) SIP. EPA is proposing to approve the 2002 base year PM 2.5...

  15. The relationship between tree canopy and crime rates across an urban-rural gradient in the greater Baltimore region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin Troy; J. Morgan Grove; Jarlath. O' Neill-Dunne

    2012-01-01

    The extent to which urban tree cover influences crime is in debate in the literature. This research took advantage of geocoded crime point data and high resolution tree canopy data to address this question in Baltimore City and County, MD, an area that includes a significant urban-rural gradient. Using ordinary least squares and spatially adjusted regression and...

  16. "I Wish Everyone Had a Library Like This": Year 2 Report on the Baltimore Elementary and Middle School Library Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Steven B.; Davis, Marcia H.

    2015-01-01

    This report focuses on the opening of new school libraries and their impact on schools, teachers and students after two years of implementation of the Baltimore Elementary and Middle School Library Project (Library Project). The findings build on the first report of this project and show that it is not just new facilities, but also the added…

  17. 77 FR 32930 - Reorganization/Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 74 Under Alternative Site Framework Baltimore, MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board [Order No. 1831] Reorganization/Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 74 Under Alternative Site Framework Baltimore, MD Pursuant to its authority under the.../22/10) as an option for the establishment or reorganization of general-purpose zones; Whereas, the...

  18. Investigating stakeholders' perceptions of the link between high STD rates and the current Baltimore City Public Schools' sex education curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolden, Shenell L. T.

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine key stakeholders' perceptions of the current Baltimore City Public Schools' (BCPS) sex education curriculum and to gain insight into how they believe the curriculum could be modified to be more effective. A mixed methods approach using qualitative and quantitative data collection consisting of a survey, focus group interview, and individual interviews was conducted to gather information on stakeholders' perceptions. The stakeholders included: (1) former students who received their sex education courses in the Baltimore City Public School system (BCPS); (2) teachers in BCPS who were affiliated with the sex education curriculum; (3) health care professionals who screened and/or treated East Baltimore City residents for a sexually transmitted disease (STD) and; (4) one policy maker who was responsible for creating sex education curriculum at the national level. Analysis of the quantitative data from former Baltimore City Public School students revealed a general satisfaction with the current sex education curriculum. However, qualitative data from the same group of stakeholders revealed several changes they thought should be implemented into the program in an effort to improve the current curriculum. Findings from the other groups after qualitative analysis of the interviews suggest three major themes in support of curriculum change: (1) a blended curriculum that integrates both the cognitive and affective learning domains; (2) knowledge of prevention of STD's and pregnancy; and (3) authentic teaching and learning. Results from this study strongly suggest that the Baltimore City Public School system is apathetic to the sexual health needs of students and, therefore, is inadvertently contributing to the high rate of sexually transmitted diseases among young people. Keywords: Abstinence, Affective domain, Indoctrination, Behavior Modification, Cognitive domain, Sex education curriculum, Sexually Transmitted Diseases.

  19. Characteristics of prepared food sources in low-income neighborhoods of Baltimore City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hee; Rowan, Megan T; Powell, Lisa M; Newman, Sara; Klassen, Ann Carroll; Frick, Kevin D; Anderson, Jennifer; Gittelsohn, Joel

    2010-01-01

    The food environment is associated with obesity risk and diet-related chronic diseases. Despite extensive research conducted on retail food stores, little is known about prepared food sources(PFSs). We conducted an observational assessment of all PFSs(N = 92) in low-income neighborhoods in Baltimore. The most common PFSs were carry-outs, which had the lowest availability of healthy food choices. Only a small proportion of these carry-outs offered healthy sides, whole wheat bread, or entrée salads (21.4%, 7.1%, and 33.9%, respectively). These findings suggest that carry-out-specific interventions are necessary to increase healthy food availability in low-income urban neighborhoods.

  20. Adventitious agents, new technology, and risk assessment, 19-20 May 2011, Baltimore, MD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Rebecca; Loewer, Johannes; Raychaudhuri, Gopa; Petricciani, John

    2012-03-01

    In May 2011, the International Alliance for Biological Standardization, with the cooperation of WHO, FDA, and NIAID, organized a conference on adventitious agents that might be found in biological products using new technology (http://www.iabs.org/index.php/past-conference-reports/116-baltimore-2011-slides). The implications of such findings on risk assessment also were considered. Topics that were addressed included: a) current routine testing--what are we doing now?; b) recent advances in testing--what tests are being explored/applied?; c) examples of finding agents with "new" techniques; and d) risk assessment, including recent WHO activities. A draft algorithm for risk assessment was discussed in terms of its applicability to a variety of potential new agents and the possibilities for improving it. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Baltimore in The Wire and Los Angeles in The Shield: Urban Landscapes in American Drama Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto N. García

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Shield (FX 2002-08 and The Wire (HBO 2002-08 are two of the most ever critically acclaimed TV-shows and they both can be seen as the finest developed film noir proposals produced in television. The Wire transcends the cop-show genre by offering a multilayered portrait of the whole city of Baltimore: from police work to drug dealing, getting through stevedores’ union corruption, tricks of local politics, problems of the school system and some unethical journalism practices. On the other, The Shield offers a breathtaking cop-show that features in the foreground the moral ambiguity that characterizes the noir genre. Both series display complementary realist strategies (a neorealist aesthetic in The Wire; a cinéma vérité pastiche in The Shield that highlight the importance of city landscape in their narrative. Baltimore and Los Angeles are portrayed not only as a dangerous and ruined physical places, but are also intertwined with moral and political issues in contemporary cities, such as race, class, political corruption, social disintegration, economical disparities, the limitations of the system of justice, the failure of the American dream and so on. The complex and expanded narrative of The Wire and The Shield, as Dimemberg has written for film noir genre, “remains well attuned to the violently fragmented spaces and times of the late-modern world”. Therefore, this article will focus on how The Wire and The Shield (and some of their TV heirs, such as Southland and Justified reflect and renew several topics related to the city in the film noir tradition: the sociopolitical effects of showing the ruins of the centripetal industrial metropolis, the inferences of filming in actual places, the dramatic presence of what Augé coined as “no-places”, the bachelardian opposition between home and city, or the streets as an urban jungle where danger lurks in every corner.

  2. Regional frequency analysis of extreme rainfall for the Baltimore Metropolitan region based on stochastic storm transposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Z.; Smith, J. A.; Yang, L.; Baeck, M. L.; Wright, D.; Liu, S.

    2017-12-01

    Regional frequency analyses of extreme rainfall are critical for development of engineering hydrometeorology procedures. In conventional approaches, the assumptions that `design storms' have specified time profiles and are uniform in space are commonly applied but often not appropriate, especially over regions with heterogeneous environments (due to topography, water-land boundaries and land surface properties). In this study, we present regional frequency analyses of extreme rainfall for Baltimore study region combining storm catalogs of rainfall fields derived from weather radar and stochastic storm transposition (SST, developed by Wright et al., 2013). The study region is Dead Run, a small (14.3 km2) urban watershed, in the Baltimore Metropolitan region. Our analyses build on previous empirical and modeling studies showing pronounced spatial heterogeneities in rainfall due to the complex terrain, including the Chesapeake Bay to the east, mountainous terrain to the west and urbanization in this region. We expand the original SST approach by applying a multiplier field that accounts for spatial heterogeneities in extreme rainfall. We also characterize the spatial heterogeneities of extreme rainfall distribution through analyses of rainfall fields in the storm catalogs. We examine the characteristics of regional extreme rainfall and derive intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves using the SST approach for heterogeneous regions. Our results highlight the significant heterogeneity of extreme rainfall in this region. Estimates of IDF show the advantages of SST in capturing the space-time structure of extreme rainfall. We also illustrate application of SST analyses for flood frequency analyses using a distributed hydrological model. Reference: Wright, D. B., J. A. Smith, G. Villarini, and M. L. Baeck (2013), Estimating the frequency of extreme rainfall using weather radar and stochastic storm transposition, J. Hydrol., 488, 150-165.

  3. The Influence of the Family on Adolescent Sexual Experience: A Comparison between Baltimore and Johannesburg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mmari, Kristin; Kalamar, Amanda M; Brahmbhatt, Heena; Venables, Emilie

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to understand the role of the family on the sexual experiences of adolescents from urban, disadvantaged settings in Baltimore and Johannesburg. Data were collected as part of the WAVE study, a global study of disadvantaged youth in five cities. Qualitative data were based on key informant interviews, a Photovoice exercise, community mapping, focus groups and in-depth interviews with adolescents. Quantitative data were gathered from an ACASI survey that was administered to approximately 450-500 adolescents per site. Results from the qualitative data revealed that while parents were viewed as important sources of information for sexual and reproductive health, they were often not present in the adolescents' lives. This lack of parental presence was perceived to result in adolescents feeling an overall lack of adult support and guidance. The impact of parental presence and support on adolescent sexual experience was further examined from the quantitative data and revealed a complex picture. In both Baltimore and Johannesburg, female adolescents who were raised by other relatives were less likely to report having had sex compared to those raised by two biological parents, which was not observed for males. In Johannesburg, female adolescents who were paternal orphans were less likely to have had sex compared to non-orphans; the opposite was true among males. Finally, in both sites, female adolescents who had been exposed to violence were more likely to have had sex compared to those who had not; for males, there was no significant relationship. The study demonstrates the powerful influence of both context and gender for understanding the influences of the family on adolescent sexual behaviors. Programs aiming to reduce adolescent sexual risk behaviors the need to understand the complex influences on risk behaviors in different settings and in particular, the role of mothers and fathers. Prevention strategies need to also understand

  4. Knowledge of oral health issues among low-income Baltimore adults: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macek, Mark D; Manski, Marion C; Schneiderman, Maryann T; Meakin, Sarah J; Haynes, Don; Wells, William; Bauer-Leffler, Simon; Cotten, P Ann; Parker, Ruth M

    2011-01-01

    This pilot study documents conceptual knowledge of oral health among low-income adults in Baltimore. Selected questions from the Baltimore Health Literacy and Oral Health Knowledge Project, a cross-sectional, population-based investigation of oral health literacy, were used for this analysis. Participants were asked questions during face-to-face interviews about basic oral health and the prevention and management of dental caries and periodontal diseases. Descriptive analyses included tests of association with selected socio-demographic variables (age, sex, education level, annual household income). The majority of respondents were African American women, 45 to 64 years of age, with 12 years of education and an income less than or equal to $25,000. Ninety-one percent of respondents knew that sugar caused dental caries, while 82% understood that the best way to prevent tooth decay was to brush and floss every day. Knowledge of oral hygiene practices and the prevention and management of gingivitis and periodontitis was mixed. Seventy-six percent understood that the best way to remove tartar was by a dental cleaning. However, only 15% knew how often to floss their teeth and only 21% knew that plaque was composed of germs. Conceptual oral health knowledge is one component of oral health literacy. In turn, oral health literacy impacts communication. Practitioners should account for limited conceptual knowledge when they discuss oral health issues with their low-income and minority patients. If this is not accounted for, they will probably find that their oral hygiene education messages are being ignored and health promotion is being adversely affected.

  5. Knowledge of Oral Health Issues Among Low–Income Baltimore Adults: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macek, Mark D.; Manski, Marion C.; Schneiderman, MaryAnn T.; Meakin, Sarah J.; Haynes, Don; Wells, William; Bauer–Leffler, Simon; Cotten, P. Ann; Parker, Ruth M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This pilot study documents conceptual knowledge of oral health among low–income adults in Baltimore. Methods Selected questions from the Baltimore Health Literacy and Oral Health Knowledge Project, a cross–sectional, population–based investigation of oral health literacy, were used for this analysis. Participants were asked questions during face–to–face interviews about basic oral health and the prevention and management of dental caries and periodontal diseases. Descriptive analyses included tests of association with selected socio–demographic variables (age, sex, education level, annual household income). Results The majority of respondents were African American women, 45 to 64 years of age, with 12 years of education and an income less than or equal to $25,000. Ninety–one percent of respondents knew that sugar caused dental caries, while 82% understood that the best way to prevent tooth decay was to brush and floss every day. Knowledge of oral hygiene practices and the prevention and management of gingivitis and periodontitis was mixed. Seventy–six percent understood that the best way to remove tartar was by a dental cleaning. However, only 15% knew how often to floss their teeth and only 21% knew that plaque was composed of germs. Conclusion Conceptual oral health knowledge is one component of oral health literacy. In turn, oral health literacy impacts communication. Practitioners should account for limited conceptual knowledge when they discuss oral health issues with their low–income and minority patients. If this is not accounted for, they will probably find that their oral hygiene education messages are being ignored and health promotion is being adversely affected. PMID:21396263

  6. Landscape scale assessment of ecosystem goods and services and the extent, location, and magnitude of urban-suburban expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human development adjoining coastal cities is the prevalent force changing the Anthropocene landscape. The extent, location, and magnitude of urban-suburban expansion can drastically modify how important features of ecosystems are effected. These effects are best summarized usin...

  7. LIVING CONDITIONS AND MIGRATION IN SUBURBAN AREA OF WROCŁAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kazak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Around large cities it is easy to come across villages taking the character of the town sleeping area. One of the factors of this process is a desire to improve their quality of life by living in better conditions – regardless of the interpretation of the term by different social groups. The area of research will be suburban communes, located close to Wroclaw, which are in the process of suburbanisation. A relevant question of the research will be to determine the relationship of migration of the population to the suburban areas with regard to changes in living conditions. Level of living conditions will be determined on the basis of available statistical data using a synthetic indicator Hellwig. The study proved that communes with the highest index in a base year (over 0.4 recorded the highest growth of population – more than 20%.

  8. [Survey on pinworm infection and egg contamination among urban, suburban and rural pupils in Shangqiu City].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jin-Huan; Wang, Chenl; Xu, Ying; Man, Na; Cui, Yue; Yang, Xia; Cui, Yan-Mei

    2012-12-30

    Seven hundred and ninety-eight preschool children and grade one pupils from three schools in the city of Shangqiu were sampled randomly in urban, suburban and rural areas. The transparent tape method was used to examine the infection of pinworm and the contamination of pinworm eggs on the environments. The average infection rate of pinworm was 9.9% (79/798). The prevalence of pinworm infection among the pupils of urban(4.6%) was statistically lower than those of suburban (11.2%) and rural (13.8%) (P pinworm eggs from armor, fingers, bedclothes, briefs,and stationery in infected pupils are 23.8% (5/21), 18.0% (9/50), 15.8% (3/19), 12.9% (4/31) and 5.0% (2/40), respectively, which showed no statistical significance (P > 0.05).

  9. The Potential for Abandoned Paddy Fields to Reduce Pollution Loads from Households in Suburban Tokyo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Yokohari

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Similar to other Asian nations, suburban areas in Japan are characterized by dense intermixtures of residential areas and farmlands. These hybrid rural/urban areas are evaluated negatively in modern planning frameworks. However, mixed rural/urban landscapes may prove advantageous when attempting to reconstruct sustainable wastewater treatment systems. This research examines the potential for abandoned paddy fields to reduce nitrogen (T-N and phosphorous (T-P loads, an increasingly problematic source of eutrophication in many closed water areas, from households in suburban areas. Our results indicate that abandoned paddy fields remaining in mixed urban/rural areas have significant potential to reduce both nitrogen and phosphorous loads. Accordingly, we suggest that abandoned paddy fields can play an important role in reducing pollution loads in mixed urban/rural areas.

  10. SUBURBAN VS. URBAN FRINGES ENTITIES’ WILLINGNESS TO PAY FOR AMENITIES: EMPIRICAL RESEARCH IN CRACOW CITY, POLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr LITYŃSKI

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to estimate the value of selected amenities of infrastructure, space and public services on both sides of the cities’ administrative borders and its territorial implications. The used method is the estimation of WTP. The method was addressed to households and companies located in the district adjoining areas which are administratively not part of the city, and that are judged to be strongly characterized by the processes of suburbanization. The conclusions of the study indicate that the administrative border of the city is polarized in terms of a household economic profile. Residents of both regions express their needs for amenities and suburban residents generally estimate their value higher. While firms from both areas are not interested in improvements, the administrative border of the city does not really differentiate businesses (size, employment, wages

  11. Land cooperatives as an approach of suburban space construction: Under the reform of Chinese land transfer market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Dang

    2016-12-01

    This study analyzed the connection between land market mechanism and suburban space formation. Results concluded that the current land transfer system caused industrial urban sprawl, and the reform program may promote the urban sprawl of population. Two typical models of rural land development were studied. A model called land cooperatives based on land pooling joint stock system was proposed to build a compact and sustainable suburban space.

  12. Health Differences Among Lesbian, Gay, and Transgender Veterans by Rural/Small Town and Suburban/Urban Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauth, Michael R; Barrera, Terri L; Denton, F Nicholas; Latini, David M

    2017-06-01

    We explored the relationship between geographic location and health indicators for lesbian, gay, and transgender veterans. We solicited participation in an online survey through national and city LGBT organizations and personal contacts to examine differences in depression, anxiety, alcohol and tobacco use, and body mass index among lesbian, gay, and transgender veterans (n = 252) in suburban/urban and rural/small town locations. Bisexual participants were too few to include in the analyses. As expected, rural/small town lesbian, gay, and transgender veterans spent more time traveling to their primary care provider. Travel time was also positively related to depressive and anxiety symptoms. However, only suburban/urban and rural/small town gay men differed in measures of depression and anxiety and tobacco use. That is, rural/small town gay men reported greater depressive and anxiety symptoms and greater tobacco use than their suburban/urban counterparts. Consistent with this finding, rural/small town gay men reported less community-related identity than suburban/urban men. Suburban/urban lesbian women showed a nonsignificant trend for community identity compared with rural/small town women. Similar to civilian studies, suburban/urban and rural/small town lesbian, gay, and transgender veterans evidenced few health differences, with the exception of suburban/urban gay men. Although rural/small town gay male veterans evidenced more depression and anxiety and less community identity than suburban/urban men, social networks likely differ for lesbian, gay, and transgender subgroups. Lesbian, gay, and transgender veterans may also differ from their civilian counterparts in ways that we do not yet understand.

  13. Nanoaerosols Including Radon Decay Products in Outdoor and Indoor Air at a Suburban Site

    OpenAIRE

    Smerajec, Mateja; Vaupotič, Janja

    2012-01-01

    Nanoaerosols have been monitored inside a kitchen and in the courtyard of a suburban farmhouse. Total number concentration and number size distribution (5–1000 nm) of general aerosol particles, as measured with a Grimm Aerosol SMPS+C 5.400 instrument outdoors, were mainly influenced by solar radiation and use of farming equipment, while, indoors, they were drastically changed by human activity in the kitchen. In contrast, activity concentrations of the short-lived radon decay products 218Po, ...

  14. Observations of urban and suburban environments with global satellite scatterometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Balk, D.; Rodriguez, E.; Neumann, G.; Sorichetta, A.; Small, C.; Elvidge, C. D.

    A global and consistent characterization of land use and land change in urban and suburban environments is crucial for many fundamental social and natural science studies and applications. Presented here is a dense sampling method (DSM) that uses satellite scatterometer data to delineate urban and intraurban areas at a posting scale of about 1 km. DSM results are analyzed together with information on population and housing censuses, with Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) imagery, and with Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) night-light data. The analyses include Dallas-Fort Worth and Phoenix in the United States, Bogotá in Colombia, Dhaka in Bangladesh, Guangzhou in China, and Quito in Ecuador. Results show that scatterometer signatures correspond to buildings and infrastructures in urban and suburban environments. City extents detected by scatterometer data are significantly smaller than city light extents, but not all urban areas are detectable by the current SeaWinds scatterometer on the QuikSCAT satellite. Core commercial and industrial areas with high buildings and large factories are identified as high-backscatter centers. Data from DSM backscatter and DMSP nighttime lights have a good correlation with population density. However, the correlation relations from the two satellite datasets are different for different cities indicating that they contain complementary information. Together with night-light and census data, DSM and satellite scatterometer data provide new observations to study global urban and suburban environments and their changes. Furthermore, the capability of DSM to identify hydrological channels on the Greenland ice sheet and ecological biomes in central Africa demonstrates that DSM can be used to observe persistent structures in natural environments at a km scale, providing contemporaneous data to study human impacts beyond urban and suburban areas.

  15. OH Reactivity Observations during the MAPS-Seoul Campaign: Contrasts between Urban and Suburban Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, D.; Jeong, D.; Blake, D. R.; Wang, M. D.; Kim, D. S.; Lee, G.; Lee, M.; Jung, J.; Ahn, J.; Cho, G.; Guenther, A. B.; Kim, S.

    2015-12-01

    Direct total OH reactivity was observed in the urban and suburban environments of Seoul, South Korea using a comparative reactivity method (CRM) during the MAPS-Seoul field campaign. In addition, CO, NOx, SO2, ozone, VOCs, aerosol, physical, and chemical parameters were also deployed. By comparing the observed total OH reactivity results with calculated OH reactivity from the trace gas observational datasets, we will evaluate our current status in constraining reactive gases in the urban and suburban environments in the East Asian megacity. Observed urban OH reactivity will be presented in the context of the ability to constrain anthropogenic reactive trace gas emissions. It will then be compared to the observed suburban results from Taehwa Research Forest (located ~ 50 km from the Seoul City Center). Our understanding of reactive trace gases in an environment of high BVOC emissions in a mildly aged anthropogenic influences will be evaluated. Using an observational constrained box model with detailed VOC oxidation schemes (e.g. MCM), we will discuss: 1) what is the amount of missing OH reactivity 2) what are the potential sources of the missing OH reactivity, and 3) what are the implications on regional air quality?

  16. Exploring bikeability in a suburban metropolitan area using the Active Commuting Route Environment Scale (ACRES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlgren, Lina; Schantz, Peter

    2014-08-15

    Commuting by bicycle could contribute to public health, and route environments may influence this behaviour. Therefore, the aim of this study is to assess the potential associations between appraisals of the overall route environment as hindering or stimulating for bicycle commuting, with both perceptions of commuting route environmental factors in a suburban area and background factors. The Active Commuting Route Environment Scale (ACRES) was used for the assessment of bicycle commuters' perceptions and appraisals of their route environments in the suburban parts of Greater Stockholm, Sweden. A simultaneous multiple regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between the outcome variable whether the overall route environment hinders or stimulates bicycle commuting and environmental factors (e.g., exhaust fumes, speeds of motor vehicles, greenery), as well as background factors (sex, age, education, income) as predictor variables. The results indicate that in suburban areas, the factors aesthetics, greenery and bicycle paths seem to be, independently of each other, stimulating factors for bicycle commuting. On the other hand, flows of motor vehicles, noise, and low "directness" of the route seem to be hindering factors. A comparison of these results with those obtained from an inner urban area points to the importance of studying different types of built-up areas separately.

  17. Suburban sprawl in the developing world: duplicating past mistakes? The case of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Lawrence C; Brieger, William B

    Newly affluent developing world cities increasingly adopt the same unfortunate low-density suburban paradigm that shaped cities in the industrialized world. Identified by a World Bank report as a "mini-Los Angeles," Kuala Lumpur is a sentinel example of the results of unrestrained sprawl in the developing world. Factors driving sprawl included government policies favoring foreign investment, "mega-projects," and domestic automobile production; fragmented governance structures allowing federal and state government influence on local planning; increasing middle-class affluence; an oligopoly of local developers; and haphazard municipal zoning and transport planning. The city's present form contributes to Malaysia's dual burden of disease, with inner-city shantytown dwellers facing communicable disease and malnutrition while suburban citizens experience increasing chronic disease, injury, and mental health issues. Despite growing awareness in city plans targeted toward higher density development, Kuala Lumpur presents a warning to other emerging economies of the financial, societal, and population health costs imposed by quickly-built suburban sprawl.

  18. Exploring Bikeability in a Suburban Metropolitan Area Using the Active Commuting Route Environment Scale (ACRES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Wahlgren

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Commuting by bicycle could contribute to public health, and route environments may influence this behaviour. Therefore, the aim of this study is to assess the potential associations between appraisals of the overall route environment as hindering or stimulating for bicycle commuting, with both perceptions of commuting route environmental factors in a suburban area and background factors. Methods: The Active Commuting Route Environment Scale (ACRES was used for the assessment of bicycle commuters’ perceptions and appraisals of their route environments in the suburban parts of Greater Stockholm, Sweden. A simultaneous multiple regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between the outcome variable whether the overall route environment hinders or stimulates bicycle commuting and environmental factors (e.g., exhaust fumes, speeds of motor vehicles, greenery, as well as background factors (sex, age, education, income as predictor variables. Results and Conclusions: The results indicate that in suburban areas, the factors aesthetics, greenery and bicycle paths seem to be, independently of each other, stimulating factors for bicycle commuting. On the other hand, flows of motor vehicles, noise, and low “directness” of the route seem to be hindering factors. A comparison of these results with those obtained from an inner urban area points to the importance of studying different types of built-up areas separately.

  19. Indoor radon progeny aerosol size measurements in urban, suburban, and rural regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, K.W.; Knutson, E.O.; George, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    By using direct and indirect methods, the authors conducted size distribution measurements of radon progeny particles in a variety of indoor environments in urban, suburban, and rural areas. The radon progeny particle size distribution owing to indoor activities has two definable source categories: (1) gas combustion from stoves and kerosene heaters - particles were found to be smaller than 0.1 μm in diameter, mostly in the range 0.02-0.08 μm; and (2) cigarette smoking and food frying - particles were found to be larger, in the size range 0.1-0.2 μm. The radon progeny particle size distribution, without significant indoor activities, such as cooking, was found to be larger in rural areas than in urban or suburban areas. The modal diameters of the size spectra in the rural areas were two to three times larger than those in urban or suburban areas, around 0.3-0.4 bs. 0.1-0.2 μm. Results obtained by applying the attachment theory to the measured number-weighted size spectra from an electrical aerosol size analyzer support this finding. These results, if confirmed by more extensive studies, will be useful for the assessment of the risk from the inhalation of radon progeny in various indoor environments

  20. Modelling of light pollution in suburban areas using remotely sensed imagery and GIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkias, C; Petrakis, M; Psiloglou, B; Lianou, M

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes a methodology for modelling light pollution using geographical information systems (GIS) and remote sensing (RS) technology. The proposed approach attempts to address the issue of environmental assessment in sensitive suburban areas. The modern way of life in developing countries is conductive to environmental degradation in urban and suburban areas. One specific parameter for this degradation is light pollution due to intense artificial night lighting. This paper aims to assess this parameter for the Athens metropolitan area, using modern analytical and data capturing technologies. For this purpose, night-time satellite images and analogue maps have been used in order to create the spatial database of the GIS for the study area. Using GIS advanced analytical functionality, visibility analysis was implemented. The outputs for this analysis are a series of maps reflecting direct and indirect light pollution around the city of Athens. Direct light pollution corresponds to optical contact with artificial night light sources, while indirect light pollution corresponds to optical contact with the sky glow above the city. Additionally, the assessment of light pollution in different periods allows for dynamic evaluation of the phenomenon. The case study demonstrates high levels of light pollution in Athens suburban areas and its increase over the last decade.

  1. Narrowing urban-suburban rural disparities in physical growth among children in China: findings from the 5th national survey in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Xinnan; Li, Hui; Zhang, Ya-Qin; Wu, Huahong

    2017-11-01

    Previous studies have reported a narrowing tendency in urban-suburban rural differences for height, but almost no tendency of narrowing for weight in Chinese children between 1975-2005. To examine urban-suburban rural disparities for both height and weight in a recent 10-year period. A representative sample of 161,643 children under 7 years old was obtained from the 5th national survey conducted in urban and suburban rural areas of the nine cities in China in 2015. Trends in urban-suburban rural differences were assessed from 1975-2015. Generally, urban boys and girls were taller or heavier than their suburban rural counterparts. By 2015, there were almost no obvious differences for urban-suburban rural height differences for children under 3. Urban-suburban rural weight differences narrowed sharply in the 10-year period. There were no obvious differences for urban-suburban rural height differences among the 3rd, 50th and 97th percentiles; however, the weight differences at the 97th percentile were larger than at the 50th percentile for children over 3. The narrowing urban-suburban rural disparities in China suggest the physical growth inequality may be eliminated, along with the sustained improvement of socioeconomic status and the acceleration of urbanisation process in suburban rural areas.

  2. Power balance and characterization of impurities in the Maryland Spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cote, C.

    1993-01-01

    The Maryland Spheromak is a medium size magnetically confined plasma of toroidal shape. Low T e and higher n e than expected contribute to produce a radiation dominated short-lived spheromak configuration. A pyroelectric radiation detector and a VUV spectrometer have been used for space and time-resolved measurements of radiated power and impurity line emission. Results from the bolometry and VUV spectroscopy diagnostics have been combined to give the absolute concentrations of the major impurity species together with the electron temperature. The large amount of oxygen and nitrogen ions in the plasma very early in the discharge is seen to be directly responsible for the abnormally high electron density. The dominant power loss mechanisms are found to be radiation (from impurity line emission) and electron convection to the end walls during the formation phase of the spheromak configuration, and radiation only during the decay phase

  3. Maryland State information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-31

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Handbook Series Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Maryland. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

  4. The 3D Elevation Program: summary for Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carswell, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Elevation data are essential to a broad range of applications, including forest resources management, wildlife and habitat management, national security, recreation, and many others. For the State of Maryland, elevation data are critical for agriculture and precision farming, natural resources conservation such as the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed, flood risk management, urban and regional planning, infrastructure and construction management, water supply and quality, coastal zone management, and other business uses. Today, high-density light detection and ranging (lidar) data are the primary sources for deriving elevation models and other datasets. Federal, State, Tribal, and local agencies work in partnership to (1) replace data that are older and of lower quality and (2) provide coverage where publicly accessible data do not exist. A joint goal of State and Federal partners is to acquire consistent, statewide coverage to support existing and emerging applications enabled by lidar data.

  5. Injector for the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehne, D.; Godlove, T.; Haldemann, P.; Bernal, S.; Guharay, S.; Kishek, R.; Li, Y.; O'Shea, P.; Reiser, M.; Yun, V.; Zou, Y.; Haber, I.

    2001-05-01

    The electron beam injector constructed by FM technologies for the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER) program is described. The program will use an electron beam to model space-charge-dominated ion beams in a recirculating linac for heavy ion inertial fusion, as well as for high-current muon colliders. The injector consists of a 10 keV, 100 mA electron gun with 50-100 nsec pulse width and a repetition rate of 120 Hz. The e-gun system includes a 6-mask, rotatable aperture plate, a Rogowski current monitor, an ion pump, and a gate valve. The injector beamline consists of a solenoid, a five-quadrupole matching section, two diagnostic chambers, and a fast current monitor. An independent diagnostic chamber also built for UMER will be used to measure horizontal and vertical emittance, current, energy, energy spread, and the evolution of the beam envelope and profile along the injector beamline.

  6. Power balance and characterization of impurities in the Maryland Spheromak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cote, Claude [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The Maryland Spheromak is a medium size magnetically confined plasma of toroidal shape. Low Te and higher ne than expected contribute to produce a radiation dominated short-lived spheromak configuration. A pyroelectric radiation detector and a VUV spectrometer have been used for space and time-resolved measurements of radiated power and impurity line emission. Results from the bolometry and VUV spectroscopy diagnostics have been combined to give the absolute concentrations of the major impurity species together with the electron temperature. The large amount of oxygen and nitrogen ions in the plasma very early in the discharge is seen to be directly responsible for the abnormally high electron density. The dominant power loss mechanisms are found to be radiation (from impurity line emission) and electron convection to the end walls during the formation phase of the spheromak configuration, and radiation only during the decay phase.

  7. Maryland state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and State levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Maryland. It contains a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations

  8. Commissioning of the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER)

    CERN Document Server

    Bernal, Santiago; Feldman, Donald; Feldman, Renee; Godlove, Terry; Haber, Irving; Harris, John R; Holloway, Mike; Kishek, Rami A; Neumann, Jonathan G; Papadopoulos, Christos; Quinn, Bryan; Reiser, Martin; Stratakis, Diktys; Thangaraj, Jayakar C T; Tian, Kai; Walter, Mark; Wilson, Mark C

    2005-01-01

    The University of Maryland electron ring (UMER) is a low-energy, high current recirculator for beam physics research. The ring is completed for multi-turn operation of beams over a broad range of intensities and initial conditions. UMER is addressing issues in beam physics with relevance to many applications that rely on intense beams of high quality. Examples are advanced accelerators, FEL's, spallation neutron sources and future heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion. We review the motivation, ring layout and operating conditions of UMER. Further, we present a summary of beam physics areas that UMER is currently investigating and others that are part of the commissioning plan: from transverse beam dynamics (matching, halo formation, strongly asymmetric beams, space-charge waves, etc), longitudinal dynamics (bunch capture/shaping, evolution of energy spread, longitudinal space-charge waves, etc.) to future upgrades and planned research (acceleration and resonance traversal, modeling of galactic dynamics, etc....

  9. Maryland State information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Handbook Series Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Maryland. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations

  10. US Geological Survey BLM/OCS Baltimore Canyon (Mid-Atlantic) Sediment Analyses (Samples collected 1 July 1975 to 30 June 1976)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains analytical data from samples acquired from the Baltimore Canyon (Mid-Atlantic) area of the Outer Continental Shelf, U.S. East Coast, by the...

  11. Argonne's performance assessment of major facility systems to support semiconductor manufacturing by the National Security Agency/R Group, Ft. Meade, Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, W.; Miller, G.M.

    1990-12-01

    The National Security Agency (NSA) was authorized in 1983 to construct a semiconductor and circuit-board manufacturing plant at its Ft. Meade, Maryland, facility. This facility was to become known as the Special Process Laboratories (SPL) building. Phase I construction was managed by the US Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore District (USACE/BD) and commenced in January 1986. Phase I construction provided the basic building and support systems, such as the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning system, the deionized-water and wastewater-treatment systems, and the high-purity-gas piping system. Phase II construction involved fitting the semiconductor manufacturing side of the building with manufacturing tools and enhancing various aspects of the Phase I construction. Phase II construction was managed by NSA and commenced in April 1989. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) was contracted by USACE/BD midway through the Phase I construction period to provide quality-assured performance reviews of major facility systems in the SPL. Following completion of the Phase I construction, ANL continued its performance reviews under NSA sponsorship, focusing its attention on the enhancements to the various manufacturing support systems of interest. The purpose of this document is to provide a guide to the files that were generated by ANL during its term of technical assistance to USACE/BD and NSA and to explain the quality assurance program that was implemented when ANL conducted its performance reviews of the SPL building's systems. One set of the ANL project files is located at NSA, Ft. Meade, and two sets are at Argonne, Illinois. The ANL sets will be maintained until the year 2000, or for the 10-year estimated life of the project. 1 fig.

  12. Optimization of green infrastructure network at semi-urbanized watersheds to manage stormwater volume, peak flow and life cycle cost: Case study of Dead Run watershed in Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari Haratmeh, B.; Rai, A.; Minsker, B. S.

    2016-12-01

    Green Infrastructure (GI) has become widely known as a sustainable solution for stormwater management in urban environments. Despite more recognition and acknowledgment, researchers and practitioners lack clear and explicit guidelines on how GI practices should be implemented in urban settings. This study is developing a noisy-based multi-objective, multi-scaled genetic algorithm that determines optimal GI networks for environmental, economic and social objectives. The methodology accounts for uncertainty in modeling results and is designed to perform at sub-watershed as well as patch scale using two different simulation models, SWMM and RHESSys, in a Cloud-based implementation using a Web interface. As an initial case study, a semi-urbanized watershed— DeadRun 5— in Baltimore County, Maryland, is selected. The objective of the study is to minimize life cycle cost, maximize human preference for human well-being and the difference between pre-development hydrographs generated from current rainfall events and design storms, as well as those that result from proposed GI scenarios. Initial results for DeadRun5 watershed suggest that placing GI in the proximity of the watershed outlet optimizes life cycle cost, stormwater volume, and peak flow capture. The framework can easily present outcomes of GI design scenarios to both designers and local stakeholders, and future plans include receiving feedback from users on candidate designs, and interactively updating optimal GI network designs in a crowd-sourced design process. This approach can also be helpful in deriving design guidelines that better meet stakeholder needs.

  13. Effects of local meteorology and aerosols on ozone and nitrogen dioxide retrievals from OMI and pandora spectrometers in Maryland, USA during DISCOVER-AQ 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Andra J; Thompson, Anne M; Kollonige, Debra E; Martins, Douglas K; Tzortziou, Maria A; Herman, Jay R; Berkoff, Timothy A; Abuhassan, Nader K; Cede, Alexander

    An analysis is presented for both ground- and satellite-based retrievals of total column ozone and nitrogen dioxide levels from the Washington, D.C., and Baltimore, Maryland, metropolitan area during the NASA-sponsored July 2011 campaign of D eriving I nformation on S urface CO nditions from Column and VER tically Resolved Observations Relevant to A ir Q uality (DISCOVER-AQ). Satellite retrievals of total column ozone and nitrogen dioxide from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Aura satellite are used, while Pandora spectrometers provide total column ozone and nitrogen dioxide amounts from the ground. We found that OMI and Pandora agree well (residuals within ±25 % for nitrogen dioxide, and ±4.5 % for ozone) for a majority of coincident observations during July 2011. Comparisons with surface nitrogen dioxide from a Teledyne API 200 EU NO x Analyzer showed nitrogen dioxide diurnal variability that was consistent with measurements by Pandora. However, the wide OMI field of view, clouds, and aerosols affected retrievals on certain days, resulting in differences between Pandora and OMI of up to ±65 % for total column nitrogen dioxide, and ±23 % for total column ozone. As expected, significant cloud cover (cloud fraction >0.2) was the most important parameter affecting comparisons of ozone retrievals; however, small, passing cumulus clouds that do not coincide with a high (>0.2) cloud fraction, or low aerosol layers which cause significant backscatter near the ground affected the comparisons of total column nitrogen dioxide retrievals. Our results will impact post-processing satellite retrieval algorithms and quality control procedures.

  14. The Influence of the Family on Adolescent Sexual Experience: A Comparison between Baltimore and Johannesburg.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Mmari

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to understand the role of the family on the sexual experiences of adolescents from urban, disadvantaged settings in Baltimore and Johannesburg. Data were collected as part of the WAVE study, a global study of disadvantaged youth in five cities. Qualitative data were based on key informant interviews, a Photovoice exercise, community mapping, focus groups and in-depth interviews with adolescents. Quantitative data were gathered from an ACASI survey that was administered to approximately 450-500 adolescents per site. Results from the qualitative data revealed that while parents were viewed as important sources of information for sexual and reproductive health, they were often not present in the adolescents' lives. This lack of parental presence was perceived to result in adolescents feeling an overall lack of adult support and guidance. The impact of parental presence and support on adolescent sexual experience was further examined from the quantitative data and revealed a complex picture. In both Baltimore and Johannesburg, female adolescents who were raised by other relatives were less likely to report having had sex compared to those raised by two biological parents, which was not observed for males. In Johannesburg, female adolescents who were paternal orphans were less likely to have had sex compared to non-orphans; the opposite was true among males. Finally, in both sites, female adolescents who had been exposed to violence were more likely to have had sex compared to those who had not; for males, there was no significant relationship. The study demonstrates the powerful influence of both context and gender for understanding the influences of the family on adolescent sexual behaviors. Programs aiming to reduce adolescent sexual risk behaviors the need to understand the complex influences on risk behaviors in different settings and in particular, the role of mothers and fathers. Prevention strategies need

  15. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Maryland based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Maryland census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  16. 75 FR 958 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; 2002 Base Year Emission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-07

    ... control measures, projection year emission inventories, motor vehicle emissions budgets, and contingency... Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; 2002 Base Year Emission Inventory, Reasonable Further Progress Plan, Contingency Measures, Reasonably Available Control Measures, and Transportation...

  17. ISLSCP II University of Maryland Global Land Cover Classifications, 1992-1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP II) study that produced this data set, ISLSCP II University of Maryland Global...

  18. University of Maryland component of the Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics: Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorland, William [University of Maryland

    2014-11-18

    The Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics (CMPD) was a five-year Fusion Science Center. The University of Maryland (UMD) and UCLA were the host universities. This final technical report describes the physics results from the UMD CMPD.

  19. A social network analysis of alcohol-impaired drivers in Maryland : an egocentric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    This study examined the personal, household, and social structural attributes of alcoholimpaired : drivers in Maryland. The study used an egocentric approach of social network : analysis. This approach concentrated on specific actors (alcohol-impaire...

  20. Map of Maryland and Virginia of 1660-1670 created by Augustin Herrmann

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hébert, J. R.; Kozák, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 2 (2012), s. 112-116 ISSN 2151-1950 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : historical cartography * Augustin Herrman * trig station surveying * Maryland * Virginia Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  1. Measuring the economic contribution of the freight industry to the Maryland economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Economic impacts of freight movement to Marylands economy were estimated by input-output analysis : using the 2010 IMPLAN data. A freight economic output (FECO) index was also developed based on the : historical payroll data and gross domestic pro...

  2. 2006 Maryland Department of Natural Resources Lidar: Caroline, Kent and Queen Anne Counties

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Maryland Department of Natural Resources requested the collection of LIDAR data over Kent, Queen Anne and Caroline Counties, MD. In response, EarthData acquired the...

  3. Measuring the economic contribution of the freight industry to the Maryland economy : [research summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The primary objective was to measure the economic contributions of the freight : industry to the Maryland economy and to develop a freight economic output (FECO) : index that tracks the economic performance of the freight industry over time.

  4. 78 FR 13497 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Deferral for CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-28

    ...EPA is approving a State Implementation Plan (SIP) revision submitted by the Maryland Department of the Environmental (MDE) on April 4, 2012. This revision defers until July 21, 2014 the application of the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) permitting requirements to biogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from bioenergy and other biogenic stationary sources in the State of Maryland. This action is being taken under the Clean Air Act (CAA).

  5. The Effect of Hurricanes on Annual Precipitation in Maryland and the Connection to Global Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jackie; Liu, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Precipitation is a vital aspect of our lives droughts, floods and other related disasters that involve precipitation can cause costly damage in the economic system and general society. Purpose of this project is to determine what, if any effect do hurricanes have on annual precipitation in Maryland Research will be conducted on Marylands terrain, climatology, annual precipitation, and precipitation contributed from hurricanes Possible connections to climate change

  6. Nurse Practitioners' Use of Communication Techniques: Results of a Maryland Oral Health Literacy Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Koo, Laura W.; Horowitz, Alice M.; Radice, Sarah D.; Wang, Min Q.; Kleinman, Dushanka V.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We examined nurse practitioners? use and opinions of recommended communication techniques for the promotion of oral health as part of a Maryland state-wide oral health literacy assessment. Use of recommended health-literate and patient-centered communication techniques have demonstrated improved health outcomes. Methods A 27-item self-report survey, containing 17 communication technique items, across 5 domains, was mailed to 1,410 licensed nurse practitioners (NPs) in Maryland in 2...

  7. A multi-stakeholder evaluation of the Baltimore City virtual supermarket program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagisetty, Pooja; Flamm, Laura; Rak, Summer; Landgraf, Jessica; Heisler, Michele; Forman, Jane

    2017-10-23

    Increasing access to healthy foods and beverages in disadvantaged communities is a public health priority due to alarmingly high rates of obesity. The Virtual Supermarket Program (VSP) is a Baltimore City Health Department program that uses online grocery ordering to deliver food to low-income neighborhoods. This study evaluates stakeholder preferences and barriers of program implementation. This study assessed the feasibility, sustainability and efficacy of the VSP by surveying 93 customers and interviewing 14 programmatic stakeholders who had recently used the VSP or been involved with program design and implementation. We identified the following themes: The VSP addressed transportation barriers and food availability. The VSP impacted customers and the city by including improving food purchasing behavior, creating a food justice "brand for the city", and fostering a sense of community. Customers appreciated using Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits to pay for groceries, but policy changes are needed allow online processing of SNAP benefits. This evaluation summarizes lessons learned and serves as a guide to other public health leaders interested in developing similar programs. Provisions in the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Bill 2014 allow for select grocers to pilot online transactions with SNAP benefits. If these pilots are efficacious, the VSP model could be easily disseminated.

  8. A multi-stakeholder evaluation of the Baltimore City virtual supermarket program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Lagisetty

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing access to healthy foods and beverages in disadvantaged communities is a public health priority due to alarmingly high rates of obesity. The Virtual Supermarket Program (VSP is a Baltimore City Health Department program that uses online grocery ordering to deliver food to low-income neighborhoods. This study evaluates stakeholder preferences and barriers of program implementation. Methods This study assessed the feasibility, sustainability and efficacy of the VSP by surveying 93 customers and interviewing 14 programmatic stakeholders who had recently used the VSP or been involved with program design and implementation. Results We identified the following themes: The VSP addressed transportation barriers and food availability. The VSP impacted customers and the city by including improving food purchasing behavior, creating a food justice “brand for the city”, and fostering a sense of community. Customers appreciated using Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP benefits to pay for groceries, but policy changes are needed allow online processing of SNAP benefits. Conclusions This evaluation summarizes lessons learned and serves as a guide to other public health leaders interested in developing similar programs. Provisions in the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA Farm Bill 2014 allow for select grocers to pilot online transactions with SNAP benefits. If these pilots are efficacious, the VSP model could be easily disseminated.

  9. Legacies of Lead in Charm City's Soil: Lessons from the Baltimore Ecosystem Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Kirsten; Pouyat, Richard V; Yesilonis, Ian

    2016-02-06

    Understanding the spatial distribution of soil lead has been a focus of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study since its inception in 1997. Through multiple research projects that span spatial scales and use different methodologies, three overarching patterns have been identified: (1) soil lead concentrations often exceed state and federal regulatory limits; (2) the variability of soil lead concentrations is high; and (3) despite multiple sources and the highly heterogeneous and patchy nature of soil lead, discernable patterns do exist. Specifically, housing age, the distance to built structures, and the distance to a major roadway are strong predictors of soil lead concentrations. Understanding what drives the spatial distribution of soil lead can inform the transition of underutilized urban space into gardens and other desirable land uses while protecting human health. A framework for management is proposed that considers three factors: (1) the level of contamination; (2) the desired land use; and (3) the community's preference in implementing the desired land use. The goal of the framework is to promote dialogue and resultant policy changes that support consistent and clear regulatory guidelines for soil lead, without which urban communities will continue to be subject to the potential for lead exposure.

  10. Screening for acute human immunodeficiency virus infection in Baltimore public testing sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin, Elizabeth; Marsiglia, Vincent C; Hague, Christian; Erbelding, Emily

    2011-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA testing of pooled HIV antibody-negative specimens can identify acute HIV infection (AHI) and trigger interventions to reduce transmission during this highly infectious period. A Baltimore, MD program serving sexually transmitted disease clinics and other high-risk sites combined HIV testing by third-generation enzyme immunoassay (EIA) with RNA testing of pooled antibody-negative specimens. Laboratory and Disease Intervention Specialists' records were reviewed for program evaluation. A cost analysis was performed. In 22 months, we tested 60,695 specimens for HIV. Of these, 1766 (2.9%) tested positive by EIA. Pooled HIV RNA testing of 58,925 EIA-negative specimens detected 7 cases of AHI (0.01%). Reflex HIV RNA testing of EIA-reactive, Western blot-indeterminate specimens confirmed 4 additional AHI cases (total AHI, 0.02%). Contact tracing detected no additional previously unknown cases of HIV infection. The utility of pooled HIV RNA testing may be limited by advances in HIV testing technology that reduce the seronegative window period and by characteristics of the local HIV epidemic.

  11. Ill, Itinerant, and Insured: The Top 20 Users of Emergency Departments in Baltimore City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Y. DiPietro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to document the clinical and demographic characteristics of the 20 most frequent users of emergency departments (EDs in one urban area. We reviewed administrative records from three EDs and two agencies providing services to homeless people in Baltimore City. The top 20 users accounted for 2,079 visits at the three EDs. Their mean age was 48, and median age was 51. Nineteen patients visited at least 2 EDs, 18 were homeless, and 13 had some form of public insurance. The vast majority of visits (86% were triaged as moderate or high acuity. The five most frequent diagnoses were limb pain (n=9, lack of housing (n=6, alteration of consciousness (n=6, infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV (n=5, and nausea/vomiting (n=5. Hypertension, HIV infection, diabetes, substance abuse, and alcohol abuse were the most common chronic illnesses. The most frequent ED users were relatively young, accounted for a high number of visits, used multiple EDs, and often received high triage scores. Homelessness was the most common characteristic of this patient group, suggesting a relationship between this social factor and frequent ED use.

  12. Renal function and long-term decline in cognitive function: the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seliger, Stephen L; Wendell, Carrington R; Waldstein, Shari R; Ferrucci, Luigi; Zonderman, Alan B

    2015-01-01

    Renal disease has been associated with greater risk of dementia and greater cognitive impairment. However, the relationship of lower renal function with long-term decline in specific domains of cognitive function remains unclear among community-dwelling, non-demented individuals. Stroke- and dementia-free participants (n = 2,116) were enrolled in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, a community-based, prospective, longitudinal study. Renal function was estimated by the inverse of serum creatinine adjusted for age, sex and race and (in sensitivity analyses) estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) using the MDRD formula. Outcome measures were changes in scores on 6 cognitive tests encompassing a range of cognitive functions, measured at 2-year intervals. Mixed-effects regression models examined the longitudinal relations of renal function with cognitive functions after adjusting for demographics, comorbidity and other potential confounders. Mean age at initial testing was 53.9 years (SD 17.1), and 94 participants (4.4%) had an eGFR age, longitudinal increases in creatinine concentrations were associated with more rapid decline in performance on several cognitive measures, including the learning slope of the California Verbal Learning Test, a test of verbal learning (p renal function independently associated with greater long-term declines in visual memory and verbal memory and learning. © 2015 National Institutes of Health (NIH). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Implications of the Baltimore Rail Tunnel Fire for Full-Scale Testing of Shipping Casks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halstead, R. J.; Dilger, F.

    2003-02-25

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) does not currently require full-scale physical testing of shipping casks as part of its certification process. Stakeholders have long urged NRC to require full-scale testing as part of certification. NRC is currently preparing a full-scale casktesting proposal as part of the Package Performance Study (PPS) that grew out of the NRC reexamination of the Modal Study. The State of Nevada and Clark County remain committed to the position that demonstration testing would not be an acceptable substitute for a combination of full-scale testing, scale-model tests, and computer simulation of each new cask design prior to certification. Based on previous analyses of cask testing issues, and on preliminary findings regarding the July 2001 Baltimore rail tunnel fire, the authors recommend that NRC prioritize extra-regulatory thermal testing of a large rail cask and the GA-4 truck cask under the PPS. The specific fire conditions and other aspects of the full-scale extra-regulatory tests recommended for the PPS are yet to be determined. NRC, in consultation with stakeholders, must consider past real-world accidents and computer simulations to establish temperature failure thresholds for cask containment and fuel cladding. The cost of extra-regulatory thermal testing is yet to be determined. The minimum cost for regulatory thermal testing of a legal-weight truck cask would likely be $3.3-3.8 million.

  14. Implications of the Baltimore Rail Tunnel Fire for Full-Scale Testing of Shipping Casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halstead, R. J.; Dilger, F.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) does not currently require full-scale physical testing of shipping casks as part of its certification process. Stakeholders have long urged NRC to require full-scale testing as part of certification. NRC is currently preparing a full-scale casktesting proposal as part of the Package Performance Study (PPS) that grew out of the NRC reexamination of the Modal Study. The State of Nevada and Clark County remain committed to the position that demonstration testing would not be an acceptable substitute for a combination of full-scale testing, scale-model tests, and computer simulation of each new cask design prior to certification. Based on previous analyses of cask testing issues, and on preliminary findings regarding the July 2001 Baltimore rail tunnel fire, the authors recommend that NRC prioritize extra-regulatory thermal testing of a large rail cask and the GA-4 truck cask under the PPS. The specific fire conditions and other aspects of the full-scale extra-regulatory tests recommended for the PPS are yet to be determined. NRC, in consultation with stakeholders, must consider past real-world accidents and computer simulations to establish temperature failure thresholds for cask containment and fuel cladding. The cost of extra-regulatory thermal testing is yet to be determined. The minimum cost for regulatory thermal testing of a legal-weight truck cask would likely be $3.3-3.8 million

  15. Process Evaluation of a Comprehensive Supermarket Intervention in a Low-Income Baltimore Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ryan M; Rothstein, Jessica D; Gergen, Jessica; Zachary, Drew A; Smith, Joyce C; Palmer, Anne M; Gittelsohn, Joel; Surkan, Pamela J

    2015-11-01

    Supermarket-based interventions are one approach to improving the local food environment and reducing obesity and chronic disease in low-income populations. We implemented a multicomponent intervention that aimed to reduce environmental barriers to healthy food purchasing in a supermarket in Southwest Baltimore. The intervention, Eat Right-Live Well! used: shelf labels and in-store displays promoting healthy foods, sales and promotions on healthy foods, in-store taste tests, increasing healthy food products, community outreach events to promote the intervention, and employee training. We evaluated program implementation through store environment, taste test session, and community event evaluation forms as well as an Employee Impact Questionnaire. The stocking, labeling, and advertising of promoted foods were implemented with high and moderate fidelity. Taste test sessions were implemented with moderate reach and low dose. Community outreach events were implemented with high reach and dose. Supermarket employee training had no significant impact on employees' knowledge, self-efficacy, or behavioral intention for helping customers with healthy purchasing or related topics of nutrition and food safety. In summary, components of this intervention to promote healthy eating were implemented with varying success within a large supermarket. Greater participation from management and employees could improve implementation. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  16. Ill, itinerant, and insured: the top 20 users of emergency departments in Baltimore city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPietro, Barbara Y; Kindermann, Dana; Schenkel, Stephen M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the clinical and demographic characteristics of the 20 most frequent users of emergency departments (EDs) in one urban area. We reviewed administrative records from three EDs and two agencies providing services to homeless people in Baltimore City. The top 20 users accounted for 2,079 visits at the three EDs. Their mean age was 48, and median age was 51. Nineteen patients visited at least 2 EDs, 18 were homeless, and 13 had some form of public insurance. The vast majority of visits (86%) were triaged as moderate or high acuity. The five most frequent diagnoses were limb pain (n = 9), lack of housing (n = 6), alteration of consciousness (n = 6), infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (n = 5), and nausea/vomiting (n = 5). Hypertension, HIV infection, diabetes, substance abuse, and alcohol abuse were the most common chronic illnesses. The most frequent ED users were relatively young, accounted for a high number of visits, used multiple EDs, and often received high triage scores. Homelessness was the most common characteristic of this patient group, suggesting a relationship between this social factor and frequent ED use.

  17. 78 FR 57213 - Notice of Passenger Facility Charge (PFC) Approvals and Disapprovals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-17

    ..., 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: David Anderson, Bismarck Airports District Office, (701) 323... and Maryland Aviation Administration, Baltimore, Maryland. Application Number: 12-10-C-00-BWI... annual enplanements at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. Brief Description of...

  18. Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arch Debranching (University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, MD, 2/16/2012) Transesophageal Echocardiogram (TEE) (Shawnee Mission ... Bypass Surgery (University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, MD, 9/09/2013) Minimally Invasive Transcatheter Aortic Valve ...

  19. Quality of life among residents in a sub-urban area. Case study: Puncak Alam, Selangor, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leh, Oliver Ling Hoon; Mahbot, Norseha Mohd; Asma Aqmalina Hadzaman, Nur; Azyyati Marzukhi, Marlyana; Abdullah, Jamalunlaili

    2018-02-01

    Along with the sub-urbanisation, people working in urban can stay in the sub-urban areas. Sub-urban housing areas provide cheaper and larger houses and more greenery environment. However, the residents are required to travel in longer distance. The effect on Quality of Life (QOL) due to the migration to sub-urban areas may not be positive even with the better environmental quality and lower direct housing cost. Puncak Alam, a new sub-urban area in Selangor, Malaysia had been chosen as the study area to examine the change of QOL among the residents after they moved into the study area. Through a questionnaire survey, the satisfaction of residents on the various aspects/indicators of QOL were examined. Through the statistical analysis, it is found that slightly more than half of the respondents felt that the QOL was dropped after they were moved to the study area. The sub-urban area did provide better quality for their residents. It had increased respondents’ satisfaction on most of the indicators in the aspects of economic, social and physical. However, due to the decreasing of satisfaction in job opportunities, family life, social activities, safety, and transportation system, most of the respondents were felt that their QOL were dropped.

  20. Distribution and urban-suburban differences in ground-level ozone and its precursors over Shenyang, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ningwei; Ren, Wanhui; Li, Xiaolan; Ma, Xiaogang; Zhang, Yunhai; Li, Bingkun

    2018-03-01

    Hourly mixing ratio data of ground-level ozone and its main precursors at ambient air quality monitoring sites in Shenyang during 2013-2015 were used to survey spatiotemporal variations in ozone. Then, the transport of ozone and its precursors among urban, suburban, and rural sites was examined. The correlations between ozone and some key meteorological factors were also investigated. Ozone and O x mixing ratios in Shenyang were higher during warm seasons and lower during cold ones, while ozone precursors followed the opposite cycle. Ozone mixing ratios reached maximum and minimum values in the afternoon and morning, respectively, reflecting the significant influence of photochemical production during daytime and depletion via titration during nighttime. Compared to those in downtown Shenyang, ozone mixing ratios were higher and the occurrence of peak values were later in suburban and rural areas downwind of the prevailing wind. The differences were most significant in summer, when the ozone mixing ratios at one suburban downwind site reached a maximum value of 35.6 ppb higher than those at the downtown site. This suggests that photochemical production processes were significant during the transport of ozone precursors, particularly in warm seasons with sufficient sunlight. Temperature, total radiation, and wind speed all displayed positive correlations with ozone concentration, reflecting their important role in accelerating ozone formation. Generally, the correlations between ozone and meteorological factors were slightly stronger at suburban sites than in urban areas, indicating that ozone levels in suburban areas were more sensitive to these meteorological factors.

  1. The prevalence of uncorrected refractive error in urban, suburban, exurban and rural primary school children in Indonesian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahayana, Indra Tri; Indrawati, Sagung Gede; Pawiroranu, Suhardjo

    2017-01-01

    Uncorrected refractive error (URE) is a major health problem among school children. This study was aimed to determine the frequency and patterns of URE across 4 gradients of residential densities (urban, exurban, suburban and rural). This was a cross-sectional study of school children from 3 districts in Yogyakarta and 1 district near Yogyakarta, Indonesia. The information regarding age, sex, school and school grader were recorded. The Snellen's chart was used to measure the visual acuity and to perform the subjective refraction. The district was then divided into urban, suburban, exurban and rural area based on their location and population. In total, 410 school children were included in the analyses (urban=79, exurban=73, suburban=160 and rural=98 school children). Urban school children revealed the worst visual acuity ( P refractive error across residential densities ( P =0.003). The risk of URE development in urban, suburban, exurban, and rural were 2.218 (95%CI: 0.914-5.385), 3.019 (95%CI: 1.266-7.197), 0.502 (95%CI: 0.195-1.293), and 0.130 (95%CI:0.017-0.972), respectively. Urban school children showed the worst visual acuity. The school children in urban and suburban residential area had 2 and 3 times higher risk of developing the URE.

  2. Effects of white-tailed deer and invasive plants on the herb layer of suburban forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Janet A

    2017-11-01

    Lack of hunting and predators and proximity to human communities make suburban forests prone to high deer abundance and non-native plant invasions. I investigated these likely drivers of community structure in the herb layers of six suburban forests in one region of New Jersey, USA. In 223 plots I assessed the herb layer response to 2.5 years with or without deer fencing and the early stage of invasion from seed additions of Microstegium vimineum , an invasive, annual grass. Non-native plants and herbaceous native plants were affected very little by fencing or M. vimineum invasion. In contrast, across all forests the combination of deer access and M. vimineum addition had a strongly negative effect on woody native percent cover. Forests differed in overall fencing effects on woody natives; their cover was greater in fenced plots in just three forests, suggesting greater deer pressure in those forests during the experiment. The early invasion by M. vimineum was greatest in two of these same forests, but was not influenced by fencing. Multi-group structural equation modelling compared two groups of forests that differed in vegetation abundance and other characteristics. It paralleled the results above and also showed no negative influence of non-native cover on native cover, even in the forests where non-native cover was greater. It identified a positive effect of light level on herb layer plants in the forests with less vegetation, and also revealed a positive effect of soil water potential (SWP) on non-native plants in the forests with more vegetation, which had higher SWP. These suburban forests within a common region varied widely in native and non-native herb layer abundance, the early success of M. vimineum invasion and the herb layer's response to early invasion and protection from deer.

  3. Suburban watershed nitrogen retention: Estimating the effectiveness of stormwater management structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J. Koch

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Excess nitrogen (N is a primary driver of freshwater and coastal eutrophication globally, and urban stormwater is a rapidly growing source of N pollution. Stormwater best management practices (BMPs are used widely to remove excess N from runoff in urban and suburban areas, and are expected to perform under a wide variety of environmental conditions. Yet the capacity of BMPs to retain excess N varies; and both the variation and the drivers thereof are largely unknown, hindering the ability of water resource managers to meet water quality targets in a cost-effective way. Here, we use structured expert judgment (SEJ, a performance-weighted method of expert elicitation, to quantify the uncertainty in BMP performance under a range of site-specific environmental conditions and to estimate the extent to which key environmental factors influence variation in BMP performance. We hypothesized that rain event frequency and magnitude, BMP type and size, and physiographic province would significantly influence the experts’ estimates of N retention by BMPs common to suburban Piedmont and Coastal Plain watersheds of the Chesapeake Bay region. Expert knowledge indicated wide uncertainty in BMP performance, with N removal efficiencies ranging from 40%. Experts believed that the amount of rain was the primary identifiable source of variability in BMP efficiency, which is relevant given climate projections of more frequent heavy rain events in the mid-Atlantic. To assess the extent to which those projected changes might alter N export from suburban BMPs and watersheds, we combined downscaled estimates of rainfall with distributions of N loads for different-sized rain events derived from our elicitation. The model predicted higher and more variable N loads under a projected future climate regime, suggesting that current BMP regulations for reducing nutrients may be inadequate in the future.

  4. Ch. Dokou on Bernice M. Murphy's The Suburban Gothic in American Popular Culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Bernice M. Murphy, The Suburban Gothic in American Popular Culture. Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009. Pp. 236. ISBN: 98-0-230-21810-9Studies in pop culture have the advantage of dealing with material that is more or less familiar to a wide majority of readers and, what is more, appreciated for what it is: the enjoyable—hence surviving and proliferating—collective currency of concepts, facts and views, crude yet effective, by which a culture defines and establishes itself and ...

  5. STILL AROUND? BARRIERS TO ENTRY IN SOLO MEDICAL PRACTICE IN SUBURBAN SETTINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Lee Mendoz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Unlike many other countries, only 19% of physicians remain independent or solo practitioners in the United States. This study seeks to determine if entry barriers to solo practice exist in physician services markets with a predominantly suburban patient base. Any entry barrier will play a critical role in a wide variety of competition and income-related issues in these markets. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study hypothesizes that substantial deterrence to entry is present in suburban settings where physician competition is typically much less than metropolitan areas. Information about their competitive position was obtained from solo primary care physicians (PCPs and specialists in southern New Jersey municipalities. Two-sample t - tests (α =0.05 ascertained whether the means differences of these two groups are statistically significant for the population from which they were sampled. Regression coefficients were computed for the magnitude of differences in barrier impact between samples. RESULTS Adapting the Orr model, E = ß0 e ß 1 (πp -π* e ß 2 Q . S ß 3 µ, to this study allowed us to estimate the overall height of entry barriers to suburban solo practice. The study finds that entry barriers tend to have moderate effects on PCPs, with the exception of legal and regulatory compliance which are just as burdensome to specialists. Risk and insurance, capital, advertising, research and development (R & D as well as market concentration are far more challenging to solo specialists mainly due to overuse of already costly tests, procedures, and medications by specialists for "defensive medicine," and heavy reliance on specialists by PCPs. Labor costs are associated with several barriers. CONCLUSION Despite their declining population, market entry (and presumably survival of solo physicians is not as straightforward of a phenomenon as conjectural and anecdotal evidence might suggest. Medical specialty offers an explanatory variable

  6. Final results of the Maryland WIC Food for Life Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havas, Stephen; Anliker, Jean; Greenberg, Deborah; Block, Gladys; Block, Torin; Blik, Cheryl; Langenberg, Patricia; DiClemente, Carlo

    2003-11-01

    The few randomized community trials in middle-income populations that tried to modify multiple dietary risk factors for cancer only demonstrated small changes. This trial sought to decrease the percent of calories derived from fat and to increase fruit, vegetable, and fiber intake among low-income women served by the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) in Maryland. We conducted six-month intervention programs for 1055 women at ten WIC sites; 1011 women served as controls. Intervention participants were invited to five interactive nutrition sessions and were sent written materials. Controls received usual care. Women were surveyed at baseline, two months post intervention, and one year later. All analyses conducted used an intention-to-treat paradigm. Mean differences (intervention-control) in change from baseline were for percent calories from fat -1.62 +/- 0.33% (P fruits and vegetables 0.40 +/- 0.11 servings (P = 0.0003), and for fiber intake 1.01 +/- 0.31 grams (P = 0.001). These differences in change were related in a dose-response relationship to the number of sessions women attended and remained significant one year post-intervention for the first two outcomes. Multiple dietary improvements can be achieved in a low-income population with an effective, multi-faceted intervention program. The changes in this trial exceeded those in previous community trials conducted in higher SES populations.

  7. Characterization of Pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus from the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlene J. Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis associated with seafood consumption in the United States. Here we investigated the presence of virulence factors and genetic diversity of V. parahaemolyticus isolated from water, oyster, and sediment samples from the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland. Of more than 2,350 presumptive Vibrio collected, more than half were confirmed through PCR as V. parahaemolyticus, with 10 encoding both tdh and trh and 6 encoding only trh. Potentially pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus were then serotyped with O1:KUT and O3:KUT predominant. Furthermore, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was performed and the constructed dendrogram displayed high diversity, as did results from multiple-locus VNTR analysis. Vibrio parahaemolyticus was readily isolated from Chesapeake Bay waters but was less frequently isolated from oyster and sediment samples collected during this study. Potentially pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus was isolated in fewer numbers and the isolates displayed expansive diversity. Although characteristics of the pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus were highly variable and the percent of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus detected was low, it is important to note that, pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus are present in the Chesapeake Bay, warranting seafood monitoring to minimize risk of disease for the public, and to reduce the economic burden of V. parahaemolyticus related illness.

  8. The Maryland nuclear science baccalaureate degree program: The utility perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    In the early 1980s, Wisconsin Public Service Corporation (WPSC) made a firm commitment to pursue development and subsequent delivery of an appropriate, academically accredited program leading to a baccalaureate degree in nuclear science for its nuclear operations personnel. Recognizing the formidable tasks to be accomplished, WPSC worked closely with the University of Maryland University College (UMUC) in curriculum definition, specific courseware development for delivery by computer-aided instruction, individual student evaluation, and overall program implementation. Instruction began on our nuclear plant site in the fall of 1984. The university anticipates conferring the first degrees from this program at WPSC in the fall of 1989. There are several notable results that WPSC achieved from this degree program. First and most importantly, an increase in the level of education of our employees. It should be stated that this program has been well received by WPSC operator personnel. These employees, now armed with plant experience, a formal degree in nuclear science, and professional education in management are real candidates for advancement in our nuclear organization

  9. Radioactive hazard of potable water in Virginia and Maryland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mose, D.G.; Mushrush, G.W.; Chrosniak, C.

    1990-01-01

    Only a few studies have examined instances of prolonged exposure to radionuclide concentrations found in natural settings. Radium in domestic water in Florida counties has been correlated with a higher than normal incidence of leukemia. A similar study in Iowa towns reported on a correlation between radium and increases in lung, bladder and breast cancer. Radium and radon in domestic water has been correlated with the development of lung cancer in a study of several Texas counties. A correlation has been found between radon in home water supplies in Maine and the incidence of lung cancer. Starting in the winter of 1986-87, the Center of Basic and Applied Science conducted a study of indoor radon and soil radon. Most of the study homes are in Fairfax County in northern Virginia, and the immediately adjacent Montgomery County in southern Maryland. Approximately 650 homeowners agreed to participate in the radon-in-water study. The study group now includes approximately 1,400 people, over 1,000 of whom have consumed their present water supply for 5 or more years, and over 700 of whom have consumed this water for 10 or more years

  10. Case report: Pox in the mourning dove in Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, L.N.; Herman, C.M.; King, E.S.

    1960-01-01

    Although trichomoniasis has received attention as a cause of death among mourning doves (Zenaidura macroura),  ittle work has been done on other diseases of this species. Kossack and Hanson2 reported the occurrence of pox lesions in mourning doves in Illinois. Rosen3 reported that "pigeon pox" had caused a severe mortality in a mourning dove flock near Yreka, Siskiyou County, California. A severe outbreak of pox that occurred in a captive flock of mourning doves at the Patuxent Research Refuge further emphasizes the need for more study of this disease as a cause of dove mortality. Twenty-two mourning doves were live trapped on the Agricultural Research Center, Beltsville, Maryland, in September, 1958. The doves were examined for presence of Trichomonas gallinae and, when found to be free of trichomonads, were made the nucleus of a captive dove colony. A mourning dove that had a small, pink nodule on the left eyelid was captured on the Agricultural Research Center on September 17, 1958. The nodule was excised and the cut surface was treated with tincture of merthiolate. The dove then was added to the dove colony.

  11. Use of recommended communication techniques by Maryland dental hygienists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Alice M; Clovis, Joanne C; Wang, Min Qi; Kleinman, Dushanka V

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine dental hygienists' use of recommended techniques to communicate science-based information for intervention and prevention of oral disease. A 30-item survey containing 18 communication techniques representing 5 domains including 7 basic skills were mailed to a random sample of 1,258 Maryland dental hygienists to determine their use of recommended communication techniques. The response rate was 43% (n = 540). Nearly all were females (98%) and 58% practiced in solo settings. About half of respondents used 6 of the 18 techniques routinely. Approximately three-quarters of respondents reported they rarely or never used 3 of the 7 basic recommended techniques. Only one basic technique (use of simple language) was used by over 90%. Respondents who had taken a communications course other than in dental hygiene school were significantly more likely to use communication techniques on a routine basis than those who had not (p communication tools and techniques to address individual patient needs. To improve oral health outcomes, dental hygiene education must strengthen health literacy knowledge and communication skills in dental hygiene education programs and through continuing education courses for practicing hygienists.

  12. Scaled electron experiments at the University of Maryland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haber, I.; Bai, G.; Bernal, S.; Beaudoin, B.; Feldman, D.; Fiorito, R.B.; Godlove, T.F.; Kishek, R.A.; O'Shea, P.G.; Quinn, B.; Papadopoulos, C.; Reiser, M.; Rodgers, J.; Stratakis, D.; Sutter, D.; Thangaraj, J.C.T.; Tian, K.; Walter, M.; Wu, C.

    2007-01-01

    The University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER) and the Long Solenoid Experiment (LSE) are two electron machines that were designed explicitly to study the physics of space-charge-dominated beams. The operating parameters of these machines can be varied by choice of apertures and gun operating conditions to access a wide range of parameters that reproduce, on a scaled basis, the full nonlinear time-dependent physics that is expected in much costlier ion systems. Early operation of these machines has demonstrated the importance of the details of beam initial conditions in determining the downstream evolution. These machines have also been a convenient tested for benchmarking simulation codes such as WARP, and for development of several novel diagnostic techniques. We present our recent experience with multi-turn operation as well as recent longitudinal and transverse physics experiments and comparisons to simulation results. Development of novel diagnostic techniques such as time-dependent imaging using optical transition radiation and tomographic beam reconstruction are also described

  13. 77 FR 23598 - Technical Amendment to Cuba Airport List: Addition of Recently Approved Airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ... International Airport Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport O'Hare International Airport... Airport. Baltimore, Maryland Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. Chicago... Palm Beach, Florida Palm Beach International Airport. Dated: April 10, 2012. David V. Aguilar, Acting...

  14. Urban and suburban lifestyles and residential preferences in a highly urbanized society Urbane en suburbane leefstijlen en woonvoorkeuren in een samenleving onder verstedelijkingsdruk. Resultaten op basis van case onderzoek in Gent (Vlaanderen, België

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Allaert

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available It is widely recognized that cities nowadays are confronted with (new challenges like segregation and suburbanisation. This paper explores the idea that these processes are related with residential choices (or preferences made by residents with divergent lifestyles and value patterns. The paper focuses on differences between urban and suburban lifestyles and residential preferences. Firstly the concept of lifestyles in general, and urban and suburban lifestyles more specifically, are approached. Secondly the results of a quantitative survey amongst residents within four neighbourhoods in the Ghent Region, a city in Belgium, are presented. This survey confirms that residents of urban and suburban zones have divergent lifestyles, but only for behavioural aspects, such as : private property protection, status behaviour and ecological behaviour. This results however in a social-spatial inequality and polarization between the urban centres and the suburban fringe. The shared aims amongst urban as well as suburban residents for a more secure residential environment and the ideal of the detached single-family house with private garden situated within a purely residential area, were identified as drivers for future suburban migrations. These residential preferences might cause (further suburbanisation but do not need to lead to segregated social communities, since living with peers does not seem to be a driver for migration in Flanders, Belgium.Heel wat steden worden vandaag de dag geconfronteerd met een toenemende of voortschrijdende segregatie en suburbanisatie. Deze maatschappelijke en ruimtelijke processen worden in deze paper in verband gebracht met concrete woonkeuzes of -voor­keuren van de bewoners en met hun specifieke leefstijlen. In eerste instantie wordt in de paper stilgestaan bij het concept leefstijl, waarbij een onderscheid wordt gemaakt tussen latente leefstijlen, gerelateerd aan normen, waarden en karaktereigenschappen van de

  15. The prevalence of uncorrected refractive error in urban, suburban, exurban and rural primary school children in Indonesian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Tri Mahayana

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Uncorrected refractive error (URE is a major health problem among school children. This study was aimed to determine the frequency and patterns of URE across 4 gradients of residential densities (urban, exurban, suburban and rural. This was a cross-sectional study of school children from 3 districts in Yogyakarta and 1 district near Yogyakarta, Indonesia. The information regarding age, sex, school and school grader were recorded. The Snellen’s chart was used to measure the visual acuity and to perform the subjective refraction. The district was then divided into urban, suburban, exurban and rural area based on their location and population. In total, 410 school children were included in the analyses (urban=79, exurban=73, suburban=160 and rural=98 school children. Urban school children revealed the worst visual acuity (P<0.001 and it was significant when compared with exurban and rural. The proportion of URE among urban, suburban, exurban and rural area were 10.1%, 12.3%, 3.8%, and 1%, respectively, and it was significant when compared to the proportion of ametropia and corrected refractive error across residential densities (P=0.003. The risk of URE development in urban, suburban, exurban, and rural were 2.218 (95%CI: 0.914-5.385, 3.019 (95%CI: 1.266-7.197, 0.502 (95%CI: 0.195-1.293, and 0.130 (95%CI:0.017-0.972, respectively. Urban school children showed the worst visual acuity. The school children in urban and suburban residential area had 2 and 3 times higher risk of developing the URE.

  16. Hydrocoelom and lymphedema in dendrobatid frogs at National Aquarium, Baltimore: 2003-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Meredith M; Clayton, Leigh A; Hadfield, Catherine A

    2015-03-01

    Hydrocoelom and lymphedema are common in amphibians. In the family Dendrobatidae at the National Aquarium, Baltimore, prevalence was 3.19% from 2005 to 2011. Complete review of all cases in dendrobatids from 01 January 2003 to 01 June 2011 at the National Aquarium identified annual incidence rate, associated signs, diagnostic findings, therapeutics, and outcomes using medical record review. Associated etiologies were assessed via available necropsy and histopathology reports. Hydrocoelom was defined as coelomic distention with fluid; lymphedema was defined as fluid accumulation in the lymph spaces. These two syndromes could occur concurrently, and no association between case success (36.5% overall) or etiology was found to contrast hydrocoelom and lymphedema. Species susceptibility varied, with increased prevalence and incidence rate in Adelphobates castaneoticus, Dendrobates auratus, and Phyllobates spp. D. auratus also had reduced case success overall (26.0%). Females experienced hydrocoelom and/or lymphedema at an attack rate more than three times that of males. Fluid aspiration for culture was the most predictive antemortem diagnostic to find infectious etiologies, but antemortem diagnostics were largely noncontributory in identifying other causes of fluid accumulation. Enrofloxacin treatment increased case success more than fivefold when compared to those not treated and was the only treatment positively associated with case success. Infectious etiology, renal disease, and gastrointestinal disease, including parasitism, were seen commonly on postmortem evaluation of cases. These findings underscore the importance of the ability to individually track and treat cases, with fluid culture and initiation of enrofloxacin therapy (10 mg/kg p.o.q. 24 hr) seen as the best first steps after presentation with hydrocoelom or lymphedema.

  17. Buying and selling "loosies" in Baltimore: the informal exchange of cigarettes in the community context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katherine Clegg; Stillman, Frances; Bone, Lee; Yancey, Norman; Price, Emmanuel; Belin, Precilla; Kromm, Elizabeth Edsall

    2007-07-01

    Since the release of the first Surgeon General's report, the proportion of adult smokers in the U.S. has been reduced by half (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2004). This success has not, however, been equally felt across all social strata. Recent survey data from Baltimore show considerably elevated smoking rates within urban, African-American communities. Of particular concern was that in some communities, over half of the young adults (18-24 years old) smoke cigarettes. As yet, there has been little focus on understanding or preventing cigarette smoking among young adults, particularly for those seeking entry into the workforce rather than being engaged in higher education. In this paper, we explore community factors contributing to high young adult smoking prevalence. Our analysis is based on data from four focus groups conducted in 2004 as part of a community-based participatory research project with two urban education and job training organizations. The focus group data reflect the experiences and opinions of 28 young adult program participants (23 smokers and 5 nonsmokers). The data highlight a normalized practice of buying and selling single cigarettes ("loosies") within the community, with participants describing buying loose cigarettes as a preferred acquisition practice. We apply theories of informal economy and suggest that this alternative purchasing option may influence the smoking behavior of these young adults. We argue that public health efforts need to more closely consider the impact of community structures on program implementation. Overlooking key community characteristics such as the availability of single cigarettes may serve to intensify health disparities.

  18. Association Between Visuospatial Ability and Vestibular Function in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Robin T; Semenov, Yevgeniy R; Trevino, Carolina; Ferrucci, Luigi; Resnick, Susan M; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Xue, Qian-Li; Agrawal, Yuri

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the relationship between vestibular loss associated with aging and age-related decline in visuospatial function. Cross-sectional analysis within a prospective cohort study. Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA). Community-dwelling BLSA participants with a mean age of 72 (range 26-91) (N = 183). Vestibular function was measured using vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials. Visuospatial cognitive tests included Card Rotations, Purdue Pegboard, Benton Visual Retention Test, and Trail-Making Test Parts A and B. Tests of executive function, memory, and attention were also considered. Participants underwent vestibular and cognitive function testing. In multiple linear regression analyses, poorer vestibular function was associated with poorer performance on Card Rotations (P = .001), Purdue Pegboard (P = .005), Benton Visual Retention Test (P = 0.008), and Trail-Making Test Part B (P = .04). Performance on tests of executive function and verbal memory were not significantly associated with vestibular function. Exploratory factor analyses in a subgroup of participants who underwent all cognitive tests identified three latent cognitive abilities: visuospatial ability, verbal memory, and working memory and attention. Vestibular loss was significantly associated with lower visuospatial and working memory and attention factor scores. Significant consistent associations between vestibular function and tests of visuospatial ability were observed in a sample of community-dwelling adults. Impairment in visuospatial skills is often one of the first signs of dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Further longitudinal studies are needed to evaluate whether the relationship between vestibular function and visuospatial ability is causal. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. Anxiety and risk of type 2 diabetes: evidence from the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Lauren E; Mezuk, Briana

    2012-12-01

    Depression is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and is also commonly comorbid with anxiety. However, few studies have examined whether anxiety is predictive of diabetes risk. The objectives of this study are to examine the prospective relationship between anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social phobia, and agoraphobia) and risk of type 2 diabetes over an 11-year period, and to investigate the association between anxiety and risk of diabetes-related complications among those with prevalent type 2 diabetes. Data come from the 1993/6 and 2004/5 waves of the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study (N=1920), a population-based prospective cohort. Anxiety disorders were assessed using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule. The prospective association between anxiety and incident type 2 diabetes was evaluated using a series of nested multivariable logistic regression models. At baseline, 315 participants (21.8%) had an anxiety disorder. The relationship between anxiety and risk of developing type 2 diabetes was not statistically significant after controlling for demographic characteristics (Odds Ratio (OR): 1.28, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.75, 2.18). There was no relationship between anxiety and diabetes risk after controlling for health behaviors and depression status (OR: 1.00, 95% CI: 0.53, 1.89). There was no significant relationship between anxiety and development of diabetes-related complications among those with prevalent type 2 diabetes (OR: 2.02, 95% CI: 0.61, 6.74). Anxiety disorders are not associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes or risk of diabetes complications among those who have diabetes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Suburban watershed nitrogen retention: Estimating the effectiveness of stormwater management structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Benjamin J.; Febria, Catherine M.; Cooke, Roger M.; Hosen, Jacob D.; Baker, Matthew E.; Colson, Abigail R.; Filoso, Solange; Hayhoe, Katharine; Loperfido, J. V.; Stoner, Anne M.K.; Palmer, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Excess nitrogen (N) is a primary driver of freshwater and coastal eutrophication globally, and urban stormwater is a rapidly growing source of N pollution. Stormwater best management practices (BMPs) are used widely to remove excess N from runoff in urban and suburban areas, and are expected to perform under a wide variety of environmental conditions. Yet the capacity of BMPs to retain excess N varies; and both the variation and the drivers thereof are largely unknown, hindering the ability of water resource managers to meet water quality targets in a cost-effective way. Here, we use structured expert judgment (SEJ), a performance-weighted method of expert elicitation, to quantify the uncertainty in BMP performance under a range of site-specific environmental conditions and to estimate the extent to which key environmental factors influence variation in BMP performance. We hypothesized that rain event frequency and magnitude, BMP type and size, and physiographic province would significantly influence the experts’ estimates of N retention by BMPs common to suburban Piedmont and Coastal Plain watersheds of the Chesapeake Bay region.

  1. Youth access to indoor tanning salons in urban versus rural/suburban communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahar, Vinayak K; Rosenthal, Meagen; Lemon, Stephenie C; Kane, Kevin; Cheng, Jie; Oleski, Jessica L; Li, Wenjun; Hillhouse, Joel J; Pagoto, Sherry L

    2018-03-01

    Research suggests that youth proximity to tanning salons may promote use; however, little is known about tanning salon proximity to schools. We assessed the proximity of tanning salons to schools in urban versus rural/suburban communities across Worcester County, Massachusetts (population > 800K). To put findings in context, we compared school proximity to tanning salons to school proximity to McDonald's restaurants, a large franchise that also caters to young people. Accessibility was measured by ArcGIS 10.2 Network Analyzer (ESRI, Redlands, CA, USA) and the most current road network data layer from Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT). A total of 145 schools were observed in the study area, of which about 39% of schools were within 1 mile from a tanning salon. Urban schools (53.41%) had a higher proportion within 1 mile of a tanning salon than rural/suburban schools (17.54%; P < .001). More schools (39.31%) were within 1 mile of a tanning salon than schools within 1 mile of a McDonald's (22.70%; P < .001). Schools may be particularly impactful for implementing skin cancer prevention programing. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Characteristics of surface ozone and nitrogen oxides at urban, suburban and rural sites in Ningbo, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Lei; Zhang, Huiling; Yu, Jie; He, Mengmeng; Xu, Nengbin; Zhang, Jingjing; Qian, Feizhong; Feng, Jiayong; Xiao, Hang

    2017-05-01

    Surface ozone (O3) is a harmful air pollutant that has attracted growing concern in China. In this study, the mixing ratios of O3 and nitrogen oxides (NOx) at three different sites (urban, suburban and rural) of Ningbo were continuously measured to investigate the spatiotemporal characteristics of O3 and its relationships with environmental variables. The diurnal O3 variations were characterized by afternoon maxima (38.7-53.1 ppb on annual average) and early morning minima (11.7-26.2 ppb) at all the three sites. Two seasonal peaks of O3 were observed in spring (April or May) and autumn (October) with minima being observed in winter (December). NOx levels showed generally opposite variations to that of O3 with diurnal and seasonal maxima occurring in morning/evening rush-hours and in winter, respectively. As to the inter-annual variations of air pollutants, generally decreasing and increasing trends were observed in NO and O3 levels, respectively, from 2012 to 2015 at both urban and suburban sites. O3 levels were positively correlated with temperature but negatively correlated with relative humidity and NOx levels. Significant differences in O3 levels were observed for different wind speeds and wind directions (p population and plant growth.

  3. Carbon dioxide fluxes in urban and suburban environments from northwestern Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Mário; João Matos, Maria; Pio, Casimiro; Borrego, Carlos

    2015-04-01

    The combined effect of global climate change and urban growth makes people in cities more vulnerable to environmental problems like extreme weather and poor air quality. CLICURB project aims at assessing the impact of future climate on urban areas and how cities can adapt to reduce exposure and sensitivity to those impacts, increasing resilience to climate change. CLICURB focuses in Oporto, a European urban area experiencing accelerated rates of urbanization and simultaneously presenting poor air quality. In the framework of CLICURB, the eddy covariance technique has been used to measure CO2, energy and water vapor fluxes at an urban environment and a suburban environment with different population densities and surface characteristics (particularly concerning vegetation cover). This study reports the first months of CO2 fluxes, which started in the middle of 2014. The urban site was a source of CO2 most of the time and fluxes appeared to be governed by anthropogenic emissions from vehicular traffic and domestic heating. The suburban site was a day-time sink and a night-time source of CO2. Day-time negative values were attributed to photosynthesis and strong mixing within the atmospheric boundary layer whereas night-time positive values were related with biospheric respiration, anthropogenic emissions and poor mixing within the atmospheric boundary layer. CO2 fluxes gathered at both sites were also used to explore the role of human activities in the surface energy balance and its contribution to urban heat island effect.

  4. A social choice-based methodology for treated wastewater reuse in urban and suburban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahjouri, Najmeh; Pourmand, Ehsan

    2017-07-01

    Reusing treated wastewater for supplying water demands such as landscape and agricultural irrigation in urban and suburban areas has become a major water supply approach especially in regions struggling with water shortage. Due to limited available treated wastewater to satisfy all water demands, conflicts may arise in allocating treated wastewater to water users. Since there is usually more than one decision maker and more than one criterion to measure the impact of each water allocation scenario, effective tools are needed to combine individual preferences to reach a collective decision. In this paper, a new social choice (SC) method, which can consider some indifference thresholds for decision makers, is proposed for evaluating and ranking treated wastewater and urban runoff allocation scenarios to water users in urban and suburban areas. Some SC methods, namely plurality voting, Borda count, pairwise comparisons, Hare system, dictatorship, and approval voting, are applied for comparing and evaluating the results. Different scenarios are proposed for allocating treated wastewater and urban runoff to landscape irrigation, agricultural lands as well as artificial recharge of aquifer in the Tehran metropolitan Area, Iran. The main stakeholders rank the proposed scenarios based on their utilities using two different approaches. The proposed method suggests ranking of the scenarios based on the stakeholders' utilities and considering the scores they assigned to each scenario. Comparing the results of the proposed method with those of six different SC methods shows that the obtained ranks are mostly in compliance with the social welfare.

  5. Performance Analysis of Trans-Jakarta Bus Suburban Service Move-Across Greater Jakarta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangkudung, ESW; Widyadayinta, C.

    2018-03-01

    Trans-Jakarta have developed their services scope as Suburban Service or Feeder move-across service that operate from greater Jakarta into Jakarta central vice versa. One of the route is Ciputat – Bundaran Hotel Indonesia (Tosari) and integrated with corridor 1 (one) and 8 (eight). This service is not travel on the exclusive lane or bus-way. Objective of Government Jakarta to provide this service is to decrease private car to enter the central of Jakarta. The objective of this study is to find the performance of the service. Survey have conducted static and dynamic on work day to get variable of travel time and delay, waiting time of passenger at the bus stop, headway and ridership of the bus. Service Standard Minimum of Trans-Jakarta have compared with the result of variable headway, travel speed, and waiting time at bus stop as concern of all the passengers. Analysis use correlation test method and linear regression model have done. The performance of Trans-Jakarta bus suburban service, based on travel speed indicator is fairly bad, only 8.1% of trip could comply with Minimum Service Standard. Bus performance based on the indicator of density in the bus is good, where all points are below the maximum limit i.e. 8 people/m2 at peak hour and 5 people/m2 at off-peak hour.

  6. Examples of landscape indicators for assessing environmental conditions and problems in urban and suburban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Duque, J. F.; Godfrey, A.; Diez, A.; Cleaves, E.; Pedraza, J.; Sanz, M.A.; Carrasco, R.M.; Bodoque, J.; Brebbia, C.A.; Martin-Duque, J.F.; Wadhwa, L.C.

    2002-01-01

    Geo-indicators can help to assess environmental conditions in city urban and suburban areas. Those indicators should be meaningful for understanding environmental changes. From examples of Spanish and American cities, geo-indicators for assessing environmental conditions and changes in urban and suburban areas are proposed. The paper explore two types of geo-indicators. The first type presents general information that can be used to indicate the presence of a broad array of geologic conditions, either favouring or limiting various kinds of uses of the land. The second type of geo-indicator is the one most commonly used, and as a group most easily understood; these are site and problem specific and they are generally used after a problem is identified. Among them, watershed processes, seismicity and physiographic diversity are explained in more detail. A second dimension that is considered when discussing geo-indicators is the issue of scale. Broad scale investigations, covering extensive areas are only efficient at cataloguing general conditions common to much of the area or some outstanding feature within the area. This type of information is best used for policy type decisions. Detailed scale investigations can provide information about local conditions, but are not efficient at cataloguing vast areas. Information gathered at the detailed level is necessary for project design and construction.

  7. Parasite egg contamination of vegetables from a suburban market in Hanoi, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uga, S; Hoa, N T V; Noda, S; Moji, K; Cong, L; Aoki, Y; Rai, S K; Fujimaki, Y

    2009-06-01

    Helminth egg contamination of vegetables purchased at suburban market in Hanoi, Vietnam was examined. A total of 317 vegetables were examined and 82 (26%) were revealed to be positive for parasite eggs. Of the 15 varieties, 13 were positive except for horseradish and cucumber. Contamination was highest in leafy vegetables (31%), followed by root vegetables (17%) and fruit vegetables (3%). Throughout the survey, five species of parasite eggs were found: Ascaris sp., Trichuris sp., Toxocara sp., Taenia sp. and Ascaridia galli. In the interview with the villagers, 121 (81%) of 149 adult villagers stated that they usually use not only animal feces but also human feces as a fertilizer. Throughout the survey, a total of 453 eggs were recovered. Number of eggs recovered from vegetables was higher in the dry season (355 eggs) than in the rainy season (98 eggs). The study revealed that vegetables purchased at a market in suburban Hanoi (Vietnam) were highly contaminated with parasite eggs excreted by humans and animals. Considering the eating habits of the Vietnamese and the 17% embryonation rate of detected parasites, vegetables seem to play an important role in soil-transmitted helminth infection in this country.

  8. Sources identification of the atmospheric aerosol at urban and suburban sites in Indonesia by positive matrix factorization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoso, Muhayatun; Hopke, Philip K.; Hidayat, Achmad; Diah Dwiana L

    2008-01-01

    Samples of fine and coarse fractions of airborne particulate matter were collected in Indonesia (west central Java) at an urban site in Bandung and in suburban Lembang from January 2002 to December 2004. The samples were collected using a Gent stacked filter sampler in two size fractions of 2.5-10 mass at both sites comes from soil dust and road dust. The biomass burning factor contributes about 40% of the PM 2.5 mass in case of suburban Lembang and about 20% in urban Bandung

  9. "How will I explain why we live behind a wall?" La Zona (2007 as suburban gothic narrative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernice M Murphy

    2012-11-01

    This paper argues that Rodrigo Pla’s film La Zona (2007, set ina privileged, self-governing gated community in Mexico City,replicates many of the North American variety of the SuburbanGothic’s most characteristic preoccupations, albeit in a LatinAmerican setting, and with reference to specifically regionaleconomic and political anxieties. The paper also discusses theways in which the Suburban Gothic so often serves as a meansof expressing specifically middle-class anxieties about therelationship between the privileged and the disenfranchised, inthis instance, specifically Mexican anxieties about the libertiesafforded to the wealthy and the ramifications of police corruptionand political cronyism.

  10. Sora rail studies on the Patuxent River, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haramis, M.; Kearns, G.D.

    1999-01-01

    The freshwater marshes of the tidal Patuxent River are well known for their annual fall concentration of migrant soras (Porzana carolina) and were formerly the most famous rail hunting grounds in the Chesapeake Bay region. Because of concern over the apparent long-term decline in number of soras and the decline in the quality of the Patuxent marshes, especially the loss of wild rice (Zizania aquatica), the Maryland National-Capital Park and Planning Commission (MNCPPC), co-steward of the Jug Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, sponsored rail-related research beginning in 1987. Past efforts focused on developing efficient trapping techniques, age and sex criteria, and monitonng body mass dynamics. Noted progress was made in developing digital playback systems and trap improvements to enhance sora captures. These improvements increased capture success by over an order of magnitude and resulted in capture of 2,315 soras and 276 Virginia rails (Rallus limicola) in the 5 year period, 1993-97. Although these methods demonstrate the efficacy of banding large numbers of soras on migration and possibly winter concentration areas, captures at the Patuxent River site have been 70-90% hatching-year birds and recoveries and recaptures have been virtually nonexistent. With the present effort, this outcome precludes population parameter estimation using traditional capture-recapture or recovery model methodologies. In 1996, studies were initiated to employ radio telemetry methods to investigate length of stay, habitat use, survival, and migration characteristics of fall migrant soras. These studies are ongoing and will be continued through 1998 with a grant from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Webless Migratory Game Bird Research Program and support from the U.S. Geological Survey's Patuxent Wildlife Research Center. Supplemental funding has also been provided by MNCPPC, FWS Region 5, the Maryland Ornithological Society, Quail Unlimited, and Prince Georges Community

  11. The Maryland Amphibian and Reptile Atlas: A Volunteer-Based Distributional Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather R. Cunningham

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Declines of amphibian and reptile populations are well documented. Yet a lack of understanding of their distribution may hinder conservation planning for these species. The Maryland Amphibian and Reptile Atlas project (MARA was launched in 2010. This five-year, citizen science project will document the distribution of the 93 amphibian and reptile species in Maryland. During the 2010 and 2011 field seasons, 488 registered MARA volunteers collected 13,919 occurrence records that document 85 of Maryland's amphibian and reptile species, including 19 frog, 20 salamander, five lizard, 25 snake, and 16 turtle species. Thirteen of these species are of conservation concern in Maryland. The MARA will establish a baseline by which future changes in the distribution of populations of native herpetofauna can be assessed as well as provide information for immediate management actions for rare and threatened species. As a citizen science project it has the added benefit of educating citizens about native amphibian and reptile diversity and its ecological benefits—an important step in creating an informed society that actively participates in the long-term conservation of Maryland's nature heritage.

  12. Ground water in the Piedmont upland of central Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Claire A.

    1982-01-01

    This report, describing ground-water occurrence in a 130-square-mile area of the central Maryland Piedmont, was originally designed for use by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in replying to a request for designation of the aquifers to be the sole or principal source of ground water. However, the information contained in the report is pertinent to other crystalline-rock areas as well. The study area is underlain chiefly by crystalline rocks and partly by unaltered sandstones and siltstones. The ground water is derived from local precipitation and generally occurs under water-table conditions. Its movement is restricted by the lack of interconnected openings, and most ground water occurs within 300 feet of the land surface. Hydrographs indicate no long-term change in ground-water storage. A few wells yield more than 100 gallons per minute, but about 70 percent of 286 inventoried wells yield 10 gallons per minute or less; most specific capacities are less than 1.0 gallon per minute per foot. The ground-water quality is generally satisfactory without treatment, and there are no known widespread pollution problems. Estimated daily figures on ground-water use are as follows: 780,000 gallons for domestic purposes; 55,000, for commercial purposes; and 160,000, for public supply. Although part of the area is served by an existing surface-water supply and could be served by possible extension of it and of other public-supply water mains, much of the rural population is dependent on the ground water available from private wells tapping the single aquifer that underlies any given location. Neither the ground-water conditions nor this dependence on individual wells is unique to the study area, but, rather, applies to the entire Piedmont province.

  13. Continuous resistivity profiling data from the Corsica River Estuary, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, V.A.; Bratton, J.F.; Worley, C.R.; Crusius, J.; Kroeger, K.D.

    2011-01-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into Maryland's Corsica River Estuary was investigated as part of a larger study to determine its importance in nutrient delivery to the Chesapeake Bay. The Corsica River Estuary represents a coastal lowland setting typical of much of the eastern bay. An interdisciplinary U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) science team conducted field operations in the lower estuary in April and May 2007. Resource managers are concerned about nutrients that are entering the estuary via SGD that may be contributing to eutrophication, harmful algal blooms, and fish kills. Techniques employed in the study included continuous resistivity profiling (CRP), piezometer sampling of submarine groundwater, and collection of a time series of radon tracer activity in surface water. A CRP system measures electrical resistivity of saturated subestuarine sediments to distinguish those bearing fresh water (high resistivity) from those with saline or brackish pore water (low resistivity). This report describes the collection and processing of CRP data and summarizes the results. Based on a grid of 67.6 kilometers of CRP data, low-salinity (high-resistivity) groundwater extended approximately 50-400 meters offshore from estuary shorelines at depths of 5 to >12 meters below the sediment surface, likely beneath a confining unit. A band of low-resistivity sediment detected along the axis of the estuary indicated the presence of a filled paleochannel containing brackish groundwater. The meandering paleochannel likely incised through the confining unit during periods of lower sea level, allowing the low-salinity groundwater plumes originating from land to mix with brackish subestuarine groundwater along the channel margins and to discharge. A better understanding of the spatial variability and geological controls of submarine groundwater flow beneath the Corsica River Estuary could lead to improved models and mitigation strategies for nutrient over-enrichment in the

  14. Causes and consequences of ecosystem service regionalization in a coastal suburban watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollheim, Wilfred M.; Mark B. Green,; Pellerin, Brian A.; Morse, Nathaniel B.; Hopkinson, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    The demand for ecosystem services and the ability of natural ecosystems to provide those services evolve over time as population, land use, and management practices change. Regionalization of ecosystem service activity, or the expansion of the area providing ecosystem services to a population, is a common response in densely populated coastal regions, with important consequences for watershed water and nitrogen (N) fluxes to the coastal zone. We link biophysical and historical information to explore the causes and consequences of change in ecosystem service activity—focusing on water provisioning and N regulation—from 1850 to 2010 in a coastal suburban watershed, the Ipswich River watershed in northeastern Massachusetts, USA. Net interbasin water transfers started in the late 1800s due to regionalization of water supply for use by larger populations living outside the Ipswich watershed boundaries, reaching a peak in the mid-1980s. Over much of the twentieth century, about 20 % of river runoff was diverted from reaching the estuary, with greater proportions during drought years. Ongoing regionalization of water supply has contributed to recent declines in diversions, influenced by socioecological feedbacks resulting from the river drying and fish kills. Similarly, the N budget has been greatly perturbed since the suburban era began in the 1950s due to food and lawn fertilizer imports and human waste release. However, natural ecosystems are able to remove most of this anthropogenic N, mitigating impacts on the coastal zone. We propose a conceptual model whereby the amount and type of ecosystem services provided by coastal watersheds in urban regions expand and contract over time as regional population expands and ecosystem services are regionalized. We hypothesize that suburban watersheds can be hotspots of ecosystem service sources because they retain sufficient ecosystem function to still produce services that meet increasing demand from the local population

  15. A survey of urban and suburban methane hotspots across five European capitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panetta, Robert; Jacobson, Gloria; Xuref-Remy, Irène; Crosson, Eric

    2013-04-01

    A growing awareness that urban and suburban areas are greenhouse gas emissions hotspots has resulted in calls to quantify and study the primary sources from cities. Of especial focus is methane, which is 25 times more potent as a greenhouse gas than CO2. Early studies have hinted at obvious sources of methane, such as industrial sites, landfills and waste water treatment plants. However, the size, density and diversity of urban and suburban areas suggest that these cannot be the only significant sources of methane emissions. Recent work has revealed that leaks from natural gas distribution networks are a major source of methane emissions in Boston, the totality of which has the potential to swamp all other sources of urban methane in accounting schemes. Such a result also indicates that not all methane sources are obvious, and that in-depth on-site investigation across large swaths of urban areas will be needed to properly appreciate the full magnitude of methane emissions from urban and suburban areas across the globe. The challenge of measuring methane emissions from large urban areas is greatly reduced by employing the Investigator, which combines the high precision of cavity ring-down spectroscopy with geospatial and metorological data. In this presentation, we will show results of such Investigator runs conducted between November 2011 to December 2012 in and around Amsterdam, Geneva, Istanbul, London, and Paris. A number of significant sources were common to all locations including the obvious (landfills, industrial sites and waste water treatment plants), the disconcerting (natural gas leaks at street level) and unexpected (recreational marinas, "green" public transport). The overall view from the Investigator runs show that even though emissions sources in and around major European cities are highly diverse, they share much commonality, suggesting harmonized emissions reductions schemes across borders are possible. The results also clearly indicate that the

  16. Pig Farmers’ Homes Harbor More Diverse Airborne Bacterial Communities Than Pig Stables or Suburban Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ditte V. Vestergaard

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Airborne bacterial communities are subject to conditions ill-suited to microbial activity and growth. In spite of this, air is an important transfer medium for bacteria, with the bacteria in indoor air having potentially major consequences for the health of a building’s occupants. A major example is the decreased diversity and altered composition of indoor airborne microbial communities as a proposed explanation for the increasing prevalence of asthma and allergies worldwide. Previous research has shown that living on a farm confers protection against development of asthma and allergies, with airborne bacteria suggested as playing a role in this protective effect. However, the composition of this beneficial microbial community has still not been identified. We sampled settled airborne dust using a passive dust sampler from Danish pig stables, associated farmers’ homes, and from suburban homes (267 samples in total and carried out quantitative PCR measurements of bacterial abundance and MiSeq sequencing of the V3–V4 region of bacterial 16S rRNA genes found in these samples. Airborne bacteria had a greater diversity and were significantly more abundant in pig stables and farmers’ homes than suburban homes (Wilcoxon rank sum test P < 0.05. Moreover, bacterial taxa previously suggested to contribute to a protective effect had significantly higher relative and absolute abundance in pig stables and farmers’ homes than in suburban homes (ALDEx2 with P < 0.05, including Firmicutes, Peptostreptococcaceae, Prevotellaceae, Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae, Ruminiclostridium, and Lactobacillus. Pig stables had significantly lower airborne bacterial diversity than farmers’ homes, and there was no discernable direct transfer of airborne bacteria from stable to home. This study identifies differences in indoor airborne bacterial communities that may be an important component of this putative protective effect, while showing that pig stables

  17. Examining science achievement of African American females in suburban middle schools: A mixed methods study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, Kecia C.

    This dissertation examined factors that affected the science achievement of African American females in suburban middle schools. The research literature informed that African American females are facing the barriers of race, gender, socioeconomic status, and cultural learning style preferences. Nationally used measurements of science achievement such as the Standardized Achievement Test, Tenth edition (SAT-10), National Assessment for Educational Progress, and National Center for Educational Statistics showed that African American females are continuing to falter in the areas of science when compared to other ethnic groups. This study used a transformative sequential explanatory mixed methods design. In the first, quantitative, phase, the relationships among the dependent variables, science subscale SAT-10 NCE scores, yearly averages, and the independent variables, attitude toward science scores obtained from the Modified Fennema-Sherman Attitudes toward Science Scale, socioeconomics, and caregiver status were tested. The participants were 150 African American females in grades 6 through 8 in four suburban middle schools located in the Southeastern United States. The results showed a positive, significant linear relationship between the females' attitude and their science subscale SAT-10 NCE scores and a positive, significant linear relationship between the females' attitudes and their yearly averages in science. The results also confirmed that attitude was a significant predictor of science subscale SAT-10 NCE scores for these females and that attitude and socioeconomics were significant predictors of the females' yearly averages in science. In the second, qualitative, phase, nine females purposefully selected from those who had high and low attitude towards science scores on the scale in the quantitative phase were interviewed. The themes that emerged revealed seven additional factors that impacted the females' science achievement. They were usefulness of science

  18. Suburban Poverty: Barriers to Services and Injury Prevention among Marginalized Women Who Use Methamphetamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boeri, Miriam

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This paper aims to identify the needed healthcare and social services barriers for women living in suburban communities who are using or have used methamphetamine. Drug users are vulnerable to injury, violence and transmission of infectious diseases, and having access to healthcare has been shown to positively influence prevention and intervention among this population. Yet little is known regarding the social context of suburban drug users, their risks behaviors, and their access to healthcare.Methods: The data collection involved participant observation in the field, face-to-face interviews and focus groups. Audio-recorded in-depth life histories, drug use histories, and resource needs were collected from 31 suburban women who were former or current users of methamphetamine. The majority was drawn from marginalized communities and highly vulnerable to risk for injury and violence. We provided these women with healthcare and social service information and conducted follow-up interviews to identify barriers to these services.Results: Barriers included (1 restrictions imposed by the services and (2 limitations inherent in the women’s social, economic, or legal situations. We found that the barriers increased the women’s risk for further injury, violence and transmission of infectious diseases. Women who could not access needed healthcare and social resources typically used street drugs that were accessible and affordable to self-medicate their untreated emotional and physical pain.Conclusion: Our findings add to the literatureon how healthcare and social services are related to injury prevention. Social service providers in the suburbs were often indifferent to the needs of drug-using women. For these women, health services were accessed primarily at emergency departments (ED. To break the cycle of continued drug use, violence and injury, we suggest that ED staff be trained to perform substance abuse assessments and provide

  19. 75 FR 68824 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore Maryland-Request...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-09

    ... No. BOEM-2010-0038] Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore..., Interior. ACTION: RFI in Commercial Wind Energy Leasing Offshore Maryland, and Invitation for Comments from... construction of a wind energy project(s) on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) offshore Maryland. The BOEMRE...

  20. A Descriptive Analysis of Enrollment and Achievement among Limited English Proficient Students in Maryland. Issues & Answers. REL 2012-No. 128

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Conner, Rosemarie; Abedi, Jamal; Tung, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    This study describes limited English proficient (LEP) student enrollment and achievement trends in Maryland. Two research questions guide this study: (1) How did the enrollment of LEP students in Maryland public schools change between 2002/03 and 2008/09?; and (2) How did performance (the percentage scoring at the proficient or advanced level) on…

  1. 77 FR 43071 - Public Power & Utility of Maryland, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... Public Power & Utility of Maryland, LLC's application for market- based rate authority, with an... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. ER12-2253-000] Public Power & Utility of Maryland, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request for...

  2. Hemoglobin J-Baltimore (beta 16(A13)Gly----Asp): interference with the assay of HbA1c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenesch, F; Baklouti, F; Francina, A; Vianey-Liaud, C; Bertrand, A; Le Dévéhat, C; Delaunay, J

    1987-09-30

    Three independent cases of Hemoglobin J-Baltimore(beta 16(A13)Gly----Asp) were detected through the assay of HbA1c in diabetic patients. Using chromatography on Bio-Rex 70 resin, one large peak replaced the usually well resolved peaks of HbA1a + b and HbA1c. The species that overlapped the latter fractions was identified as HbJ1c. HbJ-Baltimore itself was identified using HPLC of the beta-chain tryptic peptides. This observation emphasizes the errors that hemoglobin variants may introduce in the assay of HbA1c.

  3. A mixed methods assessment of the barriers and readiness for meeting the SNAP depth of stock requirements in Baltimore's small food stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Alexandra; Krishnan, Nandita; Ruggiero, Cara; Kerrigan, Deanna; Gittelsohn, Joel

    2018-01-01

    We sought to understand Baltimore corner store owners' awareness of and readiness for the then-approved Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program depth of stock requirements and assess potential barriers and solutions. In-depth interviews and stocking observations were conducted in 17 corner stores in low-income food deserts of Baltimore City. Corner store owners conveyed little to no awareness of the pending depth of stock changes. Only two stores were currently ready for the requirements. Low customer demand, high amounts of potential spoilage, and unfair pricing at the wholesaler were identified by store owners as barriers to stocking required foods.

  4. Relations of Shyness-Sensitivity and Unsociability with Adjustment in Middle Childhood and Early Adolescence in Suburban Chinese Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junsheng; Chen, Xinyin; Zhou, Ying; Li, Dan; Fu, Rui; Coplan, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined how shyness-sensitivity and unsociability were associated with social, school, and psychological adjustment in Chinese children and adolescents. Participants included 564 children (272 boys, M[subscript age] = 9 years) and 462 adolescents (246 boys, M[subscript age] = 13 years) in a suburban region in China. Data were obtained…

  5. Physical Activity of Fifth to Sixth Graders during School Hours According to School Race/Ethnicity: Suburban Cook County, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Soyang; Mason, Maryann; Welch, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Background: We compared moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA) and inactivity levels among fifth and sixth graders during school hours according to school-level race/ethnicity and income attributes to inform school-based obesity interventions in Illinois Suburban Cook County (SCC). Methods: Fifth- and sixth-grade students…

  6. The role of interorganizational partnerships in health services provision among rural, suburban, and urban local health departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Kate; Harris, Jenine K; Barnes, Priscilla A

    2010-01-01

    With limited resources and increased public health challenges facing the US, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and others have identified partnerships between local health departments (LHDs) and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) as critical to the public health system. LHDs utilize financial, human, and informational resources and develop partnerships with local NGOs to provide public health services. Our study had 2 primary goals: (1) compare resources and partnerships characterizing rural, suburban, and urban LHDs, and (2) determine whether partnerships play a mediating role between LHD resources and the services LHDs provide. We conducted secondary data analysis using the National Association of County and City Health Officials 2005 Profile Study. We used chi-squared and analysis of variance (ANOVA) to examine differences between rural, suburban, and urban LHDs. We used regression-based mediation methods to test whether partnerships mediated the relationship between resources and service provision. We found significant differences between LHDs. Urban LHDs serve larger jurisdictions, have larger budgets and more staff, cultivate more partnerships with local NGOs, and provide more health services than suburban or rural LHDs. We found that partnerships were a partial mediator between resources and service provision. In playing a mediating role, partnerships reduce differences in service provision between rural, suburban, and urban LHDs. Partnerships mediate the relationship between resources and service provision in LHDs. LHDs could place more emphasis on cultivating relationships with local NGOs in order to increase service provision. This strategy may be especially useful for rural LHDs facing limited resources and numerous health disparities.

  7. Effects of Air Pollution on Hospital Emergency Room Visits for Respiratory Diseases: Urban-Suburban Differences in Eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Wang, Xining; Fan, Jiayin; Xiao, Wenxin; Wang, Yan

    2016-03-19

    A study on the relationships between ambient air pollutants (PM2.5, SO₂ and NO₂) and hospital emergency room visits (ERVs) for respiratory diseases from 2013 to 2014 was performed in both urban and suburban areas of Jinan, a heavily air-polluted city in Eastern China. This research was analyzed using generalized additive models (GAM) with Poisson regression, which controls for long-time trends, the "day of the week" effect and meteorological parameters. An increase of 10 μg/m³ in PM2.5, SO₂ and NO₂ corresponded to a 1.4% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.7%, 2.1%), 1.2% (95% CI: 0.5%, 1.9%), and 2.5% (95%: 0.8%, 4.2%) growth in ERVs for the urban population, respectively, and a 1.5% (95%: 0.4%, 2.6%), 0.8% (95%: -0.7%, 2.3%), and 3.1% (95%: 0.5%, 5.7%) rise in ERVs for the suburban population, respectively. It was found that females were more susceptible than males to air pollution in the urban area when the analysis was stratified by gender, and the reverse result was seen in the suburban area. Our results suggest that the increase in ERVs for respiratory illnesses is linked to the levels of air pollutants in Jinan, and there may be some urban-suburban discrepancies in health outcomes from air pollutant exposure.

  8. Relations among Neighborhood Social Networks, Home Literacy Environments, and Children's Expressive Vocabulary in Suburban At-Risk Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froiland, John Mark; Powell, Douglas R.; Diamond, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    In response to increasing research and policy interest in the neighborhood context of early school success, this study examined relations among neighborhood social networks, home literacy practices/resources, and children's expressive vocabulary in a suburban at-risk sample in the USA at the beginning of the school year. In a Structural Equation…

  9. Comparison of Race-Gender, Urban-Suburban Criminal Justice College Students Satisfaction of the Police Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verga, Christopher; Murillo, Leo; Toulon, Errol D.; Morote, Elsa-Sofia; Perry, S. Marshall

    2016-01-01

    This quantitative study explored criminal justice college students' satisfaction with the police. 176 college students in Suffolk County, Long Island and New York City participated in a survey. The study examined the extent to which satisfaction with the local police department differs by location (urban and suburban), gender (female and male),…

  10. Instructional Flexibility in Rural and Suburban Secondary Schools in North and North West Queensland: A Comparative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunton, Mike

    1995-01-01

    Surveys, interviews, and classroom observation revealed no difference in instructional flexibility between Australian rural and suburban secondary teachers. Despite smaller class sizes, rural teachers followed a dais-based model of information delivery. Adherence to an assessment-driven work program precluded attention to differences in student…

  11. Media exposure and parental mediation on fast-food consumption among children in metropolitan and suburban Indonesian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lwin, May O; Malik, Shelly; Ridwan, Hardinsyah; Au, Cyndy Sook Sum

    2017-01-01

    Fast-food companies have been reproached for rising obesity levels due to aggressive marketing tactics targeted at children. They have countered that parents should be held responsible considering their critical role as nutritional gatekeepers. This study examined the comparative effects of media exposure and parental mediation on Indonesian children's fast food consumption and how the effects compare in the metropolitan versus suburban areas. The sample consisted of 394 child-mother pairs comprising grade three and four children and their mothers from two schools each in Jakarta and Bogor representing 40.9% metropolitan sample and 59.1% suburban sample, respectively. The children completed a guided inclass survey, while the mothers completed a paper-and-pen survey at home. Measures comprised children's weekly media exposure to broadcast media, computer and mobile games, print media, and online and social media, active and restrictive parental mediation strategies, children's fast food consumption and nutrition knowledge. The relationship of media exposure and parental mediation with children's fast food consumption was analyzed using Structural Equation Modelling. Fast food consumption was positively influenced by exposure to broadcast media among metropolitan children, and by exposure to online and social media among suburban children. Active parental mediation was related to lower fast food consumption, but only for suburban children. Active parental mediation is critical in preventing fast food consumption. The media play a key role in influencing fast food consumption, and hence, literacy education is important to alleviate the adverse effects of exposure to junk food marketing.

  12. Effects of urban density on carbon dioxide exchanges: Observations of dense urban, suburban and woodland areas of southern England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, H C; Kotthaus, S; Grimmond, C S B; Bjorkegren, A; Wilkinson, M; Morrison, W T J; Evans, J G; Morison, J I L; Iamarino, M

    2015-03-01

    Anthropogenic and biogenic controls on the surface-atmosphere exchange of CO2 are explored for three different environments. Similarities are seen between suburban and woodland sites during summer, when photosynthesis and respiration determine the diurnal pattern of the CO2 flux. In winter, emissions from human activities dominate urban and suburban fluxes; building emissions increase during cold weather, while traffic is a major component of CO2 emissions all year round. Observed CO2 fluxes reflect diurnal traffic patterns (busy throughout the day (urban); rush-hour peaks (suburban)) and vary between working days and non-working days, except at the woodland site. Suburban vegetation offsets some anthropogenic emissions, but 24-h CO2 fluxes are usually positive even during summer. Observations are compared to estimated emissions from simple models and inventories. Annual CO2 exchanges are significantly different between sites, demonstrating the impacts of increasing urban density (and decreasing vegetation fraction) on the CO2 flux to the atmosphere. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. The Role of Satisfaction and Emotional Response in the Choice Mechanisms of Suburban Natural-Areas Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Mosquera, Natalia; Sanchez, Mercedes

    2012-01-01

    The unique observations and experiences of users of suburban natural areas lead them to perceive their surroundings in a manner associated with their personal values. It follows that every individual has a unique cognitive decision-making structure. This paper examines users' affective and cognitive evaluation of a particular suburban natural area by applying the means-end chain method to reveal the cognitive mechanism by which users link the attributes and benefits of an environmental public good with their own personal values. Analysis of a survey conducted of visitors to a Spanish suburban natural area (park) reveals the main attributes to be the opportunity to practice sports and proximity of the park and the main potential benefits to be the improvement of physical and psychological well-being. The desired personal values include fun, quality of life and self-fulfillment at the individual level and improved social relationships at the collective level. The paper also tests for cross-group, cognitive-structure differences in visitor groups, segmented by level of satisfaction and reported range of emotions, and finds that perceived physical and psychological health improvements and individual and social awareness increase with higher levels of satisfaction and emotional response. Therefore, the recommendations for natural area management suggested by these findings include enhancing the scenic beauty and peacefulness of suburban natural areas in order to improve the affective state of visitors because this could contribute to reducing social costs (including health care) within the area of influence of the natural area.

  14. Acculturation and School Success: Understanding the Variability of Mexican American Youth Adaptation across Urban and Suburban Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conchas, Gilberto Q.; Oseguera, Leticia; Vigil, James Diego

    2012-01-01

    This article concentrates on the educational experiences of urban and suburban Mexican American youth, from recent immigrants to those that have been in the United States for generations. The article seeks to unravel the relationship between acculturation and school success by offering a holistic and longitudinal approach of three time periods:…

  15. Effects of urban density on carbon dioxide exchanges: Observations of dense urban, suburban and woodland areas of southern England

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, H.C.; Kotthaus, S.; Grimmond, C.S.B.; Bjorkegren, A.; Wilkinson, M.; Morrison, W.T.J.; Evans, J.G.; Morison, J.I.L.; Iamarino, M.

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic and biogenic controls on the surface–atmosphere exchange of CO 2 are explored for three different environments. Similarities are seen between suburban and woodland sites during summer, when photosynthesis and respiration determine the diurnal pattern of the CO 2 flux. In winter, emissions from human activities dominate urban and suburban fluxes; building emissions increase during cold weather, while traffic is a major component of CO 2 emissions all year round. Observed CO 2 fluxes reflect diurnal traffic patterns (busy throughout the day (urban); rush-hour peaks (suburban)) and vary between working days and non-working days, except at the woodland site. Suburban vegetation offsets some anthropogenic emissions, but 24-h CO 2 fluxes are usually positive even during summer. Observations are compared to estimated emissions from simple models and inventories. Annual CO 2 exchanges are significantly different between sites, demonstrating the impacts of increasing urban density (and decreasing vegetation fraction) on the CO 2 flux to the atmosphere. - Highlights: • Multi-seasonal comparison of contemporaneous CO 2 fluxes over contrasting land cover. • Signatures of anthropogenic and biogenic processes explored at various timescales. • Observations reveal relative magnitude of anthropogenic emissions. • CO 2 fluxes related to surface controls, strongly dependent on land cover. - Direct measurements of CO 2 fluxes reveal the impact of urbanisation and human behavioural patterns on the atmosphere at sub-daily to inter-annual time scales

  16. Leading a Sustainable Lifestyle in a "Non-Sustainable World": Reflections from Australian Ecovillage and Suburban Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Evonne; Bentley, Kristeen

    2012-01-01

    Despite increasing awareness and acceptance of sustainability, relatively little is known about the motivations, viewpoints and experiences of people who choose to lead extremely sustainable lives. Through in-depth interviews with seven sustainability leaders, residing in an ecovillage or traditional suburban community in south-east Queensland in…

  17. Prevalence of Brucella antibodies in rural and suburban communities in three provinces of Turkey: need for improved diagnosis and prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kose, Sukran; Smits, Henk L.; Abdoel, Theresia H.; Ozbel, Yusuf

    2006-01-01

    To determine the seroprevalence of Brucella-specific antibodies in rural and suburban communities in different provinces of Anatolia. Cross-sectional seroepidemiological study on serum samples collected in communities in two relatively developed provinces in west Anatolia with an official low

  18. Mapping and Modeling Land Use Change in the Washington-Baltimore Metropolitan Region 1986-2030

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantz, C. A.; Goetz, S. J.; Smith, A. J.

    2002-05-01

    This research describes an effort to predict the spatial extent of urban development in the Washington, DC-Baltimore region out to 2030, prompted by a need to evaluate the impacts of different regional environmental conservation policies. This investigation is especially relevant to the region since it allows an assessment of the impacts of land use controls, such as "Smart Growth" strategies, on environmental quality and ecosystem health. Given its success with regional scale simulation and its ability to incorporate different levels of land protection through an "excluded" layer, the SLEUTH (slope, land use, excluded, urban extent, transportation, hillshade) model was adopted for this project and focused on a 45 year time period (1986-2030). Using new techniques to map impervious surfaces with Landsat TM imagery we developed a time series of urban development from 1986-2000. SLEUTH was calibrated using the impervious data set, along with other input layers such as areas excluded from development. In conjunction with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, three alternative growth scenarios were defined for which future urban extent in 2030 would be predicted. The current trends scenario reflects smart growth and conservation policies that are currently in place, as well as major planned development and transportation improvements. The managed growth (moderate protection) scenario reflects a stronger commitment to focused growth (e.g. priority funding areas) and resource protection (e.g. riparian zones). The third scenario, managed growth with maximum protection, reflects a more stringent set of policies targeted toward limited growth and natural resource protection. Although a relatively simple model, SLEUTH was found to have several advantages for modeling regional growth. Because the data input requirements are not extensive, it was possible to prepare consistent and high-quality data sets for the entire study area. In addition, the ability of the user to modify the

  19. Research in Nursing Practice, Education, and Administration: Collaborative, Methodological, and Ethical Implications. Proceedings of the Research Conference of the Southern Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing (3rd, Baltimore, Maryland, December 2-3, 1983).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Ora L., Ed.; Damrosch, Shirley P., Ed.

    Collaborative research in nursing is discussed in five papers from the 1983 conference of the Southern Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing. Also included are 32 abstracts of nursing research, focusing on clinical practice, as well as nursing education and research models. Paper titles and authors are as follows: "Building a Climate…

  20. Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the BOEM Maryland Wind Energy Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.; Draxl, C.

    2013-06-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to identify and delineate leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM. This report focuses on NREL's evaluation of the delineation proposed by the Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) for the Maryland (MD) WEA and two alternative delineations. The objectives of the NREL evaluation were to assess MEA's proposed delineation of the MD WEA, perform independent analysis, and recommend how the MD WEA should be delineated.

  1. Haemoproteus, a blood parasite, in domestic pigeons and mourning doves in Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knisley, J.O.; Herman, C.M.

    1967-01-01

    The occurrence of Haemoproteus in pigeons throughout the world and in mourning doves in the United States is reviewed. Haemoproteus has previously been reported only once from pigeons in Maryland. During this study it was found in all of 18 pigeons from one area but in none of 12 from an adjacent area. No infections were found in 90 Maryland mourning doves. All of the 10 mourning doves from Florida were infected whereas 60 nestlings from Texas and Mississippi had no parasites. None was found in 358 nestling white-winged doves from Texas.

  2. Oral health literacy: a pathway to reducing oral health disparities in Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Alice M; Kleinman, Dushanka V

    2012-01-01

    Oral health literacy is a relatively new but critical concept in our efforts to decrease disparities and increase oral health for all Marylanders. Oral health literacy is important because low health literacy contributes to disease which results in increased costs for all of us. Those with low health literacy are usually at highest risk for oral diseases and problems. These individuals include the poor, those with low levels of education, minorities, and the elderly. Prompted by the untimely demise of Deamonte Driver, Maryland has taken the lead in developing a statewide approach to improving oral health literacy with the ultimate objective of reducing disparities. © 2012 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  3. New cities in the Randstad, Netherlands. Urbanisation and suburbanity; Nieuwe steden in de Randstad. Verstedelijking en suburbaniteit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reijndorp, A.; Bijlsma, L.; Nio, I.; Van der Wouden, R.

    2012-09-15

    Forty years ago, policy for centres of growth was launched in the Netherlands. The Dutch spatial planning policy hence followed the example of the English New Towns and the French Villes Nouvelles, although the term 'new cities' was not adopted in policy. As of the late 1980s, the policy for centre of growth was gradually terminated. Since then, the attention for urbanity in the suburban regions has further decreased. The 'compact city' became the new central idea in spatial planning, and urbanity became a synonym of 'big city'. The former centres of growth had to set their course in a climate characterised by fading interest in them. However, the suburban regions are still an important component of the metropolitan regions. New types of urbanity arose, partly due to the choices made by local authorities, partly as a result of the composition of the population. This mostly yields insights on how you can make suburban regions more sustainable in the sense of resistant to changes. By enhancing the adjustability of urban development, restructuring operations may be avoided in the future. This report views the centres of growth in the perspective of spatial planning and the development of metropolitan regions. Not only does it give insight in one of the most productive periods in Dutch spatial planning; it also offers future perspectives of suburban Netherlands [Dutch] Veertig jaar geleden begon het groeikernenbeleid. De Nederlandse ruimtelijke ordening volgde daarmee het voorbeeld van de Engelse New Towns en de Franse Villes Nouvelles, al werd in het beleid niet het begrip 'nieuwe steden' overgenomen. Vanaf eind jaren tachtig van de vorige eeuw werd het groeikernenbeleid geleidelijk beëindigd. Sindsdien is de aandacht voor de stedelijkheid in de suburbane gebieden verder afgenomen. De 'compacte stad' werd het centrale begrip in de ruimtelijke ordening, en stedelijkheid werd synoniem met 'grote stad'. De

  4. Partnering with education and job and training programs for sustainable tobacco control among Baltimore african american young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katherine Clegg; Bone, Lee; Clay, Eric A; Owings, Kerry; Thames, Sean; Stillman, Frances

    2009-01-01

    Young adults are generally overlooked in tobacco control initiatives, even though they are critical to sustained success. African American young adults who are not in higher education or working are particularly vulnerable to harmful tobacco use, given high smoking rates and limited access to cessation services. Guided by community-based participatory research (CBPR) principles, we sought to identify program and community-level strategies to reduce tobacco use among African American young adults in Baltimore. We describe the challenges and opportunities for integrating effective tobacco control into community-based education and job training programs for unemployed young adults. As part of a longstanding community-research partnership in Baltimore, we conducted fourteen semistructured key informant interviews with leaders from city government and education and job training programs for young adults. The research design, data collection, analysis, and dissemination all included dialogue between and active contribution by both research and community partners. Interview data were structured into opportunities (mindset for change and desire for bonds with a trusted adult), challenges (culture of fatalism, tobacco as a stress reliever, and culture of tobacco use among young adults), and possible tobacco control solutions (tobacco education designed with and for program staff and participants and integration of tobacco issues into holistic program goals and policies). The emergent themes enhance our understanding of how tobacco is situated in the lives of unemployed young adults and the potential for building sustainable, community-based public health solutions.

  5. Nanoaerosols Including Radon Decay Products in Outdoor and Indoor Air at a Suburban Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja Smerajec

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoaerosols have been monitored inside a kitchen and in the courtyard of a suburban farmhouse. Total number concentration and number size distribution (5–1000 nm of general aerosol particles, as measured with a Grimm Aerosol SMPS+C 5.400 instrument outdoors, were mainly influenced by solar radiation and use of farming equipment, while, indoors, they were drastically changed by human activity in the kitchen. In contrast, activity concentrations of the short-lived radon decay products 218Po, 214Pb, and 214Bi, both those attached to aerosol particles and those not attached, measured with a Sarad EQF3020-2 device, did not appear to be dependent on these activities, except on opening and closing of the kitchen window. Neither did a large increase in concentration of aerosol particles smaller than 10 or 20 nm, with which the unattached radon products are associated, augment the fraction of the unattached decay products significantly.

  6. Nanoaerosols including radon decay products in outdoor and indoor air at a suburban site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smerajec, Mateja; Vaupotič, Janja

    2012-01-01

    Nanoaerosols have been monitored inside a kitchen and in the courtyard of a suburban farmhouse. Total number concentration and number size distribution (5-1000 nm) of general aerosol particles, as measured with a Grimm Aerosol SMPS+C 5.400 instrument outdoors, were mainly influenced by solar radiation and use of farming equipment, while, indoors, they were drastically changed by human activity in the kitchen. In contrast, activity concentrations of the short-lived radon decay products (218)Po, (214)Pb, and (214)Bi, both those attached to aerosol particles and those not attached, measured with a Sarad EQF3020-2 device, did not appear to be dependent on these activities, except on opening and closing of the kitchen window. Neither did a large increase in concentration of aerosol particles smaller than 10 or 20 nm, with which the unattached radon products are associated, augment the fraction of the unattached decay products significantly.

  7. Computation of a Suburban Night Train Timetable Based on Key Performance Indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schittenhelm, Bernd; Landex, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Timetable evaluation can be based on a set of key performance indicators. This article presents six essential key performance indicators: Fixed interval service frequency, direct connections, transfer waiting time, use of dedicated rolling stock, dedicated train personnel, dedicated tracks...... and travel time. A short description and specific calculation method is given for each of these. The article recommends three different approaches for dividing the railway network into sections of analysis in regards to the key performance indicators. Three timetable variants for suburban night trains...... in Copenhagen are evaluated. Each timetable variant was created with a different performance focus. Values for each of the six key performance indicators are calculated and an average value is found for all timetable variants. It can be concluded that the actual implemented timetable receives the highest scores...

  8. Computation of a Suburban Night Train Timetable Based on Key Performance Indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schittenhelm, Bernd; Landex, Alex

    2010-01-01

    and travel time. A short description and specific calculation method is given for each of these. The article recommends three different approaches for dividing the railway network into sections of analysis in regards to the key performance indicators. Three timetable variants for suburban night trains......Timetable evaluation can be based on a set of key performance indicators. This article presents six essential key performance indicators: Fixed interval service frequency, direct connections, transfer waiting time, use of dedicated rolling stock, dedicated train personnel, dedicated tracks......, but a clear picture of which timetable variant is best is not achieved. To get a clearer picture the introduction of weights is recommended both for the indicators as a whole and in the specific calculation methods. A prioritization of the selected key performance indicators is essential and weights in form...

  9. Do Affordable Housing Projects Harm Suburban Communities? Crime, Property Values, and Taxes in Mount Laurel, NJ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Len; Derickson, Elizabeth S; Massey, Douglas S

    2013-06-01

    This paper offers a mixed-method analysis of the municipal-level consequences of an affordable housing development built in suburban New Jersey. Opponents of affordable housing development often suggest that creating affordable housing will harm surrounding communities. Feared consequences include increases in crime, declining property values, and rising taxes. To evaluate these claims, the paper uses the case of Mt. Laurel, NJ - the site of a landmark affordable housing legal case and subsequent affordable housing development. Employing a multiple time series group control design, we compare crime rates, property values, and property taxes in Mt. Laurel to outcomes in similar nearby municipalities that do not contain comparable affordable housing developments. We find that the opening of the affordable housing development was not associated with trends in crime, property values, or taxes, and discuss management practices and design features that may have mitigated potential negative externalities.

  10. An integrated rolling stock planning model for the Copenhagen suburban passenger railway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlacius, Per; Larsen, Jesper; Laumanns, Marco

    2015-01-01

    to take into account, rolling stock plans are often constructed in a step-by-step manner, taking some requirements into consideration in each step. This may make it difficult in the final step to produce a plan that is feasible with regard to all of the requirements and at the same time economically...... attractive. This paper proposes an integrated rolling stock planning model that simultaneously takes into account all practical requirements for rolling stock planning at DSB S-tog, the suburban passenger train operator of the City of Copenhagen. The model is then used to improve existing rolling stock plans......A central issue for operators of passenger railways is providing sufficient number of seats for passengers while at the same time minimising operating costs. This is the task of rolling stock planning. Due to the large number of practical, railway specific requirements that a rolling stock plan has...

  11. Designing for Suburban Social Inclusion: A Case of Geo-Located Storytelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anette Bengs

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article showcases a digital solution for strengthening social inclusion and well-being of senior suburban residents of a socially diverse Finnish town. The study is framed as design research where research is conducted in order to feed into a design process. A background study was first conducted in order to identify the target group’s needs, abilities, and attitudes towards the neighbourhood. The results revealed positive attitudes towards the area and the need for relatedness, autonomy, competence, pleasure and stimulation, physical thriving and security. Following a User-Centered Design process we based our design choices on these results and developed a local geocaching solution incorporating storytelling. The aim was to encourage senior citizens to socialize, be physically active and to experience the local urban place. An interview-based evaluation with older adults (n=6 combined with an analysis of online cache log data, showed positive experiences of the solution.

  12. An Integrated Rolling Stock Planning Model for the Copenhagen Suburban Passenger Railway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlacius, Per; Larsen, Jesper; Laumanns, Marco

    A central issue for operators of passenger railways is providing sufficient number of seats for passengers while at the same time minimising operating costs. This is the task of rolling stock planning. Due to the large number of practical, railway specific requirements that a rolling stock plan has...... to take into account, rolling stock plans are often constructed in a step-by-step manner, taking some requirements into consideration in each step. This may make it difficult in the final step to produce a plan that is feasible with regard to all of the requirements and at the same time economically...... attractive. This paper proposes an integrated rolling stock planning model that simultaneously takes into account all practical requirements for rolling stock planning at DSB S-tog, the suburban passenger train operator of the City of Copenhagen. The model is then used to improve existing rolling stock plans...

  13. Comparison of real driving cycles and consumed braking power in suburban Slovakian driving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gechev Tsvetomir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper compares the features of suburban real driving cycles performed with CORRSYS DATRON measurement equipment on routes in the region of Žilina, Slovakia. It observes differences in the maximum and average vehicle velocities and the amount of braking in relation to the elevation profile of each individual cycle. Consumed braking power was also calculated in the different cycles in order to review the potential electricity regeneration capabilities of hybrid electric vehicles, operating on the same routes. The change in braking energy depending on vehicle mass and presence of grade on the routes in the measured cycles was also assessed. The calculations and plotting were done by using Matlab software.

  14. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 3): Southern Maryland Wood Treating Site, Hollywood, Maryland (first remedial action) June 1988. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-06-29

    The Southern Maryland Wood Treating (SMWT) site is located in Hollywood, St. Mary's County, Maryland. The site is situated within a wetland area in a drainage divide such that runoff from the site discharges into Brooks Run and McIntosh Run tributaries, which flow into the Potomac River. The area surrounding the site is predominantly used for agricultural and residential purposes. Currently, part of the site is being used as a retail outlet for pretreated lumber and crab traps. The waste generated at the site included retort and cylinder sludges, process wastes, and material spillage. These wastes were in six onsite unlined lagoons. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the onsite ground water, soil, surface water, sediments, and debris include: VOCs, PNA, and base/neutral acid extractables. The selected remedial action for the site is included.

  15. The Urban Nexus: Contradictions and Dilemmas of (PostCommunist (SubUrbanization in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Dumitrache

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The process of urbanization in Romania was a very tumultuous and slightly different one compared to other Central and Eastern European countries, being marked by the constant willingness to increase the degree of urbanization. The communist period was the most significant from this point of view, by considering both the number of newly declared towns and urban population growth. The urbanization of communist era corroborated with the excessive and forced industrialization has generated imbalances in the urban system and created distortions in the urban hierarchy. However, the legislative inconsistency and the lack of urban regulations during the post – communist period have lead to the increasing number of new (quasi urban units (many of which without urban amenities to the chaotic sub-urbanization of cities and urban decline. In many cases, the ability of local authorities to manage the urban development in the early years of transition has been hampered by inadequate legislation that regulates the urban growth in a completely different socio-economic system. Thus, the lacks of specific urban policies and urban regeneration plans have determined indirectly a hypertrophic evolution and an uncontrolled suburban expansion. Bucharest, the capital of the country has been most affected by these processes determining multilayered space transformation within the city and open space conversion to commercial and residential use, both affecting the urban environment and quality of life of urban-rural communities. The paper focuses on the patterns, the driving forces and the consequences of two opposing processes: socialist forced urbanization vs. post-socialist chaotic urbanization unfolding across the national urban landscape.

  16. Physical Activity and Sleep Patterns in Hemodialysis Patients in a Suburban Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Schantel; Han, Maggie; Ye, Xiaoling; Zhang, Hanjie; Meyring-Wösten, Anna; Bonner, Marcee; Young, Candace; Thijssen, Stephan; Marsh, Daniel; Kotanko, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) patients are less active than their healthy counterparts. They are often plagued with sleep disorders that affect the quality of their sleep. Our aim was to objectively quantify activity and sleep quality among HD patients in a suburban HD population. Activity and sleep parameters were measured using a commercially available activity tracker in 29 HD patients from Baton Rouge, LA, USA. Patients in the feedback group received their activity and sleep data at each dialysis treatment. In addition, questionnaires were administered at the beginning and end of the study period. Patients were stratified based on activity levels and sleep quality. Patients walked an average of 5,281 steps/day and slept 370.5 min/night. Informing patients about their daily number of steps taken, did not increase activity. Only 3% of the population followed were active, defined as walking more than 10,000 steps per day. Patients walked significantly less on dialysis days compared to the other days of the week. Many of the patients experienced poor sleep quality, with patients in the first shift experiencing the greatest disturbance to their sleep/wake cycle. Patients in a suburban environment walked much less than those in a previously studied urban population. They rarely met the recommended goal of 10,000 steps/day, even on non-dialysis days. Interventions to increase physical activity may target any day of the week, particularly HD days. Prospective, long-term studies are needed to evaluate the use of activity trackers in dialysis patients and their impact on physical activity. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Agricultural Abandonment, Suburban Growth, and Forest Expansion in Puerto Rico between 1991 and 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel K. Parés-Ramos

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The response of local economies to the globalization process can have a large effect on population and land-use dynamics. In countries with a high population density and relatively high levels of education, the globalization process has resulted in a shift in the local economy from agriculture to manufacturing, technology, and service sectors. This shift in the economy has impacted land-use dynamics by decreasing agricultural lands, increasing urban growth, and in some cases, increasing forest cover. This process of economic and forest transition has been well documented in Puerto Rico for the period 1950 to 1990, but some authors predicted that poor planning and continued urban growth would eliminate the gains in forest cover. To investigate the impacts of recent economic changes, we evaluated demographic and land-use changes for 880 "barrios" (i.e., neighborhoods, the smallest administrative unit, in Puerto Rico using government census data from 1990 and 2000 and land-cover classifications from 1991 and 2000. During this period, the population increased by 284 127 people (8.2%. Most of the growth was in the suburban barrios, whereas urban barrios lost population. This shift was reflected by the construction of more than 100 000 housing units in suburban barrios. Although urban sprawl is perceived as the major land-cover change, urban cover only increased from 10% to 11% between 1990 and 2000, whereas the increase in forest cover was much greater (28% to 40%. Grasslands and shrublands were the major sources of new urban and forest areas in 2000. Although these results are encouraging in terms of increasing forest cover, most of the new development has been concentrated in the coastal plains, which are the location of most of the remaining agricultural areas, a few protected areas, and threatened ecosystems (e.g., mangroves.

  18. Prevalence and correlates of childhood obesity in suburban area of Odisha: A cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghamitra Pati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In India obesity and overweight is increasing among urban adolescents. Both under and over nutrition is grappling the country at faster rate. Present study was an attempt to explore obesity and overweight prevalence among school going children in suburban areas of Cuttack city, Odisha, India and their correlates.Methodology: A cross-sectional study was done among school children in suburban area of Cuttack city, Odisha. A predesigned and pretested questionnaire was used to interview the study participants to elicit information about their age, number of siblings, birth order of the child, working status of parents, television screen viewing time, mode of transport to school and dietary habit of the students. A total of 550 children studying in class five to ten participated in our study.Result: Out of 550 children screened, nearly (14 2.5% students were thin or severely thin, whereas (6712.1% students were overweight or obese. Univariate analysis revealed that girls were almost five times at higher risk of being overweight/obesity compared to boys (OR: 4.78 95%CI: 1.35-16.93. Children who used motorized vehicles for going to school had an unadjusted Odds ratio of 10.08 [95%CI: 2.08-48.77] of being overweight or obese compared to those who walked to school. Having more than one child at home (OR= 0.15, 95%CI: 0.039-0.6 and doing physical activity for more than 30min per day (0.105, 95%CI: 0.015-0.72 were found to be protective against overweight and obesity.Conclusion: Bearing in mind the burden of overweight and obesity among school children there is a need for periodic screening, awareness at school and parent counselling.

  19. Real-Time Lane Detection on Suburban Streets Using Visual Cue Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shehan Fernando

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The detection of lane boundaries on suburban streets using images obtained from video constitutes a challenging task. This is mainly due to the difficulties associated with estimating the complex geometric structure of lane boundaries, the quality of lane markings as a result of wear, occlusions by traffic, and shadows caused by road-side trees and structures. Most of the existing techniques for lane boundary detection employ a single visual cue and will only work under certain conditions and where there are clear lane markings. Also, better results are achieved when there are no other on-road objects present. This paper extends our previous work and discusses a novel lane boundary detection algorithm specifically addressing the abovementioned issues through the integration of two visual cues. The first visual cue is based on stripe-like features found on lane lines extracted using a two-dimensional symmetric Gabor filter. The second visual cue is based on a texture characteristic determined using the entropy measure of the predefined neighbourhood around a lane boundary line. The visual cues are then integrated using a rule-based classifier which incorporates a modified sequential covering algorithm to improve robustness. To separate lane boundary lines from other similar features, a road mask is generated using road chromaticity values estimated from CIE L*a*b* colour transformation. Extraneous points around lane boundary lines are then removed by an outlier removal procedure based on studentized residuals. The lane boundary lines are then modelled with Bezier spline curves. To validate the algorithm, extensive experimental evaluation was carried out on suburban streets and the results are presented.

  20. Seasonal variation, spatial distribution and source apportionment for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at nineteen communities in Xi'an, China: The effects of suburban scattered emissions in winter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingzhi; Cao, Junji; Dong, Zhibao; Guinot, Benjamin; Gao, Meiling; Huang, Rujin; Han, Yongming; Huang, Yu; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Shen, Zhenxing

    2017-12-01

    Seasonal variation and spatial distribution of PM 2.5 bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated at urban residential, commercial area, university, suburban region, and industry in Xi'an, during summer and winter time at 2013. Much higher levels of total PAHs were obtained in winter. Spatial distributions by kriging interpolations principle showed that relative high PAHs were detected in western Xi'an in both summer and winter, with decreasing trends in winter from the old city wall to the 2 nd -3rd ring road except for the suburban region and industry. Coefficients of diversity and statistics by SPSS method demonstrated that PAHs in suburban have significant differences (t winter and summer in urban, which different with the suburban. The coal combustion was the main source for PAHs in suburban region, which accounted for 46.6% in winter and sharp decreased to 19.2% in summer. Scattered emissions from uncontrolled coal combustion represent an important source of PAHs in suburban in winter and there were about 135 persons in Xi'an will suffer from lung cancer for lifetime exposure at winter levels. Further studies are needed to specify the effluence of the scattered emission in suburban to the city and to develop a strategy for controlling those emissions and lighten possible health effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Low-level radioactive waste transportation plan for the State of Maryland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaparala, P.N.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to prepare a recommended transportation plan that will outline specific procedures for monitoring and regulating low-level radioactive waste transport in Maryland and which is consistent with federal law and party-state requirements under the Appalachian Compact

  2. 77 FR 59156 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; The Washington County...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-26

    ... (i.e., point, area, nonroad mobile and on-road mobile). The 2002 emissions inventory was based on... Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; The Washington County 2002 Base Year Inventory... approve the fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) 2002 base year emissions inventory portion of the State of...

  3. 76 FR 51314 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Adoption of Drum and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-18

    ... Miscellaneous Metal and Plastic Parts Coatings and will help Maryland attain and maintain the National Ambient... adoption of the drum and pail coating standards found in the Miscellaneous Metal and Plastic Parts Coatings... the area's date of attainment. CTGs are intended to provide state and local air pollution control...

  4. Effects of Maryland's law banning Saturday night special handguns on crime guns

    OpenAIRE

    Vernick, J.; Webster, D.; Hepburn, L.

    1999-01-01

    Objectives—To determine the effects of a 1988 Maryland law that banned "Saturday night special" handguns on the types of guns used in crime. To determine if controls on the lawful market for handguns affect the illegal market as well.

  5. Land use change monitoring in Maryland using a probabilistic sample and rapid photointerpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonya Lister; Andrew Lister; Eunice Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. state of Maryland needs to monitor land use change in order to address land management objectives. This paper presents a change detection method that, through automation and standard geographic information system (GIS) techniques, facilitates the estimation of landscape change via photointerpretation. Using the protocols developed, we show a net loss of forest...

  6. 76 FR 52278 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Update to Materials...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-22

    ... Regulation. Solid Air Fresheners and Toilet and Urinal Care Products. 26.11.32.11 Innovative Products-- 6/18... of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Update to Materials Incorporated by Reference AGENCY... available for public inspection at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), the Air and...

  7. 33 CFR 165.500 - Safety/Security Zones; Chesapeake Bay, Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety/Security Zones; Chesapeake... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS... Safety/Security Zones; Chesapeake Bay, Maryland. (a) Definitions. (1) Certain Dangerous Cargo (CDC) means...

  8. Settle for Segregation or Strive for Diversity? A Defining Moment for Maryland's Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayscue, Jennifer B.

    2013-01-01

    Maryland, as one of 17 states that had de jure segregation, has an intense history of school segregation. Following the 1954 Brown decision, school districts across the state employed various methods to desegregate their schools, including mandatory busing in Prince George's County, magnet schools in Montgomery County, and a freedom of choice plan…

  9. CTE: Educating Tomorrow's Workforce Today. Maryland Classroom. Vol. 13, No.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulqueen, Nan, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    Maryland redesigned its CTE (career and technical education) program a dozen years ago to prepare students for the 21st Century's global economy and its rapidly changing workforce needs. With 350 business and industry representatives, the state created a program whose emphasis is problem-solving and critical thinking, rather than narrow,…

  10. Timber markets and marketing in the Monocacy River watershed of Maryland and Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    George E. Doverspike; James C. Rettie; Harry W., Jr. Camp

    1951-01-01

    The Maryland Department of State Forests and Parks, cooperating with the locally organized Monocacy River Watershed Council, has requested the Northeastern Forest Experiment Station to undertake a study of the forest resource of that watershed. The objective is to provide information that will be helpful in conserving watershed values and in promoting better management...

  11. Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine's Class of 2011 admitted in ceremonies

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas, Jeffrey S.

    2007-01-01

    The Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine's (VMRCVM) Class of 2011 was formally admitted to the college recently following a "White Coat Ceremony" at Virginia Tech in which the 91 new students were issued white laboratory coats and administered the "Veterinary Student's Oath."

  12. Selected References on the Indians of Virginia, The District of Columbia, and Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roundtree, Helen, Comp.; Potter, Stephen, Comp.; Davidson, Tom, Comp.

    This bibliography provides an introduction to the archaeology, ethnology, and history of Indians in the Washington, D.C., Virginia, and Maryland areas. Some publications are available from the Museum of Natural History bookstore while others may be found in larger libraries or obtained through inter-library loan. Sections of the bibliography…

  13. Implications of Work Values to Job Satisfaction in the Maryland Cooperative Extension Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milliken, W. James; Whaples, Gene C.

    A study was done to determine if work values of the Maryland Cooperative Extension Service faculty were related to Herzberg's job satisfaction elements. The design was ex post facto, exploratory field research. Subjects included 273 extension faculty members. A mail questionnaire composed of Hughes and Flowers'"Values for Working" and an…

  14. Reforestation species study on a reclaimed surface mine in western Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay A. Engle

    1980-01-01

    Westvaco Forest Research established a species comparison test including eighteen species of trees in the spring of 1978 on a recently reclaimed surface mine in Garrett County, Maryland. After two growing seasons height growth of all species has not been impressive. Seven species have better than 75 percent survival with pitch pine being best. Seven other species have...

  15. An Examination of Maryland Community College Trustees' Intentions to Promote Succession Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Daphne Renee

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine Maryland community college trustees' intentions to promote succession planning. This study focused on community college trustees' understandings of their roles and responsibilities related to sustainability of institutions, their knowledge of the leadership crisis, and their intentions to promote succession…

  16. University of Maryland Weighs Big Changes for Faculty Members Off the Tenure Track

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The University of Maryland at College Park is poised to embark on an unprecedented effort to improve the conditions of its faculty members who are off the tenure track. The campus's University Senate, which represents faculty members, administrators, students, and staff members, is scheduled to vote on an internal task-force report that…

  17. Environmental Impact Statement Addressing Campus Development at Fort George Meade, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Maryland September 2010 3-46 Table 3.7-2. Species Observed on Site M Common Name Scientific Name Amphibians American bullfrog Rana catesbeiana ...Pickerel frog Rana palustris Birds American goldfinch Carduelis tristis American robin Turdus migratorius Blue jay Cyanocitta cristata Carolina

  18. 77 FR 40550 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Revision for the Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    ... spray gun cleaner. Maryland's 1997 SIP-approved regulation COMAR 26.11.19.23 ``Control of Volatile... for the Control of Volatile Organic Compounds Emissions From Vehicle Refinishing AGENCY: Environmental....19.23 ``Control of Volatile Organic Compounds Emissions from Vehicle Refinishing'' to establish new...

  19. 77 FR 50969 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Low Emission Vehicle...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-23

    ... and beyond. The standards, specified in terms of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) equivalent emissions, apply to... Maryland Department of the Environment submitted a revision ( 07-16) to its SIP for its Low Emission... protection, Air pollution control, Carbon monoxide, Intergovernmental relations, Nitrogen dioxide, Ozone...

  20. 76 FR 1338 - Emerald Ash Borer; Quarantined Areas; Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Pennsylvania...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-10

    .... APHIS-2008-0072] Emerald Ash Borer; Quarantined Areas; Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri... emerald ash borer (EAB). The interim rule was necessary to prevent the artificial spread of EAB into... CONTACT: Mr. Paul Chaloux, National Program Coordinator, Emerald Ash Borer Program, Emergency and Domestic...

  1. Maryland Higher Education Commission Data Book 2015. Creating a State of Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryland Higher Education Commission, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This document presents statistics about higher education in Maryland for 2015. The tables in this document are presented according to the following categories: (1) Students; (2) Retention and Graduation; (3) Degrees; (4) Faculty; (5) Revenues & Expenditures; (6) Tuition and Fees; (7) Financial Aid, (8) Private Career Schools, and (9) Distance…

  2. Maryland Higher Education Commission Data Book 2014. Creating a State of Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryland Higher Education Commission, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This document presents statistics about higher education in Maryland for 2014. The tables in this document are presented according to the following categories: (1) Students; (2) Retention and Graduation; (3) Degrees; (4) Faculty; (5) Revenues & Expenditures; (6) Tuition and Fees; (7) Financial Aid, (8) Private Career Schools, and (9) Distance…

  3. Maryland Higher Education Commission Data Book 2016. Creating a State of Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryland Higher Education Commission, 2016

    2016-01-01

    This document presents statistics about higher education in Maryland for 2016. The tables in this document are presented according to the following categories: (1) Students; (2) Retention and Graduation; (3) Degrees; (4) Faculty; (5) Revenues & Expenditures; (6) Tuition and Fees; (7) Financial Aid, and (8) Private Career Schools. [For…

  4. Real Progress in Maryland: Student Learning Objectives and Teacher and Principal Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotnik, William J.; Bugler, Daniel; Liang, Guodong

    2014-01-01

    The Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) is making significant strides in guiding and supporting the implementation of Student Learning Objectives (SLOs) as well as a teacher and principal evaluation (TPE) system statewide. MSDE support focuses on helping districts prepare for full SLO implementation by providing technical assistance with…

  5. Maryland timber industry: an assessment of timber product output and use, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian F. Walters; Daniel R. Rider; Ronald J. Piva

    2012-01-01

    Presents recent Maryland forest industry trends; production and receipts of industrial roundwood; and production of saw logs, veneer logs, pulpwood, and other products in 2008. Logging residue generated from timber harvest operations is reported, as well as wood and bark residue generated at primary wood-using mills and disposition of mill residues.

  6. Neonatal circumcision in Maryland: a comparison of hospital discharge and maternal postpartum survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Diana; Hurt, Lee; Horon, Isabelle L

    2008-12-01

    To study circumcision rates in Maryland using hospital discharge and maternal survey data in order to provide healthcare providers, parents and policy makers with more accurate and comprehensive information about this common yet controversial procedure. Secondary data analyses were performed using Maryland hospital discharge data files containing records of 96,457 male newborns, and postpartum survey data collected from 4273 mothers through the Maryland Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System. Hospital discharge data showed that 75.3% of male infants were circumcised, and survey data showed that 82.3% of male infants were circumcised. The circumcision rate among infants weighing <1500 g at birth was 38.9% using hospital discharge data and 74.5% using maternal survey data. Both sources revealed lower circumcision rates among Asian and Hispanic infants than among non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black infants. Despite reports of decreasing circumcision rates nationally, rates remain high in Maryland. In addition to providing for the inclusion of circumcision procedures that may not have been coded properly in hospital discharge records and procedures that were performed after hospital discharge, maternal survey data provide more comprehensive information than hospital discharge data about parental characteristics and factors relevant to the circumcision decision-making process.

  7. Maryland and District of Columbia State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    The District of Columbia and Maryland State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in the District of Columbia and Maryland. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in the District of Columbia and Maryland. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in the District of Columbia and Maryland

  8. Maryland Middle School Teachers' Perceptions of Instructional Time Allotted to Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, James W., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    As part of the 2001 No Child Left Behind federal statute, U.S. lawmakers reduced the amount of time that teachers could spend on social studies instruction in favor of devoting more instructional time to other core content areas. The Middle Years Program (MYP) is present in many local middle schools in Maryland, where MYP teachers spend equal…

  9. Race-Conscious Academic Policy in Higher Education: The University of Maryland Benneker Scholars Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Walter R.; Hunt, Darnell M.; Gilbert, Derrick I. M.

    1997-01-01

    This study, which evaluates the Benjamin Banneker Scholars Program, was undertaken in response to litigation challenging the University of Maryland's right to operate a scholarship reserved exclusively for high-achieving African Americans. Using varied data sources, the study found that the Banneker scholarship program continues to be necessary as…

  10. Career Development and Its Academic Correlates. Maryland Longitudinal Study Research Highlights, Research Report 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryland Univ., College Park. Maryland Longitudinal Study Steering Committee.

    As part of a 5-year study of 772 students who entered the University of Maryland, College Park, in 1980, a study was conducted of the relationship between John Holland's concept of vocational identity (sureness and confidence in one's vocational plans) and personality type (realistic, investigative, artistic, social, enterprising or conventional)…

  11. Comer's School Development Program in Prince George's County, Maryland: A Theory-based Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Thomas D.; Habib, Farah-Naaz; Phillips, Meredith; Settersten, Richard A.; Shagle, Shobha C.; Degirmencioglu, Serdar M.

    1999-01-01

    Studied Comer's School Development Program (James P. Comer) in 23 middle schools in Prince George's County, Maryland. The study, involving repeated measurement with more than 12,000 students, shows that Comer schools implemented some of the program's central elements better than control schools did, but not all, or even most, of them. (SLD)

  12. Can a Teacher Be Fired for a Marijuana Offense? Maryland Can't Decide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flygare, Thomas J.

    1985-01-01

    According to the Maryland Court of Special Appeals, a teacher sentenced to probation as a first offender for residing in an apartment where marijuana was grown and used was improperly dismissed from her teaching position despite a state law protecting first offenders, but remained subject to dismissal for misconduct. (PGD)

  13. A Progress Assessment of the School Health Education Project of Appalachian Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regional Education Service Agency of Appalachian Maryland, Cumberland.

    This document evaluates the effectiveness of a project on health education conducted in Appalachian Maryland. The emphasis of the project was on teaching children in the fifth grade about lung and respiratory system problems and their connection with smoking. This health education course was incorporated into their regular curriculum. Prior to…

  14. CASE STUDIES OF RADON REDUCTION RESEARCH IN MARYLAND, NEW JERSEY, AND VIRGINIA SCHOOLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of radon mitigation research conducted in 1991 and 1992 in school buildings in Maryland, New Jersey, and Virginia. One school in each state was selected. In two schools, the objective was to evaluate the potential for modifying the school ventilation sy...

  15. 78 FR 36017 - MCM Rail Services LLC, d/b/a Baltimore Industrial Railroad-Operation Exemption-Hilco SP Rail, LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board [Docket No. FD 35725] MCM Rail Services LLC, d/b/a Baltimore Industrial Railroad-- Operation Exemption--Hilco SP Rail, LLC MCM Rail Services... under 49 CFR 1150.31 to operate as a common carrier over an approximately 12-mile line of railroad in...

  16. A tale of two scales: Evaluating the relationship among life satisfaction, social capital, income, and the natural environment at individual and neighborhood levels in metropolitan Baltimore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanda W. Vemuri; J. Morgan Grove; Matthew A. Wilson; William R. Jr. Burch

    2011-01-01

    With the rapid growth of cities worldwide, there is a need to better understand factors contributing to life satisfaction in urban environments. Using data from a long-term study of the Baltimore metropolitan region, we build on existing social scientific literature to examine a suite of theoretical factors that have been proposed to explain higher life satisfaction....

  17. Aerosol Composition and Variability in Baltimore Measured during DISCOVER-AQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyersdorf, A. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Chen, G.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E. L.; Diskin, G. S.; Chatfield, R. B.; Natraj, V.; Anderson, B. E.

    2012-12-01

    In order to relate satellite-based measurements of aerosols to ground-level air quality, the correlation between aerosol optical properties (wavelength-dependent scattering and absorption measured by satellites) and mass measurements of aerosol loading (i.e. PM2.5 used for air quality monitoring) must be understood. This connection varies with many factors including those specific to the aerosol type (such as composition, size, hygroscopicity, and mass scattering and absorption efficiencies) and to the surrounding atmosphere (such as temperature, relative humidity and altitude). The DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from COlumn and VERtically resolved observations relevant to Air Quality) project was designed to provide a unique dataset for determining variability in and correlations between aerosol loading, composition, optical properties and meteorological conditions. Extensive in-situ profiling of the lower atmosphere in the Baltimore-Washington D.C. region was performed during fourteen flights during July 2011. Identical flight plans and profile locations throughout the campaign provide meaningful statistics for analysis. Measured aerosol mass was composed primarily of ammonium sulfate (campaign average of 36%) and water-soluble organics (58%). A distinct difference in composition was related to aerosol loading with high-loading days having a proportionally larger percentage of ammonium sulfate (up to 60%). This composition shift causes a change in the water-uptake potential (hygroscopicity) of the aerosols with higher relative organic composition decreasing water-uptake. On average, sulfate mass increased during the day due to increased photochemistry, while organics decreased. Analysis of the linkage between aerosol loading and optical properties was also performed. The absorption by black carbon was dependent on the amount of organic coating with an increase in mass absorption efficiency from 7.5 m2/g for bare soot to 16 m2/g at an

  18. A new species of the subterranean amphipod genus Stygobromus (Amphipoda: Crangonyctidae) from two caves and a spring in western Maryland, USA with additional records of undescribed species from groundwater habitats in central Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsinger, John R; Ansell, Lynnette

    2014-02-26

    A new species of the subterranean amphipod genus Stygobromus is described from two caves and a small spring on the Appalachian Plateau in Garrett County in western Maryland, USA. The description of this species brings to six the total number of species in the genus Stygobromus from the state of Maryland. The other five species are recorded from shallow groundwater habitats (e.g., seeps and springs) in the eastern and southeastern parts of the state. In addition, at least four new species of Stygobromus from central Maryland are recognized but remain undescribed to date.

  19. Analysis of particulate matter impacts for six power plants in Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, J.; Winkler, M.; Winkler, C. [Harvard School of Public Health (United States)

    2006-02-15

    This report provides a detailed look at the influence of the six highest emitting power plants in Maryland on air pollution and health within the state and elsewhere, based on a previously published regional analysis and previous national-scale modeling efforts. The focus is on fine particulate matter, since studies have shown that respiratory and cardiovascular health are likely to be affected by PM2.5 at current outdoor levels in Maryland. The study was requested by the Maryland Nurses Association. The models determined that the six power plants combined contribute approximately 0.2-1.0 {mu}g/m{sup 3} of annual average PM2.5 in Maryland, with the impact varying across the state based on proximity to the various plants. While this only represents a fraction of current outdoor concentrations, this increment may be significant in determining non-attainment status in some locations, and the public health impacts remain potentially important. Looking at each plant individually, the impacts typically exhibit spatial patterns in which the maximum concentration impact occurs in relatively close proximity to the power plant. Considering health outcomes based on current population estimates, the six power plants together have an annual impact in Maryland of approximately 100 premature deaths, 4,000 asthma attacks, and over 100,000 person-days with minor restrictions in activity, among other health outcomes. These findings emphasize the importance of considering local, regional and national sources of PM2.5 when developing emission control strategies. 16 refs., 10 figs., 12 tabs.

  20. Year-round spatiotemporal distribution of harbour porpoises within and around the Maryland wind energy area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingfield, Jessica E; O'Brien, Michael; Lyubchich, Vyacheslav; Roberts, Jason J; Halpin, Patrick N; Rice, Aaron N; Bailey, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Offshore windfarms provide renewable energy, but activities during the construction phase can affect marine mammals. To understand how the construction of an offshore windfarm in the Maryland Wind Energy Area (WEA) off Maryland, USA, might impact harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena), it is essential to determine their poorly understood year-round distribution. Although habitat-based models can help predict the occurrence of species in areas with limited or no sampling, they require validation to determine the accuracy of the predictions. Incorporating more than 18 months of harbour porpoise detection data from passive acoustic monitoring, generalized auto-regressive moving average and generalized additive models were used to investigate harbour porpoise occurrence within and around the Maryland WEA in relation to temporal and environmental variables. Acoustic detection metrics were compared to habitat-based density estimates derived from aerial and boat-based sightings to validate the model predictions. Harbour porpoises occurred significantly more frequently during January to May, and foraged significantly more often in the evenings to early mornings at sites within and outside the Maryland WEA. Harbour porpoise occurrence peaked at sea surface temperatures of 5°C and chlorophyll a concentrations of 4.5 to 7.4 mg m-3. The acoustic detections were significantly correlated with the predicted densities, except at the most inshore site. This study provides insight into previously unknown fine-scale spatial and temporal patterns in distribution of harbour porpoises offshore of Maryland. The results can be used to help inform future monitoring and mitigate the impacts of windfarm construction and other human activities.