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Sample records for subsequent academic success

  1. Defining and Measuring Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Travis T.; Gibson, Charles; Rankin, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Despite, and perhaps because of its amorphous nature, the term "academic success" is one of the most widely used constructs in educational research and assessment within higher education. This paper conducts an analytic literature review to examine the use and operationalization of the term in multiple academic fields. Dominant…

  2. Academic dropout or academic success: a model for prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel-Flom, P

    1986-09-01

    Why do some students who qualify for admission to optometry school become academic dropouts while others succeed? This question was addressed in a study which compared the admission records of 21 academic dropouts from three classes at the University of Houston College of Optometry (UHCO) with 269 retained students. Academic dropouts were found to have significantly lower preoptometry grades, lower Optometry College Admission Test (OCAT) scores, attended less competitive (i.e., less selective) undergraduate institutions, scored lower on the California Psychological Inventory (CPI), and were older than retained students. When these differentiating admission variables, excepting age, were applied to a new entering class, prediction of subsequent academic dismissal or serious academic difficulty was highly accurate. However, it was found that such prediction must take into account not only areas of weakness, i.e., academic and psychological factors which place a student at risk, but also areas of strength which give the student an advantage. For all students, regardless of age, sex, or ethnic origin, it was the ratio of "advantage" factors to "risk" factors which gave the most valid prediction of academic success or failure.

  3. Undisciplined beginnings, academic success, and discursive psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billig, Michael

    2012-09-01

    This paper reflects on the conditions under which Discourse and social psychology, Common knowledge, and the author's Arguing and thinking were written. These books, which were independently conceived, were not specifically written as contributions to 'discursive psychology', for discursive psychology did not exist at that time. Their authors were rejecting conventional approaches to doing psychological research. The paper discusses what it takes for a new academic movement, such as discursive psychology, to be successfully established in the current climate of 'academic capitalism'. Two requirements are particularly mentioned: the necessity for a label and the necessity for adherents to be recruited. Of the three books, only Discourse and social psychology was outwardly recruiting its readers to a new way of doing social psychology. Arguing and thinking, with its celebration of ancient rhetoric, was much more ambiguous in its aims. It was turning away from present usefulness towards the past. By claiming to be 'an antiquarian psychologist' the author was rejecting disciplinary thinking. The paper also considers the intellectual costs of establishing a new specialism or sub-discipline. The 'first generation' may have freedom, but success can bring about a narrowing of perspectives and the development of orthodoxies for subsequent academic generations. This applies as much to the development of experimental social psychology as to discursive psychology. These processes are particular enhanced in the present socio-economic situation of contemporary universities, which make it more difficult for young academics to become, in the words of William James, 'undisciplinables'. ©2012 The British Psychological Society.

  4. Fitness Change and Subsequent Academic Performance in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Jung; Fox, Kenneth R.; Ku, Po-Wen; Taun, Chih-Yang

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study examined the association between fitness change and subsequent academic performance in Taiwanese schoolchildren from 7th grade to 9th grade. Methods: The 7th graders from 1 junior high school district participated in this study (N=669). Academic performance was

  5. The effect of an intercalated BSc on subsequent academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahesan, Nishanthan; Crichton, Siobhan; Sewell, Hannah; Howell, Simon

    2011-10-03

    The choice of whether to undertake an intercalated Bachelor of Science (BSc) degree is one of the most important decisions that students must make during their time at medical school. An effect on exam performance would improve a student's academic ranking, giving them a competitive edge when applying for foundation posts. Retrospective data analysis of anonymised student records. The effects of intercalating on final year exam results, Foundation Programme score, application form score (from white-space questions), quartile rank score, and success with securing Foundation School of choice were assessed using linear and ordered logistic regression models, adjusted for course type, year of graduation, graduate status and baseline (Year 1) performance. The study included 1158 students, with 54% choosing to do an intercalated BSc, and 9.8% opting to do so at an external institution. Doing an intercalated BSc was significantly associated with improved outcome in Year 5 exams (P = 0.004). This was irrespective of the year students chose to intercalate, with no significant difference between those that intercalated after years 2, 3 and 4 (p = 0.3096). There were also higher foundation application scores (P BSc leads to an improvement in subsequent exam results and develops the skills necessary to produce a strong foundation programme application. It also leads to greater success with securing preferred Foundation School posts in students. Differences between internally- and externally-intercalating students may be due to varying course structures or greater challenge in adjusting to a new study environment.

  6. Academic Success: Tapping the Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Barry S.

    1983-01-01

    A program designed to combine academic instruction with the emotions was implemented in a resource room for elementary learning and/or behavior problem children. Activities focused on the senses and included contributing to a class poem and writing individual poems about emotions. (CL)

  7. Measuring faculty retention and success in academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, Andrew; Wingard, Deborah; Gamst, Anthony; Larsen, Catherine; Farrell, Elizabeth; Reznik, Vivian

    2012-08-01

    To develop and demonstrate the usefulness of quantitative methods for assessing retention and academic success of junior faculty in academic medicine. The authors created matched sets of participants and nonparticipants in a junior faculty development program based on hire date and academic series for newly hired assistant professors at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), School of Medicine between 1988 and 2005. They used Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards survival analyses to characterize the influence of covariates, including gender, ethnicity, and program participation, on retention. They also developed a new method for quantifying academic success based on several measures including (1) leadership and professional activities, (2) honors and awards, (3) research grants, (4) teaching and mentoring/advising activities, and (5) publications. The authors then used these measures to compare matched pairs of participating and nonparticipating faculty who were subsequently promoted and remained at UCSD. Compared with matched nonparticipants, the retention of junior faculty who participated in the faculty development program was significantly higher. Among those who were promoted and remained at UCSD, the academic success of faculty development participants was consistently greater than that of matched nonparticipants. This difference reached statistical significance for leadership and professional activities. Using better quantitative methods for evaluating retention and academic success will improve understanding and research in these areas. In this study, use of such methods indicated that organized junior faculty development programs have positive effects on faculty retention and may facilitate success in academic medicine.

  8. Attributions to sexual minority women's academic success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleaf, Kathy J

    2014-01-01

    Narratives from 33 sexual minority women were examined to discover what factors contributed to their ability to acquire academic success, and what, if any, attributions are evident in some sexual minority women's experiences that provide the ability to persist and graduate. Coping strategies the participants used to gain the resiliency and persistence necessary to acquire academic success are discussed. Intrinsic themes were work ethic values, altruism, and self-efficacy. Extrinsic themes were mentors, family, and friends. Sexual minority women identified the complexity of intrinsic and extrinsic attributions that were used to successfully complete a four-year undergraduate degree in the United States.

  9. Personal factors that influence deaf college students' academic success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertini, John A; Kelly, Ronald R; Matchett, Mary Karol

    2012-01-01

    Research tells us that academic preparation is key to deaf students' success at college. Yet, that is not the whole story. Many academically prepared students drop out during their first year. This study identified entering deaf college students' personal factors as assessed by their individual responses to both the Noel-Levitz College Student Inventory Form B and the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory, second edition (LASSI). Entering students in 3 successive cohorts (total n =437) participated in this study. Results show that in addition to entry measurements of reading and mathematic skills, personal factors contributed to the academic performance of students in their first quarter in college. The Noel-Levitz provided the comparatively better predictive value of academic performance: Motivation for Academic Study Scale (e.g., desire to finish college). The LASSI also showed statistically significant predictors, the Self-Regulation Component (e.g., time management) and Will Component (e.g., self-discipline), but accounted for relatively less variability in the students' initial grade point averages. For this group of underprepared students, results show that personal factors can play a significant role in academic success. Deaf students' personal factors are discussed as they relate to other first-year college students and to their subsequent academic performance and persistence.

  10. Pedagogy and Academic Success in Prelicensure Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Teri A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a brief description of the New Careers in Nursing (NCIN) program; highlight the features of the NCIN Preentry Immersion program designed to help students achieve academic success; introduce two NCIN innovation teaching projects that used active learning strategies to foster student engagement; and conduct an integrative review on the pedagogies used to foster academic success in nursing education. The integrative review revealed that interactive pedagogies fostered student engagement and increased the students' knowledge acquisition, competence, confidence, and satisfaction. Significant variations in the methodological rigor for the studies included in this review were noted in addition to nebulousness between nursing education research and evaluation. The review validated the need for more rigorous research in nursing education to improve the students' academic experience and subsequent success of all nursing students, including those from underrepresented or disadvantaged backgrounds, enrolled in prelicensure nursing education programs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Link between Reading and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horbec, Deb

    2012-01-01

    This article is based on a qualitative study that explored the impact reading had on the lives of two female students who attained exemplary results in their final year of high school. The reading practices of these two high achieving students provided data rich information. Both students were academically successful in completing their Victorian…

  12. Academic Success Factors: An IT Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aimao; Aasheim, Cheryl L.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous studies have identified causal factors for academic success. Factors vary from personal factors, such as cognitive style (McKenzie & Schweitzer, 2001), to social factors, such as culture differences (Aysan, Tanriogen, & Tanriogen, 1996). However, in these studies it is re-searchers who theorized the causal dimensions and…

  13. Steps to Success for Academic Readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukowski/Faust, Jean

    2002-01-01

    This article provides eight steps to academic reading success for English language learners, including the following: 1) set a purpose; 2) determine the scope of the reading; 3) fill in the holes; 4) recognize what you know and don't know; 5) integrate your ideas with the reading; 6) determine the author's perspective; 7) think critically; 8)…

  14. The Role of Librarians in Academic Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia J. Dold

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Librarians address all levels of information needs for the university: its acquisition, its production, its storage, and instruction for its safe and gainful use. Most of today's college students have a high degree of computer literacy but are weak in their abilities to determine the quality of the information that is so readily available. Students need to be taught to find, evaluate, and use information in an academically-oriented manner in order to solve complex problems. Good library skills are integral to academic success. In conjunction with research and teaching faculty, librarians create a framework for knowledge acquisition in the evolving university education.

  15. Predicting academic success among deaf college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, Carol M; Marschark, Marc; Sapere, Patricia; Sarchet, Thomastine; Zupan, Megan

    2009-01-01

    For both practical and theoretical reasons, educators and educational researchers seek to determine predictors of academic success for students at different levels and from different populations. Studies involving hearing students at the postsecondary level have documented significant predictors of success relating to various demographic factors, school experience, and prior academic attainment. Studies involving deaf and hard-of-hearing students have focused primarily on younger students and variables such as degree of hearing loss, use of cochlear implants, educational placement, and communication factors-although these typically are considered only one or two at a time. The present investigation utilizes data from 10 previous experiments, all using the same paradigm, in an attempt to discern significant predictors of readiness for college (utilizing college entrance examination scores) and classroom learning at the college level (utilizing scores from tests in simulated classrooms). Academic preparation was a clear and consistent predictor in both domains, but the audiological and communication variables examined were not. Communication variables that were significant reflected benefits of language flexibility over skills in either spoken language or American Sign Language.

  16. Motivational Factors of Student Nurse Athletes Attributing to Academic Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forst, Kimberly A

    Student nurse athletes experience difficulties achieving academic success in nursing programs. The purpose of this study was to identify facilitators, barriers, and motivators of student nurse athletes that attribute to their academic success. Athletes ranked time management and prioritization as critical skills to success in the nursing program. This study reinforced the importance of academic support services for student nurse athletes to assist in their academic success.

  17. Association between academic and non-academic variables and academic success of diploma nursing students in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Parveen Azam; Naylor, Paul B

    2010-02-01

    This paper reports findings of an exploratory study conducted to determine an association between academic and non-academic factors and academic success of nursing diploma students in a province of Pakistan. Data were collected from the academic records of a cohort of 628 students. Multiple linear regression was used to identify the predictive association between certain academic and non-academic factors and academic success of the students. Regression models for each of three years were developed. Results indicated academic factors including preadmission qualifications, previous academic performance, academic performance in year one, academic performance in year two and type of school are significantly associated with the academic success of the students. Among non-academic factors, gender and place of domicile were found to be significantly associated with the academic success of the students. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sleep and academic success: mechanisms, empirical evidence, and interventional strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Reut; Wiebe, Sabrina T; Wells, Samantha Ashley; Cassoff, Jamie; Monson, Eva

    2010-12-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that sleep is beneficial for learning, memory, attention, and academic success. However, the importance of sleep in these contexts has rarely been addressed in programs aimed at optimizing academic performance. This review aims to describe the role that sleep plays in processes pertaining to academic achievement. We first describe the basic sleep processes and their role with respect to cognitive and behavioral/emotional systems important for academic performance. We next review studies conducted to assess the association between sleep and academic performance, concluding by describing interventional programs being used to optimize sleep in the context of academic success.

  19. Anticipatory brain activity predicts the success or failure of subsequent emotion regulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Denny, Bryan T; Ochsner, Kevin N; Weber, Jochen; Wager, Tor D

    2014-01-01

    ... and subsequent success in diminishing negative affect. We found that anticipatory activity in right rostrolateral prefrontal cortex was associated with greater subsequent left amygdala responses to aversive images and decreased regulation success...

  20. A Conceptual Model of Academic Success for Student-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeaux, Eddie; Harrison, C. Keith

    2011-01-01

    Concern over the academic talent development of Division I student-athletes has led to increased research to explain variations in their academic performance. Although a substantial amount of attention has been given to the relationship between student-athletes and their levels of academic success, there remain critical theoretical and analytical…

  1. The Influence of Peer Groups on Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallee, Margaret W.; Tierney, William G.

    2007-01-01

    The authors examine how peer relationships influence students' academic success. After defining peer groups, the article considers the ways in which students' peer networks facilitate or inhibit access to academic resources. The authors argue that the composition and purpose of a peer group influences academic achievement and students' likelihood…

  2. Academic Success of Adolescents in Poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomar-Lever, Joaquina; Victorio-Estrada, Amparo

    2017-01-01

    This study identified significant predictors of important academic results such as academic performance and school desertion by adolescent students living in poverty in both urban and rural settings. The results indicate the relative importance of individual, family, educational and social variables reported by the young people, and the…

  3. Decision trees for predicting the academic success of students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Josip Mesarić; Dario Šebalj

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to create a model that successfully classifies students into one of two categories, depending on their success at the end of their first academic year, and finding meaningful...

  4. Complex systems, multilingualism and academic success in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scholars of academic success in higher education in South Africa struggle to find an integrated framework that can explain the interplay between heterogeneous elements that combine in dynamic ways to influence the academic success of students. Language of teaching and learning is indicated as an important element in ...

  5. International Students' Confidence and Academic Success

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nicola Miky Telbis; Lars Helgeson; Cheryl Kingsbury

    2014-01-01

    .... This article deals with issues affecting a growing international student population. Studies show that foreign students are encountering difficulties in social adaptability, language barriers, academic ability, and financial need...

  6. Linking academic social environments, ego-identity formation, ego virtues, and academic success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Marie; Adams, Gerald R

    2008-01-01

    This study used Structural Equation Modeling to test an Eriksonian conceptual model linking academic social environments (relationships with faculty and fellow students), ego-identity formation, ego virtues, and academic success. Participants included 765 first-year students at a university in southern Ontario, Canada. Results indicated that supportive relationships with faculty was directly related to higher average grades and perceived academic ability, whereas positive relationships with fellow students was indirectly related to academic success through ego virtues. Positive ego-identity formation (identity achievement) was also indirectly related to academic success through ego virtues.

  7. Does Athletic Success Come at the Expense of Academic Success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Daniel H.; Greene, Jay P.

    2012-01-01

    Claims are often made about the impact of high school athletics on academic achievement without reference to empirical research on the issue. In this paper we empirically examine the relationship between the extent to which high schools have winning sports teams, offer a variety of sports options, and facilitate student participation in athletics…

  8. Spread of academic success in a high school social network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blansky, Deanna; Kavanaugh, Christina; Boothroyd, Cara; Benson, Brianna; Gallagher, Julie; Endress, John; Sayama, Hiroki

    2013-01-01

    Application of social network analysis to education has revealed how social network positions of K-12 students correlate with their behavior and academic achievements. However, no study has been conducted on how their social network influences their academic progress over time. Here we investigated correlations between high school students' academic progress over one year and the social environment that surrounds them in their friendship network. We found that students whose friends' average GPA (Grade Point Average) was greater (or less) than their own had a higher tendency toward increasing (or decreasing) their academic ranking over time, indicating social contagion of academic success taking place in their social network.

  9. International Students' Confidence and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telbis, Nicola Miky; Helgeson, Lars; Kingsbury, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Research shows that the international student population is showing significant growth. This article deals with issues affecting a growing international student population. Studies show that foreign students are encountering difficulties in social adaptability, language barriers, academic ability, and financial need. There is evidence that a…

  10. The Personal Characteristics Predictors of Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelkoska, Slagana; Stankovska, Gordana; Dimitrovski, Dimitar

    2016-01-01

    When we speak about the academic achievement of the students and their personality, the internal state of a student is in connection with his personal experience and individual differences and talents, dispositions, motives, his "I" and a whole range of cognitive processes. Modern psychological theories of personality believe that the…

  11. Confidence and Academic Success in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telbis, Miky

    2010-01-01

    A dropout rate can be used to determine student's ability to fulfill their perspective program of study, as well as the college's ability to qualify the right students for the completion of their academic degree. College advertisement can also play a significant role when it comes to dropout rates as it can be viewed as ineffective if the learners…

  12. Latino Adolescents' Academic Success: The Role of Discrimination, Academic Motivation, and Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, Edna C.; Umana-Taylor, Adriana J.; Gonzales-Backen, Melinda A.; Bamaca, Mayra Y.; Zeiders, Katharine H.

    2009-01-01

    Guided by the academic resilience perspective, the current longitudinal study examined whether academic motivation mediated the relation between Latino adolescents' (N = 221) experiences with discrimination and their academic success. The potential moderating role of gender was also examined. Using multiple group analysis in structural equation…

  13. Academic Resilience and Reading: Building Successful Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTigue, Erin M.; Washburn, Erin K.; Liew, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    The socioemotional factors, which influence students' trajectories on their pathways to reading success, are often overlooked in literacy screenings and reading instruction. This article outlines the connections between personality factors, in particular resilient personalities, and early literacy success. It also offers teachers a series of six…

  14. A Career Success Model for Academics at Malaysian Research Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Said, Al-Mansor; Mohd Rasdi, Roziah; Abu Samah, Bahaman; Silong, Abu Daud; Sulaiman, Suzaimah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop a career success model for academics at the Malaysian research universities. Design/methodology/approach: Self-administered and online surveys were used for data collection among 325 academics from Malaysian research universities. Findings: Based on the analysis of structural equation modeling, the…

  15. Personal Factors that Influence Deaf College Students' Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertini, John A.; Kelly, Ronald R.; Matchett, Mary Karol

    2012-01-01

    Research tells us that academic preparation is key to deaf students' success at college. Yet, that is not the whole story. Many academically prepared students drop out during their first year. This study identified entering deaf college students' personal factors as assessed by their individual responses to both the "Noel-Levitz College…

  16. Investigating Academic Success Factors for Undergraduate Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaighobadi, Mehdi; Allen, Marcus T.

    2008-01-01

    Student academic performance is of major interest to all stakeholders of higher education institutions. This study questions whether or not statistical analysis of information that is readily available in most universities' official records system can be used to predict overall academic success. In particular, this study is an attempt to…

  17. Academic Performance and School Success: Sources and Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, J. David

    The promotion of academic success has been linked to children's social and emotional wellness, reduction in risky behaviors, and promotion of social and emotional competence. This chapter briefly summarizes the evidence regarding the link between academic performance and health risk behaviors, including substance abuse, delinquency, teen sexual…

  18. Challenges and Success Factors in University Mergers and Academic Integrations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alireza Ahmadvand; Kazem Heidari; S Hamed Hosseini; Reza Majdzadeh

    2012-01-01

    ...) merged with two other medical universities in Tehran. In this study, we aim to review the literature on academic integrations and university mergers to call the attention to challenges and reasons for the success or failure of university mergers...

  19. IELTS and Academic Success in Higher Education: A UAE Perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kevin Schoepp; Dawn Garinger

    2016-01-01

    ...) entrance scores and academic success as defined by general education program GPA for students at a federal university in the United Arab Emirates in order to reflect upon regional English language...

  20. A Path Analysis Model Pertinent to Undergraduates' Academic Success: Examining Academic Confidence, Psychological Capital and Academic Coping Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirikkanat, Berke; Soyer, Makbule Kali

    2018-01-01

    The major purpose of this study was to create a path analysis model of academic success in a group of university students, which included the variables of academic confidence and psychological capital with a mediator variable--academic coping. 400 undergraduates from Marmara University and Istanbul Commerce University who were in sophomore, junior…

  1. International Academic Success: Institutional Planning & Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Kristen; Kennedy, Matthew; Crespin-Mueller, Dorys

    2010-01-01

    This study was requested by the Senate International Affairs Committee. The research questions included: (1) What factors affect the cumulative GPA (CGPA) of International students at TRU?; (2) What factors affect the retention of International students at TRU?; and (3) Are Student Success Courses among the significant factors for GPA and…

  2. Predicting Academic Success Using Admission Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovitch, Nitza; Soen, Dan

    2015-01-01

    This study, conducted at a tertiary education institution in Israel, following two previous studies, was designed to deal again with a question that is a topic of debate in Israel and worldwide: Is there justification for the approach that considers restrictive university admission policies an efficient tool for predicting students' success at the…

  3. The Impact of Participating in a Peer Assessment Activity on Subsequent Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhangiani, Rajiv S.

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the impact of participation in a peer assessment activity on subsequent academic performance. Students in two sections of an introductory psychology course completed a practice quiz 1 week prior to each of three course exams. Students in the experimental group participated in a five-step double-blind peer assessment…

  4. Social Factors That Predict Fear of Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Jonathan S.; Thomas, Jessica; Jones, Stevy; Mahoney, Lauren; Dukes, Kristina; Treadway, Jodi

    2016-01-01

    Fear of academic success is ultimately a fear of social exclusion. Therefore, various forms of social inclusion may alleviate this fear. Three studies tested the hypothesis that social inclusion variables negatively predict fear of success. In Study 1, middle and high school students (n = 129) completed surveys of parental involvement, parental…

  5. Promoting Student Academic Success: Paying Attention to Learning Environmental Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan

    2012-01-01

    Achievement gaps become greater for schools with high-poverty and high-minority school population in the United States in recent years (Dillon, 2005; Lee & Slaughter-Defoe, 2004). The academic success of minority students is important because the nation cannot successfully compete in a global market when a considerable portion of its school…

  6. The Effects of Objective Career Success on Subsequent Subjective Career Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, Stephen A.; Tymon, Walter G., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    We use a sample of working adults (N = 638) to explore the effects of past objective career success (mobility, promotions, and salary change) on current subjective success (human capital assessments by one's managers, core self evaluations, satisfaction with one's career) by gender, across an economic cycle (2004-2011), controlling for career…

  7. Linking Academic Social Environments, Ego-Identity Formation, Ego Virtues, and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Marie; Adams, Gerald R.

    2008-01-01

    This study used Structural Equation Modeling to test an Eriksonian conceptual model linking academic social environments (relationships with faculty and fellow students), ego-identity formation, ego virtues, and academic success. Participants included 765 first-year students at a university in southern Ontario, Canada. Results indicated that…

  8. Predicting Academic Success from Academic Motivation and Learning Approaches in Classroom Teaching Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetin, Baris

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to determine whether learning approaches and academic motivation together predict academic success of classroom teaching students. The sample of the study included 536 students (386 female, 150 male) studying at the Classroom Teaching Division of Canakkale 18 Mart University. Our research was designed as a prediction study. Data was…

  9. Anticipatory brain activity predicts the success or failure of subsequent emotion regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Bryan T; Ochsner, Kevin N; Weber, Jochen; Wager, Tor D

    2014-04-01

    Expectations about an upcoming emotional event have the power to shape one's subsequent affective response for better or worse. Here, we used mediation analyses to examine the relationship between brain activity when anticipating the need to cognitively reappraise aversive images, amygdala responses to those images and subsequent success in diminishing negative affect. We found that anticipatory activity in right rostrolateral prefrontal cortex was associated with greater subsequent left amygdala responses to aversive images and decreased regulation success. In contrast, anticipatory ventral anterior insula activity was associated with reduced amygdala responses and greater reappraisal success. In both cases, left amygdala responses mediated the relationship between anticipatory activity and reappraisal success. These results suggest that anticipation facilitates successful reappraisal via reduced anticipatory prefrontal 'cognitive' elaboration and better integration of affective information in paralimbic and subcortical systems.

  10. Anticipatory brain activity predicts the success or failure of subsequent emotion regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochsner, Kevin N.; Weber, Jochen; Wager, Tor D.

    2014-01-01

    Expectations about an upcoming emotional event have the power to shape one’s subsequent affective response for better or worse. Here, we used mediation analyses to examine the relationship between brain activity when anticipating the need to cognitively reappraise aversive images, amygdala responses to those images and subsequent success in diminishing negative affect. We found that anticipatory activity in right rostrolateral prefrontal cortex was associated with greater subsequent left amygdala responses to aversive images and decreased regulation success. In contrast, anticipatory ventral anterior insula activity was associated with reduced amygdala responses and greater reappraisal success. In both cases, left amygdala responses mediated the relationship between anticipatory activity and reappraisal success. These results suggest that anticipation facilitates successful reappraisal via reduced anticipatory prefrontal ‘cognitive’ elaboration and better integration of affective information in paralimbic and subcortical systems. PMID:23202664

  11. Does formal research training lead to academic success in otolaryngology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobian, Michael R; Shah, Noor; Svider, Peter F; Hong, Robert S; Shkoukani, Mahdi A; Folbe, Adam J; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate whether formalized research training is associated with higher researcher productivity, academic rank, and acquisition of National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants within academic otolaryngology departments. Each of the 100 civilian otolaryngology program's departmental websites were analyzed to obtain a comprehensive list of faculty members credentials and characteristics, including academic rank, completion of a clinical fellowship, completion of a formal research fellowship, and attainment of a doctorate in philosophy (PhD) degree. We also recorded measures of scholarly impact and successful acquisition of NIH funding. A total of 1,495 academic physicians were included in our study. Of these, 14.1% had formal research training. Bivariate associations showed that formal research training was associated with a greater h-index, increased probability of acquiring NIH funding, and higher academic rank. Using a linear regression model, we found that otolaryngologists possessing a PhD had an associated h-index of 1.8 points higher, and those who completed a formal research fellowship had an h-index of 1.6 points higher. A PhD degree or completion of a research fellowship was not associated with a higher academic rank; however, a higher h-index and previous acquisition of an NIH grant were associated with a higher academic rank. The attainment of NIH funding was three times more likely for those with a formal research fellowship and 8.6 times more likely for otolaryngologists with a PhD degree. Formalized research training is associated with academic success in otolaryngology. Such dedicated research training accompanies greater scholarly impact, acquisition of NIH funding, and a higher academic rank. NA Laryngoscope, 127:E15-E21, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  12. The Association Between Early Marijuana Use and Subsequent Academic Achievement and Health Problems: A Longitudinal Study

    OpenAIRE

    Brook, Judith S.; Stimmel, Matthew A.; Zhang, Chenshu; Brook, David W.

    2008-01-01

    In this prospective longitudinal study, the authors investigated the association between marijuana use over a period of 13 years and subsequent health problems by age 30. A community sample of 749 participants from upstate New York were interviewed at mean ages of 14, 16, 22, and 27 years. Marijuana use over time was significantly associated with increased health problems by the late twenties, including respiratory problems, general malaise, neurocognitive problems, and lower academic achieve...

  13. Integrating an Academic Electronic Health Record: Challenges and Success Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Valerie M; Connors, Helen

    2016-08-01

    Technology is increasing the complexity in the role of today's nurse. Healthcare organizations are integrating more health information technologies and relying on the electronic health record for data collection, communication, and decision making. Nursing faculty need to prepare graduates for this environment and incorporate an academic electronic health record into a nursing curriculum to meet student-program outcomes. Although the need exists for student preparation, some nursing programs are struggling with implementation, whereas others have been successful. To better understand these complexities, this project was intended to identify current challenges and success strategies of effective academic electronic health record integration into nursing curricula. Using Rogers' 1962 Diffusion of Innovation theory as a framework for technology adoption, a descriptive survey design was used to gain insights from deans and program directors of nursing schools involved with the national Health Informatics & Technology Scholars faculty development program or Cerner's Academic Education Solution Consortium, working to integrate an academic electronic health record in their respective nursing schools. The participants' experiences highlighted approaches used by these schools to integrate these technologies. Data from this project provide nursing education with effective strategies and potential challenges that should be addressed for successful academic electronic health record integration.

  14. The "Secrets" of Chinese Students' Academic Success: Academic Resilience among Students from Highly Competitive Academic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haibin

    2017-01-01

    Given Chinese students often perform well academically despite the challenges of their competitive academic environments, it is important to explore what enables the academic resilience of these students. Moreover, because the extant resilience literature is biased towards Western accounts of resilience, it is crucial that non-Western perspectives…

  15. The Relationship between Gender and Academic Success Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupczynski, Lori; Brown, Michelle; Holland, Glenda; Uriegas, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Distance learning may pose challenges to students in terms of satisfaction and academic success. This study examined the relationship between the final grade received in a distance learning course and the student characteristic of gender. Examined were differences in online course achievement between male and female students through the lens of…

  16. Bridging the Gap: Technology and Veteran Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cass, David; Hammond, Shane

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents two unique yet confluent perspectives regarding the use of technology to support student veterans in college, and is meant to ignite discussion of the blending of high impact practices with technology to promote their academic success. The authors highlight the historical trends of student veterans in the academy and discuss…

  17. Effect of Hypertextual Reading on Academic Success and Comprehension Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durukan, Erhan

    2014-01-01

    As computer technology developed, hypertexts emerged as an influential environment for developing language skills. This study aims to evaluate a text prepared in a hypertextual environment and its effects on academic success and comprehension skills. In this study, "preliminary test final test control group experimental pattern" was used…

  18. Construction of Academic Success and Failure in School Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Gamze Inan

    2018-01-01

    The idea of "Apprenticeship of Observation", proposing that pre-service teachers' early academic experiences might have effects on their professional development, has been a concern in teacher education in the last forty years. Early success or failure experiences of pre-service teachers in school may have a role in their professional…

  19. Academic predictors of success in a nursing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkowitz, Amanda A; Kelley, Jeffrey A

    2010-09-01

    The academic content areas that best predict success early in a nursing program affect admission and placement decisions in nursing programs nationwide. The purpose of this research was to apply a multiple regression model to student test scores to determine the relative strength of science, mathematics, reading, and English content areas in predicting early nursing school success. Using a standardized nursing entrance examination, the subtest scores of these four academic areas for 4,105 registered nurse students were used as the predictors in the regression model. Performance on a standardized Fundamentals of Nursing assessment was the criterion variable. Results confirmed those found in the majority of the literature indicating that science is both a statistically significant predictor and the strongest of the four content areas in the prediction of early nursing program success.

  20. Decision trees for predicting the academic success of students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Mesarić

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to create a model that successfully classifies students into one of two categories, depending on their success at the end of their first academic year, and finding meaningful variables affecting their success. This model is based on information regarding student success in high school and their courses after completing their first year of study, as well as the rank of preferences assigned to the observed faculty, and attempts to classify students into one of the two categories in line with their academic success. Creating a model required collecting data on all undergraduate students enrolled into their second year at the Faculty of Economics, University of Osijek, as well as data on completion of the state exam. These two datasets were combined and used for the model. Several classification algorithms for constructing decision trees were compared and the statistical significance (t-test of the results was analyzed. Finally, the algorithm that produced the highest accuracy was chosen as the most successful algorithm for modeling the academic success of students. The highest classification rate of 79% was produced using the REPTree decision tree algorithm, but the tree was not as successful in classifying both classes. Therefore, the average rate of classification was calculated for two models that gave the highest total rate of classification, where a higher percentage is achieved using the model relying on the algorithm J48. The most significant variables were total points in the state exam, points from high school and points in the Croatian language exam.

  1. At-Risk Students and Academic Achievement: The Relationship Between Certain Selected Factors and Academic Success

    OpenAIRE

    Worley, Catherine Lynn

    2007-01-01

    This research study examines the relationship between academic achievement and at-risk students. Many issues today affect the achievement gap and the ability for at-risk students to succeed. Most data, as revealed in the studies included in this review, conclude the factors identifying at-risk students do have significant impact on the academic achievement of individual students and schools. Most often, these students are not successful and eventually drop out of school or pursue a GED. D...

  2. Boasts are a boost: achievement prime self-reactivity predicts subsequent academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramzow, Richard H; Johnson, Camille S; Willard, Greg

    2014-03-01

    The present research tests the hypothesis that self-reactivity following an achievement prime reflects the strength of achievement goals and is a predictor of future goal-relevant performance. In Studies 1-3, undergraduates reported their grade-point averages (GPAs) following either an achievement goal prime or a control prime. Academic exaggeration (higher self-reported than official GPA) was the indicator of self-reactivity to the prime. Study 1 involved a direct achievement goal prime, whereas Studies 2 and 3 involved indirect priming techniques. In all 3 experiments, greater academic exaggeration following the achievement goal prime (but not the control prime) predicted better academic performance a semester later (based on official records). Study 4 demonstrated that the magnitude of students' GPA goals mediated the association between academic exaggeration and subsequent performance (1 year later). The fact that self-reactivity to a single achievement goal prime in the lab predicted later performance in "real life" suggests that individual differences in reactivity to a specific prime can signal much broader motivational orientations related to the primed goal. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Global Diversity and Academic Success of Foreign-Trained Academic Neurosurgeons in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Akshitkumar M; Kumar, Nishant Ganesh; Reynolds, Rebecca A; Hale, Andrew T; Wellons, John C; Naftel, Robert P

    2017-08-01

    To quantify the proportion of academic neurosurgeons practicing in the United States who acquired residency training outside of the United States and compare their training backgrounds and academic success with those who received their residency training in the United States. We identified 1338 clinically active academic neurosurgeons from 104 programs that participated in the neurosurgery residency match in the United States in January-February 2015. Their training backgrounds, current academic positions, and history of National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant awards between 2005 and 2014 were retrieved from publicly accessible sources. Eighty-four U.S. academic neurosurgeons (6.3%) received their residency training in 20 different countries outside of the United States/Puerto Rico, representing all major regions of the world. The majority trained in Canada (n = 48). We found no major differences between the foreign-trained and U.S.-trained neurosurgeons in male:female ratio, year of starting residency, proportion with positions in medical schools ranked in the top 15 by the U.S. News and World Report, general distribution of academic positions, and proportion with an NIH grant. Compared with U.S.-trained academic neurosurgeons, foreign-trained academic neurosurgeons had a significantly higher proportion of Ph.D. degrees (32.1% vs. 12.3%; P academic practices of the foreign-trained neurosurgeons were widely distributed throughout the United States. A small group of U.S. academic neurosurgeons (6.3%) have acquired residency training outside of the United States, representing all major regions of the world. Their general demographic data and academic accomplishments are comparable to those of U.S.-trained neurosurgeons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Creating a Nursing Student Center for Academic and Professional Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantillo, Mary; Marconi, Maria A; Rideout, Kathy; Anson, Elizabeth A; Reifenstein, Karen A

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the development of an innovative broad-based initiative supportive of academic and professional success, the Center for Academic and Professional Success (CAPS) at the University of Rochester School of Nursing. While CAPS was founded to support all nursing students, it was also carefully developed to meet the special needs of students in the accelerated program for non-nurses (APNN) due to their diversity and the intensity and rapidity of the APNN program. Faculty discussion, literature review, and student needs assessment findings informed program development. Outcome data obtained during the past 4 years are presented. Data revealed a correspondence between identified student needs and use of program services, as well as high satisfaction ratings. Findings supported the provision of both traditional academic support, as well as other critical supports to address the academic and social stressors associated with the transitions experienced by nontraditional, working, and graduate nursing students. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(4):235-239.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Students' motivation and academic success in inclusive classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić-Stošović Danijela D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the motivation experiences of students in the conditions of inclusive education determines teaching procedures considerably. The main aim of this research was to determine whether there were any difference in motivation experience between students with learning and developmental difficulties and the students without these difficulties, and whether there is any correlation of academic success and motivation experiences between these two groups. The sample comprised 87 students of the fifth grade (24.13% students with learning and developmental difficulties, and 75.86% students without these difficulties. The examination of motivation experience was carried out by the Scale for Estimating Extrinsic and Intrinsic Motivation. Statistics analyses show that there are differences in experiencing intrinsic and extrinsic motivation among students with and without learning and developmental difficulties. Learning difficulties correlate with lower academic achievement at the end of the fourth grade. As academic success increases the motivation experience decreases in both groups. The obtained results stress the importance of interventions by teachers and other school professionals in order to maintain motivational levels of all students. The results of this research highlight the quality of assessment system of academic achievement of all students and suggest further researching how and which way teachers understand and apply different functions of assessment.

  6. Preparing academic medical department physicians to successfully lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revere, Lee; Robinson, Arlin; Schroth, Lynn; Mikhail, Osama

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a case study which details the successful development, design and deployment of a leadership course for academic medical department chairs. The course provides a needed local and contextual alternative to the lengthy and often theoretical MBA/MHA. Faculty developers used a multi-tiered methodology for developing the physician leadership course. The methodology consisted of literature findings, needs assessment, stakeholder input and structured interviews with administrative leaders. The research, stakeholder input and interviews revealed an increasing number of physician leaders with a general lack of fundamental administrative leadership skills. These shortfalls are largely because of underexposure to core management competencies during medical school and limited contextual knowledge outside their organization. There is an urgent need for leadership development opportunities aimed at current and future academic medical department chairs. This research is limited by the assumptions that the curriculum meets the ever-changing needs of health-care leaders, the course's focus on academic medical department chairs within the Texas Medical Center and the lack of long range follow-up data to substantiate the effectiveness of the curriculum content and course structure. The Academic Medical Department Leadership course offers valuable management skills training which complements standard medical training. Much of the course structure and content is adaptable to physician administrative and leadership positions in all settings. Although the Academic Medical Department Leadership course is a response to a local concern, the study offers a generalizable approach to addressing the demand for skilled physician leaders.

  7. Hope of Success and Fear of Failure Predicting Academic Procrastination Students Who Working on a Thesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sari Zakiah Akmal; Fitri Arlinkasari; Andi Ulfa Febriani

    2017-01-01

    ... (hope of success and fear of failure) in predicting academic procrastination. The study used a quantitative approach by distributing academic procrastination and achievement motivation questionnaires...

  8. The association between earlier marijuana use and subsequent academic achievement and health problems: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Judith S; Stimmel, Matthew A; Zhang, Chenshu; Brook, David W

    2008-01-01

    In this prospective longitudinal study, the authors investigated the association between marijuana use over a period of 13 years and subsequent health problems at age 27. A community sample of 749 participants from upstate New York was interviewed at mean ages of 14, 16, 22, and 27 years. Marijuana use over time was significantly associated with increased health problems by the late twenties, including respiratory problems, general malaise, neurocognitive problems, and lower academic achievement and functioning. Effective prevention and intervention programs should consider the wide range of adverse physiological and psychosocial outcomes associated with marijuana use over time.

  9. The Effect Of Online Cooperative Homework On Students' Academic Success

    OpenAIRE

    Gunduz, Semseddin; Namlu, Aysen

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the effect of online cooperative learning homework practices on academic success of students is searched. The experience group of the research consists of 58 students from Anadolu University Education Faculty Education of Computer and Instruction Technology Section. Students in A section are taken to traditional method by neutral appointment; those in B section are taken to online homework practice method. In each class consisting of 29 people, it's decided that 14 students pre...

  10. The impact of stress on academic success in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murff, Sharon Hall

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a discussion on stress and how it can prevent students from being successful in fulfillment of their educational goals. The literature is supportive of the fact that stress places demands on an individual, and in response to the stress, the body attempts to adapt to the stressful experience to maintain a sense of normalcy (Selye, 1974). Another common theme in the literature is that college students are faced with a unique set of stressors that may be overwhelming, thus altering the ability to cope with a situation. Strategies to reduce stress have been associated with academic success in college students (Dziegielewski et al., 2004).

  11. Shifting the Curve: Fostering Academic Success in a Diverse Student Body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elks, Martha L; Herbert-Carter, Janice; Smith, Marjorie; Klement, Brenda; Knight, Brandi Brandon; Anachebe, Ngozi F

    2018-01-01

    Diversity in the health care workforce is key to achieving health equity. Although U.S. medical schools have worked to increase the matriculation and academic success of underrepresented minority (URM) students (African Americans, Latinos, others), they have had only limited success. Lower standardized test scores, including on the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), have been a barrier to matriculation for many URM applicants. Lower subsequent standardized exam scores, including on the United States Medical Licensing Exam Step 1, also have been an impediment to students' progress, with mean scores for URM students lagging behind those for others. Faculty at the Morehouse School of Medicine developed and implemented interventions to enhance the academic success of their URM students (about 75% are African American, and 5% are from other URM groups). To assess the outcomes of this work, the authors analyzed the MCAT scores and subsequent Step 1 scores of students in the graduating classes of 2009-2014. They also reviewed course evaluations, Graduation Questionnaires, and student and faculty interviews and focus groups. Students' Step 1 scores exceeded those expected based on their MCAT scores. This success was due to three key elements: (1) milieu and mentoring, (2) structure and content of the curriculum, and (3) monitoring. A series of mixed-method studies are planned to better discern the core elements of faculty-student relationships that are key to students' success. Lower test scores are not a fixed attribute; with the elements described, success is attainable for all students.

  12. The Role of Non-Academic Factors in the Academic Success of College Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaus, Joseph W.; Faggella-Luby, Michael N.; Dukes, Lyman L., III

    2011-01-01

    Successful transition to postsecondary education for students with learning disabilities requires application of both academic and non-academic skills to meet the increased demands of the college environment. While academic skills are often of primary consideration, this article addresses critical non-academic factors that impact the academic…

  13. Successful Admission Criteria to Predict Academic and Clinical Success in Entry-Level Radiography Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingrassia, Jennett M

    2016-05-01

    To examine successful admission criteria in health education programs. Health sciences databases were searched for admission criteria in medical and allied health education. Special emphasis was placed on radiologic technology investigations. Many medical and health sciences programs use cognitive and noncognitive factors to predict student success. However, research has not identified common admission criteria that can be used to predict academic and clinical success of candidates in radiologic technology education programs. Further research is needed to investigate the use of cognitive and noncognitive factors as admission criteria for radiologic technology programs and to determine whether these factors can be used to predict student success.

  14. The academic radiography workforce: Age profile, succession planning and academic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, K M; Wright, C; Clarke, H; McAnulla, S J; Nightingale, J M

    2017-09-01

    Academia is one area of practice in which radiographers can specialise; they compile approximately 2% of the total radiography profession in the UK, but are highly influential and essential for the education and development of the workforce in addition to undertaking research. However, the academic environment is very different to clinical practice and a period of transition is required. Data were collated to explore the age and retirement profile of the academic radiography workforce in the UK; to understand the research time allocated to this workforce; the time required to develop a clinical radiographer into an academic and the mentorship and succession planning provisions nationally. An online UK wide survey was conducted and sent to all 24 Universities delivering radiography education within the UK. Eighteen out of 24 Universities in the UK responded to the survey. Approximately 30% of radiography academics are due to retire over the next 10 years, with over 25% of radiographers who currently hold a doctorate qualification included within this figure. Those entering academia have notably lower qualifications as a group than those who are due to retire. Developing clinical radiographers into academics was thought to take 1-3 years on average, or longer if they are required to undertake research. There is vulnerability in the academic radiography workforce. Higher education institutions need to invest in developing the academic workforce to maintain research and educational expertise, which is underpinned by master's and doctorate level qualifications. Copyright © 2017 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Adolescents' Fear of Social Consequences of Academic Success as a Function of Age and Sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiyama, F. Ishu; Chabassol, David J.

    1985-01-01

    The Fear of Success Consequence Scale was used to assess early and mid-adolescents' fears of potential social consequences of academic success. Results indicated that fear of academic success decreased through adolescence and girls generally had a greater fear of academic success. (DWH)

  16. Impacts of early life exposure to estrogen on subsequent breeding behavior and reproductive success in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Tobias S; Söffker, Marta K; Filby, Amy L; Hodgson, David; Tyler, Charles R

    2010-08-15

    Impacts of exposure to environmental estrogens on reproductive development are well documented, but recently wider concern has been raised due to evidence that such exposures can disrupt normal patterns of reproductive behavior, dominance, and parentage, with potential population level implications. It is fundamental therefore to understand any such effects for effective risk assessment. This study investigated the impact of a transient exposure to ethinylestradiol (EE(2)) during early life (from 20-60 days post fertilization), including at a dosing level within the environmental range, on the subsequent reproductive behavior and success in both male and female zebrafish (Danio rerio) in competitive breeding scenarios. There were no obvious effects of the early life EE(2) exposures on the subsequent gonadal phenotypes in either mature males or females. In fact, reproductive success in males exposed to 2.76 ng EE(2)/L was increased in competitive spawning scenarios. In contrast, exposure of females to EE(2) (9.86 ng/L) during early life reduced their subsequent reproductive success in competitive spawning scenarios. Mate choice experiments suggested this was a consequence of the females' diminished courting behavior toward males, rather than any male preference for unexposed females. Reproductive capability of females is generally considered a key determinant in population demographics and dynamics, and therefore the effect of exposure to EE(2) on female reproductive success may have significant implications for exposed fish populations.

  17. Publication metrics and success on the academic job market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, David; Manor, Ohad; Carey, Lucas B

    2014-06-02

    The number of applicants vastly outnumbers the available academic faculty positions. What makes a successful academic job market candidate is the subject of much current discussion [1-4]. Yet, so far there has been no quantitative analysis of who becomes a principal investigator (PI). We here use a machine-learning approach to predict who becomes a PI, based on data from over 25,000 scientists in PubMed. We show that success in academia is predictable. It depends on the number of publications, the impact factor (IF) of the journals in which those papers are published, and the number of papers that receive more citations than average for the journal in which they were published (citations/IF). However, both the scientist's gender and the rank of their university are also of importance, suggesting that non-publication features play a statistically significant role in the academic hiring process. Our model (www.pipredictor.com) allows anyone to calculate their likelihood of becoming a PI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. IELTS and Academic Success in Higher Education: A UAE Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Schoepp

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study compares the relationship between International English Language Testing System (IELTS entrance scores and academic success as defined by general education program GPA for students at a federal university in the United Arab Emirates in order to reflect upon regional English language proficiency entrance requirements. It focuses on one group of students, direct entry students who have bypassed the English language foundation program with an overall IELTS 6.0 or greater and were admitted straight into the baccalaureate program. Students were grouped according to their IELTS proficiency levels: 6.0, 6.5 or ≥7.0. Measures of central tendency for overall GPA and academic-stream-specific GPA, along with the overall IELTS and the corresponding sub-scores were calculated. To test the statistical significance of any mean score GPA differences that existed between the 3 IELTS groups, a One-Way ANOVA was calculated. Based on the statistical analyses, the IELTS ≥7.0 group appears to have achieved a meaningful threshold for academic success in that they have consistently outperformed the other direct entry students. This finding corresponds to international entrance-requirement standards for non-native speakers of English.

  19. Sexual Harassment, Self Esteem and Academic Engagement as Predictors of Academic Success of Female Secondary School Students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baye Mekuriaw Ayenew; Tilahun Gidey Gebremeskal

    2014-01-01

      The purpose of the present study was to investigate the extent to which sexual harassment, self-esteem, and academic engagement predict academic success of female secondary school students in Gondar City...

  20. Academic Accommodations, Social Supports, and Academic Self-Efficacy: Predictors of Academic Success for Postsecondary Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Stefanie Marie

    2013-01-01

    Although the "Rehabilitation Act of 1973" and the "Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990" have mandated the necessity of services for students with disabilities to receive equal access to education, a clear picture of what contributes to academic success is still lacking. Research indicates that students with disabilities…

  1. The Investigation of the Relation between Physical Activity and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iri, Ruchan; Ibis, Serkan; Aktug, Zait Burak

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the interaction among Physical Activity Levels (PAL), academic successes, perceived academic competency and Motor Skills (MS) of male and female students at the age of 14-17 in terms of gender variable. The PALs, perceived academic competency and academic successes were determined through International…

  2. Project Lead the Ways' Long-Term Effects on Post-Secondary Engineering Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zion, George H.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between students' high school Project Lead They Way participation and their subsequent academic success in post-secondary engineering studies and to assess to what degree, if any, their level of Project Lead The Way (PLTW) participation, gender, and AALANA status (African American, Latino/a American and Native American) effected this success. PLTW is the nation's single largest provider of pre-engineering curriculums, the subject of this research study, currently being offered in over 3,200 secondary schools nationwide. Despite this level of integration, the amount of research on PLTW's effectiveness has been very limited. To date, the majority of the literature on PLTW has examined its impact on students' high school academic performance or their desire to further their engineering studies. The findings from these studies have been overwhelmingly positive, indicating that PLTW students often had greater achievements in math and science and either plan to, or have actually enrolled, in post-secondary studies at higher rates. Nevertheless, the amount of literature on PLTW's effects on students' academic success in post-secondary engineering studies is very limited. Furthermore, no research has yet to examine for the moderating effects of gender, ethnicity, or level of PLTW participation on students' post-secondary academics success. The population of interest for this research study was 1,478 students who entered an undergraduate engineering program from 2007 to 2009 at a privately endowed, co-educational university located in the northeastern United States. The findings of this research study were that virtually all the effects of PLTW participation, gender, and AALANA status had on academic success were observed during students' freshmen and sophomore years. These effects were positive for PLTW participation, and adverse for female and AALANA students. Additionally, PLTW participation, gender, and

  3. The effect of learning style on academic student success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackhouse, Omega N.

    The problem addressed in this study was that little was known about the impact on student academic achievement, when grouped by learning style, in a multiple intelligence based science curriculum. The larger problem was that many students were frequently unengaged and, consequently, low achieving in their science courses. This quantitative study used an ex post facto research design to better understand the impact of student learning style on the academic success of students in a Multiple Intelligence Theory based course room. Gardner's work on Multiple Intelligence served as the conceptual framework for this study. The research question for this study asked if academic instruction that employs multiple intelligence theories has a relationship with students' academic achievement differently according to their learning style group (auditory, visual, and kinesthetic). Existing data from 85 students were placed into 1 of 3 groups: (a) Auditory, (b) Visual, or (c) Kinesthetic Learning Style) using existing data from a student inventory instrument. The independent variable was existing data from student inventories of learning style and the dependent variable was existing student scores from the Physical Science End of Course Test. Existing data were taken from students that were all taught with the same strategies in similar classroom environments. The Physical Science End of Course Test was developed with stringent measures to protect validity by the developer, McGraw-Hill. Cronbach's Alpha was conducted to determine the internal reliability coefficient of the student inventory. The impact for social change is that adding to the body of knowledge regarding student learning style and science curriculum provides valuable information for teachers, administrators, and school policy makers. This will allow teachers to better prepare to engage their students' and to prepare them for their place in society.

  4. Challenges and success factors in university mergers and academic integrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadvand, Alireza; Heidari, Kazem; Hosseini, Hamed; Majdzadeh, Reza

    2012-12-01

    There are different reasons for mergers among higher education institutes. In October 2010 the Iran University of Medical Sciences (IUMS) merged with two other medical universities in Tehran. In this study, we aim to review the literature on academic integrations and university mergers to call the attention to challenges and reasons for the success or failure of university mergers. We searched for studies that pertained to university or college mergers, amalgamation, dissolution, or acquisition in the following databases: PubMed, Emerald, Web of Science, Scopus, and Ovid, without any limitations on country, language, or publication date. Two reviewers selected the search results in a joint meeting. We used content analysis methodology and held three sessions for consensus building on incompatibilities. We reviewed a total of 32 documents. The "merger" phenomenon attracted considerable attention worldwide from the 1970s until the 1990s. The most important reasons for merging were to boost efficiency and effectiveness, deal with organizational fragmentation, broaden student access and implement equity strategies, increase government control on higher education systems, decentralization, and to establish larger organizations. Cultural incompatibility, different academic standards, and geographical distance may prevent a merger. In some countries, geographical distance has caused an increase in existing cultural, social, and academic tensions. The decision and process of a merger is a broad, multi-dimensional change for an academic organization. Managers who are unaware of the fact that mergers are an evolutionary process with different stages may cause challenges and problems during organizational changes. Socio-cultural integration acts as an important stage in the post-merger process. It is possible for newly-formed schools, departments, and research centers to be evaluated as case studies in future research.

  5. Perceived Academic Control and Academic Emotions Predict Undergraduate University Student Success: Examining Effects on Dropout Intention and Achievement

    OpenAIRE

    Respondek, Lisa; Seufert, Tina; Stupnisky, Robert; Nett, Ulrike E.

    2017-01-01

    The present study addressed concerns over the high risk of university students' academic failure. It examined how perceived academic control and academic emotions predict undergraduate students' academic success, conceptualized as both low dropout intention and high achievement (indicated by GPA). A cross-sectional survey was administered to 883 undergraduate students across all disciplines of a German STEM orientated university. The study additionally compared freshman students (N = 597) vs....

  6. Fostering Academic Success of First-Year Students: Exploring the Roles of Motivation, Race, and Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roksa, Josipa; Whitley, Sarah E.

    2017-01-01

    Although academic motivation is an important predictor of academic success, we show that being academically motivated is not equally beneficial for everyone. More specifically, the results indicate that African American students benefit less from being academically motivated than do their White peers, particularly when they report interacting with…

  7. Success IS a choice! Explaining success in Academic Preparation Programs in Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Talmor

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Operating within universities and colleges, Academic Preparation Programs in Israel (APPs allow students in their twenties a second chance to pass their matriculation examinations, a requirement for acceptance by academic institutions. This research aims at explaining the success of students who have succeeded in passing matriculation examinations who have failed in the past. For this purpose we interviewed 28 such students. The findings suggest four different factors that have impacted these students: 1 The changes that occurred in the students themselves; 2 The teachers’ support; 3 The support provided by the learning environment; 4 the students’ recognition of the opportunity they reccived in the APP compared with their high school studies.

  8. The Social Support for International Graduate Students to Obtain Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that international graduate students' academic success is significantly associated with the average grade point (GPA), and this measure is closely related with international graduate students' received academic and financial supports. However, international graduate students' academic success can involve a multidimensional…

  9. What African American College Students Perceive as Contributive Factors in Their Academic Success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Brandi S.

    2016-01-01

    This study explored what African American college students perceives as contributing to their Academic success. This study moved to determine what factors significantly influence or impact how African American college students advance in their academic journey, which was hypothesized as an important component related to academic success and degree…

  10. Components of success in academic reading tasks for Swedish students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Shaw

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In a parallel-language environment students are often required to read in a language different from the one they use in lectures, seminars, and among themselves. Relatively little research has been done on the overall reading success of such groups or on the componential make up of their L2 reading skills. This paper compares the English-language reading skills of Swedish students of biology with that of equivalent British biology students. Many Swedish readers perform within or above the normal British range on the study-reading test, but the overall average score of this sample of Swedish readers was considerably lower than that of the British sample. For the Swedes study-reading success correlates significantly with vocabulary knowledge, inferencing and newspaper reading, and at a lower level for word recognition speed. For the British informants the pattern is similar, but with no significant correlation for word-recognition speed. Multiple regression analyses show that academic vocabulary knowledge test scores can account for nearly half the variance in study-reading scores and newspaper reading test scores for about ten percent more. For the British informants the same pattern emerged, but the contributions of vocabulary knowledge was considerably greater and that of newspaper skimming rather less.

  11. Authoritative parenting, psychosocial maturity, and academic success among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, L; Elmen, J D; Mounts, N S

    1989-12-01

    The over-time relation between 3 aspects of authoritative parenting--acceptance, psychological autonomy, and behavioral control--and school achievement was examined in a sample of 120 10-16-year-olds in order to test the hypothesis that authoritative parenting facilitates, rather than simply accompanies, school success. In addition, the mediating role of youngsters' psychosocial maturity was studied. Results indicate that (1) authoritative parenting facilitates adolescents' academic success, (2) each component of authoritativeness studied makes an independent contribution to achievement, and (3) the positive impact of authoritative parenting on achievement is mediated at least in part through the effects of authoritativeness on the development of a healthy sense of autonomy and, more specifically, a healthy psychological orientation toward work. Adolescents who describe their parents as treating them warmly, democratically, and firmly are more likely than their peers to develop positive attitudes toward, and beliefs about, their achievement, and as a consequence, they are more likely to do better in school.

  12. Embolization of cerebral arteriovenous malformations to make a success of subsequent radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyachi, Shigeru; Negoro, Makoto; Okamoto, Takeshi; Yoshida, Jun [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Kida, Yoshihisa; Tanaka, Takayuki

    1999-09-01

    We studied angiographic changes of embolized arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) by comparing pre- and postembolization angiograms and angiograms preceding radiosurgery. This study sought factors determining the usefulness of embolization as a pretreatment to enhance the success of subsequent radiosurgery. Thirty-seven patients with cerebral AVMs treated in this manner over 4 years were studied. In these cases, AVMs were embolized with cyanoacrylate and were treated with Gamma-knife radiosurgery. The mean size of the AVM nidus was reduced by a fraction of seven following embolization. The subsequent angiogram for planning radiosurgery showed further nidus reduction in 16 AVMs, no change in 10, and regrowth in 11. In all size-reduction cases the nidus was sufficiently packed, and 2 AVMs had thrombosed completely before radiosurgery. All the regrowing AVMs were of the diffuse type, 7 of which were associated with already-developed leptomeningeal channels, and the remaining 4 were fed by newly sprouted meningeal feeders. Five AVMs disappeared following radiosurgery, all representing size-reduction or no-change cases. Analysis of cases with regrowth showed increased risk of that event with feeder occlusion of a multi-axially supplied AVM, lack of reduction of shunt flow, or remaining meningeal feeders. On the other hand, when embolization as pretreatment prior to radiosurgery succeeds in producing a small, compacted, plexiform nidus with slow shunt flow, it furthers the likelyhood of successful radiosurgery. Nidus embolization and occlusion of fistulous and meningeal feeders are mandatory, while proximal feeder occlusion and use of embolic materials that risk recanalization should be avoided to prevent nidus regrowth. (author)

  13. Self-Efficacy, Stress, and Academic Success in College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajacova, Anna; Lynch, Scott M.; Espenshade, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the joint effects of academic self-efficacy and stress on the academic performance of 107 nontraditional, largely immigrant and minority, college freshmen at a large urban commuter institution. We developed a survey instrument to measure the level of academic self-efficacy and perceived stress associated with 27…

  14. Coaching Students to Academic Success and Engagement on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Claire; Gahagan, Jimmie

    2010-01-01

    Academic coaching can be a crucial step in helping students transition to college. Coaches work with students to be strategic in establishing and achieving their academic goals as well as becoming engaged on campus. At the University of South Carolina, academic coaching is defined as a one-on-one interaction with a student focusing on strengths,…

  15. Perceived Academic Control and Academic Emotions Predict Undergraduate University Student Success: Examining Effects on Dropout Intention and Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respondek, Lisa; Seufert, Tina; Stupnisky, Robert; Nett, Ulrike E

    2017-01-01

    The present study addressed concerns over the high risk of university students' academic failure. It examined how perceived academic control and academic emotions predict undergraduate students' academic success, conceptualized as both low dropout intention and high achievement (indicated by GPA). A cross-sectional survey was administered to 883 undergraduate students across all disciplines of a German STEM orientated university. The study additionally compared freshman students (N = 597) vs. second-year students (N = 286). Using structural equation modeling, for the overall sample of undergraduate students we found that perceived academic control positively predicted enjoyment and achievement, as well as negatively predicted boredom and anxiety. The prediction of dropout intention by perceived academic control was fully mediated via anxiety. When taking perceived academic control into account, we found no specific impact of enjoyment or boredom on the intention to dropout and no specific impact of all three academic emotions on achievement. The multi-group analysis showed, however, that perceived academic control, enjoyment, and boredom among second-year students had a direct relationship with dropout intention. A major contribution of the present study was demonstrating the important roles of perceived academic control and anxiety in undergraduate students' academic success. Concerning corresponding institutional support and future research, the results suggested distinguishing incoming from advanced undergraduate students.

  16. Perceived Academic Control and Academic Emotions Predict Undergraduate University Student Success: Examining Effects on Dropout Intention and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Respondek, Lisa; Seufert, Tina; Stupnisky, Robert; Nett, Ulrike E.

    2017-01-01

    The present study addressed concerns over the high risk of university students' academic failure. It examined how perceived academic control and academic emotions predict undergraduate students' academic success, conceptualized as both low dropout intention and high achievement (indicated by GPA). A cross-sectional survey was administered to 883 undergraduate students across all disciplines of a German STEM orientated university. The study additionally compared freshman students (N = 597) vs. second-year students (N = 286). Using structural equation modeling, for the overall sample of undergraduate students we found that perceived academic control positively predicted enjoyment and achievement, as well as negatively predicted boredom and anxiety. The prediction of dropout intention by perceived academic control was fully mediated via anxiety. When taking perceived academic control into account, we found no specific impact of enjoyment or boredom on the intention to dropout and no specific impact of all three academic emotions on achievement. The multi-group analysis showed, however, that perceived academic control, enjoyment, and boredom among second-year students had a direct relationship with dropout intention. A major contribution of the present study was demonstrating the important roles of perceived academic control and anxiety in undergraduate students' academic success. Concerning corresponding institutional support and future research, the results suggested distinguishing incoming from advanced undergraduate students. PMID:28326043

  17. Predicting early academic success: HESI Admissions Assessment Exam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauss, Parry J; Willson, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Student retention is a major challenge for undergraduate nursing programs, with the highest attrition occurring in the first year of the nursing curriculum. Admission criteria have been studied extensively but usually as related to end-of-program outcomes such as National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses success. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between HESI Admission Assessment (A(2)) scores and academic performance in the 2 first-semester nursing courses of an associate degree program, Nursing-1 and Nursing-2. Findings indicated that the composite A(2) scores were strongly correlated with both Nursing-1 and Nursing-2 final course grades. Of the scores on the 4 component A(2) exams completed by the sample students (basic math skills, reading comprehension, vocabulary/general knowledge, and grammar), vocabulary/general knowledge scores had the strongest relationship to final course grades in both nursing courses. The authors concluded that A(2) scores facilitated evidence-based admission decisions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Refractory Graves' Disease Successfully Cured by Adjunctive Cholestyramine and Subsequent Total Thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yeoree; Hwang, Seawon; Kim, Minji; Lim, Yejee; Kim, Min Hee; Lee, Sohee; Lim, Dong Jun; Kang, Moo Il; Cha, Bong Yun

    2015-12-01

    The three major forms of treatment for Graves thyrotoxicosis are antithyroid drugs, radioactive iodine therapy and thyroidectomy. Surgery is the definitive treatment for Graves thyrotoxicosis that is generally recommended when other treatments have failed or are contraindicated. Generally, thyrotoxic patients should be euthyroid before surgery to minimize potential complications which usually requires preoperative management with thionamides or inorganic iodine. But several cases of refractory Graves' disease have shown resistance to conventional treatment. Here we report a 40-year-old female patient with Graves' disease who complained of thyrotoxic symptoms for 7 months. Her thyroid function test and thyroid autoantibody profiles were consistent with Graves' disease. One kind of thionamides and β-blocker were started to control her disease. However, she was resistant to nearly all conventional medical therapies, including β-blockers, inorganic iodine, and two thionamides. She experienced hepatotoxicity from the thionamides. What was worse is her past history of serious allergic reaction to corticosteroids, which are often used to help control symptoms. A 2-week regimen of high-dose cholestyramine improved her uncontrolled thyrotoxicosis and subsequent thyroidectomy was successfully performed. In conclusion, cholestyramine could be administered as an effective and safe adjunctive agent for preoperative preparation in patients with severe hyperthyroid Graves's disease that is resistant to conventional therapies.

  19. Perceived obstacles to career success for women in academic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colletti, L M; Mulholland, M W; Sonnad, S S

    2000-08-01

    We conducted this study to determine whether concerns expressed by male and female surgeons at 1 academic center are generally reflective of broader concerns for academic surgery and academic medicine. We reviewed published studies concerning women in academic surgery within the context of reporting the results of a survey of both male and female surgeons at 1 academic center. We developed a survey that included demographic information, work experience, and social issues. The survey was distributed to the entire faculty. For key questions, we compared answers between male and female faculty. Additional data came from the published literature. We reviewed all available studies identified by a MEDLINE search with key words women and academic and medicine or physician. Included studies contained either data collection or editorial comment concerning women in academic medicine. Data and opinions from all included studies paralleling survey questions were extracted from each article. Male and female faculty members reported different experiences and perceptions, specifically relating to relationships between family and professional life and perceptions of subtle sex-related biases. Both men and women reported insufficient mentoring and difficulties in balancing personal and professional responsibilities. Attitudes, behaviors, and traditions surrounding how we structure work and evaluate participation in academic surgery are more difficult to change than just addressing obvious inequities in support for female surgeons. However, attempting the deeper changes is worthwhile, because addressing obstacles faced by female faculty, many of which also affect men, will allow progress toward environments that attract and retain the best physicians, regardless of sex.

  20. Motivational Themes and Academic Success of At-Risk Freshmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wambach, Cathrine A.

    1993-01-01

    Describes a study of motivational factors influencing 19 first-year students who made the dean's list their first quarter in college, despite a poor academic performance in high school. Applies Weiner's attributional theory of motivation. Most students attributed their prior academic performance to a lack of motivation/effort. (DMM)

  1. Measuring the success of an academic development programme: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study uses statistical analysis to estimate the impact of first-year academic development courses in microeconomics, statistics, accountancy, and information systems, offered by the University of Cape Town's Commerce Academic Development Programme, on students' graduation performance relative to that achieved ...

  2. Hope of Success and Fear of Failure Predicting Academic Procrastination Students Who Working on a Thesis

    OpenAIRE

    Sari Zakiah Akmal; Fitri Arlinkasari; Andi Ulfa Febriani

    2017-01-01

    Students, who are working on the thesis, have some difficulties caused by internal and external factors. Those problems can disrupt the completion of their thesis, such as the tendency to do academic procrastination. Increasing achievement motivation can reduce academic procrastination. This study aims to look at the role of achievement motivation (hope of success and fear of failure) in predicting academic procrastination. The study used a quantitative approach by distributing academic procr...

  3. "There She Is": Hispanic Identity, Academic Success, and Class Mobility in a Collegiate Beauty Pageant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Taylor Renee

    2018-01-01

    Widely accepted definitions of academic success are neither adequate nor meaningful for many ethnic minority students. Using ethnographic research with high-achieving Latina college students in Oklahoma, student experiences in a collegiate Hispanic beauty pageant were analyzed. These successful Latina students negotiated academic achievement…

  4. The Cognitive Coaching-Supported Reflective Teaching Approach in English Language Teaching: Academic and Permanence Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyildiz, Seçil Tümen; Semerci, Çetin

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effect of the cognitive coaching-supported reflective teaching approach in English language teaching on the academic success of students and on the permanence of success. It was conducted during the spring semester of 2013/2014 academic year at the School of Foreign Languages, Firat University, Elazig, Turkey.…

  5. A Quantitative Study of Michigan High School Students' Perception of Parents' Role in Their Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Veryl

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between parental involvement in academic success as determined by grade point average and Michigan high school students' perception of parent involvement with school, participation in homework, recognition of academic success, knowledge of school policies, and support of participation in…

  6. Is the First-Year Predictive for Study Success in Subsequent Years? Findings from an Academy of Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennen, Josien; van der Klink, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    In higher education, departments are under increasing pressure to improve study success. Research in this field focusing on higher music education is scarce. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the predictive capability of the first year for study success of students at an academy of music in subsequent years. Data on study progression…

  7. Enhancing Academic Success by Creating a Community of Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Lynette; Berlie, Helen; Salinitri, Francine; McCuistion, Micah; Slaughter, Richard

    2015-06-25

    To enhance academic performance and student progression by creating a community of learners. Academic performance and student progression of students participating in the first 3 years of a second-year pharmacy learning community were compared with those of students in the 3 previous classes. Students participating in the learning community completed surveys at the end of each semester and at the end of the academic year. Peer mentors were surveyed at the end of the academic year. After implementing the learning community, failures during the second year of the pharmacy program decreased. Students had increasingly positive perceptions of the experience over the 3 years. Peer mentors rated their overall experience highly. Implementation of a learning community resulted in improved progression through the program and was well received by students.

  8. Factors related to academic success among nursing students: a descriptive correlational research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauvais, Audrey M; Stewart, Julie G; DeNisco, Susan; Beauvais, John E

    2014-06-01

    The current rise in employment is improving forecasts for the future supply of registered nurses; however sizeable shortages are still projected. With the intention of improving academic success in nursing students, related factors need to be better understood. The purpose of the correlational study was to describe the relationship between emotional intelligence, psychological empowerment, resilience, spiritual well-being, and academic success in undergraduate and graduate nursing students. A descriptive correlational design was utilized. The study was set in a private Catholic university. There were 124 participants. There were 59% undergraduate and 41% graduate students. Background data, in addition to the Spreitzer Psychological Empowerment Scale, the Wagnild and Young Resilience Scale, and the Spiritual Well-Being Scale and the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test, was collected from students who met study criteria. In a combined sample, academic success was correlated with overall spiritual well-being, empowerment and resilience. Although academic success was not correlated with overall emotional intelligence, it was correlated with the emotional intelligence branch four (managing emotions) score. When undergraduate and graduate students were considered separately, only one correlation was found to be significantly related to academic success in the undergraduate sample, namely, emotional intelligence branch one (perceiving emotions). When examining the data from just graduate level nurses, significant relationships were found between total emotional intelligence with academic success, resilience with academic success, and psychological empowerment with academic success. The significant relationship between psychological empowerment, resilience, spiritual well-being and academic success in this study supports the statements in the literature that these concepts may play an important role in persistence through the challenges of nursing education

  9. A Previous Miscarriage and a Previous Successful Pregnancy Have a Different Impact on HLA Antibody Formation during a Subsequent Successful Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Kirsten Geneugelijk; Gideon Hönger; Hanneke Wilhelmina Maria van Deutekom; Irene Mathilde Hoesli; Stefan Schaub; Eric Spierings

    2016-01-01

    Inherited paternal HLA antigens from the semi-allogeneic fetus may trigger maternal immune responses during pregnancy, leading to the production of child-specific HLA antibodies. The prevalence of these HLA antibodies increases with the number of successful pregnancies. In the present study, we investigated the effect of a single prior miscarriage on HLA antibody formation during a subsequent successful pregnancy. Women with a successful pregnancy with one or more prior miscarriages (n = 229)...

  10. Using Reflective Writing as a Predictor of Academic Success in Different Assessment Formats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsingos-Lucas, Cherie; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Schneider, Carl R; Smith, Lorraine

    2017-02-25

    Objectives. To investigate whether reflective-writing skills are associated with academic success. Methods. Two hundred sixty-four students enrolled in a pharmacy practice course completed reflective statements. Regression procedures were conducted to determine whether reflective-writing skills were associated with academic success in different assessment formats: written, oral, and video tasks. Results. Reflective-writing skills were found to be a predictor of academic performance in some formats of assessment: written examination; oral assessment task and overall score for the Unit of Study (UoS). Reflective writing skills were not found to predict academic success in the video assessment task. Conclusions. Possessing good reflective-writing skills was associated with improved academic performance. Further research is recommended investigating the impact of reflective skill development on academic performance measures in other health education.

  11. Peer tutoring program for academic success of returning nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryer, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    High attrition rates among students in associate degree nursing programs are a concern for faculty, administrators, and students. Programs offering academic and emotional support for students at risk for failing a clinical course may decrease attrition rates and improve academic performance. A peer tutoring program was developed for returning nursing students who were unsuccessful in a previous clinical course. Peer tutors met with returning students weekly to review course work, complete case studies and practice NCLEX questions. Trusting, supportive relationships developed among students and a significant increase in grades was noted at the end of the course for 79% of students. Implementation of peer tutoring was beneficial for returning students, tutors, and the nursing program and may be valuable in other courses where academic achievement is a concern.

  12. A Previous Miscarriage and a Previous Successful Pregnancy Have a Different Impact on HLA Antibody Formation during a Subsequent Successful Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geneugelijk, Kirsten; Hönger, Gideon; van Deutekom, Hanneke Wilhelmina Maria; Hösli, Irene Mathilde; Schaub, Stefan; Spierings, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Inherited paternal HLA antigens from the semi-allogeneic fetus may trigger maternal immune responses during pregnancy, leading to the production of child-specific HLA antibodies. The prevalence of these HLA antibodies increases with the number of successful pregnancies. In the present study, we investigated the effect of a single prior miscarriage on HLA antibody formation during a subsequent successful pregnancy. Women with a successful pregnancy with one or more prior miscarriages (n = 229) and women with a successful pregnancy without a prior miscarriage (n = 58), and their children were HLA typed. HLA antibody analyses were performed in these women to identify whether HLA antibodies were formed against mismatched HLA class-I antigens of the last child. The percentage of immunogenic antigens was significantly lower after a single successful pregnancy that was preceded by a single miscarriage (n = 18 women) compared to a successful pregnancy that was preceded by a first successful pregnancy (n = 62 women). Thus, our data suggest that a previous miscarriage has a different impact on child-specific HLA antibody formation during a subsequent successful pregnancy than a previous successful pregnancy. The lower immunogenicity in these women cannot be explained by reduced numbers of immunogenic B-cell and T-cell epitopes. In conclusion, our observations indicate that increasing gravidity is not related to an increased prevalence of HLA antibodies in a single successful pregnancy that was preceded by a single prior miscarriage.

  13. The Impact of NCAA Reclassification on Academic Success Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Jason I.

    2014-01-01

    Higher education institutions choose to invest in upward reclassification for their athletics program with anticipation of generating increased revenue and exposure for their school; however, this could have a detrimental effect on their student-athletes' academic progress. This study examined the relationship between four classifications of…

  14. Developmental Education: Resilience and Academic Success in Rural Appalachian Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Sandy

    2016-01-01

    The need for developmental education is ever present in higher education as more students annually enter college underprepared for entry level college coursework. Underpreparedness is a pervasive concern in higher education. Community colleges in particular are the primary means of shepherding developmental education. Academic underpreparedness is…

  15. How One Academic Health Center Is Successfully Facing the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhak, Sherif S.

    1996-01-01

    The approach taken by one academic health center, Allegheny Health, Education and Research Foundation (Pennsylvania), to changes in the economics of health care is described. The foundation is cultivating a more responsive organization, reengineering operations, and securing its revenue base in a variety of ways. Statistics are provided to…

  16. School-Based Health Centers and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Poor academic outcomes and high dropout rates are major concerns of educators, policy makers, and parents alike--and poor health severely limits a child's motivation and ability to learn. Recent research confirms that "health disparities affect educational achievement". Improving students' health is integral to education reform.…

  17. Concrete Roses: Examining the Resilience of Academically Successful Latino Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, Daisy Denise

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on the academic resilience exhibited by urban, low-income, first college generation Latino students, as they navigated numerous risk factors and persisted from early education to law school. In order to uncover the protective factors that allowed resilient Latino students to overcome adversity within the K-20 educational…

  18. U-Pace: Facilitating Academic Success for All Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Diane M.; Fleming, Raymond; Pedrick, Laura E.; Ports, Katie A.; Barnack-Tavlaris, Jessica L.; Helion, Alicia M.; Swain, Rodney A.

    2011-01-01

    Because the transition to a knowledge-based economy requires an educated workforce, colleges and universities have made retention of students--particularly those who are academically underprepared--an institutional priority. College completion leads to economic and social advancement for students and is also critical to the nation's economic and…

  19. Do Academically Deficient Scholarship Athletes Earn Higher Wages Subsequent to Graduation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olbrecht, Alexandre

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, data from the Baccalaureate & Beyond 93/97/03 survey is used to estimate the effects on the earnings of scholarship athletics participants subsequent to graduation. Former college athletes are found to have higher wages on average. Upon first glance, colleges and universities could use these results to argue on behalf of investments…

  20. Successful emotion regulation skills application predicts subsequent reduction of symptom severity during treatment of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radkovsky, Anna; McArdle, John J; Bockting, Claudi L H; Berking, Matthias

    2014-04-01

    Deficits in emotion regulation (ER) skills are considered a putative maintaining factor for major depressive disorder (MDD) and hence a promising target in the treatment of MDD. However, to date, the association between the successful application of arguably adaptive ER skills and changes in depressive symptom severity (DSS) has yet to be investigated over the course of treatment. Thus, the primary aim of this study was to clarify reciprocal prospective associations between successful ER skills application and DSS over the course of inpatient cognitive behavioral therapy for MDD. Additionally, we explored whether such associations would differ across specific ER skills. We assessed successful ER skills application and DSS 4 times during the first 3 weeks of treatment in 152 inpatients (62.5% women, average age 45.6 years) meeting criteria for MDD. We first tested whether successful skills application and depression were cross-sectionally associated by computing Pearson's correlations. Then, we utilized latent curve modeling to test whether changes in successful skills application were negatively associated with changes in DSS during treatment. Finally, we used latent change score models to clarify whether successful skills application would predict subsequent reduction of DSS. Cross-sectionally, successful ER skills application was associated with lower levels of DSS at all assessment times, and an increase of successful skills application during treatment was associated with a decrease of DSS. Moreover, successful overall ER skills application predicted subsequent changes in DSS (but not vice versa). Finally, strength of associations between successful application and DSS differed across specific ER skills. Among a broad range of potentially adaptive skills, only the abilities to tolerate negative emotions and to actively modify undesired emotions were significantly associated with subsequent improvement in DSS. Systematically enhancing health-relevant ER skills

  1. Latino Immigrant Parents' Financial Stress, Depression, and Academic Involvement Predicting Child Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Lauren R.; Spears Brown, Christia; Mistry, Rashmita S.

    2017-01-01

    The current study examines Mexican-heritage immigrant parents' financial stress, English language fluency, and depressive symptoms as risk factors for parental academic involvement and child academic outcomes. Participants were 68 Latino immigrant (from Mexico) third and fourth graders and their parents. Results from a structural equation model…

  2. Searching for an Academic Librarian Job: Techniques to Maximize Success

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Angela R

    2015-01-01

    Job-hunting can be a confusing process for new librarians searching for their first professional position. Much of the literature available to potential job seekers focuses on general interview etiquette. This article provides advice to expedite the job hunt for academic library positions. The author draws upon personal experience to provide tips for an effective job hunt. These include how to prepare for a job search, locate job announcements, prepare application materials, typical interview...

  3. Can Academic Success Come from Five Minutes of Physical Activity?

    OpenAIRE

    Lynn M. Randall; Julienne K. Maeda

    2003-01-01

    Being physically active helps not only in the areas of health and fitness, but also in the area of academics, more specifically, mathematics. Brain-based teaching can play a large role in enhancing student learning through the use of movement, in particular, a short running activity on math fluency in addition problems. Could five minutes of a moderate to vigorous activity have any effect on students’ addition fluency? The purpose of this article is to share with readers the effects of ...

  4. Clinical Development of Cell Therapies: Setting the Stage for Academic Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-El-Enein, M; Volk, H-D; Reinke, P

    2017-01-01

    Cellular therapies have potential to treat a wide range of diseases with autologous immunotherapies showing unprecedented therapeutic promise in clinical trials. Such therapies are mainly developed by academic researchers applying small-scale production, targeting rare and unmet medical needs. Here, we highlight the clinical translation of immunotherapy product in an academic setting, which may serve as a success model for early academic development of cell-based therapeutics. © 2016 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  5. Students with Mental Health Needs: College Counseling Experiences and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwitzer, Alan M.; Moss, Catherine B.; Pribesh, Shana L.; St. John, Dan J.; Burnett, Dana D.; Thompson, Lenora H.; Foss, Jennifer J.

    2018-01-01

    This study examined college counseling experiences and academic outcomes. About 10% of college students seek counseling for mental health needs, and many would be unable to persist without support. Building on previous research, the research found that participating in counseling was beneficial to academic success. Students who visited the…

  6. Leading the 21st-century academic library successful strategies for envisioning and realizing preferred futures

    CERN Document Server

    Eden, Bradford Lee

    2015-01-01

    Leading the 21st Century Academic Library: Successful Strategies for Envisioning and Realizing Preferred Futures will explore the new roles and directions academic libraries are taking in the 21st century as a consequence of visionary leadership in exploring diverse futures.

  7. Noncognitive Variables to Predict Academic Success among Junior Year Baccalaureate Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ellen M. T.

    2017-01-01

    An equitable predictor of academic success is needed as nursing education strives toward comprehensive preparation of diverse nursing students. The purpose of this study was to discover how Sedlacek's (2004a) Noncognitive Questionnaire (NCQ) and Duckworth & Quinn's (2009) Grit-S predicted baccalaureate nursing student academic performance and…

  8. CHAID Analysis to Determine Socioeconomic Variables That Explain Students' Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Önder, Emine; Uyar, Seyma

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to determine students' characteristics that predict their academic success. The study group consisted of 4,229 students studying at middle schools in Burdur. The data were collected using a questionnaire in the 2014-2015 academic year and analyzed using CHAID (Chi-squared Automatic Interaction Detection) analysis, a type of…

  9. Military-Connected Student Academic Success at 4-Year Institutions: A Multi-Institution Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Klotz, Denise N.; Gansemer-Topf, Ann M.

    2017-01-01

    We examined how the experiences--academic, financial, social, and personal--and relationship factors of military-connected students attending a 4-year institution are associated with their academic success. This multi-institution study highlights the demographic characteristics, experiences, and campus relationships that are associated with…

  10. Identifying Predictors of Academic Success for Part-Time Students at Polytechnic Institutes in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Norhayati; Freeman, Steven A.; Shelley, Mack C.

    A central challenge for higher education today is to understand the diversity and complexity of nontraditional students' life experiences and how these factors influence their academic success. To better understand these issues, this study explored the role of demographic characteristics and employment variables in predicting the academic success…

  11. Academic Support and College Success for Postsecondary Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troiano, Peter F.; Liefeld, Julie Ann; Trachtenberg, Jennifer V.

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between degree of academic support center use and college success was examined in a population of 262 college students with learning disabilities. Five years of attendance data and graduation rates were examined and submitted to discriminant function analysis to evaluate the predictive influence of academic support center use on…

  12. Library Use and Undergraduate Student Outcomes: New Evidence for Students' Retention and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Krista M.; Fransen, Jan; Nackerud, Shane

    2013-01-01

    Academic libraries, like other university departments, are being asked to demonstrate their value to the institution. This study discusses the impact library usage has on the retention and academic success of first-time, first-year undergraduate students at a large, public research university. Usage statistics were gathered at the University of…

  13. Creating an Oasis: Some Insights into the Practice and Theory of a Successful Academic Writing Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardale, D.; Hendrickson, T.; Jefferson, T.; Klass, D.; Lord, L.; Marinelli, M.

    2015-01-01

    Academic writing groups are acknowledged as a successful approach to increasing research publication output and quality. However, the possible links between the formation and ongoing utilisation of writing groups and improvements in scholarly written research outputs remain relatively undertheorised. In this article, we draw on academic writing…

  14. Successful first-year learning: A social cognitive view of academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    underline the fact that successful learning is a complex and multi-layered process that is ongoing and that needs to be monitored, sustained and evaluated throughout students' study careers. The students' personal perspectives on academic study provided not only evidence that the development of academic literacy is ...

  15. The Professional Mentor Program Plus: An Academic Success and Retention Tool for Adult Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Chaunda L.; Homant, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    To promote the academic success of and to retain adult students of color, the Academic Services Unit at the University of Detroit Mercy (UDM), an urban Catholic university, in Detroit Michigan, has designed and implemented the Professional Mentor Program Plus, funded by the State of Michigan's King-Chavez-Parks (KCP) higher education initiative,…

  16. The Effect of the Digital Classroom on Academic Success and Online Technologies Self-Efficacy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mehmet Arif Ozerbas; Bilge Has Erdogan

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to observe whether the learning environment created by digital classroom technologies has any effect on the academic success and online technologies self-efficacy of 7th grade students...

  17. Performance Anxiety and Academic Success Level Examination of Students in Turkey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sena GÜRŞEN OTACIOĞLU

    2016-01-01

    ...). Research was carried out in order to reveal how relations of performance anxiety and academic success levels of students receiving professional music education in different universities could differ among variables...

  18. A Comparative Study of Student Engagement, Satisfaction, and Academic Success among International and American Students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nadia Korobova; Soko S Starobin

    2015-01-01

      This study examines the relationship between student engagement, student satisfaction, and the academic success of international and American students using 2008 National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) data...

  19. Relationship of academic success of medical students with motivation and pre-admission grades

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luqman, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    .... These students filled out 'Strength of Motivation for Medical School' (SMMS) questionnaire. The data of pre-admission grades of these students along with academic success in college according to examination results in different years were collected...

  20. Searching for an Academic Librarian Job: Techniques to Maximize Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela R. Davis

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Job-hunting can be a confusing process for new librarians searching for their first professional position. Much of the literature available to potential job seekers focuses on general interview etiquette. This article provides advice to expedite the job hunt for academic library positions. The author draws upon personal experience to provide tips for an effective job hunt. These include how to prepare for a job search, locate job announcements, prepare application materials, typical interview procedures, and how to interact with a hiring committee. Additionally, the article provides guidance on how to make the best use of time spent on the job hunt and not get discouraged during the process.

  1. What explains the academic success of second-year economics students? An exploratory analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Pietie Horn; Ada Jansen; Derek Yu

    2008-01-01

    The factors influencing academic success of first-year Economics students have received much attention from researchers. Very little attention, however, has been given to the determinants of success of senior Economics students. In the USA, Graunke and Woosley (2005: 367) indicate that college sophomores (second years) face academic difficulties, but this receives little attention in the literature. Economics is an elective subject for second-year students at Stellenbosch University. The acad...

  2. Social support, stress, health, and academic success in Ghanaian adolescents: a path analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glozah, Franklin N; Pevalin, David J

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study is to gain a better understanding of the role psychosocial factors play in promoting the health and academic success of adolescents. A total of 770 adolescent boys and girls in Senior High Schools were randomly selected to complete a self-report questionnaire. School reported latest terminal examination grades were used as the measure of academic success. Structural equation modelling indicated a relatively good fit to the posteriori model with four of the hypothesised paths fully supported and two partially supported. Perceived social support was negatively related to stress and predictive of health and wellbeing but not academic success. Stress was predictive of health but not academic success. Finally, health and wellbeing was able to predict academic success. These findings have policy implications regarding efforts aimed at promoting the health and wellbeing as well as the academic success of adolescents in Ghana. Copyright © 2014 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Successful rehabilitation and release with subsequently brood of a one-eyed Eagle Owl (Bubo bubo)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hegemann, Arne; Hegemann, Ernst Dieter; Krone, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    The rehabilitation and release of injured or ill raptors and owls is widespread. The overall aim of this intervention is the successful reintroduction of the bird into the wild population. Though many injuries are treatable, it is thought that vision-impaired birds have no change of survival and

  4. Case Studies of Success: Supporting Academic Success for Students with High Potential from Ethnic Minority and Economically Disadvantaged Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Carol Ann; Jarvis, Jane M.

    2014-01-01

    The underrepresentation of ethnic minority and economically disadvantaged students in gifted education must be understood in terms of broader school contexts and practices. This qualitative study investigated how teachers and schools contributed to the academic success of minority students of high potential from economically disadvantaged…

  5. Structural and socio-psychological influences on adolescents' educational aspirations and subsequent academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothon, Catherine; Arephin, Muna; Klineberg, Emily; Cattell, Vicky; Stansfeld, Stephen

    2011-06-01

    Previous literature indicates that educational aspirations are an important predictor of achievement at school and beyond. This paper examines the factors that are associated with high educational aspirations. It also looks at the relationship between aspirations and achievement at the General Certificate of Secondary Education in a deprived area of London. The results show that educational aspirations are associated with individual characteristics. Girls were more likely than boys to express a wish to remain in education beyond the age of 16. For the most academic route post-16, there were substantial ethnic differences, with minority ethnic groups generally being more likely to state a desire to follow this path. Students who were eligible for free school meals tended to have lower aspirations. Socio-psychological variables were also shown to be of importance, particularly self-esteem and psychological distress. Importantly, educational aspirations had a strong association with actual achievement at age 16, remaining associated even after controlling for a number of other variables, including prior achievement. These findings are discussed in light of previous research and potential intervention strategies.

  6. Effects of Grit on the Academic Success of Adult Female Students at Korean Open University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Mae Hyang; Lim, Hyo Jin; Ha, Hye Suk

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the structural relationship between age, grit (i.e., perseverance of effort and consistency of interest), conscientiousness, self-control, and school success of female students at an Open University in Korea. We analyzed 509 students' responses, and it turned out that the level of perseverance of effort was negatively correlated with academic maladjustment. Also, perseverance of effort had a positive indirect effect on grade point average scores. Conscientiousness and self-control were found to be positively correlated with grit factors and they had negative effects on academic maladjustment through perseverance of effort. Age had both direct and indirect effects on grit and academic success of the students.

  7. Factors associated with nursing students' academic success or failure: a retrospective Italian multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dante, A; Valoppi, G; Saiani, L; Palese, A

    2011-01-01

    With the increasing standardization of nursing education in Europe under the Bologna Process Declaration (1999), there is a growing interest in defining a common concept of academic success and/or failure, measuring associated factors and comparing differences and similarities between different countries. While there is literature available on these issues from other countries, the phenomenon has not been studied in Italy. The aim of this study was to define the factors associated with academic success or failure in an Italian cohort of nursing students on a bachelor's degree course. A retrospective multicenter study design was adopted. All students enrolling in the academic year 2004-05 on two different bachelor's courses in the north of Italy were interviewed. Only 81 of the 117 students considered (69.2%) concluded their course in three years. Multivariate analysis identified two factors determining academic success/failure: good results in the entry examination for the bachelor's degree in nursing sciences were associated with academic success (OR 4.217, IC(95%) 1.501-11.84), while family commitments, e.g. caring for children or elderly people were associated with academic failure (OR 0.120, IC(95%) 0.03-0.471). Academic failure has a strong impact on students, their families, the teaching faculties and the community, and its prevention is a challenge in the countries with a shortage of nurses. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Hope of Success and Fear of Failure Predicting Academic Procrastination Students Who Working on a Thesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sari Zakiah Akmal

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Students, who are working on the thesis, have some difficulties caused by internal and external factors. Those problems can disrupt the completion of their thesis, such as the tendency to do academic procrastination. Increasing achievement motivation can reduce academic procrastination. This study aims to look at the role of achievement motivation (hope of success and fear of failure in predicting academic procrastination. The study used a quantitative approach by distributing academic procrastination and achievement motivation questionnaires. The study involved 182 students who were working on a thesis as samples, which were obtained by using accidental sampling technique. Data were analyzed using multiple regressions. It showed that the hope of success and fear of failure have a significant role in predicting academic procrastination (R2 = 13.8%, F = 14,356, p <0.05. The hope of success can decrease academic procrastination, while fear of failure can improve it. Thus, interventions to reduce academic procrastination can be delivered by increasing students hope of success.

  9. Can Academic Success Come from Five Minutes of Physical Activity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn M. Randall

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Being physically active helps not only in the areas of health and fitness, but also in the area of academics, more specifically, mathematics. Brain-based teaching can play a large role in enhancing student learning through the use of movement, in particular, a short running activity on math fluency in addition problems. Could five minutes of a moderate to vigorous activity have any effect on students’ addition fluency? The purpose of this article is to share with readers the effects of infusing a short physical activity into an already busy day. Two primary findings were gleaned from this study. First, although there was a small positive effect on math fluency, there was no negative effect. Second, positive changes in students’ behavior were noted by the classroom teacher.

  10. Success with academic English: reflections of deaf college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano, Rose Marie; McKee, Barbara; Lepoutre, Dominique

    2002-03-01

    The study identified social, educational, and demographic characteristics of deaf postsecondary students who demonstrated strong reading and writing skills. Questionnaire information, information from institutional databases, and in-depth personal interviews were used to identify factors and characteristics that positively influenced the attainment of strong academic literacy skills. Among the areas investigated were school experiences, reading and writing experiences, study habits and attitudes, communication preferences, personality traits, and home and family background. Results of the study generally support previous work conducted with talented hearing youth. Several primary themes emerged from the study: heavy parental involvement in early education and educational decisions, differing modes of communication but extensive family communication, early exposure to and intensive experiences with reading and writing, an enjoyment of reading, a relatively limited social life, high parental and secondary school expectations, the importance of television, and positive self-image.

  11. Creating a Successful Academic Climate for Urban Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter, Terri

    2009-01-01

    Teaching students in the inner city has been likened to hugging a porcupine--teachers nudge them toward success while getting pricked along the way. Many urban students perform below proficiency level and are difficult to manage. Their apathy toward completing class assignments, let alone homework, compounds the problem. As a whole, educators do…

  12. Succession Planning In Academic Libraries In Owerri, Imo State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... assignment and job rotation between departments as strategies used in implementation. The perceived impact of succession planning includes ensuring continuity of leaders for key positions as well as increased opportunities for high potentials. The study recommended among other things that library organization should ...

  13. University students' attributions towards academic success or failure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study showed that the students consistently attributed success to internal factors and failure to external causes. Gender and age differences in attribution were not statistically significant. The study recommends further research with a larger sample to produce more generalisable results and the need for more interaction ...

  14. Components of success in academic reading tasks for Swedish students

    OpenAIRE

    Philip Shaw; Alan McMillion

    2011-01-01

    In a parallel-language environment students are often required to read in a language different from the one they use in lectures, seminars, and among themselves. Relatively little research has been done on the overall reading success of such groups or on the componential make up of their L2 reading skills. This paper compares the English-language reading skills of Swedish students of biology with that of equivalent British biology students. Many Swedish readers perform within or above the nor...

  15. The relations between the academic success levels of the boys playing basketball and certain variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umut CANLI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate the relation between the academic success levels of the boys playing basketball and certain variables such as age, basketball playing times, the number of the weekly average trainings and motoric skills. Material and Methods: 93 students participated voluntarily in the study from three different sports clubs. The ages in which the participants started basketball varied between 10 and 13, and their durations of weekly trainings differed from each other. The end-of-the-year academic success average points of the participants were considered in determining the academic success levels; and the International Physical Performance Test Profile (IPPTP (Kamar, 2008 was used in measuring the motoric skills. The issue of whether there was a significant difference between the participants was determined by using the SPSS 21.0 Package Program together with the One-Way ANOVA Test. Results: According to the findings, it was determined that there were no relations between the academic success rates and the basketball playing durations, the number of weekly trainings, and their motoric skills (p>0.05. On the other hand, a statistically significant difference was determined between the age variable and the academic success levels (p<0.05. Conclusions: No significant differences were detected between the motoric skills, number of trainings, starting basketball dates and the academic success levels of the sportsmen who receive basic basketball training (which contribute to the development of motoric skills with different numbers of weekly training and with different basketball starting dates; while a negative significance was detected between the age variable and academic success.

  16. A prospective study of Mexican American adolescents' academic success: considering family and individual factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosa, Mark W; O'Donnell, Megan; Cham, Heining; Gonzales, Nancy A; Zeiders, Katherine H; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Knight, George P; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana

    2012-03-01

    Mexican American youth are at greater risk of school failure than their peers. To identify factors that may contribute to academic success in this population, this study examined the prospective relationships from 5th grade to 7th grade of family (i.e., human capital [a parent with at least a high school education], residential stability, academically and occupationally positive family role models, and family structure) and individual characteristics (i.e., externalizing symptoms, bilingualism, gender, and immigrant status) to the academic performance of 749 Mexican American early adolescents (average age = 10.4 years and 48.7% were girls in 5th grade) from economically and culturally diverse families as these youth made the transition to junior high school. Results indicated that while controlling for prior academic performance, human capital and positive family role models assessed when adolescents were in 5th grade positively related to academic performance in 7th grade. Further, being a girl also was related to greater 7th grade academic success, whereas externalizing symptoms were negatively related to 7th grade academic performance. No other variables in the model were significantly and prospectively related to 7th grade academic performance. Implications for future research and interventions are discussed.

  17. A Prospective Study of Mexican American Adolescents’ Academic Success: Considering Family and Individual Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosa, Mark W.; O’Donnell, Megan; Cham, Heining; Gonzales, Nancy A.; Zeiders, Katherine H.; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Knight, George P.; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana

    2011-01-01

    Mexican American youth are at greater risk of school failure than their peers. To identify factors that may contribute to academic success in this population, this study examined the prospective relationships from 5th grade to 7th grade of family (i.e., human capital [a parent with at least a high school education], residential stability, academically and occupationally positive family role models, and family structure) and individual characteristics (i.e., externalizing symptoms, bilingualism, gender, and immigrant status) to the academic performance of 749 Mexican American early adolescents (average age = 10.4 years and 48.7% were girls in 5th grade) from economically and culturally diverse families as these youth made the transition to junior high school. Results indicated that while controlling for prior academic performance, human capital and positive family role models assessed when adolescents were in in 5th grade positively related to academic performance in 7th grade. Further, being a girl also was related to greater 7th grade academic success, whereas externalizing symptoms were negatively related to 7th grade academic performance. No other variables in the model were significantly and prospectively related to 7th grade academic performance. Implications for future research and interventions are discussed. PMID:21863379

  18. Intrinsic Motivating Factors for Academic Success of Young At-Risk Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Tanyia Perry

    2012-01-01

    Motivation as a factor in academic success is well documented in the literature and an important construct in educational planning. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore motivating factors for at-risk students who successfully graduated from high school. The framework for this study was based on Maslow's hierarchy of needs…

  19. Capitalizing on Academic Success: Students' Interactions with Friends as Predictors of School Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altermatt, Ellen Rydell

    2011-01-01

    Although friends often share successes with one another, very little attention has been paid to these interactions. The current study examines the nature of middle school students' interactions with friends following academic successes and the consequences of these interactions for students' school adjustment. Participants were 293 fifth- through…

  20. Undergraduate Educational Experiences: The Academic Success of College Students with Blindness and Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Ricky

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore how fifteen students with blindness and visual impairments experienced their engagement in undergraduate studies at four 4-year universities and perceived their success. They also provided their understandings of the impact of institutions, faculty, staff, and others on their academic success.…

  1. Value of College Education Mediating the Predictive Effects of Causal Attributions on Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ying; Stupnisky, Robert H.; Obade, Masela; Gerszewski, Tammy; Ruthig, Joelle C.

    2015-01-01

    Causal attributions (explanations for outcomes) have been found to predict college students' academic success; however, not all students attributing success or failure to adaptive (i.e., controllable) causes perform well in university. Eccles et al.'s ("Achievement and achievement motives." W.H. Freeman, San Francisco, pp 75-145, 1983)…

  2. Supporting Student Retention and Success: Including Family Areas in an Academic Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Ian; Rutledge, Lorelei; Mowdood, Alfred; Reed, Jacob; Bigler, Scott; Soehner, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Many universities and colleges focus on student retention and completion as a measure of their success. Publications such as the "Chronicle of Higher Education" carry an increasing number of articles dealing with student retention, success, and completion. Academic libraries support this goal through a wide variety of services, teaching,…

  3. Admission Scores as a Predictor of Academic Success in the Fiji School of Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeala, Christian C.; Swami, Niraj S.; Lal, Nilesh; Hussain, Shagufta

    2012-01-01

    Secondary education in Fiji ends with the Form 7 examination. Predictive validity for academic success of Form 7 scores which form the basis for admission into the Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery programme of the Fiji School of Medicine was examined via a cohort of 129 students. Success rates for year 1 in 2008, 2009, and 2010 were 90.7…

  4. Promoting the Academic Engagement and Success of Black Male Student-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Paul C.; Hines, Erik M.; Kelly, Darren D.; Williams, Derick J.; Bagley, Bethany

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to provide a qualitative look at the factors associated with the academic engagement and success of Black male student-athletes in high school. The research team employed a thematic analysis to examine semi-structured interviews conducted with two successful Black male student-athletes, along with their principal,…

  5. Collegiate Student-Athletes' Academic Success: Academic Communication Apprehension's Impact on Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Kai'Iah A.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation study examines the impact of traditional and non-cognitive variables on the academic prediction model for a sample of collegiate student-athletes. Three hundred and fifty-nine NCAA Division IA male and female student-athletes, representing 13 sports, including football and Men's and Women's Basketball provided demographic…

  6. Successful determination of larval dispersal distances and subsequent settlement for long-lived pelagic larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelayo Salinas-de-León

    Full Text Available Despite its importance, we still have a poor understanding of the level of connectivity between marine populations in most geographical locations. Taking advantage of the natural features of the southeast coast of New Zealand's North Island, we deployed a series of settlement stations and conducted plankton tows to capture recent settlers and planktonic larvae of the common intertidal gastropod Austrolittorina cincta (6-8 week larval period. Satellite image analysis and ground truthing surveys revealed the absence of suitable intertidal rocky shore habitat for A. cincta over a 100 km stretch of coastline between Kapiti Island to the south and Wanganui to the north. Fifteen settlement stations (3 replicates × 5 sites, which were used to mimic intertidal habitat suitable for A. cincta, were deployed for two months around and north of Kapiti Island (at 0.5, 1, 5, 15, 50 km. In addition, we also conducted plankton tows at each settlement station when the stations were first deployed to collect A. cincta larvae in the water column. On collection, all newly settled gastropods and larvae in the plankton samples were individually isolated, and a species-specific microsatellite marker was used to positively identify A. cincta individuals. Most of the positively identified A. cincta settlers and larvae were collected at the first three sampling stations (<5 km. However, low numbers of A. cincta settlers and larvae were also recorded at the two more distant locations (15 and 50 km. Dispersal curves modeled from our data suggested that <1% of gastropod larvae would travel more than 100 km. While our data show that most larvae are retained close to their natal populations (<5 km, a small proportion of larvae are able to travel much larger geographic distances. Our estimates of larval dispersal and subsequent settlement are one of only a few for marine species with a long-lived larva.

  7. Is Formal Research Training Associated With Academic Success in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jesse T; Egbert, Mark A; Dodson, Thomas B; Susarla, Srinivas M

    2018-01-01

    Pursuing promotion in academic rank and seeking funded research opportunities are core elements of academic practice. Our purpose was to assess whether formal research training influences academic rank or National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding among full-time academic oral and maxillofacial surgeons (OMSs). We performed a cross-sectional study of full-time academic OMSs in the United States. The primary predictor variable was completion of formal research training, defined as a research fellowship or advanced non-clinical doctoral research degree (PhD, DMSc, DPH, DPhil, ScD). The outcomes measures were current academic rank and successful acquisition of NIH funding (yes vs no). Other study variables included MD degree, clinical fellowship training, years since training completion, and Hirsch index (H-index), a measure of academic productivity. We computed the descriptive, bivariate, and multiple regression models and set P ≤ .05 as significant. A total of 299 full-time academic OMSs were included in the study sample. Of the 299 OMSs, 41 (13.7%) had had formal research training. Surgeons with formal research training had a greater mean interval since completion of training (P = 0.01) and had a greater mean H-index (P = 0.02). Formal research training was not associated with academic rank (P = .10) but was associated with an increased likelihood of receiving NIH funding (P academic OMSs, those with formal research training had greater success with obtaining NIH funding. However, formal research training did not appear to influence an OMS's current academic rank. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Syndicate Innovation Venturing: Translating Academic Innovations into Commercial Successes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain A. Vertès

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Innovations that initiate new technology cycles, i.e., radical innovations, bring tremendous value to Society and build for the companies that deploy them sustainable competitive advantages. However, large firms have typically been relatively inefficient at accessing from academia or technology start-ups such technological leaps. Indeed, most multiyear and multimillion dollar academia-industry partnerships have historically not resulted in any acceleration of the rate of deployment of game-changing innovations, which empirically proceeds in 25 year cycles, such as for example the expansion of the scope of the pharmaceutical industry from small molecules to biologics, or, projecting into the future, to siRNA or therapeutic stem cell technologies. Syndicated innovation venturing is a new strategic partnering concept described here that brings together actors from different economic segments in a non zero-sum game as a means to facilitate seed-funding, with the aim to de-risk technologies while reducing initial financial exposures. A case study in the pharmaceutical industry suggests that alleviating this hurdle may provide an appropriate environment to improve the dynamics of academic technology transfer to the commercial phase. By contributing to the de-risking of the creation of novel biotechnology businesses, this novel mechanism could help speed up the commercialization of emerging technologies on a large scale. At a time when knowledge-based firms such as pharmaceutical companies attempt to revisit their innovation models to advance science, in spite of an environment of increasing risk-aversion, such responses could tilt the balance in favor of disruptive products and sustained corporate financial performance by removing common barriers to radical innovation deployment.

  9. Consecutive successful pregnancies subsequent to intravenous immunoglobulin therapy in a patient with recurrent spontaneous miscarriage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diejomaoh MF

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Michael F Diejomaoh,1,2 Zainab Bello,2 Waleed Al Jassar,1,2 Jiri Jirous,2 Kavitha Karunakaran,2 Asiya T Mohammed11Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University, Safat, 2Maternity Hospital, Shuwaikh, Kuwait Background: Recurrent spontaneous miscarriage (RSM has a multifactorial etiology, mainly due to karyotype abnormalities including balanced translocation, anatomical uterine disorders, and immunological factors, although in 50%–60% the etiology is unexplained. The treatment of RSM remains challenging, and the role of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG in RSM is controversial. Case report: Mrs HM, 37 years old, obstetric summary: P0+1+13+1, a known case of hypothyroidism/polycystic ovary syndrome, married to an unrelated 47-year-old man, presented to our RSM clinic in early January 2014 for investigation and treatment. She has had multiple failed in vitro fertilization trials and 13 first-trimester missed miscarriages terminating at 6–7 weeks, all without IVIG therapy. Her tenth pregnancy was spontaneous, managed in London, UK, with multiple supportive therapy and courses of IVIG starting from the third to the 30th week of pregnancy. The pregnancy ended at 36 weeks of gestation with a cesarean section and a live girl baby was delivered. Mrs HM had balanced translocation, 46XX t (7:11 (p10:q10. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis/intracytoplasmic sperm injection/in vitro fertilization was performed with embryo transfer on May 29, 2014, and resulted in a successful pregnancy. She was commenced immediately on metformin, luteal support, and IVIG therapy, started at 6 weeks of gestation and at monthly intervals until 30 weeks of gestation, and also received additional therapy. The pregnancy was monitored with ultrasound, progressed uneventfully until admission at 35 weeks of gestation, with mildly elevated liver enzymes and suspected fetal growth restriction. She was managed conservatively, and in the light of

  10. Consecutive successful pregnancies subsequent to intravenous immunoglobulin therapy in a patient with recurrent spontaneous miscarriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diejomaoh, Michael F; Bello, Zainab; Al Jassar, Waleed; Jirous, Jiri; Karunakaran, Kavitha; Mohammed, Asiya T

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent spontaneous miscarriage (RSM) has a multifactorial etiology, mainly due to karyotype abnormalities including balanced translocation, anatomical uterine disorders, and immunological factors, although in 50%-60% the etiology is unexplained. The treatment of RSM remains challenging, and the role of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) in RSM is controversial. Mrs HM, 37 years old, obstetric summary: P0+1+13+1, a known case of hypothyroidism/polycystic ovary syndrome, married to an unrelated 47-year-old man, presented to our RSM clinic in early January 2014 for investigation and treatment. She has had multiple failed in vitro fertilization trials and 13 first-trimester missed miscarriages terminating at 6-7 weeks, all without IVIG therapy. Her tenth pregnancy was spontaneous, managed in London, UK, with multiple supportive therapy and courses of IVIG starting from the third to the 30th week of pregnancy. The pregnancy ended at 36 weeks of gestation with a cesarean section and a live girl baby was delivered. Mrs HM had balanced translocation, 46XX t (7:11) (p10:q10). Preimplantation genetic diagnosis/intracytoplasmic sperm injection/in vitro fertilization was performed with embryo transfer on May 29, 2014, and resulted in a successful pregnancy. She was commenced immediately on metformin, luteal support, and IVIG therapy, started at 6 weeks of gestation and at monthly intervals until 30 weeks of gestation, and also received additional therapy. The pregnancy was monitored with ultrasound, progressed uneventfully until admission at 35 weeks of gestation, with mildly elevated liver enzymes and suspected fetal growth restriction. She was managed conservatively, and in the light of nonreassuring fetal status, a live female infant weighing 2.29 kg was delivered by emergency cesarean section on January 14, 2015, with an Apgar score of 8 and 9 and mild respiratory distress, and was admitted to the Special Care Baby Unit for intensive therapy. The mother and baby made

  11. MOTIVATION AND SUCCESS OF ACADEMIC SPIN-OFFS: EVIDENCE FROM HUNGARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novotny Adam

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Universities today are expected to play a major role in contributing to economic competitiveness and especially through the process of commercializing research results. There is much evidence that firms started by university researchers are effective channels of knowledge from the academic sphere to the private sector. To encourage the creation of university spin-offs, first we have to understand the goals and motivations of academic entrepreneurs. This paper includes the empirical study of 80 Hungarian spin-off owners, who run their own firm besides retaining their position at the university. The purpose is to explore the motives that drive academics to start their own business and to test the relationship between motivations and entrepreneurial success. Success is measured from both objective and subjective aspects. The former refers to quantitative indices related to business performance such as firm revenue, change of revenue, number of employees and firm age. The latter refers to the self-evaluation of one’s success as an academic entrepreneur. Subjective success is measured on the one hand by the researcher’s own entrepreneurial success criteria, while on the other hand by the perceived degree to which his or her knowledge has been commercialized on the market. The results show that the dissatisfaction with the university salary (necessity is the most important motive for starting a venture in the academic sphere. The studied entrepreneurial motivations, except for necessity, have a significant relationship with subjective success, but a weaker or no relationship with objective success. The results also highlight the importance of research-related motives, which have a relatively strong link with subjective success (mainly with the subjective success of technology transfer, and are also related to some objective performance indicators of the venture such as revenue. Although the need for achievement and the need for independence are

  12. Relationship of academic success of medical students with motivation and pre-admission grades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luqman, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    To determine predictive validity of pre-admission scores of medical students, evaluate correlation between level of motivation and later on academic success in a medical college. Analytical study. Foundation University Medical College, Islamabad, from June to August 2011. A non-probability convenience sampling of students of 1st to final year MBBS classes was done after obtaining informed consent. These students filled out 'Strength of Motivation for Medical School' (SMMS) questionnaire. The data of pre-admission grades of these students along with academic success in college according to examination results in different years were collected. The correlation between the pre-admission grades and score of SMMS questionnaire with their academic success in medical college was found by applying Pearson co-efficient of correlation in order to determine the predictive validity. Only 46% students revealed strong motivation. A significant, moderate correlation was found between preadmission scores and academic success in 1st year modular examination (0.52) which became weaker in various professional examinations in higher classes. However, no significant correlation was observed between motivation and academic success of medical students in college. Selecting medical students by pre-admission scores or motivation level alone may not be desirable. A combination of measures of cognitive ability criteria (FSc/pre-admission test scores) and non-cognitive skills (personality traits) is recommended to be employed with the use of right tools for selection of students in medical schools.

  13. Does academic performance in the premedical year predict the performance of the medical student in subsequent years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mazrou, Abdulrahman M

    2008-05-01

    Student admission into the College of Medicine at King Saud University (KSU) is dependent on the achievement of a grade point average (GPA) of ≥3.5 /5 by the end of the premedical year. This study was undertaken to ascertain whether pre-selected medical students who achieve a relatively low GPA (≤3.75/5) in the premedical year are at risk of having academic difficulties in subsequent years. A cross-sectional study of all students admitted to the College of Medicine at KSU during 5 academic years (1994 to 1998) was conducted in 2004. The likelihood of completing the program by 2004 and the dropout frequency were compared in the two groups based on their GPA in the premedical year: High GPA (>3.75) and Low GPA (≤3.75). During the study period, 739 students were admitted to the college. Of these, 619 (84%) were in High GPA group, and 120 (16%) in the Low GPA group. Of the students with High GPA, 545 (88%) out of 619 graduated compared with 79 (66%) of 120 in the Low GPA group (OR 3.822 [95% CI: 2.44, 5.99]: Pcolleges should help optimize the use of resources and reduce student wastage.

  14. Student Success Survey: Supporting Academic Success for At-Risk Nursing Students Through Early Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLain, Rhonda M; Fifolt, Matthew; Dawson, Martha A; Su, Wei; Milligan, Gary; Davis, Sandra; Hites, Lisle

    Diversity in the nursing workforce has a positive impact on the quality of care provided to minority patients. Although the number of students from diverse backgrounds entering nursing programs has increased, the attrition rate of these students remains high. This study assessed the construct validity of a self-assessment tool that can be used by faculty advisors to determine individual academic needs of students.

  15. A Prospective Study of Mexican American Adolescents’ Academic Success: Considering Family and Individual Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Roosa, Mark W.; O’Donnell, Megan; Cham, Heining; Gonzales, Nancy A.; Zeiders, Katherine H.; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Knight, George P.; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana

    2011-01-01

    Mexican American youth are at greater risk of school failure than their peers. To identify factors that may contribute to academic success in this population, this study examined the prospective relationships from 5th grade to 7th grade of family (i.e., human capital [a parent with at least a high school education], residential stability, academically and occupationally positive family role models, and family structure) and individual characteristics (i.e., externalizing symptoms, bilingualis...

  16. Causes of students’ stress, its effects on their academic success, and stress management by students

    OpenAIRE

    Owusu, Patrick; Essel, George

    2017-01-01

    This thesis examines the impact of stress on students’ academic performance and stress management among students of Seinäjoki University of Applied Sciences. The main objectives were to ascertain or identify the extent to which stress affects students’ academic success, health and general lifestyle, as well as to in-quire and bring to light measures to counteract the effects of existing stress in students. A quantitative method was used in gathering and analysis the data. For this purpos...

  17. "STEMulating" success factors: An investigation of the academic talents of successful Black male college graduates from STEM programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Jill T.

    This phenomenological research study explored the contributing factors experienced by Black males that epitomized their academic success in a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) area of study. During this investigative project, eleven Black male students were interviewed to determine how they were able to successfully navigate and complete a STEM degree. The data was collected through a qualitative inquiry, which involved interviewing students and collecting the data and organizing their perspectives into common themes. The principal findings in this study suggest that Black males can excel when primary influential people establish high expectations and believe and encourage Black males to succeed by providing the essential educational support models requisite to warrant success; the Black male maintains and affirms a self-assured self-worth in himself; the Black male is exposed to these fields and professions early on in their educational quest to enable them to witness first hand powerful and productive opportunities and pathways to academic success; exposure to other Black successful male role models who can mentor and show positive proof that with effort, these fields can become a reality; increase in academic motivation and recommendations from educators and counselors who direct and guide students into and away from these rigorous career fields. An analysis of the students' individual stories gave a revealing look into the pathways of their consciousness, emotional growth, and perspectives about being a successful STEM major. This kind of insight can be a constructive diagnostic tool for students, educators, counselors, and administrators who want to motivate and influence future students to major in STEM fields of study.

  18. Social Media Success for Academic Knowledge Sharing in Indonesia (Conceptual Model Development)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assegaff, Setiawan

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate how success is the social media as a tool for knowledge sharing among scholars in Indonesia. To evaluate the success of social media we develop a model base on Delone and McLeane IS Success Model. In this article, we would like discuss the process of developing the research model. In developing the model, we conduct literature review from knowledge management, social media and IS Success Model area from previous study. This study resulted in the social success model for academic knowledge sharing in Indonesia.

  19. Cognitive Investments in Academic Success: The Role of Need for Cognition at University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Grass

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that Need for Cognition (NFC, the individual tendency to engage in and enjoy cognitive endeavors, contributes to academic performance. Most studies on NFC and related constructs have thereby focused on grades to capture tertiary academic success. This study aimed at a more comprehensive approach on NFC's meaning to success in university. We examined not only performance but also rather affective indicators of success. The current sample consisted of 396 students of different subjects with a mean age of 24 years (139 male. All participants took part in an online survey that assessed NFC together with school performance and further personality variables via self-report. Success in university was comprehensively operationalized including performance, satisfaction with one's studies, and thoughts about quitting/changing one's major as indicators. The value of NFC in predicting tertiary academic success was examined with correlation analyses and path analysis. NFC significantly correlated with all success variables with the highest correlation for study satisfaction. Path analysis confirmed the importance of NFC for study satisfaction showing that NFC had a significant direct effect on study satisfaction and via this variable also a significant indirect effect on termination thoughts. This study clearly indicates that NFC broadly contributes to the mastery of academic requirements and that it is worthwhile to intensify research on NFC in the context of tertiary education.

  20. Cognitive Investments in Academic Success: The Role of Need for Cognition at University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grass, Julia; Strobel, Alexander; Strobel, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has shown that Need for Cognition (NFC), the individual tendency to engage in and enjoy cognitive endeavors, contributes to academic performance. Most studies on NFC and related constructs have thereby focused on grades to capture tertiary academic success. This study aimed at a more comprehensive approach on NFC's meaning to success in university. We examined not only performance but also rather affective indicators of success. The current sample consisted of 396 students of different subjects with a mean age of 24 years (139 male). All participants took part in an online survey that assessed NFC together with school performance and further personality variables via self-report. Success in university was comprehensively operationalized including performance, satisfaction with one's studies, and thoughts about quitting/changing one's major as indicators. The value of NFC in predicting tertiary academic success was examined with correlation analyses and path analysis. NFC significantly correlated with all success variables with the highest correlation for study satisfaction. Path analysis confirmed the importance of NFC for study satisfaction showing that NFC had a significant direct effect on study satisfaction and via this variable also a significant indirect effect on termination thoughts. This study clearly indicates that NFC broadly contributes to the mastery of academic requirements and that it is worthwhile to intensify research on NFC in the context of tertiary education.

  1. The Nurse Entrance Test (NET): an early predictor of academic success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdur-Rahman, V; Femea, P L; Gaines, C

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether a relationship exists between beginning nursing students' Nurse Entrance Test (NET) scores and their academic success within the first year of professional study. The major goal is to identify predictors of academic success so that supportive academic strategies could be implemented for the at-risk student. A statistically significant relationship is found between NET reading comprehension, math and composite scores and nursing grades during the first semester. Test-taking skills, social stressors and learning styles were also significantly related to course performance. Successful students had significantly higher reading, math, and composite scores and lower family and social stress scores than unsuccessful students. NET scores were also predictive of nursing grades, accounting for 10-33% of the variance when entered into a multiple regression equation.

  2. Academic success across the transition from primary to secondary schooling among lower-income adolescents: understanding the effects of family resources and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbin, Lisa A; Stack, Dale M; Kingdon, Danielle

    2013-09-01

    Successful academic performance during adolescence is a key predictor of lifetime achievement, including occupational and social success. The present study investigated the important transition from primary to secondary schooling during early adolescence, when academic performance among youth often declines. The goal of the study was to understand how risk factors, specifically lower family resources and male gender, threaten academic success following this "critical transition" in schooling. The study involved a longitudinal examination of the predictors of academic performance in grades 7-8 among 127 (56 % girls) French-speaking Quebec (Canada) adolescents from lower-income backgrounds. As hypothesized based on transition theory, hierarchical regression analyses showed that supportive parenting and specific academic, social and behavioral competencies (including spelling ability, social skills, and lower levels of attention problems) predicted success across this transition among at-risk youth. Multiple-mediation procedures demonstrated that the set of compensatory factors fully mediated the negative impact of lower family resources on academic success in grades 7-8. Unique mediators (social skills, spelling ability, supportive parenting) also were identified. In addition, the "gender gap" in performance across the transition could be attributed statistically to differences between boys and girls in specific competencies observed prior to the transition, as well as differential parenting (i.e., support from mother) towards girls and boys. The present results contribute to our understanding of the processes by which established risk factors, such as low family income and gender impact development and academic performance during early adolescence. These "transitional" processes and subsequent academic performance may have consequences across adolescence and beyond, with an impact on lifetime patterns of achievement and occupational success.

  3. Research citation analysis of nursing academics in Canada: identifying success indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Thomas F; Crooks, Dauna; Plohman, James; Kepron, Emma

    2010-11-01

    This article is a report of a citation analysis of research publications by Canadian nursing academics. Citation analysis can yield objective criteria for assessing the value of published research and is becoming increasingly popular as an academic evaluation tool in universities around the world. Citation analysis is useful for examining the research performance of academic researchers and identifying leaders among them. The journal publication records of 737 nursing academics at 33 Canadian universities and schools of nursing were subject to citation analysis using the Scopus database. Three primary types of analysis were performed for each individual: number of citations for each journal publication, summative citation count of all published papers and the Scopus h-index. Preliminary citation analysis was conducted from June to July 2009, with the final analysis performed on 2 October 2009 following e-mail verification of publication lists. The top 20 nursing academics for each of five citation categories are presented: the number of career citations for all publications, number of career citations for first-authored publications, most highly cited first-authored publications, the Scopus h-index for all publications and the Scopus h-index for first-authored publications. Citation analysis metrics are useful for evaluating the research performance of academic researchers in nursing. Institutions are encouraged to protect the research time of successful and promising nursing academics, and to dedicate funds to enhance the research programmes of underperforming academic nursing groups. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. From admission to graduation: the impact of gender on student academic success in respiratory therapy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari, Arzu; Atalay, Orcin Telli; Aljamhan, Essam

    2010-01-01

    Despite research in other allied health professions and medicine, the influence of gender on student performance in respiratory therapy (RT) academic programs and on the National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC) examinations is unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify the impact of gender on student academic performance from admission to graduation and to determine whether gender differences affected student success on the NBRC examinations. This study consisted of a retrospective analysis of 91 female and 22 male graduates at a southeastern U.S. university between 2003 and 2007. The variables of academic success included the students' entering GPA, exit GPA, and first-attempt performance on the Certified Respiratory Therapy (CRT) examination and on the Written Registry for Respiratory Therapy (WRRT) examination. Independent sample t-test and paired sample t-test analyses at a level of significance of α = 0.05 were utilized. No significant gender differences were observed in the measures of students' entering GPA, exit GPA, or performance on scaled CRT and WRRT examinations (p > 0.05). When we compared entering GPAs and exit GPAs, a statistically significant difference was found (p gender plays no role in the academic success of RT students. When looking at the changes on academic success, we conclude that RT students work hard, as the graduation scores are higher than admission scores.

  5. Sources of support and psychological distress among academically successful inner-city youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Maureen E; Gallagher, Laura A; Alvarez-Salvat, Rose; Silsby, John

    2002-01-01

    Study 1 examined the relationships between parental attachment, academic achievement, and psychological distress among a multiethnic sample of academically successful inner-city high school students (19 White, 54 Black, 9 Asian, 18 Hispanic). These students participated in an enrichment program designed to prepare high school students for college success. The results suggest that the affective quality of maternal attachment is positively associated with grade point average, and the affective quality of paternal attachment is negatively associated with depressive symptoms. In Study 2, case examples provide an examination of sources of support, life stress, and patterns of resilience. Implications for prevention and intervention are also discussed.

  6. What Is Career Success for Academic Hospitalists? A Qualitative Analysis of Early-Career Faculty Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumbler, Ethan; Yirdaw, Essey; Kneeland, Patrick; Pierce, Read; Rendon, Patrick; Herzke, Carrie; Jones, Christine D

    2018-01-19

    Understanding the concept of career success is critical for hospital medicine groups seeking to create sustainably rewarding faculty positions. Conceptual models of career success describe both extrinsic (compensation and advancement) and intrinsic (career satisfaction and job satisfaction) domains. How hospitalists define career success for themselves is not well understood. In this study, we qualitatively explore perspectives on how early-career clinician-educators define career success. We developed a semistructured interview tool of open-ended questions validated by using cognitive interviewing. Transcribed interviews were conducted with 17 early-career academic hospitalists from 3 medical centers to thematic saturation. A mixed deductiveinductive, qualitative, analytic approach was used to code and map themes to the theoretical framework. The single most dominant theme participants described was "excitement about daily work," which mapped to the job satisfaction organizing theme. Participants frequently expressed the importance of "being respected and recognized" and "dissemination of work," which were within the career satisfaction organizing theme. The extrinsic organizing themes of advancement and compensation were described as less important contributors to an individual's sense of career success. Ambivalence toward the "academic value of clinical work," "scholarship," and especially "promotion" represented unexpected themes. The future of academic hospital medicine is predicated upon faculty finding career success. Clinician-educator hospitalists view some traditional markers of career advancement as relevant to success. However, early-career faculty question the importance of some traditional external markers to their personal definitions of success. This work suggests that the selfconcept of career success is complex and may not be captured by traditional academic metrics and milestones.

  7. Age is no barrier: predictors of academic success in older learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imlach, Abbie-Rose; Ward, David D.; Stuart, Kimberley E.; Summers, Mathew J.; Valenzuela, Michael J.; King, Anna E.; Saunders, Nichole L.; Summers, Jeffrey; Srikanth, Velandai K.; Robinson, Andrew; Vickers, James C.

    2017-11-01

    Although predictors of academic success have been identified in young adults, such predictors are unlikely to translate directly to an older student population, where such information is scarce. The current study aimed to examine cognitive, psychosocial, lifetime, and genetic predictors of university-level academic performance in older adults (50-79 years old). Participants were mostly female (71%) and had a greater than high school education level (M = 14.06 years, SD = 2.76), on average. Two multiple linear regression analyses were conducted. The first examined all potential predictors of grade point average (GPA) in the subset of participants who had volunteered samples for genetic analysis (N = 181). Significant predictors of GPA were then re-examined in a second multiple linear regression using the full sample (N = 329). Our data show that the cognitive domains of episodic memory and language processing, in conjunction with midlife engagement in cognitively stimulating activities, have a role in predicting academic performance as measured by GPA in the first year of study. In contrast, it was determined that age, IQ, gender, working memory, psychosocial factors, and common brain gene polymorphisms linked to brain function, plasticity and degeneration (APOE, BDNF, COMT, KIBRA, SERT) did not influence academic performance. These findings demonstrate that ageing does not impede academic achievement, and that discrete cognitive skills as well as lifetime engagement in cognitively stimulating activities can promote academic success in older adults.

  8. Big Five Personality Traits as Predictors of the Academic Success of University and College Students in Early Childhood Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smidt, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    Academic success in early childhood teacher education is important because it provides a foundation for occupational development in terms of professional competence, the quality of educational practices, as well as career success. Consequently, identifying factors that can explain differences in academic success is an important research task.…

  9. Predictors of Academic and Social Success and Psychological Well-Being in College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill M. Norvilitis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study utilized 217 student participants to examine academic, circumstantial, and personal predictors of four categories of college success. Although study skills were most important in predicting grade point average, other factors, including parental encouragement of intellectual curiosity during childhood, ADHD symptomatology, appreciation of the liberal arts, and varying motives to attend college, were also predictive of success, as indicated by measures of academic adjustment, social adjustment, and satisfaction with life. The results replicate previous research indicating that study skills, ADHD symptomatology, and motives to attend college are predictors of various measures of college success and extend prior work by establishing a relationship between college success and two additional variables, parental encouragement of intellectual curiosity and the correspondence between student and institutional values.

  10. Sifting for Success: A Grounded Theory Approach to Sponsorship of Black Student Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Shameka N.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous findings and theories have been used to make sense of African Americans students' educational successes and experiences. Along those lines, the purpose of this study is to generate a theoretical framework of sponsorship that is grounded in Black students' educational experiences. Sponsorship is taken to be the process through which agents…

  11. Successful treatment of thyroid storm presenting as recurrent cardiac arrest and subsequent multiorgan failure by continuous renal replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Soo Park

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid storm is a rare and potentially life-threatening medical emergency. We experienced a case of thyroid storm associated with sepsis caused by pneumonia, which had a catastrophic course including recurrent cardiac arrest and subsequent multiple organ failure (MOF. A 22-year-old female patient with a 10-year history of Graves’ disease was transferred to our emergency department (ED. She had a cardiac arrest at her home and a second cardiac arrest at the ED. Her heart recovered after 20 min of cardiac resuscitation. She was diagnosed with thyroid storm associated with hyperthyroidism complicated by pneumonia and sepsis. Although full conventional medical treatment was given, she had progressive MOF and hemodynamic instability consisting of hyperthermia, tachycardia and hypotension. Because of hepatic and renal failure with refractory hypotension, we reduced the patient’s dose of beta-blocker and antithyroid drug, and she was started on continuous veno-venous renal replacement therapy (CRRT with intravenous albumin and plasma supplementation. Subsequently, her body temperature and pulse rate began to stabilize within 1 h, and her blood pressure reached 120/60 mmHg after 6 h. We discontinued antithyroid drug 3 days after admission because of aggravated hyperbilirubinemia. The patient exhibited progressive improvement in thyroid function even after cessation of antithyroid drug, and she successfully recovered from thyroid storm and MOF. This is the first case of thyroid storm successfully treated by CRRT in a patient considered unfit for antithyroid drug treatment.

  12. Does Prior RN Clinical Experience Predict Academic Success in Graduate Nurse Practitioner Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Banna, Majeda M; Briggs, Linda A; Leslie, Mayri Sagady; Athey, Erin K; Pericak, Arlene; Falk, Nancy L; Greene, Jessica

    2015-05-01

    There is limited evidence on whether prior RN clinical experience is predictive of academic success in graduate nurse practitioner (NP) programs. The purpose of this study was to explore whether the frequently held assumption that more prior clinical experience is associated with better academic success in The George Washington University online NP programs. Applications (n = 106) for clinical NP students entering from 2008-2010 were examined along with data on academic performance. No relationship was found between years of prior RN clinical experience and three educational outcome variables (cumulative grade point average [GPA], clinical course GPA, and having failed any courses or been put on probation). However, students with the most prior RN clinical experience were less likely to graduate in 4 years, compared with those with the least experience. These findings serve as a building block of empirical evidence for admissions committees as they consider entry requirements for NP programs. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Understanding the Effect of Loneliness on Academic Participation and Success among International University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bek, Hafiz

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of loneliness on academic participation and success among 213 students studying at Usak University. A total of 213 international students studying at Usak University, including 151 males and 62 females, were selected and participated in the research voluntarily. In the study, feelings of…

  14. Sensory Response Patterns of Academically Successful and Unsuccessful Ninth-grade Students of English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRocque, Geraldine E.

    Testing Marshall McLuhan's thesis that the educational system favors the visually oriented student and militates against the audile-tactile youngster, this pilot study attempted to discover whether or not academically successful ninth-grade English students have a different sensory response pattern than unsuccessful ninth-grade English students.…

  15. Black Males and the Community College: Student Perspectives on Faculty and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, J. Luke; Turner, Caroline S.

    2011-01-01

    This article highlights findings from a qualitative study of factors affecting the academic success of African American male students in the community college. Data was collected through interviews with 28 Black male students in a midsized institution in the southwestern United States. Findings illuminated four key faculty-initiated elements that…

  16. Relationships among Preservice Primary Mathematics Teachers' Gender, Academic Success and Spatial Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Melih; Yilmaz, Suha

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate relationships among pre-service primary mathematics teachers' gender, academic success and spatial ability. The study was conducted in Izmir with 193 pre-service primary mathematics teachers of Dokuz Eylul University. In the work, spatial ability test, which consists of two main sub-tests measuring spatial…

  17. Strategies to Enhance Student Success: A Discourse Analysis of Academic Advice in International Student Handbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romerhausen, Nick J.

    2013-01-01

    As the population of international students continues to rise at U.S. colleges and universities, multiple academic obstacles pose barriers to success. Research on strategies of intervention has primarily included face-to-face interactions while an exploration of other assistance approaches is minimal in comparison. This study explored the role…

  18. The Effects of Family Leadership Orientation on Social Entrepreneurship, Generativity and Academic Success of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloglu, Nuri

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the effects of family leadership orientation on social entrepreneurship, generativity and academic education success were examined with the views of college students. The study was conducted at a state university in Central Anatolia in Turkey. 402 college students who attending at three different colleges voluntarily participated in…

  19. Evaluating the Success of a Science Academic Development Programme at a Research-Intensive University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Harding, Ansie; Potgieter, Marietjie

    2014-01-01

    Academic development (AD) programmes for students not complying with the entrance requirements of mainstream programmes in science have been running at a number of universities in South Africa. In this study we contribute to the debate on criteria for the success of AD programmes, specifically in the context of research-intensive universities in…

  20. A Study of the Factors That Predict Academic Success and Retention of Student-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecht, April A.

    2014-01-01

    Institutions across the country and the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) are continuously looking for ways to improve the academic success and retention of students. Most research focuses on the use of cognitive factors as predictors; however, there has been an increase in the use of non-cognitive factors in this research. This…

  1. Exploring Patterns of Achievement and Intellectual Development among Academically Successful Women from Disadvantaged Backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LePage-Lees, Pamela

    1997-01-01

    Explored the educational experiences of 21 academically successful women who were disadvantaged as children. Results indicate that resilient women who had endured stress as children often developed a highly advanced level of "emotional intelligence" or "interpersonal and intrapersonal intelligence." Presents educational strategies for encouraging…

  2. Literacy Events and Practices That Position Hmong Women to Meet Academic Success in Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Jody C.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the literacy events and practices of Hmong women achieving academic success at a community college. Three women participants were interviewed regarding their past and present literacy events and practices. In addition, each participant took photographs of their own literacy events for five weeks. The photographs provided…

  3. Success in Higher Education: The Challenge to Achieve Academic Standing and Social Position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Life, James

    2015-01-01

    When students look at their classmates in the classroom, consciously or unconsciously, they see competitors both for academic recognition and social success. How do they fit in relation to others and how do they succeed in achieving both? Traditional views on the drive to succeed and the fear of failure are well known as motivators for achieving…

  4. The Relationship between Teacher Candidates' Emotional Intelligence Level, Leadership Styles and Their Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildizbas, Füsun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The personal characteristics as well as professional competencies of teachers are important in the formation of changes in student behaviors. This article examines the relation between emotional intelligence level, teacher leadership style and academic success of teacher candidates who are studying in a Pedagogical Teacher Education…

  5. Effective Strategies for Academic Success among African American Male Student Athletes from Low Socioeconomic Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marisha R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify contributing factors for academic success among African American male student athletes from low socioeconomic backgrounds. Life narrative analysis was used in this qualitative study. The researcher conducted in-depth individual interviews with 7 African American males who attended college on athletic…

  6. The Effect of the Medium of Instruction Language on the Academic Success of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civan, Abdulkadir; Coskun, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of instruction in students' non-native language on the academic success of university students. To analyze this effect, we utilized the data from a Turkish university with many departments that offer the same bachelor degree programs both in English and in Turkish. All other aspects of the…

  7. Exploring the Impact of Work Experience on Part-Time Students' Academic Success in Malaysian Polytechnics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Norhayati; Freeman, Steven A.; Shelley, Mack C.

    2012-01-01

    The study explored the influence of work experience on adult part-time students' academic success as defined by their cumulative grade point average. The sample consisted of 614 part-time students from four polytechnic institutions in Malaysia. The study identified six factors to measure the perceived influence of work experiences--positive…

  8. Prediction Modeling for Academic Success in Professional Master's Athletic Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Scott L.; Crawford, Elizabeth; Wilkerson, Gary B.; Rausch, David; Dale, R. Barry; Harris, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Context: A common goal of professional education programs is to recruit the students best suited for the professional career. Selection of students can be a difficult process, especially if the number of qualified candidates exceeds the number of available positions. The ability to predict academic success in any profession has been a challenging…

  9. The Use of Self-Regulated Learning Measure Questionnaires as a Predictor of Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruso, Jackie L.; Stefaniak, Jill E.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the potential of utilizing the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ) and the Online Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (OSLQ) as instruments in predicting academic success as measured by overall grade point average (GPA). These instruments were of particular interest because the MSLQ was designed to measure…

  10. Relationship of Peer Mentoring to Academic Success and Social Engagement for First Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Brenda O.

    2013-01-01

    A correlational explanatory research design examined the relationship between peer mentoring, academic success and social engagement of first year college students participating in a peer mentoring program at a research one university in the southeastern United States. One hundred thirty-eight participants from the peer mentoring program responded…

  11. The Effect of the Digital Classroom on Academic Success and Online Technologies Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozerbas, Mehmet Arif; Erdogan, Bilge Has

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to observe whether the learning environment created by digital classroom technologies has any effect on the academic success and online technologies self-efficacy of 7th grade students. In this study, an experimental design with a pre-test/post-test control group was used. The research was conducted with 58 students in a secondary…

  12. The Short- and Long-Term Effects of Secondary Schools upon Students' Academic Success and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, Panayiotis

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study investigating the short- and long-term effects of secondary schools upon student academic success and development. A questionnaire was administered to a randomly selected sample of 15% of Cypriot students who graduated in June 2004 and June 2005 from secondary schools. A good response rate (i.e., 66%) was…

  13. Contributing Factors to Older Teen Mothers' Academic Success as Very Young Mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Jennifer; Abu Rabia, Hazza M.

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the factors contributed to 13 older teen mothers' academic success as very young mothers. The participants were older teen mothers who were pregnant and gave birth at the age of 16 years old or younger, and who have achieved a college degree from an accredited college or university while they raised their…

  14. A Meta-Analysis of Academic Success Courses in Postsecondary Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Tanna

    2013-01-01

    The need for higher enrollment, along with a greater focus on educational access and making college more accessible has created an urgent need for community colleges and universities to develop retention and persistence strategies for students who are not prepared academically and may lack the resources to be successful in college (Bailey &…

  15. A Comparative Study of Student Engagement, Satisfaction, and Academic Success among International and American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobova, Nadia; Starobin, Soko S.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between student engagement, student satisfaction, and the academic success of international and American students using 2008 National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) data. It was found that international students scored slightly higher than American students on enriching educational experiences and…

  16. Re-Examination of Traditional Admissions Criteria in Predicting Academic Success in a Counselor Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatchett, Gregory T.; Lawrence, Christopher; Coaston, Susannah C.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to re-evaluate the validity of traditional admissions criteria--UGPA and GRE scores--in predicting academic success for students admitted to a counselor education program in the United States. In contrast to prior research, we also included the newer GRE-Analytical Writing scores in our analyses. In general, we found…

  17. Communication Skills of a Teacher and Its Role in the Development of the Students' Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Alamgir; Khan, Salahuddin; Zia-Ul-Islam, Syed; Khan, Manzoor

    2017-01-01

    Basically the current study sought to assess the perception of students regarding the role of teacher communication skills in their academics success. Comprehensive questionnaire carrying information including social economic and demographic aspects of the study was designed by the researcher to achieve the set objectives. All those universities…

  18. Effective Developmental Math Instructional Practices That Facilitate Learning and Academic Success of Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Pamela Hilson

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the qualitative study was to discover instructional practices used by developmental math instructors that facilitate learning and academic success of students in developmental math courses at select community colleges in Alabama in order to generate improved instructional practices in the developmental education field. Emergent data…

  19. Giftedness and Academic Success in College and University: Why Emotional Intelligence Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, James D. A.; Saklofske, Donald H.; Keefer, Kateryna V.

    2017-01-01

    Much of the work on predicting academic success in postsecondary education has focused on the impact of various cognitive abilities, although in recent years there has been increased attention to the role played by emotional and social competency [also called emotional intelligence (EI)]. Previous work on the link between EI and giftedness is…

  20. Metacognitive Skills, Academic Success and Exam Anxiety as the Predictors of Psychological Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isgör, Isa Yücel

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the predicting effect of high school students' metacognitive skills, exam anxiety and academic success levels upon their psychological well-being in a provincial center with a medium-scale population in Eastern Anatolian Region. The research group included totally 251 high school students including…

  1. An Investigation of the Effectiveness of Concept Mapping on Turkish Students' Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Yavuz

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the experimental studies which test the effectiveness of the concept mapping instructional strategy compared to the traditional teaching method. Meta-analysis was used to calculate the effect size of the concept mapping strategy on academic success. Therefore, the analysis includes experimental studies conducted in Turkey…

  2. The Role of Emotional Intelligence in the Academic Success of United Arab Emirates University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahammed, Shaima; Abdullah, Abdullah S.; Hassane, Sofoh H.

    2011-01-01

    Psycho-educational researchers have often suggested that Emotional Intelligence (EI) is critical to academic success (Drago, 2004; La Civita, 2003), yet there is hardly any research that has ever addressed the question in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between EI as conceptualized by Mayer…

  3. College Student Risky Sexual Behaviors and the Attaining of Academic Success a Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Sally

    2013-01-01

    The focus of the qualitative study was to explore college student sexual health choices from a 4-year undergraduate institution. The study could be used for future research into why the numbers of sexual risk choices including sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) remain among college campuses, and how they affect academic success. Through…

  4. Predictors of Academic Success in Web-Based Courses: Age, GPA, and Instruction Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Elizabeth J.; Turesky, Elizabeth F.; Hebert, Jenni

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to use a heutagogical approach to determine whether students enrolled in blended courses achieve higher grades relative to those enrolled in completely online courses, in addition to identifying demographic predictors of academic success in college courses involving Web-based modes of instruction.…

  5. Can Higher Education Compensate for Society? Modelling the Determinants of Academic Success at University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Emma

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the role that social characteristics play in determining the academic success of students who begin university with roughly similar entry grades. The data used were drawn from the administrative records of over 38,000 UK-domiciled undergraduate students from one British university between 1998 and 2009. Results show that the…

  6. Performing the Grade: Urban Latino Youth, Gender Performance, and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foiles Sifuentes, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the intersection of race, gender, class, and academic success through an ethnographic case study in a Texas charter high school. The 98% working-class, Latino student population was exposed to an array of stigmas ascribed to their persons based on negative social stereotypes of race, ethnicity, gender, and class due to the…

  7. Academic Self-Concept and Causal Attributions for Success and Failure Amongst Elementary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohbeck, Annette; Grube, Dietmar; Moschner, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    A great deal of research shows that the way in which children attribute causes to their successes and failures in school has implications for the development of their academic self-concept (ASC). The most common attributions are ability, effort, task difficulty, and luck. The present study asked 68 elementary school children aged seven to eight…

  8. "That "Fuego," That Fire in Their Stomach": Academically Successful Latinas/os and "Racial Opportunity Cost"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venzant Chambers, Terah T.; Locke, Leslie A.; Tagarao, Annel M.

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the racial opportunity cost of academic achievement for Latina/o students who graduated from urban high schools and participated in a larger study of 18 high-achieving students of color. The article focuses on the ways the school context influenced their success. Interviews with the seven Latina/o participants reveal that…

  9. The Relationship among Parenting Styles Experienced during Childhood, Anxiety, Motivation, and Academic Success in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Marc; Dorso, Erin; Azhar, Aisha; Renk, Kimberly

    2008-01-01

    The current study examined the relationships among parenting styles experienced in childhood, anxiety, motivation, and academic success in college students. Results suggested that fathers' authoritative parenting was related to decreases, whereas mothers' authoritarian parenting was related to increases, in college students' anxiety. Further,…

  10. The Value of Family Routines for the Academic Success of Vulnerable Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Kathleen M.; Ghazarian, Sharon R.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined associations between mother reports of family routines and adolescent academic success. The authors used prospective data from "Welfare, Children, and Families: A Three City Study" (N = 1,147), a study of low-income urban youth and mothers. The vast majority of youth were African American (43%) or Latino (47%); youth were an…

  11. Intellectual ability, learning style, personality, achievement motivation and academic success of psychology students in higher education.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busato, V.V.; Prins, F.J.; Elshout, J.J.; Hamaker, C.

    2000-01-01

    This study is directed towards an integration of intellectual ability, learning style, personality and achievement motivation as predictors of academic success in higher education. Correlational analyses partly confirmed and partly disconfirmed our expectations in a sample of 409 first-year

  12. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the "Skills for Social and Academic Success" ("SASS") Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mychailyszyn, Matthew P.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to synthesize the available research on the "Skills for Social and Academic Success" ("SASS") program, a school-based cognitive/behavioural intervention for adolescents with social anxiety disorder. A search of online databases, combined with reference list examination…

  13. Benchmarking the Habits and Behaviours of Successful Students: A Case Study of Academic-Business Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Archer

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Student success and retention is a primary goal of higher education institutions across the world. The cost of student failure and dropout in higher education is multifaceted including, amongst other things, the loss of revenue, prestige, and stakeholder trust for both institutions and students. Interventions to address this are complex and varied. While the dominant thrust has been to investigate academic and non-academic risk factors thus applying a “risk” lens, equal attention should be given to exploring the characteristics of successful students which expands the focus to include “requirements for success”. Based on a socio-critical model for understanding of student success and retention, the University of South Africa (Unisa initiated a pilot project to benchmark successful students’ habits and behaviours using a tool employed in business settings, namely Shadowmatch®. The original focus was on finding a theoretically valid measured for habits and behaviours to examine the critical aspect of student agency in the social critical model. Although this was not the focus of the pilot, concerns regarding using a commercial tool in an academic setting overshadowed the process. This paper provides insights into how academic-business collaboration could allow an institution to be more dynamic and flexible in supporting its student population.

  14. Tracking Affect and Academic Success across University: Happy Students Benefit from Bouts of Negative Mood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Erin T.; Howard, Andrea L.; Galambos, Nancy L.; Wrosch, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    We examined how positive and negative affect covary within individuals over time and how patterns of association between affective traits and states relate to academic success across 4 years of university. Participants were 187 full-time first-year students at a large Canadian university who completed questionnaires about recent affective…

  15. The Effects of Using Animations on Sixth Grade Students' Academic Success in Turkish Grammar Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gün, Mesut

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this empirical study is to determine how and to what extent the use of animations impacts auditory acquisition, one of the key learning fields in 6th grade grammar, as measured by students' academic success and completion rates. By using a pre-test and post-test design, this empirical study randomly divided a group of Turkish 6th…

  16. Modeling Success: Using Preenrollment Data to Identify Academically At-Risk Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gansemer-Topf, Ann M.; Compton, Jonathan; Wohlgemuth, Darin; Forbes, Greg; Ralston, Ekaterina

    2015-01-01

    Improving student success and degree completion is one of the core principles of strategic enrollment management. To address this principle, institutional data were used to develop a statistical model to identify academically at-risk students. The model employs multiple linear regression techniques to predict students at risk of earning below a…

  17. College Athletic Participation and Academic Success: How Student-Athletes Compete for Graduation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, Heather B.

    2013-01-01

    NCAA data indicates that Division III student-athletes are graduating at higher rates than their non-athlete peers. Graduation rate data alone do not provide a full understanding of student-athletes' academic success. The data thus far simply show empirically that student-athletes have a higher federal six-year graduation rate, but…

  18. Relationship between Success in Extracurricular Programs and Student Academic Performance in Economically Disadvantaged High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killgo, Jay

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the common characteristics of economically disadvantaged schools that demonstrate success in academics and extracurricular activities. Mixed-method design was used for this study. The quantitative portion of the study determined the correlation between a school's performance in extracurricular activities,…

  19. Academic career in medicine: requirements and conditions for successful advancement in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Stamm, Martina; Buddeberg, Claus

    2009-04-29

    Within the framework of a prospective cohort study of Swiss medical school graduates a sample of young physicians aspiring to an academic career were surveyed on their career support and barriers experienced up to their sixth year of postgraduate training. Thirty-one junior academics took part in semi-structured telephone interviews in 2007. The interview guideline focused on career paths to date, career support and barriers experienced, and recommendations for junior and senior academics. The qualitatively assessed data were evaluated according to Mayring's content analysis. Furthermore, quantitatively gained data from the total cohort sample on person- and career-related characteristics were analyzed in regard to differences between the junior academics and cohort doctors who aspire to another career in medicine. Junior academics differ in terms of instrumentality as a person-related factor, and in terms of intrinsic career motivation and mentoring as career-related factors from cohort doctors who follow other career paths in medicine; they also show higher scores in the Career-Success Scale. Four types of career path could be identified in junior academics: (1) focus on basic sciences, (2) strong focus on research (PhD programs) followed by clinical training, (3) one to two years in research followed by clinical training, (4) clinical training and research in parallel. The interview material revealed the following categories of career-supporting experience: making oneself out as a proactive junior physician, research resources provided by superior staff, and social network; statements concerning career barriers encompassed interference between clinical training and research activities, insufficient research coaching, and personality related barriers. Recommendations for junior academics focused on mentoring and professional networking, for senior academics on interest in human resource development and being role models. The conditions for an academic career in

  20. Academic career in medicine – requirements and conditions for successful advancement in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamm Martina

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within the framework of a prospective cohort study of Swiss medical school graduates a sample of young physicians aspiring to an academic career were surveyed on their career support and barriers experienced up to their sixth year of postgraduate training. Methods Thirty-one junior academics took part in semi-structured telephone interviews in 2007. The interview guideline focused on career paths to date, career support and barriers experienced, and recommendations for junior and senior academics. The qualitatively assessed data were evaluated according to Mayring's content analysis. Furthermore, quantitatively gained data from the total cohort sample on person- and career-related characteristics were analyzed in regard to differences between the junior academics and cohort doctors who aspire to another career in medicine. Results Junior academics differ in terms of instrumentality as a person-related factor, and in terms of intrinsic career motivation and mentoring as career-related factors from cohort doctors who follow other career paths in medicine; they also show higher scores in the Career-Success Scale. Four types of career path could be identified in junior academics: (1 focus on basic sciences, (2 strong focus on research (PhD programs followed by clinical training, (3 one to two years in research followed by clinical training, (4 clinical training and research in parallel. The interview material revealed the following categories of career-supporting experience: making oneself out as a proactive junior physician, research resources provided by superior staff, and social network; statements concerning career barriers encompassed interference between clinical training and research activities, insufficient research coaching, and personality related barriers. Recommendations for junior academics focused on mentoring and professional networking, for senior academics on interest in human resource development and being role

  1. Career-success scale - a new instrument to assess young physicians' academic career steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Stamm, Martina; Buddeberg, Claus; Klaghofer, Richard

    2008-06-02

    Within the framework of a prospective cohort study of Swiss medical school graduates, a Career-Success Scale (CSS) was constructed in a sample of young physicians choosing different career paths in medicine. Furthermore the influence of personality factors, the participants' personal situation, and career related factors on their career success was investigated. 406 residents were assessed in terms of career aspired to, and their career progress. The Career-Success Scale, consisting of 7 items, was developed and validated, addressing objective criteria of academic career advancement. The influence of gender and career aspiration was investigated by a two-factorial analysis of variance, the relationships between personality factors, personal situation, career related factors and the Career-Success Scale by a multivariate linear regression analysis. The unidimensional Career-Success Scale has an internal consistency of 0.76. It is significantly correlated at the bivariate level with gender, instrumentality, and all career related factors, particularly with academic career and received mentoring. In multiple regression, only gender, academic career, surgery as chosen specialty, and received mentoring are significant predictors. The highest values were observed in participants aspiring to an academic career, followed by those pursuing a hospital career and those wanting to run a private practice. Independent of the career aspired to, female residents have lower scores than their male colleagues. The Career-Success Scale proved to be a short, reliable and valid instrument to measure career achievements. As mentoring is an independent predictor of career success, mentoring programs could be an important instrument to specifically enhance careers of female physicians in academia.

  2. Challenges of Dental Assisting Students in Their Pursuit of Academic Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Nancy; Laughter, Lory; Rowe, Dorothy J

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the challenges encountered by dental assisting students, especially those from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups (UREG), that affected their achieving academic success. In 2016, directors of the nine northern California dental assisting programs were contacted via email to explain the study and request an opportunity to administer the 26-item survey to their currently enrolled students. Student responses were entered into a survey research program, which tabulated the data and calculated the frequency of responses to each item. All nine programs participated, and the overall student response rate was 98%. Most (71%) of the 215 respondents agreed that they had experienced challenges in achieving academic success. Respondents reported the following challenges that made it difficult to perform well at school: financial responsibilities (41%), family responsibilities (33%), and language challenges (21%). These challenges, as well as difficulty understanding the language and vocabulary of instructional materials and cost of tuition and supplies, were statistically related to respondents' perceptions of their challenges to academic success. Most (83%) of the respondents perceived that faculty members supported their academic success. One-third of the respondents were from UREG: Hispanic, African American, and Native American. Higher percentages of UREG than non-UREG participants worked more hours/week (p=0.03) and tended to perceive financial (52%/32%) and family (42%/28%) responsibilities as challenges. Since both UREG and non-UREG respondents experienced these challenges, all students should be informed of institutional and programmatic resources that can assist them in achieving academic success.

  3. The Future of Basic Science in Academic Surgery: Identifying Barriers to Success for Surgeon-scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keswani, Sundeep G; Moles, Chad M; Morowitz, Michael; Zeh, Herbert; Kuo, John S; Levine, Matthew H; Cheng, Lily S; Hackam, David J; Ahuja, Nita; Goldstein, Allan M

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the challenges confronting surgeons performing basic science research in today's academic surgery environment. Multiple studies have identified challenges confronting surgeon-scientists and impacting their ability to be successful. Although these threats have been known for decades, the downward trend in the number of successful surgeon-scientists continues. Clinical demands, funding challenges, and other factors play important roles, but a rigorous analysis of academic surgeons and their experiences regarding these issues has not previously been performed. An online survey was distributed to 2504 members of the Association for Academic Surgery and Society of University Surgeons to determine factors impacting success. Survey results were subjected to statistical analyses. We also reviewed publicly available data regarding funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). NIH data revealed a 27% decline in the proportion of NIH funding to surgical departments relative to total NIH funding from 2007 to 2014. A total of 1033 (41%) members responded to our survey, making this the largest survey of academic surgeons to date. Surgeons most often cited the following factors as major impediments to pursuing basic investigation: pressure to be clinically productive, excessive administrative responsibilities, difficulty obtaining extramural funding, and desire for work-life balance. Surprisingly, a majority (68%) did not believe surgeons can be successful basic scientists in today's environment, including departmental leadership. We have identified important barriers that confront academic surgeons pursuing basic research and a perception that success in basic science may no longer be achievable. These barriers need to be addressed to ensure the continued development of future surgeon-scientists.

  4. Predictors of attrition and academic success of medical students: a 30-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslov Kruzicevic, Silvija; Barisic, Katarina Josipa; Banozic, Adriana; Esteban, Carlos David; Sapunar, Damir; Puljak, Livia

    2012-01-01

    To determine attrition and predictors of academic success among medical students at University of Split, Croatia. We analysed academic records of 2054 students enrolled during 1979-2008 period. We found that 26% (533/2054) of enrolled students did not graduate. The most common reasons for attrition were 'personal' (36.4%), transfer to another medical school (35.6%), and dismissal due to unsatisfactory academic record (21.2%). Grade point average (GPA) and study duration of attrition students were significantly associated with parental education. There were 1126 graduates, 395 men and 731 women. Their average graduation GPA was 3.67±0.53 and study duration 7.6±2.44 years. During 5-year curriculum only 6.4% (42/654) of students graduated in time, and 55% (240/472) of students graduated in time after curriculum was extended to 6 years. Variables predicting whether a student will graduate or not were high school grades, entrance exam score and year of enrollment. Significant predictors of graduation grades were high school grades and entrance exam score. Entrance exam score predicted length of studying. Preadmission academic qualifications and year of enrollment predict academic success in medical school. More attention should be devoted to high attrition.

  5. Is there a relationship between executive functions and academic success in children with neurofibromatosis type 1?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilboa, Yafit; Rosenblum, Sara; Fattal-Valevski, Aviva; Toledano-Alhadef, Hagit; Josman, Naomi

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to compare the executive function (EF) of children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) to those of typically developing children and to investigate whether those abilities could predict the child's academic success in terms of academic skills and enablers. Twenty-nine children with NF1 and 27 age-and-gender-matched controls (aged 8-16 years) were examined with two tests to measure EF in an ecologically valid manner: the Behavioural Assessment of the Dysexecutive Syndrome in Children (BADS-C) and the parent questionnaire for the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF). In order to evaluate academic success we used the Academic Competence Evaluation Scales (ACES). The performance of the NF1 group was significantly lower on the Water and Key search subtest of the BADS-C and on four scales of the BRIEF: initiate; working memory; plan/organise and organisation of materials. Significant correlations and predictive models via regression analysis were generated for: BADS-C, BRIEF and ACES scores. Based on these findings, children with NF1 have executive dysfunction that partially accounts for their difficulties in academic achievements.

  6. Predictors of attrition and academic success of medical students: a 30-year retrospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvija Maslov Kruzicevic

    Full Text Available AIM: To determine attrition and predictors of academic success among medical students at University of Split, Croatia. METHODS: We analysed academic records of 2054 students enrolled during 1979-2008 period. RESULTS: We found that 26% (533/2054 of enrolled students did not graduate. The most common reasons for attrition were 'personal' (36.4%, transfer to another medical school (35.6%, and dismissal due to unsatisfactory academic record (21.2%. Grade point average (GPA and study duration of attrition students were significantly associated with parental education. There were 1126 graduates, 395 men and 731 women. Their average graduation GPA was 3.67±0.53 and study duration 7.6±2.44 years. During 5-year curriculum only 6.4% (42/654 of students graduated in time, and 55% (240/472 of students graduated in time after curriculum was extended to 6 years. Variables predicting whether a student will graduate or not were high school grades, entrance exam score and year of enrollment. Significant predictors of graduation grades were high school grades and entrance exam score. Entrance exam score predicted length of studying. CONCLUSION: Preadmission academic qualifications and year of enrollment predict academic success in medical school. More attention should be devoted to high attrition.

  7. An expert performance approach to examining factors contributing to academic success in organic chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandagopal, Kiruthiga

    Successful completion of the introductory course in organic chemistry is a prerequisite for many graduate and professional science programs, yet the failure rate for this course is notoriously high. To date, there have been few studies examining factors contributing to academic success in organic chemistry. This study demonstrates that the online, longitudinal methods used by investigations of expert performance can examine and successfully identify factors contributing to academic success at the college level. Sixty-four students enrolled in introductory organic chemistry during the Fall 2007 and Spring 2008 semesters completed motivation questionnaires, interviews, diaries, and think-aloud reading and problem-solving tasks at three different points across a semester. Measures of spatial ability, general ability, and background preparation were also collected. Each measure was analyzed to determine significant differences between groups differing in grade-point average (GPA) prior to the start of the course and to identify predictors of organic chemistry grade. Variables measuring background preparation, problem-solving strategies and studying strategies were found to be the best predictors of academic success in organic chemistry. Implications for instruction in organic chemistry and effective studying behaviors are discussed.

  8. Strategies for successful academic writing - institutional and non-institutional support for students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopee, Neil; Deane, Mary

    2013-12-01

    Students develop better academic writing skills as they progress through their higher education programme, but despite recent continuing monitoring of student satisfaction with their education in UK, there has been relatively little research into students' perceptions of the active support that they need and receive to succeed as academic writers. To examine the strategies that university students on health or social care courses utilise to develop as writers in the face of many pressures and demands from different sources. Qualitative research conducted at a British University into undergraduates' writing practices in the field of healthcare. Ten participants took part in semi-structured interviews, half of whom were international students. The data was analysed by the researchers from the field of writing development using thematic analysis. The main findings are that certain students struggle as academic writers if they do not receive tuition on appropriate and effective academic writing through institutional provisions, or through non-institutional strategies, that can promote success with the writing process. There is also uncertainty over the extent to which nurse educators are expected to teach academic writing skills, alongside their discipline-specific subject areas. Both institutional provisions for academic writing development, such as a dedicated writing support department, and non-institutional factors such as peer-collaboration should be fully recognised, supported and resourced in tertiary education at a time when students' satisfaction and performance are high on the agenda. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Academic success or failure in nursing students: results of a retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancia, Loreto; Petrucci, Cristina; Giorgi, Fabio; Dante, Angelo; Cifone, Maria Grazia

    2013-12-01

    Nursing student academic failure is a phenomenon of growing international interest, not only because of its economic impact but also because it negatively affects the availability of future nurses in different healthcare systems. To recruit the students with the highest probability of academic success, an open challenge for universities is to recruit students who have previously demonstrated superior scholastic aptitudes that appear to be associated with a greater likelihood of academic success. Documenting the relationship between the selection methods used when selecting nursing students and academic failure will contribute to the international debate concerning the optimisation of the selection strategies. The principal aim of this study was to investigate the role in predicting nursing student academic success of (1) the upper-secondary diploma grades and (2) the score obtained by students in the nursing degree program admission test. A retrospective observational study was conducted. Five cohorts of nursing students, matriculated in consecutive academic years from 2004 to 2008, in an Italian bachelor's degree program were observed retrospectively. Overall, 61.2% of the 1006 considered students concluded their degree within the legal duration allowed for the nursing degree. Students who failed were those who had lowest grades associated with their upper-secondary diploma coursework (p=0.000) and were male (p=0.000). The grades associated with the upper-secondary diploma coursework, unlike the admission test score, correlates positively with the final degree grade and the average value of degree program examination scores. No correlation was found between the upper-secondary diploma coursework grades and the scores obtained in the test for the nursing degree program admission test (r=-0.037). These results suggest that upper-secondary diploma coursework grades are a parameter that should receive great consideration, especially in cases where there are planned

  10. Health and academic success: A look at the challenges of first-generation community college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Deanna L H

    2016-04-01

    Community colleges in the United States serve more than six million students and are the gateway to postsecondary education for individuals from typically underserved populations such as low-income, ethnic minorities, and first-generation college students. First-generation college students are defined as students whose adoptive or natural parents' highest level of education was a high school diploma or less. Postsecondary education has the potential to reduce both health and socioeconomic disparities. First-generation community college students face significant economic, social, and cultural barriers to academic success and are the most at risk for "dropping-out." The purpose of this brief report was to explore what is known about social, psychological, and physical factors that impede first-generation community college students' academic success. Little is known about potential health and psychological barriers experienced by first-generation community college students that impact academic achievement. Advanced practice nurses (APNs) on community college campuses are in the ideal position to identify and treat health issues, and conduct much-needed research into these areas. College health centers are an important practice setting for APNs to provide direct care to students as well as influence college policies that improve student health, well-being, and promote academic success. ©2016 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  11. Academic Self-Efficacy in Study-Related Skills and Behaviours: Relations with Learning-related Emotions and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putwain, Dave; Sander, Paul; Larkin, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Background: Academic self-efficacy, when operationalized as mastery over domain-specific knowledge, has been found to be a predictor of academic achievement and emotions. Although academic emotions are also a predictor of academic achievement, there is limited evidence for reciprocal relations with academic achievement. Aims: To examine whether…

  12. [Factors associated with academic success of medical students at Buenos Aires University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borracci, Raúl A; Pittaluga, Roberto D; Álvarez Rodríguez, Juan E; Arribalzaga, Eduardo B; Poveda Camargo, Ricardo L; Couto, Juan L; Provenzano, Sergio L

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify common factors relating to the academic success of medical students who were distinguished with honors at the Buenos Aires University. In 2011, 142 graduates were surveyed; the questionnaire included 59 questions on their sociodemographic environment, living conditions and social integration, motivation to study, learning capacity and health quality during their career. Compared to other students, these distinguished students more often lived in the city, far from their families; had been educated at private or universitary high schools, their economic needs were financed by their parents, who were on the whole professionals. Most of them were single and childless. The possibility of future employment oportunities (work) did not influence their choice of a medical career, academic success was important to them and they believed that success depended largely on personal effort; they knew how to handle anxiety, were sociable but independent and preferred solid experience to abstract conceptuality in order to obtain information. Our conclusion, within the current system of candidate selection, these results serve to calculate the covert self-selection mechanisms during the career, or in a more restrictive regime, to select those likely to reach academic success due to their privileged ambience. The analysis of demographic factors indicates some degree of inequality for socially disadvantaged students. Perhaps, a selection system based only on intellectual abilities would help identify and support the best candidates regardless of their social context.

  13. The Mediating Effects of Approaches to Learning on the Academic Success of First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadas, Sandra T.; Almeida, Leandro S.; Araújo, Alexandra M.

    2017-01-01

    Students' personal predictors of academic success are particularly relevant for first-year college students, given the specific challenges that these students face when entering higher education (HE). Academic success in HE has been related to multiple factors, including the students' approaches to learning (SAL), satisfaction (linked to…

  14. A Longitudinal Cohort Study of Student Motivational Factors Related to Academic Success and Retention Using the College Student Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slanger, William D.; Berg, Emily A.; Fisk, Paul S.; Hanson, Mark G.

    2015-01-01

    Ten years of College Student Inventory (CSI) data from one Midwestern public land-grant university were used to study the role of motivational factors in predicting academic success and college student retention. Academic success was defined as cumulative grade point average (GPA), cumulative course load capacity (i.e., the number of credits…

  15. How do I know what I can do? Anticipating expectancy of success regarding novel academic tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorges, Julia; Göke, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    After graduation from secondary school, academic tasks (i.e., learning contents) are no longer structured in terms of school subjects (i.e., English, mathematics). Therefore, learners lack past performance and mastery experience to inform their expectancy of success (i.e., ability beliefs) regarding novel tasks. In this paper, we investigate how individuals establish expectancy of success regarding novel academic tasks. We hypothesize that individuals draw on ability beliefs regarding known tasks that are deemed similar to novel tasks to estimate expectancy of success (generalization hypothesis). Participants were first-year students (n = 354) in the field of business administration (Study 1), and (Study 2) psychology students predominantly (n = 174). In Study 1, we analysed relations between ability beliefs (i.e., academic self-concepts of ability) regarding four school subjects and four fields of study varying in similarity. In Study 2, we assessed mastery experience regarding two school subjects and expectancy of success (i.e., self-efficacy) regarding a fictitious course manipulating participants' similarity judgement. We analysed the data using mainly structural equation modelling. Results support the generalization hypothesis regarding both indicators of expectancy of success (i.e., self-concept and self-efficacy). Subject-specific self-concepts of ability predict study-related self-concepts of ability according to individuals' similarity judgements. Subject-specific mastery experience predicts expectancy of success only if the respective school subject is emphasized in the course description. Individuals apparently draw on established ability beliefs regarding known tasks to inform their expectancy of success regarding novel tasks. Findings further our understanding of the development of motivation to learn in adulthood. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  16. Factors associated with academic success at Vienna Medical School: prospective survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frischenschlager, Oskar; Haidinger, Gerald; Mitterauer, Lukas

    2005-02-01

    To identify factors relating to students' success in the study of medicine at the Medical University of Vienna. In view of Austria's tradition of open access to higher education, which results large number of students, high dropout rate, long duration of studies, factors predicting success could be helpful for student counseling. In a prospective study, 674 freshmen (50.8% of students enrolled that year) responded to a questionnaire on their sociodemographic data, family background, performance in school, economic situation, living conditions, social integration and health, learning capacity, motivations related to studies and future profession, attitudes, and the ability to cope with stress. We used the results of the compulsory test of knowledge after the first year as an outcome measure of their success. By comparing two extremes of academic success, very successful students and students who twice failed the challenging first-year exam, we were able to identify three factors relevant in predicting academic success: male sex, German as mother tongue, and good performance in secondary school. Moreover, there is evidence that maturity and intrinsic motivational structure are linked to superior academic performance. The results of this study differ from or even contradict the findings of previous retrospective studies in Austria. We suggest that a more thorough examination of the effect of gender should be undertaken in future studies. We also hope that our work will lead to the improvement in the efficiency of the German courses for foreign students. Our findings confirm the importance of success in secondary school, but also clearly indicate that it should not be the only criterion for university admission.

  17. The talent process of successful academic women scientists at elite research universities in New York state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaenzig, Lisa M.

    The importance of science in our society continues to increase, as the needs of the global culture and the problems of the world's growing populations affect resources internationally (DeLisi, 2008; Fischman, 2007; Park, 2008). The need for qualified and experienced scientists to solve complex problems is important to the future of the United States. Models of success for women in STEM disciplines are important to improve the recruitment and retention of women in academic science. This study serves as an examination of the facilitators and barriers---including external factors and internal characteristics---on the talent development process of successful women academic scientists. Since there are few studies relating specifically to the career experiences of successful women in academic science careers (Ceci & Williams, 2007; Wasserman, 2000; Xie & Shauman, 2003), a literature review was conducted that examined the (1) the gifted literature on women, including the eminence literature; (2) the higher education literature on women faculty and academic science, and (3) the literature related to the internal characteristics and external factors that influence the talent development process. The final section of the literature review includes a literature map (Creswell, 2009) outlining the major studies cited in this chapter. The conclusion, based on a critical analysis of the literature review, outlines the need for this study. The current study utilizes the framework of Gagne's differentiated talent development model for gifted individuals (Gagne, 1985, 1991) to examine the themes cited in multiple studies that influence the talent development process. Through a mixed-design methodology (Creswell, 2009) that incorporates quantitative and qualitative analysis using a survey and follow-up interviews with selected participants, this study seeks to explore the effects of internal characteristics, external influences, significant events, and experiences on the success of

  18. A culture conducive to women's academic success: development of a measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westring, Alyssa Friede; Speck, Rebecca M; Sammel, Mary Dupuis; Scott, Patricia; Tuton, Lucy Wolf; Grisso, Jeane Ann; Abbuhl, Stephanie

    2012-11-01

    The work environment culture inhibits women's career success in academic medicine. The lack of clarity and consistency in the definition, measurement, and analysis of culture constrains current research on the topic. The authors addressed this gap by defining the construct of a culture conducive to women's academic success (CCWAS) and creating a measure (i.e., tool) to evaluate it. First, the authors conducted a review of published literature, held focus groups, and consulted with subject matter experts to develop a measure of academic workplace culture for women. Then they developed and pilot-tested the measure with a convenience sample of women assistant professors. After refining the measure, they administered it, along with additional scales for validation, to 133 women assistant professors at the University of Pennsylvania. Finally, they conducted statistical analyses to explore the measure's nature and validity. A CCWAS consists of four distinct, but related, dimensions: equal access, work-life balance, freedom from gender biases, and supportive leadership. The authors found evidence that women within departments/divisions agree on the supportiveness of their units but that substantial differences among units exist. The analyses provided strong evidence for the reliability and validity of their measure. This report contributes to a growing understanding of women's academic medicine careers and provides a measure that researchers can use to assess the supportiveness of the culture for women assistant professors and that leaders can use to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions designed to increase the supportiveness of the environment for women faculty.

  19. Satellite clinics in academic ophthalmology programs: an exploratory study of successes and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Irene C

    2013-12-14

    Major academic ophthalmology departments have been expanding by opening multi-office locations ("satellites"). This paper offers a first glimpse into satellites of academic ophthalmology departments. Leaders of seven medium to large, geographically diverse departments agreed to participate. One- to two-hour phone interviews were conducted to assess the features of their satellite practices. Success as clinical entities, profitability, and access to patients were stated goals for most satellites. In approximate descending order, refractive surgery, retina, oculoplastics, and pediatric ophthalmology were the most common subspecialties offered. Faculty staffing ranged from recruitment specifically for satellites to rotation of existing faculty. Except for a department with only one academic track, satellite doctors were a mix of tenure and mostly non-tenure track faculty. According to these department leaders, scholarly productivity of satellite faculty was similar to that of colleagues at the main campus, though research was more community-based and clinical in nature. Fellowship but little resident education occurred at satellites. Though it was agreed that satellite practices were integral to department finances, they accounted for a smaller percentage of revenues than of total departmental visits. Satellite offices have offered access to a better payor mix and have boosted the finances of academic ophthalmology departments. Challenges include maintaining collegiality with referring community physicians, integrating faculty despite geographic distance, preserving the department's academic "brand name," and ensuring consistent standards and operating procedures. Satellite clinics will likely help departments meet some of the challenges of health care reform.

  20. The interrelationship between cognitive control and academic success of first-year students: An interdisciplinary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostromina S.N.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Though many Russian and foreign studies have been devoted to the study of self-control in educational activity, most of the research has been limited to the use of questionnaires or psychodiagnostic methods. The neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the process of cognitive control in the context of learning have still not been sufficiently understood, despite the obvious significance of controlling action for academic success. Objective. The purpose of this study is to identify the psychological and neurophysiological features of cognitive control in the process of learning activity, for students with different levels of academic success. Design. This study investigates the control function in first-year students who have varying degrees of academic success. The research design is interdisciplinary and integrates three different approaches: the neurophysiological, psychological, and pedagogical. In the empirical part, 31 first-year students at Saint Petersburg State University (SPbSU participated in the research. We measured the personal characteristics of the subjects (using the five-factor personality questionnaire as modified by A.B. Khromov, their self-management ability (Peysakhov’s SMA test, characteristics of the event-related potentials of the brain in response to presentation of stimuli in the solving of problems that require searching for an error in a word (electroencephalographic method, response time, and number of errors and corrections. Four types of stimuli were used: the correct spelling of a word, the replacement of a letter with one that is written similarly or sounds similar, or by one that is not similar. The indicators used to measure academic success were the results of the Unified State Examination (USE and the first (winter term of the 2016–17 academic year. The data were analyzed by correlation analysis and analysis of variance. Results. Comparison of groups of students with lower and higher levels

  1. Anxiety sensitivity as a predictor of academic success of medical students at the University of Mostar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalihić, Amra; Mešukić, Sabina; Sušac, Bože; Knezović, Katarina; Martinac, Marko

    2017-12-01

    Higher education students comprise a particularly vulnerable group for the development of anxiety symptoms and disorders. The aim of our research was to examine the impact of anxiety sensitivity on the success of medical students at the University of Mostar, and to establish the differences between students depending on their sex and the year of study. One hundred students in their first and fifth year of medical school were interviewed using the ASI questionnaire, 7 days prior to their final exams. Here we demonstrate a positive correlation between anxiety sensitivity and academic success. We did not find any significant differences between the first and fifth-year medical students, nor between participants based on their sex. We conclude that anxiety can have a positive impact on the academic achievement of higher education students.

  2. French College Students’ Sports Practice and Its Relations with Stress, Coping Strategies and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Décamps, Greg; Boujut, Emilie; Brisset, Camille

    2012-01-01

    College students at university have to face several stress factors. Although sports practice has been considered as having beneficial effects upon stress and general health, few studies have documented its influence on this specific population. The aim of this comparative study was to determine whether the intensity of the college students’ sports practice (categorized into three groups: rare, regular, or intensive) would influence their levels of stress and self-efficacy, their coping strategies, and their academic success/failure. Three self-completion questionnaires were administered to 1071 French freshmen during their compulsory medical visit at the preventive medicine service of the university. Results indicated that students with intensive sport practice reported lower scores of general stress, academic stress, and emotion-focused coping strategies, and higher scores of self-efficacy than those with rare practice. However, the proportion of successful students did not differ significantly between the three groups of sports practice. PMID:22514544

  3. French college students' sports practice and its relations with stress, coping strategies and academic success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Décamps, Greg; Boujut, Emilie; Brisset, Camille

    2012-01-01

    College students at university have to face several stress factors. Although sports practice has been considered as having beneficial effects upon stress and general health, few studies have documented its influence on this specific population. The aim of this comparative study was to determine whether the intensity of the college students' sports practice (categorized into three groups: rare, regular, or intensive) would influence their levels of stress and self-efficacy, their coping strategies, and their academic success/failure. Three self-completion questionnaires were administered to 1071 French freshmen during their compulsory medical visit at the preventive medicine service of the university. Results indicated that students with intensive sport practice reported lower scores of general stress, academic stress, and emotion-focused coping strategies, and higher scores of self-efficacy than those with rare practice. However, the proportion of successful students did not differ significantly between the three groups of sports practice.

  4. Reading and Writing Habits of University Language Students and Their Academic Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urška Sešek

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Multilingual literacy is an important competence in today’s society, especially for some professional groups. In the present study, 73 university language majors reported on their reading and writing in the mother tongue and target language, within and outside of their studies (quantity, circumstances and motivation, and the data were tested for correlations with their academic success. Results show that the students’ ratio of reading and writing in Slovenian vs. English and the text types are mostly dictated by their studies, but there are big differences in the quantity of these activities and the students’ attitudes. In their free time, students mostly read and write in the electronic media. No correlations were found with the selected measure of academic success. The results of the study can be utilized for planning improvements in literacy development in the Slovenian educational system and for further research into multilingual literacy, which is currently not abundant. Key words: reading, writing, Slovenian, English, university students

  5. French college students’ sports practice and its relations with stress, coping strategies and academic success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg eDécamps

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available College students at university have to face several stress factors. Although sports practice has been considered as having beneficial effects upon stress and general health, few studies have documented its influence on this specific population. The aim of this comparative study was to determine whether the intensity of the college students’ sports practice (categorized into three groups: rare, regular or intensive would influence their levels of stress and self-efficacy, their coping strategies and their academic success/failure. Three self-completion questionnaires were administered to 1071 French freshmen during their compulsory medical visit at the preventive medicine service of the university. Results indicated that students with intensive sport practice reported lower scores of general stress, academic stress and emotion-focused coping strategies, and higher scores of self-efficacy than those with rare practice. However, the proportion of successful students did not differ significantly between the three groups of sports practice.

  6. An Investigation into the Self-Handicapping Behaviors of Undergraduates in Terms of Academic Procrastination, the Locus of Control and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akça, Figen

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between self-handicapping, academic procrastination, the locus of control and academic success. The aim was also to determine whether these variables predicted self-handicapping behavior. The population of the study consisted of 263 undergraduates studying in different departments of the…

  7. Letter to Editor: RESITA NETWORK - ACADEMIC ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND INNOVATION NETWORK OF SOUTH EASTERN EUROPEAN UNIVERSITIES: AN EXAMPLE OF SUCCESSFUL NETWORKING IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND INNOVATION AT ACADEMIC LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schulte

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The foundation, development, activities, and wider social impact of the AcademicEntrepreneurship and Innovation Network of South Eastern European Universities, or shortlyRESITA Network, is presented in this paper as a positive example of successful networking inentrepreneurship and innovation at academic level.

  8. Student nurse selection and predictability of academic success: The Multiple Mini Interview project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Julia; Ooms, Ann; Grant, Robert; Paget, Kris; Marks-Maran, Di

    2016-05-01

    With recent reports of public enquiries into failure to care, universities are under pressure to ensure that candidates selected for undergraduate nursing programmes demonstrate academic potential as well as characteristics and values such as compassion, empathy and integrity. The Multiple Mini Interview (MMI) was used in one university as a way of ensuring that candidates had the appropriate numeracy and literacy skills as well as a range of communication, empathy, decision-making and problem-solving skills as well as ethical insights and integrity, initiative and team-work. To ascertain whether there is evidence of bias in MMIs (gender, age, nationality and location of secondary education) and to determine the extent to which the MMI is predictive of academic success in nursing. A longitudinal retrospective analysis of student demographics, MMI data and the assessment marks for years 1, 2 and 3. One university in southwest London. One cohort of students who commenced their programme in September 2011, including students in all four fields of nursing (adult, child, mental health and learning disability). Inferential statistics and a Bayesian Multilevel Model. MMI in conjunction with MMI numeracy test and MMI literacy test shows little or no bias in terms of ages, gender, nationality or location of secondary school education. Although MMI in conjunction with numeracy and literacy testing is predictive of academic success, it is only weakly predictive. The MMI used in conjunction with literacy and numeracy testing appears to be a successful technique for selecting candidates for nursing. However, other selection methods such as psychological profiling or testing of emotional intelligence may add to the extent to which selection methods are predictive of academic success on nursing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Student journey work: a review of academic library contributions to student transition and success

    OpenAIRE

    Weaver, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    This review aims to capture projects, services and approaches that are being used to ensure student success and sustainability across the stages (or transitions) of the student experience of higher education where these extend the traditional role of the library, in the UK and internationally. The article examines why the student journey (and supporting it) has become a central part of the contemporary academic library's repertoire. Fundamentally, through a student lifecycle perspective, the ...

  10. Performance Anxiety and Academic Success Level Examination of Students in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Sena GÜRŞEN OTACIOĞLU

    2016-01-01

    Within this scope, “performance anxiety” grades of students being educated in music education branches, conservatories and fine arts were assessed in respect to different variables (n=306). Research was carried out in order to reveal how relations of performance anxiety and academic success levels of students receiving professional music education in different universities could differ among variables. “Kenny Music Performance anxiety” inventory developed by Kenny (2004) a...

  11. Critical Success Factors for Integrated Library System Implementation in Academic Libraries: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shea-Tinn Yeh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Integrated library system (ILS supports the entire business operations of an academic library from acquiring and processing library resources to making them available to user communities and preserving them for future use. As libraries’ needs evolve, there is a pressing demand for libraries to migrate from one generation of ILS to the next. This complex migration process is often the single largest investment in both budget and personnel involvement, but its success is by no means guaranteed. We draw upon enterprise resource planning (ERP and critical success factors (CSFs literature to identify the most salient CSFs for ILS migration success through a qualitative study with four cases. We identified that top management involvement, vendor support, user involvement, selection process, project team competence, project management and tracking, interdepartmental communication, data analysis and conversion, user education and training, and user emotion management are the CSFs that determine a migration project success.  Keywords: Integrated library systems, information systems, library automation, critical success factors, and academic libraries.

  12. Academic self-efficacy in study-related skills and behaviours: relations with learning-related emotions and academic success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putwain, Dave; Sander, Paul; Larkin, Derek

    2013-12-01

    Academic self-efficacy, when operationalized as mastery over domain-specific knowledge, has been found to be a predictor of academic achievement and emotions. Although academic emotions are also a predictor of academic achievement, there is limited evidence for reciprocal relations with academic achievement. To examine whether academic self-efficacy, when operationalized as confidence in study-related skills and behaviours, is also a predictor of academic achievement and emotions and to test reciprocal relations between academic emotions and achievement. Two hundred and six first-year undergraduate students. Academic self-efficacy was measured at the beginning of the first semester and learning-related emotions (LREs) at the beginning of the second semester. Academic performance was aggregated across assessments in semester one and semester two. Self-efficacy in study-related skills and behaviours predicted: (1) better semester one academic performance and (2) more pleasant and fewer unpleasant LREs at the beginning of the second semester directly and (3) indirectly through semester one academic performance. Reciprocal relations between academic performance and emotions were supported, but only for pleasant emotions. Self-efficacy in study-related skills was the critical academic self-efficacy variable in this study. It may play an important role in maintaining challenge appraisals to maintain pleasant emotions and better academic performance. Accordingly, practitioners in higher education may wish to consider the value of assessing and developing students' self-efficacy in relation to their independent study skills. © 2012 The British Psychological Society.

  13. Main Ingredients for Success in L2 Academic Writing: Outlining, Drafting and Proofreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Luna, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Spanish undergraduates of English Studies are required to submit their essays in academic English, a genre which most of them are not acquainted with. This paper aims to explore the extralinguistic side of second language (L2) academic writing, more specifically, the combination of metalinguistic items (e.g. transition and frame markers, among others) with students’ writing strategies when composing an academic text in L2 English. The research sample conveys a group of 200 Spanish undergraduates of English Studies; they are in their fourth year, so they are expected to be proficient in English academic writing but their written production quality varies considerably. Results are analysed following a mixed methodology by which metalinguistic items are statistically measured, and then contrasted with semi-structured interview results; SPSS and NVivo provide quantitative and qualitative outcomes, respectively. The analyses reveal that undergraduate students who produce complex sentences and more coherent texts employ a wider range of writing strategies both prior and while writing, being able to (un)consciously structure and design their texts more successfully. These high-scoring students make more proficient use of complex transition markers for coherence and frame markers for textual cohesion; their commonly used (pre-)writing strategies are drafting, outlining, and proofreading. PMID:26046836

  14. Race/Ethnicity and Success in Academic Medicine: Findings From a Longitudinal Multi-Institutional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Samantha E; Raj, Anita; Carr, Phyllis L; Terrin, Norma; Breeze, Janis L; Freund, Karen M

    2017-10-24

    To understand differences in productivity, advancement, retention, satisfaction, and compensation comparing underrepresented medical (URM) faculty with other faculty at multiple institutions. A 17-year follow-up was conducted of the National Faculty Survey, a random sample from 24 U.S. medical schools, oversampled for URM faculty. The authors examined academic productivity, advancement, retention, satisfaction, and compensation, comparing white, URM, and non-URM faculty. Retention, productivity, and advancement data were obtained from public sources for nonrespondents. Covariates included gender, specialty, time distribution, and years in academia. Negative binomial regression was used for count data, logistic regression for binary outcomes, and linear regression for continuous outcomes. In productivity analyses, advancement, and retention, 1,270 participants were included; 604 participants responded to the compensation and satisfaction survey. Response rates were lower for African American (26%) and Hispanic faculty (39%) than white faculty (52%, P academic medicine (OR = 0.49; CI: 0.32, 0.75). No differences were identified in federal grant acquisition, senior leadership roles, career satisfaction, or compensation between URM and white faculty. URM and white faculty had similar career satisfaction, grant support, leadership, and compensation; URM faculty had fewer publications and were less likely to be promoted and retained in academic careers. Successful retention of URM faculty requires comprehensive institutional commitment to changing the academic climate and deliberative programming to support productivity and advancement.

  15. Main Ingredients for Success in L2 Academic Writing: Outlining, Drafting and Proofreading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Munoz-Luna

    Full Text Available Spanish undergraduates of English Studies are required to submit their essays in academic English, a genre which most of them are not acquainted with. This paper aims to explore the extralinguistic side of second language (L2 academic writing, more specifically, the combination of metalinguistic items (e.g. transition and frame markers, among others with students' writing strategies when composing an academic text in L2 English. The research sample conveys a group of 200 Spanish undergraduates of English Studies; they are in their fourth year, so they are expected to be proficient in English academic writing but their written production quality varies considerably. Results are analysed following a mixed methodology by which metalinguistic items are statistically measured, and then contrasted with semi-structured interview results; SPSS and NVivo provide quantitative and qualitative outcomes, respectively. The analyses reveal that undergraduate students who produce complex sentences and more coherent texts employ a wider range of writing strategies both prior and while writing, being able to (unconsciously structure and design their texts more successfully. These high-scoring students make more proficient use of complex transition markers for coherence and frame markers for textual cohesion; their commonly used (pre-writing strategies are drafting, outlining, and proofreading.

  16. Main Ingredients for Success in L2 Academic Writing: Outlining, Drafting and Proofreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Luna, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Spanish undergraduates of English Studies are required to submit their essays in academic English, a genre which most of them are not acquainted with. This paper aims to explore the extralinguistic side of second language (L2) academic writing, more specifically, the combination of metalinguistic items (e.g. transition and frame markers, among others) with students' writing strategies when composing an academic text in L2 English. The research sample conveys a group of 200 Spanish undergraduates of English Studies; they are in their fourth year, so they are expected to be proficient in English academic writing but their written production quality varies considerably. Results are analysed following a mixed methodology by which metalinguistic items are statistically measured, and then contrasted with semi-structured interview results; SPSS and NVivo provide quantitative and qualitative outcomes, respectively. The analyses reveal that undergraduate students who produce complex sentences and more coherent texts employ a wider range of writing strategies both prior and while writing, being able to (un)consciously structure and design their texts more successfully. These high-scoring students make more proficient use of complex transition markers for coherence and frame markers for textual cohesion; their commonly used (pre-)writing strategies are drafting, outlining, and proofreading.

  17. Stories of Success: Understanding Academic Achievement of Hispanic Students in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Amanda

    A review of the literature shows that there is much evidence to suggest the challenges facing Hispanic students in American public schools. Hispanic enrollment in K--12 public schools has increased from 6 to 19% in the last thirty years, yet schools have not made adequate adjustments to accommodate this changing population. Issues such as remedial tracking and cultural differences have led to low high school graduate rates for Hispanic students and inequities in schooling experiences (Gay, 2000). Particularly in the area of science, Hispanic students struggle with academic success (Cole & Espinoza, 2008). Despite these obstacles, some Hispanic students are academically successful (Rochin & Mello, 2007; Merisotis & Kee, 2006). This dissertation tells the stories of these Hispanic students who have been successful in science in secondary public schools. This study followed a grounded theory methodology and utilized individual interviews to collect data about Hispanics who have demonstrated achievement in the area of science. Through the analysis of these interviews, factors were identified which may have contributed to the success of these Hispanics in the field of science. Implications for future practice in public schools are also discussed.

  18. Family influences and academic success: the perceptions of individuals using AAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackensperger, Tracy

    2012-06-01

    Positive family influences have a significant impact on addressing school barriers to academic success for students from socially disadvantaged backgrounds. Due to inequities and attitudes toward people with complex communication needs, positive family influences may be critical in the academic success of students using AAC. This study asked the following question of eight United States high school graduates who have used augmentative and alternative communication (AAC): How do family influences positively affect the ability of students who use AAC to succeed in the secondary academic environment? Five themes emerged from the qualitative analysis of participants' narratives: (a) the impact of the family in seeking appropriate education, (b) homework as a challenge that was made easier through the involvement of the family, (c) the role of the family in communicating the importance of education, (d) mothers as driving forces of support, and (e) family encouragement for self-determination. This research allows families and schools to recognize the needs of students and to take action to meet them. It identifies the needs of families and schools in establishing relationships with each other, in terms of supporting requirements for accommodation, learning, motivation, and self-determination of students with complex commmunication needs.

  19. The relationship between learning styles, emotional social intelligence, and academic success of undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suliman, Wafika A

    2010-06-01

    Feelings or emotions and thinking have been identified as forces that may affect one's learning styles (D. A. Kolb, 1984), emotional social intelligence, and success (R. Bar-On, 2004). This study on the relationship between academic success and the two variables of learning abilities or styles and emotional social intelligence was conducted at two colleges of nursing in Saudi Arabia. Both offer conventional and accelerated undergraduate nursing education programs. This study was designed to explore the preferred learning abilities or styles of Saudi nursing students in conventional and accelerated programs, the difference in emotional social intelligence between the two, and the relationships between academic success and learning styles and emotional social intelligence. A convenience sample was recruited, consisting of a total of 98 students, 50 and 48 of whom were enrolled, respectively, in conventional and accelerated programs. Self-administered instruments including the Kolb learning style inventory and the Bar-On emotional quotient inventory (EQ-i) were used to collect data, which were analyzed quantitatively. Both groups were found to favor a diverger style of learning, with total EQ-i scores showing no statistical difference between the two (t = 1.251, p =.214). "Self-regard" and "problem solving" earned the highest EQ-i content subscale scores for both groups. Pearson's correlation coefficient showed no significant relationship between learning abilities or styles and emotional social intelligence and academic success. The findings suggest that either no actual relationship exists or that emotional social intelligence may be confounded with factors such as professional and cultural values.

  20. Facilitating faculty success: outcomes and cost benefit of the UCSD National Center of Leadership in Academic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingard, Deborah L; Garman, Karen A; Reznik, Vivian

    2004-10-01

    In 1998, the University of California San Diego (UCSD) was selected as one of four National Centers of Leadership in Academic Medicine (NCLAM) to develop a structured mentoring program for junior faculty. Participants were surveyed at the beginning and end of the seven-month program, and one-four years after. The institution provided financial information. Four primary outcomes associated with participation in NCLAM were assessed: whether participants stayed at UCSD, whether they stayed in academic medicine, improved confidence in skills, and cost-effectiveness. Among 67 participants, 85% remained at UCSD and 93% in academic medicine. Their confidence in skills needed for academic success improved: 53% personal leadership, 19% research, 33% teaching, and 76% administration. Given improved retention rates, savings in recruitment was greater than cost of the program. Structured mentoring can be a cost-effective way to improve skills needed for academic success and retention in academic medicine.

  1. A longitudinal study of self-esteem, cultural identity, and academic success among American Indian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitesell, Nancy Rumbaugh; Mitchell, Christina M; Spicer, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Latent growth curve modeling was used to estimate developmental trajectories of self-esteem and cultural identity among American Indian high school students and to explore the relationships of these trajectories to personal resources, problem behaviors, and academic performance at the end of high school. The sample included 1,611 participants from the Voices of Indian Teens project, a 3-year longitudinal study of adolescents from 3 diverse American Indian cultural groups in the western United States. Trajectories of self-esteem were clearly related to academic achievement; cultural identity, in contrast, was largely unrelated, with no direct effects and only very small indirect effects. The relationships between self-esteem and success were mediated by personal resources and problem behaviors.

  2. Performance Anxiety and Academic Success Level Examination of Students in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sena GÜRŞEN OTACIOĞLU

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Within this scope, “performance anxiety” grades of students being educated in music education branches, conservatories and fine arts were assessed in respect to different variables (n=306. Research was carried out in order to reveal how relations of performance anxiety and academic success levels of students receiving professional music education in different universities could differ among variables. “Kenny Music Performance anxiety” inventory developed by Kenny (2004 and adopted to Turkish in order to measure “music performance anxiety level” were used in study. Research data, frequency percentage (% of variables (f and (ss values given for M.P.A inventory, “one-way analysis of variance”, independent (unrelated group t-test, M.W.U and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used. At the end of the research it was determined that there was negative relation between “musical performance anxiety” and “academic success” levels.

  3. AGA-primed uteri compared with SGA-primed uteri and the success of subsequent in utero fetal programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihu, Hamisu M; Mbah, Alfred K; Alio, Amina P; Kirby, Russell S

    2008-04-01

    To assess whether risk for early mortality is increased with recurrent small for gestational age (SGA) compared with nonrecurrent SGA. We used the Missouri maternally linked cohort data containing births from 1978-1997. We identified mothers according to four categories: 1) appropriate for gestational age (AGA)-AGA: both first and second pregnancies were AGA; 2) AGA-SGA: first pregnancy was AGA, second pregnancy outcome changed to SGA (a switch); 3) SGA-AGA: first pregnancy was SGA, second pregnancy outcome AGA (a switch); 4) SGA-SGA: both first and second pregnancies were SGA. We then compared the success of fetal programming in the second pregnancy with a switch compared with a pregnancy without a switch (AGA-SGA compared with SGA-SGA; and SGA-AGA compared with AGA-AGA). We used neonatal mortality as primary outcome with infant and postneonatal mortality as secondary outcomes. Appropriate for gestational age infants from a SGA-primed uterus (SGA-AGA switch) had a 19% (odds ratio 1.19; 95% confidence interval 1.11-1.28) and 29% (odds ratio 1.29; 95% confidence interval 1.17-1.42) greater likelihood of infant and neonatal mortality, respectively, when compared with AGA infants from AGA-primed uterus (AGA-AGA; nonswitch). Approximately the same magnitude of risk elevation for neonatal and infant mortality was noted among SGA infants resulting from AGA-primed uterus (a switch) as among SGA infants from SGA-primed uterus (a nonswitch). Overall, the greatest risk of neonatal, infant, and postneonatal mortality was associated with an AGA-SGA switch. Fetal programming switch in subsequent gestation adversely affects early survival of affected infants compared with those with no change in fetal growth pattern.

  4. A Culture Conducive to Women’s Academic Success: Development of a Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westring, Alyssa Friede; Speck, Rebecca M.; Sammel, Mary Dupuis; Scott, Patricia; Tuton, Lucy Wolf; Grisso, Jeane Ann; Abbuhl, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The culture of the work environment inhibits women’s career success in academic medicine. The lack of clarity and consistency in the definition, measurement, and analysis of culture constrains current research on the topic. The authors addressed this gap by defining the construct of a culture conducive to women’s academic success (CCWAS) and creating a measure (i.e., tool) to evaluate it. Method First, the authors conducted a review of published literature, held focus groups, and consulted with subject matter experts to develop a measure of academic workplace culture for women. Then they developed and pilot-tested the measure with a convenience sample of women assistant professors. After refining the measure, they administered it, along with additional scales for validation, to 133 women assistant professors at the University of Pennsylvania. Finally, they conducted statistical analyses to explore the measure’s nature and validity. Results A CCWAS consists of four distinct, but related dimensions: equal access, work-life balance, freedom from gender biases, and supportive leadership. The authors found evidence that women within departments/divisions agree on the supportiveness of their units but that substantial differences among units exist. The analyses provided strong evidence for the reliability and validity of their measure. Conclusions This report contributes to a growing understanding of women’s academic medicine careers and provides a measure that researchers can utilize to assess the supportiveness of the culture for women assistant professors and that leaders can use to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions designed to increase the supportiveness of the environment for women faculty. PMID:23018337

  5. Satellite clinics in academic ophthalmology programs: an exploratory study of successes and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Major academic ophthalmology departments have been expanding by opening multi-office locations (“satellites”). This paper offers a first glimpse into satellites of academic ophthalmology departments. Methods Leaders of seven medium to large, geographically diverse departments agreed to participate. One- to two-hour phone interviews were conducted to assess the features of their satellite practices. Results Success as clinical entities, profitability, and access to patients were stated goals for most satellites. In approximate descending order, refractive surgery, retina, oculoplastics, and pediatric ophthalmology were the most common subspecialties offered. Faculty staffing ranged from recruitment specifically for satellites to rotation of existing faculty. Except for a department with only one academic track, satellite doctors were a mix of tenure and mostly non-tenure track faculty. According to these department leaders, scholarly productivity of satellite faculty was similar to that of colleagues at the main campus, though research was more community-based and clinical in nature. Fellowship but little resident education occurred at satellites. Though it was agreed that satellite practices were integral to department finances, they accounted for a smaller percentage of revenues than of total departmental visits. Conclusions Satellite offices have offered access to a better payor mix and have boosted the finances of academic ophthalmology departments. Challenges include maintaining collegiality with referring community physicians, integrating faculty despite geographic distance, preserving the department’s academic “brand name,” and ensuring consistent standards and operating procedures. Satellite clinics will likely help departments meet some of the challenges of health care reform. PMID:24330741

  6. Non-cognitive characteristics predicting academic success among medical students in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghe, Priyanga; Ellawela, Amaya; Gunatilake, Saman B

    2012-08-03

    To identify non-cognitive and socio-demographic characteristics determining academic success of Sri Lankan medical undergraduates. A retrospective study among 90 recently graduated students of the Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Sri Lanka. Students were stratified into two equal groups; 'High-achievers' (honours degree at the final MBBS examination) and 'Low-achievers' (repeated one or more subjects at the same examination). A revised version of the Non-cognitive Questionnaire (NQ) with additional socio-demographic data was the study instrument. Academic performance indicator was performance at the final MBBS examinations. A binary logistic regression analysis was performed using the dichotomous variable 'Honours degree at final MBBS' as the dependant factor. Males were 56.7%. Mean age ± SD was 26.4 ± 0.9 years. 'High-achievers' were significantly younger than 'Low-achievers'. Significant proportion of 'High-achievers' were from the Western province and selected to university from Colombo district. A significant majority of 'High-achievers' entered medical school from their first attempt at GCE A/L examination and obtained 'Distinctions' at the GCE A/L English subject. 'High-achievers' demonstrated a significantly higher mean score for the following domains of NQ; Positive self-concept and confidence, realistic self-appraisal, leadership, preference of long range goals and academic familiarity.The binary logistic regression indicates that age, being selected to university from Colombo district, residency in Western province, entering university from GCE A/L first attempt, obtaining a 'Distinction' for GCE A/L English subject, higher number of patient-oriented case discussions, positive self-concept and confidence, leadership qualities, preference of long range goals and academic familiarity all significantly increased the odds of obtaining a Honours degree. A combined system incorporating both past academic performance and non

  7. Donde Estan los Estudiantes Puertorriquenos/os Exitosos? [Where Are the Academically Successful Puerto Rican Students?]: Success Factors of High-Achieving Puerto Rican High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antrop-Gonzalez, Rene; Velez, William; Garrett, Tomas

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the 4 success factors that 10 working class Puerto Rican urban high school students attributed to their high academic achievement. These success factors were (a) the acquisition of social capital through religiosity and participation in school and community-based extracurricular activities, (b) having a strong Puerto Rican…

  8. A Social Inequality of Motivation? The Relationship between Beliefs about Academic Success and Young People's Educational Attainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jonathan F.; Skrbiš, Zlatko

    2017-01-01

    Meritocratic ideals, which emphasise individual responsibility and self-motivation, have featured prominently in discourses about Australia's international competitiveness in academic achievement. Young people are often encouraged to attribute academic success and failure to individual factors such as hard work and talent, and to downplay…

  9. Academic Success Is about Self-Efficacy Rather than Frequency of Use of the Learning Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Jaclyn

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have investigated the association between the frequency of student learning management system (LMS) use (logins, discussion board use, resources used, etc.) and academic achievement. These studies indicate that low LMS use by students is likely to result in less academic success. However, these models fail to take into account…

  10. Predicting the academic success of architecture students by pre-enrolment requirement: using machine-learning techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Olusola Aluko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of applicants seeking admission into architecture programmes. As expected, prior academic performance (also referred to as pre-enrolment requirement is a major factor considered during the process of selecting applicants. In the present study, machine learning models were used to predict academic success of architecture students based on information provided in prior academic performance. Two modeling techniques, namely K-nearest neighbour (k-NN and linear discriminant analysis were applied in the study. It was found that K-nearest neighbour (k-NN outperforms the linear discriminant analysis model in terms of accuracy. In addition, grades obtained in mathematics (at ordinary level examinations had a significant impact on the academic success of undergraduate architecture students. This paper makes a modest contribution to the ongoing discussion on the relationship between prior academic performance and academic success of undergraduate students by evaluating this proposition. One of the issues that emerges from these findings is that prior academic performance can be used as a predictor of academic success in undergraduate architecture programmes. Overall, the developed k-NN model can serve as a valuable tool during the process of selecting new intakes into undergraduate architecture programmes in Nigeria.

  11. The Academic Success of First-Generation African American Male College Students Attending Predominantly White Institutions of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewing, Venus

    2011-01-01

    A quantitative, correlational design was utilized in this study to examine the relationship between academic self-efficacy, racial identity, and the academic success of first-generation African American male college students at Predominantly White Institutions of higher education. The study comprised 89 first-generation African American male…

  12. European nursing students' academic success or failure: a post-Bologna Declaration systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dante, Angelo; Petrucci, Cristina; Lancia, Loreto

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to synthesise the available evidence in the European scientific literature produced after the Bologna Declaration and to evaluate studies that quantify and examine the factors associated with the academic success or failure of nursing students. A systematic review of the literature was conducted. Major health literature databases were searched for studies published from 2000 to 2011. This review includes only European observational studies that were submitted to a quality assessment by two researchers before inclusion. Only five studies were included in this review. There are discordant results regarding the predictors of success or failure, which were common objects of study (gender, age, qualification on entry, ethnic group). other factors were studied individually (student personality, gendered view of nursing careers, intention to leave, family commitments, working while on course, student performance, clinical learning environment) need to be confirmed in additional studies. Although the predictors may be relevant at the local level, given their low external validity and the conflicting results, it is not possible to state with certainty that these factors are effectively predictive of success or failure in the context of post-Bologna Declaration Europe. This review showed that over the last ten years, in the European context, only a few high-quality observational studies have been performed. In this regard, given the small number and heterogeneity of the available studies, there is little useful evidence available for Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) to effectively address the problem. In the future, European researchers should focus not only on the documentation of the predictors but also on the documentation of the outcomes produced by the HEI strategies that have been implemented to prevent avoidable academic failure and contain physiological academic failure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Pathways to success for psychologists in academic health centers: from early career to emeritus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Kathryn A; Breland-Noble, Alfiee M; King, Cheryl A; Cubic, Barbara A

    2010-12-01

    Careers in academic health centers (AHCs) come with a unique set of challenges and rewards. Building a stable and rewarding career as a psychologist in an AHC requires the efforts of a whole team of players and coaches. This paper outlines the characteristics of AHCs and the general skills psychologists need to thrive in this type of setting. Advice specific to each stage of career development (early, mid, and late) is offered, highlighting the themes of coaching and teamwork that are critical to success in an AHC.

  14. The Effects of Using Animations on Sixth Grade Students’ Academic Success in Turkish Grammar Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Gün, Mesut

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this empirical study is to determine how and to what extent the use of animations impacts auditory acquisition, one of the key learning fields in 6th grade grammar, as measured by students’ academic success and completion rates. By using a pre-test and post-test design, this emrical study randomly divided a group of Turkish 6th graders into an experimental and a control group, who were taught the same standard lessons (as set forth in the Turkish annual lesson plan) by the same...

  15. Factors That Promote and Impede the Academic Success of African American Students in Prelicensure Nursing Education: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Teri A

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this review is to identify factors that impact the academic success of African American nursing students in prelicensure nursing education programs, given the need for RN health care workers to be more reflective of the general U.S. A literature review was conducted to integrate the findings of the research related to African American nursing students in entry-level nursing programs to identify perceived barriers and supports to their retention and graduation. The review revealed alienation, isolation, and being different as barriers to success. Academic support, mentoring, and integration and inclusivity were factors that helped promote success. Recommendations for the establishment of diversity and inclusivity plans, structured enrichment and academic support services, mentorship, and activities that fostered student engagement and integration were actions that could contribute to the academic success of African American nursing students. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Undergraduate African American females in the sciences: A qualitative study of student experiences affecting academic success and persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essien-Wood, Idara R.

    Given the lack of literature on Undergraduate African American females in the sciences (UAAFS), this study sought to explicate their experiences at one large, predominantly White, Research I institution in the southwestern United States. In particular, the purpose of this study was to identify factors that affect the academic success and persistence of Black females in the natural and physical sciences. Data was collected via in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 15 Black female science majors. Findings from this study identified several supportive mechanisms for academic success: family, religion, teaching assistants and friends. Also identified were seven barriers to academic success: employment, lack of diversity, cultural dissonance, unwelcoming Research I environment, faculty, advisors, classmates, and lab groups. Further, an analysis of students' responses revealed numerous instances of racial and gender micro-aggressions. Recommendations are provided to address factors identified as affecting student academic success and persistence as well as a culture of micro-aggressive behavior.

  17. Does academic performance in the premedical year predict the performance of the medical student in subsequent years?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman M Al-Mazrou

    2008-01-01

    Conclusion: Our results support the prerequisite of a minimum GPA in the premedical year before proceeding to the higher levels. The GPA of premedical year is a useful predictor of students who need close monitoring and academic support. The use of GPA in the premedical year for admission into medical colleges should help optimize the use of resources and reduce student wastage.

  18. Integrated systematic review on educational strategies that promote academic success and resilience in undergraduate indigenous students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, T; Creedy, D K; West, R

    2016-01-01

    Despite numerous recommendations by governments, researchers, and education policymakers the recruitment, retention and success of undergraduate indigenous students in higher education is not commensurate of the wider student population. There is minimal evidence of valuing indigenous worldviews and perspectives in curricula, and effectiveness of educational strategies to strengthen indigenous student success rates in completing undergraduate studies. To conduct an integrative systematic review of educational strategies to promote academic success and resilience in undergraduate indigenous students. Major databases of Scopus, ProQuest, Informit and Web of Science were searched. Inclusion criteria were peer reviewed research articles from scholarly journals that referenced indigenous, aboriginal, First Nation or Māori students in undergraduate programs in higher education. The search was limited to English language and studies conducted from 1995 to 2014. The search yielded 156 research papers which reduced to 16 papers that met the inclusion criteria. The included papers were critiqued from a standpoint theory approach that reflects feminism, cultural respect, and humanism. Much of the literature describes issues, and provides qualitative analyses of experiences, but empirical evaluations of interventions are rare. There was a gap in current research evaluating strategies to improve indigenous student success and resilience. Key strategies for indigenous student success are multi-faceted, layered support, underpinned by the principles of respect, relationships, and responsibility. Implications for nursing and midwifery education, research and health care practice are outlined. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Success Factors and Strategic Planning: Rebuilding an Academic Library Digitization Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory Lampert

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses a dual approach of case study and research survey to investigate the complex factors in sustaining academic library digitization programs. The case study involves the background of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV Libraries’ digitization program and elaborates on the authors’ efforts to gain staff support for this program. A related survey was administered to all Association of Research Libraries (ARL members, seeking to collect baseline data on their digital collections, understand their respective administrative frameworks, and to gather feedback on both negative obstacles and positive inputs affecting their success. Results from the survey, combined with the authors’ local experience, point to several potential success factors including staff skill sets, funding, and strategic planning.

  20. Is the h-index predictive of greater NIH funding success among academic radiologists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezek, Issa; McDonald, Robert J; Kallmes, David F

    2011-11-01

    Despite rapid adoption of the Hirsch index (h-index) as a measure of academic success, the correlations between the h-index and other metrics of productivity remain poorly understood. The aims of this study were to determine whether h-indices were associated with greater National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding success among academic radiologists. Using the Scopus database, h-indices were calculated for a random sample of academic radiologists with the rank of professor. Using the NIH tool Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools Expenditures and Reports, we determined the number, classification, and total years of NIH grant funding as principal investigator for each radiologist. Differences in h-index, sorted by funding status, were determined using Wilcoxon's tests. Associations between h-index and funding status were determined using logistic regression. Significant correlations between h-index and grant metrics were determined using Spearman's ρ. Among 210 professors of radiology, 48 (23%) secured at least one NIH grant. The mean h-index was significantly higher among individuals who secured at least one NIH grant (19.1) compared to those who did not (10.4) (P 10 were significantly less likely to receive NIH funding (odds ratio, 0.07; P = .0321). However, h-indices > 10 were not significantly predictive of greater funding. No significant relationships were observed between h-index and the number of grant awards, years of prior funding, the amounts of grant awards, or grant classification. Having obtained at least one NIH grant was associated with a higher h-index, yet multiple or large grants, such as those for program projects, were not predictive of higher h-indices. Copyright © 2011 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Encoding-related brain activity dissociates between the recollective processes underlying successful recall and recognition: a subsequent-memory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeh, Talya; Maril, Anat; Goshen-Gottstein, Yonatan

    2012-07-01

    The subsequent-memory (SM) paradigm uncovers brain mechanisms that are associated with mnemonic activity during encoding by measuring participants' neural activity during encoding and classifying the encoding trials according to performance in the subsequent retrieval phase. The majority of these studies have converged on the notion that the mechanism supporting recognition is mediated by familiarity and recollection. The process of recollection is often assumed to be a recall-like process, implying that the active search for the memory trace is similar, if not identical, for recall and recognition. Here we challenge this assumption and hypothesize - based on previous findings obtained in our lab - that the recollective processes underlying recall and recognition might show dissociative patterns of encoding-related brain activity. To this end, our design controlled for familiarity, thereby focusing on contextual, recollective processes. We found evidence for dissociative neurocognitive encoding mechanisms supporting subsequent-recall and subsequent-recognition. Specifically, the contrast of subsequent-recognition versus subsequent-recall revealed activation in the Parahippocampal cortex (PHc) and the posterior hippocampus--regions associated with contextual processing. Implications of our findings and their relation to current cognitive models of recollection are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Non-cognitive characteristics predicting academic success among medical students in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranasinghe Priyanga

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To identify non-cognitive and socio-demographic characteristics determining academic success of Sri Lankan medical undergraduates. Methods A retrospective study among 90 recently graduated students of the Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Sri Lanka. Students were stratified into two equal groups; ‘High-achievers’ (honours degree at the final MBBS examination and ‘Low-achievers’ (repeated one or more subjects at the same examination. A revised version of the Non-cognitive Questionnaire (NQ with additional socio-demographic data was the study instrument. Academic performance indicator was performance at the final MBBS examinations. A binary logistic regression analysis was performed using the dichotomous variable ‘Honours degree at final MBBS’ as the dependant factor. Results Males were 56.7%. Mean age ± SD was 26.4 ± 0.9 years. ‘High-achievers’ were significantly younger than ‘Low-achievers’. Significant proportion of ‘High-achievers’ were from the Western province and selected to university from Colombo district. A significant majority of ‘High-achievers’ entered medical school from their first attempt at GCE A/L examination and obtained ‘Distinctions’ at the GCE A/L English subject. ‘High-achievers’ demonstrated a significantly higher mean score for the following domains of NQ; Positive self-concept and confidence, realistic self-appraisal, leadership, preference of long range goals and academic familiarity. The binary logistic regression indicates that age, being selected to university from Colombo district, residency in Western province, entering university from GCE A/L first attempt, obtaining a ‘Distinction’ for GCE A/L English subject, higher number of patient-oriented case discussions, positive self-concept and confidence, leadership qualities, preference of long range goals and academic familiarity all significantly increased the odds of

  3. Factors That Contribute to Academic Success in Higher Education of Latino Males in the Los Angeles Community College District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Marcellino J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This dissertation sought to find the most significant personal strategies and institutional support used by Latino males who successfully complete transfer requirements in the Los Angeles Community College District and determined what factors most contribute to Latino academic success. The study begins with a review of literature and…

  4. Predicators of Success for Undergraduate Students Reinstated after an Academic Dismissal at a Small Midwest Private University Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meador, Ryan E.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined students who successfully applied for reinstatement after being academically dismissed for the first time in order to discover indicators of future success. This study examined 666 students' appeals filed at the DeVry University Kansas City campus between 2004 and 2009. Binary logistic regression was used to discover if a…

  5. From Strain to Success: A Phenomenological Study of the Personal and Academic Pressures on African American Male Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, John R.

    2009-01-01

    For many African American college students, the challenges to achieve academic success are overwhelming. The disproportionate number of African American male students enrolled in the community college system is of substantial concern because community colleges have not traditionally been successful in producing African American male graduates and…

  6. Successful Aging in the Context of the Disablement Process: Working and Volunteering as Moderators on the Association Between Chronic Conditions and Subsequent Functional Limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kail, Ben Lennox; Carr, Dawn C

    2017-03-01

    This study evaluated the successful aging model by assessing the impact of two forms of productive engagement-working and volunteering-as potential interventions in the process of disablement. The Health and Retirement Study was used to (a) estimate two-stage selection equations of (i) currently working part time and full time and (ii) currently volunteering less than 100 hours and volunteering 100 hours or more per year (net of chronic health problems) and (b) assess whether, net of selection, working, and volunteering moderate the association between chronic conditions and subsequent functional limitations. Chronic conditions were associated with elevated levels of subsequent functional limitations, whereas both working and volunteering were associated with lower levels of subsequent functional limitations. Moreover, workers and volunteers of less than 100 hours per year experienced a reduction in the association of chronic conditions on subsequent functional limitations. This research highlights the role of productive engagement as a key element in successful aging. Not only do work and volunteering have direct associations with health outcomes themselves, but they also act as potential interventions in the process of disablement by attenuating the way in which chronic conditions are translated into subsequent functional limitations. This suggests that (a) future research should apply successful aging models to health processes as well as health outcomes and (b) policy makers should support social institutions that foster late-life productive engagement.

  7. Use of Social Emotional Learning Skills to Predict Future Academic Success and Progress toward Graduation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Alan; Solberg, V. Scott; de Baca, Christine; Gore, Taryn Hargrove

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the degree to which a range of social emotional learning skills--academic self-efficacy, academic motivation, social connections, importance of school, and managing psychological and emotional distress and academic stress--could be used as an indicator of future academic outcomes. Using a sample of 4,797 from a large urban…

  8. The Academic Success of East Asian American Youth: The Role of Shadow Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Soo-yong; Park, Hyunjoon

    2013-01-01

    Using data from the Education Longitudinal Study, this study assessed the relevance of shadow education to the high academic performance of East Asian American students by examining how East Asian American students differed from other racial/ethnic students in the prevalence, purpose, and effects of using the two forms – commercial test preparation service and private one-to-one tutoring – of SAT coaching, defined as the American style of shadow education. East Asian American students were most likely to take a commercial SAT test preparation course for the enrichment purpose, and benefited most from taking this particular form of SAT coaching. However, this was not the case for private SAT one-to-one tutoring. While black students were most likely to utilize private tutoring for the remedial purpose, the impact of private tutoring was trivial for all racial/ethnic groups including East Asian American students. The authors discussed broader implications of the findings on racial/ethnic inequalities in educational achievement beyond the relevance of shadow education for the academic success of East Asian American students. PMID:24163483

  9. Informed choice of entering medical school and academic success in Iranian medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi-Khajeh-Pasha, Yasin; Nedjat, Saharnaz; Mohammadi, Aeen; Malakan Rad, Elaheh; Majdzadeh, Reza

    2014-11-01

    One of the challenges medical education policy-makers confront is matriculants' informed choice of entering medicine. However, students' reasons for choosing medicine do not seem rational. We compared students who made an informed choice about entering medicine with those who did not, in terms of academic success. The study was carried out with a self-administered questionnaire on 220 final-year medical students randomly selected from six Iranian medical schools. Depending on their informed choice of entering medicine or not at the time of application, they were divided into two groups. We compared these two groups' academic achievement as well as their satisfaction with medicine. The students who had not made an informed choice had a higher tendency not to choose medicine if they were to start over (p value ≤0.001). The pre-admission scores of students who had made an informed choice of medicine were worse than the other group (p = 0.03). However, their final year scores as well as their satisfaction with medicine were higher than the other group. Idealistic views of medicine should be replaced by rational and logical ones to help students select the careers best suited to their abilities and talents.

  10. Tracking affect and academic success across university: Happy students benefit from bouts of negative mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Erin T; Howard, Andrea L; Galambos, Nancy L; Wrosch, Carsten

    2016-12-01

    We examined how positive and negative affect covary within individuals over time and how patterns of association between affective traits and states relate to academic success across 4 years of university. Participants were 187 full-time first-year students at a large Canadian university who completed questionnaires about recent affective experiences in 6 waves across 4 years. Grade point average for each year of study was provided by the registrar's office. Our analysis identified an adaptive pattern characterized by the maintenance of high positive affect ("chronic happiness") and the cooccurrence of time-limited bouts of negative affect. Our results are consistent with findings showing productive consequences of experiencing positive and negative affect in tandem and the development of emotion regulation capacity across the transition to adulthood. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. One pathway to academic success: autobiography of Dr Ronald G. Strauss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Ronald G

    2012-01-01

    Often, I have been asked by "junior faculty"-who are usually burdened by substantial responsibilities in service and teaching-how they can launch their career in research as a means to succeed in academic medicine. Obviously, the answers/solutions are as diverse as are the circumstances of each questioner. In the following article, I offer the approach that I applied to my career-acknowledging that "one shoe doesn't fit all" and that others will advise differently. However, one truism exists whenever one seeks excellence in anything-the opportunity must be present to commit uninterrupted time for thought/concentration, organization, training/mentoring/study, and effort/hard work. Without such an opportunity, success in research will be elusive. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Becoming the Harvard man: person-environment fit, personality development, and academic success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, P D; Roberts, Brent W; Winter, David

    2006-07-01

    The continuity and change of the needs and evaluations of the college environment and person-environment fit (PE fit) with the college environment were studied in a 4-year longitudinal study of students (N = 191). Perceptions of the environment changed more dramatically than corresponding self-perceived needs. PE fit demonstrated moderate levels of consistency over the 4-year span, but no significant increases in mean levels were found over time. Antecedents to PE fit in the college environment included both intelligence and openness to experience. Outcomes associated with PE fit included changes in personality traits linked to openness to experience and higher academic achievement. The implications of the findings for personality development and the relationship of PE fit to successful outcomes are discussed.

  13. Driving Success over the Past 50 Years-The Faculty in Academic Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, Daryl D

    2015-01-01

    The faculty at member schools and colleges of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC) are critical for continued progress in veterinary medicine. The success of those faculty members over the past 50 years has positioned veterinary medicine to engage an ever-widening array of opportunities, responsibilities, and societal needs. Yet the array of skills and accomplishments of faculty in academic veterinary medicine are not always visible to the public, or even within our profession. The quality and the wide range of their scholarship are reflected, in part, through the according of national and international awards and honors from organizations relevant to their particular areas of expertise. The goal of this study was to illustrate the breadth of expertise and the quality of the faculty at 34 schools/colleges of veterinary medicine by examining the diversity of organizations that have recognized excellence in faculty achievements through a variety of awards.

  14. The Dyad School Success/Failure in the Academic Development of the Working Class Women from Mendoza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Molina-Galarza

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The notion of academic performance renders account of the results achieved by the students during their school education.  Internally, there are two opposed phenomena:  school success and school failure.  Sociology of education has contributed to the discussion of both notions revealing their social nature closely related to the institutional and socio-cultural contexts in which education is developed.  This paper is the result of a research project conducted for our doctoral thesis.  Its purpose is to contribute to enlighten the scopes of this discussion, by analyzing the school development of a group of working class women from Mendoza. We were interested, in the first place, in knowing the reasons why they quit school when they were young girls or adolescents.  Subsequently, we have approached the opportunities they had to access the system again during their adulthood, the obstacles they had to face and the resources to be able to complete the medium level.

  15. Effects of comprehensive educational reforms on academic success in a diverse student body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Steven A; Ainsworth, Michael A; Asimakis, Gregory K; Thomas, Lauree; Cain, Lisa D; Mancuso, Melodee G; Rabek, Jeffrey P; Zhang, Ni; Frye, Ann W

    2010-12-01

    Calls for medical curriculum reform and increased student diversity in the USA have seen mixed success: performance outcomes following curriculum revisions have been inconsistent and national matriculation of under-represented minority (URM) students has not met aspirations. Published innovations in curricula, academic support and pipeline programmes usually describe isolated interventions that fail to affect curriculum-level outcomes. United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 performance and graduation rates were analysed for three classes of medical students before (matriculated 1995-1997, n=517) and after (matriculated 2003-2005, n=597) implementing broad-based reforms in our education system. The changes in pipeline recruitment and preparation programmes, instructional methods, assessment systems, academic support and board preparation were based on sound educational principles and best practices. Post-reform classes were diverse with respect to ethnicity (25.8% URM students), gender (51.8% female), and Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) score (range 20-40; 24.1% scored ≤ 25). Mean±standard deviation MCAT scores were minimally changed (from 27.2±4.7 to 27.8±3.6). The Step 1 failure rate decreased by 69.3% and mean score increased by 14.0 points (effect size: d=0.67) overall. Improvements were greater among women (failure rate decreased by 78.9%, mean score increased by 15.6 points; d=0.76) and URM students (failure rate decreased by 76.5%, mean score increased by 14.6 points; d=0.74), especially African-American students (failure rate decreased by 93.6%, mean score increased by 20.8 points; d=1.12). Step 1 scores increased across the entire MCAT range. Four- and 5-year graduation rates increased by 7.1% and 5.8%, respectively. The effect sizes in these performance improvements surpassed those previously reported for isolated interventions in curriculum and student support. This success is likely to have resulted from the broad

  16. Evidence for the acceptability and academic success of an innovative remote and rural extended placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Morven; Cleland, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Time spent in remote medicine as an undergraduate is influential in career choice in Australia and Northern America. However, its influence is not known in smaller countries, where recruitment into rural medicine is also problematic. Differences across countries mean work is required to explore determinants of success of remote and rural undergraduate training locally. The objectives of this pilot study were to identify why 4th year medical students chose an extended remote and rural option within a degree program which includes a short compulsory period of remote and rural practice. Because this was a novel option the study also looks at the academic performance of the first cohort of students to ensure quality control of teaching and learning. This was a mixed methods (questionnaire, focus group, assessment data) pilot study exploring student views and performance outcomes in 4th year medical undergraduate students (n = 14), University of Aberdeen, who completed an innovative, one-year remote and rural placement. Fourteen students took part in the pilot. Questionnaire data indicated they viewed remote and rural medicine positively. This interest was maintained over the placement. Most had no definite career plans, but did have a slight preference towards general practice. Focus group data indicated four main themes relating to the decision to select the remote and rural placement: (1) teaching reputation; (2) to experience remote and rural medicine; (3) a change from Aberdeen; and (4) lifestyle factors. Assessment data indicated that student performances at the end of the year placement were consistent with their 3rd year performance on all assessments: OSCEs (p = 0.79), written exams (p = 0.10; p = 0.49), special study module/ Ethics (p = 0.10) and year mark averages (p = 0.48). The results indicate that the extended remote and rural placement was a valuable and academically successful experience for the students. Important outcomes include that: the students

  17. Academic Success of Mexican Origin Adolescent Boys and Girls: The Role of Mothers’ and Fathers’ Parenting and Cultural Orientation

    OpenAIRE

    Dumka, Larry E.; Gonzales, Nancy A.; Bonds, Darya; Millsap, Roger E.

    2009-01-01

    To understand the role that Mexican origin parents play in their children’s academic success, this study used structural equation modeling to evaluate the associations of parents’ parenting practices (warmth, monitoring, harshness, and academic involvement) and cultural orientations (enculturation and acculturation) with their adolescents’ grades, classroom behavior, and association with peers who get into trouble at school. Data were obtained from teachers, mothers, fathers, and male and fem...

  18. Examining Reciprocal Influences Among Family Climate, School Attachment, and Academic Self-Regulation: Implications for School Success

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, Mengya; Fosco, Gregory M.; Feinberg, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Guided by family systems and ecological theories, this study examined the multi-contextual implications of family, school, and individual domains for adolescents' school success. The first goal of this study was to examine reciprocal influences among family climate, school attachment, and academic self-regulation (ASR) during the middle school years. The second goal was to test the relative impact of each of these domains on adolescents' school adjustment and academic achievement after the tr...

  19. Introduction of e-learning material to Engineering students at the Vaal University of Technology: Measuring academic success

    OpenAIRE

    C Van Aardt; DE GOEDE, R; Taylor, E.; Pretorius, P D; Kroeze, Jan H

    2010-01-01

    Traditional learning and teaching methods are still an integral part of many academic institutions. Will the implementation of e-learning material as an additional resource to normal lectures have an effect on a student's academic success? Senior students enrolled for the Network Systems III module at the Vaal University of Technology (VUT) were introduced to e-learning material. A variety of different learning styles was combined to prepare the e-learning material. The activities of individu...

  20. Successful emotion regulation skills application predicts subsequent reduction of symptom severity during treatment of major depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radkovsky, Anna; McArdle, John J; Bockting, Claudi L H; Berking, Matthias

    OBJECTIVE: Deficits in emotion regulation (ER) skills are considered a putative maintaining factor for major depressive disorder (MDD) and hence a promising target in the treatment of MDD. However, to date, the association between the successful application of arguably adaptive ER skills and changes

  1. An Analysis of Factors Affecting Mature Age Students' Academic Success in Undergraduate Nursing Programs: A Critical Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Lisa J; Jeong, Sarah Y; Norton, Carol A

    2016-01-01

    The population of mature age students entering university nursing programs has steadily increased in both Australia and worldwide. The objective of the literature review was to explore how mature age students perform academically and to analyse the factors associated with their academic performance in nursing programs. A literature search was conducted in the following databases: CINAHL, ProQuest, Medline, Cochrane, Mosby's Index, Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI), and Scopus. Twenty-six (26) research papers published between 2000 and 2014 have met the selection criteria of this review. The key themes identified include; 1) ambiguity in definition of mature age and academic success, 2) age and academic success, 3) intrinsic factors (life experiences, emotional intelligence, and motivation and volition), and 4) extrinsic factors (peer, academic and family support; and learning style, components of the modules and mode of delivery). Current literature provides evidence that mature age nursing students perform at a higher level within the methodological issues discussed in this paper. Future research is warranted to advance the understanding of the complex relationship between extrinsic and intrinsic factors of mature age students and their academic success in higher education. Nursing educators will benefit from novel evidence, ideas and opportunities to explore and implement in nursing education.

  2. A Previous Miscarriage and a Previous Successful Pregnancy Have a Different Impact on HLA Antibody Formation during a Subsequent Successful Pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geneugelijk, Kirsten; Hönger, Gideon; van Deutekom, Hanneke Wilhelmina Maria; Hösli, Irene Mathilde; Schaub, Stefan; Spierings, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Inherited paternal HLA antigens from the semi-allogeneic fetus may trigger maternal immune responses during pregnancy, leading to the production of child-specific HLA antibodies. The prevalence of these HLA antibodies increases with the number of successful pregnancies. In the present study, we

  3. Does Formal Research Training Lead to Academic Success in Plastic Surgery? A Comprehensive Analysis of U.S. Academic Plastic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Joseph; Ameri, Afshin; Susarla, Srinivas M; Reddy, Sashank; Soni, Ashwin; Tong, J W; Amini, Neda; Ahmed, Rizwan; May, James W; Lee, W P Andrew; Dorafshar, Amir

    2016-01-01

    It is currently unknown whether formal research training has an influence on academic advancement in plastic surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine whether formal research training was associated with higher research productivity, academic rank, and procurement of extramural National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding in plastic surgery, comparing academic surgeons who completed said research training with those without. This was a cross-sectional study of full-time academic plastic surgeons in the United States. The main predictor variable was formal research training, defined as completion of a postdoctoral research fellowship or attainment of a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD). The primary outcome was scientific productivity measured by the Hirsh-index (h-index, the number of publications, h that have at least h citations each). The secondary outcomes were academic rank and NIH funding. Descriptive, bivariate, and multiple regression statistics were computed. A total of 607 academic surgeons were identified from 94 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited plastic surgery training programs. In all, 179 (29.5%) surgeons completed formal research training. The mean h-index was 11.7 ± 9.9. And, 58 (9.6%) surgeons successfully procured NIH funding. The distribution of academic rank was the following: endowed professor (5.4%), professor (23.9%), associate professor (23.4%), assistant professor (46.0%), and instructor (1.3%). In a multiple regression analysis, completion of formal research training was significantly predictive of a higher h-index and successful procurement of NIH funding. Current evidence demonstrates that formal research training is associated with higher scientific productivity and increased likelihood of future NIH funding. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. ClinicalTrials.gov reporting: strategies for success at an academic health center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Erin K; Hassell, Nancy J; Snyder, Denise C; Natoli, Susan; Liu, Irwin; Rimmler, Jackie; Amspacher, Valerie; Burnett, Bruce K; Parrish, Amanda B; Berglund, Jelena P; Stacy, Mark

    2015-02-01

    The Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 (FDAAA 2007, US Public Law 110-98) mandated registration and reporting of results for applicable clinical trials. Meeting these registration and results reporting requirements has proven to be a challenge for the academic research community. Duke Medicine has made compliance with registration and results reporting a high priority. In order to create uniformity across a large institution, a written policy was created describing requirements for clinical trials disclosure. Furthermore, a centralized resource group was formed with three full time staff members. The group not only ensures compliance with FDAAA 2007, it also acts as a resource for study teams providing hands-on support, reporting, training, and ongoing education. Intensive resourcing for results reporting has been crucial for success. Due to implementation of the institutional policy and creation of centralized resources, compliance with FDAAA 2007 has increased dramatically at Duke Medicine for both registration and results reporting. A consistent centralized approach has enabled success in the face of changing agency rules and new legislation.

  5. Children successfully treated for moderate acute malnutrition remain at risk for malnutrition and death in the subsequent year after recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cindy Y; Trehan, Indi; Wang, Richard J; Thakwalakwa, Chrissie; Maleta, Ken; Deitchler, Megan; Manary, Mark J

    2013-02-01

    Moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) affects 11% of children children aged 6-59 mo successfully treated for MAM in rural Malawi following randomized treatment with corn-soy blend plus milk and oil (CSB++), soy ready-to-use supplementary food (RUSF), or soy/whey RUSF were followed for 12 mo. The initial supplementary food was given until the child reached a weight-for-height Z-score (WHZ) >-2. The median duration of feeding was 2 wk, with a maximum of 12 wk. The hypothesis tested was that children treated with either RUSF would be more likely to remain well-nourished than those treated with CSB++. The primary outcome, remaining well-nourished, was defined as mid-upper arm circumference ≥12.5 cm or WHZ ≥-2 for the entire duration of follow-up. During the 12-mo follow-up period, only 1230 (63%) children remained well-nourished, 334 (17%) relapsed to MAM, 190 (10%) developed severe acute malnutrition, 74 (4%) died, and 139 (7%) were lost to follow-up. Children who were treated with soy/whey RUSF were more likely to remain well-nourished (67%) than those treated with CSB++ (62%) or soy RUSF (59%) (P = 0.01). A seasonal pattern of food insecurity and adverse clinical outcomes was observed. This study demonstrates that children successfully treated for MAM with soy/whey RUSF are more likely to remain well-nourished; however, all children successfully treated for MAM remain vulnerable.

  6. Culture and Climate: Factors That Influence the Academic Success of African American Students in Prelicensure Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Teri A

    2015-12-01

    Despite numerous calls to diversify the nursing workforce, little progress has been made in increasing the numbers of African American graduates from prelicensure nursing programs, thus widening the diversity gap in the number of African Americans who enter the RN workforce. An integrative literature review was conducted to determine whether, from the students' perspective, the institutional climate and culture influenced their academic success. Themes of Alienation and Isolation, Persistent Determination, and Difficulty Seeking Help emerged as having an influence on students' academic success. On the basis of this review, professional development programs on topics such as implicit bias, microaggressions, and other unintentional and unconscious behaviors are recommended. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Academic Performance in Children of Mothers With Schizophrenia and Other Severe Mental Illness, and Risk for Subsequent Development of Psychosis: A Population-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ashleigh; Di Prinzio, Patsy; Young, Deidra; Jacoby, Peter; Whitehouse, Andrew; Waters, Flavie; Jablensky, Assen; Morgan, Vera A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: We examined the academic performance at age 12 years of children of mothers diagnosed with schizophrenia or other severe mental illness using a large whole-population birth cohort born in Western Australia. We investigated the association between academic performance and the subsequent development of psychotic illness. Method: The sample comprised 3169 children of mothers with severe mental illness (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, unipolar major depression, delusional disorder or other psychoses; ICD-9 codes 295–298), and 88 353 children of comparison mothers without known psychiatric morbidity. Academic performance of children was indexed on a mandatory state-wide test of reading, spelling, writing and numeracy. Results: A larger proportion of children (43.1%) of mothers with severe mental illness performed below the acceptable standard than the reference group (30.3%; children of mothers with no known severe mental illness). After adjusting for covariates, children of mothers with any severe mental illness were more likely than the reference group to perform below-benchmark on all domains except reading. For all children, poor spelling was associated with the later development of psychosis, but particularly for those at familial risk for severe mental illness (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.81; 95% CI for HR = 1.21, 2.72). Conclusions: Children of mothers with a severe mental illness are at increased risk for sub-standard academic achievement at age 12 years, placing these children at disadvantage for the transition to secondary school. For children with familial risk for severe mental illness, very poor spelling skills at age 12 years may be an indicator of risk for later psychotic disorder. PMID:27131155

  8. Academic Performance in Children of Mothers With Schizophrenia and Other Severe Mental Illness, and Risk for Subsequent Development of Psychosis: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ashleigh; Di Prinzio, Patsy; Young, Deidra; Jacoby, Peter; Whitehouse, Andrew; Waters, Flavie; Jablensky, Assen; Morgan, Vera A

    2017-01-01

    We examined the academic performance at age 12 years of children of mothers diagnosed with schizophrenia or other severe mental illness using a large whole-population birth cohort born in Western Australia. We investigated the association between academic performance and the subsequent development of psychotic illness. The sample comprised 3169 children of mothers with severe mental illness (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, unipolar major depression, delusional disorder or other psychoses; ICD-9 codes 295-298), and 88 353 children of comparison mothers without known psychiatric morbidity. Academic performance of children was indexed on a mandatory state-wide test of reading, spelling, writing and numeracy. A larger proportion of children (43.1%) of mothers with severe mental illness performed below the acceptable standard than the reference group (30.3%; children of mothers with no known severe mental illness). After adjusting for covariates, children of mothers with any severe mental illness were more likely than the reference group to perform below-benchmark on all domains except reading. For all children, poor spelling was associated with the later development of psychosis, but particularly for those at familial risk for severe mental illness (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.81; 95% CI for HR = 1.21, 2.72). Children of mothers with a severe mental illness are at increased risk for sub-standard academic achievement at age 12 years, placing these children at disadvantage for the transition to secondary school. For children with familial risk for severe mental illness, very poor spelling skills at age 12 years may be an indicator of risk for later psychotic disorder. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Examining Success and Sustainability of Academic Writing: A Case Study of Two Writing-Group Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewska, Kinga; Lock, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    In contemporary higher education there is a growing demand for academics to increase their publication output. This requirement raises the question of how institutions can best support a sustainable academic writing culture, which is needed to challenge the assumption that all academics know how to write for publication. This case study examines…

  10. Engineering students' and faculty perceptions of teaching methods and the level of faculty involvement that promotes academic success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpilo, Lacy N.

    Student academic success is a top priority of higher education institutions in the United States and the trend of students leaving school prior to finishing their degree is a serious concern. Accountability has become a large part of university and college ratings and perceived success. Retention is one component of the accountability metrics used by accreditation agencies. In addition, there are an increasing number of states allocating funds based in part on retention (Seidman, 2005). Institutions have created initiatives, programs, and even entire departments to address issues related to student academic success to promote retention. Universities and colleges have responded by focusing on methods to retain and better serve students. Retention and student academic success is a primary concern for high education institutions; however, engineering education has unique retention issues. The National Science Board (2004) reports a significant decline in the number of individuals in the United States who are training to become engineers, despite the fact that the number of jobs that utilize an engineering background continues to increase. Engineering education has responded to academic success issues by changing curriculum and pedagogical methods (Sheppard, 2001). This descriptive study investigates the perception of engineering students and faculty regarding teaching methods and faculty involvement to create a picture of what is occurring in engineering education. The population was the engineering students and faculty of Colorado State University's College of Engineering. Data from this research suggests that engaging teaching methods are not being used as often as research indicates they should and that there is a lack of student-faculty interaction outside of the classroom. This research adds to the breadth of knowledge and understanding of the current environment of engineering education. Furthermore, the data allows engineering educators and other higher

  11. Picturing Success: Young Femininities and the (Im)Possibilities of Academic Achievement in Selective, Single-Sex Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Over the last decade it is young women who have come to be widely understood as the bearers of educational qualifications. It is girls who are now seen to have "the world at their feet" and to be able to attain the glittering prizes of academic success associated with elite universities and top occupations. And it is upper-middle-class…

  12. Characteristics Expected in Fields of Higher Education and Gender Stereotypical Traits Related to Academic Success: A Mirror Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verniers, Catherine; Martinot, Delphine

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to test whether the content of a gender stereotype concerning general academic achievement matched the characteristics deemed to predict success in the fields of higher education dominated by women and men respectively. A sample of 207 undergraduate students rated the extent to which characteristics ascribed to…

  13. Factors Affecting Burnout and School Engagement among High School Students: Study Habits, Self- Efficacy Beliefs, and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilge, Filiz; Tuzgol Dost, Meliha; Cetin, Bayram

    2014-01-01

    This study examines high school students' levels of burnout and school engagement with respect to academic success, study habits, and self-efficacy beliefs. The data were gathered during the 2011-2012 school year from 633 students attending six high schools located in Ankara, Turkey. The analyses were conducted on responses from 605 students. The…

  14. Measuring Vocabulary Learning Strategy Use of Turkish EFL Learners in Relation to Academic Success and Vocabulary Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmizi, Özkan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate Vocabulary Learning Strategy (VLS) use of English Language and Literature Department students in relation to academic success and vocabulary size. The participants of the study are 213 English Language and Literature students. Two data collection tools were used in the study. The first tool was…

  15. Predicting Academic Success of Junior Secondary School Students in Mathematics through Cognitive Style and Problem Solving Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badru, Ademola K.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the prediction of academic success of Junior secondary school mathematics students using their cognitive style and problem solving technique. A descriptive survey of correlation type was adopted for this study. A purposive sampling procedure was used to select five Public Junior secondary schools in Ijebu-Ode local government…

  16. Student Experience and Academic Success: Comparing a Student-Centred and a Lecture-Based Course Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severiens, Sabine; Meeuwisse, Marieke; Born, Marise

    2015-01-01

    Past research has shown that, under certain conditions, student-centred and small-scale course programmes result in more academic success. The present study investigates these conditions in further detail. It is examined whether, in comparison to a course programme that is relatively more lecture-based, a student-centred course programme promotes…

  17. A Thematic-Based Meta Analytic Study Regarding the Effect of Creativity on Academic Success and Learning Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdas, Faysal; Batdi, Veli

    2017-01-01

    This thematic-based meta-analytic study aims to examine the effect of creativity on the academic success and learning retention scores of students. In the context of this aim, 18 out of 225 studies regarding creativity that were carried out between 2001 and 2011 have been obtained from certain national and international databases. The studies…

  18. The Influence of Student-Centered Methods in Turkish Language Instruction on Academic Success: A Meta-Analysis Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biçer, Nursat

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine the influence of student-centered methods employed in Turkish language instruction on the academic success of students through meta-analysis. To this end, a literature review was conducted on the relevant studies conducted between 2000 and 2016 in order to determine the studies were suitable for the…

  19. Determining the Impact of a Summer Bridge Program on Academic Success for First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Mary Christine

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a summer bridge program geared toward first-year students at a large public university located in the Southeastern United States. The research question guiding this study was, "Does participation in a summer bridge program increase academic success for first-year college students?"…

  20. Undergraduate Latina/o Students: A Systematic Review of Research Identifying Factors Contributing to Academic Success Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, Gloria; Taggart, Amanda; Nora, Amaury

    2015-01-01

    A systematic review was conducted to produce an up-to-date and comprehensive summary of qualitative and quantitative evidence specific to the factors related to undergraduate Latina/o student academic success outcomes during college. The purpose of the study was to make sense of and provide critique to this rapidly growing body of research, as…

  1. Protective Factors and Processes Contributing to the Academic Success of Students Living in Poverty: Implications for Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Joseph M.; Bryan, Julia; Morrison, Stephaney; Scott, Tracey R.

    2017-01-01

    This phenomenological qualitative study examined a national sample of high-achieving, low-income middle school students' (N = 24) perspectives of protective factors and processes that contribute to their academic success in school. Four main themes and 12 subthemes were identified. The main themes are peer social capital, teachers who care, family…

  2. Student experience and academic success: comparing a student-centred and a lecture-based course programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severiens, S.; Meeuwisse, M.; Born, M.

    2015-01-01

    Past research has shown that, under certain conditions, student-centred and small-scale course programmes result in more academic success. The present study investigates these conditions in further detail. It is examined whether, in comparison to a course programme that is relatively more

  3. The Cross-Lagged Relations between Children's Academic Skill Development, Task-Avoidance, and Parental Beliefs about Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magi, Katrin; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Poikkeus, Anna-Maija; Rasku-Puttonen, Helena; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2011-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigated the cross-lagged associations between children's academic skill development, task-avoidant behaviour in the context of homework, and parental beliefs about their child's success from kindergarten to Grade 2. The participants were 1267 children. The children's pre-skills were assessed at the end of the…

  4. Voices of Four Small Rural High Schools That Have Successfully Reduced the Gap in Academic Achievement of Economically Disadvantaged Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, Freeman H.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the voices of four small, rural high schools in Texas that had successfully minimized the gap in academic achievement of economically disadvantaged students in the 2006-2007 school year. The purpose of this study was to identify the inherent qualities of each identified school through the voice of the local school…

  5. Correlation of Admission Metrics with Eventual Success in Mathematics Academic Performance of Freshmen in AMAIUB's Business Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calucag, Lina S.; Talisic, Geraldo C.; Caday, Aileen B.

    2016-01-01

    This is a correlational study research design, which aimed to determine the correlation of admission metrics with eventual success in mathematics academic performance of the admitted 177 first year students of Bachelor of Science in Business Informatics and 59 first year students of Bachelor of Science in International Studies. Using Pearson's…

  6. The Validity of Interpersonal Skills Assessment via Situational Judgment Tests for Predicting Academic Success and Job Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievens, Filip; Sackett, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    This study provides conceptual and empirical arguments why an assessment of applicants' procedural knowledge about interpersonal behavior via a video-based situational judgment test might be valid for academic and postacademic success criteria. Four cohorts of medical students (N = 723) were followed from admission to employment. Procedural…

  7. Family Background, Students' Academic Self-Efficacy, and Students' Career and Life Success Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mihyeon

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of family background on students' academic self-efficacy and the impact of students' self-efficacy on their career and life success expectations. The study used the national dataset of the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS: 2002), funded by the U.S. Department of Education. Based on a path…

  8. The Mark of a Leader: Longevity, Strategic Planning and Vision Bring Academic and Financial Success to Xavier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Kenneth J.

    2011-01-01

    This article profiles Dr. Norman Francis and describes how his longevity, strategic planning and vision as president of Xavier University bring academic and financial success. Higher education leaders say his 43 years at the Catholic HBCU in New Orleans is an increasingly rare example of the benefits possible from a lengthy presidency. It takes…

  9. Peer Mentoring Styles and Their Contribution to Academic Success among Mentees: A Person-Oriented Study in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidenfrost, Birgit; Strassnig, Barbara; Schabmann, Alfred; Spiel, Christiane; Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to explore peer mentoring styles and examine their contribution to academic success among mentees. Data were collected as part of a comprehensive evaluation of a peer mentoring program. The sample consisted of 49 mentors (advanced students) who supported 376 mentees (first year students) in small groups. Indicators for…

  10. College Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Perceptions of Social Supports That Buffer College-Related Stress and Facilitate Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeGary, Robert A., Jr.

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory case study examined the reports by advanced undergraduate students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) of perceived social supports that buffer college-related stress and facilitate academic success. The sample for this study was comprised of 10 advanced undergraduate students who self-identified as having ASD. These participants…

  11. The Effect of Math Anxiety on the Academic Success of Developmental Mathematics Students at a Texas Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fannin-Carroll, Kristen D.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between math anxiety and academic success of developmental mathematics students at a Texas community college based on age, gender, and level of developmental mathematics program. A quantitative, casual-comparative design was used to determine relationships. A total of 185 developmental…

  12. A Contemporary Examination of Factors Promoting the Academic Success of Minority Students at a Predominantly White University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Robert T.; Maramba, Dina C.; Holmes, Sharon L.

    2012-01-01

    Although the numbers of minority students are increasing in higher education, researchers remain concerned about the ability of predominantly White institutions (PWIs) to support and retain these students. Therefore, the purpose of this qualitative study was to explore factors promoting the academic success of minority students at a research…

  13. Characteristics of Academic Advising that Contribute to Racial and Ethnic Minority Student Success at Predominantly White Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Museus, Samuel D.; Ravello, Joanna N.

    2010-01-01

    Racial and ethnic minority student departure continues to be a major concern for higher education researchers, policy makers, and practitioners. We explore the role that academic advisors play in facilitating success among students of color at predominantly White institutions that have demonstrated effectiveness at generating ethnic minority…

  14. Case report: diagnosis of portal vein thrombosis with successful treatment and subsequent 3-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.M. Stepanov

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the clinical observation of extrahepatic portal hypertension as an outcome of portal vein thrombosis, which was first manifested by hemorrhage from varicose veins of the esophagus and stomach, in a young patient. Features of an anamnesis, a clinical picture pointed to the asymptomatic course of the disease until the moment of the catastrophe. The complexity of these patients is caused by the lack of informative routine methods of study, the need for special research methods for the diagnosis and non-standard methods of treatment. The data of laboratory-instrumental methods of study in this patient are analyzed, a modern diagnostic search for the causes of liver disease and portal hypertension syndrome in real conditions is presented. The absence of signs of hepatitis was revealed, and the evaluation of the liver with elastometry excluded the presence of fibrosis in this patient. The diagnosis of extrahepatic portal hypertension is made, and the patient is directed to surgical treatment. A successful shunt operation was performed at the Institute of Surgery and Transplantology. Further, a positive dynamics of clinical data, splenomegaly has been shown, which caused pain syndrome and hypersplenism. The conservative treatment of the syndrome of portal hypertension and symptomatic treatment of the patient are described. The necessity of an individual choice of motion regimen and drug management with inclusion of ursodeoxycholic acid is proved. For 3 years, the patient has a significant reduction in portal hypertension, with the preservation of the parenchyma of the liver, which gives hope for positive long-term results.

  15. The Relationship between Intelligence, Emotional Intelligence, Personality Styles and Academic Success

    OpenAIRE

    Marietta Kiss; Agnes Kotsis; Andras Istvan Kun

    2014-01-01

    This paper assesses the effects of general and emotional intelligence and personality preferences on academic performance. The question is examined using surveys among students in economics at the University of Debrecen, Hungary. In our examination we primarily used regression analysis. With our results we answer the question of what kind of relationship exists between the aforementioned variables and academic performance. Based on our findings we can conclude that academic performance was si...

  16. Examining reciprocal influences among family climate, school attachment, and academic self-regulation: Implications for school success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Mengya; Fosco, Gregory M; Feinberg, Mark E

    2016-06-01

    Guided by family systems and ecological theories, this study examined the multicontextual implications of family, school, and individual domains for adolescents' school success. The first goal of this study was to examine reciprocal influences among family climate, school attachment, and academic self-regulation (ASR) during the middle school years. The second goal was to test the relative impact of each of these domains on adolescents' school adjustment and academic achievement after the transition to high school. We applied a cross-lag structural equation modeling approach to longitudinal data from 979 students in the 6th grade and their families, followed over 5 measurement occasions, from 6th through 9th grade. Controlling for family income, parent education, and adolescent gender, the results revealed reciprocal relationships between the family climate and school attachment over time; both of these factors were related to increases in ASR over time. In turn, ASR was a robust predictor of academic success, with unique associations with school adjustment and academic achievement. Family climate and school adjustment had modest to marginal associations with school adjustment, and no association with academic achievement. Applications of these findings for family school interventions are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Examining Reciprocal Influences Among Family Climate, School Attachment, and Academic Self-Regulation: Implications for School Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Mengya; Fosco, Gregory M.; Feinberg, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Guided by family systems and ecological theories, this study examined the multi-contextual implications of family, school, and individual domains for adolescents' school success. The first goal of this study was to examine reciprocal influences among family climate, school attachment, and academic self-regulation (ASR) during the middle school years. The second goal was to test the relative impact of each of these domains on adolescents' school adjustment and academic achievement after the transition to high school. We applied a cross-lag structural equation modeling approach to longitudinal data from 979 6th grade students and their families, followed over five measurement occasions, from 6th through 9th grade. Controlling for family income, parent education, and adolescent gender, the results revealed reciprocal relationships between the family climate and school attachment over time; both of these factors were related to increases in ASR over time. In turn, ASR was a robust predictor of academic success, with unique associations with school adjustment and academic achievement. Family climate and school adjustment had modest to marginal associations with school adjustment, and no association with academic achievement. Applications of these findings for family-school interventions are discussed. PMID:26376426

  18. Admission variables and academic success in the first year of the professional phase in a doctor of physical therapy program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscingno, Gerald; Zipp, Genevieve Pinto; Olson, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    To date, there are no standard sets of admission criteria identifying an applicant's ability to succeed in an entry-level doctor of physical therapy (DPT) program. The purpose of this study was to determine if a relationship existed between preadmission variables and academic success, as measured by the physical therapy GPA in the basic sciences after the first professional year (PY1GPA). The sample consisted of 63 students from three consecutive classes admitted to an entry-level DPT Program from fall 2002 through fall 2004. The preadmission variables included age, gender, degree status, pre-cumulative GPA, and prerequisite course GPA. The preadmission factors were correlated with the dependent variable of PYIGPA. In a second analysis, the resulting significant correlations (p academic success throughout the length of the professional academic program, the findings offer insight regarding students' initial academic performance. Gaining insight into students' performance at this early stage in their education may provide a greater understanding of their potential success throughout the graduate program.

  19. The relationship between self-regulation skills and academic success in students with mild and moderate intellectual disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaljača Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Students with intellectual disabilities (ID have considerable difficulties in adjusting to the requirements of the academic environment. The major risk factors are: cognition deficiency, insufficiently developed adaptive skills, lower levels of self-regulation of behavior, and social and functional incompetence. The goal of this research was to establish the relationship among self-regulation skills, the level of intellectual disability, academic success, and sex in students with mild and moderate intellectual disabilities. The sample included 131 students with mild and moderate ID, of both sexes, between 8 and 24 years of age. Self-Control Rating Scale (SCRS was used to assess the level of self-regulation skills. Academic success of students was expressed as the average grade at the end of the school year. A considerable interrelation was found between the level of adoption of self-regulation skills, the level of intellectual development and general academic success in students with ID. Significant influence of the participants' sex on the quality of self-regulation was found only in participants with moderate ID. Female participants had better achievements than male participants.

  20. Intrinsic Motivation to Learn: The Nexus between Psychological Health and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froiland, John Mark; Oros, Emily; Smith, Liana; Hirchert, Tyrell

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsic motivation (IM) to learn, if cultivated, can lead to many academic and social/emotional improvements among K-12 students. This article discusses intrinsic motivation to learn as it relates to Self Determination Theory and the trouble with relying solely on extrinsic motivators. The academic benefits of IM in the specific subject areas of…

  1. Examining the Academic Success of Latino Students in Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Darnell; Espinoza, Araceli

    2008-01-01

    Using a longitudinal sample of 146 Latino students' in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics majors, the purpose of the study was to examine factors that affect their academic performance. The main premise supporting this study suggested that Latino students perform better academically when they have cultural congruity within their…

  2. Student-Generated Solutions To Enhance the Academic Success of African American Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Carolyn M.; Herman, Keith C.; Pedersen, Tyler; Vogel, David; Reinke, Wendy M.

    2000-01-01

    Investigated African American elementary and high school students' perceptions of academic problems and solutions to these problems. Found that students considered the following factors beneficial: academic preparation and active class participation; positive peer influences; self- management techniques; and teachers' encouragement. (JPB)

  3. Rethinking Intelligence: The Role of Mindset in Promoting Success for Academically High-Risk Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, Rishi

    2014-01-01

    This study utilized an experimental pretest-posttest control group design to determine if changing the way academically high-risk college students view intelligence affected their academic effort and achievement when compared to students in a control intervention. Results indicated that students taught to view intelligence as malleable reported…

  4. Measures of Success: Cruel Optimism and the Paradox of Academic Women's Participation in Australian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Briony

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the reworking of gender in the measured university and the impact this has on gender equality in academia. Neoliberal market rationalities and measurements embedded in academic publishing, funding and promotion have transformed Australian higher education and impacts upon the careers of academic women in ways that are gendered.…

  5. Predicting Academic Success of Health Science Students for First Year Anatomy and Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderton, Ryan S.; Evans, Tess; Chivers, Paola T.

    2016-01-01

    Students commencing tertiary education enter through a number of traditional and alternative academic pathways. As a result, tertiary institutions encounter a broad range of students, varying in demographic, previous education, characteristics and academic achievement. In recent years, the relatively constant increase in tertiary applications in…

  6. Influences of Co-Curricular Participation on Academic Success and Persistence among Sophomore Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillar, James D.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined 690 sophomore students who entered a small private institution at the beginning of the 2013-2014 academic year. It analyzed relationships among sophomore participation in co-curricular activities and academic performance measured by grade-point averages and persistence measured by continued enrollment. Significant relationships…

  7. Measuring the Success of an Academic Development Programme: A Statistical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L. C.

    2009-01-01

    This study uses statistical analysis to estimate the impact of first-year academic development courses in microeconomics, statistics, accountancy, and information systems, offered by the University of Cape Town's Commerce Academic Development Programme, on students' graduation performance relative to that achieved by mainstream students. The data…

  8. Predictive power of individual factors and clinical learning experience on academic success: findings from a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dante, Angelo; Fabris, Stefano; Palese, Alvisa

    2015-01-01

    Academic failure is the inability of a nursing student to graduate or to complete the nursing degree on time. This longitudinal cohort study, involving 2 Italian universities, documents the effects of selected individual variables and the quality of the clinical learning experience as perceived by students on academic success. Factors related to the clinical learning experience were the quality of the supervisory relationship, pedagogical atmosphere, and commitment of the ward related to the level of personalized nursing care delivered and clarity of nursing documentation.

  9. Self-reported extracurricular activity, academic success, and quality of life in UK medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumley, Sophie; Ward, Peter; Roberts, Lesley; Mann, Jake P

    2015-09-19

    To explore the relationship between academic performance, extracurricular activity, and quality of life at medical school in the UK to aid our understanding of students' work-life balance. A cross-sectional study, using an electronic questionnaire distributed to UK final year medical students across 20 medical schools (4478 students). Participants reported the hours of self-regulated learning and extracurricular activities undertaken each year at medical school; along with their academic decile (1 = highest, 10 = lowest). Self-reported quality of life (QoL) was assessed using an established screening tool (7 = highest, 1 = lowest). Seven hundred responses were obtained, across 20 participating medical schools, response rate 16% (700/4478). Factors associated with higher academic achievement were: graduate entry course students (2 deciles higher, p academic study during term and revision periods (rho=-0.1, p academic achievement and QoL. Graduate-entry students attain higher decile scores despite similar self-reported duration of study.

  10. Accommodative facility test results and academic success in Polish second graders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedzia, B; Tondel, G; Pieczyrak, D; Maples, W C

    1999-02-01

    Accommodative infacility, as commonly measured by accommodative flippers, has been implicated as a factor in academic underperformance. This study compares four areas of academics (reading, writing, math and gym) to accommodative flexibility scores. Seventy-six elementary school children with a mean age was 8 years, 8 months were tested monocularly and binocularly with traditional accommodative flexibility flipper testing and with a new accommodative flexibility apparatus that allows control of visual acuteness, minification/magnification, and reaction time. These scores were then compared with academic scores using a number of failure criteria. The academic ratings were based on teacher responses for each student. Our data did not show any clear correlation or relationship between evaluations by reading, writing, math, or gym teachers and accommodative flexibility by either the traditional or new testing methods. Accommodative function, free of contaminating variables, does not appear to predict academic function any better than the traditional.

  11. THE EFFECT OF WEB-BASED COMPUTER-AIDED ART EDUCATION TO ACADEMIC SUCCESS BY CONSTRUCTIVIST APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan TEPECIK

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The general objective of this study is to examine the effect of the “Web Based Computer Aided Teaching” activity which is prepared according to the structural approach on the academic success of the students who study art at graduate level. With this study, interactive education material has been prepared for the web based computer aided teaching and teaching activity has been carried out with two separate student groups. One group has been subjected to the traditional teaching method, and the other has been subjected to the web based computer aided teaching. The success and the learning persistency of the students after the application have been examined. “Multiple subject – one factor experimental pattern” among the experimental models has been used as the pattern in the study. In this respect, the study has been carried out on the pattern with the pretest-posttest control group. A significant increase has been seen in the academic successes of the students who participated in the Web Based Computer Aided teaching applications when compared to the academic successes of the students who participated in the Traditional Teaching method. It has been revealed that the actions in the test group are more effective than those in the control group. Relying on the obtained results, it can be suggested that new studies can be carried out including the web based computer aided teaching applications for different lessons in the field of art education.

  12. Predictors of success on Wound Ostomy Continence Nursing certification board examinations: a regression study of academic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitz, Janice M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive validity of selected programmatic factors of a Wound Ostomy Continence Nursing Education Program (WOCNEP) on graduates' success when completing their certification examinations. First-time certification examination candidates over a 10-year period graduating from 1 WOCNEP located in the northeastern section of the United States comprised the sample. Logistic regression analyses were used to determine the predictive value of academic factors (entry-level grade point average [GPA], test scores from the 2 WOCNEP courses, scores in a comprehensive final examination, and scores on the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing Certification Board [WOCNCB] self-assessment examinations). Program format (on-site vs online study) was not analyzed due to the small online sample size. The predictive power of academic factors for WOCNCB certification success is similar to findings in published literature. Entry-level GPA, 4 course examination test scores, comprehensive final examination score, and 3 self-assessment examination (SAE) tests accounted for 56% of the variance in successful passing of the WOCNCB examinations (χ2 = 25.98, P academic course work are most predictive of successful completion of WOCNCB certification examination.

  13. Incidence and risk factors of injuries and their impact on academic success: A prospective study in PETE students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliekendaal, S; Goossens, L; Stubbe, J H

    2017-12-01

    Injuries can have a major impact on the physical performance and academic career of physical education teacher education (PETE) students. To investigate the injury problem, risk factors, and the impact of injuries on academic success, 252 PETE students were followed during their first semester. Risk factor analysis was conducted by means of logistic regression analysis with a differentiation for upper body, lower body, acute, overuse, and severe injuries. An incidence of 1.26 injuries/student/semester was found. Most injuries involved the lower body (61%), were new injuries (76%), occurred acutely (66%), and were sustained during curricular gymnastics (25%) or extracurricular soccer (28%). Significant risk factors for lower body acute injuries were age (OR=2.14; P=.01), previous injury (OR=2.23; P=.01), and an injury at the start of the year (OR=2.56; P=.02). For lower body overuse injuries, gender (OR=2.85; P=.02) and the interval shuttle run test score (OR=2.44; P=.04) were significant risk factors. Previous injury (OR=2.59; P=.04) and injury at the start of the year (upper body: OR=4.57; P=.02; lower body: OR=3.75; Pacademic success (r=.20; P=.02) and success in theoretical courses (r=.24; P=academic success for sport courses. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Academic Success of Montgomery College Students in the Achieving Collegiate Excellence and Success (ACES) Program: 2014-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper-Martin, Elizabeth; Wolanin, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    The Office of Shared Accountability in Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS) is conducting a multiyear evaluation of the Achieving Collegiate Excellence and Success (ACES) program. The ACES program is a collaboration between MCPS, Montgomery College (MC) and the Universities at Shady Grove to create a seamless pathway from high school to college…

  15. Critical Teacher Talk: Successful English for Academic Purposes Classroom Practices in a Global Campus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Namsook Kim

    2016-01-01

    ... in an English for Academic Purposes classroom in a global campus in the U.S. Developmental data analyses of class observations, teacher and student interviews, and documents led to finding multidimensional characteristics of Critical Teacher Talk (CTT...

  16. A framework of academic persistence and success for ethnically diverse graduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veal, Josie L; Bull, Margaret J; Miller, Judith Fitzgerald

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this qualitative study was to examine how ethnically diverse graduate nursing students persisted with academic studies. Ethnically diverse nurses are vastly underrepresented in the workforce.This problem is accentuated by high attrition rates in academic programs. A grounded theory approach was used. Five focus groups were conducted with 16 ethnically diverse graduate students in nursing and interviews were conducted with two diversity advisers. Analysis of the data indicated that the process of learning to balance stressors with moderators was key to academic persistence and retention.A conceptual framework emerged from the data that provides a guide for academic institutions seeking to implement strategies to promote retention and graduation of diverse graduate nursing students. Recommendations are offered to address faculty development, administrative action, and student resources.

  17. The Influence of Presage and Study Processes on Academic Success of Undergraduate Turkish Students

    OpenAIRE

    Suphi, Nilgün

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The aim of the research was to make a preformative evaluation on which presage (personal and institutional) factors have the strongest influence on the learning process factors and academic achievement and which learning process factors have the strongest influence on academic achievement of the 2nd, 3rd and 4th year Turkish undergraduate students studying in the Faculty of Education in the Eastern Mediterranean University in one of the following programs: Guidance and Psychologica...

  18. A model midshipman factors related to academic and military success of prior enlisted midshipmen at the United States Naval Academy

    OpenAIRE

    Wyrick, Jared W.

    2005-01-01

    This research analyzes performance at the U.S. Naval Academy (USNA) and attrition of Midshipmen who have prior-enlisted experience in the Navy and Marine Corps. The primary hypothesis of this study is that the experience gained by enlisted service members provides them with valuable tools and training that helps them overcome perceived academic deficiencies to be successful at the Naval Academy. Linear and Bi-Linear regression models are used to analyze the influence of prior-enlisted expe...

  19. Virtual Microscopy in Histopathology Training: Changing Student Attitudes in 3 Successive Academic Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Christof A; Firsching, Theresa; Klopfleisch, Robert

    2017-11-03

    Several veterinary faculties have integrated virtual microscopy into their curricula in recent years to improve and refine their teaching techniques. The many advantages of this recent technology are described in the literature, including remote access and an equal and constant slide quality for all students. However, no study has analyzed the change of perception toward virtual microscopy at different time points of students' academic educations. In the present study, veterinary students in 3 academic years were asked for their perspectives and attitudes toward virtual microscopy and conventional light microscopy. Third-, fourth-, and fifth-year veterinary students filled out a questionnaire with 12 questions. The answers revealed that virtual microscopy was overall well accepted by students off all academic years. Most students even suggested that virtual microscopy be implemented more extensively as the modality for final histopathology examinations. Nevertheless, training in the use of light microscopy and associated skills was surprisingly well appreciated. Regardless of their academic year, most students considered these skills important and necessary, and they felt that light microscopy should not be completely replaced. The reasons for this view differed depending on academic year, as the perceived main disadvantage of virtual microscopy varied. Third-year students feared that they would not acquire sufficient light microscopy skills. Fifth-year students considered technical difficulties (i.e., insufficient transmission speed) to be the main disadvantage of this newer teaching modality.

  20. Hot topics, urgent priorities, and ensuring success for racial/ethnic minority young investigators in academic pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Glenn; Mendoza, Fernando S; Fuentes-Afflick, Elena; Mendoza, Jason A; Pachter, Lee; Espinoza, Juan; Fernandez, Cristina R; Arnold, Danielle D P; Brown, Nicole M; Gonzalez, Kymberly M; Lopez, Cynthia; Owen, Mikah C; Parks, Kenya M; Reynolds, Kimberly L; Russell, Christopher J

    2016-12-09

    The number of racial/ethnic minority children will exceed the number of white children in the USA by 2018. Although 38% of Americans are minorities, only 12% of pediatricians, 5% of medical-school faculty, and 3% of medical-school professors are minorities. Furthermore, only 5% of all R01 applications for National Institutes of Health grants are from African-American, Latino, and American Indian investigators. Prompted by the persistent lack of diversity in the pediatric and biomedical research workforces, the Academic Pediatric Association Research in Academic Pediatrics Initiative on Diversity (RAPID) was initiated in 2012. RAPID targets applicants who are members of an underrepresented minority group (URM), disabled, or from a socially, culturally, economically, or educationally disadvantaged background. The program, which consists of both a research project and career and leadership development activities, includes an annual career-development and leadership conference which is open to any resident, fellow, or junior faculty member from an URM, disabled, or disadvantaged background who is interested in a career in academic general pediatrics. As part of the annual RAPID conference, a Hot Topic Session is held in which the young investigators spend several hours developing a list of hot topics on the most useful faculty and career-development issues. These hot topics are then posed in the form of six "burning questions" to the RAPID National Advisory Committee (comprised of accomplished, nationally recognized senior investigators who are seasoned mentors), the RAPID Director and Co-Director, and the keynote speaker. The six compelling questions posed by the 10 young investigators-along with the responses of the senior conference leadership-provide a unique resource and "survival guide" for ensuring the academic success and optimal career development of young investigators in academic pediatrics from diverse backgrounds. A rich conversation ensued on the topics

  1. Prediction of the academic success of children with suspected neurological impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, P; Berk, R A

    1979-07-01

    Explored a multivariate approach to the prediction of 8-year academic achievement. Ss were black, of low socioeconomic status, and had been diagnosed as suspect neurologically impaired at age 7. A serial array of early predictors that included maternal education, sex, birth weight, 8-month and 4-year intelligence, and 3-year speech, hearing, and language were entered into multiple regression analyses to determine their value in predicting 8-year academic achievement in word recognition, arithmetic, spelling, and oral reading. The 4-year intelligence measure was the best overall predictor, although maternal education, sex, and birth weight contributed slightly to the predictions. The resulting equations, however, could not be used to predict accurately 8-year academic achievement.

  2. A grounded theory study on the academic success of undergraduate women in science, engineering, and mathematics fields at a private, research university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hroch, Amber Michelle

    2011-12-01

    This grounded theory study revealed the common factors of backgrounds, strategies, and motivators in academically successful undergraduate women in science, engineering, and mathematics (SEM) fields at a private, research university in the West. Data from interviews with 15 women with 3.25 or better grade point averages indicated that current academic achievement in their college SEM fields can be attributed to previous academic success, self awareness, time management and organizational skills, and maintaining a strong support network. Participants were motivated by an internal drive to academically succeed and attend graduate school. Recommendations are provided for professors, advisors, and student affairs professionals.

  3. Fear of Success: Its Measurement and Its Impact On College Students' Academic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffore, Robert J.

    Two experiments were conducted to determine: (1) whether fear of success, as measured by three different instruments, interacts with subjects' expectancies of success to affect performance on exams in college courses; (2) whether fear of success can be clearly distinguished from fear of failure; and (3) whether males and females differ on fear of…

  4. Self-Esteem and Academic Success as Influenced by Reading Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Eghbal; Shokrpour, Nasrin; Nasiri, Elham; Kafipour, Reza

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at determining the effect of instruction in cognitive and metacognitive strategies on the students' educational self-esteem and academic performance. 87 students were selected through random sampling. The two first groups were consciously taught about cognitive and metacognitive strategies. All the classes were taught by the same…

  5. An Exploration of Factors Affecting the Academic Success of Students in a College Quantitative Business Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mary M.

    2009-01-01

    The American Association of Colleges and Universities reports that over 50% of the students entering colleges and universities are academically under prepared; that is, according to Miller and Murray (2005), students "lack basic skills in at least one of the three fundamental areas of reading, writing, and mathematics" (paragraph 4). Furthermore,…

  6. In Pursuit of Success: Latino Male College Students Exercising Academic Determination and Community Cultural Wealth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, David, II

    2017-01-01

    Discourse about Latino male college students centers on their low enrollment, persistence, and graduation rates. Two asset-based theoretical frameworks were used to understand how 21 Latino males' academic determination was nurtured and sustained by cultural wealth at selective institutions. Although most participants entered college with unclear…

  7. Social and Emotional Learning in the Classroom: Promoting Mental Health and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrell, Kenneth W.; Gueldner, Barbara A.

    2010-01-01

    This highly engaging, eminently practical book provides essential resources for implementing social and emotional learning (SEL) in any K-12 setting. Numerous vivid examples illustrate the nuts and bolts of this increasingly influential approach to supporting students' mental health, behavior, and academic performance. Helpful reproducibles are…

  8. Clinical Physiology: A Successful Academic and Clinical Discipline is Threatened in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arheden, Hakan

    2009-01-01

    Clinical physiologists in Sweden are physicians (the majority with a PhD degree) with thorough training in system physiology and pathophysiology. They investigate patients in a functional approach and are engaged in basic and applied physiology teaching and research. In 1954, clinical physiology was founded as an independent academic and clinical…

  9. Maximizing Academic Success for Foster Care Students: A Trauma-Informed Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardi, Anna; Morton, Brenda M.

    2017-01-01

    Children in foster care have experienced significant trauma due to the loss of primary attachment figures and the circumstances associated with that loss. Children who have suffered trauma generally present with cognitive, social, physical, and emotional vulnerabilities. These vulnerabilities are often expressed in the P-12 academic setting…

  10. Motivation, Academic Assessments and First-Semester Success at a Midwestern Technical College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Sarah A.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined college admission criteria and college readiness in an effort to reduce barriers in college admission. The Academic Motivation Scale (AMS) was administered to a convenience sample of 74 participants among 503 students during their first semester at a two-year college. Scale scores were compared to demographic characteristics,…

  11. The Effects of a Peer Mentoring Program on Academic Success among First Year University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger, Susan; Tremblay, Paul F.

    2003-01-01

    The present study examines the effect of participation of first-year university students in a full-year peer mentoring program as well as individual differences in motivation in relation to outcome measures of retention and achievement. A sample of 983 first year students completed the Academic Motivation Inventory (Tremblay, 1998) and agreed to…

  12. Communication Disorders in the School: Perspectives on Academic and Social Success an Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Karen L.; Fletcher, Kathryn; Decker, Blair

    2008-01-01

    The critical role of communication in schools cannot be understated. Communication skills are a necessity both in the academic and social atmosphere of the school environment. Unfortunately, there are a large number of children in the schools today identified with speech and language disorders. This special edition of "Psychology in the Schools"…

  13. A STUDY OF ACADEMIC SUCCESS OF COLLEGE READINESS STUDENTS AT THE COLLEGE OF SAN MATEO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PEARCE, FRANK C.

    THE COLLEGE READINESS PROGRAM AT THE COLLEGE OF SAN MATEO, CALIFORNIA, WAS DESIGNED TO INTEGRATE MINORITY YOUTH INTO THE COLLEGE AND THE COMMUNITY. A STUDY OF STUDENTS WHO HAD ENROLLED IN THE PROGRAM SINCE ITS BEGINNING IN 1966 INCLUDED THESE OBSERVATIONS--(1) 95 PERCENT WERE NEGROES, (2) ALTHOUGH 40 PERCENT HAD NOT CHOSEN A MAJOR, ACADEMIC OR…

  14. Patterns of Early Reading and Social Skills Associated with Academic Success in Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Brittany Rhoades; Moore, Julia E.; Powers, C. J.; Cleveland, Michael; Greenberg, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: Researchers and policymakers emphasize that early childhood is a critical developmental stage with the potential to impact academic and social-emotional outcomes (G. Conti & J. J. Heckman, 2012; J. J. Heckman, 2012; R. Murnane, I. Sawhill, & C. Snow, 2012). Although there is substantial evidence that children's early…

  15. Playing It Down/Playing It Up: Girls' Strategic Negotiations of Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raby, Rebecca; Pomerantz, Shauna

    2015-01-01

    Through the lens of post-structural agency, this article focuses on how self-identified smart girls strategically negotiate their academic identities within the gendered terrain of the school. Based on interviews with 51 smart high school girls in Canada, our analysis complicates current narrative of girls' easy achievement in school. Participants…

  16. Factors influencing academic success or failure of first-year and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    They were: "Effective written communications skills". (ranked 14th by lecturers and 41st by first-year students), "The reason for doing a specific course" (ranked 20th and 45th), "Ability to handle stress" (ranked 38th and 16th)"An appropriate balance between academic commitments and social life" (ranked 41st and 18th), and.

  17. DECA Membership and Its Effect on Grade Point Average as an Indicator of Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosloski, Michael F., Jr.; Ritz, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Stakeholders in career and technical education declare the value of applied learning through corresponding co-curricular student organizations. However, there is limited empirical evidence to support the notion that student organizations help participants to achieve academic gains. This study examined the levels of engagement in DECA's…

  18. Becoming Part of the Academy: Factors Affecting the Academic Career Success of Foreign-Born Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer, Teri R.

    2012-01-01

    The entire diversity landscape of our university campuses is changing. As American colleges and universities address their need for more globally aware campuses, academic institutions are hiring well-qualified foreign-born scholars to teach in their programs. Both non-resident alien faculty as well as those who are foreign-born but are classified…

  19. Successful Learning of Academic Word List via MALL: Mobile Assisted Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemi, Minoo; Sarab, Mohammad Reza Anani; Lari, Zahra

    2012-01-01

    Mobile phones as new addition to information and communication technologies have created new ways to help learners in the process of foreign language learning. Given the importance of academic vocabularies for university students, this study tried to investigate the effectiveness of SMS on Iranian university students' vocabulary learning and…

  20. Successful Academic Achievement among Foster Children: What Did the Foster Parents Do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skilbred, Dag Tore; Iversen, Anette Christine; Moldestad, Bente

    2017-01-01

    Children who spend part of their childhood in foster homes have, as a group, lower academic achievement than their peers. However, some of these children do well and succeed in higher education. Resilience is about positive development enhanced by protective factors despite adversity. Protective factors may be both positive qualities in the…

  1. Critical Teacher Talk: Successful English for Academic Purposes Classroom Practices in a Global Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Namsook

    2016-01-01

    Drawn on the sociocultural paradigm, I examined teacher-student communication with emphasis on teacher's talk and its role on international students' learning English as a Second Language in an English for Academic Purposes classroom in a global campus in the U.S. Developmental data analyses of class observations, teacher and student interviews,…

  2. Self-reported extracurricular activity, academic success, and quality of life in UK medical students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumley, Sophie; Ward, Peter; Roberts, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore the relationship between academic performance, extracurricular activity, and quality of life at medical school in the UK to aid our understanding of students’ work-life balance. Methods A cross-sectional study, using an electronic questionnaire distributed to UK final year medical students across 20 medical schools (4478 students). Participants reported the hours of self-regulated learning and extracurricular activities undertaken each year at medical school; along with their academic decile (1 = highest, 10 = lowest). Self-reported quality of life (QoL) was assessed using an established screening tool (7 = highest, 1 = lowest). Results Seven hundred responses were obtained, across 20 participating medical schools, response rate 16% (700/4478). Factors associated with higher academic achievement were: graduate entry course students (2 deciles higher, pstudy during term and revision periods (rho=-0.1, pstudy was associated with lower QoL (rho = -0.13, pStudy skills may be more important than duration spent studying, for academic achievement and QoL. Graduate-entry students attain higher decile scores despite similar self-reported duration of study. PMID:26385285

  3. Factors determining a successful socioeconomic introduction of horticulture in foreign countries - Academic Consultancy Training Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, N.; Dobma, B.J.; Gonbour, M.; González Ximénez de Embún, M.; Heddes, M.; Visser, de J.; Lans, van der C.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Course: Academic Consultancy Training (YMC 60809) Project: Sustainable development of greenhouse horticulture in developing countries (756) Commissioner: Wageningen UR Greenhouse Horticulture Contact person: Ir. C.J.M. van der Lans Coach: Dr. Ir. J.W. Hofstee Expert: Prof. Dr. O. van Kooten A lot of

  4. Predicting academic success in higher education: what’s more important than being smart?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappe, F.R.; van der Flier, H.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the combined predictive validity of intelligence and personality factors on multiple measures of academic achievement. Students in a college of higher education in the Netherlands (N0137) completed a survey that measured intelligence, the Big Five personality traits,

  5. Predicting Academic Success and Technological Literacy in Secondary Education: A Learning Styles Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avsec, Stanislav; Szewczyk-Zakrzewska, Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate the predictive validity of learning styles on academic achievement and technological literacy (TL). For this purpose, secondary school students were recruited (n = 150). An empirical research design was followed where the TL test was used with a learning style inventory measuring learning orientation, processing…

  6. Apps for Academic Success: Developing Digital Literacy and Awareness to Increase Usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuel, Robin; MacKenzie, Emily; Andrew Senior, Andrew; Torabi, Nazi

    2017-01-01

    As a consequence of the high adoption levels of mobile technology, users are increasingly accessing academic library-subscribed content via vendor-supplied mobile applications (apps) or responsive websites. However, users may be unaware of the existence of some standalone apps and might miss benefitting from available apps at their most…

  7. Predicting Academic Success in Higher Education: What's More Important than Being Smart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappe, Rutger; van der Flier, Henk

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the combined predictive validity of intelligence and personality factors on multiple measures of academic achievement. Students in a college of higher education in the Netherlands (N = 137) completed a survey that measured intelligence, the Big Five personality traits, motivation, and four specific personality traits.…

  8. Academic Biliteracy in South African Higher Education: Strategies and Practices of Successful Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Walt, Christa; Dornbrack, Jacqui

    2011-01-01

    Academic support for higher education students in multilingual contexts often focuses on the development of separate language proficiencies, on the one hand, and on general study skills, on the other hand. In bi/multilingual education contexts where students are presented with lectures and study material in more than one language, successful…

  9. HESI admission assessment (A(2)) examination scores, program progression, and NCLEX-RN success in baccalaureate nursing: an exploratory study of dependable academic indicators of success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinderer, Katherine A; DiBartolo, Mary C; Walsh, Catherine M

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to meet the demand for well-educated, high-quality nurses, schools of nursing seek to admit those candidates most likely to have both timely progression and first-time success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Finding the right combination of academic indicators, which are most predictive of success, continues to be an ongoing challenge for entry-level baccalaureate nursing programs across the United States. This pilot study explored the relationship of a standardized admission examination, the Health Education Systems, Inc. (HESI) Admission Assessment (A(2)) Examination to preadmission grade point average (GPA), science GPA, and nursing GPA using a retrospective descriptive design. In addition, the predictive ability of the A(2) Examination, preadmission GPA, and science GPA related to timely progression and NCLEX-RN success were explored. In a sample of 89 students, no relationship was found between the A(2) Examination and preadmission GPA or science GPA. The A(2) Examination was correlated with nursing GPA and NCLEX-RN success but not with timely progression. Further studies are needed to explore the utility and predictive ability of standardized examinations such as the A(2) Examination and the contribution of such examinations to evidence-based admission decision making. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Retrospective analysis of etomidate versus ketamine for first-pass intubation success in an academic emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patanwala, Asad E; McKinney, Courtney B; Erstad, Brian L; Sakles, John C

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare first-pass intubation success between patients who received etomidate versus ketamine for rapid sequence intubation (RSI) in the emergency department (ED). This was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data recorded in a quality improvement database between July 1, 2007, and December 31, 2012. The study was conducted in an academic ED in the United States. All patients who received etomidate or ketamine as part of RSI were included. The primary outcome measure was first-pass success. A multivariate analysis was conducted to determine if sedative type was associated with first-pass success, after adjusting for potential confounders and baseline differences. The final cohort consisted of 2,098 RSI procedures using either etomidate (n = 1,983) or ketamine (n = 115). First-pass success occurred in 77.0% of patients in the etomidate group and 79.1% of patients in the ketamine group (difference = -2.1%; 95% CI = -5.5% to 9.8%). In the multivariate analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, sedative type was not associated with first-pass success (odds ratio = 0.89; 95% CI = 0.5 to 1.5; p = 0.632). Etomidate and ketamine are associated with equivalent first-pass success when used in RSI. Ketamine may be an appropriate alternative to etomidate for RSI in the ED. © 2013 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  11. A Successful US Academic Collaborative Supporting Medical Education in a Postconflict Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia McQuilkin MD

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a model employed by the Academic Collaborative to Support Medical Education in Liberia to augment medical education in a postconflict setting where the health and educational structures and funding are very limited. We effectively utilized a cohort of visiting US pediatric faculty and trainees for short-term but recurrent clinical work and teaching. This model allows US academic medical centers, especially those with smaller residency programs, to provide global health experiences for faculty and trainees while contributing to the strengthening of medical education in the host country. Those involved can work toward a goal of sustainable training with a strengthened host country specialty education system. Partnerships such as ours evolve over time and succeed by meeting the needs of the host country, even during unanticipated challenges, such as the Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa.

  12. Effects of perceived attractiveness and academic success on early adolescent peer popularity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyatzis, C J; Baloff, P; Durieux, C

    1998-09-01

    Effects of perceived attractiveness and academic performance on 9th graders' ratings of peers' popularity were investigated. Participants were 270 9th graders (152 girls, 118 boys) who read a vignette describing a hypothetical same-sex peer with whom the student had been assigned to complete a project. The partner's attractiveness and academic performance were systematically varied in four conditions: high attractiveness/high grades, high attractiveness/low grades, low attractiveness/high grades, and low attractiveness/low grades. After reading the vignette, the students rated the partner's popularity. As hypothesized, analyses of variance revealed that attractive partners were significantly more popular than unattractive partners, regardless of whether the partner had high or low grades. Contrary to expectation, attractiveness was not more important to girls than to boys. Integration with past research and suggestions for future research are offered.

  13. Getting published in an academic-community hospital: the success of writing groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Lopez, Debbie; Deitrick, Lynn; Mahady, Erica T; Moser, Kathleen; Gertner, Eric J; Sabino, Judith N

    2012-01-01

    Expressed barriers to writing for publication include lack of time, competing demands, anxiety about writing and a lack of knowledge about the submission process. These limitations can be magnified for practitioners in non-university environments in which there are fewer incentives or expectations regarding academic publication productivity. However, as members of professional disciplines, practitioners have both the responsibility and, oftentimes, the insights to make valuable contributions to the professional literature. Collaborative writing groups can be a useful intervention to overcome barriers, provide the necessary skills and encouragement as well as produce publications and conference presentations that make worthy additions to the professional body of knowledge. This article discusses the evolution and outcomes of writing groups at Lehigh Valley Health Network and describes how this strategy can be adopted by other academic community hospitals to promote professional development and publication.

  14. Success in everyday physics: The role of personality and academic variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norvilitis, Jill M.; Reid, Howard M.; Norvilitis, Bret M.

    2002-05-01

    Two studies examined students' intuitive physics ability and characteristics associated with physics competence. In Study 1, although many students did well on a physics quiz, more than 25% of students performed below levels predicted by chance. Better performance on the physics quiz was related to physics grades, highest level of math taken, and students' perceived scholastic competence, but was not related to a number of other hypothesized personality variables. Study 2 further explored personality and academic variables and also examined students' awareness of their own physics ability. Results indicate that the personality variables were again unrelated to ability, but narcissism may be related to subjects' estimates of knowledge. Also, academic variables and how important students think it is to understand the physical world are related to both measured and estimated physics proficiency.

  15. The effect of sleep duration and quality on academical success of the elementary school children in Kayseri Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unalan, Demet; Ozturk, Ahmet; Ismailogullari, Sevda; Akgul, Nilgun; Aksu, Murat

    2013-05-01

    To assess the sleeping habits of primary school children and establish link between sleeping hours and academic achievement. The cross-sectional study was conducted between April and June 2007, involving 2422 students of 6-8th grades in 12 primary schools located in Kayseri, Turkey. A questionnaire was presented to the students on the basis of probability sampling method. Academic performance was evaluated with regard to their school grades. SPSS 20 was used for statistical analysis. Of the total 2422 questionnaires distributed, 1966 (81.2%) were used for further evaluation. The mean sleeping period of the students during school days was 8.86 +/- 1.10 hours. The number of students having difficulty in waking up in the morning was 940 (47.8%), while 910 (46.3%) were confused when they woke up during the night, and the 886 (45.1%) had nightmares, while 609 (31.0%) were sleepy all day long. As the sleeping period increased, the probability of a mediocre achievement in science lessons increased by 1.33 fold and poor achievement increased by 1.57 fold. Besides, the probability of a mediocre achievement in mathematics lessons increased by 1.36 fold, and poor achievement increased by 1.67 fold. For Turkish language lessons, these increases were found to be 1.40 and 1.60 respectively. Correlation analysis showed a significant negative relationship between sleeping time and successful scores in Turkish (r = -0.65, p sleeping period increased, the academic achievement of the students was negatively affected. The academic success was low in children who felt sleepy throughout the day.

  16. A longitudinal study of self-esteem, cultural identity, and academic success among American Indian adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Whitesell, Nancy Rumbaugh; Mitchell, Christina M.; Spicer, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Latent growth curve modeling was used to estimate developmental trajectories of self-esteem and cultural identity among American Indian high school students and to explore the relationships of these trajectories to personal resources, problem behaviors, and academic performance at the end of high school. The sample included 1,611 participants from the Voices of Indian Teens project, a three-year longitudinal study of adolescents from three diverse American Indian cultural groups in the wester...

  17. Self-reported extracurricular activity, academic success, and quality of life in UK medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Lumley, Sophie; Ward, Peter; Roberts, Lesley; Mann, Jake P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore the relationship between academic performance, extracurricular activity, and quality of life at medical school in the UK to aid our understanding of students’ work-life balance. Methods A cross-sectional study, using an electronic questionnaire distributed to UK final year medical students across 20 medical schools (4478 students). Participants reported the hours of self-regulated learning and extracurricular activities undertaken each year at medical school; along with ...

  18. Peer mentorship and positive effects on student mentor and mentee retention and academic success

    OpenAIRE

    Snowden, Michael; Hardy, Tracey

    2012-01-01

    This study examined how the introduction of peer mentorship in an undergraduate health and social welfare programme at a large northern university affected student learning. Using an ethnographic case study approach, the study draws upon data collected from a small group of mentors and their mentees over a period of one academic year using interviews, reflective journals, assessment and course evaluation data.\\ud Analysis of the data collected identified a number of key findings: peer mentors...

  19. The reproducibility issue and preclinical academic drug discovery: educational and institutional initiatives fostering translation success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janero, David R

    2016-09-01

    Drug discovery depends critically upon published results from the academy. The reproducibility of preclinical research findings reported by academia in the peer-reviewed literature has been called into question, seriously jeopardizing the value of academic science for inventing therapeutics. The corrosive effects of the reproducibility issue on drug discovery are considered. Purported correctives imposed upon academia from the outside deal mainly with expunging fraudulent literature and imposing punitive sanctions on the responsible authors. The salutary influence of such post facto actions on the reproducibility of discovery-relevant preclinical research data from academia appears limited. Rather, intentional doctoral-scientist education focused on data replicability and translationally-meaningful science and active participation of university entities charged with research innovation and asset commercialization toward ensuring data quality are advocated as key academic initiatives for addressing the reproducibility issue. A mindset shift on the part of both senior university faculty and the academy to take responsibility for the data reproducibility crisis and commit proactively to positive educational, incentivization, and risk- and reward-sharing practices will be fundamental for improving the value of published preclinical academic research to drug discovery.

  20. Predictors of Reading and Math Academic Success in Pennsylvania Charter Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetsko, April Christine

    2010-01-01

    The charter school movement, established to implement innovative educational methods that improve student outcomes (Nathan, 1996), necessitates further research on successful charter schools. Using a multivariate prediction design, this quantitative study sought to address the relationship between charter school success and demographic and…

  1. Development of an Instrument to Measure Student Use of Academic Success Skills: An Exploratory Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, John; Brigman, Greg; Webb, Linda; Villares, Elizabeth; Harrington, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development of the Student Engagement in School Success Skills instrument including item development and exploratory factor analysis. The instrument was developed to measure student use of the skills and strategies identified as most critical for long-term school success that are typically taught by school counselors.

  2. Between a "ROC" and a School Place: The Role of "Racial Opportunity Cost" in the Educational Experiences of Academically Successful Students of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Terah Venzant; Huggins, Kristin S.; Locke, Leslie A.; Fowler, Rhonda M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite numerous reform efforts, schools have not achieved equitable academic outcomes for all students. To better identify where schools have failed, research has sought to understand the complex role the school environment plays in mediating academic success, particularly for students of color. In this article, we forward the concept of…

  3. The Impact of Interpersonal Interaction on Academic Engagement and Achievement in a College Success Strategies Course with a Blended Learning Instructional Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosser, Brent Steven

    2010-01-01

    A quasi-experiment was carried out in a college success strategies course to evaluate the impact of structured interpersonal interaction on undergraduate students' Academic Engagement and Academic Achievement. The course, EPL 259: Individual Learning and Motivation, employs a blended learning instructional model that requires students to spend the…

  4. An Examination of the Effects of Career Development Courses on Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy, Adjustment to College, Learning Integration, and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Michele J.; Pedersen, Joan S.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of career development courses on career decision-making self-efficacy (CDMSE), college adjustment, learning integration, academic achievement, and retention among undecided undergraduates. It also investigated the effects of course format on career decision-making abilities and academic success outcomes and…

  5. Predictors of Academic Success for Maori, Pacific and Non-Maori Non-Pacific Students in Health Professional Education: A Quantitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikaire, Erena; Curtis, Elana; Cormack, Donna; Jiang, Yannan; McMillan, Louise; Loto, Rob; Reid, Papaarangi

    2017-01-01

    Tertiary institutions internationally aim to increase student diversity, however are struggling to achieve equitable academic outcomes for indigenous and ethnic minority students and detailed exploration of factors that impact on success is required. This study explored the predictive effect of admission variables on academic outcomes for health…

  6. Educating the surgeon-scientist: A qualitative study evaluating challenges and barriers toward becoming an academically successful surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodadek, Lisa M; Kapadia, Muneera R; Changoor, Navin R; Dunn, Kelli Bullard; Are, Chandrakanth; Greenberg, Jacob A; Minter, Rebecca M; Pawlik, Timothy M; Haider, Adil H

    2016-12-01

    The advancement of surgical science relies on educating new generations of surgeon-scientists. Career development awards (K Awards) from the National Institutes of Health, often considered a marker of early academic success, are one way physician-scientists may foster skills through a mentored research experience. This study aimed to develop a conceptual framework to understand institutional support and other factors leading to a K Award. A national, qualitative study was conducted with academic surgeons. Participants included 15 K Awardees and 12 surgery department Chairs. Purposive sampling ensured a diverse range of experiences. Semistructured, in-depth telephone interviews were conducted. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim, and 2 reviewers analyzed the transcripts using Grounded Theory methodology. Participants described individual and institutional factors contributing to success. K Awardees cited personal factors such as perseverance and team leadership skills. Chairs described the K Awardee as an institutional "investment" requiring protected time for research, financial support, and mentorship. Both K Awardees and Chairs identified a number of challenges unique to the surgeon-scientist, including financial strains and competing clinical demands. Institutional support for surgeons pursuing K Awards is a complex investment with significant initial costs to the department. Chairs act as stewards of institutional resources and support those surgeon-scientists most likely to be successful. Although the K Award pathway is one way to develop surgeon-scientists, financial burdens and challenges may limit its usefulness. These findings, however, may better prepare young surgeons to develop career plans and identify new mechanisms for academic productivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Success after Failure: Academic Effects and Psychological Implications of Early Universal Algebra Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Keith A.; Scott, Allison; Romero, Martin; Saddler, Derrick

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the authors use the High School Longitudinal Study 2009 (HSLS:09) national database to analyze the relationships between algebra failure, subsequent performance, motivation, and college readiness. Students who failed eighth-grade Algebra I did not differ significantly in mathematics proficiency from those who passed lower-level…

  8. Determining the Drivers of Academic Success in Surgery: An Analysis of 3,850 Faculty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakul P Valsangkar

    Full Text Available Determine drivers of academic productivity within U.S. departments of surgery.Eighty academic metrics for 3,850 faculty at the top 50 NIH-funded university- and 5 outstanding hospital-based surgical departments were collected using websites, Scopus, and NIH RePORTER.Mean faculty size was 76. Overall, there were 35.3% assistant, 27.8% associate, and 36.9% full professors. Women comprised 21.8%; 4.9% were MD-PhDs and 6.1% PhDs. By faculty-rank, median publications/citations were: assistant, 14/175, associate, 39/649 and full-professor, 97/2250. General surgery divisions contributed the most publications and citations. Highest performing sub-specialties per faculty member were: research (58/1683, transplantation (51/1067, oncology (41/777, and cardiothoracic surgery (48/860. Overall, 23.5% of faculty were principal investigators for a current or former NIH grant, 9.5% for a current or former R01/U01/P01. The 10 most cited faculty (MCF within each department contributed to 42% of all publications and 55% of all citations. MCF were most commonly general (25%, oncology (19%, or transplant surgeons (15%. Fifty-one-percent of MCF had current/former NIH funding, compared with 20% of the rest (p<0.05; funding rates for R01/U01/P01 grants was 25.1% vs. 6.8% (p<0.05. Rate of current-NIH MCF funding correlated with higher total departmental NIH rank (p < 0.05.Departmental academic productivity as defined by citations and NIH funding is highly driven by sections or divisions of research, general and transplantation surgery. MCF, regardless of subspecialty, contribute disproportionally to major grants and publications. Approaches that attract, develop, and retain funded MCF may be associated with dramatic increases in total departmental citations and NIH-funding.

  9. Success Factors and Strategic Planning: Rebuilding an Academic Library Digitization Program

    OpenAIRE

    Cory Lampert; Jason Vaughan

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses a dual approach of case study and research survey to investigate the complex factors in sustaining academic library digitization programs. The case study involves the background of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) Libraries’ digitization program and elaborates on the authors’ efforts to gain staff support for this program. A related survey was administered to all Association of Research Libraries (ARL) members, seeking to collect baseline data on their digital c...

  10. Emotional Intelligence as a Predictor of Academic and/or Professional Success

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frank Romanelli; Jeff Cain; Kelly M Smith

    2006-01-01

      The concept of "emotional intelligence" has been extensively popularized in the lay press and corporate world as individuals purport the potential ability of emotional intelligence to predict various markers of success...

  11. Development of Peer Tutoring Services to Support Osteopathic Medical Students' Academic Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swindle, Nicholas; Wimsatt, Leslie

    2015-11-01

    Peer tutoring can benefit both tutors and tutored students, but information is lacking regarding establishing and measuring outcomes of such a program at new medical schools. To examine the outcomes of a pilot peer tutoring initiative and explore the implications for long-term program development. Fifty-one osteopathic medical students who participated in a pilot peer tutoring program during the 2013-2014 academic year were surveyed regarding satisfaction with the program. Course grade means for the tutors (all courses) and tutored students (specific courses) were analyzed before and after participating in the tutoring experience. Data analyses were performed using frequency distributions, t tests, and qualitative assessment of emergent themes. The survey had a 76% response rate (39 of 51 students). Both tutored students and tutors were satisfied with the tutoring program. Statistically significant changes in course grades for the tutored courses were noted at 3 to 4 and 8 to 9 months among the tutored students who were most at risk for failure (P=.001). Tutor course grades showed no significant changes for any of the courses in which they were enrolled (P=.445). Learning gains were realized by the students at greatest academic risk. Additional research is needed to evaluate long-term outcomes.

  12. Comparing traditional measures of academic success with emotional intelligence scores in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheshire, Michelle H; Strickland, Haley P; Carter, Melondie R

    2015-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) is the ability to perceive emotions, to access and generate emotions so as to assist thought, to understand emotions and emotional knowledge and to reflectively regulate emotions so as to promote emotional and intellectual growth. EI is increasingly discussed in healthcare as having a potential role in nursing. The purpose of this descriptive study was to examine the causal relationship between EI scores and the traditional academic admission criteria (GPA) and evaluation methods of a baccalaureate nursing program. The sample included second semester upper division nursing students (n = 85). EI was measured using the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). The results of the statistical analysis (MANOVA, ANOVA and Pearson correlational coefficient) found no significant relationships or correlations with the current methods of evaluation for admission to nursing school or the evaluation methods used once students are in the nursing program. These results imply that assessing a nursing student's EI is measuring a different type of intelligence than that represented by academic achievement. Based on the findings of this study and the current state of nursing education, EI abilities should be included as part of the admission criteria for nursing programs.

  13. STEM Education-An Exploration of Its Impact on Female Academic Success in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ybarra, Michael E.

    The 21st century presents many new career opportunities and choices for women today. However, over the past decade, there has been a growing concern that there will not be enough students trained in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) to fill jobs in the United States. Current research reveals that there will be a need for highly skilled workers in the STEM industries, along with the opportunities to earn higher wages. With these opportunities ahead, it is paramount that secondary schools prepare not only their male students, but also their female students for these lucrative STEM careers. The purpose of this study was to investigate to what degree female high school students enrolled in a STEM academy, and who may play sports, experience academic differences in college preparatory math and science courses, and in the math and science portions of the California Standards Test. Academic differences shall be defined as differences in grade point averages. A comparison will be made of female students who take similar classes and play sports, but who are not enrolled in a STEM academy program. This comparison will then incorporate a quantitative non-experimental research design, along with a chi-square test.

  14. Comparing traditional measures of academic success with emotional intelligence scores in nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle H Cheshire

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Emotional intelligence (EI is the ability to perceive emotions, to access and generate emotions so as to assist thought, to understand emotions and emotional knowledge and to reflectively regulate emotions so as to promote emotional and intellectual growth. EI is increasingly discussed in healthcare as having a potential role in nursing. The purpose of this descriptive study was to examine the causal relationship between EI scores and the traditional academic admission criteria (GPA and evaluation methods of a baccalaureate nursing program. Methods: The sample included second semester upper division nursing students (n = 85. EI was measured using the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT. Results: The results of the statistical analysis (MANOVA, ANOVA and Pearson correlational coefficient found no significant relationships or correlations with the current methods of evaluation for admission to nursing school or the evaluation methods used once students are in the nursing program. Conclusions: These results imply that assessing a nursing student′s EI is measuring a different type of intelligence than that represented by academic achievement. Based on the findings of this study and the current state of nursing education, EI abilities should be included as part of the admission criteria for nursing programs.

  15. Transfer students in STEM majors at a Midwestern University: Academic and social involvement factors that influence student success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Carlos

    There is soon-to-be a shortage of qualified U.S. workers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). As a result, many science-related jobs are being filled by technically-skilled foreign workers. If the U.S wants to maintain its global economic leadership, then it must ensure a continuous growth of highly-trained individuals in STEM disciplines. Therefore, American institutions of higher education, including community colleges, must identify potential factors that contribute to the lack of interest in STEM majors, as well as the low rate of success of students who enter STEM majors but struggle to finish their degrees. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the perceptions of community college transfer students who are pursuing bachelor degrees in STEM majors at Iowa State University (ISU). What were their transfer experiences and what influenced their academic success in STEM. Participants were encouraged to share their transfer experiences while at the community college as well as their experiences on the ISU campus. They were also asked about their level of academic involvement, their relationships with faculty, and their participation in peer group activities prior to and after transferring. The research design included both quantitative and qualitative components, which provided an in-depth look at the experiences of STEM non-engineering and engineering students. Quantitative data include students' background characteristics, demographic information, and college activities at the community college and ISU. Qualitative data were used to illuminate students' overall transfer experience and their successful journey in STEM fields. The combination of quantitative and qualitative methods allowed a better understanding of the strategies students put into practice once they transfer from a community college to a four-year institution in pursuit of a STEM bachelor's degree. The results of this study suggest that there is an association among the

  16. Arriving at Success: Academic Management by Hispanic Nursing Students During the First Semester of a Baccalaureate Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Diana Martinez; Young, Elizabeth Anne; Cesario, Sandra; Symes, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Although an ethnically diverse workforce is believed to enhance patient care quality, Hispanics are under-represented in the nursing workforce. Recruiting and retaining Hispanic students in nursing programs is essential for greater workforce participation. This grounded theory study explored practices used by Hispanic nursing students to promote their academic success during the first semester of a baccalaureate program. Fifteen Hispanic nursing students participated in focus groups and individual interviews. Students engaged in an adaption process composed of phases related to arrival, managing, and responding to evaluations. For entering Hispanic nursing students, recognizing the weight of different assignments and adjusting time and energy accordingly were essential in the process of arriving at success. Finances, family dynamics, dealing with potential failure, and time management were significant concerns.

  17. Group Peer Mentoring: An Answer to the Faculty Mentoring Problem? A Successful Program at a Large Academic Department of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pololi, Linda H; Evans, Arthur T

    2015-01-01

    To address a dearth of mentoring and to avoid the pitfalls of dyadic mentoring, the authors implemented and evaluated a novel collaborative group peer mentoring program in a large academic department of medicine. The mentoring program aimed to facilitate faculty in their career planning, and targeted either early-career or midcareer faculty in 5 cohorts over 4 years, from 2010 to 2014. Each cohort of 9-12 faculty participated in a yearlong program with foundations in adult learning, relationship formation, mindfulness, and culture change. Participants convened for an entire day, once a month. Sessions incorporated facilitated stepwise and values-based career planning, skill development, and reflective practice. Early-career faculty participated in an integrated writing program and midcareer faculty in leadership development. Overall attendance of the 51 participants was 96%, and only 3 of 51 faculty who completed the program left the medical school during the 4 years. All faculty completed a written detailed structured academic development plan. Participants experienced an enhanced, inclusive, and appreciative culture; clarified their own career goals, values, strengths and priorities; enhanced their enthusiasm for collaboration; and developed skills. The program results highlight the need for faculty to personally experience the power of forming deep relationships with their peers for fostering successful career development and vitality. The outcomes of faculty humanity, vitality, professionalism, relationships, appreciation of diversity, and creativity are essential to the multiple missions of academic medicine. © 2015 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  18. The Importance of Interaction for Academic Success in Online Courses with Hearing, Deaf, and Hard-of-Hearing Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Long

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the findings of three studies within a program of research designed to better understand the factors contributing to the academic achievement of students in online courses and the contributions of interaction to online learning. The first study compared the academic achievement of students in the online and face-to-face (F2F sections of multiple courses. In the second study, an online survey was used to obtain student perceptions of course satisfaction, learning, and communication. These factors were then related, using binary logistic regression analysis, to the amount of interaction that occurred in the students’ respective online courses; information from the myCourses course management system was used to quantify the amount of interaction that occurred in online courses. In the final study, both datasets were used to examine the academic achievement of students in online courses based upon the amount of interaction that had actually occurred. Whenever possible, a subgroup of deaf and hard-of-hearing students was included in the study to increase our understanding of the role that communication plays in the teaching-learning process. Our findings indicate that students enrolled in online courses, especially those designed with high levels of online interaction, receive higher grades and report greater learning than students in comparable F2F courses. In addition, online courses appear to provide deaf and hard-of-hearing students with special benefits in terms of academic achievement through online discussion. Overall, the studies illuminate how the quantity of interaction in online discussions relates to important success factors. Students in online courses with more interaction outperformed students in online courses with less interaction.

  19. 'Luck, chance, and happenstance? Perceptions of success and failure amongst fixed-term academic staff in UK higher education'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveday, Vik

    2017-09-07

    What does it mean to attribute success to 'luck', but failure to personal deficiency? In 2015/16, more than 34 per cent of academic employees in UK higher education institutions were employed on temporary contracts, and the sector itself has undergone a substantial transformation in recent years in terms of expansion, measurement, and marketization. Based on two waves of interviews conducted with fixed-term academic employees at different career stages, the article explores the narrativization of success and failure amongst staff working at the 'sharp end' of the so-called neoliberal academy. Arguing that precarious employment situations precipitate the feeling of being 'out of control', the majority of the participants' narratives were characterized by a distinct lack of agency. The paper explores the recourse to notions of chance and the consolidation of 'luck' as an explanatory factor in accounting for why good things happen; however, in tandem with this inclination is the tendency to individualize failure when expectations have been thwarted. While accounts of fixed-term work are suffused with notions of chance and fortune, 'luck' remains an under-researched concept within sociology. The article thus concludes by considering what the analysis of 'luck' might offer for a fuller, politicized understanding of processes at work in the contemporary academy. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2017.

  20. Optimism, self-efficiency and self-concept: Why some students expect greater academic success than others?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Bele

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our research was to examine the relation between academic success and constructs: optimism, self-efficiency, and self-concept. We also wanted to examine how this relation reflects in previous and future marks of fourth-grade highschool students. We predicted that students with higher academic success in specific fields will also have higher specific self-concept, which reflects characteristic competence. We also predicted that more optimistic, more self-efficient students and students with higher self-concept will set up higher future goals, because they see desired goals as attainable and are persistent in reaching their goals. One-hundred students filled in the Self-Description Questionnire III (SDQIII, the Life Orientation Test-Revised (LOT-R, the Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE, and stated marks of their previous grade, present marks (Slovenian language, mathematics, and foreign language and anticipated marks at graduation. The results confirmed our expectations: Students with higher marks on different subjects in previous grade also had higher specific self-concept, and more optimistic and self-efficient students with higher self-concept set up higher future goals.

  1. Successful strategy to decrease indwelling catheter utilization rates in an academic medical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sushilkumar Satish; Irukulla, Pavan Kumar; Shenoy, Mangalore Amith; Nyemba, Vimbai; Yacoub, Diana; Kupfer, Yizhak

    2017-12-01

    Duration of indwelling urinary catheterization is an important risk factor for urinary tract infections. We devised a strategy to decrease the utilization of indwelling urinary catheters (IUCs). We also highlight the challenges of managing critically ill patients without IUCs and demonstrate some of the initiatives that we undertook to overcome these challenges. A retrospective observational outcomes review was performed in an adult medical intensive care unit (ICU) between January 2012 and December 2016. This period included a baseline and series of intervals, whereby different aspects of the strategies were implemented. IUC utilization ratio and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) rates were calculated. Our IUC utilization ratio had a statistically significant decrease from 0.92 (baseline) to 0.28 (after 3 interventions) (P use, leading to a lower IUC utilization ratio and CAUTI rate in a large complex academic ICU setting. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. When small words foretell academic success: the case of college admissions essays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W Pennebaker

    Full Text Available The smallest and most commonly used words in English are pronouns, articles, and other function words. Almost invisible to the reader or writer, function words can reveal ways people think and approach topics. A computerized text analysis of over 50,000 college admissions essays from more than 25,000 entering students found a coherent dimension of language use based on eight standard function word categories. The dimension, which reflected the degree students used categorical versus dynamic language, was analyzed to track college grades over students' four years of college. Higher grades were associated with greater article and preposition use, indicating categorical language (i.e., references to complexly organized objects and concepts. Lower grades were associated with greater use of auxiliary verbs, pronouns, adverbs, conjunctions, and negations, indicating more dynamic language (i.e., personal narratives. The links between the categorical-dynamic index (CDI and academic performance hint at the cognitive styles rewarded by higher education institutions.

  3. Determining the Drivers of Academic Success in Surgery: An Analysis of 3,850 Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsangkar, Nakul P; Zimmers, Teresa A; Kim, Bradford J; Blanton, Casi; Joshi, Mugdha M; Bell, Teresa M; Nakeeb, Attila; Dunnington, Gary L; Koniaris, Leonidas G

    2015-01-01

    Determine drivers of academic productivity within U.S. departments of surgery. Eighty academic metrics for 3,850 faculty at the top 50 NIH-funded university- and 5 outstanding hospital-based surgical departments were collected using websites, Scopus, and NIH RePORTER. Mean faculty size was 76. Overall, there were 35.3% assistant, 27.8% associate, and 36.9% full professors. Women comprised 21.8%; 4.9% were MD-PhDs and 6.1% PhDs. By faculty-rank, median publications/citations were: assistant, 14/175, associate, 39/649 and full-professor, 97/2250. General surgery divisions contributed the most publications and citations. Highest performing sub-specialties per faculty member were: research (58/1683), transplantation (51/1067), oncology (41/777), and cardiothoracic surgery (48/860). Overall, 23.5% of faculty were principal investigators for a current or former NIH grant, 9.5% for a current or former R01/U01/P01. The 10 most cited faculty (MCF) within each department contributed to 42% of all publications and 55% of all citations. MCF were most commonly general (25%), oncology (19%), or transplant surgeons (15%). Fifty-one-percent of MCF had current/former NIH funding, compared with 20% of the rest (pacademic productivity as defined by citations and NIH funding is highly driven by sections or divisions of research, general and transplantation surgery. MCF, regardless of subspecialty, contribute disproportionally to major grants and publications. Approaches that attract, develop, and retain funded MCF may be associated with dramatic increases in total departmental citations and NIH-funding.

  4. Policy principles for the creation and success of corporate and academic spin-offs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilsing, V.A.; van Burg, J.C.; Romme, A.G.L.

    2010-01-01

    Following a design science approach, this paper develops a framework of policy design principles for fostering technology entrepreneurship in a region. These principles are grounded in research findings and describe the factors and causal mechanisms that explain the founding and success rates of

  5. Gender, Family Negotiations and Academic Success of Young Moroccan Women in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrés, Marta Bertran; Ponferrada-Arteaga, Maribel; Rovira, Jordi Pàmies

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the lives of pioneering young women from Morocco, the first to enjoy educational and social success in Catalonia, by analyzing the family negotiations entered into during this process. The study is based on the life stories of these young Moroccan women and on ideas that emerge from discussion groups involving the women…

  6. Emotional Intelligence: A Quantitative Study of the Relationship among Academic Success Factors and Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannucci, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have found a correlation between emotional intelligence (EI) and success in the workplace. As a result, many companies have invested a large amount of resources into EI testing during their hiring process. In the United States, corporations are spending over $33 billion on hiring, training, and development. In addition to the increase…

  7. Assessing the Relationship between Multiple Measures Placement and Student Academic Success at a Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Laura D.

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that using multiple measures can potentially reduce misplacement and improve student success in college (Bracco et al., 2014; Ngo, Kwon, Melguizo, Prather, & Bos, 2013; Scott-Clayton, 2012). Minimal research, however, describes the multiple-measures placement in community colleges, at the institutional level. An embedded…

  8. Modeling the Impact of Wilderness Orientation Programs on First-Year Academic Success and Life Purpose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Andrew W.; Kang, Hyoung-Kil

    2015-01-01

    Wilderness orientation programs (WOPs) are becoming a popular method of encouraging college student retention and success. Previous studies have identified outcomes and correlates of participation in these programs, but a cohesive model of impact is lacking. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of WOPs on first-year student success…

  9. Identifying the Relationships Between Perseverance, Openness to Problem Solving, and Academic Success in PISA 2012 Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer KUTLU

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the predictive roles of perseverance and openness to problem solving on success in the lower and upper quartiles of score distribution are analyzed in scientific, mathematical, and reading domains of PISA 2012 Turkey sample. Since their index values can’t be calculated due to missing values, some students are excluded from the sample. The study sample is comprised of 3,190 students. Regression models in which perseverance and openness to problem solving are predictive variables and success is response variable are formed for the lower and upper quartiles of score distribution of each domain. Models are analyzed by quantile regression analysis. It is found that there is a positive, medium level, significant relationship between perseverance and openness to problem solving. The results of quantile regression analysis show that perseverance predicts success better in the lower quartile of score distribution while openness to problem solving predicts success better in the upper quartile of score distribution in all domains. Based on these results, suggestions regarding classroom activities, assessment processes and feedback given to students are discussed respectively.

  10. The Multiple Worlds of Ghanaian-Born Immigrant Students and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumi-Yeboah, Alex

    2018-01-01

    Background/Context: The multiple worlds model is defined as the ability of students to connect, manage, and negotiate to cross the borders of their two worlds to successfully transition through different everyday worlds of school, family, and peers. Prior research has linked multiple worlds such as school, teacher, family, and peers to the…

  11. How do veterinary students' motivation and study practices relate to academic success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkonen, Johanna; Ruohoniemi, Mirja

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the factors associated with veterinary students' study success. All veterinary students who began their studies at the University of Helsinki in 2005 participated in this qualitative longitudinal study (N=52). The data consisted of assignments that the students completed at the beginning of their studies and again after three years of studying. The focus was on differences in motivation and study practices as well as possible changes in these over the three-year period. The students were divided into three groups according to their study success (grade point average and study progress). These groups were compared according to group-level differences in the categorized data. The most successful students already described themselves using more positive words than other students at the beginning of their veterinary studies. In addition, they seemed more adaptive in relation to the study's demands. However, there were drops in both the most and least successful students' motivation during their studies. The findings suggest that it is possible to predict forthcoming study problems by analyzing students' study practices and their own descriptions of themselves as learners. In addition, the results show that veterinary students' high motivation cannot be taken for granted. The comparative and longitudinal perspective of the present study can be useful in the development of curricula and in student support.

  12. Beyond Career Collection Development: Academic Libraries Collaborating with Career Center for Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, Raymond; Kubo, Hiromi

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores a case study at Fresno State and how the library partners with the career center to support student success in career placement and advancement. The article will share opportunities and challenges in forming and maintaining such partnership and offer some best practices to deliver career research workshops collaboratively.

  13. The Study Experiences of the High Achievers in a Competitive Academic Environment: A Cost of Success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordmo, Ivar; Samara, Akylina

    2009-01-01

    The present paper is a case study that explores the study experiences and possible costs of success for the students accepted into the professional program in psychology at the University of Bergen in Norway. In this highly competitive environment, between 500 and 1000 students compete for 36 places during the introduction year. The study is based…

  14. Benchmarking the Habits and Behaviours of Successful Students: A Case Study of Academic-Business Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Elizabeth; Chetty, Yuraisha Bianca; Prinsloo, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Student success and retention is a primary goal of higher education institutions across the world. The cost of student failure and dropout in higher education is multifaceted including, amongst other things, the loss of revenue, prestige, and stakeholder trust for both institutions and students. Interventions to address this are complex and…

  15. Self-Monitoring Tools and Student Academic Success: When Perception Matches Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercher, Debra A.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate self-monitoring of one's mastery of material is a necessary skill for student success. Without this skill students lack the awareness of when to prolong or terminate their studying for an exam, or when to modify their study strategies. Inaccurate self-monitoring can lead to false assessment of mastery, premature termination of study,…

  16. Emotional Intelligence as a Predictor of Academic and/or Professional Success

    OpenAIRE

    Romanelli, Frank; Cain, Jeff; Smith, Kelly M.

    2006-01-01

    The concept of “emotional intelligence” has been extensively popularized in the lay press and corporate world as individuals purport the potential ability of emotional intelligence to predict various markers of success. Emotional intelligence (EI) most commonly incorporates concepts of emotional expression and regulation, self-awareness, and empathy. The concept has been criticized by some for its loose definition and parallels to personality traits. Additionally, several limitations to the i...

  17. Determining the Differences Between Academic Success and Perception Levels of Conservatory Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan OTACIOĞLU

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This research was studied about professionals in the field of music education students, with musical perception levels and some variable to reveal the differences that occur in this dimension. 50 students from Mimar Sinan University State Conservatory, 39 students from İstanbul University State Conservatory and 38 students from Karadeniz Technique University State Conservatory (N=127. Conservatory students, who are the students of the 2nd, 3 rd and 4th class in 2014-2015 academic year, have been participated which is a field research done by survey method.In this survey, two basic data collection tools were used. First data collection tool is “Student Information Form” which is aimed to obtain individual knowledge, second data collection tool is “Musical Perception Inventory” developed by G.Otacıoğlu and Aslan in 2007 to measure musical perception skills of students. Statistical analysis techniques were used to demonstrate the differences between the variables in the study. As a result of the study, there were statistically significant differences between demographic variables and the scores of musical perception

  18. A Successful Model for a Comprehensive Patient Flow Management Center at an Academic Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovett, Paris B; Illg, Megan L; Sweeney, Brian E

    2016-05-01

    This article reports on an innovative approach to managing patient flow at a multicampus academic health system, integrating multiple services into a single, centralized Patient Flow Management Center that manages supply and demand for inpatient services across the system. Control of bed management was centralized across 3 campuses and key services were integrated, including bed management, case management, environmental services, patient transport, ambulance and helicopter dispatch, and transfer center. A single technology platform was introduced, as was providing round-the-clock patient placement by critical care nurses, and adding medical directors. Daily bed meetings with nurse managers and charge nurses drive action plans. This article reports immediate improvements in the first year of operations in emergency department walkouts, emergency department boarding, ambulance diversion, growth in transfer volume, reduction in lost transfers, reduction in time to bed assignment, and bed turnover time. The authors believe theirs is the first institution to integrate services and centralize bed management so comprehensively. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Learning style preferences and academic success of preclinical allied health students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Jonathan P; Ramos, Diane; D'Amore, Domenic C

    2013-01-01

    Student learning style modality preferences, in preclinical classes, were assessed using the visual-aural-read/write-kinesthetic (VARK) inventory. Preferences were assessed for 137 preclinical students, including those in nursing, physician's assistant, physical therapy, athletic training, and natural science programs using the online VARK inventory. All classes contained a majority of multimodal and a significantly high proportion of kinesthetic learners. No correlations were noted between modality preference strength and assessment performance in general biology classes; significant correlations were discovered for kinesthetic preference among the same cohort in subsequent human anatomy (negative correlation) and general physiology (positive correlation) classes. Assessment performance of nursing students in an anatomy and physiology class resulted in correlations with aural (negative correlation) and visual (positive correlation) preference strengths. Study findings are used to evaluate the efficacy of non-omnimodal delivery of content-focused science classes, before the students have developed the background knowledge or skills required to contextualize the learning.

  20. A Study of Home Environment, Academic Achievement and Teaching Aptitude on Training Success of Pre-Service Elementary Teachers of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Sunita; Siddiqui, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    The primary intend of the study was to explore the relationship of Arts, Science and Commerce stream and training success and the influence of Home Environment, Academic Achievement and Teaching Aptitude on training success of ETE trainees. The study analyzed the numerical data from a survey of 380 teacher trainees of three DIETs of Delhi, India.…

  1. Lessons in Success: A Multi-Campus Study of Factors Influencing Academic Accomplishment among High-Achieving African American Students at Private Liberal Arts Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ryan A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the academic experiences of highly successful African-American male graduates of small, private liberal arts colleges using a qualitative approach. Fourteen highly successful alumni from selective, private colleges were purposefully selected for the study, including seven African-American males and seven…

  2. Supporting Geoscience Students at Two-Year Colleges: Career Preparation and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaris, J. R.; Kirk, K. B.; Layou, K.; Macdonald, H.; Baer, E. M.; Blodgett, R. H.; Hodder, J.

    2013-12-01

    Two-year colleges play an important role in developing a competent and creative geoscience workforce, teaching science to pre-service K-12 teachers, producing earth-science literate citizens, and providing a foundation for broadening participation in the geosciences. The Supporting and Advancing Geoscience Education in Two-Year Colleges (SAGE 2YC) project has developed web resources for geoscience faculty on the preparation and support of students in two-year colleges (2YCs). Online resources developed from two topical workshops and several national, regional, and local workshops around the country focus on two main categories: Career Preparation and Workforce Development, and Supporting Student Success in Geoscience at Two-year Colleges. The Career Preparation and Workforce Development resources were developed to help faculty make the case that careers in the geosciences provide a range of possibilities for students and to support preparation for the geoscience workforce and for transfer to four-year programs as geoscience majors. Many two-year college students are unaware of geoscience career opportunities and these materials help illuminate possible futures for them. Resources include an overview of what geoscientists do; profiles of possible careers along with the preparation necessary to qualify for them; geoscience employer perspectives about jobs and the knowledge, skills, abilities and attitudes they are looking for in their employees; employment trends in sectors of the economy that employ geoscience professionals; examples of geotechnician workforce programs (e.g. Advanced Technological Education Centers, environmental technology programs, marine technician programs); and career resources available from professional societies. The website also provides information to support student recruitment into the geosciences and facilitate student transfer to geoscience programs at four- year colleges and universities, including sections on advising support before

  3. Experience Corps: a dual trial to promote the health of older adults and children's academic success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Linda P; Carlson, Michelle C; McGill, Sylvia; Seeman, Teresa; Xue, Qian-Li; Frick, Kevin; Tan, Erwin; Tanner, Elizabeth K; Barron, Jeremy; Frangakis, Constantine; Piferi, Rachel; Martinez, Iveris; Gruenewald, Tara; Martin, Barbara K; Berry-Vaughn, Laprisha; Stewart, John; Dickersin, Kay; Willging, Paul R; Rebok, George W

    2013-09-01

    As the population ages, older adults are seeking meaningful, and impactful, post-retirement roles. As a society, improving the health of people throughout longer lives is a major public health goal. This paper presents the design and rationale for an effectiveness trial of Experience Corps™, an intervention created to address both these needs. This trial evaluates (1) whether senior volunteer roles within Experience Corps™ beneficially impact children's academic achievement and classroom behavior in public elementary schools and (2) impact on the health of volunteers. Dual evaluations of (1) an intention-to-treat trial randomizing eligible adults 60 and older to volunteer service in Experience Corps™, or to a control arm of usual volunteering opportunities, and (2) a comparison of eligible public elementary schools receiving Experience Corps™ to matched, eligible control schools in a 1:1 control:intervention school ratio. For older adults, the primary outcome is decreased disability in mobility and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL). Secondary outcomes are decreased frailty, falls, and memory loss; slowed loss of strength, balance, walking speed, cortical plasticity, and executive function; objective performance of IADLs; and increased social and psychological engagement. For children, primary outcomes are improved reading achievement and classroom behavior in Kindergarten through the 3rd grade; secondary outcomes are improvements in school climate, teacher morale and retention, and teacher perceptions of older adults. This trial incorporates principles and practices of community-based participatory research and evaluates the dual benefit of a single intervention, versus usual opportunities, for two generations: older adults and children. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A midwifery-led in-hospital birth center within an academic medical center: successes and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdion, Karen; Lesser, Rebecca; Hirsch, Jennifer; Barger, Mary; Kelly, Thomas F; Moore, Thomas R; Lacoursiere, D Yvette

    2013-01-01

    The University of California San Diego Community Women's Health Program (CWHP) has emerged as a successful and sustainable coexistence model of women's healthcare. The cornerstone of this midwifery practice is California's only in-hospital birth center. Located within the medical center, this unique and physically separate birth center has been the site for more than 4000 births. With 10% cesarean delivery and 98% breast-feeding rates, it is an exceptional example of low-intervention care. Integrating this previously freestanding birth center into an academic center has brought trials of mistrust and ineffectual communication. Education, consistent leadership, and development of multidisciplinary guidelines aided in overcoming these challenges. This collaborative model provides a structure in which residents learn to be respectful consultants and appreciate differences in medical practice. The CWHP and its Birth Center illustrates that through persistence and flexibility a collaborative model of maternity services can flourish and not only positively influence new families but also future generations of providers.

  5. Elimination of waste: creation of a successful Lean colonoscopy program at an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damle, Aneel; Andrew, Nathan; Kaur, Shubjeet; Orquiola, Alan; Alavi, Karim; Steele, Scott R; Maykel, Justin

    2016-07-01

    Lean processes involve streamlining methods and maximizing efficiency. Well established in the manufacturing industry, they are increasingly being applied to health care. The objective of this study was to determine feasibility and effectiveness of applying Lean principles to an academic medical center colonoscopy unit. Lean process improvement involved training endoscopy personnel, observing patients, mapping the value stream, analyzing patient flow, designing and implementing new processes, and finally re-observing the process. Our primary endpoint was total colonoscopy time (minutes from check-in to discharge) with secondary endpoints of individual segment times and unit colonoscopy capacity. A total of 217 patients were included (November 2013-May 2014), with 107 pre-Lean and 110 post-Lean intervention. Pre-Lean total colonoscopy time was 134 min. After implementation of the Lean process, mean colonoscopy time decreased by 10 % to 121 min (p = 0.01). The three steps of the process affected by the Lean intervention (time to achieve adequate sedation, time to recovery, and time to discharge) decreased from 3.7 to 2.4 min (p < 0.01), 4.0 to 3.4 min (p = 0.09), and 41.2 to 35.4 min (p = 0.05), respectively. Overall, unit capacity of colonoscopies increased from 39.6 per day to 43.6. Post-Lean patient satisfaction surveys demonstrated an average score of 4.5/5.0 (n = 73) regarding waiting time, 4.9/5.0 (n = 60) regarding how favorably this experienced compared to prior colonoscopy experiences, and 4.9/5.0 (n = 74) regarding professionalism of staff. One hundred percentage of respondents (n = 69) stated they would recommend our institution to a friend for colonoscopy. With no additional utilization of resources, a single Lean process improvement cycle increased productivity and capacity of our colonoscopy unit. We expect this to result in increased patient access and revenue while maintaining patient satisfaction. We believe these results are

  6. Do scores on three commonly used measures of critical thinking correlate with academic success of health professions trainees? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, David; Loeffler, Kim; Schipper, Shirley; Vandermeer, Ben; Allan, G Michael

    2013-05-01

    To determine whether the three commonly used measures of critical thinking correlate with academic success of medical professionals in training. The search for English-language articles (from 1980 to 2011) used Medline, Embase, Scopus, Cochrane Library on Ovid, Proquest Dissertations, Health and Psychosocial Instruments, PsychINFO, and references of included articles. Studies comparing critical thinking with academic success among medical professionals were included. Two authors performed study selection independently, with disagreement resolved by consensus. Two authors independently abstracted data on study characteristics, quality, and outcomes, with disagreement resolved by a third author. Critical thinking tests studied were the California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST), California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory (CCTDI), and Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal. Correlation coefficients were pooled in meta-analysis. The search identified 557 studies: 52 met inclusion for systematic review, 41 of which were meta-analyzed. Critical thinking was positively correlated with academic success, r=0.31 (95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.26, 0.35), with a moderate statistical heterogeneity (I=67%). In subgroup analysis, only student type had statistical significance for correlation, although bias was likely due to low numbers for some student types. In direct comparison, using studies that employed two critical thinking tests, the CCTDI (r=0.23, 95% CI 0.15, 0.30) was significantly inferior (PCritical thinking was moderately correlated with academic success of medical professionals in training. The CCTDI was inferior to the CCTST in correlating with academic success.

  7. Influence of study approaches and course design on academic success in the undergraduate anatomy laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleazer, Courtney D; Scopa Kelso, Rebecca

    2018-01-04

    Many pre-health professional programs require completion of an undergraduate anatomy course with a laboratory component, yet grades in these courses are often low. Many students perceive anatomy as a more challenging subject than other coursework, and the resulting anxiety surrounding this perception may be a significant contributor to poor performance. Well-planned and deliberate guidance from instructors, as well as thoughtful course design, may be necessary to assist students in finding the best approach to studying for anatomy. This article assesses which study habits are associated with course success and whether course design influences study habits. Surveys (n = 1,274) were administered to students enrolled in three undergraduate human anatomy laboratory courses with varying levels of cooperative learning and structured guidance. The surveys collected information on potential predictors of performance, including student demographics, educational background, self-assessment ability, and study methods (e.g., flashcards, textbooks, diagrams). Compared to low performers, high performers perceive studying in laboratory, asking the instructor questions, quizzing alone, and quizzing others as more effective for learning. Additionally, students co-enrolled in a flipped, active lecture anatomy course achieve higher grades and find active learning activities (e.g., quizzing alone and in groups) more helpful for their learning in the laboratory. These results strengthen previous research suggesting that student performance is more greatly enhanced by an active classroom environment that practices successful study strategies rather than one that simply encourages students to employ such strategies inside and outside the classroom. Anat Sci Educ. © 2018 American Association of Anatomists. © 2018 American Association of Anatomists.

  8. Characteristics of success in mentoring and research productivity - a case-control study of academic centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joshua G; Sherman, Alexander E; Kiet, Tuyen K; Kapp, Daniel S; Osann, Kathryn; Chen, Lee-may; O'Sullivan, Patricia S; Chan, John K

    2012-04-01

    While mentoring has been associated with research productivity, the specific characteristics of successful mentoring have not been well studied. Thus, we performed a case-control study to identify characteristics of successful mentoring programs. Institutions were divided based on number of plenary research presentations at an annual society meeting over 6years. Case institutions (Group A) had more presentations vs. controls (Group B). A survey of professors and research fellows assessed characteristics of their mentoring program. Chi-square and logistic regression analyses were performed. Of 159 surveyed, response rates were 46% for professors and 51% for fellows. Compared to Group B, Group A was more likely to have: an additional year of protected fellowship research training (62% vs. 24%; p=0.003), an established program to connect a mentor and mentee with similar research interests (52% vs. 27%; p=0.049), methods to provide feedback to mentors (62% vs. 29%; p=0.01), require mentee research progress reports (45% vs. 21%; p=0.047), and report ease of identifying a mentor (90% vs. 69%; p=0.046). On multivariate analyses, the additional year of research training (OR=7.53, 95% CI: 2.10-27.09; p=0.002) and ease at identifying a research mentor (OR=7.45, 95% CI: 1.44-38.6; p=0.017) remained as independent factors associated with higher research productivity. Our data suggest that programs can enhance research productivity with the incorporation of accountability features including formalized reports of progress and mentorship feedback in fellowship training. Facilitating the identification of a mentor and providing an additional year of research may be independent factors associated with research productivity. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Learning medical English: A prerequisite for successful academic and professional education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milosavljević Nataša

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present specificities of the English language teaching necessary for successful education and professional training of medical students. In contemporary globalized world the English language has become the basic language of communication in all scientific fields including the field of medical science. It is well established that Medical English teaching should primarily focus on stable linguistic competence in English that is created by means of content and context based curriculum, thus preparing students for active use of English upon graduation. In order to achieve this it is very important that English language teaching be based on specific real situations in which the language is to be used. In addition, students should be encouraged to adapt practical skills applicable in specific future professional setting. Medical English teaching represents constant challenge for teachers because they need to be flexible, open to new approaches and methods, make decisions and adapt themselves to constant changes. In addition, long-term learning is at the core of higher education, and being equal partners, both students and teachers should be aware that education is a two-way process.

  10. The Four-Tier Continuum of Academic and Behavioral Support (4T-CABS) Model: An Integrated Model for Medical Student Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegers-Jager, Karen M; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Themmen, Axel P N

    2017-11-01

    Not all students cope successfully with the demands of medical school, and students' struggles may result in study delay or dropout. To prevent these outcomes, medical schools need to identify students who are experiencing academic difficul ties and provide them with timely interventions through access to support programs. Although the importance of early identification and intervention is well recognized, less is known about successful strategies for identifying and supporting struggling students.Building on the literature and their own empirical findings, the authors propose an integrated, school-wide model for medical student success comprising a continuum of academic and behavioral support. This Four-Tier Continuum of Academic and Behavioral Support (4T-CABS) model focuses on improving both academic and behavioral outcomes by offering support for students at four levels, which range from adequate instruction for all, to targeted small-group interventions, to individualized support, and also include exit support for students who might be better off in another degree program. Additionally, medical schools should provide both academic and behavioral support; set high, yet realistic expectations and clearly communicate these to students; and intervene early, which requires timely identification of at-risk students who would benefit from the different types and tiers of support. Finally, interventions should be evidence based and fit the needs of the identified groups of students. The authors argue that adopting the core principles of the 4T-CABS model will enable medical schools to maximize academic engagement and performance for all students.

  11. Successfully accelerating translational research at an academic medical center: the University of Michigan-Coulter translational research partnership program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pienta, Kenneth J

    2010-12-01

    Translational research encompasses the effective movement of new knowledge and discoveries into new approaches for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. There are many roadblocks to successful bench to bedside research, but few have received as much recent attention as the "valley of death". The valley of death refers to the lack of funding and support for research that moves basic science discoveries into diagnostics, devices, and treatments in humans, and is ascribed to be the result of companies unwilling to fund research development that may not result in a drug or device that will be utilized in the clinic and conversely, the fact that researchers have no access to the funding needed to carry out preclinical and early clinical development to demonstrate potential efficacy in humans. The valley of death also exists because bridging the translational gap is dependent on successfully managing an additional four risks: scientific, intellectual property, market, and regulatory. The University of Michigan (UM) has partnered with the Wallace H. Coulter Foundation (CF) to create a model providing an infrastructure to overcome these risks. This model is easily adoptable to other academic medical centers (AMCs). © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. A Reputation for Success (or Failure): The Association of Peer Academic Reputations With Academic Self-Concept, Effort, and Performance Across the Upper Elementary Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gest, Scott D.; Rulison, Kelly L.; Davidson, Alice J.; Welsh, Janet A.

    2008-01-01

    The associations between children's academic reputations among peers and their academic self-concept, effort, and performance were examined in a longitudinal study of 427 students initially enrolled in Grades 3, 4, and 5. Assessments were completed in the fall and spring of 2 consecutive school years and in the fall of a 3rd school year. Peer…

  13. Relationships of Personality, Affect, Emotional Intelligence and Coping with Student Stress and Academic Success: Different Patterns of Association for Stress and Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saklofske, Donald H.; Austin, Elizabeth J.; Mastoras, Sarah M.; Beaton, Laura; Osborne, Shona E.

    2012-01-01

    The associations of personality, affect, trait emotional intelligence (EI) and coping style measured at the start of the academic year with later academic performance were examined in a group of undergraduate students at the University of Edinburgh. The associations of the dispositional and affect measures with concurrent stress and life…

  14. Examining the relationship between childhood health conditions and health service utilisation at school entry and subsequent academic performance in a large cohort of Australian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasuuna, Esther; Santoro, Giuseppe; Kremer, Peter; de Silva, Andrea M

    2016-07-01

    Chronic health conditions are associated with poor academic outcomes. This study examines the relationship between health conditions, specialist health service utilisation and academic performance in Australian children. This was a quasi-longitudinal study where School Entrant Health Questionnaire (a survey tool with parent report on children's health) data for 24 678 children entering school in 2008 was matched with the 2011 National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN). Linear and logistic regressions were used to examine associations between health conditions, use of a specialist health service and reading and numeracy scores. The study comprised 24 678 children. Children with allergies, very low birth weight, developmental delay, diabetes, spina bifida, cystic fibrosis, birth abnormality, speech problems, intellectual disability and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder had lower numeracy scores than those without any of these conditions (P performance from those that had not used specialist health services. Some health conditions put children at risk of poorer academic performance, and interventions to prevent this such as appropriate support services in schools should be considered. © 2016 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  15. Continuing Professional Development for Faculty: An Elephant in the House of Academic Medicine or the Key to Future Success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, David A; Rayburn, William F; Smith, Gary A

    2017-08-01

    The scope of change required by academic medical centers (AMCs) to maintain their viability and achieve their tripartite mission in the future is large; such reform is affected by numerous global, national, and local forces. Most AMCs focus their transformational efforts on organizational infrastructure (e.g., undertaking payment reform, developing new organizational structures, investing in information technology) and educational programs (with subsequent changes in undergraduate and graduate medical education curricula). Although useful, these efforts have failed to produce the kind of change required for AMCs to succeed in the future.The authors of this Invited Commentary describe a key element missing from most of these reform efforts-the preparation of faculty for new models of health care and educational practice. To address this issue, they call for the effective, system-aligned presence of continuing professional development (CPD) programs. CPD combines continuing medical education, with its focus on content knowledge, and faculty development, with its focus on evidence-based learning methodologies, across the institution to produce a more robust, system- and outcomes-oriented program to facilitate both individual and organizational learning. If sufficiently supported, CPD programs can provide a platform for the human changes necessary to ensure the smooth transition of AMCs to new models of education, clinical research, and ultimately patient care.

  16. Identification of at-risk students and strategies to improve academic success in first year health programs. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Gerard Pearson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The transition to university is a difficult process for many students, having a negative impact on their academic performance, ultimately resulting in failure or withdrawal from one or more courses in their first semester. This practice report describes a profile analysis and readiness assessment designed to identify students at high academic risk. Students so identified were offered additional workshops to address assumed knowledge and academic skills. Attendance at the workshops correlated with improved academic outcomes.

  17. The Drivers of Academic Success in Cleft and Craniofacial Centers: A 10-Year Analysis of over 2000 Publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plana, Natalie M; Massie, Jonathan P; Stern, Marleigh J; Alperovich, Michael; Runyan, Christopher M; Staffenberg, David A; Koniaris, Leonidas G; Grayson, Barry H; Diaz-Siso, J Rodrigo; Flores, Roberto L

    2017-02-01

    (β = 0.116). Variables most positively associated with basic science publications were craniofacial surgery and craniofacial orthodontics fellowships (β = 0.676) and craniofacial surgery fellowship (β = 0.208). The only variable associated with National Institutes of Health funding was craniofacial surgery and craniofacial orthodontics fellowship (β = 0.332). Participation in both craniofacial surgery and orthodontics fellowships demonstrates the strongest association with academic success; craniofacial surgery fellowship, university affiliation, and number of surgeons are also predictive.

  18. The role biomedical science laboratories can play in improving science knowledge and promoting first-year nursing academic success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneson, Pam

    The Role Biomedical Science Laboratories Can Play In Improving Science Knowledge and Promoting First-Year Nursing Academic Success The need for additional nursing and health care professionals is expected to increase dramatically over the next 20 years. With this in mind, students must have strong biomedical science knowledge to be competent in their field. Some studies have shown that participation in bioscience laboratories can enhance science knowledge. If this is true, an analysis of the role bioscience labs have in first-year nursing academic success is apposite. In response, this study sought to determine whether concurrent enrollment in anatomy and microbiology lecture and lab courses improved final lecture course grades. The investigation was expanded to include a comparison of first-year nursing GPA and prerequisite bioscience concurrent lecture/lab enrollment. Additionally, research has indicated that learning is affected by student perception of the course, instructor, content, and environment. To gain an insight regarding students' perspectives of laboratory courses, almost 100 students completed a 20-statement perception survey to understand how lab participation affects learning. Data analyses involved comparing anatomy and microbiology final lecture course grades between students who concurrently enrolled in the lecture and lab courses and students who completed the lecture course alone. Independent t test analyses revealed that there was no significant difference between the groups for anatomy, t(285) = .11, p = .912, but for microbiology, the lab course provided a significant educational benefit, t(256) = 4.47, p = .000. However, when concurrent prerequisite bioscience lecture/lab enrollment was compared to non-concurrent enrollment for first-year nursing GPA using independent t test analyses, no significant difference was found for South Dakota State University, t(37) = -1.57, p = .125, or for the University of South Dakota, t(38) = -0.46, p

  19. Working-class female students: academic success and regulating discourse / Alunas da classe trabalhadora: sucesso acadêmico e discurso de regulação

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luísa Saavedra

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This study, conducted in Portugal, analysed interviews of 3 female students from working-class backgrounds and their respective families. These students were selected from a previous study in which academic results and their link to socio-economic background were analysed. That work demonstrated that, out of 600 students from all socio-economic backgrounds, there were only three working-class female students who achieved high academic results up to the 9-th and final year of compulsory education. The aim of the present study is to understand why these three female students have succeeded, and how they appreciate this success. "Critical discourse analysis" has been the theoretical and methodological basis for this work and has permitted to consider the possibility that these female students had achieved such great academic success by internalising the discourse of the middle classes, although this is dissimulated, hidden and masked forboth for the female students and their families.

  20. An Analysis of the Impact of "Success for All" on Reading, Attendance, and Academic Self-Efficacy With At-Risk Elementary School

    OpenAIRE

    Atkinson, Cheryl L. H.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative/qualitative evaluation study was to analyze the impact of the Success for All (SFA) program on reading achievement, attendance, and academic self-efficacy. Robert Slavin (1996) and his colleagues at Johns Hopkins University developed the Success for All program, which incorporates a comprehensive school restructuring approach. This program focuses on improving achievement of at-risk children and aims to have every child reading on or above grade level by gra...

  1. MS PHD'S: Bridging the Gap of Academic and Career Success Through Educational and Professional Development for Minorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D.; Vargas, W.; Padilla, E.; Strickland, J.; Echols, E.; Johnson, A.; Williamson Whitney, V.; Ithier-Guzman, W.; Ricciardi, L.; Johnson, A.; Braxton, L.

    2011-12-01

    Historically, there has been a lack of ethnic and gender diversity in the geo-sciences. The Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Science (MS PHD'S) Professional Development Program provides a bridge to young scientists of diverse backgrounds who in turn will impact many. In a process of 3 phases, the program introduces the students to the scientific community through participation in professional and society meetings and networking with scientists and personnel within federal agencies, academic institutions and STEM-based industries. The program builds confidence, offers role models for professional development and provides students support during their education. Upon completion, students achieve a high level of self-actualization and self-esteem combined with individual growth. They become part of a community that continuously provides support and security to each other. This support is tangible through the mentor/mentee relationships which will help with individual growth throughout the mentoring cycle. Having role models and familiar faces to whom mentees can relate to will encourage our students to succeed in the STEM's field. To date, 159 students have participated in the program: 26 have successfully completed their PhD and 56 are currently enrolled in the PhD programs nationwide. The MS PHD'S Program creates a forum of diverse peoples by diverse peoples with diverse interest and strength, where the ongoing goal is to continually raise the bar for each individual. MS PHD'S establishes a nurturing goal-oriented environment for the geo scientist of the future who in turn will make profound contributions on a local, national and global scale. To conclude, MSPHD'S not only bridges the gap of unrepresented minorities in STEM careers, but also generates educational approaches to make the earth system sciences available to more, impacting all.

  2. Using the Achieving Success Everyday (ASE) Group Model to Promote Self-Esteem and Academic Achievement for English as a Second Language (ESL) Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qi; Steen, Sam

    2012-01-01

    The Achieving Success Everyday (ASE) group model is used to promote self-esteem and academic performance of English as a second language (ESL) students. The findings from the preliminary data indicated that the participants' self-esteem was significantly improved after participation in the group. There was no significant improvement in the total…

  3. Early predictors of first-year academic success at university: pre-university effort, pre-university self-efficacy, and pre-university reasons for attending university

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.G.A. van Herpen (Sanne); M. Meeuwisse (Marieke); W.H.A. Hofman (W. H. Adriaan); S.E. Severiens (Sabine); L.R. Arends (Lidia)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractGiven the large number of dropouts in the 1st year at university, it is important to identify early predictors of 1st-year academic success. The present study (n = 453 first-year students) contributes to literature on the transition from secondary to higher education by investigating how

  4. An Investigation into the Academic Success of Prospective Teachers in Terms of Learning Strategies, Learning Styles and the Locus of Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akça, Figen

    2013-01-01

    The present research aims to investigate the relationship between the learning strategies, learning styles, the locus of control and the academic success of prospective teachers. The study group consists of 198 university students in various departments at the Uludag University Faculty of Education. Research data were collected with the Locus of…

  5. Early predictors of first-year academic success at university : Pre-university effort, pre-university self-efficacy, and pre-university reasons for attending university

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Herpen, Sanne G.A.; Meeuwisse, Marieke; Hofman, W. H.Adriaan; Severiens, Sabine E.; Arends, Lidia R.

    Given the large number of dropouts in the 1st year at university, it is important to identify early predictors of 1st-year academic success. The present study (n = 453 first-year students) contributes to literature on the transition from secondary to higher education by investigating how the

  6. The Relationships between Self-Regulated Learning Skills, Causal Attributions and Academic Success of Trainee Teachers Preparing to Teach Gifted Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leana-Tascilar, Marilena Z.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the self-regulated learning skills and causal attributions of trainee teachers preparing to teach gifted pupils, and also to study the predictive relationships between these skills and attributions, on one hand, and academic success, on the other hand. The research was conducted on 123 students attending…

  7. The Role of Social Networks in the Adjustment and Academic Success of International Students: A Case Study of a University in the Southwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisang, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    This study is a qualitative investigation of the role that social networks play in the adjustment and academic success of international students. With large numbers of international students enrolled on US campuses, it is important for practitioners to prepare, understand and address their dynamic needs. Based on social network, social capital and…

  8. The Relationship between the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) Scores and Academic Success of International Master's Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcuino, Cathy Lee T.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine if the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) are related to academic success defined by final cumulative grade point average (GPA). The data sample, from three Midwestern universities, was comprised of international graduate students who…

  9. The Effects of the First Step to Success Program on Academic Engagement Behaviors of Turkish Students with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Selda

    2011-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of the First Step to Success (FSS) early intervention program with Turkish children identified with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Intervention effectiveness on target children's academic engagement behaviors was studied. Participants were four 7-year-old first-grade students in…

  10. School Emphasis on Academic Success: Exploring Changes in Science Performance in Norway between 2007 and 2011 Employing Two-Level SEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Trude; Gustafsson, Jan-Eric

    2014-01-01

    We study whether changes in school emphasis on academic success (SEAS) and safe schools (SAFE) may explain the increased science performance in Norway between TIMSS 2007 and 2011. Two-level structural equation modelling (SEM) of merged TIMSS data was used to investigate whether changes in levels of SEAS and SAFE mediate the changes in science…

  11. A Religious Experience? Personal, Parental, and Peer Religiosity and the Academic Success of Sexual-Minority Youth Using Nationally Representative Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Michael A.; Polikoff, Morgan S.

    2012-01-01

    Using nationally representative transcript data, this study is the first to include a discussion of religiosity in the context of sexual-minority students' academic achievement. This study examines the issue in three capacities: first, by comparing school success of sexual-minority youth to a non-sexual-minority reference group; second, by…

  12. The Effect of Academic Controversy Technique on Turkish Teachers Candidates' Success to Effective Speaking Skills and Its Relation with Some Variables (Gender, Multilingualism)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karda, Mehmet Nuri

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effect of Academic controversy as a technique of collaborative learning on Turkish Teachers candidates' success to effective speaking skills and its relationship with variables like gender and multilingualism. Therefore the experimental design based on the pre-test and post-test measurement with control…

  13. The Relationship between Field Dependent-Independent Cognitive Style and Understanding of English Text Reading and Academic Success

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nozari, Ali Yazdanpanah; Siamian, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    .... This study seeks to find the relationship between field dependence -independence cognitive style and English text reading comprehension, learning English as a foreign language, academic achievement...

  14. Iowa Lakes Community College: Partnerships for Academic and Economic Success in a Rapidly Evolving Wind-Energy Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohni, Mary; Rogers, Jolene; Zeitz, Al

    2007-01-01

    Iowa Lakes Community College responded to a national need for wind-energy technicians. The Wind-Energy and Turbine Program aligned industry and academic competencies with experiential learning components to foster exploration of additional renewable energy applications. Completers understand both the physical and academic rigor a career in wind…

  15. The Positive Action Program: Improving Academics, Behavior, and Character by Teaching Comprehensive Skills for Successful Learning and Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flay, Brian R.; Allred, Carol G.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter outlines and provides evidence for the effects of the "Positive Action Program" as a way of inculcating values, driving student wellbeing, and improving academic performance and interpersonal behavior. The program centers on addressing behavioral, emotional, and academic problems by developing in individuals positive beliefs…

  16. Do Cs Make Degrees? The Relationship of Maximizing versus Satisficing Student Types and Academic Success in the Business Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohs, Mark Hoven

    2016-01-01

    The author analyzed the academic performance of 197 business students in their first required finance course. He postulated that the students' performance related to whether their academic strategy was one of two types: satisficing or maximizing. Satisficers seemed content with getting Cs to earn their degree, while maximizers aimed for the…

  17. An Examination of the Relationship between Collegiate Student-Athlete's Leadership Role in the Athletic Setting and Their Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Darla K.

    2013-01-01

    Academic performance of collegiate student-athletes compared to non-athletes has been studied extensively. Results of these studies have been mixed in their findings of student-athletes academic performance in comparison to the nonstudent-athlete population. These conflicting results may be due to differences in level of competition or demographic…

  18. The Impact of Blended Learning and Social Media-Supported Learning on the Academic Success and Motivation of the Students in Science Education

    OpenAIRE

    AKGÜNDÜZ, Devrim; Akınoğlu, Orhan

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of blended learning and social media supported learning on the students’ academic success and motivation in Science Education. This research, in which the mixed pattern method is used as research model, took place with the 7th grade 74 students attending to a primary school in Kadikoy, Istanbul and carried out “Our Body Systems” unit at 2011-2012 Academic Years. The study groups of the research were; the control group (CG) taught by ...

  19. Diagnosis of stenosis within the popliteal–femoral venous segment upon clinical presentation with a venous ulcer and subsequent successful treatment with venoplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbs, Emma; Sheikh, Alina; Beckett, David; Whiteley, Mark S

    2017-01-01

    This case study reports the diagnosis and treatment of a lower limb venous ulcer with abnormal underlying venous pathology. One male patient presented with bilateral varicose veins and a right lower limb ulcer. Upon investigation, full-leg duplex ultrasonography revealed total incompetence of the great saphenous vein in the left leg. In the right leg, duplex ultrasonography showed proximal incompetence of the small saphenous vein, and dilation of the anterior accessory saphenous vein, which remained competent. Incidentally, two venous collaterals connected onto the distal region of both these segments, emerging from a scarred, atrophic popliteal–femoral segment. An interventional radiologist performed venoplasty to this popliteal–femoral venous segment. Intervention was successful and 10 weeks post procedure ulceration healed. Popliteal–femoral venous stenosis may be associated with venous ulceration in some cases and may be successfully treated with balloon venoplasty intervention. PMID:29147566

  20. Diagnosis of stenosis within the popliteal-femoral venous segment upon clinical presentation with a venous ulcer and subsequent successful treatment with venoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbs, Emma; Sheikh, Alina; Beckett, David; Whiteley, Mark S

    2017-01-01

    This case study reports the diagnosis and treatment of a lower limb venous ulcer with abnormal underlying venous pathology. One male patient presented with bilateral varicose veins and a right lower limb ulcer. Upon investigation, full-leg duplex ultrasonography revealed total incompetence of the great saphenous vein in the left leg. In the right leg, duplex ultrasonography showed proximal incompetence of the small saphenous vein, and dilation of the anterior accessory saphenous vein, which remained competent. Incidentally, two venous collaterals connected onto the distal region of both these segments, emerging from a scarred, atrophic popliteal-femoral segment. An interventional radiologist performed venoplasty to this popliteal-femoral venous segment. Intervention was successful and 10 weeks post procedure ulceration healed. Popliteal-femoral venous stenosis may be associated with venous ulceration in some cases and may be successfully treated with balloon venoplasty intervention.