WorldWideScience

Sample records for subscales physical functioning

  1. Differential Item Functioning in the SF-36 Physical Functioning and Mental Health Sub-Scales: A Population-Based Investigation in the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lix, Lisa M; Wu, Xiuyun; Hopman, Wilma; Mayo, Nancy; Sajobi, Tolulope T; Liu, Juxin; Prior, Jerilynn C; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Josse, Robert G; Towheed, Tanveer E; Davison, K Shawn; Sawatzky, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Self-reported health status measures, like the Short Form 36-item Health Survey (SF-36), can provide rich information about the overall health of a population and its components, such as physical, mental, and social health. However, differential item functioning (DIF), which arises when population sub-groups with the same underlying (i.e., latent) level of health have different measured item response probabilities, may compromise the comparability of these measures. The purpose of this study was to test for DIF on the SF-36 physical functioning (PF) and mental health (MH) sub-scale items in a Canadian population-based sample. Study data were from the prospective Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos), which collected baseline data in 1996-1997. DIF was tested using a multiple indicators multiple causes (MIMIC) method. Confirmatory factor analysis defined the latent variable measurement model for the item responses and latent variable regression with demographic and health status covariates (i.e., sex, age group, body weight, self-perceived general health) produced estimates of the magnitude of DIF effects. The CaMos cohort consisted of 9423 respondents; 69.4% were female and 51.7% were less than 65 years. Eight of 10 items on the PF sub-scale and four of five items on the MH sub-scale exhibited DIF. Large DIF effects were observed on PF sub-scale items about vigorous and moderate activities, lifting and carrying groceries, walking one block, and bathing or dressing. On the MH sub-scale items, all DIF effects were small or moderate in size. SF-36 PF and MH sub-scale scores were not comparable across population sub-groups defined by demographic and health status variables due to the effects of DIF, although the magnitude of this bias was not large for most items. We recommend testing and adjusting for DIF to ensure comparability of the SF-36 in population-based investigations.

  2. Differential Item Functioning in the SF-36 Physical Functioning and Mental Health Sub-Scales: A Population-Based Investigation in the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M Lix

    Full Text Available Self-reported health status measures, like the Short Form 36-item Health Survey (SF-36, can provide rich information about the overall health of a population and its components, such as physical, mental, and social health. However, differential item functioning (DIF, which arises when population sub-groups with the same underlying (i.e., latent level of health have different measured item response probabilities, may compromise the comparability of these measures. The purpose of this study was to test for DIF on the SF-36 physical functioning (PF and mental health (MH sub-scale items in a Canadian population-based sample.Study data were from the prospective Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos, which collected baseline data in 1996-1997. DIF was tested using a multiple indicators multiple causes (MIMIC method. Confirmatory factor analysis defined the latent variable measurement model for the item responses and latent variable regression with demographic and health status covariates (i.e., sex, age group, body weight, self-perceived general health produced estimates of the magnitude of DIF effects.The CaMos cohort consisted of 9423 respondents; 69.4% were female and 51.7% were less than 65 years. Eight of 10 items on the PF sub-scale and four of five items on the MH sub-scale exhibited DIF. Large DIF effects were observed on PF sub-scale items about vigorous and moderate activities, lifting and carrying groceries, walking one block, and bathing or dressing. On the MH sub-scale items, all DIF effects were small or moderate in size.SF-36 PF and MH sub-scale scores were not comparable across population sub-groups defined by demographic and health status variables due to the effects of DIF, although the magnitude of this bias was not large for most items. We recommend testing and adjusting for DIF to ensure comparability of the SF-36 in population-based investigations.

  3. Comparative, validity and responsiveness of the HOOS-PS and KOOS-PS to the WOMAC physical function subscale in total joint replacement for osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, A M; Perruccio, A V; Canizares, M

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the internal consistency of the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score-Physical Function Short-form (HOOS-PS) and the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score-Physical Function Short-form (KOOS-PS) in total hip replacement (THR) and total knee (TKR) replacement....... Construct validity and responsiveness were compared to the Western Ontario McMaster Universities' Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) Likert 3.0 physical function (PF) subscale and the PF excluding the items in the short measures (PF-exclusions). METHODS: Participants completed the full HOOS or KOOS, measures...... of fatigue, anxiety, depression and the Chronic Pain Grade (CPG) pre-surgery and the HOOS or KOOS 6 months post-surgery. Internal consistency for the HOOS-PS and KOOS-PS was calculated using Cronbach's alpha. For construct validity, it was hypothesized that correlations between the HOOS-PS or KOOS-PS and PF...

  4. Establishing a Common Metric for Physical Function: Linking the HAQ-DI and SF-36 PF Subscale to PROMIS(®) Physical Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalet, Benjamin D; Revicki, Dennis A; Cook, Karon F; Krishnan, Eswar; Fries, Jim F; Cella, David

    2015-10-01

    Physical function (PF) is a common health concept measured in clinical trials and clinical care. It is measured with different instruments that are not directly comparable, making comparative effectiveness research (CER) challenging when PF is the outcome of interest. Our goal was to establish a common reporting metric, so that scores on commonly used physical function measures can be converted into PROMIS scores. Following a single-sample linking design, all participants completed items from the NIH Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) Physical Function (PROMIS PF) item bank and at least one other commonly used "legacy" measure: the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) or the Short Form-36 physical function ten-item PF scale (SF-36 PF). A common metric was created using analyses based on item response theory (IRT), producing score cross-walk tables. Participants (N = 733) were part of an internet panel, many of whom reported one or more chronic health conditions. PROMIS PF, SF-36 PF, and the HAQ-Disability Index (HAQ-DI). Our results supported the hypothesis that all three scales measure essentially the same concept. Cross-walk tables for use in CER are therefore justified. HAQ-DI and SF-36 PF results can be expressed on the PROMIS PF metric for the purposes of CER and other efforts to compare PF results across studies that utilize any one of these three measures. Clinicians seeking to incorporate PROs into their clinics can collect patient data on any one of these three instruments and estimate the equivalent on the other two.

  5. Functional autonomy measurement system: development of a social subscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsonnault, E; Desrosiers, J; Dubuc, N; Kalfat, H; Colvez, A; Delli-Colli, N

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a subscale assessing social functioning for the functional autonomy measurement system (SMAF). The development of this new dimension was based on consultations (focus groups and nominal groups) of experts from different health care disciplines in Quebec, Canada, and France. Two interrater reliability studies were carried out with older people presenting a loss of functional autonomy and living either in an institution or at home. With the focus groups, the experts clarified the definition of social functioning and identified the factors involved. The nominal groups were used to construct a subscale composed of six items. The results of the first interrater reliability study showed a mean agreement percentage of 60% for the subscale and an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.70 (CI: 0.57-0.80). The results of the second interrater reliability study showed higher coefficients with an agreement percentage of 74% for the subscale and an ICC of 0.83 (CI: 0.61-0.93). These preliminary results demonstrate that the new social functioning subscale has good reliability, but more studies are needed to show its validity. The new SMAF, including the social functioning subscale, should help clinicians and researchers to obtain a comprehensive profile of functional autonomy. It could also contribute to the improvement of health care for older people.

  6. The Subjective Index for Physical and Social Outcome (SIPSO in Stroke: investigation of its subscale structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Steve

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Short and valid measures of the impact of a stroke on integration are required in health and social settings. The Subjective Index of Physical and Social Outcome (SIPSO is one such measure. However, there are questions whether scores can be summed into a total score or whether subscale scores should be calculated. This paper aims to provide clarity on the internal construct validity of the subscales and the total scale. Methods SIPSO data were collected as part of two parallel surveys of the met and unmet needs of 445 younger people (aged 18-65 with non-recent stroke (at least one year and living at home. Factor, Mokken and Rasch analysis were used. Results Factor analysis supported a two factor structure (explaining 68% of the variance as did the Mokken analysis (overall Loevinger coefficient 0.77 for the Physical Integration subscale; 0.51 for the Social Integration subscale. Both subscales fitted the Rasch model (P > 0.01 after adjusting for some observed differential item functioning. The 10-items together did not fit the Rasch model. Conclusions The SIPSO subscales are valid for use with stroke patients of working age but the total SIPSO is not. The conversion table can be used by clinicians and researchers to convert ordinal data to interval level prior to mathematical operations and other parametric procedures. Further work is required to explore the occurrence of bias by gender for some of the items.

  7. Development and validation of the functional assessment of cancer therapy-antiangiogenesis subscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Karen; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Webster, Kimberly; Yount, Susan E; Wagner, Lynne I; Kuzel, Timothy M; Cella, David

    2015-05-01

    The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT)-Antiangiogenesis (AntiA) Subscale was developed and validated to enhance treatment decision-making and side effect management for patients receiving anti-angiogenesis therapies. Side effects related to anti-angiogenesis therapies were identified from the literature, clinician input, and patient input. Fifty-nine possible patient expressions of side effects were generated. Patient and clinician ratings of the importance of these expressions led us to develop a 24-item questionnaire with clinical and research potential. To assess the scale's reliability and validity, 167 patients completed the AntiA Subscale, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-general (FACT-G), the FACT-Kidney Symptom Index (FKSI), the FACIT-Fatigue Subscale, the Global Rating of Change Scale (GRC), and the PROMIS Global Health Scale. Patient responses to the AntiA were analyzed for internal consistency, test-retest reliability, convergent and discriminant validity, and responsiveness to change in clinical status. All tested scales were found to have good internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha 0.70-0.92). Test-retest reliability was also good (0.72-0.88) for total and subscale scores and lower for individual items. The total score, subscale scores, and all single items (except nosebleeds) significantly differentiated between groups defined by level of side effect bother. Evaluation of responsiveness to change in this study was not conclusive, suggesting an area for further research. The AntiA is a reliable and valid measure of side effects from anti-angiogenesis therapy. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Development and validation of the functional assessment of cancer therapy–antiangiogenesis subscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Karen; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Webster, Kimberly; Yount, Susan E; Wagner, Lynne I; Kuzel, Timothy M; Cella, David

    2015-01-01

    The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT)–Antiangiogenesis (AntiA) Subscale was developed and validated to enhance treatment decision-making and side effect management for patients receiving anti-angiogenesis therapies. Side effects related to anti-angiogenesis therapies were identified from the literature, clinician input, and patient input. Fifty-nine possible patient expressions of side effects were generated. Patient and clinician ratings of the importance of these expressions led us to develop a 24-item questionnaire with clinical and research potential. To assess the scale's reliability and validity, 167 patients completed the AntiA Subscale, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-general (FACT-G), the FACT-Kidney Symptom Index (FKSI), the FACIT-Fatigue Subscale, the Global Rating of Change Scale (GRC), and the PROMIS Global Health Scale. Patient responses to the AntiA were analyzed for internal consistency, test–retest reliability, convergent and discriminant validity, and responsiveness to change in clinical status. All tested scales were found to have good internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha 0.70–0.92). Test–retest reliability was also good (0.72–0.88) for total and subscale scores and lower for individual items. The total score, subscale scores, and all single items (except nosebleeds) significantly differentiated between groups defined by level of side effect bother. Evaluation of responsiveness to change in this study was not conclusive, suggesting an area for further research. The AntiA is a reliable and valid measure of side effects from anti-angiogenesis therapy. PMID:25619758

  9. Using data from Multidimensional Pain Inventory subscales to assess functioning in pain rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harlacher, Uwe; Persson, Ann L; Rivano-Fischer, Marcelo

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether Multidimensional Pain Inventory (MPI) subscale score changes can be used for monitoring interdisciplinary cognitive behavioural pain rehabilitation programmes, using the Psychological General Well-Being (PGWB) index as an independent variable...... of rehabilitation outcome. Data from 434 consecutively referred patients disabled by chronic pain were analysed. The intervention was a 4-week interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation group programme (5 h/day), based on biopsychosocial and cognitive behavioural principles. Mean PGWB total scores improved after...... rehabilitation (P...

  10. The kidney disease quality of life cognitive function subscale and cognitive performance maintenance hemodialysis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Cognitive impairment is common but often undiagnosed in patients with end-stage renal disease, in part reflecting limited validated and easily administered tools to assess cognitive function in dialysis patients. Accordingly, we assessed the utility of the Kidney Disease Quality of Life ...

  11. Measurement of aggressive behaviors in dementia: comparison of the physical aggression subscales of the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory and the Ryden Aggression Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whall, Ann L; Kim, Hyojeong; Colling, Kathleen Byrne; Hong, Gwi-Ryung; DeCicco, Barry; Antonakos, Cathy

    2013-07-01

    One of the central issues in the development of research-based interventions for aggressive behavior (AB) in late-stage dementia is the provision of precise measurement of the major dependent variable, in this case, AB levels. To advance the nursing goal of evidence-based practice, this article presents the characteristics of two research instruments: the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI) aggressive behavior subscale (CMAI-ABS) and the Ryden Aggression Scale (RAS) physically aggressive behavior subscale (RAS-PABS). A total of 282 shower bath events (which are most associated with AB) were observed for 107 nursing home residents with dementia in nine randomly selected nursing homes. Then, we compared the psychometric properties of the CMAI-ABS and the RAS-PABS. Moderate to substantial agreements between the two instruments were identified using Cohen's Kappa. A similar percentage of AB was found on both subscales. Similar items on both subscales, such as hitting and pushing, were moderately correlated. Overall, the study results support that the CMAI-ABS and RAS-PABS measure a single but multifaceted construct-physically aggressive behavior in dementia. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Evaluation of Neuropsychiatric Function in Phenylketonuria: Psychometric Properties of the ADHD Rating Scale-IV and Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale Inattention Subscale in Phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrwich, Kathleen W; Auguste, Priscilla; Yu, Ren; Zhang, Charlie; Dewees, Benjamin; Winslow, Barbara; Yu, Shui; Merilainen, Markus; Prasad, Suyash

    2015-06-01

    Previous qualitative research among adults and parents of children with phenylketonuria (PKU) has identified inattention as an important psychiatric aspect of this condition. The parent-reported ADHD Rating Scale-IV (ADHD RS-IV) and the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) have been validated for measuring inattention symptoms in persons with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); however, their psychometric attributes for measuring PKU-related inattention have not been established. The primary objective of this investigation was to demonstrate the reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the ADHD RS-IV and ASRS inattention symptoms subscales in a randomized controlled trial of patients with PKU aged 8 years or older. A post hoc analysis investigated the psychometric properties (Rasch model fit, reliability, construct validity, and responsiveness) of the ADHD RS-IV and ASRS inattention subscales using data from a phase 3b, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial in those with PKU aged 8 years or older. The Rasch results revealed good model fit, and reliability analyses revealed strong internal consistency reliability (α ≥ 0.87) and reproducibility (intraclass correlation coefficient ≥ 0.87) for both measures. Both inattention measures demonstrated the ability to discriminate between known groups (P < 0.001) created by the Clinical Global Impression-Severity scale. Correlations between the ADHD RS-IV and the ASRS with the Clinical Global Impression-Severity scale and the age-appropriate Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function Working Memory subscale were consistently moderate to strong (r ≥ 0.56). Similarly, results of the change score correlations were of moderate magnitude (r ≥ 0.43) for both measures when compared with changes over time in Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function Working Memory subscales. These findings of reliability, validity, and responsiveness of both the ADHD RS-IV and the ASRS inattention scales

  13. Mental Health in Multiple Sclerosis Patients without Limitation of Physical Function: The Role of Physical Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Tallner

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS patients, in general, show reduced physical function, physical activity, and quality of life. Positive associations between physical activity and quality of life have been reported. In particular, we were interested in the relation between physical activity and mental health in MS patients without limitation of physical function, since limitations of physical function may influence both physical activity and quality of life. Assessment comprised the Baecke questionnaire on physical activity, the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36, and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. We ranked our sample according to physical activity into four groups and performed an ANOVA to analyze the relationship between levels of physical activity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL. Then we performed a subgroup analysis and included patients with unlimited walking distance and a score of less than 18 in the BDI. Most active vs. inactive patients were compared for the mental subscales of the SF-36 and depression scores. From 632 patients, 265 met inclusion criteria and hence quartiles were filled with 67 patients each. Active and inactive patients did not differ considerably in physical function. In contrast, mental subscales of the SF-36 were higher in active patients. Remarkable and significant differences were found regarding vitality, general health perception, social functioning and mental health, all in favor of physically active patients. Our study showed that higher physical activity is still associated with higher mental health scores even if limitations of physical function are accounted for. Therefore, we believe that physical activity and exercise have considerable health benefits for MS patients.

  14. Mental Health in Multiple Sclerosis Patients without Limitation of Physical Function: The Role of Physical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallner, Alexander; Waschbisch, Anne; Hentschke, Christian; Pfeifer, Klaus; Mäurer, Mathias

    2015-07-02

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, in general, show reduced physical function, physical activity, and quality of life. Positive associations between physical activity and quality of life have been reported. In particular, we were interested in the relation between physical activity and mental health in MS patients without limitation of physical function, since limitations of physical function may influence both physical activity and quality of life. Assessment comprised the Baecke questionnaire on physical activity, the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36), and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). We ranked our sample according to physical activity into four groups and performed an ANOVA to analyze the relationship between levels of physical activity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Then we performed a subgroup analysis and included patients with unlimited walking distance and a score of less than 18 in the BDI. Most active vs. inactive patients were compared for the mental subscales of the SF-36 and depression scores. From 632 patients, 265 met inclusion criteria and hence quartiles were filled with 67 patients each. Active and inactive patients did not differ considerably in physical function. In contrast, mental subscales of the SF-36 were higher in active patients. Remarkable and significant differences were found regarding vitality, general health perception, social functioning and mental health, all in favor of physically active patients. Our study showed that higher physical activity is still associated with higher mental health scores even if limitations of physical function are accounted for. Therefore, we believe that physical activity and exercise have considerable health benefits for MS patients.

  15. [Sexual function, physical handicap].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevène, Arnaud

    2014-10-01

    While the right to a sexual life for disabled people is not contested, their sexuality cannot be summed up in a debate for or against sexual assistance. In a similar way, sexual function can only be understood in light of all the difficulties related to disability. Medical progress can improve sexual function and solve many problems in order to facilitate access to procreation. However, these are not well known and are reserved to specialized teams. Many disabled persons are totally autonomous in their sexuality, but for some who require medical assistance, it is necessary to support them in a process of creation where therapeutic interventions consist of facilitating or stimulating the patient's own resources. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Physically Functional Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    acids or peptides having azobenzenes or other physicially functional groups, e.g., photoresponsive groups, as side chains. These compounds may be synthesized using solid phase peptide synthesis techniques. Materials, e.g., thin films, comprising such compounds may be used for optical storage...... of information (holographic data storage), nonlinear optics (NLO), as photoconductors, photonic band-gap materials, electrically conducting materials, electroluminescent materials, piezo-electric materials, pyroelectric materials, magnetic materials, ferromagnetic materials, ferroelectric materials......, photorefractive materials, or materials in which light-induced conformational changes can be produced. Optical anisotropy may reversibly be generated with polarized laser light whereby a hologram is formed. First order diffraction efficiencies of up to around 80% have been obtained....

  17. The functions of mathematical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hochstadt, Harry

    2012-01-01

    A modern classic, this clearly written, incisive textbook provides a comprehensive, detailed survey of the functions of mathematical physics, a field of study straddling the somewhat artificial boundary between pure and applied mathematics.In the 18th and 19th centuries, the theorists who devoted themselves to this field - pioneers such as Gauss, Euler, Fourier, Legendre, and Bessel - were searching for mathematical solutions to physical problems. Today, although most of the functions have practical applications, in areas ranging from the quantum-theoretical model of the atom to the vibrating

  18. Validation of the 4DSQ somatization subscale in the occupational health care setting as a screener.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vroege, Lars; Emons, Wilco H M; Sijtsma, Klaas; Hoedeman, Rob; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M

    2015-03-01

    Somatoform disorders (physical symptoms without medical explanation that cause dysfunction) are prevalent in the occupational health (OH) care setting and are associated with functional impairment and absenteeism. Availability of psychometric instruments aimed at assessing somatoform disorders is limited. In the OH setting, so far only the Patient-Health-Questionnaire 15 has been validated as screener for somatoform disorder, and has been shown to have moderate validity. The Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ) is frequently used in the OH setting but the Somatization subscale is not validated yet. The aim of this study is to validate the 4DSQ Somatization subscale as screener for DSM-IV somatoform disorder in the OH setting by using the MINI interview as gold standard. Employees absent from work due to physical symptoms, for a period longer than 6 weeks and shorter than 2 years, were asked to participate in this study. They filled out the 4DSQ and underwent a MINI interview by telephone for DSM-IV classification. Specificity and sensitivity scores were calculated for all possible cut-off scores and a receiver operator curve was computed for the Somatization subscale. 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CIs) were calculated for sensitivity and specificity. The Somatization subscale of the 4DSQ has an optimal cut point of 9, with specificity and sensitivity equal to 64.3 % [95 % CI (53.6; 73.7 %)] and 60.9 % [95 % CI (40.8; 77.8 %)], respectively. Receiver operator curves showed an area under the curve equal to 0.61 [SE = 0.07; 95 % CI (0.48; 0.75)] for the Somatization subscale of the 4DSQ. The 4DSQ Somatization subscale is a questionnaire of moderate sensitivity and specificity.

  19. Assessing physical function and physical activity in patients with CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Patricia; Marcus, Robin L

    2013-05-01

    Patients with CKD are characterized by low levels of physical functioning, which, along with low physical activity, predict poor outcomes in those treated with dialysis. The hallmark of clinical care in geriatric practice and geriatric research is the orientation to and assessment of physical function and functional limitations. Although there is increasing interest in physical function and physical activity in patients with CKD, the nephrology field has not focused on this aspect of care. This paper provides an in-depth review of the measurement of physical function and physical activity. It focuses on physiologic impairments and physical performance limitations (impaired mobility and functional limitations). The review is based on established frameworks of physical impairment and functional limitations that have guided research in physical function in the aging population. Definitions and measures for physiologic impairments, physical performance limitations, self-reported function, and physical activity are presented. On the basis of the information presented, recommendations for incorporating routine assessment of physical function and encouragement for physical activity in clinical care are provided.

  20. Physical activity and physical function in individuals post-bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josbeno, Deborah A; Kalarchian, Melissa; Sparto, Patrick J; Otto, Amy D; Jakicic, John M

    2011-08-01

    A better understanding of the physical activity behavior of individuals who undergo bariatric surgery will enable the development of effective post-surgical exercise guidelines and interventions to enhance weight loss outcomes. This study characterized the physical activity profile and physical function of 40 subjects 2-5 years post-bariatric surgery and examined the association between physical activity, physical function, and weight loss after surgery. Moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA) was assessed with the BodyMedia SenseWear® Pro (SWPro) armband, and physical function (PF) was measured using the physical function subscale of the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey instrument (SF-36(PF)). Height and weight were measured. Percent of excess weight loss (%EWL) was associated with MVPA (r = 0.44, p = 0.01) and PF (r = 0.38, p = 0.02); MVPA was not associated with PF (r = 0.24, p = 0.14). Regression analysis demonstrated that MVPA was associated with %EWL (β = 0.38, t = 2.43, p = 0.02). Subjects who participated in ≥150 min/week of MVPA had a greater %EWL (68.2 ± 19, p = 0.01) than those who participated in <150 min/week (52.5 ± 17.4). Results suggest that subjects are capable of performing most mobility activities. However, the lack of an association between PF and MVPA suggests that a higher level of PF does not necessarily correspond to a higher level of MVPA participation. Thus, the barriers to adoption of a more physically active lifestyle may not be fully explained by the subjects' physical limitations. Further understanding of this relationship is needed for the development of post-surgical weight loss guidelines and interventions.

  1. A3 Subscale Diffuser Test Article Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, G. P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper gives a detailed description of the design of the A3 Subscale Diffuser Test (SDT) Article Design. The subscale diffuser is a geometrically accurate scale model of the A3 altitude rocket facility. It was designed and built to support the SDT risk mitigation project located at the E3 facility at Stennis Space Center, MS (SSC) supporting the design and construction of the A3 facility at SSC. The subscale test article is outfitted with a large array of instrumentation to support the design verification of the A3 facility. The mechanical design of the subscale diffuser and test instrumentation are described here

  2. Associations between physical strength, cerebral function and mental health in independent-living elderly Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kimiko; Sato, Juichi; Fujiwara, Nakako; Kajita, Miwako; Fukuharu, Michitaro; Hu, Xiaochen; Kuriki, Kiyonori; Hoshino, Hideki; Kato, Rieko; Tokudome, Shinkan; Sato, Yuzo

    2002-07-01

    To evaluate the physical strength, cerebral function, and mental health conditions in elderly persons, and to examine the correlation between these functions. The subjects were 151 independent-living elderly Japanese women, mean age 70 +/-5 years (+/-SD; range, 60 to 80 years), with normal abilities in daily life. The health check-up was conducted from April to May 1997. Physical strength was estimated by measuring seven activities. Cerebral functions were assessed by six sub-tests of the General Aptitude Test Battery (GATB). Their mental health status was measured by four sub-scales of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ)-28. The physical strenght and almost all of the cerebral functions decreased with age. Social dysfunction and severe depression on the GHQ sub-scales also worsened with age. Physical strength was strongly correlated with cerebral functions after adjusting for the confounding effect of aging. There were also interrelations between physical strength and mental health. This study provided important information on the correlation between physical and mental status in elderly women. Future longitudinal studies with the intervention of physical training are required to determine whether a causal relationship exists between these factors.

  3. Physical functioning of low back pain patients: perceived physical functioning and functional capacity, but not physical activity is affected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooij, Willemijn M J; Senden, Rachel; Heyligers, Ide C; Cuppen, Paul M A H; van Hemert, Wouter L W; Grimm, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Physical functioning is a multidimensional construct covering perceived functioning, functional capacity and actual physical activity. Currently, the assessment of physical functioning in low back pain (LBP) patients has been limited to only one or two of these aspects. This study evaluates physical functioning of LBP patients by assessing the three individual aspects using questionnaires and ambulant sensor-based measurements. Actual physical activity, functional capacity and perceived functioning were measured in 26 patients undergoing patient specific treatment before, direct and 3-4 weeks after the first treatment using, respectively, sensor-based activity monitoring, sensor-based motion analysis test and the Oswestry questionnaire. Patients were compared to a healthy control group. Perceived functioning and functional capacity, but not actual physical activity is impaired in pre-treatment LBP patients. After treatment, patients improved in perceived physical functioning and functional capacity approaching healthy levels, however only slight (p > 0.05) improvements in actual physical activity were found. Moreover, only few and weak correlations were found between the different aspects of physical functioning. Perceived functioning, actual physical activity and functional capacity are three independent outcome dimensions, being complementary but not redundant. Especially, perceived functioning and physical capacity need attention when evaluating LBP patients during rehabilitation. Implications for Rehabilitation Perceived physical functioning and physical capacity are negatively affected by low back pain and improve after treatment. Low back pain patients perform their daily activity independent of pain and complaints. Inertia sensor-based motion analysis can objectify treatment effects showing low back pain patients their progress in rehabilitation. New interventions can be justified with inertia sensor technology in low back pain patients.

  4. Association between Body Mass Index and Physical Function among Endometrial Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaochen; Brown, Justin C; Schmitz, Kathryn H

    2016-01-01

    We sought to quantify the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and physical function among endometrial cancer survivors. Understanding this relationship would help healthcare providers target efforts to refer obese endometrial cancer survivors to weight loss and exercise interventions. We conducted a survey of 213 endometrial cancer survivors who received cancer care at an academic l health system between 2006 and 2010. Physical function subscale was quantified using physical functional component score from the SF-12 questionnaire. We compared physical function of endometrial cancer survivors to population-based age-standardized normative values. Among the 213 patients, 16% were normal weight (BMI ≤25 kg/m2), and 52% were obese (≥30 kg/m2). Higher BMI categories were associated with lower physical function (Ptrend = 0.003), as a continuous variable each 5kg/m2 higher BMI, physical function score was lower by 0.15 points (β = -0.15; P = 0.045). Compared to population-based age-standardized normative values, patients endometrial cancer survivors, higher BMI is associated with lower physical function. Younger endometrial cancer survivors report lower physical function compared to age-standardized normative values. Healthcare providers should be aware that younger, obese endometrial cancer survivors may particularly benefit from interventions such as exercise and weight loss to increase or preserve physical function.

  5. Multimorbidity, cognitive function, and physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loprinzi, Paul D

    2016-02-01

    Previous research demonstrates that both physical activity and multimorbidity are associated with cognitive function. However, the extent to which physical activity may moderate the relationship between multimorbidity and cognitive function has not been thoroughly evaluated. Data from the 1999-2002 NHANES were used (60+ years; N = 2157). A multimorbidity index variable was created based on physician diagnosis of a multitude of chronic diseases. Physical activity was self-reported and cognitive function was evaluated from the digit symbol substitution test. Multimorbidity was inversely associated with cognitive function for the unadjusted and adjusted models. However, generally, multimorbidity was no longer associated with cognitive function for the majority of older adults who achieved the minimum recommended physical activity level (≥2000 MET-min-month), as issued by the United States Department of Health and Human Services. In this national sample of older adults, there was some evidence to suggest that physical activity moderates the relationship between multimorbidity and cognitive function.

  6. Physically unclonable functions constructions, properties and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Maes, Roel

    2013-01-01

    Physically unclonable functions (PUFs) are innovative physical security primitives that produce unclonable and inherent instance-specific measurements of physical objects; in many ways they are the inanimate equivalent of biometrics for human beings. Since they are able to securely generate and store secrets, they allow us to bootstrap the physical implementation of an information security system. In this book the author discusses PUFs in all their facets: the multitude of their physical constructions, the algorithmic and physical properties which describe them, and the techniques required to

  7. Green’s functions in classical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rother, Tom

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the Green’s function formalism in a basic way and demonstrates its usefulness for applications to several well-known problems in classical physics which are usually solved not by this formalism but other approaches. The book bridges the gap between applications of the Green’s function formalism in quantum physics and classical physics. This book is written as an introduction for graduate students and researchers who want to become more familiar with the Green’s function formalism. In 1828 George Green has published an essay that was unfortunately sunken into oblivion shortly after its publication. It was rediscovered only after several years by the later Lord Kelvin. But since this time, using Green’s functions for solving partial differential equations in physics has become an important mathematical tool. While the conceptual and epistemological importance of these functions were essentially discovered and discussed in modern physics - especially in quantum field theory and quantum...

  8. Oxidation subscale of gamma-titanium aluminide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beye, R.; Verwerft, Marc; de Hosson, J.T.M.; Gronsky, R.

    1996-01-01

    The subscale formed during high temperature rapid oxidation of gamma-titanium aluminum is revealed by transmission electron microscopy and microanalysis to consist of two phases: one hexagonal with unit cell dimensions a = 0.58 nm, c = 0.47 nm (+/- 0.005 nm), and a composition close to Ti6Al3O4; the

  9. Ethical Perspectives: Leadership Subscales Applied to Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gable, Sherry K.; Kavich, Larry L.

    Ethical perspectives are needed to gain insight into the history of leader behavior, especially as related to the current emphasis on contingency and Path-Goal Theories. An instrument to help select professionals who reflect ethical traits is the Leadership Behavior Description Questionnaire with 12 leadership subscales (LBDQ, Form XII). Selected…

  10. Functional integration and quantum physics

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Barry

    2004-01-01

    The main theme of this book is the "path integral technique" and its applications to constructive methods of quantum physics. The central topic is probabilistic foundations of the Feynman-Kac formula. Starting with the main examples of Gaussian processes (the Brownian motion, the oscillatory process, and the Brownian bridge), the author presents four different proofs of the Feynman-Kac formula. Also included is a simple exposition of stochastic Itô calculus and its applications, in particular to the Hamiltonian of a particle in a magnetic field (the Feynman-Kac-Itô formula). Among other topics

  11. Effects of exercise adherence on physical function among overweight older adults with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gool, Coen H; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Kempen, Gertrudis I J M; Rejeski, W Jack; Miller, Gary D; van Eijk, Jacques Th M; Pahor, Marco; Messier, Stephen P

    2005-02-15

    To determine whether high exercise adherence improved physical function among older adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA) who were overweight or obese. Associations between exercise adherence, changes in 6-minute walking distance in meters, and self-reported disability (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index function subscale) after 6 and 18 months were examined among an Arthritis, Diet, and Activity Promotion Trial subsample (n = 134) using multiple linear regression models. Higher exercise adherence was associated with greater improvements in 6-minute walking distance after 6 and 18 months and in disability after 6 months. Pain and body mass index (BMI) contributed, to some extent, to explaining the link between exercise adherence and changes in physical performance and self-reported disability. Higher exercise adherence is associated with improved physical function in overweight and obese older adults with knee OA. This indicates that promoting adherence is clinically relevant when prescribing exercise regimens that also focus on decreasing pain and BMI.

  12. Wind Turbine Blade Design for Subscale Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, Arash; Naughton, Jonathan W.; Kelley, Christopher L.; Maniaci, David C.

    2016-09-01

    Two different inverse design approaches are proposed for developing wind turbine blades for sub-scale wake testing. In the first approach, dimensionless circulation is matched for full scale and sub-scale wind turbine blades for equal shed vorticity in the wake. In the second approach, the normalized normal and tangential force distributions are matched for large scale and small scale wind turbine blades, as these forces determine the wake dynamics and stability. The two approaches are applied for the same target full scale turbine blade, and the shape of the blades are compared. The results show that the two approaches have been successfully implemented, and the designed blades are able to produce the target circulation and target normal and tangential force distributions.

  13. Physical training improves cardiopulmonary functional capacity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    intensity, duration, and frequency of physical activity play a key role in determining immune function, which can either increase or decrease the response to infection. Long-term physical training, in turn, can increase of antiinflammatory cytokines, especially interleukin IL-10 and IL-13. [6]. Regular moderate-intensity exercise ...

  14. On physical functioning after pediatric burns : Physical fitness and functional independence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Disseldorp, Laurien Maria

    2015-01-01

    Burn injury can negatively impact physical functioning. This is not only due to the local damage of the skin or subsequent scarring, but also due to the disturbance of physiological processes and a period of physical inactivity. If limitations in physical functioning persist, it can affect health

  15. Effects of Physical (Inactivity on Platelet Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Heber

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As platelet activation is closely related to the liberation of growth factors and inflammatory mediators, platelets play a central role in the development of CVD. Virtually all cardiovascular risk factors favor platelet hyperreactivity and, accordingly, also physical (inactivity affects platelet function. Within this paper, we will summarize and discuss the current knowledge on the impact of acute and habitual exercise on platelet function. Although there are apparent discrepancies regarding the reported effects of acute, strenuous exercise on platelet activation, a deeper analysis of the available literature reveals that the applied exercise intensity and the subjects’ cardiorespiratory fitness represent critical determinants for the observed effects. Consideration of these factors leads to the summary that (i acute, strenuous exercise can lead to platelet activation, (ii regular physical activity and/or physical fitness diminish or prevent platelet activation in response to acute exercise, and (iii habitual physical activity and/or physical fitness also favorably modulate platelet function at physical rest. Notably, these effects of exercise on platelet function show obvious similarities to the well-recognized relation between exercise and the risk for cardiovascular events where vigorous exercise transiently increases the risk for myocardial infarction and a physically active lifestyle dramatically reduces cardiovascular mortality.

  16. Physical function in older men with hyperkyphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzman, Wendy B; Harrison, Stephanie L; Fink, Howard A; Marshall, Lynn M; Orwoll, Eric; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Cawthon, Peggy M; Kado, Deborah M

    2015-05-01

    Age-related hyperkyphosis has been associated with poor physical function and is a well-established predictor of adverse health outcomes in older women, but its impact on health in older men is less well understood. We conducted a cross-sectional study to evaluate the association of hyperkyphosis and physical function in 2,363 men, aged 71-98 (M = 79) from the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study. Kyphosis was measured using the Rancho Bernardo Study block method. Measurements of grip strength and lower extremity function, including gait speed over 6 m, narrow walk (measure of dynamic balance), repeated chair stands ability and time, and lower extremity power (Nottingham Power Rig) were included separately as primary outcomes. We investigated associations of kyphosis and each outcome in age-adjusted and multivariable linear or logistic regression models, controlling for age, clinic, education, race, bone mineral density, height, weight, diabetes, and physical activity. In multivariate linear regression, we observed a dose-related response of worse scores on each lower extremity physical function test as number of blocks increased, p for trend ≤.001. Using a cutoff of ≥4 blocks, 20% (N = 469) of men were characterized with hyperkyphosis. In multivariate logistic regression, men with hyperkyphosis had increased odds (range 1.5-1.8) of being in the worst quartile of performing lower extremity physical function tasks (p Hyperkyphosis is associated with impaired lower extremity physical function in older men. Further studies are needed to determine the direction of causality. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. [Preserve brain function...through physical exercice?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garraux, G

    2008-01-01

    Over the last few years, there has been an increasing interest in the relationship between brain function and physical exercise. Preliminary evidence from observational and interventional studies in humans suggests a positive and robust effect of chronic aerobic exercise on several brain functions across the entire lifespan. Physical activity and exercise might also serve to reduce the risk of age-associated neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. The mechanisms underlying these beneficial effects remain poorly understood. More scientific work is needed before disseminating more specific recommendations to the general population.

  18. Self-reported fatigue and physical function in late mid-life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boter, Han; Mänty, Minna; Hansen, Åse Marie

    2014-01-01

    population cohort (n = 4,964; age 49-63 years). Methods: Self-reported fatigue was measured using the MFI-20 comprising: general fatigue, physical fatigue, reduced activity, reduced motivation, and mental fatigue. Handgrip strength and chair rise tests were used as measures of physical function. Multiple...... ratio (OR) 0.75 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.66-0.86); p ≤ 0.001) and reduced motivation (adjusted OR 0.85 (95% CI 0.75-0.96); p ≤ 0.05), but not with the other subscales. After these adjustments, the chair rise test was associated with physical fatigue (adjusted OR 0.61 (0.53-0.69); p ≤ 0...

  19. Measured versus self-reported physical function in adult survivors of childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Webb A; Li, Zhenghong; Loftin, Mark; Carlyle, Brent E; Hudson, Melissa M; Robison, Leslie L; Ness, Kirsten K

    2014-02-01

    Childhood cancer survivors (CCS) experience late effects that interfere with physical function. Limitations in physical function can affect CCS abilities to actively participate in daily activities. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the concordance between self-reported physical performance and clinically evaluated physical performance among adult CCS. CCS 18 yr or older and 10 yr or older from diagnosis who are participants in the St. Jude Lifetime cohort study responded to the physical function section of the Medical Outcome Survey Short Form (SF-36). Measured physical performance was evaluated using the Physical Performance Test and the 6-Minute Walk Test. Individuals (N = 1778, 50.8% female) with a median time since diagnosis of 24.9 yr (range = 10.9-48.2) and a median age of 32.4 yr (range = 19.1-48.2) completed testing. Limitations in physical performance were self-reported by 14.1% of participants. The accuracy of self-report physical performance was 0.87 when the SF-36 was compared with the 6-Minute Walk Test or the Physical Performance Test. Reporting inaccuracies most often involved reporting a physical performance limitation. Poor accuracy was associated with previous diagnosis of a bone or CNS tumor, lymphoma, older age, and large body size. These results suggest that self-report, using the physical performance subscale of the SF-36, correctly identifies CCS who do not have physical performance limitations. In contrast, this same measure is less able to identify individuals who have performance limitations.

  20. Brownian Functionals in Physics and Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Satya N.

    This is a brief review on Brownian functionals in one dimension and their various applications. After a brief description of Einstein's original derivation of the diffusion equation, this article provides a pedagogical introduction to the path integral methods leading to the derivation of the celebrated Feynman-Kac formula. The usefulness of this technique in calculating the statistical properties of Brownian functionals is illustrated with several examples in physics and probability theory, with particular emphasis on applications in computer science. The statistical properties of "first-passage Brownian functionals" and their applications are also discussed.

  1. Physical functioning in pediatric survivors of childhood posterior fossa brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscione, P Janine; Bouffet, Eric; Mabbott, Donald J; Shams, Iffat; Kulkarni, Abhaya V

    2014-01-01

    Survival rates for children diagnosed with posterior fossa brain tumors (PFBTs) have improved significantly over the past several decades, and long-term functioning assessments have become priorities. These evaluations have occurred frequently in adults but only rarely in children. This study describes a cross-sectional assessment of physical functioning in pediatric survivors of PFBTs using the Bruininks-Osteretsky Test of Motor Performance, Second Edition (BOT-2). Primary analyses compared BOT-2 scores to normative data using 1-sample t tests for each gross motor subscale (Bilateral Coordination, Balance, Running Speed/Agility, Strength) and motor-area composite (Body Coordination and Strength and Agility). Second, the cohort was stratified by diagnostic or treatment variables. Group differences and groups vs norms were evaluated using independent 2-sample and 1-sample t tests, respectively. Primary analyses compared BOT-2 scores with normative data using 1-sample t tests for each gross motor subscale (Bilateral Coordinationcoordination, Balance, Running Speed/Agility, Strength) and motor-area composite (Body Coordination and Strength and Agility). Second, the cohort was stratified by diagnostic or treatment variables. Group differences and groups vs norms were evaluated using independent 2-sample and 1-sample t tests, respectively. Mean age of 30 participants was 11.4 years (range, 4.9y-18.2y), and mean time from diagnosis was 6.1 years (range, 1.1y-16.7y). Cerebellar astrocytoma (43.3%) and medulloblastoma (40%) were the most common diagnoses. As a group, significantly decreased functioning, compared with norms, was observed in Balance (P Survivors with tumors infiltrating the vermis demonstrated significantly lower Body Coordination than norms (P Pediatric survivors of PFBTs demonstrated decreased physical functioning, most notably in Balance. These data underscore the need for further research and implementation of physical activity programs aimed

  2. A brief assessment of physical functioning for prostate cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Shei Lai

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Jin-Shei Lai1, Rita Bode2, Hwee-Lin Wee3, David Eton4, David Cella11Department of Medical Social Sciences, 2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, IL USA; 3Department of Pharmacy, National University of Singapore, Singapore; 4Division of Health Care Policy and Research, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: We aimed to validate a more rapid, yet reliable means of assessing physical function (PF for patients with prostate cancer. The sample included 128 prostate cancer patients recruited from urology and general oncology clinics at two Chicago-area hospitals. The main outcome measures were: A 36-item PF item bank that included a 5-item short form (BriefPF and the 10-item PF subscale (PF-10 from the Medical Outcomes Study SF-36. Validity, information function, and relative precision (calculated using Rasch analysis and raw scores of the BriefPF were compared to the PF-10 and the full PF item bank. We found that the BriefPF and PF-10 were strongly correlated (r = 0.85 with the PF bank, and all three scales differentiated patients according to performance status (FPF bank(2,124 = 32.51 P < 0.001, FPF-10(2,121 = 27.35 P < 0.001, FBriefPF (2,123 = 38.40 P < 0.001. BriefPF has excellent precision relative to the PF-10 in measuring patients with different performance status levels. The Rasch-based information function indicated that the BriefPF was more informative than PF-10 in measuring moderate to higher functioning patients. Hence, the BriefPF offers a parsimonious and precise measure of PF for use among men with prostate cancer, and may aid in the timely inclusion of patient-reported outcomes in treatment decision-making.Keywords: quality-of-life, item bank, short-form, Medical Outcomes Study

  3. Polymer physics of nuclear organization and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amitai, A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute for Medical Engineering & Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Holcman, D., E-mail: david.holcman@ens.fr [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics (DAMTP), University of Cambridge, Churchill College, CB30DS, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris (France)

    2017-03-23

    We review here recent progress to link the nuclear organization to its function, based on elementary physical processes such as diffusion, polymer dynamics of DNA, chromatin and the search mechanism for a small target by double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) break. These physical models and their analysis make it possible to compute critical rates involved in cell reorganization timing, which depend on many parameters. In the framework of polymer models, various empirical observations are interpreted as anomalous diffusion of chromatin at various time scales. The reviewed theoretical approaches offer a framework for extracting features, biophysical parameters, predictions, and so on, based on a large variety of experimental data, such as chromosomal capture data, single particle trajectories, and more. Combining theoretical approaches with live cell microscopy data should unveil some of the still unexplained behavior of the nucleus in carrying out some of its key function involved in survival, DNA repair or gene activation.

  4. Results of subscale MTF compression experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Stephen; Mossman, A.; Donaldson, M.; Fusion Team, General

    2016-10-01

    In magnetized target fusion (MTF) a magnetized plasma torus is compressed in a time shorter than its own energy confinement time, thereby heating to fusion conditions. Understanding plasma behavior and scaling laws is needed to advance toward a reactor-scale demonstration. General Fusion is conducting a sequence of subscale experiments of compact toroid (CT) plasmas being compressed by chemically driven implosion of an aluminum liner, providing data on several key questions. CT plasmas are formed by a coaxial Marshall gun, with magnetic fields supported by internal plasma currents and eddy currents in the wall. Configurations that have been compressed so far include decaying and sustained spheromaks and an ST that is formed into a pre-existing toroidal field. Diagnostics measure B, ne, visible and x-ray emission, Ti and Te. Before compression the CT has an energy of 10kJ magnetic, 1 kJ thermal, with Te of 100 - 200 eV, ne 5x1020 m-3. Plasma was stable during a compression factor R0/R >3 on best shots. A reactor scale demonstration would require 10x higher initial B and ne but similar Te. Liner improvements have minimized ripple, tearing and ejection of micro-debris. Plasma facing surfaces have included plasma-sprayed tungsten, bare Cu and Al, and gettering with Ti and Li.

  5. Physical Heterogeneity and Aquatic Community Function in ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The geomorphological character of a river network provides the template upon which evolution acts to create unique biological communities. Deciphering commonly observed patterns and processes within riverine landscapes resulting from the interplay between physical and biological components is a central tenet for the interdisciplinary field of river science. Relationships between the physical heterogeneity and food web character of functional process zones (FPZs) – large tracts of river with a similar geomorphic character - in the Kanawha River (West Virginia, USA) are examined in this study. Food web character was measured as food chain length (FCL), which reflects ecological community structure and ecosystem function. Our results show the same basal resources were present throughout the Kanawha River but their assimilation into the aquatic food web by primary consumers differed between FPZs. Differences in the trophic position of secondary consumers – fish - were also recorded between FPZs. Overall, both the morphological heterogeneity and heterogeneity of the river bed sediment of FPZs were significantly correlated with FCL. Specifically, FCL increases with greater FPZ physical heterogeneity, supporting tenet 8 of the river ecosystem synthesis. In previous research efforts, we delineated the functional process zones (FPZs) of the Kanawha River. In this study, we examined the relationship between the hydrogeomorphically-derived zones with food webs.

  6. Physically active academic lessons : Effects on physical fitness and executive functions in primary school children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Greeff, Johannes Wilhelmus

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that physical activity can improve cognitive functions of primary school children, especially the executive functions (functions that are important for goal directed cognition and behavior). Physically active academic lessons, however, do not improve executive functions

  7. A medical risk attitude subscale for DOSPERT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoshana Butler

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Domain-Specific Risk Taking scale (DOSPERT is a widely used instrument that measures perceived risk and benefit and attitude toward risk for activities in several domains, but does not include medical risks. Objective: To develop a medical risk domain subscale for DOSPERT. Methods: Sixteen candidate risk items were developed through expert discussion. We conducted cognitive telephone interviews, an online survey, and a random-digit dialing (RDD telephone survey to reduce and refine the scale, explore its factor structure, and obtain estimates of reliability. Participants: Eight patients recruited from UIC medical center waiting rooms participated in 45-60 minute cognitive interviews. Thirty Amazon Mechanical Turk workers completed the online survey. One hundred Chicago-area residents completed the RDD telephone survey. Results: On the basis of cognitive interviews, we eliminated five items due to poor variance or participant misunderstanding. The online survey suggested that two additional items were negatively correlated with the scale, and we considered them candidates for removal. Factor analysis of the responses in the RDD telephone survey and non-statistical factors led us to recommend a final set of 6 items to represent the medical risk domain. The final set of items included blood donation, kidney donation, daily medication use for allergies, knee replacement surgery, general anesthesia in dentistry, and clinical trial participation. The interitem reliability (Cronbach's alpha of the final set of 6 items ranged from 0.57-0.59 depending on the response task. Older respondents gave lower overall ratings of expected benefit from the activities. Conclusion: We refined a set of items to measure risk and benefit perceptions for medical activities. Our next step will be to add these items to the complete DOSPERT scale, confirm the scale's psychometric properties, determine whether medical risks constitute a psychologically

  8. Physical modification of food starch functionalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BeMiller, James N; Huber, Kerry C

    2015-01-01

    Because, in general, native starches do not have properties that make them ideally suited for applications in food products, most starch is modified by dervatization to improve its functionality before use in processed food formulations, and because food processors would prefer not to have to use the modified food starch label designation required when chemically modified starches are used, there is considerable interest in providing starches with desired functionalities that have not been chemically modified. One investigated approach is property modification via physical treatments, that is, modifications of starches imparted by physical treatments that do not result in any chemical modification of the starch. Physical treatments are divided into thermal and nonthermal treatments. Thermal treatments include those that produce pregelatinized and granular cold-water-swelling starches, heat-moisture treatments, annealing, microwave heating, so-called osmotic pressure treatment, and heating of dry starch. Nonthermal treatments include ultrahigh-pressure treatments, instantaneous controlled pressure drop, use of high-pressure homogenizers, dynamic pulsed pressure, pulsed electric field, and freezing and thawing.

  9. Assessing physical activity and function in the Filipino older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceria-Ulep, Clementina D; Dalusung-Angosta, Alona; Magday-Asselstine, Richelle T; Castillo, Marilyn A; Pagano, Ian S; Li, Dongmei; Wooton, Angela

    2013-01-01

    This cross-sectional study was conducted to describe: the physical activity and function of 47 Filipinos (N = 47), 65+ years old living in Honolulu; and the relationship between these two variables. Data collected included an interview on demographics, health history, physical activity and function. Performance based physical function tests included handgrip, chair stands, balance, ten foot and six minutes walk. For physical activity, most of the participants engaged in sedentary lifestyle. However, they did not have difficulty performing activities of daily living (ADL) and generally had no difficulty with the performance-based physical function tests. Physical function, handgrip, was significantly related to heavy physical activity.

  10. Multifidi Muscle Characteristics and Physical Function among Older Adults with and without Chronic Low Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sions, J. Megan; Coyle, Peter C.; Velasco, Teonette O.; Elliott, James M.; Hicks, Gregory E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine if multifidi size and/or intramuscular fat were associated with self-reported and performance-based physical function in older adults with and without chronic LBP. Design Case-control study Setting Individuals participated in a standardized evaluation in a clinical laboratory and underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lumbar spine at a nearby facility. Patient Sample A volunteer sample of 106 community-dwelling older adults, aged 60-85 years, with (n=57) and without (n=49) chronic LBP were included in this secondary data analysis. Intervention Average right-left, L5 multifidi relative, i.e. total, cross-sectional area (rCSA); muscle-fat infiltration index (MFI), i.e. a measure of intramuscular fat; and relative muscle cross-sectional area (rmCSA), i.e. total CSA minus intramuscular fat CSA, were determined from MRIs. Linear regression modeling was performed with physical function measures as the dependent variables. Age, sex, and body mass index were entered as covariates. The main effects of L5 multifidi MFI and rmCSA, as well as their interaction with group assignment, were compared as independent variables. Main Outcome Measures Short Form-36 Health Survey Physical Functioning subscale (SF-36 PFS), Timed Up and Go (TUG), gait speed, and fast stair descent performance. Results Interaction terms between L5 multifidi MFI and group assignment were found to be significant contributors to the variance explained in all physical function measures (p≤.012). Neither the main effect, nor the interaction with group assignment for L5 multifidi rmCSA, significantly contributed to the variance explained in any of the physical function measures (p>.012). Conclusions Among older adults with chronic LBP of at least moderate intensity, L5 multifidi muscle composition, but not size, may help to explain physical function. PMID:27590444

  11. Improving physical activity and function in overweight and obese older adults with osteoarthritis of the knee: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenk, Elizabeth A; Lias, Jennifer L; Sereika, Susan M; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline; Kwoh, C Kent

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis of the knee, a prevalent condition in older adults, can impact physical function and ability to perform physical activity. This randomized controlled trial examined the effects of a 6-month self-efficacy-based, individually delivered, lower-extremity exercise and fitness walking intervention with 6-month follow-up on physical activity and function. The 26 subjects were mostly older (M = 63.2 years, SD = 9.8), White (83%), obese (BMI M = 33.3, SD = 6.0) women (96%). Physical activity was measured by diaries. Physical function was measured by the 6-minute walk, Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), and WOMAC Physical Function subscale. Exercise self-efficacy was assessed by a questionnaire. Results showed significant increases in self-reported performance of lower-extremity exercise and participation in fitness walking distance in the 6-minute walk, and SPPB scores from baseline to 6-month follow-up with a trend for improvement in self-efficacy. Results suggest that the intervention was feasible, acceptable, and improved physical activity and function.

  12. Preschool physical activity and functional constipation: The generation r study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, L.M.; Jong, J.C.K.D.; Wijtzes, A.; Vries, S.I. de; Jaddoe, V.W.V.; Hofman, A.; Raat, H.; Moll, H.A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES:: Decreased physical activity levels in children may partly explain the rising prevalence of functional constipation in childhood. The aim of the present study, therefore, was to examine the association between physical activity and functional constipation during the preschool period.

  13. FUNCTIONAL TRAINING In the system of physical education students

    OpenAIRE

    Білецька Вікторія Вікторівна; Усачов Юрій Олександрович; Семененко В.П.

    2012-01-01

    The article systematized means of functional training activities, especially their distribution in classes of different directions, and reasonably rational structure of various functional training applications lessons during physical education students to improve their physical fitness.

  14. Longitudinal Construct Validity of Brief Symptom Inventory Subscales in Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jeffrey D.; Harring, Jeffrey R.; Brekke, John S.; Test, Mary Ann; Greenberg, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Longitudinal validity of Brief Symptom Inventory subscales was examined in a sample (N = 318) with schizophrenia-related illness measured at baseline and every 6 months for 3 years. Nonlinear factor analysis of items was used to test graded response models (GRMs) for subscales in isolation. The models varied in their within-time and between-times…

  15. A new physical unclonable function architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Bai; Xuecheng, Zou; Kui, Dai

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes a new silicon physical unclonable function (PUF) architecture that can be fabricated on a standard CMOS process. Our proposed architecture is built using process sensors, difference amplifier, comparator, voting mechanism and diffusion algorithm circuit. Multiple identical process sensors are fabricated on the same chip. Due to manufacturing process variations, each sensor produces slightly different physical characteristic values that can be compared in order to create a digital identification for the chip. The diffusion algorithm circuit ensures further that the PUF based on the proposed architecture is able to effectively identify a population of ICs. We also improve the stability of PUF design with respect to temporary environmental variations like temperature and supply voltage with the introduction of difference amplifier and voting mechanism. The PUF built on the proposed architecture is fabricated in 0.18 μm CMOS technology. Experimental results show that the PUF has a good output statistical characteristic of uniform distribution and a high stability of 98.1% with respect to temperature variation from -40 to 100 °C, and supply voltage variation from 1.7 to 1.9 V. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61376031).

  16. Evaluating PROMIS Physical Function Measures in Older Adults at Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis Tatsuoka PhD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Activities of daily living can be affected by cognitive decline. Self-report measurement of functioning is attractive due to ease of data collection, low cost, and accessibility via technology-assisted means, and for understanding patient perspective. A concern is with reliability of such measurement as cognitive decline occurs. We compared a widely used, self-report “legacy” measure of functioning, Lawton and Brody’s Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale (IADLS, with a subset of physical functioning items from the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS. The study sample consisted of 304 individuals of varying cognitive status: normal, mild cognitive impairment (MCI, or early dementia. An expert consensus method was used to select PROMIS functional items most relevant to neurocognitive disorder and to identify major functional sub-domains. Selected PROMIS functional subscales and the IADLS were then evaluated with respect to cognitive status. Few PROMIS functional items were useful in identifying MCI, while we reaffirmed the utility of the IADLS. Also, even mild depression levels were found to have negative effects on functioning according to both PROMIS and IADLS.

  17. Dynamic Balance Training Improves Physical Function in Individuals With Knee Osteoarthritis: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs, Judit; Krowchuk, Natasha M; Garland, S Jayne; Carpenter, Mark G; Hunt, Michael A

    2017-08-01

    To examine the effect of a targeted balance training program on dynamic balance and self-reported physical function in people with medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis (OA). Single-blind randomized controlled trial. Exercise gymnasium and community dwellings. Individuals with medial compartment knee OA (N=40). Ten weeks of partially supervised exercises targeting dynamic balance and strength performed 4 times per week or no intervention (nonintervention group). Dynamic balance was measured using the Community Balance and Mobility Scale (CB&M), and self-reported physical function was measured using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index physical function subscale. Secondary outcomes included knee pain, fear of movement, knee joint proprioception, and muscle strength. Forty individuals underwent baseline testing, with 36 participants completing follow-up testing. Adherence to exercise in the training group was high, with 82.2% of all home-based exercise sessions completed. No significant changes were observed in any outcome in the nonintervention group at follow-up. Significant improvements in self-reported pain, physical function, and fear of movement were observed in the training group when compared with the nonintervention group. No other within- or between-group differences were observed. A 10-week dynamic balance training program for people with knee OA significantly improved self-reported knee pain, physical function, and fear of movement; however, there was no change in dynamic balance as quantified by the CB&M. Further research is needed to investigate how exercise may result in improvement on objective measures of dynamic balance. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Lambert W function for applications in physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veberič, Darko

    2012-12-01

    The Lambert W(x) function and its possible applications in physics are presented. The actual numerical implementation in C++ consists of Halley's and Fritsch's iterations with initial approximations based on branch-point expansion, asymptotic series, rational fits, and continued-logarithm recursion. Program summaryProgram title: LambertW Catalogue identifier: AENC_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENC_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1335 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 25 283 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ (with suitable wrappers it can be called from C, Fortran etc.), the supplied command-line utility is suitable for other scripting languages like sh, csh, awk, perl etc. Computer: All systems with a C++ compiler. Operating system: All Unix flavors, Windows. It might work with others. RAM: Small memory footprint, less than 1 MB Classification: 1.1, 4.7, 11.3, 11.9. Nature of problem: Find fast and accurate numerical implementation for the Lambert W function. Solution method: Halley's and Fritsch's iterations with initial approximations based on branch-point expansion, asymptotic series, rational fits, and continued logarithm recursion. Additional comments: Distribution file contains the command-line utility lambert-w. Doxygen comments, included in the source files. Makefile. Running time: The tests provided take only a few seconds to run.

  19. Leveraging Distributions in Physical Unclonable Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjie Che

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A special class of Physical Unclonable Functions (PUFs referred to as strong PUFs can be used in novel hardware-based authentication protocols. Strong PUFs are required for authentication because the bit strings and helper data are transmitted openly by the token to the verifier, and therefore are revealed to the adversary. This enables the adversary to carry out attacks against the token by systematically applying challenges and obtaining responses in an attempt to machine learn, and later predict, the token’s response to an arbitrary challenge. Therefore, strong PUFs must both provide an exponentially large challenge space and be resistant to machine-learning attacks in order to be considered secure. We investigate a transformation called temperature–voltage compensation (TVCOMP, which is used within the Hardware-Embedded Delay PUF (HELP bit string generation algorithm. TVCOMP increases the diversity and unpredictability of the challenge–response space, and therefore increases resistance to model-building attacks. HELP leverages within-die variations in path delays as a source of random information. TVCOMP is a linear transformation designed specifically for dealing with changes in delay introduced by adverse temperature–voltage (environmental variations. In this paper, we show that TVCOMP also increases entropy and expands the challenge–response space dramatically.

  20. Airspace Simulation Through Indoor Operation of Subscale Flight Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An indoor environment for simulating airspace operations will be designed. Highly maneuverable subscale vehicles can be used to simulate the dynamics of full-scale...

  1. Comparison of Child Behavior Checklist subscales in screening for obsessive-compulsive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Pia Aaron Skovby; Bilenberg, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a prevalent psychiatric disorder in children and adolescents associated with significant functional impairment. Early and correct diagnosis is essential for an optimal treatment outcome. The purpose of this study was to determine which of four subscales...... derived from the Child Behavior Checklist best discriminates OCD patients from clinical and population-based controls....

  2. Functional neuroanatomy of intuitive physical inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Jason; Mikhael, John G; Tenenbaum, Joshua B; Kanwisher, Nancy

    2016-08-23

    To engage with the world-to understand the scene in front of us, plan actions, and predict what will happen next-we must have an intuitive grasp of the world's physical structure and dynamics. How do the objects in front of us rest on and support each other, how much force would be required to move them, and how will they behave when they fall, roll, or collide? Despite the centrality of physical inferences in daily life, little is known about the brain mechanisms recruited to interpret the physical structure of a scene and predict how physical events will unfold. Here, in a series of fMRI experiments, we identified a set of cortical regions that are selectively engaged when people watch and predict the unfolding of physical events-a "physics engine" in the brain. These brain regions are selective to physical inferences relative to nonphysical but otherwise highly similar scenes and tasks. However, these regions are not exclusively engaged in physical inferences per se or, indeed, even in scene understanding; they overlap with the domain-general "multiple demand" system, especially the parts of that system involved in action planning and tool use, pointing to a close relationship between the cognitive and neural mechanisms involved in parsing the physical content of a scene and preparing an appropriate action.

  3. Perceived family functioning and friendship quality: cross-sectional associations with physical activity and sedentary behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkin, Andrew J; Corder, Kirsten; Goodyer, Ian; Bamber, Diane; Ekelund, Ulf; Brage, Soren; Dunn, Valerie; van Sluijs, Esther M F

    2015-02-21

    This study examined the association of adolescent-reported family functioning and friendship quality with objectively-measured moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), sedentary time, and self-reported sedentary behaviours. Data are from the ROOTS study. MVPA and sedentary time were assessed using combined movement and heart rate sensing. Time spent TV viewing, using the internet, playing video games, doing homework and reading for pleasure was self-reported. Data on objectively-measured and self-reported outcomes for weekdays was available for 738 (age 14.5y, 55.7% female) and 800 (56.3% female) participants, respectively. Adolescents perceived family functioning and friendship quality (Two subscales: 'Good friendship qualities', 'Friendship difficulties') was assessed by questionnaire. Analyses were conducted using multi-level linear or logistic regression. Adolescents reporting better family functioning accumulated more MVPA on weekdays (beta; 95% confidence interval: 0.57; 0.17,0.98). Higher scores on the good friendship qualities subscale was associated with greater MVPA throughout the week (weekdays: 1.13; 0.62,1.65, weekend: 0.56; 0.09,1.02) and lower sedentary time on weekdays (-10.34; -17.03,-3.66). Boys from better functioning families were less likely to report playing video games at the weekend (OR; 95% confidence interval: 0.73; 0.57,0.93) or reading for pleasure (weekday: 0.73; 0.56,0.96 weekend: 0.75; 0.58,0.96). Boys who attained higher scores on the good friendship qualities scale were less likely to play video games at the weekend (0.61; 0.44,0.86) or report high homework on weekdays (0.54; 0.31,0.94). A higher score for good friendship qualities was associated with lower odds of girls playing video games during the week (0.76; 0.58,1.00) or reading for pleasure at the weekend (0.61; 0.42,0.88). Girls that reported fewer friendship difficulties had lower odds of high TV viewing (0.76; 0.62,0.93) or playing video games (0.71; 0.52,0.97) at

  4. Feelings of well being in elderly people: relationship to physical activity and physical function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garatachea, Nuria; Molinero, Olga; Martínez-García, Raquel; Jiménez-Jiménez, Rodrigo; González-Gallego, Javier; Márquez, Sara

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate in a sample of Spanish elderly whether measures of physical activity and physical function are related to feelings of well being, and whether level of dependence is a moderator in the relation of well being, physical activity and physical function. The sample was a cohort of 151 elderly people (89 women and 62 men, aged 60-98 years) from the North of Spain. Participants completed surveys including demographic characteristics, and measures of physical activity (Yale Physical Activity Survey, YPAS), instrumental activities of daily living (Barthel Index, BI) and well being (Psychological Well Being Scale, from Spanish: Escala de Bienestar Psicológico=EBP). Components of the physical function were measured by the Senior Fitness Test (SFT). Upper and lower body strength, dynamic balance, aerobic endurance, self-reported weekly energy expenditure and physical activity total time were significantly correlated with both Material and Subjective well being. All components of physical function were significantly impaired in dependent subjects when compared to independent individuals of the same sex and physical activity category. Significant differences were also observed in Subjective well being among less active dependent or independent individuals. In conclusion, physical function and physical activity are related to feelings of well being, and results emphasize the positive functional and psychological effects of physical activity in dependent subjects.

  5. The importance of physical function to people with osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, C; Bottomley, C; Shingler, S; Giangregorio, L; de Freitas, H M; Patel, C; Randall, S; Gold, D T

    2017-05-01

    There is increasing need to understand patient outcomes in osteoporosis. This article discusses that fracture in osteoporosis can lead to a cycle of impairment, driven by complex psychosocial factors, having a profound impact on physical function/activity which accumulates over time. More information is required on how treatments impact physical function. There is increasing need to understand patient-centred outcomes in osteoporosis (OP) clinical research and management. This multi-method paper provides insight on the effect of OP on patients' physical function and everyday activity. Data were collected from three sources: (1) targeted literature review on OP and physical function, conducted in MEDLINE, Embase and PsycINFO; (2) secondary thematic analysis of transcripts from patient interviews, conducted to develop a patient-reported outcome instrument. Transcripts were re-coded to focus on OP impact on daily activities and physical function for those with and without fracture history; and (3) discussions of the literature review and secondary qualitative analysis results with three clinical experts to review and interpret the importance and implications of the findings. Results suggest that OP, particularly with fracture, can have profound impacts on physical function/activity. These impacts accumulate over time through a cycle of impairment, as fracture leads to longer term detriments in physical function, including loss of muscle, activity avoidance and reduced physical capacity, which in turn leads to greater risk of fracture and potential for further physical restrictions. The cycle of impairment is complex, as other physical, psychosocial and treatment-related factors, such as comorbidities, fears and beliefs about physical activity and fracture risk influence physical function and everyday activity. More information on how treatments impact physical function would benefit healthcare professionals and persons with OP in making treatment decisions and

  6. SPE5 Sub-Scale Test Series Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandersall, Kevin S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reeves, Robert V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); DeHaven, Martin R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Strickland, Shawn L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-14

    A series of 2 SPE5 sub-scale tests were performed to experimentally confirm that a booster system designed and evaluated in prior tests would properly initiate the PBXN-110 case charge fill. To conduct the experiments, a canister was designed to contain the nominally 50 mm diameter booster tube with an outer fill of approximately 150 mm diameter by 150 mm in length. The canisters were filled with PBXN-110 at NAWS-China Lake and shipped back to LLNL for testing in the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF). Piezoelectric crystal pins were placed on the outside of the booster tube before filling, and a series of piezoelectric crystal pins along with Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) probes were placed on the outer surface of the canister to measure the relative timing and magnitude of the detonation. The 2 piezoelectric crystal pins integral to the booster design were also utilized along with a series of either piezoelectric crystal pins or piezoelectric polymer pads on the top of the canister or outside case that utilized direct contact, gaps, or different thicknesses of RTV cushions to obtain time of arrival data to evaluate the response in preparation for the large-scale SPE5 test. To further quantify the margin of the booster operation, the 1st test (SPE5SS1) was functioned with both detonators and the 2nd test (SPE5SS2) was functioned with only 1 detonator. A full detonation of the material was observed in both experiments as observed by the pin timing and PDV signals. The piezoelectric pads were found to provide a greater measured signal magnitude during the testing with an RTV layer present, and the improved response is due to the larger measurement surface area of the pad. This report will detail the experiment design, canister assembly for filling, final assembly, experiment firing, presentation of the diagnostic results, and a discussion of the results.

  7. Tactile Teaching: Exploring Protein Structure/Function Using Physical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Tim; Morris, Jennifer; Colton, Shannon; Batiza, Ann; Patrick, Michael; Franzen, Margaret; Goodsell, David S.

    2006-01-01

    The technology now exists to construct physical models of proteins based on atomic coordinates of solved structures. We review here our recent experiences in using physical models to teach concepts of protein structure and function at both the high school and the undergraduate levels. At the high school level, physical models are used in a…

  8. Trajectory of change in pain, depression, and physical functioning after physical activity adoption in fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Jennifer L; Bigatti, Silvia M; Ang, Dennis C

    2015-07-01

    Fibromyalgia is associated with widespread pain, depression, and declines in physical functioning. The purpose of this study was to examine the trajectory of these symptoms over time related to physical activity adoption and maintenance via motivational interviewing versus education, to increase physical activity. There were no treatment group differences; we divided the sample (n = 184) based on changes in physical activity. Repeated measures analyses demonstrated differential patterns in depression, pain, and physical functioning at 24 and 36 weeks. Findings suggest increased physical activity may serve as a multiple-target intervention that provides moderate to large, long-lasting benefits for individuals with fibromyalgia. © The Author(s) 2013.

  9. Association between physical functions and quality of life in sarcoidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drent, M.; Marcellis, R. G. J.; Lenssen, A. F.; de Vries, J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quality of life (QOL) is often reduced in patients with sarcoidosis. Studies of the associations between physical functions and QOL are lacking. OBJECTIVES: So the aims of this study were (i) to evaluate the associations between QOL and physical functions, including muscle strength and

  10. Some physical applications of generalized Lambert functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mező, István; Keady, Grant

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we show two applications for a generalization of the Lambert W function. Explicit calculations are given for the inverse Langevin function that plays an important role in the study of paramagnetic materials, and for the dispersion equations for water waves. After these examples we provide some additional knowledge on the generalized Lambert function as well as a review of former studies made towards this direction by other authors.

  11. Physical Exercise Can Induce Brain Plasticity and Regulate Mental Function

    OpenAIRE

    Ichiro, KITA; Graduate School of Human Health Science, Tokyo Metropolitan University

    2014-01-01

    Physical exercise can enhance learning and memory, and improve stress-related psychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety. There is accumulating evidence that physical exercise can induce morphological and functional alterations in the brain via changes in molecular and cellular plasticity. Thus, it is suggested that the neuroplasticity produced by physical exercise underlies the exercise-induced changes in mental function, including learning and psychological health. Although the ne...

  12. Efficacy of Tailored Exercise Therapy on Physical Functioning in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis and Comorbidity: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rooij, Mariëtte; van der Leeden, Marike; Cheung, John; van der Esch, Martin; Häkkinen, Arja; Haverkamp, Daniël; Roorda, Leo D; Twisk, Jos; Vollebregt, Joke; Lems, Willem F; Dekker, Joost

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the efficacy on physical functioning and safety of tailored exercise therapy in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and comorbidities. In a randomized controlled trial, 126 participants were included with a clinical diagnosis of knee OA and at least 1 of the following target comorbidities: coronary disease, heart failure, type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or obesity (body mass index ≥30 kg/m(2) ), with severity score ≥2 on the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale. The intervention group received a 20-week, individualized, comorbidity-adapted exercise program consisting of aerobic and strength training and training of daily activities. The control group received their current medical care for knee OA and were placed on a waiting list for exercise therapy. Primary outcome measures were the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, subscale physical functioning (WOMAC-pf), and the 6-minute walk test (6MWT). Measurements were performed at baseline, after 20 weeks (directly posttreatment), and at 3 months posttreatment. Statistically significant physical functioning differences over time were found between the intervention and control group (WOMAC: B = -7.43 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) -9.99, -4.87], P exercise therapy is efficacious in improving physical functioning and safe in patients with knee OA and severe comorbidities. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  13. The influence of physical exercise on improvement of cognitive functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov Stanislava

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews contemporary studies on the influence of physical exercise on human cognitive functioning. One of the aims of the interdisciplinary neuroscience that connects psychology, medicine and sport, is in discovering the mechanisms by which physical exercise might improve cognitive functioning across the lifespan, especially in the old age, when cognitive efficiency naturally decreases. Studies have shown that physical exercise produces cognitive benefit over the lifetime, both directly, through physiological mechanisms and structural brain changes, and indirectly, through mood improvement and stress reduction. However, studies have shown that the effects of physical exercise depend on the exercise intensity - while moderate physical activity has a positive impact on the cognitive functioning, the high-intensity exercise shows the reversed effect. Also, studies have suggested that the effect of physical exercise on cognitive functioning depends on the type of physical activity. Overall, studies have demonstrated that physical exercise may produce positive effects on different cognitive processes, but still have not provided a clear mechanism underlying this influence. Also, existing studies have not revealed to what extent the various physical activities differ in their effects and whether such effects are specific or potentially beneficial for cognitive functioning in general.

  14. Development and validation of subscales to assess perceived support for self-management of mood or emotional problems: Results from a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, Jane; Haggerty, Jeannie; De Raad, Manon; Belzile, Eric; Bouharaoui, Fatima; Beaulieu, Christine; Yaffe, Mark; Ciampi, Antonio

    2017-06-10

    To validate 2 new patient-reported measures of self-management support from health professionals for mood and emotional problems. The sample comprised primary care patients with chronic physical conditions and co-morbid depressive symptoms enrolled in a randomized trial of telephone coaching of a depression self-care intervention (n=120). At 6-month follow-up, patients completed 2 subscales with respect to support for self-management of their chronic physical condition(s): 1) Self-Management Information (SMInfo-Phys); and 2) Care Plan (CP-Phys) and equivalent subscales adapted to assess self-management support for mood and emotional problems: SMInfo-Mood and CP-Mood. Subscale scoring was assessed with Item Response Theory (IRT) analysis. Convergent validity of the mood subscales was assessed. The sensitivity of the mood and physical condition subscales to mental health interventions was assessed with generalized estimating equations (GEE). The mood subscales were associated with relevant measures of perceived unmet mental health needs. Both SMInfo-Mood and CP-Mood were sensitive to the coaching intervention; CP-Mood was also sensitive to receipt of depression treatment outside the trial. This study provides preliminary evidence for the validity of the 2 new subscales. The subscales may be used to assess perceived health professional support for self-management of mood and emotional problems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Subscale Water Based Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Rubik; Hansen, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Supplemental heat rejection devices are required in many spacecraft as the radiators are not sized to meet the full heat rejection demand. One means of obtaining additional heat rejection is through the use of phase change material heat exchangers (PCM HX's). PCM HX's utilize phase change to store energy in unfavorable thermal environments (melting) and reject the energy in favorable environments (freezing). Traditionally, wax has been used as a PCM on spacecraft. However, water is an attractive alternative because it is capable of storing about 40% more energy per unit mass due to its higher latent heat of fusion. The significant problem in using water as a PCM is its expansion while freezing, leading to structural integrity concerns when housed in an enclosed heat exchanger volume. Significant investigation and development has taken place over the past five years to understand and overcome the problems associated with water PCM HX's. This paper reports on the final efforts by Johnson Space Center's Thermal Systems Branch to develop a water based PCM HX. The test article developed and reported on is a subscale version of the full-scale water-based PCM HX's constructed by Mezzo Technologies. The subscale unit was designed by applying prior research on freeze front propagation and previous full-scale water PCM HX development. Design modifications to the subscale unit included use of urethane bladder, decreased aspect ratio, perforated protection sheet, and use of additional mid-plates. Testing of the subscale unit was successful and 150 cycles were completed without fail.

  16. Physical training improves cardiopulmonary functional capacity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The NI group exhibited a significant increase (p < 0.05) in the serum levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-17 and tumor necrosis factor (all p< 0.05). Conclusion: All of the participants presented improvements in cardiopulmonary functional capacity and good prognosis, indicating the protective effect of IL-10 ...

  17. Physical training improves cardiopulmonary functional capacity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1995; 21(6): 363–364. PMCID: PMC1376838. 12. American Thoracic Society Committee on Proficiency. Standards for Clinical Pulmonary Function Laboratories. ATS Statement: guidelines for the six-minute walk test. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2002; 166(1): 111-117. 13. Regenga MM. Fisioterapia em Cardiologia da UTI à.

  18. Joint Health, Functional Ability and Physical Activity in Haemophilia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, W.G.

    2011-01-01

    In haemophilia outcome measurement has long been strongly focused on the level of body functions and structures while functional outcome and physical activity have been underrepresented. However, the past decade a shift has been made to a more total evaluation of the patients’ functional health

  19. Determinants of physical functioning in women with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, Hakan; Sertkaya, Bilge Saruhan; Tuncer, Tiraje

    2017-06-12

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is an important health problem with its high prevalence and association with pain and functional disability in physical tasks and activities especially in women. To explore the impacts of widely seen demographic, pathological, psychological, and impairment factors on physical functioning in women with knee OA using the performance-based and self-reported measures. One hundred and ten women with knee OA participated in this study. Performance-based measures included the 10-m walk test, timed up and go (TUG) test, and a stair test. Self-reported physical functioning was measured using the Western Ontario and McMasters Universities OA Index. Knee muscle strength, pain intensity, flexion range of motion (ROM), body mass index (BMI), radiographic severity, and anxious and depressive symptoms were measured. Age, disease duration, and comorbidities were recorded. Correlation and linear regression analyses were used to assess the associations. In the linear regression models, knee muscle weakness, limited knee flexion ROM, pain intensity, and older age contributed to 65% of variance in physical performance measures mostly explained by knee muscle weakness. Knee pain intensity, BMI, anxiety, and knee muscle weakness contributed to 60% of variance in WOMAC physical function score mostly explained by pain. Radiologic severity, depression, comorbidities, and disease duration did not have a significant association (P knee OA, knee muscle strength was the main determinant of performance-based physical functioning together with knee flexion ROM, knee pain, and age. Knee pain was the main determinant of self-reported physical functioning. BMI, anxiety, and knee muscle strength had some contributions as well. Performance-based and self-reported measures had moderate relations and evaluate different aspects of physical functioning. In the management of women with knee OA strengthening of weak knee muscles, improving limited flexion ROM, pain management

  20. Changes in the health status and functional outcomes in acute traumatic hand injury patients, during physical therapy treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca John

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traumatic hand injury causes chronic disability. A large number of studies have reported impairments in clinical parameters, but few studies have described their disability experience. Aims To examine the functional disability and quality of life in traumatic hand injured patients receiving physical therapy. Settings and Design: The physiotherapy department in a multi-specialty public sector hospital. Convenient sampling method was used. Materials and Methods: The 36-item short-form health survey-MOS (SF-36, v2 and disabilities of arm, shoulder and hand (DASH questionnaire were obtained and subjects were given physiotherapy, accordingly to their condition. Questionnaires were re-administered every month till discharge. Statistical Analysis Used: A One-way ANOVA test. Results: At end of 6 months, among eight subscales of SF-36, there is improvement in mean scores of physical functioning (39.1%. The bodily pain, general health, vitality, social function, and mental health had more than 100% improvement. DASH showed regression in disability (50.8%. Conclusions: Measuring quality of life (QOL can provide detailed assessment of physical disability and treatment effects as well as the global impact of those effects on the person′s daily life. Hence, the use of self-report questionnaires such as DASH and SF-36, combined with physical performance score, helps to achieve more comprehensive evaluation of outcome.

  1. Physical rehabilitation improves muscle function following volumetric muscle loss injury

    OpenAIRE

    Aurora, Amit; Garg, Koyal; Benjamin T Corona; Walters, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Given the clinical practice of prescribing physical rehabilitation for the treatment of VML injuries, the present study examined the functional and histomorphological adaptations in the volumetric muscle loss (VML) injured muscle to physical rehabilitation. Methods Tibialis anterior muscle VML injury was created in Lewis rats (n?=?32), and were randomly assigned to either sedentary (SED) or physical rehabilitation (RUN) group. After 1?week, RUN rats were given unlimited access to v...

  2. Controlled physical activity for functional operability determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luchenkov А.А.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim: to use veloergometry test at patients of high anaeshtesiology-operative risk before traumatic operations for functional operability determination. Material and methods: Randomized prospective research with the double "blind" control has been performed at 95 patients of high risk (ASA>III, undergoing long and traumatic operations on thoracic and abdominal organs. Patients have divided into groups without complications and with complications (51 and 44 patients which one day prior to operation have spent veloergometry test (VEMT. Average dynamic pressure (ADP, the general peripheral resistance of vessels (GPRV, a core index (Cl; arterio-venous (a-v difference on oxygen, oxygen delivery to tissues, consumption of oxygen and coefficients extraction oxygen in tissues; energy consumption have been investigated. Statistics has been done by nonparametric methods. Results. In response to veloergometry test in both groups growth of Cl at the expense of a tachycardia and GPRV fall which in complication group remains above norm is noted. In group without complications coefficients extraction oxygen in tissues were normalised, a-v difference on 02 became above norm, in other group — coefficients extraction oxygen in tissues and a-v difference on 02 began to exceed norm, and oxygen consumption has grown almost in 2 times. After VEMT a-v a difference on О and oxygen consumption were essentially above in group with complications. Under the influence of VEMT markecT stabilization of function of vegetative nervous systems (VNS. The number of complications made 39: intraoperation cardiovascular — 23, postoperative respiratory — 16. Clinically important connection (p=0,069 of perioperative complications with growth a-v differences on oxygen and a power interchanging have been received. Conclusion. Thus, the oxygen-energy exchange and the vegetative status can be referred to clinical functional operability determination.

  3. Ten physical applications of spectral zeta functions

    CERN Document Server

    Elizalde, Emilio

    1995-01-01

    Zeta-function regularization is a powerful method in perturbation theory. This book is meant as a guide for the student of this subject. Everything is explained in detail, in particular the mathematical difficulties and tricky points, and several applications are given to show how the procedure works in practice (e.g. Casimir effect, gravity and string theory, high-temperature phase transition, topological symmetry breaking). The formulas some of which are new can be used for accurate numerical calculations. The book is to be considered as a basic introduction and a collection of exercises for those who want to apply this regularization procedure in practice.

  4. Physical activity and cognitive function in bariatric surgery candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galioto, Rachel; King, Wendy C; Bond, Dale S; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Strain, Gladys; Devlin, Michael; Cohen, Ronald; Crosby, Ross D; Mitchell, James E; Gunstad, John

    2014-12-01

    Cognitive impairment is common in severe obesity. Lack of physical activity is a likely contributor to impairment in this population, as many obese persons are inactive and physical activity has been positively and independently associated with cognitive function in healthy and medically-ill samples. This study investigated whether physical activity, measured by self-report of aerobic physical activity in 85 bariatric surgery candidates, was associated with cognitive function. A subset of 31 participants also completed objective activity monitoring. Steps/d and high-cadence min/week, representative of ambulatory moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), were calculated. Approximately one quarter of participants self-reported at least 30 min/d of aerobic MVPA, at least 5 d/week. Median steps/d was 7949 (IQR = 4572) and median MVPA min/week was 105 (IQR = 123). Cognitive deficits were found in 32% of participants (29% memory, 10% executive function, 13% language, 10% attention). Controlling for demographic and medical factors, self-reported aerobic physical activity was weakly correlated with lower attention (r = -0.21, p = 0.04) and executive function (r = -0.27, p activity and objectively-determined MVPA min/week were negatively correlated with memory (r = -0.20, p = 0.04; r = -0.46; p = 0.02, respectively). No other correlations between physical activity measures and cognitive function were significant. Contrary to expectations, greater levels of physical activity were not associated with better cognitive functioning. Such findings encourage future studies to clarify the association among cognitive function and physical activity in obese persons.

  5. Work Characteristics Associated with Physical Functioning in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Aimee J; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Cannuscio, Carolyn; Robinson, Lucy; Mossey, Jana; Weitlauf, Julie; Garcia, Lorena; Wallace, Robert; Michael, Yvonne

    2017-04-15

    Women make up almost half of the labor force with older women becoming a growing segment of the population. Work characteristics influence physical functioning and women are at particular risk for physical limitations. However, little research has explored the effects of work characteristics on women's physical functioning. U.S. women between the ages of 50 and 79 were enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study between 1993 and 1998. Women provided job titles and years worked at their three longest-held jobs (n = 79,147). Jobs were linked to characteristics in the Occupational Information Network. Three categories of job characteristics related to substantive complexity, physical demand, and social collaboration emerged. The association between job characteristics and physical limitations in later life, measured using a SF-36 Physical Functioning score critical thinking were associated with better physical functioning. Employers should explore opportunities to reduce strain from physically demanding jobs and incorporate substantively complex tasks into women's work to improve long-term health.

  6. Exercise: effects on physical functional performance in independent older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cress, M E; Buchner, D M; Questad, K A; Esselman, P C; deLateur, B J; Schwartz, R S

    1999-05-01

    Age-related loss in physiologic capacities contributes to the decline in physical function in the elderly population. Despite the beneficial effects of exercise interventions on maximal physiologic capacity measures, the functional benefits have not been shown in independently living older adults. The objective of this study was to evaluate exercise in independent older adults for significant and meaningful improvements in physical function, not detected by commonly used measures of physical function. In a randomized controlled study, 49 independently living men and women were assigned to either a nonexercise control group (Control; n = 26) or an exercise training group (Exercise; n = 23). Participants (age = 76+/-4) in good general health were recruited from retirement communities or apartments. The combined endurance and strength training was performed at 75% to 80% intensity; the groups met 3 times/week for 6 months of supervised sessions. Outcome measures included physical capacity, health status, and physical function using a newly developed performance test--the Continuous Scale-Physical Functional Performance test (CS-PFP). Compared to the Control group, the Exercise group showed significant increases in maximal oxygen consumption (11%) and muscle strength (33%). No significant differences were found between groups for changes in the Sickness Impact Profile, SF-36 scales, or the 6-minute walk. However, the CS-PFP score improved significantly in the Exercise group (14%, effect size 0.80). Independent older adults gain meaningful functional benefits from several months of exercise training. The public health importance of physical activity may relate not just to its role in preventing decline, but also to its role in enhancing physical function.

  7. Subscale Test Program for the Orion Conical Ribbon Drogue Parachute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Anita; Stuart, Phil; Machin, Ricardo; Bourland, Gary; Schwing, Allen; Longmire, Ellen; Henning, Elsa; Sinclair, Rob

    2011-01-01

    A subscale wind tunnel test program for Orion's conical ribbon drogue parachute is under development. The desired goals of the program are to quantify aerodynamic performance of the parachute in the wake of the entry vehicle, including understanding of the coupling of the parachute and command module dynamics, and an improved understanding of the load distribution within the textile elements of the parachute. The test program is ten percent of full scale conducted in a 3x2.1 m (10x7 ft) closed loop subsonic wind tunnel. The subscale test program is uniquely suited to probing the aerodynamic and structural environment in both a quantitative and qualitative manner. Non-intrusive diagnostics, including Particle Image Velocimetry for wake velocity surveys, high speed pressure transducers for canopy pressure distribution, and a high speed photogrammetric reconstruction, will be used to quantify the parachute's performance.

  8. Subscale Acoustic Testing: Comparison of ALAT and ASMAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Janice D.; Counter, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option. This paper compares the acoustic measurements of two different subscale tests: the 2% Ares Liftoff Acoustic Test conducted at Stennis Space Center and the 5% Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center.

  9. Physical function and muscle strength in sporadic inclusion body myositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anders N; Aagaard, Per; Nielsen, Jakob L

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In this study, self-reported physical function, functional capacity, and isolated muscle function were investigated in sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM) patients. METHODS: The 36-item Short Form (SF-36) Health Survey and 2-min walk test (2MWT), timed up & go test (TUG), and 30...... to sensitively predict self-perceived physical function in sIBM patients. Notably, between-limb asymmetry in lower limb muscle strength had a substantial negative impact on motor tasks involving gait function. Muscle Nerve, 2017.......INTRODUCTION: In this study, self-reported physical function, functional capacity, and isolated muscle function were investigated in sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM) patients. METHODS: The 36-item Short Form (SF-36) Health Survey and 2-min walk test (2MWT), timed up & go test (TUG), and 30-s...... chair stand performance were evaluated. In addition, patients were tested for knee extensor muscle strength (isokinetic dynamometer) and leg extension power (Nottingham power rig). RESULTS: TUG performance was the strongest predictor of self-reported physical function (r(2) = 0.56, P

  10. Energy Cascade Analysis: from Subscale Eddies to Mean Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheikh, Mohamad Ibrahim; Wonnell, Louis; Chen, James

    2017-11-01

    Understanding the energy transfer between eddies and mean flow can provide insights into the energy cascade process. Much work has been done to investigate the energy cascade at the level of the smallest eddies using different numerical techniques derived from the Navier-Stokes equations. These methodologies, however, prove to be computationally inefficient when producing energy spectra for a wide range of length scales. In this regard, Morphing Continuum Theory (MCT) resolves the length-scales issues by assuming the fluid continuum to be composed of inner structures that play the role of subscale eddies. The current study show- cases the capabilities of MCT in capturing the dynamics of energy cascade at the level of subscale eddies, through a supersonic turbulent flow of Mach 2.93 over an 8× compression ramp. Analysis of the results using statistical averaging procedure shows the existence of a statistical coupling of the internal and translational kinetic energy fluctuations with the corresponding rotational kinetic energy of the subscale eddies, indicating a multiscale transfer of energy. The results show that MCT gives a new characterization of the energy cascade within compressible turbulence without the use of excessive computational resources. This material is based upon work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Award Number FA9550-17-1-0154.

  11. The Mental Activity and eXercise (MAX) trial: Effects on physical function and quality of life among older adults with cognitive complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Laura E; Ventura, Maria I; Santos-Modesitt, Wendy; Poelke, Gina; Yaffe, Kristine; Barnes, Deborah E

    2017-10-21

    Older adults with cognitive complaints are vulnerable to dementia, physical impairments, and poor quality of life. Exercise and mental activity may improve physical function and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) but combinations have not been investigated systematically. The Mental Activity and eXercise (MAX) trial found that mental activity plus exercise over 12weeks improved cognitive function (primary outcome) in sedentary older adults with cognitive complaints. To investigate the effects of combinations of two mental activity and exercise programs on physical function and HRQOL (secondary outcomes). Participants (n=126, age 73±6years, 65% women) were randomized to 12weeks of exercise (aerobic exercise or stretching/toning, 3×60min/week) plus mental activity (computer-based cognitive training or educational DVDs, 3×60min/week) using a factorial design. Assessments included the Senior Fitness Test (physical function), Short Form-12 physical and mental sub-scales (HRQOL), and CHAMPS questionnaire (physical activity). There were no differences between groups at baseline (p>0.05). We observed improvements over time in most physical function measures [chair stands (p-for-time=0.001), arm curls (p-for-time0.05). Changes in most physical function measures and physical HRQOL correlated with physical activity changes. Combined mental activity and exercise interventions of various types can improve both physical function and physical HRQOL among sedentary older adults with cognitive complaints. Exercise control group design should be carefully considered as even light exercise may induce benefits in vulnerable older adults. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. The Relationship Between Approach to Activity Engagement, Specific Aspects of Physical Function, and Pain Duration in Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Nicole E; Strong, Jenny; Meredith, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    To examine: (1) the relationships between habitual approach to activity engagement and specific aspects of physical functioning in chronic pain; and (2) whether or not these relationships differ according to pain duration. Outpatients (N=169) with generalized chronic pain completed a set of written questionnaires. Categories of "approach to activity engagement" were created using the confronting and avoidance subscales of the Pain and Activity Relations Questionnaire. An interaction term between "approach to activity engagement" categories and pain duration was entered into analysis with age, sex, pain intensity, the categorical "approach to activity engagement" variable, and pain duration, in 9 ordinal regression models investigating functioning in a variety of daily activities. The "approach to activity engagement" category predicted the personal care, lifting, sleeping, social life, and traveling aspects of physical functioning but, interestingly, not the performance skills used during these activities, that is, walking, sitting, and standing. The interaction term was significant in 2 models; however, the effect of pain duration on associations was the inverse of that theorized, with the relationship between variables becoming less pronounced with increasing duration of pain. The results of this study do not support the commonly held notion that avoidance and/or overactivity behavior leads to deconditioning and reduced physical capacity over time. Findings do, however, suggest that a relationship exists between avoidance and/or overactivity behavior and reduced participation in activities. Implications for the clinical management of chronic pain and directions for further research are discussed.

  13. Physical function and muscle strength in sporadic inclusion body myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Anders N; Aagaard, Per; Nielsen, Jakob L; Christiansen, Mette; Hvid, Lars G; Frandsen, Ulrik; Diederichsen, Louise P

    2017-12-01

    In this study, self-reported physical function, functional capacity, and isolated muscle function were investigated in sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM) patients. The 36-item Short Form (SF-36) Health Survey and 2-min walk test (2MWT), timed up & go test (TUG), and 30-s chair stand performance were evaluated. In addition, patients were tested for knee extensor muscle strength (isokinetic dynamometer) and leg extension power (Nottingham power rig). TUG performance was the strongest predictor of self-reported physical function (r2 = 0.56, P function in sIBM patients. Notably, between-limb asymmetry in lower limb muscle strength had a substantial negative impact on motor tasks involving gait function. Muscle Nerve 56: E50-E58, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Physical activity and obesity in endometrial cancer survivors: associations with pain, fatigue, and physical functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basen-Engquist, Karen; Scruggs, Stacie; Jhingran, Anuja; Bodurka, Diane C; Lu, Karen; Ramondetta, Lois; Hughes, Daniel; Carmack Taylor, Cindy

    2009-03-01

    This study aims to determine the prevalence of physical activity and obesity and their relationship to physical functioning (PF), fatigue, and pain in endometrial cancer survivors. Surveys were mailed to 200 survivors of endometrial cancer diagnosed within the last 5 years; 61% were returned. Surveys assessed physical activity, height and weight, comorbid health problems, PF, fatigue, and pain. In all, 22% exercised in the past month at the level of current public health recommendations, 41% reported no physical activity, and 38% reported some activity. A total of 16% were overweight and 50% were obese. Both lower body mass index (BMI) and higher physical activity were related to better PF. Higher physical activity was related to less fatigue, primarily for patients of normal BMI. Results suggest endometrial cancer survivors' obesity and inactivity contributes to poorer quality of life. This population could benefit from quality-of-life interventions incorporating physical activity.

  15. Hand-related physical function in rheumatic hand conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokker, Louise; Terwee, Caroline B; Wæhrens, Eva Ejlersen

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is no consensus about what constitutes the most appropriate patient-reported outcome measurement (PROM) instrument for measuring physical function in patients with rheumatic hand conditions. Existing instruments lack psychometric testing and vary in feasibility and their psych......INTRODUCTION: There is no consensus about what constitutes the most appropriate patient-reported outcome measurement (PROM) instrument for measuring physical function in patients with rheumatic hand conditions. Existing instruments lack psychometric testing and vary in feasibility...... and their psychometric qualities. We aim to develop a PROM instrument to assess hand-related physical function in rheumatic hand conditions. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will perform a systematic search to identify existing PROMs to rheumatic hand conditions, and select items relevant for hand-related physical function...... as well as those items from the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Physical Function (PF) item bank that are relevant to patients with rheumatic hand conditions. Selection will be based on consensus among reviewers. Content validity of selected items will be established...

  16. [Convalescence and decline in physical function level following intensive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, J.B.; Moller, K.; Perner, A.

    2009-01-01

    More patients survive critical illness, which emphasises the need to assess outcome measures other than mortality. A prolonged decline in physical function is frequently observed after discharge in the critically ill. Neuromuscular dysfunction and muscle atrophy incurred during intensive care may...... prolong convalescence after discharge. Thus, strategies to counteract neuromuscular dysfunction and to improve physical outcome may reduce the overall burden of critical illness. This review describes the most common predisposing factors and discusses preventative measures and interventions Udgivelsesdato...

  17. Exploring measurement invariance by gender in the profile of mood states depression subscale among cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihye; Smith, Tenbroeck

    2017-01-01

    The Profile of Mood States-Short Form (POMS-SF) is a well-validated tool commonly used in medical/clinical research. Less attention has been paid to the measurement invariance of the POMS-the degree to which the structure and items behave similarly for different groups (e.g., women and men). This study investigated the measurement invariance of the POMS Depression subscale across gender groups in a sample of cancer survivors. The POMS Depression subscale has 8 items (Unhappy, Sad, Blue, Hopeless, Discouraged, Miserable, Helpless, and Worthless). Invariance was measured using multigroup confirmatory factor analysis. This study used data from American Cancer Society Studies of Cancer Survivors-II, a population-based survey of adult cancer survivors (n = 9170). We found factor structures and factor loadings were invariant for gender groups, but moderate differential item functioning (DIF) in the question containing the word blue. With regard to cancer survivors' gender, we found the Depression subscale of the POMS-SF had configural invariance, and partial metric and scalar invariance. This suggests that results should be interpreted with caution, especially when gender is considered important. More broadly, our finding suggests that questions with the word blue may introduce DIF into other measures of depressive mood. More research is needed to replicate these findings in other samples and with other instruments.

  18. Functional fitness of older women performing physical activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Rosane Bertoldo Benedetti

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Aging is a natural and progressive process and physical activities have been indi-cated as a possibility to minimize its impact and, especially, to maintain the functional capacity of older adults for a longer period of time. The objective of the present study was to analyze modifications in the General Functional Fitness Index (GFFI in older adults participating in a physical activity program for a period of 10 months and to associate the results with different age strata, duration of participation in the program and modifications in physical fitness. The study was conducted on 225 older women (mean age: 69.26, sd=5.685, participating in the Physical Activity and Folk Dance Program for The Elderly of the Sports Center, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina. Descriptive statistics, Student t-test and analysis of variance (ANOVA were used for analysis of the data. A significant difference (p< 0.01 in GFFI and in the variables agility/balance and coordination (p< 0.01 was observed between March and December 2005. Strength (p=0.323, resistance (p=0,946 and flexibility (p=0.722 did not differ significantly during the period analyzed. In addition, the group performing physical activity for more than 10 years and the group older than 80 years presented the best GFFI in the assessments. Physical activity for older adults might be an important factor to improve and/or maintain functional fitness during the process of aging.

  19. Description and Operation of the A3 Subscale Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, G. P.; Varner, D. G.; Grover, J. B.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the general design and operation of the A3 Subscale test facility. The goal is to provide the reader with a general understanding of what the major facility systems are, where they are located, and how they are used to meet the objectives supporting the design of the A3 altitude rocket test facility. This paper also provides the reader with the background information prior to reading the subsequent papers detailing the design and test results of the various systems described herein.

  20. Association of physical activity with the visuospatial/executive functions of the montreal cognitive assessment in patients with vascular cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Masafumi; Okamoto, Yoko; Hase, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Ryosuke

    2013-10-01

    The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) is more suitable than the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) for the detection of vascular cognitive impairment. In this study, we performed a correlation analysis of MoCA/MMSE scores with daily physical activity in patients with subcortical ischemic white matter changes. Ten patients (average 75.9 ± 9.1 years old) with extensive leukoaraiosis detected on magnetic resonance imaging underwent cognitive testing, including the MMSE and the Japanese version of the MoCA (MoCA-J). Physical activity was monitored with the Kenz Lifecorder EX device (Suzuken, Nagoya, Japan) to assess daily physical activity in terms of caloric expenditure, motor activity, number of steps, and walking distance for 6 months. Correlations of individual physical activity with total and subscale scores of MMSE/MoCA-J or 6-month interval change of MoCA-J scores were assessed. The total or subscale scores of the MMSE did not correlate with any parameters of physical activity. However, the mean number of steps and walking distance significantly correlated with the total MoCA-J scores (r = .67 and .64, respectively) and its visuospatial/executive subscores (r = .66 and .66, respectively). The mean interval change of MoCA-J was + .6; those who improved number of steps (n = 4; 80.5 ± 3.0 years of age) had significantly preserved MoCA-J scores compared to those who did not (n = 6; 73.0 ± 11.6 years of age; +2.0 versus - .3; P = .016). These results suggest that MoCA is useful to detect a biologically determined specific relationship between physical activity and executive function. In addition, physical exercise, such as walking, may help enhance cognitive function in patients with vascular cognitive impairment of subcortical origin. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Childhood depression subscales using repeated sessions on Children's Depression Rating Scale - revised (CDRS-R) scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isa, Ameena; Bernstein, Ira; Trivedi, Madhukar; Mayes, Taryn; Kennard, Betsy; Emslie, Graham

    2014-08-01

    Although acute treatments have been shown to be effective in treating early-onset depression, only one-third or thereabouts reach a remission within 3 months. Unfortunately, delayed time to remission in early-onset depression leads to poorer therapeutic outcomes. Clearly, there is a need to identify, diagnose, and provide effective treatment of a depressed patient quickly. A sophisticated understanding of depression subscales and their change over time with treatment could enhance pathways to individualized treatment approaches for childhood depression. Previous studies have found that the clinician-measured instrument, Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised (CDRS-R) measures multiple subscales (or components) of depression. The aim of this study was to see how these subscales may change over the course of a 12-week study. This knowledge will help determine if dimensions/subscales of childhood depression (paralleling the adult literature) using the subscales derived from factor analysis procedure is useful. We examined two clinical trials in which youth (n=234) with major depressive disorder (MDD) were treated openly with fluoxetine for eight sessions spread over 12 weeks. The CDRS-R was completed based on clinician interviews with parent and child at each session. Classical test theory and component analysis with associated parallel analysis (oblique rotation) were conducted on each week's scores. Although more factors were needed for the baseline and first two therapy sessions, a two-factor solution sufficed thereafter. Depressed facial affect, listless speech, and hypoactivity best defined Factor I, whereas sleep problems, appetite disturbance, physical symptoms, irritability, guilt, and weeping best defined Factor II. All other symptoms cross-loaded almost equally on the two factors. The scale's reliability (internal consistency) improved from baseline to exit sessions (α=0.65-0.91). As a result, the clinicians' assessments of the various symptoms became

  2. Acute effect of a physical exercise session on cognitive functioning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In sport, physical activity (PA) and life in general, cognitive functioning plays a very important role in decision-making and performance. This study investigated whether the relationship between acute exercise and cognitive performance was beneficial and if there was a difference in this relationship between moderately ...

  3. Physical activity and sexual function in middle-aged women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Uchôa Leitão Cabral

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the relationship between physical activity level and sexual function in middle-aged women. Methods A cross-sectional study with a sample of 370 middle-aged women (40-65 years old, treated at public health care facilities in a Brazilian city. A questionnaire was used containing enquiries on sociodemographic, clinical and behavioral characteristics: the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ, short form, and the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI. Results The average age of the women studied was 49.8 years (± 8.1, 67% of whom exhibited sexual dysfunction (FSFI ≤ 26.55. Sedentary women had a higher prevalence (78.9% of sexual dysfunction when compared to active (57.6% and moderately active (66.7% females (p = 0.002. Physically active women obtained higher score in all FSFI domains (desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction and pain and total FSFI score (20.9, indicating better sexual function than their moderately active (18.8 and sedentary (15.6 counterparts (p <0.05. Conclusion Physical activity appears to influence sexual function positively in middle-aged women.

  4. Sensorimotor peripheral nerve function and physical activity in older men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange-Maia, B. S.; Cauley, J A; Newman, Anne B

    2016-01-01

    We determined whether sensorimotor peripheral nerve (PN) function was associated with physical activity (PA) in older men. The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study Pittsburgh, PA, site (n = 328, age 78.8 ± 4.7 years) conducted PN testing, including: peroneal motor and sural sensory nerve conduction...

  5. Physical, functional and amylograph pasting properties of cocoyam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four composite flours prepared by combining cooked cocoyam cormels, cooked soybeans, and dried crayfish in the ratios 80:15:5. 70:25:5, 60:35:5. 50:45:5 were analyzed for selected physical and functional properties. The composite flours were reconstituted into pastes and the relative viscosities of the pastes determined.

  6. Comparison of Functional Disability with Physical Activity in Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of functional disabilities and physical activity in patients with low back pain (LBP) and apparently healthy individuals (AHI).Oswestry Low back Pain disability questionnaire was administered to thirty five (35) subjects drawn from 3 various health facilities in Lagos State.

  7. Physical Activity Level, Nutritional Intake, Functional Status and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Participation in physical activity (PA) and healthy nutrition are important factors that affects muscle and bone strength and the resultant functioning in the activities of daily living (ADL) skills including the overall quality of life (QoL) of geriatric individuals. However, the relationships between all these parameters ...

  8. Structural, physical, functional and nutraceutical changes of freeze ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review examines the structural, physical, functional and nutraceutical changes of lyophilized fruits. Collapse, porosity, color, glass transition temperature, rehydration capacity, ability to retain water, volatile compounds, phenolic compounds, ascorbic acid, and beta-carotene, were defined, and the causes of changes in ...

  9. Physical and cognitive functioning of people older than 90 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; Thinggaard, Mikael; Oksuzyan, Anna

    2013-01-01

    A rapidly increasing proportion of people in high-income countries are surviving into their tenth decade. Concern is widespread that the basis for this development is the survival of frail and disabled elderly people into very old age. To investigate this issue, we compared the cognitive and phys...... and physical functioning of two cohorts of Danish nonagenarians, born 10 years apart....

  10. Physical activity unveils the relationship between mitochondrial energetics, muscle quality, and physical function in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distefano, Giovanna; Standley, Robert A; Zhang, Xiaolei; Carnero, Elvis A; Yi, Fanchao; Cornnell, Heather H; Coen, Paul M

    2018-01-24

    The concept of mitochondrial dysfunction in ageing muscle is highly controversial. In addition, emerging evidence suggests that reduced muscle oxidative capacity and efficiency underlie the aetiology of mobility loss in older adults. Here, we hypothesized that studying well-phenotyped older cohorts across a wide range of physical activity would unveil a range of mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle and in turn allow us to more clearly examine the impact of age per se on mitochondrial energetics. This also enabled us to more clearly define the relationships between mitochondrial energetics and muscle lipid content with clinically relevant assessments of muscle and physical function. Thirty-nine volunteers were recruited to the following study groups: young active (YA, n = 2 women/8 men, age = 31.2 ± 5.4 years), older active (OA, n = 2 women/8 men, age = 67.5 ± 2.7 years), and older sedentary (OS, n = 8 women/11 men, age = 70.7 ± 4.7 years). Participants completed a graded exercise test to determine fitness (VO 2 peak), a submaximal exercise test to determine exercise efficiency, and daily physical activity was recorded using a tri-axial armband accelerometer. Mitochondrial energetics were determined by (i) 31 P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and (ii) respirometry of fibre bundles from vastus lateralis biopsies. Quadriceps function was assessed by isokinetic dynamometry and physical function by the short physical performance battery and stair climb test. Daily physical activity energy expenditure was significantly lower in OS, compared with YA and OA groups. Despite fitness being higher in YA compared with OA and OS, mitochondrial respiration, maximum mitochondrial capacity, Maximal ATP production/Oxygen consumption (P/O) ratio, and exercise efficiency were similar in YA and OA groups and were significantly lower in OS. P/O ratio was correlated with exercise efficiency. Time to complete the stair climb and repeated chair stand tests were

  11. Statins, mood, sleep, and physical function: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiger, Kristopher J; Manalac, Raoul J; Blaha, Michael J; Blumenthal, Roger S; Martin, Seth S

    2014-12-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effects of statins on mood, sleep, and physical function. We performed a systematic computer-aided search of MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register and augmented this search by scrutinizing reference lists and making inquiries among colleagues and experts in the field. All patient populations and study types were considered. We selected studies of statin therapy compared with no statin or placebo. Outcome measures included mood, sleep, and physical function. Thirty-four studies were included in qualitative synthesis. Seven of eight (88 %) observational studies, 4/6 (66 %) randomized trials with mood as a primary endpoint (487 total participants; exposure 4 weeks to 1 year), and 3/3 (100 %) randomized trials with mood as a secondary endpoint (2,851 total participants; exposure 1-4 years) were not compatible with a negative mood effect of statins. Comparatively, fewer studies examined statin effects on sleep and physical function. Studies reporting negative effects contained potential sources of bias, including multiple testing or lack of adjustment for confounders in observational studies, and failure to prespecify outcomes or report blinding in trials. A limited body of available evidence is most compatible with no adverse effect of statins on quality of life measures, namely, mood, sleep, and physical function. Studies suggesting such effects suffer from an increased risk of bias. High-quality, prospective, and adequately powered studies are needed, especially in the domains of sleep and physical function, with careful attention to patients who may be most vulnerable to adverse effects.

  12. Physical exercises, functional capacity and depressive symptoms in Brazilian elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Manuela Crispim Nascimento

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of our study was to investigate the effects of 16 weeks of multimodal exercise on functional capacity components, general functional fitness and depressive symptoms in the elderly. Fifty-five elderly (67.3 ± 5.8 years participated inthe study. The groups were distributed according to the participation on the proposed protocol: a trained group (TG composed of 27 participants who attended at least 75% of the total generalized physical exercise sessions for16 weeks; and b control group (CG, participants who did not attend any regular physical activity program. Functional capacity was assessed using theAAHPERD battery of motor tests for elderly, which consists of five tests: coordination, flexibility, muscular resistance, agility/dynamic balance, and overall aerobic endurance. Depressive symptoms were measured using the short version of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15. The results showed that elderly on TG had better performance on motor tests. Depressive symptoms did not change for both groups. Thus, our results indicate that 16 weeks is sufficient to improve general functional fitness in elderly, while those who remain sedentary tend to decrease their overall physical fitness. The proposed program could not induce significant changes in the elderly with low levels ofdepressive symptoms reported for this variable. The evidence of this study allows the prediction that a generalized program can help prevent chronic diseases, reduce functional decline and produce positive effects on quality oflife.

  13. The physical characteristics of human proteins in different biological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tengjiao; Tang, Hailin

    2017-01-01

    The physical properties of gene products are the foundation of their biological functions. In this study, we systematically explored relationships between physical properties and biological functions. The physical properties including origin time, evolution pressure, mRNA and protein stability, molecular weight, hydrophobicity, acidity/alkaline, amino acid compositions, and chromosome location. The biological functions are defined from 4 aspects: biological process, molecular function, cellular component and cell/tissue/organ expression. We found that the proteins associated with basic material and energy metabolism process originated earlier, while the proteins associated with immune, neurological system process etc. originated later. Tissues may have a strong influence on evolution pressure. The proteins associated with energy metabolism are double-stable. Immune and peripheral cell proteins tend to be mRNA stable/protein unstable. There are very few function items with double-unstable of mRNA and protein. The proteins involved in the cell adhesion tend to consist of large proteins with high proportion of small amino acids. The proteins of organic acid transport, neurological system process and amine transport have significantly high hydrophobicity. Interestingly, the proteins involved in olfactory receptor activity tend to have high frequency of aromatic, sulfuric and hydroxyl amino acids.

  14. "Prehabilitation" prior to CABG surgery improves physical functioning and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furze, Gill; Dumville, Jo C; Miles, Jeremy N V; Irvine, Karen; Thompson, David R; Lewin, Robert J P

    2009-02-06

    Many patients demonstrate psychological distress and reduced physical activity before coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). Here we evaluated the addition of a brief, cognitive-behavioural intervention (the HeartOp Programme) to routine nurse counselling for people waiting for CABG surgery. Randomised controlled trial comparing nurse counselling with the HeartOp programme to routine nurse counselling in 204 patients awaiting first time elective CABG. Primary outcome measures were: anxiety and length of hospital stay; secondary outcome measures were: depression, physical functioning, cardiac misconceptions and cost utility. Measures were collected prior to randomisation and after 8 weeks of their intervention prior to surgery, excepting length of hospital stay which was collected after discharge following surgery. 100 patients were randomised to intervention, 104 to control. At follow-up there were no differences in anxiety or length of hospital stay. There were significant differences in depression (difference=7.79, p=0.008, 95% CI=2.04-13.54), physical functioning (difference=0.82, p=0.001, 95%CI=0.34-1.3) and cardiac misconceptions (difference=2.56, pmisconceptions. The HeartOp Programme was found to have an Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratio (ICER) of pound 288.83 per Quality-Adjusted Life Year. Nurse counselling with the HeartOp Programme reduces depression and cardiac misconceptions and improves physical functioning before bypass surgery significantly more than nurse counselling alone and meets the accepted criteria for cost efficacy.

  15. Home environmental problems and physical function in Taiwanese older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Tzuo-Yun; Wu, Shwu-Chong; Chang, Wen-Chiung; Chen, Ching-Yu

    2009-01-01

    Environmental hazards play an important role in the disablement process. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between home environmental problems and personal physical function. Data were based on a two-stage nationwide survey and evaluation on the needs of long-term care in Taiwan. A total of 10,596 individuals aged 65 and over were included in this study. These participants were identified with physical or cognitive problems at the screening interview and further evaluated at the second interview on health condition, functional status, needs of long-term care, and home environmental problems. Six items of environmental hazards were assessed at the participants' homes with direct observation. The prevalence rates of home environmental problems were similar among older adults with different levels of physical function. No grab bars (79.6-85.1%) and no protections against slip (81.9-92.8%) in the bathroom were two commonly present hazards in older adults' homes. Older adults with a higher income (Odds ratio=OR=0.75), without income information (OR=0.78) or living with other persons (OR=0.74) were less likely to experience environmental problems at home. Results from this study revealed that home environment condition was associated with factors other than personal disabling conditions for the elderly. Modifying home environment, especially the bathroom, should be attached with great importance for physically disabled older adults.

  16. Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI-3) subscales predict unique variance in anxiety and depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olthuis, Janine V; Watt, Margo C; Stewart, Sherry H

    2014-03-01

    Anxiety sensitivity (AS) has been implicated in the development and maintenance of a range of mental health problems. The development of the Anxiety Sensitivity Index - 3, a psychometrically sound index of AS, has provided the opportunity to better understand how the lower-order factors of AS - physical, psychological, and social concerns - are associated with unique forms of psychopathology. The present study investigated these associations among 85 treatment-seeking adults with high AS. Participants completed measures of AS, anxiety, and depression. Multiple regression analyses controlling for other emotional disorder symptoms revealed unique associations between AS subscales and certain types of psychopathology. Only physical concerns predicted unique variance in panic, only cognitive concerns predicted unique variance in depressive symptoms, and social anxiety was predicted by only social concerns. Findings emphasize the importance of considering the multidimensional nature of AS in understanding its role in anxiety and depression and their treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Impairments that Influence Physical Function among Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen L. Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Children treated for cancer are at increased risk of developing chronic health conditions, some of which may manifest during or soon after treatment while others emerge many years after therapy. These health problems may limit physical performance and functional capacity, interfering with participation in work, social, and recreational activities. In this review, we discuss treatment-induced impairments in the endocrine, musculoskeletal, neurological, and cardiopulmonary systems and their influence on mobility and physical function. We found that cranial radiation at a young age was associated with a broad range of chronic conditions including obesity, short stature, low bone mineral density and neuromotor impairments. Anthracyclines and chest radiation are associated with both short and long-term cardiotoxicity. Although numerous chronic conditions are documented among individuals treated for childhood cancer, the impact of these conditions on mobility and function are not well characterized, with most studies limited to survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and brain tumors. Moving forward, further research assessing the impact of chronic conditions on participation in work and social activities is required. Moreover, interventions to prevent or ameliorate the loss of physical function among children treated for cancer are likely to become an important area of survivorship research.

  18. Precipitous Dehydroepiandrosterone Declines Reflect Decreased Physical Vitality and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendina, Danielle N; Ryff, Carol D; Coe, Christopher L

    2017-06-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfated form, DHEA-S, peak in young adulthood and then decrease dramatically with age. However, there is extensive variation in this age-related hormone decline, suggesting an early decrement may be associated with lower vitality and be prognostic of poor health in old age. To determine whether DHEA-S and DHEA are correlated with physical indices of vitality, hormone levels were analyzed with respect to clinical health histories, physical functioning including grip strength, gait speed and repetitive standing, and self-reported chronic pain. The participants (N = 1,214) were 35-86 years of age from a nationally representative survey, Midlife Development in the United States. DHEA-S and DHEA below age-expected levels were associated with more chronic illness conditions and self-reported persistent pain and pain sensitivity upon manual palpation. Additionally, lower DHEA-S and DHEA correlated with poorer performance on tests of physical functioning by middle age suggesting a more precipitous decline is already indicative of reduced vigor and physical strength. When considered with respect to age- and gender-typical norms, larger decrements in DHEA-S and DHEA may be causally related to the loss of physical vitality. Conversely, when hormone secretion is sustained in older adults, it conveys reduced risk for the physical weakness and ailments that precede frailty. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Organizational member involvement in physical activity coalitions across the United States: development and testing of a novel survey instrument for assessing coalition functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Daniel B; Pate, Russell R; Beets, Michael W; Saunders, Ruth P; Blair, Steven N

    2015-06-01

    Coalitions are often composed of member organizations. Member involvement is thought to be associated with coalition success. No instrument currently exists for evaluating organizational member involvement in physical activity coalitions. This study aimed to develop a survey instrument for evaluating organizational member involvement in physical activity coalitions. The study was carried out in three phases: (a) developing a draft survey, (b) assessing the content validity of the draft survey, and (c) assessing the underlying factor structure, reliability, and validity of the survey. A cross-sectional design was employed. In Phase 1, a team of experts in survey development produced a draft survey. In Phase 2, the content validity of the draft survey was evaluated by a panel of individuals with expertise in physical activity coalitions. In Phase 3, the survey was administered to 120 individuals on local-, state-, and national-level physical activity coalitions. Responses were subjected to an exploratory factor analysis in order to determine the survey's underlying factor structure, reliability, and validity. Phases 1 and 2yielded a survey instrument with demonstrated content validity. Phase 3 yielded a three-factor model with three subscales: Strategic Alignment, Organizational Alignment, and Providing Input. Each subscale demonstrated high internal consistency reliability and construct validity. The survey instrument developed here demonstrated sound psychometric properties and provides new insight into organizational member involvement in physical activity coalitions. This instrument may be an important tool in developing a more complete picture of coalition functioning in physical activity coalitions specifically and health-based coalitions overall. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  20. Additional applications of the Lambert W function in physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houari, Ahmed

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, using the Lambert W function, I derive closed-form analytical expressions for the decay constant of an exponentially decaying process and the time constant of a process subject to a linear resistive force. Similarly, I derive closed-form analytical formulae for the electrical resistivity of a metal and the temperature of a thermionic emitter material. Besides their theoretical importance, the results obtained will be of interest to teachers involved in undergraduate physics experiments.

  1. Physical and functional properties of breakfast cereals from maize ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results revealed the following ranges of physical and functional properties; pH (4.70- 6.56), bulk density (0.29 - 0.71g/ml), water absorption capacity (68.31- 76.39%), oil absorption capacity (0.87- 1.32%), foam capacity (2.48- 3.49%), viscosity (19.73-31.08%), gelation temperature (121-157°C), emulsification capacity ...

  2. Women with knee osteoarthritis have more pain and poorer function than men, but similar physical activity prior to total knee replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonelli Shalome M

    2011-11-01

    duration, pain catastrophizing, body mass index (BMI, and heat pain threshold; and (3 physical activity (average metabolic equivalent tasks (METS/day were BMI, age, Short-Form 36 (SF-36 Physical Function, Kellgren-Lawrence osteoarthritis grade, depression, and Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS pain subscale. Conclusions Women continue to be as physically active as men prior to total knee replacement even though they have significantly more pain, greater pain sensitivity, poorer perceived function, and more impairment on specific functional tasks.

  3. Effects of an Oral Nutritional Supplementation Plus Physical Exercise Intervention on the Physical Function, Nutritional Status, and Quality of Life in Frail Institutionalized Older Adults: The ACTIVNES Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abizanda, Pedro; López, Mateo Díez; García, Victoria Pérez; Estrella, Juan de Dios; da Silva González, Álvaro; Vilardell, Núria Barcons; Torres, Krysmarú Araujo

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effects of a hyperproteic, hypercaloric oral nutritional supplement with prebiotic fiber, vitamin D, and calcium, plus a standardized physical intervention, in the functional status, strength, nutritional status, and quality of life of frail institutionalized older adults. Multicentric prospective observational study under usual clinical practice conditions. Four nursing homes from Burgos (2), Albacete, and Madrid, Spain. Participants included 91 institutionalized older adults (age ≥70), able to walk 50 m, and meeting at least 3 of the Fried frailty phenotype criteria. Daily intake of two 200-mL bottles of an oral nutritional supplement, each bottle containing 300 kcal, 20 g protein, 3 g fiber, 500 IU vitamin D, and 480 mg calcium, plus a standardized physical exercise training consisting of flexibility, balance, and strengthening exercises for arms and legs, 5 days per week. Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), Short-Form-Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument (SF-LLFDI) function subscale, handgrip strength, EuroQoL-5 Dimensions visual analogic scale (EQ5DVAS), weight, body mass index (BMI), and Short-Form Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA-SF) at baseline and 6 and 12 weeks. Forty-eight participants (52.7%) improved at least 1 point in the SPPB at week 6, and 44 (48.4%) did so at week 12; 39 participants (42.9%) improved at least 2 points in the SF-LLFDI at week 6, and 46 (50.5%) at week 12. Participants improved their quality of life measured with the EQ5DVAS by 6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 3%-10%) at week 6, and by 5% (95% CI 0%-10%) at week 12. They also improved their nutritional status (weight gain, BMI increase, and higher MNA-SF scores at 6- and 12-week follow-up). This improvement was higher in participants with more frailty criteria, lower functional level, lower vitamin D levels, and poorer nutritional status. A 12-week intervention with oral nutritional supplementation plus physical

  4. Relationship between physical functioning and physical activity in the lifestyle interventions and independence for elders pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalé-Rush, Angela; Guralnik, Jack M; Walkup, Michael P; Miller, Michael E; Rejeski, W Jack; Katula, Jeffrey A; King, Abby C; Glynn, Nancy W; Manini, Todd M; Blair, Steven N; Fielding, Roger A

    2010-10-01

    To determine whether participation in usual moderate-intensity or more-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) is associated with physical function performance and to identify sociodemographic, psychosocial, and disease-related covariates that may also compromise physical function performance. Cross-sectional analysis of baseline variables of a randomized controlled intervention trial. Four academic research centers. Four hundred twenty-four older adults aged 70 to 89 at risk for mobility disability (scoring Physical Performance Battery (SPPB)) and able to complete the 400-m walk test within 15 minutes. Minutes of MVPA (dichotomized according to above or below 150 min/wk of MVPA) assessed according to the Community Healthy Activities Model Program for Seniors questionnaire, SPPB score, 400-m walk test, sex, body mass index (BMI), depressive symptoms, age, and number of medications. The SPPB summary score was associated with minutes of MVPA (ρ=0.16, P=.001). In multiple regression analyses, age, minutes of MVPA, number of medications, and depressive symptoms were associated with performance on the composite SPPB (Pperformance on the 400-m walk test (Pphysical function performance and should all be taken into consideration in the prevention of mobility disability. © 2010, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2010, The American Geriatrics Society.

  5. The Mechanical Performance of Subscale Candidate Elastomer Docking Seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastrzyk, Marta B.; Daniels, Christopher C.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is developing a Low Impact Docking System (LIDS) for future exploration missions. The mechanism is a new state-of-the-art device for in-space assembly of structures and rendezvous of vehicles. At the interface between two pressurized modules, each with a version of the LIDS attached, a composite elastomer-metal seal assembly prevents the breathable air from escaping into the vacuum of space. Attached to the active LIDS, this seal mates against the passive LIDS during docking operation. The main interface seal assembly must exhibit low leak and outgas values, must be able to withstand various harsh space environments, must remain operational over a range of temperatures from -50 C to 75 C, and perform after numerous docking cycles. This paper presents results from a comprehensive study of the mechanical performance of four candidate subscale seal assembly designs at -50, 23, 50, and 75 C test temperatures. In particular, the force required to fully compress the seal during docking, and that which is required for separation during the undocking operation were measured. The height of subscale main interface seal bulbs, as well as the test temperature, were shown to have a significant effect on the forces the main interface seal of the LIDS may experience during docking and undocking operations. The average force values required to fully compress each of the seal assemblies were shown to increase with test temperature by approximately 50% from -50 to 75 C. Also, the required compression forces were shown to increase as the height of the seal bulb was increased. The seal design with the tallest elastomer seal bulb, which was 31% taller than that with the shortest bulb, required force values approximately 45% higher than those for the shortest bulb, independent of the test temperature. The force required to separate the seal was shown to increase with decreasing temperature after 15 hours of simulated docking. No adhesion

  6. Associations between executive function and physical function poststroke: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Sara; Donnellan, Claire; Stokes, Emma

    2013-06-01

    Associations between executive function and physical function poststroke have not been extensively studied. More complex physiotherapy interventions poststroke require a greater degree of cognitive ability, especially executive function. This pilot study aimed to inform the methodology of a larger study by examining the associations between executive function and the performance of basic and complex gait tasks in people poststroke. A cross-sectional pilot study was conducted in a convenience sample of 20 participants recruited from a community-based voluntary stroke organisation and from the outpatient services of two urban hospitals. A battery of tests was used to measure executive function (Trail Making Test, Stroop Word-Colour Test, Zoo Map test, Frontal Assessment Battery and Digit Span backward test). Basic and complex 10metre gait tests were used to mimic aspects of physiotherapy intervention poststroke. Other measures included the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the Motor Assessment Scale (MAS). Observational comparisons between participant executive function scores and age- and/or education-matched normative data demonstrated that executive dysfunction ranged between 55% and 100%. Poorer performance in measures of executive function was more frequently associated with poorer performance in complex gait tests compared with basic gait tests. The MAS was not significantly associated with any measure of executive function. Executive dysfunction is a common sequel poststroke which may negatively affect physical performance. Physiotherapists should consider executive dysfunction when developing rehabilitation strategies to improve physical function poststroke. Copyright © 2012 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of functional physical activity on the maintenance of motor function in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laís Fajersztajn

    Full Text Available Abstract It is widely known that older adults, even frail individuals, can improve their physical function using appropriately targeted exercise. Nevertheless, older adults with Alzheimer's disease (AD have been excluded from the majority of studies on exercise. The functional-task physical activity program is based on activities of daily living, and may be suited for elderly people with AD because it focuses on the maintenance and stimulation of preserved abilities. In addition, session costs are substantially reduced by adopting a group approach. Furthermore, the group approach may improve the social interaction of the demented patient. Objectives: To determine whether a functional-task physical activity program in groups can maintain motor function in elderly with AD. Methods: 10 elderly diagnosed with mild or moderate AD were assigned into one of two groups: subjects with and without intervention. The intervention consisted of a 12-week function-task physical activity program in groups. Measurements: activities of daily living (Katz and Lawton & Brody questionnaires, mobility (Timed Up and Go Test, Timed Up and Go manual Test and Timed Up and Go Cognitive Test, cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination, behavioral disturbances (Neuropsychiatric Inventory I-brief and functional balance (Berg Balance Scale. Results: A statistically significant difference between the two groups was found regarding the functional balance mean change measured by Berg scale score (p=0.046. A significant improvement of 1.60 points (95%CI[0.22;2.98] was observed in the intervention group on this scale, while the non-intervention group showed -0.40 points (95%CI[-1.78;0.98], no change. Conclusions: It is possible to treat mild and moderate Alzheimer's patients using a group approach. The functional task physical activity program was efficient in functional balance improvement and also appeared to prevent mobility decline.

  8. Perceived effort of walking: relationship with gait, physical function and activity, fear of falling, and confidence in walking in older adults with mobility limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julius, Leslie M; Brach, Jennifer S; Wert, David M; VanSwearingen, Jessie M

    2012-10-01

    Although clinicians have a number of measures to use to describe walking performance, few, if any, of the measures capture a person's perceived effort in walking. Perceived effort of walking may be a factor in what a person does versus what he or she is able to do. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship of perceived effort of walking with gait, function, activity, fear of falling, and confidence in walking in older adults with mobility limitations. Design This investigation was a cross-sectional, descriptive, relational study. The study took place at a clinical research training center. The participants were 50 older adults (mean age=76.8 years, SD=5.5) with mobility limitations. The measurements used were the Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) for walking; gait speed; the Modified Gait Abnormality Rating Scale; energy cost of walking; Late Life Function and Disability Instrument (LLFDI) for total, basic, and advanced lower-extremity function and for disability limitations; activity and restriction subscales of the Survey of Activities and Fear of Falling in the Elderly (SAFFE); activity counts; SAFFE fear subscale; and Gait Efficacy Scale (GES). The relationship of the RPE of walking with gait, function, activity, fear, and confidence was determined by using Spearman rank order coefficients and an analysis of variance (adjusted for age and sex) for mean differences between groups defined by no exertion during walking and some exertion during walking. The RPE was related to confidence in walking (GES, R=-.326, P=.021) and activity (activity counts, R=.295, P=.044). The RPE groups (no exertion versus some exertion) differed in LLFDI scores for total (57.9 versus 53.2), basic (68.6 versus 61.4), and advanced (49.1 versus 42.6) lower-extremity function; LLFDI scores for disability limitations (74.9 versus 67.5); SAFFE fear subscale scores (0.346 versus 0.643); and GES scores (80.1 versus 67.8) (all PLimitations The range of RPE scores for the

  9. Simulation of a GOX-kerosene subscale rocket combustion chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglauer, Christoph; Kniesner, Björn; Knab, Oliver; Kirchberger, Christoph; Schlieben, Gregor; Kau, Hans-Peter

    2011-12-01

    In view of future film cooling tests at the Institute for Flight Propulsion (LFA) at Technische Universität München, the Astrium in-house spray combustion CFD tool Rocflam-II was validated against first test data gained from this rocket test bench without film cooling. The subscale rocket combustion chamber uses GOX and kerosene as propellants which are injected through a single double swirl element. Especially the modeling of the double swirl element and the measured wall roughness were adapted on the LFA hardware. Additionally, new liquid kerosene fluid properties were implemented and verified in Rocflam-II. Also the influences of soot deposition and hot gas radiation on the wall heat flux were analytically and numerically estimated. In context of reviewing the implemented evaporation model in Rocflam-II, the binary diffusion coefficient and its pressure dependency were analyzed. Finally simulations have been performed for different load points with Rocflam-II showing a good agreement compared to test data.

  10. Daily Physical Activity and Cognitive Function Variability in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Christine B; Edwards, Jerri D; Andel, Ross; Kilpatrick, Marcus

    2016-04-01

    Physical activity (PA) is believed to preserve cognitive function in older adulthood, though little is known about these relationships within the context of daily life. The present microlongitudinal pilot study explored within- and between-person relationships between daily PA and cognitive function and also examined within-person effect sizes in a sample of community-dwelling older adults. Fifty-one healthy participants (mean age = 70.1 years) wore an accelerometer and completed a cognitive assessment battery for five days. There were no significant associations between cognitive task performance and participants' daily or average PA over the study period. Effect size estimates indicated that PA explained 0-24% of within-person variability in cognitive function, depending on cognitive task and PA dose. Results indicate that PA may have near-term cognitive effects and should be explored as a possible strategy to enhance older adults' ability to perform cognitively complex activities within the context of daily living.

  11. Many-body Green functions in nuclear physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, J.; Lyutorovich, N.

    Many-body Green functions are a very efficient formulation of the many-body problem. We review the application of this method to nuclear physics problems. The formulas which can be derived are of general applicability, e.g., in self-consistent as well as in nonself-consistent calculations. With the help of the Landau renormalization, one obtains relations without any approximations. This allows to apply conservation laws which lead to important general relations. We investigate the one-body and two-body Green functions as well as the three-body Green function and discuss their connection to nuclear observables. The generalization to systems with pair correlations are also presented. Numerical examples are compared with experimental data.

  12. Special functions of mathematical physics a unified introduction with applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nikiforov, Arnold F

    1988-01-01

    With students of Physics chiefly in mind, we have collected the material on special functions that is most important in mathematical physics and quan­ tum mechanics. We have not attempted to provide the most extensive collec­ tion possible of information about special functions, but have set ourselves the task of finding an exposition which, based on a unified approach, ensures the possibility of applying the theory in other natural sciences, since it pro­ vides a simple and effective method for the independent solution of problems that arise in practice in physics, engineering and mathematics. For the American edition we have been able to improve a number of proofs; in particular, we have given a new proof of the basic theorem (§3). This is the fundamental theorem of the book; it has now been extended to cover difference equations of hypergeometric type (§§12, 13). Several sections have been simplified and contain new material. We believe that this is the first time that the theory of classical or­ th...

  13. Milk powders ageing: effect on physical and functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Marie E C; Scher, Joël; Desobry-Banon, Sylvie; Desobry, Stéphane

    2004-01-01

    Milk powders are now considered as food ingredients, mainly because of the functional properties of milk proteins. During the storage of milk powders, many physicochemical damages, mainly dependent on lactose glass transition occur. They have important consequences on physical (flowability) and functional properties (solubility, emulsifying, and foaming properties) of milk powders. First, lactose crystallization modifies the microstructure and chemical composition of the surface of powder particles. Thus, milk powders flowability is decreased. Since the structure of milk proteins is destabilized, its solubility is damaged. Moreover, particle collapse and caking occur and mainly decrease the physical properties of milk powders (density and flowability). The mechanical stresses involved may also enhance proteins unfolding, which is detrimental to solubility. Finally, molecular mobility is favored upon ageing, and both chemical (Maillard reaction) and enzymatic reactions occur. Maillard reaction and oxidation enhance protein interactions and aggregations, which mainly lessen milk powders solubility. Maillard reaction also decreases emulsifying and foaming properties. Storage temperature and relative humidity have been considered as the predominant factors involved, but time, milk components, and their physical state also have been implied.

  14. Symbolic Computation, Number Theory, Special Functions, Physics and Combinatorics

    CERN Document Server

    Ismail, Mourad

    2001-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the conference "Symbolic Computation, Number Theory, Special Functions, Physics and Combinatorics" held at the Department of Mathematics, University of Florida, Gainesville, from November 11 to 13, 1999. The main emphasis of the conference was Com­ puter Algebra (i. e. symbolic computation) and how it related to the fields of Number Theory, Special Functions, Physics and Combinatorics. A subject that is common to all of these fields is q-series. We brought together those who do symbolic computation with q-series and those who need q-series in­ cluding workers in Physics and Combinatorics. The goal of the conference was to inform mathematicians and physicists who use q-series of the latest developments in the field of q-series and especially how symbolic computa­ tion has aided these developments. Over 60 people were invited to participate in the conference. We ended up having 45 participants at the conference, including six one hour plenary speakers and 28 half hour speakers. T...

  15. Effects of Sports Nutritional Beverages Containing Glycerinum on the Physical Functions of Bicyclists after Physical Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xiaodong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at providing a reference for the selection of energy tonics for sportsmen engaging in high-strength training and competitions by investigating the effects of the intake of beverages containing glycerinum before exercise at high temperature on the physical functions of bicyclists. Forty bicyclists were selected as research subjects and divided into a test group and a control group. The indexes such as urine volume, weight loss value, oxyhemoglobin saturation, blood lactic acid, nervous tension difference value and reaction time were detected after the sportsmen took different beverages. The conclusions were drawn after the data were analyzed by SPSS ver. 18.0. The research results demonstrated that, the intake of beverages containing glycerinum could reduce urine output and lower weight loss value, prolong the endurance riding time of bicyclists in high temperature environment, reduce the concentration of blood lactic acid, improve the aerobic exercise ability of sportsmen, relieve nervous tension and fatigue, and improve physical functions.

  16. Area-efficient physically unclonable function circuit architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurrieri, Thomas; Hamlet, Jason; Bauer, Todd; Helinski, Ryan; Pierson, Lyndon G

    2015-04-28

    Generating a physically a physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit value includes comparing each of first identification components in a first bank to each of second identification components in a second bank. A given first identification component in the first bank is not compared to another first identification component in the first bank and a given second identification component in the second bank is not compared to another second identification component in the second bank. A digital bit value is generated for each comparison made while comparing each of the first identification components to each of the second identification components. A PUF circuit value is generated from the digital bit values from each comparison made.

  17. The functionality of the anatomy in the physical education career

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel D. Buffone

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Historically, the teaching of anatomy within the area of Physical Education has not focused its content on the practice of the course of studies; it has not been contextualized in its difficulties. This is an attempt to show that the subject that is offered to us could answer the needs of a dynamic Physical Education, and because of this, it is important to highlight the functional contribution which adapts in a more realistic sense to our teaching practice. The functional anatomy that is proposed goes beyond the static description of the different regions of the human body, having a wider and more dynamic vision of the body in motion. From this idea, we try to see the contents of the subject not as something rigid or invariable, but to use them to think and to create spaces of discussion on our practice and to wonder, how a descriptive anatomy reduced to only its descriptive contents may helps us. The anatomy, in this aspect, must begin from its own field and here lies our main concern as regards focusing on its functions, starting from the movement and not from the dead bodies where we observe the lack of dynamics

  18. WOMAC-pf as a measure of physical function in patients with Parkinson's disease and late-onset sequels of poliomyelitis: unidimensionality and item behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steultjens, Martijn P M; Stolwijk-Swüste, Janneke; Roorda, Leo D; Dallmeijer, Annet J; van Dijk, Gabriella M; Post, Bart; Dekker, Joost

    2012-01-01

    To assess psychometric properties of the Western Ontario and MacMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC)-pf, an osteoarthritis (OA)-specific questionnaire used to establish the level of physical functioning in patients with late-onset sequels of poliomyelitis (LOSP) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Unidimensionality (using principal component analyses [PCA] and Rasch analyses) was separately established for three diagnostic groups: OA (n = 288), LOSP (n = 168) and PD (n = 200). Additionally, differential item functioning (DIF) among the three diagnostic groups was assessed using ordinal regression (Polytomous Universal Model) analyses. Baseline data were used from an ongoing cohort study of these three patient populations. Unidimensionality was adequate, with all items loading on the first principal component. The Rasch analyses revealed that item fit was generally good. Uniform and non-uniform DIF were found to be present among the three diagnostic groups in three and one of the 17 physical functioning subscale (WOMAC-pf) items, respectively. The WOMAC-pf is a unidimensional measure of physical functioning in patients with LOSP and PD, in addition to its established use in OA. [ • Disability in physical functioning related to mobility(walking, stair climbing, etc.) is a common feature of many chronic diseases, including osteoarthritis, late-onset sequels of poliomyelitis and Parkinson's disease.• In this study, the Western Ontario and MacMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index-pf was shown to bea useful and adequate tool to assess physical functioning in these patient groups.• The study highlighted that, despite differences in diagnosis,history and course of the disease, patients with different conditions experience similar disabilities in their physical functioning.

  19. Characterisation of Physical Frailty and Associated Physical and Functional Impairments in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Shwe Zin Nyunt

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo characterize the physical frailty phenotype and its associated physical and functional impairments in mild cognitive impairment (MCI.MethodParticipants with MCI (N = 119, normal low cognition (NLC, N = 138, and normal high cognition (NHC, N = 1,681 in the Singapore Longitudinal Ageing Studies (SLAS-2 were compared on the prevalence of physical frailty, low lean body mass, weakness, slow gait, exhaustion and low physical activity, and POMA balance and gait impairment and fall risk.ResultsThere were significantly higher prevalence of frailty in MCI (18.5%, than in NLC (8.0% and NHC (3.9%, and pre-frailty in MCI (54.6%, NLC (52.9% than in NHC (48.0%. Age, sex, and ethnicity-adjusted OR (95% CI of association with MCI (versus NHC for frailty were 4.65 (2.40–9.04 and for pre-frailty, 1.67 (1.07–2.61. Similar significantly elevated prevalence and adjusted ORs of association with MCI were observed for frailty-associated physical and functional impairments. Further adjustment for education, marital status, living status, comorbidities, and GDS significantly reduced the OR estimates. However, the OR estimates remained elevated for frailty: 3.86 (1.83–8.17, low body mass: 1.70 (1.08–2.67, slow gait: 1.84 (1.17–2.89, impaired gait: 4.17 (1.98–8.81, and elevated fall risk 3.42 (1.22–9.53.ConclusionTwo-thirds of MCI were physically frail or pre-frail, most uniquely due to low lean muscle mass, slow gait speed, or balance and gait impairment. The close associations of frailty and physical and functional impairment with MCI have important implications for improving diagnostic acuity of MCI and targetting interventions among cognitively frail individuals to prevent dementia and disability.

  20. Physical function and disability in older adults with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rekeneire, Nathalie; Volpato, Stefano

    2015-02-01

    Functional decline and physical disability are an important clinical and public health problem in older adults because they are associated with loss of independence, nursing home admission, and mortality. Several impairments and comorbidities related to or associated with diabetes are potential disabling conditions that could account for the excess risk of disability. But in most studies, no single condition explains this association. Accelerated loss of muscle strength is a potential mediator in the disabling effect of diabetes. Because some diabetes-related comorbidities are potential modifiable risk factors, preventing and reducing the excess risk of disability associated with diabetes needs further study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The technology - activities of daily living questionnaire: a version with a technology-related subscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Neira, Carlos; López, Oscar L; Riveros, Rodrigo; Núñez-Huasaf, Javier; Flores, Patricia; Slachevsky, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) has become an increasingly important part of daily life. The ability to use technology is becoming essential for autonomous functioning in society. Current functional scales for patients with cognitive impairment do not evaluate the use of technology. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a new version of the Activities of Daily Living Questionnaire (ADLQ) that incorporates an ICT subscale. A new technology-based subscale was incorporated into the Spanish version of the ADLQ (SV-ADLQ), entitled the Technology version of the ADLQ (T-ADLQ). The T-ADLQ was administered to 63 caregivers of dementia patients, 21 proxies of mild cognitive impairment patients and 44 proxies of normal elderly subjects (mean age of the sample ± SD: 73.5 ± 8.30 years). We analysed the convergent validity, internal consistency, reliability cut-off point, sensitivity and specificity of the T-ADLQ. The results of the T-ADLQ were compared to the SV-ADLQ. The T-ADLQ showed significant correlations with the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB) as well as other measures of functional impairment and dementia severity (MMSE: r = -0.70; FAB: r = -0.65; Functional Assessment Questionnaire: r = 0.77; Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale: r = -0.75; Clinical Dementia Rating Scale: r = 0.72; p questions to the ADLQ, our experience suggested that this has to be done cautiously, since the sensitivity of these additional items could vary in different populations. The T-ADLQ needs to be validated in a different population of dementia subjects. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Elderly’s Physical-Functional Fitness and Perceived Functional Capacity and Health after Participation in a Hydrotherapy Program

    OpenAIRE

    Elsa Cristina Sacramento Pereira; Marlene Baião; João Herculano de Carvalho; Vanda Correia

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated how physical activity in older people benefits their physical fitness, health and well-being. The relation between physical activity and perceived functional capacity and health is yet to be considered. This study is a quantitative research design that investigated the improvement of the physical-functional fitness and the perception of the functional capacity and health of an elderly group participating in a water-based exercise program (hydrotherapy). The d...

  3. The Cardiovascular Function Profile and Physical Fitness in Overweight Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megawati, E. R.; Lubis, L. D.; Harahap, F. Y.

    2017-03-01

    Obesity in children and young adult is associated with cardiovascular risk in short term and long term. The aim of this study was to describe the profile of the cardiovascular functions parameters and physical fitness in overweight. This is an analytical observational study with cross sectional approach. The samples of this study were 85 randomly selected subjects aged 18 to 24 years with normoweight and body mass index parameters measures were body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), waist-hip ratio (WHR), cardiovascular function parameters (resting pulse, blood pressure, and peak flow meter) and physical fitness parameters (VO2max dengan McArdle step test). The mean BMI was 24,53±4,929. The WC and WHR mean were 86,7±14,10 cms and 0,89±0,073 cm respectively. The mean of resting pulses were higher in normoweight subject (p=0,0209). The mean systole were lower in normoweight subject (p=0,0026). No differences VO2 max between groups (p=0,3888). The peak flow meter was higher in normoweight (p=0,0274). The result of this study indicate that heart rate, systole and peak flow meter are signifantly different between groups. The heart rate and the peak flow meter in the overweight subjects were lower meanwhile the systole blood pressure was higher compared to normoweight subjects.

  4. Simultaneous Physical and Mental Effort Alters Visual Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Jesús; Jiménez, Raimundo; García, José Antonio; Cárdenas, David

    2017-08-01

    Perceptual processing is sensitive to physiological changes. Thus, the homeostatic disturbances during and after exercise may alter the visual function. Here, we investigated the effect of simultaneous physical effort and two levels of cognitive demand on skills related to the visuoperceptual and motor processing. Eighteen male regular exercisers performed 60 minutes of simultaneous physical exercise (cycling at 60 ± 5% of reserve heart rate) and cognitive effort (mental workload). The same protocol was performed with a mental workload and an oddball condition of this task on different days in a counterbalanced manner. We assessed the near point of convergence, near stereoacuity, accommodative facility (Hart Charts), and eye-hand coordination before and after the two dual-tasking sessions. Also, we calculated cognitive-performance scores and subjective measures of mental load. We found that the near point of convergence (break and recovery) is significantly (P ≤ .05) reduced after physical and mental effort independently of the mental level administered. Only the condition of mental workload with simultaneous constant-intensity cycling promoted a significant impairment in the near stereoacuity and the eye-hand coordination (P = .006 and P = .018, respectively); however, these two parameters did not significantly change under the oddball condition. The accommodative facility showed an improvement in the oddball and mental workload conditions (P manipulation, participants experienced higher mental demand and arousal and achieved lower scores on cognitive performance during the mental workload task (both P mental effort, the manipulation of mental-task complexity being an important modulator of this effect. Both dual tasks, physical with or without mental workload demands, may enhance or impair visual and motor processing depending on the visual parameter tested, and those changes could be related to the activation state of the nervous system.

  5. Functional strength training: Seated machine vs standing cable training to improve physical function in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Anoop; Martins, Maria M; De Faveri, Frederico G; Alan, Ozgur; Cetinkaya, Funda; Signorile, Joseph F

    2016-09-01

    The majority of the strength training studies in older adults have incorporated fixed-form exercises using seated resistance training machines. In light of the modest improvements in physical function shown in these studies, functional or task-specific exercises, involving movement patterns that mimic daily activities, have been studied. Free-form exercises, using free-weights or cable, is another form of functional strength training. Currently, no intervention studies exist comparing free-form exercises, using cable machines, and fixed-form exercises, using seated machines in older adults. A total of 29 independently-living older adults, 65years or older, were randomized into two groups, seated machine (SM, n=10) and standing cable (SC, n=12). After 12weeks of training twice per week, groups were compared. The primary outcome was the Physical Performance Battery (PPB), a measure of physical function. Secondary outcomes were lower and upper body strength and power, activities of daily living evaluated by multiple tests including: Physical Performance Test (PPT), pan carry and gallon jug transfers, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), and self-reported function using Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS). Outcome assessors were blinded to participants' intervention assignments. The PPB (SC=0.23 points; SM=0.15 points) showed clinical and significant improvements, but there was no significant difference between the groups (g=0.2, 95% CI (-0.6, 1.0). For secondary outcomes, chair stand (g=0.7, 95% CI (0.2, 1.6), p=0.03) and pan carry (g=0.8, 95% CI (0.07, 1.07), p=0.04) favored SC, while chest press 1RM (g=0.2, 95% CI (0.06, 1.1), p=0.02) favored SM. There were no statistically significant group differences between PPB, gallon jug transfer, leg press 1RM, power, RPE or self-reported function. Standing cable training was not superior to seated machine training in improving physical performance in older adults. However, both training

  6. Physical activity and cognitive function of long-distance walkers: Studying Four Days Marches participants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, H.J.P.; Aalbers, T.; Maessen, M.F.H.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Eijsvogels, T.M.

    2017-01-01

    Studies show physical activity to be beneficial for cognitive function. However, studies usually included individuals who were not particularly inclined to exercise. Following research among master athletes, we examined associations between physical activity and cognitive function in participants of

  7. Physical activity and cognitive function of long distance walkers: Studying Four Days Marches participants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, H.J.P.; Aalbers, T.; Maessen, M.F.H.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Eijsvogels, T.M.H.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Studies show physical activity to be beneficial for cognitive function. However, studies usually included individuals who were not particularly inclined to exercise. Following research among master athletes, we examined associations between physical activity and cognitive function in

  8. Physical Activity and Cognitive Function of Long-Distance Walkers : Studying Four Days Marches Participants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Hans; Aalbers, Teun; Maessen, Martijn F. H.; Verbeek, Andre L. M.; Rikkert, Marcel G. M. Olde; Kessels, Roy P. C.; Hopman, Maria T. E.; Eijsvogels, Thijs M. H.

    2017-01-01

    Studies show physical activity to be beneficial for cognitive function. However, studies usually included individuals who were not particularly inclined to exercise. Following research among master athletes, we examined associations between physical activity and cognitive function in participants of

  9. Habitual physical activity levels are associated with performance in measures of physical function and mobility in older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morie, Marina; Reid, Kieran F; Miciek, Renee; Lajevardi, Newsha; Choong, Karen; Krasnoff, Joanne B; Storer, Thomas W; Fielding, Roger A; Bhasin, Shalender; Lebrasseur, Nathan K

    2010-09-01

    To determine whether objectively measured physical activity levels are associated with physical function and mobility in older men. Cross-sectional. Academic research center. Eighty-two community-dwelling men aged 65 and older with self-reported mobility limitations were divided into a low-activity and a high-activity group based on the median average daily physical activity counts of the whole sample. Physical activity according to triaxial accelerometers; physical function and mobility according to the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), gait speed, stair climb time, and a lift-and-lower task; aerobic capacity according to maximum oxygen consumption (VO(2) max); and leg press and chest press maximal strength and peak power. Older men with higher physical activity levels had a 1.4-point higher mean SPPB score and a 0.35-m/s faster walking speed than those with lower physical activity levels. They also climbed a standard flight of stairs 1.85 seconds faster and completed 60% more shelves in a lift-and-lower task (all Pactivity groups. Correlation analyses and multiple linear regression models showed that physical activity is positively associated with all physical function and mobility measures, leg press strength, and VO(2) max. Older men with higher physical activity levels demonstrate better physical function and mobility than their less-active peers. Moreover, physical activity levels are predictive of performance in measures of physical function and mobility in older men. Future work is needed to determine whether modifications in physical activity levels can improve or preserve physical performance in later life. © 2010, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2010, The American Geriatrics Society.

  10. Physical function metric over measure: An illustration with the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaat, Aaron J; Schalet, Benjamin D; Rutsohn, Joshua; Jensen, Roxanne E; Cella, David

    2017-09-08

    Measuring patient-reported outcomes (PROs) is becoming an integral component of quality improvement initiatives, clinical care, and research studies in cancer, including comparative effectiveness research. However, the number of PROs limits comparability across studies. Herein, the authors attempted to link the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General Physical Well-Being (FACT-G PWB) subscale with the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Physical Function (PF) calibrated item bank. The also sought to augment a subset of the conceptually most similar FACT-G PWB items with PROMIS PF items to improve the linking. Baseline data from 5506 participants in the Measuring Your Health (MY-Health) study were used to identify the optimal items for linking FACT-G PWB with PROMIS PF. A mixed methods approach identified the optimal items for creating the 5-item FACT/PROMIS-PF5 scale. Both the linked and augmented relationships were cross-validated using the follow-up MY-Health data. A 5-item FACT-G PWB item subset was found to be optimal for linking with PROMIS PF. In addition, a 2-item subset, including only items that were conceptually very similar to the PROMIS item bank content, were augmented with 3 PROMIS PF items. This new FACT/PROMIS-PF5 provided superior score recovery. The PROMIS PF metric allows for the evaluation of the extent to which similar questionnaires can be linked and therefore expressed on the same metric. These results allow for the aggregation of existing data and provide an optimal measure for future studies wishing to use the FACT yet also report on the PROMIS PF metric. Cancer 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  11. Short-term Physical Inactivity Impairs Vascular Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosova, Emily V.; Yen, Priscilla; Chong, Karen C.; Alley, Hugh F.; Stock, Eveline O.; Quinn, Alex; Hellmann, Jason; Conte, Michael S.; Owens, Christopher D.; Spite, Matthew; Grenon, S. Marlene

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sedentarism, also termed physical inactivity, is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Mechanisms thought to be involved include insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and increased inflammation. It is unknown whether changes in vascular and endothelial function also contribute to this excess risk. We hypothesized that short-term exposure to inactivity would lead to endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffening and increased vascular inflammation. Methods Five healthy subjects (4 males and 1 female) underwent 5 days of bed rest (BR) to simulate inactivity. Measurements of vascular function [flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) to evaluate endothelial function; applanation tonometry to assess arterial resistance], inflammation and metabolism were made before BR, daily during BR and after 2 recovery days. Subjects maintained an isocaloric diet throughout. Results Bed rest led to significant decreases in brachial artery and femoral artery FMD [Brachial: 11 ± 3% pre-BR vs. 9 ± 2% end-BR, P=0.04; Femoral: 4 ± 1% vs. 2 ± 1%, P=0.04]. The central augmentation index increased with BR [−4 ± 9% vs. 5 ± 11%, P=0.03]. Diastolic blood pressure (DBP) increased [58 ± 7 mmHg vs. 62 ± 7 mmHg, P=0.02], while neither systolic blood pressure nor heart rate changed. 15-HETE, an arachidonic acid metabolite, increased but the other inflammatory and metabolic biomarkers were unchanged. Conclusions Our findings show that acute exposure to sedentarism results in decreased endothelial function, arterial stiffening, increased DBP, and an increase in 15-HETE. We speculate that inactivity promotes a vascular “deconditioning” state characterized by impaired endothelial function, leading to arterial stiffness and increased arterial tone. Although physiologically significant, the underlying mechanisms and clinical relevance of these findings need to be further explored. PMID:24630521

  12. Applying posttraumatic stress disorder MMPI subscale to World War II POW veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Query, W T; Megran, J; McDonald, G

    1986-03-01

    In order to determine whether the MMPI-PTSD subscale has application for assessing DSM-III diagnosed PTSD among populations other than Vietnam veterans, a group of WWII POWs (N = 69) were given the subscale. Results indicated that the use of the PTSD subscale can be generalized to older veterans; in a small sample of Pacific POWs, PTSD is more common among those from the Pacific theater than those from Europe. However, the subscale fails to distinguish between Pacific and European POW veterans. Difficulties in sampling and confounding stressors are discussed, as well as implications for treatment of WWII veterans.

  13. Neighbourhood green space, physical function and participation in physical activities among elderly men: the Caerphilly Prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yi; Gallacher, John; Palmer, Stephen; Fone, David

    2014-03-19

    The built environment in which older people live plays an important role in promoting or inhibiting physical activity. Most work on this complex relationship between physical activity and the environment has excluded people with reduced physical function or ignored the difference between groups with different levels of physical function. This study aims to explore the role of neighbourhood green space in determining levels of participation in physical activity among elderly men with different levels of lower extremity physical function. Using data collected from the Caerphilly Prospective Study (CaPS) and green space data collected from high resolution Landmap true colour aerial photography, we first investigated the effect of the quantity of neighbourhood green space and the variation in neighbourhood vegetation on participation in physical activity for 1,010 men aged 66 and over in Caerphilly county borough, Wales, UK. Second, we explored whether neighbourhood green space affects groups with different levels of lower extremity physical function in different ways. Increasing percentage of green space within a 400 meters radius buffer around the home was significantly associated with more participation in physical activity after adjusting for lower extremity physical function, psychological distress, general health, car ownership, age group, marital status, social class, education level and other environmental factors (OR = 1.21, 95% CI 1.05, 1.41). A statistically significant interaction between the variation in neighbourhood vegetation and lower extremity physical function was observed (OR = 1.92, 95% CI 1.12, 3.28). Elderly men living in neighbourhoods with more green space have higher levels of participation in regular physical activity. The association between variation in neighbourhood vegetation and regular physical activity varied according to lower extremity physical function. Subjects reporting poor lower extremity physical function living in

  14. Social class differences in physical functions in middle-aged men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Åse Marie; Andersen, Lars Louis; Skotte, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to analyze gender differences and social class gradients in physical functions; and to study whether the social class gradients in physical functions in midlife differed between men and women.......The objective of the present study is to analyze gender differences and social class gradients in physical functions; and to study whether the social class gradients in physical functions in midlife differed between men and women....

  15. 21 CFR 890.5880 - Multi-function physical therapy table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Multi-function physical therapy table. 890.5880 Section 890.5880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...-function physical therapy table. (a) Identification. A multi-function physical therapy table is a device...

  16. Physical characterization of functionalized spider silk: electronic and sensing properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eden Steven, Jin Gyu Park, Anant Paravastu, Elsa Branco Lopes, James S Brooks, Ongi Englander, Theo Siegrist, Papatya Kaner and Rufina G Alamo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This work explores functional, fundamental and applied aspects of naturally harvested spider silk fibers. Natural silk is a protein polymer where different amino acids control the physical properties of fibroin bundles, producing, for example, combinations of β-sheet (crystalline and amorphous (helical structural regions. This complexity presents opportunities for functional modification to obtain new types of material properties. Electrical conductivity is the starting point of this investigation, where the insulating nature of neat silk under ambient conditions is described first. Modification of the conductivity by humidity, exposure to polar solvents, iodine doping, pyrolization and deposition of a thin metallic film are explored next. The conductivity increases exponentially with relative humidity and/or solvent, whereas only an incremental increase occurs after iodine doping. In contrast, iodine doping, optimal at 70 °C, has a strong effect on the morphology of silk bundles (increasing their size, on the process of pyrolization (suppressing mass loss rates and on the resulting carbonized fiber structure (that becomes more robust against bending and strain. The effects of iodine doping and other functional parameters (vacuum and thin film coating motivated an investigation with magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR to monitor doping-induced changes in the amino acid-protein backbone signature. MAS-NMR revealed a moderate effect of iodine on the helical and β-sheet structures, and a lesser effect of gold sputtering. The effects of iodine doping were further probed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, revealing a partial transformation of β-sheet-to-amorphous constituency. A model is proposed, based on the findings from the MAS-NMR and FTIR, which involves iodine-induced changes in the silk fibroin bundle environment that can account for the altered physical properties. Finally, proof

  17. Fitness, Fatness, Physical Activity, and Autonomic Function in Midlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviniemi, Antti M; Perkiömäki, Nelli; Auvinen, Juha; Niemelä, Maisa; Tammelin, Tuija; Puukka, Katri; Ruokonen, Aimo; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Tulppo, Mikko P; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jämsä, Timo; Huikuri, Heikki V; Korpelainen, Raija

    2017-12-01

    Although low cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), physical inactivity, and obesity are associated with impaired autonomic function, they are also extensively interrelated. The present study aimed to assess the extent to which they contribute to autonomic function independently of each other. At the age of 46 yr, 1383 men and 1761 women without cardiorespiratory diseases and diabetes underwent assessments of vagally mediated heart rate (HR) variability (root mean square of successive differences in R-R interval (rMMSD)), peak HR during a submaximal step test (CRF), and 60-s HR recovery (HRR). Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA; ≥3.5 METs, 2 wk) was measured by wrist-worn accelerometer and body fat percentage (Fat%) by bioimpedance. In men, CRF and Fat% were significantly associated with higher rMSSD (standardized β = 0.31 and -0.16) and HRR (β = 0.19 and -0.18), whereas higher MVPA was linked with higher HRR (β = 0.13) when including CRF, MVPA, and Fat% in the initial regression. After adjustments for other lifestyle and cardiometabolic factors, CRF remained significantly associated with rMMSD (β = 0.24) and HRR (β = 0.14), as did MVPA with HRR (β = 0.11). In women, CRF was associated with rMSSD (β = 0.23) and HRR (β = 0.15), and MVPA (β = 0.17) and Fat% (β = -0.07) with HRR, when CRF, MVPA, and Fat% were adjusted for each other. After further adjustments, CRF remained a significant determinant of rMSSD (β = 0.20) and HRR (β = 0.13), as did MVPA with HRR (β = 0.15). The final models explained 23% and 21% of variation in rMSSD and HRR in men, and 10% and 12% in women, respectively. CRF was a more important determinant of cardiac autonomic function than MVPA and body fat. Furthermore, MVPA but not body fat was independently associated with cardiac autonomic function in both men and women.

  18. Physical characterization of functionalized spider silk: electronic and sensing properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven, Eden; Brooks, James S [Department of Physics and National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, 1800 East Paul Dirac, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Park, Jin Gyu [FAMU-FSU Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, High-Performance Materials Institute, Florida State University, 2005 Levy Ave., Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Paravastu, Anant; Siegrist, Theo; Kaner, Papatya; Alamo, Rufina G [FAMU-FSU Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering and National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, 1800 East Paul Dirac, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Branco Lopes, Elsa [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear/CFMC-UL, P-2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Englander, Ongi, E-mail: esteven@magnet.fsu.edu [FAMU-FSU Department of Mechanical Engineering and National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, 1800 East Paul Dirac, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    This work explores functional, fundamental and applied aspects of naturally harvested spider silk fibers. Natural silk is a protein polymer where different amino acids control the physical properties of fibroin bundles, producing, for example, combinations of {beta}-sheet (crystalline) and amorphous (helical) structural regions. This complexity presents opportunities for functional modification to obtain new types of material properties. Electrical conductivity is the starting point of this investigation, where the insulating nature of neat silk under ambient conditions is described first. Modification of the conductivity by humidity, exposure to polar solvents, iodine doping, pyrolization and deposition of a thin metallic film are explored next. The conductivity increases exponentially with relative humidity and/or solvent, whereas only an incremental increase occurs after iodine doping. In contrast, iodine doping, optimal at 70 deg. C, has a strong effect on the morphology of silk bundles (increasing their size), on the process of pyrolization (suppressing mass loss rates) and on the resulting carbonized fiber structure (that becomes more robust against bending and strain). The effects of iodine doping and other functional parameters (vacuum and thin film coating) motivated an investigation with magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) to monitor doping-induced changes in the amino acid-protein backbone signature. MAS-NMR revealed a moderate effect of iodine on the helical and {beta}-sheet structures, and a lesser effect of gold sputtering. The effects of iodine doping were further probed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, revealing a partial transformation of {beta}-sheet-to-amorphous constituency. A model is proposed, based on the findings from the MAS-NMR and FTIR, which involves iodine-induced changes in the silk fibroin bundle environment that can account for the altered physical properties. Finally, proof

  19. The impact of body composition, pain and resilience on physical activity, physical function and physical performance at 2 months post hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Barbara; Hebel, J Richard; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L; Hicks, Gregory E; Hochberg, Marc C; Orwig, Denise; Eastlack, Marty; Magaziner, Jay

    2018-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to test a model of the factors influencing physical activity, physical function and physical performance at 2 months post hip fracture and compare model fit between men and women. Age, cognitive status, comorbidities, pain, resilience, bone mineral density, total body lean mass, total body fat and grip strength were hypothesized to be directly and/or indirectly related to physical activity, physical function and physical performance. This analysis used data from the seventh Baltimore Hip Studies (BHS-7), a prospective cohort study that included 258 community-dwelling participants, 125 (48%) men and 133 (52%) women, hospitalized for treatment of a hip fracture; survey and objective data were obtained at 2 months post hip fracture. In addition to age, sex and comorbidities (modified Charlson scale), data collection included body composition from dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans, grip strength, and physical activity, function and performance based on the Yale Physical Activity Survey, the Short Physical Performance Battery and the Lower Extremity Gain Scale. Age, cognition, and comorbidities were not significantly associated with resilience; and, resilience was not associated with pain. In addition, bone mineral density was not associated with physical activity, physical performance or physical function. Total lean body mass, resilience and pain were associated with physical activity, physical function and physical performance in women, but were not consistently associated with physical and functional outcomes in men. Future research should consider evaluation of muscle quality and additional psychosocial factors (e.g., depression, social supports) in model testing. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Associations of Mental Health and Physical Function with Colonoscopy-related Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Eiji; Watanabe, Seitaro; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    Objective To clarify the effects of mental health and physical function in association with colonoscopy-related pain. Methods The mental health and physical function were evaluated using the Japanese version of the SF-8 Health Survey questionnaire. Poor physical status was defined as a physical component summary (PCS) mental status as a mental component summary (MCS) mental health and physical function are important determinants of colonoscopy-related pain. Evaluating the mental health and physical function of patients prior to colonoscopy may effectively predict the degree of colonoscopy-related pain.

  1. Lower extremity functional electrical stimulation cycling promotes physical and functional recovery in chronic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowsky, Cristina L; Hammond, Edward R; Strohl, Adam B; Commean, Paul K; Eby, Sarah A; Damiano, Diane L; Wingert, Jason R; Bae, Kyongtae T; McDonald, John W

    2013-11-01

    To examine the effect of long-term lower extremity functional electrical stimulation (FES) cycling on the physical integrity and functional recovery in people with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). Retrospective cohort, mean follow-up 29.1 months, and cross-sectional evaluation. Washington University Spinal Cord Injury Neurorehabilitation Center, referral center. Twenty-five people with chronic SCI who received FES during cycling were matched by age, gender, injury level, and severity, and duration of injury to 20 people with SCI who received range of motion and stretching. Lower extremity FES during cycling as part of an activity-based restorative treatment regimen. Change in neurological function: motor, sensory, and combined motor-sensory scores (CMSS) assessed by the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment scale. Response was defined as ≥ 1 point improvement. FES was associated with an 80% CMSS responder rate compared to 40% in controls. An average 9.6 CMSS point loss among controls was offset by an average 20-point gain among FES subjects. Quadriceps muscle mass was on average 36% higher and intra/inter-muscular fat 44% lower, in the FES group. Hamstring and quadriceps muscle strength was 30 and 35% greater, respectively, in the FES group. Quality of life and daily function measures were significantly higher in FES group. FES during cycling in chronic SCI may provide substantial physical integrity benefits, including enhanced neurological and functional performance, increased muscle size and force-generation potential, reduced spasticity, and improved quality of life.

  2. The physics of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Richard B

    2013-09-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a methodology for detecting dynamic patterns of activity in the working human brain. Although the initial discoveries that led to fMRI are only about 20 years old, this new field has revolutionized the study of brain function. The ability to detect changes in brain activity has a biophysical basis in the magnetic properties of deoxyhemoglobin, and a physiological basis in the way blood flow increases more than oxygen metabolism when local neural activity increases. These effects translate to a subtle increase in the local magnetic resonance signal, the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect, when neural activity increases. With current techniques, this pattern of activation can be measured with resolution approaching 1 mm(3) spatially and 1 s temporally. This review focuses on the physical basis of the BOLD effect, the imaging methods used to measure it, the possible origins of the physiological effects that produce a mismatch of blood flow and oxygen metabolism during neural activation, and the mathematical models that have been developed to understand the measured signals. An overarching theme is the growing field of quantitative fMRI, in which other MRI methods are combined with BOLD methods and analyzed within a theoretical modeling framework to derive quantitative estimates of oxygen metabolism and other physiological variables. That goal is the current challenge for fMRI: to move fMRI from a mapping tool to a quantitative probe of brain physiology.

  3. Avian magnetic compass: Its functional properties and physical basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roswitha WILTSCHKO, Wolfgang WILTSCHKO

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The avian magnetic compass was analyzed in bird species of three different orders – Passeriforms, Columbiforms and Galliforms – and in three different behavioral contexts, namely migratory orientation, homing and directional conditioning. The respective findings indicate similar functional properties: it is an inclination compass that works only within a functional window around the ambient magnetic field intensity; it tends to be lateralized in favor of the right eye, and it is wavelength-dependent, requiring light from the short-wavelength range of the spectrum. The underlying physical mechanisms have been identified as radical pair processes, spin-chemical reactions in specialized photopigments. The iron-based receptors in the upper beak do not seem to be involved. The existence of the same type of magnetic compass in only very distantly related bird species suggests that it may have been present already in the common ancestors of all modern birds, where it evolved as an all-purpose compass mechanism for orientation within the home range [Current Zoology 56 (3: 265–276, 2010].

  4. Increasing the Precision of Subscale Scores by Using Out-of-Scale Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Nilufer; Kamata, Akihito

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the precision of subscale score estimates was evaluated when out-of-scale information was incorporated. Procedures that incorporated out-of-scale information and only information within a subscale were compared through a series of simulations. It was revealed that more information (i.e., more precision) was always provided for…

  5. Functional evaluation indicates physical losses after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa Vasconcellos de Souza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To perform a function evaluation of patients before and after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. METHODS: From November 2008 to November 2010, 29 female (58% and 21 male patients (42% with median age of 48 years (range: 24-67 were enrolled in this study. Data collection was performed before and after autologous or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Evaluation instruments included the 2-minute walking test to evaluate gait performance with assessment of the oxygen saturation, heart rate and Borg Scale before and after the test; grip strength for strength evaluation, Schober Test for spine mobility testing and maximum and adapted activity scores of the Human Activity Profile questionnaire to test functionality in daily activities. RESULTS: Fifty patients were evaluated at baseline; six did not undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (three died, one refused and two were excluded. Thus 44/50 (88% - 21 allogeneic and 23 autologous transplantations were performed. Only 33 of the 44 patients (75% performed evaluations after transplantation (nine died and two were excluded. Of the patients who performed both evaluations, significantly lower values were found in the evaluation after transplantation for the 2-minute walking test (p-value = 0.004, grip strength of both right and left hands (p-value = 0.004 and p-value < 0.0001, respectively, the Schober Test, and maximum and adapted activity scores (p-value < 0.0001. The heart rate was higher (p-value = 0.01 before the 2-minute walking test and oxygen saturation was higher (p-value = 0.02 after. CONCLUSION: Statistical differences indicate functional impairment after transplantation showing physical losses in this population.

  6. Social participation predicts cognitive functioning in aging adults over time: comparisons with physical health, depression, and physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, Kyle J; Memel, Molly; Woolverton, Cindy; Sbarra, David A

    2017-02-01

    Several risk and protective factors are associated with changes in cognitive functioning in aging adults - including physical health, depression, physical activity, and social activities - though the findings for participation in social activities are mixed. This study investigated the longitudinal association between social participation and two domains of cognitive functioning, memory and executive function. A primary goal of our analyses was to determine whether social participation predicted cognitive functioning over-and-above physical health, depression, and physical activity in a sample with adequate power to detect unique effects. The sample included aging adults (N = 19,832) who participated in a large, multi-national study and provided data across six years; split into two random subsamples. Unique associations between the predictors of interest and cognitive functioning over time and within occasion were assessed in a latent curve growth model. Social participation predicted both domains of cognitive functioning at each occasion, and the relative magnitude of this effect was comparable to physical health, depression, and physical activity level. In addition, social participation at the first time point predicted change in cognitive functioning over time. The substantive results in the initial sample were replicated in the second independent subsample. Overall, the magnitude of the association of social participation is comparable to other well-established predictors of cognitive functioning, providing evidence that social participation plays an important role in cognitive functioning and successful aging.

  7. Functional training in the management of chronic facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, V; Hariohm, K; Vijayakumar, P; Bindiya, D Thangjam

    2012-04-01

    Disability in patients with facial paralysis is the result of impairment or loss of complex and multidimensional functions of the face, including expression of emotions, facial identity, and communication. However, the majority of interventions for facial paralysis are unidimensional and impairment oriented. Thus, a functional training program intended to address various dimensions of disability caused by facial paralysis was devised. This patient-centered, multidimensional approach to the rehabilitation of people with facial paralysis consists of patient education, functional training, and complementary exercises. This approach is focused on various dimensions of disability, including the physical, emotional, and social dimensions, by encouraging context-specific facial functions, positive coping strategies, and social interaction skills. The patient was a 25-year-old woman with chronic complete right facial paralysis caused by a postoperative complication of ear surgery. The patient's problems were evaluated with the Facial Disability Index (physical function subscale score=45/100, social/well-being function subscale score=28/100) and an informal interview exploring her experiences and priorities. After 8 weeks of functional training, the patient showed considerable improvement in facial functions (physical function subscale score=95/100, social/well-being function subscale score=100/100) and reported positive changes in social interactions and interpersonal relationships. The use of a functional training program was associated with positive changes in emotional expression, psychosocial function, and social integration, thus contributing to reduced disability of a person with chronic facial paralysis.

  8. Social class differences in physical functions in middle-aged men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Åse Marie; Andersen, Lars L; Skotte, Jørgen; Christensen, Ulla; Mortensen, Ole Steen; Molbo, Drude; Lund, Rikke; Nilsson, Charlotte Juul; Avlund, Kirsten

    2014-02-01

    The objective of the present study is to analyze gender differences and social class gradients in physical functions; and to study whether the social class gradients in physical functions in midlife differed between men and women. This study used traditionally used physical performance tests and we added several tests of vigorous physical functioning (trunk muscle strength and power and sagittal flexibility). We measured reaction time, one-legged balance, sagittal flexibility, jump height, chair rise ability, trunk muscle- and handgrip strength in 5,412 participants aged 50 to 60 years (68.5% men). We found gender differences and social class gradients for all physical performance tests. We did not find an interaction between social class and gender, indicating that the social gradient in physical functions did not differ between men and women. Including measures of vigorous physical functioning may add to the existing knowledge on development of functional limitation and poorer functional health later in life.

  9. Joint association of physical activity and body weight with subsequent physical and mental functioning: a follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhom, Vivian; Lahti, Jouni; Rahkonen, Ossi; Lahelma, Eero; Lallukka, Tea

    2013-03-06

    Physical inactivity and overweight are major threats to public health. However, it is not well understood to what extent physical activity might counteract the harmful effects of overweight on functioning. Thus, we examined the joint associations of leisure-time physical activity and body mass index (BMI) with subsequent physical and mental functioning over a follow-up of five to seven years. The data were derived from the Helsinki Health Study, which is a cohort study among employees of the City of Helsinki, Finland. The baseline postal survey data were collected among 40-60-year-old employees in 2000-02 (n = 8960, response rate 67%), and the follow-up data in 2007 among all baseline survey respondents (n = 7332, response rate 83%). We divided the participants into six groups according to their amount of physical activity (inactive, moderately active and highly active) and their relative weight (normal weight and overweight). Highly active normal-weight participants were used as a reference group in all the analyses. Poor functioning was defined as the lowest quartile of the Short Form 36 (SF-36) health survey's physical and mental component summaries, with the follow-up cut-off point also applied at baseline. We used logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, gender, baseline functioning, smoking, alcohol use, marital status, socioeconomic position and working conditions. At baseline 48% of the participants were overweight and 11% were inactive. After adjustments inactivity was associated with poor physical functioning at follow-up both among the normal-weight (OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.09-2.10) and overweight (OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.56-2.63) groups. Being overweight regardless of activity level was associated with poor physical functioning. Poor physical functioning was practically equally common among the highly active overweight group and the inactive normal-weight group. After adjustments, for mental functioning, only inactivity among the overweight was associated

  10. Investigating the function spiral in later life: Aging attitudes, physical activity, and gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Brenda R

    2017-06-01

    This study tests the Function Spiral Model, which proposes that functional decline often occurs prematurely: negative aging attitudes reduce activity engagement, which then advances functional decline via physical deconditioning. A total of 89 adults aged 61-96 ( M = 77) years completed a questionnaire assessing aging attitudes and physical activity and participated in a follow-up assessment of gait/balance and function. Results supported the process model: physical activity mediated the impact of negative aging attitudes on gait/balance, and gait/balance mediated the impact of physical activity on function. Findings highlight multiple points of intervention that could mitigate the acceleration of functional decline in later life.

  11. Nutrition and function, with emphasis on physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torun, B; Viteri, F E

    1993-01-01

    Consumption of insufficient quantities of food would result to energy deficiency in children, and this can be prevented by early assessment of changes in physical activity. This paper focuses on the effects of general undernutrition on physical activity and on growth, behavior, and cognitive development in Mexico, Uganda, Colombia, and Guatemala. The paper contains studies investigating the influence of undernutrition on physical activity; total energy expenditure; level of physical fitness; influence of physical activity and growth; and relationship of physical activity with behavior and cognitive development. The level of energy expenditure between nutritional groups could be accounted for the smaller size of the body among undernourished children. On the other hand, physiological potential to physically perform work can be maintained by children with mild or moderate malnutrition, but their smaller size limits their output. Lastly, increased physical activity of children receiving food supplementation was associated with exploratory and behavioral differences compared with nonsupplemented children.

  12. Physical and mental health-related correlates of physical function in community dwelling older adults: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burbank Patricia A

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical function is the ability to perform both basic and instrumental activities of daily living, and the ability of older adults to reside in the community depends to a large extent on their level of physical function. Multiple physical and health-related variables may differentially affect physical function, but they have not been well characterized. The purpose of this investigation was to identify and examine physical and mental health-related correlates of physical function in a sample of community-dwelling older adults. Methods Nine hundred and four community dwelling older men (n = 263 and women (n = 641 with a mean (95% Confidence Interval age of 76.6 (76.1, 77.1 years underwent tests of physical function (Timed Up and Go; TUG, Body Mass Index (BMI was calculated from measured height and weight, and data were collected on self-reported health quality of life (SF-36, falls during the past 6 months, number of medications per day, depression (Geriatric Depression Scale; GDS, social support, and sociodemographic variables. Results Subjects completed the TUG in 8.7 (8.2, 9.2 seconds and expended 6,976 (6,669, 7,284 Kcal.wk-1 in physical activity. The older persons had a mean BMI of 27. 6 (27.2, 28.0, 62% took 3 or more medications per day, and14.4% had fallen one or more times over the last 6 months. Mean scores on the Mental Component Summary (MCS was 50.6 (50.2, 51,0 and the Physical Component Summary (PCS was 41.3 (40.8, 41.8. Multiple sequential regression analysis showed that, after adjustment for TUG floor surface correlates of physical function included age, sex, education, physical activity (weekly energy expenditure, general health, bodily pain, number of medications taken per day, depression and Body Mass Index. Further, there is a dose response relationship such that greater degree of physical function impairment is associated with poorer scores on physical health-related variables. Conclusions Physical

  13. Physical and mental health-related correlates of physical function in community dwelling older adults: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Carol Ewing; Greaney, Mary L; Riebe, Deborah; Nigg, Claudio R; Burbank, Patricia A; Clark, Phillip G

    2010-02-03

    Physical function is the ability to perform both basic and instrumental activities of daily living, and the ability of older adults to reside in the community depends to a large extent on their level of physical function. Multiple physical and health-related variables may differentially affect physical function, but they have not been well characterized. The purpose of this investigation was to identify and examine physical and mental health-related correlates of physical function in a sample of community-dwelling older adults. Nine hundred and four community dwelling older men (n = 263) and women (n = 641) with a mean (95% Confidence Interval) age of 76.6 (76.1, 77.1) years underwent tests of physical function (Timed Up and Go; TUG), Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated from measured height and weight, and data were collected on self-reported health quality of life (SF-36), falls during the past 6 months, number of medications per day, depression (Geriatric Depression Scale; GDS), social support, and sociodemographic variables. Subjects completed the TUG in 8.7 (8.2, 9.2) seconds and expended 6,976 (6,669, 7,284) Kcal.wk-1 in physical activity. The older persons had a mean BMI of 27. 6 (27.2, 28.0), 62% took 3 or more medications per day, and 14.4% had fallen one or more times over the last 6 months. Mean scores on the Mental Component Summary (MCS) was 50.6 (50.2, 51,0) and the Physical Component Summary (PCS) was 41.3 (40.8, 41.8).Multiple sequential regression analysis showed that, after adjustment for TUG floor surface correlates of physical function included age, sex, education, physical activity (weekly energy expenditure), general health, bodily pain, number of medications taken per day, depression and Body Mass Index. Further, there is a dose response relationship such that greater degree of physical function impairment is associated with poorer scores on physical health-related variables. Physical function in community-dwelling older adults is associated

  14. The Child Behavior Checklist-Obsessive-Compulsive Subscale Detects Severe Psychopathology and Behavioral Problems Among School-Aged Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Laura O; do Rosario, Maria C; Cesar, Raony C; Batistuzzo, Marcelo C; Hoexter, Marcelo Q; Manfro, Gisele G; Shavitt, Roseli G; Leckman, James F; Miguel, Eurípedes C; Alvarenga, Pedro G

    2017-05-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to assess obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) dimensionally in a school-aged community sample and to correlate them with clinical and demographical variables; (2) to determine a subgroup with significant OCS ("at-risk for OCD") using the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL-OCS) and (3) to compare it with the rest of the sample; (4) To review the CBCL-OCS subscale properties as a screening tool for pediatric OCD. Data from the Brazilian High Risk Cohort were analyzed. The presence and severity of OCS were assessed through the CBCL-OCS subscale. DSM-IV psychiatric diagnoses were obtained by the Developmental and Well-Being Assessment. Behavioral problems were assessed using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, the Youth Strengths Inventory, and the CBCL internalizing and externalizing behavior subscales. A total of 2512 (mean age: 8.86 ± 1.84 years; 55.0% male) children were included. Moderate correlations were found between OCS severity and functional impairment (r = 0.36, p behavioral problems (p behavioral patterns and psychiatric comorbidities (e.g., tics [odds ratios, OR = 6.41, p approach suggests that the presence of OCS in children is associated with higher rates of comorbidity, behavioral problems, and impairment. The "at-risk for OCD" group defined by the CBCL revealed a group of patients phenotypically similar to full blown OCD.

  15. The association between energy cost of walking and physical function in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wert, David M; Brach, Jennifer S; Perera, Subashan; VanSwearingen, Jessie

    2013-01-01

    To assess the association between energy cost of walking and self-report of function, independent of comorbidity and gait speed, in older adults with mobility limitations. This cross-sectional observational study was conducted within an ambulatory clinical research training center. Forty-two older adults, age 65 and older, with slow and variable gait participated. Function was assessed using the Late Life Function and Disability Index-Basic Lower Extremity Subscale, while energy cost of walking was derived by standardizing the mean oxygen consumption recorded during physiological steady state by gait speed. Comorbidity and gait speed were collected as co-variates. Pearson's r correlation coefficient and regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between energy cost and function. Energy cost of walking was significantly correlated with self-reported function (Pearson's r=-0.50, penergy cost of walking explained an additional 17% (p=0.002) of the variance in self-reported function above and beyond the variance explained by comorbidity and gait speed combined. Energy cost of walking is emerging as another significant factor related to functional performance among older adults, even after controlling for comorbidity and gait speed - robust variables known for their strong contributions to function. Knowledge of and attention to the efficiency of how one moves (high energy cost of walking) may enhance rehabilitation efforts to further reduce "functional burden" in older adults. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Self report functional disability scores and the use of devices: two distinct aspects of physical function in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, A.; Jacobs, J. W.; van Albada-Kuipers, G. A.; Kraaimaat, F. W.; Geenen, R.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Self report scores of physical disability and the use of devices or assistance in performing activities are sometimes integrated in one index of physical function, although they are aimed at measuring different dimensions of physical disability. The properties of both parameters were evaluated in

  17. Physical Activity Play: The Nature and Function of a Neglected Aspect of Play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, A. D.; Smith, Peter K.

    1998-01-01

    Considers the nature and developmental functions of physical activity play. Distinguishes three kinds of physical activity play with consecutive age peaks: rhythmic stereotypies, exercise play, and rough-and-tumble play. Considers gender differences and function in terms of immediate and deferred consequences in physical, cognitive, and social…

  18. Efficacy of physical exercise intervention on mobility and physical functioning in older people with dementia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkälä, Kaisu; Savikko, Niina; Poysti, Minna; Strandberg, Timo; Laakkonen, Marja-Liisa

    2013-01-01

    Numerous trials have shown that physical activity and exercise training have beneficial effects in general older populations. However, few have studied its effectiveness among people with dementia. The aim of this systematic review is to examine the efficacy of trials using a rigorous randomised, controlled design and including physical activity or exercise as a major component of intervention on the physical functioning, mobility and functional limitations of people with dementia. We found 20 randomised controlled trials that included a total of 1378 participants. Of these, only three were of high methodological quality, and six of moderate quality. Nevertheless, these studies consistently show that intensive physical rehabilitation enhances mobility and, when administered over a long period, may also improve the physical functioning of patients with dementia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Long-term effects of physically active academic lessons on physical fitness and executive functions in primary school children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Greeff, Johannes W; Hartman, Esther; Wijnsma, Marijke; Bosker, Roelof J; Doolaard, Simone; Visscher, Christiaan

    Integrating physical activity into the curriculum has potential health and cognitive benefits in primary school children. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of physically active academic lessons on cardiovascular fitness, muscular fitness and executive functions. In the current

  20. Physical activity and cognitive function of community Chinese elderly in Hong Kong (HK) and Guangzhou (GZ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Elena X F; Lin, Y Q; Zhang, S L; Leung, Grace T Y; Lam, Linda C W; Chiu, Helen F K

    2015-06-01

    Some studies demonstrated that physical activity may have beneficial effect on cognitive function. The objective of the study was to estimate the association between physical activity and cognitive function in community-dwelling elderly Chinese in Hong Kong (HK) and Guangzhou (GZ). In the neighborhood of HK and GZ, a convenience sample of 557 (260 in HK and 297 in GZ) older persons without dementia aged over 60 years (73.4 ± 6.5) was recruited. Physical activity was measured using a checklist. Information on physical activity participation, cognitive function, and other variables were collected. Multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to evaluate the association between physical activity and cognitive function. Total number of physical activities showed significant association with the delayed recall test (p 0.05) CONCLUSION: Physical activity may not be associated with better cognitive function among elderly Chinese independently of other factors.

  1. Symmetry control in subscale near-vacuum hohlraums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turnbull, D., E-mail: turnbull2@llnl.gov; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N.; Landen, O. L.; Ho, D. D.; Ross, J. S.; Khan, S.; Pak, A.; Dewald, E. L.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J. [National Ignition Facility, LLNL, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Mackinnon, A. [National Ignition Facility, LLNL, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Zylstra, A. B. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Rinderknecht, H. G. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); National Ignition Facility, LLNL, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Sio, H.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Controlling the symmetry of indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions remains a key challenge. Increasing the ratio of the hohlraum diameter to the capsule diameter (case-to-capsule ratio, or CCR) facilitates symmetry tuning. By varying the balance of energy between the inner and outer cones as well as the incident laser pulse length, we demonstrate the ability to tune from oblate, through round, to prolate at a CCR of 3.2 in near-vacuum hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility, developing empirical playbooks along the way for cone fraction sensitivity of various laser pulse epochs. Radiation-hydrodynamic simulations with enhanced inner beam propagation reproduce most experimental observables, including hot spot shape, for a majority of implosions. Specular reflections are used to diagnose the limits of inner beam propagation as a function of pulse length.

  2. Extending the Floor and the Ceiling for Assessment of Physical Function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fries, James F.; Lingala, Bharathi; Tjin-Kam-Jet-Siemons, Liseth; Glas, Cornelis A.W.; Cella, David; Hussain, Yusra N.; Bruce, Bonnie; Krishnan, Eswar

    2014-01-01

    Objective To improve the assessment of physical function by enhancing precision of physical function assessment as it pertains to subjects at extreme ends of the health continuum (i.e., subjects with extremely poor function [“floor”] or extremely good health [“ceiling”]). Methods Under the

  3. Effects of interactive physical-activity video-game training on physical and cognitive function in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillot, Pauline; Perrot, Alexandra; Hartley, Alan

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the potential of exergame training based on physically simulated sport play as a mode of physical activity that could have cognitive benefits for older adults. If exergame play has the cognitive benefits of conventional physical activity and also has the intrinsic attractiveness of video games, then it might be a very effective way to induce desirable lifestyle changes in older adults. To examine this issue, the authors developed an active video game training program using a pretest-training-posttest design comparing an experimental group (24 × 1 hr of training) with a control group without treatment. Participants completed a battery of neuropsychological tests, assessing executive control, visuospatial functions, and processing speed, to measure the cognitive impact of the program. They were also given a battery of functional fitness tests to measure the physical impact of the program. The trainees improved significantly in measures of game performance. They also improved significantly more than the control participants in measures of physical function and cognitive measures of executive control and processing speed, but not on visuospatial measures. It was encouraging to observe that, engagement in physically simulated sport games yielded benefits to cognitive and physical skills that are directly involved in functional abilities older adults need in everyday living (e.g., Hultsch, Hertzog, Small, & Dixon, 1999).

  4. "Moved by the spirit": does spirituality moderate the interrelationships between subjective well-being subscales?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuurmans-Stekhoven, James

    2010-07-01

    Despite the recent escalation of research into the spirituality and well-being link, past efforts have been plagued by methodological problems. However, the potential for measurement error within psychometric instruments remains largely unexplored. After reviewing theory and evidence suggesting spirituality might represent an affective misattribution, moderation modeling-with each subjective well-being (SWB) subscale as a dependent variable as predicted by the remaining SWB subscales-is utilized to test the assumption of scale invariance. These interrelationships were shown to vary in conjunction with spirituality; that is the analysis revealed significant spirituality x subscale interactions. Importantly, in all models the spirituality main effect was either nonsignificant or accounted for by other predictors. In combination, the findings suggest the interrelationship between the subscales rather than the level of SWB varies systematically with spirituality and casts considerable doubt on the previously reported "belief-as-benefit" effect.

  5. Validation of the 4DSQ Somatization Subscale in the Occupational Health Care Setting as a Screener

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vroege, Lars; Emons, Wilco H. M.; Sijtsma, Klaas; Hoedeman, Rob; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M.

    Purpose Somatoform disorders (physical symptoms without medical explanation that cause dysfunction) are prevalent in the occupational health (OH) care setting and are associated with functional impairment and absenteeism. Availability of psychometric instruments aimed at assessing somatoform

  6. Endogenous subclinical thyroid disorders, physical and cognitive function, depression, and mortality in older individuals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Renate T de Jongh; Paul Lips; Natasja M van Schoor; Kelly J Rijs; Dorly J H Deeg; Hannie C Comijs; Mark H H Kramer; Jan P Vandenbroucke; Olaf M Dekkers

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To what extent endogenous subclinical thyroid disorders contribute to impaired physical and cognitive function, depression, and mortality in older individuals remains a matter of debate. Design...

  7. Physical activity, quality of life, and functional autonomy of adults with spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanishi, Camilla Yuri; Greguol, Márcia

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to perform a systematic review of studies that address the influence of physical activity on the quality of life and functional independence of adult individuals with spinal cord injury. The review was performed using data obtained from the MEDLINE, CINAHL, SciELO, LILACS, SPORTDiscus, Web of Science, Academic Search Premier, and PEDro databases using the following keywords: quality of life; functional independence; autonomy; independence; physical activity; activities of daily living; physical exercise; tetraplegia; paraplegia; spinal cord injury; physical disabilities; and wheelchair. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria. Although there was a lack of consensus among the selected studies, the majority of them presented a strong correlation between physical activity and variables of quality of life and/or functional independence. Thus, physical activity appears to have an important influence on social relationships, functional independence, psychological factors, and physical aspects, which can enhance quality of life and independence in the performance of daily activities.

  8. The Correlation of SCL-90-R Anxiety, Depression, Somatization Subscale Scores with Chronic Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adilay, Utku; Guclu, Bulent; Goksel, Murat; Keskil, Semih

    2017-02-07

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation of the Symptom Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R) anxiety, depression, and somatization subscale scores with chronic low back pain. In this study, 75 patients admitted with the complaint of chronic low back pain (patient group) and 75 healthy persons (control group) were evaluated. SCL-90-R anxiety, depression, and somatization subscale scores of patients having chronic low back pain and healthy persons were measured. The mean values were paired and using two tailed t test they were statistically evaluated. The difference between SCL-90-R anxiety subscale subscores of patients having choronic low back pain and healthy persons was statistically non significant (p 0.05).The difference betweenSCL-90-R depression subscale subscores of patients having chronic low back pain and healthy persons was statistically non significant (p 0.05). The difference between SCL-90-R somatization subscale subscores of patients having chronic low back pain and healthy persons was statistically significant (p 0.05). Our data show that SCL-90-R somatization subscale subscores were higher in patients with low back pain. The treatment of low back pain can be more successful when combined with the treatment of somatization.

  9. Criteria, indicators and levels of formed professional functional competences of future teachers of physical culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samsutina N.M.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available It is shown the structural components of the functional competence of professional teachers of physical education: motivational, cognitive and action-practical. We used the following methods of scientific knowledge, as the analysis of psychological, educational and methodological literature, synthesis, comparison, generalization, specification, classification, ordering Criteria and levels of occupational functional competence of future teachers of physical education. It is determined that the high level of professional formation of the functional competence of future teachers of physical culture is characterized by the motivation to perform professional functions of a teacher of physical culture, fundamental knowledge required to perform professional functions of a teacher of physical culture, a high level of general physical fitness, pronounced specific motor abilities and skills.

  10. Physical Heterogeneity and Aquatic Community Function in River Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    The geomorphological character of a river network provides the template upon which evolution acts to create unique biological communities. Deciphering commonly observed patterns and processes within riverine landscapes resulting from the interplay between physical and biological...

  11. Anxiety treatment improves physical functioning with oblique scoring of the SF-12 short form health survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Andrea N; Sherbourne, Cathy D; Roy-Byrne, Peter P; Stein, Murray B; Sullivan, Greer; Bystritsky, Alexander; Craske, Michelle G

    2013-01-01

    No studies have found a positive effect of anxiety treatment on physical functioning, but recent investigations of the 12-item Short Form Health Questionnaire (SF-12), which is frequently used to assess physical functioning, have suggested that orthogonal scoring of the summary measure may distort representations of physical health. The current study reanalyzes whether anxiety treatment improves physical functioning using oblique scoring in the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management (CALM) randomized clinical trial for the treatment of anxiety disorders. Replication was tested in reanalysis of data from the earlier Collaborative Care for Anxiety and Panic (CCAP) randomized clinical trial for the treatment of panic disorder. The CALM study included 1004 primary care patients with panic, social anxiety, generalized anxiety or posttraumatic stress disorders. Patients received usual care (UC) or an evidence-based intervention (cognitive behavioral therapy, psychotropic medication or both; ITV). Physical functioning (SF-12v2) was assessed at baseline and at 6, 12 and 18 months. Oblique and orthogonal scoring methods for the physical functioning aggregate measure from SF-12 scale items were compared. In CALM, physical functioning improved to a greater degree in ITV than UC for oblique but not orthogonal scoring. Findings were replicated in the CCAP data. Evidence-based treatment for anxiety disorders in primary care improves physical functioning when measured using oblique scoring of the SF-12. Due to this scoring issue, effects of mental health treatment on physical functioning may have been understated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Anxiety treatment improves physical functioning with oblique scoring of the SF-12 Short Form Health Survey☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Andrea N.; Sherbourne, Cathy D.; Roy-Byrne, Peter P.; Stein, Murray B.; Sullivan, Greer; Bystritsky, Alexander; Craske, Michelle G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective No studies have found a positive effect of anxiety treatment on physical functioning, but recent investigations of the 12-item Short Form Health Questionnaire (SF-12), which is frequently used to assess physical functioning, have suggested that orthogonal scoring of the summary measure may distort representations of physical health. The current study reanalyzes whether anxiety treatment improves physical functioning using oblique scoring in the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management (CALM) randomized clinical trial for the treatment of anxiety disorders. Replication was tested in reanalysis of data from the earlier Collaborative Care for Anxiety and Panic (CCAP) randomized clinical trial for the treatment of panic disorder. Method The CALM study included 1004 primary care patients with panic, social anxiety, generalized anxiety or posttraumatic stress disorders. Patients received usual care (UC) or an evidence-based intervention (cognitive behavioral therapy, psychotropic medication or both; ITV). Physical functioning (SF-12v2) was assessed at baseline and at 6, 12 and 18 months. Oblique and orthogonal scoring methods for the physical functioning aggregate measure from SF-12 scale items were compared. Results In CALM, physical functioning improved to a greater degree in ITV than UC for oblique but not orthogonal scoring. Findings were replicated in the CCAP data. Conclusions Evidence-based treatment for anxiety disorders in primary care improves physical functioning when measured using oblique scoring of the SF-12. Due to this scoring issue, effects of mental health treatment on physical functioning may have been understated. PMID:23332608

  13. Validity of the German Version of the Continuous-Scale Physical Functional Performance 10 Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Härdi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The Continuous-Scale Physical Functional Performance 10 Test (CS-PFP 10 quantitatively assesses physical functional performance in older adults who have a broad range of physical functional ability. This study assessed the validity and reliability of the CS-PFP 10 German version. Methods. Forward-translations and backtranslations as well as cultural adaptions of the test were conducted. Participants were German-speaking Swiss community-dwelling adults aged 64 and older. Concurrent validity was assessed using Pearson correlation coefficients between CS-PFP 10 and gait velocity, Timed Up and Go Test, hand grip strength, SF-36 physical function domain, and Freiburger Physical Activity Questionnaire. Internal consistency was calculated by Cronbach’s alpha. Results. Backtranslation and cultural adaptions were accepted by the CS-PFP 10 developer. CS-PFP 10 total score and subscores (upper body strength, upper body flexibility, lower body strength, balance and coordination, and endurance correlated significantly with all measures of physical function tested. Internal consistency was high (Cronbach’s alpha 0.95–0.98. Conclusion. The CS-PFP 10 German version is valid and reliable for measuring physical functional performance in German-speaking Swiss community-dwelling older adults. Quantifying physical function is essential for clinical practice and research and provides meaningful insight into physical functional performance of older adults. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01539200.

  14. Effects of physical exercise therapy on mobility, physical functioning, physical activity and quality of life in community-dwelling older adults with impaired mobility, physical disability and/or multi-morbidity: a meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, N.M. de; Ravensberg, C.D. van; Hobbelen, J.S.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.; Staal, J.B.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.

    2012-01-01

    This is the first meta-analysis focusing on elderly patients with mobility problems, physical disability and/or multi-morbidity. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of physical exercise therapy on mobility, physical functioning, physical activity and quality of life. A broad systematic

  15. Associations between daily physical activity and executive functioning in primary school-aged children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Niet, Anneke G.; Smith, Joanne; Scherder, Erik J. A.; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Hartman, Esther; Visscher, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: While there is some evidence that aerobic fitness is positively associated with executive functioning in children, evidence for a relation between children's daily physical activity and their executive functioning is limited. The objective was to examine associations between objectively

  16. The impact of nutritional status, physical function, comorbidity and early versus late start in dialysis on quality of life in older dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lægreid, Inger Karin; Aasarød, Knut; Bye, Asta; Leivestad, Torbjørn; Jordhøy, Marit

    2014-02-01

    For the majority of the older patients in dialysis, the treatment will be lifelong. Thus, quality of life (QoL) is a crucial outcome. Our aim was to assess the QoL of older Norwegian dialysis patients and to investigate the impact of early (estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR ≥10 mL/min) versus late (eGFR nutritional status and physical capacity. A self-report questionnaire including SF-36 (QoL) and the Subjective Global Assessment (SGA; nutritional status) was mailed to all patients (n = 320) ≥75 years registered in the Norwegian Renal Registry (NRR) as being in dialysis by September 2009. Reply was received from 233 patients (73%). Medical data including comorbidities and eGFR at dialysis start (obtained for 194 patients) were retrieved from the NRR. Functional capacity was determined from the SGA. Compared to reports from younger dialysis patients, our patients scored poorer on all SF-36 subscales. Early start in dialysis was registered for 52 patients, 142 patients started late, 51.4% were well nourished (SGA A), 32.3% moderately malnourished (SGA B) and 16.4% were severely malnourished (SGA C). No significant association between any SF-36 scores and early versus late start, nutritional status or comorbidity was found. Better physical function was significantly associated with better scores on all SF-36 scales. Our results indicate that physical function is important to all QoL aspects. Increased focus on physical rehabilitation seems pertinent. Early start of dialysis treatment was not associated with better long term QoL scores.

  17. Elderly’s Physical-Functional Fitness and Perceived Functional Capacity and Health after Participation in a Hydrotherapy Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Cristina Sacramento Pereira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have demonstrated how physical activity in older people benefits their physical fitness, health and well-being. The relation between physical activity and perceived functional capacity and health is yet to be considered. This study is a quantitative research design that investigated the improvement of the physical-functional fitness and the perception of the functional capacity and health of an elderly group participating in a waterbased exercise program (hydrotherapy. The data was collected in three different moments of the exercise program through a battery of tests of physical-functional fitness established by Batista and Sardinha (2005 and a questionnaire adapted from SABE project (Lebrão and Duarte, 2003. Twenty-six elderly persons (23 women and 3 men aged between 60 and 84 years old participated in a 31-week hydrotherapy program (twice a week; 45 minutes by session. Friedman test was used for assessing statistical differences between the physical-functional fitness and the questionnaire responses in each of the three evaluation moments. Results revealed that this program was enough to improve the physical-functional fitness of the elderly, as well as the perception they had about their health and ability to perform activities of daily living.

  18. Functional Independence in Late-Life: Maintaining Physical Functioning in Older Adulthood Predicts Daily Life Function after Age 80.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Leslie; Leng, Xiaoyan; La Monte, Michael J; Tindle, Hilary A; Cochrane, Barbara B; Shumaker, Sally A

    2016-03-01

    We examined physical functioning (PF) trajectories (maintaining, slowly declining, and rapidly declining) spanning 15 years in older women aged 65-80 and protective factors that predicted better current levels and less decline in functional independence outcomes after age 80. Women's Health Initiative extension participants who met criteria (enrolled in either the clinical trial or observational study cohort, >80 years at the data release cutoff, PF survey data from initial enrollment to age 80, and functional independence survey data after age 80) were included in these analyses (mean [SD] age = 84.0 [1.4] years; N = 10,478). PF was measured with the SF-36 (mean = 4.9 occasions). Functional independence was measured by self-reported level of dependence in basic and instrumental activities of daily living (ADLs and IADLs) (mean = 3.4 and 3.3 occasions). Maintaining consistent PF in older adulthood extends functional independence in ADL and IADL in late-life. Protective factors shared by ADL and IADL include maintaining PF over time, self-reported excellent or very good health, no history of hip fracture after age 55, and no history of cardiovascular disease. Better IADL function is uniquely predicted by a body mass index less than 25 and no depression. Less ADL and IADL decline is predicted by better self-reported health, and less IADL decline is uniquely predicted by having no history of hip fracture after age 55. Maintaining or improving PF and preventing injury and disease in older adulthood (ages 65-80) has far-reaching implications for improving late-life (after age 80) functional independence. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Features of physical development, physical preparedness and functional state of boys and girls – students of Polish higher educational establishments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prusik Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The features of level and structure of indexes of physical development, physical preparedness and functional state of students are considered. In research 50 took part students of Higher School of Sciences about health from Bydgoshch (14 boys and 36 girls, age 18-29 years. Reliable distinctions are exposed in physical preparedness and functional state of boys and girls on the indexes of force. Indexes of psychophysiological possibilities, frequencies of heart-throbs in a state of rest, the index of Ruf'e have no reliable distinctions at boys and girls. It is shown that power capabilities have the most value in complex preparedness of boys. Functional and psychophysiological possibilities have the most value in complex preparedness of girls. The factor structure of preparedness of girls is differ by greater complication as compared to boys. On the level of physical preparedness and functional state of girls in a greater degree of anthropometric information have influence as compared to boys. Power capabilities for girls occupy middle position in the general structure of preparedness, while for boys' power capabilities occupy leading position. It is shown that on employments on physical education of boys it is necessary to do an accent on development of force, while for girls - on development of endurance (functional possibilities and in a greater degree as compared to boys it is necessary to take into account psychophysiological possibilities.

  20. Physical capacity and functional abilities improve in young adults with intellectual disabilities after functional training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barwick, Ryan B; Tillman, Mark D; Stopka, Christine B; Dipnarine, Krishna; Delisle, Anthony; Sayedul Huq, Mona

    2012-06-01

    Individuals with an intellectual disability (ID) have higher rates of obesity, lower rates of physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and muscular endurance than do typically developed individuals (TDI) and are twice as likely to develop chronic disease, living half as long as TDIs do. The purpose of this study was to examine the improvements in physical capacity and functional ability in Special Olympic Athletes (SOAs) aged 19-22 years after participating in a functional training (FT) program and compare these scores with those of the SOAs in a resistance weight training (WT) program. Twenty SOAs (13 men, 7 women with mild to moderate ID) participated in a 1-hour FT program, twice a week, for 10 weeks, compared with 22 same-aged SOAs (14 men, 8 women) participating in a 1-hour WT program (2× week for 8 weeks). Prefitness and postfitness tests consisting of heart rate (HR) for the 3-minute step test, static plank, body weight squats, static bar hang, and knee push-ups were conducted. Two-tailed, paired sample t-tests (p < 0.05) were used to evaluate the differences in the FT group. Change scores were used to compare FTG with the WT group. The HR decreased by 31.8 b·min⁻¹ pre-post in the FTG (p < 0.001). Static plank duration improved by 22.4 seconds in the FTG (p = 0.016); static plank change scores improved (p = 0.037) for the FTG (26.5 ± 32.1 seconds compared with that for the WT group (4.6 ± 22 seconds). Height and weight values were unchanged in both the groups. The results of this study demonstrate the value of FT programs for this population, because weight equipment is not always available in many settings.

  1. Effects of a Cognitively Demanding Aerobic Intervention During Recess on Children's Physical Fitness and Executive Functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Niet, Anneke G.; Smith, Joanne; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Scherder, Erik J. A.; Hartman, Esther; Visscher, Chris

    The objective of this study was to analyze the effects of a physical activity program including both aerobic exercise and cognitively engaging physical activities on children's physical fitness and executive functions. Children from 3 primary schools (aged 8-12 years) were recruited. A

  2. Classification of quality of life subscales within the ICF framework in burn research: identifying overlaps and gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirte, J; van Loey, N E E; Maertens, K; Moortgat, P; Hubens, G; Van Daele, U

    2014-11-01

    Quality of life (QOL) is one of the leading outcomes in burn care research. This study classifies subscales of common QOL measures within the International Classification of Functioning disability and health (ICF) framework to determine to which extent the measures are complementary or overlapping and to investigate whether the instruments are able to describe the full spectrum of patients' functioning. A literature search was performed to determine the most frequently used questionnaires in burn research. The subscales of the three mostly used questionnaires were classified within the ICF framework. Two generic measures, the Short Form-36 items (SF-36) and the European Quality of Life 5 Dimensions (EQ-5D), and a disease specific measure, the Burn Specific Health Scale-Brief (BSHS-B), were analyzed. The BSHS-B covered most domains and was the only scale that included personal factors. The SF-36 included only one domain in the activity limitations and similar to the EQ-5D no contextual factors were included. Environmental factors were not addressed in the questionnaires, even though these may have an impact on the quality of life in patients with burns. To capture the full spectrum of dysfunctioning a combination of the BSHS-B with a generic questionnaire seems obligatory. However still some domains of functioning remain uncovered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  3. Promoting a Functional Physical Self-Concept in Physical Education: Evaluation of a 10-Week Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Mirko; Valkanover, Stefan; Roebers, Claudia; Conzelmann, Achim

    2013-01-01

    Most physical education intervention studies on the positive effect of sports on self-concept development have attempted to "increase" schoolchildren's self-concept without taking the "veridicality" of the self-concept into account. The present study investigated whether a 10-week intervention in physical education would lead…

  4. Kernel functions and elliptic differential equations in mathematical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bergman, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    This text focuses on the theory of boundary value problems in partial differential equations, which plays a central role in various fields of pure and applied mathematics, theoretical physics, and engineering. Geared toward upper-level undergraduates and graduate students, it discusses a portion of the theory from a unifying point of view and provides a systematic and self-contained introduction to each branch of the applications it employs.The two-part treatment begins with a survey of boundary value problems occurring in certain branches of theoretical physics. It introduces fundamental solu

  5. Kernel functions and elliptic differential equations in mathematical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bergman, Stefan

    1953-01-01

    This text focuses on the theory of boundary value problems in partial differential equations, which plays a central role in various fields of pure and applied mathematics, theoretical physics, and engineering. Geared toward upper-level undergraduates and graduate students, it discusses a portion of the theory from a unifying point of view and provides a systematic and self-contained introduction to each branch of the applications it employs.The two-part treatment begins with a survey of boundary value problems occurring in certain branches of theoretical physics. It introduces fundamental solu

  6. Associations between physical function, dual-task performance and cognition in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sobol, Nanna Aue; Hoffmann, Kristine; Vogel, Asmus

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Alzheimer's disease (AD) causes a gradual decline in cognition, limitations of dual-tasking and physical function leading to total dependence. Hence, information about the interaction between physical function, dual-task performance and cognition may lead to new treatment strategies...... blinded multicenter RCT 'ADEX' (Alzheimer's disease: the effect of physical exercise) were used. Assessments included tests of physical function: 400-m walk test, 10-m walk test, Timed Up and Go test and 30-s chair stand test; dual-task performance, i.e., 10-m walk while counting backwards from 50...

  7. Physical Activity and Cognitive Function in Older Adults: The Mediating Effect of Depressive Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, David E; Marson, Daniel C; Triebel, Kristen L; Ball, Karlene K; Wadley, Virginia G; Cody, Shameka L

    2016-01-01

    Depressive symptoms and social networks may influence the relationship between physical activity and cognition. Using structural equation modeling, depressive symptoms and social networks were examined as mediators between physical activity and cognition in community-dwelling older adults (N = 122), with a range of cognitive abilities (e.g., normal, mild cognitive impairment). The model included age, physical activity, sedentary behavior, sleeping, social networks, depressive symptoms, and cognitive function. A path was observed between physical activity, depressive symptoms, and cognition; specifically, those who were more physically active experienced less depression and better cognitive functioning. No relationship between social networks and cognition was found. This model fits the data well (goodness-of-fit index = .93, adjusted goodness-of-fit index = .90, root mean square error of approximation = .06). Results suggest that physical activity may mitigate depressive symptoms, with beneficial effects on cognitive functioning in both those with and without mild cognitive impairment. Suggestions for managing depression and improving cognitive functioning are provided.

  8. Genetic and environmental links between cognitive and physical functions in old age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Wendy; Deary, Ian J; McGue, Matt

    2009-01-01

    of twins from the Longitudinal Study of Aging Danish Twins. Cognitive function was measured using forward and backward digit span, immediate and delayed memory, and fluency tasks. Physical function was measured using self-report of ability to carry out physical activities including walking, running...

  9. Physical function and fitness in long-term survivors of childhood leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brussel, Marco; Takken, Tim; van der Net, Janjaap; Engelbert, Raoul H. H.; Bierings, Marc; Schoenmakers, Marja A. G. C.; Helders, Paul J. M.

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the physical function and fitness in survivors of childhood leukaemia 5-6 years after cessation of chemotherapy. Thirteen children (six boys and seven girls; mean age 15.5 years) who were treated for leukaemia were studied 5-6 years after cessation of therapy. Physical function and

  10. The Relationship between Physical Activity and Thermal Protective Clothing on Functional Balance in Firefighters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Pui W.; Suyama, Joe; Cham, Rakie; Hostler, David

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between baseline physical training and the use of firefighting thermal protective clothing (TPC) with breathing apparatus on functional balance. Twenty-three male firefighters performed a functional balance test under four gear/clothing conditions. Participants were divided into groups by physical training status,…

  11. Physical Activity and Cognitive Function in the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirduso, Waneen W.; Asplund, Lesli A.

    1995-01-01

    A relationship between physical fitness and cognition has been difficult to document. The paper describes cognition and examines the effects of aging on cognition, the fitness-cognition relationship hypothesis, difficulties in determining the fitness-cognition relationship, and the current status of the relationship. (SM)

  12. The effect of pain on physical functioning after breast cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kenneth G.; Christensen, Karl B.; Kehlet, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Persistent postsurgical pain, musculoskeletal pain, sensory disturbances, and lymphedema are major clinical problems after treatment for breast cancer. However, there is little evidence on how these sequelae affects physical function. The aim this study was to develop and validate a p...... qualities, and may be used to evaluate the impact of specific sequelae after breast cancer treatment on physical functioning, as well as to monitor and target interventions to optimize pain treatment and rehabilitation.......Objectives: Persistent postsurgical pain, musculoskeletal pain, sensory disturbances, and lymphedema are major clinical problems after treatment for breast cancer. However, there is little evidence on how these sequelae affects physical function. The aim this study was to develop and validate...... a procedure-specific tool for assessing the impact of pain and other sequelae on physical function after breast cancer treatment. Methods: A literature review, patient and expert interviews were used to identify dimensions of physical function and sequelae. A questionnaire was developed and tested using...

  13. The perioperative changes in physical function and physique of patients with gastrointestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Tsuyoshi; Kubo, Akira

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to observe the long-term change in physical function and physique from perioperative to discharge of patients with gastrointestinal cancer. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were 47 perioperative patients with gastrointestinal cancer [25 men and 22 women aged 61.3 ± 11.0 years (mean ± SD)]. Six-minute walk distance was measured for physical function and body mass index and calf circumference were measured for physique. These items were evaluated at three time points: before surgery, after surgery, and after discharge. [Results] Significant declines in physical function and physique were observed temporarily after surgery. Physical function improved equally before surgery in after discharge. On the other hand, postoperative physique was significantly lower than that observed pre-operatively. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the perioperative changes in physical function and physique follow different courses in patients with gastrointestinal cancer.

  14. Physical activity and obesity mediate the association between childhood motor function and adolescents’ academic achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantomaa, Marko T.; Stamatakis, Emmanuel; Kankaanpää, Anna; Kaakinen, Marika; Rodriguez, Alina; Taanila, Anja; Ahonen, Timo; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Tammelin, Tuija

    2013-01-01

    The global epidemic of obesity and physical inactivity may have detrimental implications for young people’s cognitive function and academic achievement. This prospective study investigated whether childhood motor function predicts later academic achievement via physical activity, fitness, and obesity. The study sample included 8,061 children from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986, which contains data about parent-reported motor function at age 8 y and self-reported physical activity, predicted cardiorespiratory fitness (cycle ergometer test), obesity (body weight and height), and academic achievement (grades) at age 16 y. Structural equation models with unstandardized (B) and standardized (β) coefficients were used to test whether, and to what extent, physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and obesity at age 16 mediated the association between childhood motor function and adolescents’ academic achievement. Physical activity was associated with a higher grade-point average, and obesity was associated with a lower grade-point average in adolescence. Furthermore, compromised motor function in childhood had a negative indirect effect on adolescents’ academic achievement via physical inactivity (B = –0.023, 95% confidence interval = –0.031, –0.015) and obesity (B = –0.025, 95% confidence interval = –0.039, –0.011), but not via cardiorespiratory fitness. These results suggest that physical activity and obesity may mediate the association between childhood motor function and adolescents’ academic achievement. Compromised motor function in childhood may represent an important factor driving the effects of obesity and physical inactivity on academic underachievement. PMID:23277558

  15. Physical activity and obesity mediate the association between childhood motor function and adolescents' academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantomaa, Marko T; Stamatakis, Emmanuel; Kankaanpää, Anna; Kaakinen, Marika; Rodriguez, Alina; Taanila, Anja; Ahonen, Timo; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Tammelin, Tuija

    2013-01-29

    The global epidemic of obesity and physical inactivity may have detrimental implications for young people's cognitive function and academic achievement. This prospective study investigated whether childhood motor function predicts later academic achievement via physical activity, fitness, and obesity. The study sample included 8,061 children from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986, which contains data about parent-reported motor function at age 8 y and self-reported physical activity, predicted cardiorespiratory fitness (cycle ergometer test), obesity (body weight and height), and academic achievement (grades) at age 16 y. Structural equation models with unstandardized (B) and standardized (β) coefficients were used to test whether, and to what extent, physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and obesity at age 16 mediated the association between childhood motor function and adolescents' academic achievement. Physical activity was associated with a higher grade-point average, and obesity was associated with a lower grade-point average in adolescence. Furthermore, compromised motor function in childhood had a negative indirect effect on adolescents' academic achievement via physical inactivity (B = -0.023, 95% confidence interval = -0.031, -0.015) and obesity (B = -0.025, 95% confidence interval = -0.039, -0.011), but not via cardiorespiratory fitness. These results suggest that physical activity and obesity may mediate the association between childhood motor function and adolescents' academic achievement. Compromised motor function in childhood may represent an important factor driving the effects of obesity and physical inactivity on academic underachievement.

  16. Exploring the relations among physical fitness, executive functioning, and low academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruijn, A G M; Hartman, E; Kostons, D; Visscher, C; Bosker, R J

    2018-03-01

    Physical fitness seems to be related to academic performance, at least when taking the role of executive functioning into account. This assumption is highly relevant for the vulnerable population of low academic achievers because their academic performance might benefit from enhanced physical fitness. The current study examined whether physical fitness and executive functioning are independent predictors of low mathematics and spelling achievement or whether the relation between physical fitness and low achievement is mediated by specific executive functions. In total, 477 students from second- and third-grade classes of 12 primary schools were classified as either low or average-to-high achievers in mathematics and spelling based on their scores on standardized achievement tests. Multilevel structural equation models were built with direct paths between physical fitness and academic achievement and added indirect paths via components of executive functioning: inhibition, verbal working memory, visuospatial working memory, and shifting. Physical fitness was only indirectly related to low achievement via specific executive functions, depending on the academic domain involved. Verbal working memory was a mediator between physical fitness and low achievement in both domains, whereas visuospatial working memory had a mediating role only in mathematics. Physical fitness interventions aiming to improve low academic achievement, thus, could potentially be successful. The mediating effect of executive functioning suggests that these improvements in academic achievement will be preceded by enhanced executive functions, either verbal working memory (in spelling) or both verbal and visuospatial working memory (in mathematics). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Subscales of the vestibular activities and participation questionnaire could be applied across cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Martin; Whitney, Susan L; Alghwiri, Alia; Alshebber, Kefah; Strobl, Ralf; Alghadir, Ahmad; Al-momani, Murad O; Furman, Joseph M; Grill, Eva

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the objectivity, cross-cultural validity, and convergent validity of the Vestibular Activities and Participation (VAP) questionnaire among four countries, Germany, United States, Jordan, and Saudi Arabia. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in four specialized outpatient dizziness clinics in Germany, United States, Jordan, and Saudi Arabia. A total of 453 participants were included in the study. The Rasch analysis revealed two separate subscales. Subscale 1 items included focusing attention, lying down, standing, bending, lifting and carrying objects, and sports. Subscale 2 items included walking long distances, climbing, running, moving around within buildings other than home, using transportation, and driving. The Pearson product-moment correlation between the Dizziness Handicap Inventory and the summary score of the VAP subscale 1 was 0.66 and was 0.64 for subscale 2. Owing to its shortness and intercultural adaptability, the new two-scale version of the VAP questionnaire lends itself to clinical practice and research across countries to estimate the effect of vertigo and dizziness on activity limitation and participation restrictions. Psychometrically sound summary scores can be calculated. More extended versions of the VAP can be used for comprehensive clinical assessment where summary scores are not needed or a more detailed documentation is warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Abdominal plasty with and without plication-effects on trunk muscles, lung function, and self-rated physical function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmsson, Sofia; Fagevik Olsén, Monika; Staalesen, Trude; Elander, Anna; Nygren-Bonnier, Malin

    2017-06-01

    Weight loss after obesity and pregnancy is associated with excess abdominal skin and weakness of the abdominal wall, which is assumed to cause low back pain and reduce lung function. Today, abdominoplasty is the only known method to treat excess skin, and plication is used to improve aesthetics and function alone or in addition to surgery. There is lack of evidence concerning the surgery's effect on trunk muscles, lung function, and physical function. The aim was to evaluate the effect on trunk muscle endurance, lung function and self-rated physical function after abdominoplasty with and without muscle plication. To evaluate the effect on trunk muscle endurance, lung function, and self-rated physical function after abdominoplasty with and without muscle plication. A series of 125 people were randomised to abdominoplasty with or without rectus abdominis muscle plication. Trunk muscle endurance, lung function, and self-rated physical function (disability rating index) were measured before and 1 year after surgery. There were no significant differences in any of the measured variables between the groups either before or after surgery. A significant decrease (p = .02) in back muscle endurance was seen after abdominoplasty without muscle plication. A significant positive effect (p = .04) in one of the activities (running) assessed by DRI was reported after abdominoplasty with muscle plication. No significant differences in trunk muscle endurance, lung function, or self-rated physical function were found after abdominoplasty with vs without plication. As the primary indication for surgery was excess skin and not diastasis of the rectus abdominis muscles, there is a need for future trials before conclusions can be drawn of effect of abdominoplasty and plication.

  19. Association between Physical Functionality and Falls Risk in Community-Living Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Disa J. Smee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ageing-related declines in physiological attributes, such as muscle strength, can bring with them an increased risk of falls and subsequently greater risk of losing independence. These declines have substantial impact on an individual’s functional ability. However, the precise relationship between falls risk and physical functionality has not been evaluated. The aims of this study were to determine the association between falls risk and physical functionality using objective measures and to create an appropriate model to explain variance in falls risk. Thirty-two independently living adults aged 65–92 years completed the FallScreen, the Continuous-Scale Physical Functional Performance 10 (CS-PFP10 tests, and the 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12. The relationships between falls risk, physical functionality, and age were investigated using correlational and multiple hierarchical regression analyses. Overall, total physical functionality accounted for 24% of variance in an individual’s falls risk while age explained a further 13%. The oldest-old age group had significantly greater falls risk and significantly lower physical functional performance. Mean scores for all measures showed that there were substantial (but not significant differences between males and females. While increasing age is the strongest single predictor of increasing falls risk, poorer physical functionality was strongly, independently related to greater falls risk.

  20. Relationships between functional movement screen scores, maturation and physical performance in young soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Rhodri S; Oliver, Jon L; Radnor, John M; Rhodes, Benjamin C; Faigenbaum, Avery D; Myer, Gregory D

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between functional movement screen scores, maturation and physical performance in young soccer players. Thirty males (11-16 years) were assessed for maturation, functional movement screen scores and a range of physical performance tests (squat jump, reactive strength index protocol and reactive agility cut). Older players significantly outperformed younger participants in all tests (P functional movement screen scores and maturation.

  1. Physical exercise and osteoporosis: effects of different types of exercises on bone and physical function of postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Linda Denise Fernandes; Oliveira, Mônica Longo de; Lirani-Galvão, Ana Paula; Marin-Mio, Rosângela Villa; Santos, Rodrigo Nolasco dos; Lazaretti-Castro, Marise

    2014-07-01

    Physical exercise is an important stimulus for osteoporosis prevention and treatment. However, it is not clear yet which modality would be better to stimulate bone metabolism and enhance physical function of postmenopausal women. This review paper aims to summarize and update present knowledge on the effects of different kinds of aquatic and ground physical exercises on bone metabolism and physical function of postmenopausal women. Moderate to intense exercises, performed in a high speed during short intervals of time, in water or on the ground, can be part of a program to prevent and treat postmenopausal osteoporosis. Mechanical vibration has proven to be beneficial for bone microarchitecture, improving bone density and bone strength, as well as increasing physical function. Although impact exercises are recognized as beneficial for the stimulation of bone tissue, other variables such as muscle strength, type of muscle contraction, duration and intensity of exercises are also determinants to induce changes in bone metabolism of postmenopausal women. Not only osteoanabolic exercises should be recommended; activities aimed to develop muscle strength and body balance and improve the proprioception should be encouraged to prevent falls and fractures.

  2. Changes in Physical Activity and Function with Transition to Retirement Living: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Kayla; Intzandt, Brittany; Swatridge, Karli; Myers, Anita; Roy, Eric; Middleton, Laura E

    2016-12-01

    This pilot study examined changes in physical activity and function among older adults moving from community dwellings to retirement living. Twelve community-dwelling older adults, recruited from the wait-lists of two retirement living facilities, were assessed prior to and following the transition to retirement living. Physical activity was assessed using an Actigraph (GT3X+) activity monitor; physical activity by type was reported with the CHAMPS activity questionnaire. Physical function was assessed using the Senior Fitness Test. Objectively monitored total physical activity decreased after the transition to retirement living (p = 0.02). Reports of physical activity by type indicated that only activities of daily living decreased (p < 0.01) although intentional exercise increased (p < 0.03) with the transition. Endurance and strength also improved (p < 0.05 and p < 0.04). Pilot results indicate that possible physical benefits accrue from retirement living, although efforts to reduce sedentary time are needed.

  3. Functions of Maladaptive Behavior in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Behavior Categories and Topographies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojahn, Johannes; Zaja, Rebecca H.; Turygin, Nicole; Moore, Linda; van Ingen, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Research has shown that different maladaptive behavior categories may be maintained by different contingencies. We examined whether behavior categories or behavior topographies determine functional properties. The "Questions about Behavioral Function" with its five subscales ("Attention", "Escape", "Nonsocial", "Physical", and "Tangible") was…

  4. Effects of zinc supplementation on subscales of anorexia in children: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademian, Majid; Farhangpajouh, Neda; Shahsanaee, Armindokht; Bahreynian, Maryam; Mirshamsi, Mehran; Kelishadi, Roya

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to assess the effects of zinc supplementation on improving the appetite and its subscales in children. This study was conducted in 2013 in Isfahan, Iran. It had two phases. At the first step, after validation of the Child Eating Behaviour Questionaire (CEBQ), it was completed for 300 preschool children, who were randomly selected. The second phase was conducted as a randomized controlled trial. Eighty of these children were randomly selected, and were randomly assigned to two groups of equal number receiving zinc (10 mg/day) or placebo for 12 weeks. Overall 77 children completed the trial (39 in the case and 3 in the control group).The results showed that zinc supplement can improve calorie intake in children by affecting some CEBQ subscales like Emotional over Eating and Food Responsible. Zinc supplementation had positive impact in promoting the calorie intake and some subscales of anorexia.

  5. The patellofemoral pain and osteoarthritis subscale of the KOOS (KOOS-PF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crossley, Kay M; Macri, Erin M; Cowan, Sallie M

    2017-01-01

    for patellofemoral pain have methodological limitations. This study aimed to develop a new subscale of the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score for patellofemoral pain and osteoarthritis (KOOS-PF), and evaluate its measurement properties. METHODS: Items were generated using input from 50 patients...... and interpretability of the final version of KOOS-PF and other KOOS subscales. RESULTS: From an initial 80 generated items, the final subscale included 11 items. KOOS-PF items loaded predominantly on one factor, pain during activities that load the patellofemoral joint. KOOS-PF had good internal consistency (Cronbach......'s α 0.86) and adequate test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.86). Hypothesis testing supported convergent, divergent and known-groups validity. Responsiveness was confirmed, with KOOS-PF demonstrating a moderate correlation with Global Rating of Change scores (r 0.52) and large...

  6. Enhancing physical function in HIV-infected older adults: A randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Krupa N; Majeed, Zahraa; Yoruk, Yilmaz B; Yang, Hongmei; Hilton, Tiffany N; McMahon, James M; Hall, William J; Walck, Donna; Luque, Amneris E; Ryan, Richard M

    2016-06-01

    HIV-infected older adults (HOA) are at risk of functional decline. Interventions promoting physical activity that can attenuate functional decline and are easily translated into the HOA community are of high priority. We conducted a randomized, controlled clinical trial to evaluate whether a physical activity counseling intervention based on self-determination theory (SDT) improves physical function, autonomous motivation, depression and the quality of life (QOL) in HOA. In total, 67 community-dwelling HOA with mild-to-moderate functional limitations were randomized to 1 of 2 groups: a physical activity counseling group or the usual care control group. We used SDT to guide the development of the experimental intervention. Outcome measures that were collected at baseline and final study visits included a battery of physical function tests, levels of physical activity, autonomous motivation, depression, and QOL. The study participants were similar in their demographic and clinical characteristics in both the treatment and control groups. Overall physical performance, gait speed, measures of endurance and strength, and levels of physical activity improved in the treatment group compared to the control group (p autonomous regulation such as identified regulation, and measures of depression and QOL improved significantly in the treatment group compared with the control group (p autonomous motivation, depression, and QOL in HOA with functional limitations. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Associations between daily physical activity and executive functioning in primary school-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Niet, Anneke G; Smith, Joanne; Scherder, Erik J A; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Hartman, Esther; Visscher, Chris

    2015-11-01

    While there is some evidence that aerobic fitness is positively associated with executive functioning in children, evidence for a relation between children's daily physical activity and their executive functioning is limited. The objective was to examine associations between objectively measured daily physical activity (total volume, sedentary behavior, moderate to vigorous physical activity) and executive functioning in children. Cross-sectional. Eighty primary school children (36 boys, 44 girls) aged 8-12 years old participated in the study. Physical activity was measured using accelerometers. Executive functions measured included inhibition (Stroop test), working memory (Visual Memory Span test), cognitive flexibility (Trailmaking test), and planning (Tower of London). Total volume of physical activity, time spent in sedentary behavior and moderate to vigorous physical activity were calculated and related to performance on executive functioning. More time spent in sedentary behavior was related to worse inhibition (r = -0.24). A higher total volume of physical activity was associated with better planning ability, as reflected by both a higher score on the Tower of London (r = 0.24) and a shorter total execution time (r = -0.29). Also, a significant moderate correlation was found between time spent in moderate to vigorous physical activity and the total execution time of the Tower of London (r = -0.29). Children should limit time spent in sedentary behavior, and increasing their total physical activity. Total volume of physical activity, which consisted mostly of light intensity physical activity, is related to executive functioning. This opens up new possibilities to explore both the quantity and quality of physical activity in relation to cognition in children. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Home blood pressure predicts stroke incidence among older adults with impaired physical function: the Ohasama study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Keiko; Asayama, Kei; Satoh, Michihiro; Hosaka, Miki; Matsuda, Ayako; Inoue, Ryusuke; Tsubota-Utsugi, Megumi; Murakami, Takahisa; Nomura, Kyoko; Kikuya, Masahiro; Metoki, Hirohito; Imai, Yutaka; Ohkubo, Takayoshi

    2017-12-01

    Several observational studies have found modifying effects of functional status on the association between conventional office blood pressure (BP) and adverse outcomes. We aimed to examine whether the association between higher BP and stroke was attenuated or inverted among older adults with impaired function using self-measured home BP measurements. We followed 501 Japanese community-dwelling adults aged at least 60 years (mean age, 68.6 years) with no history of stroke. Multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios for 1-SD increase in home BP and office BP measurements were calculated by the Cox proportional hazards model. Functional status was assessed by self-reported physical function. During a median follow-up of 11.5 years, first strokes were observed in 47 participants. Higher home SBP, but not office SBP, was significantly associated with increased risk of stroke among both 349 participants with normal physical function and 152 participants with impaired physical function [hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) per 14.4-mmHg increase: 1.74 (1.12-2.69) and 1.77 (1.06-2.94), respectively], with no significant interaction for physical function (P = 0.56). Higher home DBP, but not office DBP, was also significantly associated with increased risk of stroke (P ≤ 0.029) irrespective of physical function (all P > 0.05 for interaction). Neither home BP nor office BP was significantly associated with all-cause mortality irrespective of physical function. Higher home BP was associated with increased risk of stroke even among those with impaired physical function. Measurements of home BP would be useful for stroke prevention, even after physical function decline.

  9. Muscle Strength and Changes in Physical Function in Women With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, James S; Trupin, Laura; Schmajuk, Gabriela; Barton, Jennifer; Margaretten, Mary; Yazdany, Jinoos; Yelin, Edward H; Katz, Patricia P

    2015-08-01

    Cross-sectional studies have observed that muscle weakness is associated with worse physical function among women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The present study examines whether reduced upper and lower extremity muscle strength predict declines in function over time among adult women with SLE. One hundred forty-six women from a longitudinal SLE cohort participated in the study. All measures were collected during in-person research visits approximately 2 years apart. Upper extremity muscle strength was assessed by grip strength. Lower extremity muscle strength was assessed by peak knee torque of extension and flexion. Physical function was assessed using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB). Regression analyses modeled associations of baseline upper and lower extremity muscle strength with followup SPPB scores controlling for baseline SPPB, age, SLE duration, SLE disease activity (Systemic Lupus Activity Questionnaire), physical activity level, prednisone use, body composition, and depression. Secondary analyses tested whether associations of baseline muscle strength with followup in SPPB scores differed between intervals of varying baseline muscle strength. Lower extremity muscle strength strongly predicted changes over 2 years in physical function even when controlling for covariates. The association of reduced lower extremity muscle strength with reduced physical function in the future was greatest among the weakest women. Reduced lower extremity muscle strength predicted clinically significant declines in physical function, especially among the weakest women. Future studies should test whether therapies that promote preservation of lower extremity muscle strength may prevent declines in function among women with SLE. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  10. Expansion with respect to resonance functions in nuclear physics problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gareev, F.A.; Bang, J.

    1980-07-01

    A study is made of the pole expansion (in accordance with Mittag-Leffler's theorem) of the wave functions, scattering amplitudes, and Green's functions at positive energies. The general form of these expansions is obtained and discussed for finite-range potentials and also for a Coulomb repulsive potential. A number of examples of the use of the method are considered in structure calculations including continuum states, and the limits of applicability of other approximate methods used in such calculations are established.

  11. Vitamin D, surface electromyography and physical function in uraemic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heaf, J.G.; Mølsted, Stig; Harrison, Adrian Paul

    2010-01-01

    parameters were measured including 25-OHD, 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25-OHD) and parathyroid hormone analysis. Muscle function was determined by 30-second surface electromyography (sEMG) recordings of a right thigh muscle (vastus lateralis) and a second left finger muscle (second dorsal interosseous...

  12. Everyday physics of extended bodies or why functionals need analyzing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. William Lawvere

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Functionals were discovered and used by Volterra over a century ago in his study of the motions of viscous elastic materials and electromagnetic fields. The need to precisely account for the qualitative effects of the cohesion and shape of the domains of these functionals was the major impetus to the development of the branch of mathematics known as topology, and today large numbers of mathematicians still devote their work to a detailed technical analysis of functionals. Yet the concept needs to be understood by all people who want to fully participate in 21st century society. Through some explicit use of mathematical categories and their transformations, functionals can be treated in a way which is non-technical and yet permits considerable reliable development of thought. We show how a deformable body such as a storm cloud can be viewed as a kind of space in its own right, as can an interval of time such as an afternoon; the infinite-dimensional spaces of configurations of the body and of its states of motion are constructed, and the role of the infinitesimal law of its motion revealed. We take nilpotent infinitesimals as given, and follow Euler in defining real numbers as ratios of infinitesimals.

  13. The presence and impact of diastolic dysfunction on physical function and body composition in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jin Hee; Wu, Pei-Tzu; Kistler, Brandon Michael; Fitschen, Peter John; Biruete, Annabel Guzman; Phillips, Shane Aaron; Ali, Mohamed M; Fernhall, Bo; Wilund, Kenneth Robert

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) diseases are the main cause of death in maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients. Muscle wasting and physical function decline are common in MHD patients, and significantly impair their quality of life. These can result from abnormalities in cardiac function, which can be further worsened by physical deconditioning. Left ventricular diastolic function parameters were recently shown to be a better predictor of exercise capacity than systolic measures in patients with CV complications. But little is known about the relationship between cardiac function and physical function in MHD patients. In 82 MHD patients, left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) was assessed by ejection fraction and fractional shortening with echocardiography, and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (LVDD) was assessed by pulse wave and tissue Doppler indices. Physical function was assessed by gait speed, performance on a shuttle walk test, and leg muscle strength. Dual-emission X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was used to measure whole body lean mass (WBLM). The prevalence of LVDD and LVSD was 48.8 and 12.2%, respectively. Gait speed, shuttle walk time, leg strength, and WBLM% were significantly higher in the group without LVDD than with LVDD (p physical function or body composition between patients with and without LVSD. These data suggest that LVDD is more closely related to physical function and body composition than LVSD in MHD patients, and hence that LVDD may be an important therapeutic target.

  14. DYNAMICS OF PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT AND FUNCTIONAL READINESS OF PRE-SCHOOL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.N. Kuznetsova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the analysis of a dynamics of physical development and functional readiness of children 3–7 years old, studying in children’s educational institution with daily stay. Authors revealed statistically significant (р < 0,001 correlation connections between the age and the rates of functional readiness (except flexibility; р = 0,08. Sanitary and pedagogical measures, performed in children’s educational institution, favor to physical development of pre-school children and locomotive experiences and skills.Key words: pre-school children, health, physical development, functional readiness.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(1:12-16

  15. Physical activity and cognitive function in adults with multiple sclerosis: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Janet D; Mayer, Lori

    2017-09-01

    To identify and synthesize the research evidence concerning (1) the relationship between physical activity and cognitive performance in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) and (2) to review the reported effects of physical activity interventions on neurocognitive performance conducted in this population. Relevant peer-reviewed journal articles were identified by searching PubMed, PsychINFO, and SPORTDiscus through May 2016. Full-text articles meeting the inclusion criteria were evaluated for quality using tools developed by the National Institutes of Health. Studies deemed to be of poor quality were excluded from the review. Nineteen studies meeting the inclusion/exclusion criteria were analyzed. Nine studies reported significant relationships between higher levels of physical activity or cardiorespiratory fitness and measures of cognitive function. Data extracted from 10 physical activity intervention studies reported mixed results on the effectiveness of physical activity to improve selected domains of cognitive function in persons with MS. Although correlational studies provide evidence to support a linkage between physical activity and cognitive function in persons with MS, this linkage is confounded by factors that may have influenced the studies' results. Evidence derived from intervention studies that could support a positive effect of physical activity on cognition in persons with MS is equivocal. Implications for Rehabilitation Physical activity has numerous benefits for persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) including improvements in balance, ambulation, depression, fatigue, and quality of life. Structured physical activity programs may contribute to cognitive function stability or improvement in persons with MS.

  16. Cognitive function and the agreement between self-reported and accelerometer-accessed physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbolsheimer, Florian; Riepe, Matthias W; Peter, Richard

    2018-02-21

    Numerous studies have reported weak or moderate correlations between self-reported and accelerometer-assessed physical activity. One explanation is that self-reported physical activity might be biased by demographic, cognitive or other factors. Cognitive function is one factor that could be associated with either overreporting or underreporting of daily physical activity. Difficulties in remembering past physical activities might result in recall bias. Thus, the current study examines whether the cognitive function is associated with differences between self-reported and accelerometer-assessed physical activity. Cross-sectional data from the population-based Activity and Function in the Elderly in Ulm study (ActiFE) were used. A total of 1172 community-dwelling older adults (aged 65-90 years) wore a uniaxial accelerometer (activPAL unit) for a week. Additionally, self-reported physical activity was assessed using the LASA Physical Activity Questionnaire (LAPAQ). Cognitive function was measured with four items (immediate memory, delayed memory, recognition memory, and semantic fluency) from the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease Total Score (CERAD-TS). Mean differences of self-reported and accelerometer-assessed physical activity (MPA) were associated with cognitive function in men (r s  = -.12, p = .002) but not in women. Sex-stratified multiple linear regression analyses showed that MPA declined with high cognitive function in men (β = -.13; p = .015). Results suggest that self-reported physical activity should be interpreted with caution in older populations, as cognitive function was one factor that explained the differences between objective and subjective physical activity measurements.

  17. Standards in function of quality promotion in physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radojević Jaroslava

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the Standards for completion of compulsory education, elaborated by the Institute for education quality evaluation, adopted in 19th May 2009 by the National Educational Council of Serbia, there are standards for ten teaching subjects, PE included. The aim of this paper is to introduce them, immediately before the adoption of the standards, possibly before their publishing in the Official Journal, to the professional public as well as to prepare and activate them fir the process of their incorporation and application in practice. The paper considers the basic features of PE standards: testability, direction at fundamental knowledge, abilities and skills; accumulation (taking into consideration contents of both elementary education cycles; differentiated approach to students; feasibility and obligation. By comparative analysis of a formulated, valid aim of PE, of syllabuses for elementary education and recommendations for the way of its realizations and features of educational standards for completion of elementary education, in which educational aims and tasks are concretized through students - acquisitions - outcomes visible in both behaviour and reasoning, the answer is given to the question of how to achieve better effects, increase PE quality with the capacities we have at our disposal. Directed at: ability in skills; knowledge on physical exercises and physical education by the, the standards objectively assessment, making thus the marks comparable and provide foundation for further development of self-evaluation instruments. One the major contributions of realization of instruction process in compliance with the educational standards is activation of teachers, students, parents and school. The paper also presents the dilemmas related to concrete problems in PE educational field (subject, primarily in conditions for realization of PE syllabuses as well as realization of instruction contents within the first cycle of elementary

  18. A Conceptual Foundation for Measures of Physical Function and Behavioral Health Function for Social Security Work Disability Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfeo, Elizabeth E.; Haley, Stephen M.; Jette, Alan M.; Eisen, Susan V.; Ni, Pengsheng; Bogusz, Kara; Meterko, Mark; McDonough, Christine M.; Chan, Leighton; Brandt, Diane E.; Rasch, Elizabeth K.

    2014-01-01

    Physical and mental impairments represent the two largest health condition categories for which workers receive Social Security disability benefits. Comprehensive assessment of physical and mental impairments should include aspects beyond medical conditions such as a person’s underlying capabilities as well as activity demands relevant to the context of work. The objective of this paper is to describe the initial conceptual stages of developing new measurement instruments of behavioral health and physical functioning relevant for Social Security work disability evaluation purposes. To outline a clear conceptualization of the constructs to be measured, two content models were developed using structured and informal qualitative approaches. We performed a structured literature review focusing on work disability and incorporating aspects of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) as a unifying taxonomy for framework development. Expert interviews provided advice and consultation to enhance face validity of the resulting content models. The content model for work-related behavioral health function identifies five major domains (1) Behavior Control, (2) Basic Interactions, (3) Temperament and Personality, (4) Adaptability, and (5) Workplace Behaviors. The content model describing physical functioning includes three domains (1) Changing and Maintaining Body Position, (2) Whole Body Mobility, and (3) Carrying, Moving and Handling Objects. These content models informed subsequent measurement properties including item development, measurement scale construction, and provided conceptual coherence guiding future empirical inquiry. The proposed measurement approaches show promise to comprehensively and systematically assess physical and behavioral health functioning relevant to work. PMID:23548543

  19. Physical Function Assessment of a Mayan Population Living With Osteoarthritis: The Importance of Considering Different Aspects of Functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalberto Loyola-Sanchez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the physical function of people living with osteoarthritis in a Maya-Yucateco rural community from 3 perspectives and explore factors associated with the presence of disability. Design: Physical function and social, physical, psychological, and behavioral factors were evaluated in all adults detected with hand, hip, and/or knee osteoarthritis (n = 144 through a Community-Oriented Program for the Control of Rheumatic Diseases–based census in the Mayan community of Chankom, Yucatán. All cases fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology criteria. Physical function was assessed from 3 perspectives: hypothetical or “what people think they can do” (Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index [HAQ-DI], experimental or “what people could do in standardized conditions” (6-minute walk test [6MWT] + the Functional Dexterity Test and enacted or “what people actually do” (personal care, work, and leisure activities’ self-report. Results: About 80% of participants reported “mild” disability (HAQ-DI ≤ 1 in the hypothetical function perspective, whereas average experimental function scores were low (6MWT: 206 m, Functional Dexterity Test: 64 seconds, and 78% of participants reported problems with enacted function (ie, work. Pain was significantly associated with disability in the hypothetical perspective (odds ratio [OR] = 3 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 1-4]; levels of wealth (β = 5 [95% CI: 1-9] and muscle strength (β = 54 [95% CI: 20-87] were significantly associated with functioning in the experimental perspective; and lower levels of self-efficacy (OR = 12 [95% CI: 6-27] and physical activity (OR = 12 [95% CI: 6-27] were significantly associated with work disability in the enacted function perspective. Conclusions: People living with osteoarthritis in Chankom show important issues when assessing physical function at the experimental and enacted perspectives, which

  20. Calculating Fragmentation Functions in Heavy Ion Physics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Charles; Aukerman, Alex; Krobatsch, Thomas; Matyja, Adam; Nattrass, Christine; Neuhaus, James; Sorensen, Soren; Witt, William

    2017-09-01

    A hot dense liquid of quarks and gluons called a Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) is formed in high energy nuclear collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the Large Hadron Collider. The high energy partons which scatter during these collisions can serve as probes for measuring QGP bulk properties. The details of how partons lose energy to the QGP medium as they traverse it can be used to constrain models of their energy loss. Specifically, measurements of fragmentation functions in the QGP medium can provide experimental constraints on theoretical parton energy loss mechanisms. However, the high background in heavy ion collisions limits the precision of these measurements. We investigate methods for measuring fragmentation functions in a simple model in order to assess their feasibility. We generate a data-driven heavy ion background based on measurements of charged hadron transverse momentum spectra, charged hadron azimuthal flow, and charged hadron rapidity spectra. We then calculate fragmentation functions in this heavy ion background and compare to calculations in proton-proton simulations. We present the current status of these studies.

  1. Are a Healthy Diet and Physical Activity Synergistically Associated with Cognitive Functioning in Older Adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijholt, W; Jager-Wittenaar, H; Visser, M; van der Schans, C P; Hobbelen, J S M

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that being both physically active and adhering a healthy diet is associated with improved cognitive functioning; however, it remains unclear whether these factors act synergistically. We investigated the synergistic association of a healthy diet and being physically active with cognitive functioning. Cross-sectional study. Data from the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam (LASA) were used. We analyzed data from 2,165 community dwelling adults who were aged 55-85 years, 56% of whom were female. Cognitive functioning was assessed by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), an MMSE score of >26 indicates good cognitive functioning. Physical activity was assessed by the LASA Physical Activity Questionnaire and was considered sufficient if the person engaged in moderately intense physical activity ≥ 20 min/day. A healthy diet score was based on the intake of fruit, vegetables and fish. Each of the food groups was assigned a score that ranged from 1 (well below the Dutch guideline for a healthy diet) to 4 (well above the Dutch guideline for a healthy diet), and the scores were aggregated to determine a healthy diet (healthy ≥ 9 points). Multiple logistic and linear regression analyses were used to examine the (synergistic) association among physical activity, a healthy diet and cognitive functioning. All analyses were adjusted for potential chronic diseases and lifestyle confounders. Of all of the participants, 25% were diagnosed with a cognitive impairment (MMSE ≤26), 80% were physically active and 41% had a healthy diet. Sixty three percent of the participants both adhered to a healthy diet and were physically active. Sufficient daily physical activity (OR=2.545 pdiet (OR=1.766 p=.002) were associated with good cognitive functioning. After adjusting for confounding factors, sufficient physical activity was not significantly related to cognitive functioning (p=.163); however adherence to a healthy diet remained significantly

  2. Cardiorespiratory fitness and physical function in children with cancer from diagnosis throughout treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Troels; Larsen, Hanne Baekgaard; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with cancer experience severe reductions in physical fitness and functionality during and following intensive treatment. This may negatively impact their quality of life. PURPOSE: To describe the physical capacity and functionality of children with cancer during and after...... or Langerhans cell histiocytosis, all treated with chemotherapy. Seventy-five of 78 consecutively eligible children (96.2%) were included. Median age was 11 years (range 6‒18). The physical capacity and function were assessed based on testing of physical strength, balance and cardiorespiratory fitness. Children...... programme with no dropouts. Strenuous physical exercise and physiological testing during paediatric cancer treatment was safe and feasible, with only five minor adverse events during the intervention. Cardiorespiratory fitness was significantly lower in children with cancer than norms for healthy age...

  3. SF36 physical functioning scale and 2-minute walk test advocated as core qualifiers to evaluate physical functioning in patients with late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolwijk-Swüste, Janneke M.; Beelen, Anita; Lankhorst, Gustaaf J.; Nollet, Frans; Stolwijk-Swüste, J. M.; Lankhorst, G. J.; Dekker, J.; van Dijk, G. M.; van den Ende, C. H. M.; Post, B.; de Haan, R. J.; Speelman, H.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To select a questionnaire and walking capacity test based on comparison of clinimetric properties and mutual association to be used as "core" qualifiers for physical functioning in patients with late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis. DESIGN: Repeated-measures at 3-week intervals. SUBJECTS:

  4. Physical function and properties of quadriceps femoris muscle after bariatric surgery and subsequent weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyytinen, T; Liikavainio, T; Pääkkönen, M; Gylling, H; Arokoski, J P

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the effects of bariatric surgery-induced weight loss on physical function, the properties of quadriceps femoris muscle (QFM), and the subjective disabilities of the subjects with excessive weight. Thirteen female and three male subjects were studied before and 8.8 months after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGP) operation. The health-related quality of life (RAND-36) and the self-reported disease-specific joint symptoms (WOMAC) were estimated. The objective physical function was evaluated with sock, repeated sit-to-stand, 6-minute walk, stair ascending and descending and timed up and go tests and the properties of the QFM were measured with ultrasound. The average weight loss was 27.3 kg. Objectively measured physical function improved after RYGP operation. Physical functioning, physical role functioning and general health domain scores of the RAND-36 were significantly improved. The stiffness and function scores were lower after RYGP operation in knee OA subjects. The subcutaneous fat thickness and the absolute muscle thickness of QFM decreased, but the ratio of muscle cross sectional area/total body weight did not change. The fat and connective tissue proportion in the QFM muscle were significantly increased. The RYPG-surgery-induced weight loss exerts a positive impact on physical function but a negative impact on a muscle structure.

  5. Physical Function and Mental Health in Trauma Intensive Care Patients: A 2-Year Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Leanne M; Macfarlane, Bonnie; Chaboyer, Wendy; Schuetz, Michael; Joyce, Christopher; Barnett, Adrian G

    2016-04-01

    This study was designed to examine changes in function over time after injury and to identify factors associated with long-term recovery that may be amenable to change through intervention. Prospective cohort study. Intensive care in a tertiary hospital in Queensland, Australia. Adult (n = 123) admitted to intensive care for treatment of injury. Data were collected prior to hospital discharge and 1, 6, 12, and 24 months post injury. Data included demographics, preinjury health, injury characteristics, acute care factors, psychosocial measures, and health status. Linear mixed-effects models were used to identify factors associated with physical function and mental health over time. Physical function and mental health improved over time; however, the averages remained below Australian norms at 24 months. Optimistic perception of illness and greater self-efficacy were potentially modifiable factors associated with improved mental health and physical function over time. Greater perceived social support, also potentially modifiable, was associated with improved mental health. Injury insurance and income were significant nonmodifiable factors for mental health, with mental health gains associated with higher income. Hospital length of stay and injury insurance were nonmodifiable factors linked with physical function. Improvements in physical function and mental health are evident in the 24 months following injury, but most patients remain below Australian population norms. Factors that were associated with physical function and mental health outcomes over time that are potentially amenable to change include illness perception, self-efficacy, and perceived social support.

  6. Complex Estimation of Intersystem Relations of Functional Reactions on Physical Load

    OpenAIRE

    Romanchuk, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    The studying of features of functional mutual relations in the group of persons engaged in physical culture was the purpose of this paper. The complex research including the survey of 55 examinees engaged in physical culture and 50 persons of control group was carried out. The results of the carried out complex researches had allowed allocating the number of attributes showing the intersystem mutual relation at the persons engaged in physical culture. They cardinally differ from parameters in...

  7. Analysis of the Subscales of the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellen, Murray I.; Hoffman, Roy A.

    1984-01-01

    Factor analyzed the item responses comprising each of the five external dimensions and the three internal dimensions of the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale. The results indicated that seven of the eight subscales are essentially single-factor scales. Implications for counseling are discussed. (Author)

  8. Evaluation of the Construction of the Subscales for the Piers-Harris and Tennessee Inventories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Julia Anne

    A sample of 234 fifth- and 259 sixth-grade students scaled the items of the Piers-Harris, Tennessee, Coopersmith, and Lipsett self-concept measures. The scaling of the Piers-Harris and the Tennessee inventories was examined in reference to their subscales. The present technique placed items on a bivariate plane of two orthogonal dimensions…

  9. Musculoskeletal pain and physical functioning in the oldest old

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mänty, Minna Regina; Thinggaard, M; Christensen, K

    2013-01-01

    for assistive device or personal help in transferring, dressing, washing, using toilet and/or walking indoors. Results: At baseline, the number of painful sites was significantly associated with measured grip strength and walking speed as well as self-reported disability in a stepwise manner; the more sites...... impairment, functional limitation and disability) among nonagenarians (more than ninety years old persons). Second, we described the effect of painful sites on disability during a 2-year follow-up period. Methods: This study is based on baseline (n = 1177) and 2-year follow-up (n = 709) data...

  10. Are a healthy diet and physical activity synergistically associated with cognitive functioning in older adults?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, W.; Jager-Wittenaar, H.; Visser, M.; Van der Schans, C. P.; Hobbelen, J. S. M.

    Previous research has demonstrated that being both physically active and adhering a healthy diet is associated with improved cognitive functioning; however, it remains unclear whether these factors act synergistically. We investigated the synergistic association of a healthy diet and being

  11. Are a healthy diet and physical activity synergistically associated with cognitive functioning in older adults?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. C.P. van der Schans; MSc Willemke Nijholt; M. Visser; Dr Harriët Jager-Wittenaar; dr. Hans Hobbelen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Previous research has demonstrated that being both physically active and adhering a healthy diet is associated with improved cognitive functioning; however, it remains unclear whether these factors act synergistically. We investigated the synergistic association of a healthy diet and

  12. The role of neuropsychological performance in the relationship between chronic pain and functional physical impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pulles, W.L.J.A.; Oosterman, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. In this study, the relationship between pain intensity, neuropsychological, and physical function in adult chronic pain patients was examined. Design. Thirty participants with chronic pain completed neuropsychological tests tapping mental processing speed, memory, and executive

  13. Preserving Cognition, Quality of Life, Physical Health and Functional Ability in Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Kristine; Frederiksen, Kristian S; Sobol, Nanna Aue

    2013-01-01

    ('Preserving Cognition, Quality of Life, Physical Health and Functional Ability in Alzheimer's Disease: the Effect of Physical Exercise') trial is to establish whether aerobic exercise is effective in improving cognition as well as in reducing the prevalence of psychiatric symptoms among patients...... with Alzheimer's disease (AD)....

  14. Association between vitamin D status and physical function in the severely obese.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ahern, T

    2014-07-01

    Mortality is 85% higher in severely obese subjects (body mass index [BMI] > 40 kg\\/m(2)) than in subjects with a healthy BMI; poor physical function may be contributory. Hypovitaminosis D is common in obese subjects and is associated with physical dysfunction in the elderly.

  15. Physical Frailty and Cognitive Functioning in Depressed Older Adults: Findings From the NESDO Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, Matheus H. L.; Collard, Rose M.; Comijs, Hannie C.; Zuidersma, Marij; de Rooij, Sophia E.; Naarding, Paul; Oude Voshaar, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive frailty has recently been defined as the co-occurrence of physical frailty and cognitive impairment. Late-life depression is associated with both physical frailty and cognitive impairment, especially processing speed and executive functioning. The objective of this study was to investigate

  16. Physical Frailty and Cognitive Functioning in Depressed Older Adults: Findings From the NESDO Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, M.H.; Collard, R.M.; Comijs, H.C.; Zuidersma, M.; Rooij, S.E. De; Naarding, P.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Cognitive frailty has recently been defined as the co-occurrence of physical frailty and cognitive impairment. Late-life depression is associated with both physical frailty and cognitive impairment, especially processing speed and executive functioning. The objective of this study was to

  17. Physical Frailty and Cognitive Functioning in Depressed Older Adults : Findings From the NESDO Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, Matheus H. L.; Collard, Rose M.; Comijs, Hannie C.; Zuidersma, Marij; de Rooij, Sophia E.; Naarding, Paul; Oude Voshaar, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Cognitive frailty has recently been defined as the co-occurrence of physical frailty and cognitive impairment. Late-life depression is associated with both physical frailty and cognitive impairment, especially processing speed and executive functioning. The objective of this study was to

  18. Physical practice is associated with less functional disability in medical students with migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renan B. Domingues

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate possible association between migraine and physical practice among 480 medical students who were submitted to a questionnaire about headaches and physical practices. Migraine diagnosis was assessed by ID-Migraine and functional disability was evaluated with MIDAS. The type (aerobic or strength training, the weekly frequency and the intensity of physical practice and body mass index (BMI were assessed. There was a reduction in functional disability of migraine in students reporting physical practice (no physical practice - MIDAS=8.81±1.40, physical practice - MIDAS=15.49±1.78; P=0.03. Frequency, intensity, and type of physical practices were not associated with functional impact of migraine. BMI did not correlate with migraine impact (normal weight - MIDAS=12.34±1.33, overweight or obese - MIDAS=17.45±3.86; P=0.33. These results were confirmed by multivariate analysis. Our data suggest that physical practice is inversely related with functional disability of migraine in university students regardless of BMI.

  19. Modeling relationships between physical fitness, executive functioning, and academic achievement in primary school children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Niet, Anneke G.; Hartman, Esther; Smith, Joanne; Visscher, Chris

    Objectives: The relationship between physical fitness and academic achievement in children has received much attention, however, whether executive functioning plays a mediating role in this relationship is unclear. The aim of this study therefore was to investigate the relationships between physical

  20. Exploring the relations among physical fitness, executive functioning, and low academic achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, A.G.M.; Hartman, E.; Kostons, D.; Visscher, C.; Bosker, R.J.

    Physical fitness seems to be related to academic performance, at least when taking the role of executive functioning into account. This assumption is highly relevant for the vulnerable population of low academic achievers because their academic performance might benefit from enhanced physical

  1. Physical training is beneficial to functional status and survival in patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiauyee Chen

    2011-09-01

    Conclusion: Six weeks physical therapy training plus 6 weeks unsupervised maintenance exercise enhanced functional levels and increased survival for the PMV patients compared with those with no such intervention. Early physical therapy interventions are needed for the PMV patients in respiratory care centers. [J Formos Med Assoc 2011; 110(X:XX–XX

  2. Physical exercise modifies the functional capacity of elderly patients on hemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Marchesan, Moane; Krug, Rodrigo de Rosso; Silva,José Raphael Leandro da Costa e; BARBOSA,Aline Rodrigues; Rombaldi, Airton José

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Patients on hemodialysis (HD) improve functional capacity after physical training. However, little is discussed about these effects in elderly patients, since these are usually excluded of studies, due to their physical disabilities and other deficits. Objective To analyze the effects of aerobic and resistance training in the functional capacity of elderly patients submitted to HD. Methods Studied participants were 15 patients, of both genders, and aged over 60 years...

  3. Impaired physical function, loss of muscle mass and assessment of biomechanical properties in critical ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jesper Brøndum

    2012-01-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) admission is associated with muscle weakness and ICU survivors report sustained limitation of physical capacity for years after discharge. Limited information is available on the underlying biomechanical properties responsible for this muscle function impairment. A plaus......Intensive care unit (ICU) admission is associated with muscle weakness and ICU survivors report sustained limitation of physical capacity for years after discharge. Limited information is available on the underlying biomechanical properties responsible for this muscle function impairment...

  4. Early life stress and physical and psychosocial functioning in late adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alastalo, Hanna; von Bonsdorff, Mikaela B; Räikkönen, Katri; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Osmond, Clive; Barker, David J P; Heinonen, Kati; Kajantie, Eero; Eriksson, Johan G

    2013-01-01

    Severe stress experienced in early life may have long-term effects on adult physiological and psychological health and well-being. We studied physical and psychosocial functioning in late adulthood in subjects separated temporarily from their parents in childhood during World War II. The 1803 participants belong to the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study, born 1934-44. Of them, 267 (14.8%) had been evacuated abroad in childhood during WWII and the remaining subjects served as controls. Physical and psychosocial functioning was assessed with the Short Form 36 scale (SF-36) between 2001 and 2004. A test for trends was based on linear regression. All analyses were adjusted for age at clinical examination, social class in childhood and adulthood, smoking, alcohol intake, physical activity, body mass index, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Physical functioning in late adulthood was lower among the separated men compared to non-separated men (b = -0.40, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: -0.71 to -0.08). Those men separated in school age (>7 years) and who were separated for a duration over 2 years had the highest risk for lower physical functioning (b = -0.89, 95% CI: -1.58 to -0.20) and (b = -0.65, 95% CI: -1.25 to -0.05), respectively). Men separated for a duration over 2 years also had lower psychosocial functioning (b = -0.70, 95% CI: -1.35 to -0.06). These differences in physical and psychosocial functioning were not observed among women. Early life stress may increase the risk for impaired physical functioning in late adulthood among men. Timing and duration of the separation influenced the physical and psychosocial functioning in late adulthood.

  5. Physical Functioning Among Women Aged 80 Years and Older With Previous Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMonte, Michael J.; Snively, Beverly M.; LeBoff, Meryl S.; Cauley, Jane A.; Lewis, Cora E.; Wallace, Robert; Li, Wenjun; Chen, Zhao; Robbins, John A.; Wactawski-Wende, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Background. The oldest old are the fastest growing segment of the elderly population. Little is known regarding the associations of fracture history with physical functioning assessed after age 80. Methods. Among 33,386 women surviving to age 80 years (mean ± SD years 84.6±3.4), we examined the relationship between history of incident fracture after entry into the Women’s Health Initiative (follow-up 15.2±1.3 years) and their physical functioning assessed using the RAND-36 instrument most proximal to 2012 end of follow-up. Results. Baseline mean (±SD) physical function score was 82 (±18). After adjustment for demographic and medical characteristics, fracture at each site, including hip, upper limb, lower limb, and central body, was associated with significantly lower subsequent physical functioning (all p pelvis fractures were particularly related with lower physical functioning scores, 11.7 (95% CI: 10.3, 13.1), 10.5 (8.8, 12.3), 9.8 (8.9, 10.8), and 8.7 (7.2, 10.2) units lower, respectively, compared with women without fracture (each p fracture, women with central site fractures also had lower physical functioning scores (10.0 [9.3, 10.8] units lower]; p fractures, older age, less than 1 year since fracture, one or more additional sites fractured, history of cardiovascular disease or cancer, higher body mass index, and no alcohol intake in the past 3 months also were independent predictors of lower physical functioning score (all p fracture is associated with lower current physical functioning, regardless of anatomical site of fracture, independent of other major predictors of disability. PMID:26858323

  6. Early life stress and physical and psychosocial functioning in late adulthood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Alastalo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Severe stress experienced in early life may have long-term effects on adult physiological and psychological health and well-being. We studied physical and psychosocial functioning in late adulthood in subjects separated temporarily from their parents in childhood during World War II. METHODS: The 1803 participants belong to the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study, born 1934-44. Of them, 267 (14.8% had been evacuated abroad in childhood during WWII and the remaining subjects served as controls. Physical and psychosocial functioning was assessed with the Short Form 36 scale (SF-36 between 2001 and 2004. A test for trends was based on linear regression. All analyses were adjusted for age at clinical examination, social class in childhood and adulthood, smoking, alcohol intake, physical activity, body mass index, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. RESULTS: Physical functioning in late adulthood was lower among the separated men compared to non-separated men (b = -0.40, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: -0.71 to -0.08. Those men separated in school age (>7 years and who were separated for a duration over 2 years had the highest risk for lower physical functioning (b = -0.89, 95% CI: -1.58 to -0.20 and (b = -0.65, 95% CI: -1.25 to -0.05, respectively. Men separated for a duration over 2 years also had lower psychosocial functioning (b = -0.70, 95% CI: -1.35 to -0.06. These differences in physical and psychosocial functioning were not observed among women. CONCLUSION: Early life stress may increase the risk for impaired physical functioning in late adulthood among men. Timing and duration of the separation influenced the physical and psychosocial functioning in late adulthood.

  7. The development of a short measure of physical function for knee OA KOOS-Physical Function Shortform (KOOS-PS) - an OARSI/OMERACT initiative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perruccio, A V; Stefan Lohmander, L; Canizares, M

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a short measure of physical function for knee osteoarthritis (OA) using multi-national data from individuals with varying degrees of severity of knee OA. METHODS: Rasch analysis, based on the partial credit model, was conducted on Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score......-test). Invariance across age, gender and country was evaluated. Unidimensionality was evaluated by factor analysis of residuals. The derived short measure was further tested for fit through re-analyses in individual sub-samples. A nomogram converting raw summed scores to Rasch-derived interval scores was developed...... and OA severity represented in this study, our seven item short measure of physical function for knee OA is likely generalizable and widely applicable. This measure has potential for use as the function component in an OA severity scoring system....

  8. Physical Function, Relocation, and Mortality Outcomes in Residential Care and Assisted Living Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Lorraine J; Leary, Emily; Blankenship, Jody; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to identify predictors of 6-month physical function and 12-month relocation or death in 272 residents of 34 residential care/assisted communities. Measures collected at baseline, 6, and 12 months included health and demographic characteristics; self-reported pain, fatigue, and depressive symptoms; exercise self-efficacy, barriers, and expectations; attitudes on aging; performance-based physical function and physical activity; and community demographics, programs, and policies. GLIMMIX procedures for regression analyses with community as a random effect were run. Better baseline physical function and grip strength, female sex, and residential care community predicted better 6-month physical function. At 12 months, 25.6% had relocated or died. The odds of 12-month relocation or death for 1-point increase in physical function score was 0.84 and for 1-point increase in depression score was 1.16. Targets to promote longer tenure in residential care/assisted living include programs to ameliorate functional decline and depression screening and treatment.

  9. Physical fitness and oral function in community-dwelling older people: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izuno, Hiromi; Hori, Kazuhiro; Sawada, Misao; Fukuda, Masayo; Hatayama, Chikako; Ito, Kayoko; Nomura, Yoshio; Inoue, Makoto

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to quantify the relation between physical fitness and oral function, including tongue and lip movements. Physical fitness and oral function influence quality of life and activities of daily living in older individuals. Occlusal contact and mastication performance are associated with physical fitness, but the association between tongue and lip movements and physical fitness is unclear. Sixty-six independent community-dwelling older individuals (24 men, 42 women; mean age, 70.3 ± 5.9 years) participated in this study. Measures of physical fitness were the one-leg standing time with eyes open, the functional reach test, anteflexion, the timed up and go test, and grip strength. Measures of oral function were tongue pressure, lip pressure, tongue movement from side to side, the repetitive saliva-swallowing test (RSST), oral diadochokinesis and masticatory efficiency. Multiple regression analysis was used to quantify the relation between physical fitness and oral function. After adjustment for age, sex, BMI, exercise habits and number of remaining teeth, the tongue movement from side to side and/or oral diadochokinesis were chosen as significant factors in each physical fitness measurement. Furthermore, the lip pressure and masticatory efficiency were associated with handgrip strength. Oral function, including tongue and lip movements, was associated with physical fitness in older people in this study. Tongue dexterity as characterised by tongue movement from side to side and oral diadochokinesis particularly associated with physical fitness. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Exercise and physical training improve physical function in older adults with visual impairments but their effect on falls is unclear: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gleeson

    2014-09-01

    [Gleeson M, Sherrington C, Keay L (2014 Exercise and physical training improve physical function in older adults with visual impairments but their effect on falls is unclear: a systematic review. Journal of Physiotherapy 60: 130–135

  11. Longitudinal Analysis of Physical Performance, Functional Status, Physical Activity, and Mood in Relation to Executive Function in Older Adults Who Fall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, John R; Davis, Jennifer C; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa

    2015-06-01

    To examine whether good executive function (EF; the cognitive processes important for goal-oriented and controlled behavior) at baseline and maintenance of EF over time predict maintenance of physical performance, functional status, physical activity, and mood over a 1-year period, and conversely, to examine whether baseline functioning in these noncognitive domains predicts maintenance of EF over the same period of time. 12-month prospective cohort study. Vancouver Falls Prevention Clinic. Community-dwelling older adults (N = 199; mean age 81.6 ± 6.5; 63% female) referred to the clinic after a fall. At each time point, structural equation modeling created a latent EF variable from performance on five EF tasks. Physical performance (physiological falls risk and gait speed), instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), physical activity, and depressive symptoms were also assessed at each time point. Higher baseline EF predicted decreases in depressive symptoms (P = .005) and maintenance of IADLs (P = .006) from baseline to follow-up. Improvements in EF correlated with increases in gait speed (P = .005) and physical activity (P = .03) and with the maintenance of IADLs (P = .002) over follow-up. All effects were independent of demographic characteristics and global cognitive function. Baseline performance in the noncognitive domains did not predict changes in EF. In older fallers, EF is a marker of resiliency in several noncognitive domains and should therefore be assessed. Furthermore, interventions to improve EF should be tested in older fallers with EF deficits. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  12. Functional profile of ALS patients over 14 months of physical therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Natane de Medeiros Cirne

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS is a degenerative and fatal disease that changes the individuals’ functionality. Physical therapy plays an important role in ALS by using assessment tools to evaluate functional performance. Objective: To investigate functional changes caused by ALS through 14 months in individuals with and without physical therapy. Method: A cohort study conducted between 2010 and 2013 in the city of Natal-RN. The study included patients in various stages of ALS, with no associated pathologies and those who were being monitored by the Reference Center since 2010. Functional characteristics were categorized by applying the motor items of Functional Independence Measure (FIM, Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS and ALS-Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS. Participants were divided into two groups, those who performed physical therapy (FA and those who didn’t (CG. They were longwise evaluated in 3 different moments (1st day of assessment, four months after the first assessment and 10 months after the second evaluation. Nonparametric Friedman test was performed, considering p <0.05. Results: It was observed a significant functional decline in the control group (p <0.05 measured by the ALSFRS. The CG also presented functional decline greater than the AF group from FIM scores, however without statistical significance. There was no difference in the scores of FSS. Conclusion: Physical therapy can be a great adjunct in functional decline retardation in patients with ALS. It also emphasizes the importance of specific scales for ALS, considering the disease progressive and heterogeneous nature.

  13. Direction-dependent functions of physical properties for crystals and polycrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mojia; Chen, Mengcheng; Zheng, Tenglong

    2009-10-01

    Some physical properties of crystals differ in direction n because crystal lattices are often anisotropic. A polycrystal is an aggregate of numerous tiny crystallites. Unless the polycrystal is an isotropic aggregate of crystallites, the physical properties of the polycrystal vary with n. The direction-dependent functions (DDF) for crystals and polycrystals are introduced to describe the variations of the physical properties in direction n. Until now there are few papers dealing systematically with relations between the DDF and the crystalline orientation distribution. Herein we give general expressions of the DDF for crystals and polycrystals. We discuss the applications of the DDF in describing the physical properties of crystals and polycrystals.

  14. Greater physical activity is associated with better cognitive function in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Krysten K; Alosco, Michael L; Miller, Lindsay; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Cohen, Ronald; Raz, Naftali; Sweet, Lawrence; Colbert, Lisa H; Josephson, Richard; Hughes, Joel; Rosneck, Jim; Gunstad, John

    2014-11-01

    Nearly 6 million Americans have heart failure (HF), up to 80% of which exhibit cognitive deficits on testing. Physical inactivity is common in HF, yet little is known about the possible contribution of physical inactivity to cognitive dysfunction in this population. Older adults with HF (N = 93; Mage = 68.5 years, 33.7% women) completed neuropsychological testing, as well as cardiac and physical activity assessment as part of a larger protocol. HF severity was measured via impedance cardiography. Physical activity was assessed via an Actigraph accelerometer and operationalized using daily step count and time engaged in moderate-vigorous activity (minutes/day). Linear regression analyses controlling for sex, high blood pressure, diabetes, depressive symptomatology, and HF severity showed that greater physical activity (both step count and minutes spent in moderate-vigorous activity) was associated with better executive function/attention, processing speed, and scores on a screening measure of cognition. These findings indicate that physical activity is an independent predictor of cognitive function in persons with HF. Future work is needed to clarify the mechanisms by which physical activity benefits cognitive function in HF and determine whether interventions to promote physical activity can attenuate cognitive decline over time. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. Effect of single physical load of different duration and intensity on cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipavičienė, Saulė; Dumčienė, Audronė; Ramanauskienė, Irina; Skurvydas, Albertas

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a single physical load of different duration and intensity on cognitive function. The study population comprised 90 male soldiers. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups: experimental (n=60) and control group (n=30). The soldiers in the experimental group undertook 3 specific loads of different types, durations, and intensities. Attention concentration and tapping tests were carried out, and the reaction time was measured. After the physical load, the soldiers in the experimental group performed the attention concentration test faster, the number of committed mistakes decreased, and the rate of processing information increased as compared to the corresponding values before physical load (all Preaction time, in the experimental group were found to be worse than before physical loads (P<0.05). No significant changes were observed in the control group of soldiers. Despite fatigue, a single physical load of different duration and intensity improved the cognitive function.

  16. Functional and social limitations after facial palsy: expanded and independent validation of the Italian version of the facial disability index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavese, Chiara; Cecini, Miriam; Camerino, Nora; De Silvestri, Annalisa; Tinelli, Carmine; Bejor, Maurizio; Dalla Toffola, Elena

    2014-09-01

    The Facial Disability Index (FDI) is widely used for self-assessment of functional impairment and quality of life in patients with facial palsy. The study aim was to complete the validation of the FDI by generating an Italian version (IT-FDI) and evaluating its clinimetric properties. This was a longitudinal, observational measurement study. The questionnaire was translated, cross-culturally adapted, and administered to 100 consecutive participants (outpatients) with facial palsy. The clinical severity of facial palsy, impairments in physical and social function, and quality of life were evaluated with the Sunnybrook Facial Grading System, IT-FDI, and 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey. The IT-FDI showed excellent test-retest reliability for every item and for total scores (intraclass correlation coefficients of .93 and .84 for physical function subscale and social/well-being function subscale, respectively). The IT-FDI confirmed the high internal consistency of the original version, with theta coefficients of .82 for the physical function subscale and .78 for the social/well-being function subscale. The physical function subscale correlated with the Sunnybrook Facial Grading System composite score (r=.44), and the social/well-being function subscale correlated with the 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey mental component (r=.55). The IT-FDI confirmed the good responsiveness of the original version, as expressed by effect size, standardized response mean, and responsiveness ratio of, respectively, 1, 1.03, and 1.21 for the physical function subscale and 0.75, 0.83, and 1.15 for the social/well-being function subscale. Responsiveness was evaluated with a limited number of participants. The results demonstrated the test-retest reliability for all items of the FDI and confirmed its internal consistency, construct validity, and responsiveness with an independent and larger clinical subset. This study completes the validation of the FDI and provides the first validated

  17. The effect of mobilization on improvement of physical function in knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Tavakkoli

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knee osteoarthritis is one of the most common disabilities, which may lead to some limitations in physical activity. This study aimed to evaluation of grade one mobilization in improvement of physical function.Methods: In this single blind clinical trial with a randomized sampling method, 30 patients of grade two or three, knee osteoarthritis were assigned into three groups: group one mobilization + exercise therapy, group two exercise therapy and group three mobilization. Ultrasound with the intensity below 0.2 w/cm2 in three minutes was used for all groups as placebo. The duration of treatment was 10 sessions for three weeks. Outcome was measured by WOMAC questionnaire form (Likert type before and one week after treatment.Results: Physical function showed no significant difference between before and after treatment and between before treatment and follow up among the groups (P>0.05. The difference of physical function after treatment compared to before treatment was significant in all groups (P<0.05. Only group one showed a significant difference of physical function at the follow up period compare to before treatment (P<0.05.Conclusion: This study confirmed that grade one mobilization of patellofemoral joint may improve physical function of the grade two or three knee in osteoarthritis patients. Exercise therapy combined with mobilization, would prolong treatment effect up to one week.

  18. Function-focused care and changes in physical function in Chinese American and non-Chinese American hospitalized older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltz, Marie; Resnick, Barbara; Capezuti, Elizabeth; Shabbat, Nina; Secic, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Function-focused care (FFC) is a rehabilitative philosophy of care with which nurses help patients engage in activities of daily living and physical activity with the goal of preventing avoidable functional decline. This prospective, observational study described the degree of FFC provided by nursing staff to Chinese American (n = 32) and non-Chinese American (n = 43) older adults in medical-surgical units of an urban hospital. In both groups, only a few ADLs were a focus of FFC. Loss of physical function occurred, and physical function did not return to baseline by discharge in both groups; however, FFC was associated with less decline. Results suggest that hospitalized elders, both Chinese American and non-Chinese American, can benefit from nurse-led FFC. FFC may help minimize functional decline and decrease the use of postacute care rehabilitation. The gerontological rehabilitation nurse can play an essential role, guiding a function-focused approach throughout the hospital stay, including with the transitional care plan.

  19. Association between physical activity and kidney function: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Marquis S; Sevick, Mary Ann; Richardson, Caroline R; Fried, Linda F; Arena, Vincent C; Kriska, Andrea M

    2011-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a condition characterized by the deterioration of the kidney's ability to remove waste products from the body. Although treatments to slow the progression of the disease are available, chronic kidney disease may eventually lead to a complete loss of kidney function. Previous studies have shown that physical activities of moderate intensity may have renal benefits. Few studies have examined the effects of total movement on kidney function. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between time spent at all levels of physical activity intensity and sedentary behavior and kidney function. Data were obtained from the 2003-2004 and 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a cross-sectional study of a complex, multistage probability sample of the US population. Physical activity was assessed using an accelerometer and questionnaire. Glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was estimated using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease study formula. To assess linear associations between levels of physical activity and sedentary behavior with log-transformed estimated GFR (eGFR), linear regression was used. In general, physical activity (light and total) was related to log eGFR in females and males. For females, the association between light and total physical activity with log eGFR was consistent regardless of diabetes status. For males, the association between light and total physical activity and log eGFR was only significant in males without diabetes. When examining the association between physical activity, measured objectively with an accelerometer, and kidney function, total and light physical activities were found to be positively associated with kidney function.

  20. Benefits of Physical Exercise on Executive Functions in Older People with Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Katia; de Quadros, Antonio Carlos, Jr.; Santos, Ruth Ferreira; Stella, Florindo; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa Bucken; Gobbi, Sebastiao

    2009-01-01

    The benefits of physical exercise on cognitive functioning have been reported in the literature, but the potential benefits to slow the eventual decline in executive functioning (EF) caused by neurodegeneration from Parkinson's Disease (PD) have rarely been studied. Thus the objective of this study was to analyze the effects of a multimodal…

  1. Changes in endurance and walking ability through functional physical training in children with cerebral palsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorter, H.; Holty, L.; Rameckers, E.A.A.; Elvers, J.W.H.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the feasibility and effect of a functional physical training program on aerobic endurance and walking ability of children with cerebral palsy. METHODS: Thirteen children (8-13 years, Gross Motor Function Classification System level I or II, with normal intelligence or mild

  2. Physical activity and enhanced fitness to improve cognitive function in older people without known cognitive impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angevaren, Maaike; Aufdemkampe, Geert; Verhaar, H. J. J.; Aleman, A.; Vanhees, Luc

    2008-01-01

    Background Physical activity is beneficial for healthy ageing. It may also help maintain good cognitive function in older age. Aerobic activity improves cardiovascular fitness, but it is not known whether this sort of fitness is necessary for improved cognitive function. Studies in which activity,

  3. Physical activity and executive functions in the elderly with mild cognitive impairment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherder, E.J.A.; Paasschen, J. van; Deijen, J.-B.; Knokke, S. van der; Orlebeke, J.F.K.; Burgers, I.; DeVriesse, P.-P.; Swaab, D.F.; Sergeant, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    The primary goal of the present study was to examine whether in the elderly with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), the effect of physical activity measured directly following treatment, was reflected in an improvement in cognitive functioning in general or in executive functions (EF) in particular.

  4. Physical activity and executive functions in the elderly with mild cognitive impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherder, EJA; Van Paasschen, J; Deijen, JB; Van der Knokke, S; Orlebeke, JFK; Burgers, [No Value; Devriese, PP; Swaab, DF; Sergeant, JA

    The primary goal of the present study was to examine whether in the elderly with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), the effect of physical activity measured directly following treatment, was reflected in an improvement in cognitive functioning in general or in executive functions (EF) in particular.

  5. Structural-functional model of medical students’ professional-applied physical training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Petryshyn

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to work out and experimentally prove model of professional-applied physical training of medical higher educational establishments’ students. Material: in the research 80 students participated. In questioning physical education instructors of medical higher education establishments (n=20 participated. Results: influence of students’ professionally important characteristics on general physical fitness indicators and functional state has been shown. Directions of students’ physical fitness parameters’ individual diagnostic and control over physical education effectiveness have been offered. Volumes of physical exercises in the structure of training have been found: special training (15-20% and competition exercises (20-30%. Conclusions: the need in raising the level of professionally important for students’ abilities has been noted: speed power, static power endurance, power endurance, coordination of arms’ movements, static balance.

  6. Conceptual foundation for measures of physical function and behavioral health function for Social Security work disability evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfeo, Elizabeth E; Haley, Stephen M; Jette, Alan M; Eisen, Susan V; Ni, Pengsheng; Bogusz, Kara; Meterko, Mark; McDonough, Christine M; Chan, Leighton; Brandt, Diane E; Rasch, Elizabeth K

    2013-09-01

    Physical and mental impairments represent the 2 largest health condition categories for which workers receive Social Security disability benefits. Comprehensive assessment of physical and mental impairments should include aspects beyond medical conditions such as a person's underlying capabilities as well as activity demands relevant to the context of work. The objective of this article is to describe the initial conceptual stages of developing new measurement instruments of behavioral health and physical functioning relevant for Social Security work disability evaluation purposes. To outline a clear conceptualization of the constructs to be measured, 2 content models were developed using structured and informal qualitative approaches. We performed a structured literature review focusing on work disability and incorporating aspects of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health as a unifying taxonomy for framework development. Expert interviews provided advice and consultation to enhance face validity of the resulting content models. The content model for work-related behavioral health function identifies 5 major domains: (1) behavior control, (2) basic interactions, (3) temperament and personality, (4) adaptability, and (5) workplace behaviors. The content model describing physical functioning includes 3 domains: (1) changing and maintaining body position, (2) whole-body mobility, and (3) carrying, moving, and handling objects. These content models informed subsequent measurement properties including item development and measurement scale construction, and provided conceptual coherence guiding future empirical inquiry. The proposed measurement approaches show promise to comprehensively and systematically assess physical and behavioral health functioning relevant to work. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Education, material condition and physical functioning trajectories in middle-aged and older adults in Central and Eastern Europe: a cross-country comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yaoyue; Pikhart, Hynek; Pająk, Andrzej; Kubínová, Růžena; Malyutina, Sofia; Besala, Agnieszka; Peasey, Anne; Marmot, Michael; Bobak, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Two competing hypotheses, cumulative advantage/disadvantage and age-as-leveller, have been proposed to explain the contradictory findings on socioeconomic differences in health over the lifespan. To test these hypotheses, this investigation examined the influence of educational attainment and material condition on individual trajectories of physical functioning (PF) in unexplored ageing populations in Central and Eastern Europe. 28 783 men and women aged 45-69 years selected from populations in seven Czech towns, Krakow (Poland) and Novosibirsk (Russia). PF was measured by the Physical Functioning Subscale (PF-10) of the Short-Form-36 questionnaire (SF-36) at baseline and three subsequent occasions. The highest educational attainment was self-reported at baseline, and material condition was captured by the sum score of 12 household amenities and assets. In all cohorts, participants with a university degree had the highest PF-10 score at baseline and slowest rate of decline in the score during follow-up, while the lowest baseline scores and fastest decline rate were found in participants with less than secondary education in all cohorts and in Russians with secondary education. Similar disparities in the baseline PF-10 score and decline rate were observed across tertiles of material condition, but differences in decline rates across the three tertiles among Czechs or between the lower two tertiles among Russians were not statistically significant. Disparities in PF by educational attainment and material condition among middle-aged and older adults in Central and Eastern Europe existed at baseline and widened during ∼10 years of follow-up, supporting the cumulative advantage/disadvantage hypothesis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Motives for adult participation in physical activity: type of activity, age, and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molanorouzi, Keyvan; Khoo, Selina; Morris, Tony

    2015-01-31

    In recent years, there has been a decline in physical activity among adults. Motivation has been shown to be a crucial factor in maintaining physical activity. The purpose of this study was to examine whether motives for participation could accurately discriminate gender, age, and type of physical activity. A quantitative, cross-sectional descriptive research design was employed. The Physical Activity and Leisure Motivation Scale (PALMS) was used to assess motives for physical activity in 1,360 adults (703 males, 657 females) who had been exercising regularly for at least six months. The PALMS consists of 40 items that constitute eight sub-scales (mastery, enjoyment, psychological condition, physical condition, appearance, others' expectations, affiliation, competition/ego). Respondents were divided into two age groups (young adults aged 20 to 40 years and middle-aged adults 41 to 64 years) and five types of activity (individual racing sports plus bowls, team sports, racquet sports, martial arts, and exercise). The group discriminant function analyses revealed significant canonical functions correctly classifying the cases into gender (82%), age group (83%), team sport players 76%, individual racing sport plus bowls players 91%, racquet sport players 90%, exercisers 84%, and martial art players 91%. The competition/ego, appearance, physical condition, and mastery sub-scales contributed most to gender differences. Five sub-scales (mastery, psychological condition, others' expectations, affiliation, and enjoyment) contributed most to the discriminant function for age. For type of activity, different sub-scales were the strongest contributors to the discriminant function for each type of PA. The findings in this study suggest that strong and important motives for participation in physical activity are different across type of activity, age, and gender in adults. Understanding the motives that influence physical activity participation is critical for developing

  9. Thermodynamic analysis and subscale modeling of space-based orbit transfer vehicle cryogenic propellant resupply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defelice, David M.; Aydelott, John C.

    1987-01-01

    The resupply of the cryogenic propellants is an enabling technology for spacebased orbit transfer vehicles. As part of the NASA Lewis ongoing efforts in microgravity fluid management, thermodynamic analysis and subscale modeling techniques were developed to support an on-orbit test bed for cryogenic fluid management technologies. Analytical results have shown that subscale experimental modeling of liquid resupply can be used to validate analytical models when the appropriate target temperature is selected to relate the model to its prototype system. Further analyses were used to develop a thermodynamic model of the tank chilldown process which is required prior to the no-vent fill operation. These efforts were incorporated into two FORTRAN programs which were used to present preliminary analyticl results.

  10. Acute Cognitively Engaging Exergame-Based Physical Activity Enhances Executive Functions in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinks, Theda; Eggenberger, Noëmi; Schmidt, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to elucidate the influence of cognitive engagement comprised in an acute bout of exergame-based physical activity on executive functions (inhibition, cognitive flexibility) in adolescents. Therefore, the level of cognitive engagement and the intensity of physical activity were systematically varied across three experimental conditions. Sixty-five healthy male adolescents (13–16 years) were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: (a) physical activity with high levels of cognitive engagement during active video gaming, (b) physical activity with low levels of cognitive engagement during active video gaming, (c) sedentary with low levels of cognitive engagement during passive video watching. Manipulation checks, including subjective and objective operationalizations of cognitive engagement, were applied. Executive functions were assessed before and after each condition using the D-KEFS design fluency test. Results showed that cognitive engagement, operationalized by subjects’ ratings and heart rate variability, differed between conditions. The physical activity condition with a high level of cognitive engagement resulted in significantly better performance in cognitive flexibility compared to conditions with low levels of cognitive engagement. Regarding benefits for executive functions in male adolescents, the results indicate that acute physical activity with high cognitive engagement could be more efficient than physical activity of the same intensity with low cognitive engagement. Even though further evidence is needed, these results extend previous research and suggest a methodological approach for measuring cognitive engagement. PMID:28030542

  11. Physical activity and trajectories in cognitive function: English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, Mark; Muniz Terrera, Graciela; Demakakos, Panayotes

    2018-02-06

    There are limited data on physical activity in relation to trajectories in cognitive function. The aim was to examine the association of physical activity with trajectories in cognitive function, measured from repeated assessments over 10 years. We conducted a 10-year follow-up of 10 652 (aged 65±10.1 years) men and women from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, a cohort of community dwelling older adults. Self-reported physical activity was assessed at baseline and neuropsychological tests of memory and executive function were administered at regular 2-year intervals. Data from six repeated measurements of memory over 10 years and five repeated measurements of executive function over 8 years were used. The multivariable models revealed relatively small baseline differences in cognitive function by physical activity status in both men and women. Over the 10-year follow-up, physically inactive women experienced a greater decline in their memory (-0.20 recalled words, 95% CI -0.29 to -0.11, per study wave) and in executive function ability (-0.33 named animals; -0.54 to -0.13, per study wave) in comparison with the vigorously active reference group. In men, there were no differences in memory (-0.08 recalled words, 95% CI -0.18 to 0.01, per study wave), but small differences in executive function (-0.23 named animals; -0.46 to -0.01, per study wave) between inactive and vigorously active. Physical activity was associated with preservation of memory and executive function over 10 years follow-up. The results were, however, more pronounced in women. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Sleep and executive function in older women: the moderating effect of physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambiase, Maya J; Gabriel, Kelley P; Kuller, Lewis H; Matthews, Karen A

    2014-09-01

    Sleep and physical activity are both important for cognition. However, few cognitive function studies include comprehensive measurement of both sleep and physical activity. The purpose of this study was to examine the independent and interactive associations of sleep and physical activity in relation to cognitive function in older women. A subset of 121 women from the Healthy Women Study, mean age 73.3 ± 1.7 years, wore an actigraphy sleep monitor, physical activity accelerometer, and kept sleep and physical activity diaries for 7 consecutive days. Executive function was measured with the Digit Symbol Substitution Test and the Trail Making Test B. Verbal fluency was assessed with a word generation task. In adjusted models, greater actigraphy-assessed sleep efficiency was associated with more correct responses on the Digit Symbol Substitution Test (β = 0.35, SE = 0.15, p function in older women, with the clearest effects observed using direct measurements of sleep and physical activity. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Effects of aquatic exercise on physical function and fitness among people with spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunxiao; Khoo, Selina; Adnan, Athirah

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this review is to synthesize the evidence on the effects of aquatic exercise interventions on physical function and fitness among people with spinal cord injury. Data source: Six major databases were searched from inception till June 2015: MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsychInfo, SPORTDiscus, and Cochrane Center Register of Controlled Trials. Study appraisal and synthesis methods: Two reviewers independently rated methodological quality using the modified Downs and Black Scale and extracted and synthesized key findings (i.e., participant characteristics, study design, physical function and fitness outcomes, and adverse events). Results: Eight of 276 studies met the inclusion criteria, of which none showed high research quality. Four studies assessed physical function outcomes and 4 studies evaluated aerobic fitness as outcome measures. Significant improvements on these 2 outcomes were generally found. Other physical or fitness outcomes including body composition, muscular strength, and balance were rarely reported. Conclusions and implications of key findings: There is weak evidence supporting aquatic exercise training to improve physical function and aerobic fitness among adults with spinal cord injury. Suggestions for future research include reporting details of exercise interventions, evaluating other physical or fitness outcomes, and improving methodological quality. PMID:28296754

  14. Association between race and physical functioning limitations among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallicchio, Lisa; Calhoun, Carla; Helzlsouer, Kathy J

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this study was to examine differences in physical functioning limitations among African-American and white breast cancer survivors. Data were analyzed from 115 African-American and 712 white breast cancer survivors who responded to a hospital registry-based survey. Physical functioning limitations were assessed using a series of eight questions in which individuals were asked about their ability to perform a physical task such as walking a quarter of a mile. A four-category summary score, representing overall severity of limitation, was created using participant responses to the eight questions. Ordinal logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the association between race and physical functioning limitation adjusted for potential confounders. In the unadjusted model, the African-American breast cancer survivors were more than twice as likely to have a greater degree of physical functioning limitation compared to their white counterparts (OR 2.31; 95% CI 1.59, 3.38). After adjustment for covariates, including body mass index (BMI), the race OR was attenuated and no longer statistically significant (OR 1.44; 95% CI 0.92, 2.27). Findings from this study showed that African-American breast cancer survivors were more likely to have worse physical functioning limitations than their white counterparts; however, much of this disparity was due to racial differences in other variables such as BMI. Future research should focus on effective interventions targeting modifiable risk factors of physical functioning limitations among breast cancer survivors with the goal of improving quality of life.

  15. Determinants of objectively measured physical functional performance in early to mid-stage Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluger, Benzi M; Brown, R Preston; Aerts, Shanae; Schenkman, Margaret

    2014-11-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) may lead to functional limitations through both motor and nonmotor symptoms. Although patients with advanced disease have well-documented and profound functional limitations, less is known about the determinants of function in early to mid-stage disease where interventions may be more likely to benefit and preserve function. The objective of the current study was to identify motor, cognitive, and gait determinants of physical functional performance in patients with early to mid-stage PD. This was a secondary analysis of cross-sectional baseline data from a randomized clinical trial of exercise. The study was performed at a tertiary academic medical center. The study included 121 patients with early to mid-stage PD. Our functional performance outcomes included the following: the Continuous Scale Physical Functional Performance Test (CS-PFP; primary outcome); the Timed Up and Go test (TUG); and Section 2 (Activities of Daily Living) of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). Explanatory variables included measures of disease severity, motor function, cognitive function, balance, and gait. Stepwise linear regression models were used to determine correlations between explanatory variables and outcome measures. In our regression models, the CS-PFP significantly correlated with walking endurance (Six-Minute Walk Test; r(2) = 0.12, P activity outcomes may underestimate the impact of both motor and nonmotor symptoms. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Objectively measured physical activity and cognitive functioning in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinac, Catherine R; Godbole, Suneeta; Kerr, Jacqueline; Natarajan, Loki; Patterson, Ruth E; Hartman, Sheri J

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to explore the relationship between objectively measured physical activity and cognitive functioning in breast cancer survivors. Participants were 136 postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. Cognitive functioning was assessed using a comprehensive computerized neuropsychological test. Seven-day physical activity was assessed using hip-worn accelerometers. Linear regression models examined associations of minutes per day of physical activity at various intensities on individual cognitive functioning domains. The partially adjusted model controlled for primary confounders (model 1), and subsequent adjustments were made for chemotherapy history (model 2) and body mass index (BMI) (model 3). Interaction and stratified models examined BMI as an effect modifier. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was associated with information processing speed. Specifically, 10 min of MVPA was associated with a 1.35-point higher score (out of 100) on the information processing speed domain in the partially adjusted model and a 1.29-point higher score when chemotherapy was added to the model (both p activity was not significantly associated with any of the measured domains of cognitive function. MVPA may have favorable effects on information processing speed in breast cancer survivors, particularly among overweight or obese women. Interventions targeting increased physical activity may enhance aspects of cognitive function among breast cancer survivors.

  17. Six-year trajectory of objective physical function in persons with depressive and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lever-van Milligen, Bianca A; Lamers, Femke; Smit, Jan H; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2017-02-01

    Depression and anxiety have been related to poorer self-reported physical functioning over time; however, objective measures of physical function are less frequently examined. This study assessed the 6-year trajectory of hand-grip strength and lung function in persons with depressive and/or anxiety disorders. At four waves (baseline, 2, 4, and 6 years) hand-grip strength and lung function were assessed in 2,480 participants, aged 18-65 years, of the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. Linear mixed models were used to examine the association between baseline psychiatric status (current and remitted depression and anxiety, healthy controls) and physical function during 6-year follow-up, adjusted for sociodemographics, lifestyle, and health indicators. Although there were no differences in the rate of decline over time, women with current, but not remitted, depression and anxiety had poorer hand-grip strength (B = -1.34, P women during the entire 6-year follow-up. Associations with depression and anxiety severity measures confirmed dose-response relationships with objective physical function. In men, stronger 6-year decline of lung function was found in those with current disorders (current diagnosis-by-time: B = -11.72, P = .002) and even in those with remitted disorders (remitted diagnosis by time: B = -10.11, P = .04) compared to healthy men. Depression and anxiety are associated with consistently poorer hand-grip strength in women and poorer lung function in women and men over 6 years of time, implicating their long-lasting impact on physical functioning. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Extending the floor and the ceiling for assessment of physical function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, James F; Lingala, Bharathi; Siemons, Liseth; Glas, Cees A W; Cella, David; Hussain, Yusra N; Bruce, Bonnie; Krishnan, Eswar

    2014-05-01

    To improve the assessment of physical function by enhancing precision of physical function assessment as it pertains to subjects at extreme ends of the health continuum (i.e., subjects with extremely poor function ["floor"] or extremely good health ["ceiling"]). Under the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) (a National Institutes of Health initiative), we developed new items to assess floor and ceiling physical function in order to supplement the existing item bank. Using item response theory and standard PROMIS methodology, we developed 31 floor items and 31 ceiling items and administered the items during a 12-month prospective, observational study of 737 subjects whose health status was at either extreme. Effect size was calculated and change over time was compared across anchor instruments and across items. Using the observed changes in scores, we back-calculated sample size requirements for the new and comparison measures. We studied 444 subjects who had been diagnosed as having a chronic illness and/or were of old age and 293 generally fit subjects (including athletes in training). Item response theory analyses confirmed that the new floor and ceiling items outperformed reference items (P ceiling population. Extending the range of items by which physical function is measured can substantially improve measurement quality, reduce sample size requirements, and improve research efficiency. The paradigm shift from assessing disability to assessing physical function focuses assessment on the entire spectrum of physical function, signals improvement in the conceptual base of outcome assessment, and may be transformative as medical goals more closely approach societal goals for health. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  19. Physical activity in the elderly is associated with improved executive function and processing speed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Kristian Steen; Verdelho, Ana; Madureira, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    or dementia, were included. Multiple variable linear regression analysis with baseline MMSE, education, gender, age, stroke, diabetes and ARWMC rating as covariates revealed that physical activity was associated with better scores at baseline and 3-year follow-up for executive function (baseline: β: 0.39, 95......OBJECTIVES: Physical activity reduces the risk of cognitive decline but may affect cognitive domains differently. We examined whether physical activity modifies processing speed, executive function and memory in a population of non-dementia elderly subjects with age-related white matter changes......-year follow-up. Physical activity was assessed at baseline, and cognitive compound scores at baseline and 3-year assessment were used. RESULTS: Two-hundred-eighty-two subjects (age, y (mean (SD)): 73.1 (± 5.1); gender (f/m): 164/118); MMSE (mean (SD)): 28.3 (± 1.7)) who had not progressed to MCI...

  20. Optimizing the Benefits of Exercise on Physical Function in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buford, Thomas W.; Anton, Stephen D.; Clark, David J.; Higgins, Torrance J.; Cooke, Matthew B.

    2014-01-01

    As the number of older adults continues to rise worldwide, the prevention of physical disability among seniors is an increasingly important public health priority. Physical exercise is among the best known methods of preventing disability, but accumulating evidence indicates that considerable variability exists in the responsiveness of older adults to standard training regimens. Accordingly, a need exists to develop tailored interventions to optimize the beneficial effects of exercise on the physical function of older adults at risk for becoming disabled. The present review summarizes the available literature related to the use of adjuvant or alternative strategies intended to enhance the efficacy of exercise in improving the physical function of older adults. Within this work, we also discuss potential future research directions in this area. PMID:24361365

  1. Impact of termogidroprocedure to the physical health and functional capacity of student's organism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agoshkov V.V.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The aspects of the use are considered athletic-health-improvement technologies of termogidrotrenings for the increase of functional possibilities and somatic health of students. 12 boys and 16 girls took part in research. Testing of physical development, functional trained, physical preparedness and somatic health of students is conducted. The health swimming was used in combination with the dosed contrasting shower. Also bath-house procedures with dousing cold water. The increase of level of general physical capacity of students is set. It is marked that the use of technology of termogidrotrenings is instrumental in the increase of level of adaptation possibilities of organism of students. The optimum variant of the use of technology is recommended: 32 planned employment after a physical culture with the health swimming; 16 additional bath-house procedures with dousing; 16 independent employments.

  2. Secure and Resilient Functional Modeling for Navy Cyber-Physical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-24

    release; distribution is unlimited. Page 1 of 4 Secure & Resilient Functional Modeling for Navy Cyber- Physical Systems FY17 Quarter 2 Technical Progress...team defined the following attack models for cyber- physical systems: - 6 basic attacks targeting signals. - 1 basic attack targeting control...approach and the early results of the practical evaluation were encompassed in the research paper “Modeling and Simulation of Cyberattacks for Resilient

  3. Physical activity and neurocognitive functioning in aging - a condensed updated review

    OpenAIRE

    Gajewski, Patrick D.; Falkenstein, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This condensed review gives an overview about two methodological approaches to study the impact of physical activity on cognition in elderly, namely cross-sectional studies and randomized controlled intervention studies with pre- and post-measures. Moreover, this review includes studies investigating different types of physical activity and their relation to cognitive functions in older age. Behavioral data are considered but the main focus lies on neuroscientific methods like event-related p...

  4. Contribution of physical fitness, cerebrovascular reserve and cognitive stimulation to cognitive function in postmenopausal women

    OpenAIRE

    Eskes, Gail A.; Stewart eLongman; Allison D. eBrown; Carly A. eMcMorris; Langdon, Kristopher D; David B. eHogan; Marc ePoulin

    2010-01-01

    Studies of the effects of physical fitness on cognition suggest that exercise can improve cognitive abilities in healthy older adults, as well as delay the onset of age-related cognitive decline. The mechanisms for the positive benefit of exercise and how these effects interact with other variables known to influence cognitive function (e.g., involvement in cognitive activities) are less well understood. The current study examined the associations between the physical fitness, cerebrovascul...

  5. Does increased physical activity in school affect children's executive function and aerobic fitness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvalø, S E; Bru, E; Brønnick, K; Dyrstad, S M

    2017-02-16

    This study seeks to explore whether increased PA in school affects children's executive function and aerobic fitness. The "Active school" study was a 10-month randomized controlled trial. The sample included 449 children (10-11 years old) in five intervention and four control schools. The weekly interventions were 2×45 minutes physically active academic lessons, 5×10 minutes physically active breaks, and 5×10 minutes physically active homework. Aerobic fitness was measured using a 10-minute interval running test. Executive function was tested using four cognitive tests (Stroop, verbal fluency, digit span, and Trail Making). A composite score for executive function was computed and used in analyses. Mixed ANCOVA repeated measures were performed to analyze changes in scores for aerobic fitness and executive function. Analysis showed a tendency for a time×group interaction on executive function, but the results were non-significant F(1, 344)=3.64, P=.057. There was no significant time×group interaction for aerobic fitness. Results indicate that increased physical activity in school might improve children's executive function, even without improvement in aerobic fitness, but a longer intervention period may be required to find significant effects. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Relating Unidimensional IRT Parameters to a Multidimensional Response Space: A Review of Two Alternative Projection IRT Models for Scoring Subscales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Nilufer; Thompson, Tony

    2011-01-01

    A practical concern for many existing tests is that subscore test lengths are too short to provide reliable and meaningful measurement. A possible method of improving the subscale reliability and validity would be to make use of collateral information provided by items from other subscales of the same test. To this end, the purpose of this article…

  7. Formation of student personality’s physical culture as subject of professional functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otravenko O.V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: generalization of experience of higher educational establishments’ future specialists’ professional training, oriented on formation of students’ personalities’ physical culture. Material: we questioned students (n=50 and institute teachers (n=30. Results: it was found that for increase of future specialists’ professional fitness effectiveness it was important to consider orientation of educational process on formation of student personality’s physical culture. Besides, it was noticed that professional fitness of future specialists is greatly influenced by implementation of modern technologies of formation of students’ physical culture in educational-learning process. Physical education means, oriented on aesthetic are of great health related and recreation significance. Conclusions: educational process shall be oriented on support of active motor functioning, motivation for physical exercises’ and healthy life style practicing.

  8. Influences of Resistance Training on Physical Function in Older, Obese Men and Women With Sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoever, Katja; Heber, Anke; Eichberg, Sabine; Brixius, Klara

    2016-11-07

    Sarcopenic obesity is associated with disability, gait problems, and falls. Activities of daily living such as walking and climbing stairs are physically difficult or impossible for the individual with severe obesity. These aspects also limit participation in recreational activities or exercise programs. However, good muscle function is crucial to maintain functional independence. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of resistance training on physical function in older, obese persons with sarcopenia. The study was conducted in a pre-test/post-test design with 2 intervention groups. The participants were physically inactive and obese older adults (≥65 years, BMI ≥ 30 kg/m), without severe diseases. They were divided into a group with sarcopenia (SAR, n = 28) and a group with no or presarcopenia (NSAR, n = 20). The intervention consisted of progressive resistance training, undertaken twice a week for 16 weeks, increasing to 80% to 85% of maximum strength with 3 sets of 8 to 12 repetitions. Sarcopenia was assessed using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), hand-grip strength, and skeletal muscle mass index (SMI). In addition, the modified Physical Performance Test (PPT) and the Functional Reach Test were used for determining physical function. After training, participants in the SAR group were able to significantly increase their performance in hand-grip strength (by 9%), gait speed (by 5%), SPPB score (by 13%), and modified PPT score (by 11%). In SPPB and modified PPT, they could reach the values of the NSAR group's baseline performance. The NSAR group participants were also able to improve their already good performance at baseline in the 2 tests of physical function after training (SPPB score by 10%, modified PPT score by 7%). However, the participants of both groups could not increase the results of the SMI and the Functional Reach Test. The participants of both groups improved their physical performance in several parameters

  9. A physical function test for use in the intensive care unit: validity, responsiveness, and predictive utility of the physical function ICU test (scored).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denehy, Linda; de Morton, Natalie A; Skinner, Elizabeth H; Edbrooke, Lara; Haines, Kimberley; Warrillow, Stephen; Berney, Sue

    2013-12-01

    Several tests have recently been developed to measure changes in patient strength and functional outcomes in the intensive care unit (ICU). The original Physical Function ICU Test (PFIT) demonstrates reliability and sensitivity. The aims of this study were to further develop the original PFIT, to derive an interval score (the PFIT-s), and to test the clinimetric properties of the PFIT-s. A nested cohort study was conducted. One hundred forty-four and 116 participants performed the PFIT at ICU admission and discharge, respectively. Original test components were modified using principal component analysis. Rasch analysis examined the unidimensionality of the PFIT, and an interval score was derived. Correlations tested validity, and multiple regression analyses investigated predictive ability. Responsiveness was assessed using the effect size index (ESI), and the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) was calculated. The shoulder lift component was removed. Unidimensionality of combined admission and discharge PFIT-s scores was confirmed. The PFIT-s displayed moderate convergent validity with the Timed "Up & Go" Test (r=-.60), the Six-Minute Walk Test (r=.41), and the Medical Research Council (MRC) sum score (rho=.49). The ESI of the PFIT-s was 0.82, and the MCID was 1.5 points (interval scale range=0-10). A higher admission PFIT-s score was predictive of: an MRC score of ≥48, increased likelihood of discharge home, reduced likelihood of discharge to inpatient rehabilitation, and reduced acute care hospital length of stay. Scoring of sit-to-stand assistance required is subjective, and cadence cutpoints used may not be generalizable. The PFIT-s is a safe and inexpensive test of physical function with high clinical utility. It is valid, responsive to change, and predictive of key outcomes. It is recommended that the PFIT-s be adopted to test physical function in the ICU.

  10. Physical activity and cognitive function in individuals over 60 years of age: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Ashley; Rea, Irene Maeve; Parimon, Tanyalak; Cusack, Barry J

    2014-01-01

    It is unclear whether physical activity in later life is beneficial for maintenance of cognitive function. We performed a systematic review examining the effects of exercise on cognitive function in older individuals, and present possible mechanisms whereby physical activity may improve cognition. Sources consisted of PubMed, Medline, CINAHL, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, and the University of Washington, School of Medicine Library Database, with a search conducted on August 15, 2012 for publications limited to the English language starting January 1, 2000. Randomized controlled trials including at least 30 participants and lasting at least 6 months, and all observational studies including a minimum of 100 participants for one year, were evaluated. All subjects included were at least 60 years of age. Twenty-seven studies met the inclusion criteria. Twenty-six studies reported a positive correlation between physical activity and maintenance or enhancement of cognitive function. Five studies reported a dose-response relationship between physical activity and cognition. One study showed a nonsignificant correlation. The preponderance of evidence suggests that physical activity is beneficial for cognitive function in the elderly. However, the majority of the evidence is of medium quality with a moderate risk of bias. Larger randomized controlled trials are needed to clarify the association between exercise and cognitive function and to determine which types of exercise have the greatest benefit on specific cognitive domains. Despite these caveats, the current evidence suggests that physical activity may help to improve cognitive function and, consequently, delay the progression of cognitive impairment in the elderly.

  11. Exercise Interventions for Preserving Physical Function Among Cancer Survivors in Middle to Late Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daum, C W; Cochrane, S K; Fitzgerald, J D; Johnson, L; Buford, T W

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to evaluate randomized controlled trials aiming to preserve the functional status, i.e. physical capabilities, of middle-aged and older cancer survivors through a structured, physical exercise intervention. The study team performed a thorough search of the literature using six online databases. This literature search limited included studies to randomized controlled trials which implemented a structured physical activity intervention for middle- and older-aged adults diagnosed with cancer. Studies were also required include at least one objective measure of physical function as a dependent outcome. This literature search yielded thirty-eight studies. The majority of the literature reviewed was successful in improving several functional outcomes including time needed to rise from a chair or distance covered during the six-minute walk test. A large number of published trials also suggest that exercise is effective in decreasing fatigue. However, a lack of trials investigating outcomes in older populations (≥ 65 years) was noted in this review. The results of this review suggest that a structured exercise program may be physically beneficial for middle-aged to older cancer survivors. Particularly, such interventions could preserve the functional status of cancer patients and, consequently, improve their long-term health outcomes. Future implications include further investigation into strictly older cancer patient populations, as outcomes related to exercise might differ between older and middle-aged adults.

  12. Personality and Physical Functioning Among Older Adults: The Moderating Role of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Drawing upon a vulnerability model, this study tested whether low educational level would amplify the negative contribution of risky personality traits, such as high neuroticism and low conscientiousness, on older adults physical functioning. Method. Five hundred and thirteen French-speaking community-dwelling older adults aged 60–91 years (mean age = 66.37, SD = 5.32) completed measures of physical functioning, education, personality traits, chronic conditions, and demographic variables. Results. Results revealed that extraversion and conscientiousness were positively associated with physical functioning, whereas neuroticism was a negative predictor, beyond demographics, chronic conditions, and education. The negative relationship between neuroticism and physical functioning was stronger among individuals with low educational level and was nonsignificant among older people with higher level of education. Discussion. This study is the first to support a vulnerability model, which entails an amplification of neuroticism risk at low education, but a diminishment of neuroticism risk for activity limitations at high education. As a whole, it appears that a focus on either personality or education without taking into account each other provides only a partial account of the predictors of basic daily physical activities in old age. PMID:23070900

  13. Cognitive Mediators of Change in Physical Functioning in Response to a Multifaceted Intervention for Managing Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Shannon Stark; Oddone, Eugene Z; Coffman, Cynthia J; Jeffreys, Amy S; Bosworth, Hayden B; Allen, Kelli D

    2018-02-16

    Although non-pharmacological interventions have been shown to improve physical functioning in individuals with osteoarthritis (OA), the mechanisms by which this occurs are often unclear. This study assessed whether changes in arthritis self-efficacy, perceived pain control, and pain catastrophizing mediated changes in physical functioning following an osteoarthritis intervention involving weight management, physical activity, and cognitive-behavioral pain management. Three hundred Veteran patients of 30 primary care providers with knee and/or hip OA were cluster randomized to an OA intervention group or usual care. The OA intervention included a 12-month phone-based patient behavioral protocol (weight management, physical activity, and cognitive-behavioral pain management) plus patient-specific OA treatment recommendations delivered to primary care providers. Using linear mixed models adjusted for provider clustering, we observed that baseline to 6-month changes in arthritis self-efficacy and pain control partially mediated baseline to 12-month physical functioning improvements for the intervention group; catastrophizing did not. Findings of a mediating role of arthritis self-efficacy and pain control in intervention-related functional changes are consistent with hypotheses and align with theoretical assertions of the role of cognitions in cognitive and behavioral interventions for chronic pain. However, contrary to hypotheses, catastrophizing was not found to be a mediator of these changes.

  14. Association between physical activity in daily life and pulmonary function in adult smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriane Lilian Barboza

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine whether the level of physical activity in daily life (PADL is associated with pulmonary function in adult smokers. Methods: We selected 62 adult smokers from among the participants of an epidemiological study conducted in the city of Santos, Brazil. The subjects underwent forced spirometry for pulmonary function assessment. The level of PADL was assessed by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire and triaxial accelerometry, the device being used for seven days. The minimum level of PADL, in terms of quantity and intensity, was defined as 150 min/week of moderate to vigorous physical activity. Correlations between the studied variables were tested with Pearson's or Spearman's correlation coefficient, depending on the distribution of the variables. We used linear multiple regression in order to analyze the influence of PADL on the spirometric variables. The level of significance was set at 5%. Results: Evaluating all predictors, corrected for confounding factors, and using pulmonary function data as outcome variables, we found no significant associations between physical inactivity, as determined by accelerometry, and spirometric indices. The values for FVC were lower among the participants with arterial hypertension, and FEV1/FVC ratios were lower among those with diabetes mellitus. Obese participants and those with dyslipidemia presented with lower values for FVC and FEV1. Conclusions: Our results suggest that there is no consistent association between physical inactivity and pulmonary function in adult smokers. Smoking history should be given special attention in COPD prevention strategies, as should cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidities.

  15. Personality and physical functioning among older adults: the moderating role of education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaconelli, Alban; Stephan, Yannick; Canada, Brice; Chapman, Benjamin P

    2013-07-01

    Drawing upon a vulnerability model, this study tested whether low educational level would amplify the negative contribution of risky personality traits, such as high neuroticism and low conscientiousness, on older adults physical functioning. Five hundred and thirteen French-speaking community-dwelling older adults aged 60-91 years (mean age = 66.37, SD = 5.32) completed measures of physical functioning, education, personality traits, chronic conditions, and demographic variables. Results revealed that extraversion and conscientiousness were positively associated with physical functioning, whereas neuroticism was a negative predictor, beyond demographics, chronic conditions, and education. The negative relationship between neuroticism and physical functioning was stronger among individuals with low educational level and was nonsignificant among older people with higher level of education. This study is the first to support a vulnerability model, which entails an amplification of neuroticism risk at low education, but a diminishment of neuroticism risk for activity limitations at high education. As a whole, it appears that a focus on either personality or education without taking into account each other provides only a partial account of the predictors of basic daily physical activities in old age.

  16. Long-Term Effects of Individually Tailored Physical Training and Activity on Physical Function, Well-Being and Cognition in Scandinavian Nursing Home Residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frändin, Kerstin; Grönstedt, Helena; Helbostad, Jorunn L

    2016-01-01

    Background: The preservation of physical functions such as muscle strength, balance and mobility is fundamental to maintaining independence in activities of daily living (ADL). The physical activity level of most nursing home residents is very low, which implies that they are often subject...... the individuals' capability, gains in ADL function, balance and transfer ability deteriorated during the 3 months following the intervention period. Thus, continuous, individually adjusted and supported physical activity seems crucial for the maintenance of physical functions in these vulnerable elderly persons...

  17. The effect of pain on physical functioning after breast cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kenneth Geving; Christensen, Karl Bang; Kehlet, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    interviews, and field tested among 389 patients treated for primary breast cancer without recurrence (response rate 81%). Median follow-up was 14 months. Using item response theory we identified 5 cause scales of reduced physical functioning; pain after surgery, musculoskeletal pain, sensory disturbances......, lymphedema and other causes. Convergent validity was assessed using the "Quick-disability of arm, shoulder and hand" scale (Q-DASH). RESULTS:: About half of the patients reported decreased physical function. All 5 scales displayed good fit, unidimensionality, monotonicity, local independence, and lack...

  18. Physic, which can be learned from the functioning of the car

    OpenAIRE

    Kamnik Krek, Metka

    2016-01-01

    Most people use cars on a daily basis, in one way or another, as drivers, passengers or in some other way. As children are also familiar with cars, and often enthusiastic about them, it seems reasonable to try to link some basic physics to the functioning of cars. Some of the basic physics laws can be illustrated and further developed at the example of cars. In the diploma thesis it is demonstrated how some basic features of functioning of a car can be explained in a simple manner which c...

  19. Item-level and subscale-level factoring of Biggs' Learning Process Questionnaire (LPQ) in a mainland Chinese sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, J; Gao, L

    2000-09-01

    The learning process questionnaire (LPQ) has been the source of intensive cross-cultural study. However, an item-level factor analysis of all the LPQ items simultaneously has never been reported. Rather, items within each subscale have been factor analysed to establish subscale unidimensionality and justify the use of composite subscale scores. It was of major interest to see if the six logically constructed items groups of the LPQ would be supported by empirical evidence. Additionally, it was of interest to compare the consistency of the reliability and correlational structure of the LPQ subscales in our study with those of previous cross-cultural studies. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to fit the six-factor item level model and to fit five representative subscale level factor models. A total of 1070 students between the ages of 15 to 18 years was drawn from a representative selection of 29 classes from within 15 secondary schools in Guangzhou, China. Males and females were almost equally represented. The six-factor item level model of the LPQ seemed to fit reasonably well, thus supporting the six dimensional structure of the LPQ and justifying the use of composite subscale scores for each LPQ dimension. However, the reliability of many of these subscales was low. Furthermore, only two subscale-level factor models showed marginally acceptable fit. Substantive considerations supported an oblique three-factor model. Because the LPQ subscales often show low internal consistency reliability, experimental and correlational studies that have used these subscales as dependent measures have been disappointing. It is suggested that some LPQ items should be revised and other items added to improve the inventory's overall psychometric properties.

  20. The Evaluation of Baseline Physical Function and Cognition in Women Undergoing Pelvic Floor Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Maria L; Kisby, Cassandra; Matthews, Catherine A; Wu, Jennifer M

    2016-01-01

    Physical and cognitive function impairments are associated with increased perioperative morbidity; however, limited data exist regarding these parameters in women planning pelvic floor surgery. Thus, our goal was to assess baseline physical function and cognition in patients scheduled for pelvic reconstructive surgery and to evaluate factors associated with preoperative upper and lower body function. In a prospective study, we evaluated sociodemographics, body mass index, the Functional Comorbidity Index (FCI), Katz Activities of Daily Living (ADL), and Instrumental ADL (IADL). Physical function was evaluated with Timed Up and Go (TUG) test and dynamometers to assess handgrip and pinch strength. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) was used to evaluate cognitive impairment. Among 142 women in our study population, mean age was 58.4 ± 13.9 years, comorbidities were low (mean FCI, 3.7 ± 2.7) and independence level was high (mean ADL, 5.7 ± 0.5; mean IADL, 7.8 ± 0.8). Mean TUG test was 11.6 ± 4.5 seconds, reflecting mildly impaired mobility. Maximum handgrip and pinch strength were 51.7 ± 16.6 lb and 12.7 ± 3.6 lb, respectively, which represent normal/above average scores. Age (P = 0.007), body mass index (P = 0.003), IADL (P = 0.003), and MMSE (P = 0.003) were significantly associated with TUG test scores in a multivariate linear regression analysis that adjusted for FCI. The mean MMSE mean score was 29.2 ± 0.9; only 3.5% had mild cognitive impairment and 0.7% had moderate-severe impairment. Women undergoing elective pelvic reconstructive surgery had good physical and cognitive function. The simple TUG test was the most likely tool to identify patients with poorer physical function.

  1. Physical models have gender-specific effects on student understanding of protein structure-function relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes-Lorman, Robin M; Harris, Michelle A; Chang, Wesley S; Dent, Erik W; Nordheim, Erik V; Franzen, Margaret A

    2016-07-08

    Understanding how basic structural units influence function is identified as a foundational/core concept for undergraduate biological and biochemical literacy. It is essential for students to understand this concept at all size scales, but it is often more difficult for students to understand structure-function relationships at the molecular level, which they cannot as effectively visualize. Students need to develop accurate, 3-dimensional mental models of biomolecules to understand how biomolecular structure affects cellular functions at the molecular level, yet most traditional curricular tools such as textbooks include only 2-dimensional representations. We used a controlled, backward design approach to investigate how hand-held physical molecular model use affected students' ability to logically predict structure-function relationships. Brief (one class period) physical model use increased quiz score for females, whereas there was no significant increase in score for males using physical models. Females also self-reported higher learning gains in their understanding of context-specific protein function. Gender differences in spatial visualization may explain the gender-specific benefits of physical model use observed. © 2016 The Authors Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):326-335, 2016. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  2. Physical models have gender‐specific effects on student understanding of protein structure–function relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Michelle A.; Chang, Wesley S.; Dent, Erik W.; Nordheim, Erik V.; Franzen, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Understanding how basic structural units influence function is identified as a foundational/core concept for undergraduate biological and biochemical literacy. It is essential for students to understand this concept at all size scales, but it is often more difficult for students to understand structure–function relationships at the molecular level, which they cannot as effectively visualize. Students need to develop accurate, 3‐dimensional mental models of biomolecules to understand how biomolecular structure affects cellular functions at the molecular level, yet most traditional curricular tools such as textbooks include only 2‐dimensional representations. We used a controlled, backward design approach to investigate how hand‐held physical molecular model use affected students' ability to logically predict structure–function relationships. Brief (one class period) physical model use increased quiz score for females, whereas there was no significant increase in score for males using physical models. Females also self‐reported higher learning gains in their understanding of context‐specific protein function. Gender differences in spatial visualization may explain the gender‐specific benefits of physical model use observed. © 2016 The Authors Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):326–335, 2016. PMID:26923186

  3. Effects of teaching physical education on the functional abilities of female students of younger school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zrnzević Nevenka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available So far researches have showed that physical education has unsufficient efficiency on development of motor and functional abilities of early age pupils. The purpose of this research is to determine how much is the specially programed performance of physical education, with increased demands and application of additional exercises, influenting the functional abilities. The research purpose was also to determine the influence of the current curriculum concerning teaching physical education of functional abilities of the control group of female. The experimental program was carried out on the sample of 97 first-grade schoolgirls of the elementary school. Six metrical instruments were used for evaluation of functional abilities of female. Basic statistic parameters were calculated by processing of data during initial and final measuring. Multivariant and univariant analysis of variance for repeated measures (MANOVA and ANOVA - repeated measures were applied for determination of eventual differences between initial and final measuring. The multivariant analysis of covariance (MANCOVA and univariant analysis of covariance (ANCOVA were applied in order to determine the effects of the experimental program. Based on retrieved results it could be concluded that specially programed performance of physical education had a significant influence on changing the most functional abilities of pupils.

  4. Effects of Pomegranate Extract Supplementation on Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Physical Function in Hemodialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pei-Tzu; Fitschen, Peter J; Kistler, Brandon M; Jeong, Jin Hee; Chung, Hae Ryong; Aviram, Michael; Phillips, Shane A; Fernhall, Bo; Wilund, Kenneth R

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of oral supplementation with pomegranate extract on cardiovascular risk, physical function, oxidative stress, and inflammation in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Thirty-three HD subjects were randomized to the pomegranate (POM) or placebo (CON) group. Patients in POM ingested a 1000 mg capsule of a purified pomegranate polyphenol extract 7 days/week for 6 months. Individuals in CON ingested a noncaloric placebo capsule using the same protocol. Measurements were conducted at baseline and repeated 6 months following the start of the intervention. Brachial blood pressure (BP) was obtained using an automatic digital BP monitor. Cardiovascular risk was assessed using ultrasound and arterial tonometry. Blood samples were collected for the measurements of circulating markers of inflammation, oxidative stress, and antioxidant capacity. Muscle strength and physical function were assessed by isokinetic dynamometry, a validated shuttle walk test, and a battery of tests to assess functional fitness. Systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure were reduced by 24 ± 13.7 and 10 ± 5.3 mmHg, respectively, in POM (P pomegranate supplementation had no effect on other markers of cardiovascular disease risk, inflammation and oxidative stress, or measures of physical function and muscle strength. While pomegranate extract supplementation may reduce BP and increase the antioxidant activity in HD patients, it does not improve other markers of cardiovascular risk, physical function, or muscle strength.

  5. A review of the effects of physical activity and sports concussion on brain function and anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Sara; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Théoret, Hugo

    2017-09-08

    Physical activity has been associated with widespread anatomical and functional brain changes that occur following acute exercise or, in the case of athletes, throughout life. High levels of physical activity through the practice of sports also lead to better general health and increased cognitive function. Athletes are at risk, however, of suffering a concussion, the effects of which have been extensively described for brain function and anatomy. The level to which these effects are modulated by increased levels of fitness is not known. Here, we review literature describing the effects of physical activity and sports concussions on white matter, grey matter, neurochemistry and cortical excitability. We suggest that the effects of sports concussion can be coufounded by the effects of exercise. Indeed, available data show that the brain of athletes is different from that of healthy individuals with a non-active lifestyle. As a result, sports concussions take place in a context where structural/functional plasticity has occurred prior to the concussive event. The sports concussion literature does not permit, at present, to separate the effects of intense and repeated physical activity, and the abrupt removal from such activities, from those of concussion on brain structure and function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Executive Functioning and Engagement in Physical and Relational Aggression among Children with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuade, Julia D; Breaux, Rosanna P; Miller, Rose; Mathias, Laney

    2017-07-01

    Although evidence suggests that executive functioning (EF) impairments are implicated in physically aggressive behavior (e.g., hitting) these cognitive impairments have rarely been examined with regard to relational aggression (e.g., gossip, systematic exclusion). Studies also have not examined if EF impairments underlie the expression of aggression in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and if child gender moderates risk. Children with and without clinical elevations in ADHD symptoms (N = 124; ages 8-12 years; 48 % male) completed a battery of EF tests. Parent and teacher report of ADHD and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) symptoms and teacher report of engagement in physical and relational aggression were collected. Models tested the unique association of EF abilities with physical and relational aggression and the indirect effect through the expression of ADHD or ODD behaviors; child gender was also tested as a moderator. EF impairment was uniquely associated with physical aggression, but better EF ability was associated with relational aggression. For boys, poor EF also was indirectly associated with greater physical aggression through the expression of ADHD behaviors. However, ADHD symptoms were unrelated to relational aggression. ODD symptoms also predicted physical aggression for boys but relational aggression for girls. Results suggest that there are multiple and distinct factors associated with engagement in physical and relational aggression and that better EF may actually promote relational aggression. Established models of physical aggression should not be assumed to map on to explanations of relational aggression.

  7. Associations between neuromuscular function and levels of physical activity differ for boys and girls during puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudroff, Thorsten; Kelsey, Megan M; Melanson, Edward L; McQueen, Matthew B; Enoka, Roger M

    2013-08-01

    To compare the associations between neuromuscular performance and anthropometric characteristics with habitual levels of physical activity in boys and girls during the initial stages of puberty. In a cross-sectional study of 72 healthy children (39 boys and 33 girls) ranging in age from 8 to 14 years, sex differences in anthropometric and motor performance characteristics were compared at 3 Tanner stages (T1-T3). Outcome variables included dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry measurements of body composition, assessments of neuromuscular function, and levels of physical activity (steps/day) measured by accelerometry. Physical activity was lower in girls than boys at T2 and T3, but there was no sex difference at T1. Physical activity increased with Tanner stage for boys but did not differ between Tanner stages in girls. Physical activity at each Tanner stage was strongly associated (R(2) > 0.85) with neuromuscular characteristics for both boys and girls, but percentage of body fat also was associated with physical activity for T3 girls. The attenuated gains in neuromuscular function experienced by girls in early stages of puberty were strongly associated with lower levels of physical activity, whereas the increase in physical activity exhibited by boys was mostly related to increases in the strength and endurance of leg muscles. Because sedentary activity is a known contributor to the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes in youth, this study helps to identify possible contributors to decreases in physical activity in young girls and provides potential targets for early intervention. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Lifelong physical activity preserves functional sympatholysis and purinergic signalling in the ageing human leg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, S P; Nyberg, Michael; Winding, K

    2012-01-01

    Ageing is associated with an impaired ability to modulate sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity (functional sympatholysis) and a reduced exercise hyperaemia. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a physically active lifestyle can offset the impaired functional sympatholysis and exer......Ageing is associated with an impaired ability to modulate sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity (functional sympatholysis) and a reduced exercise hyperaemia. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a physically active lifestyle can offset the impaired functional sympatholysis.......05), whereas ATP-induced vasodilatation was lower in the sedentary elderly (P vascular conductance and VO2 was lower and leg lactate release higher in the sedentary elderly compared to the young (P ... elderly and young. Interstitial [ATP] during exercise and P2Y(2) receptor content were higher in the active elderly compared to the sedentary elderly (P vascular conductance in all groups, but only in the sedentary elderly during exercise (P

  9. Omega-3 Fatty Acids Moderate Effects of Physical Activity on Cognitive Function

    OpenAIRE

    Leckie, Regina L.; Manuck, Stephen B.; Bhattacharee, Neha; Muldoon, Matthew F.; Flory, Janine M.; Erickson, Kirk I.

    2014-01-01

    Greater amounts of physical activity (PA) and omega-3 fatty acids have both been independently associated with better cognitive performance. Because of the overlapping biological effects of omega-3 fatty acids and PA, fatty acid intake may modify the effects of PA on neurocognitive function. The present study tested this hypothesis by examining whether the ratio of serum omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acid levels would moderate the association between PA and executive and memory functions in 344 pa...

  10. Longitudinal functional additive model with continuous proportional outcomes for physical activity data

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Haocheng; Kozey-Keadle, Sarah; Kipnis, Victor; Carroll, Raymond J.

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by physical activity data obtained from the BodyMedia FIT device (www.bodymedia.com), we take a functional data approach for longitudinal studies with continuous proportional outcomes. The functional structure depends on three factors. In our three-factor model, the regression structures are specified as curves measured at various factor-points with random effects that have a correlation structure. The random curve for the continuous factor is summarized using a few important princi...

  11. Effects of common mental disorders and physical conditions on role functioning in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaglia, Gabriela; Duran, Núria; Vilagut, Gemma; Forero, Carlos García; Haro, Josep Maria; Alonso, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    To examine the effects of common mental disorders and physical conditions on role functioning in Spain. Cross-sectional study of the general adult population of Spain (n = 2,121). Non-psychotic mental disorders were assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI 3.0) and physical conditions with a checklist. The role functioning dimension of the WHO-Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS) was used to asses the number of days in the past month in which respondents were fully or partially limited to perform daily activities. Generalized linear models were used to estimate individual-level associations of specific conditions and role functioning, controlling for co-morbidity. Societal level estimates were calculated using population attributable risk proportions (PARP). Mental disorders and physical conditions showed similar number of days with full role limitation (about 20 days per year); in contrast mental disorders were responsible for twice as many days with partial role limitation than physical conditions (42 vs 21 days, respectively). If the population were entirely unexposed to mental and physical conditions, days with full limitation would be reduced by 73% and days with partial limitation by 41%. Common health conditions in Spain are associated with considerably more days with role limitation than other Western countries. There is need of mainstreaming disability in the Spanish public health agenda in order to reduce role limitation among individuals with common conditions. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Leisure time physical activity and subsequent physical and mental health functioning among midlife Finnish, British and Japanese employees: a follow-up study in three occupational cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahti, Jouni; Sabia, Séverine; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Kivimäki, Mika; Tatsuse, Takashi; Yamada, Masaaki; Sekine, Michikazu; Lallukka, Tea

    2016-01-06

    The aim of this study was to examine whether leisure time physical activity contributes to subsequent physical and mental health functioning among midlife employees. The associations were tested in three occupational cohorts from Finland, Britain and Japan. Cohort study. Finland, Britain and Japan. Prospective employee cohorts from the Finnish Helsinki Health Study (2000-2002 and 2007, n=5958), British Whitehall II study (1997-1999 and 2003-2004, n=4142) and Japanese Civil Servants Study (1998-1999 and 2003, n=1768) were used. Leisure time physical activity was classified into three groups: inactive, moderately active and vigorously active. Mean scores of physical and mental health functioning (SF-36) at follow-up were examined. Physical activity was associated with better subsequent physical health functioning in all three cohorts, however, with varying magnitude and some gender differences. Differences were the clearest among Finnish women (inactive: 46.0, vigorously active: 49.5) and men (inactive: 47.8, active vigorous: 51.1) and British women (inactive: 47.3, active vigorous: 50.4). In mental health functioning, the differences were generally smaller and not that clearly related to the intensity of physical activity. Emerging differences in health functioning were relatively small. Vigorous physical activity was associated with better subsequent physical health functioning in all three cohorts with varying magnitude. For mental health functioning, the intensity of physical activity was less important. Promoting leisure time physical activity may prove useful for the maintenance of health functioning among midlife employees. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Subscales of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale differentially relate to the Big Five factors of personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Florian; Wagner, Adina; Müller, Astrid; Eggert, Frank

    2017-06-01

    The place of impulsiveness in multidimensional personality frameworks is still unclear. In particular, no consensus has yet been reached with regard to the relation of impulsiveness to Neuroticism and Extraversion. We aim to contribute to a clearer understanding of these relationships by accounting for the multidimensional structure of impulsiveness. In three independent studies, we related the subscales of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS) to the Big Five factors of personality. Study 1 investigated the associations between the BIS subscales and the Big Five factors as measured by the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) in a student sample (N = 113). Selective positive correlations emerged between motor impulsiveness and Extraversion and between attentional impulsiveness and Neuroticism. This pattern of results was replicated in Study 2 (N = 132) using a 10-item short version of the Big Five Inventory. In Study 3, we analyzed BIS and NEO-FFI data obtained from a sample of patients with pathological buying (N = 68). In these patients, the relationship between motor impulsiveness and Extraversion was significantly weakened when compared to the non-clinical samples. At the same time, the relationship between attentional impulsiveness and Neuroticism was substantially stronger in the clinical sample. Our studies highlight the utility of the BIS subscales for clarifying the relationship between impulsiveness and the Big Five personality factors. We conclude that impulsiveness might occupy multiple places in multidimensional personality frameworks, which need to be specified to improve the interpretability of impulsiveness scales. © 2017 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Anthropometric, physical function and general health markers of Masters athletes: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fien, Samantha; Climstein, Mike; Quilter, Clodagh; Buckley, Georgina; Henwood, Timothy; Grigg, Josie; Keogh, Justin W L

    2017-01-01

    Once the general decline in muscle mass, muscle strength and physical performance falls below specific thresholds, the middle aged or older adult will be diagnosed as having sarcopenia (a loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength). Sarcopenia contributes to a range of adverse events in older age including disability, hospitalisation, institutionalisation and falls. One potentially relevant but understudied population for sarcopenia researchers would be Masters athletes. Masters sport is becoming more common as it allows athletes (typically 40 years and older) the opportunity to participate in individual and/or team sports against individuals of similar age. This study examined a variety of measures of anthropometric, physical function and general health markers in the male and female Masters athletes who competed at the 2014 Pan Pacific Masters Games held on the Gold Coast, Australia. Bioelectrical impedance analysis was used to collect body fat percentage, fat mass and fat-free mass; with body mass, height, body mass index (BMI) and sarcopenic status also recorded. Physical function was quantified by handgrip strength and habitual walking speed; with general health described by the number of chronic diseases and prescribed medications. Between group analyses utilised ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests to examine the effect of age group (40-49, 50-59, 60-69 and >70 years old) on the outcome measures for the entire sample as well as the male and female sub-groups. A total of 156 athletes (78 male, 78 female; mean 55.7 years) provided informed consent to participate in this study. These athletes possessed substantially better anthropometric, physical function and general health characteristics than the literature for their less physically active age-matched peers. No Masters athletes were categorised as being sarcopenic, although one participant had below normal physical performance and six participants had below normal muscle strength. In contrast, significant age

  15. New analytical solutions for conformable fractional PDEs arising in mathematical physics by exp-function method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasbozan, Orkun; Çenesiz, Yücel; Kurt, Ali; Baleanu, Dumitru

    2017-11-01

    Modelling of physical systems mathematically, produces nonlinear evolution equations. Most of the physical systems in nature are intrinsically nonlinear, therefore modelling such systems mathematically leads us to nonlinear evolution equations. The analysis of the wave solutions corresponding to the nonlinear partial differential equations (NPDEs), has a vital role for studying the nonlinear physical events. This article is written with the intention of finding the wave solutions of Nizhnik-Novikov-Veselov and Klein-Gordon equations. For this purpose, the exp-function method, which is based on a series of exponential functions, is employed as a tool. This method is an useful and suitable tool to obtain the analytical solutions of a considerable number of nonlinear FDEs within a conformable derivative.

  16. SIFAT FISIK, KIMIA, DAN FUNGSIONAL DAMAR [Brief Review on: Physical, Chemical and Functional Properties of Dammar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noryawati Mulyono1

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Dammar is one of Indonesian forestry products which is abundant. It has unique physical, chemical and functional properties. The important physical properties of dammar include its solubility in some organic solvents, softening temperature, viscosity and its absorbance. The important chemical properties reviewed here include its properties as resin, composition of terpenoid compounds present in dammar, and essential oil yielded from distillation of fresh dammar. Physical and chemical properties of dammar need to be studied further in order to optimize its functional properties. So far, dammar is widely used as weighting agent and source of essential oil. However, now, some species of dammar are being explored and developed for sal flour, fat source, triacylglycerol substituent for cocoa butter and wood preservatives.

  17. Physical and expenditure formulations of demand functions and evaluations of price demand elasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Syrovátka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies of the demand relations on the consumer markets bring much useful information. The concept of the elasticity coefficients is frequently used for the quantitative analysis of the demand sensitivity. Formulation of the investigated demand functions is very important for the evaluation of the demand elasticity. Within net consumer demand (consumer purchase, it is possible to differentiate the physical and expenditure forms of the demand functions. The paper is focused on the theoretical and methodological backgrounds of the evaluation of price-demand elasticity under the physical and expenditure definitions of the demand relationships. In this paper, the relationship between the coefficient of the price elasticity of demand in the physical form and the coefficient of the price elasticity of demand in the expenditure form is determined and studied. The derived formula is tested using the USDA database.

  18. GENASIS Basics: Object-oriented utilitarian functionality for large-scale physics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardall, Christian Y.; Budiardja, Reuben D.

    2015-11-01

    Aside from numerical algorithms and problem setup, large-scale physics simulations on distributed-memory supercomputers require more basic utilitarian functionality, such as physical units and constants; display to the screen or standard output device; message passing; I/O to disk; and runtime parameter management and usage statistics. Here we describe and make available Fortran 2003 classes furnishing extensible object-oriented implementations of this sort of rudimentary functionality, along with individual 'unit test' programs and larger example problems demonstrating their use. These classes compose the Basics division of our developing astrophysics simulation code GENASIS (General Astrophysical Simulation System), but their fundamental nature makes them useful for physics simulations in many fields.

  19. Educational Functioning of Children of Parents with Chronic Physical Illness: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cliff Yung-Chi

    2016-01-01

    A systematic review of the literature was performed to answer the question: What are the effects of parental chronic physical illness on children's educational functioning? Thirteen studies that met the inclusion criteria for the purpose of this review were identified, indicating the paucity of research on the topic. The results found that…

  20. Greater yogurt consumption is associated with increased bone mineral density and physical function in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, E; Molloy, A M; McNulty, H; Ward, M; McCarroll, K; Hoey, L; Hughes, C F; Cunningham, C; Strain, J J; Casey, M C

    2017-08-01

    In this cohort of community dwelling older adults (>60 years), we observed significant positive associations between the frequencies of yogurt intake with measures of bone density, bone biomarkers, and indicators of physical function. Improving yogurt intakes could be a valuable health strategy for maintaining bone health in older adults. The associations of yogurt intakes with bone health and frailty in older adults are not well documented. The aim was to investigate the association of yogurt intakes with bone mineral density (BMD), bone biomarkers, and physical function in 4310 Irish adults from the Trinity, Ulster, Department of Agriculture aging cohort study (TUDA). Bone measures included total hip, femoral neck, and vertebral BMD with bone biochemical markers. Physical function measures included Timed Up and Go (TUG), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale, and Physical Self-Maintenance Scale. Total hip and femoral neck BMD in females were 3.1-3.9% higher among those with the highest yogurt intakes (n = 970) compared to the lowest (n = 1109; P function scores. These results suggest that improving yogurt intakes could be a valuable public health strategy for maintaining bone health in older adults.

  1. Plant diversity and root traits benefit physical properties key to soil function in grasslands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gould, Iain J.; Quinton, John N.; Weigelt, Alexandra; Deyn, De Gerlinde B.; Bardgett, Richard D.; Seabloom, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Plant diversity loss impairs ecosystem functioning, including important effects on soil. Most studies that have explored plant diversity effects belowground, however, have largely focused on biological processes. As such, our understanding of how plant diversity impacts the soil physical

  2. Differential Item Functioning Analysis of the 2003-04 NHANES Physical Activity Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yong; Zhu, Weimo

    2011-01-01

    Using differential item functioning (DIF) analyses, this study examined whether there were any DIF items in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) physical activity (PA) questionnaire. A subset of adult data from the 2003-04 NHANES study (n = 3,083) was used. PA items related to respondents' occupational, transportation,…

  3. Subliminal strengthening: improving older individuals' physical function over time with an implicit-age-stereotype intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Becca R; Pilver, Corey; Chung, Pil H; Slade, Martin D

    2014-12-01

    Negative age stereotypes that older individuals assimilate from their culture predict detrimental outcomes, including worse physical function. We examined, for the first time, whether positive age stereotypes, presented subliminally across multiple sessions in the community, would lead to improved outcomes. Each of 100 older individuals (age=61-99 years, M=81) was randomly assigned to an implicit-positive-age-stereotype-intervention group, an explicit-positive-age-stereotype-intervention group, a combined implicit- and explicit-positive-age-stereotype-intervention group, or a control group. Interventions occurred at four 1-week intervals. The implicit intervention strengthened positive age stereotypes, which strengthened positive self-perceptions of aging, which, in turn, improved physical function. The improvement in these outcomes continued for 3 weeks after the last intervention session. Further, negative age stereotypes and negative self-perceptions of aging were weakened. For all outcomes, the implicit intervention's impact was greater than the explicit intervention's impact. The physical-function effect of the implicit intervention surpassed a previous study's 6-month-exercise-intervention's effect with participants of similar ages. The current study's findings demonstrate the potential of directing implicit processes toward physical-function enhancement over time. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Long term high flow heated oxygen treatment in COPD – lung function and physical ability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinreich, Ulla; Storgaard, Line; Hockey, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Long term oxygen therapy (LTOT) improves survival in patients with COPD with resting hypoxemia. Despite this, a progressive loss of lung function and physical ability is expected in COPD. The AIRVO device delivers nasal high flow (NHF) warmed and humidified oxygen-enriched air, 20...

  5. Functional level, physical activity and wellbeing in nursing home residents in three Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grönstedt, Helena; Hellström, Karin; Bergland, Astrid

    2011-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to describe physical and cognitive function and wellbeing among nursing home residents in three Nordic countries. A second aim was to compare groups of differing ages, levels of dependency in daily life activities (ADL), degree of fall-related self-efficacy, wellbeing...

  6. A systematic review of physical illness, functional disability, and suicidal behaviour among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fässberg, Madeleine Mellqvist; Cheung, Gary; Canetto, Silvia Sara; Erlangsen, Annette; Lapierre, Sylvie; Lindner, Reinhard; Draper, Brian; Gallo, Joseph J; Wong, Christine; Wu, Jing; Duberstein, Paul; Wærn, Margda

    2016-01-01

    To conduct a systematic review of studies that examined associations between physical illness/functional disability and suicidal behaviour (including ideation, nonfatal and fatal suicidal behaviour) among individuals aged 65 and older. Articles published through November 2014 were identified through electronic searches using the ERIC, Google Scholar, PsycINFO, PubMed, and Scopus databases. Search terms used were suicid* or death wishes or deliberate self-harm. Studies about suicidal behaviour in individuals aged 65 and older with physical illness/functional disabilities were included in the review. Sixty-five articles (across 61 independent samples) met inclusion criteria. Results from 59 quantitative studies conducted in four continents suggest that suicidal behaviour is associated with functional disability and numerous specific conditions including malignant diseases, neurological disorders, pain, COPD, liver disease, male genital disorders, and arthritis/arthrosis. Six qualitative studies from three continents contextualized these findings, providing insights into the subjective experiences of suicidal individuals. Implications for interventions and future research are discussed. Functional disability, as well as a number of specific physical illnesses, was shown to be associated with suicidal behaviour in older adults. We need to learn more about what at-risk, physically ill patients want, and need, to inform prevention efforts for older adults.

  7. Wheat gluten in extruded fish feed: Effects on morphology and on physical and functional properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draganovic, V.; Goot, van der A.J.; Boom, R.M.; Jonkers, J.

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on understanding the role of vital wheat gluten on the structural parameters of extruded fish feed and its correlation to the physical and functional properties. Gluten–soy protein concentrate blends with five gluten concentrations (0–200 g kg-1) were produced. An abrupt

  8. Implant removal after internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture: Effects on physical functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Zielinski (Stephanie); M.J. Heetveld (Martin); M. Bhandari (Mohit); P. Patka (Peter); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: The effect of implant removal after internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture on physical functioning was analyzed. Characteristics of patients who had their implant removed were studied, as it is currently unknown from which type of patients implants are removed and what

  9. Changes in functional network centrality underlie cognitive dysfunction and physical disability in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonheim, M.M.; Geurts, J.J.G.; Wiebenga, O.T.; de Munck, J.C.; Polman, C.H.; Stam, C.J.; Barkhof, F.; Wink, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis (MS) has a large impact on the quality of life and is poorlyunderstood.Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate functional network integrity in MS, and relate this to cognitivedysfunction and physical disability.Methods: Resting

  10. Bike Desks in the Classroom: Energy Expenditure, Physical Health, Cognitive Performance, Brain Functioning, and Academic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbeyns, Tine; de Geus, Bas; Bailey, Stephen; Decroix, Lieselot; Van Cutsem, Jeroen; De Pauw, Kevin; Meeusen, Romain

    2017-06-01

    Physical activity is positively associated with physical health, cognitive performance, brain functioning and academic performance. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of bike desks in the classroom on adolescents' energy expenditure, physical health, cognitive performance, brain functioning and academic performance. Forty-four adolescents were randomly assigned to control group (CG) or intervention group (IG). During 5 months, the IG used a bike desk for 4 class hours/week. Energy expenditure was measured during 6 consecutive days. Anthropometric parameters, aerobic fitness, academic performance, cognitive performance and brain functioning were assessed before (T0) and after (T1) the intervention. Energy expenditure of the IG was significantly higher during the class hours in which they used the bike desks relative to normal class hours. The CG had a significantly higher BMI at T1 relative to T0 while this was not significantly different for the IG. Aerobic fitness was significantly better in the IG at T1 relative to T0. No significant effects on academic performance cognitive performance and brain functioning were observed. As the implementation of bike desks in the classroom did not interfere with adolescents' academic performance, this can be seen as an effective means of reducing in-class sedentary time and improving adolescents' physical health.

  11. Physical Functionality and Self-Rated Health Status of Adult Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Knee osteoarthritis is a chronic medical condition of public health importance in Nigeria which causes disability and impacts daily activities in the sufferers. This study aimed to describe the physical functionality and self-rated health status of adult patients with clinical knee osteoarthritis presenting at the Family ...

  12. Biomarker-calibrated protein intake and physical function in the Women's Health Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Jeannette M; Wertheim, Betsy C; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Prentice, Ross L; Neuhouser, Marian L; Tinker, Lesley F; Kritchevsky, Stephen; Shikany, James M; Eaton, Charles; Chen, Zhao; Thomson, Cynthia A

    2013-11-01

    To determine whether preservation of physical function with aging may be partially met through modification in dietary protein intake. Prospective cohort study. Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Clinical Trials (CT) and Observational Study (OS) conducted at 40 clinical centers. Women aged 50 to 79 (N = 134,961) with dietary data and one or more physical function measures. Physical function was assessed using the short-form RAND-36 at baseline and annually beginning in 2005 for all WHI participants and at closeout for CT participants (average ~7 years after baseline). In a subset of 5,346 participants, physical performance measures (grip strength, number of chair stands in 15 seconds, and timed 6-m walk) were assessed at baseline and Years 1, 3, and 6. Calibrated energy and protein intake were derived from regression equations using baseline food frequency questionnaire data collected on the entire cohort and doubly labeled water and 24-hour urinary nitrogen collected from a representative sample as reference measures. Associations between calibrated protein intake and each of the physical function measures were assessed using generalized estimating equations. Calibrated protein intake ranged from 6.6% to 22.3% energy. Higher calibrated protein intake at baseline was associated with higher self-reported physical function (quintile (Q)5, 85.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 81.9-87.5; Q1, 75.4, 95% CI = 73.2-78.5, P trend = .002) and a slower rate of functional decline (annualized change: Q5, -0.47, 95% CI = -0.63 to -0.39; Q1, -0.98, 95% CI = -1.18 to -0.75, P trend = .02). Women with higher calibrated protein intake also had greater grip strength at baseline (Q5, 24.7 kg, 95% CI = 24.3-25.2 kg; Q1, 24.1 kg, 95% CI = 23.6-24.5 kg, P trend = .04) and slower declines in grip strength (annualized change: Q5, -0.45 kg, 95% CI = -0.39 to -0.63 kg; Q1, -0.59 kg, 95% CI = -0.50 to -0.66 kg, P trend = .03). Women with higher calibrated protein intake also completed more chair

  13. The orexin neuropeptide system: Physical activity and hypothalamic function throughout the aging process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia N Zink

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There is a rising medical need for novel therapeutic targets of physical activity. Physical activity spans from spontaneous, low intensity movements to voluntary, high-intensity exercise. Regulation of spontaneous and voluntary movement is distributed over many brain areas and neural substrates, but the specific cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for mediating overall activity levels are not well understood. The hypothalamus plays a central role in the control of physical activity, which is executed through coordination of multiple signaling systems, including the orexin neuropeptides. Orexin producing neurons integrate physiological and metabolic information to coordinate multiple behavioral states and modulate physical activity in response to the environment. This review is organized around three questions: (1 How do orexin peptides modulate physical activity? (2 What are the effects of aging and lifestyle choices on physical activity? (3 What are the effects of aging on hypothalamic function and the orexin peptides? Discussion of these questions will provide a summary of the current state of knowledge regarding hypothalamic orexin regulation of physical activity during aging and provide a platform on which to develop improved clinical outcomes in age-associated obesity and metabolic syndromes.

  14. Ageing, Muscle Power and Physical Function: A Systematic Review and Implications for Pragmatic Training Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Christopher; Faure, Charles; Keene, David J; Lamb, Sarah E

    2016-09-01

    The physiological impairments most strongly associated with functional performance in older people are logically the most efficient therapeutic targets for exercise training interventions aimed at improving function and maintaining independence in later life. The objectives of this review were to (1) systematically review the relationship between muscle power and functional performance in older people; (2) systematically review the effect of power training (PT) interventions on functional performance in older people; and (3) identify components of successful PT interventions relevant to pragmatic trials by scoping the literature. Our approach involved three stages. First, we systematically reviewed evidence on the relationship between muscle power, muscle strength and functional performance and, second, we systematically reviewed PT intervention studies that included both muscle power and at least one index of functional performance as outcome measures. Finally, taking a strong pragmatic perspective, we conducted a scoping review of the PT evidence to identify the successful components of training interventions needed to provide a minimally effective training dose to improve physical function. Evidence from 44 studies revealed a positive association between muscle power and indices of physical function, and that muscle power is a marginally superior predictor of functional performance than muscle strength. Nine studies revealed maximal angular velocity of movement, an important component of muscle power, to be positively associated with functional performance and a better predictor of functional performance than muscle strength. We identified 31 PT studies, characterised by small sample sizes and incomplete reporting of interventions, resulting in less than one-in-five studies judged as having a low risk of bias. Thirteen studies compared traditional resistance training with PT, with ten studies reporting the superiority of PT for either muscle power or functional

  15. Accurate Semilocal Density Functional for Condensed-Matter Physics and Quantum Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jianmin; Mo, Yuxiang

    2016-08-12

    Most density functionals have been developed by imposing the known exact constraints on the exchange-correlation energy, or by a fit to a set of properties of selected systems, or by both. However, accurate modeling of the conventional exchange hole presents a great challenge, due to the delocalization of the hole. Making use of the property that the hole can be made localized under a general coordinate transformation, here we derive an exchange hole from the density matrix expansion, while the correlation part is obtained by imposing the low-density limit constraint. From the hole, a semilocal exchange-correlation functional is calculated. Our comprehensive test shows that this functional can achieve remarkable accuracy for diverse properties of molecules, solids, and solid surfaces, substantially improving upon the nonempirical functionals proposed in recent years. Accurate semilocal functionals based on their associated holes are physically appealing and practically useful for developing nonlocal functionals.

  16. Multiple nutritional deficiencies in cerebral palsy compounding physical and functional impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P G Hariprasad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cerebral palsy (CP refers to a spectrum of disorders causing physical and intellectual morbidity. Macro and micro nutrient deficiencies often contribute to the subnormal physical and mental capabilities of them. Objectives: To assess the growth, nutritional status, physical and functional ability and quality of life in cerebral palsy children and to determine any relation with their gross motor and functional capabilities. Method: The study was conducted at a Tertiary Care Centre, with the participants in the age group 1-16 years. A pretested evaluation tool was prepared which included Anthropometric measurements, tests for hemoglobin and Vitamin D estimation, evidence of micronutrient deficiencies, Dietary patterns, Epidemiological factors, Functional assessment using GMFM (Gross Motor Function Measure and FIM (Functional Independent Measurement scales and Quality of life (QOL assessment. The data was statistically analyzed. Results: Out of the 41 children, 30 had quadriplegia, 3 had hemiplegia and 8 had spastic diplegia. 34 (82.9% were severely underweight, 35 (85.4% had severe stunting and 38 (92.7% had severe wasting. Micronutrient deficiencies were noted like vitamin B complex deficiency in 37 (90.2%, vitamin A deficiency in 31 (75.6%, low vitamin D levels in 27 (65.9% and insufficient levels in 9 (22%, severe anemia in 5 (12.2% and moderate anemia in 26 (63.4%.The gross motor and functional scores were suboptimum in the majority of patients and the care givers had significant impairment in the quality of life. Conclusion: Majority of children with cerebral palsy had multiple nutritional deficiencies, gross motor and functional disabilities. QOL of the children and their care givers were suboptimum. A comprehensive package that address dietary intake, correction of micronutrient deficiencies especially anemia and vitamin D deficiency, physical and emotional support is recommended for the wellbeing of the affected children.

  17. Multiple Nutritional Deficiencies in Cerebral Palsy Compounding Physical and Functional Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariprasad, P G; Elizabeth, K E; Valamparampil, Mathew J; Kalpana, D; Anish, T S

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) refers to a spectrum of disorders causing physical and intellectual morbidity. Macro and micro nutrient deficiencies often contribute to the subnormal physical and mental capabilities of them. To assess the growth, nutritional status, physical and functional ability and quality of life in cerebral palsy children and to determine any relation with their gross motor and functional capabilities. The study was conducted at a Tertiary Care Centre, with the participants in the age group 1-16 years. A pretested evaluation tool was prepared which included Anthropometric measurements, tests for hemoglobin and Vitamin D estimation, evidence of micronutrient deficiencies, Dietary patterns, Epidemiological factors, Functional assessment using GMFM (Gross Motor Function Measure ) and FIM (Functional Independent Measurement) scales and Quality of life (QOL) assessment. The data was statistically analyzed. Out of the 41 children, 30 had quadriplegia, 3 had hemiplegia and 8 had spastic diplegia. 34 (82.9%) were severely underweight, 35 (85.4%) had severe stunting and 38 (92.7%) had severe wasting. Micronutrient deficiencies were noted like vitamin B complex deficiency in 37 (90.2%), vitamin A deficiency in 31 (75.6%), low vitamin D levels in 27 (65.9%) and insufficient levels in 9 (22%), severe anemia in 5 (12.2%) and moderate anemia in 26 (63.4%). The gross motor and functional scores were suboptimum in the majority of patients and the care givers had significant impairment in the quality of life. Majority of children with cerebral palsy had multiple nutritional deficiencies, gross motor and functional disabilities. QOL of the children and their care givers were suboptimum. A comprehensive package that address dietary intake, correction of micronutrient deficiencies especially anemia and vitamin D deficiency, physical and emotional support is recommended for the wellbeing of the affected children.

  18. Change in economic difficulties and physical and mental functioning: Evidence from British and Finnish employee cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallukka, Tea; Ferrie, Jane E; Rahkonen, Ossi; Shipley, Martin J; Pietiläinen, Olli; Kivimäki, Mika; Marmot, Michael G; Lahelma, Eero

    2013-09-01

    The main aims of this longitudinal study were to (i) examine associations between changes in economic difficulties and health functioning among middle-aged employees and (ii) assess whether the associations remained after considering conventional domains of socioeconomic position. The associations were tested in two European welfare state occupational cohorts to strengthen the evidence base and improve generalizability. Data came from two cohorts: the Finnish Helsinki Health Study (baseline 2000-2002, follow-up 2007, N = 6328) and the British Whitehall II Study (baseline 1997-1999, follow-up 2003-2004, N = 4350). Responses to the survey item "finding it hard to afford adequate food and clothes and pay bills" repeated at baseline and follow-up were used to examine persistent, increasing, and decreasing economic difficulties. Poor physical and mental health functioning were denoted as being in the lowest quartile of the Short Form 36 physical and mental component summary. Logistic regression analyses were adjusted for sex, age, childhood economic difficulties, household income at baseline and follow-up, employment status at follow-up, and baseline health functioning. We observed strong sex- and age-adjusted associations between increasing [odds ratio (OR) range 1.69-2.96] and persistent (OR range 2.54-3.21) economic difficulties and poorer physical and mental health functioning in both British and Finnish occupational cohorts. These associations remained after full adjustments. Those reporting decreasing difficulties over follow-up also had poorer functioning (OR range 1.30-1.61) compared to those who did not have difficulties at baseline, possibly reflecting residual effects of economic difficulties at baseline. Changes in economic difficulties are associated with poorer physical and mental health functioning independent of income, employment status, and baseline health functioning.

  19. Fat mass loss predicts gain in physical function with intentional weight loss in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavers, Kristen M; Miller, Michael E; Rejeski, W Jack; Nicklas, Barbara J; Krichevsky, Stephen B; Kritchevsky, Stephen B

    2013-01-01

    Clinical recommendation of weight loss (WL) in older adults remains controversial, partially due to concerns regarding lean mass loss and potential loss of physical function. The purpose of this study is to determine the independent associations between changes in fat and lean mass and changes in physical function in older, overweight, and obese adults undergoing intentional WL. Data from three randomized-controlled trials of intentional WL in older adults with similar functional outcomes (short physical performance battery and Pepper assessment tool for disability) were combined. Analyses of covariance models were used to investigate relationships between changes in weight, fat, and lean mass (acquired using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry) and changes in physical function. Overall loss of body weight was -7.8 ± 6.1 kg (-5.6 ± 4.1 kg and -2.7 ± 2.4 kg of fat and lean mass, respectively). In all studies combined, after adjustment for age, sex, and height, overall WL was associated with significant improvements in self-reported mobility disability (p fat and lean mass as independent variables found only the change in fat mass to significantly predict change in mobility disability (β[fat] = 0.04; p fat] = -0.01; p loss of body weight, following intentional WL, is associated with significant improvement in self-reported mobility disability and walking speed in overweight and obese older adults. Importantly, fat mass loss was found to be a more significant predictor of change in physical function than lean mass loss.

  20. Associations between education and physical functioning and pain in adult Danish cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winther, Dorte; Nygaard, Tina K; Horsbøl, Trine A; Kjær, Trille; Vedsted, Peter; Johansen, Christoffer; Hovaldt, Hanna B; Sandager, Mette; Dalton, Susanne O

    2017-02-01

    Late effects after cancer diagnosis and treatment are common, but only few studies have examined the role of social factors in developing these late effects. The aim of this study was to examine the association between educational level and physical function and pain among cancer survivors two years after diagnosis. The study population consisted of adult Danish patients with a first-time cancer diagnosis who were sent a questionnaire in 2010 and followed up in 2012. In total, 4346 returned the first questionnaire shortly after diagnosis and 2568 returned the follow-up questionnaire. After exclusion of 177 due to missing information, we included 2391 cancer survivors in the analyses. Physical function and pain were measured using the EORTC QLQ-C30. Linear regression analyses were conducted separately for men and women, and adjusted for demographic and clinical characteristics. Additionally, analyses were stratified on comorbidity. Differences in mean scores according to educational level were small. Physical function was better in women with medium (2.8; 95% CI 0.1;5.4) and higher education (3.4; 95% CI 0.9;5.9) compared to women with short education. In contrast, men with medium education reported lower physical function (-2.9; 95% CI -5.7;-0.1) than men with short education. Compared to women with short education, we found lower pain scores among women with medium (-5.0; 95% CI -8.7;-1.4) and higher education (-3.4; 95% CI -6.7;0.0). Similarly, men with higher education experienced lower pain score (-3.4; 95% CI -6.9;0.1) than men with short education. The role of educational level differed between those with and without comorbidity. Educational level is slightly associated with physical function and pain among cancer survivors. However, mean differences in this study were small and below what is considered clinically relevant.

  1. Contribution of physical fitness, cerebrovascular reserve and cognitive stimulation to cognitive function in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail A Eskes

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies of the effects of physical fitness on cognition suggest that exercise can improve cognitive abilities in healthy older adults, as well as delay the onset of age-related cognitive decline. The mechanisms for the positive benefit of exercise and how these effects interact with other variables known to influence cognitive function (e.g., involvement in cognitive activities are less well understood. The current study examined the associations between the physical fitness, cerebrovascular blood flow regulation and involvement in cognitive activities with neuropsychological function in healthy postmenopausal women. Methods: Forty-two healthy women between the ages of 55 and 90 were recruited. Physical fitness (V˙ o2max, cerebrovascular reserve (cerebral blood flow during rest and response to an increase in end-tidal (i.e., arterial PCO2, and cognitive activity (self-reported number and hours of involvement in cognitive activities were assessed. The association of these variables with neuropsychological performance was examined through linear regression. Results: Physical fitness, cerebrovascular reserve and total number of cognitive activities (but not total hours were independent predictors of cognitive function, particularly measures of overall cognitive performance, attention and executive function. In addition, prediction of neuropsychological performance was better with multiple variables than each alone. Conclusions: Cognitive function in older adults is associated with multiple factors, including physical fitness, cerebrovascular health and cognitive stimulation. Interestingly, cognitive stimulation effects appear related more to the diversity of activities, rather than the duration of activity. Further examination of these relationships is ongoing in a prospective cohort study.

  2. Use of the dosed physical loadings in the increase of physical health and functional state of the cardiorespiratory system of organism of students 18-19 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokolova O.V.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The changes of the functional state of the systems of circulation of blood, external breathing and physical health of students are rotined at employments by a step-aerobics. In an experiment students took part 18-19 years. The inspection of 114 students is conducted (61 girl and 53 youths. Plugging in the program of physical education of students of this type of physical exercises is instrumental in the substantial increase of level of the functional state of their organism and physical health.

  3. Combined cognitive-psychological-physical intervention induces reorganization of intrinsic functional brain architecture in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhiwei; Zhu, Xinyi; Yin, Shufei; Wang, Baoxi; Niu, Yanan; Huang, Xin; Li, Rui; Li, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that enriched mental, physical, and socially stimulating activities are beneficial for counteracting age-related decreases in brain function and cognition in older adults. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to demonstrate the functional plasticity of brain activity in response to a combined cognitive-psychological-physical intervention and investigated the contribution of the intervention-related brain changes to individual performance in healthy older adults. The intervention was composed of a 6-week program of combined activities including cognitive training, Tai Chi exercise, and group counseling. The results showed improved cognitive performance and reorganized regional homogeneity of spontaneous fluctuations in the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals in the superior and middle temporal gyri, and the posterior lobe of the cerebellum, in the participants who attended the intervention. Intriguingly, the intervention-induced changes in the coherence of local spontaneous activity correlated with the improvements in individual cognitive performance. Taken together with our previous findings of enhanced resting-state functional connectivity between the medial prefrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe regions following a combined intervention program in older adults, we conclude that the functional plasticity of the aging brain is a rather complex process, and an effective cognitive-psychological-physical intervention is helpful for maintaining a healthy brain and comprehensive cognition during old age.

  4. Combined Cognitive-Psychological-Physical Intervention Induces Reorganization of Intrinsic Functional Brain Architecture in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mounting evidence suggests that enriched mental, physical, and socially stimulating activities are beneficial for counteracting age-related decreases in brain function and cognition in older adults. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to demonstrate the functional plasticity of brain activity in response to a combined cognitive-psychological-physical intervention and investigated the contribution of the intervention-related brain changes to individual performance in healthy older adults. The intervention was composed of a 6-week program of combined activities including cognitive training, Tai Chi exercise, and group counseling. The results showed improved cognitive performance and reorganized regional homogeneity of spontaneous fluctuations in the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD signals in the superior and middle temporal gyri, and the posterior lobe of the cerebellum, in the participants who attended the intervention. Intriguingly, the intervention-induced changes in the coherence of local spontaneous activity correlated with the improvements in individual cognitive performance. Taken together with our previous findings of enhanced resting-state functional connectivity between the medial prefrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe regions following a combined intervention program in older adults, we conclude that the functional plasticity of the aging brain is a rather complex process, and an effective cognitive-psychological-physical intervention is helpful for maintaining a healthy brain and comprehensive cognition during old age.

  5. Abdominal binders may reduce pain and improve physical function after major abdominal surgery - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothman, Josephine Philip; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Bisgaard, Thue

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Evidence for the effect of post-operative abdominal binders on post-operative pain, seroma formation, physical function, pulmonary function and increased intra-abdominal pressure among patients after surgery remains largely un-investigated. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted...... to reduce seroma formation after laparoscopic ventral herniotomy and a non-significant reduction in pain. Physical function was improved, whereas evidence supports a beneficial effect on psychological distress after open abdominal surgery. Evidence also supports that intra-abdominal pressure increases....... The PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched for studies on the use of abdominal binders after abdominal surgery or abdominoplasty. All types of clinical studies were included. Two independent assessors evaluated the scientific quality of the studies. The primary outcomes were pain, seroma...

  6. Abdominal binders may reduce pain and improve physical function after major abdominal surgery - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothman, Josephine Philip; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Bisgaard, Thue

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Evidence for the effect of post-operative abdominal binders on post-operative pain, seroma formation, physical function, pulmonary function and increased intra-abdominal pressure among patients after surgery remains largely un-investigated. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted....... The PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched for studies on the use of abdominal binders after abdominal surgery or abdominoplasty. All types of clinical studies were included. Two independent assessors evaluated the scientific quality of the studies. The primary outcomes were pain, seroma...... to reduce seroma formation after laparoscopic ventral herniotomy and a non-significant reduction in pain. Physical function was improved, whereas evidence supports a beneficial effect on psychological distress after open abdominal surgery. Evidence also supports that intra-abdominal pressure increases...

  7. A systematic review of physical illness, functional disability, and suicidal behaviour among older adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fässberg, Madeleine Mellqvist; Cheung, Gary; Canetto, Silvia Sara

    2016-01-01

    were included in the review. RESULTS: Sixty-five articles (across 61 independent samples) met inclusion criteria. Results from 59 quantitative studies conducted in four continents suggest that suicidal behaviour is associated with functional disability and numerous specific conditions including......OBJECTIVES: To conduct a systematic review of studies that examined associations between physical illness/functional disability and suicidal behaviour (including ideation, nonfatal and fatal suicidal behaviour) among individuals aged 65 and older. METHOD: Articles published through November 2014...... were identified through electronic searches using the ERIC, Google Scholar, PsycINFO, PubMed, and Scopus databases. Search terms used were suicid* or death wishes or deliberate self-harm. Studies about suicidal behaviour in individuals aged 65 and older with physical illness/functional disabilities...

  8. Abdominal binders may reduce pain and improve physical function after major abdominal surgery - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothman, Josephine Philip; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Bisgaard, Thue

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Evidence for the effect of post-operative abdominal binders on post-operative pain, seroma formation, physical function, pulmonary function and increased intra-abdominal pressure among patients after surgery remains largely un-investigated. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted....... The PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched for studies on the use of abdominal binders after abdominal surgery or abdominoplasty. All types of clinical studies were included. Two independent assessors evaluated the scientific quality of the studies. The primary outcomes were pain, seroma...... formation and physical function. RESULTS: A total of 50 publications were identified; 42 publications were excluded leaving eight publications counting a total of 578 patients for analysis. Generally, the scientific quality of the studies was poor. Use of abdominal binder revealed a non-significant tendency...

  9. Promoting physical activity for elders with compromised function: the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE Study physical activity intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejeski WJ

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available W Jack Rejeski,1 Robert Axtell,2 Roger Fielding,3 Jeffrey Katula,1 Abby C King,4 Todd M Manini,5 Anthony P Marsh,1 Marco Pahor,5 Alvito Rego,6 Catrine Tudor-Locke,7 Mark Newman,8 Michael P Walkup,9 Michael E Miller9  On behalf of the LIFE Study Investigator Group 1Department of Health and Exercise Science, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC, 2Exercise Science Department, Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, CT, 3Nutrtion, Exercise Physiology, and Sarcopenia Laboratory, Jean Mayer US Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA, 4Department of Health Research and Policy and Stanford Prevention Research Center, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, 5Department of Aging and Geriatric Research, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 6Department of Internal Medicine, Northwestern School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, 7Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA, 8Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, 9Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Division of Public Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC, USA Abstract: The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE Study is a Phase III randomized controlled clinical trial (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01072500 that will provide definitive evidence regarding the effect of physical activity (PA on major mobility disability in older adults (70–89 years old who have compromised physical function. This paper describes the methods employed in the delivery of the LIFE Study PA intervention, providing insight into how we promoted adherence and monitored the fidelity of treatment. Data are presented on participants' motives and self-perceptions at the onset of the trial along with accelerometry data on patterns of PA during exercise training. Prior to the onset of training, 31.4% of

  10. Intake of B vitamins and impairment in physical function in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struijk, Ellen A; Lana, Alberto; Guallar-Castillón, Pilar; Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando; Lopez-Garcia, Esther

    2017-05-23

    The effect of vitamin B intake on physical function is not well known. To examine the prospective association of the intake of vitamins B6, B12 and folate with physical function impairment in older adults. We performed a prospective cohort study with 1630 participants from the Seniors-ENRICA study, a cohort of community-dwelling adults aged ≥60 years who were free of physical function impairment at baseline. In 2008-2010, nutrient intake was obtained through a validated computer-assisted face-to-face diet history. Study participants were followed-up through 2012 to assess incident impairment in agility and mobility, as well as impairment in overall physical functioning, defined as a decrease in the physical component summary of the 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey. Over a median follow-up of 3.5 years, we identified 343 individuals with agility limitation, 212 with mobility limitation, and 457 with decreased overall physical functioning. A significant association was observed between intake of vitamin B6 and lower risk of impaired mobility (odds ratio [OR] for highest vs. lowest tertile: 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI]:0.44-0.99; p-trend = 0.05). The results lost significance when additionally adjusted for vitamin B12 and folate, however the OR did not materially change. A higher consumption of important sources of vitamin B6, such as fish or fruit, was also related to a lower risk of impaired mobility (OR 100-g increase in fish: 0.50; 95% CI: 0.32-0.79; OR 100-g increase in fruit: 0.92; 95% CI: 0.84-1.01). No association was found between vitamin B12 and folate intake and physical function. A higher intake of vitamin B6 and of several of its main sources, such as fish and fruit, was associated with lower risk of impaired mobility in Spanish older adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  11. Numerical Simulations of Subscale Wind Turbine Rotor Inboard Airfoils at Low Reynolds Number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, Myra L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Thermal/ Fluid Sciences & Engineering Dept.; Maniaci, David Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Wind Energy Technologies Dept.; Resor, Brian R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Wind Energy Technologies Dept.

    2015-04-01

    New blade designs are planned to support future research campaigns at the SWiFT facility in Lubbock, Texas. The sub-scale blades will reproduce specific aerodynamic characteristics of utility-scale rotors. Reynolds numbers for megawatt-, utility-scale rotors are generally above 2-8 million. The thickness of inboard airfoils for these large rotors are typically as high as 35-40%. The thickness and the proximity to three-dimensional flow of these airfoils present design and analysis challenges, even at the full scale. However, more than a decade of experience with the airfoils in numerical simulation, in the wind tunnel, and in the field has generated confidence in their performance. Reynolds number regimes for the sub-scale rotor are significantly lower for the inboard blade, ranging from 0.7 to 1 million. Performance of the thick airfoils in this regime is uncertain because of the lack of wind tunnel data and the inherent challenge associated with numerical simulations. This report documents efforts to determine the most capable analysis tools to support these simulations in an effort to improve understanding of the aerodynamic properties of thick airfoils in this Reynolds number regime. Numerical results from various codes of four airfoils are verified against previously published wind tunnel results where data at those Reynolds numbers are available. Results are then computed for other Reynolds numbers of interest.

  12. Changes to the subscales of two vision-related quality of life questionnaires are proposed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Michiel R; de Vet, Henrica C W; Terwee, Caroline B; Moll, Annette C; Völker-Dieben, Hennie J M; van Rens, Ger H M B

    2005-12-01

    Psychometrically sound questionnaires for the assessment of vision-related quality of life (QOL) are scarce. Therefore, the objective was to further validate two vision-related QOL questionnaires in a Dutch population of visually impaired elderly. A total of 329 visually impaired older persons referred to low vision services completed the low vision QOL (LVQOL) and Vision-Related Quality of Life Core Measure (VCM1) questionnaires at baseline, after 1-4 weeks (retest), and after 5 months. Confirmatory factor analyses were performed on baseline data. The smallest detectable change (SDC) was assessed, based on the standard error of measurement (SEM). Change scores between the baseline and 5 months follow-up data were related to a general transition question to assess the minimal important change (MIC). Furthermore, the MIC was related to the SDC, to examine whether the MICs were detectable beyond measurement error. The original factor structures could not be confirmed. After omitting items and remodeling, adequate fits were obtained. SDCs comprised at least one quarter of the scale for all scales and subscales on the individual level and exceeded the MICs on every occasion. We propose MICs of 5-10 points for the scales and subscales of the LVQOL and VCM1. The questionnaires are not useful in the follow-up of individual patients.

  13. Practical Application of a Subscale Transport Aircraft for Flight Research in Control Upset and Failure Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kevin; Foster, John V.; Morelli, Eugene A.; Murch, Austin M.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past decade, the goal of reducing the fatal accident rate of large transport aircraft has resulted in research aimed at the problem of aircraft loss-of-control. Starting in 1999, the NASA Aviation Safety Program initiated research that included vehicle dynamics modeling, system health monitoring, and reconfigurable control systems focused on flight regimes beyond the normal flight envelope. In recent years, there has been an increased emphasis on adaptive control technologies for recovery from control upsets or failures including damage scenarios. As part of these efforts, NASA has developed the Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research (AirSTAR) flight facility to allow flight research and validation, and system testing for flight regimes that are considered too risky for full-scale manned transport airplane testing. The AirSTAR facility utilizes dynamically-scaled vehicles that enable the application of subscale flight test results to full scale vehicles. This paper describes the modeling and simulation approach used for AirSTAR vehicles that supports the goals of efficient, low-cost and safe flight research in abnormal flight conditions. Modeling of aerodynamics, controls, and propulsion will be discussed as well as the application of simulation to flight control system development, test planning, risk mitigation, and flight research.

  14. The use of Spielberger's State-Trait Personality Inventory (trait anxiety subscale) with naval subaquatic specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wijk, Charles H

    2014-12-01

    Panic behavior poses a particular threat to the health and safety of subaquatic occupational specialists. Trait anxiety has previously been identified as a marker of panic behavior under water, and Spielberger's State-Trait Personality Inventory (trait anxiety subscale) has been previously used to measure trait anxiety among subaquatic specialists. Using archived data, the trait anxiety scores of subaquatic specialists were analyzed to meet 3 objectives: 1stly - to develop a trait anxiety profile of subaquatic specialists; 2ndly - to investigate the predictive value of trait anxiety measures upon entering an occupational field; and 3rdly - to establish the reliability of these scores over time. Archival trait-anxiety data from 322 subjects were analyzed statistically. Analysis of the available scores revealed a highly homogenous as well as a very low trait anxiety profile for the investigated occupational group. Additionally, low trait anxiety was somewhat associated with success during specialist training: fewer candidates with high trait anxiety scores completed their qualification. Moreover, measurement of trait anxiety was stable over time, which suggests that when scores for this occupational group are screened, deviations from previous scores could signify a potential need for referral to an intervention from health professionals. Using the trait anxiety subscale as part of occupational health surveillance of subaquatic specialists could support prevention of accidents by identifying high-risk candidates during their annual health assessments, and referral for timeous intervention.

  15. Topographic effect of Sub-scale Mountains around the main Tibetan Plateau on Asian climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Yingying; Shi, Zhengguo

    2017-04-01

    As one of the most important tectonic events in Cenozoic, the uplift of the Tibetan Plateau (TP) is considered to have profound influences on the evolution of Asian climate.However, the potential influence from the sub-scale mountains around the main TP is largely neglected. In actual, these sub-scale mountains may affect some climate systems, which facilitates from their sensitive locations. Taking the Mongolian Plateau (MP) and Yunnan-Guizhou Plateau (YGP, SW China) as examples, they are located at the core paths of mid-latitude winter westerly and Indian summer southwesterly monsoon, respectively, and seem to significantly block the eastward propagation of these systems from modern climatological data. In this study, general circulation model experiments with and without mountains are employed to evaluate the topographic effect of MP and YGP on the Asian climate. The results show that, the MP, despite its smaller size, exerts a great influence on the strengthened winter climate over East Asia, including the East Asian trough, the subtropical westerly jet and the winter monsoon. The YGP, however, plays an opposite role in the Indian monsoon change, compared to the main TP. It weakens the Indian summer monsoon circulation and associated precipitation. Thus, the response of Asian climate to the mountain uplift depends closely on the actual distributions of topography rather than a simplified bulk of main TP.

  16. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sphicas

    There have been three physics meetings since the last CMS week: “physics days” on March 27-29, the Physics/ Trigger week on April 23-27 and the most recent physics days on May 22-24. The main purpose of the March physics days was to finalize the list of “2007 analyses”, i.e. the few topics that the physics groups will concentrate on for the rest of this calendar year. The idea is to carry out a full physics exercise, with CMSSW, for select physics channels which test key features of the physics objects, or represent potential “day 1” physics topics that need to be addressed in advance. The list of these analyses was indeed completed and presented in the plenary meetings. As always, a significant amount of time was also spent in reviewing the status of the physics objects (reconstruction) as well as their usage in the High-Level Trigger (HLT). The major event of the past three months was the first “Physics/Trigger week” in Apri...

  17. Using the electron localization function to correct for confinement physics in semi-local density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Feng; Armiento, Rickard; Mattsson, Ann E

    2014-05-14

    We have previously proposed that further improved functionals for density functional theory can be constructed based on the Armiento-Mattsson subsystem functional scheme if, in addition to the uniform electron gas and surface models used in the Armiento-Mattsson 2005 functional, a model for the strongly confined electron gas is also added. However, of central importance for this scheme is an index that identifies regions in space where the correction provided by the confined electron gas should be applied. The electron localization function (ELF) is a well-known indicator of strongly localized electrons. We use a model of a confined electron gas based on the harmonic oscillator to show that regions with high ELF directly coincide with regions where common exchange energy functionals have large errors. This suggests that the harmonic oscillator model together with an index based on the ELF provides the crucial ingredients for future improved semi-local functionals. For a practical illustration of how the proposed scheme is intended to work for a physical system we discuss monoclinic cupric oxide, CuO. A thorough discussion of this system leads us to promote the cell geometry of CuO as a useful benchmark for future semi-local functionals. Very high ELF values are found in a shell around the O ions, and take its maximum value along the Cu-O directions. An estimate of the exchange functional error from the effect of electron confinement in these regions suggests a magnitude and sign that could account for the error in cell geometry.

  18. Heterogeneity of physical function responses to exercise training in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmelo, Elizabeth A; Crotts, Charlotte I; Newman, Jill C; Brinkley, Tina E; Lyles, Mary F; Leng, Xiaoyan; Marsh, Anthony P; Nicklas, Barbara J

    2015-03-01

    To describe the interindividual variability in physical function responses to supervised resistance and aerobic exercise training interventions in older adults. Data analysis of two randomized, controlled exercise trials. Community-based research centers. Overweight and obese (body mass index (BMI)≥27.0 kg/m2) sedentary men and women aged 65 to 79 (N=95). Five months of 4 d/wk of aerobic training (AT, n=40) or 3 d/wk of resistance training (RT, n=55). Physical function assessments: global measure of lower extremity function (Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB)), 400-m walk, peak aerobic capacity (VO2 peak), and knee extensor strength. On average, both exercise interventions significantly improved physical function. For AT, there was a 7.9% increase in VO2 peak; individual absolute increases varied from 0.4 to 4.3 mL/kg per minute, and four participants (13%) showed no change or a decrease in VO2 peak. For RT, knee extensor strength improved an average of 8.1%; individual increases varied from 1.2 to 63.7 Nm, and 16 participants (30%) showed no change or a decrease in strength. Usual gait speed, 400-m walk time, chair rise time, and SPPB improved for the majority of AT participants and usual gait speed, chair rise time, and SPPB improved for the majority of RT participants, but there was wide variation in the magnitude of improvement. Only change in 400-m walk time with RT was related to exercise adherence (correlation coefficient=-0.31, P=.004). Despite sufficient levels of adherence to both exercise interventions, some participants did not improve function, and the magnitude of improvement varied widely. Additional research is needed to identify factors that optimize responsiveness to exercise to maximize its functional benefits in older adults. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. Cognitive and cognitive-motor interventions affecting physical functioning: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murer Kurt

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several types of cognitive or combined cognitive-motor intervention types that might influence physical functions have been proposed in the past: training of dual-tasking abilities, and improving cognitive function through behavioral interventions or the use of computer games. The objective of this systematic review was to examine the literature regarding the use of cognitive and cognitive-motor interventions to improve physical functioning in older adults or people with neurological impairments that are similar to cognitive impairments seen in aging. The aim was to identify potentially promising methods that might be used in future intervention type studies for older adults. Methods A systematic search was conducted for the Medline/Premedline, PsycINFO, CINAHL and EMBASE databases. The search was focused on older adults over the age of 65. To increase the number of articles for review, we also included those discussing adult patients with neurological impairments due to trauma, as these cognitive impairments are similar to those seen in the aging population. The search was restricted to English, German and French language literature without any limitation of publication date or restriction by study design. Cognitive or cognitive-motor interventions were defined as dual-tasking, virtual reality exercise, cognitive exercise, or a combination of these. Results 28 articles met our inclusion criteria. Three articles used an isolated cognitive rehabilitation intervention, seven articles used a dual-task intervention and 19 applied a computerized intervention. There is evidence to suggest that cognitive or motor-cognitive methods positively affects physical functioning, such as postural control, walking abilities and general functions of the upper and lower extremities, respectively. The majority of the included studies resulted in improvements of the assessed functional outcome measures. Conclusions The current evidence on the

  20. Physical activity and cognitive function in individuals over 60 years of age: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho A

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ashley Carvalho,1,2 Irene Maeve Rea,2 Tanyalak Parimon,3,4 Barry J Cusack3,51Department of Public Health, 2School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Science, Queen’s University Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK; 3Research and Development Service, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Boise, ID, USA; 4Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, 5Division of Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USABackground: It is unclear whether physical activity in later life is beneficial for maintenance of cognitive function. We performed a systematic review examining the effects of exercise on cognitive function in older individuals, and present possible mechanisms whereby physical activity may improve cognition.Methods: Sources consisted of PubMed, Medline, CINAHL, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, and the University of Washington, School of Medicine Library Database, with a search conducted on August 15, 2012 for publications limited to the English language starting January 1, 2000. Randomized controlled trials including at least 30 participants and lasting at least 6 months, and all observational studies including a minimum of 100 participants for one year, were evaluated. All subjects included were at least 60 years of age.Results: Twenty-seven studies met the inclusion criteria. Twenty-six studies reported a positive correlation between physical activity and maintenance or enhancement of cognitive function. Five studies reported a dose-response relationship between physical activity and cognition. One study showed a nonsignificant correlation.Conclusion: The preponderance of evidence suggests that physical activity is beneficial for cognitive function in the elderly. However, the majority of the evidence is of medium quality with a moderate risk of bias. Larger randomized controlled trials are needed to clarify the association between exercise and cognitive function and to determine

  1. Effects of Structured Physical Activity Program on Chinese Young Children’s Executive Functions and Perceived Physical Competence in a Day Care Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanying Xiong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To examine the effects of a structured physical activity program on executive functions and perceived physical competence as compared to a traditional recess among preschool children. Methods. Participants were 40 preschool children aged 4-5 from an urban child care center in a southern Chinese metropolitan area. Prior to the intervention, baseline assessments of children’s executive functions and perceived physical competence were conducted. Children were then assigned to (1 intervention condition: a structured physical activity intervention group; (2 control condition: free-activity recess. The structured physical activity or recess programs were provided to the intervention and control groups 30 minutes daily for 3 months, respectively, followed by the identical postintervention measures. Results. Thirty-nine children (19 girls; mean age = 4.67 years old, BMI = 15.54±1.21 were included in the analysis. In general, children’s executive functions and perceived physical competence increased over time. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed the intervention group had significant greater increases in executive functions compared to the control children (F(1, 37 = 4.20, p=0.04, η2=.10, yet there were no greater increases in perceived physical competence (F(1, 37 = 2.35, p=0.13, η2=.06. Conclusion. The intervention exerted significant greater increases in executive functions in preschool children. It is meaningful to offer structured physical activity programs in day care centers.

  2. The influence of functional fitness and cognitive training of physical disabilities of institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, I-Chen; Chang, Chia-Ming; Chen, Ko-Chia; Hong, Wei-Chin; Lu, Yu-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    According to an investigation done by Taiwan Ministry of the Interior in 2013, there was more than 90% of the disability care institutions mainly based on life care. Previous studies have shown that individuals can effectively improve physical and cognitive training, improved in independent living and everyday competence. The purpose of the study was to investigate influence of the intervention program applying functional fitness and cognitive training to disabled residents in the institution. The subjects were disabled persons of a care institution in southern Taiwan and were randomly divided into training and control groups, both having 17 subjects. The age of the subjects was between 56 and 98 years with a mean age of 79.08 ± 10.04 years; the subjects of training group implemented 12 weeks of training on physical and cognitive training, while the control group subjects did not have any training program. The results revealed that subjects of the training group have significantly improved their functional shoulder rotation flexibility of left and right anterior hip muscle group flexibility of right, sitting functional balance of left and right, naming, attention, delayed recall, orientation, and Montreal cognitive assessment (MOCA). The study suggested developing physical fitness programs and physical and cognitive prescriptions for the disabled people of the institutions.

  3. Plant diversity and root traits benefit physical properties key to soil function in grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Iain J; Quinton, John N; Weigelt, Alexandra; De Deyn, Gerlinde B; Bardgett, Richard D

    2016-09-01

    Plant diversity loss impairs ecosystem functioning, including important effects on soil. Most studies that have explored plant diversity effects belowground, however, have largely focused on biological processes. As such, our understanding of how plant diversity impacts the soil physical environment remains limited, despite the fundamental role soil physical structure plays in ensuring soil function and ecosystem service provision. Here, in both a glasshouse and a long-term field study, we show that high plant diversity in grassland systems increases soil aggregate stability, a vital structural property of soil, and that root traits play a major role in determining diversity effects. We also reveal that the presence of particular plant species within mixed communities affects an even wider range of soil physical processes, including hydrology and soil strength regimes. Our results indicate that alongside well-documented effects on ecosystem functioning, plant diversity and root traits also benefit essential soil physical properties. © 2016 The Authors Ecology Letters published by CNRS and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The association between child maltreatment and emotional, cognitive, and physical health functioning in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Nhu K; Van Berkel, Sheila R; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H; Alink, Lenneke R A

    2017-04-19

    There is a paucity of research on correlates of child maltreatment in limited-resource countries with a relatively high tolerance of harsh discipline. This Vietnamese study aimed to investigate associations between different types of child maltreatment and child emotional, cognitive, and physical health functioning as well as moderation effects of gender and ethnicity. This cross-sectional study was conducted with 1851 randomly selected students aged 12-17 years. Both self-report and more objective measures (weight, height, study ranking, and a memory test) were used. All types of child maltreatment were associated with emotional dysfunctioning. Life time and past year experiences of physical abuse and life time experiences of sexual abuse and neglect were related to poorer perceived physical health. The study did not find associations between any type of child maltreatment and overweight or underweight status. Regarding cognitive functioning, life time experience of sexual abuse and neglect were related to poorer working memory performance. Noticeably, emotional abuse was related to better academic performance, which might be an indication of "tiger parenting" practice in Vietnam, implying academic performance stimulation at the expense of emotional security. No significant moderation effects by gender and ethnicity were found. Even in a culture in which harsh discipline is normative, child maltreatment was related to negative aspects of child wellbeing including emotional, cognitive, and physical health functioning. Efficient and low-cost interventions on child maltreatment should be developed and conducted in Vietnam as well as other countries with similar contexts.

  5. Relationship between built environment attributes and physical function in Japanese community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soma, Yuki; Tsunoda, Kenji; Kitano, Naruki; Jindo, Takashi; Tsuji, Taishi; Saghazadeh, Mahshid; Okura, Tomohiro

    2017-03-01

    To explore the relationships between the built environment and older adults' physical function. The present cross-sectional study carried out in 2010-2012 used data drawn from 509 community-dwelling older adults aged 65-86 years living in Kasama City, a Japanese rural region. We evaluated physical function with the following performance tests: grip strength, sit-to-stand, timed up & go and walking speed. Using geographic information systems, we measured population density and the number of destinations related to daily life, community centers, medical facilities and recreational facilities within participants' neighborhoods. After adjusting for potential confounders, we found lower population density was related to poor performance of sit-to-stand and walking speed in both sexes, and grip strength in women (trend P community centers was related to walking speed in both sexes. The number of medical and recreational facilities was also related to some physical performance in both sexes. A lower land use mix score, calculated by principal component analysis, was related to lower performance of sit-to-stand and walking speed in men, and grip strength and sit-to-stand in women. The present study suggests that, although there are some sex differences, low population density, land use mix, and fewer daily life-related destinations, community centers, medical facilities and recreational facilities are negative determinants of physical function. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 382-390. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  6. The French functional physical therapy method for the treatment of congenital clubfoot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimeglio, Alain; Canavese, Federico

    2012-01-01

    The French method, also called the functional physical therapy method, is a combination of physiotherapy, splinting and surgery à la carte. The French functional physical therapy method consists of daily manipulations of the newborn's clubfoot by a specialized physical therapist, stimulation of the muscles around the foot and temporary immobilization of the foot with elastic and nonelastic adhesive taping. Physiotherapy is optimized by early triceps surae lengthening. Sequences of plaster can also be used. If conservative treatment is no longer effective, surgery should be considered. Mini-invasive surgery is a complementary procedure to nonoperative treatment (surgery 'à la carte'). The French method reduces but does not eliminate the need for mini-invasive surgical procedures. Equinus is the most difficult deformity to treat; posterior release is sometimes necessary in a severe foot. Very severe feet (stiff-stiff; score, 16-20) are still a challenge. However, regular manipulations and splinting improve foot morphology and stiffness, and, ultimately, make surgery easier and less extensive. From the French method to the Ponseti method, the Hybrid method or the 'the third way', combining the advantages of both methods, is the future. The primary reason for relapses is the inability of families to maintain the correction initially achieved. The aim of this work is to provide an overview of the French functional physical therapy method and to help understand how it has evolved over time.

  7. The Influence of Functional Fitness and Cognitive Training of Physical Disabilities of Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Chen Yeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available According to an investigation done by Taiwan Ministry of the Interior in 2013, there was more than 90% of the disability care institutions mainly based on life care. Previous studies have shown that individuals can effectively improve physical and cognitive training, improved in independent living and everyday competence. The purpose of the study was to investigate influence of the intervention program applying functional fitness and cognitive training to disabled residents in the institution. The subjects were disabled persons of a care institution in southern Taiwan and were randomly divided into training and control groups, both having 17 subjects. The age of the subjects was between 56 and 98 years with a mean age of 79.08 ± 10.04 years; the subjects of training group implemented 12 weeks of training on physical and cognitive training, while the control group subjects did not have any training program. The results revealed that subjects of the training group have significantly improved their functional shoulder rotation flexibility of left and right anterior hip muscle group flexibility of right, sitting functional balance of left and right, naming, attention, delayed recall, orientation, and Montreal cognitive assessment (MOCA. The study suggested developing physical fitness programs and physical and cognitive prescriptions for the disabled people of the institutions.

  8. Associations Between Arthritis and Change in Physical Function in U.S. Retirees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Nancy A; Barbour, Kamil E; Helmick, Charles G; Zack, Matthew M; Al Snih, Soham

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine among retirees: the associations of arthritis with limitations in physical functions, and whether these associations changed differently with age for those with arthritis versus without arthritis. We identified retirees from the Health and Retirement Study, a nationally representative longitudinal panel study of U.S. adults ≥51 years old. We calculated incidence density ratios (IDRs) using Poisson regression modeling with generalized estimating equations to estimate the associations between arthritis and limitations in four physical function measures (large muscle tasks, mobility, activities of daily living, and instrumental activities of daily living) adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, marital status, education, total household income, depression, obesity, smoking, chronic conditions, physical activity, and cohort status. We examined interaction effects between arthritis and age to determine if the rate of change in physical function differed by arthritis status across age. Over 8 years (2004-2012), significantly more retirees with arthritis had limitations with large muscle tasks (IDR 2.1: 95% confidence interval 1.6, 2.8), mobility (IDR 1.6: 1.2, 2.2), activities of daily living (IDR 2.2: 1.0, 4.7), and instrumental activities of daily living (IDR 3.7: 1.9, 7.4) than retirees without arthritis. Retirees with arthritis did not develop limitations in mobility, activities of daily living, and instrumental activities of daily living at a different rate as they aged compared to those without arthritis. Arthritis was associated with a greater prevalence of physical function limitations. Preventing limitations caused by arthritis is a key strategy to prevent disability in retirees. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  9. Diminished physical capacity in obese individuals with normal left ventricular function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliana Cabrera Rojo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obesity is a pandemic today. The physical capacity of subjects with ex-cess body weight decreases due to high energy consumption, even though their heart function is normal.Objective: The objective was to determine the physical capacity in subjects with over-nutrition and in those with normal weight, with normal systolic left ventricular func-tion.Method: A descriptive, observational, cross-sectional analytical study was conducted in 170 subjects who came to the General Calixto García University Hospital in Havana, Cuba from April 2009 to November 2012. The sample was divided, according to body mass index, into normal weight (50, overweight (60 and obese (60. An exercise test and an echocardiogram were performed.Results: Females and white skin color predominated (53.2%, respectively. A seden-tary lifestyle and adding salt to food were found in a greater proportion among the overweight and obese subjects (p<0.001 vs. normal weight. The systolic blood press-ure at maximal effort differed between the groups: 200 ± 15 mmHg in obese subjects, 185 ± 27 mmHg in overweight subjects and 173 ± 24 mmHg in normal weight (p<0.05. The physical capacity, measured in METs, was low in obese subjects (5.8 ± 1.3 compared with overweight subjects (7.8 ± 2.1 and normal weight subjects (8.3 ± 1.7, p<0.001. The diameters, wall thickness and left ventricular mass increased in obese subjects with normal systolic function.Conclusions: Physical capacity deteriorates as body mass index increases even with normal systolic left ventricular function.Key words: Obesity, Physical capacity, Systolic function, Echocardiography, Exercise testing

  10. Physical Quantities of Reissner-Nordström Spacetime with Arbitrary Function and Regularized Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal G. L. Nashed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We use the covariant teleparallel approach to compute the total energy of a spherically symmetric frame with an arbitrary function, that is, ℑ(r. We show how the total energy is always effected by the inertia. When use is made of the pure gauge connection, teleparallel gravity always yields the physically relevant result. We also calculate the total conserved charge and show how inertia spoils the physics in the time coordinate direction. Therefore, a regularized expression is employed to get a plausible value of energy. Finally, we use the Euclidean continuation method, in the context of TEGR, to calculate the energy, Hawking temperature, entropy, and first law of thermodynamics.

  11. Age-related decrease in physical activity and functional fitness among elderly men and women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milanović Z

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Zoran Milanovic,1 Saša Pantelic,1 Nebojša Trajkovic,1 Goran Sporiš,2 Radmila Kostic,1 Nic James31Faculty of Sport and Physical Education, University of Niš, Niš, Serbia; 2Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia; 3London Sport Institute, Middlesex University, London, UKAim: To determine differences in physical activity level and functional fitness between young elderly (60–69 years and old elderly (70–80 years people with the hypothesis that an age-related decline would be found.Methods: A total of 1288 participants’ level of physical activity was evaluated using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire: 594 were male (mean ± standard deviation: body height 175.62 ± 9.78 cm; body weight 82.26 ± 31.33 kg and 694 female (mean ± standard deviation: body height 165.17 ± 23.12 cm; body weight 69.74 ± 12.44 kg. Functional fitness was also estimated using the Senior Fitness Test: back scratch, chair sit and reach, 8-foot up and go, chair stand up for 30 seconds, arm curl, and 2-minute step test.Results: Significant differences (P < 0.05 were found for all Senior Fitness tests between young elderly (60–69 years and old elderly (70–80 men. Similar results were found for the women, except no significant differences were found for the chair sit and reach and the 2-minute step test. From the viewpoint of energy consumption estimated by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, moderate physical activity is dominant. In addition, with aging, among men and women older than 60 years, the value of the Metabolic Equivalent of Task in total physical activity significantly reduces (P < 0.05.Conclusions: This study found that the reduction in physical activity level and functional fitness was equal for both men and women and was due to the aging process. These differences between young and old elderly people were due to the reduction of muscle strength in both upper and lower limbs and changes in body

  12. Functional capacity and physical activity level in failed back surgery syndrome patients

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Malu Cristina de Araujo Montoro; Stefanello, Joice Mara Facco; Keller, Birgit; Almeida, Daniel Benzecry de; Coelho,Ricardo Weigert

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:Failed back surgery syndrome refers to a condition in which a patient has undergone back surgery with a poor outcome. This syndrome leads to losses in daily living activities and hinders the return to physical exercise. The objective of this study was to analyze the relation between chronic low back pain and functional capacity and the physical activity level of these patients.METHODS:Cross-sectional study comprising 57 patients, mean age 51.07±12.93 years, who under...

  13. Measurement of pelvic floor function during physical activity: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Dagmar; Pannek, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Pelvic floor function is closely related to bladder storage or voiding dysfunctions. So far, however, pelvic floor activity has not been reliably measured during physical activity. In 14 female healthy volunteers, the activity of the pelvic floor was evaluated during a standardized horseback riding course by a biofeedback device. Pelvic floor activity could be reliably measured during horseback riding. Each pace was associated with corresponding electromyographic (EMG) activity that was similar in the overwhelming majority of participants. Different paces demonstrated distinctly different EMG activities. To the authors' knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that pelvic floor activity can be reliably measured during physical activity with a commercially available biofeedback device.

  14. Unconditionally Secure Credit/Debit Card Chip Scheme and Physical Unclonable Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Laszlo B.; Entesari, Kamran; Granqvist, Claes-Göran; Kwan, Chiman

    The statistical-physics-based Kirchhoff-law-Johnson-noise (KLJN) key exchange offers a new and simple unclonable system for credit/debit card chip authentication and payment. The key exchange, the authentication and the communication are unconditionally secure so that neither mathematics- nor statistics-based attacks are able to crack the scheme. The ohmic connection and the short wiring lengths between the chips in the card and the terminal constitute an ideal setting for the KLJN protocol, and even its simplest versions offer unprecedented security and privacy for credit/debit card chips and applications of physical unclonable functions (PUFs).

  15. Longitudinal relationships of executive cognitive function and parent influence to child substance use and physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentz, Mary Ann; Riggs, Nathaniel R

    2013-06-01

    Considered a set of neuro-cognitive skills, executive cognitive function (ECF) may serve to protect children from initiating substance use, although its role relative to other protective influences that parents and physical activity might provide is not known. As part of a large multiple health risk behavior trial for prevention of substance use and obesity, Pathways, the present study evaluated the relative impact of ECF on lifetime substance use (tobacco and alcohol) and physical activity in a panel of fourth grade children over a 6-month period (N = 1005; 51 % female; 25 % on free/reduced lunch; 60 % Hispanic/Latino or multi-racial; 28 elementary schools). A self-report survey included measures of ECF, lifetime tobacco and alcohol use, out-of-school physical activity, exercising with parents, and parent rules about food/sedentary behavior, monitoring, and arguing, was adapted for use with children. A path analysis demonstrated that ECF was the major predictor of lower substance use and higher physical activity and exercising with parents. Physical activity and exercising with parents showed reciprocal positive relationships. Findings suggest that promoting ECF skills should be a major focus of child health promotion and substance use prevention programs, although the potential protective effects of physical activity and exercise with parents on substance use in this young age group are not yet clear.

  16. Effects of changes in depressive symptoms and cognitive functioning on physical disability in home care elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lydia W; Conwell, Yeates

    2009-02-01

    This study sought to investigate the effect of changes in depression status on physical disability in older persons receiving home care, examine whether the effect is due to concomitant changes in cognitive status, and test whether affective state and cognitive ability interact to influence physical disability. Multilevel analyses were conducted using longitudinal data collected about every 3 months from older participants in Michigan's community-based long-term care programs (N = 13,129). The data set provided an average of nine repeated measures of depressive symptoms, cognitive functioning, and physical disability. We estimated the lag effects of within-person changes in depression and cognitive status, and their interaction, on physical disability measured by activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), controlling for health-related events that occurred in the interim. Changes between not having and having depressive symptoms, including subsyndromal symptoms, are critical to physical disability for home care elders. The effects are independent of concomitant changes in cognitive status, which also have significant adverse effects on physical disability. There is some evidence that improvement of depression buffers the adverse effect of cognitive decline on IADL disability. Providers should monitor changes in depression and cognitive status in home care elders. Early detection and treatment of subthreshold depression, as well as efforts to prevent worsening of cognitive status in home care elders, may have a meaningful impact on their ability to live at home.

  17. The Relationship between Body Mass Index and 10-Year Trajectories of Physical Functioning in Middle-Aged and Older Russians: Prospective Results of the Russian HAPIEE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Y; Malyutina, S; Pikhart, H; Peasey, A; Holmes, M V; Hubacek, J; Denisova, D; Nikitin, Y; Bobak, M

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the associations of overweight and obesity with longitudinal decline in physical functioning (PF) among middle-aged and older Russians. Prospective cohort study. Four rounds of data collection in the Russian Health, Alcohol and Psychosocial factors In Eastern Europe study with up to 10 years of follow-up. 9,222 men and women aged 45-69 years randomly selected from the population of two districts of Novosibirsk, Russia. PF score (range 0-100) was measured by the Physical Functioning Subscale (PF-10) of the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) at baseline and three subsequent occasions. Body mass index (BMI), derived from objectively measured body height and weight at baseline, was classified into normal weight (BMI 18.5-24.9), overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9), obesity class I (BMI 30.0-34.9), and obesity class II+ (BMI≥35.0). The mean annual decline in the PF score during the follow-up was -1.92 (95% confidence interval -2.17; -1.68) in men and -1.91 (-2.13; -1.68) in women. At baseline, compared with normal weight, obesity classes I and II+ (but not overweight) were associated with significantly lower PF in both sexes. In prospective analyses, the decline in PF was faster in overweight men (difference from normal weight subjects -0.38 [-0.63; -0.14]), class I obese men and women (-0.49 [-0.82; -0.17] and -0.44 [-0.73; -0.15] respectively) and class II+ obese men and women (-1.13 [-1.73; -0.53] and -0.43 [-0.77; -0.09] respectively). Adjustment for physical activity and other covariates did not materially change the results. PF decreased more rapidly in obese men and women than among those with normal weight. The adverse effect of high BMI on PF trajectories appeared to be more pronounced in men than in women, making more extremely obese Russian men an important target population to prevent/slow down the process of decline in PF.

  18. Observed Agreement Problems between Sub-Scales and Summary Components of the SF-36 Version 2 - An Alternative Scoring Method Can Correct the Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Graeme; Adams, Robert; Wilson, David

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A number of previous studies have shown inconsistencies between sub-scale scores and component summary scores using traditional scoring methods of the SF-36 version 1. This study addresses the issue in Version 2 and asks if the previous problems of disagreement between the eight SF-36 Version 1 sub-scale scores and the Physical and Mental Component Summary persist in version 2. A second study objective is to review the recommended scoring methods for the creation of factor scoring weights and the effect on producing summary scale scores Methods The 2004 South Australian Health Omnibus Survey dataset was used for the production of coefficients. There were 3,014 observations with full data for the SF-36. Data were analysed in LISREL V8.71. Confirmatory factor analysis models were fit to the data producing diagonally weighted least squares estimates. Scoring coefficients were validated on an independent dataset, the 2008 South Australian Health Omnibus Survey. Results Problems of agreement were observed with the recommended orthogonal scoring methods which were corrected using confirmatory factor analysis. Conclusions Confirmatory factor analysis is the preferred method to analyse SF-36 data, allowing for the correlation between physical and mental health. PMID:23593428

  19. Physical functioning and life style of 50-65 years’ age hee teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Baskevich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to study life style of 50-65 years’ age university teachers depending on their physical functioning and its connection with behavior habits. Material: questioning of 150 respondents was fulfilled by specially prepared questionnaire. Anthropometric testing was conducted. Results: it was found that most of the questioned spend time watching TV or reading and pay very little attention to physical functioning. We also found that most of respondents deal with household chores but want to do something outdoors (practice public activity. There is a trend to avoid smoking among them. Only 5.0% are cigarette smokers. The rest have never smoked or gave up smoking more than 10 years ago. Among the partners of the questioned there are a lot of smokers (16.2%. Most of the questioned have friends and relatives, who can help to achieve the highest level of physical functioning. 18.9% of partners of the questioned regularly practice sports. Some useful for health habits are observed in life situations of all respondents. Conclusions: the received data witness about purposefulness of seeking of effective ways of pre retirement age HEE teachers’ involvement in active recreational functioning. We have also found that there are time reserves for this purpose.

  20. The Physical Brain: New Approaches to Brain Structure, Activity, and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, P. A.

    By viewing the brain as a multiscale physical system it is possible to circumvent the shortcomings of abstract signal-based and statistical approaches to analysis of brain structure, activity, and function. Eigenmode approaches enable the key elements of brain structure to be isolated systematically, along with their effects on brain activity and functional measures. Physiologically-based neural field theory permits tractable analysis from sub-mm scales to the whole brain, demonstrating the near-critical state of normal brain operation, relationships between structure and function, nonlinear dynamics, and phase transitions. Results in normal and abnormal states include experimentally verified predictions of electrical and hemodynamic signals, and the successful inversion of functional correlation measures to infer underlying brain structure, including connectivities that cannot be measured directly. These results illustrate the power of physically based modeling to predict, explain, and unify multiple observations across scales. Furthermore, they open up ways to expand the field of biological physics and apply it to a host of new phenomena. Australian Research Council, Grants FL1401000225 and CE140100007.

  1. Functional Capacity and Levels of Physical Activity in Aging: A 3-Year Follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Tomás

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, the world elderly population has increased exponentially and this tendency will continue during the coming years; from 2000 to 2050, people over 60 will double and those over 80 will quadruple. Loss of independence occurs as people age due to mobility restrictions, frailty, and decreased functional fitness and cognitive abilities. Evidence has shown that appropriate programs and policies contribute to keep older adults healthy and independent over time. The purpose of this chapter is to report the results of our 3-year follow-up study designed to characterize functional physical fitness in a sample of Portuguese community-dwelling older adults to propose a set of functional parameters that decline the most. We studied a group of 43 elderly people, aged 60 and over. Variables assessed on the participants were anthropometric measurements, functional capacity with the Senior Fitness Test battery (muscle strength, aerobic endurance, flexibility, agility, and dynamic balance, handgrip strength, levels of physical activity, and balance. Three years after the first assessment, a second assessment of the same variables was conducted. We analyzed what were the variables that, for this group, were related with a healthier aging and the relation with different physical activity levels. Our study showed that the distance covered in 6-min walk test and handgrip strength seem to explain a great amount of variability on functional variables that have changed on this period (68% of balance, lower and upper functional strength, respectively and the active participants showed less decrements with aging in anthropometric and functional variables than those inactive or insufficiently active (p < 0.05. Greater importance should be given to prescription of exercise targeting older adults and, specifically, walking and manual activities should be given more attention as components of a community exercise program.

  2. Family Functioning: Associations with Weight Status, Eating Behaviors, and Physical Activity in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Jerica M.; Wall, Melanie; Larson, Nicole; Loth, Katie A.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This paper examines the relationship between family functioning (e.g. communication, closeness, problem solving, behavioral control) and adolescent weight status and relevant eating and physical activity behaviors. Methods Data are from EAT 2010 (Eating and Activity in Teens), a population-based study that assessed eating and activity among socioeconomically and racially/ethnically diverse youth (n = 2,793). Adolescents (46.8% boys, 53.2% girls) completed anthropometric assessments and surveys at school in 2009–2010. Multiple linear regression was used to test the relationship between family functioning and adolescent weight, dietary intake, family meal patterns, and physical activity. Additional regression models were fit to test for interactions by race/ethnicity. Results For adolescent girls, higher family functioning was associated with lower body mass index z-score and percent overweight, less sedentary behavior, higher intake of fruits and vegetables, and more frequent family meals and breakfast consumption. For adolescent boys, higher family functioning was associated with more physical activity, less sedentary behavior, less fast food consumption, and more frequent family meals and breakfast consumption. There was one significant interaction by race/ethnicity for family meals; the association between higher family functioning and more frequent family meals was stronger for non-white boys compared to white boys. Overall, strengths of associations tended to be small with effect sizes ranging from - 0.07 to 0.31 for statistically significant associations. Conclusions Findings suggest that family functioning may be protective for adolescent weight and weight-related health behaviors across all race/ethnicities, although assumptions regarding family functioning in the homes of overweight children should be avoided given small effect sizes. PMID:23299010

  3. Functional Capacity and Levels of Physical Activity in Aging: A 3-Year Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás, Maria Teresa; Galán-Mercant, Alejandro; Carnero, Elvis Alvarez; Fernandes, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decades, the world elderly population has increased exponentially and this tendency will continue during the coming years; from 2000 to 2050, people over 60 will double and those over 80 will quadruple. Loss of independence occurs as people age due to mobility restrictions, frailty, and decreased functional fitness and cognitive abilities. Evidence has shown that appropriate programs and policies contribute to keep older adults healthy and independent over time. The purpose of this chapter is to report the results of our 3-year follow-up study designed to characterize functional physical fitness in a sample of Portuguese community-dwelling older adults to propose a set of functional parameters that decline the most. We studied a group of 43 elderly people, aged 60 and over. Variables assessed on the participants were anthropometric measurements, functional capacity with the Senior Fitness Test battery (muscle strength, aerobic endurance, flexibility, agility, and dynamic balance), handgrip strength, levels of physical activity, and balance. Three years after the first assessment, a second assessment of the same variables was conducted. We analyzed what were the variables that, for this group, were related with a healthier aging and the relation with different physical activity levels. Our study showed that the distance covered in 6-min walk test and handgrip strength seem to explain a great amount of variability on functional variables that have changed on this period (68% of balance, lower and upper functional strength, respectively) and the active participants showed less decrements with aging in anthropometric and functional variables than those inactive or insufficiently active ( p  prescription of exercise targeting older adults and, specifically, walking and manual activities should be given more attention as components of a community exercise program.

  4. Better assessment of physical function: item improvement is neglected but essential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Bonnie; Fries, James F; Ambrosini, Debbie; Lingala, Bharathi; Gandek, Barbara; Rose, Matthias; Ware, John E

    2009-01-01

    Physical function is a key component of patient-reported outcome (PRO) assessment in rheumatology. Modern psychometric methods, such as Item Response Theory (IRT) and Computerized Adaptive Testing, can materially improve measurement precision at the item level. We present the qualitative and quantitative item-evaluation process for developing the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Physical Function item bank. The process was stepwise: we searched extensively to identify extant Physical Function items and then classified and selectively reduced the item pool. We evaluated retained items for content, clarity, relevance and comprehension, reading level, and translation ease by experts and patient surveys, focus groups, and cognitive interviews. We then assessed items by using classic test theory and IRT, used confirmatory factor analyses to estimate item parameters, and graded response modeling for parameter estimation. We retained the 20 Legacy (original) Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI) and the 10 SF-36's PF-10 items for comparison. Subjects were from rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and healthy aging cohorts (n = 1,100) and a national Internet sample of 21,133 subjects. We identified 1,860 items. After qualitative and quantitative evaluation, 124 newly developed PROMIS items composed the PROMIS item bank, which included revised Legacy items with good fit that met IRT model assumptions. Results showed that the clearest and best-understood items were simple, in the present tense, and straightforward. Basic tasks (like dressing) were more relevant and important versus complex ones (like dancing). Revised HAQ-DI and PF-10 items with five response options had higher item-information content than did comparable original Legacy items with fewer response options. IRT analyses showed that the Physical Function domain satisfied general criteria for unidimensionality with one-, two-, three-, and four-factor models

  5. Comparison of the Lung Function in Response to Physical Activity in Two Different Climates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Marefati

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: As factors that affect the pulmonary functioning, different climatic conditions and physical activities can produce respiratory diseases. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of physical activities on the pulmonary functioning in 12-14 years old females in two different Kerman and Gorgan climatic conditions. Materials & Methods: In the semi-experimental study, 128 female students of the elementary schools, aged between 12 and 14 years, were studied in Kerman and Gorgan (n=64 per city in 2013. The subjects were selected through random cluster method. The pulmonary functioning test was done before, immediately after, 7min after, and 20min after the physical activities. The peak expiratory flow (PEF, the expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1, the forced vital capacity (FVC, the maximum expiratory flow at 50% of forced vital capacity (MEF50% were measured. More than 15% reductions in FEV1 and PEF after the activities were explained as Exercise Induced Asthma. Data was analyzed by SPSS 19 software using repeated measurement of variences and Chi-square tests. Findings: There was no significant difference in either FEV1 or PEF between Kerman and Gorgan cities (p>0.05. Nevertheless, there was a significant difference in the mean FVC between the cities (p=0.001. In total, there was more pulmonary-functioning drop after the activities in Kerman than Gorgan. Conclusion: More than average severe physical activities reduces the pulmonary capacity in 12-14 years old female, which cool and dry climate leads to more drop in the pulmonary functioning after the activities, as well as the continuance of the drop, than the wet climate.

  6. Rehabilitation and multiple sclerosis: hot topics in the preservation of physical functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgas, Ulrik

    2011-12-01

    In a chronic and disabling disease like multiple sclerosis, rehabilitation becomes of major importance in the preservation of physical, psychological and social functioning. Approximately 80% of patients have multiple sclerosis for more than 35 years and most will develop disability at some point of their lives, emphasising the importance of rehabilitation in order to maintain quality of life. An important aspect of multiple sclerosis rehabilitation is the preservation of physical functioning. Hot topics in the rehabilitation of physical function include (1) exercise therapy, (2) robot-assisted training and (3) pharmacological interventions. Exercise therapy has for many years been a controversial issue in multiple sclerosis rehabilitation and the advice generally given to patients was not to participate in physical exercise, since it was thought to lead to a worsening of symptoms or fatigue. However, a paradigm shift is taking place and it is now increasingly acknowledged that exercise therapy is both safe and beneficial. Robot-assisted training is also attracting attention in multiple sclerosis rehabilitation. Several sophisticated commercial robots exist, but so far the number of scientific studies that have evaluated these is limited, although some promising results have been reported. Finally, recent studies have shown that certain pharmacological interventions have the potential to improve functional capacity substantially, with the potassium channel blocker fampridine being one of the most promising. This drug has been shown to improve walking ability in some patients with multiple sclerosis, associated with a reduction of patients' self-reported ambulatory disability. Rehabilitation strategies involving these different approaches, or combinations of them, may be of great use in improving everyday functioning and quality of life in patients with MS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of increased fruit and vegetable consumption on physical function and muscle strength in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Charlotte E; Young, Ian S; Gilchrist, Sarah E C M; McKinley, Michelle C; Gibson, Andrew; Edgar, J David; Woodside, Jayne V

    2013-12-01

    Fruit and vegetable (FV) intake, which is often low in older people, may be associated with improved muscle strength and physical function. However, there is a shortage of intervention trial evidence to support this. The current study examined the effect of increased FV consumption on measures of muscle strength and physical function among healthy, free-living older adults. A randomized controlled intervention study was undertaken. Eighty-three participants aged 65-85 years, habitually consuming ≤ 2 portions of FV/day, were randomised to continue their normal diet (≤ 2 portions/day), or to consume ≥ 5 portions of FV/day for 16 weeks. FV were delivered to all participants each week, free of charge. Compliance was monitored at baseline, 6, 12 and 16 weeks by diet history and by measuring biomarkers of micronutrient status. Grip strength was measured by a hand-held dynamometer, while lower-extremity physical function was assessed by performance-based measures. Eighty-two participants completed the intervention. The 5 portions/day group showed greater change in daily FV consumption compared to the 2 portions/day group (P function between the two groups. However, there was a trend towards a greater change in grip strength in the 5 portions/day compared to the 2 portions/day group (mean change at 16 weeks ± SD, 2.04 ± 5.16 and 0.11 ± 3.26 kg, respectively, P = 0.06). Increased FV consumption may modestly increase grip strength but has no effect on physical function in healthy older adults.

  8. Functional capacity, physical activity, and quality of life in hypoxemic patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saglam M

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Melda Saglam,1 Naciye Vardar-Yagli,1 Sema Savci,2 Deniz Inal-Ince,1 Ebru Calik Kutukcu,1 Hülya Arikan,1 Lutfi Coplu3 1Department of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey; 2School of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkey; 3Department of Chest Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey Background: The risk of hypoxemia increases with the progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and the deterioration of pulmonary function. The aim of this study was to compare functional capacity, physical activity, and quality of life in hypoxemic and non-hypoxemic patients with COPD.Methods: Thirty-nine COPD patients (mean age: 62.0±7.03 years were included in this study. Arterial blood gas tensions were measured, and patients were divided into two groups according to oxygen partial pressure (PaO2, the hypoxemic COPD (PaO2 <60 mmHg (n=18, and the control (PaO2 ≥60 mmHg (n=21 groups. Functional exercise capacity was evaluated using the 6-minute walk test (6MWT. Oxygen saturation, dyspnea, and fatigue perception were measured before and after the 6MWT. Physical activity was assessed using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ and an accelerometer. Quality of life was assessed using the St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ.Results: The number of emergency visits and hospitalizations were higher in hypoxemic patients (P<0.05. Lung function parameters, 6MWT distance, exercise oxygen saturation, IPAQ total score, and energy expenditure during daily life were significantly lower, but percentage of maximum heart rate reached during the 6MWT was significantly higher, in hypoxemic COPD patients than in controls (P<0.05.Conclusion: Hypoxemia has a profound effect on functional capacity and physical activity in patients with COPD. Keywords: COPD, hypoxemia, 6-minute walk test

  9. [Functional status, self-rated health and level of physical activity of patients with osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Val Jiménez, Carmen Llanos; López-Torres Hidalgo, Jesús; García Atienza, Eva María; Navarro Ruiz, María Soledad; Hernández Cerón, Inmaculada; Moreno de la Rosa, Lorena

    2017-04-01

    To describe the functional status and self-rated health of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) in Primary Care, and checking their relationship with the level of physical activity and sociodemographic characteristics. Study of prevalence and cross association. Primary Care Clinics. Adult patients with a diagnosis of OA in any joint in their clinical records. Out of a total of 487 selected, 346 (71.0%) took part in the study. Functional capacity (WOMAC scale), self-rated quality of life (EuroQol- 5D questionnaire), physical activity (IPAQ questionnaire), number of affected joints, pain level, and sociodemographic characteristics. A mean score of 30.2 (SD: 20.8; CI 95% CI: 28.0 to 32.4) was obtained on the WOMAC scale, with pain, stiffness, and functional capacity scores of 6.5 (SD: 4.8), 1.9 (SD: 2.0), and 21.7 (SD: 15.7), respectively. The score showed a linear trend (P<.001) compared to the level of physical activity, being 41.1 (SD: 19.9) in inactive subjects, 24.3 (SD: 18.7) in subjects with moderate activity, and 22.3 (SD: 19.8) in subjects with intense activity. In the multiple linear regression, the score on the WOMAC scale, as well as that obtained in self-rated health status, maintained their association with physical activity level after adjusting for sociodemographic variables and the number of affected joints. In patients with OA, pain and functional capacity are the most affected dimensions. Functional status and self-rated health status are higher in active patients, regardless of the number of joints affected and their demographic characteristics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Outcome of Physical Therapy Intervention on Ventilator Weaning and Functional Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Hsuan Yang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Our study aimed to understand the characteristics of ventilator dependence in patients at a respiratory care center and the potential effects of physical therapy on ventilator weaning and patients' functional status. Prospective data collection consisted of the following: (1 demographic data, including name, gender, age, diagnosis, the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation as a severity of the disease, modified Glasgow Coma Scale, mobility at the time of admission, and days of hospitalization; (2 Rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI as a predictive indicator of ventilator weaning, including indicators of ventilator weaning were collected from the respiratory flow sheet; and (3 Barthel index. Between July 1 and December 31, 2007, 126 patients were admitted to the respiratory care center, and those who required mechanical ventilation for more than 14 days were enrolled. Fifty-five subjects received physical therapy. The RSBI in patients who received physical therapy was 75.7 ± 37.9 before therapy and 80.0 ± 48.5 afterwards, while the Barthel index increased from 0.8 ± 1.4 to 1.9 ± 2.5 (p < 0.05. The RSBI decreased as time of physical therapy lengthened, but not significantly (r = 0.12, p = 0.44. The success rate of ventilator weaning in patients receiving physical therapy intervention versus non-physical therapy intervention was 58.2% and 40.9%, respectively. The results indicated that lengthening the physical therapy intervention time enhanced the ventilator weaning success rate while mobility was not affected (r = −0.11, p = 0.41. Physical therapy may be offered to ventilator-dependent patients in line with their individual needs to improve or maintain basic mobility.

  11. [Demographic, social, physical and mental factors associated with functional capacity in the elderly, Antioquia, Colombia, 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Muñoz, Carolina; Cardona-Arango, Doris; Segura-Cardona, Ángela; Garzón-Duque, María O

    2016-04-01

    Objective To describe the demographic, social, physical and mental health factors associated with the functional capacity of older adults in the Department of Antioquia in 2012. Materials and Methods A descriptive study with the records of 4 248 adults aged 60 years or more as the population, surveyed in the Department of Antioquia, in 2012. They were asked about their functional capacity through a Katz survey consisting of 6 items. With the independent variables, frequency measurements were calculated, along with crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) with their respective 95 % CI. Results Being single, widowed or separated, presenting little or no educational level (66.4 %), suffering from hypertension (56.7 %), diabetes (16.8 %) and bone problems (22.0 %), cigarette smoking (64.6 %), nutritional risk, suffering from depression (20.1 %), or anxiety and cognitive impairment (49.6 %), impact negatively on functional capacity of older adults in Antioquia. However, younger ages, active social lives, and proper use of leisure strengthen good functional capacity in the same population group. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that there are demographic factors of physical and mental health that negatively affect the functional capacity of older adults. Therefore, training them on the issue, in order to recognize these factors and their influence on the weakening of functional capacity, is required.

  12. Comparison of Subjective and Objective Physical Functions in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agwubike EO

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the subjective and objective physical function scores of patients with Chronic Low Back Pain (CLBP. Method: A cross- sectional survey design was used. Fifty-one patients with CLBP of mechanical origin were recruited from the physiotherapy out patient clinics of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital and the National Orthopedic Hospital both in Enugu, Nigeria. The box numerical scale, Roland-Morris Questionnaire (RMQ-24 and the Back Performance Scale (BPS were used to assess the present pain intensity, the subjective and objective functional status of the participants respectively. Pearson correlation was used to determine relationships. Multiple Regressions were used to determine the predictors of objective function. Alpha level was set at 0.5. Results: The mean age and Body Mass Index of the participants were 49.04 ± 14.33 years and 26.57 ± 4.29 kg/m2 respectively. The mean Pain Intensity, subjective disability (RMQ and objective disability (BPS scores were 6.33 ± 2.09, 9.76 ± 5.14 and 6.43 ± 2.9 respectively. Stepwise multiple regressions showed that when all the variables were entered only marital status was a significant predictor of objective physical function. Conclusion: There is no significant association between subjective and objective functions in patients with CLBP. However, marital status (married is a significant predictor of objective function in CLBP.

  13. Change of International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group Rating Scale subscales with treatment and placebo: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell UH

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Ulrike H Mitchell,1 Sterling C Hilton2 1Brigham Young University, Department of Exercise Sciences, 2Department of Educational Leadership and Foundations, Provo, UT, USA Background: In 2003, the 10-question International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group Rating Scale (IRLS was developed as a means of assessing the severity of restless legs syndrome. Two subscales were identified: symptom severity (SS 1 and symptom impact (SS 2. Only one study has investigated the subscales' responsiveness to a 12-week treatment with ropinirole. This current study was undertaken to assess the impact of a 4-week, non-pharmaceutical treatment on the two subscales and to explore whether or not both subscales were impacted by the observed placebo effect. Methods: The pooled data from questionnaires of 58 patients (41 from both treatment groups and 17 from the sham treatment control group, who participated in two clinical studies, were reviewed. Their change in score over a 4-week trial was computed. The average change in both subscales in both groups was computed and t-tests were performed. Results: In the treatment group, the average scores of both subscales changed significantly from baseline to week 4 (P<0.005 for both. Compared to the control, SS 1 changed (P<0.001, but not SS 2 (P=0.18. In the sham treatment group, the scores for SS 1 changed significantly (P=0.002, but not for SS 2 (P=0.2. Conclusion: This study corroborated findings from an earlier study in which both subscales changed with a 12-week drug treatment. It also showed that the observed placebo effect is attributed to a small but significant change in symptom severity, but not symptom impact. Keywords: restless legs syndrome, RLS severity scale, IRLS subscales, symptom impact, symptom severity

  14. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2010-01-01

    A remarkable amount of progress has been made in Physics since the last CMS Week in June given the exponential growth in the delivered LHC luminosity. The first major milestone was the delivery of a variety of results to the ICHEP international conference held in Paris this July. For this conference, CMS prepared 15 Physics Analysis Summaries on physics objects and 22 Summaries on new and interesting physics measurements that exploited the luminosity recorded by the CMS detector. The challenge was incorporating the largest batch of luminosity that was delivered only days before the conference (300 nb-1 total). The physics covered from this initial running period spanned hadron production measurements, jet production and properties, electroweak vector boson production, and even glimpses of the top quark. Since then, the accumulated integrated luminosity has increased by a factor of more than 100, and all groups have been working tremendously hard on analysing this dataset. The September Physics Week was held ...

  15. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sphicas

    The CPT project came to an end in December 2006 and its original scope is now shared among three new areas, namely Computing, Offline and Physics. In the physics area the basic change with respect to the previous system (where the PRS groups were charged with detector and physics object reconstruction and physics analysis) was the split of the detector PRS groups (the old ECAL-egamma, HCAL-jetMET, Tracker-btau and Muons) into two groups each: a Detector Performance Group (DPG) and a Physics Object Group. The DPGs are now led by the Commissioning and Run Coordinator deputy (Darin Acosta) and will appear in the correspond¬ing column in CMS bulletins. On the physics side, the physics object groups are charged with the reconstruction of physics objects, the tuning of the simulation (in collaboration with the DPGs) to reproduce the data, the provision of code for the High-Level Trigger, the optimization of the algorithms involved for the different physics analyses (in collaboration with the analysis gr...

  16. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Incandela

    There have been numerous developments in the physics area since the September CMS week. The biggest single event was the Physics/Trigger week in the end of Octo¬ber, whereas in terms of ongoing activities the “2007 analyses” went into high gear. This was in parallel with participation in CSA07 by the physics groups. On the or¬ganizational side, the new conveners of the physics groups have been selected, and a new database for man¬aging physics analyses has been deployed. Physics/Trigger week The second Physics-Trigger week of 2007 took place during the week of October 22-26. The first half of the week was dedicated to working group meetings. The ple¬nary Joint Physics-Trigger meeting took place on Wednesday afternoon and focused on the activities of the new Trigger Studies Group (TSG) and trigger monitoring. Both the Physics and Trigger organizations are now focused on readiness for early data-taking. Thus, early trigger tables and preparations for calibr...

  17. Association between hearing impairment and self-reported difficulty in physical functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, David S; Genther, Dane J; Betz, Joshua; Lin, Frank R

    2014-05-01

    To determine whether hearing impairment, defined by using objective audiometry, is associated with multiple categories of self-reported physical functioning in a cross-sectional, nationally representative sample of older adults. Multivariate secondary analysis of cross-sectional data. The 2005-06 and 2009-10 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Adults aged 70 and older who completed audiometric testing (N = 1,669). Hearing was measured using pure-tone audiometry. Physical functioning was assessed using a structured interview. In a model adjusted for age and demographic and cardiovascular risk factors, greater hearing impairment (per 25 dB hearing level (HL)) was associated with greater odds of physical disability in activities of daily living (odds ratio (OR) = 1.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.1-1.9), instrumental activities of daily living (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.2-2.2), leisure and social activities (OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.1-2.0), lower extremity mobility (OR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.1-1.7), general physical activities (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.1-1.6), work limitation (OR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.0-1.9), walking limitation (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.3-2.0), and limitation due to memory or confusion (OR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.1-1.8). Hearing impairment was not associated with limitations in amount or type of work done (OR = 1.2, 95% CI = 1.0-1.6). Hearing impairment in older adults is independently associated with greater disability and limitations in multiple self-reported categories of physical functioning. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  18. EFFECTS OF LONG-TERM PHYSICAL ACTIVITY ON CARDIAC STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION: A TWIN STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urho M.Kujala

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that athletic training or other physical activity causes structural and functional adaptations in the heart, but less is known how long-term physical activity affects heart when genetic liability and childhood environment are taken into account. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of long-term physical activity vs. inactivity on cardiac structure and function in twin pairs discordant for physical activity for 32 years. Twelve same-sex twin pairs (five monozygotic and seven dizygotic, 50-67 years were studied as a part of the TWINACTIVE study. Discordance in physical activity was initially determined in 1975 and it remained significant throughout the follow-up. At the end of the follow-up in 2007, resting echocardiographic and electrocardiographic measurements were performed. During the follow-up period, the active co-twins were on average 8.2 (SD 4.0 MET hours/day more active than their inactive co-twins (p < 0.001. At the end of the follow-up, resting heart rate was lower in the active than inactive co-twins [59 (SD 5 vs. 68 (SD 10 bpm, p=0.03]. The heart rate-corrected QT interval was similar between the co-twins. Also, there was a tendency for left ventricular mass per body weight to be greater and T wave amplitude in lead II to be higher in the active co-twins (18% and 15%, respectively, p=0.08 for both. Similar trends were found for both monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs. In conclusion, the main adaptation to long- term physical activity is lowered resting heart rate, even after partially or fully controlling for genetic liability and childhood environment

  19. Physical Fatigue, Fitness, and Muscle Function in Patients With Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClean, Andrew; Morgan, Matthew D; Basu, Neil; Bosch, Jos A; Nightingale, Peter; Jones, David; Harper, Lorraine

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated differences in cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular function, perceived exertion, and anxiety/depression between patients and healthy controls (HCs) and assessed which of these variables may account for the fatigue experienced by patients. Fatigue was measured in 48 antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis patients and 41 healthy controls using the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20), focusing on the physical component. Quality of life, anxiety/depression, and sleep quality were assessed by validated questionnaires. Muscle mass was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scan, strength as the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force, and endurance as sustained isometric contraction at 50% MVC of the quadriceps. Voluntary activation was assessed by superimposed electrical stimulation. Cardiorespiratory fitness ( ˙Vo2 max and oxygen pulse [O2 pulse]) and perceived exertion (Borg scale) were measured during progressive submaximal exercise. Patients reported elevated physical fatigue scores compared to HCs (patients MFI-20 physical 13 [interquartile range (IQR) 8-16], HCs MFI-20 physical 5.5 [IQR 4-8]; P Muscle mass was the same in both groups, but MVC and time to failure in the endurance test were lower due to reduced voluntary activation in patients. Estimated ˙Vo2 max and O2 pulse were the same in both groups. For the same relative workload, patients reported higher ratings of perceived exertion, which correlated with reports of MFI-20 physical fatigue (R(2)  = 0.2). Depression (R(2)  = 0.6), anxiety (R(2)  = 0.3), and sleep disturbance (R(2)  = 0.3) were all correlated with MFI-20 physical fatigue. These observations suggest that fatigue in patients is of a central rather than peripheral origin, supported by associations of fatigue with heightened perception of exertion, depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbance but normal muscle and cardiorespiratory function. © 2016, American College

  20. The Relationship between Diet Quality and Falls Risk, Physical Function and Body Composition in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smee, D; Pumpa, K; Falchi, M; Lithander, F E

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to examine associations between diet quality, falls risk, physical function, physical activity and body composition. Cross-sectional study. Data collected from 171 men and women, aged 60-88 years old, as part of the Falls Risk and Osteoporosis Longitudinal Study. Dietary Intake (Dietary Questionnaire for Epidemiological Studies Version 2 (DQES v2)), Falls Risk (FES-I, ABC, Berg Balance and Physiological Profile Assessment), Physical Function (SPPB), Physical Activity (PASE) and Body Composition (fat mass, lean mass, BMD, BMI, android/gynoid ratio) were ascertained. Diet quality was determined using two measures (Healthy Eating Index - HEI and Healthy Diet Indicator - HDI). One-way Analysis of Variance was used to compare mean scores between females and males and Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients were calculated to examine bivariate relationships. Although females and males were analysed separately, the HDI-total score showed more associations that the HEI in both genders. The HDI showed, in females weak negative associations with BMI (r =-.21, p=.04), gynoid fat (r = -.20, p=.01), total fat mass (r = -.20, p=.02), with a weak positive association between HDI and percentage lean mass (r =.20, p=.03). Males showed positive associations between HDI and age (r =.30 p=.02) physical function (SPPB)(r =.26, p=.04), and subjective falls-risk (ABC) (r =.26, p=.03). In addition, in males, a negative association was found between HDI and FES-I (r = -.25, p=.04). The only measure that was significantly associated with the HEI-total score was the android/gynoid ratio in males (r = -.29, p=.04). When controlling for age, females demonstrated weak positive associations between gynoid (r = .19 p = .02), android (r = .19, p = .02) and total fat mass (r = .20 p = .02) as well as weak negative correlation with lean mass (r = 1.19, p = .03). Age also impacts on the FES-I (r = .29 p older community dwelling, higher functioning adults appear to be gender specific

  1. Physical preparedness and functional status of young players in the competition period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svystun Yu.D.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : evaluate physical preparedness and functional status of young players in the competitive period. Material : the study involved two groups of players. One group - 18 athletes aged 13 years. The second group - 16 players aged 14-16 years. Athletes performed tests: running 15 m stroke and 15 m, 30 m from the spot. Determines the amount of creatinine in the urine of athletes. Results : the evaluation of physical preparedness of young players indicates a decrease in the speed of the players, as evidenced by indicators and creatinine excretion in the urine. Revealed hypertrophy of the left ventricle, systolic blood volume. Functional state of the older age group athletes is somewhat better than the younger players. Analysis of the studied parameters indicates incomplete recovery of the body of young players. Conclusions : It is recommended to use the results to correct the training process of young players.

  2. Physical activity as intervention for age-related loss of muscle mass and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Christian Skou; Garde, Ellen; Reislev, Nina Linde

    2016-01-01

    and cognitive function, mental well-being, health-related quality of life and brain morphology. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The study includes 450 home-dwelling men and women (62-70 years). Participants are randomly allocated to (1) 1 year of supervised, centre-based heavy resistance training, (2) home-based moderate...... intensity resistance training or (3) habitual physical activity (control). Changes in primary (leg extensor power) and secondary outcomes are analysed according to the intention to treat principle and per protocol at 1, 2, 4, 7 and 10 years. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study is expected to generate new...... insights into training-induced promotion of functional ability and independency after retirement and will help to formulate national recommendations regarding physical activity schemes for the growing population of older individuals in western societies. Results will be published in scientific peer...

  3. Physical and functional characteristics of extrudates prepared from fenugreek and oats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajad Ahmad Wani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the effect of fenugreek seed powder (FSP and oat flour (OF on the physical and functional properties of extruded snack product such as bulk density (BD, hardness (HD, lateral expansion (LE, water absorption index (WAI and water solubility index (WSI using response surface methodology. All the properties were found to be significantly (p < 0.05 affected by proportion of FSP and OF. Results indicated that with the increase in the FSP content, an increase in the values of BD, HD, WAI and WSI was noticed, whereas negative effect of FSP on LE was observed. Results showed negative effect of OF on HD and WSI and an increased effect on BD, LE and WAI of the extruded product. Numerical optimization results showed that a mixture of 2% FSP and 6% OF had higher preference levels for parameters of physical and functional characteristics and could be extruded to produce acceptable quality extrudates.

  4. Effects of expressive writing on standardized graduate entrance exam performance and physical health functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Jonathan J; Glenwick, David S

    2009-05-01

    A substantial body of literature has demonstrated that expressive writing about an individual's deepest thoughts and feelings regarding a past or ongoing stressful experience results in a wide range of beneficial effects, including physical health and cognitive functioning. The authors examined the effects of writing about a future stressful experience--an impending graduate entrance exam--by comparing the exam performance and physical health functioning of participants who wrote about their deepest thoughts regarding the exam with those of participants who wrote about neutral and nonemotional topics. The experimental group reported a mean exam score that was significantly (19 percentile points) higher than that of the comparison group (i.e., the control group). The participants in the experimental group who wrote on 3--compared with fewer--occasions experienced the greatest benefits. The authors propose possible causal mechanisms for the results and suggest future research questions and applications.

  5. Functional Movement Screen Scores and Physical Performance among Youth Elite Soccer Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Silva

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study had two main objectives: (1 to determine if differences in Functional Movement Screen (FMS scores exist between two levels of competition; and (2 to analyze the association between FMS individual and overall scores and physical performance variables of lower-limb power (jumps, repeated sprint ability and shot speed. Twenty-two Under 16 (U16 and twenty-six Under 19 (U19 national competitive soccer players participated in this study. All participants were evaluated according to anthropometrics, FMS, jump performance, instep kick speed and anaerobic performance. There were no significant differences in the individual FMS scores between competitive levels. There were significant negative correlations between hurdle step (right and Running-based Anaerobic Sprint Test (RAST power average ( ρ = −0.293; p = 0.043 and RAST fatigue index (RAST FatIndex ( ρ = −0.340; p = 0.018. The hurdle step (left had a significant negative correlation to squat jump (SJ ( ρ = −0.369; p = 0.012. Rotary stability had a significant negative correlation to RAST fatigue index (Right: ρ = −0.311; p = 0.032. Left: ρ = −0.400; p = 0.005. The results suggest that individual FMS scores may be better discriminants of performance than FMS total score and established minimal association between FMS scores and physical variables. Based on that, FMS may be suitable for the purposes of determining physical function but not for discriminating physical performance.

  6. Pineal gland function is required for colon antipreneoplastic effects of physical exercise in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frajacomo, F T T; de Paula Garcia, W; Fernandes, C R; Garcia, S B; Kannen, V

    2015-10-01

    Light-at-night exposure enhances the risk of cancer. Colon cancer is among the most dangerous tumors affecting humankind. Physical exercise has shown positive effects against colon cancer. Here, we investigated whether pineal gland modulates antipreneoplastic effects of physical exercise in the colon. Surgical and non-surgical pineal impairments were performed to clarify the relationship between the pineal gland activity and manifestation of colonic preneoplastic lesions. Next, a progressive swimming training was applied in rats exposed or not to either non-surgical pineal impairment or carcinogen treatment for 10 weeks. Both surgical and non-surgical pineal impairments increased the development of colon preneoplasia. It was further found that impairing the pineal gland function, higher rates of DNA damage were induced in colonic epithelial and enteric glial cells. Physical exercise acted positively against preneoplasia, whereas impairing the pineal function with constant light exposure disrupts its positive effects on the development of preneoplastic lesions in the colon. This was yet related to increased DNA damage in glial cells and enteric neuronal activation aside from serum melatonin levels. Our findings suggest that protective effects of physical exercise against colon cancer are dependent on the pineal gland activity. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Stability of memories of parental rearing among psychiatric inpatients: a replication based on EMBU subscales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, J; Eisemann, M

    2001-01-01

    With regard to information about parental rearing, retrospective data are exclusively available among adults. These data are vulnerable due to various biases. This study was performed in order to replicate the findings of overall stability of three perceived parental rearing factors of the EMBU (Swedish acronym for 'own memories of childhood upbringing') based on 14 rather detailed subscales. A consecutive sample of 220 depressive inpatients were investigated on admission and at discharge by means of the EMBU, the Beck Depression Inventory and the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale. Perceived parental rearing scores showed high stability despite clinically significant changes in the severity of depression, except for 'tolerance', 'guilt engendering', 'performance orientation' and 'shaming' parenting with probable gender-specific effects which were found to covary with dysfunctional attitudes. Recall of parenting should be taken as a subjective truth when it is assessed by standardised behaviour-oriented questionnaires like the EMBU. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  8. Subscale Validation of the Subsurface Active Filtration of Exhaust (SAFE) Approach to the NTP Ground Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, William M.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Bulman, Mel; Joyner, Russell; Martin, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) has been recognized as an enabling technology for missions to Mars and beyond. However, one of the key challenges of developing a nuclear thermal rocket is conducting verification and development tests on the ground. A number of ground test options are presented, with the Sub-surface Active Filtration of Exhaust (SAFE) method identified as a preferred path forward for the NTP program. The SAFE concept utilizes the natural soil characteristics present at the Nevada National Security Site to provide a natural filter for nuclear rocket exhaust during ground testing. A validation method of the SAFE concept is presented, utilizing a non-nuclear sub-scale hydrogen/oxygen rocket seeded with detectible radioisotopes. Additionally, some alternative ground test concepts, based upon the SAFE concept, are presented. Finally, an overview of the ongoing discussions of developing a ground test campaign are presented.

  9. Physical rehabilitation approaches for the recovery of function and mobility following stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Alex; Baer, Gillian; Campbell, Pauline; Choo, Pei Ling; Forster, Anne; Morris, Jacqui; Pomeroy, Valerie M; Langhorne, Peter

    2014-04-22

    Various approaches to physical rehabilitation may be used after stroke, and considerable controversy and debate surround the effectiveness of relative approaches. Some physiotherapists base their treatments on a single approach; others use a mixture of components from several different approaches. To determine whether physical rehabilitation approaches are effective in recovery of function and mobility in people with stroke, and to assess if any one physical rehabilitation approach is more effective than any other approach.For the previous versions of this review, the objective was to explore the effect of 'physiotherapy treatment approaches' based on historical classifications of orthopaedic, neurophysiological or motor learning principles, or on a mixture of these treatment principles. For this update of the review, the objective was to explore the effects of approaches that incorporate individual treatment components, categorised as functional task training, musculoskeletal intervention (active), musculoskeletal intervention (passive), neurophysiological intervention, cardiopulmonary intervention, assistive device or modality.In addition, we sought to explore the impact of time after stroke, geographical location of the study, dose of the intervention, provider of the intervention and treatment components included within an intervention. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched December 2012), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 12, 2012), MEDLINE (1966 to December 2012), EMBASE (1980 to December 2012), AMED (1985 to December 2012) and CINAHL (1982 to December 2012). We searched reference lists and contacted experts and researchers who have an interest in stroke rehabilitation. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of physical rehabilitation approaches aimed at promoting the recovery of function or mobility in adult participants with a clinical diagnosis of stroke. Outcomes included

  10. Renewal of functions of lumbar department of spine for judoists facilities of physical rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleynikova K.A.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Researches of functional state of lumbar department of spine are conducted for sportsmen. 16 judoists of 18-22 years took part in research. Sportsmen drew on the complex of restoration measures within the framework of training process for the improvement of the functional state of lumbar department of spine. It is set that in trainings employments of judoists it is necessary to include such facilities of physical rehabilitation: exercises on flexibility and strengthening of muscles on all perimeter, different methods developed endurance, force and mobility of lumbar department of spine, massage.

  11. PROMIS PF CAT Outperforms the ODI and SF-36 Physical Function Domain in Spine Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodke, Darrel S; Goz, Vadim; Voss, Maren W; Lawrence, Brandon D; Spiker, William Ryan; Hung, Man

    2017-06-15

    The Oswestry Disability Index v2.0 (ODI), SF36 Physical Function Domain (SF-36 PFD), and PROMIS Physical Function CAT v1.2 (PF CAT) questionnaires were prospectively collected from 1607 patients complaining of back or leg pain, visiting a university-based spine clinic. All questionnaires were collected electronically, using a tablet computer. The aim of this study was to compare the psychometric properties of the PROMIS PF CAT with the ODI and SF36 Physical Function Domain in the same patient population. Evidence-based decision-making is improved by using high-quality patient-reported outcomes measures. Prior studies have revealed the shortcomings of the ODI and SF36, commonly used in spine patients. The PROMIS Network has developed measures with excellent psychometric properties. The Physical Function domain, delivered by Computerized Adaptive Testing (PF CAT), performs well in the spine patient population, though to-date direct comparisons with common measures have not been performed. Standard Rasch analysis was performed to directly compare the psychometrics of the PF CAT, ODI, and SF36 PFD. Spearman correlations were computed to examine the correlations of the three instruments. Time required for administration was also recorded. One thousand six hundred seven patients were administered all assessments. The time required to answer all items in the PF CAT, ODI, and SF-36 PFD was 44, 169, and 99 seconds. The ceiling and floor effects were excellent for the PF CAT (0.81%, 3.86%), while the ceiling effects were marginal and floor effects quite poor for the ODI (6.91% and 44.24%) and SF-36 PFD (5.97% and 23.65%). All instruments significantly correlated with each other. The PROMIS PF CAT outperforms the ODI and SF-36 PFD in the spine patient population and is highly correlated. It has better coverage, while taking less time to administer with fewer questions to answer. 2.

  12. Theory of Electron Transport in Semiconductors A Pathway from Elementary Physics to Nonequilibrium Green Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Jacoboni, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    This book describes in details the theory of the electron transport in the materials and structures at the basis of modern micro- and nano-electronics. It leads and accompanies the reader, through a step-by-step derivation of all calculations, from the basic laws of classical and quantum physics up to the most modern theoretical techniques, such as nonequilibrium Green functions, to study transport properties of both semiconductor materials and modern low-dimensional and mesoscopic structures.

  13. Dehydroepiandrosterone combined with exercise improves muscle strength and physical function in frail older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Anne M; Boxer, Rebecca S; Kleppinger, Alison; Brindisi, Jennifer; Feinn, Richard; Burleson, Joseph A

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the effects of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) combined with exercise on bone mass, strength, and physical function in older, frail women. Double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. A major medical institution. Ninety-nine women (mean age 76.6 ± 6.0) with low sulfated DHEA (DHEAS) levels, low bone mass, and frailty. Participants received 50 mg/d DHEA or placebo for 6 months; all received calcium and cholecalciferol. Women participated in 90-minute twice-weekly exercise regimens. Hormone levels, bone mineral density (BMD), bone turnover markers, body composition, upper and lower extremity strength, physical performance. Eighty-seven women (88%) completed 6 months. There were no significant changes in BMD or bone turnover markers. DHEA supplementation resulted in gains in lower extremity strength (from 459 ± 121 N to 484 ± 147 N; P=.01). There was also improvement in Short Physical Performance Battery score, a composite score that focuses on lower extremity function, in those taking DHEA (from 10.1 ± 1.8 to 10.7 ± 1.9; P=.02). There were significant changes in all hormone levels, including DHEAS, estradiol, estrone, and testosterone, and a decline in sex hormone-binding globulin levels in those taking DHEA. DHEA supplementation improved lower extremity strength and function in older, frail women involved in a gentle exercise program of chair aerobics or yoga. No changes were found in BMD either due to small sample size, short duration of study or no effect. The physical function findings are promising and require further evaluation as frail women are at high risk for falls and fracture. © 2010, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2010, The American Geriatrics Society.

  14. INFLUENCE OF PHYSICAL CULTURE INNOVATIVE MEANS ON FUNCTIONAL STATE OF SECOND MATURITY WOMEN

    OpenAIRE

    Konakova O.Y.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: to find influence of physical culture innovative means (combination of Pilates - exercises for body and mind - and program Port de bras (movements of arms and body)) on functional state of second maturity women. Material: 22 women of age from 50 to 55 were tested; they were divided into main and control groups. Control group practiced health related swimming; experimental group was trained by system Pilates and program Port de bras with application of special equipment. Results: it w...

  15. Ageing, physical function, and the diurnal rhythms of cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone

    OpenAIRE

    Heaney, Jennifer L. J.; Phillips, Anna C.; Carroll, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between ageing, physical function and the diurnal rhythms of cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). Participants were 36 community dwelling older adults aged between 65-86 years old. Salivary cortisol and DHEA were measured over the course of one day: immediately upon awakening, 30 min later, and then 3 h, 6 h, 9 h and 12 h post-awakening. Participants completed the Nottingham extended activities of daily living index, the Berg Balance Scale ...

  16. Physical therapy and functional motor recovery in patient with Guillain-Barré Syndrome - Case report

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrova, Antoaneta; Izov, Nikolai; Maznev, Ivan; Grigorova-Petrova, Kristin; Lubenova, Daniela; Vasileva, Dance

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an autoimmune disease with sudden onset and progressive impairment of the peripheral nerves. Aim: To study the influence of applied physical therapy (PT) on functional recovery in patient with a prolonged complicated course of GBS, Landry ascending paralysis and assisted breathing and 4 months in-hospital stay. Case report: The study was conducted with a 34-year-old woman in subacute stage of GBS, over the course of 2 months in the patien...

  17. The influence of physical activity during youth on structural and functional properties of the Achilles tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenskjold, A; Kongsgaard, M; Larsen, J O

    2015-01-01

    were either physically active (HAY) or inactive (LAY) in young age. Twelve men in HAY group and eight men in LAY group participated. Structural, functional, and biochemical properties of Achilles tendon were estimated from magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound video recordings, mechanical tests......-link density did not differ between the groups, nor did collagen fibril density, diameter, and area. There was a correlation between age and pentosidine/collagen within the groups [(HAY: P activity during youth...

  18. Vertical equilibrium with sub-scale analytical methods for geological CO2 sequestration

    KAUST Repository

    Gasda, S. E.

    2009-04-23

    Large-scale implementation of geological CO2 sequestration requires quantification of risk and leakage potential. One potentially important leakage pathway for the injected CO2 involves existing oil and gas wells. Wells are particularly important in North America, where more than a century of drilling has created millions of oil and gas wells. Models of CO 2 injection and leakage will involve large uncertainties in parameters associated with wells, and therefore a probabilistic framework is required. These models must be able to capture both the large-scale CO 2 plume associated with the injection and the small-scale leakage problem associated with localized flow along wells. Within a typical simulation domain, many hundreds of wells may exist. One effective modeling strategy combines both numerical and analytical models with a specific set of simplifying assumptions to produce an efficient numerical-analytical hybrid model. The model solves a set of governing equations derived by vertical averaging with assumptions of a macroscopic sharp interface and vertical equilibrium. These equations are solved numerically on a relatively coarse grid, with an analytical model embedded to solve for wellbore flow occurring at the sub-gridblock scale. This vertical equilibrium with sub-scale analytical method (VESA) combines the flexibility of a numerical method, allowing for heterogeneous and geologically complex systems, with the efficiency and accuracy of an analytical method, thereby eliminating expensive grid refinement for sub-scale features. Through a series of benchmark problems, we show that VESA compares well with traditional numerical simulations and to a semi-analytical model which applies to appropriately simple systems. We believe that the VESA model provides the necessary accuracy and efficiency for applications of risk analysis in many CO2 sequestration problems. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  19. Direct and indirect effects of nutritional status, physical function and cognitive function on activities of daily living in Japanese older adults requiring long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamo, Tomohiko; Nishida, Yuusuke

    2014-10-01

    To identify the direct and indirect effects of nutritional status, physical function, and cognitive function on activities of daily living in Japanese older adults requiring long-term care. In total, 179 participants aged ≥ 65 years who were eligible for long-term care insurance (mean age 85.5 ± 7.8 years) were recruited for this study. Nutritional status (Mini Nutritional Assessment, Short Form) and physical function (Short Physical Performance Battery) were examined. Activities of daily living, cognitive function and frailty were assessed using the Barthel Index, Mini-Mental State Examination and Clinical Frailty Scale, respectively. Path analysis was used to determine relationships between these factors and the activities of daily living. For Japanese older adults requiring long-term care, pathways were modeled for nutritional status, physical function and the activities of daily living. The total effect of nutritional status was 0.516 (Pnutritional status through physical function on the activities of daily living was 0.458 (Pnutritional status on activities of daily living was observed (b=0.058, P=0.258). The present study identified the complex pathway from nutritional status to the activities of daily living through physical function in aged Japanese people requiring long-term care. These findings suggest that maintaining good nutritional status and nutritional support might delay physical function decline, and prolong the activities of daily living. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  20. Influence of physical exercise on the functional capacity in institutionalized elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Covolo Scarabottolo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: With the rapid increase in life expectancy, systematic physical exercise programs can have a good influence on the functional capacity of the elderly, especially in relation to institutionalization. Objective: To analyze the association between a systematic physical exercise program and functional capacity in institu-tionalized elderly. Methods: The sample included 30 elderly subjects (16 women and 14 men aged 60 years or older (mean age = 74.43, divided into a control group (n=16 and a training group (n=14, residents in a long-stay institution. A training protocol of 12 weeks, two weekly sessions, was applied, and functional capa-city was assessed before and after the intervention, through chair lift tests (lower limb strength, upper limb strength, timed up and go and handgrip dynamometry. The analysis pre and post-training of intervention and control groups was performed using paired Student t test and the ANOVA test for repeated measures. The level of significance was set at 5%. Results: The main statistical significance were found for the following functional tests: upper limb strength (training 15.6±4.1 x control 10.7±6.6 rep, p<0.05 and chair lift test (training 11.0±4.0 x control 8.0±3.1 rep, p<0.05. Conclusion: The protocol used proved to be effective in improving some of the functional capabilities of the institutionalized elderly.

  1. IMPROVING FUNCTIONAL INDEPENDENCE OF PATIENTS WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS BY PHYSICAL THERAPY AND OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Ticărat

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Patients with multiple sclerosis can have a normal life despite of their real or possible disability and of the progressive nature of it. Scope. Patients who follow physical therapy and occupational therapy will have an increased quality of life and a greater functional independence.Methods. The randomized study was made on 7 patients with multiple sclerosis, from Oradea Day Centre, 3 times/week, ages between 35 – 55 years, functional level between mild and sever. Assessment and rehabilitation methods: inspection, BARTHEL Index. Frenkel method, brething exercises, weights exercises, gait exercises, writind exercises and games were used in the rehabilitation process. Group therapies: sociotherapy, arttherapy, music therapy. Results analysis consisted of the comparison of baseline and final means.Results. By analizing baseline and final means for Barthel Index for each functon separately, it was shown a mild improvement of functional independence for almost assessed functions, with at least 1-1,5 points.Conclusions. Persons with multiple sclerosis who follow physical therapy and occupational therapy presents a better functional independence after the treatment.

  2. Influence of Resistance Training on Neuromuscular Function and Physical Capacity in ALS Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Jensen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The present study aimed to explore the effect of resistance training in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, a disease characterized by progressive motor neuron loss and muscle weakness. Materials and Methods. Following a 12-week “lead-in” control period, a population of ALS patients from Funen, Denmark, completed a 12-week resistance training program consisting of 2-3 sessions/week. Neuromuscular function (strength and power and voluntary muscle activation (superimposed twitch technique were evaluated before and after both control and training periods. Physical capacity tests (chair rise and timed up and go, the revised ALS functional rating scale (ALSFRS-R scores, and muscle cross sectional area (histology were also assessed. Results. Of twelve ALS patients assessed for eligibility, six were included and five completed the study. Training did not significantly affect the ALSFRS-R score, and loss of neuromuscular function (strength and power increased following the training period. However, an improved functionality (chair rise and an increase in greatly hypertrophied type II fibres combined with an increase in atrophied fibres following the training period compared to the control period were observed. Conclusion. In this small study, the present form of resistance training was unable to attenuate progressive loss of neuromuscular function in ALS, despite some changes in physical capacity and morphology.

  3. Exercise is brain food: the effects of physical activity on cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploughman, Michelle

    2008-07-01

    This commentary reviews selected biomedical and clinical research examining the relationship between physical exercise and cognitive function especially in youth with disability. Youth with physical disability may not benefit from the effects of exercise on cardiovascular fitness and brain health since they are less active than their non-disabled peers. In animal models, physical activity enhances memory and learning, promotes neurogenesis and protects the nervous system from injury and neurodegenerative disease. Neurotrophins, endogenous proteins that support brain plasticity likely mediate the beneficial effects of exercise on the brain. In clinical studies, exercise increases brain volume in areas implicated in executive processing, improves cognition in children with cerebral palsy and enhances phonemic skill in school children with reading difficulty. Studies examining the intensity of exercise required to optimize neurotrophins suggest that moderation is important. Sustained increases in neurotrophin levels occur with prolonged low intensity exercise, while higher intensity exercise, in a rat model of brain injury, elevates the stress hormone, corticosterone. Clearly, moderate physical activity is important for youth whose brains are highly plastic and perhaps even more critical for young people with physical disability.

  4. Non-linear function model of voice pitch dependency on physical and mental load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannes, Bernd; Wittels, Peter; Enne, Robert; Eisinger, Günter; Castro, Carl A; Thomas, Jeffrey L; Adler, Amy B; Gerzer, Rupert

    2007-10-01

    The present work describes that under increasing physical load the voice fundamental frequency (voice pitch) remains on a given level as long as the physical load is well tolerated by the subject, whereas heart rate and blood pressure continuously increase during increasing physical load. This voice pitch level was compared to voice pitch levels under mental load. Using a word recognition system, 11 well trained, young male subjects had to solve 2 moderate mental load tasks. Before, during and after each task, there were structured relaxation phases. The physical load protocol was a standard bicycle stress test. In each protocol phase the subjects had to count from 1 to 10 in order to provide a standardized speech sample. Heart rate and blood pressure were recorded in all phases. Voice frequency was at average 106 +/- 5.2 Hz in the relaxation phases ('rest level') and was increased under mental load (115.9 +/- 5.7 Hz, Pillais-P = 0.037). During physical stress testing, voice pitch remained unchanged ('tolerated load level') between 100 and 200 W (117.4 +/- 4.8 Hz) and increased shortly before physical exhaustion ('exhaustion level', 275-350 W, 142.9 +/- 5.6 Hz, Pillais-P = 0.007). In contrast, heart rate and blood pressure increased continuously with the physical load. Three voice pitch levels could be verified also individually for each subject. For the practical monitoring of emotional stress the individual anchor frequencies for these levels must be assessed. These data indicate that the relationship between both types of load and voice pitch is non-linear with multiple plateaus and transition functions between them.

  5. Inverse treatment planning by physically constrained minimization of a biological objective function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrev, P; Hristov, D; Warkentin, B; Sham, E; Stavreva, N; Fallone, B G

    2003-11-01

    In the current state-of-the art of clinical inverse planning, the design of clinically acceptable IMRT plans is predominantly based on the optimization of physical rather than biological objective functions. A major impetus for this trend is the unproven predictive power of radiobiological models, which is largely due to the scarcity of data sets for an accurate evaluation of the model parameters. On the other hand, these models do capture the currently known dose-volume effects in tissue dose-response, which should be accounted for in the process of optimization. In order to incorporate radiobiological information in clinical treatment planning optimization, we propose a hybrid physico-biological approach to inverse treatment planning based on the application of a continuous penalty function method to the constrained minimization of a biological objective. The objective is defined as the weighted sum of normal tissue complication probabilities evaluated with the Lyman normal-tissue complication probability model. Physical constraints specify the admissible minimum and maximum target dose. The continuous penalty function method is then used to find an approximate solution of the resulting large-scale constrained minimization problem. Plans generated by our approach are compared to ones produced by a commercial planning system incorporating physical optimization. The comparisons show clinically negligible differences, with the advantage that the hybrid technique does not require specifications of any dose-volume constraints to the normal tissues. This indicates that the proposed hybrid physico-biological method can be used for the generation of clinically acceptable plans.

  6. The relationship between cognitive and physical function among residents of a Czech senior home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelies Matthé

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The decline in cognition and physical fitness is common in advanced age. Objective: The relationship between cognition and aerobic capacity was compared to the relationship between cognition and balance. Methods: Twenty one females and six male residents of a Czech senior center participated in the study (mean age: 77.5 ± 7.0; range: 62-86 years. The Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE was used for assessing cognition, the Berg Balance Scale (BBS for assessing balance, and the 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT assessed physical fitness. Based on the MMSE scores, two groups of cognitive functioning were formed - high and low. Results: Participants in the "high MMSE" group reached a significantly higher score on the 6MWT (p = .01 than the "low MMSE" group. Group differences on the BBS were marginally significant (p = .07, d = 0.6. Conclusions: Based on this sample, the level of physical fitness can be explained by cognitive functioning, while that of balance should be further studied in its relationship to cognitive functioning.

  7. FUNCTIONALITY OF STUDENTS WITH PHYSICAL DEFICIENCY IN WRITING AND COMPUTER USE ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Matrigani Mercado Gutierres de Queiroz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The educational inclusion is focused on the learning of all students that have confronts barriers in to effective participation in the school life. In the inclusive education perspective, the students with disabilities must meet be served preferably in the regular education and the special education that needs to offer the educational attendance specialized to complement their educational needs. In this context, the objective of the research is defined in: Describe the functionality of students with physical disabilities, in the Multifunctional Resource Rooms, for activities of writing and computer use, according to the perception of the teachers. The participants of this analysis were teachers of the Educational Service Specialist that are serving students with disabilities. For data collection was used instrument School Function Assessment. The data were organized into a single document, the categories being presented. 1Written work; 2Use of the computer and the equipment. The conclusion was that students with physical disabilities, especially those with impaired upper-limb functionality can have find difficult to write using conventional materials, so they need Assistive Technology to develop their writing skills. Therefore, it is important to improve the profile analysis of the student, thus to choose the more appropriate resource as, it is necessary to improve the materials of the Multifunctional Resource Rooms to meet the diversity of all students with physical disabilities, since the type of furniture, didactic-pedagogical materials and equipment, are not favor in the use by students with serious motor disabilities.

  8. Tea consumption and physical function in older adults: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, T P; Aung, K C Y; Feng, L; Feng, L; Nyunt, M S Z; Yap, K B

    2014-01-01

    Tea consumption has been reported to be associated with lowered risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke and osteoporosis that cause functional disability, but its association with physical function has not been investigated directly. We examined the association between tea consumption and performance in gait and balance, instrumental and basic activities of daily living (IADL and BADL) in a cross-sectional study of community-living older persons. Baseline data of 2398 adults aged ≥ 55 years in the Singapore Longitudinal Ageing Studies who completed self-reported current tea consumption, Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment (POMA) of gait and balance, and self reports of BADL and IADL were analyzed. In multivariate analyses controlling for age, gender, education, housing type, co-morbidities, hospitalization, arthritis and hip fracture, GDS depression score, MMSE cognitive score, body mass index, creatinine, serum albumin, haemoglobin, physical activities score and coffee consumption, tea consumption was positively associated with better balance (β=0.06, p<0.01), gait (β=0.01, p=0.02), IADL (β=0.03, p=0.01) and BADL (β=0.01, p=0.05). Strongly positive associations were observed for black/oolong tea in multivariate analyses, and for green tea consumption only in univariate analysis, whereas coffee consumption was not associated at all. Tea consumption was associated with better physical functional performances in community-living older adults.

  9. Perspective: Fifty years of density-functional theory in chemical physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becke, Axel D

    2014-05-14

    Since its formal inception in 1964-1965, Kohn-Sham density-functional theory (KS-DFT) has become the most popular electronic structure method in computational physics and chemistry. Its popularity stems from its beautifully simple conceptual framework and computational elegance. The rise of KS-DFT in chemical physics began in earnest in the mid 1980s, when crucial developments in its exchange-correlation term gave the theory predictive power competitive with well-developed wave-function methods. Today KS-DFT finds itself under increasing pressure to deliver higher and higher accuracy and to adapt to ever more challenging problems. If we are not mindful, however, these pressures may submerge the theory in the wave-function sea. KS-DFT might be lost. I am hopeful the Kohn-Sham philosophical, theoretical, and computational framework can be preserved. This Perspective outlines the history, basic concepts, and present status of KS-DFT in chemical physics, and offers suggestions for its future development.

  10. Perspective: Fifty years of density-functional theory in chemical physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becke, Axel D., E-mail: axel.becke@dal.ca [Department of Chemistry, Dalhousie University, 6274 Coburg Rd., P.O. Box 15000, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada)

    2014-05-14

    Since its formal inception in 1964–1965, Kohn-Sham density-functional theory (KS-DFT) has become the most popular electronic structure method in computational physics and chemistry. Its popularity stems from its beautifully simple conceptual framework and computational elegance. The rise of KS-DFT in chemical physics began in earnest in the mid 1980s, when crucial developments in its exchange-correlation term gave the theory predictive power competitive with well-developed wave-function methods. Today KS-DFT finds itself under increasing pressure to deliver higher and higher accuracy and to adapt to ever more challenging problems. If we are not mindful, however, these pressures may submerge the theory in the wave-function sea. KS-DFT might be lost. I am hopeful the Kohn-Sham philosophical, theoretical, and computational framework can be preserved. This Perspective outlines the history, basic concepts, and present status of KS-DFT in chemical physics, and offers suggestions for its future development.

  11. Virtual reality using games for improving physical functioning in older adults: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Karina Iglesia; Ricci, Natalia Aquaroni; de Moraes, Suzana Albuquerque; Perracini, Monica Rodrigues

    2014-11-15

    The use of virtual reality through exergames or active video game, i.e. a new form of interactive gaming, as a complementary tool in rehabilitation has been a frequent focus in research and clinical practice in the last few years. However, evidence of their effectiveness is scarce in the older population. This review aim to provide a summary of the effects of exergames in improving physical functioning in older adults. A search for randomized controlled trials was performed in the databases EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsyInfo, Cochrane data base, PEDro and ISI Web of Knowledge. Results from the included studies were analyzed through a critical review and methodological quality by the PEDro scale. Thirteen studies were included in the review. The most common apparatus for exergames intervention was the Nintendo Wii gaming console (8 studies), followed by computers games, Dance video game with pad (two studies each) and only one study with the Balance Rehabilitation Unit. The Timed Up and Go was the most frequently used instrument to assess physical functioning (7 studies). According to the PEDro scale, most of the studies presented methodological problems, with a high proportion of scores below 5 points (8 studies). The exergames protocols and their duration varied widely, and the benefits for physical function in older people remain inconclusive. However, a consensus between studies is the positive motivational aspect that the use of exergames provides. Further studies are needed in order to achieve better methodological quality, external validity and provide stronger scientific evidence.

  12. INTENSITY, DURATION AND TYPE OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY REQUIRED TO IMPROVE FUNCTION IN KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    KIRIHARA, RICARDO AKIHIRO; CATELAN, FELLIPE BRAVIM; FARIAS, FABIANE ELIZE SABINO DE; SILVA, CLEIDNÉIA APARECIDA CLEMENTE DA; CERNIGOY, CLAUDIA HELENA DE AZEVEDO; REZENDE, MÁRCIA UCHOA DE

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the effects of physical activity intensity, type and duration in patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Methods: A retrospective study of 195 KOA patients who were followed for two years after receiving educational material about KOA with or without attending classes. The patients were evaluated at baseline and 24 months. At the evaluations, the patients answered questionnaires pertaining to pain and function (WOMAC, Lequesne, VAS and SF-36); reported the intensity, duration and type of exercise performed per week; and performed the Timed Up & Go (TUG) and Five Times Sit-to-Stand (FTSST) tests. Results: Increased age affected improvements in the TUG results (p=0.017). The type, intensity and duration of physical activity did not correlate with pain, function or quality of life improvements (p>0.05), but the TUG results were on average 4 seconds faster among the patients who practiced intense physical activity and/or exercised for more than 180 minutes per week and/or performed isolated weight training or swam compared with those who remained sedentary after 2 years (p=0.01; pbodybuilding) for relevant pain reduction and functional improvement.Level of Evidence II, Retrospective Study. PMID:28642646

  13. Physical activity outside of organised sports is associated with functional performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocci, Noah; Howell, David R; Sugimoto, Dai; Stracciolini, Andrea; Morse, Jen; Meehan, William P

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether high levels of strenuous physical activity outside of organised sports are associated with better functional test performance. Youth athletes (n = 445, mean = 14.2 ± 2.5 years) reported their frequency of strenuous physical activity outside of organised sports. The functional performance tests: vertical jump height, pro agility test time, estimated maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max), front plank time and postural stability were measured and compared between groups. Athletes in the five or more times a week group demonstrated faster pro agility times (5.37 ± 0.43 seconds) than the never group (5.59 ± 0.56 seconds; p = 0.002) and the 1-4 times a week group (5.52 ± 0.47 seconds; p = 0.005). The five or more times a week group demonstrated higher mean vertical jump height (42.9 ± 13.3 vs. 40.3 ± 10.8 cm; p = 0.009) and higher estimated VO2 max (48.1 vs. 45.6 mL/kg/minute; p = 0.001) than the 1-4 times a week group. Youth athletes who engaged in strenuous physical activity outside of organised sports five or more times a week performed best on functional performance tests. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Course and predictors of pain and physical functioning in patients with hip osteoarthritis : Systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, Mariëtte; van der Leeden, Marike; Heymans, Martijn W; Holla, Jasmijn F M; Häkkinen, Arja; Lems, Willem F; Roorda, Leo D; Veenhof, Cindy; Sanchez-Ramirez, Diana C; de Vet, Henrica C W; Dekker, Joost

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To systematically summarize the literature on: (i) the course of pain and physical functioning; and (ii) predictors of deterioration of pain and physical functioning in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip. METHODS: A literature search was conducted in PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, PsychINFO

  15. OARSI recommended performance-based tests to assess physical function in people diagnosed with hip or knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobson, F; Hinman, R S; Roos, Ewa M.

    2013-01-01

    To recommend a consensus-derived set of performance-based tests of physical function for use in people diagnosed with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) or following joint replacement.......To recommend a consensus-derived set of performance-based tests of physical function for use in people diagnosed with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) or following joint replacement....

  16. Physical function in ankylosing spondylitis is independently determined by both disease activity and radiographic damage of the spine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landewé, R.; Dougados, M.; Mielants, H.; van der Tempel, H.; van der Heijde, D.

    2009-01-01

    To study the relationship between disease activity, radiographic damage and physical function in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) PATIENTS AND METHODS: Baseline and 2-year data of the Outcome in Ankylosing Spondylitis International Study (OASIS)(217 patients) were used. Physical function

  17. Prognosis of pain and physical functioning in patients with knee osteoarthritis : Systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, Mariëtte; van der Leeden, Marike; Heymans, Martijn W; Holla, Jasmijn F M; Häkkinen, Arja; Lems, Willem F; Roorda, Leo D; Veenhof, Cindy; Sanchez-Ramirez, Diana C; de Vet, Henrica C W; Dekker, Joost

    OBJECTIVES: To systematically summarise the literature on 1) the course of pain in patients with knee OA; 2) prognostic factors that predict deterioration of pain; 3) the course of physical functioning; and 4) prognostic factors that predict deterioration of physical functioning in persons with knee

  18. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Submitted by

    Physics Week: plenary meeting on physics groups plans for startup (14–15 May 2008) The Physics Objects (POG) and Physics Analysis (PAG) Groups presented their latest developments at the plenary meeting during the Physics Week. In the presentations particular attention was given to startup plans and readiness for data-taking. Many results based on the recent cosmic run were shown. A special Workshop on SUSY, described in a separate section, took place the day before the plenary. At the meeting, we had also two special DPG presentations on “Tracker and Muon alignment with CRAFT” (Ernesto Migliore) and “Calorimeter studies with CRAFT” (Chiara Rovelli). We had also a report from Offline (Andrea Rizzi) and Computing (Markus Klute) on the San Diego Workshop, described elsewhere in this bulletin. Tracking group (Boris Mangano). The level of sophistication of the tracking software increased significantly over the last few months: V0 (K0 and Λ) reconstr...

  19. Physical and psychological functioning of daily living in relation to physical activity. A longitudinal study among former elite male athletes and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäckmand, Heli; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kujala, Urho M; Sarna, Seppo; Fogelholm, Mikael

    2006-02-01

    Physical exercise plays an important role in the prevention and reduction of disabilities in elderly people. The aim of this study was to determine the role of physical activity in the physical and psychological functioning of daily living in a cohort of former elite male athletes representing different sports, and controls of middle and old age. Subjects were 664 former elite male athletes (mean age 64.4 years) and 500 controls (62.0 years) in middle and old age. Subjects were mailed "Physical activity and health survey" questionnaires in 1985 and 1995. The primary outcomes the physical and psychological functioning of daily living--were assessed in 1995 using items from the Mini-Finland Health Survey. Logistic regression was used for longitudinal as well as cross-sectional analyses to estimate odds ratios (OR) for poor physical and psychological functioning of daily living in relation to recreational physical activity adjusted for age, sport group, life-style, BMI, mood, chronic diseases, personality characteristics, life-events and socio-economic status. In the longitudinal analysis, low levels of physical activity (lowest MET quintile vs highest quintile) in 1985 (OR 4.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.02-11.9), older age (> or =70 yrs vs under 60 yrs OR 9.93, 95% CI 4.90-20.2), depression (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.01-4.09) and anxiety in 1995 (OR 2.67, 95% CI 1.34-5.32) increased the risk of poor physical functioning of daily living in 1995, whereas an increase in a physical activity between 1985-1995 (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.83-0.95) protected against poor physical functioning of daily living. A history of participating in specific types of sports, especially among certain power sports (weight-lifting and track & field throwers) (OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.06-0.60) and team sports (OR 0.34, 95% CI 0.15-0.81) did reveal a significant protective effect against poor psychological functioning of daily living in the longitudinal analysis. This study suggests that an increase in

  20. Effects of moderate- versus high-intensity exercise training on physical fitness and physical function in people with type 2 diabetes: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J David; Fletcher, James P; Mathis, Ruth Ann; Cade, W Todd

    2014-12-01

    Exercise training is effective for improving physical fitness and physical function in people with type 2 diabetes. However, limited research has been conducted on the optimal exercise training intensity for this population. The primary study objective was to investigate the effects of moderate- versus high-intensity exercise training on physical fitness and physical function in people with type 2 diabetes. This was a randomized clinical trial. The setting was a university campus. Twenty-one people with type 2 diabetes were randomly allocated to receive either moderate-intensity training (MOD group) or high-intensity training (HIGH group). The MOD group performed resistance training at an intensity of 75% of the 8-repetition maximum (8-RM) and aerobic training at an intensity of 30% to 45% of the heart rate reserve (HRR). The HIGH group performed resistance training at an intensity of 100% of the 8-RM and aerobic training at an intensity of 50% to 65% of the HRR. Muscle strength (peak torque [newton-meters]), exercise capacity (graded exercise test duration [minutes]), and physical function (Patient-Specific Functional Scale questionnaire) were measured at baseline and 3 months later. Acute exercise-induced changes in glucose levels were assessed immediately before exercise, immediately after exercise, and 1 hour after exercise during the first exercise training session. Although both groups showed improvements in physical fitness and physical function, the between-group effect sizes were not statistically significant (exercise capacity estimated marginal mean [EMM] difference=2.1, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]=-0.2, 4.5; muscle strength EMM difference=20.8, 95% CI=-23.3, 65.0; and physical function EMM difference=0.1, 95% CI=-0.6, 0.9). Mean percent changes in glucose levels measured immediately before exercise and immediately after exercise, immediately after exercise and 1 hour after exercise, and immediately before exercise and 1 hour after exercise for the

  1. Clinical meaningfulness of Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive subscale change in relation to goal attainment in patients on cholinesterase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwood, Kenneth; Howlett, Susan E; Hoffman, Deborah; Schindler, Rachel; Mitnitski, Arnold

    2017-10-01

    The clinical meaningfulness of Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog) subscale change is disputed. We compared 2- to 4-point ADAS-Cog changes with changes in Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS) and everyday function across initial ADAS-Cog scores and treatment responses. This exploratory analysis evaluated mild-moderate Alzheimer's disease patients treated with donepezil (12 months) or galantamine (8 months). Clinical meaningfulness was defined as concomitant ADAS-Cog and GAS changes of ±3 points and/or functional improvement. Patients with ≥3-point ADAS-Cog improvement significantly improved on GAS but not on standard tests of everyday function. ADAS-Cog "no change" (≤±3 points) was seen with mean GAS improvement. Initial ADAS-Cog improvement made endpoint improvement (ADAS-Cog 3 points and GAS 1 point) more likely (odds ratio = 6.9; 95% confidence interval = 2.5-19.5). In contrast, initial deterioration made endpoint improvement unlikely (0.33; 0.14-0.64). ADAS-Cog improvement and no change were each associated with GAS improvement. Initial ADAS-Cog worsening was unlikely to result in later improvement. ISRCTN26167328. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Structure and function of human muscle fibres and muscle proteome in physically active older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocca, Lorenza; McPhee, Jamie S; Longa, Emanuela; Canepari, Monica; Seynnes, Olivier; De Vito, Giuseppe; Pellegrino, Maria Antonietta; Narici, Marco; Bottinelli, Roberto

    2017-07-15

    Loss of muscle mass and strength in the growing population of elderly people is a major health concern for modern societies. This condition, termed sarcopenia, is a major cause of falls and of the subsequent increase in morbidity and mortality. Despite numerous studies on the impact of ageing on individual muscle fibres, the contribution of single muscle fibre adaptations to ageing-induced atrophy and functional impairment is still unsettled. The level of physical function and disuse is often associated with ageing. We studied relatively healthy older adults in order to understand the effects of ageing per se without the confounding impact of impaired physical function. We found that in healthy ageing, structural and functional alterations of muscle fibres occur. Protein post-translational modifications, oxidation and phosphorylation contribute to such alterations more than loss of myosin and other muscle protein content. Contradictory results have been reported on the impact of ageing on structure and functions of skeletal muscle fibres, likely to be due to a complex interplay between ageing and other phenomena such as disuse and diseases. Here we recruited healthy, physically and socially active young (YO) and elderly (EL) men in order to study ageing per se without the confounding effects of impaired physical function. In vivo analyses of quadriceps and in vitro analyses of vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were performed. In EL subjects, our results show that (i) quadriceps volume, maximum voluntary contraction isometric torque and patellar tendon force were significantly lower; (ii) muscle fibres went through significant atrophy and impairment of specific force (isometric force/cross-sectional area) and unloaded shortening velocity; (iii) myosin/actin ratio and myosin content in individual muscle fibres were not altered; (iv) the muscle proteome went through quantitative adaptations, namely an up-regulation of the content of several groups of proteins among

  3. Genetic and Environmental Basis in Phenotype Correlation Between Physical Function and Cognition in Aging Chinese Twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chunsheng; Zhang, Dongfeng; Tian, Xiaocao; Wu, Yili; Pang, Zengchang; Li, Shuxia; Tan, Qihua

    2017-02-01

    Although the correlation between cognition and physical function has been well studied in the general population, the genetic and environmental nature of the correlation has been rarely investigated. We conducted a classical twin analysis on cognitive and physical function, including forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), handgrip strength, five-times-sit-to-stand test (FTSST), near visual acuity, and number of teeth lost in 379 complete twin pairs. Bivariate twin models were fitted to estimate the genetic and environmental correlation between physical and cognitive function. Bivariate analysis showed mildly positively genetic correlations between cognition and FEV1, r G = 0.23 [95% CI: 0.03, 0.62], as well as FVC, r G = 0.35 [95% CI: 0.06, 1.00]. We found that FTSST and cognition presented very high common environmental correlation, r C = -1.00 [95% CI: -1.00, -0.57], and low but significant unique environmental correlation, r E = -0.11 [95% CI: -0.22, -0.01], all in the negative direction. Meanwhile, near visual acuity and cognition also showed unique environmental correlation, r E = 0.16 [95% CI: 0.03, 0.27]. We found no significantly genetic correlation for cognition with handgrip strength, FTSST, near visual acuity, and number of teeth lost. Cognitive function was genetically related to pulmonary function. The FTSST and cognition shared almost the same common environmental factors but only part of the unique environmental factors, both with negative correlation. In contrast, near visual acuity and cognition may positively share part of the unique environmental factors.

  4. Leisure-time physical activity, health related functioning and retirement : a prospective cohort study among middle-aged employees

    OpenAIRE

    Lahti, Jouni

    2011-01-01

    Physical inactivity has become a major threat to public health worldwide. The Finnish health and welfare policies emphasize that the working population should maintain good health and functioning until their normal retirement age and remain in good health and independence later in life. Health behaviours like physical activity potentially play an important role in reaching this target as physical activity contributes to better physical fitness and to reduced risk of major chronic diseases. ...

  5. On the Quantum Mechanical Wave Function as a Link Between Cognition and the Physical World A Role for Psychology

    CERN Document Server

    Snyder, D

    2002-01-01

    A straightforward explanation of fundamental tenets of quantum mechanics concerning the wave function results in the thesis that the quantum mechanical wave function is a link between human cognition and the physical world. The reticence on the part of physicists to adopt this thesis is discussed. A comparison is made to the behaviorists' consideration of mind, and the historical roots of how the problem concerning the quantum mechanical wave function arose are discussed. The basis for an empirical demonstration that the wave function is a link between human cognition and the physical world is provided through developing an experiment using methodology from psychology and physics. Based on research in psychology and physics that relied on this methodology, it is likely that Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen's theoretical result that mutually exclusive wave functions can simultaneously apply to the same concrete physical circumstances can be implemented on an empirical level.

  6. Independent Associations Between Sedentary Behaviors and Mental, Cognitive, Physical, and Functional Health Among Older Adults in Retirement Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Dori E; Bellettiere, John; Gardiner, Paul A; Villarreal, Veronica N; Crist, Katie; Kerr, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    We examined the relationships between objective and self-reported sedentary time and health indicators among older adults residing in retirement communities. Our cross-sectional analysis used data from 307 participants who completed baseline measurements of a physical activity trial in 11 retirement communities in San Diego County. Sedentary time was objectively measured with devices (accelerometers) and using self-reports. Outcomes assessed included emotional and cognitive health, physical function, and physical health (eg, blood pressure). Linear mixed-effects models examined associations between sedentary behavior and outcomes adjusting for demographics and accelerometer physical activity. Higher device-measured sedentary time was associated with worse objective physical function (Short Physical Performance Battery, balance task scores, 400-m walk time, chair stand time, gait speed), self-reported physical function, and fear of falling but with less sleep disturbance (all ps poorer physical function independently of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and may be a modifiable behavior target in interventions aiming to improve physical function in older adults. Few associations were observed with self-reported sedentary behavior measures. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Physical examination findings and their relationship with performance-based function in adults with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Maura D; Price, Lori Lyn; von Heideken, Johan; Harvey, William F; Wang, Chenchen

    2016-07-12

    Many physical examination (PE) maneuvers exist to assess knee function, none of which are specific to knee osteoarthritis (KOA). The Osteoarthritis Research Society International also recommends the use of six functional performance measures to assess function in adults with KOA. While earlier studies have examined the relationship between PE findings and self-reported function or PE findings and select performance tests in adults with knee pain and KOA, few have examined the all three types of measures. This cross-sectional study specifically examines the relationships between results of PE findings, functional performance tests and self-reported function in adults with symptomatic KOA. We used baseline PE data from a prospective randomized controlled trial in 87 participants aged ≥40 years with symptomatic and radiographic KOA. The PE performed by three experienced physical therapists included: muscle assessment, function and special tests. Participants also completed functional performance tests and the Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). Multivariate linear regression identified contributions of PE findings towards functional performance and WOMAC scores, adjusting for age and gender. Participants' mean age was 60.4 years (SD = 10.5), mean disease duration was 8.4 years (SD = 10.1) and 27 participants had varus knee alignment. Mean WOMAC pain and function scores were 211 (SD = 113) and 709 (SD = 394), respectively. Weakness was present in major hip and knee muscles. Seventy-nine participants had a positive Ely's, 65 a positive Waldron and 49 a positive Grind. Mean 6-min walk was 404 m (SD = 83) and mean Berg Balance was 53 (SD = 4). Regression analysis identified positive findings on 5 special tests (P muscle strength and flexibility, and patella dysfunction were prevalent in these adults with symptomatic KOA. Results of functional performance tests suggest balance and walking ability are impaired and are

  8. Physical activity, functional ability, and disease activity in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueddari, S; Amine, B; Rostom, S; Badri, D; Mawani, N; Ezzahri, M; Moussa, F; Shyen, S; Abouqal, R; Chkirat, B; Hajjaj-Hassouni, N

    2014-09-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a chronic condition known to cause pain-related complications in youth and affect children's physical functioning. There is no data in Arabic children with JIA about the impact of illness upon their physical activity. The objective of this study was to explore physical activity (PA) in children and adolescents with JIA compared with a healthy population and to examine associations between PA, functional ability, and disease activity. Our study included patients with JIA and group control aged between 8 and 17 years. The diagnosis was used according to the International League of Association of Rheumatology (ILAR) criteria 2001. Sociodemographic data and clinical features were collected. Physical activity level and energy expenditure were assessed with a 1-day activity diary and the metabolic equivalent (MET), respectively. Functional ability was assessed with the Moroccan version of the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ). Disease activity was measured using the Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score (JADAS). Fifty patients and 50 controls were included (mean ± SD age 11.5 ± 3.3 and 10.5 ± 3.8 years, respectively; p = 0.49) with masculine predominance n = 30 (59.6 %) and n = 29 (58 %), respectively (p = 0.26). The median disease duration was 4.3 years (2-5). The median analog scale (VAS) pain was 20 (10-40). Fourteen patients (28 %) had an active disease. Patient population consisted in majority of oligoarticular arthritis (28 %), 14 patients. The mean of energy expenditure and physical activity were significantly higher in the JIA group. The JIA group spent more time in bed and less time on moderate to vigorous PA than the control group. There is no significant relationship between PA, functional ability, and disease activity. Our study suggests that children and adolescents with JIA have low PA levels and are at risk of losing the benefits of PA. Low PA is not related to

  9. Vitamin D Insufficiency Is Associated with Lower Physical Function in Patients with Heart Failure and Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Lopes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency is frequent among patients with heart failure (HF and diabetes, disorders associated with exercise intolerance and muscle weakness. This study aims to search for associations between vitamin D sufficiency and physical function indexes in patients with HF and diabetes. A cross-sectional study of 146 HF patients, 39.7% with diabetes, at a Brazilian tertiary outpatient clinic was performed. Patients underwent clinical evaluation, 6-minute walk test (6 MWT, handgrip strength, physical activity level (IPAQ, and biochemical evaluations including serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Classification was done according to vitamin D status (≥30 ng/dL, sufficient and presence/absence of diabetes in vitamin sufficient, no diabetes (DS-C, n=25, vitamin sufficient, diabetes (DS-DM, n=18, vitamin deficient, no diabetes (DD-C, n= 63, and vitamin deficient, diabetes (DD-DM, n=40. Patients age was 55.4 ± 8 yrs; 70.5% had vitamin D deficiency. Clinical characteristics were similar among groups. Total time expended in physical activity was similar among groups (P=0.26. DS-C covered higher distances in the 6 MWT (392 ± 60 m versus DD-DM (309 ± 116 m; P=0.024. Handgrip strength was similar among groups but tended to lower levels in DD-DM (P=0.074 even after being adjusted to physical activity (P=0.069. Vitamin D deficiency can influence physical function in HF diabetic patients.

  10. Functional status in patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms: Coping styles and their relationship with depression and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sempértegui, Gabriela A; Karreman, Annemiek; van Hout, Gerbrand Cm; Bekker, Marrie Hj

    2017-11-01

    This study examined how coping styles are related to functional status in patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms and to what extent depression and anxiety account for this relationship. In 90 Dutch adult patients presenting medically unexplained physical symptoms, coping styles, health-related functional status, anxiety, and depression were measured. Multiple regression analyses and mediation analysis showed that coping styles were directly and indirectly related to functional status. In this relationship, depression and anxiety played an important role. The findings highlight the relevance of addressing coping styles, depression, and anxiety when targeting the functional status of patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms in clinical practice.

  11. Correlation between upper limb function and oral health impact in stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Fernanda C; da Silva, Daniela F T; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel A; Fernandes, Kristianne P S; Bussadori, Sandra K

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between upper limb impairment and oral health impact in individuals with hemiparesis stemming from a stroke. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects were conducted with a sample of 27 stroke survivors with complete or partial hemiparesis with brachial or crural predominance. The 14-item short version of the Oral Health Impact Profile was used to evaluate perceptions of oral health. The Brazilian version of the Stroke Specific Quality of Life Scale was used to evaluate perceptions regarding quality of life. [Results] A statistically significant association was found between the upper extremity function subscale of the SSQOL-Brazil and the impact of oral health evaluated using the OHIP-14, with a strong correlation found for the physical pain subscale, moderate correlations with the functional limitation, psychological discomfort, physical disability, social disability and social handicap subscales as well as a weak correlation with the psychological disability subscale. Analyzing the OHIP-14 scores with regard to the impact of oral health on quality of life, the most frequent classification was weak impact, with small rates of moderate and strong impact. [Conclusion] Compromised upper limb function and self-perceived poor oral health, whether due to cultural resignation or functional disability, exert a negative impact on the quality of life of individuals with hemiparesis stemming from a stroke.

  12. Supervised physical exercise improves endothelial function in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Reis-Neto, Edgard Torres; da Silva, Aline Evelyn; Monteiro, Carlos Manoel de Castro; de Camargo, Luciano Monteiro; Sato, Emilia Inoue

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of supervised physical exercise on endothelial function, ergospirometric test variables and disease activity in SLE patients. We conducted a prospective study in which women with SLE who were available to perform physical exercise were allocated to the exercise group (EG) to practise supervised physical exercise for 1 h three times per week for 16 weeks. Those who were not available for this activity were allocated to the control group (CG). Intervention consisted of walking at a heart rate corresponding to the ventilatory 1 threshold obtained from ergospirometry and monitored by a frequency meter. At baseline (T0) and after 16 weeks (T16), patients were assessed for endothelial function by brachial artery (flow-mediated dilation), ergospirometry and disease activity (SLEDAI). Statistical analysis was performed through normality tests, Student's t-test and non-parametric tests for data with non-normal distribution. P exercise tolerance [12.3 (2.4) vs 13.4 (2.6) min, P = 0.027], maximum speed [7.7 (1.0) vs 8.3 (1.2) km/h, P = 0.027] and threshold speed [5.6 (0.7) vs 6.1 (0.9) km/h, P = 0.005] in the EG without a difference in the CG. There was no difference in the SLEDAI score in both groups. Physical exercise is a useful strategy to improve endothelial function and aerobic capacity without worsening disease activity in SLE patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION; ClinicalTrials.gov (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov), NCT01712529.

  13. Association of Fluid Status and Body Composition with Physical Function in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Ming Hsiao

    Full Text Available Impairment of physical function and abnormal body composition are the major presentations in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between body composition and physical function in CKD patients.This cross-sectional study enrolled 172 of CKD stages 1-5 from February 2013 to September 2013. Handgrip strength (upper extremity muscle endurance, 30-second chair-stand test (lower extremity muscle endurance and 2-minute step test (cardiorespiratory endurance were used as indices of physical function. Body composition, including fluid status (extracellular water/total body water, ECW/TBW, lean tissue index (LTI, and fat tissue index (FTI, was measured using a bioimpedance spectroscopy method.All patients with high ECW/TBW had lower handgrip strength and 30-second chair-stand than those with low ECW/TBW (P<0.001 and P = 0.002. CKD patients with high FTI had lower handgrip strength and 30-second chair-stand than those with low FTI (P<0.001 and P = 0.002. These patients with low LTI had lower handgrip strength than those with high LTI (P = 0.04. In multivariate analysis, high ECW/TBW was positively associated with decreased handgrip strength (β = -41.17, P = 0.03 in CKD patients. High FTI was significantly correlated with decreased times of 30-second chair-stand (β = -0.13, P = 0.01. There was no significant relationship between body composition and 2-minute step test.Our results show a significant association of impaired upper and lower extremity muscle endurance with high fluid status and fat tissue. Evaluation of body composition may assist in indentifying physical dysfunction earlier in CKD patients.

  14. The association between child maltreatment and emotional, cognitive, and physical health functioning in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nhu K. Tran

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a paucity of research on correlates of child maltreatment in limited-resource countries with a relatively high tolerance of harsh discipline. This Vietnamese study aimed to investigate associations between different types of child maltreatment and child emotional, cognitive, and physical health functioning as well as moderation effects of gender and ethnicity. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted with 1851 randomly selected students aged 12–17 years. Both self-report and more objective measures (weight, height, study ranking, and a memory test were used. Results All types of child maltreatment were associated with emotional dysfunctioning. Life time and past year experiences of physical abuse and life time experiences of sexual abuse and neglect were related to poorer perceived physical health. The study did not find associations between any type of child maltreatment and overweight or underweight status. Regarding cognitive functioning, life time experience of sexual abuse and neglect were related to poorer working memory performance. Noticeably, emotional abuse was related to better academic performance, which might be an indication of “tiger parenting” practice in Vietnam, implying academic performance stimulation at the expense of emotional security. No significant moderation effects by gender and ethnicity were found. Conclusion Even in a culture in which harsh discipline is normative, child maltreatment was related to negative aspects of child wellbeing including emotional, cognitive, and physical health functioning. Efficient and low-cost interventions on child maltreatment should be developed and conducted in Vietnam as well as other countries with similar context