WorldWideScience

Sample records for subscription print close

  1. Italian print magazines and subscription discounts

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Mangani

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies the antecedents of subscription discounts of Italian print magazines. Drawing on previous empirical work on the theme, I formulate six research hypotheses regarding demand and supply factors that may affect subscription pricing. The two-sidedness of magazine industry is considered implicitly in the empirical analysis. The empirical observations show that the issue frequency, economies of scope deriving from publishing multiple titles, intra-category competition and content ...

  2. Subscriptions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    za/Journal%20subscriptions%20rates.pdf. NOTE: Members of the African Language Association of Southern Africa receive print copies of the journal with their membership. Membership enquiries should be addressed to: The Treasurer (ALASA) ...

  3. Subscriptions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annual subscription rates: Annual subscription: Individuals – US$300.00; Institutions and organisations - $350.00. Two-year subscription (less 15% discount). Three-year subscription (less 20% discount). Distribution agents are charged subscription rates as for organisations, less 15% discount. All rates exclude postage.

  4. Subscriptions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subscriptions Contact. Emmanuel U. Onweremadu Department of Soil Science and Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria Phone: +234 08053127006. Email: tapasinstitute@yahoo.com. Current Subscription Rate: Subscription to Animal Production Research Advances for a full calendar year, ...

  5. Subscriptions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subscriptions Contact. Dr. BA Kolawole Medicine Department, College of Health Sciences, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria Phone: +2348033804884. Email: nigendopractice@gmail.com. The annual subscription rate for this journal is 100USD per annum. ISSN: 2251-0362. AJOL African Journals Online.

  6. Subscriptions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subscriptions Contact. Abiodun Bankole c/o Trade Policy Research and Training Programme Department of Economics University of Ibadan Ibadan Nigeria Email: asbanky@yahoo.com. Annual Subscription Rates (Two issues per year) Institutional Africa: $30.00. Rest of the World: $60.00. Personal Africa: $20.00

  7. Subscriptions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Food Journal is an annual publication of the Nigerian Institute of Food Science and Technology. Subscription prices have changed slightly in response to the economy. Subscription prices for this issue are: individuals in Nigeria N3, 000.00; Nigerian Institution N5,000.00, African Countries 100,00 US Dollars, ...

  8. Subscriptions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... P/Bag 66022 Kopje Harare Zimbabwe Email: mupedziswars@yahoo.com. SUBSCRIPTIONS PER ANNUM (2 ISSUES PER YEAR)* Developing world US$ 50. Rest of the world US$ 80. Airmail US$ 30 * Note: • Please indicate starting year for subscriptions. • Back issues available on request. • Agents discount 15%.

  9. Subscriptions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subscriptions Contact. Christine Lucia Musicological Society of Southern Africa PO Box 3452. MATIELAND 7602. South Africa Email: clucia@telkomsa.net. International Subscriptions SA Rand 90 per volume by surface (plus R50 if paid in currency other than SA Rand) SA Rand 165 per volume by air mail (plus R50 if paid ...

  10. Subscriptions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subscriptions Contact. Dr Jide Owoeye College press Publishers Lts P O Box 30678 Ibadan Oyo State NIGERIA Phone: 234 02 8101963. Fax: 234 02 8104165. Email: ajiadlcu@gmail.com. International Rates. Subscription per volume (2 issues) $50 (including airmail and handling). Advertisement per volume $50 (full ...

  11. Subscriptions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subscriptions Contact. Ms Julia Clare School of Philosophy and Ethics University of KwaZulu-Natal Durban 4041 South Africa Email: clare@ukzn.ac.za. Annual subscription fees (volume of four numbers) are ZAR200,00 for subscribers on the continent of Africa, and for others US$60 (airmail included). Orders to: Ms Julia ...

  12. Subscriptions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ₤36.30 less 10% to Subscription Agent (₤32.67 + ₤9.33 Forex charges = ₤42.00 to ISEA, Rhodes University). $57.48 less 10% to Subscription Agent ($51.73 + $18.27 Forex charges = $70.00 to ISEA, Rhodes University). Airmail: Please add a further £9/$16. Africa: Individuals: R230.00 less 10% to Agent - (R 207.00 incl.

  13. Subscriptions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subscriptions Contact. Prof B M Marshall Transactions of the Zimbabwe Scientific P.O. Box CY 124 Causeway, Harare, Zimbabwe. Email: marshall@trep.co.zw ) To subscribe to Transactions it is necessary to become a member of the Association: Membership Rates (2001/2002) Ordinary member (in Zimbabwe) Z$300.00

  14. Subscriptions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subscriptions Contact. Prof. S Feresu P.O. Box CY 124 Causeway, Harare, Zimbabwe Email: feresu@ies.uz.ac.zw. To subscribe to The Zimbabwe Science News it is necessary to become a member of the Association: Membership Rates (2001/2002) Ordinary member (in Zimbabwe) Z$300.00. Ordinary member ...

  15. Subscriptions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subscriptions Contact. Dr Obinna Muogboh Pan African University 2 Ahmed Onibudo Street, P.O. Box 73688, Victoria Island, Lagos, NIGERIA Email: omuogboh@lbs.edu.ng. One Year Institutional: US$40. Individual: US$30. Two Years Institutional: US$70. Individual: US$55. To subscribe, please return information to:

  16. Subscriptions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subscriptions Contact. Dr Basil C Ezeanolue Department of Otorhinolaryngology College of Medicine University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital Enugu 400 001. Nigeria Email: editornjorl@yahoo.com. Individuals Nigeria - 600.00 Naira Africa - US$15.00. Other Countries - US$25.00. Institutions Nigeria - 1200.00 Naira

  17. Subscriptions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Europe 75 USD. USA 100 USD. Asia 75 USD. Institutional subscription: Tanzania 40 USD. East African 50 USD. Africa 75 UDS. Europe 150 USD. USA 175 USD. Asia 75 USD. Purchase of single copies: Tanzania 10 USD. East African Community 15 USD. Others 25 USD. Prices include postage costs. ADVERTISING ...

  18. Some reduce facilities for pretty printing subscripts and formal derivatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshof, B.J.A.; van Hulzen, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Some REDUCE facilities are presented for pretty printing formal (partial) derivatives, for array-and matrix subcripts and for operators with arbitrary arguments. The package is completely written in Standard LISP and can be considered as an addition to the output repertoire of the algebraic mode of

  19. Some reduce facilities for pretty printing subscripts and formal derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Hulshof, B.J.A.; van Hulzen, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Some REDUCE facilities are presented for pretty printing formal (partial) derivatives, for array-and matrix subcripts and for operators with arbitrary arguments. The package is completely written in Standard LISP and can be considered as an addition to the output repertoire of the algebraic mode of REDUCE.

  20. Closed loop supply chain in printing operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcius Fabius Henriques Carvalho

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a clear change in focus in large companies, previously dedicated primarily to the production of physical goods, toward offering complimentary services and changing their focus toward more service-oriented businesses, in order to increase their competitiveness. At the same time, companies are facing increasing product returns due to various reasons leading to reverse logistics practices and toward the introduction of a Closed Loop Supply Chain management perspective. The purpose of this work is to identify, using a case study in the printing industry,  specific characteristics, regarding product returns, both in a product-oriented and a service-oriented operation. Furthermore, the current work performs a diagnosis of current practices applications of CLSC models in the two operating models. The paper concludes that indeed there are relevant differences in managing the CLSC for each case and identify the main gaps for each operation.

  1. SUBSCRIPTION POLICY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chief Editor

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available SUBSCRIPTION POLICYIndian Journal of Community Health (IJCH, the official publication of Indian Association of Preventive and Social Medicine (IAPSM published from Uttar Pradesh and Uttarakhand, India is an indexed journal published quarterly. All the registered members of the association and currently working as faculty in Community Medicine at various Medical Colleges of Uttar Pradesh and Uttarakhand are only entitled to receive a free copy of the journal. Subscription Rate - 2017 (Including Postage India (INROverseas (US$CategoryIndividualInstituteIndividualInstituteBack Single Issue1500200075100Current Single Issue100015005075Yearly Four Issues30005000175250* Subscription Agent Discount: 10% of the Institute Rates (Details of end user is mandatory  Modes of payment: NEFT / RTGS / Online Transfer / Net Banking / Demand DraftAccount Name: Indian Journal of Community Health  Account No: 33858042598 Type: Saving AccountBank Name: State Bank of India (SBI HIHT  Branch: HIHT Jolly Grant, Dehradun Branch Code: 10580 IFSC Code: SBIN0010580 MICR Code: 248002201Note: Please allow at least six to eight weeks for commencement of new subscription, Subscription are for calendar year only, Claims for missing issues can be made only within one month of publication, Worldwide free online full text access in PDF format (Open Access.  Postal Address:To Editor Indian Journal of Community Health (IJCH Publication of Indian Association of Preventive and Social MedicineUttar Pradesh and Uttarakhand Department of Community Medicine,Himalayan Institute of Medical Sciences,Swami Ram Nagar, Doiwala, Dehradun 248140UttarakhandWebsite: www.iapsmupuk.org E – Mail:  chiefeditor@iapsmupuk.orgSubscription FormTo Editor Indian Journal of Community Health (IJCH Publication of Indian Association of Preventive and Social MedicineUttar Pradesh and Uttarakhand Department of Community Medicine,Himalayan Institute of Medical Sciences,Swami Ram Nagar, Doiwala, Dehradun

  2. Using a Subscription Agent for E-Journal Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogg, Jill E.

    2010-01-01

    Subscription agents have had to reinvent themselves over the past 15 years as the numbers of print subscriptions have dramatically dwindled. Many libraries have chosen to bypass the subscription agent and its extra fees in favor of dealing directly with the publisher for e-journal and e-journal package procurement and management. Especially in…

  3. Subscription Agencies: A New Look at an Old Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, N. Bernard; Warner, Alice Sizer

    1988-01-01

    Provides a historical overview of subscription agencies and describes the current situation. The largest companies are identified and issues for the future--computers and integrated systems, pricing, budgeting, optical technology, and printing technology--are discussed. (MES)

  4. Grammatical and Nongrammatical Contributions to Closed-Class Word Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alario, F.-Xavier; Ayora, Pauline; Costa, Albert; Melinger, Alissa

    2008-01-01

    Closed-class word selection was investigated by focusing on determiner production. Native speakers from three different languages named pictures of objects using determiner plus noun phrases (e.g., in French "la table" (the [subscript feminine] table), while ignoring distractor determiners printed on the pictures (e.g., "le"…

  5. Negotiating with Subscription Agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, Judy; Basch, N. Bernard

    1991-01-01

    This first in a two-part series on how librarians can negotiate services and prices with subscription agencies focuses on how vendors operate. Factors that influence agency costs, revenues, and service charges are described, including economies of scale, discounts from publishers, and prepayment and cash flow. (seven references) (LRW)

  6. CERN GSM SUBSCRIPTIONS

    CERN Multimedia

    Labo Telecom

    2002-01-01

    AS Division has created a new EDH document for handling all GSM subscription requests and amendments. This procedure will enter force immediately and from now on the Labo Telecom stores will no longer be able to deal with requests submitted on paper forms. Detailed information on the subject can be found here and the Labo Telecom stores will continue to open every day between 11.00 a.m. and 12.00 midday. IT-CS-TEL, Labo Telecom

  7. Subscriptions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Email: vinck.aequatoria@skynet.be
    Honore.Vinck@ped.kuleuven.be. Congo Mbandaka : Centre Aequatoria, B.P. 276(don't use this address in times of trouble/n'utilisez pas cette adresse en p riode de troubles) Kinshasa: Maison MSC, Limete, 19, 3 me rue,Vente: Librairie St Paul Kinshasa et Limete Belgium

  8. Subscriptions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Communicate; Journal of Library and Information Science, Department of Library of Information Science, Ambrose Alli University, PMB 14, Ekpoma, Edo State. Nigeria. Phone: + 234 703 636 0662. Email: communicatejournal@yahoo.com. Prices: Recent issue = $30. Past Issue =$20. Mode of Payment for Journal: Send a ...

  9. Subscriptions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Institutions: US$ 50 (East Africa), US$ 200 (Europe), US$ 250 (USA). Individuals: US$ 25 (East Africa), US$ 120 (Europe), US$ 140 (USA). Purchase of single copies: US$ 20.00 per copy VAT inclusive. ... Advertising rates (may change without notice) Inside cover: US$ 200.0 per issue. Full page: US$ 250.0 per issue

  10. Subscriptions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Non-contributors, libraries and institutions wishing to procure copies can do so at a moderate charge which defrays the costs of production and postage: 2000 CFA for individuals or national institutions 4000 CFA for international organizations $10 for institutions in Africa $20 for institutions outside Africa. ISSN: 1813-3320.

  11. Subscriptions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amadou Hama MAÏGA Revue " SUD SCIENCES ET TECHNOLOGIES " Ecole inter-états d'Ingénieurs de l'Equipement Rural (E.I.E.R.) 03 BP 7023. OUAGADOUGOU 03. BURKINA FASO Phone: (226) 30 71 16/17. Fax: (226) 31 27 24. Afrique del'Ouest et du Centre Autres pays. Abonnement. individuel 10 000 f cfa 15 000 f ...

  12. Subscriptions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    : U. B. A.. (ii) Payments from Outside Nigeria. Intermediary Bank: STANDARD CHARTERED BANK, LONDON SWIFT CODE: SCBLGB2L. Beneficiary Bank: First Bank of Nigeria LTD. Address: 35, SAMUEL ASABIA HOUSE, MARIN, LAGOS, ...

  13. Does SDDS Subscription Reduce Borrowing Costs for Emerging Market Economies?

    OpenAIRE

    John Cady

    2005-01-01

    Does macroeconomic data transparency-as signaled by subscription to the IMF's Special Data Dissemination Standard (SDDS)-help reduce borrowing costs in international capital markets? This question is examined using data on new issues of sovereign foreign-currency-denominated (U.S. dollar, yen, and euro) bonds for several emerging market economies. Panel econometric estimates indicate that spreads on new bond issues declined on average by close to 20 percent, or by an average of about 55 basis...

  14. Dental economics: a non-subscription dental journal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaes, J A

    1999-01-01

    The editor of a non-subscription publication for dentists explains the advantages of having a journal whose contents are driven by advertising revenue unrelated to products or services mentioned in the journal and free from political influence as well. The drive on the publication is reader interest rather than author or publisher philosophy, and surveys and other methods are used to stay close to the issues practicing dentists are interested in.

  15. Managing Distributed Systems with Smart Subscriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filman, Robert E.; Lee, Diana D.; Swanson, Keith (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We describe an event-based, publish-and-subscribe mechanism based on using 'smart subscriptions' to recognize weakly-structured events. We present a hierarchy of subscription languages (propositional, predicate, temporal and agent) and algorithms for efficiently recognizing event matches. This mechanism has been applied to the management of distributed applications.

  16. What Does f[subscript xx]f[subscript yy] - f[superscript 2][subscript xy] Greater than 0 "Really" Mean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartin, Brian J.

    2008-01-01

    This note presents geometric and physical interpretations of the sufficient condition for a critical point to be a strict relative extremum: f[subscript xx]f[subscript yy] - f[superscript 2][subscript xy] greater than 0. The role of the double derivative f[subscript xy] in this inequality will be highlighted in these interpretations. (Contains 14…

  17. Consecutive C[subscript 60] Fullerene Dissociation from Ir([eta][superscript 2]-C[subscript 60])(CO)(Cl)(PPh[subscript 3])[subscript 2] and the Oxidative Addition of Benzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Tamara; Cortes-Figueroa, Jose E.

    2010-01-01

    This laboratory activity is a mechanistic exploration of the interactions between electronically deficient organometallic compounds and solvent molecules. Simple kinetics experiments designed to explore the mechanism of C[subscript 60] fullerene-benzene exchange on Ir(([eta][superscript 2]-C[subscript 60])(CO)(Cl)(PPh[subscript 3])[subscript 2]…

  18. Vibrational Spectroscopy of the CCI[subscript 4]?[subscript 1] Mode: Effect of Thermally Populated Vibrational States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynor, James D.; Wetterer, Anna M.; Cochran, Rea M.; Valente, Edward J.; Mayer, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    In our previous article on CCl[subscript 4] in this "Journal," we presented an investigation of the fine structure of the symmetric stretch of carbon tetrachloride (CCl[subscript 4]) due to isotopic variations of chlorine in C[superscript 35]Cl[subscript x][superscript 37]Cl[subscript 4-x]. In this paper, we present an investigation of…

  19. CERN Library - Reduction of subscriptions to scientific journals

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The Library Working Group for Acquisitions has identified some scientific journal subscriptions as candidates for cancellation. Although the 2005 budget is unchanged with respect to 2004 thanks to the efforts of the Management, it does not take account of inflation, which for many years has been much higher for scientific literature than the normal cost-of-living index. For 2006, the inflation rate is estimated to be 7-8%. Moreover, the Library does not only intend to compensate for the loss of purchasing power but also to make available some funds to promote new Open Access publishing models. (See Bulletin No.15/2005) The list of candidates can be found on the Library homepage (http://library.cern.ch/). In addition, some subscriptions will be converted to online-only, i.e. CERN will no longer order the print version of certain journals. We invite users to carefully check the list (http://library.cern.ch/). Comments on this proposal should be sent to the WGA Chairman, Rudiger Voss, with a copy to the Hea...

  20. Nitration of Phenols Using Cu(NO[subscript 3])[subscript 2]: Green Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Urvashi; Mande, Hemant; Ghalsasi, Prasanna

    2012-01-01

    An easy-to-complete, microwave-assisted, green chemistry, electrophilic nitration method for phenol using Cu(NO[subscript 3])[subscript 2] in acetic acid is discussed. With this experiment, students clearly understand the mechanism underlying the nitration reaction in one laboratory session. (Contains 4 schemes.)

  1. An Advanced Organometallic Lab Experiment with Biological Implications: Synthesis and Characterization of Fe[subscript 2](µ-S[subscript 2])(C0)[subscript 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Jacob; Spentzos, Ariana; Works, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The organometallic complex Fe[subscript 2](µ-S[subscript 2])(CO)[subscript 6] has interesting biological implications. The concepts of bio-organometallic chemistry are rarely discussed at the undergraduate level, but this experiment can start such a conversation and, in addition, teach valuable synthetic techniques. The lab experiment takes a…

  2. [Reading behavior and preferences regarding subscriptions to scientific journals : Results of a survey of members of the German Society for General and Visceral Surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronellenfitsch, U; Klinger, C; Buhr, H J; Post, S

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of surgical literature is to publish the latest study results and to provide continuing medical education to readers. For optimal allocation of resources, institutional subscribers, professional societies and scientific publishers require structured data on reading and subscription preferences of potential readers of surgical literature. To obtain representative data on the preferences of German general and visceral surgeons regarding reading of and subscription to scientific journals. All members of the German Society for General and Visceral Surgery (DGAV) were invited to participate in a web-based survey. Questions were asked on the affiliation and position of the member, individual journal subscriptions, institutional access to scientific journals, preferences regarding electronic or print articles and special subscriptions for society members. Answers were descriptively analyzed. A total of 630 out of 4091 (15 %) members participated in the survey and 73 % of the respondents had at least 1 individual subscription to a scientific journal. The most frequently subscribed journal was Der Chirurg (47 % of respondents). The institutional access to journals was deemed insufficient by 48 % of respondents, predominantly in primary care hospitals and outpatient clinics. Almost half of the respondents gave sufficient importance to reading printed versions of articles for which they would pay extra fees. A group subscription for society members was perceived as advantageous as long as no relevant extra costs were incurred. This structured survey among members of the DGAV provides data on preferences regarding reading of and subscription to scientific journals. Individual subscriptions to journals are still common, possibly due to suboptimal institutional access particularly at smaller non-academic institutions. In an age of online publications it seems surprising that many respondents place a high value on printed versions. The results are relevant for

  3. Internet Access from CERN GSM subscriptions

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2008-01-01

    The data service on GSM subscriptions has been improved, allowing CERN users to access the Internet directly. A CERN GSM subscription with data option now allows you to connect to the Internet from a mobile phone or a PC equipped with a GSM modem. The previous access (CERN intranet) still exists. To get access to the new service, you will find all the information on configurations at: http://cern.ch/gprs The use of this service on the Sunrise network is charged on a flat-rate basis (no extra charge related to the volume of downloaded data). Depending on your CERN subscription type (standard or master), you can also connect to foreign GSM data networks (roaming), but this is strongly discouraged, except where absolutely necessary, due to international roaming charges. Telecom Section, IT/CS

  4. Full Text Journal Subscriptions: An Evolutionary Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, Judy

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of companies offering Web accessible subscriptions to full text electronic versions of scientific, technical, and medical journals (Academic Press, Blackwell, EBSCO, Elsevier, Highwire Press, Information Quest, Institute of Physics, Johns Hopkins University Press, OCLC, OVID, Springer, and SWETS). Also lists guidelines for…

  5. 47 CFR 73.642 - Subscription TV service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Subscription TV service. 73.642 Section 73.642... Television Broadcast Stations § 73.642 Subscription TV service. (a) Subscription TV service may be provided by: (1) Licensees and permittees of commercial and noncommercial TV stations, and (2) Licensees and...

  6. 47 CFR 73.641 - Subscription TV definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Subscription TV definitions. 73.641 Section 73.641 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Television Broadcast Stations § 73.641 Subscription TV definitions. (a) Subscription...

  7. 41 CFR 101-25.108 - Multiyear subscriptions for publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Multiyear subscriptions...-GENERAL 25.1-General Policies § 101-25.108 Multiyear subscriptions for publications. Subscriptions for... the purpose of economy or otherwise. Where various bureaus or offices in the same agency are...

  8. New types of subscriptions for CERN GSM

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2010-01-01

    A recent renegotiation of our commercial conditions with our mobile telephony operator allows us today to deploy new GSM mobile services, reduce communication costs, as well as put in place a new subscription system. First of all, the "email to SMS" service has already been extended to all Swiss numbers. This service allows you to send SMS messages (Short Message Service) to any Swiss mobile telephone from your CERN e-mail account. For further details, please refer to the web site http://cern.ch/sms. The sending of MMS messages (Multi-media Message Service) will be activated by default on all CERN subscriptions by the end of March 2010. This service allows users to attach to a text message an image, a video or an audio recording. All the necessary details for configuring this new service on CERN mobile phones will be published on the web site http://cern.ch/mms. Concerning mobile service costs, new rates have been put in place since 1st January 2010. All tariffs have dramatically decrea...

  9. Anon-Pass: Practical Anonymous Subscriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael Z.; Dunn, Alan M.; Katz, Jonathan; Waters, Brent; Witchel, Emmett

    2014-01-01

    We present the design, security proof, and implementation of an anonymous subscription service. Users register for the service by providing some form of identity, which might or might not be linked to a real-world identity such as a credit card, a web login, or a public key. A user logs on to the system by presenting a credential derived from information received at registration. Each credential allows only a single login in any authentication window, or epoch. Logins are anonymous in the sense that the service cannot distinguish which user is logging in any better than random guessing. This implies unlinkability of a user across different logins. We find that a central tension in an anonymous subscription service is the service provider’s desire for a long epoch (to reduce server-side computation) versus users’ desire for a short epoch (so they can repeatedly “re-anonymize” their sessions). We balance this tension by having short epochs, but adding an efficient operation for clients who do not need unlinkability to cheaply re-authenticate themselves for the next time period. We measure performance of a research prototype of our protocol that allows an independent service to offer anonymous access to existing services. We implement a music service, an Android-based subway-pass application, and a web proxy, and show that adding anonymity adds minimal client latency and only requires 33 KB of server memory per active user. PMID:24504081

  10. 47 CFR 73.644 - Subscription TV transmission systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Subscription TV transmission systems. 73.644... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Television Broadcast Stations § 73.644 Subscription TV transmission systems. (a... increasing the RMS output power from either the video or audio transmitters over that required to transmit...

  11. Developing a Pre-Engineering Curriculum for 3D Printing Skills for High School Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Yu-Hung

    2017-01-01

    This study developed an integrated-STEM CO[subscript 2] dragster design course using 3D printing technology. After developing a pre-engineering curriculum, we conducted a teaching experiment to assess students' differences in creativity, race forecast accuracy, and learning performance. We compared student performance in both 3D printing and…

  12. The Sabatier Principle Illustrated by Catalytic H[subscript2]O[subscript2] Decomposition on Metal Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Anders B.; Man, Isabela Costinela; Trinhammer, Ole L.; Rossmeisl, Jan; Dahl, Soren

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis is important in today's industry. Hence, it is imperative to introduce students to this field and its tools. A new way of introducing one of these tools, the Sabatier principle, via a laboratory exercise is presented. A volcano plot is constructed for the well-known heterogeneous H[subscript2]O[subscript2] catalytic…

  13. L[subscript 1] and L[subscript 2] Spoken Word Processing: Evidence from Divided Attention Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiee Nahrkhalaji, Saeedeh; Lotfi, Ahmad Reza; Koosha, Mansour

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to reveal some facts concerning first language (L[subscript 1]) and second language (L[subscript 2]) spoken-word processing in unbalanced proficient bilinguals using behavioral measures. The intention here is to examine the effects of auditory repetition word priming and semantic priming in first and second languages of…

  14. Print mass media: territory of survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny V. Akhmadulin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the problem of the survival of the print media in the information market in the conditions of intense competition with online journalism and the whole information flow on the Internet. Despite the predictions of the impending death of print periodicals, more than half of the world adult population read a daily newspaper. At the same time, the trends taking place in the media market, confirm the reduction of print media segment in favor of the Internet. According to TNS-Russia data, only in 2013 the Internet audience has grown by 6 %. At the same time the circulation of print media in the US fell by 15 % in 2008- 2014, in Western Europe – by a quarter. In Russia, subscription circulation periodicals in the second half of 2014 fell by 20.2 %, and on the basis of subscription for the first half of 2015, the national average – 22 % (data of Federal State Unitary Enterprise “Russian Post”. Finding ways to stabilize the fall of the print media, many US publishing houses see the transition from advertcentric business model to consumcentric model. It is necessary to use the specifics and advantages of newspapers and magazines (comfort, media planning logic, analytic, continuity and consistency of the content of individual and hypertext editions, and others to maintain the intellectual elite. Print media targeting to an elite audience (willing to pay for exclusiveness allows publishers to offset the rising cost of issuing paperbased, and consumers (subscribers will give a sense of communion to a certain social community, receiving verified and thorough information. In this case, the subscription to a newspaper or magazine (no retail outlet and online will be fashionable factor of association of elite communities and acquire new qualitative features in the development of civil society.

  15. Packaging Printing Today

    OpenAIRE

    Bolanča, Stanislav; Majnarić, Igor; Golubović, Kristijan

    2015-01-01

    Printing packaging covers today about 50% of all the printing products. Among the printing products there are printing on labels, printing on flexible packaging, printing on folding boxes, printing on the boxes of corrugated board, printing on glass packaging, synthetic and metal ones. The mentioned packaging are printed in flexo printing technique, offset printing technique, intaglio halftone process, silk – screen printing, ink ball printing, digital printing and hybrid printing process. T...

  16. Power Subscription Strategy: Administrator`s Record of Decision.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration

    1998-12-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to adopt a Power Subscription Strategy for entering into new power sales contracts with its Pacific Northwest customers. The Strategy equitably distributes the electric power generated by the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) within the framework of existing law. The Power Subscription Strategy addresses the availability of power; describes power products; lays out strategies for pricing, including risk management; and discusses contract elements. In proceeding with this Subscription Strategy, BPA is guided by and committed to the Fish and Wildlife funding Principles for the BPA announced by the Vice President of the US in September 1998. This Record of Decision (ROD) addresses the issues raised by commenters who responded to BPA`s Power Subscription Strategy Proposal during and after the comment period that began with the release of the Proposal on September 18, 1998. The ROD is organized in approximately the same way as the Proposal and the Power Subscription Strategy that BPA developed based on the comments received. Abbreviations of party names used in citations appear in the section just preceding this introduction; a list of all the commenters follows the text of the ROD.

  17. Printed Bioelectronics

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Printed Bioelectronics   Anthony P. F. Turner   Biosensors and Bioelectronics Centre, IFM, Linköping University, Linköping S-58183, Sweden.      www.ifm.liu.se/biosensors     This lecture will consider how the recent emergence of printed bioelectronics can offer new solutions to distributed diagnostics for the maintenance of wellbeing, management of an ageing population, food security and environmental safety.   The adaptation of screen printing for the production of enzy...

  18. 47 CFR 10.270 - Subscribers' right to terminate subscription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Subscribers' right to terminate subscription. 10.270 Section 10.270 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMERCIAL MOBILE ALERT SYSTEM Election to Participate in Commercial Mobile Alert System § 10.270 Subscribers' right to...

  19. Constructing I[subscript h] Symmetrical Fullerenes from Pentagons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Li-Hua

    2008-01-01

    Twelve pentagons are sufficient and necessary to form a fullerene cage. According to this structural feature of fullerenes, we propose a simple and efficient method for the construction of I[subscript h] symmetrical fullerenes from pentagons. This method does not require complicated mathematical knowledge; yet it provides an excellent paradigm for…

  20. How Einstein Discovered "E[subscript 0] = mc[squared]"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    This paper traces Einstein's discovery of "the equivalence of mass [m] and energy ["E[subscript 0]"]." He came to that splendid insight in 1905 while employed by the Bern Patent Office, at which time he was not an especially ardent reader of physics journals. How then did the young savant, working outside of academia in semi-isolation, realize…

  1. Trends in Health Insurance Subscription at Cape Coast, Ghana: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to increase subscription to the scheme through innovative ways such as sharing the scheme's achievements ... Health care financing in Ghana started after independence, with a tax-funded system called free .... serve as motivations for its adoption, while the costs refer to the barriers hindering adoption (Mhere,. 2013).

  2. GRID[subscript C] Renewable Energy Data Streaming into Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLuca, V. William; Carpenter, Pam; Lari, Nasim

    2010-01-01

    For years, researchers have shown the value of using real-world data to enhance instruction in mathematics, science, and social studies. In an effort to help develop students' higher-order thinking skills in a data-rich learning environment, Green Research for Incorporating Data in the Classroom (GRID[subscript C]), a National Science…

  3. Trends in Health Insurance Subscription at Cape Coast, Ghana: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study underscores the need for the National Health Insurance Authority to increase subscription to the scheme through innovative ways such as sharing the scheme's achievements through improved advertisement and contracting private entities through public-private partnerships to augment its efforts at recruiting ...

  4. price list 2015.pdf | Subscription | Journals | Resources | public ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; public; Resources; Journals; Subscription; price list 2015.pdf. 404! error. The page your are looking for can not be found! Please check the link or use the navigation bar at the top. YouTube · Twitter · Facebook · Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Associates – 2017. Posted on 30 August 2017. Click here to see the list ...

  5. d Subunit-Containing GABA[subscript A] Receptor Prevents Overgeneralization of Fear in Adult Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Hua; Zhou, Jin; Pan, Han-Qing; Wang, Xiao-Yang; Liu, Wei-Zhu; Zhang, Jun-Yu; Yin, Xiao-Ping; Pan, Bing-Xing

    2017-01-01

    The role of d subunit-containing GABA[subscript A] receptor (GABA[subscript A](d)R) in fear generalization is uncertain. Here, by using mice with or without genetic deletion of GABA[subscript A](d)R and using protocols in which the conditioned tone stimuli were cross presented with different nonconditioned stimuli, we observed that when the two…

  6. The 5-HT[subscript 3A] Receptor Is Essential for Fear Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Makoto; Nakamura, Yukiko; Ishida, Yusuke; Yamada, Takahiro; Shimada, Shoichi

    2014-01-01

    The 5-HT [subscript 3] receptor, the only ionotropic 5-HT receptor, is expressed in limbic regions, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and cortex. However, it is not known whether it has a role in fear memory processes. Analysis of 5-HT [subscript 3A] receptor knockout mice in fear conditioning paradigms revealed that the 5-HT [subscript 3A]…

  7. Printed Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, John M. (Inventor); Lettow, John S. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Korkut, Sibel (Inventor); Chiang, Katherine S. (Inventor); Chen, Chuan-Hua (Inventor); Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Printed electronic device comprising a substrate onto at least one surface of which has been applied a layer of an electrically conductive ink comprising functionalized graphene sheets and at least one binder. A method of preparing printed electronic devices is further disclosed.

  8. Printed periodicals in the CERN Library: your opinion matters!

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    There is a strong demand for offices close to the Main Building and the CERN Management is looking at many solutions to increase the number of offices available in this area.   One of these solutions concerns the Library and the periodicals reading room. A new set of offices will be built where the paper periodicals are stored and part of these will be moved to a nearby store, easily accessible by the Library staff on user request. The space taken from the Library will be fully compensated by a new veranda to be built in the garden adjacent to the reading room. This new reading room is expected to offer a better and more modern use of the available library space (indoor/outdoor). The advantage to the Organization is obviously that we will create more work stations in an inspiring environment, while the disadvantage is that some printed material will have to be moved to the nearby stockroom. In this context it should also be remembered that two years ago, the Library stopped most subscriptions to ...

  9. Vibrational Spectroscopy of the CCl[subscript 4] v[subscript 1] Mode: Theoretical Prediction of Isotopic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynor, James D.; Wetterer, Anna M.; Cochran, Rea M.; Valente, Edward J.; Mayer, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful experimental technique, yet it is often missing from the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory curriculum. Tetrachloromethane (CCl[subscript 4]) is the ideal molecule for an introductory vibrational spectroscopy experiment and the symmetric stretch vibration contains fine structure due to isotopic variations…

  10. pK[subscript a] Values in the Undergraduate Curriculum: What Is the Real pK[subscript a] of Water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Todd P.; Heller, Stephen T.

    2017-01-01

    Since at least the 1960s, organic chemistry textbooks have featured pK[subscript a] tables for organic acids that include values for H[subscript 2]O and H[subscript 3]O[superscript +] (15.74 and -1.74, respectively) that are thermodynamically and chemically indefensible. Here we trace this error back to Brønsted's early contributions in the 1920s…

  11. Block-Cell-Printing for live single-cell printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Chou, Chao-Kai; Xia, Xiaofeng; Hung, Mien-Chie; Qin, Lidong

    2014-02-25

    A unique live-cell printing technique, termed "Block-Cell-Printing" (BloC-Printing), allows for convenient, precise, multiplexed, and high-throughput printing of functional single-cell arrays. Adapted from woodblock printing techniques, the approach employs microfluidic arrays of hook-shaped traps to hold cells at designated positions and directly transfer the anchored cells onto various substrates. BloC-Printing has a minimum turnaround time of 0.5 h, a maximum resolution of 5 µm, close to 100% cell viability, the ability to handle multiple cell types, and efficiently construct protrusion-connected single-cell arrays. The approach enables the large-scale formation of heterotypic cell pairs with controlled morphology and allows for material transport through gap junction intercellular communication. When six types of breast cancer cells are allowed to extend membrane protrusions in the BloC-Printing device for 3 h, multiple biophysical characteristics of cells--including the protrusion percentage, extension rate, and cell length--are easily quantified and found to correlate well with their migration levels. In light of this discovery, BloC-Printing may serve as a rapid and high-throughput cell protrusion characterization tool to measure the invasion and migration capability of cancer cells. Furthermore, primary neurons are also compatible with BloC-Printing.

  12. Computer Security: Printing confidentially

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefan Lueders, Computer Security Team

    2015-01-01

    Have you ever hesitated to print a confidential document using CERN printers? Or perhaps you have rushed quickly to the printer after hitting the “print” button in order to avoid someone else getting hold of and reading your document? These times are over now with the new printing infrastructure!   Indeed, many of us regularly print out confidential documents like our salary slips, MARS forms, tendering documents and drafts of preliminary papers. The upcoming CERN data protection policy will require all of us to respect the confidentiality of such documents and, as the word “confidential” implies, access to “confidential” or sensitive documents will be tightly controlled. What can we do about the public printers located in many buildings, floors and shared spaces - accessible not only to CERN staff and users but also to visitors and guests? Some printers are located in the vicinity of restaurants, cafeterias or close to paths taken b...

  13. Printed photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Giuseppina; Grimoldi, Andrea; Sampietro, Marco; Natali, Dario; Caironi, Mario

    2015-10-01

    Photodetectors convert light pulses into electrical signals and are fundamental building blocks for any opto-electronic system adopting light as a probe or information carrier. They have widespread technological applications, from telecommunications to sensors in industrial, medical and civil environments. Further opportunities are plastic short-range communications systems, interactive large-area surfaces and light-weight, flexible, digital imagers. These applications would greatly benefit from the cost-effective fabrication processes enabled by printing technology. While organic semiconductors are the most investigated materials for printed photodetectors, and are the main focus of the present review, there are notable examples of other inorganic or hybrid printable semiconductors for opto-electronic systems, such as quantum-dots and nanowires. Here we propose an overview on printed photodetectors, including three-terminal phototransistors. We first give a brief account of the working mechanism of these light sensitive devices, and then we review the recent progress achieved with scalable printing techniques such as screen-printing, inkjet and other non-contact technologies in the development of all-printed or hybrid systems.

  14. Open Access, Library Subscriptions, and Article Processing Charges

    KAUST Repository

    Vijayakumar, J.K.

    2016-05-01

    Hybrid journals contains articles behind a pay-wall to be subscribed, as well as papers made open access when author pays article processing charge (APC). In such cases, an Institution will end up paying twice and Publishers tend to double-dip. Discussions and pilot models are emerging on pricing options, such as “offset pricing,” [where APCs are adjusted or discounted with subscription costs as vouchers or reductions in next year subscriptions, APCs beyond the subscription costs are modestly capped etc] and thus reduce Institutions’ cost. This presentation will explain different models available and how can we attain a transparent costing structure, where the scholarly community can feel the fairness in Publishers’ pricing mechanisms. Though most of the offset systems are developed through national level or consortium level negotiations, experience of individual institutions, like KAUST that subscribe to large e-journals collections, is important in making right decisions on saving Institutes costs and support openness in scholarly communications.

  15. Modifying Optical Properties of ZnO Films by Forming Zn[subscript 1-x] Co[subscript x]O Solid Solutions via Spray Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Anne K.; Weaver, Gabriela C.; Russell, Cianan B.; Fornes, William L.; Choi, Kyoung-Shin; Shih, Susan M.

    2007-01-01

    A simple and cost-effective experiment for the development and characterization of semiconductors using Uv-vis spectroscopy is described. The study shows that the optical properties of ZnO films can be easily modified by forming Zn[subscript 1-x] Co[subscript x]O solid solutions via spray pyrolysis.

  16. Synthesis and Migratory-Insertion Reactivity of CpMo(CO)[subscript3](CH[subscript3]): Small-Scale Organometallic Preparations Utilizing Modern Glovebox Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whited, Matthew T.; Hofmeister, Gretchen E.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments are described for the reliable small-scale glovebox preparation of CpMo(CO)[subscript 3](CH[subscript 3]) and acetyl derivatives thereof through phosphine-induced migratory insertion. The robust syntheses introduce students to a variety of organometallic reaction mechanisms and glovebox techniques, and they are easily carried out…

  17. Regionally Selective Requirement for D[subscript 1]/D[subscript 5] Dopaminergic Neurotransmission in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex in Object-in-Place Associative Recognition Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savalli, Giorgia; Bashir, Zafar I.; Warburton, E. Clea

    2015-01-01

    Object-in-place (OiP) memory is critical for remembering the location in which an object was last encountered and depends conjointly on the medial prefrontal cortex, perirhinal cortex, and hippocampus. Here we examined the role of dopamine D[subscript 1]/D[subscript 5] receptor neurotransmission within these brain regions for OiP memory. Bilateral…

  18. Do Magazines' "Companion  Websites" Cannibalize the Demand for the Print Version?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Ulrich; Kongsted, Hans Christian

    We analyze the extent to which visits to a magazine's companion website affects total circulation, subscription, kiosk sales and foreign sales using Granger causality tests on the basis of monthly data for the German magazine market spanning the period January 1998 to September 2005. We find...... evidence for positive effects of website visits on magazine subscription but negative effects on magazine kiosk sales. Contrary to the widespread belief that the Internet will cannibalize print media markets, our results do not, however, provide evidence for website visits adversely affecting total...

  19. Elite Female Athletes' Ventilatory Compensation to Decreased Inspired O[subscript 2] during the Wingate Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, Sarah; Belcoe, Ana; Shawcross, Callan; May, Alyssa; Monteverde, Cristina; McCann, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if anaerobic performance as measured by the Wingate is decremented in elite female athletes when fraction of inspired oxygen is decreased from 20.9% to 10%. Method: Nine collegiate female soccer players (M[subscript weight] = 63.2 ± 10 kg, M[subscript height] = 164 ± 4.7 cm, M[subscript age] =…

  20. A comparison of subscription and open access journals in construction management and related fields

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bjork, Bo-Christer

    2012-01-01

    .... This study looks closer at the current publishing situation in construction management and related fields and compares empirical data about 17 OA journals and 16 traditional subscription journals...

  1. 75 FR 3666 - Digital Performance Right in Sound Recordings and Ephemeral Recordings for a New Subscription...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-22

    ... Copyright Royalty Board 37 CFR Part 383 Digital Performance Right in Sound Recordings and Ephemeral... subscription service that ``performs sound recordings on digital audio channels programmed by the licensee for... recordings and new subscription services performing the sound recordings on digital audio channels programmed...

  2. Pulmonary and Cutaneous O[subscript 2] Gas Exchange: A Student Laboratory Exercise in the Frog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Glenn J.; Currie, Suzanne; LeBlanc, Danielle M.

    2013-01-01

    Gas exchange in animals is ultimately diffusion based, generally occurring across dedicated respiratory organs. In many aquatic amphibians, however, multiple modes of gas exchange exist, allowing for the partitioning of O[subscript 2] uptake and CO[subscript 2] excretion between respiratory organs with different efficiencies. For example, due to…

  3. Packaging Printing Today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Bolanča

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Printing packaging covers today about 50% of all the printing products. Among the printing products there are printing on labels, printing on flexible packaging, printing on folding boxes, printing on the boxes of corrugated board, printing on glass packaging, synthetic and metal ones. The mentioned packaging are printed in flexo printing technique, offset printing technique, intaglio halftone process, silk – screen printing, ink ball printing, digital printing and hybrid printing process. The possibilities of particular printing techniques for optimal production of the determined packaging were studied in the paper. The problem was viewed from the technological and economical aspect. The possible printing quality and the time necessary for the printing realization were taken as key parameters. An important segment of the production and the way of life is alocation value and it had also found its place in this paper. The events in the field of packaging printing in the whole world were analyzed. The trends of technique developments and the printing technology for packaging printing in near future were also discussed.

  4. Managing without a subscription agent: the experience of doing it yourself

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Lovén

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In October 2015 Stockholm University Library (SUB decided to no longer use the services of a subscription agent for managing individual journal subscriptions. Instead, SUB has taken a do-it-yourself (DIY approach to subscriptions management and now renews and orders new journals directly from each publisher. In the light of two years of experience, this article discusses the key findings of this new way of working with subscriptions, the differences between the first and second year of renewing directly with publishers and the pros and cons of not using an agent. The article ends with a few recommendations and things for other libraries to consider before making the decision to do without a subscription agent and explains why SUB has decided to continue with the DIY approach. 'Based on a breakout session presented at the 40th UKSG Annual Conference, Harrogate, April 2017 '

  5. Printed Electronic Devices in Human Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, John B.

    2004-01-01

    The space environment requires robust sensing, control, and automation, whether in support of human spaceflight or of robotic exploration. Spaceflight embodies the known extremes of temperature, radiation, shock, vibration, and static loads, and demands high reliability at the lowest possible mass. Because printed electronic circuits fulfill all these requirements, printed circuit technology and the exploration of space have been closely coupled throughout their short histories. In this presentation, we will explore the space (and space launch) environments as drivers of printed circuit design, a brief history of NASA's use of printed electronic circuits, and we will examine future requirements for such circuits in our continued exploration of space.

  6. ATLAS Replica Management in Rucio: Replication Rules and Subscriptions

    CERN Document Server

    Barisits, M; The ATLAS collaboration; Garonne, V; Lassnig, M; Stewart, G; Beermann, T; Vigne, R; Goossens, L; Nairz, A; Molfetas, A

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Data Management system stores more than 150PB of physics data across 120 sites globally. To cope with the anticipated ATLAS workload of the coming decade, Rucio, the next-generation data management system has been developed. Replica management, as one of the keys aspects of the system, has to satisfy critical performance requirements in order to keep pace with the experiment’s high rate of continual data generation. The challenge lies in meeting these performance objectives while still giving the system users and applications a powerful toolkit to control their data workflows. In this work we present the concept, design and implementation of the replica management in Rucio. We will specifically introduce the workflows behind replication rules, their formal language definition, weighting and site selection. Furthermore we will present the subscription component, which offers functionality for users to proclaim interest in data that has not been created yet. This contribution describes t...

  7. ATLAS Replica Management in Rucio: Replication Rules and Subscriptions

    CERN Document Server

    Barisits, M; The ATLAS collaboration; Garonne, V; Lassnig, M; Stewart, G; Beermann, T; Vigne, R; Goossens, L; Nairz, A; Molfetas, A

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Data Management system stores more than 150PB of physics data across 120 sites globally. To cope with the anticipated ATLAS workload of the coming decade, Rucio, the next-generation data management system has been developed. Replica management, as one of the keys aspects of the system, has to satisfy critical performance requirements in order to keep pace with the experiment’s high rate of continual data generation. The challenge lies in meeting these performance objectives while still giving the system users and applications a powerful toolkit to control their data workflows. In this work we present the concept, design and implementation of the replica management in Rucio. We will specifically introduce the workflows behind replication rules, their formal language definition, weighting and site selection. Furthermore we will present the subscription component, which offers functionality for users to proclaim interest in data that has not been created yet. This contribution describes t...

  8. Journal subscription expenditure of UK higher education institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Stuart; Meghreblian, Ben

    2014-01-01

    The academic libraries of higher education institutions (HEIs) pay significant amounts of money each year for access to academic journals. The amounts paid are often not transparent especially when it comes to knowing how much is paid to specific publishers. Therefore data on journal subscription expenditure were obtained for UK HEIs using a series of Freedom of Information requests. Data were obtained for 153 HEIs' expenditure with ten publishers over a five-year period. The majority of institutions have provided figures but some are still outstanding. The data will be of interest to those who wish to understand the economics of scholarly communication and see the scale of payments flowing within the system. Further research could replicate the data collection in other jurisdictions.

  9. The Determinants of Library Subscription Prices of the Top-Ranked Economics Journals: An Econometric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chressanthis, George A.; Chressanthis, June D.

    1994-01-01

    Asserts that subscription price increases for academic journals have been the area of single greatest concern to librarians during the past decade. Finds that systematic variations in library prices across economics journals offer explainable reasons. (CFR)

  10. Empirical Analysis of Pre-Paid and Post-Paid Mobile Subscription in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat ÇETİNKAYA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the determinants of pre-paid and post-paid mobile phone subscriptions in Turkey. The binary logit analysis is employed to explore the relationship between the subscribers’ characteristics and their subscription type i.e. pre-paid or post-paid. The data used in the analysis relies on a survey carried out during 2009-Q3. The results indicate that there is a statistically significant relationship between the subscription type choice and the dependent variables. It is found that the choices of the other members living in the respondents’ household have significant effect on the decisions of the subscribers. The results also show that the subscribers who use their phones mainly for mobile calls and for surfing on internet are more likely to have a post-paid subscription while the pre-paid users usually use their phones for short messages and for playing games on their mobile phones.

  11. 75 FR 5513 - Determination of Rates and Terms for Preexisting Subscription Services and Satellite Digital...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... Copyright, Digital audio transmissions, Performance right, Sound recordings. Final Regulations 0 For the... Federal Regulations as follows: PART 382--RATES AND TERMS FOR DIGITAL TRANSMISSIONS OF SOUND RECORDINGS AND THE REPRODUCTION OF EPHEMERAL RECORDINGS BY PREEXISTING SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES AND PREEXISTING...

  12. ATLAS Replica Management in Rucio: Replication Rules and Subscriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barisits, M.; Serfon, C.; Garonne, V.; Lassnig, M.; Stewart, G.; Beermann, T.; Vigne, R.; Goossens, L.; Nairz, A.; Molfetas, A.; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Data Management system stores more than 150PB of physics data across 120 sites globally. To cope with the anticipated ATLAS workload of the coming decade, Rucio, the next-generation data management system has been developed. Replica management, as one of the key aspects of the system, has to satisfy critical performance requirements in order to keep pace with the experiment's high rate of continual data generation. The challenge lies in meeting these performance objectives while still giving the system users and applications a powerful toolkit to control their data workflows. In this work we present the concept, design and implementation of the replica management in Rucio. We will specifically introduce the workflows behind replication rules, their formal language definition, weighting and site selection. Furthermore we will present the subscription component, which offers functionality for users to proclaim interest in data that has not been created yet. This contribution describes the concept and the architecture behind those components and will show the benefits made by this system.

  13. Synthesis and Characterization of a Perovskite Barium Zirconate (BaZrO[subscript 3]): An Experiment for an Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thananatthanachon, Todsapon

    2016-01-01

    In this experiment, the students explore the synthesis of a crystalline solid-state material, barium zirconate (BaZrO3) by two different synthetic methods: (a) the wet chemical method using BaCl[subscript 2]·2H[subscript 2]O and ZrOCl[subscript 2]·8H[subscript 2]O as the precursors, and (b) the solid-state reaction from BaCO[subscript 3] and…

  14. Dramatic Advance in Quality in Flexographic Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Richter

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The enormous changes in flexography printing in recent years concerning the printing quality achievable cannot generally be ascribed to a single revolutionary invention, but are the result of continuous developments to the complete system. Thus the direct drive technology in all machine types and its associated advantages in terms of printing length corrections has become established since drupa 2000. The race for ever finer raster rolls has also been completed to the benefit of improvements in bowl geometry and in ceramic surfaces. Clearly improved colour transfer behaviour has become feasible as a result. In a closely intermeshed system such as flexography printing this naturally has to have an effect on the printing colours used. Further improvements in bonding agents and pigment concentrations now allow users to print ever thinner colour layers while maintaining all of the required authenticities.Furthermore, it has become possible to reduce additional disturbing characteristics in the UV colour area, such as the unpleasant odour. While the digital imaging of printing plates has primarily been improved in terms of economic efficiency by the use of up to eight parallel laser beams, extreme improvements in the system are noticeable especially in the area of directly engraved printing moulds. Whereas many still dismissed directly engraved polymer plates at the last drupa as a laboratory system, the first installation was recently placed on the market a mere three years later. A further noteworthy innovation of recent years that has reached market maturity is thin sleeve technology, which combines the advantages of a photopolymer plate with a round imaged printing mould. There are no high sleeve costs for each printing mould, except for one-off cost for an adapter sleeve. To conclude, it can be said that although flexography printing has experienced many new features in the time between drupa 2000 and today, it still has enormous potential for

  15. Inkjet-printed optoelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Zhaoyao; An, Jianing; Wei, Yuefan; Tran, Van Thai; Du, Hejun

    2017-01-19

    Inkjet printing is a powerful and cost-effective technique for deposition of liquid inks with high accuracy, which is not only of great significance for graphic applications but also has enormous potential for the direct printing of optoelectronic devices. This review highlights a comprehensive overview of the progress that has been made in optoelectronics fabrication by the inkjet printing technique. The first part briefly covers the droplet-generation process in the nozzles of printheads and the physical properties affecting droplet formation and the profiles of the printed patterns. The second section outlines the recent activities related to applications of inkjet printing in optoelectronics fabrication including solar cells, light-emitting diodes, photodetectors and transparent electrodes. In each application field, the challenges with the inkjet printing process and the possible solutions are discussed before a few remarks. In the last section, a brief summary on the progress of inkjet printing fabrication of optoelectronics and an outlook for future research effort are presented.

  16. Public Policy Implications of the Transition to a Subscription-Based Economic Structure for the Television Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Thomas F.; Wirth, Michael O.

    This paper argues that the United States television industry is in a transitional period between the dominance of an advertiser-supported system and an advertiser-subscription system, and that a "dual revenue stream" system of subscription and advertising will eventually relegate the advertiser-only support system to a secondary role.…

  17. Why Combustions Are Always Exothermic, Yielding about 418 kJ per Mole of O[subscript 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    The strongly exothermic nature of reactions between molecular oxygen and all organic molecules as well as many other substances is explained in simple, general terms. The double bond in O[subscript 2] is much weaker than other double bonds or pairs of single bonds, and therefore the formation of the stronger bonds in CO[subscript 2] and…

  18. West Syndrome in an Infant with Vitamin B[subscript 12] Deficiency in the Absence of Macrocytic Anaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Ilknur; Alehan, Fusun; Gumus, Ayten

    2007-01-01

    Vitamin B[subscript 12] deficiency in infants often produces haematological and neurological deficits, including macrocytic anaemia, neurodevelopmental delay or regression, irritability, weakness, hypotonia, ataxia, apathy, tremor, and seizures. The diagnosis of vitamin B[subscript 12] deficiency can be difficult when the typical macrocytic…

  19. The Impact of Coenzyme Q[subscript10] Supplement on the Indicators of Muscle Damage in Young Male Skiing Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Nevzat

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to know the impact of coenzyme Q[subscript 10] (CoQ[subscript 10]) supplement on the muscle damage and total oxidant (TOS) enzyme levels of young skiing athletes during exercise. 15 male athletes were used for two weeks in the study. The athletes were divided into three groups: the control group and two subject…

  20. Blockade of IP[subscript 3]-Mediated SK Channel Signaling in the Rat Medial Prefrontal Cortex Improves Spatial Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Avis R.; Dolinsky, Beth; Vu, Mai-Anh T.; Stanley, Marion; Yeckel, Mark F.; Arnsten, Amy F. T.

    2008-01-01

    Planning and directing thought and behavior require the working memory (WM) functions of prefrontal cortex. WM is compromised by stress, which activates phosphatidylinositol (PI)-mediated IP[subscript 3]-PKC intracellular signaling. PKC overactivation impairs WM operations and in vitro studies indicate that IP[subscript 3] receptor (IP[subscript…

  1. Lithium cobalt(II) pyrophosphate, Li[subscript 1.86]CoP[subscript 2]O[subscript 7], from synchrotron X-ray powder data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Hui; Upreti, Shailesh; Chernova, Natasha A.; Whittingham, M.Stanley (Binghamton)

    2015-10-15

    Structure refinement of high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction data of the title compound gave the composition Li{sub 1.865}CoP{sub 2}O{sub 7}, which is also verified by the ICP measurement. Two Co sites exist in the structure: one is a CoO{sub 5} square pyramid and the other is a CoO{sub 6} octahedron. They share edges and are further interconnected through P{sub 2}O{sub 7} groups, forming a three-dimensional framework, which exhibits different kinds of intersecting tunnels containing Li cations and could be of great interest in Li ion battery chemistry. The structure also exhibits cation disorder with 13.5% Co residing at the lithium (Li1) site. Co seems to have an average oxidation state of 2.135, as obtained from the strutural stochiometry that closely supports the magnetic susceptibility findings.

  2. DIS[subscript 2]ECT: A Framework for Effective Inclusive Science Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Lucinda S.; Flannagan, Jenny Sue

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide special education and general education teachers a framework (DIS[subscript 2]ECT) for teaching science in inclusive settings. DIS2ECT stands for Design (Backwards); Individualization; Scaffolding and Strategies; Experiential learning; Cooperative Learning; and Teamwork. This framework was derived from our…

  3. 11 CFR 100.52 - Gift, subscription, loan, advance or deposit of money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... money. 100.52 Section 100.52 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL SCOPE AND DEFINITIONS..., advance or deposit of money. (a) A gift, subscription, loan (except for a loan made in accordance with 11 CFR 100.72 and 100.73), advance, or deposit of money or anything of value made by any person for the...

  4. GABA[subscript A] Receptor Downregulation in Brains of Subjects with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Reutiman, Teri J.; Folsom, Timothy D.; Thuras, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA[subscript A]) receptors are ligand-gated ion channels responsible for mediation of fast inhibitory action of GABA in the brain. Preliminary reports have demonstrated altered expression of GABA receptors in the brains of subjects with autism suggesting GABA/glutamate system dysregulation. We investigated the…

  5. CO[subscript 2] Rebreathing: An Undergraduate Laboratory to Study the Chemical Control of Breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domnik, N. J.; Turcotte, S. E.; Yuen, N. Y.; Iscoe, S.; Fisher, J. T.

    2013-01-01

    The Read CO[subscript]2 rebreathing method (Read DJ. "A clinical method for assessing the ventilatory response to carbon dioxide." "Australas Ann Med" 16: 20-32, 1967) provides a simple and reproducible approach for studying the chemical control of breathing. It has been widely used since the modifications made by Duffin and…

  6. Killeen's (2005) "p[subscript rep]" Coefficient: Logical and Mathematical Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraun, Michael; Gabriel, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    In his article, "An Alternative to Null-Hypothesis Significance Tests," Killeen (2005) urged the discipline to abandon the practice of "p[subscript obs]"-based null hypothesis testing and to quantify the signal-to-noise characteristics of experimental outcomes with replication probabilities. He described the coefficient that he…

  7. Measurement of Levitation Forces of High-"T[subscript c] Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, M.; Koblischka, M. R.; Hartmann, U.

    2010-01-01

    We show the construction of a so-called levitation balance which is capable of measuring the levitation forces between a permanent magnet and a superconducting high-T[subscript c] thin film sample. The underlying theoretical basis is discussed in detail. The experiment is performed as an introductory physics experiment for school students as well…

  8. Optimization Performance of a CO[subscript 2] Pulsed Tuneable Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, J. H. F.; Lobo, R. F. M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a procedure is presented that will allow (i) the power and (ii) the energy of a pulsed and tuneable TEA CO[subscript 2] laser to be optimized. This type of laser represents a significant improvement in performance and portability. Combining a pulse mode with a grating tuning facility, it enables us to scan the working wavelength…

  9. Bond Order and Chemical Properties of BF, CO, and N[subscript 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinie, Ryan J.; Bultema, Jarred J.; Vander Wal, Mark N.; Burkhart, Brandon J.; Vander Griend, Douglas A.; DeKock, Roger L.

    2011-01-01

    The traditional chemical approaches, Lewis electron dot structures and molecular orbital theory, predict the relative bond orders of boron monofluoride, carbon monoxide, and dinitrogen to be BF less than CO less than N[subscript 2]. This is quantified by quantum mechanical, theoretical studies that show the bond orders to be approximately 1.4,…

  10. Enhancing the L[subscript 1] Primary Students' Achievement in Writing Paragraph by Using Pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmawaty

    2013-01-01

    Lecturing method is a very old method and makes students become bored during the teaching learning process especially in writing paragraphs. This case occurred in teaching learning process of L[subscript 1] learners on primary level in Indonesia. This problem is solved by using picture as media for teaching writing paragraphs. The scope of this…

  11. GABA[subscript A] Receptors Determine the Temporal Dynamics of Memory Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Gavan P.; Augustyn, Katarzyna A.; Richardson, Rick

    2008-01-01

    Four experiments studied the role of GABA[subscript A] receptors in the temporal dynamics of memory retention. Memory for an active avoidance response was a nonmonotonic function of the retention interval. When rats were tested shortly (2 min) or some time (24 h) after training, retention was excellent, but when they were tested at intermediate…

  12. Downregulation of GABA[Subscript A] Receptor Protein Subunits a6, ß2, d, e, ?2, ?, and ?2 in Superior Frontal Cortex of Subjects with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Reutiman, Teri J.; Folsom, Timothy D.; Rustan, Oyvind G.; Rooney, Robert J.; Thuras, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    We measured protein and mRNA levels for nine gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA[subscript A]) receptor subunits in three brain regions (cerebellum, superior frontal cortex, and parietal cortex) in subjects with autism versus matched controls. We observed changes in mRNA for a number of GABA[subscript A] and GABA[subscript B] subunits and overall…

  13. Olfactory Bulb [alpha][subscript 2]-Adrenoceptor Activation Promotes Rat Pup Odor-Preference Learning via a cAMP-Independent Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakhawat, Amin MD.; Harley, Carolyn W.; Yuan, Qi

    2012-01-01

    In this study, three lines of evidence suggest a role for [alpha][subscript 2]-adrenoreceptors in rat pup odor-preference learning: olfactory bulb infusions of the [alpha][subscript 2]-antagonist, yohimbine, prevents learning; the [alpha][subscript 2]-agonist, clonidine, paired with odor, induces learning; and subthreshold clonidine paired with…

  14. Introduction to printed electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2014-01-01

    This book describes in detail modern technologies for printed electronics, explaining how nanotechnology and modern printing technology are merging to revolutionize electronics fabrication of thin, lightweight, large, and inexpensive products. Readers will benefit from the explanations of materials, devices and circuits used to design and implement the latest applications of printed electronics, such as thin flexible OLED displays, organic solar cells, OLED lighting, smart wallpaper, sensors, logic, memory and more.

  15. Prints Uiljam ne pozirujet

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    John Wonnacott'i maalitud prints Williami portreed eksponeeritakse Londonis Agnew's galeriis. See on ainus natuurist maalitud printsi portree. John Wonnacott on portreteerinud ka teisi kuningliku perekonna liikmeid

  16. Printing Has a Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Georg Wenke

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Printing will also be done in the future. Printed items meet basic needs and are deeply anchored in people’s habits. Being able to handle and collect printed matter is highly attractive. And paper is now more alive than ever. It is therefore too shortsighted to disclaim the importance of one of the still large economic sectors just because of a few looming-recession instigated market shifts.The exciting aspect of drupa 2004 is: printing will be reinvented, so to speak. Much more printing will be done in the future than at present. On the one hand, people are concentrating on process optimization and automation to ensure this. Measuring and testing, process control and optimization, and linking up "office software" with printing technology will be very central topics at drupa 2004. Electronics and print are not rivals; a symbiosis exists. And printing is high-tech: hardly any other multifaceted sector which has been so successful for centuries is as computerized as the printing industry.A series of "new chapters" in the variety of printing possibilities will be opened at drupa. Talk will be generated by further technical developments, often the connection between paper/cardboard and electronics, the link between the office world and graphics industry, text databases and their link-up to graphic page production tools, and "on the fly" dynamic printing over networks.All of this and more belongs to future potentialities, which are so substantial overall, the outlook is by no means black for the "black art". Like its predecessors, drupa 2004 is also a product trade fair. However, more than ever before in its history, it is also an "information village". The exhibits are useful, because they occasionally make what this means visible.

  17. Mechanical Properties of Flexographic Prints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Grigaliūnienė

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical properties of paper and flexographic prints madewith different anilox rollers were investigated experimentally.Flexographic prints roughness, breaking force and folding resistancevalues were determined. The results showed that foldingresistance is bigger for machine direction prints than for crossmachine direction prints. Flexographic prints on cardboardsfolding resistance values are different for machine direction andcross machine direction. It was determined that roughness offlexographic prints increases with the amount of ink on aniloxroller. Results were explained by the ink water influence.

  18. Hybrid printed electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetse, M.; Smits, E.; Rubingh, E.; Teunissen, P.; Kusters, R.; Abbel, R.; Brand, J. van den

    2016-01-01

    Although many electronic functionalities can be realized by printed or organic electronics, short-term marketable products often require robust, reproducible, and nondisturbing technologies. In this chapter we show how hybrid electronics, a combination of printed circuitry, thin-film electronics,

  19. Jet printing flexible displays

    OpenAIRE

    Street, R. A.; Wong, W S; Ready, S. E.; Chabinyc, M.L; Arias, A.C.; Limb, S.; Salleo, A; Lujan, R.

    2006-01-01

    Jet printing is an interesting patterning technique for electronic devices because it requires no physical mask, has digital control of ejection, and provides good layer-to-layer registration. It also has the potential to reduce display manufacturing costs and enable roll-to-roll processing. The technique is illustrated with examples of prototype printed displays using amorphous silicon and polymer semiconductors.

  20. Inkjet printing of graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arapov, K.; Abbel, R.; De With, G.; Friedrich, H.

    2014-01-01

    The inkjet printing of graphene is a cost-effective, and versatile deposition technique for both transparent and non-transparent conductive films. Printing graphene on paper is aimed at low-end, high-volume applications, i.e.; in electromagnetic shielding, photovoltaics or, e.g.; as a replacement

  1. 3D Printing the ATLAS' barrel toroid

    CERN Document Server

    Goncalves, Tiago Barreiro

    2016-01-01

    The present report summarizes my work as part of the Summer Student Programme 2016 in the CERN IR-ECO-TSP department (International Relations – Education, Communication & Outreach – Teacher and Student Programmes). Particularly, I worked closely with the S’Cool LAB team on a science education project. This project included the 3D designing, 3D printing, and assembling of a model of the ATLAS’ barrel toroid. A detailed description of the project' development is presented and a short manual on how to use 3D printing software and hardware is attached.

  2. mRNA and Protein Levels for GABA[subscript A][alpha]4, [alpha]5, [beta]1 and GABA[subscript B]R1 Receptors are Altered in Brains from Subjects with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Reutiman, Teri J.; Folsom, Timothy D.; Rooney, Robert J.; Patel, Diven H.; Thuras, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    We have shown altered expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA[subscript A]) and gamma-aminobutyric acid B (GABA[subscript B]) receptors in the brains of subjects with autism. In the current study, we sought to verify our western blotting data for GABBR1 via qRT-PCR and to expand our previous work to measure mRNA and protein levels of 3…

  3. Organ printing: tissue spheroids as building blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, Vladimir; Visconti, Richard P; Kasyanov, Vladimir; Forgacs, Gabor; Drake, Christopher J; Markwald, Roger R

    2009-04-01

    Organ printing can be defined as layer-by-layer additive robotic biofabrication of three-dimensional functional living macrotissues and organ constructs using tissue spheroids as building blocks. The microtissues and tissue spheroids are living materials with certain measurable, evolving and potentially controllable composition, material and biological properties. Closely placed tissue spheroids undergo tissue fusion - a process that represents a fundamental biological and biophysical principle of developmental biology-inspired directed tissue self-assembly. It is possible to engineer small segments of an intraorgan branched vascular tree by using solid and lumenized vascular tissue spheroids. Organ printing could dramatically enhance and transform the field of tissue engineering by enabling large-scale industrial robotic biofabrication of living human organ constructs with "built-in" perfusable intraorgan branched vascular tree. Thus, organ printing is a new emerging enabling technology paradigm which represents a developmental biology-inspired alternative to classic biodegradable solid scaffold-based approaches in tissue engineering.

  4. Prediction of VO[subscript 2peak] from the 20-m Shuttle-Run Test in Youth with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agiovlasitis, Stamatis; Pitetti, Kenneth H.; Guerra, Myriam; Fernhall, Bo

    2011-01-01

    This study examined whether 20-m shuttle-run performance, sex, body mass index (BMI), age, height, and weight are associated with peak oxygen uptake (VO[subscript 2peak]) in youth with Down syndrome (DS; n = 53; 25 women, age 8-20 years) and whether these variables can be used to develop an equation to predict VO[subscript 2peak]. BMI, 20-m…

  5. Understanding perception and factors influencing private voluntary health insurance policy subscription in the Lucknow region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Tanuj; Paul, Ujjwal Kanti; Prasad, Himanshu Narayan; Das, Subodh Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Health insurance has been acknowledged by researchers as a valuable tool in health financing. In spite of its significance, a subscription paralysis has been observed in India for this product. People who can afford health insurance are also found to be either ignorant or aversive towards it. This study is designed to investigate into the socio-economic factors, individuals’ health insurance product perception and individuals’ personality traits for unbundling the paradox which inhibits people from subscribing to health insurance plans. Methods: This survey was conducted in the region of Lucknow. An online questionnaire was sent to sampled respondents. Response evinced by 263 respondents was formed as a part of study for the further data analysis. For assessing the relationships between variables T-test and F-test were applied as a part of quantitative measuring tool. Finally, logistic regression technique was used to estimate the factors that influence respondents’ decision to purchase health insurance. Results: Age, dependent family members, medical expenditure, health status and individual’s product perception were found to be significantly associated with health insurance subscription in the region. Personality traits have also showed a positive relationship with respondent’s insurance status. Conclusion: We found in our study that socio-economic factors, individuals’ product perception and personality traits induces health insurance policy subscription in the region. PMID:25674567

  6. Printed battery power management

    OpenAIRE

    Josefsson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Printed electronics and low power radio has evolved significantly in recent years. This has made it possible to implement electronic worn on the body or clothing. Printed batteries internal resistance is much higher compared to regular batteries. Unless a battery power management circuit is used, the radio peak current makes that the terminal voltage may drop to a level below the specified supply voltage for the radio, causing operation failure. A large capacitor solves this but a large surfa...

  7. Organ printing: Tissue spheroids as building blocks☆

    OpenAIRE

    Mironov, Vladimir; Visconti, Richard P.; Kasyanov, Vladimir; Forgacs, Gabor; Drake, Christopher J.; Markwald, Roger R.

    2009-01-01

    Organ printing can be defined as layer-by-layer additive robotic biofabrication of three-dimensional functional living macrotissues and organ constructs using tissue spheroids as building blocks. The microtissues and tissue spheroids are living materials with certain measurable, evolving and potentially controllable composition, material and biological properties. Closely placed tissue spheroids undergo tissue fusion — a process that represents a fundamental biological and biophysical princip...

  8. Printed Spacecraft Separation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehoff, Ryan R [ORNL; Holmans, Walter [Planetary Systems Corporation

    2016-10-01

    In this project Planetary Systems Corporation proposed utilizing additive manufacturing (3D printing) to manufacture a titanium spacecraft separation system for commercial and US government customers to realize a 90% reduction in the cost and energy. These savings were demonstrated via “printing-in” many of the parts and sub-assemblies into one part, thus greatly reducing the labor associated with design, procurement, assembly and calibration of mechanisms. Planetary Systems Corporation redesigned several of the components of the separation system based on additive manufacturing principles including geometric flexibility and the ability to fabricate complex designs, ability to combine multiple parts of an assembly into a single component, and the ability to optimize design for specific mechanical property targets. Shock absorption was specifically targeted and requirements were established to attenuate damage to the Lightband system from shock of initiation. Planetary Systems Corporation redesigned components based on these requirements and sent the designs to Oak Ridge National Laboratory to be printed. ORNL printed the parts using the Arcam electron beam melting technology based on the desire for the parts to be fabricated from Ti-6Al-4V based on the weight and mechanical performance of the material. A second set of components was fabricated from stainless steel material on the Renishaw laser powder bed technology due to the improved geometric accuracy, surface finish, and wear resistance of the material. Planetary Systems Corporation evaluated these components and determined that 3D printing is potentially a viable method for achieving significant cost and savings metrics.

  9. Printed hybrid systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karioja, Pentti; Mäkinen, Jukka-Tapani; Keränen, Kimmo; Aikio, Janne; Alajoki, Teemu; Jaakola, Tuomo; Koponen, Matti; Keränen, Antti; Heikkinen, Mikko; Tuomikoski, Markus; Suhonen, Riikka; Hakalahti, Leena; Kopola, Pälvi; Hast, Jukka; Liedert, Ralf; Hiltunen, Jussi; Masuda, Noriyuki; Kemppainen, Antti; Rönkä, Kari; Korhonen, Raimo

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents research activities carried out at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland in the field of hybrid integration of optics, electronics and mechanics. Main focus area in our research is the manufacturing of electronic modules and product structures with printed electronics, film-over-molding and polymer sheet lamination technologies and the goal is in the next generation of smart systems utilizing monolithic polymer packages. The combination of manufacturing technologies such as roll-to-roll -printing, injection molding and traditional component assembly is called Printed Hybrid Systems (PHS). Several demonstrator structures have been made, which show the potential of polymer packaging technology. One demonstrator example is a laminated structure with embedded LED chips. Element thickness is only 0.3mm and the flexible stack of foils can be bent in two directions after assembly process and was shaped curved using heat and pressure. The combination of printed flexible circuit boards and injection molding has also been demonstrated with several functional modules. The demonstrators illustrate the potential of origami electronics, which can be cut and folded to 3D shapes. It shows that several manufacturing process steps can be eliminated by Printed Hybrid Systems technology. The main benefits of this combination are small size, ruggedness and conformality. The devices are ideally suited for medical applications as the sensitive electronic components are well protected inside the plastic and the structures can be cleaned easily due to the fact that they have no joints or seams that can accumulate dirt or bacteria.

  10. Printing at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Otto, R

    2007-01-01

    For many years CERN had a very sophisticated print server infrastructure which supported several different protocols (AppleTalk, IPX and TCP/IP) and many different printing standards. Today’s situation differs a lot: we have a much more homogenous network infrastructure, where TCP/IP is used everywhere and we have less printer models, which almost all work using current standards (i.e. they all provide PostScript drivers). This change gave us the possibility to review the printing architecture aiming at simplifying the infrastructure in order to achieve full automation of the service. The new infrastructure offers both: LPD service exposing print queues to Linux and Mac OS X computers and native printing for Windows based clients. The printer driver distribution is automatic and native on Windows and automated by custom mechanisms on Linux, where the appropriate Foomatic drivers are configured. Also the process of printer registration and queue creation is completely automated following the printer regis...

  11. Roles of publishers, subscription agents, and institutional subscribers in the academic journal business : Opinions after reading the “Series: Perspectives on serials crisis and scholarly communication practice”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Nobuyuki

    Roles of publishers, subscription agents, and institutional subscribers in the academic journal business : Opinions after reading the “Series: Perspectives on serials crisis and scholarly communication practice”

  12. Influence of the Print Run on Silver Halide Printing Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Cigula

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The most common printing technique today is lithography. The difference between printing and nonprinting areason a printing plate is accomplished by opposite physical and chemical properties of those areas (MacPhee, 1998.The printing areas are made of photoactive layer that attracts oil and chemical substances with oil solvent – printinginks. The nonprinting areas are made of aluminium-oxide which attracts water based substances – the fountainsolution.There are many of various types of photoactive layer which are used for production of offset printing plates, amongothers is silver halide layer. The usage of the silver halide technology in the graphic reproduction is not a novelty.The filmmaking phase is based on the usage of the silver halide as the photographically active ingredient, for instance,AgBr (silver bromide. The new, digital plate making technology (Computer to Plate, CtP eliminates thefilmmaking phase and therefore enables control of the printing plate’s exposure made by computer. CtP technologyeliminates the filmmaking phase, but it also results with the reduction of needed material quantities and requiredtime for the production (Limburg, 1994; Seydel, 1996.In this paper the basis of the graphic reproduction by using the silver halide digital printing plates was described.The changes of the AgX copying layer and the surface of the aluminium base in the printing process have beenobserved. The surface characteristics were determined by measuring the relevant surface roughness parameters. Inaddition, measurements of coverage values on the prints, detailed at smaller print run, were conducted.Results showed that surface changes on the printing plate are changing during printing process and that thesechanges influence transfer of the printing ink on the printing substrate. These measurements proved to be of greatinterest in the graphic reproduction as they enable us to determine consistency of the printing plates during theprinting

  13. Inkjet printing of graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arapov, Kirill; Abbel, Robert; de With, Gijsbertus; Friedrich, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    The inkjet printing of graphene is a cost-effective, and versatile deposition technique for both transparent and non-transparent conductive films. Printing graphene on paper is aimed at low-end, high-volume applications, i.e., in electromagnetic shielding, photovoltaics or, e.g., as a replacement for the metal in antennas of radio-frequency identification devices, thereby improving their recyclability and biocompatibility. Here, we present a comparison of two graphene inks, one prepared by the solubilization of expanded graphite in the presence of a surface active polymer, and the other by covalent graphene functionalization followed by redispersion in a solvent but without a surfactant. The non-oxidative functionalization of graphite in the form of a donor-type graphite intercalation compound was carried out by a Birch-type alkylation, where graphene can be viewed as a macrocarbanion. To increase the amount of functionalization we employed a graphite precursor with a high edge to bulk carbon ratio, thus, allowing us to achieve up to six weight percent of functional groups. The functionalized graphene can be readily dispersed at concentrations of up to 3 mg ml(-1) in non-toxic organic solvents, and is colloidally stable for more than 2 months. The two inks are readily inkjet printable with good to satisfactory spreading. Analysis of the sheet resistance of the deposited films demonstrated that the inks based on expanded graphite outperform the functionalized graphene inks, possibly due to the significantly larger graphene sheet size in the former, which minimizes the number of sheet-to-sheet contacts along the conductive path. We found that the sheet resistance of printed large-area films decreased with an increase of the number of printed layers. Conductivity levels reached approximately 1-2 kΩ □(-1) for 15 printing passes, which roughly equals a film thickness of 800 nm for expanded graphite based inks, and 2 MΩ □(-1) for 15 printing passes of

  14. Printed MIMO antenna engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sharawi, Mohammad S

    2014-01-01

    Wireless communications has made a huge leap during the past two decades. The multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) technology was proposed in the 1990's as a viable solution that can overcome the data rate limit experienced by single-input-single-output (SISO) systems. This resource is focused on printed MIMO antenna system design. Printed antennas are widely used in mobile and handheld terminals due to their conformity with the device, low cost, good integration within the device elements and mechanical parts, as well as ease of fabrication.A perfect design companion for practicing engineers

  15. Primer printed circuit boards

    CERN Document Server

    Argyle, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Step-by-step instructions for making your own PCBs at home. Making your own printed circuit board (PCB) might seem a daunting task, but once you master the steps, it's easy to attain professional-looking results. Printed circuit boards, which connect chips and other components, are what make almost all modern electronic devices possible. PCBs are made from sheets of fiberglass clad with copper, usually in multiplelayers. Cut a computer motherboard in two, for instance, and you'll often see five or more differently patterned layers. Making boards at home is relatively easy

  16. Gathering the needles: evaluating the impact of gold open access content with traditional subscription journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Bobal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing the Project COUNTER Release 4 JR1-GOA report, two librarians explore these data in comparison to journal package subscriptions represented via the JR1 reports. This paper outlines the methodology and study undertaken at the Portland State University Library and the University of Nebraska Medical Center Library using these reports for the first time. The initial outcomes of the study are provided in various Tables for 2014 and 2015. The intent of the study was to provide both institutions with a baseline from which to do further study. In addition, some ideas are given for how these reports can be used in vendor negotiations going forward.

  17. Promoting public transport as a subscription service: Effects of a free month travel card

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, John

    2009-01-01

    Newspapers, book clubs, telephone services and many other subscription services are often marketed to new customers by means of a free or substantially discounted trial period. This article evaluates this method as a means to promote commuting by public transport in a field experiment and based...... that had an effect was the free month travel card, which led to a significant increase in commuting by public transport.As expected, the effect was mediated through a change in behavioural intentions rather than a change in perceived constraints. As expected, the effect became weaker when the promotion...

  18. The Role of Subscription-Based Patrol and Restitution in the Future of Liberty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Guillory

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Market anarchists are often keen to know how we might rid ourselves of the twin evils institutionalized in the state: taxation and monopoly. A possible future history for North America is suggested, focusing upon the implications of the establishment of a subscription-based patrol and restitution business sector. We favor Rothbard over Higgs regarding crises and liberty. We favor Barnett over Rothbard regarding vertical integration of security. We examine derived demand for adjudication, mediation and related goods; and we advance the thesis that private adjudication will tend to libertarianly just decisions. We show how firms will actively build civil society, strengthening and coordinating Nisbettian intermediating institutions.

  19. Comparing Subscription-Based Anatomy E-Resources for Collections Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClurg, Caitlin; Stieda, Vivian; Talsma, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a chart-based approach for health sciences libraries to compare anatomy e-resources. The features, functionalities, and user experiences of seven leading subscription-based e-resources were assessed using a chart that was iteratively developed by the investigators. Acland's Video Atlas of Human Anatomy, Thieme Winking Skull, and Visible Body were the preferred products as they respectively excel in cadaver-based videos, self-assessment, and 3D graphical manipulation. Moreover, each product affords a pleasant user experience. The investigative team found that resources specializing in one aspect of anatomy teaching are superior to those that contain a wealth of content for diverse audiences.

  20. Magazine "Companion Websites" and the Demand for Newsstand Sales and Subscriptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Ulrich; Kongsted, H.C.

    2012-01-01

    The authors analyzed the relationship of visits to a magazine's online companion website and total circulation, subscription, and kiosk sales using bivariate vector autoregressions estimated on 67 German magazines that were observed monthly in the period May 1998 to November 2009. Their econometric...... that the negative relationships between website visits and total circulation as well as kiosk sales are primarily associated with magazines that have a mainly male and Internet–affine readership and by magazines that are published with a less than weekly periodicity....

  1. 3D Printing A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zulkifl Hasan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Solid free fabrication SFF are produced to enhance the printing instrument utilizing distinctive strategies like Piezo spout control multi-spout injet printers or STL arrange utilizing cutting information. The procedure is utilized to diminish the cost and enhance the speed of printing. A few techniques take long at last because of extra process like dry the printing. This study will concentrate on SFFS utilizing UV gum for 3D printing.

  2. Spectrophotometric Examination of Rough Print Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erzsébet Novotny

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to assess the impact of the surface texture of individual creative paper types (coated or patternedon the quality of printing and to identify to what extent the various creative paper types require specific types ofspectrophotometers. We used stereomicroscopic images to illustrate unprinted and printed surfaces of creative papertypes. Surface roughness was measured to obtain data on the unevenness of surfaces. Spectrophotometric tests wereused to select the most suitable spectrophotometer from meters with different illumination setup for testing anygiven print. For the purpose of testing, we used spectrophotometers which are commonly available generally used totest print products for colour accuracy. With the improvement of measuring geometries, illumination setup, colourmeasurement becomes more and more capable of producing reliable results unaffected by surface textures. Our testshave proved this fact by showing that the GretagMacbeth Spectrolino with annular illumination is less sensitive tosurface texture than the X-Rite Spetrodensitometer and the Techkon SpetroDens with directional illumination. Furthertests have brought us to the conclusion that there is a difference even between the two devices with directionalillumination. While the X-Rite 530 Spectrodensitometer is more suitable for testing coated surfaces, the TechkonSpectroDens can come close to ΔE*ab values produced by the annular illuminated device for textured surfaces.

  3. A laser printing based approach for printed electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T.; Hu, M.; Liu, Y.; Guo, Q.; Wang, X.; Zhang, W.; Lau, W.; Yang, J.

    2016-03-01

    Here we report a study of printing of electronics using an office use laser printer. The proposed method eliminates those critical disadvantages of solvent-based printing techniques by taking the advantages of electroless deposition and laser printing. The synthesized toner acts as a catalyst for the electroless copper deposition as well as an adhesion-promoting buffer layer between the substrate and deposited copper. The easy metallization of printed patterns and strong metal-substrate adhesion make it an especially effective method for massive production of flexible printed circuits. The proposed process is a high throughput, low cost, efficient, and environmentally benign method for flexible electronics manufacturing.

  4. Print Advertisements in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Azirah

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines print advertisements in Malaysia to determine how advertisers seek to achieve their primary goal of persuading or influencing an audience by the use of both language and visuals. It describes the main component moves and rhetorical strategies used by writers to articulate the communicative purpose of the genre and the language…

  5. Donato Mancini Print Launch

    OpenAIRE

    Shing, Cherman; Mancini, Donato

    2012-01-01

    During Institutions by Artists, Fillip was pleased to present a series of free, parallel events in the lobby of SFU Woodward’s that investigated the material culture produced by the institutional practices of artists. The Print Centre featured talks, launches, and screenings by conference presenters and attendees. Presented in collaboration with a temporary book store hosted by Motto Books (Berlin).

  6. Print Centre Event 2

    OpenAIRE

    Hadbavny, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    During Institutions by Artists, Fillip was pleased to present a series of free, parallel events in the lobby of SFU Woodward’s that investigated the material culture produced by the institutional practices of artists. The Print Centre featured talks, launches, and screenings by conference presenters and attendees. Presented in collaboration with a temporary book store hosted by Motto Books (Berlin).

  7. Print Centre Event 3

    OpenAIRE

    Hadbavny, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    During Institutions by Artists, Fillip was pleased to present a series of free, parallel events in the lobby of SFU Woodward’s that investigated the material culture produced by the institutional practices of artists. The Print Centre featured talks, launches, and screenings by conference presenters and attendees. Presented in collaboration with a temporary book store hosted by Motto Books (Berlin).

  8. "Printed-circuit" rectenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    Rectifying antenna is less bulky structure for absorbing transmitted microwave power and converting it into electrical current. Printed-circuit approach, using microstrip technology and circularly polarized antenna, makes polarization orientation unimportant and allows much smaller arrays for given performance. Innovation is particularly useful with proposed electric vehicles powered by beam microwaves.

  9. Print advertising: vivid content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, B.M.; Das, E.; Fransen, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    The present research examines the effects of vivid ad content in two types of appeal in print ads as a function of individual differences in chronically experienced vividness of visual imagery. For informational ads for a functional product, vivid ad content strongly affected individuals high in

  10. Plasmonic colour laser printing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Vannahme, Christoph; Højlund-Nielsen, Emil

    2016-01-01

    Colour generation by plasmonic nanostructures and metasurfaces has several advantages over dye technology: reduced pixel area, sub-wavelength resolution and the production of bright and non-fading colours. However, plasmonic colour patterns need to be pre-designed and printed either by e-beam lit......Colour generation by plasmonic nanostructures and metasurfaces has several advantages over dye technology: reduced pixel area, sub-wavelength resolution and the production of bright and non-fading colours. However, plasmonic colour patterns need to be pre-designed and printed either by e......-beam lithography (EBL) or focused ion beam (FIB), both expensive and not scalable processes that are not suitable for post-processing customization. Here we show a method of colour printing on nanoimprinted plasmonic metasurfaces using laser post-writing. Laser pulses induce transient local heat generation...... that leads to melting and reshaping of the imprinted nanostructures. Depending on the laser pulse energy density, different surface morphologies that support different plasmonic resonances leading to different colour appearances can be created. Using this technique we can print all primary colours...

  11. Just press print

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornes, Stephen

    2013-09-01

    Patients requiring an organ transplant may one day no longer have to wait for a matching donor. As Stephen Ornes explains, researchers are making progress towards creating human organs with techniques such as 3D printing, using the patient's own cells for ink.

  12. Print advertising : Vivid content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, B.M.; Das, E.H.H.J.; Fransen, M.L.

    The present research examines the effects of vivid ad content in two types of appeal in print ads as a function of individual differences in chronically experienced vividness of visual imagery. For informational ads for a functional product, vivid ad content strongly affected individuals high in

  13. Printed Triband Terminal Antenna

    OpenAIRE

    John, Matthias; Ammann, Max; Farrell, R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a printed triple-band multibranch monopole for use in modern wireless systems. The antenna is designed to operate in three bands which cover virtually all wireless channels. Parameters of the antenna geometry are varied and the effects of these variations on the impedance bandwidth are shown.

  14. Legibility of Print.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloodsworth, James Gaston

    Legibility refers to the physical appearance of printed materials: line lengths, type size, style of type face, space between lines and between letters, margins, and physical format are some of the factors that are involved. After the turn of the century, especially after 1925, research became fairly common in this area, but has been meager since…

  15. A comparison of subscription and open access journals in construction management and related fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Christer Bjork

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Internet has profoundly changed the technical infrastructure for the publishing of scientific peer reviewed journals. The traditional business model of selling the content to subscribers is increasingly being challenged by Open Access journals, which are either run at low cost by voluntary academics or which sell dissemination services to authors. In addition authors in many fields are taking advantage of the legal possibilities of uploading free manuscript versions to institutional or subject-based repositories, in order to increase readership and impact. Construction Management is lagging behind many other fields in utilising the potential of the web for efficient dissemination results, in particular to academics outside the leading universities in industrialised countries. This study looks closer at the current publishing situation in construction management and related fields and compares empirical data about 16 OA journals and 16 traditional subscription journals. Of the articles published in 2011 in the subscription journals only 9 % could be found as OA copies. The overall OA availability (including article in OA journals was 14 % for Construction Management and Economics and 29 for construction IT scholarship.

  16. A comparison of subscription and open access journals in construction management and related fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Christer Bjork

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Internet has profoundly changed the technical infrastructure for the publishing of scientific peer reviewed journals. The traditional business model of selling the content to subscribers is increasingly being challenged by Open Access journals, which are either run at low cost by voluntary academics or which sell dissemination services to authors. In addition authors in many fields are taking advantage of the legal possibilities of uploading free manuscript versions to institutional or subject-based repositories, in order to increase readership and impact. Construction Management is lagging behind many other fields in utilising the potential of the web for efficient dissemination results, in particular to academics outside the leading universities in industrialised countries. This study looks closer at the current publishing situation in construction management and related fields and compares empirical data about 16 OA journals and 16 traditional subscription journals. Of the articles published in 2011 in the subscription journals only 9 % could be found as OA copies. The overall OA availability (including article in OA journals was 14 % for Construction Management and Economics and 29 for construction IT scholarship. 

  17. Operational Experience of an Open-Access, Subscription-Based Mass Spectrometry and Proteomics Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Nicholas A.

    2018-01-01

    This paper discusses the successful adoption of a subscription-based, open-access model of service delivery for a mass spectrometry and proteomics facility. In 2009, the Mass Spectrometry and Proteomics Facility at the University of Melbourne (Australia) moved away from the standard fee for service model of service provision. Instead, the facility adopted a subscription- or membership-based, open-access model of service delivery. For a low fixed yearly cost, users could directly operate the instrumentation but, more importantly, there were no limits on usage other than the necessity to share available instrument time with all other users. All necessary training from platform staff and many of the base reagents were also provided as part of the membership cost. These changes proved to be very successful in terms of financial outcomes for the facility, instrument access and usage, and overall research output. This article describes the systems put in place as well as the overall successes and challenges associated with the operation of a mass spectrometry/proteomics core in this manner.

  18. Solvents interactions with thermochromic print

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Rožić

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the interactions between different solvents (benzene, acetone, cyclohexanone, various alcohols and water and thermochromic printing ink were investigated. Thermochromic printing ink was printed on metal surface. Components of thermochromic printing inks are polymeric microcapsules and classic yellow offset printing ink. Below its activation temperature, dye and developer within the microcapsules form a blue coloured complex. Therefore, thermochromic print is green. By heating above the activation temperature, blue colour of the complex turns into the leuco dye colourless state and the green colour of the prints turns into the yellow colour of the classic offset pigment. The results of the interaction with various solvents show that the thermochromic print is stable in all tested solvents except in ethanol, acetone and cyclohexanone. In ethanol, the green colour of the print becomes yellow. SEM analysis shows that microcapsules are dissolved. In acetone and cyclohexanone, the green colour of the print turns into blue, and the microcapsules become significantly more visible. Thus, the yellow pigment interacts with examined ketones. Based on the obtained interactions it can be concluded that the microcapsules have more polar nature than the classical pigment particles. Solvent-thermocromic print interactions were analysed using Hansen solubility parameters that rank the solvents based on their estimated interaction capabilities.

  19. The Economics of Access versus Ownership: The Costs and Benefits of Access to Scholarly Articles via Interlibrary Loan and Journal Subscriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingma, Bruce R.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a study of State University of New York libraries that determined the cost effectiveness of journal ownership versus access by calculating financial costs of interlibrary loan versus subscriptions. Journal subscriptions in the fields of mathematics and sciences that historically have high prices and low levels of use were studied. (LRW)

  20. The L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Ca [subscript V] 1.2 Mediates Fear Extinction and Modulates Synaptic Tone in the Lateral Amygdala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temme, Stephanie J.; Murphy, Geoffrey G.

    2017-01-01

    L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (LVGCCs) have been implicated in both the formation and the reduction of fear through Pavlovian fear conditioning and extinction. Despite the implication of LVGCCs in fear learning and extinction, studies of the individual LVGCC subtypes, Ca[subscript V]1.2 and Ca[subscript V] 1.3, using transgenic mice have…

  1. A method for three-dimensional color printing and a three-dimensional color printing device

    OpenAIRE

    Urban, Philipp; Brunton, Alan; Arikan, Can Ates

    2016-01-01

    The invention relates to a method and a device for three-dimensional color printing, wherein at least a first printing material with a first printing material color and at least another printing material with another printing material color is used to construct a printing object (7), wherein an arrangement of the printing materials in a surface region and a near surface interior region of the printing object (7) is determined based on a desired color reproduction of the printing object.

  2. Electrohydrodynamic Printing and Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Saville, Dudley A. (Inventor); Poon, Hak Fei (Inventor); Korkut, Sibel (Inventor); Chen, Chuan-hua (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An stable electrohydrodynamic filament is obtained by causing a straight electrohydrodynamic filament formed from a liquid to emerge from a Taylor cone, the filament having a diameter of from 10 nm to 100.mu.m. Such filaments are useful in electrohydrodynamic printing and manufacturing techniques and their application in liquid drop/particle and fiber production, colloidal deployment and assembly, and composite materials processing.

  3. Plasmonic colour laser printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Vannahme, Christoph; Højlund-Nielsen, Emil; Mortensen, N. Asger; Kristensen, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Colour generation by plasmonic nanostructures and metasurfaces has several advantages over dye technology: reduced pixel area, sub-wavelength resolution and the production of bright and non-fading colours. However, plasmonic colour patterns need to be pre-designed and printed either by e-beam lithography (EBL) or focused ion beam (FIB), both expensive and not scalable processes that are not suitable for post-processing customization. Here we show a method of colour printing on nanoimprinted plasmonic metasurfaces using laser post-writing. Laser pulses induce transient local heat generation that leads to melting and reshaping of the imprinted nanostructures. Depending on the laser pulse energy density, different surface morphologies that support different plasmonic resonances leading to different colour appearances can be created. Using this technique we can print all primary colours with a speed of 1 ns per pixel, resolution up to 127,000 dots per inch (DPI) and power consumption down to 0.3 nJ per pixel.

  4. Chemical deinking of prints obtained by non-impact printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdenka Bolanca

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows the results of efficiency investi-gation of chemical deinking of non-impact prints, where the principle of electrophotography is used for obtaining the latent image, on which the toner could adhere. The basis of scientific prepositions of deinking flotation and the mechanism for particle separation in the explanation of the results of experiment are given. The optical properties of hand-sheets in relation to the particle separation mechanism, their size, form and structure are discussed.The results obtained by deinking flotation of a mixed sample from the prints of non-impact printing and the conventional offset printing show clearly the influence of the specific characteristic of printing techniques and the chemical composition of toner, i.e. of printing inks on the quality of recycled fibers.

  5. Economics of Scholarly Publishing: Exploring the Causes of Subscription Price Variations of Scholarly Journals in Business Subject-Specific Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lewis G.

    2011-01-01

    This empirical research investigates subscription price variations of scholarly journals in five business subject-specific areas using the semilogarithmic regression model. It has two main purposes. The first is to address the unsettled debate over whether or not and to what extent commercial publishers reap monopoly profits by overcharging…

  6. Peer review quality and transparency of the peer-review process in open access and subscription journals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wicherts, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent controversies highlighting substandard peer review in Open Access (OA) and traditional (subscription) journals have increased the need for authors, funders, publishers, and institutions to assure quality of peer-review in academic journals. I propose that transparency of the

  7. Controlled Synthesis of Nanomaterials at the Undergraduate Laboratory: Cu(OH)[subscript 2] and CuO Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Anderson G. M.; Rodrigues, Thenner S.; Parussulo, Andre´ L. A.; Candido, Eduardo G.; Geonmonond, Rafael S.; Brito, Hermi F.; Toma, Henrique E.; Camargo, Pedro H. C.

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate-level laboratory experiments that involve the synthesis of nanomaterials with well-defined/controlled shapes are very attractive under the umbrella of nanotechnology education. Herein we describe a low-cost and facile experiment for the synthesis of Cu(OH)[subscript 2] and CuO nanowires comprising three main parts: (i) synthesis of…

  8. A GC-MS Analysis of an S[subscript N]2 Reaction for the Organic Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clennan, Malgorzata M.; Clennan, Edward L.

    2005-01-01

    The S[subscript N]2 reaction of 1-bromohexane and 1-bromobutane with potassium acetate is introduced to address the shortage of suitable laboratory experiments in organic laboratory. The experiment offers a review of some common laboratory techniques including the use of infrared spectroscopy to identify functional groups, the use of GC-MS…

  9. Observation and Analysis of N[subscript 2]O Rotation-Vibration Spectra: A Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Mark S.; Reeve, Scott W.; Burns, William A.

    2008-01-01

    The linear molecule N[subscript 2]O is presented as an alternative gas-phase species for the ubiquitous undergraduate physical chemistry rotation-vibration spectroscopy experiment. Utilizing a 0.5 cm[superscript -1] resolution teaching grade FTIR spectrometer, 15 vibrational bands, corresponding to 1229 rotation-vibration transitions, have been…

  10. The A[subscript 1c] Blood Test: An Illustration of Principles from General and Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerber, Robert C.

    2007-01-01

    The glycated hemoglobin blood test, usually designated as the A[subscript 1c] test, is a key measure of the effectiveness of glucose control in diabetics. The chemistry of glucose in the bloodstream, which underlies the test and its impact, provides an illustration of the importance of chemical equilibrium and kinetics to a major health problem.…

  11. A flexible high potential printed battery for powering printed electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Abhinav M.; Steingart, Daniel A.; Nga Ng, Tse; Schwartz, David E.; Whiting, Gregory L.

    2013-06-01

    Mechanically flexible arrays of alkaline electrochemical cells fabricated using stencil printing onto fibrous substrates are shown to provide the necessary performance characteristics for driving ink-jet printed circuits. Due to the dimensions and material set currently required for reliable low-temperature print processing of electronic devices, a battery potential greater than that sourced by single cells is typically needed. The developed battery is a series interconnected array of 10 low resistance Zn-MnO2 alkaline cells, giving an open circuit potential of 14 V. This flexible battery is used to power an ink-jet printed 5-stage complementary ring oscillator based on organic semiconductors.

  12. Recent trends in print portals and Web2Print applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuijn, Chris

    2009-01-01

    For quite some time now, the printing business has been under heavy pressure because of overcapacity, dropping prices and the delocalization of the production to low income countries. To survive in this competitive world, printers have to invest in tools that, on one hand, reduce the production costs and, on the other hand, create additional value for their customers (print buyers). The creation of customer portals on top of prepress production systems allowing print buyers to upload their content, approve the uploaded pages based on soft proofs (rendered by the underlying production system) and further follow-up the generation of the printed material, has been illustrative in this respect. These developments resulted in both automation for the printer and added value for the print buyer. Many traditional customer portals assume that the printed products have been identified before they are presented to the print buyer in the portal environment. The products are, in this case, typically entered by the printing organization in a so-called MISi system after the official purchase order has been received from the print buyer. Afterwards, the MIS system then submits the product to the customer portal. Some portals, however, also support the initiation of printed products by the print buyer directly. This workflow creates additional flexibility but also makes things much more complex. We here have to distinguish between special products that are defined ad-hoc by the print buyer and standardized products that are typically selected out of catalogs. Special products are most of the time defined once and the level of detail required in terms of production parameters is quite high. Systems that support such products typically have a built-in estimation module, or, at least, a direct connection to an MIS system that calculates the prices and adds a specific mark-up to calculate a quote. Often, the markup is added by an account manager on a customer by customer basis; in this

  13. Printed Electrochemical Instruments for Biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Beni, Valerio; Nilsson, D.; Arven, P.; Norberg, P.; Gustafsson, G.; Turner, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Mobile diagnostics for healthcare, food safety and environmental monitoring, demand a new generation of inexpensive sensing systems suitable for production in high volume. Herein we report on the development of a new disposable electrochemical instrument exploiting the latest advances in printed electronics and printed biosensors. The current system is manufactured under ambient conditions with all interconnections printed; electrochemical measurements and data elaboration are realized by the...

  14. Evaluating the Impact of Competition on the Work of Editorial Bodies of the Local Communal Print Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beztelesna Liudmyla I.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article evaluates the impact of competition on the work of editorial bodies of the local communal print media. The indicators of profitability of communal newspapers, their circulation, and the cost of subscribing in terms of regions were researched. An indicative framework has been defined and, proceedng from results of the correlation-regression analysis, impact of the demographic, institutional, economic, social, infrastructural factors and indicators of performance of communal newspapers on the number of profitable communal publications, the amount of local budget subsidies, and the average annual cost of subscriptions have been evaluated. The identified features of relationship between the factors allowed to allocate only one significant factor of influence on the number of profitable communal newspapers and none for the local budget subsidies and the average annual cost of the subscription. The carried out calculations led to the conclusion that profitability of the editorial bodies of the local communal print media is provided, above all, by efficiency of their management. The external factors, although they form a competitive environment for the local media, have no significant impact on their profitability.

  15. 3D printing for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Hausman, Kalani Kirk

    2014-01-01

    Get started printing out 3D objects quickly and inexpensively! 3D printing is no longer just a figment of your imagination. This remarkable technology is coming to the masses with the growing availability of 3D printers. 3D printers create 3-dimensional layered models and they allow users to create prototypes that use multiple materials and colors.  This friendly-but-straightforward guide examines each type of 3D printing technology available today and gives artists, entrepreneurs, engineers, and hobbyists insight into the amazing things 3D printing has to offer. You'll discover methods for

  16. Quality Inspection of Printed Texts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Ballisager; Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2016-01-01

    Inspecting the quality of printed texts has its own importance in many industrial applications. To do so, this paper proposes a grading system which evaluates the performance of the printing task using some quality measures for each character and symbols. The purpose of these grading system is two......-folded: for costumers of the printing and verification system, the overall grade used to verify if the text is of sufficient quality, while for printer's manufacturer, the detailed character/symbols grades and quality measurements are used for the improvement and optimization of the printing task. The proposed system...

  17. Evolutionary Aesthetics and Print Advertising

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kamil Luczaj

    2015-01-01

    .... The purpose of a comprehensive content analysis of print advertising is to determine whether the items indicated by evolutionists such as animals, flowers, certain types of landscapes, beautiful...

  18. Cell and organ printing 2: fusion of cell aggregates in three-dimensional gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Thomas; Mironov, Vladimir; Gutowska, Anna; Roth, Elisabeth A; Markwald, Roger R

    2003-06-01

    We recently developed a cell printer (Wilson and Boland, 2003) that enables us to place cells in positions that mimic their respective positions in organs. However, this technology was limited to the printing of two-dimensional (2D) tissue constructs. Here we describe the use of thermosensitive gels to generate sequential layers for cell printing. The ability to drop cells on previously printed successive layers provides a real opportunity for the realization of three-dimensional (3D) organ printing. Organ printing will allow us to print complex 3D organs with computer-controlled, exact placing of different cell types, by a process that can be completed in several minutes. To demonstrate the feasibility of this novel technology, we showed that cell aggregates can be placed in the sequential layers of 3D gels close enough for fusion to occur. We estimated the optimum minimal thickness of the gel that can be reproducibly generated by dropping the liquid at room temperature onto a heated substrate. Then we generated cell aggregates with the corresponding (to the minimal thickness of the gel) size to ensure a direct contact between printed cell aggregates during sequential printing cycles. Finally, we demonstrated that these closely-placed cell aggregates could fuse in two types of thermosensitive 3D gels. Taken together, these data strongly support the feasibility of the proposed novel organ-printing technology. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Printing and Prototyping of Tissues and Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derby, Brian

    2012-11-01

    New manufacturing technologies under the banner of rapid prototyping enable the fabrication of structures close in architecture to biological tissue. In their simplest form, these technologies allow the manufacture of scaffolds upon which cells can grow for later implantation into the body. A more exciting prospect is the printing and patterning in three dimensions of all the components that make up a tissue (cells and matrix materials) to generate structures analogous to tissues; this has been termed bioprinting. Such techniques have opened new areas of research in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  20. Versioning of printed products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuijn, Chris

    2005-01-01

    During the definition of a printed product in an MIS system, a lot of attention is paid to the production process. The MIS systems typically gather all process-related parameters at such a level of detail that they can determine what the exact cost will be to make a specific product. This information can then be used to make a quote for the customer. Considerably less attention is paid to the content of the products since this does not have an immediate impact on the production costs (assuming that the number of inks or plates is known in advance). The content management is typically carried out either by the prepress systems themselves or by dedicated workflow servers uniting all people that contribute to the manufacturing of a printed product. Special care must be taken when considering versioned products. With versioned products we here mean distinct products that have a number of pages or page layers in common. Typical examples are comic books that have to be printed in different languages. In this case, the color plates can be shared over the different versions and the black plate will be different. Other examples are nation-wide magazines or newspapers that have an area with regional pages or advertising leaflets in different languages or currencies. When considering versioned products, the content will become an important cost factor. First of all, the content management (and associated proofing and approval cycles) becomes much more complex and, therefore, the risk that mistakes will be made increases considerably. Secondly, the real production costs are very much content-dependent because the content will determine whether plates can be shared across different versions or not and how many press runs will be needed. In this paper, we will present a way to manage different versions of a printed product. First, we will introduce a data model for version management. Next, we will show how the content of the different versions can be supplied by the customer

  1. Printing of the year book, carton boxes and printed envelopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-01-18

    Jan 18, 2018 ... 1. Title: PRINTING AND SUPPLY OF THE YEAR BOOK - 2018 AND CARTON BOXES ALONG WITH PRINTED. ENVELOPES. Description a) Book size: : 140 X 215 mm / 22.5 cm x 15 cm (Trim Size) b) No. of Pages. : 340 + 4 in DOUBLE COLOUR c) Inner Pages. Matt Art 100 GSM. 2) Natural shade (NS), ...

  2. Printed electronic switch on flexible substrates using printed microcapsules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cate, A.T. ten; Gaspar, C.H.; Virtanen, H.L.K.; Stevens, R.S.A.; Koldeweij, R.B.J.; Olkkonen, J.T.; Rentrop, C.H.A.; Smolander, M.H.

    2014-01-01

    Printed electronics, the manufacturing of electronic components on large, flexible, and low-cost substrates by printing techniques, can facilitate widespread, very low-cost electronics for consumer applications and disposable devices. New technologies are needed to create functional components in

  3. Centralized printing; UniPrint reduces printing problems in Citrix and Terminal Server

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gaskin, James E

    2006-01-01

    ... for that printer on the server, and no easy way to support every odd printer connected to every remote PC. You've traded printing problems for better security, but users care far more about printing than security. They will tell you so in no uncertain terms, at high volume. Enter UniPrint's Terminal Server Edition 6.0, and the company's claim of pro...

  4. Preparing, Characterizing, and Investigating Luminescent Properties of a Series of Long-Lasting Phosphors in a SrO-Al[subscript 2]O[subscript 3] System: An Integrated and Inquiry-Based Experiment in Solid State Chemistry for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan-Zi; Jia, Li; Ma, Kai-Guo; Wang, Hai-Hong; Jing, Xi-Ping

    2017-01-01

    An integrated and inquiry-based experiment on solid state chemistry is applied to an inorganic chemistry lab course to provide insight into the characteristics of the solid phase reaction. In this experiment, students have the opportunity to synthesize long-lasting phosphors with formula xSrO·yAl[subscript 2]O[subscript 3]:Eu[superscript 2+],…

  5. The Prints of the Remondinis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschloo, Anton W.A.

    1998-01-01

    Present-day visual culture partly owes its existence to the print publishers of the eighteenth century. The north Italian Remondini family owned the largest print publishing house in Europe at the time. They broke with tradition by aiming their production mainly at a broad, middle class public,

  6. Some Thoughts on Contemporary Graphic Print

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Skiba

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The production requirements of original graphic works of art have changed since 1980. The development of digital printing using lightfast colors now rivals traditional techniques such as wood cut, screen print, lithography, etching etc. Today, with respect to artistic legitimacy, original graphics using traditional printing techniques compete with original graphics produced by digital printing techniques on the art market. What criteria distinguish traditional printing techniques from those of digital printing in the production and acquisition of original graphics? What consequences is the serious artist faced with when deciding to implement digital print production? How does digital print change original graphic acquisition decisions?

  7. Chemical Information Literacy: pK[subscript a] Values--Where Do Students Go Wrong?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Alison B.; Amellal, Delphine G.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical information literacy is an essential skillset for navigating, evaluating, and using the wealth of print and online information. Accordingly, efforts are underway to improve students' acquisition and mastery of this skillset. However, less is known about students' abilities related to finding and using chemical information to solve…

  8. PRINTS and its automatic supplement, prePRINTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attwood, T K; Bradley, P; Flower, D R; Gaulton, A; Maudling, N; Mitchell, A L; Moulton, G; Nordle, A; Paine, K; Taylor, P; Uddin, A; Zygouri, C

    2003-01-01

    The PRINTS database houses a collection of protein fingerprints. These may be used to assign uncharacterised sequences to known families and hence to infer tentative functions. The September 2002 release (version 36.0) includes 1800 fingerprints, encoding approximately 11 000 motifs, covering a range of globular and membrane proteins, modular polypeptides and so on. In addition to its continued steady growth, we report here the development of an automatic supplement, prePRINTS, designed to increase the coverage of the resource and reduce some of the manual burdens inherent in its maintenance. The databases are accessible for interrogation and searching at http://www.bioinf.man.ac.uk/dbbrowser/PRINTS/.

  9. Libraries Can Make Open Access Happen Today by Simply Redirecting Subscription Funds: An Update on the SCOAP3 Initiative

    CERN Document Server

    Gentil-Beccot, Anne

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the SCOAP3 initiative which aims to redirect the subscription funds used for the core journals in High Energy Physics, to make them Open Access. This model re-interprets the role of librarians in the Open Access debate. As they are the pivot of the current system, by keeping the lifeblood of scientific information flowing to their scientists, the authors argue that they are the best placed to make it change and take advantage of it.

  10. Effect of Eight Weekly Aerobic Training Program on Auditory Reaction Time and MaxVO[subscript 2] in Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskin, Cengiz

    2016-01-01

    The aim of study was to examine the effect of eight weekly aerobic exercises on auditory reaction time and MaxVO[subscript 2] in visual impairments. Forty visual impairment children that have blind 3 classification from the Turkey, experimental group; (age = 15.60 ± 1.10 years; height = 164.15 ± 4.88 cm; weight = 66.60 ± 4.77 kg) for twenty…

  11. MPRINT: VAX printing made simple

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worlton, T.

    1994-08-01

    Users with stand-alone personal computers and personal printers usually find printing simple, but on a VAX computer or VAX cluster there may be many printers of different types located in different areas. The print queues set up for these printers may require different form qualifiers and may not all be able to print all documents. This article describes the basic steps a VAX system manager should take in setting up and managing print queues on a VAX and tells how to access these queues from a VAX, Unix, Macintosh, or DOS Computer. It gives a basic overview, but includes several helpful items that are obscure or completely undocumented. Following this overview, there is a description of a Fortran program, MPRINT, written to simplify printing for users. The MPRINT program simplifies the choice of printers and print forms for users of VAX print queues by allowing them to select from a one line per queue menu. The menu includes queue descriptions and only lists printers which can correctly print the specified file. MPRINT selects the correct form to use based on file type and maximum record length of the file. MPRINT may be useful at your site, and provides examples of a number of system services. MPRINT includes routines to do a user open of a file and get information from the File and Record Access Blocks (FAB and RAB), and a routine to obtain information about print queues. There are also routines to parse a file name, detab a character buffer, and trim trailing nulls and blanks from a character string.

  12. Conductive nanomaterials for printed electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamyshny, Alexander; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2014-09-10

    This is a review on recent developments in the field of conductive nanomaterials and their application in printed electronics, with particular emphasis on inkjet printing of ink formulations based on metal nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and graphene sheets. The review describes the basic properties of conductive nanomaterials suitable for printed electronics (metal nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and graphene), their stabilization in dispersions, formulations of conductive inks, and obtaining conductive patterns by using various sintering methods. Applications of conductive nanomaterials for electronic devices (transparent electrodes, metallization of solar cells, RFID antennas, TFTs, and light emitting devices) are also briefly reviewed.

  13. 48 CFR 970.5208-1 - Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Printing. 970.5208-1... and Operating Contracts 970.5208-1 Printing. As prescribed in 970.0808-3, insert the following clause: Printing (DEC 2000) (a) To the extent that duplicating or printing services may be required in the...

  14. 25 CFR 276.17 - Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Printing. 276.17 Section 276.17 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS § 276.17 Printing. As permitted by paragraph 36-2(c) in the Government Printing and Binding Regulations (October 1974, No. 23), published by the Joint Committee on Printing (JCP...

  15. 48 CFR 1308.802-70 - Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Printing. 1308.802-70... ACQUISITION PLANNING REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Printing and Related Supplies 1308.802-70 Printing. Insert clause 1352.208-70, Restrictions on Printing and Duplicating, in all...

  16. Engineering design of artificial vascular junctions for 3D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaoxiao; Bibb, Richard; Harris, Russell

    2016-06-20

    Vascular vessels, including arteries, veins and capillaries, are being printed using additive manufacturing technologies, also known as 3D printing. This paper demonstrates that it is important to follow the vascular design by nature as close as possible when 3D printing artificial vascular branches. In previous work, the authors developed an algorithm of computational geometry for constructing smooth junctions for 3D printing. In this work, computational fluid dynamics (CFDs) is used to compare the wall shear stress and blood velocity field for the junctions of different designs. The CFD model can reproduce the expected wall shear stress at locations remote from the junction. For large vessels such as veins, it is shown that ensuring the smoothness of the junction and using smaller joining angles as observed in nature is very important to avoid high wall shear stress and recirculation. The issue is however less significant for capillaries. Large joining angles make no difference to the hemodynamic behavior, which is also consistent with the fact that most capillary junctions have large joining angles. The combination of the CFD analysis and the junction construction method form a complete design method for artificial vascular vessels that can be 3D printed using additive manufacturing technologies.

  17. 3D printing in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  18. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  19. Reviewing printed and electronic dictionaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    Dictionary reviewing is an integral part of the lexicographic universe. However, lexicographers have called for generally applicable principles embracing both printed and electronic dictionaries. I propose that scholarly reviews contain information that is useful to their intended audiences...

  20. Printing and Publishing Monitoring Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page covers monitoring information specific to the printing and publishing industry.

  1. Print a Bed Bug Card

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two sets of business card-sized lists of tips for prevention of bed bug infestations, one for general use around home, the other for travelers. Print a single card or a page of cards for distribution.

  2. Print media vs internet media

    OpenAIRE

    Koganuramath, M. M.; Angadi, Mallikarjun

    1999-01-01

    The Information Technology has revolutionised the communication media with the emergence of Internet. This paper describes the pace of change in print media to On-line journalism. The process has began with On-line journalism utilising Internet wherein websites are replacing the print media. Most of the On-line newspapers are free, interactive and archival in nature and it provides users to search the information on newspapers through various access points i.e. by contributors, title, and dat...

  3. Kaleidoscope – Printed Textiles by Neil Bottle

    OpenAIRE

    Bottle, Neil

    2013-01-01

    One man show at Rochester Art Gallery. In the Kaleidoscope series, Neil Bottle explores the relationship between digital textile printing and craft printing techniques and how these seemingly opposing practices can coexist. A combination of the latest cutting-edge digital print techniques such as dye sublimation combined with craft traditions such as screen printing, discharge printing, pleating and shibori have been developed in the work. The Kaleidoscope series of wallhangings is pr...

  4. 3D-Printed Millimeter Wave Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-14

    demonstrates the resolution of the printer with a 10 micron nozzle. Figure 2: Measured loss tangent of SEBS and SBS samples. 3D - Printed Millimeter... 3D printing of styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) and styrene ethylene/butylene-styrene (SEBS) is used to demonstrate the feasibility of 3D - printed ...Additionally, a dielectric lens is printed which improves the antenna gain of an open-ended WR-28 waveguide from 7 to 8.5 dBi. Keywords: 3D printing

  5. Carbohydrate microarrays by microcontact printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendeln, Christian; Heile, Andreas; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2010-04-06

    This Article describes the preparation of carbohydrate microarrays by the immobilization of carbohydrates via microcontact printing (microCP) on glass and silicon substrates. To this end, diene-modified carbohydrates (galactose, glucose, mannose, lactose, and maltose) were printed on maleimide-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). A Diels-Alder reaction occurred exclusively in the contact area between stamp and substrate and resulted in a carbohydrate pattern on the substrate. It was found that cyclopentadiene-functionalized carbohydrates could be printed within minutes at room temperature, whereas furan-functionalized carbohydrates required long printing times and high temperatures. By successive printing, microstructured arrays of up to three different carbohydrates could be produced. Immobilization and patterning of the carbohydrates on the surfaces was investigated with contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), and fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, the lectins concanavalin A (ConA) and peanut agglutinin (PNA) bind to the microarrays, and the printed carbohydrates retain their characteristic selectivity toward these proteins.

  6. Organ printing: promises and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, Vladimir; Kasyanov, Vladimir; Drake, Christopher; Markwald, Roger R

    2008-01-01

    Organ printing or biomedical application of rapid prototyping, also defined as additive layer-by-layer biomanufacturing, is an emerging transforming technology that has potential for surpassing traditional solid scaffold-based tissue engineering. Organ printing has certain advantages: it is an automated approach that offers a pathway for scalable reproducible mass production of tissue engineered products; it allows a precised simultaneous 3D positioning of several cell types; it enables creation tissue with a high level of cell density; it can solve the problem of vascularization in thick tissue constructs; finally, organ printing can be done in situ. The ultimate goal of organ-printing technology is to fabricate 3D vascularized functional living human organs suitable for clinical implantation. The main practical outcomes of organ-printing technology are industrial scalable robotic biofabrication of complex human tissues and organs, automated tissue-based in vitro assays for clinical diagnostics, drug discovery and drug toxicity, and complex in vitro models of human diseases. This article describes conceptual framework and recent developments in organ-printing technology, outlines main technological barriers and challenges, and presents potential future practical applications.

  7. Multiobjective Optimization of PID Controller of PMSM

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xu, Qingyang; Zhang, Chengjin; Zhang, Li; Wang, Chaoyang

    2014-01-01

      PID controller is used in most of the current-speed closed-loop control of permanent magnet synchronous motors (PMSM) servo system. However, [subscript]Kp[/subscript] , [subscript]Ki[/subscript] , and [subscript]Kd[/subscript...

  8. 3D Printed Bionic Nanodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yong Lin; Gupta, Maneesh K.; Johnson, Blake N.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological and functional materials could enable the creation of bionic devices possessing unique and compelling geometries, properties, and functionalities. Indeed, interfacing high performance active devices with biology could impact a variety of fields, including regenerative bioelectronic medicines, smart prosthetics, medical robotics, and human-machine interfaces. Biology, from the molecular scale of DNA and proteins, to the macroscopic scale of tissues and organs, is three-dimensional, often soft and stretchable, and temperature sensitive. This renders most biological platforms incompatible with the fabrication and materials processing methods that have been developed and optimized for functional electronics, which are typically planar, rigid and brittle. A number of strategies have been developed to overcome these dichotomies. One particularly novel approach is the use of extrusion-based multi-material 3D printing, which is an additive manufacturing technology that offers a freeform fabrication strategy. This approach addresses the dichotomies presented above by (1) using 3D printing and imaging for customized, hierarchical, and interwoven device architectures; (2) employing nanotechnology as an enabling route for introducing high performance materials, with the potential for exhibiting properties not found in the bulk; and (3) 3D printing a range of soft and nanoscale materials to enable the integration of a diverse palette of high quality functional nanomaterials with biology. Further, 3D printing is a multi-scale platform, allowing for the incorporation of functional nanoscale inks, the printing of microscale features, and ultimately the creation of macroscale devices. This blending of 3D printing, novel nanomaterial properties, and ‘living’ platforms may enable next-generation bionic systems. In this review, we highlight this synergistic integration of the unique properties of nanomaterials with

  9. Dynamics of Capillary-Driven Flow in 3D Printed Open Microchannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lade, Robert K; Hippchen, Erik J; Macosko, Christopher W; Francis, Lorraine F

    2017-03-28

    Microchannels have applications in microfluidic devices, patterns for micromolding, and even flexible electronic devices. Three-dimensional (3D) printing presents a promising alternative manufacturing route for these microchannels due to the technology's relative speed and the design freedom it affords its users. However, the roughness of 3D printed surfaces can significantly influence flow dynamics inside of a microchannel. In this work, open microchannels are fabricated using four different 3D printing techniques: fused deposition modeling (FDM), stereolithography (SLA), selective laser sintering, and multi jet modeling. Microchannels printed with each technology are evaluated with respect to their surface roughness, morphology, and how conducive they are to spontaneous capillary filling. Based on this initial assessment, microchannels printed with FDM and SLA are chosen as models to study spontaneous, capillary-driven flow dynamics in 3D printed microchannels. Flow dynamics are investigated over short (∼10-3 s), intermediate (∼1 s), and long (∼102 s) time scales. Surface roughness causes a start-stop motion down the channel due to contact line pinning, while the cross-sectional shape imparted onto the channels during the printing process is shown to reduce the expected filling velocity. A significant delay in the onset of Lucas-Washburn dynamics (a long-time equilibrium state where meniscus position advances proportionally to the square root of time) is also observed. Flow dynamics are assessed as a function of printing technology, print orientation, channel dimensions, and liquid properties. This study provides the first in-depth investigation of the effect of 3D printing on microchannel flow dynamics as well as a set of rules on how to account for these effects in practice. The extension of these effects to closed microchannels and microchannels fabricated with other 3D printing technologies is also discussed.

  10. Structure and properties of Fe-modified Na[subscript 0.5]Bi[subscript 0.5]TiO[subscript 3] at ambient and elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksel, Elena; Forrester, Jennifer S.; Kowalski, Benjamin; Deluca, Marco; Damjanovic, Dragan; Jones, Jacob L. (SFIT); (Montanuniversität); (Florida)

    2012-03-15

    Sodium bismuth titanate (NBT) ceramics are among the most promising lead-free materials for piezoelectric applications. This work reports the crystal structure and phase evolution of NBT and Fe-modified NBT (from 0-2 at.% Fe) using synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy, at both ambient and elevated temperatures. The crystallographic results are discussed with reference to permittivity and piezoelectric thermal depolarization measurements of the same compositions. Changes in the depolarization temperature due to Fe substitution were detected by Raman spectroscopy and were found to correlate closely with depolarization temperatures obtained from converse piezoelectric coefficient and permittivity measured in situ. The depolarization temperatures obtained from direct piezoelectric coefficient measured ex situ as well as the phase transition temperatures obtained from synchrotron x-ray diffraction were found to be at higher temperatures. The mechanisms underlying the relationship between permittivity and piezoelectric depolarization to structural transitions observed in Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction are discussed.

  11. Preparation of solid silver nanoparticles for inkjet printed flexible electronics with high conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wenfeng; Zhang, Xianpeng; Huang, Qijin; Xu, Qingsong; Song, Weijie

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (NPs) which could be kept in solid form and were easily stored without degeneration or oxidation at room temperature for a long period of time were synthesized by a simple and environmentally friendly wet chemistry method in an aqueous phase. Highly stable dispersions of aqueous silver NP inks, sintered at room temperature, for printing highly conductive tracks (~8.0 μΩ cm) were prepared simply by dispersing the synthesized silver NP powder in water. These inks are stable, fairly homogeneous and suitable for a wide range of patterning techniques. The inks were successfully printed on paper and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates using a common color printer. Upon annealing at 180 °C, the resistivity of the printed silver patterns decreased to 3.7 μΩ cm, which is close to twice that of bulk silver. Various factors affecting the resistivity of the printed silver patterns, such as annealing temperature and the number of printing cycles, were investigated. The resulting high conductivity of the printed silver patterns reached over 20% of the bulk silver value under ambient conditions, which enabled the fabrication of flexible electronic devices, as demonstrated by the inkjet printing of conductive circuits of LED devices.Silver nanoparticles (NPs) which could be kept in solid form and were easily stored without degeneration or oxidation at room temperature for a long period of time were synthesized by a simple and environmentally friendly wet chemistry method in an aqueous phase. Highly stable dispersions of aqueous silver NP inks, sintered at room temperature, for printing highly conductive tracks (~8.0 μΩ cm) were prepared simply by dispersing the synthesized silver NP powder in water. These inks are stable, fairly homogeneous and suitable for a wide range of patterning techniques. The inks were successfully printed on paper and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates using a common color printer. Upon annealing at 180 °C, the

  12. Print Finishing: From Manual to Automated Print Finishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth Ward

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Meeting the demand for faster turnrounds and shorter print runs goes beyond making the printing press easier to set up and change. There is little point in producing plates and then sheets from a press if the post press area does not change to keep abreast of developments in prepress and the print room. The greatest impact is going to come from JDF, the end to end production data format which is finding wide spread acceptance in print areas. To date finishing equipment manufacturers are not as well represented within the CIP4 organisation as prepress and press vendors, but the major manufacturers are members. All are working to the goal of complete connectivity.The idea of JDF is that if the format of a print product like a magazine is known during the creation phases, the information can be used to preset machinery that is going to be used to produce it, so avoiding input errors and saving manufacturing time.A second aspect to JDF is that information about performance and progress is gathered and can be retrieved from a central point or made available to a customer. Production scheduling and costing becomes more accurate and customer relationships are deepened. However JDF to its fullest extent is not yet in use in connecting the finishing area to the rest of the printing plant. Around the world different companies are testing the idea of JDF to connect saddle stitchers, guillotines and binders with frantic work underway to be able to show results soon.

  13. A comparison of lip prints between Aryans-Dravidians and Mongols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prathibha Prasad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Lip prints are very useful in forensic investigation and personal identification. Like finger prints, even lip prints can be instrumental in identifying a person positively. Aims: Indians are closer to Mongoloids than to Caucasoids or Negroids as indicated by the phylogenetic tree. Most of the studies on lip prints are done in their own population. We have compared lip prints of Manipuris with other Indians (Aryans and Dravidians who are both close to Mongoloid race and are genetically similar. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 students 50 males and 50 females were selected of whom 30 males and 30 females were of Aryan and Dravidian features and 20 males and 20 females showed the Mongol features. Study materials used were Red colored lipstick, Lip brush, Cellophane tape, White chart paper and Magnifying lens. The lip prints were analyzed by dividing them into eight compartments. Results: Analysis of lip prints showed that the most common and the least common pattern in both males and females (Aryans-Dravidians and Mongols were the same, but the compartment wise distribution of the lip patterns was different. Conclusion: In the present study, it is established that there is no similarity of lip prints from one individual to another individual and between males and females. Regarding the comparison with Mongols, more studies with a larger sample size is necessary.

  14. Balkan Print Forum – Dynamic Balkan Print Media Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossitza Velkova

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Founded in October 2006, the Balkan Print Forum is gradually becoming an important regional institution. Its main targets are to share experiences and know-how,to initiate and intensify contacts and to support joint projects in the Balkan region.Since drupa 2008 there are 11 member countries of the Balkan Print Forum:Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Greece, Hungary, Romania, Serbia, Slovenia and Turkey. Partners of BPF are some companies and universities from Russia and Ukraine.

  15. 3D Printing: Print the future of ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenbin; Zhang, Xiulan

    2014-08-26

    The three-dimensional (3D) printer is a new technology that creates physical objects from digital files. Recent technological advances in 3D printing have resulted in increased use of this technology in the medical field, where it is beginning to revolutionize medical and surgical possibilities. It is already providing medicine with powerful tools that facilitate education, surgical planning, and organ transplantation research. A good understanding of this technology will be beneficial to ophthalmologists. The potential applications of 3D printing in ophthalmology, both current and future, are explored in this article. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  16. Economics of access versus ownership the costs and benefits of access to scholarly articles via interlibrary loan and journal subscriptions

    CERN Document Server

    Kingma, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    The Economics of Access Versus Ownership offers library professionals a model economic analysis of providing access to journal articles through interlibrary loan as compared to library subscriptions to the journals. This model enables library directors to do an economic analysis of interlibrary loan and collection development in their own libraries and to then make cost-efficient decisions about the use of these services.This practical book's analysis and conclusions are based on 1994/95 academic year research conducted by the State University of New York libraries at Albany, Binghamton, Buffa

  17. Obtaining Journal Titles via Big Deals Most Cost Effective Compared to Individual Subscriptions, Pay-Per-View, and Interlibrary Loan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Reed

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To determine if “Big Deal” journal subscription packages are a cost-effective way to provide electronic journal access to academic library users versus individual subscriptions, pay-per-view, and interlibrary loans (ILL. Design – Cost-per-article-use analysis. Setting – Public research university in the United States of America. Subjects – Cost-per-use data from 1 journals in seven Big Deal packages, 2 individually subscribed journals, 3 pay-per-view from publishers’ websites, and 4 interlibrary loans. Methods – The authors determined cost-per-use for Big Deal titles by utilizing COUNTER JR1 metric Successful Full-Text Article Request (SFTAR reports. Individual journal subscription cost-per-use data were obtained from individual publishers or platforms. Pay-per-view cost was determined by recording the price listed on publishers’ websites. ILL cost-per-use was established by reviewing cost-per-article obtained from libraries outside of reciprocal borrowing agreement networks. With the exception of pay-per-view numbers, title cost-per-use was averaged over a three-year period from 2010 through 2012. Main Results – Cost-per-article use for journals from Big Deals varied from $2.11 to $9.42. For individually subscribed journals, the average cost-per-article ranged from $0.25 to $84.00. Pay-per-view charges ranged from $15.00 to $80.00, with an average cost of $37.72. Conclusion – The authors conclude that Big Deals are cost effective, but that they consume such a large amount of funds that they limit the purchase of other resources. The authors go on to outline the options for libraries thinking about Big Deal packages. First, libraries should keep Big Deal packages in place if the average cost-per-article is less than individual subscriptions. Second, libraries could subscribe only to the most-used journals in Big Deals, cancel the packages, and rely on ILL and pay-per-view access. Third, consortia could be joined

  18. All-printed paper memory

    KAUST Repository

    He, Jr-Hau

    2016-08-11

    All-printed paper-based substrate memory devices are described. In an embodiment, a paper-based memory device is prepared by coating one or more areas of a paper substrate with a conductor material such as a carbon paste, to form a first electrode of a memory, depositing a layer of insulator material, such as titanium dioxide, over one or more areas of the conductor material, and depositing a layer of metal over one or more areas of the insulator material to form a second electrode of the memory. In an embodiment, the device can further include diodes printed between the insulator material and the second electrode, and the first electrode and the second electrodes can be formed as a crossbar structure to provide a WORM memory. The various layers and the diodes can be printed onto the paper substrate by, for example, an ink jet printer.

  19. Fingerprint + Iris = IrisPrint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Asem; Ross, Arun

    2015-05-01

    We consider the problem of generating a biometric image from two different traits. Specifically, we focus on generating an IrisPrint that inherits its structure from a fingerprint image and an iris image. To facilitate this, the continuous phase of the fingerprint image, characterizing its ridge flow, is first extracted. Next, a scheme is developed to extract "minutiae" from an iris image. Finally, an IrisPrint, that resembles a fingerprint, is created by mixing the ridge flow of the fingerprint with the iris minutiae. Preliminary experiments suggest that the new biometric image (i.e., IrisPrint) (a) can potentially be used for authentication by an existing fingerprint matcher, and (b) can potentially conceal and preserve the privacy of the original fingerprint and iris images.

  20. Printing systems for MEMS packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Donald J.; Cox, Weldon R.; Wallace, David B.

    2001-10-01

    Ink-jet printing technology is, in many ways, ideally suited for addressing a number of these MEMS device packaging challenges. The general advantages of this form of microdispensing derive from the incorporation of data-driven, non-contact processes which enable precise, picoliter-level volumes of material to be deposited with high accuracy and speed at target sites, even on non-planar surfaces. Being data-driven, microjet printing is a highly flexible and automated process which may readily be incorporated into manufacturing lines. It does not require application-specific tooling such as photomasks or screens, and, as an additive process with no chemical waste, it is environmentally friendly. In short, the advantages obtainable with incorporation of micro-jet printing technology in many fabrication applications range from increased process capability, integration and automation to reduced manufacturing costs.

  1. Quality Assessment of Studies Published in Open Access and Subscription Journals: Results of a Systematic Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorino, Roberta; Milovanovic, Sonja; Stojanovic, Jovana; Efremov, Ljupcho; Amore, Rosarita; Boccia, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    Along with the proliferation of Open Access (OA) publishing, the interest for comparing the scientific quality of studies published in OA journals versus subscription journals has also increased. With our study we aimed to compare the methodological quality and the quality of reporting of primary epidemiological studies and systematic reviews and meta-analyses published in OA and non-OA journals. In order to identify the studies to appraise, we listed all OA and non-OA journals which published in 2013 at least one primary epidemiologic study (case-control or cohort study design), and at least one systematic review or meta-analysis in the field of oncology. For the appraisal, we picked up the first studies published in 2013 with case-control or cohort study design from OA journals (Group A; n = 12), and in the same time period from non-OA journals (Group B; n = 26); the first systematic reviews and meta-analyses published in 2013 from OA journals (Group C; n = 15), and in the same time period from non-OA journals (Group D; n = 32). We evaluated the methodological quality of studies by assessing the compliance of case-control and cohort studies to Newcastle and Ottawa Scale (NOS) scale, and the compliance of systematic reviews and meta-analyses to Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) scale. The quality of reporting was assessed considering the adherence of case-control and cohort studies to STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) checklist, and the adherence of systematic reviews and meta-analyses to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) checklist. Among case-control and cohort studies published in OA and non-OA journals, we did not observe significant differences in the median value of NOS score (Group A: 7 (IQR 7-8) versus Group B: 8 (7-9); p = 0.5) and in the adherence to STROBE checklist (Group A, 75% versus Group B, 80%; p = 0.1). The results did not change after adjustment

  2. Quality Assessment of Studies Published in Open Access and Subscription Journals: Results of a Systematic Evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Pastorino

    Full Text Available Along with the proliferation of Open Access (OA publishing, the interest for comparing the scientific quality of studies published in OA journals versus subscription journals has also increased. With our study we aimed to compare the methodological quality and the quality of reporting of primary epidemiological studies and systematic reviews and meta-analyses published in OA and non-OA journals.In order to identify the studies to appraise, we listed all OA and non-OA journals which published in 2013 at least one primary epidemiologic study (case-control or cohort study design, and at least one systematic review or meta-analysis in the field of oncology. For the appraisal, we picked up the first studies published in 2013 with case-control or cohort study design from OA journals (Group A; n = 12, and in the same time period from non-OA journals (Group B; n = 26; the first systematic reviews and meta-analyses published in 2013 from OA journals (Group C; n = 15, and in the same time period from non-OA journals (Group D; n = 32. We evaluated the methodological quality of studies by assessing the compliance of case-control and cohort studies to Newcastle and Ottawa Scale (NOS scale, and the compliance of systematic reviews and meta-analyses to Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR scale. The quality of reporting was assessed considering the adherence of case-control and cohort studies to STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE checklist, and the adherence of systematic reviews and meta-analyses to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA checklist.Among case-control and cohort studies published in OA and non-OA journals, we did not observe significant differences in the median value of NOS score (Group A: 7 (IQR 7-8 versus Group B: 8 (7-9; p = 0.5 and in the adherence to STROBE checklist (Group A, 75% versus Group B, 80%; p = 0.1. The results did not change after

  3. High resolution printing of charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, John; Park, Jang-Ung

    2015-06-16

    Provided are methods of printing a pattern of charge on a substrate surface, such as by electrohydrodynamic (e-jet) printing. The methods relate to providing a nozzle containing a printable fluid, providing a substrate having a substrate surface and generating from the nozzle an ejected printable fluid containing net charge. The ejected printable fluid containing net charge is directed to the substrate surface, wherein the net charge does not substantially degrade and the net charge retained on the substrate surface. Also provided are functional devices made by any of the disclosed methods.

  4. Double curved concrete printing : Printing on non-planar surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, H.R.; Borg Costanzi, C.; Bos, Freek; Ahmed, Z; Wolfs, R.

    2017-01-01

    It is no secret that there have been some great advances in the realm of concrete additive manufacturing. However, one of the major drawbacks of this fabrication technique is that the elements must be self-supporting during printing. While most other additive manufacturing materials can overcome

  5. Bone tissue engineering using 3D printing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bose, Susmita; Vahabzadeh, Sahar; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2013-01-01

    .... Among the different technology options, three dimensional printing (3DP) is becoming popular due to the ability to directly print porous scaffolds with designed shape, controlled chemistry and interconnected porosity...

  6. Bone tissue engineering using 3D printing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bose, Susmita; Vahabzadeh, Sahar; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2013-01-01

    .... Among the different technology options, three dimensional printing (3DP) is becoming popular due to the ability to directly print porous scaffolds with designed shape, controlled chemistry and interconnected...

  7. 3D holographic printer: fast printing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Alexander V; Putilin, Andrey N; Kopenkin, Sergey S; Borodin, Yuriy P; Druzhin, Vladislav V; Dubynin, Sergey E; Dubinin, German B

    2014-02-10

    This article describes the general operation principles of devices for synthesized holographic images such as holographic printers. Special emphasis is placed on the printing speed. In addition, various methods to increase the printing process are described and compared.

  8. Transfer printing of DNA by "click" chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozkiewicz, D.I.; Gierlich, Johannes; Burley, Glenn A.; Gutschmiedl, Katrin; Carell, Thomas; Ravoo, B.J.; Reinhoudt, David

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a straightforward procedure to immobilize oligonucleotides on glass substrates in well-defined micropatterns by microcontact printing with a dendrimer-modified stamp. The oligonucleotides are efficiently immobilized by click chemistry induced by microcontact printing.

  9. Reading Environmental Print: What Is the Role of Concepts about Print in Discriminating Young Readers' Responses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutzel, D. Ray; Fawson, Parker C.; Young, Janet R.; Morrison, Timothy G.; Wilcox, Brad

    2003-01-01

    Examines how concepts-about-print knowledge interacted with other traditional measures of print knowledge, to affect children's reading environmental print in context and out. Demonstrates that concepts-about-print and word recognition were the most reliable discriminators between children who could accurately and consistently read environmental…

  10. 3D Printing Electrically Small Spherical Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Oleksiy S.

    2013-01-01

    3D printing is applied for rapid prototyping of an electrically small spherical wire antenna. The model is first printed in plastic and subsequently covered with several layers of conductive paint. Measured results are in good agreement with simulations.......3D printing is applied for rapid prototyping of an electrically small spherical wire antenna. The model is first printed in plastic and subsequently covered with several layers of conductive paint. Measured results are in good agreement with simulations....

  11. Your Next Airplane: Just Hit Print

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    have tailored their equipment suites to their missions and tactics. Subsequently, it will enable increased efficiency and mission effectiveness in...SDK”. 24 Hurst, “Dita Von Teese Flaunts Fibonacci -Inspired 3D Printed Gown”. 25 McClusky, “Pro Track Athletes Get a Grip With 3-D Printed Equipment...02/22/3d-printed-ear/ Hurst, Nathan, “Dita Von Teese Flaunts Fibonacci -Inspired, 3-D Printed Gown”, Wired Design, Mar. 5, 2013. http

  12. Optimization of laser printing of nanoparticle suspensions for microelectronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duocastella, Martí; Kim, Heungsoo; Serra, Pere; Piqué, Alberto

    2012-03-01

    Digital printing of interconnects for electronic devices requires processes capable of delivering controlled amounts of conductive inks in a fast and accurate way. Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is an emerging technology that enables controlled printing of voxels of a wide range of inks with micrometer resolution. Its use with high solids content nanoparticle suspensions results in the deposition of voxels shaped as the impinging laser beam. This allows higher processing speeds, increasing the throughput of the technique. However, the optimum conditions for printing spot-like voxels have not been determined, yet. In this work, we perform a systematic study of the main experimental parameters, including laser pulse energy, laser beam dimensions, and gap distance, in order to understand the role that these parameters play in laser printing. Based on these results, we find that there is a narrow fluence range at distances close to the receiving substrate where spot-like voxels are deposited. We also provide a detailed discussion of the possible mechanisms that may lead to the observed features.

  13. Inkjet-printed, intrinsically stretchable conductors and interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, U.; Molina-Lopez, F.; Zhu, C.; Wang, Y.; Bao, Z.; Murmann, B.

    2017-08-01

    In the future, a large variety of electronic devices will be wearable and operate in close contact with the skin. To accommodate deformations such as twisting and elongation, these devices should ideally be stretchable. One viable approach toward stretchable electronics is the development of intrinsically stretchable electronic materials, devices and circuits. Recently, the first intrinsically stretchable transistors have been demonstrated [1-7]. However, for the realization of stretchable circuits, stretchable interconnects are equally important. For the deployment of highly stretchable materials as interconnects and electrodes, patterning is crucial. Therefore, we developed a process for inkjet printing of intrinsically stretchable PEDOT:PSS-based interconnects and conductors. Ionic additives act as dopants and plasticisers in this approach [8]. A customized ink was printed on stretchable polymeric substrates (SEBS, styrene-ethylene-butadiene-styrene) and optimized to achieve a smooth morphology of the printed features by adjusting the surface tension and suppressing the coffee stain effect. The printed interconnects have a conductivity of 700 S/cm, sustain strains above 100% and show good stability in 1000-cycle stretching experiments. In addition to morphology, electrical properties and stretchability, we also investigated bias-stress stability, long-term stability in ambient air and cycling stability.

  14. 48 CFR 1552.208-70 - Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Printing. 1552.208-70... FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1552.208-70 Printing. As prescribed in 1508.870, insert the following clause: Printing (DEC 2005) (a) Definitions...

  15. 48 CFR 3452.208-70 - Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Printing. 3452.208-70... Printing. As prescribed in 3408.870, insert the following clause in all solicitations and contracts other than purchase orders: Printing (AUG 1987) Unless otherwise specified in this contract, the contractor...

  16. 48 CFR 3408.870 - Printing clause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Printing clause. 3408.870... COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Printing and Related Supplies 3408.870 Printing clause. The contracting officer shall insert the clause in 3452.208-70...

  17. 7 CFR 58.319 - Printing equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Printing equipment. 58.319 Section 58.319 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....319 Printing equipment. All printing equipment shall be designed so as to adequately protect the...

  18. 48 CFR 952.208-70 - Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Printing. 952.208-70... SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 952.208-70 Printing. As prescribed in 908.802, insert the following clause: Printing (APR 1984) The Contractor shall not engage in, nor...

  19. Printing of the book - Leelavathi's daughter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J-11 IPURIBNNIASciPrint/2017-18 DC 02)ozoic Dated: 27 DECEMBER 207. NOTICE INVITING TENDER FOR PRINTING OF LILAVATS DAUGHTER. The Indian Academy of Sciences is an Institution of Dept. of Science and Technology,. Government of India needs the following book to be printed and supplied as per below.

  20. Progress in 3D Printing of Carbon Materials for Energy-Related Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Kun; Yao, Yonggang; Dai, Jiaqi; Hu, Liangbing

    2017-03-01

    The additive-manufacturing (AM) technique, known as three-dimensional (3D) printing, has attracted much attention in industry and academia in recent years. 3D printing has been developed for a variety of applications. Printable inks are the most important component for 3D printing, and are related to the materials, the printing method, and the structures of the final 3D-printed products. Carbon materials, due to their good chemical stability and versatile nanostructure, have been widely used in 3D printing for different applications. Good inks are mainly based on volatile solutions having carbon materials as fillers such as graphene oxide (GO), carbon nanotubes (CNT), carbon blacks, and solvent, as well as polymers and other additives. Studies of carbon materials in 3D printing, especially GO-based materials, have been extensively reported for energy-related applications. In these circumstances, understanding the very recent developments of 3D-printed carbon materials and their extended applications to address energy-related challenges and bring new concepts for material designs are becoming urgent and important. Here, recent developments in 3D printing of emerging devices for energy-related applications are reviewed, including energy-storage applications, electronic circuits, and thermal-energy applications at high temperature. To close, a conclusion and outlook are provided, pointing out future designs and developments of 3D-printing technology based on carbon materials for energy-related applications and beyond. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Printing Values In Interactive ROOT

    CERN Document Server

    Perovic, Boris

    2015-01-01

    This project report summarizes the work I have been performing during the past twelve weeks as a Summer Student intern working on ROOT project in the SFT group, PH department, under the supervision of Axel Naumann and Danilo Piparo. One of the widely requested features for ROOT was improved interactive shell experience as well as improved printing of object values. Solving this issue was the goal of this project. Primarily, we have enabled printing of the collections. Secondly, we have unified the printing interface, making it much more robust and extendible. Thirdly, we have implemented printing of nested collections in a flexible and user-friendly manner. Finally, we have added an interactive mode, allowing for paginated output. At the beginning of the report, ROOT is presented with examples of where it is used and how important it is. Then, the motivation behind the project is elaborated, by presenting the previous state of the software package and its potential for improvement. Further, the process in wh...

  2. Latin American Folk Art Prints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navah, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Latin American customs and colors play an important role as second graders are introduced to multicultural experiences through food, music, dance, art, and craft. In this article, the author describes a printing project inspired by Guatemalan weavings and amate bark paintings. (Contains 2 online resources.)

  3. The Power of the Print

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    The print has a long-standing tradition of carrying a political message. This can be seen in the works of artists from the German Expressionists, like Kathe Kollwitz and Emil Nolde, to Mexican printmakers like Jose Posada and Leopoldo Mendez. Whether it was during the Mexican Revolution of 1910, the War in Iraq, or the 2008 presidential election,…

  4. 3D Printing of Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Gupta

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The potential benefits that could be derived if the science and technology of 3D printing were to be established have been the crux behind monumental efforts by governments, in most countries, that invest billions of dollars to develop this manufacturing technology.[...

  5. All-printed paper memory

    KAUST Repository

    Lien, Derhsien

    2014-08-26

    We report the memory device on paper by means of an all-printing approach. Using a sequence of inkjet and screen-printing techniques, a simple metal-insulator-metal device structure is fabricated on paper as a resistive random access memory with a potential to reach gigabyte capacities on an A4 paper. The printed-paper-based memory devices (PPMDs) exhibit reproducible switching endurance, reliable retention, tunable memory window, and the capability to operate under extreme bending conditions. In addition, the PBMD can be labeled on electronics or living objects for multifunctional, wearable, on-skin, and biocompatible applications. The disposability and the high-security data storage of the paper-based memory are also demonstrated to show the ease of data handling, which are not achievable for regular silicon-based electronic devices. We envision that the PPMDs manufactured by this cost-effective and time-efficient all-printing approach would be a key electronic component to fully activate a paper-based circuit and can be directly implemented in medical biosensors, multifunctional devices, and self-powered systems. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  6. Printing in Ubiquitous Computing Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karapantelakis, Athanasios; Delvic, Alisa; Zarifi Eslami, Mohammed; Khamit, Saltanat

    Document printing has long been considered an indispensable part of the workspace. While this process is considered trivial and simple for environments where resources are ample (e.g. desktop computers connected to printers within a corporate network), it becomes complicated when applied in a mobile

  7. Printing Silver Nanogrids on Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Wesley C.; Valcarce, Ron; Iles, Peter; Smith, James S.; Glass, Gabe; Gomez, Jesus; Johnson, Glen; Johnston, Dan; Morham, Maclaine; Befus, Elliot; Oz, Aimee; Tomaraei, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    This manuscript describes a laboratory experiment that provides students with an opportunity to create conductive silver nanogrids using polymeric templates. A microcontact-printed polyvinylpyrrolidone grid directs the citrate-induced reduction of silver ions for the fabrication of silver nanogrids on glass substrates. In addition to…

  8. Printing. Florida Vocational Program Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    University of South Florida, Tampa. Dept. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This document contains a vocational program guide and Career Merit Achievement Plan (Career MAP) for secondary and postsecondary printing programs. The guide contains the following sections: occupational description; program content (curriculum framework and student performance standards); program implementation (student admission criteria,…

  9. Catalytic microcontact printing without ink

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X.; Péter, M.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Reinhoudt, David

    2003-01-01

    A novel microcontact printing technique is described that does not require ink. Patterns were created by direct contact of oxidized PDMS stamps with silyl ether-derivatized, acid-labile SAMs on gold. The surface of the stamps was oxidized by oxygen plasma to give a layer of silicon oxide. These

  10. Fabrication of Capacitive Acoustic Resonators Combining 3D Printing and 2D Inkjet Printing Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Rubaiyet Iftekharul Haque; Erick Ogam; Christophe Loussert; Patrick Benaben; Xavier Boddaert

    2015-01-01

    A capacitive acoustic resonator developed by combining three-dimensional (3D) printing and two-dimensional (2D) printed electronics technique is described. During this work, a patterned bottom structure with rigid backplate and cavity is fabricated directly by a 3D printing method, and then a direct write inkjet printing technique has been employed to print a silver conductive layer. A novel approach has been used to fabricate a diaphragm for the acoustic sensor as well, where the conductive ...

  11. 3D printing PLGA: a quantitative examination of the effects of polymer composition and printing parameters on print resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ting; Holzberg, Timothy R; Lim, Casey G; Gao, Feng; Gargava, Ankit; Trachtenberg, Jordan E; Mikos, Antonios G; Fisher, John P

    2017-04-12

    In the past few decades, 3D printing has played a significant role in fabricating scaffolds with consistent, complex structure that meet patient-specific needs in future clinical applications. Although many studies have contributed to this emerging field of additive manufacturing, which includes material development and computer-aided scaffold design, current quantitative analyses do not correlate material properties, printing parameters, and printing outcomes to a great extent. A model that correlates these properties has tremendous potential to standardize 3D printing for tissue engineering and biomaterial science. In this study, we printed poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) utilizing a direct melt extrusion technique without additional ingredients. We investigated PLGA with various lactic acid:glycolic acid (LA:GA) molecular weight ratios and end caps to demonstrate the dependence of the extrusion process on the polymer composition. Micro-computed tomography was then used to evaluate printed scaffolds containing different LA:GA ratios, composed of different fiber patterns, and processed under different printing conditions. We built a statistical model to reveal the correlation and predominant factors that determine printing precision. Our model showed a strong linear relationship between the actual and predicted precision under different combinations of printing conditions and material compositions. This quantitative examination establishes a significant foreground to 3D print biomaterials following a systematic fabrication procedure. Additionally, our proposed statistical models can be applied to couple specific biomaterials and 3D printing applications for patient implants with particular requirements.

  12. Using 3D printing techniques to create an anthropomorphic thorax phantom for medical imaging purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazelaar, Colien; van Eijnatten, Maureen; Dahele, Max; Wolff, Jan; Forouzanfar, Tymour; Slotman, Ben; Verbakel, Wilko F A R

    2018-01-01

    Imaging phantoms are widely used for testing and optimization of imaging devices without the need to expose humans to irradiation. However, commercially available phantoms are commonly manufactured in simple, generic forms and sizes and therefore do not resemble the clinical situation for many patients. Using 3D printing techniques, we created a life-size phantom based on a clinical CT scan of the thorax from a patient with lung cancer. It was assembled from bony structures printed in gypsum, lung structures consisting of airways, blood vessels >1 mm, and outer lung surface, three lung tumors printed in nylon, and soft tissues represented by silicone (poured into a 3D-printed mold). Kilovoltage x-ray and CT images of the phantom closely resemble those of the real patient in terms of size, shapes, and structures. Surface comparison using 3D models obtained from the phantom and the 3D models used for printing showed mean differences 3D printing and molding techniques. The phantom closely resembles a real patient in terms of spatial accuracy and is currently being used to evaluate x-ray-based imaging quality and positional verification techniques for radiotherapy. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  13. Cost-estimating for commercial digital printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keif, Malcolm G.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to document current cost-estimating practices used in commercial digital printing. A research study was conducted to determine the use of cost-estimating in commercial digital printing companies. This study answers the questions: 1) What methods are currently being used to estimate digital printing? 2) What is the relationship between estimating and pricing digital printing? 3) To what extent, if at all, do digital printers use full-absorption, all-inclusive hourly rates for estimating? Three different digital printing models were identified: 1) Traditional print providers, who supplement their offset presswork with digital printing for short-run color and versioned commercial print; 2) "Low-touch" print providers, who leverage the power of the Internet to streamline business transactions with digital storefronts; 3) Marketing solutions providers, who see printing less as a discrete manufacturing process and more as a component of a complete marketing campaign. Each model approaches estimating differently. Understanding and predicting costs can be extremely beneficial. Establishing a reliable system to estimate those costs can be somewhat challenging though. Unquestionably, cost-estimating digital printing will increase in relevance in the years ahead, as margins tighten and cost knowledge becomes increasingly more critical.

  14. Multifrequency Printed Antennas Loaded with Metamaterial Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Segovia-Vargas

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a review of printed antennas loaded with metamaterial particles. This novel technique allows developing printed antennas with interesting features such as multifrequency (simultaneous operation over two or more frequency bands and multifunctionality (e. g. radiation pattern diversity. Moreover, compactness is also achieved and the main advantages of conventional printed antennas (light weight, low profile, low cost ... are maintained. Different types of metamaterial-loaded printed antennas are reviewed: printed dipoles and patch antennas. Several prototypes are designed, manufactured and measured showing good results. Furthermore, simple but accurate equivalent models are proposed. These models allow an easy and quick design of metamaterial-loaded printed antennas. Finally, two interesting applications based on the proposed antennas are reviewed: the patch antennas are used as radiating elements of emerging active RFID systems in the microwave band and the metamaterial-loaded printed dipoles are employed to increase the performance of log-periodic arrays.

  15. An analysis of printing conditions for wavefront overlapping printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihashi, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Wakunami, K.; Oi, R.; Okui, M.; Senoh, T.

    2017-03-01

    Wavefront printing for a digitally-designed hologram has got attentions recently. In this printing, a spatial light modulator (SLM) is used for displaying a hologram data and the wavefront is reproduced by irradiating the hologram with a reference light the same way as electronic holography. However, a pixel count of current SLM devices is not enough to display an entire hologram data. To generate a practical digitally-designed hologram, the entire hologram data is divided into a set of sub-hologram data and wavefront reproduced by each sub-hologram is sequentially recorded in tiling manner by using X-Y motorized stage. Due to a lack of positioning an accuracy of X-Y motorized stage and the temporal incoherent recording, phase continuity of recorded/reproduced wavefront is lost between neighboring subholograms. In this paper, we generate the holograms that have different size of sub-holograms with an overlap or nonoverlap, and verify the size of sub-holograms effect on the reconstructed images. In the result, the reconstructed images degrade with decreasing the size of sub-holograms and there is little or no degradation of quality by the wavefront printing with the overlap.

  16. Case study on printed matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    global warming, acidification and nutrification. The studies focus on energy consumption including the emissions and impact categories related to energy. The chemical-related impact categories comprising ecotoxicity and human toxicity are not included at all or only to a limited degree. In this paper we...... of potential environmental impacts and consumption of resources along the life cycle of a generic printed matter produced on a model sheet feed offset printing industry in Europe. Main activities at all stages in the life cycle are covered. However special focus is on the production stage but upstream...... – how important are emissions of chemicals? J Clean Prod 17, 115 – 128. Larsen HF (2004). Assessment of chemical emissions in life cycle impact assessment - focus on low substance data availability and ecotoxicity effect indicators. Ph.D. Thesis, October 2004. Department of Manufacturing, Engineering...

  17. Mortars for 3D printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demyanenko Olga

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is aimed at developing scientifically proven compositions of mortars for 3D printing modified by a peat-based admixture with improved operational characteristics. The paper outlines the results of experimental research on hardened cement paste and concrete mixture with the use of modifying admixture MT-600 (thermally modified peat. It is found that strength of hardened cement paste increases at early age when using finely dispersed admixtures, which is the key factor for formation of construction and technical specifications of concrete for 3D printing technologies. The composition of new formations of hardened cement paste modified by MT-600 admixture were obtained, which enabled to suggest the possibility of their physico-chemical interaction while hardening.

  18. Comparison of VO[subscript 2] Maximum Obtained from 20 m Shuttle Run and Cycle Ergometer in Children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairney, John; Hay, John; Veldhuizen, Scott; Faught, Brent

    2010-01-01

    Oxygen consumption at peak physical exertion (VO[subscript 2] maximum) is the most widely used indicator of cardiorespiratory fitness. The purpose of this study was to compare two protocols for its estimation, cycle ergometer testing and the 20 m shuttle run, among children with and without probable developmental coordination disorder (pDCD). The…

  19. PI[subscript 3]-Kinase Cascade Has a Differential Role in Acquisition and Extinction of Conditioned Fear Memory in Juvenile and Adult Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slouzkey, Ilana; Maroun, Mouna

    2016-01-01

    The basolateral amygdala (BLA), medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) circuit, plays a crucial role in acquisition and extinction of fear memory. Extinction of aversive memories is mediated, at least in part, by the phosphoinositide-3 kinase (P[subscript 3]K)/Akt pathway in adult rats. There is recent interest in the neural mechanisms that mediate fear…

  20. Using the "K[subscript 5]Connected Cognition Diagram" to Analyze Teachers' Communication and Understanding of Regions in Three-Dimensional Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore-Russo, Deborah; Viglietti, Janine M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a study that introduces and applies the "K[subscript 5]Connected Cognition Diagram" as a lens to explore video data showing teachers' interactions related to the partitioning of regions by axes in a three-dimensional geometric space. The study considers "semiotic bundles" (Arzarello, 2006), introduces "semiotic connections,"…

  1. A Pictorial Visualization of Normal Mode Vibrations of the Fullerene (C[subscript 60]) Molecule in Terms of Vibrations of a Hollow Sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Janette L.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the normal mode vibrations of a molecule is important in the analysis of vibrational spectra. However, the complicated 3D motion of large molecules can be difficult to interpret. We show how images of normal modes of the fullerene molecule C[subscript 60] can be made easier to understand by superimposing them on images of the normal…

  2. Protecting buyers from fine print

    OpenAIRE

    D'Agostino, Elena; Daniel J. Seidmann

    2016-01-01

    Buyers typically do not read the …ne print in contracts, providing an incentive for a monopolist to draft terms which are unfavorable to buyers. We model this problem, proving that trade must then be inefficient. We show that regulation which mandates efficient terms raises welfare. More interestingly, regulations which prohibit the least efficient terms may reduce welfare by inducing the monopolist not to other favorable terms. We extend these results to markets in which some buyers are naiv...

  3. Inkjet printed wireless smart bandage

    KAUST Repository

    Farooqui, Muhammad Fahad

    2016-12-19

    Chronic wounds affect millions of patients around the world and requires a major portion of health care budget for treatment. In this article, we present an unprecedented low cost continuous wireless monitoring system, realized through inkjet printing on a standard bandage strip, which can send early warnings as well as record long term wound progression data. The smart bandage can communicate upto a distance of 60 m when worn on the body.

  4. Nanoparticle Solutions for Printed Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    titania, silica ) were investigated in the production of complementary inks for complex devices. These were either obtained commercially in...fabricated by deposition of nanoparticle systems on ITO coated glass, but this was subsequently replaced by a printing a translucent conducting layer onto...Materials & Nanotechnology VI: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings vol 33 (Eds. S. Mathur, S. Sinha Ray, & M. Halbig), ISBN: 978-1-1182- 0597-6

  5. 3D printed bionic ears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing.

  6. Responsibility Towards The Customers Of Subscription-Based Software Solutions In The Context Of Using The Cloud Computing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Ștefan Ionescu

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The continuously transformation of the contemporary society and IT environment circumscribed its informational has led to the emergence of the cloud computing technology that provides the access to infrastructure and subscription-based software services, as well. In the context of a growing number of service providers with of cloud software, the paper aims to identify the perception of some current or potential users of the cloud solution, selected from among students enrolled in the accounting (professional or research master programs with the profile organized by the Bucharest University of Economic Studies, in terms of their expectations for cloud services, as well as the extent to which the SaaS providers are responsible for the provided services.

  7. Ruling the Market: How Venice Dominated the Early Music Printing World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Poore

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to prove that Venice was the main geographical center of music printing and publishing from the 1300s to the late 1500s using several economic, legal, and cultural factors. The primary research method was examining secondary sources on music printing, publishing, and European and Venetian history. From the 1300s to the late 1500s, Venetian commercial trade and activity, including book publishing, reached unheard of levels. Venice held a powerful position in the European economy and its merchants were able to leverage this to great advantage when the new technology of printing became available. The specialized business of music printing and publishing was dominated by Venetian companies, who produced more sheet music than the rest of Europe combined between 1530 and 1560. The economic success of Venice also created a legal framework that benefited the burgeoning music printing industry. The printing and publishing of music required considerable capital such as specialized type faces, but the government system and capitalist economy of Venice made it easier for entrepreneurs to finance music publishing enterprises. The Venetian government system also encouraged close personal or even family relationships between different printing and publishing companies. This created a culture in which competing companies frequently benefited from cooperation. This paper makes it clear that there were a variety of economic, legal, and cultural factors that helped to propel Venice to its preeminent position as the provider of printed music to Europe during the 1300s to the late 1500s. In the mid-Renaissance, when it came to printed music, Venice did indeed own the market.

  8. A catalogue of potentially bright close binary gravitational wave sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webbink, Ronald F.

    This is a current print-out of results of a survey, undertaken in the spring of 1985, to identify those known binary stars which might produce significant gravitational wave amplitudes at earth, either dimensionless strain amplitudes exceeding a threshold h = 10-21, or energy fluxes exceeding F = 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1. All real or putative binaries brighter than a certain limiting magnitude (calculated as a function of primary spectral type, orbital period, orbital eccentricity, and bandpass) are included. All double degenerate binaries and Wolf-Rayet binaries with known or suspected orbital periods have also been included. The catalog consists of two parts: a listing of objects in ascending order of Right Ascension (Equinox B1950), followed by an index, listing of objects by identification number according to all major stellar catalogs. The object listing is a print-out of the spreadsheets on which the catalog is currently maintained. It should be noted that the use of this spreadsheet program imposes some limitations on the display of entries. Text entries which exceed the cell size may appear in truncated form, or may run into adjacent columns. Greek characters are not available; they are represented here by the first two or three letters of their Roman names, the first letter appearing as a capital or lower-case letter according to whether the capital or lower-case Greek character is represented. Neither superscripts nor subscripts are available; they appear here in normal position and type-face. The index provides the Right Ascension and Declination of objects sorted by catalogue number.

  9. Peer Review Quality and Transparency of the Peer-Review Process in Open Access and Subscription Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicherts, Jelte M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent controversies highlighting substandard peer review in Open Access (OA) and traditional (subscription) journals have increased the need for authors, funders, publishers, and institutions to assure quality of peer-review in academic journals. I propose that transparency of the peer-review process may be seen as an indicator of the quality of peer-review, and develop and validate a tool enabling different stakeholders to assess transparency of the peer-review process. Methods and Findings Based on editorial guidelines and best practices, I developed a 14-item tool to rate transparency of the peer-review process on the basis of journals’ websites. In Study 1, a random sample of 231 authors of papers in 92 subscription journals in different fields rated transparency of the journals that published their work. Authors’ ratings of the transparency were positively associated with quality of the peer-review process but unrelated to journal’s impact factors. In Study 2, 20 experts on OA publishing assessed the transparency of established (non-OA) journals, OA journals categorized as being published by potential predatory publishers, and journals from the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ). Results show high reliability across items (α = .91) and sufficient reliability across raters. Ratings differentiated the three types of journals well. In Study 3, academic librarians rated a random sample of 140 DOAJ journals and another 54 journals that had received a hoax paper written by Bohannon to test peer-review quality. Journals with higher transparency ratings were less likely to accept the flawed paper and showed higher impact as measured by the h5 index from Google Scholar. Conclusions The tool to assess transparency of the peer-review process at academic journals shows promising reliability and validity. The transparency of the peer-review process can be seen as an indicator of peer-review quality allowing the tool to be used to predict academic

  10. Peer Review Quality and Transparency of the Peer-Review Process in Open Access and Subscription Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicherts, Jelte M

    2016-01-01

    Recent controversies highlighting substandard peer review in Open Access (OA) and traditional (subscription) journals have increased the need for authors, funders, publishers, and institutions to assure quality of peer-review in academic journals. I propose that transparency of the peer-review process may be seen as an indicator of the quality of peer-review, and develop and validate a tool enabling different stakeholders to assess transparency of the peer-review process. Based on editorial guidelines and best practices, I developed a 14-item tool to rate transparency of the peer-review process on the basis of journals' websites. In Study 1, a random sample of 231 authors of papers in 92 subscription journals in different fields rated transparency of the journals that published their work. Authors' ratings of the transparency were positively associated with quality of the peer-review process but unrelated to journal's impact factors. In Study 2, 20 experts on OA publishing assessed the transparency of established (non-OA) journals, OA journals categorized as being published by potential predatory publishers, and journals from the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ). Results show high reliability across items (α = .91) and sufficient reliability across raters. Ratings differentiated the three types of journals well. In Study 3, academic librarians rated a random sample of 140 DOAJ journals and another 54 journals that had received a hoax paper written by Bohannon to test peer-review quality. Journals with higher transparency ratings were less likely to accept the flawed paper and showed higher impact as measured by the h5 index from Google Scholar. The tool to assess transparency of the peer-review process at academic journals shows promising reliability and validity. The transparency of the peer-review process can be seen as an indicator of peer-review quality allowing the tool to be used to predict academic quality in new journals.

  11. Peer Review Quality and Transparency of the Peer-Review Process in Open Access and Subscription Journals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelte M Wicherts

    Full Text Available Recent controversies highlighting substandard peer review in Open Access (OA and traditional (subscription journals have increased the need for authors, funders, publishers, and institutions to assure quality of peer-review in academic journals. I propose that transparency of the peer-review process may be seen as an indicator of the quality of peer-review, and develop and validate a tool enabling different stakeholders to assess transparency of the peer-review process.Based on editorial guidelines and best practices, I developed a 14-item tool to rate transparency of the peer-review process on the basis of journals' websites. In Study 1, a random sample of 231 authors of papers in 92 subscription journals in different fields rated transparency of the journals that published their work. Authors' ratings of the transparency were positively associated with quality of the peer-review process but unrelated to journal's impact factors. In Study 2, 20 experts on OA publishing assessed the transparency of established (non-OA journals, OA journals categorized as being published by potential predatory publishers, and journals from the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ. Results show high reliability across items (α = .91 and sufficient reliability across raters. Ratings differentiated the three types of journals well. In Study 3, academic librarians rated a random sample of 140 DOAJ journals and another 54 journals that had received a hoax paper written by Bohannon to test peer-review quality. Journals with higher transparency ratings were less likely to accept the flawed paper and showed higher impact as measured by the h5 index from Google Scholar.The tool to assess transparency of the peer-review process at academic journals shows promising reliability and validity. The transparency of the peer-review process can be seen as an indicator of peer-review quality allowing the tool to be used to predict academic quality in new journals.

  12. Impact Of Screen Ruling on the Formation of the Printing Elements on the Flexographic Printing Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Tomašegović

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Flexography is a printing technique widely used in the packaging production. The main feature of the flexography is the usage of the printing plate which is elastically deformed during the reproduction process. The printing plate is made of elastic material, rubber or nowadays mainly of different types of photopolymer. Elasticity of the plate enables printing on a wide range of printing substrates (papers, foils, board, magazines, hygienic papers etc., which is one of its advantages compared to other printing techniques. On the other hand, deformations of the printing plate in the printing process caused by the pressure between the printing plate and substrate present major limitation of the flexography. Beside functional properties of the printing plate in the printing process, the plate making process including photopolymerization highly influences the value of the halftones on the printing plate, and consequently on the final product.  The aim of this paper is to examine the influence of the screen ruling on the formation of the printing elements and the procedure of the printing plate making process adjustment in order to achieve optimal quality of the printing plate and, therefore, the final product. Results have shown that the usage of different screen ruling is of great significance in processes of printing plate curve adjustment. It was proven that the usage of different screen ruling highly influences the relief depth and a cross-section of the printing elements (3D analysis, which have a significant impact on the final product quality, but cannot be detected in 2D analysis.

  13. Impact Of Screen Ruling on the Formation of the Printing Elements on the Flexographic Printing Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Tomašegović

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Flexography is a printing technique widely used in the packaging production. The main feature of the flexography is the usage of the printing plate which is elastically deformed during the reproduction process. The printing plate is made of elastic material, rubber or nowadays mainly of different types of photopolymer. Elasticity of the plate enables printing on a wide range of printing substrates (papers, foils, board, magazines, hygienic papers etc., which is one of its advantages compared to other printing techniques. On the other hand, deformations of the printing plate in the printing process caused by the pressure between the printing plate and substrate present major limitation of the flexography. Beside functional properties of the printing plate in the printing process, the plate making process including photopolymerization highly influences the value of the halftones on the printing plate, and consequently on the final product. The aim of this paper is to examine the influence of the screen ruling on the formation of the printing elements and the procedure of the printing plate making process adjustment in order to achieve optimal quality of the printing plate and, therefore, the final product.Results have shown that the usage of different screen ruling is of great significance in processes of printing plate curve adjustment. It was proven that the usage of different screen ruling highly influences the relief depth and a cross-section of the printing elements (3D analysis, which have a significant impact on the final product quality, but cannot be detected in 2D analysis.

  14. Printing-induced cell injury evaluation during laser printing of 3T3 mouse fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengyi; Chai, Wenxuan; Xiong, Ruitong; Zhou, Lei; Huang, Yong

    2017-06-20

    Three-dimensional bioprinting has emerged as a promising solution for the freeform fabrication of living cellular constructs, which can be used for tissue/organ transplantation and tissue models. During bioprinting, some living cells are unavoidably injured and may become necrotic or apoptotic cells. This study aims to investigate the printing-induced cell injury and evaluates injury types of post-printing cells using the annexin V/7-aminoactinomycin D and FAM-DEVD-FMK/propidium iodide assays during laser printing of NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts. As observed, the percentage of post-printing early apoptotic mouse fibroblasts increases with the incubation time, indicating that post-printing apoptotic mouse fibroblasts have different initiation lag times of apoptosis due to different levels of mechanical stress exerted during laser printing. Post-printing necrotic mouse fibroblasts can be detected immediately after printing, while post-printing early apoptotic mouse fibroblasts need time to develop into a late apoptotic stage. The minimum time needed for post-printing early apoptotic mouse fibroblasts to complete their apoptosis pathway and transition into late apoptotic mouse fibroblasts is from 4 h to 5 h post-printing. The resulting knowledge of the evolution of different apoptotic post-printing mouse fibroblasts will help better design future experiments to quantitatively determine, model, and mitigate the post-printing cell injury based on molecular signal pathway modeling.

  15. Plasma jet printing for flexible substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandhiraman, Ram P.; Singh, Eric; Diaz-Cartagena, Diana C.; Koehne, Jessica; Meyyappan, M. [Center for Nanotechnology, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California 94035 (United States); Nordlund, Dennis [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2016-03-21

    Recent interest in flexible electronics and wearable devices has created a demand for fast and highly repeatable printing processes suitable for device manufacturing. Robust printing technology is critical for the integration of sensors and other devices on flexible substrates such as paper and textile. An atmospheric pressure plasma-based printing process has been developed to deposit different types of nanomaterials on flexible substrates. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes were deposited on paper to demonstrate site-selective deposition as well as direct printing without any type of patterning. Plasma-printed nanotubes were compared with non-plasma-printed samples under similar gas flow and other experimental conditions and found to be denser with higher conductivity. The utility of the nanotubes on the paper substrate as a biosensor and chemical sensor was demonstrated by the detection of dopamine, a neurotransmitter, and ammonia, respectively.

  16. Prints Charles ja prints Michael külastasid Tallinna kirikuid / Allan Tammiku

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tammiku, Allan

    2001-01-01

    Prints Charles külastas 6. novembril Eesti-visiidi ajal Tallinna toomkirikut ja Pühavaimu kirikut, prints Michael viibis Tallinnas 11. novembril eravisiidil, ta külastas toomkirikut, Niguliste ja Pühavaimu kirikut

  17. 3D Printed Multimaterial Microfluidic Valve

    OpenAIRE

    Keating, Steven J.; Gariboldi, Maria Isabella; Patrick, William G.; Sharma, Sunanda; Kong, David S.; Oxman, Neri

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel 3D printed multimaterial microfluidic proportional valve. The microfluidic valve is a fundamental primitive that enables the development of programmable, automated devices for controlling fluids in a precise manner. We discuss valve characterization results, as well as exploratory design variations in channel width, membrane thickness, and membrane stiffness. Compared to previous single material 3D printed valves that are stiff, these printed valves constrain fluidic deform...

  18. ERP system for 3D printing industry

    OpenAIRE

    Deaky Bogdan; Pârv Luminița

    2017-01-01

    GOCREATE is an original cloud-based production management and optimization service which helps 3D printing service providers to use their resources better. The proposed Enterprise Resource Planning system can significantly increase income through improved productivity. With GOCREATE, the 3D printing service providers get a much higher production efficiency at a much lower licensing cost, to increase their competitiveness in the fast growing 3D printing market.

  19. ERP system for 3D printing industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deaky Bogdan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available GOCREATE is an original cloud-based production management and optimization service which helps 3D printing service providers to use their resources better. The proposed Enterprise Resource Planning system can significantly increase income through improved productivity. With GOCREATE, the 3D printing service providers get a much higher production efficiency at a much lower licensing cost, to increase their competitiveness in the fast growing 3D printing market.

  20. 3D Bio-Printing Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xianbin

    2018-01-01

    Ultimate goal of tissue engineering is to replace pathological or necrotic body tissue or organ by artificial tissue or organ and tissue engineering is a very promising research field. 3D bio-printing is a kind of emerging technologies and a branch of tissue engineering. It has made significant progress in the past decade. 3D bio-printing can realize tissue and organ construction in vitro and has wide application in basic research and pharmacy. This paper is to make an analysis and review on 3D bio-printing from the perspectives of bioink, printing technology and technology application.

  1. Recent developments and directions in printed nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyung Woo; Zhou, Tianlei; Singh, Madhusudan; Jabbour, Ghassan E.

    2015-02-01

    In this review, we survey several recent developments in printing of nanomaterials for contacts, transistors, sensors of various kinds, light-emitting diodes, solar cells, memory devices, and bone and organ implants. The commonly used nanomaterials are classified according to whether they are conductive, semiconducting/insulating or biological in nature. While many printing processes are covered, special attention is paid to inkjet printing and roll-to-roll printing in light of their complexity and popularity. In conclusion, we present our view of the future development of this field.

  2. Embedding complex objects with 3d printing

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2017-10-12

    A CMOS technology-compatible fabrication process for flexible CMOS electronics embedded during additive manufacturing (i.e. 3D printing). A method for such a process may include printing a first portion of a 3D structure; pausing the step of printing the 3D structure to embed the flexible silicon substrate; placing the flexible silicon substrate in a cavity of the first portion of the 3D structure to embed the flexible silicon substrate in the 3D structure; and resuming the step of printing the 3D structure to form the second portion of the 3D structure.

  3. Considerations for millimeter wave printed antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozar, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    Calculated data are presented on the performance of printed antenna elements on substrates which may be electrically thick, as would be the case for printed antennas at millimeter wave frequencies. Printed dipoles and microstrip patch antennas on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), quartz, and gallium arsenide substrates are considered. Data are given for resonant length, resonant resistance, bandwidth, loss due to surface waves, loss due to dielectric heating, and mutual coupling. Also presented is an optimization procedure for maximizing or minimizing power launched into surface waves from a multielement printed antenna array. The data are calculated by a moment method solution.

  4. Active origami by 4D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Qi; Dunn, Conner K.; Qi, H. Jerry; Dunn, Martin L.

    2014-09-01

    Recent advances in three dimensional (3D) printing technology that allow multiple materials to be printed within each layer enable the creation of materials and components with precisely controlled heterogeneous microstructures. In addition, active materials, such as shape memory polymers, can be printed to create an active microstructure within a solid. These active materials can subsequently be activated in a controlled manner to change the shape or configuration of the solid in response to an environmental stimulus. This has been termed 4D printing, with the 4th dimension being the time-dependent shape change after the printing. In this paper, we advance the 4D printing concept to the design and fabrication of active origami, where a flat sheet automatically folds into a complicated 3D component. Here we print active composites with shape memory polymer fibers precisely printed in an elastomeric matrix and use them as intelligent active hinges to enable origami folding patterns. We develop a theoretical model to provide guidance in selecting design parameters such as fiber dimensions, hinge length, and programming strains and temperature. Using the model, we design and fabricate several active origami components that assemble from flat polymer sheets, including a box, a pyramid, and two origami airplanes. In addition, we directly print a 3D box with active composite hinges and program it to assume a temporary flat shape that subsequently recovers to the 3D box shape on demand.

  5. Banner Pages on the New Printing Infrastructure

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Changes to the printing service were announced in CERN Bulletin No. 37-38/2006. In the new infrastructure, the printing of the banner page has been disabled in order to reduce paper consumption. Statistics show that the average print job size is small and the paper savings by not printing the banner page could be up to 20 %. When each printer is moved onto the new infrastructure banner page printing will be disabled. In the case of corridor printers which are shared by several users, the Helpdesk can re-enable banner page printing upon request. We hope ultimately to arrive at a situation where banner page printing is enabled on fewer than 10% of printers registered on the network. You can still print banner pages on printers where it has been centrally disabled by using Linux. Simply add it to your print job on the client side by adding the -o job-sheets option to your lpr command. Detailed documentation is available on each SLC3/4 under the following link: http://localhost:631/sum.html#4_2 Please bea...

  6. Artists' books at the Centre for Fine Print Research

    OpenAIRE

    Bodman, S. L.; Sowden, T.

    2015-01-01

    Article on the artists’ books area within the Centre for Fine\\ud Print Research (CFPR) at the University of the West\\ud of England (UWE). Evolving over a fifteen-year\\ud period, through ongoing developments in external and\\ud faculty funded projects, and a wider national growth of\\ud interest in the book as a work of art. The programme is\\ud led by research staff (the authors of this article), working\\ud closely with colleagues, artists, curators, students, and\\ud external parties from many c...

  7. MolPrint3D: Enhanced 3D Printing of Ball-and-Stick Molecular Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paukstelis, Paul J.

    2018-01-01

    The increased availability of noncommercial 3D printers has provided instructors and students improved access to printing technology. However, printing complex ball-and-stick molecular structures faces distinct challenges, including the need for support structures that increase with molecular complexity. MolPrint3D is a software add-on for the…

  8. Printing of small molecular medicines from the vapor phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, Olga; Raghavan, Shreya; Mazzara, J Maxwell; Senabulya, Nancy; Sinko, Patrick D; Fleck, Elyse; Rockwell, Christopher; Simopoulos, Nicholas; Jones, Christina M; Schwendeman, Anna; Mehta, Geeta; Clarke, Roy; Amidon, Gregory E; Shtein, Max

    2017-09-27

    There is growing need to develop efficient methods for early-stage drug discovery, continuous manufacturing of drug delivery vehicles, and ultra-precise dosing of high potency drugs. Here we demonstrate the use of solvent-free organic vapor jet printing to deposit nanostructured films of small molecular pharmaceutical ingredients, including caffeine, paracetamol, ibuprofen, tamoxifen, BAY 11-7082 and fluorescein, with accuracy on the scale of micrograms per square centimeter, onto glass, Tegaderm, Listerine tabs, and stainless steel microneedles. The printed films exhibit similar crystallographic order and chemistry as the original powders; controlled, order-of-magnitude enhancements of dissolution rate are observed relative to powder-form particles. In vitro treatment of breast and ovarian cancer cell cultures in aqueous media by tamoxifen and BAY 11-7082 films shows similar behavior to drugs pre-dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide. The demonstrated precise printing of medicines as films, without the use of solvents, can accelerate drug screening and enable continuous manufacturing, while enhancing dosage accuracy.Traditional approaches used in the pharmaceutical industry are not precise or versatile enough for customized medicine formulation and manufacture. Here the authors produce a method to form coatings, with accurate dosages, as well as a means of closely controlling dissolution kinetics.

  9. Printed-Compliant Electrochemical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Abhinav Machhindra

    Compliant electronic devices such as health monitoring tags, wearable electronics, fabricated using add-on printing techniques or by patterning traditional silicon based electronics in ultrathin format, enable them to flex, stretch and twist without any noticeable change in performance. These devices require a power source---a primary or secondary battery---to power the electronics. Traditional forms of batteries are bulky and negate the advantages of this new class of devices. Herein, I investigate various printing techniques and architectures that enable compliant batteries and study the performance of such batteries under mechanical deformations. Firstly, this dissertation investigates electrochemical-mechanical performance of a dispenser printed micro-battery using a microfluidic cell. Nanoparticulate silver ink was printed and cured to form silver electrodes, which was charged in-situ to form a silver-zinc battery. The electrochemical performance of the silver-zinc micro-battery was similar to macro-sized batteries. The shear stress generated by flow of electrolyte over the electrode was used to emulate the shear stress generated during flexing and was used as a tool to study the shear strength of the silver electrode at different state of charge. The dissertation then investigates supported architecture as a reinforcement to maintain the performance of the battery under strain. We demonstrate a highly flexible Zn-MnO2 alkalinebattery by embedding the electrochemically active particles in a mesh support. The mesh support absorbs the stresses generated during flexing. A Similar principle was used to make a stretchable battery. The backbone of the stretchable electrode was a stretchable fabric with silver-coated fibers weaved through a rubber network, which served as the current collector. The fabric was coated with Zn and MnO2 to form a stretchable electrode. Due to the weave architecture the electrode could stretch by 100% without any loss is contact between

  10. Printed circuit dispersive transmission line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikezi, Hiroyuki; Lin-Liu, Yuh-Ren; DeGrassie, John S.

    1991-01-01

    A printed circuit dispersive transmission line structure is disclosed comprising an insulator, a ground plane formed on one surface of the insulator, a first transmission line formed on a second surface of the insulator, and a second transmission line also formed on the second surface of the insulator and of longer length than the first transmission line and periodically intersecting the first transmission line. In a preferred embodiment, the transmission line structure exhibits highly dispersive characteristics by designing the length of one of the transmission line between two adjacent periodic intersections to be longer than the other.

  11. Evolutionary Aesthetics and Print Advertising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Luczaj

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the extent to which predictions based on the theory of evolutionary aesthetics are utilized by the advertising industry. The purpose of a comprehensive content analysis of print advertising is to determine whether the items indicated by evolutionists such as animals, flowers, certain types of landscapes, beautiful humans, and some colors are part of real advertising strategies. This article has shown that many evolutionary hypotheses (although not all of them are supported by empirical data. Along with these hypotheses, some inferences from Bourdieu’s cultural capital theory were tested. It turned out that advertising uses both biological schemata and cultural patterns to make an image more likable.

  12. Mail2Print online tutorial

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Mail2print is a feature which allows you to send documents to a printer by mail. This tutorial (text attached to the event page) explains how to use this service. Content owner: Vincent Nicolas Bippus Presenter: Pedro Augusto de Freitas Batista Tell us what you think via e-learning.support at cern.ch More tutorials in the e-learning collection of the CERN Document Server (CDS) https://cds.cern.ch/collection/E-learning%20modules?ln=en All info about the CERN rapid e-learning project is linked from http://twiki.cern.ch/ELearning  

  13. Realizing what's essential: a case study on integrating electronic journal management into a print-centric technical services department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollar, Daniel M; Gallagher, John; Glover, Janis; Marone, Regina Kenny; Crooker, Cynthia

    2007-04-01

    To support migration from print to electronic resources, the Cushing/Whitney Medical Library at Yale University reorganized its Technical Services Department to focus on managing electronic resources. The library hired consultants to help plan the changes and to present recommendations for integrating electronic resource management into every position. The library task force decided to focus initial efforts on the periodical collection. To free staff time to devote to electronic journals, most of the print subscriptions were switched to online only and new workflows were developed for e-journals. Staff learned new responsibilities such as activating e-journals, maintaining accurate holdings information in the online public access catalog and e-journals database ("electronic shelf reading"), updating the link resolver knowledgebase, and troubleshooting. All of the serials team members now spend significant amounts of time managing e-journals. The serials staff now spends its time managing the materials most important to the library's clientele (e-journals and databases). The team's proactive approach to maintenance work and rapid response to reported problems should improve patrons' experiences using e-journals. The library is taking advantage of new technologies such as an electronic resource management system, and library workflows and procedures will continue to evolve as technology changes.

  14. Mass transfer ways of ultraviolet printing ink ingredients into foodstuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, T; Simat, T J; Altkofer, W

    2010-07-01

    The case of isopropylthioxanthone (ITX) showed conclusively that the ingredients of ultraviolet printing inks may migrate into packaged foodstuffs. For multilayered materials like beverage cartons, the only way that mass transfer can occur is by the so-called set-off effect. In contrast, in the case of rigid plastics like yoghurt cups, two other methods of mass transfer, permeation and gas phase, have to be considered. In cooperation with producers of ink, plastic cups and yoghurt, a project was conducted in order to elucidate the mass transfer of ink ingredients. In addition, the influence of storage time and the age of ultraviolet lamps on the migration level was examined. The suitability of 50% ethanol as a simulant for yoghurt was also tested. ITX was chosen as a model migrant, as it is easily detectable. Furthermore, the migration of two other substances, the photo-initiator 2-methyl-4'-(methylthio)-2-morpholinopropiophenone (MTMP) and the amine synergist ethyl-4-(dimethylamino)benzoate (EDAB), which may be used in combination with ITX, was studied. Before being filled with yoghurt or 50% ethanol, the printed cups were stored under different contact conditions, with and without contact between the inner layer and the printed surfaces, in order to distinguish between the possible mass transfer ways. All analyses were performed by means of high performance liquid chromatography with diode array and fluorescence detection (HPLC-DAD/FLD). It was shown that contamination with ITX and EDAB occurs via set-off and that the degree of migration increases with lamp age and storage time of the unfilled cups. Migration of MTMP was not detectable. The results show that besides the careful selection of the appropriate raw materials for printing ink, a close monitoring of the process also plays a major role in migration control. In addition, the results proved that 50% ethanol is a suitable simulant for yoghurt.

  15. Ceramic Product Forming Technologies Research Based on 3D Printing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Mingchun; Yang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes two ceramic-forming technologies based on 3-D printing. One technology forms the product with 3-D printing indirectly, while the other technology forms the product directly with 3-D printing...

  16. PERFORMANCE DEMONSTRATIONS OF ALTERNATIVE SCREEN RECLAMATION PRODUCTS FOR SCREEN PRINTING

    Science.gov (United States)

    This project evaluated environmentally-preferable products for the screen reclamation process In screen printing during month-long demonstrations at 23 printing facilities nationwide. hrough the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Design for the Environment Printing Project, pr...

  17. Changes in the Printing Service

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    The print servers at CERN are being replaced and all CERN printers will be gradually migrated to a new infrastructure. This will involve a few small changes for the users, which are highlighted in the following sections. Windows computers in the CERN domain (NICE XP/2000) The printer migration in the NICE environment is transparent and will be done automatically. The only significant change is that the 'CERN Printer Wizard' will be removed. To install a new printer and to monitor or manage its printing queue you should use the native windows interface, as explained at http://cern.ch/WinServices/Help/?kbid=070103 Linux SLC3, SLC4 The migration was transparent and has already been completed for Linux computers. If necessary, you can reconfigure your system again at any time by running the following command: /usr/bin/cern-config-printers -u The only significant change for Linux is the disappearance of the xprint command. Use the lpr command instead. Documentation for SLC3 is available at http://cern...

  18. Changes in the Printing Service

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    The print servers at CERN are being replaced and all CERN printers will be gradually migrated to a new infrastructure. This will involve a few small changes for the users, which are highlighted in the following sections. Windows computers in the CERN domain (NICE XP/2000) The printer migration in the NICE environment is transparent and will be done automatically. The only significant change is that the 'CERN Printer Wizard'will be removed. To install a new printer and to monitor or manage its printing queue you should use the native windows interface, as explained at http://cern.ch/WinServices/Help/?kbid=070103 Linux SLC3, SLC4 The migration was transparent and has already been completed for Linux computers. If necessary, you can reconfigure your system again at any time by running the following command: /usr/bin/cern-config-printers -u The only significant change for Linux is the disappearance of the xprint command. Use the lpr command instead. Documentation for SLC3 is available at: h...

  19. A novel approach for latent print identification using accurate overlays to prioritize reference prints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantz, Daniel T; Gantz, Donald T; Walch, Mark A; Roberts, Maria Antonia; Buscaglia, JoAnn

    2014-12-01

    A novel approach to automated fingerprint matching and scoring that produces accurate locally and nonlinearly adjusted overlays of a latent print onto each reference print in a corpus is described. The technology, which addresses challenges inherent to latent prints, provides the latent print examiner with a prioritized ranking of candidate reference prints based on the overlays of the latent onto each candidate print. In addition to supporting current latent print comparison practices, this approach can make it possible to return a greater number of AFIS candidate prints because the ranked overlays provide a substantial starting point for latent-to-reference print comparison. To provide the image information required to create an accurate overlay of a latent print onto a reference print, "Ridge-Specific Markers" (RSMs), which correspond to short continuous segments of a ridge or furrow, are introduced. RSMs are reliably associated with any specific local section of a ridge or a furrow using the geometric information available from the image. Latent prints are commonly fragmentary, with reduced clarity and limited minutiae (i.e., ridge endings and bifurcations). Even in the absence of traditional minutiae, latent prints contain very important information in their ridges that permit automated matching using RSMs. No print orientation or information beyond the RSMs is required to generate the overlays. This automated process is applied to the 88 good quality latent prints in the NIST Special Database (SD) 27. Nonlinear overlays of each latent were produced onto all of the 88 reference prints in the NIST SD27. With fully automated processing, the true mate reference prints were ranked in the first candidate position for 80.7% of the latents tested, and 89.8% of the true mate reference prints ranked in the top ten positions. After manual post-processing of those latents for which the true mate reference print was not ranked first, these frequencies increased to 90

  20. Developing an academic medical library core journal collection in the (almost) post-print era: the Florida State University College of Medicine Medical Library experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Barbara S; Nagy, Suzanne P

    2003-07-01

    The Florida State University (FSU) College of Medicine Medical Library is the first academic medical library to be established since the Web's dramatic appearance during the 1990s. A large customer base for electronic medical information resources is both comfortable with and eager to migrate to the electronic format completely, and vendors are designing radical pricing models that make print journal cancellations economically advantageous. In this (almost) post-print environment, the new FSU Medical Library is being created and will continue to evolve. By analyzing print journal subscription lists of eighteen academic medical libraries with similar missions to the community-based FSU College of Medicine and by entering these and selected quality indicators into a Microsoft Access database, a core list was created. This list serves as a selection guide, as a point for discussion with faculty and curriculum leaders when creating budgets, and for financial negotiations in a broader university environment. After journal titles specific to allied health sciences, veterinary medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, library science, and nursing were eliminated from the list, 4,225 unique journal titles emerged. Based on a ten-point scale including SERHOLD holdings and DOCLINE borrowing activity, a list of 449 core titles is identified. The core list has been saved in spreadsheet format for easy sorting by a number of parameters.

  1. Templated Dry Printing of Conductive Metal Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, David Alexander

    Printed electronics can lower the cost and increase the ubiquity of electrical components such as batteries, sensors, and telemetry systems. Unfortunately, the advance of printed electronics has been held back by the limited minimum resolution, aspect ratio, and feature fidelity of present printing techniques such as gravure, screen printing and inkjet printing. Templated dry printing offers a solution to these problems by patterning nanoparticle inks into templates before drying. This dissertation shows advancements in two varieties of templated dry nanoprinting. The first, advective micromolding in vapor-permeable templates (AMPT) is a microfluidic approach that uses evaporation-driven mold filling to create submicron features with a 1:1 aspect ratio. We will discuss submicron surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators made through this process, and the refinement process in the template manufacturing process necessary to make these devices. We also present modeling techniques that can be applied to future AMPT templates. We conclude with a modified templated dry printing that improves throughput and isolated feature patterning by transferring dry-templated features with laser ablation. This method utilizes surface energy-defined templates to pattern features via doctor blade coating. Patterned and dried features can be transferred to a polymer substrate with an Nd:YAG MOPA fiber laser, and printed features can be smaller than the laser beam width.

  2. Learning about Environmental Print through Picture Books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuby, Patricia; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes picture books that contain environmental print (print found in the natural environment of a child, such as logos, billboards, and road signs) and how they can be used in the classroom. Includes "ABC Drive!" by Naomi Howland (1994), "The Signmaker's Assistant" by Tedd Arnold (1992), and four others. Also provides a…

  3. Gyotaku - Japanese Fish Printing. Leaflet 2548.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewees, Christopher M.

    A list of materials needed and methodology for "gyotaku" (fish rubbing) are provided. Originally developed in Japan and China during the early 1800's, the technique of fish printing has become popular in the United States during the last 10 years. Because good printing results depend on an understanding of fish anatomy, a chart is…

  4. 3D printing of functional structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    The technology colloquial known as ‘3D printing’ has developed in such diversity in printing technologies and application fields that meanwhile it seems anything is possible. However, clearly the ideal 3D Printer, with high resolution, multi-material capability, fast printing, etc. is yet to be

  5. 3D Printed Block Copolymer Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalfani, Vincent F.; Turner, C. Heath; Rupar, Paul A.; Jenkins, Alexander H.; Bara, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of 3D printing has dramatically advanced the availability of tangible molecular and extended solid models. Interestingly, there are few nanostructure models available both commercially and through other do-it-yourself approaches such as 3D printing. This is unfortunate given the importance of nanotechnology in science today. In this…

  6. 3D Printing of Molecular Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Adam; Olson, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Physical molecular models have played a valuable role in our understanding of the invisible nano-scale world. We discuss 3D printing and its use in producing models of the molecules of life. Complex biomolecular models, produced from 3D printed parts, can demonstrate characteristics of molecular structure and function, such as viral self-assembly,…

  7. Medical 3D Printing for the Radiologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Liacouras, Peter; Imanzadeh, Amir; Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Cai, Tianrun; Kumamaru, Kanako K; George, Elizabeth; Wake, Nicole; Caterson, Edward J; Pomahac, Bohdan; Ho, Vincent B; Grant, Gerald T; Rybicki, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    While use of advanced visualization in radiology is instrumental in diagnosis and communication with referring clinicians, there is an unmet need to render Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images as three-dimensional (3D) printed models capable of providing both tactile feedback and tangible depth information about anatomic and pathologic states. Three-dimensional printed models, already entrenched in the nonmedical sciences, are rapidly being embraced in medicine as well as in the lay community. Incorporating 3D printing from images generated and interpreted by radiologists presents particular challenges, including training, materials and equipment, and guidelines. The overall costs of a 3D printing laboratory must be balanced by the clinical benefits. It is expected that the number of 3D-printed models generated from DICOM images for planning interventions and fabricating implants will grow exponentially. Radiologists should at a minimum be familiar with 3D printing as it relates to their field, including types of 3D printing technologies and materials used to create 3D-printed anatomic models, published applications of models to date, and clinical benefits in radiology. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2015.

  8. A Framework for 3d Printing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilkington, Alan; Frandsen, Thomas; Kapetaniou, Chrystalla

    3D printing technologies and processes offer such a radical range of options for firms that we currently lack a structured way of recording possible impact and recommending actions for managers. The changes arising from 3d printing includes more than just new options for product design, but also...

  9. patient perceptions of print information, education, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patient perceptions of print information, education, and communication related to HIV/AIDS treatment. ... Four patient-oriented print IEC brochures in Swahili were designed to be read at the clinic waiting areas and also carried home by patients to supplement the knowledge received from routine counseling during clinic ...

  10. Medical 3D Printing for the Radiologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Liacouras, Peter; Imanzadeh, Amir; Giannopoulos, Andreas A.; Cai, Tianrun; Kumamaru, Kanako K.; George, Elizabeth; Wake, Nicole; Caterson, Edward J.; Pomahac, Bohdan; Ho, Vincent B.; Grant, Gerald T.

    2015-01-01

    While use of advanced visualization in radiology is instrumental in diagnosis and communication with referring clinicians, there is an unmet need to render Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images as three-dimensional (3D) printed models capable of providing both tactile feedback and tangible depth information about anatomic and pathologic states. Three-dimensional printed models, already entrenched in the nonmedical sciences, are rapidly being embraced in medicine as well as in the lay community. Incorporating 3D printing from images generated and interpreted by radiologists presents particular challenges, including training, materials and equipment, and guidelines. The overall costs of a 3D printing laboratory must be balanced by the clinical benefits. It is expected that the number of 3D-printed models generated from DICOM images for planning interventions and fabricating implants will grow exponentially. Radiologists should at a minimum be familiar with 3D printing as it relates to their field, including types of 3D printing technologies and materials used to create 3D-printed anatomic models, published applications of models to date, and clinical benefits in radiology. Online supplemental material is available for this article. ©RSNA, 2015 PMID:26562233

  11. Research highlights: printing the future of microfabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Peter; Murray, Coleman; Kim, Donghyuk; Di Carlo, Dino

    2014-05-07

    In this issue we highlight emerging microfabrication approaches suitable for microfluidic systems with a focus on "additive manufacturing" processes (i.e. printing). In parallel with the now-wider availability of low cost consumer-grade 3D printers (as evidenced by at least three brands of 3D printers for sale in a recent visit to an electronics store in Akihabara, Tokyo), commercial-grade 3D printers are ramping to higher and higher resolution with new capabilities, such as printing of multiple materials of different transparency, and with different mechanical and electrical properties. We highlight new work showing that 3D printing (stereolithography approaches in particular) has now risen as a viable technology to print whole microfluidic devices. Printing on 2D surfaces such as paper is an everyday experience, and has been used widely in analytical chemistry for printing conductive materials on paper strips for glucose and other electrochemical sensors. We highlight recent work using electrodes printed on paper for digital microfluidic droplet actuation. Finally, we highlight recent work in which printing of membrane-bound droplets that interconnect through bilayer membranes may open up an entirely new approach to microfluidic manufacturing of soft devices that mimic physiological systems.

  12. Digital Dentistry — 3D Printing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaharia Cristian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D printing is an additive manufacturing method in which a 3D item is formed by laying down successive layers of material. 3D printers are machines that produce representations of objects either planned with a CAD program or scanned with a 3D scanner. Printing is a method for replicating text and pictures, typically with ink on paper. We can print different dental pieces using different methods such as selective laser sintering (SLS, stereolithography, fused deposition modeling, and laminated object manufacturing. The materials are certified for printing individual impression trays, orthodontic models, gingiva mask, and different prosthetic objects. The material can reach a flexural strength of more than 80 MPa. 3D printing takes the effectiveness of digital projects to the production phase. Dental laboratories are able to produce crowns, bridges, stone models, and various orthodontic appliances by methods that combine oral scanning, 3D printing, and CAD/CAM design. Modern 3D printing has been used for the development of prototypes for several years, and it has begun to find its use in the world of manufacturing. Digital technology and 3D printing have significantly elevated the rate of success in dental implantology using custom surgical guides and improving the quality and accuracy of dental work.

  13. 32 CFR 705.12 - Print media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Print media. 705.12 Section 705.12 National... OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.12 Print media. Requests for reprints of items published in national media will be addressed to the Chief of Information. Commands will be careful not to...

  14. Interface mechanics of adhesiveless microtransfer printing processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim-Lee, H.-J.; Carlson, A.; Grierson, D. S.; Rogers, J. A.; Turner, K. T.

    2014-04-01

    Microtransfer printing is a versatile process for retrieving, transferring, and placing nanomembranes of various materials on a diverse set of substrates. The process relies on the ability to preferentially propagate a crack along specific interfaces at different stages in the process. Here, we report a mechanics-based model that examines the factors that determine which interface a crack will propagate along in microtransfer printing with a soft elastomer stamp. The model is described and validated through comparison to experimental measurements. The effects of various factors, including interface toughness, stamp geometry, flaw sizes at the interfaces, and nanomembrane thickness, on the effectiveness of transfer printing are investigated using a fracture-mechanics framework and finite element modeling. The modeling results agree with experimental measurements in which the effects of interface toughness and nanomembranes thickness on the transfer printing yield were examined. The models presented can be used to guide the design of transfer printing processes.

  15. Alternating Current Electrohydrodynamic Printing of Microdroplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao-Feng Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the technology of orderly printing of microdroplets by means of electrohydrodynamic print (EHDP with alternating current (AC. The AC electric field induces charges to reciprocate in the electrohydrodynamic charged jet and generates periodic alternation of electric field force, which facilitates the breakup of charged jets and injection of microdroplets. Microdroplets with a diameter of 100~300 μm can be printed with a frequency of 5~25 Hz via AC EHDP. Effects of process parameters on the microdroplet injection behaviors were investigated. A higher frequency of applied AC voltage led to a higher deposition frequency, but smaller diameters of printed droplets. Deposition frequency and droplet diameters increased with the increase of duty cycle and solution supply rate. AC pulse voltage has provided a novel way to study the control technology in EHDP, which would accelerate the application of inkjet printing in the field of micro/nanosystem production.

  16. Designing Biomaterials for 3D Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guvendiren, Murat; Molde, Joseph; Soares, Rosane M D; Kohn, Joachim

    2016-10-10

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is becoming an increasingly common technique to fabricate scaffolds and devices for tissue engineering applications. This is due to the potential of 3D printing to provide patient-specific designs, high structural complexity, rapid on-demand fabrication at a low-cost. One of the major bottlenecks that limits the widespread acceptance of 3D printing in biomanufacturing is the lack of diversity in "biomaterial inks". Printability of a biomaterial is determined by the printing technique. Although a wide range of biomaterial inks including polymers, ceramics, hydrogels and composites have been developed, the field is still struggling with processing of these materials into self-supporting devices with tunable mechanics, degradation, and bioactivity. This review aims to highlight the past and recent advances in biomaterial ink development and design considerations moving forward. A brief overview of 3D printing technologies focusing on ink design parameters is also included.

  17. Digital Printing Quality Detection and Analysis Technology Based on CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ming; Zheng, Liping

    2017-12-01

    With the help of CCD digital printing quality detection and analysis technology, it can carry out rapid evaluation and objective detection of printing quality, and can play a certain control effect on printing quality. It can be said CDD digital printing quality testing and analysis of the rational application of technology, its digital printing and printing materials for a variety of printing equipments to improve the quality of a very positive role. In this paper, we do an in-depth study and discussion based on the CCD digital print quality testing and analysis technology.

  18. 3D printing – a key technology for tailored biomedical cell culture lab ware

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmieder Florian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Today’s 3D printing technologies offer great possibilities for biomedical researchers to create their own specific laboratory equipment. With respect to the generation of ex vivo vascular perfusion systems this will enable new types of products that will embed complex 3D structures possibly coupled with cell loaded scaffolds closely reflecting the in-vivo environment. Moreover this could lead to microfluidic devices that should be available in small numbers of pieces at moderate prices. Here, we will present first results of such 3D printed cell culture systems made from plastics and show their use for scaffold based applications.

  19. Printing Non-Euclidean Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurlo, Giuseppe; Truskinovsky, Lev

    2017-07-01

    Geometrically frustrated solids with a non-Euclidean reference metric are ubiquitous in biology and are becoming increasingly relevant in technological applications. Often they acquire a targeted configuration of incompatibility through the surface accretion of mass as in tree growth or dam construction. We use the mechanics of incompatible surface growth to show that geometrical frustration developing during deposition can be fine-tuned to ensure a particular behavior of the system in physiological (or working) conditions. As an illustration, we obtain an explicit 3D printing protocol for arteries, which guarantees stress uniformity under inhomogeneous loading, and for explosive plants, allowing a complete release of residual elastic energy with a single cut. Interestingly, in both cases reaching the physiological target requires the incompatibility to have a topological (global) component.

  20. Printing Technologies for Medical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiee, Ashkan; Atala, Anthony

    2016-03-01

    Over the past 15 years, printers have been increasingly utilized for biomedical applications in various areas of medicine and tissue engineering. This review discusses the current and future applications of 3D bioprinting. Several 3D printing tools with broad applications from surgical planning to 3D models are being created, such as liver replicas and intermediate splints. Numerous researchers are exploring this technique to pattern cells or fabricate several different tissues and organs, such as blood vessels or cardiac patches. Current investigations in bioprinting applications are yielding further advances. As one of the fastest areas of industry expansion, 3D additive manufacturing will change techniques across biomedical applications, from research and testing models to surgical planning, device manufacturing, and tissue or organ replacement. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Printing images from the Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschbach, Reiner

    2000-12-01

    Images have become ubiquitous, virtually every personal computer and every Internet WEB site contains at least some number of images. Professional as well as amateur artists display their work on the net and large image collections exist, spanning all aspects of art, hobby and daily life. The images vary widely in content, but more importantly, they also vary widely in general image quality attributes. Some of the quality variation is caused by the actual image creation or internet posting process, whereas some other quality variations are caused by the lack of defining image data description, like color-space definition. This paper describes problems and possible solutions associated with the printing of images from unknown sources.

  2. X-ray crystal structure of the fibrinolysis inhibitor [alpha][subscript 2]-antiplasmin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, Ruby H.P.; Sofian, Trifina; Kan, Wan-Ting; Horvath, Anita J.; Hitchen, Corinne R.; Langendorf, Christopher G.; Buckle, Ashley M.; Whisstock, James C.; Coughlin, Paul B. (Monash)

    2008-12-11

    The serpin alpha(2)-antiplasmin (SERPINF2) is the principal inhibitor of plasmin and inhibits fibrinolysis. Accordingly, alpha(2)-antiplasmin deficiency in humans results in uncontrolled fibrinolysis and a bleeding disorder. alpha(2)-antiplasmin is an unusual serpin, in that it contains extensive N- and C-terminal sequences flanking the serpin domain. The N-terminal sequence is crosslinked to fibrin by factor XIIIa, whereas the C-terminal region mediates the initial interaction with plasmin. To understand how this may happen, we have determined the 2.65A X-ray crystal structure of an N-terminal truncated murine alpha(2)-antiplasmin. The structure reveals that part of the C-terminal sequence is tightly associated with the body of the serpin. This would be anticipated to position the flexible plasmin-binding portion of the C-terminus in close proximity to the serpin Reactive Center Loop where it may act as a template to accelerate serpin/protease interactions.

  3. Advances and Future Challenges in Printed Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ricardo E; Costa, Carlos M; Lanceros-Méndez, Senentxu

    2015-11-01

    There is an increasing interest in thin and flexible energy storage devices to meet modern society's needs for applications such as radio frequency sensing, interactive packaging, and other consumer products. Printed batteries comply with these requirements and are an excellent alternative to conventional batteries for many applications. Flexible and microbatteries are also included in the area of printed batteries when fabricated using printing technologies. The main characteristics, advantages, disadvantages, developments, and printing techniques of printed batteries are presented and discussed in this Review. The state-of-the-art takes into account both the research and industrial levels. On the academic level, the research progress of printed batteries is divided into lithium-ion and Zn-manganese dioxide batteries and other battery types, with emphasis on the different materials for anode, cathode, and separator as well as in the battery design. With respect to the industrial state-of-the-art, materials, device formulations, and manufacturing techniques are presented. Finally, the prospects and challenges of printed batteries are discussed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Magnetic Properties of 3D Printed Toroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollig, Lindsey; Otto, Austin; Hilpisch, Peter; Mowry, Greg; Nelson-Cheeseman, Brittany; Renewable Energy; Alternatives Lab (REAL) Team

    Transformers are ubiquitous in electronics today. Although toroidal geometries perform most efficiently, transformers are traditionally made with rectangular cross-sections due to the lower manufacturing costs. Additive manufacturing techniques (3D printing) can easily achieve toroidal geometries by building up a part through a series of 2D layers. To get strong magnetic properties in a 3D printed transformer, a composite filament is used containing Fe dispersed in a polymer matrix. How the resulting 3D printed toroid responds to a magnetic field depends on two structural factors of the printed 2D layers: fill factor (planar density) and fill pattern. In this work, we investigate how the fill factor and fill pattern affect the magnetic properties of 3D printed toroids. The magnetic properties of the printed toroids are measured by a custom circuit that produces a hysteresis loop for each toroid. Toroids with various fill factors and fill patterns are compared to determine how these two factors can affect the magnetic field the toroid can produce. These 3D printed toroids can be used for numerous applications in order to increase the efficiency of transformers by making it possible for manufacturers to make a toroidal geometry.

  5. Advances in thermal ink-jet printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Alfred I.

    1998-06-01

    In recent years, ink jet has emerged as one of the mainstream printing technologies. Since its market inception in 1985, Hewlett-Packard's thermal ink jet technology (TIJ) has evolved progressively from a 12 nozzle 96 dpi print head to a 300 nozzle 600 dpi print head. TIJ has made rapid progress enabling it to print text output on plain paper that challenges laser printers, and realistic photographic images that rival silver halide, at a low consumer price. Thermal ink jet technology continues to enjoy a greater unit market share than any other digital printing technology and all other ink jet technologies combined. The driving forces for the advancement of TIJ have been better, faster, and cheaper printers for consumers. These goals involve key attributes such as ink performance (gamut, sharpness, fastness), minimum deliverable colorant (drop volume), rate of colorant delivery (firing frequency, nozzle integration, firing chamber volume), and print engine cost per unit throughput. In this paper, key technology challenges for TIJ will be outlined. New materials and new processes that are required for the advancement of thermal ink jet printing are discussed. Recently, competing ink jet methods have (re-)emerged, notably piezoelectric ink jet. References will be made to piezoelectric ink jet when appropriate.

  6. 3D Printing of Ball Grid Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Shayandev; Hines, Daniel; Dasgupta, Abhijit; Das, Siddhartha

    Ball grid arrays (BGA) are interconnects between an integrated circuit (IC) and a printed circuit board (PCB), that are used for surface mounting electronic components. Typically, lead free alloys are used to make solder balls which, after a reflow process, establish a mechanical and electrical connection between the IC and the PCB. High temperature processing is required for most of these alloys leading to thermal shock causing damage to ICs. For producing flexible circuits on a polymer substrate, there is a requirement for low temperature processing capabilities (around 150 C) and for reducing strain from mechanical stresses. Additive manufacturing techniques can provide an alternative methodology for fabricating BGAs as a direct replacement for standard solder bumped BGAs. We have developed aerosol jet (AJ) printing methods to fabricate a polymer bumped BGA. As a demonstration of the process developed, a daisy chain test chip was polymer bumped using an AJ printed ultra violet (UV) curable polymer ink that was then coated with an AJ printed silver nanoparticle laden ink as a conducting layer printed over the polymer bump. The structure for the balls were achieved by printing the polymer ink using a specific toolpath coupled with in-situ UV curing of the polymer which provided good control over the shape, resulting in well-formed spherical bumps on the order of 200 um wide by 200 um tall for this initial demonstration. A detailed discussion of the AJ printing method and results from accelerated life-time testing will be presented

  7. Dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Kent; Ordway, Nathaniel; Diallo, Dalanda; Tillapaugh-Fay, Gwen; Aslan, Can

    2014-03-01

    3D printer applications in the biomedical sciences and medical imaging are expanding and will have an increasing impact on the practice of medicine. Orthopedic and reconstructive surgery has been an obvious area for development of 3D printer applications as the segmentation of bony anatomy to generate printable models is relatively straightforward. There are important issues that should be addressed when using 3D printed models for applications that may affect patient care; in particular the dimensional accuracy of the printed parts needs to be high to avoid poor decisions being made prior to surgery or therapeutic procedures. In this work, the dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebral bodies derived from CT data for a cadaver spine is compared with direct measurements on the ex-vivo vertebra and with measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra using commercial 3D image processing software. The vertebra was printed on a consumer grade 3D printer using an additive print process using PLA (polylactic acid) filament. Measurements were made for 15 different anatomic features of the vertebral body, including vertebral body height, endplate width and depth, pedicle height and width, and spinal canal width and depth, among others. It is shown that for the segmentation and printing process used, the results of measurements made on the 3D printed vertebral body are substantially the same as those produced by direct measurement on the vertebra and measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra.

  8. An aerial 3D printing test mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Michael; McGuire, Thomas; Parsons, Michael; Leake, Skye; Straub, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of an aerial 3D printing technology, its development and its testing. This technology is potentially useful in its own right. In addition, this work advances the development of a related in-space 3D printing technology. A series of aerial 3D printing test missions, used to test the aerial printing technology, are discussed. Through completing these test missions, the design for an in-space 3D printer may be advanced. The current design for the in-space 3D printer involves focusing thermal energy to heat an extrusion head and allow for the extrusion of molten print material. Plastics can be used as well as composites including metal, allowing for the extrusion of conductive material. A variety of experiments will be used to test this initial 3D printer design. High altitude balloons will be used to test the effects of microgravity on 3D printing, as well as parabolic flight tests. Zero pressure balloons can be used to test the effect of long 3D printing missions subjected to low temperatures. Vacuum chambers will be used to test 3D printing in a vacuum environment. The results will be used to adapt a current prototype of an in-space 3D printer. Then, a small scale prototype can be sent into low-Earth orbit as a 3-U cube satellite. With the ability to 3D print in space demonstrated, future missions can launch production hardware through which the sustainability and durability of structures in space will be greatly improved.

  9. Two offset printing workers with cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    Previously, the author reported a cluster of 11 cholangiocarcinoma cases exposed to 1,2-dichloropropane (1,2-DCP) and/or dichloromethane (DCM) in an offset proof-printing company. Before that report, the association between the two chemicals and cholangiocarcinoma had not been known. The current study describes two cholangiocarcinoma patients exposed to 1,2-DCP or DCM in different offset printing companies. The author obtained medical records for the patients, and interviewed the surviving patient and a relative of the deceased patient about their occupational history. Case 1 was a man born in 1950. He worked in the printing section in a proof-printing company for 26 years. He was diagnosed as cholangiocarcinoma in 1998 and died in 2000. In proof-printing operations, he used gasoline for 14 years and 1,2-DCP for 11 years to remove ink from a rubber transcription roller (blanket). The exposure concentration of 1,2-DCP was estimated to be between 72 and 5,200 ppm. Case 2 was a man born in 1963. He worked in the printing section in a general offset printing company for 11 years. He was diagnosed with cholangiocarcinoma in 2007. In printing operations, he used both kerosene and a mixture of 50% DCM and 50% 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCE) for 11 years to remove ink from a blanket. The exposure concentration of DCM was estimated to be between 240 and 6,100 ppm. He was simultaneously exposed to similar levels of 1,1,1-TCE. Because the offset printing process may cause cholangiocarcinoma, occupational history should be examined for patients with this cancer.

  10. The Three-Dimensional Elemental Distribution of 3D Printing Stainless Steel Gear via Confocal 3D–XRF Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Min; Yi, Longtao; Wang, Jingbang; Han, Yue; Sun, Tianxi; Liu, Zhiguo

    2017-11-01

    The macroscopic mechanical properties of 3D printing product are closely related to their microstructure, it has significant importance to accurately characterize the micro-structure of 3D printing products. Confocal three-dimensional micro-X-ray fluorescence (3D-XRF) is a good surface analysis technology widely used to analyse elements and elemental distributions. Therefore, this technique is also very suitable for element distribution measurement of 3D printing product which is printed layer by layer. In this paper the 3D-XRF technique was used to study the spatial elemental distribution of a micro zone from the 3D printing stainless steel gear. An elemental mapping of two orthogonal sections in the depth direction and three dimensional elemental rendering of one micro-region were obtained. The result shows that elemental distribution of the sample is not uniform, the elemental layer structure is formed in the depth direction, the content of the element in measured area vary smoothly, and with no elemental mutation region. This indicates that the 3D printing sample are fused well between layers and layers, with no large pores or bubbles inside the sample. This study demonstrates that it is feasible to make assessment for micro-structure of 3D printing metal product by using confocal 3D-XRF.

  11. Marketing plan for Jingcai digital printing studio

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Xi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to draw up an efficient marketing plan for Jingcai digital printing studio, which plans to be set up in Tianjin, China. The studio takes up providing all kinds of printing products for business customers. The aim of this thesis was to assist start-up company to gain customers’ attention in the initial stage of company’s long term development and build a concrete base for progress and further expansion in order to become a digital printing company with strong com...

  12. Ink and paper saving for sustainable printing

    OpenAIRE

    Wondemu, Ermias

    2011-01-01

    The aim of my research is to look for means to reduce the ink and paper consumption in printing. Previously, all text documents or in this case specifically final year thesis papers‘ were printed without the awareness of the number of papers used and ink consumed. This thesis leans towards green technology based systems of printing which can be termed as sustainable printing‘that can benefit the environment and the cost of production for that case. In the 21th century, global warming a...

  13. Print vs digital the future of coexistence

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Sul H

    2013-01-01

    Libraries are currently confronted by the challenges of managing increasing amounts of electronic information. Print vs. Digital: The Future of Coexistence presents the expert perspectives of eight of America's leading library administrators on ways to effectively manage digital flow and offers strategies to provide a level of coexistence between digital and print information. This excellent overview explores how to best balance print and electronic resources, and explores important issues such as the selection of electronic resources, improving access to digital information for a larger user

  14. 3D printed magnetic polymer composite transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollig, Lindsey M.; Hilpisch, Peter J.; Mowry, Greg S.; Nelson-Cheeseman, Brittany B.

    2017-11-01

    The possibility of 3D printing a transformer core using fused deposition modeling methods is explored. With the use of additive manufacturing, ideal transformer core geometries can be achieved in order to produce a more efficient transformer. In this work, different 3D printed settings and toroidal geometries are tested using a custom integrated magnetic circuit capable of measuring the hysteresis loop of a transformer. These different properties are then characterized, and it was determined the most effective 3D printed transformer core requires a high fill factor along with a high concentration of magnetic particulate.

  15. Three-dimensional metrology for printed electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberg, Vadim; Harding, Kevin

    2017-05-01

    Novel materials and printing technologies can enable rapid and low cost prototyping and manufacturing of electronic devices with increased flexibility and complexity. However, robust and on-demand printing of circuits will require accurate metrology methods that can measure micron level patterns to verify proper production. This paper presents an evaluation of a range of optical gaging tools ranging from confocal to area 3D systems to determine metrological capability for a range of key parameters from trace thickness to solder paste volumes. Finally, this paper will present a select set of optimized measurement tools detailing both capabilities and gaps in the available technologies needed to fully realize the potential of printed electronics.

  16. A high speed electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing method for line printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phung, Thanh Huy; Kim, Seora; Kwon, Kye-Si

    2017-10-01

    Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing has drawn attention due to its capability to produce smaller dots and patterns with finer lines when compared to those obtained from using conventional inkjet printing. Previous studies have suggested that drop-on-demand EHD-patterning applications should be limited to very slow printing cases with speeds far less than 10 mm s-1 due to the small dot size and limited jetting frequency. In this study, a new EHD printing method is proposed to significantly increase the line-patterning printing speed by modifying the ink and thereby changing the relic shape. The proposed method has the additional advantage of reducing the line-pattern width. The results of the experiment show that the pattern width could be reduced from 20 µm to 4 µm by increasing the printing speed from 10 mm s-1 to 50 mm s-1, respectively.

  17. Printing Insecurity? The Security Implications of 3D-Printing of Weapons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Gerald

    2015-12-01

    In 2013, the first gun printed out of plastic by a 3D-printer was successfully fired in the U.S. This event caused a major media hype about the dangers of being able to print a gun. Law enforcement agencies worldwide were concerned about this development and the potentially huge security implications of these functional plastic guns. As a result, politicians called for a ban of these weapons and a control of 3D-printing technology. This paper reviews the security implications of 3D-printing technology and 3D guns. It argues that current arms control and transfer policies are adequate to cover 3D-printed guns as well. However, while this analysis may hold up currently, progress in printing technology needs to be monitored to deal with future dangers pre-emptively.

  18. Invisible photonic printing: computer designing graphics, UV printing and shown by a magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haibo; Tang, Jian; Zhong, Hao; Xi, Zheng; Chen, Changle; Chen, Qianwang

    2013-01-01

    Invisible photonic printing, an emerging printing technique, is particularly useful for steganography and watermarking for anti-counterfeiting purposes. However, many challenges exist in order to realize this technique. Herein, we describe a novel photonic printing strategy targeting to overcome these challenges and realize fast and convenient fabrication of invisible photonic prints with good tenability and reproducibility. With this novel photonic printing technique, a variety of graphics with brilliant colors can be perfectly hidden in a soft and waterproof photonic-paper. The showing and hiding of the latent photonic prints are instantaneous with magnet as the only required instrument. In addition, this strategy has excellent practicality and allows end-user control of the structural design utilizing simple software on a PC.

  19. Close-ups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fausing, Bent

    2013-01-01

    Investigations in the close-up and its meaning regarding nearness, abstraction and transparency. Face, facelike and animism are also major key-words in thsi article... . I have always been fascinated with the close-up, not as an end, but a filter of opportunities to open up for and nearness...... of transcendence, associations and memories. The close-up is not the end, it rather in my view to be regarded as a beginning of different perceptions...

  20. 40 CFR 63.824 - Standards: Publication rotogravure printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... printing. 63.824 Section 63.824 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for the Printing and Publishing Industry § 63.824 Standards: Publication rotogravure printing. (a) Each owner or operator of any publication rotogravure printing affected...

  1. 1 CFR 18.15 - Correction of errors in printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Correction of errors in printing. 18.15 Section... errors in printing. (a) Typographical or clerical errors made in the printing of the Federal Register... Register of printing errors found in published documents. (c) If the error was in the document as submitted...

  2. Close Air Support versus Close Combat Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    with parallel Air Force and Army structures and incorporating tactical air control parties ( TACP ) down to the battalion level. This system greatly...Operations Center (ASOC) and the Tactical Air Control Party ( TACP ). Each of these agencies works in concert to facilitate close air support platforms...needed to maintain combat readiness.93 At the corps level and below is a Tactical Air Control Party ( TACP ) organized under the Army Fires Cell (FC

  3. Development of an air-stable, high energy density printed silver oxide battery for printed electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Braam, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Printed batteries are an emerging battery technology that has the potential to enable the production of cheap, small form factor, flexible batteries capable of powering a diverse set of existing and emerging applications such as RFID tags, flexible displays, and distributed sensors. Partially printed battery systems have been demonstrated with various chemistries, but what is needed is a low cost, air stable method of fully printing a high energy density battery. The silver oxide chemistry i...

  4. Dispenser printed electroluminescent lamps on textiles for smart fabric applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Marc; Torah, Russel; Tudor, John

    2016-04-01

    Flexible electroluminescent (EL) lamps are fabricated onto woven textiles using a novel dispenser printing process. Dispenser printing utilizes pressurized air to deposit ink onto a substrate through a syringe and nozzle. This work demonstrates the first use of this technology to fabricate EL lamps. The luminance of the dispenser printed EL lamps is compared to screen-printed EL lamps, both printed on textile, and also commercial EL lamps on polyurethane film. The dispenser printed lamps are shown to have a 1.5 times higher luminance than the best performing commercially available lamp, and have a comparable performance to the screen-printed lamps.

  5. A database for reproducible manipulation research: CapriDB - Capture, Print, Innovate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorny, Florian T; Bekiroglu, Yasemin; Pauwels, Karl; Butepage, Judith; Scherer, Clara; Kragic, Danica

    2017-04-01

    We present a novel approach and database which combines the inexpensive generation of 3D object models via monocular or RGB-D camera images with 3D printing and a state of the art object tracking algorithm. Unlike recent efforts towards the creation of 3D object databases for robotics, our approach does not require expensive and controlled 3D scanning setups and aims to enable anyone with a camera to scan, print and track complex objects for manipulation research. The proposed approach results in detailed textured mesh models whose 3D printed replicas provide close approximations of the originals. A key motivation for utilizing 3D printed objects is the ability to precisely control and vary object properties such as the size, material properties and mass distribution in the 3D printing process to obtain reproducible conditions for robotic manipulation research. We present CapriDB - an extensible database resulting from this approach containing initially 40 textured and 3D printable mesh models together with tracking features to facilitate the adoption of the proposed approach.

  6. Fabrication of conductive copper patterns using reactive inkjet printing followed by two-step electroless plating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jin-Ju; Lin, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Yan [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, 610054 (China); Sowade, Enrico; Baumann, Reinhard R. [Digital Printing and Imaging Technology, Technische Universität Chemnitz, Chemnitz, 09126 (Germany); Feng, Zhe-Sheng, E-mail: fzs@uestc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, 610054 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Copper patterns were fabricated by reactive inkjet printing and two-step electroless plating. • Cu particles produced via reactive inkjet printing act as catalyst for copper electroless plating. • High conductivity can be obtained without many printing passes and high temperature sintering. • This approach can largely avoid nozzle-clogging problems. • This approach presents a potential way in the flexible printed electronics with simple process. - Abstract: A simple and low-cost process for fabricating conductive copper patterns on flexible polyimide substrates was demonstrated. Copper catalyst patterns were first produced on polyimide substrates using reactive inkjet printing of Cu (II)-bearing ink and reducing ink, and then the conductive copper patterns were generated after a two-step electroless plating procedure. The copper layers were characterized by optical microscope, SEM, XRD and EDS. Homogeneously distributed copper nanoclusters were found in the catalyst patterns. A thin copper layer with uniform particle size was formed after first-step electroless plating, and a thick copper layer of about 14.3 μm with closely packed structure and fine crystallinity was produced after second-step electroless plating. This resulting copper layer had good solderability, reliable adhesion strength and a low resistivity of 5.68 μΩ cm without any sintering process.

  7. Influence of printing speed on production of embossing tools using FDM 3D printing technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Žarko

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Manufacturing of the embossing tools customary implies use of metals such as zinc, magnesium, copper, and brass. In the case of short run lengths, a conventional manufacturing process and the material itself represent a significant cost, not only in the terms of material costs and the need for using complex technological systems which are necessary for their production, but also in the terms of the production time. Alternatively, 3D printing can be used for manufacturing similar embossing tools with major savings in production time and costs. However, due to properties of materials used in the 3D printing technology, expected results of embossing by 3D printed tools cannot be identical to metal ones. This problem is emphasized in the case of long run lengths and high accuracy requirement for embossed elements. The objective of this paper is primarily focused on investigating the influence of the printing speed on reproduction quality of the embossing tools printed with FDM (Fused Deposition Modelling technology. The obtained results confirmed that printing speed as a process parameter affects the reproduction quality of the embossing tools printed with FDM technology: in the case of deposition rate of 90 mm/s was noted the poorest dimensional accuracy in relation to the 3D model, which is more emphasised in case of circular and square elements. Elements printed with the highest printing speed have a greater dimensional accuracy, but with evident cracks on the surface.

  8. Monitoring Information By Industry - Printing and Publishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions in the printing and publishing industry.

  9. 3D printing of microscopic bacterial communities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jodi L. Connell; Eric T. Ritschdorff; Marvin Whiteley; Jason B. Shear

    2013-01-01

    .... Here, we describe a microscopic threedimensional (3D) printing strategy that enables multiple populations of bacteria to be organized within essentially any 3D geometry, including adjacent, nested, and free-floating...

  10. 3D Printed Multimaterial Microfluidic Valve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J Keating

    Full Text Available We present a novel 3D printed multimaterial microfluidic proportional valve. The microfluidic valve is a fundamental primitive that enables the development of programmable, automated devices for controlling fluids in a precise manner. We discuss valve characterization results, as well as exploratory design variations in channel width, membrane thickness, and membrane stiffness. Compared to previous single material 3D printed valves that are stiff, these printed valves constrain fluidic deformation spatially, through combinations of stiff and flexible materials, to enable intricate geometries in an actuated, functionally graded device. Research presented marks a shift towards 3D printing multi-property programmable fluidic devices in a single step, in which integrated multimaterial valves can be used to control complex fluidic reactions for a variety of applications, including DNA assembly and analysis, continuous sampling and sensing, and soft robotics.

  11. EU Design Law and 3D Printing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordberg, Ana; Schovsbo, Jens Hemmingsen

    2017-01-01

    The article considers the implications for EU design law of 3D-printing. It first describes the 3D-printing technology and the e-ecosystem which is evolving around the technology and involves a number of new stakeholders who in different ways are engaged in the making and sharing of CAD-files and....../or printing. It is submitted that it is only a matter of time before 3D-printing equipment becomes ubiquitous. It is pointed out how the new technology and e-ecosystem at the same time represent threats and opportunities to design holders and to the societal interests in design and design law. EU design law...

  12. 3D-printed microfluidic automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Anthony K; Bhattacharjee, Nirveek; Horowitz, Lisa F; Chang, Tim C; Folch, Albert

    2015-04-21

    Microfluidic automation - the automated routing, dispensing, mixing, and/or separation of fluids through microchannels - generally remains a slowly-spreading technology because device fabrication requires sophisticated facilities and the technology's use demands expert operators. Integrating microfluidic automation in devices has involved specialized multi-layering and bonding approaches. Stereolithography is an assembly-free, 3D-printing technique that is emerging as an efficient alternative for rapid prototyping of biomedical devices. Here we describe fluidic valves and pumps that can be stereolithographically printed in optically-clear, biocompatible plastic and integrated within microfluidic devices at low cost. User-friendly fluid automation devices can be printed and used by non-engineers as replacement for costly robotic pipettors or tedious manual pipetting. Engineers can manipulate the designs as digital modules into new devices of expanded functionality. Printing these devices only requires the digital file and electronic access to a printer.

  13. 3D Printed Multimaterial Microfluidic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Steven J; Gariboldi, Maria Isabella; Patrick, William G; Sharma, Sunanda; Kong, David S; Oxman, Neri

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel 3D printed multimaterial microfluidic proportional valve. The microfluidic valve is a fundamental primitive that enables the development of programmable, automated devices for controlling fluids in a precise manner. We discuss valve characterization results, as well as exploratory design variations in channel width, membrane thickness, and membrane stiffness. Compared to previous single material 3D printed valves that are stiff, these printed valves constrain fluidic deformation spatially, through combinations of stiff and flexible materials, to enable intricate geometries in an actuated, functionally graded device. Research presented marks a shift towards 3D printing multi-property programmable fluidic devices in a single step, in which integrated multimaterial valves can be used to control complex fluidic reactions for a variety of applications, including DNA assembly and analysis, continuous sampling and sensing, and soft robotics.

  14. Substitution within the Danish printing industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Henrik Fred; Bøg, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    The implementation of the EU REACH regulation will most probably promote substitution within sectors handling a lot of different chemicals like the printing industry. With the aim of being at the cutting edge of this development the Danish EPA together with the Danish printing industry and IPU...... are running a substitution project. A major part of the work has been mapping the presence of chemicals which are potential candidates for substitution (e.g. PBT, CMR, vPvB, EDS) within the Danish printing industry and this work was recently finished. The mapping comprises a combination of a literature study...... and an investigation of the actual (2007) presence of candidate substances at 15 Danish printing houses including the examination of almost 900 MSDS’s (i.e. products). Furthermore, a focused search in the Danish Product Register has been included. More than 150 of the mapped substances are candidates for substitution...

  15. Recent development in 3D food printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Zhang, Min; Bhandari, Bhesh

    2017-09-22

    Robots and software have been significantly improving our daily lives by rendering us much convenience. And 3D printing is a typical example, for it is going to usher in a new era of localized manufacturing that is actually based on digital fabrication by layer-by-layer deposition in three-dimensional space. In terms of food industry, the revolution that three-dimensional printing technologies is bringing to food manufacturing is convenience of low-cost customized fabrication and even precise nutrition control. This paper is aimed to give a brief introduction of recent development of food printing and material property of food ingredients that can be used to design the 3D food matrix and investigate the relationship between process parameters and resulting printed food properties in order to establish a food manufacturing process with this new food production approach.

  16. 3D-printing zirconia implants; a dream or a reality? An in-vitro study evaluating the dimensional accuracy, surface topography and mechanical properties of printed zirconia implant and discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Reham B; van der Veen, Albert J; Huiberts, Dennis; Wismeijer, Daniel; Alharbi, Nawal

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the dimensional accuracy, surface topography of a custom designed, 3D-printed zirconia dental implant and the mechanical properties of printed zirconia discs. A custom designed implant was 3D-printed in zirconia using digital light processing technique (DLP). The dimensional accuracy was assessed using the digital-subtraction technique. The mechanical properties were evaluated using biaxial flexure strength test. Three different build angles were adopted to print the specimens for the mechanical test; 0°(Vertical), 45° (Oblique) and 90°(Horizontal) angles. The surface topography, crystallographic phase structure and surface roughness were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy analysis (SEM), X-ray diffractometer and confocal microscopy respectively. The printed implant was dimensionally accurate with a root mean square (RMSE) value of 0.1mm. The Weibull analysis revealed a statistically significant higher characteristic strength (1006.6MPa) of 0° printed specimens compared to the other two groups and no significant difference between 45° (892.2MPa) and 90° (866.7MPa) build angles. SEM analysis revealed cracks, micro-porosities and interconnected pores ranging in size from 196nm to 3.3µm. The mean Ra (arithmetic mean roughness) value of 1.59µm (±0.41) and Rq (root mean squared roughness) value of 1.94µm (±0.47) was found. A crystallographic phase of primarily tetragonal zirconia typical of sintered Yttria tetragonal stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP) was detected. DLP prove to be efficient for printing customized zirconia dental implants with sufficient dimensional accuracy. The mechanical properties showed flexure strength close to those of conventionally produced ceramics. Optimization of the 3D-printing process parameters is still needed to improve the microstructure of the printed objects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Three-Dimensional Printing in Zero Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werkheiser, Niki

    2015-01-01

    The 3D printing in zero-g (3D Print) technology demonstration project is a proof-of-concept test designed to assess the properties of melt deposition modeling additive manufacturing in the microgravity environment experienced on the International Space Station (ISS). This demonstration is the first step towards realizing a 'machine shop' in space, a critical enabling component of any deep space mission.

  18. Three-dimensional printing of biological matters

    OpenAIRE

    Munaz, Ahmed; Raja K. Vadivelu; St John, James; Barton, Matthew; Kamble, Harshad; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing of human tissues and organ has been an exciting research topic in the past three decades. However, existing technological and biological challenges still require a significant amount of research. The present review highlights these challenges and discusses their potential solutions such as mapping and converting a human organ onto a 3D virtual design, synchronizing the virtual design with the printing hardware. Moreover, the paper discusses in details recent ad...

  19. Spectrophotometric Examination of Rough Print Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Erzsébet Novotny

    2011-01-01

    The objective was to assess the impact of the surface texture of individual creative paper types (coated or patterned)on the quality of printing and to identify to what extent the various creative paper types require specific types ofspectrophotometers. We used stereomicroscopic images to illustrate unprinted and printed surfaces of creative papertypes. Surface roughness was measured to obtain data on the unevenness of surfaces. Spectrophotometric tests wereused to select the most suitable sp...

  20. 3D Printing for Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Richards, Dylan Jack; Tan, Yu; Jia, Jia; Yao, Hai; Mei, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering aims to fabricate functional tissue for applications in regenerative medicine and drug testing. More recently, 3D printing has shown great promise in tissue fabrication with a structural control from micro- to macro-scale by using a layer-by-layer approach. Whether through scaffold-based or scaffold-free approaches, the standard for 3D printed tissue engineering constructs is to provide a biomimetic structural environment that facilitates tissue formation and promotes host ...

  1. Applications of 3D printing in healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    3D printing is a relatively new, rapidly expanding method of manufacturing that found numerous applications in healthcare, automotive, aerospace and defense industries and in many other areas. In this review, applications in medicine that are revolutionizing the way surgeries are carried out, disrupting prosthesis and implant markets as well as dentistry will be presented. The relatively new field of bioprinting, that is printing with cells, will also be briefly discussed. PMID:27785150

  2. Multifunctional Composites through Inkjet-printed Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-27

    Improvements in carbon fibre reinforced composites by inkjet printing of thermoplastic polymer patterns,” physica status solidi (RRL) – Rapid Research...aircraft structures [1-3]. A range of polymer systems were printed onto carbon fibre composite pre-preg using the same consistent hexagonal pattern...areas where higher damage resistance is required, such as holes, joints and other stress concentration areas. In this work, PMMA micro- droplets

  3. Restaurants closed over Christmas

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    The restaurants will be closed during the Christmas holiday period : please note that all three CERN Restaurants will be closed from 5 p.m. on Wednesday, 21 December until Wednesday, 4 January inclusive. The Restaurants will reopen on Thursday, 5 January 2012.

  4. Organ printing: fiction or science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakab, Karoly; Neagu, Adrian; Mironov, Vladimir; Forgacs, Gabor

    2004-01-01

    Aggregates of living cells (i.e. model tissue fragments) under appropriate conditions fuse like liquid drops. According to Steinberg's differential adhesion hypothesis (DAH), this may be understood by assuming that cells are motile and tissues made of such cells possess an effective surface tension. Here we show that based on these properties three-dimensional cellular structures of prescribed shape can be constructed by a novel method: cell aggregate printing. Spherical aggregates of similar size made of cells with known adhesive properties were prepared. Aggregates were embedded into biocompatible gels. When the cellular and gel properties, as well as the symmetry of the initial configuration were appropriately adjusted the contiguous aggregates fused into ring-like organ structures. To elucidate the driving force and optimal conditions for this pattern formation, Monte Carlo simulations based on a DAH motivated model were performed. The simulations reproduced the experimentally observed cellular arrangements and revealed that the control parameter of pattern evolution is the gel-tissue interfacial tension, an experimentally accessible parameter.

  5. Flexible printed circuit board actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junseok; Cha, Youngsu

    2017-12-01

    Out-of-plane actuators are made possible by the breaking of planar symmetry. In this paper, we present a thin-film out-of-plane electrostatic actuator for a flexible printed circuit board (FPCB) that can be fabricated with a single step of the conventional manufacturing process. No other components are required for actuation except a single sheet of the FPCB, and it works based on the planar asymmetry resulting from asymmetrically patterned top and bottom electrodes on each side of the polyimide film. With the structural asymmetry, the application of a high voltage in the order of kilovolts results in the asymmetry of the electric fields and the body force density, which generates the bending moment that leads to macroscopic deformations. We applied the finite element method to examine the asymmetry induced by the difference in the electrodes. In the experiment, the displacement responses to step input and square wave input of various frequencies were analyzed. It was found that our actuator constitutes an underdamped system, exhibiting resonance characteristics. The maximum oscillatory amplitude was determined at resonance, and the relationship between the displacement and the applied voltage was investigated.

  6. Direct Numerical Simulation of Cell Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Rui; He, Ping

    2010-11-01

    Structural cell printing, i.e., printing three dimensional (3D) structures of cells held in a tissue matrix, is gaining significant attention in the biomedical community. The key idea is to use desktop printer or similar devices to print cells into 3D patterns with a resolution comparable to the size of mammalian cells, similar to that in living organs. Achieving such a resolution in vitro can lead to breakthroughs in areas such as organ transplantation and understanding of cell-cell interactions in truly 3D spaces. Although the feasibility of cell printing has been demonstrated in the recent years, the printing resolution and cell viability remain to be improved. In this work, we investigate one of the unit operations in cell printing, namely, the impact of a cell-laden droplet into a pool of highly viscous liquids using direct numerical simulations. The dynamics of droplet impact (e.g., crater formation and droplet spreading and penetration) and the evolution of cell shape and internal stress are quantified in details.

  7. Cell Source for Tissue and Organ Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Yuan, Yuyu; Yoo, James J.

    Organ printing, a novel approach in tissue engineering, applies computer-driven deposition of cells, growth factors, biomaterials layer-by-layer to create complex 3D tissue or organ constructs. This emerging technology shows great promise in regenerative medicine, because it may help to address current crisis of tissue and organ shortage for transplantation. Organ printing is developing fast, and there are exciting new possibilities in this area. Successful cell and organ printing requires many key elements. Among these, the choice of appropriate cells for printing is vital. This chapter surveys available cell sources for cell and organ printing application and discusses factors that affect cell choice. Special emphasis is put on several important factors, including the proposed printing system and bioprinters, the assembling method, and the target tissues or organs, which need to be considered to select proper cell sources and cell types. In this chapter, characterizations of the selected cells to justify and/or refine the cell selection will also be discussed. Finally, future prospects in this field will be envisioned.

  8. "Books in Print Plus" as a Tool for Analyzing U.S. In-Print Monographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisonger, Thomas E.

    1990-01-01

    Explores the 1988 "Books in Print Plus" (BIP Plus) CD-ROM database to determine broad characteristics of material currently in print in U.S. book trade in terms of publication year; price; language; and audience, grade level, and illustration. Accuracy and potential of BIP Plus as a tool for generating data and testing hypotheses…

  9. Print2Screen Mobile App: Embedding Multimedia in Printed ODL Course Materials Using QR Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeywardena, Ishan Sudeera

    2017-01-01

    With the rise of OER and multimedia such as YouTube videos, many academic institutions are becoming mindful of the richness they bring into the teaching and learning process. Given that multimedia resources cannot be directly integrated into printed material, the only available alternative is to print hyperlinks, which teachers and learners can…

  10. Interactive Print: The Design of Cognitive Tasks in Blended Augmented Reality and Print Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadolny, Larysa

    2017-01-01

    The combination of print materials and augmented reality in education is increasingly accessible due to advances in mobile technologies. Using familiar paper-based activities overlaid with digital items, also known as interactive print, educators can create a custom learning experience for students. There is very little guidance on the design of…

  11. µPlasma printing of hydrophobic and hydrophilic patterns to improve wetting behaviour for printed electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erik Niewenhuis; ir Renee Verkuijlen; Dr Jan Bernards; ir Martijn van Dongen; Lise Verbraeken

    2012-01-01

    Inkjet printing is a rapidly growing technology for depositing functional materials in the production of organic electronics. Challenges lie among others in the printing of high resolution patterns with high aspect ratio of functional materials to obtain the needed functionality like e.g.

  12. Tissue strands as "bioink" for scale-up organ printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yin; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T

    2014-01-01

    Organ printing, takes tissue spheroids as building blocks together with additive manufacturing technique to engineer tissue or organ replacement parts. Although a wide array of cell aggregation techniques has been investigated, and gained noticeable success, the application of tissue spheroids for scale-up tissue fabrication is still worth investigation. In this paper, we introduce a new micro-fabrication technique to create tissue strands at the scale of 500-700μm as a "bioink" for future robotic tissue printing. Printable alginate micro-conduits are used as semi-permeable capsules for tissue strand fabrication. Mouse insulinoma beta TC3 cell tissue strands were formed upon 4 days post fabrication with reasonable mechanical strength, high cell viability close to 90%, and tissue specific markers expression. Fusion was readily observed between strands when placing them together as early as 24h. Also, tissue strands were deposited with human umbilical vein smooth muscle cells (HUVSMCs) vascular conduits together to fabricated miniature pancreatic tissue analog. Our study provided a novel technique using tissue strands as "bioink" for scale-up bioprinting of tissues or organs.

  13. Closed Claim Query File

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This file is used to hold information about disability claims that have been closed and have been selected for sampling.Sampling is the process whereby OQR reviews...

  14. Surgical wound care -- closed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000738.htm Surgical wound care - closed To use the sharing features on ... made during surgery. It is also called a "surgical wound." Some incisions are small. Others are very long. ...

  15. Examination of printability parameters of IPA free offset printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Ozcan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Fountain solution system in offset printing system has significant impacts on the printing quality and fountain is the indispensable part of this system. The most important chemical added into the fountain solution is isopropyl alcohol. Fundamental features of isopropyl alcohol are reducing surface tension and adjusting and stabilizing pH. However, in the course of time, the disadvantages of using alcohol have emerged. In the present study, the quality levels of IPA-based and IPA-free offset prints were compared. Specially designed test scale printing was carried out after IPA-based and IPA-free fountain solutions were prepared with the same ink on matt-coated paper under optimal printing conditions. Densitometric and spectrophotometric measurements were carried out on the prints and it was ensured that they were printed in accordance with ISO-12647-2:2013 offset printing standards. Special test scales that were printed were read through scale readers and colour profiles were obtained. Comparisons were carried out on the obtained IPA-free and IPAbased printing colour gamut. Microscopic images of the smallest dots were taken and edge sharpening was examined. Print brightness measurements were carried out for the selected areas on the test scale. The study practically demonstrated that printing performed by using IPA-free fountain solution produced a better and wider colour gamut, edge sharpening was better in the IPA-free systems as the number of prints increased and the prints made by using IPA-free fountain solution were brighter.

  16. From Print to Digital Platforms: A PBL Framework for Fostering Multimedia Competencies and Consciousness in Traditional Journalism Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Debbie; Kale, Ugur

    2015-01-01

    The project-based learning (PBL) approach closely reflects the tenets of journalism and provides a potential pedagogical guide for transforming traditional journalism education. This study operationalizes and applies a PBL framework in digitizing a print journalism course. The findings illustrate how the presence of seven key elements of PBL…

  17. Towards Single-Step Biofabrication of Organs on a Chip via 3D Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Yenilmez, Bekir; Tasoglu, Savas

    2016-09-01

    Organ-on-a-chip engineering employs microfabrication of living tissues within microscale fluid channels to create constructs that closely mimic human organs. With the advent of 3D printing, we predict that single-step fabrication of these devices will enable rapid design and cost-effective iterations in the development stage, facilitating rapid innovation in this field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Raman Spectroscopy of 3-D Printed Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Vanessa; Wood, Erin; Hight Walker, Angela; Seppala, Jonathan; Kotula, Anthony

    Additive manufacturing (AM) techniques, such as 3-D printing are becoming an innovative and efficient way to produce highly customized parts for applications ranging from automotive to biomedical. Polymer-based AM parts can be produced from a myriad of materials and processing conditions to enable application-specific products. However, bringing 3-D printing from prototype to production relies on understanding the effect of processing conditions on the final product. Raman spectroscopy is a powerful and non-destructive characterization technique that can assist in determining the chemical homogeneity and physical alignment of polymer chains in 3-D printed materials. Two polymers commonly used in 3-D printing, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and polycarbonate (PC), were investigated using 1- and 2-D hyperspectral Raman imaging. In the case of ABS, a complex thermoplastic, the homogeneity of the material through the weld zone was investigated by comparing Raman peaks from each of the three components. In order to investigate the effect of processing conditions on polymer chain alignment, polarized Raman spectroscopy was used. In particular, the print speed or shear rate and effect of strain on PC filaments was investigated with perpendicular and parallel polarizations. National Institute of Standards and Technology Gaithersburg, MD ; Society of Physics Students.

  19. THE DISTRIBUTION NETWORK DEVELOPEMENT IN PRINT MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Iordache

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we identify the characteristics of the distribution networks in print media and the features ofmarketing in mass media, emphasising the attempts initiated by the press in the context of the financial crisis. Theresearch was conducted through a case study on regional newspaper,, Gazeta de Sud'' The main problems analyzedwere decreasing newspaper circulation and advertising. The research taken into account trends and developmentsworldwide print media as well as print media particularities of Romania, with a focus on identifying factors thatcontributed to the closure of a significant number of newspapers, or their transition from printed version online format.The paper is mainly focused on some practical issues related to the way of organizing the print media sales networks,the authors elaborating proposals for the implementation of certain measures to increase the circulation, on the onehand, and on the hand, to increase the sale of ad space in the newspaper. Compared with other products, thenewspaper has unique characteristics caused by daily changing content, and therefore the product itself. Having ahighly perishable, the content of media products should always seen in relation to time, which requires more rapiddistribution and continuous production.

  20. Microscale 3D Printing of Nanotwinned Copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behroozfar, Ali; Daryadel, Soheil; Morsali, S Reza; Moreno, Salvador; Baniasadi, Mahmoud; Bernal, Rodrigo A; Minary-Jolandan, Majid

    2018-01-01

    Nanotwinned (nt)-metals exhibit superior mechanical and electrical properties compared to their coarse-grained and nanograined counterparts. nt-metals in film and bulk forms are obtained using physical and chemical processes including pulsed electrodeposition (PED), plastic deformation, recrystallization, phase transformation, and sputter deposition. However, currently, there is no process for 3D printing (additive manufacturing) of nt-metals. Microscale 3D printing of nt-Cu is demonstrated with high density of coherent twin boundaries using a new room temperature process based on localized PED (L-PED). The 3D printed nt-Cu is fully dense, with low to none impurities, and low microstructural defects, and without obvious interface between printed layers, which overall result in good mechanical and electrical properties, without any postprocessing steps. The L-PED process enables direct 3D printing of layer-by-layer and complex 3D microscale nt-Cu structures, which may find applications for fabrication of metamaterials, sensors, plasmonics, and micro/nanoelectromechanical systems. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. 3D printed orodispersible films with Aripiprazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamróz, Witold; Kurek, Mateusz; Łyszczarz, Ewelina; Szafraniec, Joanna; Knapik-Kowalczuk, Justyna; Syrek, Karolina; Paluch, Marian; Jachowicz, Renata

    2017-11-30

    Three dimensional printing technology is gaining in importance because of its increasing availability and wide applications. One of the three dimensional printing techniques is Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) which works on the basis of hot melt extrusion-well known in the pharmaceutical technology. Combination of fused deposition modelling with preparation of the orodispersible film with poorly water soluble substance such as aripiprazole seems to be extra advantageous in terms of dissolution rate. 3D printed as well as casted films were compared in terms of physicochemical and mechanical properties. Moreover, drug-free films were prepared to evaluate the impact of the extrusion process and aripiprazole presence on the film properties. X-ray diffractometry and thermal analyses confirmed transition of aripiprazole into amorphous state during film preparation using 3D printing technique. Amorphization of the aripiprazole and porous structure of printed film led to increased dissolution rate in comparison to casted films, which, however have slightly better mechanical properties due to their continuous structure. It can be concluded that fused deposition modelling is suitable technique and polyvinyl alcohol is applicable polymer for orodispersible films preparation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Boosting bonsai trees for handwritten/printed text discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricquebourg, Yann; Raymond, Christian; Poirriez, Baptiste; Lemaitre, Aurélie; Coüasnon, Bertrand

    2013-12-01

    Boosting over decision-stumps proved its efficiency in Natural Language Processing essentially with symbolic features, and its good properties (fast, few and not critical parameters, not sensitive to over-fitting) could be of great interest in the numeric world of pixel images. In this article we investigated the use of boosting over small decision trees, in image classification processing, for the discrimination of handwritten/printed text. Then, we conducted experiments to compare it to usual SVM-based classification revealing convincing results with very close performance, but with faster predictions and behaving far less as a black-box. Those promising results tend to make use of this classifier in more complex recognition tasks like multiclass problems.

  3. COMPUTER- AIDED MODELING AND IMPROVING OF RISOGRAPH PRINTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. E. Sulim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The considered improvement of qualit y of the risofraph print based on a mathematical model in the environment Matlab by using the specialized algorithms and digital filter of the Image Processing Toolbox. Use the model of screen printing in Matlab environment for risograph provide an opportunit y to improve the qualit y of prints by adjusting profile risograph to a specific view and the t ype of digital image. The use of the proposed technology will reduce the flow of the film and the paint by eliminating printing test prints and reducing the time spent printing.

  4. SINGLE IMAGE CAMERA CALIBRATION IN CLOSE RANGE PHOTOGRAMMETRY FOR SOLDER JOINT ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Heinemann

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Printed Circuit Boards (PCB play an important role in the manufacturing of electronic devices. To ensure a correct function of the PCBs a certain amount of solder paste is needed during the placement of components. The aim of the current research is to develop an real-time, closed-loop solution for the analysis of the printing process where solder is printed onto PCBs. Close range photogrammetry allows for determination of the solder volume and a subsequent correction if necessary. Photogrammetry is an image based method for three dimensional reconstruction from two dimensional image data of an object. A precise camera calibration is indispensable for an accurate reconstruction. In our certain application it is not possible to use calibration methods with two dimensional calibration targets. Therefore a special calibration target was developed and manufactured, which allows for single image camera calibration.

  5. A screen-printed flexible flow sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschos, A.; Syrovy, T.; Syrova, L.; Kaltsas, G.

    2017-04-01

    A thermal flow sensor was printed on a flexible plastic substrate using exclusively screen-printing techniques. The presented device was implemented with custom made screen-printed thermistors, which allows simple, cost-efficient production on a variety of flexible substrates while maintaining the typical advantages of thermal flow sensors. Evaluation was performed for both static (zero flow) and dynamic conditions using a combination of electrical measurements and IR imaging techniques in order to determine important characteristics, such as temperature response, output repeatability, etc. The flow sensor was characterized utilizing the hot-wire and calorimetric principles of operation, while the preliminary results appear to be very promising, since the sensor was successfully evaluated and displayed adequate sensitivity in a relatively wide flow range.

  6. Lip prints: Role in forensic odontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dineshshankar, Janardhanam; Ganapathi, Nalliappan; Yoithapprabhunath, Thukanaykanpalayam Ragunathan; Maheswaran, Thangadurai; Kumar, Muniapillai Siva; Aravindhan, Ravi

    2013-06-01

    Identification plays a major role in any crime investigation. The pattern of wrinkles on the lips has individual characteristics like fingerprints. Cheiloscopy is a forensic investigation technique that deals with identification of humans based on lips traces. In the past decades, lip-print studies attracted the attention of many scientists as a new tool for human identification in both civil and criminal issues. The lip crease pattern is on the vermilion border of the lip, which is quite mobile and lip prints may vary in appearance according to the pressure, direction and method used in making the print. It concludes by enlightening the readers with the fact that the possibilities to use the red part of lips to identify a human being are wider than it is commonly thought.

  7. Three-dimensional printing of biological matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Munaz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D printing of human tissues and organ has been an exciting research topic in the past three decades. However, existing technological and biological challenges still require a significant amount of research. The present review highlights these challenges and discusses their potential solutions such as mapping and converting a human organ onto a 3D virtual design, synchronizing the virtual design with the printing hardware. Moreover, the paper discusses in details recent advances in formulating bio-inks and challenges in tissue construction with or without scaffold. Next, the paper reviews fusion processes effecting vascular cells and tissues. Finally, the paper deliberates the feasibility of organ printing with state-of-the-art technologies.

  8. Lip prints: Role in forensic odontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janardhanam Dineshshankar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification plays a major role in any crime investigation. The pattern of wrinkles on the lips has individual characteristics like fingerprints. Cheiloscopy is a forensic investigation technique that deals with identification of humans based on lips traces. In the past decades, lip-print studies attracted the attention of many scientists as a new tool for human identification in both civil and criminal issues. The lip crease pattern is on the vermilion border of the lip, which is quite mobile and lip prints may vary in appearance according to the pressure, direction and method used in making the print. It concludes by enlightening the readers with the fact that the possibilities to use the red part of lips to identify a human being are wider than it is commonly thought.

  9. Inkjet Printed Radio Frequency Passive Components

    KAUST Repository

    McKerricher, Garret

    2015-12-01

    Inkjet printing is a mature technique for colourful graphic arts. It excels at customized, large area, high resolution, and small volume production. With the developments in conductive, and dielectric inks, there is potential for large area inkjet electronics fabrication. Passive radio frequency devices can benefit greatly from a printing process, since the size of these devices is defined by the frequency of operation. The large size of radio frequency passives means that they either take up expensive space “on chip” or that they are fabricated on a separate lower cost substrate and somehow bonded to the chips. This has hindered cost-sensitive high volume applications such as radio frequency identification tags. Substantial work has been undertaken on inkjet-printed conductors for passive antennas on microwave substrates and even paper, yet there has been little work on the printing of the dielectric materials aimed at radio frequency passives. Both the conductor and dielectric need to be integrated to create a multilayer inkjet printing process that is capable of making quality passives such as capacitors and inductors. Three inkjet printed dielectrics are investigated in this thesis: a ceramic (alumina), a thermal-cured polymer (poly 4 vinyl phenol), and a UV-cured polymer (acrylic based). For the conductor, both a silver nanoparticle ink as well as a custom in-house formulated particle-free silver ink are explored. The focus is on passives, mainly capacitors and inductors. Compared to low frequency electronics, radio frequency components have additional sensitivity regarding skin depth of the conductor and surface roughness, as well as dielectric constant and loss tangent of the dielectric. These concerns are investigated with the aim of making the highest quality components possible and to understand the current limitations of inkjet-fabricated radio frequency devices. An inkjet-printed alumina dielectric that provides quality factors of 200 and high

  10. The characterization of microcapsules printed by screen printing and coating technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastko Milošević

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Depending on the microcapsules functionality, i.e. encapsulated core material, nowadays microcapsules are used in various fields of application, such as in medicine, pharmacy, agriculture, construction industry, chemical industry, food industry, biotechnology, electronics, as well as in printing and textile industry. In order to fulfil their basic purpose, microcapsules have to be transferred onto the target areas of the substrate material without damage, using different deposition techniques, mostly coating and printing techniques. The aim of this research is to firstly investigate the physical characteristics of the two selected fragranced microcapsules, applied by screen printing and coating technique, and secondly to determine how their addition in the selected three varnishes affected the basic characteristics of the prints. Fragranced microcapsules were before printing and coating adequately premixed with the selected varnish. The research revealed that the characteristics of the fragranced microcapsules and the varnishes as well as the used application techniques significantly affected the behaviour of the fragranced microcapsules and their deposition in the printed varnish layer as well as on the characteristics of the prints.

  11. Cardiothoracic Applications of 3D Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannopoulos, Andreas A.; Steigner, Michael L.; George, Elizabeth; Barile, Maria; Hunsaker, Andetta R.; Rybicki, Frank J.; Mitsouras, Dimitris

    2016-01-01

    Summary Medical 3D printing is emerging as a clinically relevant imaging tool in directing preoperative and intraoperative planning in many surgical specialties and will therefore likely lead to interdisciplinary collaboration between engineers, radiologists, and surgeons. Data from standard imaging modalities such as CT, MRI, echocardiography and rotational angiography can be used to fabricate life-sized models of human anatomy and pathology, as well as patient-specific implants and surgical guides. Cardiovascular 3D printed models can improve diagnosis and allow for advanced pre-operative planning. The majority of applications reported involve congenital heart diseases, valvular and great vessels pathologies. Printed models are suitable for planning both surgical and minimally invasive procedures. Added value has been reported toward improving outcomes, minimizing peri-operative risk, and developing new procedures such as transcatheter mitral valve replacements. Similarly, thoracic surgeons are using 3D printing to assess invasion of vital structures by tumors and to assist in diagnosis and treatment of upper and lower airway diseases. Anatomic models enable surgeons to assimilate information more quickly than image review, choose the optimal surgical approach, and achieve surgery in a shorter time. Patient-specific 3D-printed implants are beginning to appear and may have significant impact on cosmetic and life-saving procedures in the future. In summary, cardiothoracic 3D printing is rapidly evolving and may be a potential game-changer for surgeons. The imager who is equipped with the tools to apply this new imaging science to cardiothoracic care is thus ideally positioned to innovate in this new emerging imaging modality. PMID:27149367

  12. Laser printing of 3D metallic interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniam, Iyoel; Mathews, Scott A.; Charipar, Nicholas A.; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Piqué, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The use of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) techniques for the printing of functional materials has been demonstrated for numerous applications. The printing gives rise to patterns, which can be used to fabricate planar interconnects. More recently, various groups have demonstrated electrical interconnects from laser-printed 3D structures. The laser printing of these interconnects takes place through aggregation of voxels of either molten metal or of pastes containing dispersed metallic particles. However, the generated 3D structures do not posses the same metallic conductivity as a bulk metal interconnect of the same cross-section and length as those formed by wire bonding or tab welding. An alternative is to laser transfer entire 3D structures using a technique known as lase-and-place. Lase-and-place is a LIFT process whereby whole components and parts can be transferred from a donor substrate onto a desired location with one single laser pulse. This paper will describe the use of LIFT to laser print freestanding, solid metal foils or beams precisely over the contact pads of discrete devices to interconnect them into fully functional circuits. Furthermore, this paper will also show how the same laser can be used to bend or fold the bulk metal foils prior to transfer, thus forming compliant 3D structures able to provide strain relief for the circuits under flexing or during motion from thermal mismatch. These interconnect "ridges" can span wide gaps (on the order of a millimeter) and accommodate height differences of tens of microns between adjacent devices. Examples of these laser printed 3D metallic bridges and their role in the development of next generation electronics by additive manufacturing will be presented.

  13. Closing global material loops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prosman, Ernst-Jan; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum; Liotta, Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    Replacing virgin materials with waste materials, a practice known as Industrial Symbiosis (IS), has been identified as a key strategy for closing material loops. This article adopts a critical view on geographic proximity and external coordinators – two key enablers of IS. By ‘uncovering’ a case...... for geographic proximity and external coordinators. In doing so, our insights into firm-level challenges of long-distance IS exchanges contribute to closing global material loops by increasing the number of potential circular pathways....

  14. Laser printed plasmonic color metasurfaces (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Anders; Zhu, Xiaolong; Højlund-Nielsen, Emil; Vannahme, Christoph; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes color printing on nanoimprinted plasmonic metasurfaces by laser post-writing, for flexible decoration of high volume manufactured plastic products. Laser pulses induce transient local heat generation that leads to melting and reshaping of the imprinted nanostructures. Different surface morphologies that support different plasmonic resonances, and thereby different color appearances, are created by control of the laser pulse energy density. All primary colors can be printed, with a speed of 1 ns per pixel, resolution up to 127,000 dots per inch (DPI) and power consumption down to 0.3 nJ per pixel.

  15. Nozzle geometry for organic vapor jet printing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forrest, Stephen R.; McGraw, Gregory

    2017-10-25

    A first device is provided. The device includes a print head. The print head further includes a first nozzle hermetically sealed to a first source of gas. The first nozzle has an aperture having a smallest dimension of 0.5 to 500 microns in a direction perpendicular to a flow direction of the first nozzle. At a distance from the aperture into the first nozzle that is 5 times the smallest dimension of the aperture of the first nozzle, the smallest dimension perpendicular to the flow direction is at least twice the smallest dimension of the aperture of the first nozzle.

  16. Plasmonic laser printing for functional metasurfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Carstensen, M. S.; Vannahme, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we show a method of color printing on nanoimprinted plasmonic metasurfaces using laser post-writing. Laser pulses induce transient local heat generation that leads to melting and reshaping of the imprinted nanostructures [1]. Depending on the laser pulse energy density, different surface...... controlling. Thus, this diffraction-limited-resolution optical writing process can be further used to demonstrate a variety of applications in addition to large-area structural color printing. Multi-focus Fresnel zone plates with subwavelength focus, and more meta-surfaces different functions...

  17. 3D-PRINTING OF BUILD OBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAVYTSKYI M. V.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Raising of problem. Today, in all spheres of our life we can constate the permanent search for new, modern methods and technologies that meet the principles of sustainable development. New approaches need to be, on the one hand more effective in terms of conservation of exhaustible resources of our planet, have minimal impact on the environment and on the other hand to ensure a higher quality of the final product. Construction is not exception. One of the new promising technology is the technology of 3D -printing of individual structures and buildings in general. 3Dprinting - is the process of real object recreating on the model of 3D. Unlike conventional printer which prints information on a sheet of paper, 3D-printer allows you to display three-dimensional information, i.e. creates certain physical objects. Currently, 3D-printer finds its application in many areas of production: machine building elements, a variety of layouts, interior elements, various items. But due to the fact that this technology is fairly new, it requires the creation of detailed and accurate technologies, efficient equipment and materials, and development of common vocabulary and regulatory framework in this field. Research Aim. The analysis of existing methods of creating physical objects using 3D-printing and the improvement of technology and equipment for the printing of buildings and structures. Conclusion. 3D-printers building is a new generation of equipment for the construction of buildings, structures, and structural elements. A variety of building printing technics opens up wide range of opportunities in the construction industry. At this stage, printers design allows to create low-rise buildings of different configurations with different mortars. The scientific novelty of this work is to develop proposals to improve the thermal insulation properties of constructed 3D-printing objects and technological equipment. The list of key terms and notions of construction

  18. Printed-Circuit Cross-Slot Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, Wong; Chung, Hsien-Hsien; Peng, Sheng Y.

    1990-01-01

    Coupling between perpendicular slots suppressed. Balanced feed configuration minimizes coupling between slots of printed-circuit cross-slot antenna unit. Unit and array have conventional cavity-backed-printed-circuit, crossed-slot antenna design. Strip-line feeders behind planar conductive antenna element deliver power to horizontal slot in opposite phase. As result, little or no power propagates into vertical slot. Similar considerations apply to strip lines that feed vertical slot. Units of this type elements of phased-array antennas for radar, mobile/satellite communications, and other applications requiring flush mounting and/or rapid steering of beams with circular polarization.

  19. Three-Dimensional Printing in Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltorai, Adam E M; Nguyen, Eric; Daniels, Alan H

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is emerging as a clinically promising technology for rapid prototyping of surgically implantable products. With this commercially available technology, computed tomography or magnetic resonance images can be used to create graspable objects from 3D reconstructed images. Models can enhance patients' understanding of their pathology and surgeon preoperative planning. Customized implants and casts can be made to match an individual's anatomy. This review outlines 3D printing, its current applications in orthopedics, and promising future directions. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Modification of microneedles using inkjet printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, R. D.; Miller, P. R.; Hayes, S. L.; Monteiro-Riviere, N. A.; Narayan, R. J.

    2011-06-01

    In this study, biodegradable acid anhydride copolymer microneedles containing quantum dots were fabricated by means of visible light dynamic mask micro-stereolithography-micromolding and inkjet printing. Nanoindentation was performed to obtain the hardness and the Young's modulus of the biodegradable acid anhydride copolymer. Imaging of quantum dots within porcine skin was accomplished by means of multiphoton microscopy. Our results suggest that the combination of visible light dynamic mask micro-stereolithography-micromolding and inkjet printing enables fabrication of solid biodegradable microneedles with a wide range of geometries as well as a wide range of pharmacologic agent compositions.

  1. Modification of microneedles using inkjet printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R D Boehm

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, biodegradable acid anhydride copolymer microneedles containing quantum dots were fabricated by means of visible light dynamic mask micro-stereolithography-micromolding and inkjet printing. Nanoindentation was performed to obtain the hardness and the Young's modulus of the biodegradable acid anhydride copolymer. Imaging of quantum dots within porcine skin was accomplished by means of multiphoton microscopy. Our results suggest that the combination of visible light dynamic mask micro-stereolithography-micromolding and inkjet printing enables fabrication of solid biodegradable microneedles with a wide range of geometries as well as a wide range of pharmacologic agent compositions.

  2. A guide to printed circuit board design

    CERN Document Server

    Hamilton, Charles

    1984-01-01

    A Guide to Printed Circuit Board Design discusses the basic design principles of printed circuit board (PCB). The book consists of nine chapters; each chapter provides both text discussion and illustration relevant to the topic being discussed. Chapter 1 talks about understanding the circuit diagram, and Chapter 2 covers how to compile component information file. Chapter 3 deals with the design layout, while Chapter 4 talks about preparing the master artworks. The book also covers generating computer aided design (CAD) master patterns, and then discusses how to prepare the production drawing a

  3. Printing versus coating - What will be the future production technology for printed electronics?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glawe, Andrea; Eggerath, Daniel; Schäfer, Frank [KROENERT GmbH and Co KG, Schuetzenstrasse 105, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-02-17

    The market of Large Area Organic Printed Electronics is developing rapidly to increase efficiency and quality as well as to lower costs further. Applications for OPV, OLED, RFID and compact Printed Electronic systems are increasing. In order to make the final products more affordable, but at the same time highly accurate, Roll to Roll (R2R) production on flexible transparent polymer substrates is the way forward. There are numerous printing and coating technologies suitable depending on the design, the product application and the chemical process technology. Mainly the product design (size, pattern, repeatability) defines the application technology.

  4. 75 FR 1049 - Wausau Paper Printing & Writing, LLC,

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-08

    ...] Wausau Paper Printing & Writing, LLC, Wausau Paper Mills, LLC; Notice of Application for Transfer of... Paper Printing & Writing, LLC (transferor) and Wausau Paper Mills, LLC (transferee) filed an application...

  5. Using the printed medium to disseminate information about ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using the printed medium to disseminate information about psychiatric disorders: original article. ... Key Words: Health information, Information material, Communication / dissemination of health information, Text-focused research, Usability testing, Message design, Printed medium, Mental health, Schizophrenia

  6. Review of Recent Inkjet-Printed Capacitive Tactile Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Ahmed; Lim, Sungjoon

    2017-11-10

    Inkjet printing is an advanced printing technology that has been used to develop conducting layers, interconnects and other features on a variety of substrates. It is an additive manufacturing process that offers cost-effective, lightweight designs and simplifies the fabrication process with little effort. There is hardly sufficient research on tactile sensors and inkjet printing. Advancements in materials science and inkjet printing greatly facilitate the realization of sophisticated tactile sensors. Starting from the concept of capacitive sensing, a brief comparison of printing techniques, the essential requirements of inkjet-printing and the attractive features of state-of-the art inkjet-printed tactile sensors developed on diverse substrates (paper, polymer, glass and textile) are presented in this comprehensive review. Recent trends in inkjet-printed wearable/flexible and foldable tactile sensors are evaluated, paving the way for future research.

  7. Metallurgy: No more tears for metal 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Iain

    2017-09-01

    3D printing could revolutionize manufacturing processes involving metals, but few industrially useful alloys are compatible with the technique. A method has been developed that might open up the 3D printing of all metals. See Letter p.365

  8. Printing and Related Support Activities Sector (NAICS 323)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Find environmental regulatory and compliance information for the printing sector, including NESHAPs for paper surface coating, RCRA hazardous waste guide for small business, and a pollution prevention guidance for lithographic and screen printing

  9. A Quest for Increased Interactivity in the Print Instructional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Quest for Increased Interactivity in the Print Instructional Resources of Open and Distance Learning (ODL) Institutions in Africa: Writing the Study Units of National Open University of Nigeria (NOUN) Print Course Materials.

  10. Printing microstructures in a polymer matrix using a ferrofluid droplet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel Fattah, Abdel Rahman [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Ghosh, Suvojit [Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Puri, Ishwar K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-03-01

    We print complex curvilinear microstructures in an elastomer matrix using a ferrofluid droplet as the print head. A magnetic field moves the droplet along a prescribed path in liquid polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The droplet sheds magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) clusters in its wake, forming printed features. The PDMS is subsequently heated so that it crosslinks, which preserves the printed features in the elastomer matrix. The competition between magnetic and drag forces experienced by the ferrofluid droplet and its trailing MNPs highlight design criteria for successful printing, which are experimentally confirmed. The method promises new applications, such as flexible 3D circuitry. - Highlights: • Magnetically guided miscible ferrofluid droplets print 3D patterns in a polymer. • Printing mechanism depends on the dynamics between the fluid and magnetic forces. • Droplet size influences the width of the printed trail. • The Colloidal distribution of the ferrofluid is important for pattern integrity. • Particle trajectories and trails are simulated and validated through experiments.

  11. Review of Recent Inkjet-Printed Capacitive Tactile Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Salim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Inkjet printing is an advanced printing technology that has been used to develop conducting layers, interconnects and other features on a variety of substrates. It is an additive manufacturing process that offers cost-effective, lightweight designs and simplifies the fabrication process with little effort. There is hardly sufficient research on tactile sensors and inkjet printing. Advancements in materials science and inkjet printing greatly facilitate the realization of sophisticated tactile sensors. Starting from the concept of capacitive sensing, a brief comparison of printing techniques, the essential requirements of inkjet-printing and the attractive features of state-of-the art inkjet-printed tactile sensors developed on diverse substrates (paper, polymer, glass and textile are presented in this comprehensive review. Recent trends in inkjet-printed wearable/flexible and foldable tactile sensors are evaluated, paving the way for future research.

  12. 3D–4D Printed Objects: New Bioactive Material Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline A. Mandon

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the main objectives of 3D printing in health science is to mimic biological functions. To reach this goal, a 4D printing might be added to 3D-printed objects which will be characterized by their abilities to evolve over time and under external stimulus by modifying their shape, properties or composition. Such abilities are the promise of great opportunities for biosensing and biomimetic systems to progress towards more physiological mimicking systems. Herein are presented two 4D printing examples for biosensing and biomimetic applications using 3D-printed enzymes. The first one is based on the printing of the enzymatic couple glucose oxidase/peroxidase for the chemiluminescent detection of glucose, and the second uses printed alkaline phosphatase to generate in situ programmed and localized calcification of the printed object.

  13. 3D-4D Printed Objects: New Bioactive Material Opportunities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Celine A Mandon; Loïc J Blum; Christophe A Marquette

    2017-01-01

    .... To reach this goal, a 4D printing might be added to 3D-printed objects which will be characterized by their abilities to evolve over time and under external stimulus by modifying their shape, properties or composition...

  14. Print Exposure of Taiwanese Fifth Graders: Measurement and Prediction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Su-Yen; Fang, Sheng-Ping

    ...), and a Chinese author recognition test as measures of print exposure for fifth graders in Taiwan, and to investigate the relative extent to which print-exposure scores, diary estimates of reading...

  15. 3-D printed composites with ultrasonically arranged complex microstructure

    OpenAIRE

    Llewellyn-Jones, Tom; Trask, Richard; Allen, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the efficacy of implementing ultrasonic manipulation within a modified form of stereolithographic 3D printing to form complex microstructures in printed components. Currently 3D printed components are limited both in terms of structural performance and specialised functionality. This study aims to demonstrate a novel method for 3D printing composite materials, by arranging microparticles suspended within a photocurable resin. The resin is selectively cured by a 3-axis ...

  16. Effects of Calendering on Print Densities of Coated Paperboards

    OpenAIRE

    SÖNMEZ, Sinan

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the effect of calendering on print quality was determined. For this purpose, five different pigment-coating formulations wereprepared. They were coated on the surface of the base paperboard, previously coated with starch. Half of the coated base paperboards werecalendered. Then, the Ugra82 (Ugra82 Plate Control Wedge) was printed on calendered and uncalendered-coated base paperboard surfaceby offset printing using black inks. All solid density measurements on the printed wedge ...

  17. 3D Printing and 3D Bioprinting in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayavenkataraman, Sanjairaj; Fuh, Jerry Y H; Lu, Wen Feng

    2017-07-13

    Additive manufacturing, commonly referred to as 3D printing, is a technology that builds three-dimensional structures and components layer by layer. Bioprinting is the use of 3D printing technology to fabricate tissue constructs for regenerative medicine from cell-laden bio-inks. 3D printing and bioprinting have huge potential in revolutionizing the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This paper reviews the application of 3D printing and bioprinting in the field of pediatrics.

  18. 3D Printing and 3D Bioprinting in Pediatrics

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayavenkataraman, Sanjairaj; Fuh, Jerry Y H; Lu, Wen Feng

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, commonly referred to as 3D printing, is a technology that builds three-dimensional structures and components layer by layer. Bioprinting is the use of 3D printing technology to fabricate tissue constructs for regenerative medicine from cell-laden bio-inks. 3D printing and bioprinting have huge potential in revolutionizing the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This paper reviews the application of 3D printing and bioprinting in the field of pediatrics.

  19. Development and characterisation of lithographically printed voltaic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Southee, DJ; Hay, GI; Evans, PSA; Harrison, DJ

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports progress in the fabrication of voltaic cells and batteries via offset lithographic printing. Successful design and manufacture of lithographically printed voltaic cells would facilitate the integration of printed passive components, interconnects and display elements for disposable electronics in low-volume, low weight circuits and systems. The conductive lithographic film (CLF) printing process was developed by Brunel University to fabricate circuit interconnect and variou...

  20. The future of 3D printing technology in biomedicine

    OpenAIRE

    Iraj Nabipour

    2015-01-01

    3D printing, one of the hottest cutting-edge interdisciplinary technologies, is projected to have revenue of $8.4 billion in 2020. #D printing technology will implement the concept of personalized medicine in medical healthcare industry and pharmaceutical fabrication. Organ printing, which it is defined as computer-aided, jet based 3D tissue-engineering of living human organs, is an interesting and challengeable field for 3D printing. Customized implants and prostheses can be produced in any ...

  1. Optical Properties and Visual Appearance of Printed Special Effect Colors

    OpenAIRE

    Kehren, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    Think of perfume wrappings and chocolate boxes. For such high quality printing products, printing inks with special effect pigments are used more frequently due to the unique optical properties and visual appearance. The shifting color, the pearlescent gloss and the visible texture of printed special effect colors fascinate the observer. A lack of knowledge about the printing of special effect colors and about the description of the optical properties and visual appearance causes problems. ...

  2. Gender representation in Pakistani print media- a critical analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ullah, Hazir; Khan, Ahsun Nisar; Khan, Hifsa Nisar; Ibrahim, Ammara

    2016-01-01

    The key objective of this study was to examine the representations of men and women in print media in Pakistan. Gender role stereotyping and sexism in print media is not a low-profile gender issue as printed communication and contents still hold an important place in contemporary digital world. Keeping in view the importance of newspapers as the leading source of credible content/messages, this paper examined gender stereotyping and sexism in print media in Pakistan and attempted to highlight...

  3. 3D Printing of Photocurable Cellulose Nanocrystal Composite for Fabrication of Complex Architectures via Stereolithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaganas, Napolabel B; Mangadlao, Joey Dacula; de Leon, Al Christopher C; Palaganas, Jerome O; Pangilinan, Katrina D; Lee, Yan Jie; Advincula, Rigoberto C

    2017-10-04

    The advantages of 3D printing on cost, speed, accuracy, and flexibility have attracted several new applications in various industries especially in the field of medicine where customized solutions are highly demanded. Although this modern fabrication technique offers several benefits, it also poses critical challenges in materials development suitable for industry use. Proliferation of polymers in biomedical application has been severely limited by their inherently weak mechanical properties despite their other excellent attributes. Earlier works on 3D printing of polymers focus mainly on biocompatibility and cellular viability and lack a close attention to produce robust specimens. Prized for superior mechanical strength and inherent stiffness, cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) from abaca plant is incorporated to provide the necessary toughness for 3D printable biopolymer. Hence, this work demonstrates 3D printing of CNC-filled biomaterial with significant improvement in mechanical and surface properties. These findings may potentially pave the way for an alternative option in providing innovative and cost-effective patient-specific solutions to various fields in medical industry. To the best of our knowledge, this work presents the first successful demonstration of 3D printing of CNC nanocomposite hydrogel via stereolithography (SL) forming a complex architecture with enhanced material properties potentially suited for tissue engineering.

  4. Design of a Novel 3D Printed Bioactive Nanocomposite Scaffold for Improved Osteochondral Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Nathan J; Patel, Romil; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-09-01

    Chronic and acute osteochondral defects as a result of osteoarthritis and trauma present a common and serious clinical problem due to the tissue's inherent complexity and poor regenerative capacity. In addition, cells within the osteochondral tissue are in intimate contact with a 3D nanostructured extracellular matrix composed of numerous bioactive organic and inorganic components. As an emerging manufacturing technique, 3D printing offers great precision and control over the microarchitecture, shape and composition of tissue scaffolds. Therefore, the objective of this study is to develop a biomimetic 3D printed nanocomposite scaffold with integrated differentiation cues for improved osteochondral tissue regeneration. Through the combination of novel nano-inks composed of organic and inorganic bioactive factors and advanced 3D printing, we have successfully fabricated a series of novel constructs which closely mimic the native 3D extracellular environment with hierarchical nanoroughness, microstructure and spatiotemporal bioactive cues. Our results illustrate several key characteristics of the 3D printed nanocomposite scaffold to include improved mechanical properties as well as excellent cytocompatibility for enhanced human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteochondral differentiation in vitro. The present work further illustrates the effectiveness of the scaffolds developed here as a promising and highly tunable platform for osteochondral tissue regeneration.

  5. 3D-printed flow system for determination of lead in natural waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattio, Elodie; Robert-Peillard, Fabien; Branger, Catherine; Puzio, Kinga; Margaillan, André; Brach-Papa, Christophe; Knoery, Joël; Boudenne, Jean-Luc; Coulomb, Bruno

    2017-06-01

    The development of 3D printing in recent years opens up a vast array of possibilities in the field of flow analysis. In the present study, a new 3D-printed flow system has been developed for the selective spectrophotometric determination of lead in natural waters. This system was composed of three 3D-printed units (sample treatment, mixing coil and detection) that might have been assembled without any tubing to form a complete flow system. Lead was determined in a two-step procedure. A preconcentration of lead was first carried out on TrisKem Pb Resin located in a 3D-printed column reservoir closed by a tapped screw. This resin showed a high extraction selectivity for lead over many tested potential interfering metals. In a second step, lead was eluted by ammonium oxalate in presence of 4-(2-pyridylazo)-resorcinol (PAR), and spectrophotometrically detected at 520nm. The optimized flow system has exhibited a linear response from 3 to 120µgL(-1). Detection limit, coefficient of variation and sampling rate were evaluated at 2.7µgL(-1), 5.4% (n=6) and 4 sampleh(-1), respectively. This flow system stands out by its fully 3D design, portability and simplicity for low cost analysis of lead in natural waters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. 3D Printing by Multiphase Silicone/Water Capillary Inks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roh, Sangchul; Parekh, Dishit P.; Bharti, Bhuvnesh; Stoyanov, Simeon D.; Velev, Orlin D.

    2017-01-01

    3D printing of polymers is accomplished easily with thermoplastics as the extruded hot melt solidifies rapidly during the printing process. Printing with liquid polymer precursors is more challenging due to their longer curing times. One curable liquid polymer of specific interest is

  7. Inkjet Printing of 3D Metallic Silver Complex Microstructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wits, Wessel Willems; Sridhar, Ashok; Dimitrov, D.

    2010-01-01

    To broaden the scope of inkjet printing, this paper focuses on printing of an organic silver complex ink on glass substrates towards the fabrication of metallic 3D microstructures. The droplet formation sequence of the inkjet printer is optimised to print continuous layers of metal. A brief

  8. Evaluation of Photocrosslinked Lutrol Hydrogel for Tissue Printing applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fedorovich, Natalja E.; Swennen, Ives; Girones, Jordi; Moroni, Lorenzo; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Schacht, Etienne; Alblas, Jacqueline; Dhert, Wouter J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Application of hydrogels in tissue engineering and innovative strategies such as organ printing, which is based on layered 3D deposition of cell-laden hydrogels, requires design of novel hydrogel matrices. Hydrogel demands for 3D printing include: 1) preservation of the printed shape after the

  9. HISTORIOGRAPHY OF THE PRINT MEDIA: A GLOBAL-CUM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-07-01

    Jul 1, 2012 ... HISTORIOGRAPHY OF THE PRINT MEDIA: A GLOBAL-CUM-NIGERIAN. PERSPECTIVE. Akpobo Odorume. Oduduwa University, Ipetumodu, Ile-Ife, Osun State. Abstract. The print media as we know them today have developed over a number of centuries. Any discourse on its (print media) evolution ...

  10. Printing Processes Used to Manufacture Photovoltaic Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rardin, Tina E.; Xu, Renmei

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing need for renewable energy sources, and solar power is a good option in many instances. Photovoltaic solar panels are now being manufactured via various methods, and different printing processes are being incorporated into the manufacturing process. Screen printing has been used most prevalently in the printing process to make…

  11. 48 CFR 53.106 - Special construction and printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... printing. 53.106 Section 53.106 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS General 53.106 Special construction and printing. Contracting offices may request exceptions (see 53.103) to standard forms for special construction and printing. Examples of...

  12. Printing on Paper: Costly Nuisance or Pedagogical Imperative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pranjal; Matulich, Erika; Yalabik, Baris

    2011-01-01

    What are the typical printing behaviors of students? What is the extent of wastage? What are student attitudes towards different pay-per-print schemes? What might be strategies for educational institutions to achieve less printing while not impeding pedagogical quality?

  13. Improving Heat Transfer Performance of Printed Circuit Boards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatzel, Donald V.

    2009-01-01

    This paper will explore the ability of printed circuit boards laminated with a Carbon Core Laminate to transfer heat vs. standard printed circuit boards that use only thick layers of copper. The paper will compare the differences in heat transfer performance of printed circuit boards with and without CCL.

  14. Future of printing: changes and challenges, technologies and markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipphan, Helmut

    1998-01-01

    Digitalization within the graphic arts industry is described and it is explained how it is improving and changing the print production strategies and which new kinds of print production systems are developed or can be expected. The relationship of printed media and electronic media is analyzed and a positioning for the next century is given. The state of the art of conventional printing technologies, especially using direct imagine techniques, and their position within the digital workflow are shortly described. Non-impact printing multicolor printing systems are explained, based on general design criteria and linked to existing and newly announced equipment. The use of high-tech components for building up successful systems with high reliability, high quality and low production costs is included with some examples. Digital printing systems open many opportunities in print production: distributed printing, personalization, print and book on demand are explained as examples. The overview of the several printing technologies and their positioning regarding quality and productivity leads to the scenario about the important position of printed media, also in the distant future.

  15. Special Issue: 3D Printing for Biomedical Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Chee Kai; Yeong, Wai Yee; An, Jia

    2017-02-28

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing has a long history of applications in biomedical engineering. The development and expansion of traditional biomedical applications are being advanced and enriched by new printing technologies. New biomedical applications such as bioprinting are highly attractive and trendy. This Special Issue aims to provide readers with a glimpse of the recent profile of 3D printing in biomedical research.

  16. Evaluation of 3D printed materials used to print WR10 horn antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Elof; Rahiminejad, Sofia; Enoksson, Peter

    2016-10-01

    A WR10 waveguide horn antenna is 3D printed with three different materials. The antennas are printed on a fusion deposition modeling delta 3D printer built in house at Chalmers University of Technology. The different plastic materials used are an electrically conductive Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), a thermally conductive polylactic acid containing 35% copper, and a tough Amphora polymer containing at least 20% carbon fiber. The antennas are all printed with a 0.25 mm nozzle and 100 μm layer thickness and the software settings are tuned to give maximum quality for each material. The three 3D printed horn antennas are compared when it comes to cost, time and material properties.

  17. Are Tooth Prints a Hard Tissue Equivalence of Finger Print in Mass Disaster: A Rationalized Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Shaik Kamal; Rao, B Vengal; Rao, M Sirisha; Kumari, K V Halini; Chinna, Sudarshan Kumar; Sahu, Divya

    2017-11-01

    Personal identification methods may not be efficient when bodies are decomposed, burned, in cases of mass disasters when soft tissue cannot provide reliable information or has been lost. Various methods currently employed in forensic odontology for personal identification include comparing with antemortem dental charts, rugoscopy, denture labeling, DNA analysis from dental pulp, bite mark analysis, etc., Recently, there is growing interest in the study of enamel rod end patterns. These enamel rod end patterns are termed as "Tooth prints" and the study of these prints is known as "Ameloglyphics" (amelo: Enamel, Glyphics: Carvings). This review encompasses about the basis of using enamel rod end patterns, methods of obtaining the patterns and further suggests these tooth prints as an analogy to finger print in personal identification in mass disasters.

  18. 78 FR 22795 - EPAAR Clause for Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... city, county, town, school district or special district with a population of less than 50,000; and (3... composition using computers with the final output or generation of a camera copy done by a color inkjet or color laser printer. This is not considered ``printing.'' However, if the output from desktop publishing...

  19. Automatic recognition of printed Oriya script

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper deals with an Optical Character Recognition (OCR) system for printed Oriya script. The development of OCR for this script is difficult because a large number of character shapes in the script have to be recognized. In the proposed system, the document image is first captured using a flat-bed scanner and then ...

  20. 3D Printed Terahertz Focusing Grating Couplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, David; Weidenbach, Marcel; Lehr, Jannik; Becker, Leonard; Beltrán-Mejía, Felipe; Busch, Stefan F.; Balzer, Jan C.; Koch, Martin

    2017-06-01

    We have designed, constructed and characterized a grating that focuses electromagnetic radiation at specific frequencies out of a dielectric waveguide. A simple theoretical model predicts the focusing behaviour of these chirped gratings, along with numerical results that support our assumptions and improved the grating geometry. The leaky waveguide was 3D printed and characterized at 120 GHz demonstrating its potential for manipulating terahertz waves.

  1. Prints Charles toetab talunike innovatsiooni / Merit Mikk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Mikk, Merit, 1969-

    2015-01-01

    Mahe- ja tavatootjatele suunatud uuenduslike tehnoloogiate arendamise ja jätkusuutlike lahenduste leidmise programmist Duchy Future Farming. Programmi veavad prints Charlesi fond, maheorganisatsioon Soil Association, Waitrose kaubandusketi juhtiv mahebränd Duchy Organics ja mahepõllumajanduse uurimiskeskus (Organic Research Centre)

  2. A practical guide to 3D printing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul Dijkstra; Rik Wesselink; Tommy Stobbe; Marc Beusenberg

    2017-01-01

    In 2014 “Printen in de derde dimensie” - a booklet on 3D printing and its applications within small and medium enterprises - was published as the result of research conducted by the Professorship for Polymer Engineering. It showed the rapidly growing possibilities resulting from the

  3. Printed optically transparent graphene cellulose electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinar, Dogan; Knopf, George K.; Nikumb, Suwas; Andrushchenko, Anatoly

    2016-02-01

    Optically transparent electrodes are a key component in variety of products including bioelectronics, touch screens, flexible displays, low emissivity windows, and photovoltaic cells. Although highly conductive indium tin oxide (ITO) films are often used in these electrode applications, the raw material is very expensive and the electrodes often fracture when mechanically stressed. An alternative low-cost material for inkjet printing transparent electrodes on glass and flexible polymer substrates is described in this paper. The water based ink is created by using a hydrophilic cellulose derivative, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), to help suspend the naturally hydrophobic graphene (G) sheets in a solvent composed of 70% DI water and 30% 2-butoxyethanol. The CMC chain has hydrophobic and hydrophilic functional sites which allow adsorption on G sheets and, therefore, permit the graphene to be stabilized in water by electrostatic and steric forces. Once deposited on the functionalized substrate the electrical conductivity of the printed films can be "tuned" by decomposing the cellulose stabilizer using thermal reduction. The entire electrode can be thermally reduced in an oven or portions of the electrode thermally modified using a laser annealing process. The thermal process can reduce the sheet resistance of G-CMC films to conductive electrode is a dependent on the film thickness (ie. superimposed printed layers). The printed electrodes have also been doped with AuCl3 to increase electrical conductivity without significantly increasing film thickness and, thereby, maintain high optical transparency.

  4. Institutions by Artists Print Centre Photographs

    OpenAIRE

    Hadbavny, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    During Institutions by Artists, Fillip was pleased to present a series of free, parallel events in the lobby of SFU Woodward’s that investigated the material culture produced by the institutional practices of artists. The Print Centre featured talks, launches, and screenings by conference presenters and attendees. Presented in collaboration with a temporary book store hosted by Motto Books (Berlin).

  5. 3D-printed cereal foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, M.; Bommel, K. van; Renzetti, S.

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, also known as 3D printing, is an up-and-coming production technology based on layer-by-layer deposition of material to reproduce a computer-generated 3D design. Additive manufacturing is a collective term used for a variety of technologies, such as fused deposition modeling

  6. 3D Printing. What's the Harm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Tyler S.; Roy, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Health concerns from 3D printing were first documented by Stephens, Azimi, Orch, and Ramos (2013), who found that commercially available 3D printers were producing hazardous levels of ultrafine particles (UFPs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) when plastic materials were melted through the extruder. UFPs are particles less than 100 nanometers…

  7. Expanding Geometry Understanding with 3D Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Jill A.; Cochran, Zane; Laney, Kendra; Dean, Mandi

    2016-01-01

    With the rise of personal desktop 3D printing, a wide spectrum of educational opportunities has become available for educators to leverage this technology in their classrooms. Until recently, the ability to create physical 3D models was well beyond the scope, skill, and budget of many schools. However, since desktop 3D printers have become readily…

  8. Standardized Curriculum for Graphic and Print Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson. Office of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    Standardized vocational education course titles and core contents for two courses in Mississippi are provided: graphic and print communications I and II. The first course contains the following units: (1) orientation; (2) keyboard composer model 48 T 6; (3) keyboard composer model 7300; (4) job planning, art work, and layout; (5) basic…

  9. [The first printed textbook in dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kóbor, András

    2010-12-01

    The first book focused solely on dentistry was published in Germany in 1530. Former scientific publications on dentistry were collected by an unknown author. The book presents 44 pages on the main issues of dentistry divided into 13 chapters. It was made by the Guttenberg method of printing.

  10. Print, Newspapers and Audiences in Colonial Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Bodil Folke

    2011-01-01

    in newspapers. They depended on voluntary and political associations and anti-colonial struggles in Kenya and on links to nationalists in India and the passive resistance movement in South Africa. They sidestepped the European-dominated print culture and created an anti-colonial counter-voice. Editors insisted...

  11. Innovation protection in the Dutch printing industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, M.C.; Masurel, E.

    2014-01-01

    Although the scholarly attention for innovation by SMEs is beyond discussion, much of the protective behaviour of SMEs concerning their innovations is unknown. A survey was sent to 1,337 SMEs from the Dutch Printing Industry, containing questions on: the firm; the entrepreneur; and a recent product

  12. Functional protein microarrays by electrohydrodynamic jet printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeta, Kazuyo; He, Ying; Sutanto, Erick; Kang, Somi; Le, An-Phong; Nuzzo, Ralph G; Alleyne, Andrew G; Ferreira, Placid M; Lu, Yi; Rogers, John A

    2012-11-20

    This paper reports the use of advanced forms of electrohydrodynamic jet (e-jet) printing for creating micro- and nanoscale patterns of proteins on various surfaces ranging from flat silica substrates to structured plasmonic crystals, suitable for micro/nanoarray analysis and other applications in both fluorescent and plasmonic detection modes. The approaches function well with diverse classes of proteins, including streptavidin, IgG, fibrinogen, and γ-globulin. Detailed study reveals that the printing process does not adversely alter the protein structure or function, as demonstrated in the specific case of streptavidin through measurements of its binding specificity to biotin-modified DNA. Multinozzle printing systems enable several types of proteins (up to four currently) to be patterned on a single substrate, in rapid fashion and with excellent control over spatial dimensions and registration. High-speed, pulsed operational modes allow large-area printing, with narrow statistical distributions of drop size and spacing in patterns that include millions of droplets. The process is also compatible with the structured surfaces of plasmonic crystal substrates to enable detection without fluorescence. These collective characteristics suggest potential utility of e-jet techniques in wide-ranging areas of biotechnology, where its compatibility with various biomaterials and substrates with different topographies and surface chemistries, and ability to form deposits that range from thick films to submonolayer coatings, derive from the remote, noncontacting physical material transfer mode of operation.

  13. Cultural stereotypes in Nigerian print media advertisements ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study set out to examine the extent to which cultural stereotype roles are depicted in print advertisements in Nigeria. It specifically sought to highlight what kind of influence (negative or positive) such stereotype representations carry. The study also attempts to identify those factors that may have been responsible for the ...

  14. 3D Printed Shock Mitigating Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrand, Amanda; Elston, Edwin; Dennis, Mitzi; Metroke, Tammy; Chen, Chenggang; Patton, Steven; Ganguli, Sabyasachi; Roy, Ajit

    Here we explore the durability, and shock mitigating potential, of solid and cellular 3D printed polymers and conductive inks under high strain rate, compressive shock wave and high g acceleration conditions. Our initial designs include a simple circuit with 4 resistors embedded into circular discs and a complex cylindrical gyroid shape. A novel ink consisting of silver-coated carbon black nanoparticles in a thermoplastic polyurethane was used as the trace material. One version of the disc structural design has the advantage of allowing disassembly after testing for direct failure analysis. After increasing impacts, printed and traditionally potted circuits were examined for functionality. Additionally, in the open disc design, trace cracking and delamination of resistors were able to be observed. In a parallel study, we examined the shock mitigating behavior of 3D printed cellular gyroid structures on a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB). We explored alterations to the classic SHPB setup for testing the low impedance, cellular samples to most accurately reflect the stress state inside the sample (strain rates from 700 to 1750 s-1). We discovered that the gyroid can effectively absorb the impact of the test resulting in crushing the structure. Future studies aim to tailor the unit cell dimensions for certain frequencies, increase print accuracy and optimize material compositions for conductivity and adhesion to manufacture more durable devices.

  15. Processing and characterization of screen printing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... prepared with differentcarriers and milling treatments were rheologically characterized, screen printed on three different porous alumina substrates and sintered at 1050 and 1150 ∘ C. The resulting membranes were characterized. The data collected on the rheological properties of inks (flow curves, thixotropic behaviour, ...

  16. Numerical models for printing and coating flows

    CERN Document Server

    Gethin, DT

    2002-01-01

    This issue brings together a number of papers under the theme of thin filmflows that are generic to printing and a wide range of coating applications.These processes require the deposition of a thin layer of fluid (or polymer) ontoa substrate. The simulation of these processes presents a number of numericalchallenges.

  17. Processing and characterization of screen printing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ent carriers and milling treatments were rheologically characterized, screen printed on three different porous alumina substrates and sintered at 1050 .... prepared by heating the terpineol up to 50. ◦. C and then by adding the other ..... particle size with respect to dry powders and, in particu- lar, the inks treated with three-rolls ...

  18. 3D printed rapid disaster response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacaze, Alberto; Murphy, Karl; Mottern, Edward; Corley, Katrina; Chu, Kai-Dee

    2014-05-01

    Under the Department of Homeland Security-sponsored Sensor-smart Affordable Autonomous Robotic Platforms (SAARP) project, Robotic Research, LLC is developing an affordable and adaptable method to provide disaster response robots developed with 3D printer technology. The SAARP Store contains a library of robots, a developer storefront, and a user storefront. The SAARP Store allows the user to select, print, assemble, and operate the robot. In addition to the SAARP Store, two platforms are currently being developed. They use a set of common non-printed components that will allow the later design of other platforms that share non-printed components. During disasters, new challenges are faced that require customized tools or platforms. Instead of prebuilt and prepositioned supplies, a library of validated robots will be catalogued to satisfy various challenges at the scene. 3D printing components will allow these customized tools to be deployed in a fraction of the time that would normally be required. While the current system is focused on supporting disaster response personnel, this system will be expandable to a range of customers, including domestic law enforcement, the armed services, universities, and research facilities.

  19. DNA Assembly in 3D Printed Fluidics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G Patrick

    Full Text Available The process of connecting genetic parts-DNA assembly-is a foundational technology for synthetic biology. Microfluidics present an attractive solution for minimizing use of costly reagents, enabling multiplexed reactions, and automating protocols by integrating multiple protocol steps. However, microfluidics fabrication and operation can be expensive and requires expertise, limiting access to the technology. With advances in commodity digital fabrication tools, it is now possible to directly print fluidic devices and supporting hardware. 3D printed micro- and millifluidic devices are inexpensive, easy to make and quick to produce. We demonstrate Golden Gate DNA assembly in 3D-printed fluidics with reaction volumes as small as 490 nL, channel widths as fine as 220 microns, and per unit part costs ranging from $0.61 to $5.71. A 3D-printed syringe pump with an accompanying programmable software interface was designed and fabricated to operate the devices. Quick turnaround and inexpensive materials allowed for rapid exploration of device parameters, demonstrating a manufacturing paradigm for designing and fabricating hardware for synthetic biology.

  20. Adhesion characterization of inkjet printed tracks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sridhar, Ashok; Akkerman, Remko; van Dijk, D.J.

    2007-01-01

    The robustness and service life of inkjet printed electronic circuit structures are highly influenced by the state of the interface between these structures and the substrate. In the case of polymeric substrate materials, surface modification is necessary to realise a favourable interface, as these

  1. Flow-Directed Crystallization for Printed Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Ge; Kwok, Justin J; Diao, Ying

    2016-12-20

    The solution printability of organic semiconductors (OSCs) represents a distinct advantage for materials processing, enabling low-cost, high-throughput, and energy-efficient manufacturing with new form factors that are flexible, stretchable, and transparent. While the electronic performance of OSCs is not comparable to that of crystalline silicon, the solution processability of OSCs allows them to complement silicon by tackling challenging aspects for conventional photolithography, such as large-area electronics manufacturing. Despite this, controlling the highly nonequilibrium morphology evolution during OSC printing remains a challenge, hindering the achievement of high electronic device performance and the elucidation of structure-property relationships. Many elegant morphological control methodologies have been developed in recent years including molecular design and novel processing approaches, but few have utilized fluid flow to control morphology in OSC thin films. In this Account, we discuss flow-directed crystallization as an effective strategy for controlling the crystallization kinetics during printing of small molecule and polymer semiconductors. Introducing the concept of flow-directed crystallization to the field of printed electronics is inspired by recent advances in pharmaceutical manufacturing and flow processing of flexible-chain polymers. Although flow-induced crystallization is well studied in these areas, previous findings may not apply directly to the field of printed electronics where the molecular structures (i.e., rigid π-conjugated backbone decorated with flexible side chains) and the intermolecular interactions (i.e., π-π interactions, quadrupole interactions) of OSCs differ substantially from those of pharmaceuticals or flexible-chain polymers. Another critical difference is the important role of solvent evaporation in open systems, which defines the flow characteristics and determines the crystallization kinetics and pathways. In

  2. Performance Comparison of Image Transforms for Palm Print Recognition with Fractional Coefficients of Transformed Palm Print Images

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. H. B. Kekre,; Sudeep D. Thepade,; Ashish Varun,; Nikhil Kamat,; Arvind Viswanathan; Pratik Dhwoj

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents performance comparison of palm print recognition techniques based on fractional coefficients of transformed palm print image using six different transforms like Sine, Cosine, Walsh, Slant,Hartley and Haar. In transform domain, the energy of image gets accumulated towards high frequency region; this characteristic of image transforms is exploited here to reduce the feature vector size of palm print images by neglecting the low frequency coefficients in transformed palm print...

  3. AirPrint Forensics: Recovering the Contents and Metadata of Printed Documents from iOS Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Gómez-Miralles

    2015-01-01

    data they may store, opens new opportunities in the field of computer forensics. In 2010, version 4 of the iOS operating system introduced AirPrint, a simple and driverless wireless printing functionality supported by hundreds of printer models from all major vendors. This paper describes the traces left in the iOS device when AirPrint is used and presents a method for recovering content and metadata of documents that have been printed.

  4. Colour changes in prints during long-term dark storage of prints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parraman, Carinna, E-mail: Carinna.Parraman@uwe.ac.u [Senior Research Fellow, Centre for Fine Print Research, University of the West of UK, Bristol BS3 2JT (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-01

    The most significant impact on colour fading in prints is exposure to light and air. However what happens to coloured prints during long-term storage in boxes, drawers and on shelves? Measurements of samples, printed in July 2005, stored in a range of light and darkened storage conditions have shown some interesting initial results. As more emphasis is placed on the effects of light, the dark stability of inkjet prints is relatively overlooked when considering how to preserve or store coloured prints. This study and presentation builds on previous research [1] and has concentrated on the changes to colour during storage. With reference to ASTM F2035 - 00(2006) Standard Practice for Measuring the Dark Stability of Ink Jet Prints, the Standards outline points out that whilst natural aging is the most reliable method of assessing image stability, materials and inks any data that is produced quickly becomes redundant; therefore accelerated aging is more preferred. However, the fine art materials in this study are still very much in circulation. The leading fine art papers, and pigmented ink-sets used in these trials are still being used by artists. We can therefore demonstrate the characteristics of colour changes and the impact of ink on paper that utilises natural aging methods.

  5. Fabrication of capacitive acoustic resonators combining 3D printing and 2D inkjet printing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Rubaiyet Iftekharul; Ogam, Erick; Loussert, Christophe; Benaben, Patrick; Boddaert, Xavier

    2015-10-14

    A capacitive acoustic resonator developed by combining three-dimensional (3D) printing and two-dimensional (2D) printed electronics technique is described. During this work, a patterned bottom structure with rigid backplate and cavity is fabricated directly by a 3D printing method, and then a direct write inkjet printing technique has been employed to print a silver conductive layer. A novel approach has been used to fabricate a diaphragm for the acoustic sensor as well, where the conductive layer is inkjet-printed on a pre-stressed thin organic film. After assembly, the resulting structure contains an electrically conductive diaphragm positioned at a distance from a fixed bottom electrode separated by a spacer. Measurements confirm that the transducer acts as capacitor. The deflection of the diaphragm in response to the incident acoustic single was observed by a laser Doppler vibrometer and the corresponding change of capacitance has been calculated, which is then compared with the numerical result. Observation confirms that the device performs as a resonator and provides adequate sensitivity and selectivity at its resonance frequency.

  6. Drug-printing by flexographic printing technology--a new manufacturing process for orodispersible films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Eva Maria; Schliephacke, Ralf; Breitenbach, Armin; Breitkreutz, Jörg

    2013-01-30

    Orodispersible films (ODFs) are intended to disintegrate within seconds when placed onto the tongue. The common way of manufacturing is the solvent casting method. Flexographic printing on drug-free ODFs is introduced as a highly flexible and cost-effective alternative manufacturing method in this study. Rasagiline mesylate and tadalafil were used as model drugs. Printing of rasagiline solutions and tadalafil suspensions was feasible. Up to four printing cycles were performed. The possibility to employ several printing cycles enables a continuous, highly flexible manufacturing process, for example for individualised medicine. The obtained ODFs were characterised regarding their mechanical properties, their disintegration time, API crystallinity and homogeneity. Rasagiline mesylate did not recrystallise after the printing process. Relevant film properties were not affected by printing. Results were comparable to the results of ODFs manufactured with the common solvent casting technique, but the APIs are less stressed through mixing, solvent evaporation and heat. Further, loss of material due to cutting jumbo and daughter rolls can be reduced. Therefore, a versatile new manufacturing technology particularly for processing high-potent low-dose or heat sensitive drugs is introduced in this study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Fabrication of Capacitive Acoustic Resonators Combining 3D Printing and 2D Inkjet Printing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubaiyet Iftekharul Haque

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A capacitive acoustic resonator developed by combining three-dimensional (3D printing and two-dimensional (2D printed electronics technique is described. During this work, a patterned bottom structure with rigid backplate and cavity is fabricated directly by a 3D printing method, and then a direct write inkjet printing technique has been employed to print a silver conductive layer. A novel approach has been used to fabricate a diaphragm for the acoustic sensor as well, where the conductive layer is inkjet-printed on a pre-stressed thin organic film. After assembly, the resulting structure contains an electrically conductive diaphragm positioned at a distance from a fixed bottom electrode separated by a spacer. Measurements confirm that the transducer acts as capacitor. The deflection of the diaphragm in response to the incident acoustic single was observed by a laser Doppler vibrometer and the corresponding change of capacitance has been calculated, which is then compared with the numerical result. Observation confirms that the device performs as a resonator and provides adequate sensitivity and selectivity at its resonance frequency.

  8. Fabrication of Capacitive Acoustic Resonators Combining 3D Printing and 2D Inkjet Printing Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Rubaiyet Iftekharul; Ogam, Erick; Loussert, Christophe; Benaben, Patrick; Boddaert, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    A capacitive acoustic resonator developed by combining three-dimensional (3D) printing and two-dimensional (2D) printed electronics technique is described. During this work, a patterned bottom structure with rigid backplate and cavity is fabricated directly by a 3D printing method, and then a direct write inkjet printing technique has been employed to print a silver conductive layer. A novel approach has been used to fabricate a diaphragm for the acoustic sensor as well, where the conductive layer is inkjet-printed on a pre-stressed thin organic film. After assembly, the resulting structure contains an electrically conductive diaphragm positioned at a distance from a fixed bottom electrode separated by a spacer. Measurements confirm that the transducer acts as capacitor. The deflection of the diaphragm in response to the incident acoustic single was observed by a laser Doppler vibrometer and the corresponding change of capacitance has been calculated, which is then compared with the numerical result. Observation confirms that the device performs as a resonator and provides adequate sensitivity and selectivity at its resonance frequency. PMID:26473878

  9. Closed timelike curves

    CERN Document Server

    Thorne, K S

    1993-01-01

    This lecture reviews recent research on closed timelike curves (CTCS), including these questions: Do the laws of physics prevent CTCs from ever forming in classical spacetime? If so, by what physical mechanism are C'I‘Cs prevented? Can the laws of physics be adapted in any reasonable way to a. spacetime that contains C'I‘Cs, or do they necessarily give nonsense? What insights into quantum gravity can one gain by asking questions such as these?

  10. Green Printing: Colorimetric and Densitometric Analysis of Solvent-Based and Vegetable Oil-Based Inks of Multicolor Offset Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharavath, H. Naik; Hahn, Kim

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the differences in the measurable print attributes (Print Contrast and Dot Gain) and color gamut of solvent-based (SB) inks vs. vegetable oil-based (VO) inks of multicolor offset printing. The literature review revealed a lack of published research on this subject. VO inks tend to perform (color…

  11. Design of 3D-Printed Titanium Compliant Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriam, Ezekiel G.; Jones, Jonathan E.; Howell, Larry L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes 3D-printed titanium compliant mechanisms for aerospace applications. It is meant as a primer to help engineers design compliant, multi-axis, printed parts that exhibit high performance. Topics covered include brief introductions to both compliant mechanism design and 3D printing in titanium, material and geometry considerations for 3D printing, modeling techniques, and case studies of both successful and unsuccessful part geometries. Key findings include recommended flexure geometries, minimum thicknesses, and general design guidelines for compliant printed parts that may not be obvious to the first time designer.

  12. Embedding objects during 3D printing to add new functionalities

    OpenAIRE

    Yuen, Po Ki

    2016-01-01

    A novel method for integrating and embedding objects to add new functionalities during 3D printing based on fused deposition modeling (FDM) (also known as fused filament fabrication or molten polymer deposition) is presented. Unlike typical 3D printing, FDM-based 3D printing could allow objects to be integrated and embedded during 3D printing and the FDM-based 3D printed devices do not typically require any post-processing and finishing. Thus, various fluidic devices with integrated glass cov...

  13. Fabrication of thin yttria-stabilized-zirconia dense electrolyte layers by inkjet printing for high performing solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esposito, Vincenzo; Gadea, Christophe; Hjelm, Johan

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present how a low-cost HP Deskjet 1000 inkjet printer was used to fabricate a 1.2 mm thin, dense and gas tight 16 cm2 solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) electrolyte. The electrolyte was printed using an ink made of highly diluted (...) powders (50 nm in size) in an aqueous medium. The ink was designed to be a highly dispersed, long term stable colloidal suspension, with optimal printability characteristics. The electrolyte was made by a multiple printing procedure, which ensures coverage of the several flaws occurring in a single...... printing pass. Together with an optimized sintering procedure this resulted in good adhesion and densification of the electrolyte. The SOFC exhibited a close-to-theoretical open circuit voltage and a remarkable peak power density above 1.5 W cm-2 at 800 °C....

  14. Microscale Electro-Hydrodynamic Cell Printing with High Viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiankang; Zhao, Xiang; Chang, Jinke; Li, Dichen

    2017-12-01

    Cell printing has gained extensive attentions for the controlled fabrication of living cellular constructs in vitro. Various cell printing techniques are now being explored and developed for improved cell viability and printing resolution. Here an electro-hydrodynamic cell printing strategy is developed with microscale resolution (95%). Unlike the existing electro-hydrodynamic cell jetting or printing explorations, insulating substrate is used to replace conventional semiconductive substrate as the collecting surface which significantly reduces the electrical current in the electro-hydrodynamic printing process from milliamperes (>0.5 mA) to microamperes (printed cells. The smallest width of the electro-hydrodynamically printed hydrogel filament is 82.4 ± 14.3 µm by optimizing process parameters. Multiple hydrogels or multilayer cell-laden constructs can be flexibly printed under cell-friendly conditions. The printed cells in multilayer hydrogels kept alive and gradually spread during 7-days culture in vitro. This exploration offers a novel and promising cell printing strategy which might benefit future biomedical innovations such as microscale tissue engineering, organ-on-a-chip systems, and nanomedicine. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Forensic print extraction using 3D technology and its processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeev, Srijith; Shreyas, Kamath K. M.; Panetta, Karen; Agaian, Sos S.

    2017-05-01

    Biometric evidence plays a crucial role in criminal scene analysis. Forensic prints can be extracted from any solid surface such as firearms, doorknobs, carpets and mugs. Prints such as fingerprints, palm prints, footprints and lip-prints can be classified into patent, latent, and three-dimensional plastic prints. Traditionally, law enforcement officers capture these forensic traits using an electronic device or extract them manually, and save the data electronically using special scanners. The reliability and accuracy of the method depends on the ability of the officer or the electronic device to extract and analyze the data. Furthermore, the 2-D acquisition and processing system is laborious and cumbersome. This can lead to the increase in false positive and true negative rates in print matching. In this paper, a method and system to extract forensic prints from any surface, irrespective of its shape, is presented. First, a suitable 3-D camera is used to capture images of the forensic print, and then the 3-D image is processed and unwrapped to obtain 2-D equivalent biometric prints. Computer simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of using 3-D technology for biometric matching of fingerprints, palm prints, and lip-prints. This system can be further extended to other biometric and non-biometric modalities.

  16. REAL TIME QUALITY CONTROL OF THE HEATSET OFFSET PRINTING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Răzvan-George RĂCHERU

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Offset lithography is one of the most common ways of creating printed materials. Compared to other printing methods, offset printing is best suited for economically producing large volumes of high quality prints in a manner that requires little maintenance. Because of the high speed and the high volume of the printing press, we have to rely on automation for press control and not just to the printer’s eye. When printing an image that has more than one color, it is necessary to print each color separately and ensure each color overlaps the others precisely. If this is not done, the finished image will look fuzzy, blurred or "out of register". To help line the colors up correctly, a system of registration is necessary. Therefore, the use of an automated real time quality control system will result in a more consistent color for the customer and less waste for the printer.

  17. 3D printing applications for transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economidou, Sophia N; Lamprou, Dimitrios A; Douroumis, Dennis

    2018-01-20

    The role of two and three-dimensional printing as a fabrication technology for sophisticated transdermal drug delivery systems is explored in literature. 3D printing encompasses a family of distinct technologies that employ a virtual model to produce a physical object through numerically controlled apparatuses. The applicability of several printing technologies has been researched for the direct or indirect printing of microneedle arrays or for the modification of their surface through drug-containing coatings. The findings of the respective studies are presented. The range of printable materials that are currently used or potentially can be employed for 3D printing of transdermal drug delivery (TDD) systems is also reviewed. Moreover, the expected impact and challenges of the adoption of 3D printing as a manufacturing technique for transdermal drug delivery systems, are assessed. Finally, this paper outlines the current regulatory framework associated with 3D printed transdermal drug delivery systems. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The future of 3D printing technology in biomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj Nabipour

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available 3D printing, one of the hottest cutting-edge interdisciplinary technologies, is projected to have revenue of $8.4 billion in 2020. #D printing technology will implement the concept of personalized medicine in medical healthcare industry and pharmaceutical fabrication. Organ printing, which it is defined as computer-aided, jet based 3D tissue-engineering of living human organs, is an interesting and challengeable field for 3D printing. Customized implants and prostheses can be produced in any imaginable geometry through the translation of radiological images of patients into digital.stl 3D print files. The creation of anatomical models based on the patient’s pathological conditions using 3D printing technologies would provide good models for training and to design surgical approaches. Hence, 3D printing not only will transform medical healthcare industry but also promises new converging technologies in the field of regenerative medicine.

  19. The application of conductive polymer nano emulsion in printing ink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Luhai; Mo, Linxin; Yi, Fang; Xin, Zhiqing; Tang, Xiaojun

    2009-07-01

    In order to achieve the acquirement of flexible displayer, such as e-paper and touch screen, and to reduce the cost of conductive printing ink, the application of conductive polymer in printing ink is studied, and conductive flexible layer is acquired. The effect of N, N-dimethylformamide, glycerol, deionizer water, and pH value on the performance of water-based nano conductive polymer ink is studied by the second doping of conductive polymer nano suspension. The effect of various polymers on the conductivity of printing ink is researched by adding various polymer resins. At last, printing performance of the conductive polymer ink is tested by some printing methods, such as screen, and offset printing. Conductive printing layer which can be compared with the traditional conductive ink in the conductivity is acquired and the conductive layer is waterproof.

  20. Controllable printing droplets for high-resolution patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Minxuan; Wang, Libin; Song, Yanlin

    2014-10-29

    Inkjet printing has attracted wide attention due to the important applications in fabricating biological, optical, and electrical devices. During the inkjet printing process, the solutes prefer to deposit along the droplet periphery and form an inhomogeneous morphology, known as the coffee-ring effect. Besides, the feature size of printed dots or lines of conventional inkjet printing is usually limited to tens or even hundreds of micrometers. The above two issues greatly restrict the extensive application of printed patterns in high-performance devices. This paper reviews the recent advances in precisely controlling the printing droplets for high-resolution patterns and three-dimensional structures, with a focus on the development to suppress the coffee-ring effect and minimize the feature size of printed dots or lines. A perspective on the remaining challenges of the research is also proposed. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. 3D Printing of Carbon Nanotubes-Based Microsupercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei; Zhou, Han; Li, Ben Q; Ding, Shujiang

    2017-02-08

    A novel 3D printing procedure is presented for fabricating carbon-nanotubes (CNTs)-based microsupercapacitors. The 3D printer uses a CNTs ink slurry with a moderate solid content and prints a stream of continuous droplets. Appropriate control of a heated base is applied to facilitate the solvent removal and adhesion between printed layers and to improve the structure integrity without structure delamination or distortion upon drying. The 3D-printed electrodes for microsupercapacitors are characterized by SEM, laser scanning confocal microscope, and step profiler. Effect of process parameters on 3D printing is also studied. The final solid-state microsupercapacitors are assembled with the printed multilayer CNTs structures and poly(vinyl alcohol)-H3PO4 gel as the interdigitated microelectrodes and electrolyte. The electrochemical performance of 3D printed microsupercapacitors is also tested, showing a significant areal capacitance and excellent cycle stability.

  2. Screen printed flexible radiofrequency identification tag for oxygen monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Olmos, A; Fernández-Salmerón, J; Lopez-Ruiz, N; Rivadeneyra Torres, A; Capitan-Vallvey, L F; Palma, A J

    2013-11-19

    In this work, a radiofrequency identification (RFID) tag with an optical indicator for the measurement of gaseous oxygen is described. It consists of an O2 sensing membrane of PtOEP together with a full electronic system for RFID communication, all printed on a flexible substrate. The membrane is excited by an LED at 385 nm wavelength and the intensity of the luminescence generated is registered by means of a digital color detector. The output data corresponding to the red coordinate of the RGB color space is directly related to the concentration of O2, and it is sent to a microcontroller. The RFID tag is designed and implemented by screen printing on a flexible substrate for the wireless transmission of the measurement to a remote reader. It can operate in both active and passive mode, obtaining the power supply from the electromagnetic waves of the RFID reader or from a small battery, respectively. This system has been fully characterized and calibrated including temperature drifts, showing a high-resolution performance that allows measurement of very low values of oxygen content. Therefore this system is perfectly suitable for its use in modified atmosphere packaging where the oxygen concentration is reduced below 2%. As the reading of the O2 concentration inside the envelope is carried out with an external RFID reader using wireless communication, there is no need for perforations for probes or wires, so the packaging remains completely closed. With the presented device, a limit of detection of 40 ppm and a resolution as low as 0.1 ppm of O2 can be reached with a low power consumption of 3.55 mA.

  3. Group Theory and Crystal Field Theory: A Simple and Rigorous Derivation of the Spectroscopic Terms Generated by the t[subscript 2g][superscript 2] Electronic Configuration in a Strong Octahedral Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morpurgo, Simone

    2007-01-01

    The principles of symmetry and group theory are applied to the zero-order wavefunctions associated with the strong-field t[subscript 2g][superscript 2] configuration and their symmetry-adapted linear combinations (SALC) associated with the generated energy terms are derived. This approach will enable students to better understand the use of…

  4. Evaluation of Shear Strength of RC Beams with Multiple Interfaces Formed before Initial Setting Using 3D Printing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyeongjin Kim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available With the recent development of 3D printing technology, concrete materials are sometimes used in 3D printing. Concrete structures based on 3D printing have been characterized to have the form of multiple layer build-up. Unlike general concrete structures, therefore, the 3D-printed concrete can be regarded as an orthotropic material. The material property of the 3D-printed concrete’s interface between layers is expected to be far different from that of general concrete bodies since there are no aggregate interlocks and weak chemical bonding. Such a difference finally affects the structural performance of concrete structures even though the interfaces are formed before initial setting of the concrete. The current study mainly reviewed the changes in fracture energy (toughness with respect to various environmental conditions of such interface. Changes in fracture energies of interfaces between concrete layers were measured using low-speed Crack Mouth Opening Displacement (CMOD closed loop concrete fracture test. The experimental results indicated reduction in fracture energy as well as tensile strengths. To improve the tensile strength of interfaces, the use of bridging materials is suggested. Since it was assumed that reduction in fracture energy could be a cause of shear strength, to evaluate the reduced structural performance of concrete structure constructed with multiple interfaces by 3D printing technology, the shear strength of RC beam by 3D printing technology was predicted and compared with that of plain RC beam. Based on the fracture energy measured in this study, Modified Compression Field Theory (MCFT theory-applied Vector 2 program was employed to predict the degree of reduction in shear strength without considering stirrups. Reduction factors were presented based on the obtained results to predict the reduction in shear strength due to interfaces before initial setting of the concrete.

  5. 3D printing for orthopedic applications: from high resolution cone beam CT images to life size physical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Amiee; Ray, Lawrence A.; Dangi, Shusil; Ben-Zikri, Yehuda K.; Linte, Cristian A.

    2017-03-01

    With increasing resolution in image acquisition, the project explores capabilities of printing toward faithfully reflecting detail and features depicted in medical images. To improve safety and efficiency of orthopedic surgery and spatial conceptualization in training and education, this project focused on generating virtual models of orthopedic anatomy from clinical quality computed tomography (CT) image datasets and manufacturing life-size physical models of the anatomy using 3D printing tools. Beginning with raw micro CT data, several image segmentation techniques including thresholding, edge recognition, and region-growing algorithms available in packages such as ITK-SNAP, MITK, or Mimics, were utilized to separate bone from surrounding soft tissue. After converting the resulting data to a standard 3D printing format, stereolithography (STL), the STL file was edited using Meshlab, Netfabb, and Meshmixer. The editing process was necessary to ensure a fully connected surface (no loose elements), positive volume with manifold geometry (geometry possible in the 3D physical world), and a single, closed shell. The resulting surface was then imported into a "slicing" software to scale and orient for printing on a Flashforge Creator Pro. In printing, relationships between orientation, print bed volume, model quality, material use and cost, and print time were considered. We generated anatomical models of the hand, elbow, knee, ankle, and foot from both low-dose high-resolution cone-beam CT images acquired using the soon to be released scanner developed by Carestream, as well as scaled models of the skeletal anatomy of the arm and leg, together with life-size models of the hand and foot.

  6. Printing of Three-Dimensional Tissue Analogs for Regenerative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Vivian K.; Dai, Guohao

    2016-01-01

    3-D cell printing, which can accurately deposit cells, biomaterial scaffolds and growth factors in precisely defined spatial patterns to form biomimetic tissue structures, has emerged as a powerful enabling technology to create live tissue and organ structures for drug discovery and tissue engineering applications. Unlike traditional 3-D printing that uses metals, plastics and polymers as the printing materials, cell printing has to be compatible with living cells and biological matrix. It is also required that the printing process preserves the biological functions of the cells and extracellular matrix, and to mimic the cell-matrix architectures and mechanical properties of the native tissues. Therefore, there are significant challenges in order to translate the technologies of traditional 3-D printing to cell printing, and ultimately achieve functional outcomes in the printed tissues. So it is essential to develop new technologies specially designed for cell printing and in-depth basic research in the bioprinted tissues, such as developing novel biomaterials specifically for cell printing applications, understanding the complex cell-matrix remodeling for the desired mechanical properties and functional outcomes, establishing proper vascular perfusion in bioprinted tissues, etc. In recent years, many exciting research progresses have been made in the 3-D cell printing technology and its application in engineering live tissue constructs. This review paper summarized the current development in 3-D cell printing technologies; focus on the outcomes of the live printed tissues and their potential applications in drug discovery and regenerative medicine. Current challenges and limitations are highlighted, and future directions of 3-D cell printing technology are also discussed. PMID:27066784

  7. Electrolyte-gated, high mobility inorganic oxide transistors from printed metal halides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlapati, Suresh Kumar; Mishra, Nilesha; Dehm, Simone; Hahn, Ramona; Kruk, Robert; Hahn, Horst; Dasgupta, Subho

    2013-11-27

    Inkjet printed and low voltage (≤1 V) driven field-effect transistors (FETs) are prepared from precursor-made In2O3 as the transistor channel and a composite solid polymer electrolyte (CSPE) as the gate dielectric. Printed halide precursors are annealed at different temperatures (300-500 °C); however, the devices that are heated to 400 °C demonstrate the best electrical performance including field-effect mobility as high as 126 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and subthreshold slope (68 mV/dec) close to the theoretical limit. These outstanding device characteristics in combination with ease of fabrication, moderate annealing temperatures and low voltage operation comprise an attractive set of parameters for battery compatible and portable electronics.

  8. Inkjet Printing of Soft, Stretchable Optical Waveguides through the Photopolymerization of High-Profile Linear Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samusjew, Aleksandra; Kratzer, Markus; Moser, Andreas; Teichert, Christian; Krawczyk, Krzysztof K; Griesser, Thomas

    2017-02-08

    Optical waveguides have been fabricated via photopolymerization of stable, inkjet-printed patterns. In order to obtain high-profile lines, the properties of both the ink and the substrate were adjusted. We prove that suitable patterns, with contact angles close to 90°, can be printed by using not fully cured, "sticky" PDMS as a substrate. In addition, we propose a simple sliding-drop experiment to show the crucial difference in how the ink dewets the "sticky" and the fully cured substrate, which is otherwise difficult to demonstrate. The light attenuation vs strain curve of the obtained waveguides was determined experimentally and was found to be almost linear within the measured strain range.

  9. Journal subscription expenditure of UK higher education institutions [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4v0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Lawson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The academic libraries of higher education institutions (HEIs pay significant amounts of money each year for access to academic journals. The amounts paid are often not transparent especially when it comes to knowing how much is paid to specific publishers. Therefore data on journal subscription expenditure were obtained for UK HEIs using a series of Freedom of Information requests. Data were obtained for 141 HEIs’ expenditure with seven publishers over a five-year period. The majority of institutions have provided figures but some are still outstanding. The data will be of interest to those who wish to understand the economics of scholarly communication and see the scale of payments flowing within the system. Further research could replicate the data collection in other jurisdictions.

  10. Journal subscription expenditure of UK higher education institutions [v3; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5lj

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Lawson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The academic libraries of higher education institutions (HEIs pay significant amounts of money each year for access to academic journals. The amounts paid are often not transparent especially when it comes to knowing how much is paid to specific publishers. Therefore data on journal subscription expenditure were obtained for UK HEIs using a series of Freedom of Information requests. Data were obtained for 153 HEIs’ expenditure with ten publishers over a five-year period. The majority of institutions have provided figures but some are still outstanding. The data will be of interest to those who wish to understand the economics of scholarly communication and see the scale of payments flowing within the system. Further research could replicate the data collection in other jurisdictions.

  11. Closed Strings From Nothing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, Albion

    2001-07-25

    We study the physics of open strings in bosonic and type II string theories in the presence of unstable D-branes. When the potential energy of the open string tachyon is at its minimum, Sen has argued that only closed strings remain in the perturbative spectrum. We explore the scenario of Yi and of Bergman, Hori and Yi, who argue that the open string degrees of freedom are strongly coupled and disappear through confinement. We discuss arguments using open string field theory and worldsheet boundary RG flows, which seem to indicate otherwise. We then describe a solitonic excitation of the open string tachyon and gauge field with the charge and tension of a fundamental closed string. This requires a double scaling limit where the tachyon is taken to its minimal value and the electric field is taken to its maximum value. The resulting flux tube has an unconstrained spatial profile; and for large fundamental string charge, it appears to have light, weakly coupled open strings living in the core. We argue that the flux tube acquires a size or order {alpha}' through sigma model and string coupling effects; and we argue that confinement effects make the light degrees of freedom heavy and strongly interacting.

  12. Infrared Preheating to Enhance Interlayer Strength of Components Printed on the Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore, Vidya [ORNL; Ajinjeru, Christine [ORNL; Duty, Chad E [ORNL; Nycz, Andrzej [ORNL; Post, Brian K [ORNL; Lindahl, John M [ORNL; Kunc, Vlastimil [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    The Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) system has the capacity to print structures on the order of several meters at a rate exceeding 50 kg/h, thereby having the potential to significantly impact the production of components in automotive, aerospace and energy sectors. However, a primary issue that limits the functional use of such parts is mechanical anisotropy. The strength of printed parts across successive layers in the build direction (z-direction) is significantly lower than the corresponding in-plane strength (x-y directions). This is largely due to poor bonding between the printed layers as the lower layers cool below the glass transition temperature (Tg) before the next layer is deposited. This work explores the use of infrared heating to increase the surface temperature of the printed layer just prior to deposition of new material to improve the interlayer strength of the components. The material used in this study was acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) reinforced with 20% chopped carbon fiber by weight. Significant improvements in z-strength were observed for the parts whose surface temperature was increased from below Tg to close to or above Tg using infrared heating. Parameters such as print speed, nozzle diameter and extrusion temperature were also found to impact the heat input required to enhance interlayer adhesion without significantly degrading the polymer and compromising on surface finish.

  13. Quality Of Electrophotographic Prints On Foil Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozália Szentgyörgyvölgyi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Electrophotographic printing uses many types of substrates, our study focuses on plastic substrates. Six types ofregular and self-adhesive foil substrates were chosen to be printed using two electrophotographic presses: XeroxColour 1000 Press and Canon imagePress C7000VP. A test chart containing tone value scales and a set of samplesfor profiling was created, spectrophotomety and densitometry was applied to obtain the optical and colorimetricproperties of the substrates investigated. Xerox Color 1000 Press produced larger densities and tone value increaseon every type of substrate. The largest TVI values and reproducible colour gamut was observed on the smoothestfoil in case of both presses. Large colour differences were found between patches of full tone process colors on thedifferent substrates investigated.

  14. Organ printing: the future of bone regeneration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorovich, Natalja E; Alblas, Jacqueline; Hennink, Wim E; Oner, F Cumhur; Dhert, Wouter J A

    2011-12-01

    In engineered bone grafts, the combined actions of bone-forming cells, matrix and bioactive stimuli determine the eventual performance of the implant. The current notion is that well-built 3D constructs include the biological elements that recapitulate native bone tissue structure to achieve bone formation once implanted. The relatively new technology of organ/tissue printing now enables the accurate 3D organization of the components that are important for bone formation and also addresses issues, such as graft porosity and vascularization. Bone printing is seen as a great promise, because it combines rapid prototyping technology to produce a scaffold of the desired shape and internal structure with incorporation of multiple living cell types that can form the bone tissue once implanted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Low-cost production and sealing procedure of mechanical parts of a versatile 3D-printed perfusion chamber for digital holographic microscopy of primary neurons in culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélanger, Erik; Lévesque, Sébastien A.; Anctil, Gabriel; Poulin-Girard, Anne-Sophie; Marquet, Pierre

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a prototype of a low-cost and versatile 3D-printed perfusion chamber for digital holographic microscopy (DHM) of primary neurons in culture. The imaging chamber is 3D-printed in biocompatible plastic. It is easily convertible between a closed configuration, for refractive index - cellular thickness decoupling, and an open configuration, for electrophysiology. In the closed arrangement, the imaging volume is small, allowing a rapid laminar flow with a fast turnover for an optimal implementation of the decoupling procedure. This paper highlights especially the challenges faced while designing and prototyping the 3D-printed closed perfusion chamber with a small imaging volume for DHM. As all 3D-printed mechanical parts were initially leaking because of internal porosities, we developed a simple sealing protocol using acetone vapors to smooth surfaces. Using this protocol, almost all mechanical parts were successfully sealed. Therefore, the production process of the actual prototype, i.e. the 3D printing and the sealing method, is satisfactory for our target application in the field of microfluidics.

  16. Solar Paint: From Synthesis to Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing Zhou

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Water-based polymer nanoparticle dispersions (solar paint offer the prospect of addressing two of the main challenges associated with printing large area organic photovoltaic devices; namely, how to control the nanoscale architecture of the active layer and eliminate the need for hazardous organic solvents during device fabrication. In this paper, we review progress in the field of nanoparticulate organic photovoltaic (NPOPV devices and future prospects for large-scale manufacturing of solar cells based on this technology.

  17. Statistical Analysis of the Flexographic Printing Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnė Matulaitienė

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of flexographic printing output quality was performedusing SPSS software package. Samples of defected productswere collected for one year in the existing flexographic printingcompany. Any defective products examples were described indetails and analyzed. It was decided to use SPPS software packagebecause of large amount of data. Data flaw based hypotheseswere formulated which were approved or rejected in analysis.The results obtained are presented in the charts.

  18. DETONOGRAPHY: MAKING OF MEDIEVAL MINE PRINT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siniša Stanković

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the force of explosive authors had made a print of the picture of Renaissance mine onto an aluminium plate. This technique is called Detonography. It has been introduced and developed by Evelin Rosenberg with a number of her colleagues/co-workers, based on “Munroe effect”. To determine the optimal parameters of blasting and supporting materials a large number of laboratory testing has been made on smaller samples.

  19. [Application of 3D printing in urology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyaev, Yu G; Bezrukov, E A; Fiev, D N; Sirota, E S; Pesegov, S V; Byadretdinov, I Sh

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to outline the role and possible applications of 3D printing in urology. At present, this technique provides the opportunity to choose the individual strategy of patient management, to conduct preoperative planning and surgical rehearsal; for medical specialists to reduce the learning curve in mastering modern complex surgical techniques, and for doctors and students to improve understanding of pathological processes in the kidney and the prostate gland.

  20. Flexible three-dimensional printed antenna substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Sheheryar Bukhari

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Flexible heterogeneous substrates have been constructed, using three-dimensional printing in a single process, by introducing air-filled slots. These substrates have been used to substantially reduce the substrate losses for a flexible microstrip patch antenna causing an increase in its radiation efficiency. By combining transverse magnetic (TM10 and TM01 modes the bandwidth of this antenna has also been increased.