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Sample records for subregional dose escalation

  1. Dose escalation of a curcuminoid formulation

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    Crowell James

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Curcumin is the major yellow pigment extracted from turmeric, a commonly-used spice in India and Southeast Asia that has broad anticarcinogenic and cancer chemopreventive potential. However, few systematic studies of curcumin's pharmacology and toxicology in humans have been performed. Methods A dose escalation study was conducted to determine the maximum tolerated dose and safety of a single dose of standardized powder extract, uniformly milled curcumin (C3 Complex™, Sabinsa Corporation. Healthy volunteers were administered escalating doses from 500 to 12,000 mg. Results Seven of twenty-four subjects (30% experienced only minimal toxicity that did not appear to be dose-related. No curcumin was detected in the serum of subjects administered 500, 1,000, 2,000, 4,000, 6,000 or 8,000 mg. Low levels of curcumin were detected in two subjects administered 10,000 or 12,000 mg. Conclusion The tolerance of curcumin in high single oral doses appears to be excellent. Given that achieving systemic bioavailability of curcumin or its metabolites may not be essential for colorectal cancer chemoprevention, these findings warrant further investigation for its utility as a long-term chemopreventive agent.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of Escalating Doses of Oral Psilocybin in Healthy Adults.

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    Brown, Randall T; Nicholas, Christopher R; Cozzi, Nicholas V; Gassman, Michele C; Cooper, Karen M; Muller, Daniel; Thomas, Chantelle D; Hetzel, Scott J; Henriquez, Kelsey M; Ribaudo, Alexandra S; Hutson, Paul R

    2017-03-28

    Psilocybin is a psychedelic tryptamine that has shown promise in recent clinical trials for the treatment of depression and substance use disorders. This open-label study of the pharmacokinetics of psilocybin was performed to describe the pharmacokinetics and safety profile of psilocybin in sequential, escalating oral doses of 0.3, 0.45, and 0.6 mg/kg in 12 healthy adults. Eligible healthy adults received 6-8 h of preparatory counseling in anticipation of the first dose of psilocybin. The escalating oral psilocybin doses were administered at approximately monthly intervals in a controlled setting and subjects were monitored for 24 h. Blood and urine samples were collected over 24 h and assayed by a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay for psilocybin and psilocin, the active metabolite. The pharmacokinetics of psilocin were determined using both compartmental (NONMEM) and noncompartmental (WinNonlin) methods. No psilocybin was found in plasma or urine, and renal clearance of intact psilocin accounted for less than 2% of the total clearance. The pharmacokinetics of psilocin were linear within the twofold range of doses, and the elimination half-life of psilocin was 3 h (standard deviation 1.1). An extended elimination phase in some subjects suggests hydrolysis of the psilocin glucuronide metabolite. Variation in psilocin clearance was not predicted by body weight, and no serious adverse events occurred in the subjects studied. The small amount of psilocin renally excreted suggests that no dose reduction is needed for subjects with mild-moderate renal impairment. Simulation of fixed doses using the pharmacokinetic parameters suggest that an oral dose of 25 mg should approximate the drug exposure of a 0.3 mg/kg oral dose of psilocybin. Although doses of 0.6 mg/kg are in excess of likely therapeutic doses, no serious physical or psychological events occurred during or within 30 days of any dose. NCT02163707.

  3. Increasing Use of Dose-Escalated External Beam Radiation Therapy for Men With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

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    Swisher-McClure, Samuel, E-mail: Swisher-Mcclure@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mitra, Nandita; Woo, Kaitlin [Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Smaldone, Marc; Uzzo, Robert [Division of Urologic Oncology, Department of Surgery, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Temple University Health System, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bekelman, Justin E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To examine recent practice patterns, using a large national cancer registry, to understand the extent to which dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) has been incorporated into routine clinical practice for men with prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective observational cohort study using the National Cancer Data Base, a nationwide oncology outcomes database in the United States. We identified 98,755 men diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer between 2006 and 2011 who received definitive EBRT and classified patients into National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk groups. We defined dose-escalated EBRT as total prescribed dose of ≥75.6 Gy. Using multivariable logistic regression, we examined the association of patient, clinical, and demographic characteristics with the use of dose-escalated EBRT. Results: Overall, 81.6% of men received dose-escalated EBRT during the study period. The use of dose-escalated EBRT did not vary substantially by NCCN risk group. Use of dose-escalated EBRT increased from 70.7% of patients receiving treatment in 2006 to 89.8% of patients receiving treatment in 2011. On multivariable analysis, year of diagnosis and use of intensity modulated radiation therapy were significantly associated with receipt of dose-escalated EBRT. Conclusions: Our study results indicate that dose-escalated EBRT has been widely adopted by radiation oncologists treating prostate cancer in the United States. The proportion of patients receiving dose-escalated EBRT increased nearly 20% between 2006 and 2011. We observed high utilization rates of dose-escalated EBRT within all disease risk groups. Adoption of intensity modulated radiation therapy was strongly associated with use of dose-escalated treatment.

  4. Image guided dose escalated prostate radiotherapy: still room to improve

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    Milosevic Michael

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate radiotherapy (RT dose escalation has been reported to result in improved biochemical control at the cost of greater late toxicity. We report on the application of 79.8 Gy in 42 fractions of prostate image guided RT (IGRT. The primary objective was to assess 5-year biochemical control and potential prognostic factors by the Phoenix definition. Secondary endpoints included acute and late toxicity by the Radiotherapy Oncology Group (RTOG scoring scales. Methods From October/2001 and June/2003, 259 men were treated with at least 2-years follow-up. 59 patients had low, 163 intermediate and 37 high risk disease. 43 had adjuvant hormonal therapy (HT, mostly for high- or multiple risk factor intermediate-risk disease (n = 25. They received either 3-dimensional conformal RT (3DCRT, n = 226 or intensity modulated RT (IMRT including daily on-line IGRT with intraprostatic fiducial markers. Results Median follow-up was 67.8 months (range 24.4-84.7. There was no severe (grade 3-4 acute toxicity, and grade 2 acute gastrointestinal (GI toxicity was unusual (10.1%. The 5-year incidence of grade 2-3 late GI and genitourinary (GU toxicity was 13.7% and 12.1%, with corresponding grade 3 figures of 3.5% and 2.0% respectively. HT had an association with an increased risk of grade 2-3 late GI toxicity (11% v 21%, p = 0.018. Using the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure, the 5 year-bNED is 88.4%, 76.5% and 77.9% for low, intermediate and high risk patients respectively. On univariate analysis, T-category and Gleason grade correlated with Phoenix bNED (p = 0.006 and 0.039 respectively. Hormonal therapy was not a significant prognostic factor on uni- or multi-variate analysis. Men with positive prostate biopsies following RT had a lower chance of bNED at 5 years (34.4% v 64.3%; p = 0.147. Conclusion IGRT to 79.8 Gy results in favourable rates of late toxicity compared with published non-IGRT treated cohorts. Future avenues of

  5. PET-guided dose escalation tomotherapy in malignant pleural mesothelioma

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    Fodor, Andrei; Dell' Oca, Italo; Pasetti, Marcella; Di Muzio, Nadia Gisella [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Fiorino, Claudio; Broggi, Sara; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Calandrino, Riccardo [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy). Medical Physics; Gianolli, Luigi [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2011-11-15

    To test the feasibility of salvage radiotherapy using PET-guided helical tomotherapy in patients with progressive malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). A group of 12 consecutive MPM patients was treated with 56 Gy/25 fractions to the planning target volume (PTV); FDG-PET/CT simulation was always performed to include all positive lymph nodes and MPM infiltrations. Subsequently, a second group of 12 consecutive patients was treated with the same dose to the whole pleura adding a simultaneous integrated boost of 62.5 Gy to the FDG-PET/CT positive areas (BTV). Good dosimetric results were obtained in both groups. No grade 3 (RTOG/EORTC) acute or late toxicities were reported in the first group, while 3 cases of grade 3 late pneumonitis were registered in the second group: the duration of symptoms was 2-10 weeks. Median overall survival was 8 months (1.2-50.5 months) and 20 months (4.3-33.8 months) from the beginning of radiotherapy, for groups I and II, respectively (p = 0.19). A significant impact on local relapse from radiotherapy was seen (median time to local relapse: 8 vs 17 months; 1-year local relapse-free rate: 16% vs 81%, p = 0.003). The results of this pilot study support the planning of a phase III study of combined sequential chemoradiotherapy with dose escalation to BTV in patients not able to undergo resection. (orig.)

  6. Studying the efficacy of escalated dose conformal radiation therapy in prostate carcinoma – Pakistan experience

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    Asad Zamir

    2017-11-01

    Conclusion: Our data were comparable to international studies of dose escalation using 3D and beneficial as compared to conventional radiation therapy delivered by 2D in terms of biochemical failure rate and treatment related toxicity.

  7. Vaginal dose de-escalation in image guided adaptive brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer

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    Mohamed, Sandy; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; de Leeuw, Astrid A C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Vaginal stenosis is a major problem following radiotherapy in cervical cancer. We investigated a new dose planning strategy for vaginal dose de-escalation (VDD). Materials and methods Fifty consecutive locally advanced cervical cancer patients without lower or middle vaginal involvement...

  8. Cost of dose escalation in people with rheumatoid arthritis treated with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors across Europe.

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    Holden, Sarah E; Currie, Craig J; Lennon, Martin; Reynolds, Alan V; Moots, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to calculate the marginal cost of dose escalation in people with rheumatoid arthritis treated with tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors across Europe. The proportion of people who escalate their dose of TNF inhibitor and the average percentage increase in TNF inhibitor cost associated with escalators versus non-escalators was calculated from previously published estimates, weighted by the sample size for each study. The number of people with rheumatoid arthritis treated with TNF inhibitors and the corresponding total drug sales were obtained for five European countries from Decision Resources' Pharmacor Market Forecast. Method 1 assumed that total sales of a TNF inhibitor represented the cost of an escalator multiplied by the number of escalators plus the cost of a non-escalator multiplied by the number of non-escalators. Method 2 assumed that the drug cost per day used to forecast total sales was calculated using the dose of TNF inhibitor used by non-escalators. The marginal cost of TNF inhibitor dose escalation was estimated by multiplying the difference in cost between escalators and non-escalators by the number of escalators. The estimated increase in TNF inhibitor costs associated with dose escalation in people with rheumatoid arthritis across five European countries (Germany, France, UK, Spain and Italy) was €51.5-54.4 million for adalimumab, €44.8-52.8 million for infliximab and €5.8-5.9 million for etanercept. Dose escalation of the TNF inhibitors adalimumab, etanercept and infliximab in people with rheumatoid arthritis has resulted in an increase in TNF inhibitor costs across five European countries.

  9. Infliximab Dose Escalation as an Effective Strategy for Managing Secondary Loss of Response in Ulcerative Colitis.

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    Taxonera, Carlos; Barreiro-de Acosta, Manuel; Calvo, Marta; Saro, Cristina; Bastida, Guillermo; Martín-Arranz, María D; Gisbert, Javier P; García-Sánchez, Valle; Marín-Jiménez, Ignacio; Bermejo, Fernando; Chaparro, María; Ponferrada, Ángel; Martínez-Montiel, María P; Pajares, Ramón; de Gracia, Celia; Olivares, David; Alba, Cristina; Mendoza, Juan L; Fernández-Blanco, Ignacio

    2015-10-01

    The outcomes of infliximab dose escalation in ulcerative colitis (UC) have not been well evaluated. To assess the short- and long-term outcomes of infliximab dose escalation in a cohort of patients with UC. This was a multicenter, retrospective, cohort study. All consecutive UC patients who had lost response to infliximab maintenance infusions and who underwent infliximab dose escalation were included. Post-escalation short-term clinical response and remission were evaluated. In the long term, the cumulative probabilities of infliximab failure-free survival and colectomy-free survival were calculated. Predictors of short-term response and event-free survival were estimated using logistic regression analysis and Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. Seventy-nine patients were included. Fifty-four patients (68.4%) achieved short-term clinical response and 41 patients (51.9%) entered in clinical remission. After a median follow-up of 15 months [interquartile range (IQR) 8-26], 33 patients (41.8%) had infliximab failure. Patients with short-term response had a significantly lower adjusted rate of infliximab failure [hazard ratio (HR) 0.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.12-0.49; p infliximab during maintenance, infliximab dose escalation enabled recovery of short-term response in nearly 70% of patients. In the long term, 58% of patients maintained sustained clinical benefit, and 9 of 10 avoided colectomy. Short-term response was associated with an 86% reduction in the relative risk of colectomy.

  10. Long-term outcome of magnetic resonance spectroscopic image–directed dose escalation for prostate brachytherapy

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    King, Martin T.; Nasser, Nicola J.; Mathur, Nitin; Cohen, Gil’ad N.; Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Yuen, Jasper; Vargas, Hebert A.; Pei, Xin; Yamada, Yoshiya; Zakian, Kristen L.; Zaider, Marco; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE To report the long-term control and toxicity outcomes of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer, who underwent low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy with magnetic resonance spectroscopic image (MRSI)–directed dose escalation to intraprostatic regions. METHODS AND MATERIALS Forty-seven consecutive patients between May 2000 and December 2003 were analyzed retrospectively. Each patient underwent a preprocedural MRSI, and MRS-positive voxels suspicious for malignancy were identified. Intraoperative planning was used to determine the optimal seed distribution to deliver a standard prescription dose to the entire prostate, while escalating the dose to MRS-positive voxels to 150% of prescription. Each patient underwent transperineal implantation of radioactive seeds followed by same-day CT for postimplant dosimetry. RESULTS The median prostate D90 (minimum dose received by 90% of the prostate) was 125.7% (interquartile range [IQR], 110.3–136.5%) of prescription. The median value for the MRS-positive mean dose was 229.9% (IQR, 200.0–251.9%). Median urethra D30 and rectal D30 values were 142.2% (137.5–168.2%) and 56.1% (40.1–63.4%), respectively. Median followup was 86.4 months (IQR, 49.8–117.6). The 10-year actuarial prostate-specific antigen relapse–free survival was 98% (95% confidence interval, 93–100%). Five patients (11%) experienced late Grade 3 urinary toxicity (e.g., urethral stricture), which improved after operative intervention. Four of these patients had dose-escalated voxels less than 1.0 cm from the urethra. CONCLUSIONS Low-dose-rate brachytherapy with MRSI-directed dose escalation to suspicious intraprostatic regions exhibits excellent long-term biochemical control. Patients with dose-escalated voxels close to the urethra were at higher risk of late urinary stricture. PMID:27009848

  11. SYSTEMS-2: A randomised phase II study of radiotherapy dose escalation for pain control in malignant pleural mesothelioma

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    M. Ashton

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available SYSTEMS-2 is a randomised study of radiotherapy dose escalation for pain control in 112 patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM. Standard palliative (20 Gy/5# or dose escalated treatment (36 Gy/6# will be delivered using advanced radiotherapy techniques and pain responses will be compared at week 5. Data will guide optimal palliative radiotherapy in MPM.

  12. A product of independent beta probabilities dose escalation design for dual-agent phase I trials.

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    Mander, Adrian P; Sweeting, Michael J

    2015-04-15

    Dual-agent trials are now increasingly common in oncology research, and many proposed dose-escalation designs are available in the statistical literature. Despite this, the translation from statistical design to practical application is slow, as has been highlighted in single-agent phase I trials, where a 3 + 3 rule-based design is often still used. To expedite this process, new dose-escalation designs need to be not only scientifically beneficial but also easy to understand and implement by clinicians. In this paper, we propose a curve-free (nonparametric) design for a dual-agent trial in which the model parameters are the probabilities of toxicity at each of the dose combinations. We show that it is relatively trivial for a clinician's prior beliefs or historical information to be incorporated in the model and updating is fast and computationally simple through the use of conjugate Bayesian inference. Monotonicity is ensured by considering only a set of monotonic contours for the distribution of the maximum tolerated contour, which defines the dose-escalation decision process. Varied experimentation around the contour is achievable, and multiple dose combinations can be recommended to take forward to phase II. Code for R, Stata and Excel are available for implementation. © 2015 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Antipsychotic dose escalation as a trigger for Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS: literature review and case series report

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    Langan Julie

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background “Neuroleptic malignant syndrome” (NMS is a potentially fatal idiosyncratic reaction to any medication which affects the central dopaminergic system. Between 0.5% and 1% of patients exposed to antipsychotics develop the condition. Mortality rates may be as high as 55% and many risk factors have been reported. Although rapid escalation of antipsychotic dose is thought to be an important risk factor, to date it has not been the focus of a published case series or scientifically defined. Description We aimed to identify cases of NMS and review risk factors for its development with a particular focus on rapid dose escalation in the 30 days prior to onset. A review of the literature on rapid dose escalation was undertaken and a pragmatic definition of “rapid dose escalation” was made. NMS cases were defined using DSM-IV criteria and systematically identified within a secondary care mental health service. A ratio of titration rate was calculated for each NMS patient and “rapid escalators” and “non rapid escalators” were compared. 13 cases of NMS were identified. A progressive mean dose increase 15 days prior to the confirmed episode of NMS was observed (241.7 mg/day during days 1–15 to 346.9 mg/day during days 16–30 and the mean ratio of dose escalation for NMS patients was 1.4. Rapid dose escalation was seen in 5/13 cases and non rapid escalators had markedly higher daily cumulative antipsychotic dose compared to rapid escalators. Conclusions Rapid dose escalation occurred in less than half of this case series (n = 5, 38.5%, although there is currently no consensus on the precise definition of rapid dose escalation. Cumulative antipsychotic dose – alongside other known risk factors - may also be important in the development of NMS.

  14. Dose-escalation designs in oncology: ADEPT and the CRM.

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    Shu, Jianfen; O'Quigley, John

    2008-11-20

    The ADEPT software package is not a statistical method in its own right as implied by Gerke and Siedentop (Statist. Med. 2008; DOI: 10.1002/sim.3037). ADEPT implements two-parameter CRM models as described in O'Quigley et al. (Biometrics 1990; 46(1):33-48). All of the basic ideas (use of a two-parameter logistic model, use of a two-dimensional prior for the unknown slope and intercept parameters, sequential estimation and subsequent patient allocation based on minimization of some loss function, flexibility to use cohorts instead of one by one inclusion) are strictly identical. The only, and quite trivial, difference arises in the setting of the prior. O'Quigley et al. (Biometrics 1990; 46(1):33-48) used priors having an analytic expression whereas Whitehead and Brunier (Statist. Med. 1995; 14:33-48) use pseudo-data to play the role of the prior. The question of interest is whether two-parameter CRM works as well, or better, than the one-parameter CRM recommended in O'Quigley et al. (Biometrics 1990; 46(1):33-48). Gerke and Siedentop argue that it does. The published literature suggests otherwise. The conclusions of Gerke and Siedentop stem from three highly particular, and somewhat contrived, situations. Unlike one-parameter CRM (Biometrika 1996; 83:395-405; J. Statist. Plann. Inference 2006; 136:1765-1780; Biometrika 2005; 92:863-873), no statistical properties appear to have been studied for two-parameter CRM. In particular, for two-parameter CRM, the parameter estimates are inconsistent. This ought to be a source of major concern to those proposing its use. Worse still, for finite samples the behavior of estimates can be quite wild despite having incorporated the kind of dampening priors discussed by Gerke and Siedentop. An example in which we illustrate this behavior describes a single patient included at level 1 of 6 levels and experiencing a dose limiting toxicity. The subsequent recommendation is to experiment at level 6! Such problematic behavior is not

  15. Radiation dose escalation for loco-regional recurrence of breast cancer after mastectomy

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    Skinner Heath D

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation is a standard component of treatment for patients with locoregional recurrence (LRR of breast cancer following mastectomy. The current study reports the results of a 10% radiation dose escalation in these patients. Methods 159 patients treated at MD Anderson Cancer Center between 1994-2006 with isolated LRR after mastectomy alone were reviewed. Patients in the standard treatment group (65 pts, 40.9% were treated to 50 Gy comprehensively plus a boost of 10 Gy. The dose escalated group (94 pts, 59.1% was treated to 54 Gy comprehensively and a minimum 12 Gy boost. Median dose in the standard dose and dose escalated group was 60 Gy (±1 Gy, 95% CI and 66 Gy (±0.5 Gy, 95% CI respectively. Median follow up for living patients was 94 months from time of recurrence. Results The actuarial five year locoregional control (LRC rate was 77% for the entire study population. The five year overall survival and disease-free survival was 55% and 41%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, initial tumor size (p = 0.03, time to initial LRR (p = 0.03, absence of gross tumor at the time of radiation (p = 0.001 and Her2 status (p = 0.03 were associated with improved LRC. Five year LRC rates were similar in patients with a complete response to chemotherapy without surgery and patients with a complete surgical excision (77% vs 83%, p = NS, compared to a 63% LRC rate in patients with gross disease at the time of radiation (p = 0.024. LRC rates were 80% in the standard dose group and 75% in the dose escalated group (p = NS. Conclusions While LRR following mastectomy is potentially curable, distant metastasis and local control rates remain suboptimal. Radiation dose escalation did not appear to improve LRC. Given significant local failure rates, these patients are good candidates for additional strategies to improve their outcomes.

  16. Vaginal dose de-escalation in image guided adaptive brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer.

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    Mohamed, Sandy; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; de Leeuw, Astrid A C; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina; Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Kirisits, Christian; Pötter, Richard; Tanderup, Kari

    2016-09-01

    Vaginal stenosis is a major problem following radiotherapy in cervical cancer. We investigated a new dose planning strategy for vaginal dose de-escalation (VDD). Fifty consecutive locally advanced cervical cancer patients without lower or middle vaginal involvement at diagnosis from 3 institutions were analysed. External beam radiotherapy was combined with MRI-guided brachytherapy. VDD was obtained by decreasing dwell times in ovoid/ring and increasing dwell times in tandem/needles. The aim was to maintain the target dose (D90 of HR-CTV⩾85Gy EQD2) while reducing the dose to the surface of the vagina to <140% of the physical fractional brachytherapy dose corresponding to a total EQD2 of 85Gy. The mean vaginal loading (ovoid/ring) was reduced from 51% to 33% of the total loading with VDD, which significantly reduced the dose to the vaginal dose points (p<0.001) without compromising the target dose. The dose to the ICRU recto-vaginal point was reduced by a mean of 4±4Gy EQD2 (p<0.001), while doses to bladder and rectum (D 2cm 3 ) were reduced by 2±2Gy and 3±2Gy, respectively (p<0.001). VDD significantly reduces dose to the upper vagina which is expected to result in reduction of vaginal stenosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiobiological evaluation of simultaneously dose-escalated versus non-escalated intensity-modulated radiation therapy for patients with upper thoracic esophageal cancer

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    Huang BT

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Bao-Tian Huang,1,* Li-Li Wu,1,* Long-Jia Guo,1,* Liang-Yu Xu,1,* Rui-Hong Huang,1 Pei-Xian Lin,2 Jian-Zhou Chen,1,3 De-Rui Li,1 Chuang-Zhen Chen1 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, 2Department of Nosocomial Infection Management, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, People’s Republic of China; 3CRUK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: To compare the radiobiological response between simultaneously dose-escalated and non-escalated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (DE-IMRT and NE-IMRT for patients with upper thoracic esophageal cancer (UTEC using radiobiological evaluation. Methods: Computed tomography simulation data sets for 25 patients pathologically diagnosed with primary UTEC were used in this study. DE-IMRT plan with an escalated dose of 64.8 Gy/28 fractions to the gross tumor volume (GTV and involved lymph nodes from 25 patients pathologically diagnosed with primary UTEC, was compared to an NE-IMRT plan of 50.4 Gy/28 fractions. Dose-volume metrics, tumor control probability (TCP, and normal tissue complication probability for the lung and spinal cord were compared. In addition, the risk of acute esophageal toxicity (AET and late esophageal toxicity (LET were also analyzed. Results: Compared with NE-IMRT plan, we found the DE-IMRT plan resulted in a 14.6 Gy dose escalation to the GTV. The tumor control was predicted to increase by 31.8%, 39.1%, and 40.9% for three independent TCP models. The predicted incidence of radiation pneumonitis was similar (3.9% versus 3.6%, and the estimated risk of radiation-induced spinal cord injury was extremely low (<0.13% in both groups. Regarding the esophageal toxicities, the estimated grade ≥2 and grade ≥3 AET predicted by the Kwint model were increased by 2.5% and 3.8%. Grade ≥2

  18. An Hourly Dose-Escalation Desensitization Protocol for Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease.

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    Chen, Justin R; Buchmiller, Brett L; Khan, David A

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin desensitization followed by maintenance therapy effectively improves symptom control in patients with aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD). The majority of current desensitization protocols use 3-hour dosing intervals and often require 2 to 3 days to complete. We evaluated hourly dose escalations in a subset of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis, nasal polyps, and asthma who historically reacted to aspirin within 1 hour or were avoiding aspirin with the goal of developing a safe and efficient desensitization protocol. Fifty-seven aspirin desensitizations were performed under the hourly protocol. All patients had refractory nasal polyposis as an indication for aspirin desensitization. The clinical characteristics of each subject were analyzed in relation to aspects of his or her reactions during the procedure. Ninety-eight percent of study patients were successfully treated under the hourly protocol, including those with a history of severe reactions and intubation. None required further medication than is available in an outpatient allergy clinic. A total of 96% of reactors recorded a bronchial or naso-ocular reaction within 1 hour of the preceding dose. Of the total patients on this protocol, 40% were able to complete the procedure in a single day, and 60% within 2 days. Patients with AERD who have a history of symptoms less than 1 hour after aspirin exposure can be safely desensitized with a 1-hour dose-escalation protocol that can often be completed in a single day. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinical Outcomes With Dose-Escalated Adaptive Radiation Therapy for Urinary Bladder Cancer: A Prospective Study

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    Murthy, Vedang, E-mail: vmurthy@actrec.gov.in [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Centre, Parel, Mumbai (India); Masodkar, Renuka; Kalyani, Nikhil; Mahantshetty, Umesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Centre, Parel, Mumbai (India); Bakshi, Ganesh; Prakash, Gagan [Department of Surgical Oncology, Tata Memorial Centre, Parel, Mumbai (India); Joshi, Amit; Prabhash, Kumar [Department of Medical Oncology, Tata Memorial Centre, Parel, Mumbai (India); Ghonge, Sujata; Shrivastava, Shyamkishore [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Centre, Parel, Mumbai (India)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess feasibility, clinical outcomes, and toxicity in patients with bladder cancer treated with adaptive, image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for bladder preservation as a part of trimodality treatment. The role of dose escalation was also studied. Methods and Materials: Forty-four patients with localized bladder cancer were enrolled in a prospective study. They underwent maximal safe resection of bladder tumor and concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients with large tumors were offered induction chemotherapy. Radiation therapy planning was done using either 3 (n=34) or 6 (n=10) concentrically grown planning target volumes (PTV). Patients received 64 Gy in 32 fractions to the whole bladder and 55 Gy to the pelvic nodes and, if appropriate, a simultaneous integrated boost to the tumor bed to 68 Gy (equivalent dose for 2-Gy fractions assuming α/β of 10 [EQD2]{sub 10} = 68.7 Gy). Daily megavoltage (MV) imaging helped to choose the most appropriate PTV encompassing bladder for the particular day (using plan-of-the-day approach). Results: Most patients (88%) had T2 disease. Sixteen patients (36%) received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. A majority of the patients (73%) received prophylactic nodal irradiation, whereas 55% of the patients received escalated dose to the tumor bed. With a median follow-up of 30 months, the 3-year locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival, and overall survival (OS) were 78%, 66%, and 67%, respectively. The bladder preservation rate was 83%. LRC (87% vs 68%, respectively, P=.748) and OS (74% vs 60%, respectively, P=.36) rates were better in patients receiving dose escalation. Instances of acute and late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grade 3 genitourinary toxicity was seen in 5 (11%) and 2 (4%) patients, respectively. There was no acute or late RTOG grade 3 or higher gastrointestinal toxicity. Conclusions: Adaptive IGRT using plan-of-the-day approach for bladder

  20. Successful pregnancy outcome in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH following escalated eculizumab dosing to control breakthrough hemolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruby Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy in women with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is associated with increased maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. There is limited published experience regarding therapy of PNH during pregnancy. We describe a case of a 30 year old female with hypoplastic myelodysplastic syndrome and PNH. After two years of treatment with eculizumab, she became pregnant. She developed breakthrough hemolysis at 20 weeks gestation. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies demonstrated a subtherapeutic eculizumab level with absence of complement blockade. Escalation of her eculizumab dose successfully controlled hemolysis and restored therapeutic eculizumab level and activity. She delivered a healthy baby at 36 weeks.

  1. Impact of dose escalation and adaptive radiotherapy for cervical cancers on tumour shrinkage—a modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røthe Arnesen, Marius; Paulsen Hellebust, Taran; Malinen, Eirik

    2017-03-01

    Tumour shrinkage occurs during fractionated radiotherapy and is regulated by radiation induced cellular damage, repopulation of viable cells and clearance of dead cells. In some cases additional tumour shrinkage during external beam therapy may be beneficial, particularly for locally advanced cervical cancer where a small tumour volume may simplify and improve brachytherapy. In the current work, a mathematical tumour model is utilized to investigate how local dose escalation affects tumour shrinkage, focusing on implications for brachytherapy. The iterative two-compartment model is based upon linear-quadratic radiation response, a doubling time for viable cells and a half-time for clearance of dead cells. The model was individually fitted to clinical tumour volume data from fractionated radiotherapy of 25 cervical cancer patients. Three different fractionation patterns for dose escalation, all with an additional dose of 12.2 Gy, were simulated and compared to standard fractionation in terms of tumour shrinkage. An adaptive strategy where dose escalation was initiated after one week of treatment was also considered. For 22 out of 25 patients, a good model fit was achieved to the observed tumour shrinkage. A large degree of inter-patient variation was seen in predicted volume reduction following dose escalation. For the 10 best responding patients, a mean tumour volume reduction of 34  ±  3% (relative to standard treatment) was estimated at the time of brachytherapy. Timing of initiating dose escalation had a larger impact than the number of fractions applied. In conclusion, the model was found useful in evaluating the impact from dose escalation on tumour shrinkage. The results indicate that dose escalation could be conducted from the start of external beam radiotherapy in order to obtain additional tumour shrinkage before brachytherapy.

  2. Radiation Therapy Dose Escalation for Glioblastoma Multiforme in the Era of Temozolomide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badiyan, Shahed N.; Markovina, Stephanie; Simpson, Joseph R.; Robinson, Clifford G.; DeWees, Todd [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Tran, David D.; Linette, Gerry [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Jalalizadeh, Rohan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Dacey, Ralph; Rich, Keith M.; Chicoine, Michael R.; Dowling, Joshua L.; Leuthardt, Eric C.; Zipfel, Gregory J.; Kim, Albert H. [Department of Neurosurgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Huang, Jiayi, E-mail: jhuang@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To review clinical outcomes of moderate dose escalation using high-dose radiation therapy (HDRT) in the setting of concurrent temozolomide (TMZ) in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), compared with standard-dose radiation therapy (SDRT). Methods and Materials: Adult patients aged <70 years with biopsy-proven GBM were treated with SDRT (60 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction) or with HDRT (>60 Gy) and TMZ from 2000 to 2012. Biological equivalent dose at 2-Gy fractions was calculated for the HDRT assuming an α/β ratio of 5.6 for GBM. Results: Eighty-one patients received SDRT, and 128 patients received HDRT with a median (range) biological equivalent dose at 2-Gy fractions of 64 Gy (61-76 Gy). Overall median follow-up time was 1.10 years, and for living patients it was 2.97 years. Actuarial 5-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates for patients that received HDRT versus SDRT were 12.4% versus 13.2% (P=.71), and 5.6% versus 4.1% (P=.54), respectively. Age (P=.001) and gross total/near-total resection (GTR/NTR) (P=.001) were significantly associated with PFS on multivariate analysis. Younger age (P<.0001), GTR/NTR (P<.0001), and Karnofsky performance status ≥80 (P=.001) were associated with improved OS. On subset analyses, HDRT failed to improve PFS or OS for those aged <50 years or those who had GTR/NTR. Conclusion: Moderate radiation therapy dose escalation above 60 Gy with concurrent TMZ does not seem to improve clinical outcomes for patients with GBM.

  3. Class solution in inverse planned HDR prostate brachytherapy for dose escalation of DIL defined by combined MRI/MRSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongbok; Hsu, I-Chow J.; Lessard, Etienne; Kurhanewicz, John; Noworolski, Susan Moyher; Pouliot, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To establish an inverse planning set of parameters (class solution) to boost dominant intra-prostatic lesion (DIL) defined by MRI/MRSI. Methods For 15 patients, DIL were contoured on CT or MR images and a class solution was developed to boost the DIL under the dosimetric requirements of the RTOG-0321 protocol. To determine the maximum attainable level of boost for each patient, 5 different levels were considered, at least 110%, 120%, 130%, 140% and 150% of the prescribed dose. The maximum attainable level was compared to the plan without boost using cumulative dose volume histogram (DVH). Results DIL dose escalation was feasible for 11/15 patients under the requirements. The planning target volume (PTV) dose was slightly increased, while the DIL dose was significantly increased without any violation of requirements. With slight adjustments of the dose constraint parameters, the dose escalation was feasible for 13/15 patients under requirements. Conclusion Using a class solution, a dose escalation of the MRI/MRSI defined DIL up to 150% while complying with RTOG dosimetric requirements is feasible. This HDR brachytherapy approach to dose escalation allows a significant dose increase to the tumor while maintaining an acceptable risk of complications. PMID:18083260

  4. Disposition, behavioural and physiological effects of escalating doses of intravenously administered fentanyl to young foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knych, H K; Steffey, E P; Casbeer, H C; Mitchell, M M

    2015-09-01

    Foal responses to a broader range of plasma fentanyl concentrations than currently reported are desirable to support (or not) clinical use. To describe fentanyl plasma concentrations following an escalating i.v. fentanyl dosing schedule in foals aged 5-13 days and describe selected, associated dose- and time-related behavioural and physiological responses to plasma fentanyl concentration. Experimental. Fentanyl was administered i.v. in an escalating fashion (2, 4, 8, 16 and 32 μg/kg bwt) at 10-min intervals. Blood samples were collected before and at selected times until 24 h post administration. Blood samples were analysed for fentanyl and metabolite concentrations and correlated with behavioural and physiological observations and selected blood analytes. Foals mostly appeared to be unaffected following 2 μg/kg bwt (1.09 ± 0.41 μg/l; average maximal plasma concentration) of fentanyl, but 6 of the 8 foals appeared to be sedated following 4 μg/kg bwt (3.07 ± 1.11 μg/l). Ataxia with increased locomotor activity, muscle rigidity and head pressing posture was observed in many foals at 8 (7.24 ± 3.22 μg/l) and 16 μg/kg bwt (17.4 ± 5.67 μg/l). All foals were heavily sedated after 32 μg/kg bwt (34.5 ± 10.3 μg/l); 3 of the 8 foals became recumbent. The average (± s.d.) terminal half-life following administration of the final dose was 44.2 ± 9.85 min. Behavioural and physiological responses to i.v. fentanyl in young foals are dose related. As with mature horses, the window of fentanyl plasma concentrations related to possible clinically desirable actions appears relatively narrow. © 2014 EVJ Ltd.

  5. The effect of elective sham dose escalation on the placebo response during an antimuscarinic trial for overactive bladder symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staskin, David R.; Michel, Martin C.; Sun, Franklin; Guan, Zhonghong; Morrow, Jon D.

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the effects of baseline symptom severity and placebo response magnitude on the decision to dose escalate in a 12-week, randomized, double-blind, flexible dose antimuscarinic trial of subjects with overactive bladder symptoms. Data from the placebo arm of the trial were used for this post

  6. Dose Escalation and Healthcare Resource Use among Ulcerative Colitis Patients Treated with Adalimumab in English Hospitals: An Analysis of Real-World Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Black

    Full Text Available To describe the real-world use of adalimumab for maintenance treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC and associated healthcare costs in English hospitals.Retrospective cohort study.Analysis of NHS Hospital Episode Statistics linked with pharmacy dispensing data in English hospitals.Adult UC patients receiving ≥240mg during adalimumab treatment induction, subsequently maintained on adalimumab.Frequency and pattern of adalimumab use and dose escalation during maintenance treatment and associated healthcare costs (prescriptions and hospital visits.191 UC patients completed adalimumab treatment induction. 83 (43.46% dose escalated during maintenance treatment by ≥100% (equivalent to weekly dosing (median time to dose escalation: 139 days. 56 patients (67.47% subsequently de-escalated by ≥50% (median time to dose de-escalation: 21 days. Mean all-cause healthcare costs for all patients ≤12 months of index were £13,892. Dose escalators incurred greater mean healthcare costs than non-escalators ≤12 months of index (£14,596 vs. £13,351. Prescriptions accounted for 96.49% of UC-related healthcare costs (£11,090 of £11,494 in all patients.Within the cohort, 43.46% of UC patients escalated their adalimumab dose by ≥100% and incurred greater costs than non-escalators. The apparent underestimation of adalimumab dose escalation in previous studies may have resulted in underestimated costs in healthcare systems.

  7. Dose-Escalation Study for Cardiac Radiosurgery in a Porcine Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanck, Oliver, E-mail: oliver.blanck@uksh.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); CyberKnife Center Northern Germany, Guestrow (Germany); Bode, Frank [Medical Department II, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Gebhard, Maximilian [Institute of Pathology, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Hunold, Peter [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Brandt, Sebastian [Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Bruder, Ralf [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Grossherr, Martin [Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Vonthein, Reinhard [Institute of Medical Biometry and Statistics, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Rades, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Dunst, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); University Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To perform a proof-of-principle dose-escalation study to radiosurgically induce scarring in cardiac muscle tissue to block veno-atrial electrical connections at the pulmonary vein antrum, similar to catheter ablation. Methods and Materials: Nine mini-pigs underwent pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of heart function and electrophysiology assessment by catheter measurements in the right superior pulmonary vein (RSPV). Immediately after examination, radiosurgery with randomized single-fraction doses of 0 and 17.5-35 Gy in 2.5-Gy steps were delivered to the RSPV antrum (target volume 5-8 cm{sup 3}). MRI and electrophysiology were repeated 6 months after therapy, followed by histopathologic examination. Results: Transmural scarring of cardiac muscle tissue was noted with doses ≥32.5 Gy. However, complete circumferential scarring of the RSPV was not achieved. Logistic regressions showed that extent and intensity of fibrosis significantly increased with dose. The 50% effective dose for intense fibrosis was 31.3 Gy (odds ratio 2.47/Gy, P<.01). Heart function was not affected, as verified by MRI and electrocardiogram evaluation. Adjacent critical structures were not damaged, as verified by pathology, demonstrating the short-term safety of small-volume cardiac radiosurgery with doses up to 35 Gy. Conclusions: Radiosurgery with doses >32.5 Gy in the healthy pig heart can induce circumscribed scars at the RSPV antrum noninvasively, mimicking the effect of catheter ablation. In our study we established a significant dose-response relationship for cardiac radiosurgery. The long-term effects and toxicity of such high radiation doses need further investigation in the pursuit of cardiac radiosurgery for noninvasive treatment of atrial fibrillation.

  8. Does selective pleural irradiation of malignant pleural mesothelioma allow radiation dose escalation. A planning study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botticella, A.; Defraene, G. [KU Leuven - University of Leuven, Department of Oncology, Experimental Radiation Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Nackaerts, K. [KU Leuven - University of Leuven, University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); Deroose, C. [KU Leuven - University of Leuven, University Hospitals Leuven, Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); Coolen, J. [KU Leuven - University of Leuven, University Hospitals Leuven, Radiology Department, Leuven (Belgium); Nafteux, P. [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Leuven (Belgium); Vanstraelen, B. [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Joosten, S.; Michiels, L.A.W. [Fontys University of Applied Science, Institute Paramedical Studies, Medical Imaging and Radiotherapeutic Techniques, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Peeters, S. [KU Leuven - University of Leuven, Department of Oncology, Experimental Radiation Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Ruysscher, D. de [KU Leuven - University of Leuven, Department of Oncology, Experimental Radiation Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Maastricht University Medical Center, GROW - School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO Clinic), Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2017-04-15

    After lung-sparing radiotherapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), local failure at sites of previous gross disease represents the dominant form of failure. Our aim is to investigate if selective irradiation of the gross pleural disease only can allow dose escalation. In all, 12 consecutive stage I-IV MPM patients (6 left-sided and 6 right-sided) were retrospectively identified and included. A magnetic resonance imaging-based pleural gross tumor volume (GTV) was contoured. Two sets of planning target volumes (PTV) were generated for each patient: (1) a ''selective'' PTV (S-PTV), originating from a 5-mm isotropic expansion from the GTV and (2) an ''elective'' PTV (E-PTV), originating from a 5-mm isotropic expansion from the whole ipsilateral pleural space. Two sets of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans were generated: a ''selective'' pleural irradiation plan (SPI plan) and an ''elective'' pleural irradiation plan (EPI plan, planned with a simultaneous integrated boost technique [SIB]). In the SPI plans, the average median dose to the S-PTV was 53.6 Gy (range 41-63.6 Gy). In 4 of 12 patients, it was possible to escalate the dose to the S-PTV to >58 Gy. In the EPI plans, the average median doses to the E-PTV and to the S-PTV were 48.6 Gy (range 38.5-58.7) and 49 Gy (range 38.6-59.5 Gy), respectively. No significant dose escalation was achievable. The omission of the elective irradiation of the whole ipsilateral pleural space allowed dose escalation from 49 Gy to more than 58 Gy in 4 of 12 chemonaive MPM patients. This strategy may form the basis for nonsurgical radical combined modality treatment of MPM. (orig.) [German] Beim malignen Pleuramesotheliom (MPM) ist nach lungenschonender Radiotherapie das lokale Scheitern an Stellen eines frueheren, sichtbaren Tumors die dominierende Form des Scheiterns. Unser Ziel ist es, zu untersuchen, ob die selektive

  9. Phase I dose escalation safety study of nanoparticulate paclitaxel (CTI 52010) in normal dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axiak, Sandra M; Selting, Kim A; Decedue, Charles J; Henry, Carolyn J; Tate, Deborah; Howell, Jahna; Bilof, K James; Kim, Dae Y

    2011-01-01

    Paclitaxel is highly effective in the treatment of many cancers in humans, but cannot be routinely used in dogs as currently formulated due to the exquisite sensitivity of this species to surfactant-solubilizing agents. CTI 52010 is a formulation of nanoparticulate paclitaxel consisting of drug and normal saline. Our objectives were to determine the maximally tolerated dose, dose-limiting toxicities, and pharmacokinetics of CTI 52010 administered intravenously to normal dogs. Three normal adult hound dogs were evaluated by physical examination, complete blood count, chemistry profile, and urinalysis. Dogs were treated with staggered escalating dosages of CTI 52010 with a 28-day washout. All dogs were treated with a starting dosage of 40 mg/m(2), and subsequent dosages were escalated at 50% (dog 1), 100% (dog 2), or 200% (dog 3) with each cycle, to a maximum of 240 mg/m(2). Dogs were monitored by daily physical assessment and weekly laboratory evaluation. Standard criteria were used to grade adverse events. Plasma was collected at regular intervals to determine pharmacokinetics. Dogs were euthanized humanely, and necropsy was performed one week after the last treatment. The dose-limiting toxicity was grade 4 neutropenia and the maximum tolerated dosage was 120 mg/m(2). Grade 1-2 gastrointestinal toxicity was noted at higher dosages. Upon post mortem evaluation, no evidence of organ (liver, kidney, spleen) toxicity was noted. CTI 52010 was well tolerated when administered intravenously to normal dogs. A starting dosage for a Phase I/II trial in tumor-bearing dogs is 80 mg/m(2).

  10. Dose-Escalated Robotic SBRT for Stage I-II Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eMeier

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT is the precise external delivery of very high-dose radiotherapy to targets in the body, with treatment completed in one to five fractions. SBRT should be an ideal approach for organ-confined prostate cancer because (I dose escalation should yield improved rates of cancer control; (II the unique radiobiology of prostate cancer favors hypofractionation and (III the conformal nature of SBRT minimizes high-dose radiation delivery to immediately adjacent organs, potentially reducing complications. This approach is also more convenient for patients, and is cheaper than intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. Several external beam platforms are capable of delivering SBRT for early-stage prostate cancer, although most of the mature reported series have employed a robotic non-coplanar platform (i.e., CyberKnife. Several large studies report 5-year biochemical relapse rates which compare favorably to IMRT. Rates of late GU toxicity are similar to those seen with IMRT, and rates of late rectal toxicity may be less than with IMRT and low dose rate (LDR brachytherapy. Patient-reported quality of life (QOL outcomes appear similar to IMRT in the urinary domain. Bowel QOL may be less adversely affected by SBRT than with other radiation modalities. After five years of follow-up, SBRT delivered on a robotic platform is yielding outcomes at least as favorable as IMRT, and may be considered appropriate therapy for stage I-II prostate cancer.

  11. Gemcitabine plus dose-escalated epirubicin in advanced breast cancer: results of a phase I study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüftner, D; Flath, B; Akrivakis, C; Mergenthaler, H G; Ohnmacht, U; Arning, M; Possinger, K

    1998-01-01

    Gemcitabine has shown single-agent activity in metastatic breast cancer. Epirubicin is also widely used for the adjuvant and treatment of metastatic breast cancer. The toxicity profiles and modes of action are different which provides a good rationale for studying both drugs in combination. In a phase I study gemcitabine at a fixed dose of 1000 mg/m2 on days 1, 8, 15 of a 28 day cycle was combined with escalated weekly doses of epirubicin starting with an initial dose of 10 mg/m2. Patients had stage IV metastatic disease without previous chemotherapy except as adjuvant treatment. Nineteen patients were included in the study which defined the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of epirubicin at 20 mg/m2. Myelosuppression was the dose limiting toxicity with leucopenia WHO grade 3 and 4 in 40.0% and 20.0%, neutropenia WHO grade 3 and 4 without neutropenic fever in 20.0% and 40.0% and thrombocytopenia WHO grade 4 in 20.0%. At the epirubicin 15 mg/m2 dose level, leucopenia (11.1% WHO grade 3) and neutropenia (12.5 and 37.5% WHO grade 3 and 4) were reported. Symptomatic toxicity was generally mild: nausea/vomiting in about 20% of patients (WHO grade 3 or 4) on both 15 and 20 mg/m2 epirubicin dose levels. Alopecia WHO grade 3 and 4 was seen in 2 patients at MTD. Four of 19 evaluable patients had a partial response. We conclude that the combination of gemcitabine and epirubicin is well tolerated and has promising activity. A phase II study is underway with gemcitabine 1000 mg/m2 and epirubicin 15 mg/m2 on days 1, 8 and 15 of a 28 day cycle.

  12. Limits of dose escalation in lung cancer: a dose-volume histogram analysis comparing coplanar and non-coplanar techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derycke, S.; Van Duyse, B.; Schelfhout, J.; De Neve, W.

    1995-12-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of dose escalation in radiotherapy of inoperable lung cancer, a dose-volume histogram analysis was performed comparing standard coplanar (2D) with non-coplanar (3D) beam arrangements on a non-selected group of 20 patients planned by Sherouse`s GRATISTM 3D-planning system. Serial CT-scanning was performed and 2 Target Volumes (Tvs) were defined. Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) defined a high-dose Target Volume (TV-1). GTV plus location of node stations with > 10% probability of invasion (Minet et al.) defined an intermediate-dose Target Volume (TV-2). However, nodal regions which are incompatible with cure were excluded from TV-2. These are ATS-regions 1, 8, 9 and 14 all left and right as well as heterolateral regions. For 3D-planning, Beam`s Eye View selected (by an experienced planner) beam arrangements were optimised using Superdot, a method of target dose-gradient annihilation developed by Sherouse. A second 3D-planning was performed using 4 beam incidences with maximal angular separation. The linac`s isocenter for the optimal arrangement was located at the geometrical center of gravity of a tetraheder, the tetraheder`s comers being the consecutive positions of the virtual source. This ideal beam arrangement was approximated as close as possible, taking into account technical limitations (patient-couch-gantry collisions). Criteria for tolerance were met if no points inside the spinal cord exceeded 50 Gy and if at least 50% of the lung volume received less than 20Gy. If dose regions below 50 Gy were judged acceptable at TV-2, 2D- as well as 3D-plans allow safe escalation to 80 Gy at TV-1. When TV-2 needed to be encompassed by isodose surfaces exceeding 50Gy, 3D-plans were necessary to limit dose at the spinal cord below tolerance. For large TVs dose is limited by lung tolerance for 3D-plans. An analysis (including NTCP-TCP as cost functions) of rival 3D-plans is being performed.

  13. Chemoradiation of hepatic malignancies: prospective, phase 1 study of full-dose capecitabine with escalating doses of yttrium-90 radioembolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Ryan; Mulcahy, Mary F; Lewandowski, Robert J; Gates, Vanessa L; Vouche, Michael; Habib, Ali; Kircher, Sheetal; Newman, Steven; Nimeiri, Halla; Benson, Al B; Salem, Riad

    2014-04-01

    Radiosensitizing chemotherapy improves the outcomes in comparison with radiation alone for gastrointestinal cancers. The delivery of radiation therapy with yttrium90 ((90)Y) radioembolization, in combination with the radiosensitizing chemotherapeutic agent capecitabine, provides the opportunity to enhance the effects of radiation on hepatic malignancies. This phase 1 study sought to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of (90)Y plus capecitabine in patients with cholangiocarcinoma or liver metastases confined to the liver. Patients were given initial treatment at full-dose capecitabine during days 1 to 14 of a 21-day cycle. At days 1 to 7 of the second cycle, whole-liver (90)Y was given at the test dose, after which time capecitabine was continued. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was determined 6 weeks after (90)Y infusion. If a DLT was not observed, the (90)Y dose was escalated. The planned dose cohorts were 110, 130, 150, and 170 Gy. The primary endpoint was to determine the MTD of (90)Y with full-dose capecitabine. Sixteen patients were treated according to the study protocol. Two patients experienced DLTs. Nine patients required capecitabine dose reduction as a result of toxicities attributable to capecitabine alone. The criteria for establishing (90)Y MTD were not met, indicating an MTD of >170 Gy. The MTD of (90)Y delivered in conjunction with capecitabine in the setting of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma or metastatic disease confined to the liver exceeds 170 Gy. This is the highest (90)Y dose reported to date and has important implications on combined therapy with the radiosensitizing oral chemotherapeutic capecitabine. Further studies are under way. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Chemoradiation of Hepatic Malignancies: Prospective, Phase 1 Study of Full-Dose Capecitabine With Escalating Doses of Yttrium-90 Radioembolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickey, Ryan [Department of Radiology, Section of Interventional Radiology, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Mulcahy, Mary F. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Lewandowski, Robert J.; Gates, Vanessa L.; Vouche, Michael; Habib, Ali [Department of Radiology, Section of Interventional Radiology, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Kircher, Sheetal; Newman, Steven; Nimeiri, Halla; Benson, Al B. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Salem, Riad, E-mail: r-salem@northwestern.edu [Department of Radiology, Section of Interventional Radiology, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Radiosensitizing chemotherapy improves the outcomes in comparison with radiation alone for gastrointestinal cancers. The delivery of radiation therapy with yttrium90 ({sup 90}Y) radioembolization, in combination with the radiosensitizing chemotherapeutic agent capecitabine, provides the opportunity to enhance the effects of radiation on hepatic malignancies. This phase 1 study sought to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of {sup 90}Y plus capecitabine in patients with cholangiocarcinoma or liver metastases confined to the liver. Methods and Materials: Patients were given initial treatment at full-dose capecitabine during days 1 to 14 of a 21-day cycle. At days 1 to 7 of the second cycle, whole-liver {sup 90}Y was given at the test dose, after which time capecitabine was continued. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was determined 6 weeks after {sup 90}Y infusion. If a DLT was not observed, the {sup 90}Y dose was escalated. The planned dose cohorts were 110, 130, 150, and 170 Gy. The primary endpoint was to determine the MTD of {sup 90}Y with full-dose capecitabine. Results: Sixteen patients were treated according to the study protocol. Two patients experienced DLTs. Nine patients required capecitabine dose reduction as a result of toxicities attributable to capecitabine alone. The criteria for establishing {sup 90}Y MTD were not met, indicating an MTD of >170 Gy. Conclusion: The MTD of {sup 90}Y delivered in conjunction with capecitabine in the setting of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma or metastatic disease confined to the liver exceeds 170 Gy. This is the highest {sup 90}Y dose reported to date and has important implications on combined therapy with the radiosensitizing oral chemotherapeutic capecitabine. Further studies are under way.

  15. Dose-escalated simultaneous integrated-boost treatment of prostate cancer patients via helical tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geier, M.; Astner, S.T.; Duma, M.N.; Putzhammer, J.; Winkler, C.; Molls, M.; Geinitz, H. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie; Jacob, V. [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde; Nieder, C. [Nordland Hospital, Bodoe (Norway). Dept. of Oncology and Palliative Care; Tromsoe Univ. (Norway). Inst. of Clinical Medicine

    2012-05-15

    The goal of this work was to assess the feasibility of moderately hypofractionated simultaneous integrated-boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) with helical tomotherapy in patients with localized prostate cancer regarding acute side effects and dose-volume histogram data (DVH data). Acute side effects and DVH data were evaluated of the first 40 intermediate risk prostate cancer patients treated with a definitive daily image-guided SIB-IMRT protocol via helical tomotherapy in our department. The planning target volume including the prostate and the base of the seminal vesicles with safety margins was treated with 70 Gy in 35 fractions. The boost volume containing the prostate and 3 mm safety margins (5 mm craniocaudal) was treated as SIB to a total dose of 76 Gy (2.17 Gy per fraction). Planning constraints for the anterior rectal wall were set in order not to exceed the dose of 76 Gy prescribed to the boost volume. Acute toxicity was evaluated prospectively using a modified CTCAE (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) score. SIB-IMRT allowed good rectal sparing, although the full boost dose was permitted to the anterior rectal wall. Median rectum dose was 38 Gy in all patients and the median volumes receiving at least 65 Gy (V65), 70 Gy (V70), and 75 Gy (V75) were 13.5%, 9%, and 3%, respectively. No grade 4 toxicity was observed. Acute grade 3 toxicity was observed in 20% of patients involving nocturia only. Grade 2 acute intestinal and urological side effects occurred in 25% and 57.5%, respectively. No correlation was found between acute toxicity and the DVH data. This institutional SIB-IMRT protocol using daily image guidance as a precondition for smaller safety margins allows dose escalation to the prostate without increasing acute toxicity. (orig.)

  16. Sex Differences in Dose Escalation and Overdose Death during Chronic Opioid Therapy: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplovitch, Eric; Gomes, Tara; Camacho, Ximena; Dhalla, Irfan A; Mamdani, Muhammad M; Juurlink, David N

    2015-01-01

    The use of opioids for noncancer pain is widespread, and more than 16,000 die of opioid-related causes in the United States annually. The patients at greatest risk of death are those receiving high doses of opioids. Whether sex influences the risk of dose escalation or opioid-related mortality is unknown. We conducted a cohort study using healthcare records of 32,499 individuals aged 15 to 64 who commenced chronic opioid therapy for noncancer pain between April 1, 1997 and December 31, 2010 in Ontario, Canada. Patients were followed from their first opioid prescription until discontinuation of therapy, death from any cause or the end of the study period. Among patients receiving chronic opioid therapy, 589 (1.8%) escalated to high dose therapy and n = 59 (0.2%) died of opioid-related causes while on treatment. After multivariable adjustment, men were more likely than women to escalate to high-dose opioid therapy (adjusted hazard ratio 1.44; 95% confidence interval 1.21 to 1.70) and twice as likely to die of opioid-related causes (adjusted hazard ratio 2.04; 95% confidence interval 1.18 to 3.53). These associations were maintained in a secondary analysis of 285,520 individuals receiving any opioid regardless of the duration of therapy. Men are at higher risk than women for escalation to high-dose opioid therapy and death from opioid-related causes. Both outcomes were more common than anticipated.

  17. Caffeine in Parkinson's disease: a pilot open-label, dose-escalation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Robert D; Lang, Anthony E; Postuma, Ronald B

    2011-11-01

    Epidemiologic studies consistently find an inverse association between caffeine use and PD. Numerous explanations exist, but are difficult to evaluate as caffeine's symptomatic effect and tolerability in PD are unknown. We designed an open-label, 6-week dose-escalation study of caffeine to establish dose tolerability and evaluate potential motor/nonmotor benefits. Caffeine was started at 200 mg daily and was increased to a maximum of 1,000 mg. Of 25 subjects, 20 tolerated 200 mg, 17 tolerated 400 mg, 7 tolerated 800 mg, and 3 tolerated 1,000 mg. The most common adverse events were gastrointestinal discomfort, anxiety, and worsening/emerging tremor. At 400 mg daily, we found potential improvements in motor manifestations and somnolence (UPDRS III: -4.5 ± 4.6, P = 0.003; Epworth: -2.0 ± 3.0, P = 0.015). Maximum dose tolerability for caffeine in PD appears to be 100 to 200 mg BID. We found pilot preliminary evidence that caffeine may improve some motor and nonmotor aspects of PD, which must be confirmed in longer term, placebo-controlled, clinical trials. Copyright © 2011 Movement Disorder Society.

  18. A phase I, dose-escalation study of volasertib combined with nintedanib in advanced solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Braud, F; Cascinu, S; Spitaleri, G; Pilz, K; Clementi, L; Liu, D; Sikken, P; De Pas, T

    2015-11-01

    Volasertib is a potent and selective cell-cycle kinase inhibitor that induces mitotic arrest and apoptosis by targeting Polo-like kinases. This study determined the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and pharmacokinetics of volasertib combined with nintedanib, a potent and orally bioavailable triple angiokinase inhibitor, in patients with advanced solid tumors. This open-label, dose-escalation trial recruited patients with advanced metastatic solid tumors following failure of conventional treatment (NCT01022853; Study 1230.7). Volasertib was administered by intravenous infusion over 2 h, starting at 100 mg in the first dose cohort. Nintedanib was administered orally at a dose of 200 mg twice daily. The first treatment cycle comprised 28 days (days 1-7 and days 9-28: nintedanib; day 8: volasertib). From cycle 2 onwards, volasertib was administered on day 1 of a 21-day cycle and nintedanib was administered days 2-21. The primary objective was the MTD of volasertib in combination with nintedanib. Thirty patients were treated. The MTD of volasertib plus fixed-dose nintedanib was 300 mg once every 3 weeks, the same as the recommended single-agent dose of volasertib in solid tumors. Two of 12 assessable patients treated with the MTD experienced dose-limiting toxicities [grade 3 increased alanine aminotransferase (ALT); grade 3 ALT increase and grade 3 increased aspartate aminotransferase]. Disease control [stable disease (SD)/partial response (PR)/complete response (CR)] was achieved in 18 patients (60%): 1 CR (breast cancer), 1 PR (nonsmall-cell lung cancer), and 16 patients with SD. Volasertib showed that multiexponential pharmacokinetic behavior and co-administration of nintedanib had no significant effects on its exposure. Volasertib could be combined with fixed-dose nintedanib at the recommended single-agent dose. At this dose, the combination had a manageable safety profile without unexpected or overlapping adverse events, and showed antitumor activity. © The Author

  19. Tomotherapy PET-guided dose escalation. A dosimetric feasibility study for patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maggio, Angelo; Cutaia, Claudia; Di Dia, Amalia; Bresciani, Sara; Miranti, Anna; Poli, Matteo; Stasi, Michele [Candiolo Cancer Institute - FPO, IRCCS, Medical Physics, Turin (Italy); Del Mastro, Elena; Garibaldi, Elisabetta; Gabriele, Pietro [Candiolo Cancer Institute - FPO, IRCCS, Radiotherapy Department, Turin (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a safe escalation of the dose to the pleural cavity and PET/CT-positive areas in patients with unresectable malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is possible using helical tomotherapy (HT). We selected 12 patients with MPM. Three planning strategies were investigated. In the first strategy (standard treatment), treated comprised a prescribed median dose to the planning target volume (PTV) boost (PTV{sub 1}) of 64.5 Gy (range: 56 Gy/28 fractions to 66 Gy/30 fractions) and 51 Gy (range: 50.4 Gy/28 fractions to 54 Gy/30 fractions) to the pleura PTV (PTV{sub 2}). Thereafter, for each patient, two dose escalation plans were generated prescribing 62.5 and 70 Gy (2.5 and 2.8 Gy/fraction, respectively) to the PTV{sub 1} and 56 Gy (2.24 Gy/fraction) to the PTV{sub 2}, in 25 fractions. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) constraints and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) calculations were used to evaluate the differences between the plans. For all plans, the 95 % PTVs received at least 95 % of the prescribed dose. For all patients, it was possible to perform the dose escalation in accordance with the Quantitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC) constraints for organs at risk (OARs). The average contralateral lung dose was < 8 Gy. NTCP values for OARs did not increase significantly compared with the standard treatment (p > 0.05), except for the ipsilateral lung. For all plans, the lung volume ratio was strongly correlated with the V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, and V{sub 40} DVHs of the lung (p < 0.0003) and with the lung mean dose (p < 0.0001). The results of this study suggest that by using HT it is possible to safely escalate the dose delivery to at least 62.5 Gy in PET-positive areas while treating the pleural cavity to 56 Gy in 25 fractions without significantly increasing the dose to the surrounding normal organs. (orig.) [German] Ziel war es, zu untersuchen, ob mit der helikalen Tomotherapie (HT) eine

  20. Radiation Dose Escalation in Esophageal Cancer Revisited: A Contemporary Analysis of the National Cancer Data Base, 2004 to 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brower, Jeffrey V. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Chen, Shuai [Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bassetti, Michael F. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Yu, Menggang [Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Harari, Paul M.; Ritter, Mark A. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Baschnagel, Andrew M., E-mail: baschnagel@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of radiation dose escalation on overall survival (OS) for patients with nonmetastatic esophageal cancer treated with concurrent radiation and chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients diagnosed with stage I to III esophageal cancer treated from 2004 to 2012 were identified from the National Cancer Data Base. Patients who received concurrent radiation and chemotherapy with radiation doses of ≥50 Gy and did not undergo surgery were included. OS was compared using Cox proportional hazards regression and propensity score matching. Results: A total of 6854 patients were included; 3821 (55.7%) received 50 to 50.4 Gy and 3033 (44.3%) received doses >50.4 Gy. Univariate analysis revealed no significant difference in OS between patients receiving 50 to 50.4 Gy and those receiving >50.4 Gy (P=.53). The dose analysis, binned as 50 to 50.4, 51 to 54, 55 to 60, and >60 Gy, revealed no appreciable difference in OS within any group compared with 50 to 50.4 Gy. Subgroup analyses investigating the effect of dose escalation by histologic type and in the setting of intensity modulated radiation therapy also failed to reveal a benefit. Propensity score matching confirmed the absence of a statistically significant difference in OS among the dose levels. The factors associated with improved OS on multivariable analysis included female sex, lower Charlson-Deyo comorbidity score, private insurance, cervical/upper esophagus location, squamous cell histologic type, lower T stage, and node-negative status (P<.01 for all analyses). Conclusions: In this large national cohort, dose escalation >50.4 Gy did not result in improved OS among patients with stage I to III esophageal cancer treated with definitive concurrent radiation and chemotherapy. These data suggest that despite advanced contemporary treatment techniques, OS for patients with esophageal cancer remains unaltered by escalation of radiation dose >50.4 Gy, consistent with the results of

  1. Integrated boost IMRT with FET-PET-adapted local dose escalation in glioblastomas. Results of a prospective phase II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piroth, M.D.; Pinkawa, M.; Holy, R. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (DE). Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) - Section JARA-Brain] (and others)

    2012-04-15

    Dose escalations above 60 Gy based on MRI have not led to prognostic benefits in glioblastoma patients yet. With positron emission tomography (PET) using [{sup 18}F]fluorethyl-L-tyrosine (FET), tumor coverage can be optimized with the option of regional dose escalation in the area of viable tumor tissue. In a prospective phase II study (January 2008 to December 2009), 22 patients (median age 55 years) received radiochemotherapy after surgery. The radiotherapy was performed as an MRI and FET-PET-based integrated-boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The prescribed dose was 72 and 60 Gy (single dose 2.4 and 2.0 Gy, respectively) for the FET-PET- and MR-based PTV-FET{sub (72 Gy)} and PTV-MR{sub (60 Gy)}. FET-PET and MRI were performed routinely for follow-up. Quality of life and cognitive aspects were recorded by the EORTC-QLQ-C30/QLQ Brain20 and Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE), while the therapy-related toxicity was recorded using the CTC3.0 and RTOG scores. Median overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were 14.8 and 7.8 months, respectively. All local relapses were detected at least partly within the 95% dose volume of PTV-MR{sub (60 Gy)}. No relevant radiotherapy-related side effects were observed (excepted alopecia). In 2 patients, a pseudoprogression was observed in the MRI. Tumor progression could be excluded by FET-PET and was confirmed in further MRI and FET-PET imaging. No significant changes were observed in MMSE scores and in the EORTC QLQ-C30/QLQ-Brain20 questionnaires. Our dose escalation concept with a total dose of 72 Gy, based on FET-PET, did not lead to a survival benefit. Acute and late toxicity were not increased, compared with historical controls and published dose-escalation studies. (orig.)

  2. Influence of dose calculation algorithms on isotoxic dose-escalation of non-small cell lung cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panettieri, Vanessa; Malik, Zafar I; Eswar, Chinnamani V; Landau, David B; Thornton, John M C; Nahum, Alan E; Mayles, W Philip M; Fenwick, John D

    2010-12-01

    A series of phase I/II clinical trials are being initiated in several UK centres to explore the use of dose-escalated schedules for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Among them the IDEAL-CRT trial (ISRCTN12155469) will investigate the introduction of individualised "isotoxic" treatment schedules based on the relative mean lung normalised total dose (rNTD(mean)), an estimator related to lung toxicity. Since treatment planning will be performed using different treatment planning systems (TPSs), for the quality assurance of the trial we have carried out work to quantify the influence of dose calculation algorithms based on the determination of rNTD(mean) and on the choice of individualised prescription doses. Twenty-five patient plans with stage I, II and III NSCLC were calculated, with the same prescription dose, using the Adaptive Convolve (AC) and Collapsed Cone (CC) algorithms of the Pinnacle TPS, the pencil beam convolution (PBC) and AAA algorithms of Eclipse, and the CC and pencil beam (PB) algorithms of Oncentra Masterplan (OMP). For the paired-lungs-GTV structure, dose-volume histograms were obtained and used to calculate the corresponding rNTD(mean) values and results obtained with the different algorithms were compared. For most (19 out of 25) of the patients studied, no algorithm-to-algorithm differences were seen in dose prescription based on rNTD(mean). For the other 6 patients differences were within 2.3 Gy, except in one case where the difference was 4 Gy. For the IDEAL-CRT trial no corrections need to be applied to the value of rNTD(mean) calculated using any of the more advanced convolution/superposition algorithms studied in this work. For the two pencil beam algorithms analysed, no correction is necessary for the data obtained with the Eclipse-PBC, while for OMP-PB data a small correction needs to be applied, by using a scaling factor, to make prescription doses consistent with the other algorithms investigated. Copyright © 2010

  3. Decision Regret in Men Undergoing Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steer, Anna N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Aherne, Noel J., E-mail: noel.aherne@ncahs.health.nsw.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Rural Clinical School Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Gorzynska, Karen; Hoffman, Matthew; Last, Andrew; Hill, Jacques [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Shakespeare, Thomas P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Rural Clinical School Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Coffs Harbour (Australia)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Decision regret (DR) is a negative emotion associated with medical treatment decisions, and it is an important patient-centered outcome after therapy for localized prostate cancer. DR has been found to occur in up to 53% of patients treated for localized prostate cancer, and it may vary depending on treatment modality. DR after modern dose-escalated radiation therapy (DE-RT) has not been investigated previously, to our knowledge. Our primary aim was to evaluate DR in a cohort of patients treated with DE-RT. Methods and Materials: We surveyed 257 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer who had previously received DE-RT, by means of a validated questionnaire. Results: There were 220 responses (85.6% response rate). Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy was given in 85.0% of patients and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy in 15.0%. Doses received included 73.8 Gy (34.5% patients), 74 Gy (53.6%), and 76 Gy (10.9%). Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (AD) was given in 51.8% of patients and both neoadjuvant and adjuvant AD in 34.5%. The median follow-up time was 23 months (range, 12-67 months). In all, 3.8% of patients expressed DR for their choice of treatment. When asked whether they would choose DE-RT or AD again, only 0.5% probably or definitely would not choose DE-RT again, compared with 8.4% for AD (P<.01). Conclusion: Few patients treated with modern DE-RT express DR, with regret appearing to be lower than in previously published reports of patients treated with radical prostatectomy or older radiation therapy techniques. Patients experienced more regret with the AD component of treatment than with the radiation therapy component, with implications for informed consent. Further research should investigate regret associated with individual components of modern therapy, including AD, radiation therapy and surgery.

  4. Sex Differences in Dose Escalation and Overdose Death during Chronic Opioid Therapy: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Kaplovitch

    Full Text Available The use of opioids for noncancer pain is widespread, and more than 16,000 die of opioid-related causes in the United States annually. The patients at greatest risk of death are those receiving high doses of opioids. Whether sex influences the risk of dose escalation or opioid-related mortality is unknown.We conducted a cohort study using healthcare records of 32,499 individuals aged 15 to 64 who commenced chronic opioid therapy for noncancer pain between April 1, 1997 and December 31, 2010 in Ontario, Canada. Patients were followed from their first opioid prescription until discontinuation of therapy, death from any cause or the end of the study period. Among patients receiving chronic opioid therapy, 589 (1.8% escalated to high dose therapy and n = 59 (0.2% died of opioid-related causes while on treatment. After multivariable adjustment, men were more likely than women to escalate to high-dose opioid therapy (adjusted hazard ratio 1.44; 95% confidence interval 1.21 to 1.70 and twice as likely to die of opioid-related causes (adjusted hazard ratio 2.04; 95% confidence interval 1.18 to 3.53. These associations were maintained in a secondary analysis of 285,520 individuals receiving any opioid regardless of the duration of therapy.Men are at higher risk than women for escalation to high-dose opioid therapy and death from opioid-related causes. Both outcomes were more common than anticipated.

  5. SU-C-BRB-02: Automatic Planning as a Potential Strategy for Dose Escalation for Pancreas SBRT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S; Zheng, D; Ma, R; Lin, C; Zhu, X; Lei, Y; Enke, C; Zhou, S [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has been suggested to provide high rates of local control for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. However, the close proximity of highly radiosensitive normal tissues usually causes the labor-intensive planning process, and may impede further escalation of the prescription dose. The present study evaluates the potential of an automatic planning system as a dose escalation strategy. Methods: Ten pancreatic cancer patients treated with SBRT were studied retrospectively. SBRT was delivered over 5 consecutive fractions with 6 ∼ 8Gy/fraction. Two plans were generated by Pinnacle Auto-Planning with the original prescription and escalated prescription, respectively. Escalated prescription adds 1 Gy/fraction to the original prescription. Manually-created planning volumes were excluded in the optimization goals in order to assess the planning efficiency and quality simultaneously. Critical organs with closest proximity were used to determine the plan normalization to ensure the OAR sparing. Dosimetric parameters including D100, and conformity index (CI) were assessed. Results: Auto-plans directly generate acceptable plans for 70% of the cases without necessity of further improvement, and two more iterations at most are necessary for the rest of the cases. For the pancreas SBRT plans with the original prescription, autoplans resulted in favorable target coverage and PTV conformity (D100 = 96.3% ± 1.48%; CI = 0.88 ± 0.06). For the plans with the escalated prescriptions, no significant target under-dosage was observed, and PTV conformity remains reasonable (D100 = 93.3% ± 3.8%, and CI = 0.84 ± 0.05). Conclusion: Automatic planning, without substantial human-intervention process, results in reasonable PTV coverage and PTV conformity on the premise of adequate OAR sparing for the pancreas SBRT plans with escalated prescription. The results highlight the potential of autoplanning as a dose escalation strategy for pancreas

  6. Strategies of dose escalation in the treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: image guidance and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eChi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Radiation dose in the setting of chemo-radiation for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC has been historically limited by the risk of normal tissue toxicity and this has been hypothesized to correlate with the poor results in regard to local tumor recurrences. Dose escalation, as a means to improve local control, with concurrent chemotherapy has been shown to be feasible with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in early phase studies with good clinical outcome. However, the potential superiority of moderate dose escalation to 74 Gy has not been shown in phase III randomized studies. In this review, the limitations in target volume definition in previous studies; and the factors that may be critical to safe dose escalation in the treatment of locally advanced NSCLC, such as respiratory motion management, image guidance, intensity modulation, FDG-PET incorporation in the treatment planning process, and adaptive radiotherapy, are discussed. These factors, along with novel treatment approaches that have emerged in recent years, are proposed to warrant further investigation in future trials in a more comprehensive and integrated fashion.

  7. A randomised controlled trial of the efficacy and safety of allopurinol dose escalation to achieve target serum urate in people with gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamp, Lisa K; Chapman, Peter T; Barclay, Murray L; Horne, Anne; Frampton, Christopher; Tan, Paul; Drake, Jill; Dalbeth, Nicola

    2017-09-01

    To determine the efficacy and safety of allopurinol dose escalation using a treat-to-target serum urate (SU) approach. A randomised, controlled, parallel-group, comparative clinical trial was undertaken. People with gout receiving at least creatinine clearance (CrCL)-based allopurinol dose for ≥1 month and SU ≥6 mg/dL were recruited. Participants were randomised to continue current dose (control) or allopurinol dose escalation for 12 months. In the dose escalation group, allopurinol was increased monthly until SU was gout. Allopurinol dose escalation is well tolerated. ANZCTR12611000845932; Results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Focal Radiation Therapy Dose Escalation Improves Overall Survival in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients Receiving Induction Chemotherapy and Consolidative Chemoradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, Sunil, E-mail: skrishnan@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Chadha, Awalpreet S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Suh, Yelin [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Chen, Hsiang-Chun [Department of Biostatistics, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rao, Arvind [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Das, Prajnan; Minsky, Bruce D.; Mahmood, Usama; Delclos, Marc E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Sawakuchi, Gabriel O. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Beddar, Sam [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Katz, Matthew H.; Fleming, Jason B. [Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Javle, Milind M.; Varadhachary, Gauri R.; Wolff, Robert A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Crane, Christopher H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: To review outcomes of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) patients treated with dose-escalated intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with curative intent. Methods and Materials: A total of 200 patients with LAPC were treated with induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation between 2006 and 2014. Of these, 47 (24%) having tumors >1 cm from the luminal organs were selected for dose-escalated IMRT (biologically effective dose [BED] >70 Gy) using a simultaneous integrated boost technique, inspiration breath hold, and computed tomographic image guidance. Fractionation was optimized for coverage of gross tumor and luminal organ sparing. A 2- to 5-mm margin around the gross tumor volume was treated using a simultaneous integrated boost with a microscopic dose. Overall survival (OS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), local-regional and distant RFS, and time to local-regional and distant recurrence, calculated from start of chemoradiation, were the outcomes of interest. Results: Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (BED = 59.47 Gy) with a concurrent capecitabine-based (86%) regimen. Patients who received BED >70 Gy had a superior OS (17.8 vs 15.0 months, P=.03), which was preserved throughout the follow-up period, with estimated OS rates at 2 years of 36% versus 19% and at 3 years of 31% versus 9% along with improved local-regional RFS (10.2 vs 6.2 months, P=.05) as compared with those receiving BED ≤70 Gy. Degree of gross tumor volume coverage did not seem to affect outcomes. No additional toxicity was observed in the high-dose group. Higher dose (BED) was the only predictor of improved OS on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: Radiation dose escalation during consolidative chemoradiation therapy after induction chemotherapy for LAPC patients improves OS and local-regional RFS.

  9. SU-E-T-183: Feasibility of Extreme Dose Escalation for Glioblastoma Multiforme Using 4π Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, D; Rwigema, J; Yu, V; Kaprealian, T; Kupelian, P; Selch, M; Low, D; Sheng, K [Department of Radiation Oncology, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: GBM recurrence primarily occurs inside or near the high-dose radiation field of original tumor site requiring greater than 100 Gy to significantly improve local control. We utilize 4π non-coplanar radiotherapy to test the feasibility of planning target volume (PTV) margin expansions or extreme dose escalations without incurring additional radiation toxicities. Methods: 11 GBM patients treated with VMAT to a prescription dose of 59.4 Gy or 60 Gy were replanned with 4π. Original VMAT plans were created with 2 to 4 coplanar or non-coplanar arcs using 3 mm hi-res MLC. The 4π optimization, using 5 mm MLC, selected and inverse optimized 30 beams from a candidate pool of 1162 beams evenly distributed through 4π steradians. 4π plans were first compared to clinical plans using the same prescription dose. Two more studies were then performed to respectively escalate the GTV and PTV doses to 100 Gy, followed by a fourth plan expanding the PTV by 5 mm and maintaining the prescription dose. Results: The standard 4π plan significantly reduced (p<0.01) max and mean doses to critical structures by a range of 47.0–98.4% and 61.0–99.2%, respectively. The high dose PTV/high dose GTV/expanded PTV studies showed a reduction (p<0.05) or unchanged* (p>0.05) maximum dose of 72.1%/86.7%/77.1% (chiasm), 7.2%*/27.7%*/30.7% (brainstem), 39.8%*/84.2%/51.9%* (spinal cord), 69.0%/87.0%/66.9% (L eye), 76.2%/88.1%/84.1% (R eye), 95.0%/98.6%/97.5% (L lens), 93.9%/98.8%/97.6% (R lens), 74.3%/88.5%/72.4% (L optical nerve), 80.4%/91.3%/75.7% (R optical nerve), 64.8%/84.2%/44.9%* (L cochlea), and 85.2%/93.0%/78.0% (R cochlea), respectively. V30 and V36 for both brain and (brain - PTV) were reduced for all cases except the high dose PTV plan. PTV dose coverage increased for all 4π plans. Conclusion: Extreme dose escalation or further margin expansion is achievable using 4π, maintaining or reducing OAR doses. This study indicates that clinical trials employing 4π delivery using

  10. Heterogeneous FDG-guided dose-escalation for locally advanced NSCLC (the NARLAL2 trial): Design and early dosimetric results of a randomized, multi-centre phase-III study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ditte Sloth; Nielsen, Tine Bjørn; Brink, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    -escalation driven by FDG-avid volumes, while respecting normal tissue constraints and requiring no increase in mean lung dose. Dose-escalation driven by FDG-avid volumes, delivering mean doses of 95 Gy (tumour) and 74 Gy (lymph nodes), was pursued and compared to standard 66 Gy/33 F plans. Material and methods......: Dose plans for the first thirty patients enroled were analysed. Standard and escalated plans were created for all patients, blinded to randomization, and compared for each patient in terms of the ability to escalate while protecting normal tissue. Results: The median dose-escalation in FDG-avid areas...... received doses between 66 and 74 Gy due to escalation. Conclusions: FDG-driven inhomogeneous dose-escalation achieves large increment in tumour and lymph node dose, while delivering similar doses to normal tissue as homogenous standard plans....

  11. A strategy of escalating doses of benzodiazepines and phenobarbital administration reduces the need for mechanical ventilation in delirium tremens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Jeffrey A; Rimal, Binaya; Nolan, Anna; Nelson, Lewis S

    2007-03-01

    Patients with severe alcohol withdrawal and delirium tremens are frequently resistant to standard doses of benzodiazepines. Case reports suggest that these patients have a high incidence of requiring intensive care and many require mechanical ventilation. However, few data exist on treatment strategies and outcomes for these subjects in the medical intensive care unit (ICU). Our goal was a) to describe the outcomes of patients admitted to the medical ICU solely for treatment of severe alcohol withdrawal and b) to determine whether a strategy of escalating doses of benzodiazepines in combination with phenobarbital would improve outcomes. Retrospective cohort study. Inner-city municipal hospital. Subjects admitted to the medical ICU solely for the treatment of severe alcohol withdrawal. Institution of guidelines emphasizing escalating doses of diazepam in combination with phenobarbital. Preguideline (n = 54) all subjects were treated with intermittent boluses of diazepam with an average total and maximal individual dose of 248 mg and 32 mg, respectively; 17% were treated with phenobarbital. Forty-seven percent required intubation due to inability to achieve adequate sedation and need for constant infusion of sedative-hypnotics. Intubated subjects had longer length of stay (5.6 vs. 3.4 days; p = .09) and higher incidence of nosocomial pneumonia (42 vs. 21% p = .08). Postguideline (n = 41) there were increases in maximum individual dose of diazepam (32 vs. 86 mg; p = .001), total amount of diazepam (248 vs. 562 mg; p = .001), and phenobarbital use (17 vs. 58%; p = .01). This was associated with a reduction in the need for mechanical ventilation (47 vs. 22%; p = .008), with trends toward reductions in ICU length of stay and nosocomial pneumonia. Patients admitted to a medical ICU solely for treatment of severe alcohol withdrawal have a high incidence of requiring mechanical ventilation. Guidelines emphasizing escalating bolus doses of diazepam, and barbiturates if

  12. Multicenter, Phase 1, Dose Escalation Study of Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy With Bevacizumab for Recurrent Glioblastoma and Anaplastic Astrocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Jennifer; Neil, Elizabeth; Terziev, Robert; Gutin, Philip; Barani, Igor; Kaley, Thomas; Lassman, Andrew B; Chan, Timothy A; Yamada, Josh; DeAngelis, Lisa; Ballangrud, Ase; Young, Robert; Panageas, Katherine S; Beal, Kathryn; Omuro, Antonio

    2017-11-15

    To establish the maximum tolerated dose of a 3-fraction hypofractionated stereotactic reirradiation schedule when delivered with concomitant bevacizumab to treat recurrent high-grade gliomas. Patients with recurrent high-grade glioma with Karnofsky performance status ≥60, history of standard fractionated initial radiation, tumor volume at recurrence ≤40 cm3, and absence of brainstem or corpus callosum involvement were eligible. A standard 3+3 phase 1 dose escalation trial design was utilized, with dose-limiting toxicities defined as any grade 3 to 5 toxicities possibly, probably, or definitely related to radiation. Bevacizumab was given at a dose of 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks. Hypofractionated stereotactic reirradiation was initiated after 2 bevacizumab doses, delivered in 3 fractions every other day, starting at 9 Gy per fraction. A total of 3 patients were enrolled at the 9 Gy × 3 dose level cohort, 5 in the 10 Gy × 3 cohort, and 7 in the 11 Gy × 3 cohort. One dose-limiting toxicity of grade 3 fatigue and cognitive deterioration possibly related to hypofractionated stereotactic reirradiation was observed in the 11 Gy × 3 cohort, and this dose was declared the maximum tolerated dose in combination with bevacizumab. Although no symptomatic radionecrosis was observed, substantial treatment-related effects and necrosis were observed in resected specimens. The intent-to-treat median overall survival was 13 months. Reirradiation using a 3-fraction schedule with bevacizumab support is feasible and reasonably well tolerated. Dose-escalation was possible up to 11 Gy × 3, which achieves a near doubling in the delivered biological equivalent dose to normal brain, in comparison with our previous 6 Gy × 5 schedule. Promising overall survival warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Phase I dose escalation trial of docetaxel plus curcumin in patients with advanced and metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayet-Robert, Mathilde; Kwiatkowski, Fabrice; Leheurteur, Marianne; Gachon, Françoise; Planchat, Eloïse; Abrial, Catherine; Mouret-Reynier, Marie-Ange; Durando, Xavier; Barthomeuf, Chantal; Chollet, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Since the improvement of chemotherapy with safe molecules is needed for a better efficacy without supplementary toxicity, we investigated the feasibility and tolerability of the combination of docetaxel and curcumin, a polyphenolic derivative extracted from Curcuma longa root. Fourteen patients were accrued in this open-label phase I trial. At the last dose level of curcumin, three dose-limiting toxicities were observed and two out of three patients at this dose level refused to continue treatment, leading us to define the maximal tolerated dose of curcumin at 8,000 mg/d. Eight patients out of 14 had measurable lesions according to RECIST criteria, with five PR and three SD. Some improvements as biological and clinical responses were observed in most patients. Patients with advanced or metastatic breast cancer were eligible. Docetaxel (100 mg/m(2)) was administered as a 1 h i.v. infusion every 3 w on d 1 for six cycles. Curcumin was orally given from 500 mg/d for seven consecutive d by cycle (from d-4 to d+2) and escalated until a dose-limiting toxicity should occur. The primary endpoint of this study was to determine the maximal tolerated dose of the combination of dose-escalating curcumin and standard dose of docetaxel chemotherapy in advanced and metastatic breast cancer patients. Secondary objectives included toxicity, safety, vascular endothelial growth factor and tumor markers measurements and assessment of objective and clinical responses to the combination therapy. The recommended dose of curcumin is 6,000 mg/d for seven consecutive d every 3 w in combination with a standard dose of docetaxel. From the encouraging efficacy results, a comparative phase II trial of this regimen plus docetaxel versus docetaxel alone is ongoing in advanced and metastatic breast cancer patients.

  14. Dose Escalation of Tamoxifen in Patients with Low Endoxifen Level: Evidence for Therapeutic Drug Monitoring-The TADE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Peter; Balleine, Rosemary L; Lee, Clara; Gao, Bo; Balakrishnar, Bavanthi; Menzies, Alexander M; Yeap, Shang Heng; Ali, Sayed Sahanawaz; Gebski, Val; Provan, Pamela; Coulter, Sally; Liddle, Christopher; Hui, Rina; Kefford, Richard; Lynch, Jodi; Wong, Mark; Wilcken, Nicholas; Gurney, Howard

    2016-07-01

    Endoxifen is the major mediator of tamoxifen effect and endoxifen levels <15 nmol/L may be associated with increased risk of breast cancer recurrence. We increased tamoxifen dose in breast cancer patients with low endoxifen levels and assessed the influence of various parameters on reaching 15 nmol/L and 30 nmol/L endoxifen levels. Tamoxifen dose was increased in those with endoxifen levels below 30 nmol/L. Toxicity, including hot flash score, was measured. CYP2D6 metabolizer status was classified as ultra-rapid (UM), extensive (EM), intermediate (IM), or poor (PM) based genotype of somatic DNA. Dosage was escalated in 68 of 122 participants. On 20 mg tamoxifen, 24% had endoxifen levels below 15 nmol/L and this reduced to 6% following dose escalation. In over 50% of cases, there was no identified cause for low endoxifen. Low baseline endoxifen level, and not CYP2D6 metabolizer status, independently predicted reaching threshold targets for both the 15 nmol/L and 30 nmol/L targets (P = 0.04 and 0.003 respectively). The 15 nmol/L target was reached in all UM/EM and IM patients, 63% of PM patients, and 58% of those with baseline endoxifen of <10 nmol/L. There was no correlation between hot flash score and genotype or any tamoxifen metabolite level including endoxifen (R = 0.07). Low endoxifen on standard dose tamoxifen was the only independent predictor of failure to achieve potentially therapeutic levels. Trials examining tamoxifen dose escalation and breast cancer outcome should be guided by endoxifen levels alone, without reference to CYP2D6 genotype or presence of hot flashes. Clin Cancer Res; 22(13); 3164-71. ©2016 AACRSee related commentary by Hertz and Rae, p. 3121. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Phase 1 Dose Escalation Study of Accelerated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsey, Chris R., E-mail: christopher.kelsey@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Das, Shiva [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Gu, Lin [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Dunphy, Frank R.; Ready, Neal E. [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose of radiation therapy (RT) given in an accelerated fashion with concurrent chemotherapy using intensity modulated RT. Methods and Materials: Patients with locally advanced lung cancer (non-small cell and small cell) with good performance status and minimal weight loss received concurrent cisplatin and etoposide with RT. Intensity modulated RT with daily image guidance was used to facilitate esophageal avoidance and delivered using 6 fractions per week (twice daily on Fridays with a 6-hour interval). The dose was escalated from 58 Gy to a planned maximum dose of 74 Gy in 4 Gy increments in a standard 3 + 3 trial design. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as acute grade 3-5 nonhematologic toxicity attributed to RT. Results: A total of 24 patients were enrolled, filling all dose cohorts, all completing RT and chemotherapy as prescribed. Dose-limiting toxicity occurred in 1 patient at 58 Gy (grade 3 esophagitis) and 1 patient at 70 Gy (grade 3 esophageal fistula). Both patients with DLTs had large tumors (12 cm and 10 cm, respectively) adjacent to the esophagus. Three additional patients were enrolled at both dose cohorts without further DLT. In the final 74-Gy cohort, no DLTs were observed (0 of 6). Conclusions: Dose escalation and acceleration to 74 Gy with intensity modulated RT and concurrent chemotherapy was tolerable, with a low rate of grade ≥3 acute esophageal reactions.

  16. A phase I, dose-escalation trial evaluating the safety and efficacy of emulsified isoflurane in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Han; Li, Rui; Liu, Jin; Zhang, Wensheng; Liao, Tianzhi; Yi, Xiaoqian

    2014-03-01

    This first-in-human volunteer phase I clinical trial aimed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and anesthesia efficacy of emulsified isoflurane (EI), an intravenously injectable formulation of isoflurane. Seventy-eight healthy volunteers were recruited in this open-label, single-bolus, dose-escalation, phase I trial and were allocated into 16 cohorts. Each volunteer received a single bolus injection of EI. The dose started with 0.3 mg/kg (for isoflurane) and was planned to end with 64.6 mg/kg. Postdose vital signs, physical examination, laboratory tests, chest radiograph, 12-lead electrocardiogram, and development of any adverse event were closely monitored as safety measurements. Effectiveness in producing sedation/anesthesia was assessed by Modified Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation and Bispectral Index. The dose escalation ended as planned. The most common adverse events associated with EI were injection pain (77 of 78, 98.7%) and transient tachycardia (22 of 78, 25.6%). Only at high doses (≥38.3 mg/kg) did EI cause transient hypotension (5 of 78, 6.4%) or apnea (11 of 78, 14.1%), but all the affected volunteers recovered uneventfully. Fast onset of unconsciousness (typically 40 s after injection) was developed in all volunteers receiving doses of 22.6 mg/kg or greater. Waking-up time and depression in Modified Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation correlated well with EI dose. None of the postdose tests revealed any abnormal result. EI is safe for intravenous injection in human volunteers in the dose range of 0.3 to 64.6 mg/kg. At doses of 22.6 mg/kg or higher, EI produced rapid onset of unconsciousness in all volunteers followed by fast, predictable, and complete recovery.

  17. Prognostic Significance of Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 in Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated With Dose-Escalated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Full-Dose Gemcitabine: Analysis of a Prospective Phase 1/2 Dose Escalation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey M., E-mail: jvainsh@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Schipper, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Zalupski, Mark M. [Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Abrams, Ross [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Francis, Isaac R. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Khan, Gazala [Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Leslie, William [Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Ben-Josef, Edgar [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Although established in the postresection setting, the prognostic value of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) in unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is less clear. We examined the prognostic utility of CA19-9 in patients with unresectable LAPC treated on a prospective trial of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose escalation with concurrent gemcitabine. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients with unresectable LAPC were treated at the University of Michigan on a phase 1/2 trial of IMRT dose escalation with concurrent gemcitabine. CA19-9 was obtained at baseline and during routine follow-up. Cox models were used to assess the effect of baseline factors on freedom from local progression (FFLP), distant progression (FFDP), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Stepwise forward regression was used to build multivariate predictive models for each endpoint. Results: Thirty-eight patients were eligible for the present analysis. On univariate analysis, baseline CA19-9 and age predicted OS, CA19-9 at baseline and 3 months predicted PFS, gross tumor volume (GTV) and black race predicted FFLP, and CA19-9 at 3 months predicted FFDP. On stepwise multivariate regression modeling, baseline CA19-9, age, and female sex predicted OS; baseline CA19-9 and female sex predicted both PFS and FFDP; and GTV predicted FFLP. Patients with baseline CA19-9 ≤90 U/mL had improved OS (median 23.0 vs 11.1 months, HR 2.88, P<.01) and PFS (14.4 vs 7.0 months, HR 3.61, P=.001). CA19-9 progression over 90 U/mL was prognostic for both OS (HR 3.65, P=.001) and PFS (HR 3.04, P=.001), and it was a stronger predictor of death than either local progression (HR 1.46, P=.42) or distant progression (HR 3.31, P=.004). Conclusions: In patients with unresectable LAPC undergoing definitive chemoradiation therapy, baseline CA19-9 was independently prognostic even after established prognostic factors were controlled for, whereas CA19-9 progression

  18. Feasibility of PET-CT based hypofractionated accelerated dose escalation in oropharyngeal cancers: Final dosimetric results of the VORTIGERN study. (Secondary endpoint of UK NCRI portfolio: MREC No: 08/H0907/127, UKCRN ID 7341

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjoy Chatterjee

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Hypofractionated, slightly accelerated dose escalation in oropharyngeal cancers is likely to be safe and the chance of trismus is not any higher than when standard dose radiotherapy is used. Active measures to reduce dose to the MA achieves acceptable dose volume parameters even at escalated doses.

  19. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) Dose-Escalation Studies in Prostate Cancer Using Anti-PSMA Antibody 177Lu-J591: RIT Alone and RIT in Combination With Docetaxel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vallabhajosula, Shankar

    2006-01-01

    Phase I dose escalation studies with 177Lu-DOTA-huJ591 using dose fractionation regimen will be performed in patients with PCa and who have recurrent and/or metastatic disease. The 177Lu dose (20-45 mCi/m2...

  20. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) Dose-Escalation Studies in Prostate Cancer Using Anti-PSMA Antibody 177Lu-J591: RIT Alone and RIT in Combination with Docetaxel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vallabhajosula, Shankar

    2007-01-01

    Phase I dose escalation studies with 177Lu-DOTA-huJ591 using dose fractionation regimen will be performed in patients with PCa and who have recurrent and/or metastatic disease. The 177Lu dose (20-45 mCi/m2...

  1. A Phase I Dose Escalation Study of Hypofractionated IMRT Field-in-Field Boost for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monjazeb, Arta M., E-mail: arta.monjazeb@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [U.C. Davis School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Ayala, Deandra; Jensen, Courtney [Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Case, L. Douglas [Biostatistical Sciences, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Bourland, J. Daniel; Ellis, Thomas L. [Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); McMullen, Kevin P.; Chan, Michael D. [Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Tatter, Stephen B. [Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Lesser, Glen J. [Hematology Oncology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Shaw, Edward G. [Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Objectives: To describe the results of a Phase I dose escalation trial for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) using a hypofractionated concurrent intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) boost. Methods: Twenty-one patients were enrolled between April 1999 and August 2003. Radiotherapy consisted of daily fractions of 1.8 Gy with a concurrent boost of 0.7 Gy (total 2.5 Gy daily) to a total dose of 70, 75, or 80 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was not permitted. Seven patients were enrolled at each dose and dose limiting toxicities were defined as irreversible Grade 3 or any Grade 4-5 acute neurotoxicity attributable to radiotherapy. Results: All patients experienced Grade 1 or 2 acute toxicities. Acutely, 8 patients experienced Grade 3 and 1 patient experienced Grade 3 and 4 toxicities. Of these, only two reversible cases of otitis media were attributable to radiotherapy. No dose-limiting toxicities were encountered. Only 2 patients experienced Grade 3 delayed toxicity and there was no delayed Grade 4 toxicity. Eleven patients requiring repeat resection or biopsy were found to have viable tumor and radiation changes with no cases of radionecrosis alone. Median overall and progression-free survival for this cohort were 13.6 and 6.5 months, respectively. One- and 2-year survival rates were 57% and 19%. At recurrence, 15 patients received chemotherapy, 9 underwent resection, and 5 received radiotherapy. Conclusions: Using a hypofractionated concurrent IMRT boost, we were able to safely treat patients to 80 Gy without any dose-limiting toxicity. Given that local failure still remains the predominant pattern for GBM patients, a trial of dose escalation with IMRT and temozolomide is warranted.

  2. Dose Escalation of Total Marrow Irradiation With Concurrent Chemotherapy in Patients With Advanced Acute Leukemia Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Jeffrey Y.C., E-mail: jwong@coh.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Forman, Stephen; Somlo, George [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Rosenthal, Joseph [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Department of Pediatrics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy; Radany, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Palmer, Joycelynne [Department of Biostatistics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Stein, Anthony [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We have demonstrated that toxicities are acceptable with total marrow irradiation (TMI) at 16 Gy without chemotherapy or TMI at 12 Gy and the reduced intensity regimen of fludarabine/melphalan in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). This article reports results of a study of TMI combined with higher intensity chemotherapy regimens in 2 phase I trials in patients with advanced acute myelogenous leukemia or acute lymphoblastic leukemia (AML/ALL) who would do poorly on standard intent-to-cure HCT regimens. Methods and Materials: Trial 1 consisted of TMI on Days -10 to -6, etoposide (VP16) on Day -5 (60 mg/kg), and cyclophosphamide (CY) on Day -3 (100 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=3 patients), 13.5 (n=3 patients), and 15 (n=6 patients) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Trial 2 consisted of busulfan (BU) on Days -12 to -8 (800 {mu}M min), TMI on Days -8 to -4, and VP16 on Day -3 (30 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=18) and 13.5 (n=2) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Results: Trial 1 had 12 patients with a median age of 33 years. Six patients had induction failures (IF), and 6 had first relapses (1RL), 9 with leukemia blast involvement of bone marrow ranging from 10%-98%, 5 with circulating blasts (24%-85%), and 2 with chloromas. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Eleven patients achieved complete remission at Day 30. With a median follow-up of 14.75 months, 5 patients remained in complete remission from 13.5-37.7 months. Trial 2 had 20 patients with a median age of 41 years. Thirteen patients had IF, and 5 had 1RL, 2 in second relapse, 19 with marrow blasts (3%-100%) and 13 with peripheral blasts (6%-63%). Grade 4 dose-limiting toxicities were seen at 13.5 Gy (stomatitis and hepatotoxicity). Stomatitis was the most frequent toxicity in both trials. Conclusions: TMI dose escalation to 15 Gy is possible when combined with CY/VP16 and is associated with acceptable toxicities and encouraging outcomes. TMI dose escalation is not possible with BU/VP16 due to

  3. Is Androgen Deprivation Therapy Necessary in All Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Treated in the Dose Escalation Era?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castle, Katherine O., E-mail: kocastle@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hoffman, Karen E.; Levy, Lawrence B.; Lee, Andrew K.; Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quynh N.; Frank, Steven J.; Pugh, Thomas J.; McGuire, Sean E.; Kuban, Deborah A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The benefit of adding androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) to dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT) for men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer is unclear; therefore, we assessed the impact of adding ADT to dose-escalated RT on freedom from failure (FFF). Methods: Three groups of men treated with intensity modulated RT or 3-dimensional conformal RT (75.6-78 Gy) from 1993-2008 for prostate cancer were categorized as (1) 326 intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone, (2) 218 intermediate-risk patients treated with RT and ≤6 months of ADT, and (3) 274 low-risk patients treated with definitive RT. Median follow-up was 58 months. Recursive partitioning analysis based on FFF using Gleason score (GS), T stage, and pretreatment PSA concentration was applied to the intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate 5-year FFF. Results: Based on recursive partitioning analysis, intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone were divided into 3 prognostic groups: (1) 188 favorable patients: GS 6, ≤T2b or GS 3+4, ≤T1c; (2) 71 marginal patients: GS 3+4, T2a-b; and (3) 68 unfavorable patients: GS 4+3 or T2c disease. Hazard ratios (HR) for recurrence in each group were 1.0, 2.1, and 4.6, respectively. When intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone were compared to intermediate-risk patients treated with RT and ADT, the greatest benefit from ADT was seen for the unfavorable intermediate-risk patients (FFF, 74% vs 94%, respectively; P=.005). Favorable intermediate-risk patients had no significant benefit from the addition of ADT to RT (FFF, 94% vs 95%, respectively; P=.85), and FFF for favorable intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone approached that of low-risk patients treated with RT alone (98%). Conclusions: Patients with favorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer did not benefit from the addition of ADT to dose-escalated RT, and their FFF was nearly as good as patients with low-risk disease

  4. A Phase I dose-escalation study of afatinib combined with nintedanib in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michael S; Springett, Gregory M; Su, Yungpo Bernard; Ould-Kaci, Mahmoud; Wind, Sven; Zhao, Yihua; LoRusso, Patricia M

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of afatinib combined with nintedanib. Patients received afatinib 10-20 mg daily plus nintedanib 150-200 mg twice daily (28-day cycle). Dose escalation followed a 3+3 design. Patients received afatinib/nintedanib: 10/150 mg (n = 11); 10/200 mg (n = 13; MTD); 20/200 mg (n = 4). Four patients had dose-limiting toxicities (all grade 3): increased alanine aminotransferase (afatinib/nintedanib: 10/150 mg), diarrhea (10/200 mg), dehydration (20/200 mg), diarrhea with elevated liver enzymes (20/200 mg). Frequent treatment-related adverse events were diarrhea, nausea, anorexia, fatigue and vomiting. In total, 14 patients (46.2%) had objective responses at the MTD. The MTD, afatinib 10 mg daily plus nintedanib 200 mg twice daily, had a manageable safety profile, but was considered subtherapeutic for Phase II evaluation.

  5. Safety of a dose-escalated pre-workout supplement in recreationally active females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Roxanne M; Joy, Jordan M; Falcone, Paul H; Mosman, Matt M; Kim, Michael P; Moon, Jordan R

    2015-01-01

    Pre-workout supplements (PWS) have increased in popularity among athletic populations for their purported ergogenic benefits. Most PWS contain a "proprietary blend" of several ingredients, such as caffeine, beta-alanine, and nitrate in undisclosed dosages. Currently, little research exists on the safety and potential side effects of chronic consumption of PWS, and even less so involving female populations. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to examine the safety of consuming a dose-escalated PWS over a 28-day period among active adult females. 34 recreationally active, adult females (27.1 ± 5.4 years, 165.2 ± 5.7 cm, 68.2 ± 16.0 kg) participated in this study. Participants were randomly assigned to consume either 1 (G1) or 2 (G2) servings of a PWS daily or remain unsupplemented (CRL) for a period of 28 days. All were instructed to maintain their habitual dietary and exercise routines for the duration of the study. Fasting blood samples, as well as resting blood pressure and heart rate, were taken prior to and following the supplementation period. Samples were analyzed for hematological and clinical chemistry panels, including lipids. Significant (p < 0.05) group by time interactions were present for absolute monocytes (CRL -0.10 ± 0.10; G1 + 0.03 ± 0.13; G2 + 0.01 ± 0.12×10E3/uL), MCH (CRL -0.13 ± 0.46; G1 + 0.36 ± 0.52; G2 -0.19 ± 0.39 pg), creatinine (CRL 0.00 ± 0.05; G1 -0.06 ± 0.13; G2 -0.14 ± 0.08 mg/dL), eGFR (CRL -0.69 ± 5.97; G1 + 6.10 ± 15.89; G2 + 14.63 ± 7.11 mL/min/1.73), and total cholesterol (CRL -2.44 ± 13.63; G1 + 14.40 ± 27.32; G2 -10.38 ± 15.39 mg/dL). Each of these variables remained within the accepted physiological range. No other variables had significant interactions. The present study confirms the hypothesis that a PWS containing caffeine, beta-alanine, and nitrate will not cause abnormal changes in

  6. Prospective evaluation of a hydrogel spacer for rectal separation in dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eckert Franziska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As dose-escalation in prostate cancer radiotherapy improves cure rates, a major concern is rectal toxicity. We prospectively assessed an innovative approach of hydrogel injection between prostate and rectum to reduce the radiation dose to the rectum and thus side effects in dose-escalated prostate radiotherapy. Methods Acute toxicity and planning parameters were prospectively evaluated in patients with T1-2 N0 M0 prostate cancer receiving dose-escalated radiotherapy after injection of a hydrogel spacer. Before and after hydrogel injection, we performed MRI scans for anatomical assessment of rectal separation. Radiotherapy was planned and administered to 78 Gy in 39 fractions. Results From eleven patients scheduled for spacer injection the procedure could be performed in ten. In one patient hydrodissection of the Denonvillier space was not possible. Radiation treatment planning showed low rectal doses despite dose-escalation to the target. In accordance with this, acute rectal toxicity was mild without grade 2 events and there was complete resolution within four to twelve weeks. Conclusions This prospective study suggests that hydrogel injection is feasible and may prevent rectal toxicity in dose-escalated radiotherapy of prostate cancer. Further evaluation is necessary including the definition of patients who might benefit from this approach. Trial registration: German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00003273.

  7. A randomized, pilot trial comparing full versus escalating dose regimens for the desensitization of AIDS patients allergic to sulfonamides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Straatmann Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfonamides are drugs extensively used in the management of AIDS patients. However, the use of sulfonamides is often associated with the development of allergic reactions, provoking the substitution of the drug (by another that may be less effective; alternatively attempts are made to desensitize the patient. OBJECTIVE: Compare two drug regimens (full vs. escalating doses for the oral desensitization of AIDS patients allergic to sulfonamides. MATERIAL AND METHODS: AIDS patients with previous allergic reactions to sulfonamides and requiring prophylaxis against Pneumocistis carinii, central nervous system toxoplasmosis and diarrhea caused by Isospora belli were randomly assigned to a group receiving a routine dose of cothrimoxazole, or another that received escalating doses of an oral suspension of the same drug, initiating with 75mg/day of sulfamethoxazole that was doubled every 48 hours till the full dose was reached, if no allergic reaction occurred. Patients were monitored for at least 6 months after enrollment in the trial. The major end-point was the ability to maintain prophylactic treatment after that period of time. Plasma viral load (PVL and CD4/CD8 counts were measured at baseline. Liver enzymes and hematological parameters were measured at baseline and after 1, 3 and 6 months. RESULTS: Eighteen patients were enrolled in the study (15 men and 3 women, with ages ranging from 30 to 57 years (mean 39.9. The mean CD4 counts were slightly higher for patients receiving a full dose; there was also a trend towards higher baseline CD8 counts among patients developing new reactions. The mean PVL was similar among the patients in both desensitization groups. The incidence of new allergic reactions was identical (40% in the two groups. All adverse reactions were mild and no significant increase in liver enzymes were observed. CONCLUSON: Dose regimen is not a predictor of the development of new allergic reactions amongst patients challenged with

  8. A randomized, pilot trial comparing full versus escalating dose regimens for the desensitization of AIDS patients allergic to sulfonamides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Straatmann

    Full Text Available Sulfonamides are drugs extensively used in the management of AIDS patients. However, the use of sulfonamides is often associated with the development of allergic reactions, provoking the substitution of the drug (by another that may be less effective; alternatively attempts are made to desensitize the patient. OBJECTIVE: Compare two drug regimens (full vs. escalating doses for the oral desensitization of AIDS patients allergic to sulfonamides. MATERIAL AND METHODS: AIDS patients with previous allergic reactions to sulfonamides and requiring prophylaxis against Pneumocistis carinii, central nervous system toxoplasmosis and diarrhea caused by Isospora belli were randomly assigned to a group receiving a routine dose of cothrimoxazole, or another that received escalating doses of an oral suspension of the same drug, initiating with 75mg/day of sulfamethoxazole that was doubled every 48 hours till the full dose was reached, if no allergic reaction occurred. Patients were monitored for at least 6 months after enrollment in the trial. The major end-point was the ability to maintain prophylactic treatment after that period of time. Plasma viral load (PVL and CD4/CD8 counts were measured at baseline. Liver enzymes and hematological parameters were measured at baseline and after 1, 3 and 6 months. RESULTS: Eighteen patients were enrolled in the study (15 men and 3 women, with ages ranging from 30 to 57 years (mean 39.9. The mean CD4 counts were slightly higher for patients receiving a full dose; there was also a trend towards higher baseline CD8 counts among patients developing new reactions. The mean PVL was similar among the patients in both desensitization groups. The incidence of new allergic reactions was identical (40% in the two groups. All adverse reactions were mild and no significant increase in liver enzymes were observed. CONCLUSON: Dose regimen is not a predictor of the development of new allergic reactions amongst patients challenged with

  9. Phase 1 Study of Dose Escalation in Hypofractionated Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Daniel R., E-mail: dgomez@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gillin, Michael [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wei, Caimiao [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lin, Steven H.; Swanick, Cameron; Alvarado, Tina; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Chang, Joe Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Background: Many patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cannot undergo concurrent chemotherapy because of comorbidities or poor performance status. Hypofractionated radiation regimens, if tolerable, may provide an option to these patients for effective local control. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients were enrolled in a phase 1 dose-escalation trial of proton beam therapy (PBT) from September 2010 through July 2012. Eligible patients had histologically documented lung cancer, thymic tumors, carcinoid tumors, or metastatic thyroid tumors. Concurrent chemotherapy was not allowed, but concurrent treatment with biologic agents was. The dose-escalation schema comprised 15 fractions of 3 Gy(relative biological effectiveness [RBE])/fraction, 3.5 Gy(RBE)/fraction, or 4 Gy(RBE)/fraction. Dose constraints were derived from biologically equivalent doses of standard fractionated treatment. Results: The median follow-up time for patients alive at the time of analysis was 13 months (range, 8-28 months). Fifteen patients received treatment to hilar or mediastinal lymph nodes. Two patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity possibly related to treatment; 1 received 3.5-Gy(RBE) fractions and experienced an in-field tracheoesophageal fistula 9 months after PBT and 1 month after bevacizumab. The other patient received 4-Gy(RBE) fractions and was hospitalized for bacterial pneumonia/radiation pneumonitis 4 months after PBT. Conclusion: Hypofractionated PBT to the thorax delivered over 3 weeks was well tolerated even with significant doses to the lungs and mediastinal structures. Phase 2/3 trials are needed to compare the efficacy of this technique with standard treatment for locally advanced NSCLC.

  10. Phase 1 dose escalation multicenter trial of pracinostat alone and in combination with azacitidine in patients with advanced hematologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaza, Yasmin M; Kadia, Tapan M; Jabbour, Elias J; Konopleva, Marina Y; Borthakur, Gautam; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Estrov, Zeev; Wierda, William G; Alfonso, Ana; Chong, Toh Han; Chuah, Charles; Koh, Liang-Piu; Goh, Boon-Cher; Chang, Julie E; Durkes, Daniel E; Foudray, Maria Cielo; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Dong, Xiao Qin; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo

    2017-12-15

    Pracinostat is a potent histone deacetylase inhibitor with antitumor activity in both solid tumor and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines. Pracinostat is reported to have modest clinical activity in patients with advanced solid tumors. Given the higher preclinical sensitivity of hematologic malignancies to pracinostat, the authors conducted a phase 1 study to assess the safety, maximum tolerated dose, recommended phase 2 dose, efficacy, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of pracinostat in patients with advanced hematological malignancies. Pracinostat was administered orally 3 times a week for 3 weeks on a 28-day cycle. Patients were assigned to 7 dose levels using a 3 + 3 dose escalation design. A total of 44 patients were enrolled, 25 of whom had AML and 14 of whom had myelodysplastic syndrome. The maximum tolerated dose was 120 mg and the recommended phase 2 dose was 60 mg. Two patients with AML achieved a response: 1 complete remission (CR) and 1 complete cytogenetic response. Despite a dose-dependent increase in the plasma concentration of pracinostat, a similar increase in histone acetylation was not observed. As an extension, 10 additional patients with myelodysplastic syndrome were enrolled to assess the safety and efficacy of pracinostat in combination with azacitidine. Six patients achieved a CR and 3 achieved a CR without platelet recovery with no added toxicity. The results of the current study demonstrate that pracinostat is safe, with modest single-agent activity in patients with hematological malignancies. Cancer 2017;123:4851-9. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  11. Dose escalation of radiotherapy for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) in patients with relatively favorable survival prognosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rades, Dirk [Luebeck Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Panzner, Annika [Luebeck Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Rudat, Volker [Saad Specialist Hospital, Al-Khobar (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Karstens, Johann H. [Medical School Hannover (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schild, Steven E. [Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2011-11-15

    Local control of metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) is particularly important for long-term survivors. Radiotherapy alone is the most common treatment for MSCC. The most frequently used schedule world wide is 30 Gy/10 fractions. This study investigated whether patients with favorable survival prognoses benefit from a dose escalation beyond 30 Gy. Data from 191 patients treated with 30 Gy/10 fractions were matched to 191 patients (1:1) receiving higher doses (37.5 Gy/15 fractions or 40 Gy/20 fractions). All patients had favorable survival prognoses based on a validated scoring system and were matched for age, gender, tumor type, performance status, number of involved vertebrae, visceral or other bone metastases, interval from tumor diagnosis to radiotherapy, ambulatory status, and time developing motor deficits. Both groups were compared for local control, progression-free survival, overall survival, and functional outcome. Local control rates at 2 years were 71 % after 30 Gy and 92 % after higher doses (p = 0.012). Two-year progression-free survival rates were 68 % and 90 %, respectively (p = 0.013). Two-year overall survival rates were 53 % and 68 %, respectively (p = 0.032). Results maintained significance in the multivariate analyses (Cox proportional hazards model; stratified model) with respect to local control (p = 0.011; p = 0.012), progression-free survival (p = 0.010; p = 0.018), and overall survival (p = 0.014; p = 0.015). Functional outcome was similar in both groups. Motor function improved in 40 % of patients after 30 Gy and 41 % after higher doses (p = 0.98). Escalation of the radiation dose beyond 30 Gy resulted in significantly better local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival in patients with favorable survival prognoses. (orig.)

  12. A phase I dose-escalation and bioequivalence study of a trastuzumab biosimilar in healthy male volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisman, Liselijn A B; De Cock, Eduard P M; Reijers, Joannes A A; Kamerling, Ingrid M C; Van Os, Sandra H G; de Kam, Marieke L; Burggraaf, Jacobus; Voortman, Gerrit

    2014-12-01

    Trastuzumab (Herceptin(®)) is a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and is used in the treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast and gastric cancer. FTMB is being developed as a biosimilar of trastuzumab. In this combined dose-escalation and bioequivalence study of parallel design, the pharmacokinetic profile of FTMB was compared with Herceptin(®). Healthy male volunteers received single doses of 0.5, 1.5, 3.0 or 6.0 mg/kg FTMB, or placebo, in consecutive dose-escalation cohorts to assess the safety profile. Thereafter, the 6 mg/kg cohort was expanded to establish bioequivalence between FTMB (Test) and Herceptin(®) (Reference) based on an acceptance interval of 80.0-125.0 %. In total, 118 subjects were enrolled in the study. The mean area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity (AUC∞) was 1,609 µg·day/mL (Test) and 1,330 µg·day/mL (Reference). The log-transformed geometric mean Test/Reference (T/R) ratio for AUC∞ was 89.6 % (90 % confidence interval [CI] 85.1-94.4), demonstrating bioequivalence. For the secondary endpoint, the maximum concentration observed (Cmax), the geometric mean T/R ratio was 89.4 % (90 % CI 83.4-95.9). Non-linear, target-mediated pharmacokinetics were also observed. Adverse events other than the documented side effects of Herceptin(®) (fever, influenza-like illness, and fatigue) did not occur. No signs of cardiotoxicity were observed. This bioequivalence study with a trastuzumab biosimilar in healthy male volunteers demonstrated bioequivalence of FTMB with Herceptin(®). FTMB was well tolerated in doses up to 6 mg/kg. Non-linear target elimination was also observed in the pharmacokinetic profile of trastuzumab.

  13. Trigeminal Neuralgia Treated With Stereotactic Radiosurgery: The Effect of Dose Escalation on Pain Control and Treatment Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotecha, Rupesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Kotecha, Ritesh [MidMichigan Medical Center, Midland, Michigan (United States); Modugula, Sujith [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Murphy, Erin S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-Oncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Jones, Mark; Kotecha, Rajesh [MidMichigan Medical Center, Midland, Michigan (United States); Reddy, Chandana A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Suh, John H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-Oncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Barnett, Gene H. [Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-Oncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, Neurological Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Neyman, Gennady [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-Oncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Machado, Andre; Nagel, Sean [Department of Neurosurgery, Neurological Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Chao, Samuel T., E-mail: chaos@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumor and Neuro-Oncology Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of dose escalation on treatment outcome in patients undergoing stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed of 870 patients who underwent SRS for a diagnosis of TN from 2 institutions. Patients were typically treated using a single 4-mm isocenter placed at the trigeminal nerve dorsal root entry zone. Patients were divided into groups based on treatment doses: ≤82 Gy (352 patients), 83 to 86 Gy (85 patients), and ≥90 Gy (433 patients). Pain response was classified using a categorical scoring system, with fair or poor pain control representing treatment failure. Treatment-related facial numbness was classified using the Barrow Neurological Institute scale. Log-rank tests were performed to test differences in time to pain failure or development of facial numbness for patients treated with different doses. Results: Median age at first pain onset was 63 years, median age at time of SRS was 71 years, and median follow-up was 36.5 months from the time of SRS. A majority of patients (827, 95%) were clinically diagnosed with typical TN. The 4-year rate of excellent to good pain relief was 87% (95% confidence interval 84%-90%). The 4-year rate of pain response was 79%, 82%, and 92% in patients treated to ≤82 Gy, 83 to 86 Gy, and ≥90 Gy, respectively. Patients treated to doses ≤82 Gy had an increased risk of pain failure after SRS, compared with patients treated to ≥90 Gy (hazard ratio 2.0, P=.0007). Rates of treatment-related facial numbness were similar among patients treated to doses ≥83 Gy. Nine patients (1%) were diagnosed with anesthesia dolorosa. Conclusions: Dose escalation for TN to doses >82 Gy is associated with an improvement in response to treatment and duration of pain relief. Patients treated at these doses, however, should be counseled about the increased risk of treatment-related facial numbness.

  14. Optimizing cancer radiotheraphy with 2-deoxy-D-glucose. Dose escalation studies in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, D.; Gupta, J.P. [Dharmshila Cancer Hospital, New Delhi (India); Banerji, A.K. [Vidyasagar Inst. of Mental Health and Neurosciences, New Delhi (India); Dwarakanath, B.S.; Tripathi, R.P.; Mathew, T.L.; Ravindranath, T. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences, Delhi (India); Jain, V. [Wright State University, Dayton, OH (United States). Kettering Medical Center

    2005-08-01

    Background and purpose: Higher rates of glucose utilization and glycolysis generally correlate with poor prognosis in several types of malignant tumors. Own earlier studies on model systems demonstrated that the nonmetabolizable glucose analog 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) could enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy in a dose-dependent manner by selectively sensitizing cancer cells while protecting normal cells. Phase I/II clinical trials indicated that the combination of 2-DG, at an oral dose of 200 mg/kg body weight (BW), with large fractions of {gamma}-radiation was well tolerated in cerebral glioma patients. Since higher 2-DG doses are expected to improve the therapeutic gain, present studies were undertaken to examine the tolerance and safety of escalating 2-DG dose during combined treatment (2-DG + radiotherapy) in glioblastoma multiforme patients. Patients and methods: Untreated patients with histologically proven glioblastoma multiforme (WHO criteria) were included in the study. Seven weekly fractions of {sup 60}C {gamma}-rays (5 Gy/fraction) were delivered to the tumor volume (presurgical CT/MRI evaluation) plus 3 cm margin. Escalating 2-DG doses (200-250-300 mg/kg BW) were administered orally 30 min before irradiation after overnight fasting. Acute toxicity and tolerance were studied by monitoring the vital parameters and side effects. Late radiation damage and treatment responses were studied radiologically and clinically in surviving patients. Results: Transient side effects similar to hypoglycemia were observed in most of the patients. Tolerance and patient compliance to the combined treatment were very good up to a 2-DG dose of 250 mg/kg BW. However, at the higher dose of 300 mg/kg BW, two out of six patients were very restless and could not complete treatment, though significant changes in the vital parameters were not observed even at this dose. No significant damage to the normal brain tissue was observed during follow-up in seven out of ten patients who

  15. Results of the phase I dose-escalating study of motexafin gadolinium with standard radiotherapy in patients with glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Judith M; Seiferheld, Wendy; Alger, Jeffrey R; Wu, Genevieve; Endicott, Thyra J; Mehta, Minesh; Curran, Walter; Phan, See-Chun

    2007-11-01

    Motexafin gadolinium (MGd) is a putative radiation enhancer initially evaluated in patients with brain metastases. This Phase I trial studied the safety and tolerability of a 2-6-week course (10-22 doses) of MGd with radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme. A total of 33 glioblastoma multiforme patients received one of seven MGd regimens starting at 10 doses of 4 mg/kg/d MGd and escalating to 22 doses of 5.3 mg/kg/d MGd (5 or 10 daily doses then three times per week). The National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program toxicity and stopping rules were applied. The maximal tolerated dose was 5.0 mg/kg/d MGd (5 d/wk for 2 weeks, then three times per week) for 22 doses. The dose-limiting toxicity was reversible transaminase elevation. Adverse reactions included rash/pruritus (45%), chills/fever (30%), and self-limiting vesiculobullous rash of the thumb and fingers (42%). The median survival of 17.6 months prompted a case-matched analysis. In the case-matched analysis, the MGd patients had a median survival of 16.1 months (n = 31) compared with the matched Radiation Therapy Oncology Group database patients with a median survival of 11.8 months (hazard ratio, 0.43; 95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.94). The maximal tolerated dose of MGd with radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme in this study was 5 mg/kg/d for 22 doses (daily for 2 weeks, then three times weekly). The baseline survival calculations suggest progression to Phase II trials is appropriate, with the addition of MGd to radiotherapy with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide.

  16. SU-E-T-500: Dose Escalation Strategy for Lung Cancer Patients Using a Biologically- Guided Target Definition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shusharina, N; Khan, F; Choi, N; Sharp, G [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dose escalation strategy for lung cancer patients can lead to late symptoms such as pneumonitis and cardiac injury. We propose a strategy to increase radiation dose for improving local tumor control while simultaneously striving to minimize the injury of organs at risk (OAR). Our strategy is based on defining a small, biologically-guided target volume for receiving additional radiation dose. Methods: 106 patients with lung cancer treated with radiotherapy were selected for patients diagnosed with stage II and III disease. Previous research has shown that 50% of the maximum SUV threshold in FDG-PET imaging is appropriate for delineation of the most aggressive part of a tumor. After PET- and CT-derived targets were contoured, an IMRT treatment plan was designed to deliver 60 Gy to the GTV as delineated on a 4D CT (Plan 1). A second plan was designed with additional dose of 18 Gy to the PET-derived volume (Plan 2). A composite plan was generated by the addition of Plan 1 and Plan 2. Results: Plan 1 was compared to the composite plan and increases in OAR dose were assessed. For seven patients on average, lung V5 was increased by 1.4% and V20 by 4.2% for ipsilateral lung and by 13.5% and 7% for contralateral lung. For total lung, V5 and V20 were increased by 4.5% and 4.8% respectively. Mean lung dose was increased by 9.7% for the total lung. The maximum dose to the spinal cord increased by 16% on average. For the heart, V20 increased by 4.2% and V40 by 5.2%. Conclusion: It seems feasible that an additional 18 Gy of radiation dose can be delivered to FDG PET-derived subvolume of the CT-based GTV of the primary tumor without significant increase in total dose to the critical organs such as lungs, spinal cord and heart.

  17. Effects of Intracoronary Infusion of Escalating Doses of Cardiac Stem Cells in Rats With Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xian-Liang; Rokosh, Gregg; Sanganalmath, Santosh K; Tokita, Yukichi; Keith, Matthew C L; Shirk, Gregg; Stowers, Heather; Hunt, Gregory N; Wu, Wenjian; Dawn, Buddhadeb; Bolli, Roberto

    2015-07-01

    Although c-kit(pos) cardiac stem cells (CSCs) preserve left ventricular (LV) function and structure after myocardial infarction, CSC doses have been chosen arbitrarily, and the dose-effect relationship is unknown. Rats underwent a 90-minute coronary occlusion followed by 35 days of reperfusion. Vehicle or CSCs at 5 escalating doses (0.3×10(6), 0.75×10(6), 1.5×10(6), 3.0×10(6), and 6.0×10(6) cells/heart) were given intracoronarily 4 h after reperfusion. The lowest dose (0.3×10(6)) had no effect on LV function and morphology, whereas 0.75, 1.5, and 3.0×10(6) significantly improved regional and global LV function (echocardiography and hemodynamic studies). These 3 doses had similar effects on echocardiographic parameters (infarct wall thickening fraction, LV end-systolic and end-diastolic volumes, LV ejection fraction) and hemodynamic variables (LV end-diastolic pressure, LV dP/dtmax, preload adjusted maximal power, end-systolic elastance, preload recruitable stroke work) and produced similar reductions in apoptosis, scar size, infarct wall thinning, and LV expansion index and similar increases in viable myocardium in the risk region (morphometry). Infusion of 6.0×10(6) CSCs markedly increased postprocedural mortality. Green fluorescent protein and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine staining indicated that persistence of donor cells and formation of new myocytes were negligible with all doses. Surprisingly, in this rat model of acute myocardial infarction, the dose-response relationship for intracoronary CSCs is flat. A minimal dose between 0.3 and 0.75×10(6) is necessary for efficacy; above this threshold, a 4-fold increase in cell number does not produce greater improvement in LV function or structure. Further increases in cell dose are harmful. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Prostate Dose Escalation by a Innovative Inverse Planning-Driven IMRT

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xing, Lei

    2008-01-01

    ...) Developed a voxel-specific penalty scheme for TRV-based inverse planning; (iv) Established a cine-EPID image retrospective dose reconstruction in IMRT dose delivery for adaptive planning and IMRT dose verification. These works are both timely and important and should lead to widespread impact on prostate cancer management.

  19. Inhomogeneous dose escalation increases expected local control for NSCLC patients with lymph node involvement without increased mean lung dose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tine B; Hansen, Olfred; Schytte, Tine

    2014-01-01

    but also for patients with involved lymph nodes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Highly modulated IMRT plans with homogeneous dose distributions with a prescribed dose of 66Gy/33F were created for 20 NSCLC patients, staged T1b-T4 N0-N3, using standard PTV dose coverage of 95-107%. For each patient, an inhomogeneous......BACKGROUND: Higher doses to NSCLC tumours are required to increase the low control rates obtained with conventional dose prescriptions. This study presents the concept of inhomogeneous dose distributions as a general way to increase local control probability, not only for isolated lung tumours...... dose distribution was created with dose constraints of: PTV-coverage ≥ 95%, same mean lung dose as obtained in the homogeneous dose plan, maximum doses of 45 and 66 Gy to spinal canal and oesophagus, respectively, and V74Gy

  20. Dose-escalated radiotherapy for unresectable or locally recurrent pancreatic cancer: Dose volume analysis, toxicity and outcome of 28 consecutive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zschaeck, Sebastian; Blümke, Bibiana; Wust, Peter; Kaul, David; Bahra, Marcus; Riess, Hanno; Klein, Fritz; Sinn, Marianne; Pelzer, Uwe; Budach, Volker; Ghadjar, Pirus

    2017-01-01

    The role of radiotherapy for unresectable pancreatic cancer is controversial. A benefit of additional radiotherapy is supported by some observations. A dose-effect relationship was recently found by dose escalation employing image guided and intensity modulated radiotherapy. We retrospectively evaluated 28 consecutive patients, all with history of extensive prior therapies for unresectable locally advanced/ recurrent pancreatic cancer (LAPC/LRPC). Treatment was delivered by helical tomotherapy after daily position verification with computed tomography. Dose to the planned target volume (PTV) was 51 Gy, while the dose to the macroscopic tumor was escalated by a simultaneous integrated boost to a median cumulative dose of 66 Gy (60-66 Gy). Concomitant chemotherapy consisted mainly of capecitabine (n = 23). 10 of 28 patients presented acute toxicities > grade 2, one patient succumbed to gastrointestinal bleeding after treatment. No correlations of toxicities and dose volume histograms (DVH) of retrospectively delineated small bowel loops were observed, although average small bowel volume receiving ≥ 20 Gy was 374 ml. DVH analyses revealed a correlation of splenic parameters and acute toxicity: Vomiting, anorexia, dehydration, hematologic toxicity, fatigue, combined gastro-intestinal toxicity wit R-values between 0.392 and 0.561 (all p-values > 0.05). Only one patient developed late toxicities > grade 2. With an average follow-up time in surviving patients of 14 months median overall survival time was 19 months and median time to local recurrence 13 months. In 8 patients with available imaging of local recurrence: 5 in field recurrences, 2 marginal recurrences and one lymph node recurrence outside the high dose radiation field were observed. In univariate analysis only ΔCA-19-9 during radiotherapy was associated with local control (p = 0.029) and overall survival (p = 0.049). Dose escalated normo-fractionated radiotherapy for LAPC/LRPC seems feasible and suitable to

  1. Long-term efficacy and safety of low-dose and dose-escalating interferon alfa-2a therapy in refractory Behçet uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onal, Sumru; Kazokoglu, Haluk; Koc, Aylin; Akman, Mehmet; Bavbek, Tayfun; Direskeneli, Haner; Yavuz, Sule

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the long-term efficacy and safety of low-dose and dose-escalating therapy of interferon alfa-2a in the treatment of Behçet uveitis. This study included 37 patients with refractory Behçet panuveitis unresponsive to conventional immunosuppressive therapy. Induction interferon alfa-2a therapy was given as a daily dose of 3.0 million IU (MIU) subcutaneously for 14 days. Maintenance dose was achieved with 3.0 MIU 3 times per week given subcutaneously. The dosage was increased sequentially to 4.5, 6.0, and 9.0 MIU 3 times per week if uveitis relapses occurred. Total therapy duration was 24 months. Primary outcome measure was control of uveitis with quiescence during maintenance therapy. Ocular relapses per patient-year before and after initiation of interferon alfa-2a therapy and a corticosteroid-sparing effect were secondary outcomes. We also estimated the rate of remission after discontinuing interferon alfa-2a therapy. During maintenance therapy, interferon alfa-2a controlled uveitis in 35 patients (95%). In 15 patients (41%), a maintenance dosage of 3.0 MIU 3 times per week controlled uveitis without any relapse. The rate of uveitis relapses decreased from 3.52 per patient-year before to 0.75 per patient-year after initiating interferon alfa-2a therapy. Seventeen patients were receiving systemic corticosteroids at the time of initiation of interferon therapy. During the maintenance stage, 9 patients were able to discontinue and 8 to taper systemic corticosteroid therapy. Survival analysis estimated that the rate of remission after discontinuation of interferon alfa-2a therapy was 76% by 3 months. The rate of remission remained stable thereafter. A treatment protocol using a low-dose and dose-escalating therapy with interferon alfa-2a was able to control and achieve remission of uveitis in most patients with refractory ocular Behçet disease.

  2. Phase I/II trial of simultaneous whole-brain irradiation and dose-escalating topotecan for brain metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocher, M.; Eich, H.T.; Semrau, R.; Guener, S.A.; Mueller, R.P. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital, Univ. of Cologne, Cologne (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: topotecan penetrates the blood-brain barrier and sensitizes tumor cells against radiation. A phase I/II dose-escalating trial of repetitive daily i.v. topotecan application simultaneously with whole-brain irradiation (WBRT) was conducted to estimate toxicity, maximum tolerated dose and survival in patients with inoperable brain metastases. Patients and methods: in 47 patients suffering from previously untreated brain metastases, topotecan was applied on a daily i.v. schedule simultaneously with WBRT (36 Gy/3-Gy fractions). The infusion schedule started at the beginning of WBRT and was discontinued during weekends. Each infusion was completed within 1-2 h before irradiation. In a dose-finding study, topotecan was escalated from 5 x 0.5 mg/m{sup 2}, 8 x 0.5 mg/m{sup 2}, 12 x 0.5 mg/m{sup 2} to 12 x 0.6 mg/m{sup 2}. Results: altogether, 38/47 patients (81%) completed the prescribed schedule. Leukopenia and thrombocytopenia were dose-limiting. Grade 3/4 hematologic toxicity occurred in 5/32 chemonaive patients (16%) and 7/15 patients (47%) with previous chemotherapy. At 12 x 0.6 mg/m{sup 2}, 2/4 patients experienced grade 4 leukopenia/thrombopenia. Nonhematologic toxicities were generally mild to moderate and unrelated to topotecan. Response evaluation was possible in 26/47 patients, overall response rate was 58% (CR [complete remission] 5/26, PR [partial remission] 10/26, NC [no change] 8/26). Median survival amounted to 5.1 months. In 15/42 patients (36%), brain metastases were the dominant cause of death. Conclusion: for a daily topotecan schedule simultaneous to WBRT, the maximum tolerated dose is 12 x 0.5 mg/m{sup 2} in chemonaive patients. For chemo-pretreated patients, daily doses should be reduced to 0.4 mg/m{sup 2}. A phase III trial has now been started to find out whether WBRT + topotecan increases survival compared to WBRT alone. (orig.)

  3. A Phase Ib dose-escalation study to evaluate safety and tolerability of the addition of the aminopeptidase inhibitor tosedostat (CHR-2797) to paclitaxel in patients with advanced solid tumours.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herpen, C.M.L. van; Eskens, F.A.; Jonge, M. de; Desar, I.M.E.; Hooftman, L.; Bone, E.A.; Timmer-Bonte, J.N.H.; Verweij, J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This Phase Ib dose-escalating study investigated safety, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), pharmacokinetics (PK) and clinical antitumour activity of tosedostat (CHR-2797), an orally bioavailable aminopeptidase inhibitor, in combination with paclitaxel. METHODS:

  4. Management of benzodiazepine-resistant alcohol withdrawal across a healthcare system: Benzodiazepine dose-escalation with or without propofol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Adrian; Benedict, Neal J; Lohr, Brian R; Pizon, Anthony F; Kane-Gill, Sandra L

    2015-09-01

    Severe cases of alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) may not resolve despite escalating doses of benzodiazepines (BZDs). Benzodiazepine-resistant alcohol withdrawal (RAW) is a subset of severe alcohol withdrawal defined by the requirement of ≥40mg of diazepam administered within one hour. Use of adjunct agents, such as propofol, may be beneficial to minimize BZD adverse effects and improve symptom control. While limited evidence suggests propofol as an effective adjunct in AWS through improved sedation, evidence is currently lacking for the addition of only propofol to BZDs for management of RAW. Retrospective review of adult patients from January, 2009 to March, 2012 with RAW. Patients were categorized into BZD dose-escalation only or BZD plus propofol. The primary endpoint was time to resolution of AWS. Secondary endpoints included safety outcomes associated with medication use. Of 1083 patients with severe AWS, 66 RAW patients (n=33 BZD only, n=33 BZD plus propofol) met inclusion. Median time to AWS resolution was 5.0 and 7.0 days for BZD only vs. BZD plus propofol (p=0.025). Duration of mechanical ventilation, ICU and hospital length of stay were significantly higher with propofol (p=0.017, <0.001 and <0.001, respectively). Ten patients required intervention for management of propofol-induced adverse reactions. The addition of propofol for RAW treatment is associated with significant increases in clinical care. While randomized, prospective evaluations are necessary to determine the cause of this association, our data suggests use of adjunctive propofol therapy in RAW is associated with longer and more complicated hospital admissions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of donepezil dose escalation in Parkinson's patients with dementia receiving long-term donepezil treatment: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kei-Ichi; Motoi, Yumiko; Mizuno, Yoshikuni; Kubo, Shin-Ichiro; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2014-06-01

    The benefits of escalating the dose of donepezil in patients who are already receiving long-term treatment with it have not been well evaluated. Therefore, an exploratory study to assess the effects of donepezil dose escalation in patients with Parkinson's disease with dementia, and specifically on patients receiving long-term treatment with donepezil, was performed. Patients treated with 5-mg/day donepezil for at least 3 months and having a Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score between 10 and 26 were included in this study. Donepezil dosage was then increased to 10 mg/day for 12 weeks. The outcome measures were a modified form of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) with an extra domain for additional evaluation of fluctuation in cognitive functions (NPI-11) and the MMSE. Of the nine patients enrolled, two withdrew because of nausea and inability to be assessed on the predetermined date; this left seven participants (four men and three women) with a mean age of 74.6 ± 6.9 years, a mean period of Parkinson's disease of 11.7 ± 7.5 years, and median donepezil use of 7 months (range: 3-56 months). At baseline, the mean total NPI-11 and mean MMSE scores were 18.3 ± 5.6 points and 21.3 ± 5.3 points, respectively. At week 12, they improved by 8.3 points (P donepezil from 5 mg/day to 10 mg/day may be therapeutically useful for patients with Parkinson's disease with dementia who have taken donepezil 5 mg/day in the long term. © 2014 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2014 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  6. A phase I dose-escalation study of lenalidomide in combination with gemcitabine in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustav J Ullenhag

    Full Text Available Lenalidomide have both immunomodulatory and anti-angiogenic properties which could confer anti-cancer effects. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of combining lenalidomide with the standard treatment gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer patients with advanced disease.Eligible patients had locally advanced or metastatic adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. Patients received lenalidomide days 1-21 orally and gemcitabine 1000 mg/m2 intravenously (days 1, 8 and 15, each 28 day cycle. Three cohorts of lenalidomide were examined (Cohort I = 15 mg, Cohort II = 20 mg and Cohort III = 25 mg daily. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD of lenalidomide given in combination with gemcitabine was defined as the highest dose level at which no more than one out of four (25% subjects experiences a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT. Patients should also be able to receive daily low molecular weight heparin (LMWH (e.g. dalteparin 5000 IU s.c. daily as a prophylactic anticoagulant for venous thromboembolic events (VTEs. Twelve patients (n = 4, n = 3 and n = 5 in cohort I, II and III, respectively were enrolled in this study.Median duration of treatment was 11 weeks (range 1-66, and median number of treatment cycles were three (range 1-14. The only DLT was a cardiac failure grade 3 in cohort III. Frequent treatment-related adverse events (AEs (all grades included neutropenia, leucopenia and fatigue (83% each, but there was no febrile neutropenia; thrombocytopenia (75%; dermatological toxicity (75%; diarrhea and nausea (42% each; and neuropathy (42%.This phase I study demonstrates the feasibility of the combination of lenalidomide and gemcitabine as first-line treatment in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. The tolerability profile demonstrated in the dose escalation schedule of lenalidomide suggests the dosing of lenalidomide to be 25 mg daily on days 1-21 with standard dosing of gemcitabine and merits further evaluation in a phase II trial.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  7. A phase I dose-escalation study of Tivantinib (ARQ 197) in adult patients with metastatic solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Lee S; Senzer, Neil; Mekhail, Tarek; Ganapathi, Ram; Chai, Feng; Savage, Ronald E; Waghorne, Carol; Abbadessa, Giovanni; Schwartz, Brian; Dreicer, Robert

    2011-12-15

    Tivantinib, an oral, non-ATP competitive, selective c-MET inhibitor, exhibited antitumor activity in preclinical models. This open-label, phase I, dose-escalation study evaluated the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of tivantinib in patients with advanced or metastatic solid tumors refractory to standard therapy. Thirteen dose levels of tivantinib ranging from 10 to 360 mg twice a day were administered to patient cohorts in 21-day cycles (14 days on/7 days off); three active pharmaceutical ingredient forms of tivantinib (amorphous, crystalline A, and crystalline B) were also investigated. Treatment was continued until the occurrence of unacceptable toxicity, tumor progression, patient withdrawal, or death. A total of 79 patients with advanced solid tumors were enrolled. A maximum tolerated dose was not determined. Tivantinib was well tolerated, with mild to moderate toxicities. Two patients discontinued the study drug due to treatment-emergent adverse events. Dose-limiting grade of 3 or more toxicities including leukopenia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, vomiting, and dehydration, were observed in 2 patients treated with tivantinib 360 mg twice a day. The rate of absorption of tivantinib peaked approximately 2 to 4 hours after initial dosing, followed by a linear decrease in plasma concentrations. Increases in tivantinib exposure were not dose proportional. There was significant interpatient pharmacokinetic variability; however the clinical safety of tivantinib seemed unaffected. Three patients (3.8%) achieved a partial response and 40 patients (50.6%) maintained stable disease for a median of 19.9 weeks. Tivantinib 360 mg twice a day was well tolerated in patients with refractory advanced solid tumors. The results of this trial warrant further clinical investigation. Clin Cancer Res; 17(24); 7754-64. ©2011 AACR. ©2011 AACR.

  8. SU-C-202-04: Adapting Biologically Optimized Dose Escalation Based On Mid-Treatment PET/CT for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, P; Kuo, L; Yorke, E; Hu, Y; Lockney, N; Mageras, G; Deasy, J; Rimner, A [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a biological modeling strategy which incorporates the response observed on the mid-treatment PET/CT into a dose escalation design for adaptive radiotherapy of non-small-cell lung cancer. Method: FDG-PET/CT was acquired midway through standard fractionated treatment and registered to pre-treatment planning PET/CT to evaluate radiation response of lung cancer. Each mid-treatment PET voxel was assigned the median SUV inside a concentric 1cm-diameter sphere to account for registration and imaging uncertainties. For each voxel, the planned radiation dose, pre- and mid-treatment SUVs were used to parameterize the linear-quadratic model, which was then utilized to predict the SUV distribution after the full prescribed dose. Voxels with predicted post-treatment SUV≥2 were identified as the resistant target (response arm). An adaptive simultaneous integrated boost was designed to escalate dose to the resistant target as high as possible, while keeping prescription dose to the original target and lung toxicity intact. In contrast, an adaptive target volume was delineated based only on the intensity of mid-treatment PET/CT (intensity arm), and a similar adaptive boost plan was optimized. The dose escalation capability of the two approaches was compared. Result: Images of three patients were used in this planning study. For one patient, SUV prediction indicated complete response and no necessary dose escalation. For the other two, resistant targets defined in the response arm were multifocal, and on average accounted for 25% of the pre-treatment target, compared to 67% in the intensity arm. The smaller response arm targets led to a 6Gy higher mean target dose in the adaptive escalation design. Conclusion: This pilot study suggests that adaptive dose escalation to a biologically resistant target predicted from a pre- and mid-treatment PET/CT may be more effective than escalation based on the mid-treatment PET/CT alone. More plans and ultimately clinical

  9. Lack of benefit for the addition of androgen deprivation therapy to dose-escalated radiotherapy in the treatment of intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Krauss, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: Assessment of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) benefits for prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated radiotherapy (RT). METHODS AND MATERIALS: From 1991 to 2004, 1,044 patients with intermediate- (n = 782) or high-risk (n = 262) prostate cancer were treated with dose-escalated RT at William Beaumont Hospital. Patients received external-beam RT (EBRT) alone, brachytherapy (high or low dose rate), or high dose rate brachytherapy plus pelvic EBRT. Intermediate-risk patients had Gleason score 7, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) 10.0-19.9 ng\\/mL, or Stage T2b-T2c. High-risk patients had Gleason score 8-10, PSA >\\/=20, or Stage T3. Patients were additionally divided specifically by Gleason score, presence of palpable disease, and PSA level to further define subgroups benefitting from ADT. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 5 years; 420 patients received ADT + dose-escalated RT, and 624 received dose-escalated RT alone. For all patients, no advantages in any clinical endpoints at 8 years were associated with ADT administration. No differences in any endpoints were associated with ADT administration based on intermediate- vs. high-risk group or RT modality when analyzed separately. Patients with palpable disease plus Gleason >\\/=8 demonstrated improved clinical failure rates and a trend toward improved survival with ADT. Intermediate-risk patients treated with brachytherapy alone had improved biochemical control when ADT was given. CONCLUSION: Benefits of ADT in the setting of dose-escalated RT remain poorly defined. This question must continue to be addressed in prospective study.

  10. Long-term efficacy of botulinum toxin A for treatment of blepharospasm, hemifacial spasm, and spastic entropion: a multicentre study using two drug-dose escalation indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cillino, S; Raimondi, G; Guépratte, N; Damiani, S; Cillino, M; Di Pace, F; Casuccio, A

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the long-term effectiveness and safety of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT-A) treatment in patients with blepharospasm (BEB), hemifacial spasm (HFS), and entropion (EN) and to use for the first time two modified indexes, 'botulin toxin escalation index-U' (BEI-U) and 'botulin toxin escalation index percentage' (BEI-%), in the dose-escalation evaluation. All patients in this multicentre study were followed for at least 10 years and main outcomes were clinical efficacy, duration of relief, BEI-U and BEI-%, and frequency of adverse events. BEB, HFS, and EN patients received a mean BoNT-A dose with a significant inter-group difference (P<0.0005, respectively). The mean (+/-SD) effect duration was statistically different (P=0.009) among three patient groups. Regarding the BoNT-A escalation indexes, the mean (+/-SD) values of BEI-U and BEI-% were statistically different (P=0.035 and 0.047, respectively) among the three groups. In BEB patients, the BEI-% was significantly increased in younger compared with older patients (P=0.008). The most frequent adverse events were upper lid ptosis, diplopia, ecchymosis, and localized bruising. This long-term multicentre study supports a high efficacy and good safety profile of BoNT-A for treatment of BEB, HFS, and EN. The BEI indexes indicate a significantly greater BoNT-A-dose escalation for BEB patients compared with HFS or EN patients and a significantly greater BEI-% in younger vsolder BEB patients. These results confirm a greater efficacy in the elderly and provide a framework for long-term studies with a more flexible and reliable evaluation of drug-dose escalation.

  11. A phase I dose-escalation study to evaluate safety and tolerability of sorafenib combined with sirolimus in patients with advanced solid cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desar, I.M.E.; Timmer-Bonte, J.N.H.; Burger, D.M.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Herpen, C.M.L. van

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The combination of sorafenib (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 inhibitor) and sirolimus (mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor) might work synergistically. METHODS: A phase I dose-escalation study with sorafenib twice a day (b.i.d.) and sirolimus once daily (q.d.) was

  12. Dietary selenium for the mitigation of radiation injury: effects of selenium dose escalation and timing of supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieber, Fritz; Muir, Sarah A; Cohen, Eric P; Fish, Brian L; Mäder, Marylou; Schock, Ashley M; Althouse, Bryan J; Moulder, John E

    2011-09-01

    We recently reported that daily dietary supplementation with 100 µg selenium (a dose exceeding a rat's nutritional requirement by about 33-fold) initiated immediately after total-body irradiation (TBI) and maintained for 21 weeks mitigates radiation nephropathy in a rat model as indicated by blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels and histopathological criteria (Radiat Res. 2009; 17:368-73). In this follow-up study, we explored the risks and benefits of delaying the onset of supplementation, shortening periods of supplementation, and escalating selenium supplementation beyond 100 µg/day. Supplementation with 200 µg selenium/day (as selenite or seleno-l-methionine) substantially improved the mitigation of radiation nephropathy by lowering BUN levels at 4 months after TBI from 115 to as low as 34 mg/dl and by proportionally lowering the incidence of histopathological abnormalities. Shortening the period of supplementation to 3 or 2 months did not compromise efficacy. Delaying the onset of supplementation for 1 week reduced but did not abrogate the mitigation of radiation nephropathy. Supplementation with 300 µg/day mitigated radiation nephropathy less effectively than 200 µg and was poorly tolerated. Rats that had been given 10 Gy of TBI were less tolerant of high-dose selenium than nonirradiated rats. This reduced tolerance of high-dose selenium would need to be taken into consideration when selenium is used for the mitigation of radiation injury in victims of nuclear accidents or acts of radiological terrorism. The high dose requirements, the pronounced threshold effect, and the superior performance of selenite suggest that the mitigation of radiation nephropathy involves mechanisms that go beyond the induction of selenoproteins.

  13. Dietary Selenium for the Mitigation of Radiation Injury: Effects of Selenium Dose Escalation and Timing of Supplementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieber, Fritz; Muir, Sarah A.; Cohen, Eric P.; Fish, Brian L.; Mäder, Marylou; Schock, Ashley M.; Althouse, Bryan J.; Moulder, John E.

    2011-01-01

    We recently reported that daily dietary supplementation with 100 μg selenium (a dose exceeding a rat’s nutritional requirement by about 33-fold) initiated immediately after total-body irradiation (TBI) and maintained for 21 weeks mitigates radiation nephropathy in a rat model as indicated by blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels and histopathological criteria (Radiat Res. 2009; 17:368–73). In this follow-up study, we explored the risks and benefits of delaying the onset of supplementation, shortening periods of supplementation, and escalating selenium supplementation beyond 100 μg/day. Supplementation with 200 μg selenium/day (as selenite or seleno-L-methionine) substantially improved the mitigation of radiation nephropathy by lowering BUN levels at 4 months after TBI from 115 to as low as 34 mg/dl and by proportionally lowering the incidence of histopathological abnormalities. Shortening the period of supplementation to 3 or 2 months did not compromise efficacy. Delaying the onset of supplementation for 1 week reduced but did not abrogate the mitigation of radiation nephropathy. Supplementation with 300 μg/day mitigated radiation nephropathy less effectively than 200 μg and was poorly tolerated. Rats that had been given 10 Gy of TBI were less tolerant of high-dose selenium than nonirradiated rats. This reduced tolerance of high-dose selenium would need to be taken into consideration when selenium is used for the mitigation of radiation injury in victims of nuclear accidents or acts of radiological terrorism. The high dose requirements, the pronounced threshold effect, and the superior performance of selenite suggest that the mitigation of radiation nephropathy involves mechanisms that go beyond the induction of selenoproteins. PMID:21867430

  14. Final results of a phase I dose-escalation, dose-expansion study of adding disulfiram with or without copper to adjuvant temozolomide for newly diagnosed glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiayi; Campian, Jian L; Gujar, Amit D; Tsien, Christina; Ansstas, George; Tran, David D; DeWees, Todd A; Lockhart, A Craig; Kim, Albert H

    2018-01-27

    Disulfiram has shown promising activity including proteasome inhibitory properties and synergy with temozolomide in preclinical glioblastoma (GBM) models. In a phase I study for newly diagnosed GBM after chemoradiotherapy, we have previously reported our initial dose-escalation results combining disulfiram with adjuvant temozolomide and established the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) as 500 mg per day. Here we report the final results of the phase I study including an additional dose-expansion cohort of disulfiram with concurrent copper. The phase I study consisted of an initial dose-escalation phase of disulfiram 500-1000 mg daily during adjuvant temozolomide, followed by a dose-expansion phase of disulfiram 500 mg daily with copper 2 mg three times daily. Proteasome inhibition was assessed using fluorometric 20S proteasome assay on peripheral blood cell. A total of 18 patients were enrolled: 7 patients received 500 mg disulfiram, 5 patients received 1000 mg disulfiram, and 6 patients received 500 mg disulfiram with copper. Two dose-limiting toxicities occurred with 1000 mg disulfiram. At disulfiram 500 mg with or without copper, only 1 patient (7%) required dose-reduction during the first month of therapy. Addition of copper to disulfiram did not increase toxicity nor proteasome inhibition. The median progression-free survival was 4.5 months (95% CI 0.8-8.2). The median overall survival (OS) was 14.0 months (95% CI 8.3-19.6), and the 2-year OS was 24%. The MTD of disulfiram at 500 mg daily in combination with adjuvant temozolomide was well tolerated by GBM patients, but 1000 mg daily was not. Toxicity and pharmacodynamic effect of disulfiram were similar with or without concurrent copper. The clinical efficacy appeared to be comparable to historical data. Additional clinical trials to combine disulfiram and copper with chemoradiotherapy or to resensitize recurrent GBM to temozolomide are ongoing.

  15. What does a modified-Fibonacci dose-escalation actually correspond to?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penel Nicolas

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In most phase I oncology trials, it is often stated that the dose increments follow a “modified-Fibonacci sequence”. This term, however, is vague. Methods To better characterize this sequence, we reviewed 81 phase I trials based on this concept. Results Out of 198 phase I oncology trials, 81 (41% are based on modified-Fibonacci series. Actual incremental ratios varied in a large range from 0.80 to 2.08. The median of actual increments was about 2.00, 1.50, 1.33, 1.33, 1.33, 1.33, 1.30, 1.35…. The “modified Fibonacci-sequence” gathers heterogeneous variation of the genuine sequence, which does not tend to a constant number at higher dose-levels. Conclusion This confusing term should be avoided.

  16. Establishing Dual Resistance to EGFR-TKI and MET-TKI in Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells In Vitro with a 2-step Dose-escalation Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Toshimitsu; Ohba, Motoi; Arata, Satoru; Ohmori, Tohru

    2017-08-11

    Drug resistance is a major challenge in cancer therapy. The generation of resistant sublines in vitro is necessary for discovering novel mechanisms to overcome this challenge. Here, a 2-step dose-escalation method for establishing dual-resistance to an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), gefitinib, and a MET-TKI, PHA665752, is described. This method is based on simple stepwise dose-escalation of inhibitors for inducing acquired resistance in cell lines. The alternate method for generating resistant sublines involves exposing the cells to high concentrations of the inhibitor in one step. The stepwise dose-escalation method has a higher possibility of successfully inducing acquired resistance than this method. Activating EGFR mutations are biomarkers of a response to treatment with EGFR-TKI, which is an applied first-line treatment for non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) that harbor these mutations. However, despite reports of effective responses, the use of EGFR-TKI is limited because tumors inevitably acquire resistance. The major mechanisms behind EGFR-TKI resistance include a secondary mutation at the gatekeeper site, T790M in exon 20 of EGFR, and a bypass signal of MET. Thus, a potential solution for this issue would be a combination of EGFR-TKI and MET-TKI. This combined treatment has been shown to be effective in an in vitro study model. Acquired gefitinib-resistance was established through MET-amplification by stepwise dose-escalation of gefitinib for 12 months, and a cell line named PC-9MET1000 was generated in a previous study. To further investigate the mechanisms of acquired MET-TKI and EGFR-TKI resistance, a MET-TKI, PHA665752, was administered to these cells with stepwise dose-escalation in the presence of gefitinib for 12 months. This protocol has also been successfully applied for a number of combination therapies to establish acquired resistance to other inhibitor molecules.

  17. Phase-I dose escalation and sequencing study of docetaxel and continuous infusion topotecan in patients with advanced malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posey, James A; Wang, Hui; Hamilton, Joelle; Delgrosso, Alma; Zhang, Ruiwen; Freda, Timothy; Zamboni, William C

    2005-08-01

    Anti-tumor activity can often be enhanced with combination therapy in managing patients with metastatic cancer. However, dose sequence and schedule of delivery can alter the pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and anti-tumor response. Therefore, attention to drug-drug interactions which may be sequence or schedule-dependent are necessary. Docetaxel and topotecan are non-cross-resistance cytotoxic agents with activity in a variety of malignancies. The goal of this study was to determine the maximum tolerated dose of docetaxel and continuous infusion topotecan using two sequences of administration. Patients were randomized to schedule A or B and enrolled in four escalating-dose cohorts. On schedule A, docetaxel was administered over 1 h and followed by topotecan administered over 72 h. On schedule B, topotecan was given as a 72 h continuous infusion followed by a 1 h infusion of docetaxel. While the doses for the docetaxel and topotecan were the same for schedule A and schedule B, the toxicities, and thus the determination of maximum tolerated dose (MTD), were assessed independently. The plasma pharmacokinetic disposition of topotecan and docetaxel were evaluated during the first cycle of each sequence to assess drug interactions. Thirty patients, 20 males and 10 females were evaluable for toxicity and response. Four patients were chemonaive. Mean number cycles given were 3. Grade 3/4 thrombocytopenia and neutropenia were comparable on both schedules, as was the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) for both schedules. There were no apparent differences in absolute neutrophil count or platelet nadirs between schedules A and B for three of the four cohorts. The principal non-hematologic toxicity was nausea and vomiting. The time of overlap of topotecan lactone or total concentrations and docetaxel concentrations were greater on schedule A as compared with schedule B and was associated with reduced clearance of docetaxel on schedule A as compared to schedule B. However, the mean

  18. A phase I/II dose-escalation trial of vitamin D3 and calcium in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, J M; Kimball, S; Vieth, R; Bar-Or, A; Dosch, H-M; Cheung, R; Gagne, D; D'Souza, C; Ursell, M; O'Connor, P

    2010-06-08

    Low vitamin D status has been associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) prevalence and risk, but the therapeutic potential of vitamin D in established MS has not been explored. Our aim was to assess the tolerability of high-dose oral vitamin D and its impact on biochemical, immunologic, and clinical outcomes in patients with MS prospectively. An open-label randomized prospective controlled 52-week trial matched patients with MS for demographic and disease characteristics, with randomization to treatment or control groups. Treatment patients received escalating vitamin D doses up to 40,000 IU/day over 28 weeks to raise serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] rapidly and assess tolerability, followed by 10,000 IU/day (12 weeks), and further downtitrated to 0 IU/day. Calcium (1,200 mg/day) was given throughout the trial. Primary endpoints were mean change in serum calcium at each vitamin D dose and a comparison of serum calcium between groups. Secondary endpoints included 25(OH)D and other biochemical measures, immunologic biomarkers, relapse events, and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score. Forty-nine patients (25 treatment, 24 control) were enrolled [mean age 40.5 years, EDSS 1.34, and 25(OH)D 78 nmol/L]. All calcium-related measures within and between groups were normal. Despite a mean peak 25(OH)D of 413 nmol/L, no significant adverse events occurred. Although there may have been confounding variables in clinical outcomes, treatment group patients appeared to have fewer relapse events and a persistent reduction in T-cell proliferation compared to controls. High-dose vitamin D (approximately 10,000 IU/day) in multiple sclerosis is safe, with evidence of immunomodulatory effects. This trial provides Class II evidence that high-dose vitamin D use for 52 weeks in patients with multiple sclerosis does not significantly increase serum calcium levels when compared to patients not on high-dose supplementation. The trial, however, lacked statistical precision and the

  19. Precision Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy in Poor Performing Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Phase 1 Dose Escalation Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westover, Kenneth D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Loo, Billy W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Gerber, David E. [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Iyengar, Puneeth; Choy, Hak [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Diehn, Maximilian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Hughes, Randy; Schiller, Joan; Dowell, Jonathan [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Wardak, Zabi [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Sher, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Christie, Alana; Xie, Xian-Jin [Department of Clinical Science, Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Corona, Irma [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Sharma, Akanksha [School of Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Wadsworth, Margaret E. [Radiation Oncology of Mississippi, Jackson, Mississippi (United States); Timmerman, Robert, E-mail: Robert.Timmerman@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: Treatment regimens for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) give suboptimal clinical outcomes. Technological advancements such as radiation therapy, the backbone of most treatment regimens, may enable more potent and effective therapies. The objective of this study was to escalate radiation therapy to a tumoricidal hypofractionated dose without exceeding the maximally tolerated dose (MTD) in patients with locally advanced NSCLC. Methods and Materials: Patients with stage II to IV or recurrent NSCLC and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 2 or greater and not candidates for surgical resection, stereotactic radiation, or concurrent chemoradiation were eligible. Highly conformal radiation therapy was given to treat intrathoracic disease in 15 fractions to a total of 50, 55, or 60 Gy. Results: Fifty-five patients were enrolled: 15 at the 50-Gy, 21 at the 55-Gy, and 19 at the 60-Gy dose levels. A 90-day follow-up was completed in each group without exceeding the MTD. With a median follow-up of 12.5 months, there were 93 grade ≥3 adverse events (AEs), including 39 deaths, although most AEs were considered related to factors other than radiation therapy. One patient from the 55- and 60-Gy dose groups developed grade ≥3 esophagitis, and 5, 4, and 4 patients in the respective dose groups experienced grade ≥3 dyspnea, but only 2 of these AEs were considered likely related to therapy. There was no association between fraction size and toxicity (P=.24). The median overall survival was 6 months with no significant differences between dose levels (P=.59). Conclusions: Precision hypofractionated radiation therapy consisting of 60 Gy in 15 fractions for locally advanced NSCLC is generally well tolerated. This treatment regimen could provide patients with poor performance status a potent alternative to chemoradiation. This study has implications for the cost effectiveness of lung cancer therapy. Additional studies of long

  20. An individualized radiation dose escalation trial in non-small cell lung cancer based on FDG-PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanet, Marie; Goossens, Samuel; Lee, John Aldo; Janssens, Guillaume; Bol, Anne; Geets, Xavier [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Center of Molecular Imaging, Radiotherapy and Oncology (MIRO), Institut de Recherche Experimentale et Clinique, Brussels (Belgium); Delor, Antoine [Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Department of Radiation Oncology, Brussels (Belgium); Hanin, Francois-Xavier [Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Brussels (Belgium); Ghaye, Benoit [Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Maanen, Aline van [Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Statistical Support Unit, Cancer Centre, Brussels (Belgium); Remouchamps, Vincent; Clermont, Christian [Clinique et Maternite Sainte Elisabeth, Department of Radiation Oncology, CHU UCL Namur (Belgium)

    2017-10-15

    The aim of the study was to assess the feasibility of an individualized 18F fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)-guided dose escalation boost in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and to assess its impact on local tumor control and toxicity. A total of 13 patients with stage II-III NSCLC were enrolled to receive a dose of 62.5 Gy in 25 fractions to the CT-based planning target volume (PTV; primary tumor and affected lymph nodes). The fraction dose was increased within the individual PET-based PTV (PTV{sub PET}) using intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) until the predefined organ-at-risk (OAR) threshold was reached. Tumor response was assessed during follow-up by means of repeat FDG-PET/computed tomography. Acute and late toxicity were recorded and classified according to the CTCAE criteria (Version 4.0). Local progression-free survival was determined using the Kaplan-Meier method. The average dose to PTV{sub PET} reached 89.17 Gy for peripheral and 75 Gy for central tumors. After a median follow-up period of 29 months, seven patients were still alive, while six had died (four due to distant progression, two due to grade 5 toxicity). Local progression was seen in two patients in association with further recurrences. One and 2-year local progression free survival rates were 76.9% and 52.8%, respectively. Three cases of acute grade 3 esophagitis were seen. Two patients with central tumors developed late toxicity and died due to severe hemoptysis. These results suggest that a non-uniform and individualized dose escalation based on FDG-PET in IMRT delivery is feasible. The doses reached were higher in patients with peripheral compared to central tumors. This strategy enables good local control to be achieved at acceptable toxicity rates. However, dose escalation in centrally located tumors with direct invasion of mediastinal organs must be performed with great caution in order to avoid severe

  1. Long-term tolerance and outcomes for dose escalation in early salvage post-prostatectomy radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safdieh, Joseph; Schwartz, David; Weiner, Joseph; Weiss, Jeffrey P.; Madeb, Isaac; Rotman, Marvin; Schreiber, David [Dept.of Veteran Affairs, New York Harbor Healthcare System, Brooklyn (United States); Rineer, Justin [University of Florida Health Cancer Center, Orlando (United States)

    2014-09-15

    To study the long-term outcomes and tolerance in our patients who received dose escalated radiotherapy in the early salvage post-prostatectomy setting. The medical records of 54 consecutive patients who underwent radical prostatectomy subsequently followed by salvage radiation therapy (SRT) to the prostate bed between 2003-2010 were analyzed. Patients included were required to have a pre-radiation prostate specific antigen level (PSA) of 2 ng/mL or less. The median SRT dose was 70.2 Gy. Biochemical failure after salvage radiation was defined as a PSA level >0.2 ng/mL. Biochemical control and survival endpoints were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis were used to identify the potential impact of confounding factors on outcomes. The median pre-SRT PSA was 0.45 ng/mL and the median follow-up time was 71 months. The 4- and 7-year actuarial biochemical control rates were 75.7% and 63.2%, respectively. The actuarial 4- and 7-year distant metastasis-free survival was 93.7% and 87.0%, respectively, and the actuarial 7-year prostate cancer specific survival was 94.9%. Grade 3 late genitourinary toxicity developed in 14 patients (25.9%), while grade 4 late genitourinary toxicity developed in 2 patients (3.7%). Grade 3 late gastrointestinal toxicity developed in 1 patient (1.9%), and grade 4 late gastrointestinal toxicity developed in 1 patient (1.9%). In this series with long-term follow-up, early SRT provided outcomes and toxicity profiles similar to those reported from the three major randomized trials studying adjuvant radiation therapy.

  2. Preliminary Results of a Phase 1 Dose-Escalation Trial for Early-Stage Breast Cancer Using 5-Fraction Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Partial-Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahimi, Asal, E-mail: asal.rahimi@utsouthwestern.edu [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Thomas, Kimberly; Spangler, Ann [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Rao, Roshni; Leitch, Marilyn; Wooldridge, Rachel; Rivers, Aeisha [Department of Surgery, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Seiler, Stephen [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Albuquerque, Kevin; Stevenson, Stella [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Goudreau, Sally [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Garwood, Dan [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Haley, Barbara [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Euhus, David [Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Heinzerling, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Levine Cancer Institute, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Ding, Chuxiong [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Gao, Ang; Ahn, Chul [Department of Statistics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Timmerman, Robert [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the tolerability of a dose-escalated 5-fraction stereotactic body radiation therapy for partial-breast irradiation (S-PBI) in treating early-stage breast cancer after partial mastectomy; the primary objective was to escalate dose utilizing a robotic stereotactic radiation system treating the lumpectomy cavity without exceeding the maximum tolerated dose. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients included those with ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive nonlobular epithelial histologies and stage 0, I, or II, with tumor size <3 cm. Patients and physicians completed baseline and subsequent cosmesis outcome questionnaires. Starting dose was 30 Gy in 5 fractions and was escalated by 2.5 Gy total for each cohort to 40 Gy. Results: In all, 75 patients were enrolled, with a median age of 62 years. Median follow-up for 5 cohorts was 49.9, 42.5, 25.7, 20.3, and 13.5 months, respectively. Only 3 grade 3 toxicities were experienced. There was 1 dose-limiting toxicity in the overall cohort. Ten patients experienced palpable fat necrosis (4 of which were symptomatic). Physicians scored cosmesis as excellent or good in 95.9%, 100%, 96.7%, and 100% at baseline and 6, 12, and 24 months after S-PBI, whereas patients scored the same periods as 86.5%, 97.1%, 95.1%, and 95.3%, respectively. The disagreement rates between MDs and patients during those periods were 9.4%, 2.9%, 1.6%, and 4.7%, respectively. There have been no recurrences or distant metastases. Conclusion: Dose was escalated to the target dose of 40 Gy in 5 fractions, with the occurrence of only 1 dose-limiting toxicity. Patients felt cosmetic results improved within the first year after surgery and stereotactic body radiation therapy. Our results show minimal toxicity with excellent cosmesis; however, further follow-up is warranted in future studies. This study is the first to show the safety, tolerability, feasibility, and cosmesis results of a 5-fraction dose-escalated S-PBI treatment for

  3. The effects of oral and intramuscular administration and dose escalation of enrofloxacin on the selection of quinolone resistance among Salmonella and coliforms in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiuff, C.; Lykkesfeldt, J.; Svendsen, O.

    2003-01-01

    the resistant and total number of coliforms and Salmonella in faeces of the pigs. High frequencies of fluoroquinolone resistance developed rapidly among the coliform flora independent of route of administration, dose or time of initiation of the treatment. Selection for resistance among the artificially...... introduced Salmonella was reduced by using the intramuscular route and by escalating the dose 3 or 6 times the recommended dose of 2.5 mg/kg bwt, which also resulted in shortening of the period, in which the pigs were shedding Salmonella. The resistance among the coliform flora persisted for at least 2 weeks...

  4. Off-label biologic regimens in psoriasis: a systematic review of efficacy and safety of dose escalation, reduction, and interrupted biologic therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Brezinski

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: While off-label dosing of biologic treatments may be necessary in selected psoriasis patients, no systematic review exists to date that synthesizes the efficacy and safety of these off-label dosing regimens. The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate efficacy and safety of off-label dosing regimens (dose escalation, dose reduction, and interrupted treatment with etanercept, adalimumab, infliximab, ustekinumab, and alefacept for psoriasis treatment. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SELECTION: We searched OVID Medline from January 1, 1990 through August 1, 2011 for prospective clinical trials that studied biologic therapy for psoriasis treatment in adults. Individual articles were screened for studies that examined escalated, reduced, or interrupted therapy with etanercept, adalimumab, infliximab, ustekinumab, or alefacept. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 23 articles with 12,617 patients matched the inclusion and exclusion criteria for the systematic review. Data were examined for primary and secondary efficacy outcomes and adverse events including infections, malignancies, cardiovascular events, and anti-drug antibodies. The preponderance of data suggests that continuous treatment with anti-TNF agents and anti-IL12/23 agent was necessary for maintenance of disease control. Among non-responders, dose escalation with etanercept, adalimumab, ustekinumab, and alefacept typically resulted in greater efficacy than standard dosing. Dose reduction with etanercept and alefacept resulted in reduced efficacy. Withdrawal of the examined biologics led to an increase in disease activity; efficacy from retreatment did not result in equivalent initial response rates for most biologics. Safety data on off-label dosing regimens are limited. CONCLUSION: Dose escalation in non-responders generally resulted in increased efficacy in the examined biologics used to treat moderate-to-severe psoriasis. Continuous treatment with anti-TNF agents and anti-IL12/23 agent

  5. Effects of aspirin dose escalation on platelet function and urinary thromboxane and prostacyclin levels in normal dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLewee, N; Archer, T; Wills, R; Mackin, A; Thomason, J

    2018-02-01

    Established "low" aspirin dosages inconsistently inhibit platelet function in dogs. Higher aspirin dosages consistently inhibit platelet function, but are associated with adverse effects. The objectives of this study were to use an escalation in dosage to determine the lowest aspirin dosage that consistently inhibited platelet function without inhibiting prostacyclin synthesis. Eight dogs were treated with five aspirin dosages: 0.5 mg/kg q24h, 1 mg/kg q24h, 2 mg/kg q24h, 4 mg/kg q24h and 10 mg/kg q12h for 7 days. Utilizing aggregometry and a whole-blood platelet function analyzer (PFA-100), platelet function was evaluated before and after treatment. Urine 11-dehydro-thromboxane-B2 (11-dTXB2 ) and 6-keto-prostaglandin-F1α (6-keto-PGF1α ), were measured. Compared to pretreatment, there were significant post-treatment decreases in the maximum aggregometry amplitude and increases in the PFA-100 closure times for all dosages expect 0.5 mg/kg q24h. There was no difference in amplitude or closure time among the 2 mg/kg q24h, 4 mg/kg q24h, and 10 mg/kg q12h dosages. Compared to pretreatment values, there was a significant decrease in urinary 11-dTXB2 -to-creatinine and 6-keto-PGF1α -to-creatinine ratios, but there was no dose-dependent decrease for either metabolite. An aspirin dosage of 2 mg/kg q24h consistently inhibits platelet function without decreasing prostacyclin synthesis significantly more than lower aspirin dosages. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Safety of Intracavernous Bone Marrow-Mononuclear Cells for Postradical Prostatectomy Erectile Dysfunction: An Open Dose-Escalation Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiou, René; Hamidou, Leila; Birebent, Brigitte; Bitari, Dalila; Lecorvoisier, Philippe; Contremoulins, Isabelle; Khodari, Muhieddine; Rodriguez, Anne-Marie; Augustin, Déborah; Roudot-Thoraval, Françoise; de la Taille, Alexandre; Rouard, Hélène

    2016-06-01

    Evidence from animal models replicating postradical prostatectomy erectile dysfunction (pRP-ED) suggests intracavernous injection of bone marrow-mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) as a promising treatment approach for pRP-ED. We conducted a phase 1/2 pilot clinical trial of intracavernous autologous BM-MNC injection to treat pRP-ED (NCT01089387). Twelve patients with localized prostate cancer and vasculogenic pRP-ED refractory to maximal medical treatment were divided into four equal groups treated with escalating BM-MNC doses (2×10(7), 2×10(8), 1×10(9), 2×10(9)). Tolerance was the primary endpoint. Secondary endpoints were the effects on erectile function and penile vascularization at 6 mo, as assessed using the International Index of Erectile Function-15 and Erection Hardness Scale questionnaires, and color duplex Doppler ultrasound. We measured the peak systolic velocity in cavernous arteries and assessed endothelial function using the penile nitric oxide release test. No serious side effects occurred. At 6 mo versus baseline, significant improvements of intercourse satisfaction (6.8±3.6, 3.9±2.5, p=0.044) and erectile function (17.4±8.9, 7.3±4.5, p=0.006) domains of the International Index of Erectile Function-15 and Erection Hardness Scale (2.6±1.1, 1.3±0.8, p=0.008) were observed in the total population. Spontaneous erections showed significantly greater improvement with the higher doses. Clinical benefits were associated with improvement of peak systolic velocity and of % penile nitric oxide release test and sustained after 1 yr. Our results need to be confirmed by phase 2 clinical trials. We report a phase 1/2 pilot clinical trial investigating cell therapy with injection of bone marrow mononucleated cells to treat postradical prostatectomy erectile dysfunction. No serious side effects occurred. Improvements of erectile function and penile vascularization were noted. Further studies are required to confirm these preliminary results. Copyright © 2015

  7. Exon skipping and dystrophin restoration in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy after systemic phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer treatment: an open-label, phase 2, dose-escalation study

    OpenAIRE

    Cirak, S.; Arechavala-Gomeza, V.; Guglieri, M.; Feng, L.; Torelli, S.; Anthony, K.; Abbs, S.; Garralda, M. E.; Bourke, J.; Wells, D. J.; Dickson, G.; Wood, M. J. A.; Wilton, S. D.; Straub, V.; Kole, R.

    2011-01-01

    Background We report clinical safety and biochemical efficacy from a dose-ranging study of intravenously administered AVI-4658 phosphorodiamidate Morph lino oligomer (PMO) in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.Method We undertook an open-label, phase 2, dose-escalation study (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 10.0, and 20.0 mg/kg bodyweight) in ambulant patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy aged 5-15 years with amenable deletions in DMD. Participants had a muscle biopsy before starting treatment...

  8. The dynamic pituitary response to escalating-dose TRH stimulation test in hypothyroid patients treated with liothyronine or levothyroxine replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Sahzene; Linderman, Joyce D; Smith, Sheila; Zhao, Xiongce; Pucino, Frank; Celi, Francesco S

    2013-05-01

    A recent trial showed that 1:3 μg:μg liothyronine (L-T3) substitution for levothyroxine (L-T4) achieving near-identical TSH levels resulted in a significant decrease in weight and cholesterol levels with no appreciable changes in cardiovascular parameters, suggesting a differential peripheral response to the therapy. We characterized the pituitary-thyroid axis in hypothyroid patients receiving equivalent doses of L-T3 or L-T4 by escalating-dose TRH stimulation test. A secondary analysis of a L-T3 vs L-T4 therapy trial was performed. The study was conducted at the National Institutes of Health. Thirteen patients were studied. Escalating-dose (5, 15, and 200 μg) TRH stimulation test on both treatment arms. Study outcomes were peak serum TSH concentration (Cmax), time to peak TSH concentration (Tmax), area under the curve from 0 to 60 minutes (AUC₀₋₆₀) after TRH injection. Thirteen patients aged 51.2 ± 8.29 years completed escalating-dose TRH stimulation test. No significant difference between L-T3 and L-T4 treatments was observed in TSH Cmax or area under the curve. L-T4 resulted in a small but significantly shorter Tmax compared to L-T3 (3.5 ± 0.73 min on 200 μg TRH dose, P TRH dose compared to 200 μg resulted in a shorter Tmax on both treatment arms (6.9 ± 0.59 min L-T3, 4 ± 0.3 min L-T4; P = .0002). The assessment of the dynamic pituitary response to escalating doses of TRH confirms that substitution of L-T3 for L-T4 on a 1:3 ratio achieves a near-identical degree of pituitary euthyroidism. Furthermore, the data suggest that lower doses of TRH might provide clinically relevant information of thyrotroph function, particularly when investigating partial pituitary insufficiency states.

  9. Hypofractionated Dose Escalated 3D Conformal Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Outcomes from a Mono-Institutional Phase II Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramacere, Francesco; Arcangeli, Stefano; Pignatelli, Antonietta; Castagna, Roberta; Portaluri, Maurizio

    2015-05-01

    (bNED) was 83% for all patients. Our study confirms that 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) remains a safe and effective method to deliver a dose-escalated hypofractionated regimen for PCa patients in all risk classes with acceptable toxicity rates and optimal biochemical control. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  10. Using Generalized Equivalent Uniform Dose Atlases to Combine and Analyze Prospective Dosimetric and Radiation Pneumonitis Data From 2 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Dose Escalation Protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Fan; Yorke, Ellen D. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Belderbos, Jose S.A.; Borst, Gerben R. [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rosenzweig, Kenneth E. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Lebesque, Joos V. [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jackson, Andrew, E-mail: jacksona@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the use of generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) atlas for data pooling in radiation pneumonitis (RP) modeling, to determine the dependence of RP on gEUD, to study the consistency between data sets, and to verify the increased statistical power of the combination. Methods and Materials: Patients enrolled in prospective phase I/II dose escalation studies of radiation therapy of non-small cell lung cancer at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) (78 pts) and the Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI) (86 pts) were included; 10 (13%) and 14 (17%) experienced RP requiring steroids (RPS) within 6 months after treatment. gEUD was calculated from dose-volume histograms. Atlases for each data set were created using 1-Gy steps from exact gEUDs and RPS data. The Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model was fit to the atlas and exact gEUD data. Heterogeneity and inconsistency statistics for the fitted parameters were computed. gEUD maps of the probability of RPS rate {>=}20% were plotted. Results: The 2 data sets were homogeneous and consistent. The best fit values of the volume effect parameter a were small, with upper 95% confidence limit around 1.0 in the joint data. The likelihood profiles around the best fit a values were flat in all cases, making determination of the best fit a weak. All confidence intervals (CIs) were narrower in the joint than in the individual data sets. The minimum P value for correlations of gEUD with RPS in the joint data was .002, compared with P=.01 and .05 for MSKCC and NKI data sets, respectively. gEUD maps showed that at small a, RPS risk increases with gEUD. Conclusions: The atlas can be used to combine gEUD and RPS information from different institutions and model gEUD dependence of RPS. RPS has a large volume effect with the mean dose model barely included in the 95% CI. Data pooling increased statistical power.

  11. A dosimetric evaluation of dose escalation for the radical treatment of locally advanced vulvar cancer by intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloemers, Monique C.W.M., E-mail: c.bloemers@nki.nl [Department of Radiotherapy, the Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Portelance, Lorraine [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Ruo, Russell; Parker, William [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Souhami, Luis [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this planning study was to determine whether intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) reduces the radiation dose to organs at risk (OAR) when compared with 3D conventional radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in patients with vulvar cancer treated by irradiation. This study also investigated the use of sequential IMRT boost (seq-IMRT) and simultaneous integrated boost (SIB-IMRT) for dose escalation in the treatment of locally advanced vulvar cancer. Five vulvar cancer patients treated in the postoperative setting and 5 patients treated with definitive intent (def-group) were evaluated. For the postoperative group, 3D-CRT and IMRT plans to a total dose (TD) of 45 Gy were generated. For the def-group, 4 plans were generated: a 3D-CRT and an IMRT plan to a TD of 56.4 Gy, a SIB-IMRT plan to a TD of 56 Gy, and a SIB-IMRT with dose escalation (SIB-IMRT-esc): TD of 67.2 Gy. Mean dose and dose-volume histograms were compared using Student's t-test. IMRT significantly (all p < 0.05) reduced the D{sub mean}, V30, and V40 for all OAR in the adjuvant setting. The V45 was also significantly reduced for all OAR except the bladder. For patients treated in the def-group, all IMRT techniques significantly reduced the D{sub mean}, V40, and V45 for all OAR. The mean femur doses with SIB-IMRT and SIB-IMRT-esc were 47% and 49% lower compared with 3D-CRT. SIB-IMRT-esc reduced the doses to the OAR compared with seq-3D-CRT but increased the D{sub max.} for the small bowel, rectum, and bladder. IMRT reduces the dose to the OAR compared with 3D-CRT in patients with vulvar cancer receiving irradiation to a volume covering the vulvar region and nodal areas without compromising the dosimetric coverage of the target volume. IMRT for vulvar cancer is feasible and an attractive option for dose escalation studies.

  12. A phase I, dose-escalation study of TB-403, a monoclonal antibody directed against PlGF, in patients with advanced solid tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, U; Nielsen, D L; Sørensen, M

    2012-01-01

    and the terminal half-life values ranged from 9 to 14 days. Six patients exhibited stable disease for at least 8 weeks. Two patients, (oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma and pancreatic adenocarcinoma) both treated with 5 mg kg(-1) weekly, remained stable for 12 months. CONCLUSION: TB-403 treatment in this patient......BACKGROUND: TB-403 (RO 5323441), a humanised monoclonal antibody, is a novel antiangiogenesis agent directed against placental growth factor. The safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and antitumour activity of TB-403 were assessed in a phase I, dose-escalation study in patients with advanced solid...

  13. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost After Concurrent Chemoradiation for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Phase 1 Dose Escalation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T., E-mail: jhepel@lifespan.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Leonard, Kara Lynne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Safran, Howard [Division of Medical Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Division of Medical Oncology, Miriam Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Ng, Thomas [Division of Thoracic Surgery, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Taber, Angela [Division of Medical Oncology, Miriam Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Khurshid, Humera; Birnbaum, Ariel [Division of Medical Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Wazer, David E.; DiPetrillo, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost to primary and nodal disease after chemoradiation has potential to improve outcomes for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A dose escalation study was initiated to evaluate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients received chemoradiation to a dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions and had primary and nodal volumes appropriate for SBRT boost (<120 cc and <60 cc, respectively). SBRT was delivered in 2 fractions after chemoradiation. Dose was escalated from 16 to 28 Gy in 2 Gy/fraction increments, resulting in 4 dose cohorts. MTD was defined when ≥2 of 6 patients per cohort experienced any treatment-related grade 3 to 5 toxicity within 4 weeks of treatment or the maximum dose was reached. Late toxicity, disease control, and survival were also evaluated. Results: Twelve patients (3 per dose level) underwent treatment. All treatment plans met predetermined dose-volume constraints. The mean age was 64 years. Most patients had stage III disease (92%) and were medically inoperable (92%). The maximum dose level was reached with no grade 3 to 5 acute toxicities. At a median follow-up time of 16 months, 1-year local-regional control (LRC) was 78%. LRC was 50% at <24 Gy and 100% at ≥24 Gy (P=.02). Overall survival at 1 year was 67%. Late toxicity (grade 3-5) was seen in only 1 patient who experienced fatal bronchopulmonary hemorrhage (grade 5). There were no predetermined dose constraints for the proximal bronchial-vascular tree (PBV) in this study. This patient's 4-cc PBV dose was substantially higher than that received by other patients in all 4 cohorts and was associated with the toxicity observed: 20.3 Gy (P<.05) and 73.5 Gy (P=.07) for SBRT boost and total treatment, respectively. Conclusions: SBRT boost to both primary and nodal disease after chemoradiation is feasible and well tolerated. Local control rates are encouraging, especially at doses ≥24

  14. A Phase 1 Study of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Dose Escalation for Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer After Modified FOLFIRINOX (NCT01446458)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaib, Walid L.; Hawk, Natalyn [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Cassidy, Richard J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Chen, Zhengjia; Zhang, Chao [Department of Biostatistics, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Brutcher, Edith [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Kooby, David; Maithel, Shishir K.; Sarmiento, Juan M. [Department of Surgery, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Landry, Jerome [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); El-Rayes, Bassel F., E-mail: bassel.el-rayes@emoryhealthcare.org [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: A challenge in borderline resectable pancreatic cancer (BRPC) management is the high rate of positive posterior margins (PM). Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) allows for higher radiation delivery dose with conformity. This study evaluated the maximal tolerated dose with a dose escalation plan level up to 45 Gy using SBRT in BRPC. Methods and Materials: A single-institution, 3 + 3 phase 1 clinical trial design was used to evaluate 4 dose levels of SBRT delivered in 3 fractions to the planning target volume (PTV) with a simultaneous in-field boost (SIB) to the PM. Dose level (DL) 1 was 30 Gy to the PTV, and for dose levels 2 through 4 (DL2-DL4) the dose was 36 Gy. The SIB dose to the PM was 6, 6, 7.5, and 9 Gy for DL-1, DL-2, DL-3, and DL-4, respectively. All patients received 4 treatments of modified FOLFIRINOX (fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, oxaliplatin) before SBRT. Results: Thirteen patients with a median age of 64 years were enrolled. The median follow-up time was 18 months. The locations of the cancer were head (n=12) and uncinate/neck (n=1). One patient did not undergo SBRT. There were no grade 3 or 4 toxicities. Five patients did not undergo resection because of disease progression (1 local, 4 distant); 8 had R0 resection in the PM, and 5 of 8 had vessel reconstruction. Two patients had disease downstaged to T1 and T2 from T3 disease. Four patients are still alive, and 3 are disease free. The median overall survival for resected patients was not reached (9.3: not reached). Conclusion: The SBRT dose of 36 Gy with a 9-Gy SIB to the PM (total 45 Gy) delivered in 3 fractions is safe and well tolerated. The dose-limiting toxicity for a 45-Gy dose was not reached, and further dose escalations are needed in future trials.

  15. A phase I dose escalation study of oral c-MET inhibitor tivantinib (ARQ 197) in combination with gemcitabine in patients with solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, S; Saleh, M; Bendell, J; Infante, J R; Jones, S; Kurkjian, C D; Moore, K M; Kazakin, J; Abbadessa, G; Wang, Y; Chen, Y; Schwartz, B; Camacho, L H

    2014-07-01

    Tivantinib (ARQ 197) is an orally available, non-adenosine triphosphate competitive, selective c-MET inhibitor. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the safety, tolerability and to establish the recommended phase II dose (RP2D) of tivantinib and gemcitabine combination. Patients with advanced or metastatic solid tumors were treated with escalating doses of tivantinib (120-360 mg capsules) in combination with gemcitabine (1000 mg/m(2) weekly for 3 of 4 weeks). Different schedules of administration were tested and modified based on emerging preclinical data. Tivantinib was given continuously, twice a day (b.i.d.) for 2, 3 or 4 weeks of a 28-day cycle or on a 5-day on, 2-day off schedule (the day before and day of gemcitabine administration). Twenty-nine patients were treated with gemcitabine and escalating doses of tivantinib: 120 mg b.i.d. (n = 4), 240 mg b.i.d. (n = 6) and 360 mg b.i.d. (n = 19). No dose-limiting toxicities were observed in escalation. The RP2D was 360 mg b.i.d. daily, and 45 additional patients were enrolled in the expansion cohort. Grade ≥3 treatment-related toxicities were observed in 54 of 74 (73%) patients with the most common being neutropenia (43%), anemia (30%), thrombocytopenia (28%) and fatigue (15%). There was one treatment-related death due to neutropenia. Administration of gemcitabine did not affect tivantinib concentration. Fifty-six patients were assessable for response. Eleven (20%) patients achieved a partial response and 26 (46%) had stable disease (SD), including 15 (27%) who achieved SD for over 4 months. Ten of 37 patients with clinical benefit had prior exposure to gemcitabine. The combination of tivantinib at its monotherapy dose and standard dose gemcitabine was safe and tolerable. Early signs of antitumor activity may warrant further development of this combination in nonsmall-cell lung cancer, ovarian, pancreatic and cholangiocarcinoma. NCT00874042. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press

  16. Phase 1 dose-escalation trial evaluating the combination of the selective MET (mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor) inhibitor tivantinib (ARQ 197) plus erlotinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Jonathan W; Laux, Isett; Chai, Feng; Savage, Ronald E; Ferrari, Dora; Garmey, Edward G; Just, Richard G; Rosen, Lee S

    2012-12-01

    Amplification of the mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (MET) gene can promote tumor resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibition. Dual EGFR-MET inhibition may overcome this resistance. Tivantinib (ARQ 197) is a selective, oral, non-ATP-competitive, small-molecule inhibitor of the MET receptor tyrosine kinase. This phase 1 trial assessed the safety, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary antitumor activity of tivantinib combined with the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib. Patients with advanced solid malignancies were administered oral tivantinib at escalating doses of 120, 240, 360, and 480 mg twice daily (BID) plus 150 mg erlotinib once daily (QD). Single or multiple intrapatient dose escalation was planned in the absence of dose-limiting toxicity in the first cycle of therapy (21 days). Thirty-two patients received combination treatment. Tivantinib serum concentrations were not dose-proportional. The most common (≥ 20%) adverse events (AEs) regardless of causality included rash (n = 17), fatigue (n = 12), nausea (n = 10), abdominal pain (n = 10), diarrhea (n = 9), bradycardia (n = 9), and anemia (n = 7). AEs considered related to study treatment occurred in 28 patients (87.5%), and 5 patients (15.6%) had treatment-related serious AEs, including neutropenia, leukopenia, syncope, sinus bradycardia, and sick sinus syndrome. Fifteen of 32 patients (46.8%) had a partial response (n = 1) or stable disease (n = 14) as assessed by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. Six of 8 patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer achieved stable disease. The recommended phase 2 dose is tivantinib 360 mg BID plus erlotinib 150 mg QD. Tivantinib plus erlotinib was well tolerated with encouraging clinical activity, especially in patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer. Copyright © 2012 American Cancer Society.

  17. Phase 1 dose-escalating study to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of a recombinant factor Xa variant (FXa(I16L) ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons-Rich, D; Hua, F; Li, G; Kantaridis, C; Pittman, D D; Arkin, S

    2017-05-01

    Essentials FXa(I16L) is a recombinant zymogen-like variant of activated coagulation factor X (FXa). A phase 1 dose escalation clinical trial of FXa(I16L) was conducted in healthy adults. FXa(I16L) was safe and tolerated at doses up to 5 μg/kg; no dose-limiting toxicity was observed. Data support further development of FXa(I16L) for patients with acute hemorrhagic conditions. Background FXa(I16L) (PF-05230907) is a zymogen-like variant of activated factor X (FXa). It shows enhanced resistance to inactivation by endogenous inhibitors as compared with wild-type FXa, and restores hemostatic activity in non-clinical models of various bleeding conditions. Objectives To evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of FXa(I16L) by performing a phase 1, first-in-human, dose-escalation clinical trial in healthy adult volunteers. Methods Participants were assigned to one of six ascending single-dose cohorts (0.1, 0.3, 1, 2, 3 or 5 μg kg(-1) ), each planned to comprise six volunteers treated with FXa(I16L) and two treated with placebo. Assessments included safety monitoring, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PD) analyses, and immunogenicity testing. Results The trial enrolled 49 male volunteers. Administration of a single intravenous bolus dose of FXa(I16L) was safe and tolerated at all dose levels tested, with no dose-limiting toxicity or serious adverse events. FXa(I16L) plasma levels appeared to increase dose-proportionally, with a half-life of ~ 4 min. Treatment-related PD changes were observed for activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin generation assay, thrombin-antithrombin complexes, prothrombin fragment 1 + 2, and D-dimer. One volunteer had a weak and transient non-neutralizing antidrug antibody response, which did not cross-react with native FX or native FXa. Conclusions FXa(I16L) was safe and tolerated, and showed a pharmacologic effect in healthy adults when administered at doses up to 5 μg kg(-1) . The safety profile, pharmacokinetics

  18. First-in-Man Dose-Escalation Study of the Selective BRAF Inhibitor RG7256 in Patients with BRAF V600-Mutated Advanced Solid Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dienstmann, Rodrigo; Lassen, Ulrik; Cebon, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    (18 %), fatigue (16 %) and nausea (13 %), mainly grade 1. Three patients (7 %) developed cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. Photosensitivity, arthralgia and increased liver enzyme levels were each observed in only one patient each. Of 44 evaluable patients, 14 (32 %) had a partial response (melanoma......BACKGROUND: BRAF mutations are a validated target for cancer therapy. A second-generation BRAF inhibitor with an improved preclinical safety profile (RG7256) was evaluated in a first-in-man study in order to determine the safety, efficacy, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in patients with BRAF...... V600-mutated advanced solid tumors. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients received RG7256 orally over 8 dose levels from 200 mg once a day (QD) to 2400 mg twice a day (BID) (50-, 100- and 150-mg tablets) using a classic 3 + 3 dose escalation design. RESULTS: In total, 45 patients were enrolled; most (87...

  19. Optimization of tolerability and efficacy of the novel dual amylin and calcitonin receptor agonist KBP-089 through dose escalation and combination with a GLP-1 analog

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gydesen, Sofie; Andreassen, Kim Vietz; Hjuler, Sara Toftegaard

    2017-01-01

    Amylin and GLP-1 agonism induce a well-known anorexic effect at dose initiation, which is managed by dose escalation. In this study we investigated how to optimize tolerability while maintaining efficacy of a novel, highly potent dual amylin and calcitonin receptor agonist (DACRA), KBP-089......, and the following treatment with 2.5, 10, and 40 µg/kg resulted in an ~15% vehicle-corrected weight loss, a corresponding reduction in adipose tissue (AT), and, in all treatment groups, improved oral glucose tolerance (P ...-089 was well tolerated and induced and sustained a significant weight loss and a reduction in AT in lean and HFD rats, underscoring the potential of KBP-089 as an anti-obesity agent....

  20. Somatostatin-based radiotherapy with [90Y-DOTA]-TOC in neuroendocrine tumors: long-term outcome of a phase I dose escalation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marincek Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We describe the long-term outcome after clinical introduction and dose escalation of somatostatin receptor targeted therapy with [90Y-DOTA]-TOC in patients with metastasized neuroendocrine tumors. Methods In a clinical phase I dose escalation study we treated patients with increasing [90Y-DOTA]-TOC activities. Multivariable Cox regression and competing risk regression were used to compare efficacy and toxicities of the different dosage protocols. Results Overall, 359 patients were recruited; 60 patients were enrolled for low dose (median: 2.4 GBq/cycle, range 0.9-7.8 GBq/cycle, 77 patients were enrolled for intermediate dose (median: 3.3 GBq/cycle, range: 2.0-7.4 GBq/cycle and 222 patients were enrolled for high dose (median: 6.7 GBq/cycle, range: 3.7-8.1 GBq/cycle [90Y-DOTA]-TOC treatment. The incidences of hematotoxicities grade 1–4 were 65.0%, 64.9% and 74.8%; the incidences of grade 4/5 kidney toxicities were 8.4%, 6.5% and 14.0%, and the median survival was 39 (range: 1–158 months, 34 (range: 1–118 months and 29 (range: 1–113 months. The high dose protocol was associated with an increased risk of kidney toxicity (Hazard Ratio: 3.12 (1.13-8.59 vs. intermediate dose, p = 0.03 and a shorter overall survival (Hazard Ratio: 2.50 (1.08-5.79 vs. low dose, p = 0.03. Conclusions Increasing [90Y-DOTA]-TOC activities may be associated with increasing hematological toxicities. The dose related hematotoxicity profile of [90Y-DOTA]-TOC could facilitate tailoring [90Y-DOTA]-TOC in patients with preexisting hematotoxicities. The results of the long-term outcome suggest that fractionated [90Y-DOTA]-TOC treatment might allow to reduce renal toxicity and to improve overall survival. (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00978211.

  1. Somatostatin-based radiotherapy with [90Y-DOTA]-TOC in neuroendocrine tumors: long-term outcome of a phase I dose escalation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marincek, Nicolas; Jörg, Ann-Catherine; Brunner, Philippe; Schindler, Christian; Koller, Michael T; Rochlitz, Christoph; Müller-Brand, Jan; Maecke, Helmut R; Briel, Matthias; Walter, Martin A

    2013-01-15

    We describe the long-term outcome after clinical introduction and dose escalation of somatostatin receptor targeted therapy with [90Y-DOTA]-TOC in patients with metastasized neuroendocrine tumors. In a clinical phase I dose escalation study we treated patients with increasing [90Y-DOTA]-TOC activities. Multivariable Cox regression and competing risk regression were used to compare efficacy and toxicities of the different dosage protocols. Overall, 359 patients were recruited; 60 patients were enrolled for low dose (median: 2.4 GBq/cycle, range 0.9-7.8 GBq/cycle), 77 patients were enrolled for intermediate dose (median: 3.3 GBq/cycle, range: 2.0-7.4 GBq/cycle) and 222 patients were enrolled for high dose (median: 6.7 GBq/cycle, range: 3.7-8.1 GBq/cycle) [90Y-DOTA]-TOC treatment. The incidences of hematotoxicities grade 1-4 were 65.0%, 64.9% and 74.8%; the incidences of grade 4/5 kidney toxicities were 8.4%, 6.5% and 14.0%, and the median survival was 39 (range: 1-158) months, 34 (range: 1-118) months and 29 (range: 1-113) months. The high dose protocol was associated with an increased risk of kidney toxicity (Hazard Ratio: 3.12 (1.13-8.59) vs. intermediate dose, p = 0.03) and a shorter overall survival (Hazard Ratio: 2.50 (1.08-5.79) vs. low dose, p = 0.03). Increasing [90Y-DOTA]-TOC activities may be associated with increasing hematological toxicities. The dose related hematotoxicity profile of [90Y-DOTA]-TOC could facilitate tailoring [90Y-DOTA]-TOC in patients with preexisting hematotoxicities. The results of the long-term outcome suggest that fractionated [90Y-DOTA]-TOC treatment might allow to reduce renal toxicity and to improve overall survival. (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00978211).

  2. Phase 1, placebo-controlled, dose escalation trial of chicory root extract in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonnala Geetha

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extracts of chicory root have anti-inflammatory properties in vitro and in animal models of arthritis. The primary objective of this investigator-initiated, Phase 1, placebo-controlled, double blind, dose-escalating trial was to determine the safety and tolerability of a proprietary bioactive extract of chicory root in patients with osteoarthritis (OA. Secondary objectives were to assess effects on the signs and symptoms of this disorder. Methods Individuals greater than 50 years of age with OA of the hip or knee were eligible for trial entry. A total of 40 patients were enrolled in 3 cohorts and were treated with escalating chicory doses of 600 mg/day, 1200 mg/day and 1800 mg/day for 1 month. The ratio of active treatment to placebo was 5:3 in cohorts 1 and 2 (8 patients each and 16:8 in cohort 3 (24 patients. Safety evaluations included measurement of vital signs and routine lab tests at baseline and the end of the treatment period. Efficacy evaluations at baseline and final visits included self-assessment questionnaires and measurement of the 25-foot walking time. Results In the highest dose cohort, 18 patients who completed treatment per protocol were analyzed for efficacy. In this group, 13 patients showed at least 20% improvement in the defined response domains of pain, stiffness and global assessment: 9 of 10 (90% patients randomized to active treatment with chicory and 4 of 8 (50% patients randomized to placebo (P = 0.06. In general, the treatment was well-tolerated. Only one patient who was treated with the highest dose of chicory had to discontinue treatment due to an adverse event. Conclusions The results of this pilot study suggest that a proprietary bioactive extract of chicory root has a potential role in the management of OA and merits further investigation. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT 01010919.

  3. Hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant integrated boost of 70-75 Gy in 5 weeks for advanced head and neck cancer. A phase I dose escalation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvek, J.; Skacelikova, E.; Otahal, B.; Halamka, M.; Feltl, D. [University Hospital Ostrava (Czech Republic). Dept. of Oncology; Kubes, J. [University Hospital Bulovka, Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kominek, P. [University Hospital Ostrava (Czech Republic). Dept. of Otolaryngology

    2012-08-15

    Background and purpose: The present study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of a new, 5-week regimen of 70-75 Gy hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant integrated boost (HARTCIB) for locally advanced, inoperable head and neck cancer. Methods and materials: A total of 39 patients with very advanced, stage IV nonmetastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (median gross tumor volume 72 ml) were included in this phase I dose escalation study. A total of 50 fractions intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were administered twice daily over 5 weeks. Prescribed total dose/dose per fraction for planning target volume (PTV{sub tumor}) were 70 Gy in 1.4 Gy fractions, 72.5 Gy in 1.45 Gy fractions, and 75 Gy in 1.5 Gy fractions for 10, 13, and 16 patients, respectively. Uninvolved lymphatic nodes (PTV{sub uninvolved}) were irradiated with 55 Gy in 1.1 Gy fractions using the concomitant integrated boost. Results: Acute toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG/EORTC scale; the incidence of grade 3 mucositis was 51% in the oral cavity/pharynx and 0% in skin and the recovery time was {<=} 9 weeks for all patients. Late toxicity was evaluated in patients in complete remission according to the RTOG/EORTC scale. No grade 3/4 late toxicity was observed. The 1-year locoregional progression-free survival was 50% and overall survival was 55%. Conclusion: HARTCIB (75 Gy in 5 weeks) is feasible for patients deemed unsuitable for chemoradiation. Acute toxicity was lower than predicted from radiobiological models; duration of dysphagia and confluent mucositis were particularly short. Better conformity of radiotherapy allows the use of more intensive altered fractionation schedules compared with older studies. These results suggest that further dose escalation might be possible when highly conformal techniques (e.g., stereotactic radiotherapy) are used.

  4. Dose-Escalated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Is Feasible and May Improve Locoregional Control and Laryngeal Preservation in Laryngo-Hypopharyngeal Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miah, Aisha B.; Bhide, Shreerang A.; Guerrero-Urbano, M. Teresa [Head and Neck Unit, The Royal Marsden National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Clark, Catharine; Bidmead, A. Margaret [Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); St Rose, Suzanne; Barbachano, Yolanda; A' Hern, Roger [Department of Statistics, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Tanay, Mary; Hickey, Jennifer; Nicol, Robyn; Newbold, Kate L. [Head and Neck Unit, The Royal Marsden National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Harrington, Kevin J. [Head and Neck Unit, The Royal Marsden National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Nutting, Christopher M., E-mail: chris.nutting@rmh.nhs.uk [Head and Neck Unit, The Royal Marsden National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the safety and outcomes of induction chemotherapy followed by dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with concomitant chemotherapy in locally advanced squamous cell cancer of the larynx and hypopharynx (LA-SCCL/H). Methods and Materials: A sequential cohort Phase I/II trial design was used to evaluate moderate acceleration and dose escalation. Patients with LA-SCCL/H received IMRT at two dose levels (DL): DL1, 63 Gy/28 fractions (Fx) to planning target volume 1 (PTV1) and 51.8 Gy/28 Fx to PTV2; DL2, 67.2 Gy/28 Fx and 56 Gy/28 Fx to PTV1 and PTV2, respectively. Patients received induction cisplatin/5-fluorouracil and concomitant cisplatin. Acute and late toxicities and tumor control rates were recorded. Results: Between September 2002 and January 2008, 60 patients (29 DL1, 31 DL2) with Stage III (41% DL1, 52% DL2) and Stage IV (52% DL1, 48% DL2) disease were recruited. Median (range) follow-up for DL1 was 51.2 (12.1-77.3) months and for DL2 was 36.2 (4.2-63.3) months. Acute Grade 3 (G3) dysphagia was higher in DL2 (87% DL2 vs. 59% DL1), but other toxicities were equivalent. One patient in DL1 required dilatation of a pharyngeal stricture (G3 dysphagia). In DL2, 2 patients developed benign pharyngeal strictures at 1 year. One underwent a laryngo-pharyngectomy and the other a dilatation. No other G3/G4 toxicities were reported. Overall complete response was 79% (DL1) and 84% (DL2). Two-year locoregional progression-free survival rates were 64.2% (95% confidence interval, 43.5-78.9%) in DL1 and 78.4% (58.1-89.7%) in DL2. Two-year laryngeal preservation rates were 88.7% (68.5-96.3%) in DL1 and 96.4% (77.7-99.5%) in DL2. Conclusions: At a mean follow-up of 36 months, dose-escalated chemotherapy-IMRT at DL2 has so far been safe to deliver. In this study, DL2 delivered high rates of locoregional control, progression-free survival, and organ preservation and has been selected as the experimental arm in a Cancer Research UK Phase III

  5. Predictors of Rectal Tolerance Observed in a Dose-Escalated Phase 1-2 Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D.W. Nathan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Cho, L. Chinsoo [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Straka, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Christie, Alana [Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Lotan, Yair [Department of Urology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Pistenmaa, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado (United States); Nanda, Akash [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Health Cancer Center at Orlando Health, Orlando, Florida (United States); Kueplian, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Brindle, Jeffrey [Prairie Lakes Hospital, Watertown, South Dakota (United States); Cooley, Susan; Perkins, Alida [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Raben, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado (United States); Xie, Xian-Jin [Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Timmerman, Robert D., E-mail: robert.timmerman@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To convey the occurrence of isolated cases of severe rectal toxicity at the highest dose level tested in 5-fraction stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for localized prostate cancer; and to rationally test potential causal mechanisms to guide future studies and experiments to aid in mitigating or altogether avoiding such severe bowel injury. Methods and Materials: Clinical and treatment planning data were analyzed from 91 patients enrolled from 2006 to 2011 on a dose-escalation (45, 47.5, and 50 Gy in 5 fractions) phase 1/2 clinical study of SBRT for localized prostate cancer. Results: At the highest dose level, 6.6% of patients treated (6 of 91) developed high-grade rectal toxicity, 5 of whom required colostomy. Grade 3+ delayed rectal toxicity was strongly correlated with volume of rectal wall receiving 50 Gy >3 cm{sup 3} (P<.0001), and treatment of >35% circumference of rectal wall to 39 Gy (P=.003). Grade 2+ acute rectal toxicity was significantly correlated with treatment of >50% circumference of rectal wall to 24 Gy (P=.010). Conclusion: Caution is advised when considering high-dose SBRT for treatment of tumors near bowel structures, including prostate cancer. Threshold dose constraints developed from physiologic principles are defined, and if respected can minimize risk of severe rectal toxicity.

  6. Phase I dose-escalation and pharmacokinetic study (TED 11576) of cabazitaxel in Japanese patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Shunji; Nozawa, Masahiro; Onozawa, Yusuke; Miyazaki, Jun; Ohno, Keiji; Suzuki, Kazuhiro

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of the study is to analyze the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of cabazitaxel and evaluate its safety and tolerability as a 1-h IV infusion every 3 weeks in Japanese patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Seventeen patients were treated with cabazitaxel at doses of 20 and 25 mg/m(2) for PK analyses. Dose escalation was performed only in the absence of dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was the highest dose at which less than 33 % of the patients developed DLT. Cabazitaxel exhibited a triphasic elimination profile with a long terminal half-life of 116 ± 29.0 or 113 ± 28.0 h after IV infusion of 20 or 25 mg/m(2) cabazitaxel, respectively. The major differences in the PK parameters of cabazitaxel and docetaxel were cabazitaxel's fairly high clearance rate, representing approximately half the hepatic flow, and its large volume of distribution at steady-state conditions. No DLT was observed during Cycle 1. Mild-to-moderate hematological adverse events (AEs), including neutropenia, and other AEs typically associated with taxanes were observed; all AEs were manageable. Cabazitaxel at 25 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks was selected as the MTD in Japanese patients. The PK parameters of cabazitaxel in Japanese CRPC patients were comparable with those previously determined in Caucasian subjects. The safety and tolerability of cabazitaxel were also comparable in both ethnic populations.

  7. Combination of dose escalation with technological advances (intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy) is not associated with increased morbidity for patients with prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkawa, Michael; Piroth, Marc D.; Holy, Richard; Djukic, Victoria; Klotz, Jens; Krenkel, Barbara; Eble, Michael J. [RWTH Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie

    2011-08-15

    The aim was to evaluate treatment-related morbidity after intensity-modulated (IMRT) and image-guided (IGRT) radiotherapy with a total dose of 76 Gy in comparison to conventional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) up to 70.2-72 Gy for patients with prostate cancer. All patients were prospectively surveyed prior to, on the last day, as well as after a median time of 2 and 16 months after RT using a validated questionnaire (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite). Criteria for the 78 matched pairs after IMRT vs. 3DCRT were patient age, use of antiandrogens, treatment volume ({+-} whole pelvis), prognostic risk group, and urinary/bowel/sexual quality of life (QoL) before treatment. QoL changes after dose-escalated IMRT were found to be similar to QoL changes after 3DCRT in all domains. Only sexual function scores more than 1 year after RT decreased slightly more after 3DCRT in comparison to IMRT (mean 9 vs. 6 points; p = 0.04), with erections firm enough for intercourse in 14% vs. 30% (p = 0.03). Painful bowel movements were reported more frequently after 3DCRT vs. IMRT 2 months after treatment ({>=} once a day in 10% vs. 1%; p = 0.03), but a tendency for higher rectal bleeding rates was found after IMRT vs. 3DCRT more than 1 year after RT ({>=} rarely in 20% vs. 9%; p = 0.06). Combination of dose escalation with technological advances (IMRT and IGRT) is not associated with increased morbidity for patients with prostate cancer. (orig.)

  8. Short-term Androgen-Deprivation Therapy Improves Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality in Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Undergoing Dose-Escalated External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zumsteg, Zachary S.; Spratt, Daniel E.; Pei, Xin; Yamada, Yoshiya; Kalikstein, Abraham [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Kuk, Deborah; Zhang, Zhigang [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zelefsky, Michael J., E-mail: zelefskm@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: We investigated the benefit of short-term androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) in patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer (PC) receiving dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The present retrospective study comprised 710 intermediate-risk PC patients receiving external beam radiation therapy with doses of ≥81 Gy at a single institution from 1992 to 2005, including 357 patients receiving neoadjuvant and concurrent ADT. Prostate-specific antigen recurrence-free survival (PSA-RFS) and distant metastasis (DM) were compared using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards models. PC-specific mortality (PCSM) was assessed using competing-risks analysis. Results: The median follow-up was 7.9 years. Despite being more likely to have higher PSA levels, Gleason score 4 + 3 = 7, multiple National Comprehensive Cancer Network intermediate-risk factors, and older age (P≤.001 for all comparisons), patients receiving ADT had improved PSA-RFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.598; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.435-0.841; P=.003), DM (HR, 0.424; 95% CI, 0.219-0.819; P=.011), and PCSM (HR, 0.380; 95% CI, 0.157-0.921; P=.032) on univariate analysis. Using multivariate analysis, ADT was an even stronger predictor of improved PSA-RFS (adjusted HR [AHR], 0.516; 95% CI, 0.360-0.739; P<.001), DM (AHR, 0.347; 95% CI, 0.176-0.685; P=.002), and PCSM (AHR, 0.297; 95% CI, 0.128-0.685; P=.004). Gleason score 4 + 3 = 7 and ≥50% positive biopsy cores were other independent predictors of PCSM. Conclusions: Short-term ADT improves PSA-RFS, DM, and PCSM in patients with intermediate-risk PC undergoing dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy.

  9. Strategy of Using Intratreatment Hypoxia Imaging to Selectively and Safely Guide Radiation Dose De-escalation Concurrent With Chemotherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Human Papillomavirus–Related Oropharyngeal Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Nancy, E-mail: leen2@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Schoder, Heiko [Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Beattie, Brad [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Lanning, Ryan; Riaz, Nadeem; McBride, Sean [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Katabi, Nora [Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Li, Duan [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yarusi, Brett; Chan, Susie; Mitrani, Lindsey [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zhang, Zhigang [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Pfister, David G.; Sherman, Eric; Baxi, Shrujal [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Boyle, Jay; Morris, Luc G.T.; Ganly, Ian; Wong, Richard [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Humm, John [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: To report a small substudy of an ongoing large, multi-arm study using functional imaging to assess pre-/intratreatment hypoxia for all head and neck cancer, in which we hypothesized that pre- and early-treatment hypoxia assessment using functional positron emission tomography (PET) imaging may help select which human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive (HPV{sup +}) oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) patients can safely receive radiation de-escalation without jeopardizing treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: Patients with HPV{sup +} oropharyngeal carcinoma were enrolled on an institutional review board–approved prospective study of which de-escalation based on imaging response was done for node(s) only. Pretreatment {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose and dynamic {sup 18}F-FMISO (fluoromisonidazole) positron emission tomography (PET) scans were performed. For patients with pretreatment hypoxia on{sup 18}F-FMISO PET (defined as a >1.2 tumor to muscle standard uptake value ratio), a repeat scan was done 1 week after chemoradiation. Patients without pretreatment hypoxia or with resolution of hypoxia on repeat scan received a 10-Gy dose reduction to metastatic lymph node(s). The 2-year local, regional, distant metastasis–free, and overall survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method. A subset of patients had biopsy of a hypoxic node done under image guidance. Results: Thirty-three HPV{sup +} OPC patients were enrolled in this pilot study. One hundred percent showed pretreatment hypoxia (at primary site and/or node[s]), and among these, 48% resolved (at primary site and/or node[s]); 30% met criteria and received 10-Gy reduction to the lymph node(s). At the median follow-up of 32 months (range, 21-61 months), the 2-year locoregional control rate was 100%. One patient failed distantly with persistence of hypoxia on {sup 18}F-FMISO PET. The 2-year distant metastasis–free rate was 97%. The 2-year OS rate was 100%. Hypoxia on imaging was

  10. ASCENDE-RT: An Analysis of Treatment-Related Morbidity for a Randomized Trial Comparing a Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost with a Dose-Escalated External Beam Boost for High- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodda, Sree; Tyldesley, Scott; Morris, W James; Keyes, Mira; Halperin, Ross; Pai, Howard; McKenzie, Michael; Duncan, Graeme; Morton, Gerard; Hamm, Jeremy; Murray, Nevin

    2017-06-01

    To report the genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) morbidity and erectile dysfunction in a randomized trial comparing 2 methods of dose escalation for high- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer. ASCENDE-RT (Androgen Suppression Combined with Elective Nodal and Dose Escalated Radiation Therapy) enrolled 398 men, median age 68 years, who were then randomized to either a standard arm that included 12 months of androgen deprivation therapy and pelvic irradiation to 46 Gy followed by a dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (DE-EBRT) boost to 78 Gy, or an experimental arm that substituted a low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR-PB) boost. At clinic visits, investigators recorded GU and GI morbidity and information on urinary continence, catheter use, and erectile function. Exclusion of 15 who received nonprotocol treatment and correction of 14 crossover events left 195 men who actually received a DE-EBRT boost and 188, an LDR-PB boost. Median follow-up was 6.5 years. The LDR-PB boost increased the risk of needing temporary catheterization and/or requiring incontinence pads. At 5 years the cumulative incidence of grade 3 GU events was 18.4% for LDR-PB, versus 5.2% for DE-EBRT (Pversus 3.2% for DE-EBRT (P=.124). The 5-year prevalence of grade 3 GI toxicity was lower than the cumulative incidence for both arms (1.0% vs 2.2%, respectively). Among men reporting adequate baseline erections, 45% of LDR-PB patients reported similar erectile function at 5 years, versus 37% after DE-EBRT (P=.30). The incidence of acute and late GU morbidity was higher after LDR-PB boost, and there was a nonsignificant trend for worse GI morbidity. No differences in the frequency of erectile dysfunction were observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. An open-label phase 1 dose-escalation clinical trial of a single intravenous administration of gemcitabine in dogs with advanced solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconato, L; Finotello, R; Bonfanti, U; Dacasto, M; Beatrice, L; Pizzoni, S; Leone, V F; Balestra, G; Furlanello, T; Rohrer Bley, C; Aresu, L

    2015-01-01

    A broad range of gemcitabine dosages have been used in dogs. To determine maximally tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), and preliminary antitumor activity of intravenous administration of gemcitabine in dogs with advanced solid tumors. Twenty-two client-owned dogs. Dogs with advanced cancer were prospectively enrolled in an open-label Phase 1 study of gemcitabine. Gemcitabine was administered as a 30-minute intravenous bolus starting at 800 mg/m(2), using escalation of 50 mg/m(2) increments with 3 dogs per dose level. MTD was established based on the number of dogs experiencing DLT assessed after 1 cycle. Treatment continued until disease progression or unacceptable toxicosis. Additional dogs were enrolled at MTD to better characterize tolerability, and to assess the extent and duration of gemcitabine excretion. Twenty-two dogs were treated at 4 dose levels, ranging from 800 to 950 mg/m(2). Neutropenia was identified as DLT. MTD was 900 mg/m(2). DLT consisting of grade 4 febrile neutropenia was observed at 950 mg/m(2) in 2 dogs. There were no nonhematologic DLTs. Twenty dogs received multiple doses, and none had evidence of severe toxicosis from any of their subsequent treatments. At 900 mg/m(2), 2 complete and 5 partial responses were observed in dogs with measurable tumors. The amount of gemcitabine excreted in urine decreased over time, and was undetectable after the first 24 hours. The recommended dose of gemcitabine for future Phase 2 studies is weekly 900 mg/m(2). In chemotherapy-naïve dogs with advanced solid tumor this dose level merits further evaluation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  12. Adaptation requirements due to anatomical changes in free-breathing and deep-inspiration breath-hold for standard and dose-escalated radiotherapy of lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibolt, Patrik; Ottosson, Wiviann; Sjöström, David

    2015-01-01

    Background. Radiotherapy of lung cancer patients is subject to uncertainties related to heterogeneities, anatomical changes and breathing motion. Use of deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) can reduce the treated volume, potentially enabling dose-escalated (DE) treatments. This study was designed...... to investigate the need for adaptation due to anatomical changes, for both standard (ST) and DE plans in free-breathing (FB) and DIBH. Material and methods. The effect of tumor shrinkage (TS), pleural effusion (PE) and atelectasis was investigated for patients and for a CIRS thorax phantom. Sixteen patients were...... and had no effect for DIBH. Conclusion. Phantom simulations provided potential adaptation action levels for PE and TS. For the more complex patient geometry, individual assessment of the dosimetric impact is recommended for both ST and DE plans in DIBH as well as in FB. However, DIBH was found...

  13. Mathematical modelling of survival of glioblastoma patients suggests a role for radiotherapy dose escalation and predicts poorer outcome after delay to start treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnet, N G; Jena, R; Jefferies, S J; Stenning, S P; Kirkby, N F

    2006-03-01

    The outcome of patients with glioblastoma (GBM) remains extremely poor. We have developed a mathematical model, using pathological and radiation biology concepts, to assess the detrimental effect of delay to start radiotherapy, the possible benefit from dose escalation, and to extract biological data from clinical data. Survival data were available for 154 adult patients with GBM treated in our centre with curative intent to a dose of 60 Gy in 30 fractions between 1996 and 2002. Survival data for 129 patients from the 60 Gy arm of the MRC BR02 randomised trial of radiotherapy dose were obtained for comparison. The model generates the equivalent of individual patients with a brain tumour, and produces an explicit outcome, either death or survival. The tumour, assumed to be growing exponentially, causes normal cell damage in the brain, and death occurs when the number of normal brain cells falls below a critical level. The outcome for an individual patient is determined by values of the variables assigned by the model. Parameters for the single patient include tumour doubling time, surviving fraction of tumour cells after each fraction of radiotherapy, and a waiting time from presentation to the start of radiotherapy. A surrogate for performance status is implemented, using a rule that rejects patients whose tumours are too advanced at presentation to be suitable for radical radiotherapy. Values for the parameters that determine individual patient outcome are randomly assigned from a set of probability distributions, using Monte Carlo simulation. The simulation constructs survival results for a population, typically 2000 individuals. The descriptors of the probability distributions that are used to determine the parameters that define the patient characteristics are adjusted to optimise the fit of the modelled population to real clinical data, using a combination of folding polygon and simulated annealing techniques. The model fits the clinical data well. The results

  14. A phase I safety and immunogenicity dose escalation trial of plague vaccine, Flagellin/F1/V, in healthy adult volunteers (DMID 08-0066).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Sharon E; Lottenbach, Kathleen; Graham, Irene; Anderson, Edwin; Bajwa, Kanwaldeep; May, Ryan C; Mizel, Steven B; Graff, Aaron; Belshe, Robert B

    2017-12-04

    Intentional aerosolization of Yersinia pestis may result in pneumonic plague which is highly fatal if not treated early. We conducted a phase 1 randomized, double blind (within each group), placebo controlled, dose escalation trial to evaluate a plague vaccine, Flagellin/F1/V, in healthy adults aged 8 through 45years. Vaccine was administered intramuscularly on Days 0 and 28 at a dose of 1, 3, 6 or 10mcg. Subjects were observed for 4h after vaccination for cytokine release syndrome. Reactogenicity and adverse events (AE) were collected for 14 and 28days, respectively, after each vaccination. Serious AE were collected for the entire study. ELISA antibody and cytokines were measured at multiple time points. Subject's participation lasted 13months. Sixty healthy subjects were enrolled; 52% males, 100% non-Hispanic, 91.7% white and mean age 30.8years. No severe reactogenicity events occurred; most AE were mild. No serious AE related to vaccine occurred. A dose response effect was observed to F1, V and flagellin. The peak ELISA IgG antibody titers (95% CI) after two 10mcg doses of vaccine were 260.0 (102.6-659.0) and 983.6 (317.3-3048.8), respectively, against F1 and V antigens. The 6mcg dose group provided similar titers. Titers were low for the placebo, 1mcg and 3mcg recipients. A positive antibody dose response was observed to F1, V and flagellin. Vaccine antigen specific serum IgE was not detected. There were no significant rises in serum or cellular cytokine responses and no significant IgG increase to flagellin after the second dose. The Flagellin/F1/V vaccine exhibited a dose dependent increase in immunogenicity and was well tolerated at all doses. Antibody specific responses to F1, V and flagellin increased as dose increased. Given the results from this trial, testing higher doses of the vaccine may be merited. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Phase I dose escalation study of concurrent palliative radiation therapy with sorafenib in three anatomical cohorts (Thorax, Abdomen, Pelvis): The TAP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Louise; Longo, Joseph; Wan, Jonathan; Chung, Caroline; Wang, Lisa; Dawson, Laura; Milosevic, Michael; Oza, Amit; Brade, Anthony

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the tolerability and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of sorafenib administered concurrently with palliative radiotherapy. In patients with incurable cancer, sorafenib was escalated independently in three cohorts based on irradiation site: thorax, abdomen or pelvis. Sorafenib was administered days 1-28 and radiotherapy (30Gy in 10 fractions) was delivered days 8-12 and 15-19. Dose-limiting toxicities (DLT) were acute grade 3+ toxicities attributable to radiotherapy. For the thorax, abdomen and pelvis cohorts, 14, 16 and 4 patients were recruited, and Dose Levels 3, 3 and 2 were reached, respectively. Sorafenib-related systemic toxicity led to significant sorafenib interruption in 10 patients. There were 3 DLTs in total, one per cohort: grade 3 oesophagitis (thoracic), transaminase elevation (abdominal) and grade 5 bowel perforation (pelvic; patient with tumour invading bowel). Grade 2 radiation dermatitis developed in 12 patients. The trial was terminated early as slow accrual and sorafenib-related systemic toxicity prevented efficient evaluation of RT-related DLTs. The MTD of sorafenib when used with 30Gy in 10 fractions was not established due to sorafenib-related systemic toxicity. Severe radiotherapy-related toxicities were also observed. These events suggest this concurrent combination does not warrant further study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. CSF1R inhibition with emactuzumab in locally advanced diffuse-type tenosynovial giant cell tumours of the soft tissue: a dose-escalation and dose-expansion phase 1 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassier, Philippe A; Italiano, Antoine; Gomez-Roca, Carlos A; Le Tourneau, Christophe; Toulmonde, Maud; Cannarile, Michael A; Ries, Carola; Brillouet, Anne; Müller, Claudia; Jegg, Anna-Maria; Bröske, Ann-Marie; Dembowski, Markus; Bray-French, Katharine; Freilinger, Christine; Meneses-Lorente, Georgina; Baehner, Monika; Harding, Ross; Ratnayake, Jayantha; Abiraj, Keelara; Gass, Nathalie; Noh, Karen; Christen, Randolph D; Ukarma, Lidia; Bompas, Emmanuelle; Delord, Jean-Pierre; Blay, Jean-Yves; Rüttinger, Dominik

    2015-08-01

    Diffuse-type tenosynovial giant cell tumour (dt-GCT) of the soft tissue (alternatively known as pigmented villonodular synovitis), an orphan disease with unmet medical need, is characterised by an overexpression of colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1), and is usually caused by a chromosomal translocation involving CSF1. CSF1 receptor (CSF1R) activation leads to the recruitment of CSF1R-expressing cells of the mononuclear phagocyte lineage that constitute the tumor mass in dt-GCT. Emactuzumab (RG7155) is a novel monoclonal antibody that inhibits CSF1R activation. We have assessed the safety, tolerability and activity of emactuzumab in patients with Dt-GCT of the soft tissue. In this phase 1, first-in-human dose-escalation and dose-expansion study, eligible patients were aged 18 years or older with dt-GCT of the soft tissue with locally advanced disease or resectable tumours requiring extensive surgery, an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 1 or less, measurable disease according to Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors version 1.1, and adequate end-organ function. Patients with GCT of the bone were not eligible. Patients received intravenous emactuzumab at 900 mg, 1350 mg, or 2000 mg every 2 weeks in the dose-escalation phase and at the optimal biological dose in a dose-expansion phase. The primary objective was to evaluate the safety and tolerability of emactuzumab, and to determine the maximum tolerated dose or optimal biological dose. All treated patients were included in the analyses. Expansion cohorts are currently ongoing. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01494688. Between July 26, 2012, and Oct 21, 2013, 12 patients were enrolled in the dose-escalation phase. No dose-limiting toxicities were noted in the dose-escalation cohort; on the basis of pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and safety information, we chose a dose of 1000 mg every 2 week for the dose-expansion cohort, into which 17 patients were enrolled

  17. SU-E-T-69: A Radiobiological Investigation of Dose Escalation in Lower Oesophageal Tumours with a Focus On Gastric Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrington, R [Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales (United Kingdom); Staffurth, J; Spezi, E; Crosby, T [Velindre Cancer Centre, Cardiff, Wales (United Kingdom); Warren, S; Partridge, M; Hawkins, M [CRUK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Gwynne, S [Singleton Hospital, Swansea, Wales (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    The incidence of lower third oesophageal tumours is increasing in most Western populations. With the role of radiotherapy dose escalation being identified as a research priority in improving outcomes, it is important to quantify the increased toxicity that this may pose to sites such as the lower oesophagus. This study therefore aims to investigate the feasibility of lower oesophageal dose escalation with a focus on stomach tissue toxicity.The original 3D-conformal plans (50Gy3D) from 10 patients in the SCOPE1 trial were reviewed and compared to two RapidArc plans created retrospectively to represent the treatment arms of the forthcoming SCOPE2 trial: 50GyRA and 60GyRA (50Gy to PTV1 with a simultaneously integrated boost of 60Gy to PTV2). The stomach was contoured as stomach wall and dose constraints set according to QUANTEC. Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) was estimated for the stomach wall for an endpoint of gastric bleeding. There was a mean increase of 5.93% in NTCP from 50Gy3D to 60GyRA and a mean increase of 8.15% in NTCP from the 50GyRA to 60GyRA. With NTCP modelling restricted to volumes outside PTV2, there was a mean decrease of 0.92% in NTCP from the 50Gy3D to 60GyRA, and a mean increase of 2.25% from 50GyRA to 60GyRA. There was a strong correlation between the NTCP and Stomach Wall/PTV1 overlap volume for all plans (R=0.80, 0.77 and 0.77 for 60GyRA, 50GyRA and 50Gy3D respectively). There was also a strong correlation between NTCP and the Stomach Wall/PTV2 overlap volume for 60GyRA (R= 0.82).Radiobiological modelling suggests that increasing the prescribed dose to 60Gy may be associated with a significantly increased risk of toxicity to the stomach within the boost volume. It is recommended that stomach toxicity be closely monitored prospectively when treating patients with lower oesophageal tumours in the forthcoming SCOPE 2 trial. Rhys Carrington received a PhD studentship grant from Cancer Research Wales. Grant number: 2445; Dr Warren and

  18. Androgen Suppression Combined with Elective Nodal and Dose Escalated Radiation Therapy (the ASCENDE-RT Trial): An Analysis of Survival Endpoints for a Randomized Trial Comparing a Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost to a Dose-Escalated External Beam Boost for High- and Intermediate-risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, W. James, E-mail: jmorris@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); BC Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Tyldesley, Scott [Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); BC Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Rodda, Sree [Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Halperin, Ross [Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); BC Cancer Agency–Centre for the Southern Interior, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Pai, Howard [Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); BC Cancer Agency–Vancouver Island Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); McKenzie, Michael; Duncan, Graeme [Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); BC Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Morton, Gerard [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hamm, Jeremy [Department of Population Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Murray, Nevin [BC Cancer Agency–Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: To report the primary endpoint of biochemical progression-free survival (b-PFS) and secondary survival endpoints from ASCENDE-RT, a randomized trial comparing 2 methods of dose escalation for intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: ASCENDE-RT enrolled 398 men, with a median age of 68 years; 69% (n=276) had high-risk disease. After stratification by risk group, the subjects were randomized to a standard arm with 12 months of androgen deprivation therapy, pelvic irradiation to 46 Gy, followed by a dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (DE-EBRT) boost to 78 Gy, or an experimental arm that substituted a low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR-PB) boost. Of the 398 trial subjects, 200 were assigned to DE-EBRT boost and 198 to LDR-PB boost. The median follow-up was 6.5 years. Results: In an intent-to-treat analysis, men randomized to DE-EBRT were twice as likely to experience biochemical failure (multivariable analysis [MVA] hazard ratio [HR] 2.04; P=.004). The 5-, 7-, and 9-year Kaplan-Meier b-PFS estimates were 89%, 86%, and 83% for the LDR-PB boost versus 84%, 75%, and 62% for the DE-EBRT boost (log-rank P<.001). The LDR-PB boost benefited both intermediate- and high-risk patients. Because the b-PFS curves for the treatment arms diverge sharply after 4 years, the relative advantage of the LDR-PB should increase with longer follow-up. On MVA, the only variables correlated with reduced overall survival were age (MVA HR 1.06/y; P=.004) and biochemical failure (MVA HR 6.30; P<.001). Although biochemical failure was associated with increased mortality and randomization to DE-EBRT doubled the rate of biochemical failure, no significant overall survival difference was observed between the treatment arms (MVA HR 1.13; P=.62). Conclusions: Compared with 78 Gy EBRT, men randomized to the LDR-PB boost were twice as likely to be free of biochemical failure at a median follow-up of 6.5 years.

  19. Androgen Suppression Combined with Elective Nodal and Dose Escalated Radiation Therapy (the ASCENDE-RT Trial): An Analysis of Survival Endpoints for a Randomized Trial Comparing a Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost to a Dose-Escalated External Beam Boost for High- and Intermediate-risk Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, W James; Tyldesley, Scott; Rodda, Sree; Halperin, Ross; Pai, Howard; McKenzie, Michael; Duncan, Graeme; Morton, Gerard; Hamm, Jeremy; Murray, Nevin

    2017-06-01

    To report the primary endpoint of biochemical progression-free survival (b-PFS) and secondary survival endpoints from ASCENDE-RT, a randomized trial comparing 2 methods of dose escalation for intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer. ASCENDE-RT enrolled 398 men, with a median age of 68 years; 69% (n=276) had high-risk disease. After stratification by risk group, the subjects were randomized to a standard arm with 12 months of androgen deprivation therapy, pelvic irradiation to 46 Gy, followed by a dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (DE-EBRT) boost to 78 Gy, or an experimental arm that substituted a low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR-PB) boost. Of the 398 trial subjects, 200 were assigned to DE-EBRT boost and 198 to LDR-PB boost. The median follow-up was 6.5 years. In an intent-to-treat analysis, men randomized to DE-EBRT were twice as likely to experience biochemical failure (multivariable analysis [MVA] hazard ratio [HR] 2.04; P=.004). The 5-, 7-, and 9-year Kaplan-Meier b-PFS estimates were 89%, 86%, and 83% for the LDR-PB boost versus 84%, 75%, and 62% for the DE-EBRT boost (log-rank P<.001). The LDR-PB boost benefited both intermediate- and high-risk patients. Because the b-PFS curves for the treatment arms diverge sharply after 4 years, the relative advantage of the LDR-PB should increase with longer follow-up. On MVA, the only variables correlated with reduced overall survival were age (MVA HR 1.06/y; P=.004) and biochemical failure (MVA HR 6.30; P<.001). Although biochemical failure was associated with increased mortality and randomization to DE-EBRT doubled the rate of biochemical failure, no significant overall survival difference was observed between the treatment arms (MVA HR 1.13; P=.62). Compared with 78 Gy EBRT, men randomized to the LDR-PB boost were twice as likely to be free of biochemical failure at a median follow-up of 6.5 years. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Botulinum toxin type B (Myobloc) in subjects with hemifacial spasm: results from an open-label, dose-escalation safety study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosch, Richard M; Adler, Charles H; Pappert, Eric J

    2007-07-15

    Evaluate the safety of botulinum toxin type B (BoNT-B) in subjects with hemifacial spasm (HFS). This open-label, sequential dose-escalation study evaluated BoNT-B in subjects with HFS. Eligible subjects were enrolled and received a single injection of one of four sequential BoNT-B doses (100, 200, 400, or 800 U). Following injection, subjects were evaluated in person at Weeks 2 and 8 and by phone at Weeks 1, 4, and 10 and every 2 weeks thereafter until benefit was lost. Safety was assessed by adverse events (AEs), vital signs and clinical laboratory evaluation. The severity of HFS was assessed using a patient social impairment visual analog scale (VAS), subject severity of contraction VAS, the HFS physician assessment, and subject HFS frequency and severity assessment. Nineteen predominately Caucasian (92%) and female (67%) subjects (aged 36-80 years) with HFS participated in this study. Subjects remained in the study an average of 88 days (range of 41-332 days) after receiving a single dose of BoNT-B. No deaths, serious AEs or AEs leading to trial discontinuation occurred during the study period. Two subjects in the 400 U dose group requested early withdrawal, whereas all other subjects completed the study. A reduction in HFS severity was observed in subjects treated with doses of 200 U or more. Improvements in subject HFS assessments tended to return to baseline values by 8 weeks following injection. BoNT-B was well-tolerated and reduced HFS severity in subjects who received injections of 200 to 800 U. Additional investigation is necessary to confirm the findings from this open-label study. 2007 Movement Disorder Society

  1. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor flavopiridol potentiates doxorubicin efficacy in advanced sarcomas: preclinical investigations and results of a phase I dose escalation clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Jason J.; D’Adamo, David R.; Dickson, Mark A.; Keohan, Mary Louise; Carvajal, Richard D.; Maki, Robert G.; de Stanchina, Elisa; Musi, Elgilda; Singer, Samuel; Schwartz, Gary K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Dysregulated cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are important to the growth of some sarcomas. Flavopiridol is a pan-CDK inhibitor that has been shown to potentiate chemotherapy. As such, we explored the potentiation of doxorubicin by flavopiridol in sarcoma, in vitro and in vivo, and performed a phase I trial of flavopiridol with doxorubicin in patients with advanced sarcomas. Design Sarcoma cell lines and xenografts were treated with flavopiridol alone and in combination with doxorubicin. In the phase I study, doxorubicin and flavopiridol were administered on 2 flavopiridol schedules; a 1 hour bolus and split dosing as a 30 minute bolus followed by a 4 hour infusion. Results Pre-clinically, flavopiridol potentiated doxorubicin. In vivo, doxorubicin administered 1 hour prior to flavopiridol was more active than doxorubicin alone. Clinically, 31 patients were enrolled on protocol and flavopiridol was escalated to target dose in 2 schedules (90 mg/m2 bolus; 50 mg/m2 bolus + 40 mg/m2 infusion) both in combination with doxorubicin (60 mg/m2). Dose-limiting toxicities were neutropenia, leukopenia and febrile neutropenia but no maximum tolerated dose was defined. Flavopiridol pharmacokinetics showed increasing Cmax with increasing dose. RECIST responses included 2 partial responses however stable disease was seen in 16 patients. Of 12 evaluable patients with progressive well- and de-differentiated liposarcoma, 8 had stable disease greater than 12 weeks. Conclusions The sequential combination of doxorubicin followed flavopiridol is well tolerated on both schedules. Disease control was observed in well- and de-differentiated liposarcoma specifically, a disease where CDK4 is known to be amplified. PMID:22374332

  2. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor flavopiridol potentiates doxorubicin efficacy in advanced sarcomas: preclinical investigations and results of a phase I dose-escalation clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Jason J; D'Adamo, David R; Dickson, Mark A; Keohan, Mary Louise; Carvajal, Richard D; Maki, Robert G; de Stanchina, Elisa; Musi, Elgilda; Singer, Samuel; Schwartz, Gary K

    2012-05-01

    Dysregulated cyclin-dependent kinases are important to the growth of some sarcomas. Flavopiridol is a pan-CDK inhibitor that has been shown to potentiate chemotherapy. As such, we explored the potentiation of doxorubicin by flavopiridol in sarcoma, in vitro and in vivo, and conducted a phase I trial of flavopiridol with doxorubicin in patients with advanced sarcomas. Sarcoma cell lines and xenografts were treated with flavopiridol alone and in combination with doxorubicin. In the phase I study, doxorubicin and flavopiridol were administered on two flavopiridol schedules; a 1-hour bolus and split dosing as a 30-minute bolus followed by a 4-hour infusion. Preclinically, flavopiridol potentiated doxorubicin. In vivo, doxorubicin administered 1 hour before flavopiridol was more active than doxorubicin alone. Clinically, 31 patients were enrolled on protocol and flavopiridol was escalated to target dose in two schedules (90 mg/m(2) bolus; 50 mg/m(2) bolus + 40 mg/m(2) infusion) both in combination with doxorubicin (60 mg/m(2)). Dose-limiting toxicities were neutropenia, leukopenia, and febrile neutropenia but no maximum tolerated dose was defined. Flavopiridol pharmacokinetics showed increasing C(max) with increasing dose. Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) responses included two partial responses, however, stable disease was seen in 16 patients. Of 12 evaluable patients with progressive well- and dedifferentiated liposarcoma, eight had stable disease greater than 12 weeks. The sequential combination of doxorubicin followed by flavopiridol is well tolerated on both schedules. Disease control was observed in well- and dedifferentiated liposarcoma specifically, a disease in which CDK4 is known to be amplified. ©2012 AACR.

  3. The role of androgen deprivation therapy on biochemical failure and distant metastasis in intermediate-risk prostate cancer: effects of radiation dose escalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Michelle S; Kuban, Deborah A; Strom, Sara S; Du, Xianglin L; Lopez, David S; Yamal, Jose-Miguel

    2015-03-27

    To determine whether the effect of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) on the risk of biochemical failure varies at different doses of radiation in patients treated with definitive external beam radiation for intermediate risk prostate cancer (IRPC). This study included 1218 IRPC patients treated with definitive external beam radiation therapy to the prostate and seminal vesicles from June 1987 to January 2009 at our institution. Patient, treatment, and tumor information was collected, including age, race, Gleason score, radiation dose, PSA, T-stage, and months on ADT. The median follow-up was 6 years. A total of 421(34.6%) patients received ADT, 211 (17.3%) patients experienced a biochemical failure, and 38 (3.1%) developed distant metastasis. On univariable analyses, higher PSA, earlier year of diagnosis, higher T-stage, lower doses of radiation, and the lack of ADT were associated with an increased risk of biochemical failure. No difference in biochemical failure was seen among different racial groups or with the use of greater than 6 months of ADT compared with less than 6 months. On multivariate analysis, the use of ADT was associated with a lower risk of biochemical failure than no ADT (HR, 0.599; 95% CI, 0.367-0.978; P<0.04) and lower risk of distant metastasis (HR, 0.114; 95% CI, 0.014-0.905; P=0.04). ADT reduced the risk of biochemical failure and distant metastasis in both low- and high dose radiation groups among men with intermediate-risk PCa. Increasing the duration of ADT beyond 6 months did not reduce the risk of biochemical failures. Better understanding the benefit of ADT in the era of dose escalation will require a randomized clinical trial.

  4. A dose-escalation and signal-generating study of the immunocytokine L19-IL2 in combination with dacarbazine for the therapy of patients with metastatic melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigentler, Thomas K; Weide, Benjamin; de Braud, Filippo; Spitaleri, Gianluca; Romanini, Antonella; Pflugfelder, Annette; González-Iglesias, Reinerio; Tasciotti, Annaelisa; Giovannoni, Leonardo; Schwager, Kathrin; Lovato, Valeria; Kaspar, Manuela; Trachsel, Eveline; Menssen, Hans D; Neri, Dario; Garbe, Claus

    2011-12-15

    L19-IL2 is an immunocytokine composed of an antibody fragment specific to the EDB domain of fibronectin, a tumor angiogenesis marker, and of human interleukin-2 (IL2). L19-IL2 delivers IL2 to the tumor site exploiting the selective expression of EDB on newly formed blood vessels. Previously, the recommended dose of L19-IL2 monotherapy was defined as 22.5 million international units (Mio IU) IL2 equivalents. In this study, safety and clinical activity of L19-IL2 in combination with dacarbazine were assessed in patients with metastatic melanoma. The first 10 studied patients received escalating doses of L19-IL2 on days 1, 3, and 5 in combination with 1 g/m(2) of dacarbazine on day 1 of a 3-weekly therapy cycle. Subsequently, 22 patients received L19-IL2 at recommended dose plus dacarbazine. Up to six treatment cycles were given, followed by a maintenance regimen with biweekly L19-IL2. The recommended dose of L19-IL2 in combination with dacarbazine was defined as 22.5 Mio IU. Toxicity was manageable and reversible, with no treatment-related deaths. Twenty-nine patients were evaluable for efficacy according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). In a centralized radiology analysis, eight of 29 (28%) patients achieved a RECIST-confirmed objective response, including a complete response still ongoing 21 months after treatment beginning. The 12-month survival rate and median overall survival of the recommended dose-treated patients (n = 26) were 61.5% and 14.1 months, respectively. The repeated administration of L19-IL2 in combination with dacarbazine is safe and shows encouraging signs of clinical activity in patients with metastatic melanoma. This combination therapy is currently evaluated in a randomized phase II trial with patients with metastatic melanoma. ©2011 AACR.

  5. Baseline tumour necrosis factor alpha levels predict the necessity for dose escalation of infliximab therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Tatsuki, Yoshihiko; Yano, Toshiro; Yoshinari, Toru; Abe, Tohru; Koike, Takao

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the possible role of baseline plasma tumour necrosis factor alpha levels (baseline-TNF) on the clinical response to infliximab in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Patients with RA refractory to methotrexate received 3, 6, or 10 mg/kg of infliximab every 8 weeks, in a randomised, double-blind manner: the RISING study. Clinical response (disease activity score in 28 joints based on C-reactive protein or American College of Rheumatology core set) at week 54 and serum infliximab levels were compared in three patient groups with low, intermediate, or high baseline-TNF (TNF-low, TNF-int, or TNF-high). Results In TNF-low patients, the clinical response to different doses of infliximab was comparable, whereas TNF-int patients exhibited a dose-dependent trend. In contrast, TNF-high patients (approximately 13% of the total patients) had a clinical response to 10 mg/kg significantly better than the response to 3 and 6 mg/kg of infliximab. In TNF-high patients, the median trough serum levels of infliximab were below the detection limit (infliximab in patients with a high baseline-TNF. A higher dose of infliximab may be necessary in these patients, whereas lower doses of infliximab are sufficient for those with a low baseline-TNF. Baseline-TNF may be a useful measure for personalising the treatment of RA using infliximab. PMID:21478189

  6. [18F]fluoroethylcholine-PET/CT imaging for radiation treatment planning of recurrent and primary prostate cancer with dose escalation to PET/CT-positive lymph nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahl Andreas

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At present there is no consensus on irradiation treatment volumes for intermediate to high-risk primary cancers or recurrent disease. Conventional imaging modalities, such as CT, MRI and transrectal ultrasound, are considered suboptimal for treatment decisions. Choline-PET/CT might be considered as the imaging modality in radiooncology to select and delineate clinical target volumes extending the prostate gland or prostate fossa. In conjunction with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and imaged guided radiotherapy (IGRT, it might offer the opportunity of dose escalation to selected sites while avoiding unnecessary irradiation of healthy tissues. Methods Twenty-six patients with primary (n = 7 or recurrent (n = 19 prostate cancer received Choline-PET/CT planned 3D conformal or intensity modulated radiotherapy. The median age of the patients was 65 yrs (range 45 to 78 yrs. PET/CT-scans with F18-fluoroethylcholine (FEC were performed on a combined PET/CT-scanner equipped for radiation therapy planning. The majority of patients had intermediate to high risk prostate cancer. All patients received 3D conformal or intensity modulated and imaged guided radiotherapy with megavoltage cone beam CT. The median dose to primary tumours was 75.6 Gy and to FEC-positive recurrent lymph nodal sites 66,6 Gy. The median follow-up time was 28.8 months. Results The mean SUVmax in primary cancer was 5,97 in the prostate gland and 3,2 in pelvic lymph nodes. Patients with recurrent cancer had a mean SUVmax of 4,38. Two patients had negative PET/CT scans. At 28 months the overall survival rate is 94%. Biochemical relapse free survival is 83% for primary cancer and 49% for recurrent tumours. Distant disease free survival is 100% and 75% for primary and recurrent cancer, respectively. Acute normal tissue toxicity was mild in 85% and moderate (grade 2 in 15%. No or mild late side effects were observed in the majority of patients (84%. One patient had

  7. TU-F-CAMPUS-T-05: Dose Escalation to Biological Tumor Volumes of Prostate Cancer Patients Using Gold Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jermoumi, M; Ngwa, W [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, Medical Physics Program, University of Massachusetts Lowell (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Insitute, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical, Boston, MA (United States); Sajo, E [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, Medical Physics Program, University of Massachusetts Lowell (United States); Houari, K [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Insitute, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Studies have shown that radiation boosting could help reduce prostate cancer (PCa) recurrence. Biological tumor volumes (BTV) are a high priority for such radiation boosting. The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential of radiation boosting of real patient BTVs using gold nanoparticles (GNP) released from gold-loaded brachytherapy spacers (GBS) during brachytherapy. Methods: The BTVs of 12 patients having prostate adenocarcinoma identified with positron emission tomography (PET) and CT scanner using C-11 labeled tracer [11C]acetate were investigated. The initial GNP concentration and time to achieve a dose enhancement effect (DEF) of 2 was simulated using the freely downloadable software RAID APP. The investigations were carried out for low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy sources (BTS) described in AAPM Task Group report 43: Cs-131, I-125, and Pd-103. In first case, we used 7 mg/g and 18 mg/g of GNP initial concentrations to estimate the time needed for released GNP to achieve a DEF of 2 for the different BTS, and compare with clinically relevant treatment times. In second case, we calculated the initial concentration of GNPs needed to achieve a DEF of 2 during the time the BTS would typically deliver 50%, 70% and 90% of the total dose. Results: For an initial concentration of 18 mg/g, when using Cs-131, and Pd-103, a DEF of 2 could only be achieved for BTV of 3.3 cm3 and 1 cm3 respectively. Meanwhile a DEF of 2 could be achieved for all 12 BTVs when using I-125. To achieve a DEF of 2 for all patients using Cs-131 and Pd-103, much higher initial concentrations would have to be used than have been typically employed in pre-clinical studies. Conclusion: The I-125 is the most viable BTS that can be employed with GBS to guide dose painting treatment planning for localized PCa.

  8. Bosutinib plus capecitabine for selected advanced solid tumours: results of a phase 1 dose-escalation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakoff, S J; Wang, D; Campone, M; Calles, A; Leip, E; Turnbull, K; Bardy-Bouxin, N; Duvillié, L; Calvo, E

    2014-11-25

    This phase 1 study evaluated the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), safety, and efficacy of bosutinib (competitive Src/Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor) plus capecitabine. Patients with locally advanced/metastatic breast, pancreatic, or colorectal cancers; cholangiocarcinoma; or glioblastoma received bosutinib plus capecitabine at eight of nine possible dose combinations using an 'up-down' design to determine the toxicity contour of the combination. Among 32 enrolled patients, none of the 9 patients receiving MTD (bosutinib 300 mg once daily plus capecitabine 1000 mg m(-2) twice daily) experienced dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs). Overall, 2 out of 31 (6%) evaluable patients experienced DLTs (grade 3 neurologic pain (n=1); grade 3 pruritus/rash and increased alanine aminotransferase (n=1)). Most common treatment-related adverse events (AEs) were diarrhoea, nausea, vomiting, palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia (PPE), fatigue; most frequent grade 3/4 AEs: PPE, fatigue, and increased alanine/aspartate aminotransferase. Although diarrhoea was common, 91% of affected patients experienced maximum grade 1/2 events that resolved. Best overall confirmed partial response or stable disease >24 weeks (all tumour types) was observed in 6 and 13% of patients. In this population of patients with advanced solid tumours, bosutinib plus capecitabine demonstrated a safety profile similar to that previously reported for bosutinib or capecitabine monotherapy; limited efficacy was observed.

  9. Ewing sarcoma localized on spine: a dose escalation study in child; Sarcome d'Ewing localise au rachis: une etude d'escalade de dose chez l'enfant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogin, G.; Marchesi, V. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Nancy (France); Biston, M.C.; Gassa, F. [Centre Leon-Berard, Lyon (France); Amessis, M.; Zefkili, S.; Helfre, S. [Institut Curie, Paris (France); De Marzi, L.; Lacroix, F.; Leroy, A. [Institut Curie, Orsay (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report the study of dose escalation for the treatment of spinal in two types of Ewing tumours. They used 5 dose levels at the rate of five 1,6 Gy per week. They compare different radiotherapy techniques: three-dimensional conformation radiotherapy, static intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy, helical tomo-therapy, volume-modulated arc-therapy (VMAT), stereotactic radiotherapy, and proton-therapy (in passive diffusion). It appears that it is possible to safely and efficiently deliver until 70,4 Gy in some Ewing tumours. In child, exclusive radiotherapy might become a local treatment option and would require a clinic trial and comparison with exclusive surgery or post-operative radiotherapy. Short communication

  10. First-in-human, open-label dose-escalation and dose-expansion study of the safety, pharmacokinetics, and antitumor effects of an oral ALK inhibitor ASP3026 in patients with advanced solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhong Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ASP3026 is a second-generation anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK inhibitor that has potent in vitro activity against crizotinib-resistant ALK-positive tumors. This open-label, multicenter, first-in-human phase I study ( NCT01284192 assessed the safety, pharmacokinetic profile, and antitumor activity of ASP3026. Methods Advanced solid tumor patients received oral ASP3026 in 3 + 3 dose-escalation cohorts at doses of 25–800 mg once daily in 28-day cycles. The endpoints were to identify the maximum tolerated dose (MTD, the recommended phase II dose (RP2D, and the pharmacokinetic profile of ASP3026. A phase Ib expansion cohort enrolled patients with metastatic, crizotinib-resistant ALK-positive solid tumors at the RP2D, and response was evaluated by RECIST 1.1. Results The dose-escalation cohort enrolled 33 patients, including three crizotinib-resistant, ALK-positive patients, and the dose-expansion cohort enrolled another 13 crizotinib-resistant, ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients. ASP3026 demonstrated both linear pharmacokinetics and dose-proportional exposure for area under the plasma concentration–time curve and maximum concentration observed with a median terminal half-life of 35 h, supporting the daily dosing. Grade 3 rash and elevated transaminase concentrations were dose-limiting toxicities observed at 800 mg; hence, 525 mg daily was the MTD and RP2D. The most common treatment-related adverse events were nausea (38 %, fatigue (35 %, and vomiting (35 %. Among the 16 patients with crizotinib-resistant ALK-positive tumors (15 NSCLC, 1 neuroblastoma, eight patients achieved partial response (overall response rate 50 %; 95 % confidence interval 25–75 % and seven patients (44 % achieved stable disease. Conclusions ASP3026 was well tolerated and had therapeutic activity in patients with crizotinib-resistant ALK-positive advanced tumors. Trial registration ClinTrials.gov: NCT01284192

  11. A phase 1 dose-escalation study of the oral histone deacetylase inhibitor abexinostat in combination with standard hypofractionated radiotherapy in advanced solid tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Eric; Moyal, Elizabeth Cohen-Jonathan; Gregorc, Vanesa; Zucali, Paolo Andrea; Menard, Jean; Soria, Jean-Charles; Kloos, Ioana; Hsu, Jeff; Luan, Ying; Liu, Emily; Vezan, Remus; Graef, Thorsten; Rivera, Sofia

    2017-01-01

    Current treatments for advanced solid tumors tend to be only palliative. Although radiotherapy is administered with a curative intent, radioresistance and dose-limiting toxicities pose limitations to treatment. Abexinostat, an oral pan-histone deacetylase inhibitor, demonstrated enhanced sensitivity to radiation in various solid tumor cell lines. We conducted an exploratory, phase 1, dose-escalation study of abexinostat in combination with standard hypofractionated radiotherapy in patients with advanced solid tumors treated in a palliative setting. Among 58 treated patients, the median age was 61.5 years (range, 20-82); 47% of the patients had M1 stage disease, and 95% had received previous chemotherapy alone or chemotherapy in combination with surgery and/or radiotherapy. The recommended phase 2 dose was determined to be 90 mg/m2 (140 mg). Of the 51 patients evaluable for response, best overall response was 8% (1 complete response [CR], 3 partial responses [PRs]), and best loco-regional response was 12% (1 CR and 5 PRs) at a median follow-up of 16 weeks. Of note, patients with target or non-target brain lesions showed encouraging responses, with 1 patient achieving a best loco-regional response of CR. Treatment-emergent grade ≥3 adverse events (AEs) were few, with most common being thrombocytopenia (17%), lymphopenia (12%), and hypokalemia (7%). Six patients (10%) discontinued treatment due to AEs. No grade ≥3 prolongation of the QTc interval was observed, with no treatment discontinuations due to this AE. Oral abexinostat combined with radiotherapy was well tolerated in patients with advanced solid tumors. The combination may have potential for treatment of patients with brain lesions. PMID:28915584

  12. Dose-escalation study for the targeting of CD44v+cancer stem cells by sulfasalazine in patients with advanced gastric cancer (EPOC1205).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shitara, Kohei; Doi, Toshihiko; Nagano, Osamu; Imamura, Chiyo K; Ozeki, Takeshi; Ishii, Yuya; Tsuchihashi, Kenji; Takahashi, Shunji; Nakajima, Takako E; Hironaka, Shuichi; Fukutani, Miki; Hasegawa, Hiromi; Nomura, Shogo; Sato, Akihiro; Einaga, Yasuaki; Kuwata, Takeshi; Saya, Hideyuki; Ohtsu, Atsushi

    2017-03-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have enhanced mechanisms of protection from oxidative stress. A variant form of CD44 (CD44v), a major CSC marker, was shown to interact with xCT, a subunit of cystine-glutamate transporter, which maintains high levels of intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH) which defend the cell against oxidative stress. Sulfasalazine (SSZ) is an inhibitor of xCT and was shown to suppress the survival of CD44v-positive stem-like cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. To find the dose of SSZ which can safely reduce the population of CD44v-positive cells in tumors, a dose-escalation study in patients with advanced gastric cancer was conducted. SSZ was given four times daily by oral administration with 2 weeks as one cycle. Tumor biopsies were obtained before and after 14 days of administration of SSZ to evaluate expression of CD44v and the intratumoral level of GSH. Eleven patients were enrolled and received a dosage from 8 to 12 g/day. Safety was confirmed up to a dosage of 12 g/day, which was considered the maximum tolerated dose. Among the eight patients with CD44v-positive cells in their pretreatment biopsy samples, the CD44v-positive cancer cell population appeared to be reduced in the posttreatment biopsy tissues of four patients. Intratumoral GSH levels were also decreased in two patients, suggesting biological effectiveness of SSZ at 8 g/day or greater. This is the first study of SSZ as an xCT inhibitor for targeting CSCs. Reduction of the levels of CD44v-positive cells and GSH was observed in some patients, consistent with the mode of action of SSZ in CSCs.

  13. ASCENDE-RT: An Analysis of Treatment-Related Morbidity for a Randomized Trial Comparing a Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost with a Dose-Escalated External Beam Boost for High- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodda, Sree [British Columbia (BC) Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Tyldesley, Scott [British Columbia (BC) Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Morris, W. James, E-mail: jmorris@bccancer.bc.ca [British Columbia (BC) Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Keyes, Mira [British Columbia (BC) Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Halperin, Ross [Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); BC Cancer Agency, Centre for the Southern Interior, Kelowna, British Columbia (Canada); Pai, Howard [Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); McKenzie, Michael; Duncan, Graeme [British Columbia (BC) Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Morton, Gerard [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hamm, Jeremy [Department of Population Oncology, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Murray, Nevin [British Columbia (BC) Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: To report the genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) morbidity and erectile dysfunction in a randomized trial comparing 2 methods of dose escalation for high- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: ASCENDE-RT (Androgen Suppression Combined with Elective Nodal and Dose Escalated Radiation Therapy) enrolled 398 men, median age 68 years, who were then randomized to either a standard arm that included 12 months of androgen deprivation therapy and pelvic irradiation to 46 Gy followed by a dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (DE-EBRT) boost to 78 Gy, or an experimental arm that substituted a low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR-PB) boost. At clinic visits, investigators recorded GU and GI morbidity and information on urinary continence, catheter use, and erectile function. Exclusion of 15 who received nonprotocol treatment and correction of 14 crossover events left 195 men who actually received a DE-EBRT boost and 188, an LDR-PB boost. Median follow-up was 6.5 years. Results: The LDR-PB boost increased the risk of needing temporary catheterization and/or requiring incontinence pads. At 5 years the cumulative incidence of grade 3 GU events was 18.4% for LDR-PB, versus 5.2% for DE-EBRT (P<.001). Compared with the cumulative incidence, the 5-year prevalence of grade 3 GU morbidity was substantially lower for both arms (8.6% vs 2.2%, P=.058). The 5-year cumulative incidence of grade 3 GI events was 8.1% for LDR-PB, versus 3.2% for DE-EBRT (P=.124). The 5-year prevalence of grade 3 GI toxicity was lower than the cumulative incidence for both arms (1.0% vs 2.2%, respectively). Among men reporting adequate baseline erections, 45% of LDR-PB patients reported similar erectile function at 5 years, versus 37% after DE-EBRT (P=.30). Conclusions: The incidence of acute and late GU morbidity was higher after LDR-PB boost, and there was a nonsignificant trend for worse GI morbidity. No differences in the frequency of

  14. Causes of Mortality After Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy and Androgen Deprivation for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tendulkar, Rahul D., E-mail: tendulr@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Hunter, Grant K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Intermountain Healthcare, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Reddy, Chandana A.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Ciezki, Jay P.; Abdel-Wahab, May [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Stephenson, Andrew J.; Klein, Eric A. [Department of Urology, Glickman Urological Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Mahadevan, Arul [Seacoast Cancer Center New Hampshire, Dover, New Hampshire (United States); Kupelian, Patrick A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles Health System, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: Men with high-risk prostate cancer have other competing causes of mortality; however, current risk stratification schema do not account for comorbidities. We aim to identify the causes of death and factors predictive for mortality in this population. Methods and Materials: A total of 660 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated with definitive high-dose external beam radiation therapy (≥74 Gy) and androgen deprivation (AD) between 1996 and 2009 at a single institution. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was conducted to determine factors predictive of survival. Results: The median radiation dose was 78 Gy, median duration of AD was 6 months, and median follow-up was 74 months. The 10-year overall survival (OS) was 60.6%. Prostate cancer was the leading single cause of death, with 10-year mortality of 14.1% (95% CI 10.7-17.6), compared with other cancers (8.4%, 95% CI 5.7-11.1), cardiovascular disease (7.3%, 95% CI 4.7-9.9), and all other causes (10.4%, 95% CI 7.2-13.6). On multivariate analysis, older age (HR 1.55, P=.002) and Charlson comorbidity index score (CS) ≥1 (HR 2.20, P<.0001) were significant factors predictive of OS, whereas Gleason score, T stage, prostate-specific antigen, duration of AD, radiation dose, smoking history, and body mass index were not. Men younger than 70 years of age with CS = 0 were more likely to die of prostate cancer than any other cause, whereas older men or those with CS ≥1 more commonly suffered non-prostate cancer death. The cumulative incidences of prostate cancer-specific mortality were similar regardless of age or comorbidities (P=.60). Conclusions: Men with high-risk prostate cancer are more likely to die of causes other than prostate cancer, except for the subgroup of men younger than 70 years of age without comorbidities. Only older age and presence of comorbidities significantly predicted for OS, whereas prostate cancer- and treatment-related factors did not.

  15. Preoperative Single-Fraction Partial Breast Radiation Therapy: A Novel Phase 1, Dose-Escalation Protocol With Radiation Response Biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, Janet K., E-mail: janet.horton@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Blitzblau, Rachel C.; Yoo, Sua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Geradts, Joseph [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chang, Zheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Baker, Jay A. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Georgiade, Gregory S. [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chen, Wei [Department of Bioinformatics: Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Siamakpour-Reihani, Sharareh; Wang, Chunhao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Broadwater, Gloria [Department of Biostatistics: Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Groth, Jeff [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Palta, Manisha; Dewhirst, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Barry, William T. [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Duffy, Eileen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); and others

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Women with biologically favorable early-stage breast cancer are increasingly treated with accelerated partial breast radiation (PBI). However, treatment-related morbidities have been linked to the large postoperative treatment volumes required for external beam PBI. Relative to external beam delivery, alternative PBI techniques require equipment that is not universally available. To address these issues, we designed a phase 1 trial utilizing widely available technology to 1) evaluate the safety of a single radiation treatment delivered preoperatively to the small-volume, intact breast tumor and 2) identify imaging and genomic markers of radiation response. Methods and Materials: Women aged ≥55 years with clinically node-negative, estrogen receptor–positive, and/or progesterone receptor–positive HER2−, T1 invasive carcinomas, or low- to intermediate-grade in situ disease ≤2 cm were enrolled (n=32). Intensity modulated radiation therapy was used to deliver 15 Gy (n=8), 18 Gy (n=8), or 21 Gy (n=16) to the tumor with a 1.5-cm margin. Lumpectomy was performed within 10 days. Paired pre- and postradiation magnetic resonance images and patient tumor samples were analyzed. Results: No dose-limiting toxicity was observed. At a median follow-up of 23 months, there have been no recurrences. Physician-rated cosmetic outcomes were good/excellent, and chronic toxicities were grade 1 to 2 (fibrosis, hyperpigmentation) in patients receiving preoperative radiation only. Evidence of dose-dependent changes in vascular permeability, cell density, and expression of genes regulating immunity and cell death were seen in response to radiation. Conclusions: Preoperative single-dose radiation therapy to intact breast tumors is well tolerated. Radiation response is marked by early indicators of cell death in this biologically favorable patient cohort. This study represents a first step toward a novel partial breast radiation approach. Preoperative radiation should

  16. A Phase I-II dose escalation study of fixed-dose rate gemcitabine, oxaliplatin and capecitabine every two weeks in advanced cholangiocarcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Ulrik V; Jensen, Lars Henrik; Sorensen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction. Gemcitabine based regimens have been widely used in patients with advanced cholangiocarcinoma (CC), but no standard therapy exists. In this study we aimed to find the maximally tolerated dose (MTD) of a two-week schedule of fixed dose rate (FDR) gemcitabine (G), oxaliplatin...

  17. A Phase I-II dose escalation study of fixed-dose rate gemcitabine, oxaliplatin and capecitabine every two weeks in advanced cholangiocarcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Ulrik; Jensen, Lars Henrik; Sorensen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Gemcitabine based regimens have been widely used in patients with advanced cholangiocarcinoma (CC), but no standard therapy exists. In this study we aimed to find the maximally tolerated dose (MTD) of a two-week schedule of fixed dose rate (FDR) gemcitabine (G), oxaliplatin (O) and capecitabine (C...

  18. Dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiotherapy and irradiation of subventricular zones in relation to tumor control outcomes of patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusumawidjaja G

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Grace Kusumawidjaja,1 Patricia Zhun Hong Gan,1 Whee Sze Ong,2 Achiraya Teyateeti,3 Pittaya Dankulchai,3 Daniel Yat Harn Tan,1 Eu Tiong Chua,1 Kevin Lee Min Chua,1 Chee Kian Tham,4 Fuh Yong Wong,1 Melvin Lee Kiang Chua1,5 1Division of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Centre, Singapore; 2Division of Clinical Trials and Epidemiological Sciences, National Cancer Centre, Singapore; 3Department of Radiology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Thailand; 4Division of Medical Oncology, National Cancer Centre, Singapore; 5Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore Background: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most aggressive primary brain tumor with high relapse rate. In this study, we aimed to determine if dose-escalated (DE radiotherapy improved tumor control and survival in GBM patients. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of 49 and 23 newly-diagnosed histology-proven GBM patients, treated with DE radiotherapy delivered in 70 Gy (2.33 Gy per fraction and conventional doses (60 Gy, respectively, between 2007 and 2013. Clinical target volumes for 70 and 60 Gy were defined by 0.5 and 2.0 cm expansion of magnetic resonance imaging T1-gadolinium-enhanced tumor/surgical cavity, respectively. Bilateral subventricular zones (SVZ were contoured on a co-registered pre-treatment magnetic resonance imaging and planning computed tomography dataset as a 5 mm wide structure along the lateral margins of the lateral ventricles. Survival outcomes of both cohorts were compared using log-rank test. Radiation dose to SVZ in the DE cohort was evaluated. Results: Median follow-up was 13.6 and 15.1 months for the DE- and conventionally-treated cohorts, respectively. Median overall survival (OS of patients who received DE radiotherapy was 15.2 months (95% confidence interval [CI] =11.0–18.6, while median OS of the latter cohort was 18.4 months (95% CI =12.5–31.4, P=0.253. Univariate analyses of

  19. Long-term outcomes from dose-escalated image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy with androgen deprivation: encouraging results for intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilcox SW

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Shea W Wilcox,1,4 Noel J Aherne,2,4 Linus C Benjamin,1 Bosco Wu,1 Thomaz de Campos Silva,3 Craig S McLachlan,4 Michael J McKay,3,5 Andrew J Last,1 Thomas P Shakespeare1–4 1North Coast Cancer Institute, Port Macquarie, NSW, Australia; 2North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour, NSW, Australia; 3North Coast Cancer Institute, Lismore, NSW, Australia; 4The University of New South Wales, Rural Clinical School, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 5The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Purpose: Dose-escalated (DE radiotherapy in the setting of localized prostate cancer has been shown to improve biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS in several studies. In the same group of patients, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT has been shown to confer a survival benefit when combined with radiotherapy doses of up to 70 Gy; however, there is currently little long-term data on patients who have received high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT with ADT. We report the long-term outcomes in a large cohort of patients treated with the combination of DE image-guided IMRT (IG-IMRT and ADT. Methods and materials: Patients with localized prostate cancer were identified from a centralized database across an integrated cancer center. All patients received DE IG-IMRT, combined with ADT, and had a minimum follow up of 12 months post-radiotherapy. All relapse and toxicity data were collected prospectively. Actuarial bDFS, metastasis-free survival, prostate cancer-specific survival, and multivariate analyses were calculated using the SPSS v20.0 statistical package. Results: Seven hundred and eighty-two eligible patients were identified with a median follow up of 46 months. Overall, 4.3% of patients relapsed, 2.0% developed distant metastases, and 0.6% died from metastatic prostate cancer. At 5-years, bDFS was 88%, metastasis-free survival was 95%, and prostate cancer-specific survival was 98%. Five-year grade 2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity was 2

  20. A Clinical phase I/II trial to investigate preoperative dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT in patients with retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roeder Falk

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Local control rates in patients with retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcoma (RSTS remain disappointing even after gross total resection, mainly because wide margins are not achievable in the majority of patients. In contrast to extremity sarcoma, postoperative radiation therapy (RT has shown limited efficacy due to its limitations in achievable dose and coverage. Although Intraoperative Radiation Therapy (IORT has been introduced in some centers to overcome the dose limitations and resulted in increased outcome, local failure rates are still high even if considerable treatment related toxicity is accepted. As postoperative administration of RT has some general disadvantages, neoadjuvant approaches could offer benefits in terms of dose escalation, target coverage and reduction of toxicity, especially if highly conformal techniques like intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT are considered. Methods/design The trial is a prospective, one armed, single center phase I/II study investigating a combination of neoadjuvant dose-escalated IMRT (50–56 Gy followed by surgery and IORT (10–12 Gy in patients with at least marginally resectable RSTS. The primary objective is the local control rate after five years. Secondary endpoints are progression-free and overall survival, acute and late toxicity, surgical resectability and patterns of failure. The aim of accrual is 37 patients in the per-protocol population. Discussion The present study evaluates combined neoadjuvant dose-escalated IMRT followed by surgery and IORT concerning its value for improved local control without markedly increased toxicity. Trial registration NCT01566123

  1. WE-G-BRB-02: The Role of Program Project Grants in Study of 3D Conformal Therapy, Dose Escalation and Motion Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraass, B. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Over the past 20 years the NIH has funded individual grants, program projects grants, and clinical trials which have been instrumental in advancing patient care. The ways that each grant mechanism lends itself to the different phases of translating research into clinical practice will be described. Major technological innovations, such as IMRT and proton therapy, have been advanced with R01-type and P01-type funding and will be discussed. Similarly, the role of program project grants in identifying and addressing key hypotheses on the potential of 3D conformal therapy, normal tissue-guided dose escalation and motion management will be described. An overview will be provided regarding how these technological innovations have been applied to multi-institutional NIH-sponsored trials. Finally, the panel will discuss regarding which research questions should be funded by the NIH to inspire the next advances in radiation therapy. Learning Objectives: Understand the different funding mechanisms of the NIH Learn about research advances that have led to innovation in delivery Review achievements due to NIH-funded program project grants in radiotherapy over the past 20 years Understand example advances achieved with multi-institutional clinical trials NIH.

  2. Gemcitabine Plus Radiation Therapy for High-Grade Glioma: Long-Term Results of a Phase 1 Dose-Escalation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Michelle M., E-mail: michekim@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Camelo-Piragua, Sandra [Department of Pathology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Schipper, Matthew; Tao, Yebin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Normolle, Daniel [Department of Biostatistics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Junck, Larry; Mammoser, Aaron [Department of Neurology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Betz, Bryan L. [Department of Pathology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cao, Yue [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kim, Christopher J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Heth, Jason; Sagher, Oren [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Tsien, Christina I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the tolerability and efficacy of gemcitabine plus radiation therapy (RT) in this phase 1 study of patients with newly diagnosed malignant glioma (HGG). Patients and Methods: Between 2004 and 2012, 29 adults with HGG were enrolled. After any extent of resection, RT (60 Gy over 6 weeks) was given concurrent with escalating doses of weekly gemcitabine. Using a time-to-event continual reassessment method, 5 dose levels were evaluated starting at 500 mg/m{sup 2} during the last 2 weeks of RT and advanced stepwise into earlier weeks. The primary objective was to determine the recommended phase 2 dose of gemcitabine plus RT. Secondary objectives included progression-free survival, overall survival (OS), and long-term toxicity. Results: Median follow-up was 38.1 months (range, 8.9-117.5 months); 24 patients were evaluable for toxicity. After 2005 when standard practice changed, patients with World Health Organization grade 4 tumors were no longer enrolled. Median progression-free survival for 22 patients with grade 3 tumors was 26.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 15.6-inestimable), and OS was 48.5 months (95% CI 26.8-inestimable). In 4 IDH mutated, 1p/19q codeleted patients, no failures occurred, with all but 1 alive at time of last follow-up. Seven with IDH mutated, non-codeleted tumors with ATRX loss had intermediate OS of 73.5 months (95% CI 32.8-inestimable). Six nonmutated, non-codeleted patients had a median OS of 26.5 months (95% CI 25.4-inestimable). The recommended phase 2 dose of gemcitabine plus RT was 750 mg/m{sup 2}/wk given the last 4 weeks of RT. Dose reductions were most commonly due to grade 3 neutropenia; no grade 4 or 5 toxicities were seen. Conclusions: Gemcitabine concurrent with RT is well-tolerated and yields promising outcomes, including in patients with adverse molecular features. It is a candidate for further study, particularly for poor-prognosis patient subgroups with HGG.

  3. Safety and immunogenicity of the novel H4:IC31 tuberculosis vaccine candidate in BCG-vaccinated adults: Two phase I dose escalation trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrby, Maria; Vesikari, Timo; Lindqvist, Lars; Maeurer, Markus; Ahmed, Raija; Mahdavifar, Shahnaz; Bennett, Sean; McClain, J Bruce; Shepherd, Barbara M; Li, Daner; Hokey, David A; Kromann, Ingrid; Hoff, Søren T; Andersen, Peter; de Visser, Adriëtte W; Joosten, Simone A; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; Andersson, Jan; Brighenti, Susanna

    2017-03-14

    Novel vaccine strategies are required to provide protective immunity in tuberculosis (TB) and prevent development of active disease. We investigated the safety and immunogenicity of a novel TB vaccine candidate, H4:IC31 (AERAS-404) that is composed of a fusion protein of M. tuberculosis antigens Ag85B and TB10.4 combined with an IC31® adjuvant. BCG-vaccinated healthy subjects were immunized with various antigen (5, 15, 50, 150μg) and adjuvant (0, 100, 500nmol) doses of the H4:IC31 vaccine (n=106) or placebo (n=18) in two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase I studies conducted in a low TB endemic setting in Sweden and Finland. The subjects were followed for adverse events and CD4+ T cell responses. H4:IC31 vaccination was well tolerated with a safety profile consisting of mostly mild to moderate self-limited injection site pain, myalgia, arthralgia, fever and post-vaccination inflammatory reaction at the screening tuberculin skin test injection site. The H4:IC31 vaccine elicited antigen-specific CD4+ T cell proliferation and cytokine production that persisted 18weeks after the last vaccination. CD4+ T cell expansion, IFN-γ production and multifunctional CD4+ Th1 responses were most prominent after two doses of H4:IC31 containing 5, 15, or 50μg of H4 in combination with the 500nmol IC31 adjuvant dose. The novel TB vaccine candidate, H4:IC31, demonstrated an acceptable safety profile and was immunogenic, capable of triggering multifunctional CD4+ T cell responses in previously BCG-vaccinated healthy individuals. These dose-escalation trials provided evidence that the optimal antigen-adjuvant dose combinations are 5, 15, or 50μg of H4 and 500nmol of IC31. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02066428 and NCT02074956. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Safety of dexamphetamine in acute ischemic stroke: a randomized, double-blind, controlled dose-escalation trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinsson, Louise; Wahlgren, Nils Gunnar

    2003-02-01

    Amphetamine is reported to enhance recovery after experimental stroke, but results from the first few trials in humans are inconclusive. Limited information is available on treatment safety. This study intended to investigate the safety and tolerability of dexamphetamine in patients with acute cerebral ischemia. Forty-five patients with cerebral ischemia were enrolled within 72 hours after onset of symptoms. Patients were randomized to 1 of 3 dose levels (2.5, 5, or 10 mg orally twice daily) or placebo for 5 consecutive days. Adverse events, blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature, consciousness level, and functional outcome measures were followed up daily during treatment. Follow-ups were made at day 7 and 1 and 3 months after stroke. Mean systolic and diastolic blood pressures and heart rate increased 14 mm Hg, 8 mm Hg, and 9 bpm, respectively, with dexamphetamine treatment compared with placebo (P< or =0.01). There was no difference between dexamphetamine and placebo regarding adverse events, body temperature, or consciousness level. During treatment, there was a benefit of dexamphetamine in neurological and functional outcome (P<0.05), but differences were not maintained at follow-up. Overall, dexamphetamine was safe and well tolerated by patients with acute cerebral ischemia, but blood pressure and heart rate increased during treatment in comparison to placebo. These observations may be important in the future planning of amphetamine trials because changes in these variables have been observed to interfere with clinical outcome. The suggestions of improvement in outcome must be confirmed in further studies.

  5. An outpatient, ambulant-design, controlled human infection model using escalating doses of Salmonella Typhi challenge delivered in sodium bicarbonate solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddington, Claire S; Darton, Thomas C; Jones, Claire; Haworth, Kathryn; Peters, Anna; John, Tessa; Thompson, Ben A V; Kerridge, Simon A; Kingsley, Robert A; Zhou, Liqing; Holt, Kathryn E; Yu, Ly-Mee; Lockhart, Stephen; Farrar, Jeremy J; Sztein, Marcelo B; Dougan, Gordon; Angus, Brian; Levine, Myron M; Pollard, Andrew J

    2014-05-01

    Typhoid fever is a major global health problem, the control of which is hindered by lack of a suitable animal model in which to study Salmonella Typhi infection. Until 1974, a human challenge model advanced understanding of typhoid and was used in vaccine development. We set out to establish a new human challenge model and ascertain the S. Typhi (Quailes strain) inoculum required for an attack rate of 60%-75% in typhoid-naive volunteers when ingested with sodium bicarbonate solution. Groups of healthy consenting adults ingested escalating dose levels of S. Typhi and were closely monitored in an outpatient setting for 2 weeks. Antibiotic treatment was initiated if typhoid diagnosis occurred (temperature ≥38°C sustained ≥12 hours or bacteremia) or at day 14 in those remaining untreated. Two dose levels (10(3) or 10(4) colony-forming units) were required to achieve the primary objective, resulting in attack rates of 55% (11/20) or 65% (13/20), respectively. Challenge was well tolerated; 4 of 40 participants fulfilled prespecified criteria for severe infection. Most diagnoses (87.5%) were confirmed by blood culture, and asymptomatic bacteremia and stool shedding of S. Typhi was also observed. Participants who developed typhoid infection demonstrated serological responses to flagellin and lipopolysaccharide antigens by day 14; however, no anti-Vi antibody responses were detected. Human challenge with a small inoculum of virulent S. Typhi administered in bicarbonate solution can be performed safely using an ambulant-model design to advance understanding of host-pathogen interactions and immunity. This model should expedite development of diagnostics, vaccines, and therapeutics for typhoid control.

  6. Individual vulnerability to escalated aggressive behavior by a low dose of alcohol: decreased serotonin receptor mRNA in the prefrontal cortex of male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiavegatto, S; Quadros, I M H; Ambar, G; Miczek, K A

    2010-02-01

    Low to moderate doses of alcohol consumption induce heightened aggressive behavior in some, but not all individuals. Individual vulnerability for this nonadaptive behavior may be determined by an interaction of genetic and environmental factors with the sensitivity of alcohol's effects on brain and behavior. We used a previously established protocol for alcohol oral self-administration and characterized alcohol-heightened aggressive (AHA) mice as compared with alcohol non-heightened (ANA) counterparts. A week later, we quantified mRNA steady state levels of several candidate genes in the serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] system in different brain areas. We report a regionally selective and significant reduction of all 5-HT receptor subtype transcripts, except for 5-HT(3), in the prefrontal cortex of AHA mice. Comparable gene expression profile was previously observed in aggressive mice induced by social isolation or by an anabolic androgenic steroid. Additional change in the 5-HT(1B) receptor transcripts was seen in the amygdala and hypothalamus of AHA mice. In both these areas, 5-HT(1B) mRNA was elevated when compared with ANA mice. In the hypothalamus, AHA mice also showed increased transcripts for 5-HT(2A) receptor. In the midbrain, 5-HT synthetic enzyme, 5-HT transporter and 5-HT receptors mRNA levels were similar between groups. Our results emphasize a role for postsynaptic over presynaptic 5-HT receptors in mice which showed escalated aggression after the consumption of a moderate dose of alcohol. This gene expression profile of 5-HT neurotransmission components in the brain of mice may suggest a vulnerability trait for alcohol-heightened aggression.

  7. An Outpatient, Ambulant-Design, Controlled Human Infection Model Using Escalating Doses of Salmonella Typhi Challenge Delivered in Sodium Bicarbonate Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddington, Claire S.; Darton, Thomas C.; Jones, Claire; Haworth, Kathryn; Peters, Anna; John, Tessa; Thompson, Ben A. V.; Kerridge, Simon A.; Kingsley, Robert A.; Zhou, Liqing; Holt, Kathryn E.; Yu, Ly-Mee; Lockhart, Stephen; Farrar, Jeremy J.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Dougan, Gordon; Angus, Brian; Levine, Myron M.; Pollard, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Typhoid fever is a major global health problem, the control of which is hindered by lack of a suitable animal model in which to study Salmonella Typhi infection. Until 1974, a human challenge model advanced understanding of typhoid and was used in vaccine development. We set out to establish a new human challenge model and ascertain the S. Typhi (Quailes strain) inoculum required for an attack rate of 60%–75% in typhoid-naive volunteers when ingested with sodium bicarbonate solution. Methods. Groups of healthy consenting adults ingested escalating dose levels of S. Typhi and were closely monitored in an outpatient setting for 2 weeks. Antibiotic treatment was initiated if typhoid diagnosis occurred (temperature ≥38°C sustained ≥12 hours or bacteremia) or at day 14 in those remaining untreated. Results. Two dose levels (103 or 104 colony-forming units) were required to achieve the primary objective, resulting in attack rates of 55% (11/20) or 65% (13/20), respectively. Challenge was well tolerated; 4 of 40 participants fulfilled prespecified criteria for severe infection. Most diagnoses (87.5%) were confirmed by blood culture, and asymptomatic bacteremia and stool shedding of S. Typhi was also observed. Participants who developed typhoid infection demonstrated serological responses to flagellin and lipopolysaccharide antigens by day 14; however, no anti-Vi antibody responses were detected. Conclusions. Human challenge with a small inoculum of virulent S. Typhi administered in bicarbonate solution can be performed safely using an ambulant-model design to advance understanding of host–pathogen interactions and immunity. This model should expedite development of diagnostics, vaccines, and therapeutics for typhoid control. PMID:24519873

  8. Phase I study of continuous MKC-1 in patients with advanced or metastatic solid malignancies using the modified Time-to-Event Continual Reassessment Method (TITE-CRM) dose escalation design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevaarwerk, Amye; Wilding, George; Eickhoff, Jens; Chappell, Rick; Sidor, Carolyn; Arnott, Jamie; Bailey, Howard; Schelman, William; Liu, Glenn

    2012-06-01

    MKC-1 is an oral cell-cycle inhibitor with broad antitumor activity in preclinical models. Clinical studies demonstrated modest antitumor activity using intermittent dosing schedule, however additional preclinical data suggested continuous dosing could be efficacious with additional effects against the mTor/AKT pathway. The primary objectives were to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and response of continuous MKC-1. Secondary objectives included characterizing the dose limiting toxicities (DLTs) and pharmacokinetics (PK). Patients with solid malignancies were eligible, if they had measurable disease, ECOG PS ≤1, and adequate organ function. Exclusions included brain metastases and inability to receive oral drug. MKC-1 was dosed twice daily, continuously in 28-day cycles. Other medications were eliminated if there were possible drug interactions. Doses were assigned using a TITE-CRM algorithm following enrollment of the first 3 pts. Disease response was assessed every 8 weeks. Between 5/08-9/09, 24 patients enrolled (15 M/9 F, median 58 years, range 44-77). Patients 1-3 received 120 mg/d of MKC-1; patients 4-24 were dosed per the TITE-CRM algorithm: 150 mg [n = 1], 180 [2], 200 [1], 230 [1], 260 [5], 290 [6], 320 [5]. The median time on drug was 8 weeks (range 4-28). The only DLT occurred at 320 mg (grade 3 fatigue). Stable disease occurred at 150 mg/d (28 weeks; RCC) and 320 mg/d (16 weeks; breast, parotid). Escalation halted at 320 mg/d. Day 28 pharmacokinetics indicated absorption and active metabolites. Continuous MKC-1 was well-tolerated; there were no RECIST responses, although clinical benefit occurred in 3/24 pts. Dose escalation stopped at 320 mg/d, and this is the MTD as defined by the CRM dose escalation algorithm; this cumulative dose/cycle exceeds that determined from intermittent dosing studies. A TITE-CRM allowed for rapid dose escalation and was able to account for late toxicities with continuous dosing via a modified algorithm.

  9. Survival Outcomes of Dose-Escalated External Beam Radiotherapy versus Combined Brachytherapy for Intermediate and High Risk Prostate Cancer Using the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Arya; Jones, Bernard; Jackson, Matthew W; Yeh, Norman; Waxweiler, Timothy V; Maroni, Paul; Kavanagh, Brian D; Raben, David

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated survival outcomes between dose-escalated EBRT (external beam radiotherapy) vs EBRT plus brachytherapy for intermediate and high risk prostate cancer using NCDB (National Cancer Data Base). Patients with cN0M0 prostate cancer treated from 2004 to 2006 were divided into radiotherapy comparison groups, including EBRT alone (75.6 to 81 Gy) and EBRT (40 to 50.4 Gy) plus brachytherapy with EBRT delivered at 1.8 to 2.0 Gy per fraction. Brachytherapy data were limited to yes/no with no information on modality, dose or schedule. Eligible patients were known to have received androgen deprivation therapy. Overall survival was evaluated using multivariate Cox regression and propensity score matched analyses. Of the 20,279 study patients with prostate cancer, including 12,617 at intermediate risk and 7,662 at high risk, 71.3% received EBRT alone and 28.7% received EBRT plus brachytherapy. Median followup was 82 months (range 3 to 120) and median age was 70 years (range 36 to 90). On multivariate analysis compared to EBRT alone (75.6 to 81 Gy) EBRT plus brachytherapy was associated with improved survival (HR 0.75, p <0.001). This significance remained consistent for intermediate and high risk when analyzed separately (HR 0.73 and 0.76, respectively, each p <0.001). However on subset analysis compared to very high dose EBRT alone (79.2 to 81 Gy) in all patients combined EBRT plus brachytherapy was not associated with improved survival (HR 0.91, p = 0.083). Compared to EBRT (75.6 to 81 Gy) we observed an association of EBRT plus brachytherapy with a decreased risk of death in men with intermediate and high risk prostate cancer. However this association was no longer significant when EBRT doses of 79.2 to 81 Gy were used. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Is Intermediate Radiation Dose Escalation With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Stage III Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Beneficial? A Multi-Institutional Propensity Score Matched Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, George, E-mail: george.rodrigues@lhsc.on.ca [London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Oberije, Cary [MAASTRO Clinic, Maastricht (Netherlands); Senan, Suresh [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tsujino, Kayoko [Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi (Japan); Wiersma, Terry [MAASTRO Clinic, Maastricht (Netherlands); Moreno-Jimenez, Marta [Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Kim, Tae Hyun [National Cancer Center, Goyang-si, Gy eonggi (Korea, Republic of); Marks, Lawrence B. [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Rengan, Ramesh [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); De Petris, Luigi [Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Ramella, Sara [Campus Bio-Medico University, Rome (Italy); DeRuyck, Kim [Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); De Dios, Núria Rodriguez [Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Warner, Andrew [London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Palma, David A. [London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The clinical benefits and risks of dose escalation (DE) for stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remain uncertain despite the results from Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 0617. There is significant heterogeneity of practice, with many clinicians prescribing intermediate dose levels between the 0617 study arms of 60 and 74 Gy. This study investigated whether this strategy is associated with any survival benefits/risks by analyzing a large multi-institutional database. Methods and Materials: An individual patient database of stage III NSCLC patients treated with radical intent concurrent chemoradiation therapy was created (13 institutions, n=1274 patients). Patients were divided into 2 groups based on tumor Biological Effective Dose at 10 Gy (BED 10): those receiving standard dose (SD; n=552), consisting of 72Gy ≤ BED 10 ≤ 76.8 Gy (eg 60-64 Gy/30-32 fractions [fr]), and those receiving intermediate dose (ID; n=497), consisting of 76.8Gy < BED 10 < 100.8 Gy (eg >64 Gy/32 fr and <74 Gy/37 fr), with lower-dose patients (n=225) excluded from consideration. Patients were then matched using propensity scores, leading to 2 matched groups of 196 patients. Outcomes were compared using various statistics including interquartile range (IQR), Kaplan-Meier curves, and adjusted Cox regression analysis. Results: Matched groups were found to be balanced except for N stage (more N3 disease in SD), median treatment year (SD in 2003; ID in 2007), platinum and taxane chemotherapy (SD in 28%; ID in 39%), and median follow-up (SD were 89 months; ID were 40 months). Median dose fractionation was 60 Gy/30 fr in SD (BED 10 IQR: 72.0-75.5 Gy) and 66 Gy/33 fr (BED 10 IQR: 78.6-79.2 Gy) in ID. Survival curves for SD and ID matched cohorts were statistically similar (P=.27); however, a nonstatistically significant trend toward better survival for ID was observed after 15 months (median survival SD: 19.3 months; ID: 21.0

  11. Late Genitourinary Toxicity Outcomes in 300 Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Dose-escalated Image-guided Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, K; Hruby, G; Kneebone, A; Whalley, D; Guo, L; McCloud, P; Eade, T

    2017-09-01

    To quantify and qualify late genitourinary toxicity in a cohort of patients with localised prostate cancer treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to doses ≥78 Gy. The cohort consisted of 300 patients treated with definitive dose-escalated IMRT between 2007 and 2013. Ninety-seven patients received 78-80 Gy in 38 fractions, and 203 received 82-84 Gy in 40 fractions. International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS) and supplemental quality of life data were recorded at baseline, weekly during treatment and at follow-up. Genitourinary toxicities were recorded using modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria during weekly treatment review and at each follow-up. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to assess the cumulative incidence of grade ≥ 2 genitourinary toxicity at 3 years. Baseline patient characteristics and symptoms were then used in univariate and multivariate analyses to identify predictors of late urinary toxicity. The median follow-up was 58 months (range 9-109 months). The actuarial cumulative 3 year rates of grade ≥ 2 and grade 3 genitourinary toxicity were 14.9% and 2.8%, respectively. There was no grade 4 toxicity. History of transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), alpha blocker use before radiation, any hormone use, baseline IPSS ≥ 14 and pre-existing incontinence or nocturia were significantly associated with late ≥ 2 genitourinary toxicity on univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, only previous TURP retained significance, with a hazard ratio of 2.54 (P=0.002). Our study showed acceptable levels of late grade 2 genitourinary toxicity and low rates of late grade 3 genitourinary toxicity in a cohort of patients with prostate cancer treated with image-guided IMRT to doses between 78 and 84 Gy. Variables associated with increased late ≥ 2 genitourinary toxicity include previous TURP, alpha blocker use, hormone use and pre-existing urinary dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of

  12. A Phase I Dose Escalation Study of the Triple Angiokinase Inhibitor Nintedanib Combined with Low-Dose Cytarabine in Elderly Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Schliemann

    Full Text Available Nintedanib (BIBF 1120, a potent multikinase inhibitor of VEGFR-1/-2/-3, FGFR-1/-2/-3 and PDGFR-α/-β, exerts growth inhibitory and pro-apoptotic effects in myeloid leukemic cells, especially when used in combination with cytarabine. This phase I study evaluated nintedanib in combination with low-dose cytarabine (LDAC in elderly patients with untreated or relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML ineligible for intensive chemotherapy in a 3+3 design. Nintedanib (dose levels 100, 150, and 200 mg orally twice daily and LDAC (20 mg subcutaneous injection twice daily for 10 days were administered in 28-day cycles. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT was defined as non-hematological severe adverse reaction CTC grade ≥ 4 with possible or definite relationship to nintedanib. Between April 2012 and October 2013, 13 patients (median age 73 [range: 62-86] years were enrolled. One patient did not receive study medication and was replaced. Nine (69% patients had relapsed or refractory disease and 6 (46% patients had unfavorable cytogenetics. The most frequently reported treatment-related adverse events (AE were gastrointestinal events. Twelve SAEs irrespective of relatedness were reported. Two SUSARs were observed, one fatal hypercalcemia and one fatal gastrointestinal infection. Two patients (17% with relapsed AML achieved a complete remission (one CR, one CRi and bone marrow blast reductions without fulfilling PR criteria were observed in 3 patients (25%. One-year overall survival was 33%. Nintedanib combined with LDAC shows an adequate safety profile and survival data are promising in a difficult-to-treat patient population. Continuation of this trial with a phase II recommended dose of 2 x 200 mg nintedanib in a randomized, placebo-controlled phase II study is planned. The trial is registered to EudraCT as 2011-001086-41.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01488344.

  13. A Phase I Dose Escalation Study of the Triple Angiokinase Inhibitor Nintedanib Combined with Low-Dose Cytarabine in Elderly Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schliemann, Christoph; Gerss, Joachim; Wiebe, Stefanie; Mikesch, Jan-Henrik; Knoblauch, Nicola; Sauer, Tim; Angenendt, Linus; Kewitz, Tobias; Urban, Marc; Butterfass-Bahloul, Trude; Edemir, Sabine; Vehring, Kerstin; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Krug, Utz

    2016-01-01

    Nintedanib (BIBF 1120), a potent multikinase inhibitor of VEGFR-1/-2/-3, FGFR-1/-2/-3 and PDGFR-α/-β, exerts growth inhibitory and pro-apoptotic effects in myeloid leukemic cells, especially when used in combination with cytarabine. This phase I study evaluated nintedanib in combination with low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) in elderly patients with untreated or relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) ineligible for intensive chemotherapy in a 3+3 design. Nintedanib (dose levels 100, 150, and 200 mg orally twice daily) and LDAC (20 mg subcutaneous injection twice daily for 10 days) were administered in 28-day cycles. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as non-hematological severe adverse reaction CTC grade ≥ 4 with possible or definite relationship to nintedanib. Between April 2012 and October 2013, 13 patients (median age 73 [range: 62-86] years) were enrolled. One patient did not receive study medication and was replaced. Nine (69%) patients had relapsed or refractory disease and 6 (46%) patients had unfavorable cytogenetics. The most frequently reported treatment-related adverse events (AE) were gastrointestinal events. Twelve SAEs irrespective of relatedness were reported. Two SUSARs were observed, one fatal hypercalcemia and one fatal gastrointestinal infection. Two patients (17%) with relapsed AML achieved a complete remission (one CR, one CRi) and bone marrow blast reductions without fulfilling PR criteria were observed in 3 patients (25%). One-year overall survival was 33%. Nintedanib combined with LDAC shows an adequate safety profile and survival data are promising in a difficult-to-treat patient population. Continuation of this trial with a phase II recommended dose of 2 x 200 mg nintedanib in a randomized, placebo-controlled phase II study is planned. The trial is registered to EudraCT as 2011-001086-41. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01488344.

  14. Retrospective Evaluation Reveals That Long-term Androgen Deprivation Therapy Improves Cause-Specific and Overall Survival in the Setting of Dose-Escalated Radiation for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Felix Y., E-mail: ffeng@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Blas, Kevin; Olson, Karin; Stenmark, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and duration for high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated RT (minimum 75 Gy) with or without ADT was performed. The relationship between ADT use and duration with biochemical failure (BF), metastatic failure (MF), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), non-prostate cancer death (NPCD), and overall survival (OS) was assessed as a function of pretreatment characteristics, comorbid medical illness, and treatment using Fine and Gray's cumulative incidence methodology. Results: The median follow-up time was 64 months. In men with National Comprehensive Cancer Network defined high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated RT, on univariate analysis, both metastasis (P<.0001; hazard ratio 0.34; 95% confidence interval 0.18-0.67; cumulative incidence at 60 months 13% vs 35%) and PCSM (P=.015; hazard ratio 0.41; 95% confidence interval 0.2-1.0; cumulative incidence at 60 months 6% vs 11%) were improved with the use of ADT. On multivariate analysis for all high-risk patients, Gleason score was the strongest negative prognostic factor, and long-term ADT (LTAD) improved MF (P=.002), PCSM (P=.034), and OS (P=.001). In men with prostate cancer and Gleason scores 8 to 10, on multivariate analysis after adjustment for other risk features, there was a duration-dependent improvement in BF, metastasis, PCSM, and OS, all favoring LTAD in comparison with STAD or RT alone. Conclusion: For men with high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated EBRT, this retrospective study suggests that the combination of LTAD and RT provided a significant improvement in clinical outcome, which was especially true for those with Gleason scores of 8 to 10.

  15. Tolerability and pharmacokinetics of avanafil, a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor: a single- and multiple-dose, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation study in healthy Korean male volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jinah; Choi, Sangmin; Cho, Sang Heon; Ghim, Jong-Lyul; Hwang, Aekyung; Kim, Unjib; Kim, Bong Sik; Koguchi, Atsushi; Miyoshi, Shinji; Okabe, Hirotaka; Bae, Kyun-Seop; Lim, Hyeong-Seok

    2010-06-01

    Avanafil is a selective phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor being developed for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. This study was conducted to meet Korean regulatory requirements for the marketing of avanafil. To this end, tolerability and pharmacokinetic properties of single and multiple oral doses of avanafil in healthy Korean male volunteers were assessed. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, dose-escalation study was conducted at the Asan Medical Center (Seoul, Korea). Subjects were randomized to receive either drug or placebo in blocks according to each dose. Subjects were randomly allocated to receive 50-, 100-, or 200-mg tablets of avanafil or placebo once daily for 7 days (avanafil:placebo, 8:2 in each dose group). Tolerability was assessed by monitoring vital signs and results of laboratory tests, 12-lead ECGs, and color discrimination tests. Blood samples of approximately 6 mL were collected in heparinized tubes before and 0.1, 0.33, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, and 24 hours after drug administration on days 1 and 7. Plasma concentrations of avanafil were measured using LC-MS/MS. Pharmacokinetic parameters of avanafil on days 1 and 7 were determined by noncompartmental analysis and compared among the 3 dose groups. Of the 32 healthy male subjects initially enrolled, 30 completed the study. The mean (SD) age, height, and weight of the participants were 23.4 (1.7) years, 175.0 (5.4) cm, and 70.3 (8.9) kg, respectively. Adverse events were reported by 20 of 25 subjects (80%) taking avanafil and by 4 of 6 (67%) taking placebo. No serious adverse events were reported, and there were no clinically relevant changes in vital signs, ECG recordings, physical examination findings, or color discrimination test results. All the adverse events resolved spontaneously. Avanafil reached a mean T(max) at 0.33 to 0.52 hour after dosing and then declined, with a mean apparent t1/2 of 5.36 to 10.66 hours. AUC and C(max) were proportional

  16. The natural history and predictors of outcome following biochemical relapse in the dose escalation era for prostate cancer patients undergoing definitive external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumsteg, Zachary S; Spratt, Daniel E; Romesser, Paul B; Pei, Xin; Zhang, Zhigang; Polkinghorn, William; McBride, Sean; Kollmeier, Marisa; Yamada, Yoshiya; Zelefsky, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    The management of biochemical failure (BF) following external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer is controversial, due to both the heterogeneous disease course following a BF and a lack of clinical trials in this setting. We sought to characterize the natural history and predictors of outcome for patients experiencing BF in a large cohort of men with localized prostate cancer undergoing definitive dose-escalated EBRT. This retrospective analysis included 2694 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with EBRT at a large academic center. Of these, 609 experienced BF, defined as prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir + 2 ng/ml. The median follow-up was 83 mo for all patients and 122 mo for BF patients. All patients received EBRT at doses of 75.6-86.4 Gy. The primary objective of this study was to determine predictors of distant progression at the time of BF. Cox proportional hazards models were used in univariate and multivariate analyses of distant metastases (DM), and a competing risks method was used to analyze prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). From the date of BF, the median times to DM and PCSM mortality were 5.4 yr and 10.5 yr, respectively. Shorter posttreatment PSA doubling time, a higher initial clinical tumor stage, a higher pretreatment Gleason score, and a shorter interval from the end of radiotherapy to BF were independent predictors for clinical progression following BF. Patients with two of these risk factors had a significantly higher incidence of DM and PCSM following BF than those with zero or one risk factor. The main limitations of this study are its retrospective nature and heterogeneous salvage interventions. Clinical and pathologic factors can help identify patients at high risk of clinical progression following BF. In this report, we look at predictors of outcome for patients with prostate cancer recurrence, as determined by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, following radiation treatment. We found that the

  17. A Phase I/II Trial of Intensity Modulated Radiation (IMRT) Dose Escalation With Concurrent Fixed-dose Rate Gemcitabine (FDR-G) in Patients With Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Josef, Edgar, E-mail: edgar.ben-josef@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Schipper, Mathew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Francis, Isaac R. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hadley, Scott; Ten-Haken, Randall; Lawrence, Theodore; Normolle, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Simeone, Diane M.; Sonnenday, Christopher [Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Abrams, Ross [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Leslie, William [Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Khan, Gazala; Zalupski, Mark M. [Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Local failure in unresectable pancreatic cancer may contribute to death. We hypothesized that intensification of local therapy would improve local control and survival. The objectives were to determine the maximum tolerated radiation dose delivered by intensity modulated radiation with fixed-dose rate gemcitabine (FDR-G), freedom from local progression (FFLP), and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Eligibility included pathologic confirmation of adenocarcinoma, radiographically unresectable, performance status of 0-2, absolute neutrophil count of {>=}1500/mm{sup 3}, platelets {>=}100,000/mm{sup 3}, creatinine <2 mg/dL, bilirubin <3 mg/dL, and alanine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase {<=}2.5 Multiplication-Sign upper limit of normal. FDR-G (1000 mg/m{sup 2}/100 min intravenously) was given on days -22 and -15, 1, 8, 22, and 29. Intensity modulated radiation started on day 1. Dose levels were escalated from 50-60 Gy in 25 fractions. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as gastrointestinal toxicity grade (G) {>=}3, neutropenic fever, or deterioration in performance status to {>=}3 between day 1 and 126. Dose level was assigned using TITE-CRM (Time-to-Event Continual Reassessment Method) with the target dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) rate set to 0.25. Results: Fifty patients were accrued. DLTs were observed in 11 patients: G3/4 anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and/or dehydration (7); duodenal bleed (3); duodenal perforation (1). The recommended dose is 55 Gy, producing a probability of DLT of 0.24. The 2-year FFLP is 59% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 32-79). Median and 2-year overall survival are 14.8 months (95% CI: 12.6-22.2) and 30% (95% CI 17-45). Twelve patients underwent resection (10 R0, 2 R1) and survived a median of 32 months. Conclusions: High-dose radiation therapy with concurrent FDR-G can be delivered safely. The encouraging efficacy data suggest that outcome may be improved in unresectable patients through intensification of local

  18. IDEAL-CRT: A Phase 1/2 Trial of Isotoxic Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy in Patients With Stage II/III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landau, David B., E-mail: david.landau@kcl.ac.uk [Guy' s & St. Thomas' NHS Trust, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Hughes, Laura [Cancer Research UK and UCL Cancer Trials Centre, London (United Kingdom); Baker, Angela [Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Bebington (United Kingdom); Bates, Andrew T. [Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom); Bayne, Michael C. [Poole Hospital, Poole (United Kingdom); Counsell, Nicholas [Cancer Research UK and UCL Cancer Trials Centre, London (United Kingdom); Garcia-Alonso, Angel [North Wales Cancer Centre, Rhyl (United Kingdom); Harden, Susan V. [Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Hicks, Jonathan D. [Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Hughes, Simon R. [Guy' s & St. Thomas' NHS Trust, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Illsley, Marianne C. [Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guilford (United Kingdom); Khan, Iftekhar [Cancer Research UK and UCL Cancer Trials Centre, London (United Kingdom); Laurence, Virginia [Poole Hospital, Poole (United Kingdom); Malik, Zafar; Mayles, Helen; Mayles, William Philip M. [Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Bebington (United Kingdom); Miles, Elizabeth [Mount Vernon Hospital, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Mohammed, Nazia [Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Ngai, Yenting [Cancer Research UK and UCL Cancer Trials Centre, London (United Kingdom); Parsons, Emma [Mount Vernon Hospital, Middlesex (United Kingdom); and others

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: To report toxicity and early survival data for IDEAL-CRT, a trial of dose-escalated concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for non-small cell lung cancer. Patients and Methods: Patients received tumor doses of 63 to 73 Gy in 30 once-daily fractions over 6 weeks with 2 concurrent cycles of cisplatin and vinorelbine. They were assigned to 1 of 2 groups according to esophageal dose. In group 1, tumor doses were determined by an experimental constraint on maximum esophageal dose, which was escalated following a 6 + 6 design from 65 Gy through 68 Gy to 71 Gy, allowing an esophageal maximum tolerated dose to be determined from early and late toxicities. Tumor doses for group 2 patients were determined by other tissue constraints, often lung. Overall survival, progression-free survival, tumor response, and toxicity were evaluated for both groups combined. Results: Eight centers recruited 84 patients: 13, 12, and 10, respectively, in the 65-Gy, 68-Gy, and 71-Gy cohorts of group 1; and 49 in group 2. The mean prescribed tumor dose was 67.7 Gy. Five grade 3 esophagitis and 3 grade 3 pneumonitis events were observed across both groups. After 1 fatal esophageal perforation in the 71-Gy cohort, 68 Gy was declared the esophageal maximum tolerated dose. With a median follow-up of 35 months, median overall survival was 36.9 months, and overall survival and progression-free survival were 87.8% and 72.0%, respectively, at 1 year and 68.0% and 48.5% at 2 years. Conclusions: IDEAL-CRT achieved significant treatment intensification with acceptable toxicity and promising survival. The isotoxic design allowed the esophageal maximum tolerated dose to be identified from relatively few patients.

  19. Higher toxicity with 42 Gy in 10 fractions as a total dose for 3D-conformal accelerated partial breast irradiation: results from a dose escalation phase II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgier, Celine; Acevedo-Henao, Catalina; Dunant, Ariane; Rossier, Christine; Levy, Antonin; El Nemr, Mohamed; Dumas, Isabelle; Delaloge, Suzette; Mathieu, Marie-Christine; Garbay, Jean-Remi; Taghian, Alphonse; Marsiglia, Hugo

    2012-08-22

    Recent recommendations regarding indications of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) have been put forward for selected breast cancer (BC) patients. However, some treatment planning parameters, such as total dose, are not yet well defined. The Institut Gustave Roussy has initiated a dose escalation trial at the 40 Gy/10 fractions/5 days and at a further step of total dose (TD) of 42 Gy/10 fractions/ 5 days. Here, we report early results of the latest step compared with the 40 Gy dose level. From October 2007 to March 2010, a total of 48 pT1N0 BC patients were enrolled within this clinical trial: 17 patients at a TD of 42 Gy/10f/5d and 31 at a TD of 40 Gy/10f/5d. Median follow-up was 19 months (min-max, 12-26). All the patients were treated by APBI using a technique with 2 minitangents and an "enface" electrons delivering 20% of the total dose. Toxicities were systematically assessed at 1; 2; 6 months and then every 6 months. Patients' recruitment of 42 Gy step was ended owing to persistent grade 3 toxicity 6 months after APBI completion (n = 1). Early toxicities were statistically higher after a total dose of 42 Gy regarding grade ≥2 dry (p = 0.01) and moist (p = 0.05) skin desquamation. Breast pain was also statistically higher in the 42 Gy step compared to 40 Gy step (p = 0.02). Other late toxicities (grade ≥2 fibrosis and telangectasia) were not statistically different between 42 Gy and 40 Gy. Early toxicities were more severe and higher rates of late toxicities were observed after 42 Gy/10 fractions/5 days when compared to 40 Gy/10 fractions/5 days. This data suggest that 40 Gy/10 fractions/ 5 days could potentially be the maximum tolerance for PBI although longer follow-up is warranted to better assess late toxicities.

  20. A first-in-human phase I dose-escalation, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic evaluation of intravenous LY2090314, a glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibitor, administered in combination with pemetrexed and carboplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Jhanelle E; Infante, Jeffrey R; Brail, Les H; Simon, George R; Cooksey, Jennifer F; Jones, Suzanne F; Farrington, Daphne L; Yeo, Adeline; Jackson, Kimberley A; Chow, Kay H; Zamek-Gliszczynski, Maciej J; Burris, Howard A

    2015-12-01

    LY2090314 (LY) is a glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibitor with preclinical efficacy in xenograft models when combined with platinum regimens. A first-in-human phase 1 dose-escalation study evaluated the combination of LY with pemetrexed/carboplatin. Forty-one patients with advanced solid tumors received single-dose LY monotherapy lead-in and 37 patients received LY (10-120 mg) plus pemetrexed/carboplatin (500 mg/m(2) and 5-6 AUC, respectively) across 8 dose levels every 21 days. Primary objective was maximum tolerated dose (MTD) determination; secondary endpoints included safety, antitumor activity, pharmacokinetics, and beta-catenin pharmacodynamics. MTD of LY with pemetrexed/carboplatin was 40 mg. Eleven dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) occurred in ten patients. DLTs during LY monotherapy occurred at ≥ 40 mg: grade 2 visual disturbance (n = 1) and grade 3/4 peri-infusional thoracic pain during or shortly post infusion (n = 4; chest, upper abdominal, and back pain). Ranitidine was added after de-escalation to 80 mg LY to minimize peri-infusional thoracic pain. Following LY with pemetrexed/carboplatin therapy, DLTs included grade 3/4 thrombocytopenia (n = 4) and grade 4 neutropenia (n = 1). Best overall response by RECIST included 5 confirmed partial responses (non-small cell lung cancer [n = 3], mesothelioma, and breast cancer) and 19 patients having stable disease. Systemic LY exposure was approximately linear over dose range studied. Transient upregulation of beta-catenin measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) occurred at 40 mg LY. The initial safety profile of LY2090314 was established. MTD LY dose with pemetrexed/carboplatin is 40 mg IV every 3 weeks plus ranitidine. Efficacy of LY plus pemetrexed/carboplatin requires confirmation in randomized trials.

  1. A single-blind, dose escalation, phase I study of high-fluence light-emitting diode-red light (LED-RL) on human skin: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Derek; Kraeva, Ekaterina; Wun, Ted; Isseroff, R Rivkah; Jagdeo, Jared

    2016-08-02

    Skin fibrosis is involved in a variety of pathologic conditions ranging from scar formation secondary to surgery or trauma to immune-mediated processes. Skin fibrosis is a significant international health problem with an estimated incidence of greater than 100 million people affected per year worldwide with few effective treatment options available. Preliminary in vitro data generated by our research group suggests that red light can function as a stand-alone treatment for skin fibrosis. To our knowledge, no prior clinical trials have been performed to determine the safety of high-fluence (dose) light-emitting diode-red light (LED-RL) phototherapy. The goal of this study is to evaluate the safety of LED-RL fluences from 160 J/cm(2) up to 640 J/cm(2) in healthy subjects. This is a single-blind, dose escalation, randomized controlled, phase I study to evaluate the safety of high-fluence LED-RL on human skin. The protocol for dose escalation requires subjects be enrolled sequentially in groups of five. Within each group, three subjects will be randomized to LED-RL phototherapy and two subjects randomized to mock therapy. Subjects in group 1 randomized to LED-RL phototherapy will receive the maximum recommended starting dose (160 J/cm(2)). LED-RL dose will be escalated in subsequent groups (320 J/cm(2), 480 J/cm(2) and 640 J/cm(2)). The maximally tolerated dose (MTD) is defined as the dose level below the dose producing unacceptable but reversible toxicity and is considered to be the upper limit of subject tolerance. After either a MTD has been established, or the study endpoint of 640 J/cm(2) has been achieved, an additional 27 LED-RL phototherapy subjects (for a total of 30) and 18 mock therapy subjects (for a total of 20) (determined randomly) will be enrolled. Each subject will receive a total of nine procedures, three times per week for three consecutive weeks. This study may provide important safety information on the effects of high-fluence LED

  2. Phase I dose escalation, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic study of naptumomab estafenatox alone in patients with advanced cancer and with docetaxel in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghaei, Hossein; Alpaugh, Katherine; Hedlund, Gunnar

    2009-01-01

    recognizing the tumor-associated antigen 5T4. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), pancreatic cancer (PC), and renal cell cancer (RCC) received 5 daily boluses of ABR-217620 (3-month cycles) in escalating doses to determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD; ABR-217620 dose...... after therapy. Fourteen patients (36%) had stable disease (SD) on day 56 of the MONO study. Two patients (15%) in the COMBO study had partial responses, one in a patient with progressive disease on prior docetaxel, and five patients (38%) had SD on day 56. CONCLUSION: ABR-217620 was well tolerated....... In the COMBO study, the MTD was 22 microg/kg (neutropenic sepsis). Adverse events included grade 1 to 2 fever, hypotension, nausea, and chills. Treatment caused a systemic increase of inflammatory cytokines and selective expansion of SEA/E-120 reactive T-cells. Tumor biopsies demonstrated T-cell infiltration...

  3. The tumor-targeting immunocytokine F16-IL2 in combination with doxorubicin: dose escalation in patients with advanced solid tumors and expansion into patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catania, Chiara; Maur, Michela; Berardi, Rossana; Rocca, Andrea; Giacomo, Anna Maria Di; Spitaleri, Gianluca; Masini, Cristina; Pierantoni, Chiara; González-Iglesias, Reinerio; Zigon, Giulia; Tasciotti, Annaelisa; Giovannoni, Leonardo; Lovato, Valeria; Elia, Giuliano; Menssen, Hans D; Neri, Dario; Cascinu, Stefano; Conte, Pier Franco; Braud, Filippo de

    2015-01-01

    A phase Ib/II trial was performed to evaluate safety, tolerability, recommended dose (RD) and efficacy of F16-IL2, a recombinant antibody-cytokine fusion protein, in combination with doxorubicin in patients with solid tumors (phase Ib) and metastatic breast cancer (phase II). Six patient cohorts with progressive solid tumors (n = 19) received escalating doses of F16-IL2 [5-25 Million International Units (MIU) of IL2 equivalent dose] in combination with escalating doses of doxorubicin (0-25 mg/m(2)) on day 1, 8 and 15 every 4 weeks. Subsequently, patients with metastatic breast cancer (n = 10) received the drug combination at the RD. Clinical data and laboratory findings were analyzed for safety, tolerability, and activity. F16-IL2 could be administered up to 25 MIU, in combination with the RD of doxorubicin (25 mg/m(2)). No human anti-fusion protein antibodies (HAFA) response was detected. Pharmacokinetics of F16-IL2 was dose-dependent over the tested range, with half-lives of ca. 13 and ca. 8 hours for cohorts dosed at lower and higher levels, respectively. Toxicities were controllable and reversible, with no combination treatment-related death. After 8 weeks, 57% and 67% disease control rates were observed for Phase I and II, respectively (decreasing to 43% and 33% after 12 weeks), considering 14 and 9 patients evaluable for efficacy. One patient experienced a long lasting partial response (45 weeks), still on-going at exit of study. F16-IL2 can be safely and repeatedly administered at the RD of 25 MIU in combination with 25 mg/m(2) doxorubicin; its safety and activity are currently being investigated in combination with other chemotherapeutics, in order to establish optimal therapy settings.

  4. A Phase I Clinical Study of a Live Attenuated Bordetella pertussis Vaccine - BPZE1; A Single Centre, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Dose-Escalating Study of BPZE1 Given Intranasally to Healthy Adult Male Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorstensson, Rigmor; Trollfors, Birger; Al-Tawil, Nabil; Jahnmatz, Maja; Bergström, Jakob; Ljungman, Margaretha; Törner, Anna; Wehlin, Lena; Van Broekhoven, Annie; Bosman, Fons; Debrie, Anne-Sophie; Mielcarek, Nathalie; Locht, Camille

    2014-01-01

    Background Acellular pertussis vaccines do not control pertussis. A new approach to offer protection to infants is necessary. BPZE1, a genetically modified Bordetella pertussis strain, was developed as a live attenuated nasal pertussis vaccine by genetically eliminating or detoxifying 3 toxins. Methods We performed a double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalating study of BPZE1 given intranasally for the first time to human volunteers, the first trial of a live attenuated bacterial vaccine specifically designed for the respiratory tract. 12 subjects per dose group received 103, 105 or 107 colony-forming units as droplets with half of the dose in each nostril. 12 controls received the diluent. Local and systemic safety and immune responses were assessed during 6 months, and nasopharyngeal colonization with BPZE1 was determined with repeated cultures during the first 4 weeks after vaccination. Results Colonization was seen in one subject in the low dose, one in the medium dose and five in the high dose group. Significant increases in immune responses against pertussis antigens were seen in all colonized subjects. There was one serious adverse event not related to the vaccine. Other adverse events were trivial and occurred with similar frequency in the placebo and vaccine groups. Conclusions BPZE1 is safe in healthy adults and able to transiently colonize the nasopharynx. It induces immune responses in all colonized individuals. BPZE1 can thus undergo further clinical development, including dose optimization and trials in younger age groups. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01188512 PMID:24421886

  5. Social conflict resolution regulated by two dorsal habenular subregions in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Ming-Yi; Amo, Ryunosuke; Kinoshita, Masae; Cherng, Bor-Wei; Shimazaki, Hideaki; Agetsuma, Masakazu; Shiraki, Toshiyuki; Aoki, Tazu; Takahoko, Mikako; Yamazaki, Masako; Higashijima, Shin-ichi; Okamoto, Hitoshi

    2016-04-01

    When animals encounter conflict they initiate and escalate aggression to establish and maintain a social hierarchy. The neural mechanisms by which animals resolve fighting behaviors to determine such social hierarchies remain unknown. We identified two subregions of the dorsal habenula (dHb) in zebrafish that antagonistically regulate the outcome of conflict. The losing experience reduced neural transmission in the lateral subregion of dHb (dHbL)-dorsal/intermediate interpeduncular nucleus (d/iIPN) circuit. Silencing of the dHbL or medial subregion of dHb (dHbM) caused a stronger predisposition to lose or win a fight, respectively. These results demonstrate that the dHbL and dHbM comprise a dual control system for conflict resolution of social aggression. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. Conformal radiotherapy of 450 localized prostate cancers (may 1999 - march 2007): impact of digestive disorders on the quality of life after dose escalation; Radiotherapie conformationnelle de 450 cancers localises de la prostate (mai 1999 - mars 2007): impact des troubles digestifs sur la qualite de vie apres escalade de dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerif, S.; Lavigne, B.; Berger, A. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 86 - Poitiers (France)

    2007-11-15

    The incidence of digestive toxicity and the impact of quality of life do not depend on dose escalation in our population selected out of the measurement at the end of the treatment. The incidence of rectum hemorrhages does not any impact on the quality of life of patients. The factors linked to digestive toxicity were the 'co morbidities' (cardiopathy, ischemia, diabetes) and a high initial digestive score. (N.C.)

  7. Dose-escalation using intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer - evaluation of quality of life with and without 18F-choline PET-CT detected simultaneous integrated boost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinkawa Michael

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In comparison to the conventional whole-prostate dose escalation, an integrated boost to the macroscopic malignant lesion might potentially improve tumor control rates without increasing toxicity. Quality of life after radiotherapy (RT with vs. without 18F-choline PET-CT detected simultaneous integrated boost (SIB was prospectively evaluated in this study. Methods Whole body image acquisition in supine patient position followed 1 h after injection of 178-355MBq 18F-choline. SIB was defined by a tumor-to-background uptake value ratio > 2 (GTVPET. A dose of 76Gy was prescribed to the prostate (PTVprostate in 2Gy fractions, with or without SIB up to 80Gy. Patients treated with (n = 46 vs. without (n = 21 SIB were surveyed prospectively before (A, at the last day of RT (B and a median time of two (C and 19 month (D after RT to compare QoL changes applying a validated questionnaire (EPIC - expanded prostate cancer index composite. Results With a median cut-off standard uptake value (SUV of 3, a median GTVPET of 4.0 cm3 and PTVboost (GTVPET with margins of 17.3 cm3 was defined. No significant differences were found for patients treated with vs. without SIB regarding urinary and bowel QoL changes at times B, C and D (mean differences ≤3 points for all comparisons. Significantly decreasing acute urinary and bowel score changes (mean changes > 5 points in comparison to baseline level at time A were found for patients with and without SIB. However, long-term urinary and bowel QoL (time D did not differ relative to baseline levels - with mean urinary and bowel function score changes 5 points at time D. Conclusions Treatment planning with 18F-choline PET-CT allows a dose escalation to a macroscopic intraprostatic lesion without significantly increasing toxicity.

  8. DW-MRI and (18) F-FLT PET for early assessment of response to radiation therapy associated with hypoxia-driven interventions. Preclinical studies using manipulation of oxygenation and/or dose escalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Ly-Binh-An; Bol, Anne; Labar, Daniel; Karroum, Oussama; Mignion, Lionel; Bol, Vanesa; Jordan, Bénédicte F; Grégoire, Vincent; Gallez, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Early markers of treatment response may help in the management of patients by predicting the outcome of a specific therapeutic intervention. Here, we studied the potential value of diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) and (18)F-fluorothymidine ((18)F-FLT), markers of cell death and cell proliferation respectively, to predict the response to irradiation. In addition, dose escalation and/or carbogen breathing were used to modulate the response to irradiation. The studies were performed on two hypoxic rat tumor models: rhabdomyosarcoma and 9L-glioma. The rats were imaged using MRI and PET before and two days after the treatment. In both tumor models, changes in ADC (apparent diffusion coefficient) and (18)F-FLT SUV (standardized uptake value) were significantly correlated with the tumor growth delay. For both tumor models, the ADC values increased in all irradiated groups two days after the treatment while they decreased in the untreated groups. At the same time, the uptake of (18)F-FLT increased in the untreated groups and decreased in all treated groups. Yet, ADC values were not sensitive enough to predict the added value of dose escalation or carbogen breathing in either model. Change in (18)F-FLT uptake was able to predict the higher tumor response when using increased dose of irradiation, but not when using a carbogen breathing challenge. Our results also emphasize that the magnitude of change in (18)F-FLT uptake was strongly dependent on the tumor model. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Phase I, dose-escalation trial of the oral cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitor PD 0332991, administered using a 21-day schedule in patients with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Keith T; Lorusso, Patricia M; Demichele, Angela; Abramson, Vandana G; Courtney, Rachel; Randolph, Sophia S; Shaik, M Naveed; Wilner, Keith D; O'Dwyer, Peter J; Schwartz, Gary K

    2012-01-15

    To identify the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of the first-in-class, oral CDK4/6 inhibitor PD 0332991 administered once daily for 21 of 28 days (3/1 schedule) in patients with retinoblastoma protein (Rb)-positive advanced solid tumors and to describe pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationships relative to drug effects. This open-label phase I study (NCT00141297) enrolled patients who received PD 0332991 orally in six dose-escalation cohorts in a standard 3 + 3 design. Forty-one patients were enrolled. DLTs were observed in five patients (12%) overall; at the 75, 125, and 150 mg once daily dose levels. The MTD and recommended phase II dose of PD 0332991 was 125 mg once daily. Neutropenia was the only dose-limiting effect. After cycle 1, grade 3 neutropenia, anemia, and leukopenia occurred in five (12%), three (7%), and one (2%) patient(s), respectively. The most common non-hematologic adverse events included fatigue, nausea, and diarrhea. Thirty-seven patients were evaluable for tumor response; 10 (27%) had stable disease for ≥4 cycles of whom six derived prolonged benefit (≥10 cycles). PD 0332991 was slowly absorbed (median T(max), 5.5 hours), and slowly eliminated (mean half-life was 25.9 hours) with a large volume of distribution (mean, 2,793 L). The area under the concentration-time curve increased linearly with dose. Using an E(max) model, neutropenia was shown to be proportional to exposure. PD 0332991 warrants phase II testing at 125 mg once daily, at which dose neutropenia was the sole significant toxicity. ©2011 AACR.

  10. Safety, pharmacokinetics, and antitumour activity of trastuzumab deruxtecan (DS-8201), a HER2-targeting antibody-drug conjugate, in patients with advanced breast and gastric or gastro-oesophageal tumours: a phase 1 dose-escalation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Toshihiko; Shitara, Kohei; Naito, Yoichi; Shimomura, Akihiko; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Yonemori, Kan; Shimizu, Chikako; Shimoi, Tatsunori; Kuboki, Yasutoshi; Matsubara, Nobuaki; Kitano, Atsuko; Jikoh, Takahiro; Lee, Caleb; Fujisaki, Yoshihiko; Ogitani, Yusuke; Yver, Antoine; Tamura, Kenji

    2017-11-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates have emerged as a powerful strategy in cancer therapy and combine the ability of monoclonal antibodies to specifically target tumour cells with the highly potent killing activity of drugs with payloads too toxic for systemic administration. Trastuzumab deruxtecan (also known as DS-8201) is an antibody-drug conjugate comprised of a humanised antibody against HER2, a novel enzyme-cleavable linker, and a topoisomerase I inhibitor payload. We assessed its safety and tolerability in patients with advanced breast and gastric or gastro-oesophageal tumours. This was an open-label, dose-escalation phase 1 trial done at two study sites in Japan. Eligible patients were at least 20 years old with breast or gastric or gastro-oesophageal carcinomas refractory to standard therapy regardless of HER2 status. Participants received initial intravenous doses of trastuzumab deruxtecan from 0·8 to 8·0 mg/kg and dose-limiting toxicities were assessed over a 21-day cycle; thereafter, dose reductions were implemented as needed and patients were treated once every 3 weeks until they had unacceptable toxic effects or their disease progressed. Primary endpoints included identification of safety and the maximum tolerated dose or recommended phase 2 dosing and were analysed in all participants who received at least one dose of study drug. The dose-escalation study is the first part of a two-part study with the second dose-expansion part ongoing and enrolling patients as of July 8, 2017, in Japan and the USA. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02564900. Between Aug 28, 2015, and Aug 26, 2016, 24 patients were enrolled and received trastuzumab deruxtecan (n=3 for each of 0·8, 1·6, 3·2, and 8·0 mg/kg doses; n=6 for each of 5·4 and 6·4 mg/kg). Up to the study cutoff date of Feb 1, 2017, no dose-limiting toxic effects, substantial cardiovascular toxic effects, or deaths occurred. One patient was removed from the activity analysis because they

  11. A dose-escalation safety and immunogenicity study of a new live attenuated human rotavirus vaccine (Rotavin-M1) in Vietnamese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Duc Anh; Nguyen, Van Trang; Vu, Dinh Thiem; Nguyen, Thi Hien Anh; Nguyen, Duc Mao; Yuhuan, Wang; Baoming, Jiang; Nguyen, Dang Hien; Le, Thi Luan

    2012-04-27

    We tested a candidate live, oral, rotavirus vaccine (Rotavin-M1™) derived from an attenuated G1P [8] strain (KH0118-2003) isolated from a child in Vietnam. The vaccine was tested first for safety in 29 healthy adults. When deemed safe, it was further tested for safety and immunogenicity in 160 infants (4 groups) aged 6-12 weeks in a dose and schedule ranging study. The vaccine was administered in low titer (10(6.0)FFU/dose) on a 2-dose schedule given 2 months apart (Group 2L) and on a 3-dose schedule given 1 month apart (Group 3L) and in high titer (10(6.3)FFU/dose) in 2 doses 2 months apart (Group 2H) and in 3 doses 1 month apart (Group 3H). For comparison, 40 children (group Rotarix™) were given 2 doses of the lyophilized Rotarix™ vaccine (10(6.5)CCID(50)/dose) 1 month apart. All infants were followed for 30 days after each dose for clinical adverse events including diarrhea, vomiting, fever, abdominal pain, irritability and intussusception. Immunogenicity was assessed by IgA seroconversion and viral shedding was monitored for 7 days after administration of each dose. Two doses of Rotavin-M1 (10(6.3)FFU/dose) were well tolerated in adults. Among infants (average 8 weeks of age at enrollment), administration of Rotavin-M1 was safe and did not lead to an increased rate of fever, diarrhea, vomiting or irritability compared to Rotarix™, indicating that the candidate vaccine virus had been fully attenuated by serial passages. No elevation of levels of serum transaminase, blood urea, or blood cell counts were observed. The highest rotavirus IgA seroconversion rate (73%, 95%CI (58-88%)) was achieved in group 2H (2 doses--10(6.3)FFU/dose, 2 months apart). The 2 dose schedules performed slightly better than the 3 dose schedules and the higher titer doses performed slightly better than the lower titer doses. These rates of seroconversion were similar to that of the Rotarix™ group (58%, 95%CI (42-73%)). However more infants who received Rotarix™ (65%) shed virus

  12. Phase 1 dose-escalation study of the antiplacental growth factor monoclonal antibody RO5323441 combined with bevacizumab in patients with recurrent glioblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Ulrik; Chinot, Olivier L; McBain, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    with bevacizumab was generally well tolerated, and the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. Two participants experienced dose-limiting toxicities (grade 3 meningitis associated with spinal fluid leak [1250 mg] and grade 3 cerebral infarction [2500 mg]). Common adverse events included hypertension (14...

  13. Note on subregion holographic complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Pratim; Sarkar, Tapobrata

    2017-07-01

    The volume inside a Ryu-Takayanagi surface has been conjectured to be related to the complexity of subregions of the boundary field theory. Here, we study the behavior of this volume analytically, when the entangling surface has a strip geometry. We perform systematic expansions in the low- and high-temperature regimes for AdS-Schwarzschild and RN-AdS black holes. In the latter regime, we point out spurious divergences that might occur due to the limitations of a near horizon expansion. A similar analysis is performed for extremal black holes and, at large charge, we find that there might be some new features of the volume as compared to the area. Finally, we numerically study a four-dimensional RN-AdS black hole in global AdS, the entangling surface being a sphere. We find that the holographic complexity captures essentially the same information as the entanglement entropy, as far as phase transitions are concerned.

  14. A phase I dose escalation trial of vaccine replicon particles (VRP) expressing prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) in subjects with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovin, Susan F; Kehoe, Marissa; Durso, Robert; Fernandez, Celina; Olson, William; Gao, Jian P; Israel, Robert; Scher, Howard I; Morris, Stephen

    2013-01-30

    PSMA-VRP is a propagation defective, viral replicon vector system encoding PSMA under phase I evaluation for patients with castration resistant metastatic prostate cancer (CRPC). The product is derived from an attenuated strain of the alphavirus, Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis (VEE) virus, and incorporates multiple redundant safety features. In this first in human trial, two cohorts of 3 patients with CRPC metastatic to bone were treated with up to five doses of either 0.9×10(7)IU or 0.36×10(8)IU of PSMA-VRP at weeks 1, 4, 7, 10 and 18, followed by an expansion cohort of 6 patients treated with 0.36×10(8)IU of PSMA-VRP at weeks 1, 4, 7, 10 and 18. No toxicities were observed. In the first dose cohort, no PSMA specific cellular immune responses were seen but weak PSMA-specific signals were observed by ELISA. The remaining 9 patients, which included the higher cohort and the extension cohort, had no PSMA specific cellular responses. PSMA-VRP was well-tolerated at both doses. While there did not appear to be clinical benefit nor robust immune signals at the two doses studied, neutralizing antibodies were produced by both cohorts suggesting that dosing was suboptimal. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Phase I dose-escalation study of cabazitaxel administered in combination with gemcitabine in patients with metastatic or unresectable advanced solid malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzanov, Igor; LoRusso, Patricia M.; Cohen, Roger B.; Morris, John C.; Olowokure, Olugbenga O.; Yin, Jian Y.; Doroumian, Séverine; Shen, Liji; Olszanski, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Taxane–gemcitabine combinations have demonstrated antitumor activity. This phase I study (NCT01001221) aimed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of cabazitaxel plus gemcitabine and to assess the preliminary efficacy of this combination. The patients included had metastatic or unresectable solid tumors and had exhausted standard treatment. Cohorts of three to six patients received cabazitaxel (15–20 mg/m2) before (part 1a) or after (part 1b) gemcitabine (700–1000 mg/m2) on Day 1 and gemcitabine alone on Day 8. Prophylactic growth factors were not allowed in cycle 1. In part 1a (n=12), five patients received 20 mg/m2 cabazitaxel plus 1000 mg/m2 gemcitabine (20/1000), five received 15/900, two received 15/700. In part 1b, all six patients received the lowest dose (700/15). At all doses, two or more patients experienced a DLT, regardless of administration sequence, including febrile neutropenia (n=4), grade 4 neutropenia (n=2), grade 4 thrombocytopenia (n=2), and grade 3 aspartate transaminase increase (n=1). The MTD was not established as all cohorts exceeded the MTD by definition. All patients experienced an adverse event; the most frequent all-grade nonhematologic events were fatigue (66.7%), decreased appetite (50.0%), and diarrhea (44.4%). The most frequent grade 3–4 hematologic abnormalities were neutropenia (83.3%), leukopenia (77.8%), and lymphopenia (72.2%). Toxicity was sequence-independent but appeared worse with gemcitabine followed by cabazitaxel. Durable partial responses were observed in three patients (prostate cancer, appendiceal cancer, and melanoma). The unacceptable DLTs with cabazitaxel plus gemcitabine, at doses reduced more than 25% from single-agent doses, preclude further investigation. PMID:26020806

  16. Favorable effect of priming with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in remission induction of acute myeloid leukemia restricted to dose escalation of cytarabine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Pabst (Thomas); E. Vellenga (Edo); W.L.J. van Putten (Wim); H. Schouten (Harry); C. Graux (Carlos); M.-C. Vekemans (Marie-Christiane); B.J. Biemond (Bart); P. Sonneveld (Pieter); J. Passweg (Jakob Robert); L.F. Verdonck (Leo); M.C.J.C. Legdeur (M. C J C); M. Theobald (Matthias); E. Jacky (Emanuel); M. Bargetzi (Mario); J. Maertens (Johan); G.J. Ossenkoppele (Gert); B. Löwenberg (Bob)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe clinical value of chemotherapy sensitization of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with G-CSF priming has remained controversial. Cytarabine is a key constituent of remission induction chemotherapy. The effect of G-CSF priming has not been investigated in relationship with variable dose

  17. Favorable effect of priming with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in remission induction of acute myeloid leukemia restricted to dose escalation of cytarabine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pabst, Thomas; Vellenga, Edo; van Putten, Wim; Schouten, Harry C.; Graux, Carlos; Vekemans, Marie-Christiane; Biemond, Bart; Sonneveld, Peter; Passweg, Jakob; Verdonck, Leo; Legdeur, Marie-Cecile; Theobald, Matthias; Jacky, Emanuel; Bargetzi, Mario; Maertens, Johan; Ossenkoppele, Gert Jan; Lowenberg, Bob

    2012-01-01

    The clinical value of chemotherapy sensitization of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with G-CSF priming has remained controversial. Cytarabine is a key constituent of remission induction chemotherapy. The effect of G-CSF priming has not been investigated in relationship with variable dose levels of

  18. Impact of Escalating Loading Dose Regimens of Ticagrelor in Patients With ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction Undergoing Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: Results of a Prospective Randomized Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi, Francesco; Rollini, Fabiana; Cho, Jung Rae; Bhatti, Mona; DeGroat, Christopher; Ferrante, Elisabetta; Dunn, Elizabeth C; Nanavati, Amit; Carraway, Edward; Suryadevara, Siva; Zenni, Martin M; Guzman, Luis A; Bass, Theodore A; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2015-09-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) profiles of escalating ticagrelor loading dose (LD) regimens in primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI). Patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing PPCI frequently have suboptimal platelet inhibition in the early hours after ticagrelor LD. The use of high ticagrelor LD regimens has been hypothesized to optimize platelet inhibition in PPCI. This was a prospective, randomized study of escalating ticagrelor LD regimens (180 mg, 270 mg, or 360 mg) in PPCI (N = 52). PK/PD analyses were performed before and 30 min, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 h post-LD. PK assessments included exposure to ticagrelor and its metabolite (AR-C124910XX). PD assessments included P2Y12 reaction units (PRU) measured by VerifyNow P2Y12 and platelet reactivity index (PRI) measured by vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP). Platelet reactivity was elevated during the first 2 h post-LD. There were no differences in PRU between groups during the study time course (p = 0.179). There were no significant differences in PRU levels across groups at all time points, except at 1 h (p = 0.017) where platelet reactivity was lowest with a 270-mg LD. No differences were found between the 180-mg and 360-mg groups (primary endpoint; p > 0.999). High on-treatment platelet reactivity rates were not different across groups, except at 1 hour (p = 0.038). Parallel PD findings were observed with VASP-PRI. PK analysis showed a delay in ticagrelor absorption and generation of AR-C124910XX, irrespective of dose. Although morphine was associated with a delay in ticagrelor PK/PD, it was not an independent predictor of high on-treatment platelet reactivity. ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients undergoing PPCI frequently exhibit impaired response to ticagrelor in the early hours after drug administration, which cannot be overcome by increasing LD regimens. These PD findings are largely

  19. Defense Cooperation in Europe: Subregional Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury I. Nadtochey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of subregional cooperation among European nations in security and defense area is the topic of the article. It describes sub-regionalism as a phenomenon and explains the reasons why small states of Europe are eager to cooperate in defense area after the end of the Cold War. Such cooperation is analyzed within the broader context of European integration - a trend which still has a great impact on sub-regional cooperation in certain parts of a common EU and NATO space. According to the article former socialist countries of Central and Eastern Europe as well as some European neutral states viewed sub-regional groupings as means of security enhancement in a period of transition - a time when these countries were getting ready for fully-fledged integration into European or Euro-Atlantic organizations. Nevertheless, subregional groupings have become even more relevant while EU and NATO enlargements were slowing down. So called threat perception gap among individual members of the EU and NATO contributed to forming of small subregional groupings based on members' security common vision and their aspiration to reach common goals. These groupings estimated as marginal by pan -European organizations, are extremely important for the grouped countries themselves. For European Union and the North Atlantic Alliance it is not easy to govern these subregional trends of multinational cooperation and synchronize them with European and Euro-Atlantic integration as such.

  20. A randomized, double-blind, multiple-dose escalation study of a Chinese herbal medicine preparation (Dang Gui Buxue Tang) for moderate to severe menopausal symptoms and quality of life in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chi Chiu; Cheng, King Fai; Lo, Wing Man; Law, Cindy; Li, Lu; Leung, Ping Chung; Chung, Tony Kwok Hung; Haines, Christopher John

    2013-02-01

    This study is a phase II clinical trial that aims to investigate the dose-response relationship of a Chinese herbal medicine preparation, Dang Gui Buxue Tang (DBT), with short-term menopausal symptoms and quality of life in local postmenopausal women. A randomized, double-blind, multiple-dose escalation trial was performed in 60 postmenopausal women experiencing severe hot flashes and night sweats. The participants were randomized to receive DBT preparations at 1.5, 3.0, or 6.0 g/day for 12 weeks. The primary outcomes were vasomotor symptoms, Greene Climacteric Scale (GCS) score, and Menopause-Specific Quality of Life (MENQOL) score. Secondary outcomes included serum hormones and lipids. There were between-group differences in psychological/psychosocial (P = 0.015, GCS; P = 0.013, MENQOL) and somatic/physical (P = 0.019, GCS; P = 0.037, MENQOL) domains, and improvement was significantly greatest (P DBT preparations at 6.0 g/day significantly improve physical and psychological scores and significantly reduce vasomotor symptoms from baseline. The treatment was well tolerated, with no serious adverse events noted during the 12-week intervention period. The changes do not affect hormones and lipid profiles.

  1. Phase I dose-escalation study of the PI3K/mTOR inhibitor voxtalisib (SAR245409, XL765) plus temozolomide with or without radiotherapy in patients with high-grade glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Patrick Y; Omuro, Antonio; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S; Fathallah-Shaykh, Hassan M; Mohile, Nimish; Lager, Joanne J; Laird, A Douglas; Tang, Jiali; Jiang, Jason; Egile, Coumaran; Cloughesy, Timothy F

    2015-09-01

    This phase I study aimed to evaluate safety, maximum tolerated dose, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and preliminary efficacy of voxtalisib (SAR245409, XL765), a pan-class I phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, in combination with temozolomide (TMZ), with or without radiation therapy (RT), in patients with high-grade glioma. Patients received voxtalisib 30-90 mg once daily (q.d.) or 20-50 mg twice daily (b.i.d.), in combination with 200 mg/m(2) TMZ (n = 49), or voxtalisib 20 mg q.d. with 75 mg/m(2) TMZ and RT (n = 5). A standard 3 + 3 dose-escalation design was used to determine the maximum tolerated dose. Patients were evaluated for adverse events (AEs), plasma pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamic effects in skin biopsies, and tumor response. The maximum tolerated doses were 90 mg q.d. and 40 mg b.i.d. for voxtalisib in combination with TMZ. The most frequently reported treatment-related AEs were nausea (48%), fatigue (43%), thrombocytopenia (26%), and diarrhea (24%). The most frequently reported treatment-related grade ≥3 AEs were lymphopenia (13%), thrombocytopenia, and decreased platelet count (9% each). Pharmacokinetic parameters were similar to previous studies with voxtalisib monotherapy. Moderate inhibition of PI3K signaling was observed in skin biopsies. Best response was partial response in 4% of evaluable patients, with stable disease observed in 68%. Voxtalisib in combination with TMZ with or without RT in patients with high-grade gliomas demonstrated a favorable safety profile and a moderate level of PI3K/mTOR pathway inhibition. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS): context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shannassy, Teresa O

    2013-01-01

    The epidemiology and outcome of malaria control initiatives are affected by a great diversity of factors including environment, economy and politics, to name but a few. Nowhere is this more obvious than in the GMS, where the rapid pace of economic development that has occurred over the past decade has brought with it a raft of changes to environment, employment, transport, communication, and demography and wealth patterns. The GMS, as a subregion, continues to gain increasing political and economic significance and has the potential to become one of the fastest growing regions in the world. While the pace of change is impressive, it has also brought with it new challenges in the fight against malaria. On the one hand, improvement in transport networks such as roads and railways, facilitates increased cross-border trade and development, on the other hand such improvements are likely to result in a massive increase in population movements across borders. As travel becomes easier the numbers of migrant workers moving between areas of high and low transmission, also expands, further increasing the risk of the spread of resistant malaria strains. In addition, the increase in large infrastructure projects such as the construction of dams, as well as agricultural plantations, also potentially lead to changes in vector behavior with unknown consequences for malaria transmission. Effectively addressing the new challenges to malaria control will require renewed commitment, coordination and better collaboration between all sectors from governments and non government organizations in the GMS.

  3. Toxicity and efficacy of re-irradiation of high-grade glioma in a phase I dose- and volume escalation trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Munck Af Rosenschöld, Per; Costa, Junia

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of PET and MRI guided re-irradiation of recurrent high-grade glioma (HGG) and to assess the impact of radiotherapy dose, fractionation and irradiated volume. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients with localized, recurrent HGG...... (grades III-IV) and no other treatment options were eligible for a prospective phase I trial. Gross tumor volumes for radiotherapy were defined using T1-contrast enhanced MRI and (18)F-fluoro-ethyl tyrosine PET. Radiotherapy was delivered using volumetric modulated arc therapy with a 2-mm margin. The dose...... and irreversible white matter changes. CONCLUSION: Re-irradiation showed limited efficacy and 43% of patients achieving disease control suffered late toxicity that was manageable but not negligible....

  4. Phase I, Dose-Escalation Study of the Targeted Cytotoxic LHRH Analog AEZS-108 in Patients with Castration- and Taxane-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Stephen V.; Tsao-Wei, Denice D.; Xiong, Shigann; Groshen, Susan; Dorff, Tanya B.; Quinn, David I.; Tai, Yu-Chong; Engel, Juergen; Hawes, Debra; Schally, Andrew V.; Pinski, Jacek K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: AEZS-108, formerly AN-152, is a cytotoxic hybrid molecule consisting of an LHRH agonist moiety covalently coupled to doxorubicin, allowing it to deliver doxorubicin selectively to cells expressing LHRH receptors. LHRH receptors are expressed on the cell membrane of many tumors, including prostate cancer (PC). This Phase I study determined the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of AEZS-108 in men with taxane- and castration-resistant PC (CRPC) while providing additional information on th...

  5. A randomised dose escalation study of subcutaneous interleukin 2 with and without levamisole in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma or malignant melanoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, F Y; Leonard, G A; A'Hern, R.; Taylor, A. E.; Lorentzos, A.; Atkinson, H; Moore, J.; Nicolson, M. C.; Riches, P G; Gore, M E

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the efficacy, toxicity and host immunological response of two different dose schedules of interleukin 2 (IL-2) given subcutaneously, daily for 3 months in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) or metastatic melanoma (MM). We also examined the effect of adding the immune modulator levamisole to the two different schedules of IL-2. Thirty-nine patients were entered into two sequential phase I/II studies. Eighteen patients entered study 1 and were randomised to receive IL-2, ...

  6. Safety and activity of microRNA-loaded minicells in patients with recurrent malignant pleural mesothelioma: a first-in-man, phase 1, open-label, dose-escalation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zandwijk, Nico; Pavlakis, Nick; Kao, Steven C; Linton, Anthony; Boyer, Michael J; Clarke, Stephen; Huynh, Yennie; Chrzanowska, Agata; Fulham, Michael J; Bailey, Dale L; Cooper, Wendy A; Kritharides, Leonard; Ridley, Lloyd; Pattison, Scott T; MacDiarmid, Jennifer; Brahmbhatt, Himanshu; Reid, Glen

    2017-10-01

    TargomiRs are minicells (EnGeneIC Dream Vectors) loaded with miR-16-based mimic microRNA (miRNA) and targeted to EGFR that are designed to counteract the loss of the miR-15 and miR-16 family miRNAs, which is associated with unsuppressed tumour growth in preclinical models of malignant pleural mesothelioma. We aimed to assess the safety, optimal dosing, and activity of TargomiRs in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. In this first-in-man, open-label, dose-escalation phase 1 trial at three major cancer centres in Sydney (NSW, Australia), we recruited adults (aged ≥18 years) with a confirmed diagnosis of malignant pleural mesothelioma, measurable disease, radiological signs of progression after previous chemotherapy, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 or 1, life expectancy of 3 months or more, immunohistochemical evidence of tumour EGFR expression, and adequate bone marrow, liver, and renal function. Patients were given TargomiRs via 20 min intravenous infusion either once or twice a week (3 days apart) in a traditional 3 + 3 dose-escalation design in five dose cohorts. The dose-escalation steps planned were 5 × 10 9 , 7 × 10 9 , and 9 × 10 9 TargomiRs either once or twice weekly, but after analysis of data from the first eight patients, all subsequent patients started protocol treatment at 1 × 10 9 TargomiRs. The primary endpoints were to establish the maximum tolerated dose of TargomiRs as measured by dose-limiting toxicity, define the optimal frequency of administration, and objective response (defined as the percentage of assessable patients with a complete or partial response), duration of response (defined as time from the first evidence of response to disease progression in patients who achieved a response), time to response (ie, time from start of treatment to the first evidence of response) and overall survival (defined as time from treatment allocation to death from any cause). Analyses were based

  7. COSMIC: A Regimen of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Plus Dose-Escalated, Raster-Scanned Carbon Ion Boost for Malignant Salivary Gland Tumors: Results of the Prospective Phase 2 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Alexandra D., E-mail: alexdjensen@gmx.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Nikoghosyan, Anna V.; Lossner, Karen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberer, Thomas; Jäkel, Oliver [Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Centre, Heidelberg (Germany); Münter, Marc W.; Debus, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and dose-escalated carbon ion (C12) therapy in adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) and other malignant salivary gland tumors (MSGTs) of the head and neck. Patients and Methods: COSMIC (combined treatment of malignant salivary gland tumors with intensity modulated radiation therapy and carbon ions) is a prospective phase 2 trial of 24 Gy(RBE) C12 followed by 50 Gy IMRT in patients with pathologically confirmed MSGT. The primary endpoint is mucositis Common Terminology Criteria grade 3; the secondary endpoints are locoregional control (LC), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and toxicity. Toxicity was scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3; treatment response was scored according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.1. Results: Between July 2010 and August 2011, 54 patients were accrued, and 53 were available for evaluation. The median follow-up time was 42 months; patients with microscopically incomplete resections (R1, n=20), gross residual disease (R2, n=17), and inoperable disease (n=16) were included. Eighty-nine percent of patients had ACC, and 57% had T4 tumors. The most common primary sites were paranasal sinus (34%), submandibular gland, and palate. At the completion of radiation therapy, 26% of patients experienced grade 3 mucositis, and 20 patients reported adverse events of the ear (38%). The most common observed late effects were grade 1 xerostomia (49%), hearing impairment (25%, 2% ipsilateral hearing loss), and adverse events of the eye (20%), but no visual impairment or loss of vision. Grade 1 central nervous system necrosis occurred in 6%, and 1 grade 4 ICA hemorrhage without neurologic sequelae. The best response was 54% (complete response/partial remission). At 3 years, the LC, PFS, and OS were 81.9%, 57.9%, and 78.4%, respectively. No difference was found regarding resection status. The

  8. A phase I dose-escalation clinical trial of a peptide-based human papillomavirus therapeutic vaccine with Candida skin test reagent as a novel vaccine adjuvant for treating women with biopsy-proven cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2/3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, William W; Stratton, Shawna L; Myrick, Rebecca S; Vaughn, Rita; Donnalley, Lisa M; Coleman, Hannah N; Mercado, Maria; Moerman-Herzog, Andrea M; Spencer, Horace J; Andrews-Collins, Nancy R; Hitt, Wilbur C; Low, Gordon M; Manning, Nirvana A; McKelvey, Samantha S; Smith, Dora; Smith, Michael V; Phillips, Amy M; Quick, C Matthew; Jeffus, Susanne K; Hutchins, Laura F; Nakagawa, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Non-surgical treatments for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2/3 (CIN2/3) are needed as surgical treatments have been shown to double preterm delivery rate. The goal of this study was to demonstrate safety of a human papillomavirus (HPV) therapeutic vaccine called PepCan, which consists of four current good-manufacturing production-grade peptides covering the HPV type 16 E6 protein and Candida skin test reagent as a novel adjuvant. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study was a single-arm, single-institution, dose-escalation phase I clinical trial, and the patients (n = 24) were women with biopsy-proven CIN2/3. Four injections were administered intradermally every 3 weeks in limbs. Loop electrical excision procedure (LEEP) was performed 12 weeks after the last injection for treatment and histological analysis. Six subjects each were enrolled (50, 100, 250, and 500 μg per peptide). RESULTS: The most common adverse events (AEs) were injection site reactions, and none of the patients experienced dose-limiting toxicities. The best histological response was seen at the 50 μg dose level with a regression rate of 83% (n = 6), and the overall rate was 52% (n = 23). Vaccine-induced immune responses to E6 were detected in 65% of recipients (significantly in 43%). Systemic T-helper type 1 (Th1) cells were significantly increased after four vaccinations (P = 0.02). CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated that PepCan is safe. A significantly increased systemic level of Th1 cells suggests that Candida, which induces interleukin-12 (IL-12) in vitro, may have a Th1 promoting effect. A phase II clinical trial to assess the full effect of this vaccine is warranted. PMID:26451301

  9. An Open-Label, Dose-Escalation Phase I Study of Anti-TYRP1 Monoclonal Antibody IMC-20D7S for Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Danny N; Postow, Michael A; Ibrahim, Nageatte; Ludwig, Dale L; Cosaert, Jan; Kambhampati, Siva Rama Prasad; Tang, Shande; Grebennik, Dmitri; Kauh, John Sae Wook; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Flaherty, Keith T; Hodi, F Stephen; Lawrence, Donald P; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2016-11-01

    Tyrosinase-related protein-1 (TYRP1) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that is specifically expressed in melanocytes and melanoma cells. Preclinical data suggest that mAbs targeting TYRP1 confer antimelanoma activity. IMC-20D7S is a recombinant human IgG1 mAb targeting TYRP1. Here, we report the first-in-human phase I/Ib trial of IMC-20D7S. The primary objective of this study was to establish the safety profile and the MTD of IMC-20D7S. Patients with advanced melanoma who progressed after or during at least one line of treatment or for whom standard therapy was not indicated enrolled in this standard 3 + 3 dose-escalation, open-label study. IMC-20D7S was administered intravenously every 2 or 3 weeks. Twenty-seven patients were enrolled. The most common adverse events were fatigue and constipation experienced by nine (33%) and eight (30%) patients, respectively. There were no serious adverse events related to treatment, no discontinuations of treatment due to adverse events, and no treatment-related deaths. Given the absence of dose-limiting toxicities, an MTD was not defined, but a provisional MTD was established at the 20 mg/kg every 2-week dose based on serum concentration and safety data. One patient experienced a complete response. A disease control rate, defined as stable disease or better, of 41% was observed. IMC-20D7S is well tolerated among patients with advanced melanoma with evidence of antitumor activity. Further investigation of this agent as monotherapy in selected patients or as part of combination regimens is warranted. Clin Cancer Res; 22(21); 5204-10. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. First-In-Human, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized, Dose-Escalation Study of BG00010, a Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Family Member, in Subjects with Unilateral Sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolan, Paul E; O'Neill, Gilmore; Versage, Eve; Rana, Jitesh; Tang, Yongqiang; Galluppi, Gerald; Aycardi, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of single doses of BG00010 (neublastin, artemin, enovin) in subjects with unilateral sciatica. This was a single-center, blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized Phase 1 sequential-cohort, dose-escalation study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00961766; funded by Biogen Idec). Adults with unilateral sciatica were enrolled at The Royal Adelaide Hospital, Australia. Four subjects were assigned to each of eleven cohorts (intravenous BG00010 0.3, 1, 3, 10, 25, 50, 100, 200, 400, or 800 μg/kg, or subcutaneous BG00010 50 μg/kg) and were randomized 3:1 to receive a single dose of BG00010 or placebo. The primary safety and tolerability assessments were: adverse events; clinical laboratory parameters and vital signs; pain as measured by a Likert rating scale; intra-epidermal nerve fiber density; and longitudinal assessment of quantitative sensory test parameters. Blood, serum, and plasma samples were collected for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic assessments. Subjects were blinded to treatment assignment throughout the study. The investigator was blinded to treatment assignment until the Data Safety Review Committee review of unblinded data, which occurred after day 28. Beyond the planned enrollment of 44 subjects, four additional subjects were enrolled into to the intravenous BG00010 200 μg/kg cohort after one original subject experienced mild generalized pruritus. Therefore, a total of 48 subjects were enrolled between August 2009 and December 2011; all were included in the safety analyses. BG00010 was generally well tolerated: in primary analyses, the most common treatment-emergent adverse events were changes in temperature perception, pruritus, rash, or headache; no trends were observed in clinical laboratory parameters, vital signs, intra-epidermal nerve fiber density, or quantitative sensory testing. BG00010 was not associated with any clear, dose-dependent trends in Likert pain scores. BG00010 was

  11. Phase I clinical trial of sipuleucel-T combined with escalating doses of ipilimumab in progressive metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholz M

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mark Scholz,1 Sabrina Yep,1 Micah Chancey,1 Colleen Kelly,1 Ken Chau,1 Jeffrey Turner,1 Richard Lam,1 Charles G Drake,2,3 1Prostate Oncology Specialists, Inc., Marina del Rey, CA, 2The Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, 3The James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, John Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USA Background: Sipuleucel-T (SIP-T, which functions by stimulating cancer-specific dendritic cells, prolongs survival in men with prostate cancer. Ipilimumab (IPI achieved a borderline survival advantage in a large randomized trial. SIP-T and IPI are potentially synergistic. Patients and Methods: Nine men with progressive metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC were treated prospectively with SIP-T followed immediately by IPI with one of the following doses of IPI: 1 mg/kg at 1 week after SIP-T; 1 mg/kg at 1 and 4 weeks after SIP-T; or 1 mg/kg at 1, 4, and 7 weeks after SIP-T. Three patients were evaluated at each level. Cancer-specific immunoglobulins directed at granulocyte-macrophage-colony-stimulating factor/prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP fusion protein (PA2024 and PAP were measured prior to SIP-T, after SIP-T, 1 week after IPI, every other month for 5 months, then every 3 months for an additional 12 months. Results: Adverse events of SIP-T were consistent with previous reports. IPI only caused a transient grade 1 rash in one patient. Median age, Gleason score, and number of previous hormonal interventions were 77 years, 8, and 3, respectively. Eight men had bone metastases and one had lymph node metastasis. Statistically significant increases in serum immunoglobulin G (IgG and IgG-IgM specific for PA2024 and PAP occurred after SIP-T. An additional statistically significant increase in the aforementioned immunoglobulins – above the levels achieved by SIP-T – occurred after IPI. Median clinical follow-up was 36 months (range: 26–40. Three patients died from progressive disease after 9, 18, and 20 months. Out of the

  12. Activity and safety of ODM-201 in patients with progressive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (ARADES): an open-label phase 1 dose-escalation and randomised phase 2 dose expansion trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fizazi, Karim; Massard, Christophe; Bono, Petri; Jones, Robert; Kataja, Vesa; James, Nicholas; Garcia, Jorge A; Protheroe, Andrew; Tammela, Teuvo L; Elliott, Tony; Mattila, Leena; Aspegren, John; Vuorela, Annamari; Langmuir, Peter; Mustonen, Mika

    2014-08-01

    ODM-201 is a novel androgen receptor (AR) inhibitor designed to block the growth of prostate cancer cells through high-affinity binding to the AR and inhibition of AR nuclear translocation. This trial assessed ODM-201's safety, pharmacokinetics, and activity in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. The ARADES trial is an open-label phase 1-2 trial undertaken in 23 hospitals across Europe and USA with ongoing long-term follow-up. Men with progressive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, who had castrate concentrations of testosterone and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group score of 0-1 were enrolled. In the phase 1 part of the trial, patients were given oral ODM-201 at a starting daily dose of 200 mg, which was increased to 400 mg, 600 mg, 1000 mg, 1400 mg, and 1800 mg. In phase 2, patients were randomly assigned centrally and stratified by previous chemotherapy and treatment with CPY17 inhibitors, to receive one of three daily doses of ODM-201 (200 mg, 400 mg, and 1400 mg). The primary endpoint in phase 1 was safety and tolerability, whereas in phase 2 it was the proportion of patients with a PSA response (50% or greater decrease in serum PSA) at week 12. All analyses included patients who had received at least one dose of ODM-201. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01317641, and NCT01429064 for the follow-up after 12 weeks. We enrolled patients between April 5, 2011, and March 12, 2013. In phase 1, 24 patients were enrolled to six sequential cohorts of three to six patients and received a daily dose of ODM-201, 200-1800 mg. No dose-limiting toxic effects were reported and the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. In phase 1, three patients reported eight adverse events of grade 3 (fracture, muscle injury, laceration, paralytic ileus, pain, presyncope, urinary retention, and vomiting) and one patient had a grade 4 adverse event (lymphoedema). None of the grade 3-4 adverse events were deemed to be related

  13. Synthesis of effects in four Arctic subregions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, Terry V; Björn, Lars Olof; Chernov, Yuri; Chapin, Terry; Christensen, Torben R; Huntley, Brian; Ims, Rolf A; Johansson, Margareta; Jolly, Dyanna; Jonasson, Sven; Matveyeva, Nadya; Panikov, Nicolai; Oechel, Walter; Shaver, Gus; Schaphoff, Sibyll; Sitch, Stephen; Zöckler, Christoph

    2004-11-01

    An assessment of impacts on Arctic terrestrial ecosystems has emphasized geographical variability in responses of species and ecosystems to environmental change. This variability is usually associated with north-south gradients in climate, biodiversity, vegetation zones, and ecosystem structure and function. It is clear, however, that significant east-west variability in environment, ecosystem structure and function, environmental history, and recent climate variability is also important. Some areas have cooled while others have become warmer. Also, east-west differences between geographical barriers of oceans, archipelagos and mountains have contributed significantly in the past to the ability of species and vegetation zones to relocate in response to climate changes, and they have created the isolation necessary for genetic differentiation of populations and biodiversity hot-spots to occur. These barriers will also affect the ability of species to relocate during projected future warming. To include this east-west variability and also to strike a balance between overgeneralization and overspecialization, the ACIA identified four major sub regions based on large-scale differences in weather and climate-shaping factors. Drawing on information, mostly model output that can be related to the four ACIA subregions, it is evident that geographical barriers to species re-location, particularly the distribution of landmasses and separation by seas, will affect the northwards shift in vegetation zones. The geographical constraints--or facilitation--of northward movement of vegetation zones will affect the future storage and release of carbon, and the exchange of energy and water between biosphere and atmosphere. In addition, differences in the ability of vegetation zones to re-locate will affect the biodiversity associated with each zone while the number of species threatened by climate change varies greatly between subregions with a significant hot-spot in Beringia

  14. Ventricular Tachycardia Ablation versus Escalation of Antiarrhythmic Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, John L; Wells, George A; Parkash, Ratika; Stevenson, William G; Blier, Louis; Sarrazin, Jean-Francois; Thibault, Bernard; Rivard, Lena; Gula, Lorne; Leong-Sit, Peter; Essebag, Vidal; Nery, Pablo B; Tung, Stanley K; Raymond, Jean-Marc; Sterns, Laurence D; Veenhuyzen, George D; Healey, Jeff S; Redfearn, Damian; Roux, Jean-Francois; Tang, Anthony S L

    2016-07-14

    Recurrent ventricular tachycardia among survivors of myocardial infarction with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is frequent despite antiarrhythmic drug therapy. The most effective approach to management of this problem is uncertain. We conducted a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial involving patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy and an ICD who had ventricular tachycardia despite the use of antiarrhythmic drugs. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either catheter ablation (ablation group) with continuation of baseline antiarrhythmic medications or escalated antiarrhythmic drug therapy (escalated-therapy group). In the escalated-therapy group, amiodarone was initiated if another agent had been used previously. The dose of amiodarone was increased if it had been less than 300 mg per day or mexiletine was added if the dose was already at least 300 mg per day. The primary outcome was a composite of death, three or more documented episodes of ventricular tachycardia within 24 hours (ventricular tachycardia storm), or appropriate ICD shock. Of the 259 patients who were enrolled, 132 were assigned to the ablation group and 127 to the escalated-therapy group. During a mean (±SD) of 27.9±17.1 months of follow-up, the primary outcome occurred in 59.1% of patients in the ablation group and 68.5% of those in the escalated-therapy group (hazard ratio in the ablation group, 0.72; 95% confidence interval, 0.53 to 0.98; P=0.04). There was no significant between-group difference in mortality. There were two cardiac perforations and three cases of major bleeding in the ablation group and two deaths from pulmonary toxic effects and one from hepatic dysfunction in the escalated-therapy group. In patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy and an ICD who had ventricular tachycardia despite antiarrhythmic drug therapy, there was a significantly lower rate of the composite primary outcome of death, ventricular tachycardia storm, or appropriate ICD shock among

  15. Differential response of hippocampal subregions to stress and learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darby F Hawley

    Full Text Available The hippocampus has two functionally distinct subregions-the dorsal portion, primarily associated with spatial navigation, and the ventral portion, primarily associated with anxiety. In a prior study of chronic unpredictable stress (CUS in rodents, we found that it selectively enhanced cellular plasticity in the dorsal hippocampal subregion while negatively impacting it in the ventral. In the present study, we determined whether this adaptive plasticity in the dorsal subregion would confer CUS rats an advantage in a spatial task-the radial arm water maze (RAWM. RAWM exposure is both stressful and requires spatial navigation, and therefore places demands simultaneously upon both hippocampal subregions. Therefore, we used Western blotting to investigate differential expression of plasticity-associated proteins (brain derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF], proBDNF and postsynaptic density-95 [PSD-95] in the dorsal and ventral subregions following RAWM exposure. Lastly, we used unbiased stereology to compare the effects of CUS on proliferation, survival and neuronal differentiation of cells in the dorsal and ventral hippocampal subregions. We found that CUS and exposure to the RAWM both increased corticosterone, indicating that both are stressful; nevertheless, CUS animals had significantly better long-term spatial memory. We also observed a subregion-specific pattern of protein expression following RAWM, with proBDNF increased in the dorsal and decreased in the ventral subregion, while PSD-95 was selectively upregulated in the ventral. Finally, consistent with our previous study, we found that CUS most negatively affected neurogenesis in the ventral (compared to the dorsal subregion. Taken together, our data support a dual role for the hippocampus in stressful experiences, with the more resilient dorsal portion undergoing adaptive plasticity (perhaps to facilitate escape from or neutralization of the stressor, and the ventral portion involved in

  16. Differential response of hippocampal subregions to stress and learning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hawley, Darby F; Morch, Kristin; Christie, Brian R; Leasure, J Leigh

    2012-01-01

    .... In a prior study of chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) in rodents, we found that it selectively enhanced cellular plasticity in the dorsal hippocampal subregion while negatively impacting it in the...

  17. Mekong sub-region committed to ending trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susu Thatun

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available In October 2004 six countries - Cambodia, China, Laos, Myanmar/Burma, Thailand and Vietnam – joined hands in the battle against human trafficking in the Greater Mekong Sub-region (GMS.

  18. Complete Removal of Extracellular IgG Antibodies in a Randomized Dose-Escalation Phase I Study with the Bacterial Enzyme IdeS – A Novel Therapeutic Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstedt, Lena; Järnum, Sofia; Nordahl, Emma Andersson; Olsson, Andreas; Runström, Anna; Bockermann, Robert; Karlsson, Christofer; Malmström, Johan; Palmgren, Gabriella Samuelsson; Malmqvist, Ulf; Björck, Lars; Kjellman, Christian

    2015-01-01

    IdeS is a streptococcal protease that cleaves IgG antibodies into F(ab’)2 and Fc fragments with a unique degree of specificity, thereby providing a novel treatment opportunity of IgG-driven autoimmune conditions and antibody mediated transplant rejection. Here we report the results from a first in man, double blinded and randomized study with single ascending doses of IdeS in healthy, male subjects. Twenty healthy subjects were given intravenous single ascending doses of IdeS. With impressive efficacy IdeS cleaved the entire plasma IgG-pool only minutes after dosing. IgG reached nadir 6-24 hours after dosing and then slowly recovered. The half-life of IdeS was 4.9 (±2.8) hours at 0.24 mg/kg with the main fraction eliminated during 24 hours. Already two hours after IdeS-dosing, the phagocytic capacity of IgG/IgG-fragments was reduced to background levels. Importantly, IdeS has the capacity to inactivate Fc-mediated effector function in vivo, was considered safe with no serious adverse events, and without dose limiting toxicity in this study. The complete, rapid, but temporary removal of IgG provides a new potent therapeutic opportunity in IgG-mediated pathogenic conditions. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01802697 PMID:26177518

  19. A phase IB dose-escalation study of the safety and pharmacokinetics of pictilisib in combination with either paclitaxel and carboplatin (with or without bevacizumab) or pemetrexed and cisplatin (with or without bevacizumab) in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Jean-Charles; Adjei, Alex A; Bahleda, Rastilav; Besse, Benjamin; Ferte, Charles; Planchard, David; Zhou, Jing; Ware, Joseph; Morrissey, Kari; Shankar, Geetha; Lin, Wei; Schutzman, Jennifer L; Dy, Grace K; Groen, Harry J M

    2017-11-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway is a potential therapeutic target in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This study aimed to evaluate the pan-PI3K inhibitor pictilisib in combination with first-line treatment regimens that were the standard of care at the time of study, in patients with NSCLC. A 3 + 3 dose-escalation study was performed using a starting daily dose of 60 mg pictilisib on days 1-14 of a 21-day cycle. Depending on bevacizumab eligibility and NSCLC histology, patients also received either paclitaxel + carboplatin or pemetrexed + cisplatin, ± bevacizumab every 3 weeks. The primary objectives of the study were to assess safety and tolerability and to identify dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs), the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and a recommended phase II dose (RP2D), for each combination. All 66 treated patients experienced at least one adverse event (AE). Grade ≥III AEs, serious AEs and deaths occurred in 57 (86.4%), 56 (84.8%) and 9 (13.6%) patients, respectively. Three patients reported DLTs across the four arms of the study. The MTD was not reached in any arm and the RP2D of pictilisib was determined to be 330 mg (capsules) or 340 mg (tablets) on a '14 days on, 7 days off' schedule. The best confirmed response was partial response in 29 (43.9%) patients and stable disease in 20 (30.9%) patients. Combining pictilisib with various standard-of-care first-line treatment regimens is feasible from a safety perspective in patients with NSCLC, and encouraging preliminary anti-tumour activity was observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Long-term safety and tolerability of ProSavin, a lentiviral vector-based gene therapy for Parkinson's disease: a dose escalation, open-label, phase 1/2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palfi, Stéphane; Gurruchaga, Jean Marc; Ralph, G Scott; Lepetit, Helene; Lavisse, Sonia; Buttery, Philip C; Watts, Colin; Miskin, James; Kelleher, Michelle; Deeley, Sarah; Iwamuro, Hirokazu; Lefaucheur, Jean Pascal; Thiriez, Claire; Fenelon, Gilles; Lucas, Cherry; Brugières, Pierre; Gabriel, Inanna; Abhay, Kou; Drouot, Xavier; Tani, Naoki; Kas, Aurelie; Ghaleh, Bijan; Le Corvoisier, Philippe; Dolphin, Patrice; Breen, David P; Mason, Sarah; Guzman, Natalie Valle; Mazarakis, Nicholas D; Radcliffe, Pippa A; Harrop, Richard; Kingsman, Susan M; Rascol, Olivier; Naylor, Stuart; Barker, Roger A; Hantraye, Philippe; Remy, Philippe; Cesaro, Pierre; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A

    2014-03-29

    Parkinson's disease is typically treated with oral dopamine replacement therapies; however, long-term treatment leads to motor complications and, occasionally, impulse control disorders caused by intermittent stimulation of dopamine receptors and off-target effects, respectively. We aimed to assess the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of bilateral, intrastriatal delivery of ProSavin, a lentiviral vector-based gene therapy aimed at restoring local and continuous dopamine production in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease. We undertook a phase 1/2 open-label trial with 12-month follow-up at two study sites (France and UK) to assess the safety and efficacy of ProSavin after bilateral injection into the putamen of patients with Parkinson's disease. All patients were then enrolled in a separate open-label follow-up study of long-term safety. Three doses were assessed in separate cohorts: low dose (1·9×10(7) transducing units [TU]); mid dose (4·0×10(7) TU); and high dose (1×10(8) TU). Inclusion criteria were age 48-65 years, disease duration 5 years or longer, motor fluctuations, and 50% or higher motor response to oral dopaminergic therapy. The primary endpoints of the phase 1/2 study were the number and severity of adverse events associated with ProSavin and motor responses as assessed with Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part III (off medication) scores, at 6 months after vector administration. Both trials are registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00627588 and NCT01856439. 15 patients received ProSavin and were followed up (three at low dose, six mid dose, six high dose). During the first 12 months of follow-up, 54 drug-related adverse events were reported (51 mild, three moderate). Most common were increased on-medication dyskinesias (20 events, 11 patients) and on-off phenomena (12 events, nine patients). No serious adverse events related to the study drug or surgical procedure were reported. A significant improvement in mean UPDRS part

  1. Escalation of Commitment in the Surgical ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braxton, Carla C; Robinson, Celia N; Awad, Samir S

    2017-04-01

    Escalation of commitment is a business term that describes the continued investment of resources into a project even after there is objective evidence of the project's impending failure. Escalation of commitment may be a contributor to high healthcare costs associated with critically ill patients as it has been shown that, despite almost certain futility, most ICU costs are incurred in the last week of life. Our objective was to determine if escalation of commitment occurs in healthcare settings, specifically in the surgical ICU. We hypothesize that factors previously identified in business and organizational psychology literature including self-justification, accountability, sunk costs, and cognitive dissonance result in escalation of commitment behavior in the surgical ICU setting resulting in increased utilization of resources and cost. A descriptive case study that illustrates common ICU narratives in which escalation of commitment can occur. In addition, we describe factors that are thought to contribute to escalation of commitment behaviors. Escalation of commitment behavior was observed with self-justification, accountability, and cognitive dissonance accounting for the majority of the behavior. Unlike in business decisions, sunk costs was not as evident. In addition, modulating factors such as personality, individual experience, culture, and gender were identified as contributors to escalation of commitment. Escalation of commitment occurs in the surgical ICU, resulting in significant expenditure of resources despite a predicted and often known poor outcome. Recognition of this phenomenon may lead to actions aimed at more rational decision making and may contribute to lowering healthcare costs. Investigation of objective measures that can help aid decision making in the surgical ICU is warranted.

  2. Escalate shamefully, de-escalate angrily or gratefully: the influence of discrete emotions on escalation of commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Junhua; Xiao, Shanshan; Liljedahl, Sophie

    2014-08-01

    Decision makers often tend to escalate their commitment when faced with a dilemma of whether to continue a losing course of action. Researchers recently began to investigate the influence of discrete emotions on this decision tendency. However, this work has mainly focused on negative emotions and rarely considered positive emotions, to say nothing of comparing the effects of both of them simultaneously. The current study addresses this need by presenting the results of three experiments that examined the effects of four emotions of both positive and negative valences in escalation situations. Experiment 1 investigated the relationships of three trait emotions (hope, shame, and anger) and escalation of commitment. Experiments 2 and 3 examined the effects of three induced emotions (anger, shame, and gratitude) on escalation of commitment in a student sample and an employee sample, respectively. The results revealed that the effects of discrete emotions in escalation situations are mainly due to their associated differences on the appraisal dimension of responsibility that is related to escalation situations rather than their valence. The theoretical and practical implications are discussed. © 2014 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Escalation Bias: Does It Extend to Marketing?

    OpenAIRE

    JS Armstrong; Nicole Coviello; Barbara Safranek

    2005-01-01

    Escalation bias implies that managers favor reinvestments in projects that are doing poorly over those doing well. We tested this implication in a marketing context by conducting experiments on advertising and product-design decisions. Each situation was varied to reflect either a long-term or a short-term decision. Besides these four conditions, we conducted three replications. We found little evidence of escalation bias by 365 subjects in the seven experimental comparisons.

  4. Enzyme replacement therapy with alglucosidase alfa in Pompe disease: Clinical experience with rate escalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Ankit K; Walters, Crista K; Cope, Heidi L; Kazi, Zoheb B; DeArmey, Stephanie M; Kishnani, Priya S

    2017-12-23

    Patients with Pompe disease have realized significant medical benefits due to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) infusions with alglucosidase alfa. However, regular infusions are time-consuming. Utilizing recommended infusion rates, infusion duration is 3h 45min for a patient receiving the standard dose of 20mg/kg, not including additional time needed for preparation of ERT, assessment of vital signs, intravenous access, and post-infusion monitoring. Recent studies have demonstrated increased effectiveness of higher dose of ERT (40mg/kg) in infantile-onset Pompe disease (IOPD), which increases the infusion duration to 6h 36min. Increased infusion durations compound the psychosocial burden on patients and families and potentially further disrupt family activities and obligations. We developed a stepwise infusion rate escalation protocol to administer higher dose ERT safely while decreasing infusion duration, which has been implemented in 15 patients to date. Reported here in detail are five patients with IOPD on 40mg/kg/weekly ERT in whom infusion duration was decreased with individualized, stepwise rate escalation. All patients tolerated rate escalations above the recommended rates without experiencing any infusion associated reactions and experienced a reduction in infusion duration by 1h and 24min with a corresponding increase in reported satisfaction. Our experience with ERT rate escalation is presented. A careful stepwise method of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) rate escalation can safely reduce infusion duration in patients with Pompe disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Selective functional disconnection of the orbitofrontal subregions in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y; Qin, W; Zhuo, C; Xu, L; Zhu, J; Liu, X; Yu, C

    2017-07-01

    As a disconnection syndrome, schizophrenia has shown impaired resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC); however, the OFC is a rather heterogeneous region and the rsFC changes in the OFC subregions remain unknown. A total of 98 schizophrenia patients and 102 healthy controls underwent resting-state functional MRI using a sensitivity-encoded spiral-in imaging sequence (SENSE-SPIRAL) to reduce susceptibility-induced signal loss and distortion. The OFC subregions were defined according to a previous parcellation study that divided the OFC into the anterior (OFCa), medial (OFCm), posterior (OFCp), intermediate (OFCi), and lateral (OFCl) subregions. The rsFC was compared using two-way repeated-measures ANOVA. Whether or not global signal regression, compared with healthy controls, schizophrenia patients consistently exhibited decreased rsFC between the left OFCi and the left middle temporal gyrus and the right middle frontal gyrus (MFG), between the right OFCi and the right MFG and the left inferior frontal gyrus, between the right OFCm and the middle cingulate cortex and the left Rolandic operculum. These rsFC changes still remained significant even after cortical atrophy correction. These findings suggest a selective functional disconnection of the OFC subregions in schizophrenia, and provide more precise information about the functional disconnections of the OFC in this disorder.

  6. Cetacean research in the southern African subregion: a review of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data are presented separately for large whales (those subject to commercial whaling) and smaller cetaceans, and are separated by era and ocean basin. ... the subregion, but include bycatch and directed hunts, oil and gas development, ecotourism activities, shifts in prey resources, and noise and chemical pollution.

  7. Sub-region Differentials in Migration and Remittances in Zimbabwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... analytical model to assess sub-regional differentials in the likelihood to remit to households of origin. The results confirmed expectations that migration and remittances are necessary in a drought-prone region and, therefore, should be more organised. (Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review: 2003 19 (2): 55-74) ...

  8. Subregions of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the subregions of the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system (DVRFS). Subregions are...

  9. Safety and immunogenicity of novel respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccines based on the RSV viral proteins F, N and M2-1 encoded by simian adenovirus (PanAd3-RSV) and MVA (MVA-RSV); protocol for an open-label, dose-escalation, single-centre, phase 1 clinical trial in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, C A; Scarselli, E; Voysey, M; Capone, S; Vitelli, A; Nicosia, A; Cortese, R; Thompson, A J; Sande, C S; de Lara, Catherine; Klenerman, P; Pollard, A J

    2015-10-28

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection causes respiratory disease throughout life, with infants and the elderly at risk of severe disease and death. RSV001 is a phase 1 (first-in-man), open-label, dose-escalation, clinical trial of novel genetic viral-vectored vaccine candidates PanAd3-RSV and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA)-RSV. The objective of RSV001 is to characterise the (primary objective) safety and (secondary objective) immunogenicity of these vaccines in healthy younger and older adults. Heterologous and homologous 'prime'/boost combinations of PanAd3-RSV and single-dose MVA-RSV are evaluated in healthy adults. 40 healthy adults aged 18-50 years test one of four combinations of intramuscular (IM) or intranasal (IN) PanAd3-RSV prime and IM PanAd3 or IM MVA-RSV boost vaccination, starting at a low dose for safety. The following year an additional 30 healthy adults aged 60-75 years test either a single dose of IM MVA-RSV, one of three combinations of IN or IM PanAd3-RSV prime and PanAd3-RSV or MVA-RSV boost vaccination used in younger volunteers, and a non-vaccinated control group. Study participants are self-selected volunteers who satisfy the eligibility criteria and are assigned to study groups by sequential allocation. Safety assessment includes the daily recording of solicited and unsolicited adverse events for 1 week after vaccination, as well as visit (nursing) observations and safety bloods obtained at all scheduled attendances. Laboratory measures of RSV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses after vaccination will address the secondary end points. All study procedures are performed at the Centre for Clinical Vaccinology and Tropical Medicine (CCVTM), Oxford, UK. RSV001 has clinical trial authorisation from the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) and ethics approval from NRES Berkshire (reference 13/SC/0023). All study procedures adhere to International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) Good Clinical

  10. Early warning scores: unravelling detection and escalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gary B; Prytherch, David R; Meredith, Paul; Schmidt, Paul E

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to increase understanding of how patient deterioration is detected and how clinical care escalates when early warning score (EWS) systems are used. The authors critically review a recent National Early Warning Score paper published in IJHCQA using personal experience and EWS-related publications, and debate the difference between detection and escalation. Incorrect EWS choice or poorly understood EWS escalation may result in unnecessary workloads forward and responding staff. EWS system implementers may need to revisit their guidance materials; medical and nurse educators may need to expand the curriculum to improve EWS system understanding and use. The paper raises the EWS debate and alerts EWS users that scrutiny is required.

  11. [Prevalence of arterial hypertension in some subregions of Chuvashia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslova, Zh V; Suslikov, V L

    2008-01-01

    To study a possible link between prevalence of arterial hypertension (AH) among population and biogeochemical environmental factors of some subregions. Epidemiological and statistical data from Public Health Ministry of the Chuvash Republic (CR) for 10 years and annual official reports on CR public health for 2001-2005 were analysed with reference to biogeochemical conditions in the CR regions. Cardiovascular mortality is leading among causes of death. AH accounts for 25% of deaths. Biogeochemical environmental factors have a direct impact on AH prevalence in subregions. Consideration of biogeochemical environmental factors in the study of chronic non-infectious diseases, including AH, provides new information about prevalence of these diseases and help formulate recommendations for practical medicine.

  12. Health equity and migrants in the Greater Mekong Subregion

    OpenAIRE

    McMichael, Celia; Healy, Judith

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Migrant health is receiving increasing international attention, reflecting recognition of the health inequities experienced among many migrant populations and the need for health systems to adapt to diverse migrant populations. In the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) there is increasing migration associated with uneven economic integration and growth, socio-economic vulnerabilities, and disparities between countries. There has been limited progress, however, in improving mi...

  13. Neurobiology of escalated aggression and violence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miczek, Klaus A.; de Almeida, Rosa M. M.; Kravitz, Edward A.; Rissman, Emilie F.; de Boer, Sietse F.; Raine, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    Psychopathological violence in criminals and intense aggression in fruit flies and rodents are studied with novel behavioral, neurobiological, and genetic approaches that characterize the escalation from adaptive aggression to violence. One goal is to delineate the type of aggressive behavior and

  14. Elephant invasion and escalated depletion of environmental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For decades, elephants' invasion is known to be associated with severe environmental consequences leading to escalated depletion o environmental resources (plants, water, wildlife and soil). This paper examined the effects of elephants' activity on the environmental resources inHong and Gombi Local Government areas ...

  15. Flunking Kindergarten: Escalating Curriculum Leaves Many Behind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Lorrie A.; Smith, Mary Lee

    1988-01-01

    Study of kindergarten retention in Colorado reveals the following: (1) kindergarten retention does nothing to boost subsequent academic achievement; (2) regardless of what it is called, kindergarten retention creates a social stigma; and (3) kindergarten retention feeds the escalation of inappropriate academic demand in first grade. Policy…

  16. Prostate Dose Escalation by Innovative Inverse Planning-Driven IMRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    is the pro- vision of an appropriate electron density calibration; large variations of HU were observed for the same material under different scanning...imaging using the 3D optical flow method. Phys Med Biol 2004;49:4147–4161.31. Camara O, Colliot O, Delso G, et al. 3D nonlinear PET-CT im- age...Recognition from Local Scale-Invariant Features. Proc. of the International Conference on Computer Vision . Corfu; 1999. 15. Mikolajczyk K, Schmid C. A

  17. Prostate Dose Escalation by Innovative Inverse Planning-Driven IMRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    L. Xing, W. Xiong, K. Stuhr and F. Newman, Validation of a 4D Monte Carlo Treatment Planning Tool Using an Image Interpolation Model ° International...Gustafsson A, Brahme A. 1993. The clinical value of different treatment objectives and degrees of freedom in radiation therapy optimization...radiotherapy: A dosimetric analysis 50. Brahme , A. Individualizing cancer treatment: Biological optimi- using active breathing control. Int. J. Radial. Oncol

  18. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised, parallel-group, dose-escalating, repeat dose study in healthy volunteers to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacodynamic effects and pharmacokinetics of the once daily rectal application of NRL001 suppositories for 14 days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, D; Duffin, A; Jacobs, A; Pediconi, C; Gruss, H J

    2014-03-01

    The 1R,2S stereoisomer of methoxamine hydrochloride, NRL001, is a highly selective α1-adrenoceptor agonist being developed for the local treatment of non-structural faecal incontinence caused by weak internal anal sphincter tone. This study investigated the steady state pharmacokinetics (PK) and safety of 2 g rectal suppositories containing NRL001 in different strengths (7.5, 10, 12.5 or 15 mg). Healthy volunteers aged 18-45 years received 14 daily doses of NRL001 2 g suppositories or matching placebo. In each dose group nine participants received NRL001 and three received placebo. Blood samples to determine NRL001 concentrations were taken on Days 1, 7 and 14. Cardiovascular parameters were collected via electrocardiograms, Holter monitoring (three lead Holter monitor) and vital signs. Forty-eight volunteers were enrolled; 43 completed the study and were included in the PK analysis population. AUC and Cmax broadly increased with increasing dose, Tmax generally occurred between 4.0 and 5.0 h. Although the data did not appear strongly dose proportional, dose proportionality analysis did not provide evidence against dose proportionality as the log(dose) coefficients were not significantly < 1. NRL001 did not accumulate over time for any dose. Increasing NRL001 concentrations were related to changes in vital sign variables, most notably decreased heart rate. The most commonly reported adverse events (AEs) in the active treatment groups were paraesthesia and piloerection. Treatment with NRL001 was generally well tolerated over 14 days once daily dosing and plasma NRL001 did not accumulate over time. Treatment was associated with changes in vital sign variables, most notably decreased heart rate. AEs commonly reported with NRL001 treatment were events indicative of a systemic α-adrenergic effect. Colorectal Disease © 2014 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  19. Neurobiology of Escalated Aggression and Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miczek, Klaus A.; de Almeida, Rosa M. M.; Kravitz, Edward A.; Rissman, Emilie F.; de Boer, Sietse F.; Raine, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Psychopathological violence in criminals and intense aggression in fruit flies and rodents are studied with novel behavioral, neurobiological, and genetic approaches that characterize the escalation from adaptive aggression to violence. One goal is to delineate the type of aggressive behavior and its escalation with greater precision; second, the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and brainstem structures emerge as pivotal nodes in the limbic circuitry mediating escalated aggressive behavior. The neurochemical and molecular work focuses on the genes that enable invertebrate aggression in males and females and genes that are expressed or suppressed as a result of aggressive experiences in mammals. The fruitless gene, immediate early genes in discrete serotonin neurons, or sex chromosome genes identify sexually differentiated mechanisms for escalated aggression. Male, but not female, fruit flies establish hierarchical relationships in fights and learn from previous fighting experiences. By manipulating either the fruitless or transformer genes in the brains of male or female flies, patterns of aggression can be switched with males using female patterns and vice versa. Work with Sts or Sry genes suggests so far that other genes on the X chromosomes may have a more critical role in female mouse aggression. New data from feral rats point to the regulatory influences on mesocortical serotonin circuits in highly aggressive animals via feedback to autoreceptors and via GABAergic and glutamatergic inputs. Imaging data lead to the hypothesis that antisocial, violent, and psychopathic behavior may in part be attributable to impairments in some of the brain structures (dorsal and ventral PFC, amygdala, and angular gyrus) subserving moral cognition and emotion. PMID:17978016

  20. Potential interest of a development of a radiotherapy scheme in stereotactic conditions with dose escalation focused on the tumour in the case of prostate cancers with a favourable prognostic; Interet potentiel de developper un schema de radiotherapie en conditions stereotaxiques avec escalade de dose focalisee dans la tumeur dans les cancers de prostate de pronostic favorable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapet, O.; De Bari, B. [Service de radiotherapie-oncologie, centre hospitalier Lyon Sud, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France); Udrescu, C.; Sotton, M.P.; Jalade, P. [Service de physique medicale, centre hospitalier Lyon Sud, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France); Rouviere, O. [Service de radiologie urologique, hopital Edouard-Herriot, 69 - Lyon (France); Bouffard-Vercelli, J. [Service de radiologie, centre hospitalier Lyon Sud, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France)

    2010-10-15

    Irradiation in stereotactic conditions is an irradiation technique used in the case of low risk prostate cancer. Several fractionations have already been assessed. Recent advances in MRI technology allowed a more precise visualization of macroscopic tumours in the prostate and therefore offer the possibility of a focal increase of irradiation dose in the tumour. The authors report a study aiming at assessing the interest of developing an original scheme of radiotherapy in stereotactic conditions with a focal increase of irradiation. Dosimetric scanographies of nine patients have been used. The prostate and the tumour have been contoured. Two planning target volumes have been determined. For each patient, an intensity-modulated conformation radiotherapy plan has been optimized with three different dose levels. As a result, the authors notice that the dose increase in the prostate significantly limits the doses received by the rectum and the bladder. Short communication

  1. A practical local tomography reconstruction algorithm based on known subregion

    CERN Document Server

    Paleo, Pierre; Mirone, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new method to reconstruct data acquired in a local tomography setup. This method uses an initial reconstruction and refines it by correcting the low frequency artifacts known as the cupping effect. A basis of Gaussian functions is used to correct the initial reconstruction. The coefficients of this basis are iteratively optimized under the constraint of a known subregion. Using a coarse basis reduces the degrees of freedom of the problem while actually correcting the cupping effect. Simulations show that the known region constraint yields an unbiased reconstruction, in accordance to uniqueness theorems stated in local tomography.

  2. Efficacy and safety of mixed amphetamine salts extended release (adderall XR) in the management of oppositional defiant disorder with or without comorbid attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in school-aged children and adolescents: A 4-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, forced-dose-escalation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Thomas J; Abikoff, Howard B; Connor, Daniel F; Biederman, Joseph; Pliszka, Steven R; Boellner, Samuel; Read, Stephanie C; Pratt, Raymond

    2006-03-01

    Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD)is associated with a high degree of impairment in social skills, family interaction, and academic functioning. Comorbid ODD is reportedly present in 40% to 70% of children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The goal of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of mixed amphetamine salts extended release (MAS XR) for the treatment of ODD in children and adolescents aged 6 to 17 years. This was a 4-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, forced-dose-escalation study. Patients were randomized to receive active treatment with MAS XR 10, 20, 30, or 40 mg/d or placebo. The primary efficacy end point was the ODD subscale of the Swanson, Nolan, and Pelham-IV (SNAP-IV) parent rating. Primary safety measures included adverse events recorded at each visit and for 30 days after study drug discontinuation, and changes in vital signs, 12-lead electrocardiographic (ECG) findings, laboratory tests and physical examinations, and body weight. A post hoc efficacy reanalysis was completed based on the results for the per-protocol population. For this analysis, patients were divided into high and low baseline severity categories according to the dichotomized baseline ODD parent or teacher score or dichotomized baseline ADHD parent or teacher score (high defined as scores at the median or greater and low defined as scores less than the median). A total of 308 children and adolescents (age range, 6-17 years; 213 males, 95 females) were randomized to receive active treatment with MAS XR 10 mg/d (n = 60) 20 mg/d (n = 58), 30 mg/d (n = 69), or 40 mg/d (n = 61) or placebo (n = 60). Of the 308 study patients, 244 (79.2%) had comorbid ADHD. A significant change from baseline in the ODD symptoms measured with the SNAP-IV parent rating subscale was found for the MAS XR 30-mg/d (-0.52; P < 0.001) and 40-mg/d (-0.56; P = 0.002) groups in the per-protocol analysis and for the MAS XR

  3. De-Escalating the IT-Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghulam Muhammad Kundi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Escalation stickins with an ailing project beyond rational justifications. This happens because in the face of negative feedback, decision makers are strangled between whether to stick with or quit the dying project. Environmental uncertainty has been identified as the root cause of the escalatory behavior. This uncertainty emanates from several sources relating to individual, group, organization and broader environmental factors. This paper argues the premise that effective communication can help create an environment whereby workforce can develop an organized action thereby distributing the responsibility across the whole workforce and not the individuals – leading to the possible reduction of escalatory behavior in IT projects.

  4. Health equity and migrants in the Greater Mekong Subregion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Celia; Healy, Judith

    2017-01-01

    Migrant health is receiving increasing international attention, reflecting recognition of the health inequities experienced among many migrant populations and the need for health systems to adapt to diverse migrant populations. In the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) there is increasing migration associated with uneven economic integration and growth, socio-economic vulnerabilities, and disparities between countries. There has been limited progress, however, in improving migrant access to health services in the Subregion. This paper examines the health needs, access barriers, and policy responses to cross-border migrants in five GMS countries. A review of published literature and research was conducted on migrant health and health service access in Cambodia, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Myanmar, Thailand, and Viet Nam, as well as analysis of current migration trends and universal health coverage (UHC) indicators in the Subregion. The review included different migrant types: i.e. migrant workers, irregular migrants, victims of trafficking, refugees and asylum seekers, and casual cross-border migrants. There is substantial diversity in the capacity of GMS health systems to address migrant populations. Thailand has sought to enhance migrant health coverage, including development of migrant health policies/programs, bilateral migrant worker agreements, and migrant health insurance schemes; Viet Nam provides health protection for emigrant workers. Overall, however, access to good quality health care remains weak for many citizens in GMS countries let alone migrants. Migrant workers - and irregular migrants in particular - face elevated health risks yet are not adequately covered and incur high out-of-pocket (OOP) payments for health services. UHC implies equity: UHC is only achieved when everyone has the opportunity to access and use good-quality health care. Efforts to achieve UHC in the GMS require deliberate policy decisions to include migrants. The emergence of

  5. Escalation with Overdose Control Using Ordinal Toxicity Grades for Cancer Phase I Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mourad Tighiouart

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We extend a Bayesian adaptive phase I clinical trial design known as escalation with overdose control (EWOC by introducing an intermediate grade 2 toxicity when assessing dose-limiting toxicity (DLT. Under the proportional odds model assumption of dose-toxicity relationship, we prove that in the absence of DLT, the dose allocated to the next patient given that the previously treated patient had a maximum of grade 2 toxicity is lower than the dose given to the next patient had the previously treated patient exhibited a grade 0 or 1 toxicity at the most. Further, we prove that the coherence properties of EWOC are preserved. Simulation results show that the safety of the trial is not compromised and the efficiency of the estimate of the maximum tolerated dose (MTD is maintained relative to EWOC treating DLT as a binary outcome and that fewer patients are overdosed using this design when the true MTD is close to the minimum dose.

  6. De-escalating and escalating treatments for early-stage breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curigliano, G; Burstein, H J; P Winer, E

    2017-01-01

    The 15th St. Gallen International Breast Cancer Conference 2017 in Vienna, Austria reviewed substantial new evidence on loco-regional and systemic therapies for early breast cancer. Treatments were assessed in light of their intensity, duration and side-effects, seeking where appropriate to escal...

  7. Towards migration research networking in Eastern-Southern African subregions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oucho, J O

    1993-01-01

    This article reports efforts made by a small group of Eastern-Southern African (ESA) subregion scholars to adopt a systematic approach to establishing a regional network Migration Network in Eastern and Southern Africa (MINESA). The approach involved: 1) holding a conference at which symptomatic types of internal and international migration would be discussed; 2) publication of the conference proceedings; and 3) establishment of MINESA as a network of policy-oriented research in the two subregions. The first stage has been accomplished, the second is nearly complete, and the third has yet to be undertaken. During the African Population Conference organized by the International Union for Scientific Study of Population in Dakar, Senegal, on 5-9 November 1988, a small group agreed on a timetable to establish MINESA. At the ESA conference, papers were presented on ESA issues; internal migration processes and mechanism; refugee movements and their implications for countries; the effects on the economies of Southern African states, of emigration to the Republic of South Africa (RSA). In a keynote address, Adepoju surveyed migration and development in Western-Central (Middle) Africa and Eastern-Southern Africa, which included colonial and post-colonial historical epochs, internal and international migration, and labor and refugee movements. A paper on Kenya by Oucho discussed the implications for rural-urban balance of internal migration based on 1969 and 1979 censuses. Rural-urban migration from the traditional economy to Nairobi and Mombasa in particular has created an unacceptable rural-urban imbalance, adversely affecting rural development. Eastern and Southern Africa has seen massive and wide spatial dispersal of refugees (victims of wars, drought, and famine). Two papers were presented on Tanzania and one on Uganda. The final set of papers addressed the effects of labor migration to the RSA on Swaziland and Lesotho.

  8. HIV-1 envelope subregion length variation during disease progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel E Curlin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The V3 loop of the HIV-1 Env protein is the primary determinant of viral coreceptor usage, whereas the V1V2 loop region is thought to influence coreceptor binding and participate in shielding of neutralization-sensitive regions of the Env glycoprotein gp120 from antibody responses. The functional properties and antigenicity of V1V2 are influenced by changes in amino acid sequence, sequence length and patterns of N-linked glycosylation. However, how these polymorphisms relate to HIV pathogenesis is not fully understood. We examined 5185 HIV-1 gp120 nucleotide sequence fragments and clinical data from 154 individuals (152 were infected with HIV-1 Subtype B. Sequences were aligned, translated, manually edited and separated into V1V2, C2, V3, C3, V4, C4 and V5 subregions. V1-V5 and subregion lengths were calculated, and potential N-linked glycosylation sites (PNLGS counted. Loop lengths and PNLGS were examined as a function of time since infection, CD4 count, viral load, and calendar year in cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses. V1V2 length and PNLGS increased significantly through chronic infection before declining in late-stage infection. In cross-sectional analyses, V1V2 length also increased by calendar year between 1984 and 2004 in subjects with early and mid-stage illness. Our observations suggest that there is little selection for loop length at the time of transmission; following infection, HIV-1 adapts to host immune responses through increased V1V2 length and/or addition of carbohydrate moieties at N-linked glycosylation sites. V1V2 shortening during early and late-stage infection may reflect ineffective host immunity. Transmission from donors with chronic illness may have caused the modest increase in V1V2 length observed during the course of the pandemic.

  9. Tobacco and the Escalating Global Cancer Burden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard F. Oppeltz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The global burden of cancer is escalating as a result of dramatic increases in the use of tobacco in the developing world. The use of tobacco is linked to the development of a broad variety of cancers, mainly lung cancer, the single most common cancer in the world. Tobacco smoking-attributable deaths extends beyond cancer and include stroke, heart attack and COPD. Widening disparities in cancer-related mortality have shifted towards a more dramatic burden in the developing world. Appropriate interventions must be implemented to reduce tobacco use and prevent global mortality that has escalated to epidemic levels. Tobacco control policies, including public health advertisement campaigns, warning labels, adoption of smoke-free laws, comprehensive bans and tax policies are highly effective measures to control tobacco use. Clinicians and academic institutions have to be actively committed to support tobacco control initiatives. The reduction in cancer related morbidity and mortality should be viewed as a global crisis and definitive results will depend on a multilevel effort to effectively reduce the burden of cancer, particularly in underprivileged regions of the world.

  10. Causal loop diagrams as a de-escalation technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pala, O.; Vriens, D.J.; Vennix, J.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Escalation of commitment, the tendency of decision makers to keep on investing in losing courses of action, has been shown to be a costly decision bias that affects many areas of decision making. Even though escalation is a widely studied phenomenon, there has been comparatively little research on

  11. Malaria trends and challenges in the Greater Mekong Subregion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delacollette, Charles; D'Souza, Carol; Christophel, Eva; Thimasarn, Krongthong; Abdur, Rashid; Bell, David; Dai, Tran Cong; Gopinath, Deyer; Lu, Shaohong; Mendoza, Raymond; Ortega, Leonard; Rastogi, Rakesh; Tantinimitkul, Chawalit; Ehrenberg, John

    2009-07-01

    This report provides an overview of the epidemiological patterns of malaria in the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) from 1998 to 2007, and highlights critical challenges facing national malaria control programs and partners in effort to build on their successes as they move towards malaria pre-elimination and elimination as a programmatic goal. Epidemiological data provided by malaria programs show a drastic decline in malaria deaths and confirmed malaria positive cases over the last 10 years in the GMS. More than half of confirmed malaria cases and deaths recorded in the GMS occur in Myanmar, however, reporting methods and data management are not comparable between countries despite effort made by WHO to harmonize data collection, analysis and reporting among WHO Member States. Malaria is concentrated in forested/forest-fringe areas of the region mainly along international borders providing strong rationale to develop harmonized cross-border pre-elimination programs in conjunction with national efforts. Across the Mekong Region, the declining efficacy of recommended first-line antimalarials, eg artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) against falciparum malaria on the Cambodia-Thailand border, the prevalence of counterfeit and substandard antimalarial drugs, the lack of health services in general and malaria services in particular in remote settings, and the lack of information and services targeting migrants and mobile population present important barriers to reach or maintain malaria pre-elimination programmatic goals. Strengthening networking between research institutions and non-government organizations will increase knowledge-based decision and action.

  12. On volumes of subregions in holography and complexity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Ami, Omer [Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences School of Physics and Astronomy,Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv, 69978 (Israel); Carmi, Dean [Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences School of Physics and Astronomy,Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv, 69978 (Israel); Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,31 Caroline Street North, ON, N2L 2Y5 (Canada)

    2016-11-22

    The volume of the region inside the bulk Ryu-Takayanagi surface is a codimension-one object, and a natural generalization of holographic complexity to the case of subregions in the boundary QFT. We focus on time-independent geometries, and study the properties of this volume in various circumstances. We derive a formula for computing the volume for a strip entangling surface and a general asymptotically AdS bulk geometry. For an AdS black hole geometry, the volume exhibits non-monotonic behaviour as a function of the size of the entangling region (unlike the behaviour of the entanglement entropy in this setup, which is monotonic). For setups in which the holographic entanglement entropy exhibits transitions in the bulk, such as global AdS black hole, geometries dual to confining theories and disjoint entangling surfaces, the corresponding volume exhibits a discontinuous finite jump at the transition point (and so do the volumes of the corresponding entanglement wedges). We compute this volume discontinuity in several examples. Lastly, we compute the codim-zero volume and the bulk action of the entanglement wedge for the case of a sphere entangling surface and pure AdS geometry.

  13. Escalator-related injuries in 30 dogs (2007-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Emma-Leigh; Whelan, Megan; Bracker, Kiko

    2017-07-01

    To describe a population of dogs affected by escalator-related injuries, and to characterize the types of injuries sustained and describe treatment administered. Retrospective study from March 2007 to November 2014. Large urban referral and emergency facility. Thirty client-owned dogs presenting with injuries acquired while riding an escalator. None. All injuries in this study occurred secondary to entrapment of 1 or more paws in the moving parts of an escalator; 39 paws were injured in total. The median body weight of the patients in this study was 4.25 kg, with 73.3% of the patients weighing less than 10 kg. Fifteen patients (50.0%) were treated surgically, the remainder were managed conservatively. Eight patients (26.7%) underwent digit or partial-digit amputation. Of the conservatively managed patients, 10 were treated with bandaging of the wounds. Antimicrobials, opiate analgesics, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were administered in both surgically and conservatively managed patients. While uncommon, escalator accidents can result in significant injury to dogs. Measures can be taken to prevent these injuries from occurring, whether through client education, dog training, structural modifications in the escalators themselves, or avoidance of escalators. In the present study, the survival rate of dogs injured on escalators was 100%. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2017.

  14. Anatomical evidence for direct connections between the shell and core subregions of the rat nucleus accumbens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, Y.C.; Deniau, J.M.; Pennartz, C.M.A.; Galis-de Graaf, Y.; Voorn, P.; Thierry, A.M.; Groenewegen, H.J.

    2005-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens is thought to subserve different aspects of adaptive and emotional behaviors. The anatomical substrates for such actions are multiple, parallel ventral striatopallidal output circuits originating in the nucleus accumbens shell and core subregions. Several indirect ways of

  15. Agricultural intensification escalates future conservation costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Jacob; Carrasco, Luis Roman; Webb, Edward L.; Koh, Lian Pin; Pascual, Unai

    2013-01-01

    The supposition that agricultural intensification results in land sparing for conservation has become central to policy formulations across the tropics. However, underlying assumptions remain uncertain and have been little explored in the context of conservation incentive schemes such as policies for Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation, conservation, sustainable management, and enhancement of carbon stocks (REDD+). Incipient REDD+ forest carbon policies in a number of countries propose agricultural intensification measures to replace extensive “slash-and-burn” farming systems. These may result in conservation in some contexts, but will also increase future agricultural land rents as productivity increases, creating new incentives for agricultural expansion and deforestation. While robust governance can help to ensure land sparing, we propose that conservation incentives will also have to increase over time, tracking future agricultural land rents, which might lead to runaway conservation costs. We present a conceptual framework that depicts these relationships, supported by an illustrative model of the intensification of key crops in the Democratic Republic of Congo, a leading REDD+ country. A von Thünen land rent model is combined with geographic information systems mapping to demonstrate how agricultural intensification could influence future conservation costs. Once postintensification agricultural land rents are considered, the cost of reducing forest sector emissions could significantly exceed current and projected carbon credit prices. Our analysis highlights the importance of considering escalating conservation costs from agricultural intensification when designing conservation initiatives. PMID:23589860

  16. Altered Functional Connectivity of Cognitive-Related Cerebellar Subregions in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimin Zheng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most common cause of dementia. Previous studies have found disrupted resting state functional connectivities (rsFCs in various brain networks in the AD patients. However, few studies have focused on the rsFCs of the cerebellum and its sub-regions in the AD patients. In this study, we collected resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI data including 32 AD patients and 38 healthy controls (HCs. We selected two cognitive-related subregions of the cerebellum as seed region and mapped the whole-brain rsFCs for each subregion. We identified several distinct rsFC patterns of the two cognitive-related cerebellar subregions: default-mode network (DMN, frontoparietal network (FPN, visual network (VN and sensorimotor network (SMN. Compared with the controls, the AD patients showed disrupted rsFCs in several different networks (DMN, VN and SMN, predicting the impairment of the functional integration in the cerebellum. Notably, these abnormal rsFCs of the two cerebellar subregions were closely associated with cognitive performance. Collectively, we demonstrated the distinct rsFCs patterns of cerebellar sub-regions with various functional networks, which were differentially impaired in the AD patients.

  17. Capturing subregional variability in regional-scale climate change vulnerability assessments of natural resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buotte, Polly C; Peterson, David L; McKelvey, Kevin S; Hicke, Jeffrey A

    2016-03-15

    Natural resource vulnerability to climate change can depend on the climatology and ecological conditions at a particular site. Here we present a conceptual framework for incorporating spatial variability in natural resource vulnerability to climate change in a regional-scale assessment. The framework was implemented in the first regional-scale vulnerability assessment conducted by the US Forest Service. During this assessment, five subregional workshops were held to capture variability in vulnerability and to develop adaptation tactics. At each workshop, participants answered a questionnaire to: 1) identify species, resources, or other information missing from the regional assessment, and 2) describe subregional vulnerability to climate change. Workshop participants divided into six resource groups; here we focus on wildlife resources. Participants identified information missing from the regional assessment and multiple instances of subregional variability in climate change vulnerability. We provide recommendations for improving the process of capturing subregional variability in a regional vulnerability assessment. We propose a revised conceptual framework structured around pathways of climate influence, each with separate rankings for exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity. These revisions allow for a quantitative ranking of species, pathways, exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity across subregions. Rankings can be used to direct the development and implementation of future regional research and monitoring programs. The revised conceptual framework is equally applicable as a stand-alone model for assessing climate change vulnerability and as a nested model within a regional assessment for capturing subregional variability in vulnerability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Strategy Escalation: An emerging paradigm for safe clinical development of T cell gene therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junghans Richard

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gene therapy techniques are being applied to modify T cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs for therapeutic ends. The versatility of this platform has spawned multiple options for their application with new permutations in strategies continually being invented, a testimony to the creative energies of many investigators. The field is rapidly expanding with immense potential for impact against diverse cancers. But this rapid expansion, like the Big Bang, comes with a somewhat chaotic evolution of its therapeutic universe that can also be dangerous, as seen by recently publicized deaths. Time-honored methods for new drug testing embodied in Dose Escalation that were suitable for traditional inert agents are now inadequate for these novel "living drugs". In the following, I propose an approach to escalating risk for patient exposures with these new immuno-gene therapy agents, termed Strategy Escalation, that accounts for the molecular and biological features of the modified cells and the methods of their administration. This proposal is offered not as a prescriptive but as a discussion framework that investigators may wish to consider in configuring their intended clinical applications.

  19. School District Health Care Expense: Moderating the Escalation Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Gene P.

    1991-01-01

    The cafeteria plan for health insurance benefits employers by reducing the overall escalation of health costs. Employees benefit by tailoring their benefit packages to their needs to including the option to decline coverage because of spouse employment. (MLF)

  20. Effective ingredients of verbal de-escalation: validating an English modified version of the 'De-Escalating Aggressive Behaviour Scale'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavandadi, V; Bieling, P J; Madsen, V

    2016-08-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Verbal de-escalation is an intervention aimed at calmly managing an agitated client to prevent violence. Effective de-escalation can help reduce the use of seclusion and restraint in psychiatric settings. Despite its importance in practice, there is little agreement on the necessary techniques of de-escalation and most of the research on the topic is based on expert opinion. To our knowledge, only one attempt at quantifying de-escalation skill has been pursued through the German-language De-Escalating Aggressive Behaviour Scale (DABS). While the DABS identified seven qualities necessary for de-escalation, it has not been validated in English and may lack important descriptors. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: The present study enhanced the original DABS with best, acceptable and least desirable staff de-escalation practice descriptions for each of the seven items. This enhancement of the DABS lead to the creation of the English modified DABS (EMDABS). The EMDABS was psychometrically validated for use in research and practice: raters could use the EMDABS with a high level of agreement and consistency. Also, the scale appeared to measure a single cohesive construct - de-escalation. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: With further validation, the EMDABS has potential to be the first English quantitative measure of de-escalation. The EMDABS offers seven items, with associated best practice descriptions, that may be used to inform de-escalation practice. The EMDABS can be used to evaluate training and education programmes and inform how these programmes and independent de-escalation practice may be improved. Introduction Verbal de-escalation is crucial to a non-coercive psychiatric environment. Despite its importance, the literature on de-escalation is sparse and mostly qualitative. To address this, Nau et al. (2009) quantified de-escalation by creating the German-language De-Escalating Aggressive Behaviour Scale (DABS

  1. Malaria in the Greater Mekong Subregion: heterogeneity and complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Liwang; Yan, Guiyun; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Cao, Yaming; Chen, Bin; Chen, Xiaoguang; Fan, Qi; Fang, Qiang; Jongwutiwes, Somchai; Parker, Daniel; Sirichaisinthop, Jeeraphat; Kyaw, Myat Phone; Su, Xin-zhuan; Yang, Henglin; Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Baomin; Xu, Jianwei; Zheng, Bin; Zhong, Daibin; Zhou, Guofa

    2012-03-01

    The Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS), comprised of six countries including Cambodia, China's Yunnan Province, Lao PDR, Myanmar (Burma), Thailand and Vietnam, is one of the most threatening foci of malaria. Since the initiation of the WHO's Mekong Malaria Program a decade ago, malaria situation in the GMS has greatly improved, reflected in the continuous decline in annual malaria incidence and deaths. However, as many nations are moving towards malaria elimination, the GMS nations still face great challenges. Malaria epidemiology in this region exhibits enormous geographical heterogeneity with Myanmar and Cambodia remaining high-burden countries. Within each country, malaria distribution is also patchy, exemplified by 'border malaria' and 'forest malaria' with high transmission occurring along international borders and in forests or forest fringes, respectively. 'Border malaria' is extremely difficult to monitor, and frequent malaria introductions by migratory human populations constitute a major threat to neighboring, malaria-eliminating countries. Therefore, coordination between neighboring countries is essential for malaria elimination from the entire region. In addition to these operational difficulties, malaria control in the GMS also encounters several technological challenges. Contemporary malaria control measures rely heavily on effective chemotherapy and insecticide control of vector mosquitoes. However, the spread of multidrug resistance and potential emergence of artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum make resistance management a high priority in the GMS. This situation is further worsened by the circulation of counterfeit and substandard artemisinin-related drugs. In most endemic areas of the GMS, P. falciparum and Plasmodium vivax coexist, and in recent malaria control history, P. vivax has demonstrated remarkable resilience to control measures. Deployment of the only registered drug (primaquine) for the radical cure of vivax malaria is severely

  2. Malaria in the Greater Mekong Subregion: Heterogeneity and Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Liwang; Yan, Guiyun; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Cao, Yaming; Chen, Bin; Chen, Xiaoguang; Fan, Qi; Fang, Qiang; Jongwutiwes, Somchai; Parker, Daniel; Sirichaisinthop, Jeeraphat; Kyaw, Myat Phone; Su, Xin-zhuan; Yang, Henglin; Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Baomin; Xu, Jianwei; Zheng, Bin; Zhong, Daibin; Zhou, Guofa

    2011-01-01

    The Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS), comprised of six countries including Cambodia, China's Yunnan Province, Lao PDR, Myanmar (Burma), Thailand and Vietnam, is one of the most threatening foci of malaria. Since the initiation of the WHO's Mekong Malaria Program a decade ago, malaria situation in the GMS has greatly improved, reflected in the continuous decline in annual malaria incidence and deaths. However, as many nations are moving towards malaria elimination, the GMS nations still face great challenges. Malaria epidemiology in this region exhibits enormous geographical heterogeneity with Myanmar and Cambodia remaining high-burden countries. Within each country, malaria distribution is also patchy, exemplified by ‘border malaria’ and ‘forest malaria’ with high transmission occurring along international borders and in forests or forest fringes, respectively. ‘Border malaria’ is extremely difficult to monitor, and frequent malaria introductions by migratory human populations constitute a major threat to neighboring, malaria-eliminating countries. Therefore, coordination between neighboring countries is essential for malaria elimination from the entire region. In addition to these operational difficulties, malaria control in the GMS also encounters several technological challenges. Contemporary malaria control measures rely heavily on effective chemotherapy and insecticide control of vector mosquitoes. However, the spread of multidrug resistance and potential emergence of artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum make resistance management a high priority in the GMS. This situation is further worsened by the circulation of counterfeit and substandard artemisinin-related drugs. In most endemic areas of the GMS, P. falciparum and P. vivax coexist, and in recent malaria control history, P. vivax has demonstrated remarkable resilience to control measures. Deployment of the only registered drug (primaquine) for the radical cure of vivax malaria is

  3. Differentially disrupted functional connectivity in posteromedial cortical subregions in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Mingrui; Wang, Zhiqun; Dai, Zhengjia; Liang, Xia; Song, Haiqing; Shu, Ni; Li, Kuncheng; He, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have remarkable focal grey matter loss and hypometabolism in the posteromedial cortex (PMC), which is composed of the precuneus and posterior cingulate cortex, suggesting an important association of the PMC with AD pathophysiology. Studies have also shown that the PMC is a structurally and functionally heterogeneous structure containing various subregions with distinct connectivity profiles. However, whether these PMC subregions show differentially disrupted connectivity patterns in AD remains largely unknown. Here, we addressed this issue by collecting resting-state functional MRI data from 32 AD patients and 38 healthy controls. We automatically identified the PMC subregions using a graph-based module detection algorithm and then mapped the whole-brain functional connectivity pattern of each subregion. The functional connectivity analysis was followed by a hierarchical clustering analysis to classify each subregion. Three distinct spatial connectivity patterns were observed across the PMC subregions: the anterior dorsal zone was functionally connected with the sensorimotor cortex; the posterior dorsal zone was functionally connected with the frontoparietal cortex; and the central and ventral zones were functionally connected with the default-mode regions. Group comparison analysis revealed that all three functional systems were significantly disrupted in the AD patients compared to the controls and these disruptions were positively correlated with the patients' cognitive performance. Collectively, we showed that the subregions of the PMC exhibit differentially disrupted neuronal circuitry in AD patients, which provides new insight into the functional neuroanatomy of the human PMC and the alterations that may be relevant to disease.

  4. Differentially disrupted functional connectivity of the subregions of the inferior parietal lobule in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqun; Xia, Mingrui; Dai, Zhengjia; Liang, Xia; Song, Haiqing; He, Yong; Li, Kuncheng

    2015-03-01

    Recent research on Alzheimer's disease (AD) has shown that the altered structure and function of the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) provides a promising indicator of AD. However, little is known about the functional connectivity of the IPL subregions in AD subjects. In this study, we collected resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data from 32 AD patients and 38 healthy controls. We defined seven subregions of the IPL according to probabilistic cytoarchitectonic atlases and mapped the whole-brain resting-state functional connectivity for each subregion. Using hierarchical clustering analysis, we identified three distinct functional connectivity patterns of the IPL subregions: the anterior IPL connected with the sensorimotor network (SMN) and salience network (SN); the central IPL had connectivity with the executive-control network (ECN); and the posterior IPL exhibited connections with the default-mode network (DMN). Compared with the controls, the AD patients demonstrated distinct disruptive patterns of the IPL subregional connectivity with these different networks (SMN, SN, ECN and DMN), which suggests the impairment of the functional integration in the IPL. Notably, we also observed that the IPL subregions showed increased connectivity with the posterior part of the DMN in AD patients, which potentially indicates a compensatory mechanism. Finally, these abnormal IPL functional connectivity changes were closely associated with cognitive performance. Collectively, we show that the subregions of the IPL present distinct functional connectivity patterns with various functional networks that are differentially impaired in AD patients. Our results also suggest that functional disconnection and compensation in the IPL may coexist in AD.

  5. Functionally distinct amygdala subregions identified using DTI and high-resolution fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderston, Nicholas L.; Schultz, Douglas H.; Hopkins, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Although the amygdala is often directly linked with fear and emotion, amygdala neurons are activated by a wide variety of emotional and non-emotional stimuli. Different subregions within the amygdala may be engaged preferentially by different aspects of emotional and non-emotional tasks. To test this hypothesis, we measured and compared the effects of novelty and fear on amygdala activity. We used high-resolution blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) imaging and streamline tractography to subdivide the amygdala into three distinct functional subunits. We identified a laterobasal subregion connected with the visual cortex that responds generally to visual stimuli, a non-projecting region that responds to salient visual stimuli, and a centromedial subregion connected with the diencephalon that responds only when a visual stimulus predicts an aversive outcome. We provide anatomical and functional support for a model of amygdala function where information enters through the laterobasal subregion, is processed by intrinsic circuits in the interspersed tissue, and is then passed to the centromedial subregion, where activation leads to behavioral output. PMID:25969533

  6. An analysis of the role of media in conflict escalation:

    OpenAIRE

    Boğa, Gözde; Boga, Gozde

    2006-01-01

    In 25-27 May 2005, a conference entitled “Ottoman Armenians During the Decline of the Empire: Issues of Scientific Responsibility and Democracy,” referred to as the “Armenian conference” in this thesis, was scheduled to be held at Bogaziçi University, Istanbul, Turkey. There were two conflict escalation periods, in May and September 2005 about the conference. Such conflict escalation periods strengthen the parties’ own understanding of the issue and context of conflict; thus, further demarcat...

  7. Outlook for Piedmont forests: a subregional report from the Southern Forest Futures Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert B. Rummer; Mae Lee Hafer

    2014-01-01

    The Piedmont, a complex physiographic subregion of the U.S. South, encompasses parts of Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama. Anticipating the future and analyzing what the interaction of future changes might mean for the forests of the Piedmont and the services they provide can improve decisions by resource managers and policymakers that have...

  8. Cannabis-related hippocampal volumetric abnormalities specific to subregions in dependent users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chye, Yann; Suo, Chao; Yücel, Murat; den Ouden, Lauren; Solowij, Nadia; Lorenzetti, Valentina

    2017-07-01

    Cannabis use is associated with neuroanatomical alterations in the hippocampus. While the hippocampus is composed of multiple subregions, their differential vulnerability to cannabis dependence remains unknown. The objective of the study is to investigate gray matter alteration in each of the hippocampal subregions (presubiculum, subiculum, cornu ammonis (CA) subfields CA1-4, and dentate gyrus (DG)) as associated with cannabis use and dependence. A total of 35 healthy controls (HC), 22 non-dependent (CB-nondep), and 39 dependent (CB-dep) cannabis users were recruited. We investigated group differences in hippocampal subregion volumes between HC, CB-nondep, and CB-dep users. We further explored the association between CB use variables (age of onset of regular use, monthly use, lifetime use) and hippocampal subregions in CB-nondep and CB-dep users separately. The CA1, CA2/3, CA4/DG, as well as total hippocampal gray matter were reduced in volume in CB-dep but not in CB-nondep users, relative to HC. The right CA2/3 and CA4/DG volumes were also negatively associated with lifetime cannabis use in CB-dep users. Our results suggest a regionally and dependence-specific influence of cannabis use on the hippocampus. Hippocampal alteration in cannabis users was specific to the CA and DG regions and confined to dependent users.

  9. Developmental Differences in Relations between Episodic Memory and Hippocampal Subregion Volume during Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggins, Tracy; Blankenship, Sarah L.; Mulligan, Elizabeth; Rice, Katherine; Redcay, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Episodic memory shows striking improvement during early childhood. However, neural contributions to these behavioral changes are not well understood. This study examined associations between episodic memory and volume of subregions (head, body, and tail) of the hippocampus--a structure known to support episodic memory in school-aged children and…

  10. Outlook for Mid-South forests: a subregional report from the Southern Forest Futures Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    James M. Guldin; Stephen Hallgren; James S. Crooks

    2015-01-01

    This report presents forecasts from the Southern Forest Futures Project that are specific to the Mid-South, which consists of four sections located within Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Texas: the Ozark-Ouachita Highlands, the Cross Timbers, the High Plains, and the West Texas Basin and Range. Ranging from Little Rock, AR to El Paso, TX, it is the most diverse subregion in...

  11. 76 FR 6491 - San Diego County Water Authority Subregional Natural Community Conservation Program/Habitat...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-04

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service San Diego County Water Authority Subregional Natural Community Conservation Program/Habitat Conservation Plan, San Diego and Riverside Counties, CA; Final Environmental Impact Statement and Habitat Conservation Plan AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of...

  12. Robust Intratumor Partitioning to Identify High-Risk Subregions in Lung Cancer: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jia; Gensheimer, Michael F.; Dong, Xinzhe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Rubin, Daniel L. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics Research), Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Napel, Sandy [Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Li, Ruijiang, E-mail: rli2@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: To develop an intratumor partitioning framework for identifying high-risk subregions from {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and computed tomography (CT) imaging and to test whether tumor burden associated with the high-risk subregions is prognostic of outcomes in lung cancer. Methods and Materials: In this institutional review board–approved retrospective study, we analyzed the pretreatment FDG-PET and CT scans of 44 lung cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. A novel, intratumor partitioning method was developed, based on a 2-stage clustering process: first at the patient level, each tumor was over-segmented into many superpixels by k-means clustering of integrated PET and CT images; next, tumor subregions were identified by merging previously defined superpixels via population-level hierarchical clustering. The volume associated with each of the subregions was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier analysis regarding its prognostic capability in predicting overall survival (OS) and out-of-field progression (OFP). Results: Three spatially distinct subregions were identified within each tumor that were highly robust to uncertainty in PET/CT co-registration. Among these, the volume of the most metabolically active and metabolically heterogeneous solid component of the tumor was predictive of OS and OFP on the entire cohort, with a concordance index or CI of 0.66-0.67. When restricting the analysis to patients with stage III disease (n=32), the same subregion achieved an even higher CI of 0.75 (hazard ratio 3.93, log-rank P=.002) for predicting OS, and a CI of 0.76 (hazard ratio 4.84, log-rank P=.002) for predicting OFP. In comparison, conventional imaging markers, including tumor volume, maximum standardized uptake value, and metabolic tumor volume using threshold of 50% standardized uptake value maximum, were not predictive of OS or OFP, with CI mostly below 0.60 (log-rank P>.05). Conclusion: We propose a robust

  13. An Intelligent System for Aggression De-escalation Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosse, T.; Gerritsen, C.; de Man, J.

    2016-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence techniques are increasingly being used to develop smart training applications for professionals in various domains. This paper presents an intelligent training system that enables professionals in the public domain to practice their aggression de-escalation skills. The system

  14. Les escales de Likert poden augmentar en sensibilitat?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafel Bisquerra Alzina

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available En les investigacions que utilitzen escales tipus Likert s’apliquen principalment escales de 5 punts, sense una fonamentació metodològica que ho justifiqui. La revisió de 3 conegudes revistes permet arribar a aquesta conclusió. Sembla que es fa així per tradició i perquè és difícil posar nom a més de cinc opcions de resposta. En aquest article es posa en qüestió aquesta tradició i s’aporten arguments per proposar altres alternatives. S’analitza la importància de millorar la sensibilitat de les escales augmentant les opcions de resposta; es recomana evitar l’ús de denominacions categòriques, que strictu sensu impedeix el seu ús com a escala d’interval ja que la converteix en nominal (categòrica; s’analitza el rebuig a valors extrems, etc. Com a conseqüència, es recomana la proposta en favor d’escales d’onze punts (de 0 a 10.

  15. Segmenting subregions of the human hippocampus on structural magnetic resonance image scans: An illustrated tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Marshall A.; Zeidman, Peter; Barry, Daniel N.; Williams, Elaine; Maguire, Eleanor A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The hippocampus plays a central role in cognition, and understanding the specific contributions of its subregions will likely be key to explaining its wide-ranging functions. However, delineating substructures within the human hippocampus in vivo from magnetic resonance image scans is fraught with difficulties. To our knowledge, the extant literature contains only brief descriptions of segmentation procedures used to delineate hippocampal subregions in magnetic resonance imaging/functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. Methods: Consequently, here we provide a clear, step-by-step and fully illustrated guide to segmenting hippocampal subregions along the entire length of the human hippocampus on 3T magnetic resonance images. Results: We give a detailed description of how to segment the hippocampus into the following six subregions: dentate gyrus/Cornu Ammonis 4, CA3/2, CA1, subiculum, pre/parasubiculum and the uncus. Importantly, this in-depth protocol incorporates the most recent cyto- and chemo-architectural evidence and includes a series of comprehensive figures which compare slices of histologically stained tissue with equivalent 3T images. Conclusion: As hippocampal subregion segmentation is an evolving field of research, we do not suggest this protocol is definitive or final. Rather, we present a fully explained and expedient method of manual segmentation which remains faithful to our current understanding of human hippocampal neuroanatomy. We hope that this ‘tutorial’-style guide, which can be followed by experts and non-experts alike, will be a practical resource for clinical and research scientists with an interest in the human hippocampus. PMID:28596993

  16. Episodic Social Stress-Escalated Cocaine Self-Administration: Role of Phasic and Tonic Corticotropin Releasing Factor in the Anterior and Posterior Ventral Tegmental Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyson, Christopher O.; Montagud-Romero, Sandra; Stein, Dirson J.; Gobrogge, Kyle L.; DeBold, Joseph F.; Miczek, Klaus A.

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent social defeat stress escalates later cocaine self-administration. Reward and stress both activate ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine neurons, increasing downstream extracellular dopamine concentration in the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. The stress neuropeptide corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) and its receptors (CRF-R1, CRF-R2) are located in the VTA and influence dopaminergic activity. These experiments explore how CRF release and the activation of its receptors within the VTA both during and after stress influence later cocaine self-administration in rats. In vivo microdialysis of CRF in the VTA demonstrated that CRF is phasically released in the posterior VTA (pVTA) during acute defeat, but, with repeated defeat, CRF is recruited into the anterior VTA (aVTA) and CRF tone is increased in both subregions. Intra-VTA antagonism of CRF-R1 in the pVTA and CRF-R2 in the aVTA during each social defeat prevented escalated cocaine self-administration in a 24 h “binge.” VTA CRF continues to influence cocaine seeking in stressed animals long after social defeat exposure. Unlike nonstressed controls, previously stressed rats show significant cocaine seeking after 15 d of forced abstinence. Previously stressed rats continue to express elevated CRF tone within the VTA and antagonism of pVTA CRF-R1 or aVTA CRF-R2 reverses cocaine seeking. In conclusion, these experiments demonstrate neuroadaptive changes in tonic and phasic CRF with repeated stress, that CRF release during stress may contribute to later escalated cocaine taking, and that persistently elevated CRF tone in the VTA may drive later cocaine seeking through increased activation of pVTA CRF-R1 and aVTA CRF-R2. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) within the ventral tegmental area (VTA) has emerged as a likely candidate molecule underlying the fundamental link between stress history and escalated drug self-administration. However, the nature of CRF

  17. 7 CFR 1726.251 - Prior approved contract modification related to price escalation on transmission equipment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... escalation on transmission equipment, generation equipment, and generation construction contracts. 1726.251 Section 1726.251 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES... escalation on transmission equipment, generation equipment, and generation construction contracts. (a...

  18. E4 - Energy efficient elevators and escalators. Barriers to and strategies for promoting energy-efficient lift and escalator technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duetschke, Elisabeth; Hirzel, Simon

    2010-02-25

    According to prior findings of the E4 project, considerable savings potential exists both for lifts and escalators that could be realized if appropriate technology is implemented. However, energy-efficient technology is slowly diffusing the market - a phenomenon that could be explained by barriers present in the market. A barrier is defined as a mechanism that inhibits a decision or behavior that appears to be both energy-efficient and economically efficient and thereby prevents investment in energy-efficient technologies. This document has two aims. First, it will identify influential barriers in the European lift and escalator market. This analysis is based on the literature as well as a study including interviews as well as group discussions with relevant stakeholders. Second, strategies and measures to overcome the barriers identified in the first step are outlined. Major barriers to the penetration of energy-efficient technologies identified in this paper include a lack of monitoring energy consumption of installations and a lack of awareness of as well as knowledge about energy-efficient technology. Thus, installations and components are usually chosen without a (comprehensive) assessment of their energy consumption and without considering life-cycle approaches. On top of this, split incentives are a regularly occurring barrier. Various stakeholders are influential in the decisionmaking process about an installation or its components. However, those who will later pay for the energy consumption often are not involved in this process. Moreover, it is important to keep in mind that the number of new lifts and escalators installed each year is relatively low compared to the existing stock. Thus, it is very important to discuss enhancement of energy efficiency also for the existing stock. Based on our analyses, several recommendations are developed in this paper that could contribute to a market transformation in the lift and escalator market. First of all, a

  19. De-escalation in mental health care settings: patient and staff member perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauge Berring, Lene; Pedersen, Liselotte; Buus, Niels

    2016-01-01

    This multiple case study explored de-escalation processes in threatening and violent situations based on patients and staff members perspectives. Our post hoc analysis indicated that de-escalation included responsive interactions influenced by the perspectives of both patients and staff members. ......-escalation can foster shared problem solving in violent and threatening situations....

  20. Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial of Clofarabine Followed by Escalating Doses of Fractionated Cyclophosphamide in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Disorders; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

  1. Efficacy and safety of rapid escalation of cabergoline in comparison to conventional regimen for macroprolactinoma: A prospective, randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashu Rastogi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cabergoline (CAB is conventionally started at a dose of 0.25-0.5 mg once a week with dose escalation at 1to 3months intervals. Previously, we and others have shown that rapid escalation and high doses of CAB can lead to normalization of serum PRL as early as 8.2 weeks in 93% of the patients. We hypothesize that rapid escalation of CAB doses, may help in both the earlier normalization of PRL and also significant shrinkage of tumor mass. Study Design: Randomized, prospective, interventional trial. Subjects and Methods: Forty two patients (male or female with macroprolactinoma were randomized to conventional (group A or rapid escalation (group B of CAB dosing. In group B, CAB was started at a dose of 0.5 mg twice a week followed by a weekly hike of 1 mg/week, based on serum PRL and then monthly. The end point of the present study was a composite of normoprolactinemia and tumor shrinkage ≥50% from baseline. PRL and visual field analysis (weekly, other hormonal work up periodically and magnetic resonance imaging (sella was performed monthly. Results: A total of 19 patients in each group completed a minimum follow-up of 6 months. There was a reduction of 72.7 ± 26.2% in group A and 84.1 ± 15.0 in group B (P = 0.24 within a week of CAB therapy. The duration of CAB treatment to normalize PRL was 10.2 ± 9.2 week(2-36 in group A and 7.2 ± 6.2 weeks(1-24 in group B (P = 0.28. There was no difference in the tumor shrinkage in either of the groups (92.3% [46.7-100%] in group A and 90.5% [66.6-100%] reduction in group B. The composite end point was achieved in 14 patients in group A (73.6% and 16 patients in group B (84.2% (P = 0.69. The composite end point was achieved in 13.1 ± 9.5 weeks (group A versus 16.5 ± 14.1 weeks (group B (P = 0.61. Discussion: This is first head to head comparative trial showing that a rapid hike of CAB dose is not associated with earlier normalization of PRL or reduction in tumor volume as compared to

  2. The influence of toxicity constraints in models of chemotherapeutic protocol escalation

    KAUST Repository

    Boston, E. A. J.

    2011-04-06

    The prospect of exploiting mathematical and computational models to gain insight into the influence of scheduling on cancer chemotherapeutic effectiveness is increasingly being considered. However, the question of whether such models are robust to the inclusion of additional tumour biology is relatively unexplored. In this paper, we consider a common strategy for improving protocol scheduling that has foundations in mathematical modelling, namely the concept of dose densification, whereby rest phases between drug administrations are reduced. To maintain a manageable scope in our studies, we focus on a single cell cycle phase-specific agent with uncomplicated pharmacokinetics, as motivated by 5-Fluorouracil-based adjuvant treatments of liver micrometastases. In particular, we explore predictions of the effectiveness of dose densification and other escalations of the protocol scheduling when the influence of toxicity constraints, cell cycle phase specificity and the evolution of drug resistance are all represented within the modelling. For our specific focus, we observe that the cell cycle and toxicity should not simply be neglected in modelling studies. Our explorations also reveal the prediction that dose densification is often, but not universally, effective. Furthermore, adjustments in the duration of drug administrations are predicted to be important, especially when dose densification in isolation does not yield improvements in protocol outcomes. © The author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications. All rights reserved.

  3. Deterrence Adrift Mapping Conflict and Escalation in South Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-21

    selective list of conflict flashpoints articulated in the document—namely, “ the unresolved issue of Kashmir , the violation of treaty arrangements on...between India and Pakistan spiked from 2014 through late 2015, meriting an analysis of how an armed conflict might un- fold between the two nuclear... The doctrine is premised on the assump- tion that India will be able to assert escalation control and prevent the ensuing conflict from spiraling out

  4. Macroscopic broadband optical escalator with force-loaded transformation optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dongliang; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Gao, Lei; Cui, Tiejun; Zhang, Shuang

    2013-01-14

    Transformation optics enables one to guide and control light at will using metamaterials. However the designed device is deterministic and not flexible for different objects. Based on force-loaded transformation optics we propose a force-induced transformational device, which can realize dynamic escalator metamorphosing continuously between optical elevator and invisibility cloak. This escalator can visually lift up and down the perceived height of a plane fixed in space by controlling the forces loaded in different directions. Or conversely, the escalator can physically lift up and down a plane while visually maintaining the same height to an outside observer. One can quickly adjust this device to the required demand without changing the background index, while the usual transformation cloak will be detectable due to the lateral shift from mismatched background. The schematic is self-adaptive, multi-functional, and free of metamaterial or nanofabrication. Our work opens a new perspective in controlling light dynamically and continuously, empowering unprecedented applications in military cloak, optic communication, holographic imaging, and phase-involved microtechnique.

  5. Learning to make collective decisions: the impact of confidence escalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi, Ali; Bang, Dan; Ahmadabadi, Majid Nili; Bahrami, Bahador

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about how people learn to take into account others' opinions in joint decisions. To address this question, we combined computational and empirical approaches. Human dyads made individual and joint visual perceptual decision and rated their confidence in those decisions (data previously published). We trained a reinforcement (temporal difference) learning agent to get the participants' confidence level and learn to arrive at a dyadic decision by finding the policy that either maximized the accuracy of the model decisions or maximally conformed to the empirical dyadic decisions. When confidences were shared visually without verbal interaction, RL agents successfully captured social learning. When participants exchanged confidences visually and interacted verbally, no collective benefit was achieved and the model failed to predict the dyadic behaviour. Behaviourally, dyad members' confidence increased progressively and verbal interaction accelerated this escalation. The success of the model in drawing collective benefit from dyad members was inversely related to confidence escalation rate. The findings show an automated learning agent can, in principle, combine individual opinions and achieve collective benefit but the same agent cannot discount the escalation suggesting that one cognitive component of collective decision making in human may involve discounting of overconfidence arising from interactions.

  6. Migration, Occupational Mobility, and Regional Escalators in Scotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten van Ham

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to unpick the complex relationship between an individual’s migration behaviour, their place of residence, and their occupational performance in the Scottish labour market between 1991 and 2001. We investigate whether Edinburgh has emerged as an occupational escalator region and whether individuals moving there experience more rapid upward occupational mobility than those living and moving elsewhere. Using country of birth, we also control for an individual’s propensity to make long distance moves during earlier periods of their life course. Using data from the Scottish Longitudinal Study, linking 1991 and 2001 individual census records, and logistic regressions, we show that those who migrate over long distances within or to Scotland are most likely to achieve upward occupational mobility. We also found that Edinburgh is by far the most important regional escalator in Scotland; those moving to Edinburgh are the most likely to experience upward occupational mobility from low to high occupational status jobs. This is an important finding as most of the literature on escalator regions focuses on international mega cities.

  7. Learning to make collective decisions: the impact of confidence escalation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mahmoodi

    Full Text Available Little is known about how people learn to take into account others' opinions in joint decisions. To address this question, we combined computational and empirical approaches. Human dyads made individual and joint visual perceptual decision and rated their confidence in those decisions (data previously published. We trained a reinforcement (temporal difference learning agent to get the participants' confidence level and learn to arrive at a dyadic decision by finding the policy that either maximized the accuracy of the model decisions or maximally conformed to the empirical dyadic decisions. When confidences were shared visually without verbal interaction, RL agents successfully captured social learning. When participants exchanged confidences visually and interacted verbally, no collective benefit was achieved and the model failed to predict the dyadic behaviour. Behaviourally, dyad members' confidence increased progressively and verbal interaction accelerated this escalation. The success of the model in drawing collective benefit from dyad members was inversely related to confidence escalation rate. The findings show an automated learning agent can, in principle, combine individual opinions and achieve collective benefit but the same agent cannot discount the escalation suggesting that one cognitive component of collective decision making in human may involve discounting of overconfidence arising from interactions.

  8. The effects of mortality salience on escalation of commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Chih-Long; Lin, Chun-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Based on propositions derived from terror management theory (TMT), the current study proposes that people who are reminded of their mortality exhibit a higher degree of self-justification behavior to maintain their self-esteem. For this reason, they could be expected to stick with their previous decisions and invest an increasing amount of resources in those decisions, despite the fact that negative feedback has clearly indicated that they might be on a course toward failure (i.e., "escalation of commitment"). Our experiment showed that people who were reminded of their mortality were more likely to escalate their level of commitment by maintaining their current course of action. Two imaginary scenarios were tested. One of the scenarios involved deciding whether to send additional troops into the battlefield when previous attempts had failed; the other involved deciding whether to continue developing an anti-radar fighter plane when the enemy had already developed a device to detect it. The results supported our hypothesis that mortality salience increases the tendency to escalate one's level of commitment.

  9. Subregional characterization of mesoscale eddies across the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Evan; Pascual, Ananda; Gaube, Peter; Ruiz, Simón; Pelegrí, Josep L.; Delepoulle, Antoine

    2017-04-01

    Horizontal and vertical motions associated with coherent mesoscale structures, including eddies and meanders, are responsible for significant global transports of many properties, including heat and mass. Mesoscale vertical fluxes also influence upper ocean biological productivity by mediating the supply of nutrients into the euphotic layer, with potential impacts on the global carbon cycle. The Brazil-Malvinas Confluence (BMC) is a western boundary current region in the South Atlantic with intense mesoscale activity. This region has an active role in the genesis and transformation of water masses and thus is a critical component of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. The collision between the Malvinas and Brazil Currents over the Patagonian shelf/slope creates an energetic front that translates offshore to form a vigorous eddy field. Recent improvements in gridded altimetric sea level anomaly fields allow us to track BMC mesoscale eddies with high spatial and temporal resolutions using an automated eddy tracker. We characterize the eddies across fourteen 5° × 5° subregions. Eddy-centric composites of tracers and geostrophic currents diagnosed from a global reanalysis of surface and in situ data reveal substantial subregional heterogeneity. The in situ data are also used to compute the evolving quasi-geostrophic vertical velocity (QG-ω) associated with each instantaneous eddy instance. The QG-ω eddy composites have the expected dipole patterns of alternating upwelling/downwelling, however, the magnitude and sign of azimuthally averaged vertical velocity varies among subregions. Maximum eddy values are found near fronts and sharp topographic gradients. In comparison with regional eddy composites, subregional composites provide refined information about mesoscale eddy heterogeneity.

  10. Active Contours for Multispectral Images With Non-Homogeneous Sub-Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-16

    that the derivative enhances noise. As a second-order derivative, the Laplacian is even more sensitive to noise. An alternative is convolving an image ...amount of memory significantly increases depending on the number of bands B and the resolution of image intensity ∆I. For example, a 24bit RGB image ...Active Contours for Multispectral Images with Non-homogeneous Sub-regions Wesley Snyder Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering North Carolina

  11. The Formation of the Eastern Africa Rabies Network: A Sub-Regional Approach to Rabies Elimination

    OpenAIRE

    Pieracci, Emily G.; Terence P. Scott; Andre Coetzer; Mwatondo Athman; Arithi Mutembei; Abraham Haile Kidane; Meseret Bekele; Girma Ayalew; Samson Ntegeyibizaza; Justine Assenga; Godson Markalio; Peninah Munyua; Louis H. Nel; Jesse Blanton

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: International rabies networks have been formed in many of the canine-rabies endemic regions around the world to create unified and directed regional approaches towards elimination. The aim of the first sub-regional Eastern Africa rabies network meeting, which included Kenya, Ethiopia, Tanzania, Rwanda, and Uganda, was to discuss how individual country strategies could be coordinated to address the unique challenges that are faced within the network. The Stepwise Approach towards Rab...

  12. Childhood maltreatment, psychopathology, and the development of hippocampal subregions during adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittle, Sarah; Simmons, Julian G; Hendriksma, Sylke; Vijayakumar, Nandita; Byrne, Michelle L; Dennison, Meg; Allen, Nicholas B

    2017-02-01

    It is well established that childhood maltreatment has a detrimental impact on the brain, particularly the hippocampus. However, the hippocampus is a functionally and structurally heterogeneous region, and little is known about how maltreatment might affect hippocampal subregion development throughout important periods of plasticity. This study investigated whether childhood maltreatment was associated with the development of hippocampal subregion volumes from early to late adolescence. It also investigated associations between onset of psychiatric disorder and hippocampal subregion volume development. One hundred and sixty-six (85 male) adolescents took part in three magnetic resonance imaging assessments during adolescence (mean age at each assessment: 12.79 [SD 0.43] years, 16.70 [SD 0.52] years, and 19.08 [SD 0.46] years), provided a self-report of childhood maltreatment, and were assessed for Axis I psychopathology. Childhood maltreatment was associated with the development of right total and left cornu ammonis 4 (CA4-DG) volumes from early to late adolescence. Early and late onset psychopathology was associated with the development of right presubiculum and right cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) volumes, respectively. Maltreatment findings appeared to be specific to males, whereas psychopathology findings appeared to be specific to females. These findings provide evidence for possible deleterious effects of childhood maltreatment and early onset psychiatric disorder on the development of different subregions of the hippocampus. Altered development of the right CA1, on the other hand, might precede the development of late-adolescent onset psychopathology. Our results highlight the importance of considering development in research examining associations between stress, mental illness, and hippocampal morphology.

  13. IMPLEMENTATION OF LOCAL AND SUB-REGIONAL AIRSPACE MANAGEMENT SUPPORTING SYSTEM IN UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandr Luppo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available 1024x768 The article is devoted to the analysis of possible LARA (local and sub-regional airspace management supporting system implementation in Ukraine. We tried to define the problems which might occur during the integration of the new system into the flexible use of Ukrainian airspace and what it may result in. Probable allocation of responsibilities among the state aviation bodies was made Normal 0 false false false

  14. Bimanual motor deficits in older adults predicted by diffusion tensor imaging metrics of corpus callosum subregions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbruyns, L; Gooijers, J; Caeyenberghs, K; Meesen, R L; Cuypers, K; Sisti, H M; Leemans, A; Swinnen, Stephan P

    2015-01-01

    Age-related changes in the microstructural organization of the corpus callosum (CC) may explain declines in bimanual motor performance associated with normal aging. We used diffusion tensor imaging in young (n = 33) and older (n = 33) adults to investigate the microstructural organization of seven specific CC subregions (prefrontal, premotor, primary motor, primary sensory, parietal, temporal and occipital). A set of bimanual tasks was used to assess various aspects of bimanual motor functioning: the Purdue Pegboard test, simultaneous and alternating finger tapping, a choice reaction time test and a complex visuomotor tracking task. The older adults showed age-related deficits on all measures of bimanual motor performance. Correlation analyses within the older group showed that white matter fractional anisotropy of the CC occipital region was associated with bimanual fine manipulation skills (Purdue Pegboard test), whereas better performance on the other bimanual tasks was related to higher fractional anisotropy in the more anterior premotor, primary motor and primary sensory CC subregions. Such associations were less prominent in the younger group. Our findings suggest that structural alterations of subregional callosal fibers may account for bimanual motor declines in normal aging.

  15. Plils: A Practical Indoor Localization System through Less Expensive Wireless Chips via Subregion Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaolong; Yang, Yifu; Cai, Jun; Deng, Yun; Yang, Junfeng; Zhou, Xinmin; Tan, Lina

    2018-01-12

    Reducing costs is a pragmatic method for promoting the widespread usage of indoor localization technology. Conventional indoor localization systems (ILSs) exploit relatively expensive wireless chips to measure received signal strength for positioning. Our work is based on a cheap and widely-used commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) wireless chip, i.e., the Nordic Semiconductor nRF24LE1, which has only several output power levels, and proposes a new power level based-ILS, called Plils. The localization procedure incorporates two phases: an offline training phase and an online localization phase. In the offline training phase, a self-organizing map (SOM) is utilized for dividing a target area into k subregions, wherein their grids in the same subregion have similar fingerprints. In the online localization phase, the support vector machine (SVM) and back propagation (BP) neural network methods are adopted to identify which subregion a tagged object is located in, and calculate its exact location, respectively. The reasonable value for k has been discussed as well. Our experiments show that Plils achieves 75 cm accuracy on average, and is robust to indoor obstacles.

  16. Multiscale regression model to infer historical temperatures in a central Mediterranean sub-regional area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diodato, N.; Bellocchi, G.; Bertolin, C.; Camuffo, D.

    2010-12-01

    To reconstruct sub-regional European climate over the past centuries, several efforts have been made using historical datasets. However, only scattered information at low spatial and temporal resolution have been produced to date for the Mediterranean area. This paper has exploited, for Southern and Central Italy (Mediterranean Sub-Regional Area), an unprecedented historical dataset as an attempt to model seasonal (winter and summer) air temperatures in pre-instrumental time (back to 1500). Combining information derived from proxy documentary data and large-scale simulation, a statistical methodology in the form of multiscale-temperature regression (MTR)-model was developed to adapt larger-scale estimations to the sub-regional temperature pattern. The modelled response lacks essentially of autocorrelations among the residuals (marginal or any significance in the Durbin-Watson statistic), and agrees well with the independent data from the validation sample (Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient >0.60). The advantage of the approach is not merely increased accuracy in estimation. Rather, it relies on the ability to extract (and exploit) the right information to replicate coherent temperature series in historical times.

  17. Climatology and trend analysis of extreme precipitation in subregions of Northeast Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, P. T.; Santos e Silva, C. M.; Lima, K. C.

    2017-10-01

    The present paper aims of computing climatology and trend analysis of occurrence and intensity of extreme events of precipitation in subregions of Northeast Brazil (NEB). We used daily rainfall data of 148 rain gauges collected from the hydrometeorological network managed by the National Water Agency during 1972 to 2002 and used quantiles technique in order to select rainfall events. Defining heavy rainfall events as those when at least one rain gauge recorded rainfall above the 95th percentile, normal rainfall was between the 45th and 55th percentiles, and weak rainfall events were under the 5th percentile. The Mann-Kendall nonparametric test was used to calculate the linear trend of the quantity and intensity of rainfall events. The NEB was divided in five subregions using the cluster analysis based on Euclidean distance and Ward's method: Northern coast, Northern semiarid, Northwest, Southern semiarid, and Southern coast. The results suggest that the subregions are less influenced by El Niño and La Niña, and dry areas have higher variability, with the greatest number of intense events.

  18. Monthly urban (municipal and industrial use) pumpage for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM) by Water Balance Subregion (WBS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset contains the monthly urban (municipal and industrial use) pumpage for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM) by Water Balance Subregion...

  19. A Simulation Study Reveals Lack of Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Target Attainment in De-escalated Antibiotic Therapy in Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, Mieke; Roberts, Jason A; Stove, Veronique; Verstraete, Alain G; Lipman, Jeffrey; De Waele, Jan J

    2015-08-01

    De-escalation of empirical antibiotic therapy is often included in antimicrobial stewardship programs in critically ill patients, but differences in target attainment when antibiotics are switched are rarely considered. The primary objective of this study was to compare the fractional target attainments of contemporary dosing of empirical broad-spectrum β-lactam antibiotics and narrower-spectrum antibiotics for a number pathogens for which de-escalation may be considered. The secondary objective was to determine whether alternative dosing strategies improve target attainment. We performed a simulation study using published population pharmacokinetic (PK) studies in critically ill patients for a number of broad-spectrum β-lactam antibiotics and narrower-spectrum antibiotics. Simulations were undertaken using a data set obtained from critically ill patients with sepsis without absolute renal failure (n = 49). The probability of target attainment of antibiotic therapy for different microorganisms for which de-escalation was applied was analyzed. EUCAST MIC distribution data were used to calculate fractional target attainment. The probability that therapeutic exposure will be achieved was lower for the narrower-spectrum antibiotics with conventional dosing than for the broad-spectrum alternatives and could drastically be improved with higher dosages and different modes of administrations. For a selection of microorganisms, the probability that therapeutic exposure will be achieved was overall lower for the narrower-spectrum antibiotics using conventional dosing than for the broad-spectrum antibiotics. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Functional connectivity of paired default mode network subregions in primary insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nie X

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Xiao Nie,1,* Yi Shao,2,* Si-yu Liu,3 Hai-jun Li,1 Ai-lan Wan,4 Si Nie,1 De-chang Peng,1 Xi-jian Dai1,5 1Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nangchang, Jiangxi, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Ophthalmology,The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nangchang, Jiangxi, People’s Republic of China; 3Medical College of Nanchang University, Nangchang, Jiangxi, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nangchang, Jiangxi, People’s Republic of China; 5Brain Cognition and Brain Disease Institute, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: The aim of this study is to explore the resting-state functional connectivity (FC differences between the paired default mode network (DMN subregions in patients with primary insomnia (PIs.Methods: Forty-two PIs and forty-two age- and sex-matched good sleepers (GSs were recruited. All subjects underwent the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. The seed-based region-to-region FC method was used to evaluate the abnormal connectivity within the DMN subregions between the PIs and the GSs. Pearson correlation analysis was used to investigate the relationships between the abnormal FC strength within the paired DMN subregions and the clinical features in PIs.Results: Compared with the GSs, the PIs showed higher Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale score, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score, Self-Rating Depression Scale score, Self Rating Anxiety Scale score, Self-Rating Scale of Sleep score, and Profile of Mood States score (P<0.001. Compared with the GSs, the PIs showed significant decreased region-to-region FC between the medial prefrontal cortex and the right medial temporal lobe (t=-2.275, P

  1. Chronic escalating cocaine exposure, abstinence/withdrawal, and chronic re-exposure: Effects on striatal dopamine and opioid systems in C57BL/6J mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Schlussman, Stefan D.; Rabkin, Jacqui; Butelman, Eduardo R.; Ho, Ann; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is a chronic relapsing disease with periods of chronic escalating self-exposure, separated by periods of abstinence/withdrawal of varying duration. Few studies compare such cycles in preclinical models. This study models an “addiction-like cycle” in mice to determine neurochemical/molecular alterations that underlie the chronic, relapsing nature of this disease. Groups of male C57BL/6J mice received acute cocaine exposure (14-day saline/14-day withdrawal /13-day saline + 1-day cocaine), chronic cocaine exposure (14 day cocaine) or chronic re-exposure (14-day cocaine/14-day withdrawal /14-day cocaine). Escalating-dose binge cocaine (15-30 mg/kg/injection x 3/day, i.p. at hourly intervals) or saline (14-day saline) was administered, modeling initial exposure. In “re-exposure” groups, after a 14-day injection-free period (modeling abstinence/withdrawal), mice that had received cocaine were re-injected with 14-day escalating-dose binge cocaine, whereas controls received saline. Microdialysis was conducted on the 14th day of exposure or re-exposure to determine striatal dopamine content. Messenger RNA levels of preprodynorphin (Pdyn), dopamine D1 (Drd1) and D2 (Drd2) in the caudate putamen were determined by real-time PCR. Basal striatal dopamine levels were lower in mice after 14-day escalating exposure or re-exposure than in those in the acute cocaine group and controls. Pdyn mRNA levels were higher in the cocaine groups than in controls. Long-term adaptation was observed across the stages of this addiction-like cycle, in that the effects of cocaine on dopamine levels were increased after re-exposure compared to exposure. Changes in striatal dopaminergic responses across chronic escalating cocaine exposure and re-exposure are a central feature of the neurobiology of relapsing addictive states. PMID:23164614

  2. SU-D-202-01: Functional Lung Avoidance and Response-Adaptive Escalation (FLARE) RT: Feasibility of a Precision Radiation Oncology Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowen, S; Lee, E; Miyaoka, R; Kinahan, P; Sandison, G; Vesselle, H; Rengan, R; Zeng, J [University of Washington, School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States); Saini, J; Wong, T [SCCA Proton Therapy Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: NSCLC patient RT is planned without consideration of spatial heterogeneity in lung function or tumor response, which may have contributed to failed uniform dose escalation in a randomized trial. The feasibility of functional lung avoidance and response-adaptive escalation (FLARE) RT to reduce dose to [{sup 99m}Tc]MAA-SPECT/CT perfused lung while redistributing 74Gy within [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET/CT biological target volumes was assessed. Methods: Eight Stage IIB–IIIB NSCLC patients underwent FDG-PET/CT and MAA-SPECT/CT treatment planning scans. Perfused lung objectives were derived from scatter/collimator/attenuation-corrected MAA-SPECT uptake relative to ITV-subtracted lung to maintain <20Gy mean lung dose (MLD). Prescriptions included 60Gy to PTV and concomitant boost of 74Gy mean to biological target volumes (BTV=GTV+PET margin) scaled to each BTV voxel by relative FDG-PET SUV. Dose-painting-by-numbers prescriptions were integrated into commercial TPS via previously reported ROI discretization. Dose constraints for lung, heart, cord, and esophagus were defined. FLARE RT plans were optimized with VMAT, proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) with 3%-3mm robust optimization, and combination PBS (avoidance) plus VMAT (escalation). Dosimetric differences were evaluated by Friedman non-parametric paired test with multiple sampling correction. Results: PTV and normal tissue objectives were not violated in 24 FLARE RT plans. Population median of mean BTV dose was 73.7Gy (68.5–75.5Gy), mean FDG-PET peak dose was 89.7Gy (73.5–103Gy), MLD was 12.3Gy (7.5–19.6Gy), and perfused MLD was 4.8Gy (0.9–12.1Gy). VMAT achieved higher dose to the FDG-PET peak subvolume (p=0.01), while PBS delivered lower dose to lung (p<0.001). Voxelwise linear correlation between BTV dose and FDG-PET uptake was higher for VMAT (R=0.93) and PBS+VMAT (R=0.94) compared to PBS alone (R=0.89). Conclusion: FLARE RT is feasible with VMAT and PBS. A combination of PBS for functional lung avoidance

  3. Predictors of effective de-escalation in acute inpatient psychiatric settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Mary; Stewart, Duncan; James, Karen; Richardson, Michelle; Renwick, Laoise; Brennan, Geoffrey; Bowers, Len

    2016-08-01

    To explore the factors that influence the use of de-escalation and its success in halting conflict in acute psychiatric inpatient setting. De-escalation is the use of verbal and nonverbal communication to reduce or eliminate aggression and violence during the escalation phase of a patient's behaviour. Although de-escalation is a first-line intervention in aggression management in acute psychiatric settings, little is known about the use or effectiveness of this technique. A retrospective case note analysis. For each patient (n = 522), their involvement in conflict (e.g. aggression) or containment (e.g. coerced medication) during the first two weeks of their admission was recorded. The frequency and order of the conflict and containment events were identified during each shift. The sequences of events occurring in shifts involving de-escalation were analysed. Sequences where de-escalation ended the pattern of conflict or containment were categorised as 'successful', and all others were categorised as 'unsuccessful'. Over half of patients (53%) experienced de-escalation during the first two weeks of admission, with the majority of these (37%) experiencing multiple episodes. De-escalation was successful in approximately 60% of cases. Successful de-escalations were preceded by fewer, and less aggressive, conflict events, compared with unsuccessful de-escalations, which were most frequently followed by administration of pro re nata medication. Patients with a history of violence were more likely to experience de-escalation, and it was more likely to be unsuccessful. De-escalation is frequently effective in halting a sequence of conflict in acute inpatient settings, but patients with a history of violence may be specifically challenging. These findings provide support for de-escalation in practice but suggest that nurses may lack confidence in using the technique when the risk of violence is greater. Providing evidence-based staff training may improve staff confidence

  4. Sustained effect after lowering high-dose infliximab in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a prospective dose titration study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemt, B.J. van den; Broeder, AA den; Snijders, G.F.; Hekster, Y.A.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Benraad, B.; Wolbink, G.J.; Hoogen, F.H.J. van den

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In clinical trials only a small subset of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) benefits from higher than standard dose of infliximab (>3 mg/kg/8 weeks). However, dose escalation of infliximab is frequently applied in clinical practice. Individual adjustment of infliximab treatment

  5. Predicting Responses to Bids for Sexual and Romantic Escalation in Cross-Sex Friendships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbulut, Valerie; Weger, Harry

    2016-01-01

    The transition from a platonic cross-sex friendship to a more intimate sexual and/or romantic relationship is an interesting, yet somewhat understudied, phenomenon. In this study, we introduce and test relationship adaptation theory to predict cross-sex friends' predispositions for reciprocating a bid for escalation to an exclusive dating or friends with benefits (FWB) relationship. Analyses of data collected from 288 participants found participants' dating status, anticipated rewards from escalating the relationship, expected social disapproval, friendship quality, and their friend's attractiveness predicted disposition to reciprocating a cross-sex friend's hypothetical bid for escalation to an exclusive romantic escalation. In addition, participants' biological sex, anticipated rewards from escalating the relationship, expected social disapproval, sexual permissiveness, and their friend's attractiveness emerged as predictors of disposition toward a friend's hypothetical bid to escalate a platonic friendship to a FWB relationship.

  6. Interior region-of-interest reconstruction using a small, nearly piecewise constant subregion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Xu, Jingyan; Srivastava, Somesh; Tsui, Benjamin M W; Cammin, Jochen; Tang, Qiulin

    2011-03-01

    To develop a method to reconstruct an interior region-of-interest (ROI) image with sufficient accuracy that uses differentiated backprojection (DBP) projection onto convex sets (POCS) [H. Kudo et al., "Tiny a priori knowledge solves the interior problem in computed tomography," Phys. Med. Biol. 53, 2207-2231 (2008)] and a tiny knowledge that there exists a nearly piecewise constant subregion. The proposed method first employs filtered backprojection to reconstruct an image on which a tiny region P with a small variation in the pixel values is identified inside the ROI. Total variation minimization [H. Yu and G. Wang, "Compressed sensing based interior tomography," Phys. Med. Biol. 54, 2791-2805 (2009); W. Han et al., "A general total variation minimization theorem for compressed sensing based interior tomography," Int. J. Biomed. Imaging 2009, Article 125871 (2009)] is then employed to obtain pixel values in the subregion P, which serve as a priori knowledge in the next step. Finally, DBP-POCS is performed to reconstruct f(x,y) inside the ROI. Clinical data and the reconstructed image obtained by an x-ray computed tomography system (SOMATOM Definition; Siemens Healthcare) were used to validate the proposed method. The detector covers an object with a diameter of approximately 500 mm. The projection data were truncated either moderately to limit the detector coverage to Ø 350 mm of the object or severely to cover Ø199 mm. Images were reconstructed using the proposed method. The proposed method provided ROI images with correct pixel values in all areas except near the edge of the ROI. The coefficient of variation, i.e., the root mean square error divided by the mean pixel values, was less than 2.0% or 4.5% with the moderate or severe truncation cases, respectively, except near the boundary of the ROI. The proposed method allows for reconstructing interior ROI images with sufficient accuracy with a tiny knowledge that there exists a nearly piecewise constant

  7. Subregional Hippocampal Morphology and Psychiatric Outcome in Adolescents Who Were Born Very Preterm and at Term.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H Cole

    Full Text Available The hippocampus has been reported to be structurally and functionally altered as a sequel of very preterm birth (<33 weeks gestation, possibly due its vulnerability to hypoxic-ischemic damage in the neonatal period. We examined hippocampal volumes and subregional morphology in very preterm born individuals in mid- and late adolescence and their association with psychiatric outcome.Structural brain magnetic resonance images were acquired at two time points (baseline and follow-up from 65 ex-preterm adolescents (mean age = 15.5 and 19.6 years and 36 term-born controls (mean age=15.0 and 19.0 years. Hippocampal volumes and subregional morphometric differences were measured from manual tracings and with three-dimensional shape analysis. Psychiatric outcome was assessed with the Rutter Parents' Scale at baseline, the General Health Questionnaire at follow-up and the Peters Delusional Inventory at both time points.In contrast to previous studies we did not find significant difference in the cross-sectional or longitudinal hippocampal volumes between individuals born preterm and controls, despite preterm individual having significantly smaller whole brain volumes. Shape analysis at baseline revealed subregional deformations in 28% of total bilateral hippocampal surface, reflecting atrophy, in ex-preterm individuals compared to controls, and in 22% at follow-up. In ex-preterm individuals, longitudinal changes in hippocampal shape accounted for 11% of the total surface, while in controls they reached 20%. In the whole sample (both groups larger right hippocampal volume and bilateral anterior surface deformations at baseline were associated with delusional ideation scores at follow-up.This study suggests a dynamic association between cross-sectional hippocampal volumes, longitudinal changes and surface deformations and psychosis proneness.

  8. Rural Livelihoods, Climate Change and Micro-Level Adaptive Capacity in the Greater Mekong Subregion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiao, Xi

    The Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) is one of the fastest developing regions in the world, experiencing significant economic, environmental and social transformations. There is an increasing demand for policy relevant and decision support information at micro level. This PhD research contributes...... and Laos, two of the poorest countries in the GMS. Structured household surveys and participatory focus group discussions were the primary data collection methods. The findings provide new, additional and much needed quantitative information in the region, and several policy implications for rural...

  9. El tratamiento migratorio en los espacios de integración subregional sudamericana

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Martínez Pizarro; María Fernanda Stang

    2006-01-01

    El artículo presenta una síntesis de las iniciativas destinadas al tratamiento de la migración internacional en la Comunidad Andina de Naciones y el Mercado Común del Sur. Se examinan las relaciones de la migración con la integración subregional, a partir de la consideración de algunas ideas fuerza y del examen de las iniciativas llevadas a cabo recientemente en ambos bloques. Luego se presenta la evolución de los intercambios migratorios en cada uno de ellos, para exponer post...

  10. Influence of Sociocultural Practices on Food and Nutrition Security in Karamoja Subregion of Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggaga, C; Ongeng, D; Mugonola, B; Okello-Uma, I; Kaaya, N A; Taylor, D

    2017-01-01

    The study determined the influence of sociocultural practices on food and nutrition security of children and women in Karamoja subregion, located in northeastern Uganda. Sixteen focus group discussions were conducted among 133 participants. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Findings indicate that cultural norms, myths, and taboos restrict consumption of animal-sourced foods and some green vegetables by women. Sociocultural practices promoted prelacteal feeding, affecting the implementation of World Health Organization's recommendations for exclusive breast feeding. In conclusion, sociocultural practices influence food and nutrition security, exposing women and children to the risk of malnutrition and associated consequences.

  11. Nuclear Weapons and Coercive Escalation in Regional Conflicts: Lessons from North Korea and Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Daniel S. Geller . “Nuclear Weapons, Deterrence and Crisis Escalation.” Journal of Conflict Resolution 34 (1990). 17 “Nuclear Weapons, Deterrence... Geller , “Nuclear Weapons, Deterrence and Crisis Escalation,” 1990. 21 Beardsley and Asal, “Winning with the Bomb,” 2009. 22 Utgoff and Wheeler...After Proliferation: Deterrence Theory and Emerging Nuclear Powers,” 2012, 18. 25 Geller , “Nuclear Weapons, Deterrence and Crisis Escalation,” 1990

  12. El proyecto subregional cono sur de control y vigilancia de la hidatidosis The southern cone sub-regional project on cystic echinococosis control and surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Irabedra

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available El Proyecto Subregional Cono Sur de Control y Vigilancia de la Hidatidosis: Argentina, Brasil, Chile y Uruguay, es una herramienta conjunta y colaborativa de los países para promover la implantación o el fortalecimiento de los programas de control. Se hace una descripción de los antecedentes, de los aspectos institucionales que regulan su organicidad y funcionamiento y de las líneas de acción definidas en el proyecto técnico operativo. Se destaca los logros obtenidos a través de los Proyectos de Cooperación Técnica entre Países así como el desarrollo de enfoques integrales e innovadores y la formación de recursos humanos de los programas de control. Algunos de los desafíos futuros son: lograr la sustentabilidad del Proyecto, implementar los grupos técnicos de análisis y evaluación a solicitud de los países, mejorar los sistemas de información regionales, continuar las actividades de capacitación y entrenamiento de recursos humanos y la expansión y fortalecimiento de la cooperación técnica entre países.Southern Cone Sub-Regional Project on Cystic Echinococcosis Control and Surveillance: Argentina, Brasil, Chile and Uruguay, is a joint and collaborative tool with the aim of promoting the implementation or the strengthening of programs for disease control. The paper describes the background, the institutional aspects that regulates the structure and functions, as well as the guidelines defined in the technical and operational project. The article emphasize the achievements through Projects of Technical Cooperation among Countries, and the development of integrated and innovative approaches for prevention and control of the disease and training of human resources of the control programs. Some of the challenges are: to achieve the sustainability of the project, implementation of technical groups for analysis and assessment at request of the countries, improvement of the regional information systems, to continue training human

  13. The diversity of life expectancy in selected subregions of Silesia voivodeship and the quality of air between 2008 and 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Korczyńska

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The studies of life expectancy diversity of subregions in Silesia voivodeship are complemented with an important information on health inequalities. Air quality impact can not be excluded from the potential determinants of this diversity. The aim of the study is to provide an answer whether diversity of life expectancy (LE in selected subregions in Silesia voivodeship at the time of birth (LE0+ and over 65 years of age (LE65+ corresponds with the data on air pollution recorded for the years between 2008 and 2012. Material and methods. Data was collected on life expectancy 0+ (LE0+ and life expectancy 65+ (LE65+ for 2012 for the population in three subregions (Central Statistical Office – CSO. The analysis included three subregions: the best (bielski subregion, average (katowicki, and the worst (rybnicki of air quality defined by annual average concentrations of gaseous and particulate pollutants (Regional Inspectorate of Environmental Protection – RIEP, between 2008 and 2012. Then the LE was correlated with the average area pollution levels between 2008 and 2012. Results. Results of the study show diversity of LE in subregions. The lowest values LE0+ and LE65+ in 2012 were for males (70.1 and 14.8 years and for females (78.7 and 18.6 years in katowicki subregion. The highest LE0+ and LE65+ was observed for males (73.2 and 15.4 years and females (80.9 and 19.5 years in bielski subregion. Annual average area concentrations of air pollutants in subregions bielski, rybnicki and katowicki were: for PM10 42.1, 64.1 and 51 µg/m3 respectively; for PM2.5 36.8, 39 and 32.3 µg/m3 respectively; for benzo(apyrene 7.4, 13.4 and 7.6 ng/m3respectively. Conclusions. The relationship between life expectancy and air quality doesn’t provide an unambiguous answer whether LE is structured by various factors, such as a level of income available medical infrastructure and lifestyle.

  14. A new breast cancer risk analysis approach using features extracted from multiple sub-regions on bilateral mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenqing; Tseng, Tzu-Liang B.; Zheng, Bin; Zhang, Jianying; Qian, Wei

    2015-03-01

    A novel breast cancer risk analysis approach is proposed for enhancing performance of computerized breast cancer risk analysis using bilateral mammograms. Based on the intensity of breast area, five different sub-regions were acquired from one mammogram, and bilateral features were extracted from every sub-region. Our dataset includes 180 bilateral mammograms from 180 women who underwent routine screening examinations, all interpreted as negative and not recalled by the radiologists during the original screening procedures. A computerized breast cancer risk analysis scheme using four image processing modules, including sub-region segmentation, bilateral feature extraction, feature selection, and classification was designed to detect and compute image feature asymmetry between the left and right breasts imaged on the mammograms. The highest computed area under the curve (AUC) is 0.763 ± 0.021 when applying the multiple sub-region features to our testing dataset. The positive predictive value and the negative predictive value were 0.60 and 0.73, respectively. The study demonstrates that (1) features extracted from multiple sub-regions can improve the performance of our scheme compared to using features from whole breast area only; (2) a classifier using asymmetry bilateral features can effectively predict breast cancer risk; (3) incorporating texture and morphological features with density features can boost the classification accuracy.

  15. Volumetric variation in subregions of the cerebellum correlates with working memory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hui; Qin, Wen; Jiang, Tianzi; Zhang, Yunting; Yu, Chunshui

    2012-02-02

    We aimed to investigate the relationship between structural variations in the cerebellum and individual differences in working memory performance as assessed by average reaction time (RT) and correction rate (CR) on a 3-back task. High-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were acquired in 311 healthy young adults. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was used to identify cerebellar areas with volumes correlated to working memory performance when controlling for age, gender, years of education and handedness. We found that RT was positively correlated with the grey matter volume (GMV) bilaterally in cerebellar lobules IV/V, VI and VIII, in vermis VII/VIII and in left Crus I; CR was positively correlated with the GMV in the left lobule VI and Crus I. These findings suggest that RT on a working memory task is related to structural variation in both motor and cognitive subregions of the cerebellum, while CR is mainly associated with the cognitive subregions. Our findings provide further evidence that the cerebellum contributes to working memory function. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Associations Between Cerebellar Subregional Morphometry and Alcoholism History in Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Kayle S; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Mosher Ruiz, Susan; Gálvez, Daniel A; Makris, Nikos; Harris, Gordon J; Valera, Eve M

    2016-06-01

    Alcoholism has been linked to deficits in cognitive, behavioral, and emotional functions, and the cerebellum is important for optimal functioning of these abilities. However, little is known about how individual differences such as gender and drinking history might influence regional cerebellar abnormalities. Volumetric analyses of the cerebellum and its subregions were performed in relation to the interaction of gender and measures of drinking history. Structural magnetic resonance imaging scans of 44 alcoholic individuals (23 men) and 39 nonalcoholic controls (18 men) were obtained. In addition to measuring total cerebellar gray and white matter volumes, we measured 64 individual cerebellar parcellation units, as well as functionally defined a priori regions of interest that have been shown to correspond to functions impaired in alcoholism. Total cerebellar white matter volume was smaller in alcoholic relative to nonalcoholic participants. Moreover, volumes of parcellation units varied with drinking history, showing negative associations between years of heavy drinking and the anterior lobe, the vestibulocerebellar lobe, and the spinocerebellar subdivision. The negative association between anterior volume and years of heavy drinking was driven primarily by alcoholic men. Additionally, we observed larger white and gray matter volumes for alcoholic women than for alcoholic men. The identification of drinking-related abnormalities in cerebellar subregions lays a foundation that can be utilized to inform how cerebro-cerebellar networks are perturbed in this pathological condition. These results also provide estimates of how gender and individual differences in drinking history can predict cerebellar volumes. Copyright © 2016 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  17. Efficient Iris Recognition Based on Optimal Subfeature Selection and Weighted Subregion Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose three discriminative feature selection strategies and weighted subregion matching method to improve the performance of iris recognition system. Firstly, we introduce the process of feature extraction and representation based on scale invariant feature transformation (SIFT in detail. Secondly, three strategies are described, which are orientation probability distribution function (OPDF based strategy to delete some redundant feature keypoints, magnitude probability distribution function (MPDF based strategy to reduce dimensionality of feature element, and compounded strategy combined OPDF and MPDF to further select optimal subfeature. Thirdly, to make matching more effective, this paper proposes a novel matching method based on weighted sub-region matching fusion. Particle swarm optimization is utilized to accelerate achieve different sub-region’s weights and then weighted different subregions’ matching scores to generate the final decision. The experimental results, on three public and renowned iris databases (CASIA-V3 Interval, Lamp, andMMU-V1, demonstrate that our proposed methods outperform some of the existing methods in terms of correct recognition rate, equal error rate, and computation complexity.

  18. Push and pull factors determing wine tourism development in the 'Tri Morave' sub-region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović-Tončev Melita

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this paper are the factors affecting the decision of wine tourists to take a trip to a particular destination. These factors can be divided into internal (push and external (pull factors. The purpose of this study is to determine the development potential as well as the factors that influence participation in wine tourism in Tri Morave sub-region. In order to do that, two researches were conducted: one on the offer side and another on the demand side. Based on the results of the survey on the offer side, one can conclude that Tri Morave sub-region abounds in natural and anthropological resources that should be turned into an integrated wine product. On the other hand, research concerning tourist demand was conducted by polling winery visitors. The obtained data confirms assumptions about the appearance of modern tourists seeking authentic experience, satisfaction of hedonistic needs, and enjoyment of high-quality wine and food. Based on the results of the survey, the purchase of wine and wine tasting are the highest ranked benefits that tourists expect from visits to wineries. The application of Spearman's correlation coefficient points to statistically significant correlation between respondents, who referred to tasting, wine purchase, and authentic tourist experience as the basic motives of their visit, and future behavior of tourists in terms of revisiting and recommendations of the given wine destination to friends.

  19. Subregional Shape Alterations in the Amygdala in Patients with Panic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Geon Ha; Kang, Hee Jin; Kim, Bori R.; Jeon, Saerom; Im, Jooyeon Jamie; Hyun, Heejung; Moon, Sohyeon; Lim, Soo Mee; Lyoo, In Kyoon

    2016-01-01

    Background The amygdala has been known to play a pivotal role in mediating fear-related responses including panic attacks. Given the functionally distinct role of the amygdalar subregions, morphometric measurements of the amygdala may point to the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying panic disorder. The current study aimed to determine the global and local morphometric alterations of the amygdala related to panic disorder. Methods Volumetric and surface-based morphometric approach to high-resolution three-dimensional T1-weighted images was used to examine the structural variations of the amygdala, with respect to extent and location, in 23 patients with panic disorder and 31 matched healthy individuals. Results There were no significant differences in bilateral amygdalar volumes between patients with panic disorder and healthy individuals despite a trend-level right amygdalar volume reduction related to panic disorder (right, β = -0.23, p = 0.09, Cohen's d = 0.51; left, β = -0.18, p = 0.19, Cohen's d = 0.45). Amygdalar subregions were localized into three groups including the superficial, centromedial, and laterobasal groups based on the cytoarchitectonically defined probability map. Surface-based morphometric analysis revealed shape alterations in the laterobasal and centromedial groups of the right amygdala in patients with panic disorder (false discovery rate corrected p panic disorder, which may be attributed to the cause or effects of amygdalar hyperactivation. PMID:27336300

  20. Lightning fatalities in the Transkei sub-region of South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meel, B L

    2007-04-01

    Lightning is a particularly unsettling product of bad weather. It kills more people than other natural disasters such as floods, hurricanes, and tornadoes, but, because lightning usually kills people one at a time, it tends to be an underrated hazard. High risk groups are uneducated, unsheltered and rural people. This study was carried out to determine the incidence of lightning fatalities in the Transkei sub-region. It is a review of records between 1993 and 2004 from the medico-legal autopsies at Umtata General Hospital (UGH). During the study period there were 10,860 autopsies performed on those who died of trauma and other unnatural circumstances which included 151 (1.4%) lightning fatalities. This represents 0.31 deaths per million per year. The highest (0.5/million) was in 1999, and the lowest (0.13/million) in 1997. The age of the victims ranged from 1 to 82 years, with a mean of 22 years. Males and females were almost equally represented (50%). The highest number of deaths (26.5%) was in the age group of 11 to 20 years, and the lowest number (2.7%) in the age group of 70+ years. There is a high incidence of lightning fatalities in the Transkei sub-region of South Africa. People need to be educated to disregard the myths of lightning strike.

  1. Population Pharmacokinetics of Morphine and Morphine-6-Glucuronide following Rectal Administration -A Dose Escalation Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brokjær, Anne; Kreilgaard, Mads; Olesen, Anne Estrup

    2014-01-01

    data. Systemic PK parameters were allometric scaled with body weight. The mean morphine absorption transit time was 0.6 hours, clearance 78 L/h [relative standard error (RSE) 12%] and absolute bioavailability 24% (RSE 11%). To obtain clinically relevant serum concentrations, simulations revealed...

  2. Prostate Dose Escalation by a Innovative Inverse Planning-Driven IMRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    Improving Tracking of Implanted Radio-Opaque Markers On MV and KV Imaging with Techniques From Computer Vision and Machine Learning, 2008 Annual...encountered in CBCT (19). Another issue is the pro- vision of an appropriate electron density calibration; large variations of HU were observed for...Intrathoracic tumour motion estimation from CT imaging using the 3D optical flow method. Phys Med Biol 2004;49:4147–4161.31. Camara O, Colliot O, Delso G, et

  3. Correction: Image guided dose escalated prostate radiotherapy: still room to improve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milosevic Michael

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We regret to report that a proofreading error caused an incorrect legend and description of the contents of table 6 to appear in our original publication of this work. The correct description of table 6 is: Univariate analysis of prognostic factors for 5-year nadir + 2 biochemical outcome for men presenting with intermediate risk factors.

  4. A Dose Escalation Study in Adult Patients With Advanced Solid Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-09

    Advanced Solid Tumors With Alterations of FGFR1, 2 and or 3; Squamous Lung Cancer With FGFR1 Amplification; Bladder Cancer With FGFR3 Mutation or Fusion; Advanced Solid Tumors With FGFR1 Amplication; Advanced Solid Tumors With FGFR2 Amplication; Advanced Solid Tumors With FGFR3 Mutation

  5. Dose-Effect Relationship in Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Anders; Ploen, John; Vuong, Té

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Locally advanced rectal cancer represents a major therapeutic challenge. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy is considered standard, but little is known about the dose-effect relationship. The present study represents a dose-escalation phase III trial comparing 2 doses of radiation. METH...

  6. Do Sell-Side Stock Analysts Exhibit Escalation of Commitment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beshears, John; Milkman, Katherine L

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents evidence that when an analyst makes an out-of-consensus forecast of a company's quarterly earnings that turns out to be incorrect, she escalates her commitment to maintaining an out-of-consensus view on the company. Relative to an analyst who was close to the consensus, the out-of-consensus analyst adjusts her forecasts for the current fiscal year's earnings less in the direction of the quarterly earnings surprise. On average, this type of updating behavior reduces forecasting accuracy, so it does not seem to reflect superior private information. Further empirical results suggest that analysts do not have financial incentives to stand by extreme stock calls in the face of contradictory evidence. Managerial and financial market implications are discussed.

  7. Oxytocin differentially alters resting state functional connectivity between amygdala subregions and emotional control networks: Inverse correlation with depressive traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Monika; Markett, Sebastian; Kendrick, Keith M; Ditzen, Beate; Liu, Fang; Hurlemann, Rene; Becker, Benjamin

    2017-04-01

    The hypothalamic neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) has received increasing attention for its role in modulating social-emotional processes across species. Previous studies on using intranasal-OT in humans point to a crucial engagement of the amygdala in the observed neuromodulatory effects of OT under task and rest conditions. However, the amygdala is not a single homogenous structure, but rather a set of structurally and functionally heterogeneous nuclei that show distinct patterns of connectivity with limbic and frontal emotion-processing regions. To determine potential differential effects of OT on functional connectivity of the amygdala subregions, 79 male participants underwent resting-state fMRI following randomized intranasal-OT or placebo administration. In line with previous studies OT increased the connectivity of the total amygdala with dorso-medial prefrontal regions engaged in emotion regulation. In addition, OT enhanced coupling of the total amygdala with cerebellar regions. Importantly, OT differentially altered the connectivity of amygdala subregions with distinct up-stream cortical nodes, particularly prefrontal/parietal, and cerebellar down-stream regions. OT-induced increased connectivity with cerebellar regions were largely driven by effects on the centromedial and basolateral subregions, whereas increased connectivity with prefrontal regions were largely mediated by right superficial and basolateral subregions. OT decreased connectivity of the centromedial subregions with core hubs of the emotional face processing network in temporal, occipital and parietal regions. Preliminary findings suggest that effects on the superficial amygdala-prefrontal pathway were inversely associated with levels of subclinical depression, possibly indicating that OT modulation may be blunted in the context of increased pathological load. Together, the present findings suggest a subregional-specific modulatory role of OT on amygdala-centered emotion processing networks in

  8. Combined management of retroperitoneal sarcoma with dose intensification radiotherapy and resection: Long-term results of a prospective trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smith, Myles J F

    2014-01-07

    Late failure is a challenging problem following resection of retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS). We investigated the effects of preoperative XRT plus dose escalation with early postoperative brachytherapy (BT) on long-term survival and recurrence in RPS.

  9. NMDA receptor antagonism: escalation of aggressive behavior in alcohol-drinking mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Emily L; Chu, Adam; Bahamón, Brittany; Takahashi, Aki; Debold, Joseph F; Miczek, Klaus A

    2012-11-01

    Memantine is a potential treatment for alcoholic patients, yet few studies investigate the effect of concurrent treatment with memantine and ethanol on aggression. We evaluated aggressive behavior following ethanol consumption and treatment with glutamatergic drugs to characterize interactions between these compounds. This study aimed to use rodent models of aggression to examine interactions between glutamatergic compounds and ethanol. Once male CFW mice reliably self-administered 1 g/kg ethanol or water, they were assessed for aggression in resident-intruder confrontations. Alternatively, aggression was evaluated following a social-instigation procedure. Animals were then injected with memantine, ketamine, neramexane, MTEP, or LY379268 before aggressive confrontations. Effects of the pharmacological manipulations on salient aggressive and non-aggressive behaviors were analyzed. Moderate doses of memantine, neramexane, and MTEP interacted with ethanol to increase the frequency of attack bites while ketamine did not. The highest dose of LY379268, an mGluR(2/3) agonist, reduced both aggressive and non-aggressive behaviors after water and ethanol self-administration. Attack bites increased with social instigation and decreased with administration of high doses of MTEP and LY379268. Memantine and MTEP both reduced attack bite frequency in the instigation condition without reducing locomotor behavior. Memantine and neramexane interacted with ethanol to heighten aggression. The binding characteristics of these compounds allow for 'partial trapping' by which some NMDARs are unblocked between depolarizations. We propose that this feature may contribute to the differential aggression-heightening interactions between these compounds and ethanol. MTEP also interacted with ethanol to escalate aggression, possibly through inhibition of mGluR(5) modulation of NMDARs.

  10. How organizational escalation prevention potential affects success of implementation of innovations: Electronic medical records in hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.S. Lambooij (Mattijs); F. Koster (Ferry)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Escalation of commitment is the tendency that (innovation) projects continue, even if it is clear that they will not be successful and/or become extremely costly. Escalation prevention potential (EPP), the capability of an organization to stop or steer implementation

  11. Water and Wastewater Annual Price Escalation Rates for Selected Cities across the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-10-27

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted this study for the Federal Energy Management Program to identify trends in annual water and wastewater price escalation rates across the United States. This study can be used to inform the selection of an appropriate escalation rates for inclusion in LCCA.

  12. Necessary Contributions of Human Frontal Lobe Subregions to Reward Learning in a Dynamic, Multidimensional Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Avinash R; Fellows, Lesley K

    2016-09-21

    Real-world decisions are typically made between options that vary along multiple dimensions, requiring prioritization of the important dimensions to support optimal choice. Learning in this setting depends on attributing decision outcomes to the dimensions with predictive relevance rather than to dimensions that are irrelevant and nonpredictive. This attribution problem is computationally challenging, and likely requires an interplay between selective attention and reward learning. Both these processes have been separately linked to the prefrontal cortex, but little is known about how they combine to support learning the reward value of multidimensional stimuli. Here, we examined the necessary contributions of frontal lobe subregions in attributing feedback to relevant and irrelevant dimensions on a trial-by-trial basis in humans. Patients with focal frontal lobe damage completed a demanding reward learning task where options varied on three dimensions, only one of which predicted reward. Participants with left lateral frontal lobe damage attributed rewards to irrelevant dimensions, rather than the relevant dimension. Damage to the ventromedial frontal lobe also impaired learning about the relevant dimension, but did not increase reward attribution to irrelevant dimensions. The results argue for distinct roles for these two regions in learning the value of multidimensional decision options under dynamic conditions, with the lateral frontal lobe required for selecting the relevant dimension to associate with reward, and the ventromedial frontal lobe required to learn the reward association itself. The real world is complex and multidimensional; how do we attribute rewards to predictive features when surrounded by competing cues? Here, we tested the critical involvement of human frontal lobe subregions in a probabilistic, multidimensional learning environment, asking whether focal lesions affected trial-by-trial attribution of feedback to relevant and irrelevant

  13. Animal-adapted members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex endemic to the southern African subregion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlene Clarke

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC cause tuberculosis (TB in both animals and humans. In this article, three animal-adapted MTC strains that are endemic to the southern African subregion – that is, Mycobacterium suricattae, Mycobacterium mungi, and the dassie bacillus – are reviewed with a focus on clinical and pathological presentations, geographic distribution, genotyping methods, diagnostic tools and evolution. Moreover, factors influencing the transmission and establishment of TB pathogens in novel host populations, including ecological, immunological and genetic factors of both the host and pathogen, are discussed. The risks associated with these infections are currently unknown and further studies will be required for greater understanding of this disease in the context of the southern African ecosystem.Keywords: dassie bacillus; ecology; evolution; host jump; Mycobacterium mungi; Mycobacterium suricattae; Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex; phylogeny

  14. A simulated weed colony system with subregional differential evolution for multimodal optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Subhrajit; Minhazul Islam, Sk.; Das, Swagatam; Ghosh, Saurav; Vasilakos, Athanasios V.

    2013-04-01

    This article proposes a two-stage hybrid multimodal optimizer based on invasive weed optimization (IWO) and differential evolution (DE) algorithms for locating and preserving multiple optima of a real-parameter functional landscape in a single run. Both IWO and DE have been modified from their original forms to meet the demands of the multimodal problems used in this work. A p-best crossover operation is introduced in the subregional DEs to improve their exploitative behaviour. The performance of the proposed algorithm is compared with a number of state-of-the-art multimodal optimization algorithms over a benchmark suite comprising 21 basic multimodal problems and seven composite multimodal problems. Experimental results suggest that the proposed technique is able to provide better and more consistent performance over the existing well-known multimodal algorithms for the majority of test problems without incurring any serious computational burden.

  15. Digenea in notothenioid fish in the Beagle Channel (Magellanic sub-region, sub-Antarctica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeżewski, Witold; Zdzitowiecki, Krzysztof; Laskowski, Zdzisław

    2014-03-01

    Fish of five species of Notothenioidei (104 specimens), Cottoperca trigloides, Patagonotothen brevicauda, P. longipes, P. tessellata and Champsocephalus esox, caught in the Beagle Channel (Magellanic sub-region, sub-Antarctica) were infected with Digenea of nine species (1130 specimens). Faunistic data on the occurrence of all nine parasites are provided. The most abundant digenean species was Macvicaria magellanica found in the intestine of three host species of the genus Patagonotothen. The second most abundant digenean species was Elytrophalloides oatesi found in the stomach of four host species, with exception of P. brevicauda. Three digenean species: Stenakron kerguelense, Whitegonimus ozoufae and Genolinea bowersi, were more abundant in fish caught at the harbor of Ushuaia (depth 7-9 m), remaining six species: M. magellanica, Neolepidapedoides subantarcticus, Postmonorchis variabilis, Derogenes varicus, E. oatesi and Lecithaster macrocotyle, in the eastern mouth of the Beagle Channel (depth 30 m).

  16. Downscaling GRACE satellite data for sub-region groundwater storage estimates in California's Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuss, A. M.; Newcomer, M. E.; Hsu, W.; Bourai, A.; Puranam, A.; Landerer, F. W.; Schmidt, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Central Valley aquifer (CVA) is a vital economic and environmental resource for California and the United States, and supplies water for one of the most agriculturally productive regions in the world. Recent estimates of groundwater (GW) availability in California have indicated declines in GW levels that may pose a threat to sustainable groundwater use in this region. The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) can be used to estimate variations in total water storage (TWS) and are therefore used to estimate GW storage changes within the CVA. However, using GRACE data in the CVA is challenging due to the coarse spatial resolution and increased error. To compensate for this, we used a statistical downscaling approach applied to GRACE data at the sub-region level using GW storage estimates from the California Department of Water Resources' (DWR) C2VSim hydrological model. This method produced a spatially and temporally variable GW anomaly dataset for sub-region GW management and for analysis of GW changes influenced by spatial and temporal variability. An additional challenge for this region is the influence of natural climate variability, altering GW recharge and influencing pumping practices. Understanding the effects of climate variability on GW storage changes, may improve GRACE TWS and GW estimates during periods of increased rain or droughts. Thus, the GRACE TWS and GW storage estimates were compared to the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) using singular spectral analysis (SSA). Results from SSA indicate that variations in GRACE TWS are moderately correlated to PDO (10-25 year cycle), although low correlations were observed when compared to ENSO (2-7 year cycle). The incorporation of these new methods for estimating variations in groundwater storage in highly productive aquifers may improve water management techniques in California.

  17. Development of Water Resources in Appalachia. Main Report. Part 2. Volume 5a. Sub-Regional Plans. Chapters 13 thru 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-11-01

    Kanawha (Upper New) and Yadkin Rivers. The Kanawha-James Rivers sug- gestion relates to potential development of a connection that would permit water...32.69 46.29 -12.10 Includes persona in the Armed Forces. ~11-15-87 State Planning Sub-region 3bB State Planning Sub-region 36B consists of Fleming and

  18. Book Review: Shrestha, Omkar Lal, and Aekapol Chongvilaivan (eds, Greater Mekong Subregion: From Geographical to Socio-economic Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timotheus J. Krahl

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Book Review of the edited volume: Omkar Lal Shrestha and Aekapol Chongvilaivan (eds (2013, Greater Mekong Subregion: From Geographical to Socio-economic Integration. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies (ISEAS, ISBN: 978-981-4379-68-7, 270 pages

  19. Sub-regional linear programming models in land use analysis: a case study of the Neguev settlement, Costa Rica.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, R.A.; Stoorvogel, J.J.; Jansen, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    The paper deals with linear programming as a tool for land use analysis at the sub-regional level. A linear programming model of a case study area, the Neguev settlement in the Atlantic zone of Costa Rica, is presented. The matrix of the model includes five submatrices each encompassing a different

  20. Choline PET based dose-painting in prostate cancer - Modelling of dose effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belka Claus

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several randomized trials have documented the value of radiation dose escalation in patients with prostate cancer, especially in patients with intermediate risk profile. Up to now dose escalation is usually applied to the whole prostate. IMRT and related techniques currently allow for dose escalation in sub-volumes of the organ. However, the sensitivity of the imaging modality and the fact that small islands of cancer are often dispersed within the whole organ may limit these approaches with regard to a clear clinical benefit. In order to assess potential effects of a dose escalation in certain sub-volumes based on choline PET imaging a mathematical dose-response model was developed. Methods Based on different assumptions for α/β, γ50, sensitivity and specificity of choline PET, the influence of the whole prostate and simultaneous integrated boost (SIB dose on tumor control probability (TCP was calculated. Based on the given heterogeneity of all potential variables certain representative permutations of the parameters were chosen and, subsequently, the influence on TCP was assessed. Results Using schedules with 74 Gy within the whole prostate and a SIB dose of 90 Gy the TCP increase ranged from 23.1% (high detection rate of choline PET, low whole prostate dose, high γ50/ASTRO definition for tumor control to 1.4% TCP gain (low sensitivity of PET, high whole prostate dose, CN + 2 definition for tumor control or even 0% in selected cases. The corresponding initial TCP values without integrated boost ranged from 67.3% to 100%. According to a large data set of intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients the resulting TCP gains ranged from 22.2% to 10.1% (ASTRO definition or from 13.2% to 6.0% (CN + 2 definition. Discussion Although a simplified mathematical model was employed, the presented model allows for an estimation in how far given schedules are relevant for clinical practice. However, the benefit of a SIB based on

  1. Choline PET based dose-painting in prostate cancer--modelling of dose effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyazi, Maximilian; Bartenstein, Peter; Belka, Claus; Ganswindt, Ute

    2010-03-18

    Several randomized trials have documented the value of radiation dose escalation in patients with prostate cancer, especially in patients with intermediate risk profile. Up to now dose escalation is usually applied to the whole prostate. IMRT and related techniques currently allow for dose escalation in sub-volumes of the organ. However, the sensitivity of the imaging modality and the fact that small islands of cancer are often dispersed within the whole organ may limit these approaches with regard to a clear clinical benefit. In order to assess potential effects of a dose escalation in certain sub-volumes based on choline PET imaging a mathematical dose-response model was developed. Based on different assumptions for alpha/beta, gamma 50, sensitivity and specificity of choline PET, the influence of the whole prostate and simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) dose on tumor control probability (TCP) was calculated. Based on the given heterogeneity of all potential variables certain representative permutations of the parameters were chosen and, subsequently, the influence on TCP was assessed. Using schedules with 74 Gy within the whole prostate and a SIB dose of 90 Gy the TCP increase ranged from 23.1% (high detection rate of choline PET, low whole prostate dose, high gamma 50/ASTRO definition for tumor control) to 1.4% TCP gain (low sensitivity of PET, high whole prostate dose, CN + 2 definition for tumor control) or even 0% in selected cases. The corresponding initial TCP values without integrated boost ranged from 67.3% to 100%. According to a large data set of intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients the resulting TCP gains ranged from 22.2% to 10.1% (ASTRO definition) or from 13.2% to 6.0% (CN + 2 definition). Although a simplified mathematical model was employed, the presented model allows for an estimation in how far given schedules are relevant for clinical practice. However, the benefit of a SIB based on choline PET seems less than intuitively expected. Only

  2. Choline PET based dose-painting in prostate cancer - Modelling of dose effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Several randomized trials have documented the value of radiation dose escalation in patients with prostate cancer, especially in patients with intermediate risk profile. Up to now dose escalation is usually applied to the whole prostate. IMRT and related techniques currently allow for dose escalation in sub-volumes of the organ. However, the sensitivity of the imaging modality and the fact that small islands of cancer are often dispersed within the whole organ may limit these approaches with regard to a clear clinical benefit. In order to assess potential effects of a dose escalation in certain sub-volumes based on choline PET imaging a mathematical dose-response model was developed. Methods Based on different assumptions for α/β, γ50, sensitivity and specificity of choline PET, the influence of the whole prostate and simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) dose on tumor control probability (TCP) was calculated. Based on the given heterogeneity of all potential variables certain representative permutations of the parameters were chosen and, subsequently, the influence on TCP was assessed. Results Using schedules with 74 Gy within the whole prostate and a SIB dose of 90 Gy the TCP increase ranged from 23.1% (high detection rate of choline PET, low whole prostate dose, high γ50/ASTRO definition for tumor control) to 1.4% TCP gain (low sensitivity of PET, high whole prostate dose, CN + 2 definition for tumor control) or even 0% in selected cases. The corresponding initial TCP values without integrated boost ranged from 67.3% to 100%. According to a large data set of intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients the resulting TCP gains ranged from 22.2% to 10.1% (ASTRO definition) or from 13.2% to 6.0% (CN + 2 definition). Discussion Although a simplified mathematical model was employed, the presented model allows for an estimation in how far given schedules are relevant for clinical practice. However, the benefit of a SIB based on choline PET seems less than

  3. Destined to die but not to wage war: how existential threat can contribute to escalation or de-escalation of violent intergroup conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Eva; Fritsche, Immo

    2013-10-01

    War means threat to people's lives. Research derived from terror management theory (TMT) illustrates that the awareness of death leads people to defend cultural ingroups and their worldviews to attain a sense of symbolic immortality and thereby buffer existential anxiety. This can result in hostile effects of mortality salience (MS), such as derogation of outgroup members, prejudice, stereotyping, aggression, and racism, which, in turn, can lead to the escalation of violent intergroup conflict and, thus, the escalation of war. Yet, escalation of destructive conflict following MS is not automatic. Instead, research on TMT suggests that MS does not necessarily result in conflict and intolerance but can also foster positive tendencies, such as intergroup fairness or approval of pacifism, depending on how existential threat is perceived, whether the need for symbolic self-transcendence is satisfied, which social norms are salient, and how social situations are interpreted. In the present article, we review current TMT research with the aim of reconciling the seemingly contradictory findings of hostile and peaceful reactions to reminders of death. We present a terror management model of escalation and de-escalation of violent intergroup conflicts, which takes into account the interaction between threat salience and features of the social situation. We also discuss possible intervention strategies to override detrimental consequences of existential threat and argue that war is not the inevitable consequence of threat. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  4. A pilot study for segmentation of pharyngeal and sino-nasal airway subregions by automatic contour initialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelapu, Bala Chakravarthy; Kharbanda, Om Prakash; Sardana, Viren; Gupta, Abhishek; Vasamsetti, Srikanth; Balachandran, Rajiv; Rana, Shailendra Singh; Sardana, Harish Kumar

    2017-11-01

    The objective of the present study is to put forward a novel automatic segmentation algorithm to segment pharyngeal and sino-nasal airway subregions on 3D CBCT imaging datasets. A fully automatic segmentation of sino-nasal and pharyngeal airway subregions was implemented in MATLAB programing environment. The novelty of the algorithm is automatic initialization of contours in upper airway subregions. The algorithm is based on boundary definitions of the human anatomy along with shape constraints with an automatic initialization of contours to develop a complete algorithm which has a potential to enhance utility at clinical level. Post-initialization; five segmentation techniques: Chan-Vese level set (CVL), localized Chan-Vese level set (LCVL), Bhattacharya distance level set (BDL), Grow Cut (GC), and Sparse Field method (SFM) were used to test the robustness of automatic initialization. Precision and F-score were found to be greater than 80% for all the regions with all five segmentation methods. High precision and low recall were observed with BDL and GC techniques indicating an under segmentation. Low precision and high recall values were observed with CVL and SFM methods indicating an over segmentation. A Larger F-score value was observed with SFM method for all the subregions. Minimum F-score value was observed for naso-ethmoidal and sphenoidal air sinus region, whereas a maximum F-score was observed in maxillary air sinuses region. The contour initialization was more accurate for maxillary air sinuses region in comparison with sphenoidal and naso-ethmoid regions. The overall F-score was found to be greater than 80% for all the airway subregions using five segmentation techniques, indicating accurate contour initialization. Robustness of the algorithm needs to be further tested on severely deformed cases and on cases with different races and ethnicity for it to have global acceptance in Katradental radKatraiology workflow.

  5. Primary analysis of DNA polymorphisms in the TRIM region (MHC subregion) of the Japanese quail, Coturnix japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shingo; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Yokoyama, Kana; Tsuda, Kaoru; Hara, Hiromi; Yoshida, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Akira; Mizutani, Makoto; Shiina, Takashi; Kono, Tomohiro; Hanzawa, Kei

    2013-01-01

    Based on sequences of two cosmid clones from Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica, Coja), we confirmed that the syntenic cluster, GNB2L1∼BTN1∼BTN2, is located in the quail TRIM subregion of the quail major histocompatibility complex (MHC Coja) region. These cosmids also included four CjBG loci and one CjLEC locus; therefore, the quail TRIM subregion was thought to be adjacent to the BG/LEC subregion. We then identified three polymorphic markers - CjHEP21, CjTRIM39.2 and CjBTN2 - in the TRIM subregion that may be useful for the functional analysis of the MHC-Coja region. We examined MHC-Coja sequences from 321 individual quails sampled from 11 inbred strains, and we found eight alleles for each of the three genes - CjHEP21, CjTRIM39.2 and CjBTN2. These polymorphisms represent the first avian DNA markers in the TRIM subregion. Additionally, we discovered a quail-specific VNTR (variable number of long tandem repeats, 133-137 bp) in intron 7 of CjBTN2. We identified 25 haplotypes in the sample of 321 quail; these haplotypes comprised combinations of all 24 alleles of the three polymorphic genes. We suggest that there are two recombination hotspots, one between each pair of adjacent loci. All strains, except AMRP, contained multiple haplotypes; the AMRP strain contained a single, apparently fixed haplotype. © 2012 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  6. Fossil evidence for Cretaceous escalation in angiosperm leaf vein evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feild, Taylor S; Brodribb, Timothy J; Iglesias, Ari; Chatelet, David S; Baresch, Andres; Upchurch, Garland R; Gomez, Bernard; Mohr, Barbara A R; Coiffard, Clement; Kvacek, Jiri; Jaramillo, Carlos

    2011-05-17

    The flowering plants that dominate modern vegetation possess leaf gas exchange potentials that far exceed those of all other living or extinct plants. The great divide in maximal ability to exchange CO(2) for water between leaves of nonangiosperms and angiosperms forms the mechanistic foundation for speculation about how angiosperms drove sweeping ecological and biogeochemical change during the Cretaceous. However, there is no empirical evidence that angiosperms evolved highly photosynthetically active leaves during the Cretaceous. Using vein density (D(V)) measurements of fossil angiosperm leaves, we show that the leaf hydraulic capacities of angiosperms escalated several-fold during the Cretaceous. During the first 30 million years of angiosperm leaf evolution, angiosperm leaves exhibited uniformly low vein D(V) that overlapped the D(V) range of dominant Early Cretaceous ferns and gymnosperms. Fossil angiosperm vein densities reveal a subsequent biphasic increase in D(V). During the first mid-Cretaceous surge, angiosperm D(V) first surpassed the upper bound of D(V) limits for nonangiosperms. However, the upper limits of D(V) typical of modern megathermal rainforest trees first appear during a second wave of increased D(V) during the Cretaceous-Tertiary transition. Thus, our findings provide fossil evidence for the hypothesis that significant ecosystem change brought about by angiosperms lagged behind the Early Cretaceous taxonomic diversification of angiosperms.

  7. Attention modulates adaptive motor learning in the 'broken escalator' paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mitesh; Kaski, Diego; Bronstein, Adolfo M

    2014-07-01

    The physical stumble caused by stepping onto a stationary (broken) escalator represents a locomotor aftereffect (LAE) that attests to a process of adaptive motor learning. Whether such learning is primarily explicit (requiring attention resources) or implicit (independent of attention) is unknown. To address this question, we diverted attention in the adaptation (MOVING) and aftereffect (AFTER) phases of the LAE by loading these phases with a secondary cognitive task (sequential naming of a vegetable, fruit and a colour). Thirty-six healthy adults were randomly assigned to 3 equally sized groups. They performed 5 trials stepping onto a stationary sled (BEFORE), 5 with the sled moving (MOVING) and 5 with the sled stationary again (AFTER). A 'Dual-Task-MOVING (DTM)' group performed the dual-task in the MOVING phase and the 'Dual-Task-AFTEREFFECT (DTAE)' group in the AFTER phase. The 'control' group performed no dual task. We recorded trunk displacement, gait velocity and gastrocnemius muscle EMG of the left (leading) leg. The DTM, but not the DTAE group, had larger trunk displacement during the MOVING phase, and a smaller trunk displacement aftereffect compared with controls. Gait velocity was unaffected by the secondary cognitive task in either group. Thus, adaptive locomotor learning involves explicit learning, whereas the expression of the aftereffect is automatic (implicit). During rehabilitation, patients should be actively encouraged to maintain maximal attention when learning new or challenging locomotor tasks.

  8. Individualized Dose Prescription for Hypofractionation in Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Radiotherapy: An in silico Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Aswin L.; Troost, Esther G.C.; Huizenga, Henk; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bussink, Johan, E-mail: j.bussink@rther.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Local tumor control and outcome remain poor in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated by external beam radiotherapy. We investigated the therapeutic gain of individualized dose prescription with dose escalation based on normal tissue dose constraints for various hypofractionation schemes delivered with intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: For 38 Stage III NSCLC patients, the dose level of an existing curative treatment plan with standard fractionation (66 Gy) was rescaled based on dose constraints for the lung, spinal cord, esophagus, brachial plexus, and heart. The effect on tumor total dose (TTD) and biologic tumor effective dose in 2-Gy fractions (TED) corrected for overall treatment time (OTT) was compared for isotoxic and maximally tolerable schemes given in 15, 20, and 33 fractions. Rescaling was accomplished by altering the dose per fraction and/or the number of fractions while keeping the relative dose distribution of the original treatment plan. Results: For 30 of the 38 patients, dose escalation by individualized hypofractionation yielded therapeutic gain. For the maximally tolerable dose scheme in 33 fractions (MTD{sub 33}), individualized dose escalation resulted in a 2.5-21% gain in TTD. In the isotoxic schemes, the number of fractions could be reduced with a marginal increase in TED. For the maximally tolerable dose schemes, the TED could be escalated up to 36.6%, and for all patients beyond the level of the isotoxic and the MTD{sub 33} schemes (range, 3.3-36.6%). Reduction of the OTT contributed to the therapeutic gain of the shortened schemes. For the maximally tolerable schemes, the maximum esophageal dose was the dominant dose-limiting constraint in most patients. Conclusions: This modeling study showed that individualized dose prescription for hypofractionation in NSCLC radiotherapy, based on scaling of existing treatment plans up to normal tissue dose constraints, enables dose

  9. Escalation scenarios initiated by gas explosions on offshore installations. Probabilistic cause and consequence modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eknes, Monika Loeland

    1996-12-31

    This Dr. ing. thesis deals with escalation scenarios initiated by gas explosions on offshore installations. Gas explosions is one of the major hazards to such installations. The objectives were to estimate the probability of ignition and frequency of gas explosions for gas leaks on top sides of offshore installations, and to estimate the response and resistance of components that could result in escalation if they failed. Main fields considered cover risk analysis methodology, gas explosions, simplified escalation models, evaluation of structural consequences, case studies, and guidelines. 107 refs., 33 figs., 33 tabs.

  10. Learning From Trials on Radiation Dose in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, Jeffrey, E-mail: jbradley@wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Hu, Chen [Division of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2016-11-15

    In this issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics, Taylor et al present a meta-analysis of published data supporting 2 findings: (1) radiation dose escalation seems to benefit patients who receive radiation alone for non-small cell lung cancer; and (2) radiation dose escalation has a detrimental effect on overall survival in the setting of concurrent chemotherapy. The latter finding is supported by data but has perplexed the oncology community. Perhaps these findings are not perplexing at all. Perhaps it is simply another lesson in the major principle in radiation oncology, to minimize radiation dose to normal tissues.

  11. Randomized Comparison of a CrossBoss First Versus Standard Wire Escalation Strategy for Crossing Coronary Chronic Total Occlusions: The CrossBoss First Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karacsonyi, Judit; Tajti, Peter; Rangan, Bavana V; Halligan, Sean C; Allen, Raymond H; Nicholson, William J; Harvey, James E; Spaedy, Anthony J; Jaffer, Farouc A; Grantham, J Aaron; Salisbury, Adam; Hart, Anthony J; Safley, David M; Lombardi, William L; Hira, Ravi; Don, Creighton; McCabe, James M; Burke, M Nicholas; Alaswad, Khaldoon; Koenig, Gerald C; Sanghvi, Kintur A; Ice, Daniel; Kovach, Richard C; Varghese, Vincent; Murad, Bilal; Baran, Kenneth W; Resendes, Erica; Martinez-Parachini, Jose R; Karatasakis, Aris; Danek, Barbara A; Iwnetu, Rahel; Roesle, Michele; Khalili, Houman; Banerjee, Subhash; Brilakis, Emmanouil S

    2018-02-12

    The authors performed a multicenter, randomized-controlled, clinical trial comparing upfront use of the CrossBoss catheter versus antegrade wire escalation for antegrade crossing of coronary chronic total occlusions. There is equipoise about the optimal initial strategy for crossing coronary chronic total occlusions. The primary endpoints were the time required to cross the chronic total occlusion or abort the procedure and the frequency of procedural major adverse cardiovascular events. The secondary endpoints were technical and procedural success, total procedure time, fluoroscopy time required to cross and total fluoroscopy time, total air kerma radiation dose, total contrast volume, and equipment use. Between 2015 and 2017, 246 patients were randomized to the CrossBoss catheter (n = 122) or wire escalation (n = 124) at 11 U.S. centers. The baseline clinical and angiographic characteristics of the study groups were similar. Technical and procedural success were 87.8% and 84.1%, respectively, and were similar in the 2 groups. Crossing time was similar: 56 min (interquartile range: 33 to 93 min) in the CrossBoss group and 66 min (interquartile range: 36 to 105 min) in the wire escalation group (p = 0.323), as was as the incidence of procedural major adverse cardiovascular events (3.28% vs. 4.03%; p = 1.000). There were no significant differences in the secondary study endpoints. As compared with wire escalation, upfront use of the CrossBoss catheter for antegrade crossing of coronary chronic total occlusions was associated with similar crossing time, similar success and complication rates, and similar equipment use and cost. Copyright © 2018 American College of Cardiology Foundation. All rights reserved.

  12. PtmxGuard: An Improved Method for Android Kernel to Prevent Privilege Escalation Attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong Bin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vulnerabilities in Android kernel give opportunity for attacker to damage the system. Privilege escalation is one of the most dangerous attacks, as it helps attacker to gain root privilege by exploiting kernel vulnerabilities. Mitigation technologies, static detection methods and dynamic defense methods have been suggested to prevent privilege escalation attack, but they still have some disadvantages. In this paper, we propose an improved method named PtmxGuard to enhance Android kernel and defeat privilege escalation attack. We focus on a typical attack pattern that attacker hijacks the control flow of Android kernel to modify process credentials by corrupting critical global function pointers. PtmxGuard enforces Code Pointer Integrity to Android kernel, checks the accuracy and reliability of those pointers when they’re triggered by related system calls, and intercepts the system calls when attack activities are detected. Experiment result demonstrates that PtmxGuard can defense privilege escalation attack effectively.

  13. Factors Predicting an Escalation of Restrictive Eating During Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynos, Ann F; Watts, Allison W; Loth, Katie A; Pearson, Carolyn M; Neumark-Stzainer, Dianne

    2016-10-01

    To examine longitudinal risk factors and short-term risk correlates for the development of extreme forms of restrictive eating among adolescent dieters. Data from Project Eating and Activity in Teens and Young Adults, a population-based study of 2,516 students aged 12-18 years, were collected in 1998-1999 (Time 1) and 5 years later (Time 2). Within this sample, 243 adolescents who reported dieting but not engaging in disordered forms of restrictive eating (e.g., fasting, skipping meals) at Time 1 were followed to determine the self-reported psychological, familial, and social variables predicting initiation of disordered restrictive eating at Time 2. To investigate short-term risk correlates of initiating disordered restrictive eating, the same risk factors were also compared cross-sectionally at Time 2 between the dieters who had and had not initiated disordered restrictive eating. Poisson regression models with robust standard errors were fit for each predictor adjusted for covariates. Depressive symptoms and low self-esteem were significantly associated with the initiation of disordered restrictive eating in both longitudinal and cross-sectional analyses. Poor family communication/caring and maternal dieting significantly predicted long-term risk for escalating restrictive eating severity; whereas, individual body image issues (i.e., weight concerns, body dissatisfaction) and social concerns (i.e., weight-related teasing, peer dieting) were significant short-term correlates of initiating disordered restrictive eating. Depressive symptoms and low self-esteem may be especially important targets for risk identification and prevention for disordered restrictive eating. Intervening on family influences may decrease long-term risk, whereas intervening on body image and responses to social influences may decrease short-term risk for disordered restrictive eating. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  14. Role of TAAR1 within the Subregions of the Mesocorticolimbic Dopaminergic System in Cocaine-Seeking Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian-Feng; Siemian, Justin N; Seaman, Robert; Zhang, Yanan; Li, Jun-Xu

    2017-01-25

    A novel G-protein coupled receptor, trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1), has been shown to be a promising target to prevent stimulant relapse. Our recent studies showed that systemic administration of TAAR1 agonists decreased abuse-related behaviors of cocaine. However, the role of TAAR1 in specific subregions of the reward system in drug addiction is unknown. Here, using a local pharmacological activation method, we assessed the role of TAAR1 within the subregions of the mesocorticolimbic system: that is, the VTA, the prelimbic cortex (PrL), and infralimbic cortex of medial prefrontal cortex, the core and shell of NAc, BLA, and CeA, on cue- and drug-induced cocaine-seeking in the rat cocaine reinstatement model. We first showed that TAAR1 mRNA was expressed throughout these brain regions. Rats underwent cocaine self-administration, followed by extinction training. RO5166017 (1.5 or 5.0 μg/side) or vehicle was microinjected into each brain region immediately before cue- and drug-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking. The results showed that microinjection of RO5166017 into the VTA and PrL decreased both cue- and drug priming-induced cocaine-seeking. Microinjection of RO5166017 into the NAc core and shell inhibited cue- and drug-induced cocaine-seeking, respectively. Locomotor activity or food reinforced operant responding was unaffected by microinjection of RO5166017 into these brain regions. Cocaine-seeking behaviors were not affected by RO5166017 when microinjected into the substantia nigra, infralimbic cortex, BLA, and CeA. Together, these results indicate that TAAR1 in different subregions of the mesocorticolimbic system distinctly contributes to cue- and drug-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. TAAR1 has been indicated as a modulator of the dopaminergic system. Previous research showed that systemic administration of TAAR1 agonists could attenuate cocaine-related behaviors, suggesting that TAAR1 may be a promising drug target for the

  15. Regional decline of coral cover in the Indo-Pacific: timing, extent, and subregional comparisons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F Bruno

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A number of factors have recently caused mass coral mortality events in all of the world's tropical oceans. However, little is known about the timing, rate or spatial variability of the loss of reef-building corals, especially in the Indo-Pacific, which contains 75% of the world's coral reefs.We compiled and analyzed a coral cover database of 6001 quantitative surveys of 2667 Indo-Pacific coral reefs performed between 1968 and 2004. Surveys conducted during 2003 indicated that coral cover averaged only 22.1% (95% CI: 20.7, 23.4 and just 7 of 390 reefs surveyed that year had coral cover >60%. Estimated yearly coral cover loss based on annually pooled survey data was approximately 1% over the last twenty years and 2% between 1997 and 2003 (or 3,168 km(2 per year. The annual loss based on repeated measures regression analysis of a subset of reefs that were monitored for multiple years from 1997 to 2004 was 0.72 % (n = 476 reefs, 95% CI: 0.36, 1.08.The rate and extent of coral loss in the Indo-Pacific are greater than expected. Coral cover was also surprisingly uniform among subregions and declined decades earlier than previously assumed, even on some of the Pacific's most intensely managed reefs. These results have significant implications for policy makers and resource managers as they search for successful models to reverse coral loss.

  16. Challenges and prospects for malaria elimination in the Greater Mekong Subregion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Liwang; Yan, Guiyun; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Chen, Bin; Cao, Yaming; Fan, Qi; Parker, Daniel; Sirichaisinthop, Jeeraphat; Su, Xin-zhuan; Yang, Henglin; Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Baomin; Zhou, Guofa

    2012-03-01

    Despite significant improvement in the malaria situation of the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS), malaria control for the region continues to face a multitude of challenges. The extremely patchy malaria distribution, especially along international borders, makes disease surveillance and targeted control difficult. The vector systems are also diverse with dramatic differences in habitat ecology, biting behavior, and vectorial capacity, and there is a lack of effective transmission surveillance and control tools. Finally, in an era of heavy deployment of artemisinin-based combination therapies, the region acts as an epicenter of drug resistance, with the emergence of artemisinin resistant Plasmodium falciparum posing a threat to both regional and global malaria elimination campaigns. This problem is further exacerbated by the circulation of counterfeit and substandard artemisinin drugs. Accordingly, this Southeast Asian Malaria Research Center, consisting of a consortium of US and regional research institutions, has proposed four interlinked projects to address these most urgent problems in malaria control. The aims of these projects will help to substantially improve our understanding of malaria epidemiology, vector systems and their roles in malaria transmission, as well as the mechanisms of drug resistance in parasites. Through the training of next-generation scientists in malaria research, this program will help build up and strengthen regional research infrastructure and capacities, which are essential for sustained malaria control in this region. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cleft lip and palate repair: the experience from two West African sub-regional centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onah, I I; Opara, K O; Olaitan, P B; Ogbonnaya, I S

    2008-08-01

    Compliance with primary surgical treatment in people with cleft lip and palate is a well-known problem, especially in developing countries fraught with poverty and ignorance. Different protocols of treatment exist. In this paper, we retrospectively review a cohort from two centres, with a discussion on the outcome and its implications. The records of all patients with cleft lip and palate seen in the National Orthopaedic Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria, from January 1993 to December 1999, were sought, and all available case notes reviewed retrospectively. This included new cases seen in the period, and also cases operated during this period. Follow up took place until January 2005, when the data were collated. The records of all such patients seen at Ladoke Akintola University Teaching Hospital Osogbo, Nigeria, from September 2004 to June 2006 were also collated and analysed. During this period, 102 patients were seen (93 at Enugu and nine at Osogbo). Fifteen had isolated cleft palate, 42 had isolated cleft lip and 45 had combined cleft lip and palate. Presentation time ranged from 1 day to 43 years. The palate was not repaired in 20 people after lip repair; two patients with cleft lip and palate completely defaulted; and only one person with isolated cleft palate failed to undergo surgery in this period. Two patients in Osogbo absconded. The West African sub-region has a high drop out rate after lip repair.

  18. Variability of DNA Methylation within Schizophrenia Risk Loci across Subregions of Human Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Brad Ruzicka

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Identification of 108 genomic regions significantly associated with schizophrenia risk by the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium was a milestone for the field, and much work is now focused on determining the mechanism of risk associated with each locus. Within these regions, we investigated variability of DNA methylation, a low-level cellular phenotype closely linked to genotype, in two highly similar cellular populations sampled from the human hippocampus, to draw inferences about the elaboration of genotype to phenotype within these loci enriched for schizophrenia risk. DNA methylation was assessed with the Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadArray in tissue laser-microdissected from the stratum oriens of subfield CA1 or CA2/3, regions having unique connectivity with intrinsic and extrinsic fiber systems within the hippocampus. Samples consisted of postmortem human hippocampus tissue from eight schizophrenia patients, eight bipolar disorder patients, and eight healthy control subjects. Within these genomic regions, we observed far greater difference in methylation patterns between circuit locations within subjects than in a single subregion between subjects across diagnostic groups, demonstrating the complexity of genotype to phenotype elaboration across the diverse circuitry of the human brain.

  19. Riesgo de deterioro cognitivo en personas mayores de las subregiones de Antioquia, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Segura Cardona

    Full Text Available Resumen En este artículo, se buscó conocer la prevalencia de riesgo de deterioro cognitivo y su relación con factores demográficos, sociales y funcionales en las personas mayores de las subregiones de Antioquia, Colombia. Se trata de un estudio cuantitativo, transversal analítico, con fuente de información primaria. La muestra fue probabilística y se determinó el riesgo de deterioro cognitivo con la escala minimental. Así se encontró que el 83,1% de los mayores presenta algún riesgo de deterioro cognitivo, principalmente las mujeres, y está asociado significativamente con vivir en la subregión del Magdalena Medio y Medellín, tener mayor edad, no tener pareja, no tener escolaridad, tener escasos recursos sociales, no participar en grupos comunitarios, tener mala percepción de la calidad de vida, estar insatisfecho con la salud y tener dependencia funcional para realizar las actividades básicas. Estos resultados permiten orientar los programas de salud pública relacionados con la inclusión de las personas mayores hacia programas educativos, la participación en grupos comunitarios, la tamización constante en los servicios de salud, el fortalecimiento de los recursos sociales y el fomento de la actividad física en la vejez, para lograr un envejecimiento saludable con mejor calidad de vida.

  20. Social Observation Increases Functional Segregation between MPFC Subregions Predicting Prosocial Consumer Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Daehyun; Sul, Sunhae; Lee, Minwoo; Kim, Hackjin

    2018-02-20

    Although it is now well documented that observation by others can be a powerful elicitor of prosocial behaviour, the underlying neural mechanism is yet to be explored. In the present fMRI study, we replicated the previously reported observer effect in ethical consumption, in that participants were more likely to purchase social products that are sold to support people in need than non-social products when being observed by others. fMRI data revealed that the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) encoded subject-specific value parameters of purchase decisions for social and non-social products, respectively, under social observation. The ACC showed strong functional coupling with the amygdala and the anterior insula when participants in the observation condition were making purchases of social versus non-social products. Finally, ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) activity predicted faster reaction time and increased prosocial behavior during decisions to purchase social versus non-social products, regardless of social observation. The present findings suggest that subregions of the mPFC, namely the dmPFC, ACC, and vmPFC, are hierarchically organized to encode different levels of decision values from the value of context-sensitive reputation to that of internalized prosociality.

  1. Exogenous features versus prior experiences modulate different subregions of the right IPL during episodic memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Sze Chai; Macaluso, Emiliano

    2015-06-09

    The fractionation view holds that distinct cognitive operations are mediated by subregions of the inferior parietal lobule (IPL). Within IPL, we hypothesised that retrieval-related activity in different parts of the right supramarginal gyrus (rSMG) may be modulated differentially by information acquired via different combinations of attention signals at encoding. We had two groups of participants watch a 42-min TV episode and, after a 24-hr delay, perform a temporal-order judgment task during fMRI. Each retrieval trial comprised three images presented sequentially, requiring participants to judge the temporal order between the first and last images while ignoring the second image ("distractor"). We manipulated the bottom-up factor by presenting distractors that were extracted from either an event-boundary or a non-boundary of the movie. The top-down factor was manipulated by instructing one group perform a segmentation task reporting the event-boundaries at encoding, while the other group watched the movie passively. Across groups, we found that the stimulus-related factor modulated retrieval activation in the anterior rSMG (areas PFt and PFop), whereas the goal-related influence of prior segmentation interacted with this effect in the middle rSMG (area PF), demonstrating IPL segregation during retrieval as a function of prior bottom-up vs. top-down attention signals.

  2. Melatonin for Sleep in Children with Autism: A Controlled Trial Examining Dose, Tolerability, and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malow, Beth; Adkins, Karen W.; McGrew, Susan G.; Wang, Lily; Goldman, Suzanne E.; Fawkes, Diane; Burnette, Courtney

    2012-01-01

    Supplemental melatonin has shown promise in treating sleep onset insomnia in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Twenty-four children, free of psychotropic medications, completed an open-label dose-escalation study to assess dose-response, tolerability, safety, feasibility of collecting actigraphy data, and ability of outcome measures…

  3. Differential Histone Acetylation in Sub-Regions of Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis Underlies Fear Consolidation and Extinction

    OpenAIRE

    Ranjan, Vandana; Singh, Sanjay; Siddiqui, Sarfraj Ahmad; Tripathi, Sukanya; Khan, Mohd Yahiya; Prakash, Anand

    2017-01-01

    Objective The hallmark of anxiety disorders is excessive fear. Previous studies have suggested that selective neural projections from Basal nucleus of stria terminalis (BNST) to amygdala and vice-versa precisely control the fear learning process. However the exact mechanism how the BNST controls fear consolidation and its extinction is largely unknown. In the present study we observed the changes in the BNST sub-regions following fear conditioning and its extinction. Methods The change in the...

  4. Distinct Changes in Functional Connectivity in Posteromedial Cortex Subregions during the Progress of Alzheimer?s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Yan eWu; Yaqin eZhang; Yong eLiu; Jieqiong eLiu; Yunyun eDuan; Xuehu eWei; Junjie eZhuo; Kuncheng eLi; Xinqing eZhang; Chunshui eYu; Jiaojian eWang; Tianzi eJiang

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder which causes dementia, especially in the elderly. The posteromedial cortex, which consists of several subregions involved in distinct functions, is one of the critical regions associated with the progression and severity of Alzheimer’s disease. However, previous studies always ignored the heterogeneity of the posteromedial cortex and focused on one stage of Alzheimer’s disease. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance im...

  5. Organization of cortico-cortical pathways supporting memory retrieval across subregions of the left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barredo, Jennifer; Verstynen, Timothy D; Badre, David

    2016-09-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) evidence indicates that different subregions of ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) participate in distinct cortical networks. These networks have been shown to support separable cognitive functions: anterior VLPFC [inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) pars orbitalis] functionally correlates with a ventral fronto-temporal network associated with top-down influences on memory retrieval, while mid-VLPFC (IFG pars triangularis) functionally correlates with a dorsal fronto-parietal network associated with postretrieval control processes. However, it is not known to what extent subregional differences in network affiliation and function are driven by differences in the organization of underlying white matter pathways. We used high-angular-resolution diffusion spectrum imaging and functional connectivity analysis in unanesthetized humans to address whether the organization of white matter connectivity differs between subregions of VLPFC. Our results demonstrate a ventral-dorsal division within IFG. Ventral IFG as a whole connects broadly to lateral temporal cortex. Although several different individual white matter tracts form connections between ventral IFG and lateral temporal cortex, functional connectivity analysis of fMRI data indicates that these are part of the same ventral functional network. By contrast, across subdivisions, dorsal IFG was connected with the midfrontal gyrus and correlated as a separate dorsal functional network. These qualitative differences in white matter organization within larger macroanatomical subregions of VLPFC support prior functional distinctions among these regions observed in task-based and functional connectivity fMRI studies. These results are consistent with the proposal that anatomical connectivity is a crucial determinant of systems-level functional organization of frontal cortex and the brain in general. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Trends and changes in tropical and summer days at the Adana Sub-Region of the Mediterranean Region, Southern Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer Altın, Türkan; Barak, Belma

    2017-11-01

    In this study, the long-term variability and trends of the annual and seasonal numbers of summer and tropical days of the Adana Sub-region were investigated using nonlinear and linear trend detection tests for the period 1960-2014 at 14 meteorological stations. The results suggest that the annual number of summer and tropical days was generally below the long-term average through to the end of the 1980s. In particular, positive anomaly values could be observed at all stations between the years 1993-2014. With respect to the Kruskal-Wallis homogeneity test, the significant breaking date was 1993. The rapid rise of the annual number of summer (tropical) days after this year led to the inversion of the negative trends observed from 1987 to 1992 into positive ones. The increasing trend is statistically significance at 0.01 level in Yumurtalık, Mersin and Antakya for the annual number of summer and tropical days. Dörtyol, İskenderun and Elbistan were significance at 0.01 level for tropical days. The largest positive anomalies of the summer of 2010 are observed in coastal vicinity (Mersin, Yumurtalık and İskenderun). This indicates that these settlements underwent a long-term warm period and thermal conditions due to increasing temperatures in the spring and summer months. The same conditions are found in high inner areas (Göksun and Elbistan) for tropical days. It is noticed that a tendency for greater warming occurred at stations located above 1000 m in the sub-region. The average number of warm days will increase 2-days per 100-years in southern part of the sub-region. The increasing trend in summer temperatures can be considered a potential risk, notably for human health and for economic and crop losses in the Adana Sub-region, including Çukurova, one of the most important agriculture areas of Turkey.

  7. Cerebellar contribution to motor and cognitive performance in multiple sclerosis: An MRI sub-regional volumetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ambrosio, Alessandro; Pagani, Elisabetta; Riccitelli, Gianna C; Colombo, Bruno; Rodegher, Mariaemma; Falini, Andrea; Comi, Giancarlo; Filippi, Massimo; Rocca, Maria A

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the role of cerebellar sub-regions on motor and cognitive performance in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Whole and sub-regional cerebellar volumes, brain volumes, T2 hyperintense lesion volumes (LV), and motor performance scores were obtained from 95 relapse-onset MS patients and 32 healthy controls (HC). MS patients also underwent an evaluation of working memory and processing speed functions. Cerebellar anterior and posterior lobes were segmented using the Spatially Unbiased Infratentorial Toolbox (SUIT) from Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM12). Multivariate linear regression models assessed the relationship between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures and motor/cognitive scores. Compared to HC, only secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) patients had lower cerebellar volumes (total and posterior cerebellum). In MS patients, lower anterior cerebellar volume and brain T2 LV predicted worse motor performance, whereas lower posterior cerebellar volume and brain T2 LV predicted poor cognitive performance. Global measures of brain volume and infratentorial T2 LV were not selected by the final multivariate models. Cerebellar volumetric abnormalities are likely to play an important contribution to explain motor and cognitive performance in MS patients. Consistently with functional mapping studies, cerebellar posterior-inferior volume accounted for variance in cognitive measures, whereas anterior cerebellar volume accounted for variance in motor performance, supporting the assessment of cerebellar damage at sub-regional level.

  8. Emergency Department Escalation in Theory and Practice: A Mixed-Methods Study Using a Model of Organizational Resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, Jonathan; Ross, Alastair J; Duncan, Myanna D; Jaye, Peter; Henderson, Katherine; Anderson, Janet E

    2017-11-01

    Escalation policies are used by emergency departments (EDs) when responding to an increase in demand (eg, a sudden inflow of patients) or a reduction in capacity (eg, a lack of beds to admit patients). The policies aim to maintain the ability to deliver patient care, without compromising safety, by modifying "normal" processes. The study objective is to examine escalation policies in theory and practice. This was a mixed-method study involving a conceptual analysis of National Health Service escalation policies (n=12) and associated escalation actions (n=92), as well as a detailed ethnographic study of escalation in situ during a 16-month period in a large UK ED (n=30 observations). The conceptual analysis of National Health Service escalation policies found that their use requires the ability to dynamically reconfigure resources (staff and equipment), change work flow, and relocate patients. In practice, it was discovered that when the ED is under pressure, these prerequisites cannot always be attained. Instead, escalation processes were adapted to manage pressures informally. This adaptive need ("work as done") was found to be incompletely specified in policies ("work as imagined"). Formal escalation actions and their implementation in practice differed and varied in their effectiveness. Monitoring how escalation works in practice is essential in understanding whether and how escalation policies help to manage workload. Copyright © 2017 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gut Microbiota and Tacrolimus Dosing in Kidney Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, John R.; Muthukumar, Thangamani; Dadhania, Darshana; Taur, Ying; Jenq, Robert R.; Toussaint, Nora C.; Ling, Lilan; Pamer, Eric; Suthanthiran, Manikkam

    2015-01-01

    Tacrolimus dosing to establish therapeutic levels in recipients of organ transplants is a challenging task because of much interpatient and intrapatient variability in drug absorption, metabolism, and disposition. In view of the reported impact of gut microbial species on drug metabolism, we investigated the relationship between the gut microbiota and tacrolimus dosing requirements in this pilot study of adult kidney transplant recipients. Serial fecal specimens were collected during the first month of transplantation from 19 kidney transplant recipients who either required a 50% increase from initial tacrolimus dosing during the first month of transplantation (Dose Escalation Group, n=5) or did not require such an increase (Dose Stable Group, n=14). We characterized bacterial composition in the fecal specimens by deep sequencing of the PCR amplified 16S rRNA V4-V5 region and we investigated the hypothesis that gut microbial composition is associated with tacrolimus dosing requirements. Initial tacrolimus dosing was similar in the Dose Escalation Group and in the Stable Group (4.2±1.1 mg/day vs. 3.8±0.8 mg/day, respectively, P=0.61, two-way between-group ANOVA using contrasts) but became higher in the Dose Escalation Group than in the Dose Stable Group by the end of the first transplantation month (9.6±2.4 mg/day vs. 3.3±1.5 mg/day, respectively, Ptacrolimus dosing at 1 month (R=0.57, P=0.01) and had a coefficient±standard error of 1.0±0.6 (P=0.08) after multivariable linear regression. Our novel observations may help further explain inter-individual differences in tacrolimus dosing to achieve therapeutic levels. PMID:25815766

  10. INEEL Subregional Conceptual Model Report; Volume 1 - Summary of Existing Knowledge of Natural and Anthropogenic Influences Governing Subsurface Contaminant Transport in the INEEL Subregion of the Eastern Snake River Plain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wichlacz, Paul Louis; Orr, Brennan

    2002-08-01

    The National Research Council has defined a conceptual model as ''an evolving hypothesis identifying the important features, processes, and events controlling fluid flow and contaminant transport of consequence at a specific field site in the context of a recognized problem''. Presently, several subregional conceptual models are under development at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Additionally, facility-specific conceptual models have been described as part of INEEL environmental restoration activities. Compilation of these models is required to develop a comprehensive conceptual model that can be used to strategically plan for future groundwater research activities at the INEEL. Conceptual models of groundwater flow and contaminant transport at the INEEL include the description of the geologic framework, matrix hydraulic properties, and inflows and outflows. They also include definitions of the contaminant source term and contaminant transport mechanisms. The geologic framework of the INEEL subregion is described by the geometry of the system, stratigraphic units within the system, and structural features that affect groundwater flow and contaminant transport. These elements define geohydrologic units that make up the Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA). The United States Geological Survey (USGS) conceptual model encompasses approximately 1,920 mi2 of the eastern Snake River Plain. The Waste Area Group (WAG)-10 model includes the USGS area and additional areas to the northeast and southeast. Both conceptual models are bounded to the northwest by the Pioneer Mountains, Lost River Range, and Lemhi Mountains. They are bounded to the southeast by groundwater flow paths determined from aquifer water-level contours. The upgradient extent of the USGS model is a water-level contour that includes the northeastern boundary of the INEEL. The WAG-10 model includes more of the Mud Lake area to utilize previous estimates of

  11. Water-balance subregions (WBSs), soil types, and virtual crops for the five land-use time-frames used in the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset defines the model grid, water-balance subregions (WBSs), soil types, and virtual crops for the five land-use time-frames in the transient...

  12. Family initiated escalation of care for the deteriorating patient in hospital: Family centred care or just "box ticking".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Fenella J; Leslie, Gavin D; Marshall, Andrea P

    2016-11-01

    Family centred care is a shared belief that a child's emotional and developmental needs are best met when the health system involves the family in planning, delivery and evaluation of care. The important role that families contribute to health care outcomes is emphasised throughout the National Safety and Quality Healthcare Service (NSQHS) Standards. An emerging component is the family's contribution to Rapid Response Systems (RRS) through the early detection of patient clinical deterioration. This initiative has been driven, in part, by a number of high profile paediatric cases where it was identified that healthcare providers did not appropriately respond to families' concerns, resulting in patient deaths. This paper draws together the synergies between family centred care concepts, the NSQHS Standards, and the progress made to date in developing a family initiated process for escalating care with specific reference to paediatric acute care. A number of programs have been developed to guide implementation of family escalation of care. Measures of effectiveness of implementation have mainly focused on policy and process without first understanding barriers or facilitators through engagement with stakeholders and environmental assessment. Two recent reviews have not identified any rigorous attempts to evaluate implementation and only 11 reports are cited across these reviews to date. Evaluation of effectiveness of this complex intervention should take into account process measures of fidelity, dose and reach. There is also a need to assess the impact on families, particularly within a diverse cultural mix. An agreed definition for a paediatric RRS patient outcome measure is essential in evaluating the impact on patient safety and quality. Without this systematic evidence informed knowledge translation approach, then it would appear that progress in implementing family initiated deterioration of condition processes is more about meeting the NSQHS Standards - ticking

  13. Temporally Dissociable Contributions of Human Medial Prefrontal Subregions to Reward-Guided Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Tobias U; Hunt, Laurence T; Iannaccone, Reto; Walitza, Susanne; Brandeis, Daniel; Brem, Silvia; Dolan, Raymond J

    2015-08-12

    In decision making, dorsal and ventral medial prefrontal cortex show a sensitivity to key decision variables, such as reward prediction errors. It is unclear whether these signals reflect parallel processing of a common synchronous input to both regions, for example from mesocortical dopamine, or separate and consecutive stages in reward processing. These two perspectives make distinct predictions about the relative timing of feedback-related activity in each of these regions, a question we address here. To reconstruct the unique temporal contribution of dorsomedial (dmPFC) and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) to simultaneously measured EEG activity in human subjects, we developed a novel trialwise fMRI-informed EEG analysis that allows dissociating correlated and overlapping sources. We show that vmPFC uniquely contributes a sustained activation profile shortly after outcome presentation, whereas dmPFC contributes a later and more peaked activation pattern. This temporal dissociation is expressed mainly in the alpha band for a vmPFC signal, which contrasts with a theta based dmPFC signal. Thus, our data show reward-related vmPFC and dmPFC responses have distinct time courses and unique spectral profiles, findings that support distinct functional roles in a reward-processing network. Multiple subregions of the medial prefrontal cortex are known to be involved in decision making and learning, and expose similar response patterns in fMRI. Here, we used a novel approach to analyzing simultaneous EEG-fMRI that allows to dissociate the individual time courses of brain regions. We find that vmPFC and dmPFC have distinguishable time courses and time-frequency patterns. Copyright © 2015 Hauser, Hunt et al.

  14. The Formation of the Eastern Africa Rabies Network: A Sub-Regional Approach to Rabies Elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieracci, Emily G; Scott, Terence P; Coetzer, Andre; Athman, Mwatondo; Mutembei, Arithi; Kidane, Abraham Haile; Bekele, Meseret; Ayalew, Girma; Ntegeyibizaza, Samson; Assenga, Justine; Markalio, Godson; Munyua, Peninah; Nel, Louis H; Blanton, Jesse

    2017-01-01

    International rabies networks have been formed in many of the canine-rabies endemic regions around the world to create unified and directed regional approaches towards elimination. The aim of the first sub-regional Eastern Africa rabies network meeting, which included Kenya, Ethiopia, Tanzania, Rwanda, and Uganda, was to discuss how individual country strategies could be coordinated to address the unique challenges that are faced within the network. The Stepwise Approach towards Rabies Elimination and the Global Dog Rabies Elimination Pathway tool were used to stimulate discussion and planning to achieve the elimination of canine-mediated human rabies by 2030. Our analysis estimated a total dog population of 18.3 million dogs in the Eastern Africa region. The current dog vaccination coverage was estimated to be approximately 5% (915,000 dogs), with an estimated 4910 vaccinators available. Assuming that every vaccinator performs rabies vaccination, this equated to each vaccinator currently vaccinating 186 dogs per year, whilst the target would be to vaccinate 2609 dogs every year for the community to reach 70% coverage. In order to achieve the World Health Organization-recommended 70% vaccination coverage, an additional 11 million dogs need to be vaccinated each year, pointing to an average annual shortfall of $ 23 million USD in current spending to achieve elimination by 2030 across the region. Improved vaccination efficiency within the region could be achieved by improving logistics and/or incorporating multiple vaccination methods to increase vaccinator efficiency, and could serve to reduce the financial burden associated with rabies elimination. Regional approaches to rabies control are of value, as neighboring countries can share their unique challenges while, at the same time, common approaches can be developed and resource-saving strategies can be implemented.

  15. The Formation of the Eastern Africa Rabies Network: A Sub-Regional Approach to Rabies Elimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily G Pieracci

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: International rabies networks have been formed in many of the canine-rabies endemic regions around the world to create unified and directed regional approaches towards elimination. The aim of the first sub-regional Eastern Africa rabies network meeting, which included Kenya, Ethiopia, Tanzania, Rwanda, and Uganda, was to discuss how individual country strategies could be coordinated to address the unique challenges that are faced within the network. The Stepwise Approach towards Rabies Elimination and the Global Dog Rabies Elimination Pathway tool were used to stimulate discussion and planning to achieve the elimination of canine-mediated human rabies by 2030. Our analysis estimated a total dog population of 18.3 million dogs in the Eastern Africa region. The current dog vaccination coverage was estimated to be approximately 5% (915,000 dogs, with an estimated 4910 vaccinators available. Assuming that every vaccinator performs rabies vaccination, this equated to each vaccinator currently vaccinating 186 dogs per year, whilst the target would be to vaccinate 2609 dogs every year for the community to reach 70% coverage. In order to achieve the World Health Organization-recommended 70% vaccination coverage, an additional 11 million dogs need to be vaccinated each year, pointing to an average annual shortfall of $ 23 million USD in current spending to achieve elimination by 2030 across the region. Improved vaccination efficiency within the region could be achieved by improving logistics and/or incorporating multiple vaccination methods to increase vaccinator efficiency, and could serve to reduce the financial burden associated with rabies elimination. Regional approaches to rabies control are of value, as neighboring countries can share their unique challenges while, at the same time, common approaches can be developed and resource-saving strategies can be implemented.

  16. High-temperature ethanol production using thermotolerant yeast newly isolated from Greater Mekong Subregion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atiya Techaparin

    Full Text Available Abstract The application of high-potential thermotolerant yeasts is a key factor for successful ethanol production at high temperatures. Two hundred and thirty-four yeast isolates from Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS countries, i.e., Thailand, The Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR and Vietnam were obtained. Five thermotolerant yeasts, designated Saccharomyces cerevisiae KKU-VN8, KKU-VN20, and KKU-VN27, Pichia kudriavzevii KKU-TH33 and P. kudriavzevii KKU-TH43, demonstrated high temperature and ethanol tolerance levels up to 45 °C and 13% (v/v, respectively. All five strains produced higher ethanol concentrations and exhibited greater productivities and yields than the industrial strain S. cerevisiae TISTR5606 during high-temperature fermentation at 40 °C and 43 °C. S. cerevisiae KKU-VN8 demonstrated the best performance for ethanol production from glucose at 37 °C with an ethanol concentration of 72.69 g/L, a productivity of 1.59 g/L/h and a theoretical ethanol yield of 86.27%. The optimal conditions for ethanol production of S. cerevisiae KKU-VN8 from sweet sorghum juice (SSJ at 40 °C were achieved using the Box-Behnken experimental design (BBD. The maximal ethanol concentration obtained during fermentation was 89.32 g/L, with a productivity of 2.48 g/L/h and a theoretical ethanol yield of 96.32%. Thus, the newly isolated thermotolerant S. cerevisiae KKU-VN8 exhibits a great potential for commercial-scale ethanol production in the future.

  17. Potentiation of amygdala AMPA receptor activity selectively promotes escalated alcohol self-administration in a CaMKII-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannady, Reginald; Fisher, Kristen R; Graham, Caitlin; Crayle, Jesse; Besheer, Joyce; Hodge, Clyde W

    2017-05-01

    Growing evidence indicates that drugs of abuse gain control over the individual by usurping glutamate-linked mechanisms of neuroplasticity in reward-related brain regions. Accordingly, we have shown that glutamate α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR) activity in the amygdala is required for the positive reinforcing effects of alcohol, which underlie the initial stages of addiction. It is unknown, however, if enhanced AMPAR activity in the amygdala facilitates alcohol self-administration, which is a kernel premise of glutamate hypotheses of addiction. Here, we show that low-dose alcohol (0.6 g/kg/30 minutes) self-administration increases phosphorylation (activation) of AMPAR subtype GluA1 S831 (pGluA1 S831) in the central amygdala (CeA), basolateral amygdala and nucleus accumbens core (AcbC) of selectively bred alcohol-preferring P-rats as compared with behavior-matched (non-drug) sucrose controls. The functional role of enhanced AMPAR activity was assessed via site-specific infusion of the AMPAR positive modulator, aniracetam, in the CeA and AcbC prior to alcohol self-administration. Intra-CeA aniracetam increased alcohol-reinforced but not sucrose-reinforced responding and was ineffective following intra-AcbC infusion. Because GluA1 S831 is a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) substrate, we sought to determine if AMPAR regulation of enhanced alcohol self-administration is dependent on CaMKII activity. Intra-CeA infusion of the cell-permeable CaMKII peptide inhibitor myristolated autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide (m-AIP) dose-dependently reduced alcohol self-administration. A subthreshold dose of m-AIP also blocked the aniracetam-induced escalation of alcohol self-administration, demonstrating that AMPAR-mediated potentiation of alcohol reinforcement requires CaMKII activity in the amygdala. Enhanced activity of plasticity-linked AMPAR-CaMKII signaling in the amygdala may promote escalated alcohol use

  18. Subthreshold depressive disorder in adolescents: predictors of escalation to full-syndrome depressive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Daniel N; Shankman, Stewart A; Lewinsohn, Peter M; Seeley, John R

    2009-07-01

    Subthreshold depressive disorder is one of the best established risk factors for the onset of full-syndrome depressive disorders. However, many youths with subthreshold depressive disorder do not develop full-syndrome depression. We examined predictors of escalation to full-syndrome depressive disorders in a community sample of 225 adolescents with subthreshold depressive disorder. Criteria for subthreshold depressive disorder were an episode of depressed mood or loss of interest or pleasure lasting at least 1 week and at least two of the seven other DSM-IV-associated symptoms for major depression. Participants were assessed four times from mid-adolescence to age 30 years using semistructured diagnostic interviews. The estimated risk for escalation to full-syndrome depressive disorders was 67%. Five variables accounted for unique variance in predicting escalation: severity of depressive symptoms, medical conditions/symptoms, history of suicidal ideation, history of anxiety disorder, and familial loading for depression. Adolescents with three or more risk factors had an estimated 90% chance of escalating to full-syndrome depressive disorder, compared with 47% of adolescents with fewer than three risk factors. These data may be useful in identifying a subgroup of youths with subthreshold depressive disorder who are at especially high risk for escalating to full-syndrome depressive disorders.

  19. Benefits and unintended consequences of antimicrobial de-escalation: Implications for stewardship programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josie Hughes

    Full Text Available Sequential antimicrobial de-escalation aims to minimize resistance to high-value broad-spectrum empiric antimicrobials by switching to alternative drugs when testing confirms susceptibility. Though widely practiced, the effects de-escalation are not well understood. Definitions of interventions and outcomes differ among studies. We use mathematical models of the transmission and evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an intensive care unit to assess the effect of de-escalation on a broad range of outcomes, and clarify expectations. In these models, de-escalation reduces the use of high-value drugs and preserves the effectiveness of empiric therapy, while also selecting for multidrug-resistant strains and leaving patients vulnerable to colonization and superinfection. The net effect of de-escalation in our models is to increase infection prevalence while also increasing the probability of effective treatment. Changes in mortality are small, and can be either positive or negative. The clinical significance of small changes in outcomes such as infection prevalence and death may exceed more easily detectable changes in drug use and resistance. Integrating harms and benefits into ranked outcomes for each patient may provide a way forward in the analysis of these tradeoffs. Our models provide a conceptual framework for the collection and interpretation of evidence needed to inform antimicrobial stewardship.

  20. Ventilator-associated pneumonia: the influence of bacterial resistance, prescription errors, and de-escalation of antimicrobial therapy on mortality rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Souza-Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract Ventilator-associated pneumonia is the most prevalent nosocomial infection in intensive care units and is associated with high mortality rates (14–70%. Aim This study evaluated factors influencing mortality of patients with Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP, including bacterial resistance, prescription errors, and de-escalation of antibiotic therapy. Methods This retrospective study included 120 cases of Ventilator-associated pneumonia admitted to the adult adult intensive care unit of the Federal University of Uberlândia. The chi-square test was used to compare qualitative variables. Student's t-test was used for quantitative variables and multiple logistic regression analysis to identify independent predictors of mortality. Findings De-escalation of antibiotic therapy and resistant bacteria did not influence mortality. Mortality was 4 times and 3 times higher, respectively, in patients who received an inappropriate antibiotic loading dose and in patients whose antibiotic dose was not adjusted for renal function. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed the incorrect adjustment for renal function was the only independent factor associated with increased mortality. Conclusion Prescription errors influenced mortality of patients with Ventilator-associated pneumonia, underscoring the challenge of proper Ventilator-associated pneumonia treatment, which requires continuous reevaluation to ensure that clinical response to therapy meets expectations.

  1. Audience reactions to peace journalism: How supporters and critics of the Israeli policy process escalation and de-escalation oriented media frames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Thiel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on an experiment that uses the Israeli-Palestinian conflict as a natural laboratory for studying how recipients make sense of escalation vs. de-escalation oriented news articles. The results of the study indicate that media frames and individual frames have both a direct effect and complex interaction effects on participants’ text understanding. Particularly the effect of media war frames diminishes if they are incongruent with participants’ individual frames, and the propaganda function of reports about violence and human casualties can be neutralized if framed according to a peace frame. If participants had a priori positioned themselves in favor of the perpetrator, they may produce reactance, however.

  2. Choosing between stairs and escalators in China: The impact of location, height and pedestrian volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharias, John; Tang, Boshen

    2015-01-01

    This research examines whether Beijing residents are more or less likely than Montréal residents to avoid stair climbing, by replicating a study in Montréal, Canada that measured the impacts of distance between stairs and escalator, height between floors and pedestrian volume on stair climbing rate. 15 stairways, 14 up-escalators and 13 down-escalators were selected in 13 publicly accessible settings in Beijing. Distance between the bottom or top of nearest stair and escalator combinations varied from 2.1 m to 114.1 m with height between floors varying from 3.3 m to 21.7 m. Simultaneous counts were conducted on stair and escalator pairs, for a total of 37,081 counted individuals. In the ascent model, pedestrian volume accounted for 16.3% of variance in stair climbing, 16.4% when height was added and 45.1% when distance was added. In the descent model, 40.9% of variance was explained by pedestrian volume, 41.5% when height was added and 45.5% when distance was added. Separating stairs and escalator is effective in increasing stair climbing in Beijing, accounting for 29% of the variance in stair climbing, compared with 43% in Montreal. As in the Montreal case, distance has less effect on stair use rate when descending. Overall, 25.4% of Beijingers opted for stairs when ascending compared with 20.3% of Montrealers, and for descending 32.8% and 31.1% respectively.

  3. Ligand-binding domain subregions contributing to bimodal agonism in cyclic nucleotide–gated channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wai-Fung; Chan, Kerry S.C.; Michaleski, Matthew S.; Haesler, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide–gated (CNG) channels bind cGMP or cAMP in a cytoplasmic ligand–binding domain (BD), and this binding typically increases channel open probability (Po) without inducing desensitization. However, the catfish CNGA2 (fCNGA2) subtype exhibits bimodal agonism, whereby steady-state Po increases with initial cGMP-binding events (“pro” action) up to a maximum of 0.4, but decreases with subsequent cGMP-binding events (“con” action) occurring at concentrations >3 mM. We sought to clarify if low pro-action efficacy was either necessary or sufficient for con action to operate. To find BD residues responsible for con action or low pro-action efficacy or both, we constructed chimeric CNG channels: subregions of the fCNGA2 BD were substituted with corresponding sequence from the rat CNGA4 BD, which does not support con action. Constructs were expressed in frog oocytes and tested by patch clamp of cell-free membranes. For nearly all BD elements, we found at least one construct where replacing that element preserved robust con action, with a ratio of steady-state conductances, g(10 mM cGMP)/g(3 mM cGMP) < 0.75. When all of the BD sequence C terminal of strand β6 was replaced, g(10 mM cGMP)/g(3 mM cGMP) was increased to 0.95 ± 0.05 (n = 7). However, this apparent attenuation of con action could be explained by an increase in the efficacy of pro action for all agonists, controlled by a conserved “phosphate-binding cassette” motif that contacts ligand; this produces high Po values that are less sensitive to shifts in gating equilibrium. In contrast, substituting a single valine in the N-terminal helix αA abolished con action (g(30 mM cGMP)/g(3 mM cGMP) increased to 1.26 ± 0.24; n = 7) without large increases in pro-action efficacy. Our work dissociates the two functional features of low pro-action efficacy and con action, and moreover identifies a separate structural determinant for each. PMID:21624949

  4. Mercury in soils and microbial biomass of the South Kirgizstan subregion of the biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadim, Ermakov; Valentina, Danilova; Ul'yana, Gulyaeva

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to clear up the role of soil microflora in the mercury concentration by microorganisms as they are related to a problem of the soil remediation. To complete the tasks as assigned, 150 samples of both various soils formed over the ore bodies outside the ore occurrence zones and waste dumps have been taken in the areas of South Kirgizstan Some 45 soil samples (horizon A, 0-20 cm) and dumps were used for microbiological analyses [1, 2]. The soil cover as seen in the work areas is represented by Haplic Calcisols (gray) soils. All the soils are generally calcareous, in some cases salted, and have various compositions. To grow the microbial biomass in order to determine mercury content levels in there, some soil media characterized by natural concentrations, ratios and forms of the compounds of these metals were used The results showed that the mercury concentrations in soils of the sampling area varied from 0.028 to 357.3 mg/kg. The highest metal content indices (up to 357.3 mg/kg) were found for soils formed over ores, and waste dumps. The lowest mercury content (0.028 to 0.066 mg/kg) was found for soils of the control area. The data on mercury and/or antimony accumulation by the biomass of soil microorganisms grown in soil media are represented. The soil samples having various mercury levels were collected in the South Kirgizstan subregion of the biosphere. It was established that the accumulation of the metals by soil microflora depends on their content in the soil, the microorganism growth is strongly inhibited at mercury concentration of 300 mg/kg in soil. A direct and reliable correlation between the metal content level in soils and their concentration by microorganisms is found. Within the background sites a tendency of increase in mercury extraction from the soil with 1 M HCl solution, in particular from salted soils is observed. In contrast, in the conditions of an excess of mercury content in soils of ore grounds, a weak

  5. Gut microbiota and tacrolimus dosing in kidney transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R Lee

    Full Text Available Tacrolimus dosing to establish therapeutic levels in recipients of organ transplants is a challenging task because of much interpatient and intrapatient variability in drug absorption, metabolism, and disposition. In view of the reported impact of gut microbial species on drug metabolism, we investigated the relationship between the gut microbiota and tacrolimus dosing requirements in this pilot study of adult kidney transplant recipients. Serial fecal specimens were collected during the first month of transplantation from 19 kidney transplant recipients who either required a 50% increase from initial tacrolimus dosing during the first month of transplantation (Dose Escalation Group, n=5 or did not require such an increase (Dose Stable Group, n=14. We characterized bacterial composition in the fecal specimens by deep sequencing of the PCR amplified 16S rRNA V4-V5 region and we investigated the hypothesis that gut microbial composition is associated with tacrolimus dosing requirements. Initial tacrolimus dosing was similar in the Dose Escalation Group and in the Stable Group (4.2 ± 1.1 mg/day vs. 3.8 ± 0.8 mg/day, respectively, P=0.61, two-way between-group ANOVA using contrasts but became higher in the Dose Escalation Group than in the Dose Stable Group by the end of the first transplantation month (9.6 ± 2.4 mg/day vs. 3.3 ± 1.5 mg/day, respectively, P<0.001. Our systematic characterization of the gut microbial composition identified that fecal Faecalibacterium prausnitzii abundance in the first week of transplantation was 11.8% in the Dose Escalation Group and 0.8% in the Dose Stable Group (P=0.002, Wilcoxon Rank Sum test, P<0.05 after Benjamini-Hochberg correction for multiple hypotheses. Fecal Faecalibacterium prausnitzii abundance in the first week of transplantation was positively correlated with future tacrolimus dosing at 1 month (R=0.57, P=0.01 and had a coefficient ± standard error of 1.0 ± 0.6 (P=0.08 after multivariable linear

  6. Revisiting the cost escalation curse of nuclear power: New lessons from the French experience

    OpenAIRE

    Escobar Rangel, Lina; Lévêque, François

    2012-01-01

    Since the first wave of nuclear reactors in 1970 to the construction of Generation III+ reactors in Finland and France in 2005 and 2007 respectively, nuclear power seems to be doomed to a cost escalation curse. In this paper we reexamine this issue for the French nuclear power fleet. Using the construction costs from the Cour des Comptes report, that was publicly available in 2012, we found that previous studies overestimated the cost escalation. Although, it is undeniable that the scale-up e...

  7. Real-world navigation in amnestic mild cognitive impairment: The relation to visuospatial memory and volume of hippocampal subregions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Jessica; Sandkamp, Richard; Minkova, Lora; Schumacher, Lena V; Kaller, Christoph P; Abdulkadir, Ahmed; Klöppel, Stefan

    2017-12-10

    Spatial disorientation is a frequent symptom in Alzheimer's disease and in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In the clinical routine, spatial orientation is less often tested with real-world navigation but rather with 2D visuoconstructive tasks. However, reports about the association between the two types of tasks are sparse. Additionally, spatial disorientation has been linked to volume of the right hippocampus but it remains unclear whether right hippocampal subregions have differential involvement in real-world navigation. Yet, this would help uncover different functional roles of the subregions, which would have important implications for understanding the neuronal underpinnings of navigation skills. We compared patients with amnestic MCI (aMCI; n = 25) and healthy elderly controls (HC; n = 25) in a real-world navigation task that engaged different spatial processes. The association between real-world navigation and different visuoconstructive tasks was tested (i.e., figures from the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease; CERAD, the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure task; and clock drawing). Furthermore, the relation between spatial navigation and volume of right hippocampal subregions was examined. Linear regression and relative weight analysis were applied for statistical analyses. Patients with aMCI were significantly less able to correctly navigate through a route compared to HC but had comparable map drawing and landmark recognition skills. The association between visuoconstructive tasks and real-world navigation was only significant when using the visuospatial memory component of the Rey figure. In aMCI, more volume of the right hippocampal tail was significantly associated with better navigation skills, while volume of the right CA2/3 region was a significant predictor in HC. Standard visuoconstructive tasks (e.g., the CERAD figures or clock drawing) are not sufficient to detect real-world spatial disabilities in aMCI. Consequently, more

  8. Role of alcohol consumption in escalation to violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miczek, Klaus A; Fish, Eric W; De Almeida, Rosa M M; Faccidomo, Sara; Debold, Joseph F

    2004-12-01

    No other drug has been associated with aggressive and violent behavior more than alcohol has. A major characteristic of the link between alcohol and social interactions is the very large variation in who becomes more aggressive while drinking and who does not. Tracing the origins of these individual differences has led to a focus on predispositions, such as the antisocial behavior of Type 2 alcoholics. Successful development of an experimental procedure to model heightened aggressive behavior after voluntary consumption of alcohol has facilitated the neurobiologic analysis of the link between alcohol and aggression. From a pharmacologic perspective, consumption of low to moderate doses of alcohol engenders heightened aggressive behavior in a significant minority of individuals before the circulation of appreciable amounts of the aldehyde metabolite. Ionophoric receptors such as NMDA, 5-HT(3) and GABA(A) have been identified in the brain as major sites of action for alcohol in the dose range that is relevant for engendering heightened aggression. Actions at the GABA(A) receptor complex that depend on particular GABA(A) subunits appear to be necessary for alcohol-heightened aggression. Genes that encode the synthesis of these alpha and gamma subunits are potentially significant markers for those individuals that are prone to engage in heightened aggressive behavior after the consumption of alcohol. Of particular importance are the reciprocal interactions between GABA and serotonin. Activating specific serotonin receptor subtypes such as 5-HT(1B) receptors reduces alcohol-heightened aggressive behavior. How these GABAergic and serotonergic corticolimbic mechanisms for alcohol-heightened aggression develop during the adolescent period remains an area of urgent study.

  9. Multicriteria optimization of the spatial dose distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlaefer, Alexander [Medical Robotics Group, Universität zu Lübeck, Lübeck 23562, Germany and Institute of Medical Technology, Hamburg University of Technology, Hamburg 21073 (Germany); Viulet, Tiberiu [Medical Robotics Group, Universität zu Lübeck, Lübeck 23562 (Germany); Muacevic, Alexander; Fürweger, Christoph [European CyberKnife Center Munich, Munich 81377 (Germany)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Treatment planning for radiation therapy involves trade-offs with respect to different clinical goals. Typically, the dose distribution is evaluated based on few statistics and dose–volume histograms. Particularly for stereotactic treatments, the spatial dose distribution represents further criteria, e.g., when considering the gradient between subregions of volumes of interest. The authors have studied how to consider the spatial dose distribution using a multicriteria optimization approach.Methods: The authors have extended a stepwise multicriteria optimization approach to include criteria with respect to the local dose distribution. Based on a three-dimensional visualization of the dose the authors use a software tool allowing interaction with the dose distribution to map objectives with respect to its shape to a constrained optimization problem. Similarly, conflicting criteria are highlighted and the planner decides if and where to relax the shape of the dose distribution.Results: To demonstrate the potential of spatial multicriteria optimization, the tool was applied to a prostate and meningioma case. For the prostate case, local sparing of the rectal wall and shaping of a boost volume are achieved through local relaxations and while maintaining the remaining dose distribution. For the meningioma, target coverage is improved by compromising low dose conformality toward noncritical structures. A comparison of dose–volume histograms illustrates the importance of spatial information for achieving the trade-offs.Conclusions: The results show that it is possible to consider the location of conflicting criteria during treatment planning. Particularly, it is possible to conserve already achieved goals with respect to the dose distribution, to visualize potential trade-offs, and to relax constraints locally. Hence, the proposed approach facilitates a systematic exploration of the optimal shape of the dose distribution.

  10. A Co-operative Inquiry Into Generating, Describing, and Transforming Knowledge About De-escalation Practices in Mental Health Settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berring, Lene Lauge; Hummelvoll, Jan Kåre; Pedersen, Liselotte

    2016-01-01

    De-escalation is concerned with managing violent behaviour without resorting to coercive measures. Co-operative Inquiry provided the conceptual basis for generating knowledge regarding de-escalation practices in acute mental health care settings. The research included service users and staff memb...

  11. Temporal Aspects of Moral Disengagement in School Bullying: Crystallization or Escalation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermann, Marie-Louise

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the stability and change in bullying behavior and their relation to increases and decreases in moral disengagement, specifically exploring whether crystallization and escalation of disengagement occur. Within a 1-year span, two sets of data were collected. A total of 567 sixth to eighth graders participated in both data…

  12. Siding and other reactions to a conflict: A theory of escalation toward outsiders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Vliert, E

    1981-01-01

    Siding in a dyadic conflict is important because it precipitates escalation. Nevertheless, little is known about how and why a nonprofessional outsider (P) reacts when a conflict party puts him under pressure to take sides. Coalition and role conflict theories suggest four behavior alternatives

  13. Journal Price Escalation and the Market for Information: The Librarians' Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingma, Bruce R.; Eppard, Philip B.

    1992-01-01

    Analyzes the problem of journal price escalation as one of equilibrium between two market segments--the library market and the market for individual subscriptions. Argues that high quality photocopying has encouraged individuals to rely on library subscriptions and proposes that the socially responsible solution is to increase photocopy costs and…

  14. Evaluation methodology for tariff design under escalating penetrations of distributed energy resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdelmotteleb, I.I.A.; Gómez, Tomás; Reneses, Javier

    2017-01-01

    As the penetration of distributed energy resources (DERs) escalates in distribution networks, new network tariffs are needed to cope with this new situation. These tariffs should allocate network costs to users, promoting an efficient use of the distribution network. This paper proposes a

  15. Silent Escalation: Salaries of Senior University Administrators in Ontario, 1996-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essaji, Azim; Horton, Sue

    2010-01-01

    The real compensation of senior university administrators in Ontario has increased by over 43% in the last decade. The escalation is especially pronounced for presidents and provosts: their pay has risen by 63% in real terms between 1996 and 2006. These trends have been evident in universities of all types, for both genders and for professional as…

  16. Lateral and escalation therapy in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, Emanuele; Leone, Carmela; Zanghì, Aurora; Fermo, Salvatore Lo; Patti, Francesco

    2016-09-01

    Performing a therapeutic switch in MS is still a matter of debate. Objective of our study is to compare switching to another first-line therapy with switching to a second-line therapy in persons with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (pwRRMS). A retrospective analysis of data prospectively collected was performed. PwRRMS experiencing on-treatment disease activity were included. No clinical relapse, no sustained disability progression by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), and no radiological activity (new T2 and/or gadolinium-enhanced brain lesions) were used as indicators of no disease activity (NEDA 3). Time to reach the first relapse after switch and time to reach an EDSS of 4.0 were also evaluated. Ninety-one pwRRMS were enrolled. Forty-eight (52.7 %) were on lateral switch, and 43 (47.3 %) on escalation switch. At baseline, the two groups differed for T2 and T1 brain lesions number (higher in the escalation group, p < 0.005). The proportion of pwRRMS who were NEDA 3 after 24 months from the switch was similar in the two groups (20.8 % in lateral group and 18.6 % in escalation group). No difference in timing to reach the first relapse after switch and an EDSS of 4.0 were found. Therefore, in selected pwRRMS, lateral and escalation strategies showed similar efficacy in delaying MS progression.

  17. The social process of escalation: a promising focus for crisis management research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Johan; Dekker, Sidney; Nyce, James M; Amer-Wåhlin, Isis

    2012-06-15

    This study identifies a promising, new focus for the crisis management research in the health care domain. After reviewing the literature on health care crisis management, there seems to be a knowledge-gap regarding organisational change and adaption, especially when health care situations goes from normal, to non-normal, to pathological and further into a state of emergency or crisis. Based on studies of escalating situations in obstetric care it is suggested that two theoretical perspectives (contingency theory and the idea of failure as a result of incomplete interaction) tend to simplify the issue of escalation rather than attend to its complexities (including the various power relations among the stakeholders involved). However studying the process of escalation as inherently complex and social allows us to see the definition of a situation as normal or non-normal as an exercise of power in itself, rather than representing a putatively correct response to a particular emergency. The concept of escalation, when treated this way, can help us further the analysis of clinical and institutional acts and competence. It can also turn our attention to some important elements in a class of social phenomenon, crises and emergencies, that so far have not received the attention they deserve. Focusing on organisational choreography, that interplay of potential factors such as power, professional identity, organisational accountability, and experience, is not only a promising focus for future naturalistic research but also for developing more pragmatic strategies that can enhance organisational coordination and response in complex events.

  18. Escalation of drug self-administration as a hallmark of persistent addiction liability.

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    Edwards, Scott; Koob, George F

    2013-09-01

    Drug addiction is a progressive, relapsing disease comprised of interlocking stages of disordered motivation. Numerous animal models describing various stages of the addiction process have been developed over the past few decades, providing considerable advantages for the modeling of drug addiction compared with other complex psychiatric disease states. Escalation of drug self-administration has emerged as a widely accepted operant conditioning model of excessive drug intake. We further argue here that drug-escalated animals represent a comprehensive model of addiction according to the manifestations of behavioral neuroadaptations resulting directly or indirectly from excessive drug consumption. In particular, drug-escalated animals exhibit a host of symptoms in line with multiple Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria for substance dependence, which can be summarized as an emergence of uncontrollable drug-taking and drug-seeking behaviors as a consequence of within-circuit and between-circuit neuroadaptations. Such a transition from impulsive drug sampling to compulsive intake represents a highly valid conceptualization of the addiction timeline in humans, and further investigation of persistent or near-permanent (e.g. epigenetic) neuroadaptations generated by operant drug intake escalation models will continue to provide mechanisms and therapeutic interventions for reversing the aberrant neuroplasticity underlying addiction.

  19. Abortion incidence between 1990 and 2014: global, regional, and subregional levels and trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgh, Gilda; Bearak, Jonathan; Singh, Susheela; Bankole, Akinrinola; Popinchalk, Anna; Ganatra, Bela; Rossier, Clémentine; Gerdts, Caitlin; Tunçalp, Özge; Johnson, Brooke Ronald; Johnston, Heidi Bart; Alkema, Leontine

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background Information about the incidence of induced abortion is needed to motivate and inform efforts to help women avoid unintended pregnancies and to monitor progress toward that end. We estimate subregional, regional, and global levels and trends in abortion incidence for 1990 to 2014, and abortion rates in subgroups of women. We use the results to estimate the proportion of pregnancies that end in abortion and examine whether abortion rates vary in countries grouped by the legal status of abortion. Methods We requested abortion data from government agencies and compiled data from international sources and nationally representative studies. With data for 1069 country-years, we estimated incidence using a Bayesian hierarchical time series model whereby the overall abortion rate is a function of the modelled rates in subgroups of women of reproductive age defined by their marital status and contraceptive need and use, and the sizes of these subgroups. Findings We estimated that 35 abortions (90% uncertainty interval [UI] 33 to 44) occurred annually per 1000 women aged 15–44 years worldwide in 2010–14, which was 5 points less than 40 (39–48) in 1990–94 (90% UI for decline −11 to 0). Because of population growth, the annual number of abortions worldwide increased by 5·9 million (90% UI −1·3 to 15·4), from 50·4 million in 1990–94 (48·6 to 59·9) to 56·3 million (52·4 to 70·0) in 2010–14. In the developed world, the abortion rate declined 19 points (–26 to −14), from 46 (41 to 59) to 27 (24 to 37). In the developing world, we found a non-significant 2 point decline (90% UI −9 to 4) in the rate from 39 (37 to 47) to 37 (34 to 46). Some 25% (90% UI 23 to 29) of pregnancies ended in abortion in 2010–14. Globally, 73% (90% UI 59 to 82) of abortions were obtained by married women in 2010–14 compared with 27% (18 to 41) obtained by unmarried women. We did not observe an association between the abortion rates for 2010–14 and the

  20. Toward a cladistic model for the Caribbean subregion: Delimitation of areas of endemism

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    Morrone Juan J.

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available A new biogeographic scherne for the Caribbean subregion is proposed herein, where the following 29 provinces are recognized: Sierra Madre Occidental (western Mexico: states of Chihuahua, Durango, Zacatecas, Sonora, Sinaloa, Nayarit, and Jalisco, above 1,000 m altitude, Sierra Madre Oriental (eastern Mexico: states of San Luis Potosí, Coahuila, Hidalgo, Nuevo León, and Querétaro, above 1,500 m altitud e, Transmexican Volcanic Belt (central Mexico: states ofGuanajuato, Mexico, Distrito Federal, Jalisco, Michoacán, Puebla, Oaxaca, Tlaxcala, and Veracruz, Balsas Basin (central Mexico: states ofGuerrero, Mexico, Jalisco, Michoacán, Morelos, Oaxaca, and Puebla, below 2,000 m altitude, Sierra Madre del Sur (south central Mexico, from southern Michoacán to Guerrero and Oaxaca, and part of Pucbla, abo ve 1,000 m altitude, Mexican Gulf (coast ofthe Mexican Gulf, in eastern Mexico, Belize, and northern Guatemala, Yucatán peninsula (Yucatán península, in the Mexican states of Carnpeche, Yucatán, and Quintana Roo, below 200 m altitude, Mexican Pacific Coast (western Mexico, in the Pacific coast ofthe states ofSinaloa, Nayarit, Colima, Jalisco, Michoacán, Guerrero, Oaxaca, and Chiapas, Chiapas (Mexico, Guatemala, and Nicaragua, basically corresponding to the Sierra Madre de Chiapas, from 500 to 2,000 m altitude, Eastern Central Arnerica (eastern Central America, frorn Guatemala to Panarna, Western Panamanian Isthrnus (western Central America, from Costa Rica to western Panama, Bahama (Bahama archipelago, comprising the islands of Abaco-Grand Bahama, Andros-Birnini, Cat, Crooked-Mayaguana, Exurnas, Inaguas, Long-Ragged Island Range, Mona, New Providence-Eleutheras, San Salvador-Rum Cay, St. Eustatius, St. Kitts, St. Lucia, St. Martin, St. Vincent, and Turks and Caicos, Cuba (island ofCuba, Cayman islands (archipelago including Grand Cayman, Little Cayrnan, and Cayrnan Brac, Jamaica (island of Jamaica, Hispaniola (Dominican Republic and Haiti, Puerto

  1. From Crisis to De-escalation: An Examination of Politics in a U.S. High School Steroid Testing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Brennan K; Winsley, Kathryn; Fuller, Rhema D; Hutchinson, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Preventing the use of performance enhancing drugs in sport has long been a concern for policymakers. In the United States, amidst national attention the state of Texas constructed the country's largest steroid testing program for high school athletes. However, resource allocation steadily declined until the program was defunded in 2015. Using escalation of commitment theory as a framework, this conceptual paper examines the critical, but less studied, role of politics and de-escalation behavior that directed this distinct sport situation. By combining policy and media documents with the academic literature, this paper allows for a greater understanding of how the steroid testing program was formulated and implemented, which may influence how policymakers address steroids among amateur athletes in the future. This paper also offers new opportunities for future research by highlighting a new sport context in which escalation of commitment theory applies and specifically noting the significant role politics can play in escalation or de-escalation decision making.

  2. MRI T2 mapping of the asymptomatic supraspinatus tendon by age and imaging plane using clinically relevant subregions

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    Anz, Adam W., E-mail: anz.adam.w@gmail.com [The Steadman Clinic, Vail, CO (United States); Lucas, Erin P., E-mail: erin.lucas14@gmail.com [Steadman Philippon Research Institute, Vail, CO (United States); Fitzcharles, Eric K., E-mail: ericfitzcharles@gmail.com [Steadman Philippon Research Institute, Vail, CO (United States); Surowiec, Rachel K., E-mail: Rachel.surowiec@sprivail.org [Steadman Philippon Research Institute, Vail, CO (United States); Millett, Peter J., E-mail: drmillett@thesteadmanclinic.com [The Steadman Clinic, Vail, CO (United States); Ho, Charles P., E-mail: Charles.ho@sprivail.org [Steadman Philippon Research Institute, Vail, CO (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Diagnosis of partial rotator cuff tears and tendonopathy using conventional MRI has proven variable. Quantitative T2 mapping may have application for assessing rotator cuff health. In order to evaluate the usefulness of T2 mapping for the rotator cuff, methods must be refined for mapping the supraspinatus tendon, and normative T2 values must first be acquired. Materials and methods: This study was IRB approved. Thirty asymptomatic volunteers (age: 18–62) were evaluated with sagittal and coronal T2 mapping sequences. Manual segmentation of tendon and muscle as a unit and tendon alone was performed twice by two independent raters. Segmentations were divided into medial, middle and lateral subregions and mean T2 values calculated. Results: Anatomic comparison of mean T2 values illustrated highest values in the medial region, lowest values in the lateral region, and intermediate values for the middle region upon coronal segmentation (p < 0.001). In sagittal segmentations, there were higher values in the medial region and no significant differences between the lateral and middle subregions. No significant differences were found with comparison across age groups. Inter and intra-rater segmentation repeatability was excellent, with coefficients ranging from 0.85 to 0.99. Conclusion: T2 mapping illustrated anatomic variation along the supraspinatus muscle-tendon unit with low standard deviations and excellent repeatability, suggesting that changes in structure due to degeneration or changes associated with healing after repair may be detectable.

  3. Análisis de la industria cultural en el pacto de integración sub-regional andino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilo Fernández

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo general de la presente investigacion fue realizar un analisis de la industria cultural en el pacto de la integracion Sub-regional Andino, destancado el papel fundamental de esta industria como entidad de comunicacion que se construye y se modela a travez de signos culturales que se encuentran en la cotidianidad, en el discurso social y surgidas de realidades entrelazadas, siendo los medios de comunicacion los que hacen percibirlo de otra manera. Las bases teoricas describen como algunos elementos tento del contexto multidimensional de la region andina como elemento socio-juridicos y culturales influyen los aportes de autores tales como: Lorena Rincon, Lucrecia Morales, German Rey, Bernardo Klisberg, Marcelino Bisbal y Nestor Garcia Canclini, entre otros. El tipo de investigacion que se selecciono fue la descriptiva documental; para la cual se utilizo como instrumento de analisis una guia de observacion que permitio ubicar las principales categoria, sub-categorias y las unidades de analisis, de ocho (8 documentos (convenios, acuerdos y declaraciones que constituyeron en una muestra intencional de un total de 16 documentos seleccionados como poblacion inicial que conforman las bases de los pactos que ha suscrito la comunidad Andina de Naciones. Con referencia al analisis e interpretacion de los resultados, se constituyem en hallazgos los planteamientos ubicados en cada uno de los documentos estudiados confirmandose el papel central que juega la industria cultural para la integracion Sub-regional Andina, a pesar de no ser explico en algunos de los documentos.

  4. Exploring personality traits related to dopamine D2/3 receptor availability in striatal subregions of humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaggio, Fernando; Fervaha, Gagan; Chung, Jun Ku; Gerretsen, Philip; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Plitman, Eric; Iwata, Yusuke; Wilson, Alan; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2016-04-01

    While several studies have examined how particular personality traits are related to dopamine D2/3 receptor (D2/3R) availability in the striatum of humans, few studies have reported how multiple traits measured in the same persons are differentially related to D2/3R availability in different striatal sub-regions. We examined how personality traits measured with the Karolinska Scales of Personality are related to striatal D2/3R availability measured with [(11)C]-raclopride in 30 healthy humans. Based on previous the literature, five personality traits were hypothesized to be most likely related to D2/3R availability: impulsiveness, monotony avoidance, detachment, social desirability, and socialization. We found self-reported impulsiveness was negatively correlated with D2/3R availability in the ventral striatum and globus pallidus. After controlling for age and gender, monotony avoidance was also negatively correlated with D2/3R availability in the ventral striatum and globus pallidus. Socialization was positively correlated with D2/3R availability in the ventral striatum and putamen. After controlling for age and gender, the relationship between socialization and D2/3R availability in these regions survived correction for multiple comparisons (p-threshold=.003). Thus, within the same persons, different personality traits are differentially related to in vivo D2/3R availability in different striatal sub-regions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  5. Exploring peronality traits related to dopamine D2/3 receptor availability in striatal subregions of humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaggio, Fernando; Fervaha, Gagan; Chung, Jun Ku; Gerretsen, Philip; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Plitman, Eric; Iwata, Yusuke; Wilson, Alan; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    While several studies have examined how particular personality traits are related to dopamine D2/3 receptor (D2/3R) availability in the striatum of humans, few studies have reported how multiple traits measured in the same persons are differentially related to D2/3R availability in different striatal sub-regions. We examined how personality traits measured with the Karolinska Scales of Personality are related to striatal D2/3R availability measured with [11C]-raclopride in 30 healthy humans. Based on previous literature, five personality traits were hypothesized to be most likely related to D2/3R availability: impulsiveness, monotony avoidance, detachment, social desirability, and socialization. We found self-reported impulsiveness was negatively correlated with D2/3R availability in the ventral striatum and globus pallidus. After controlling for age and gender, monotony avoidance was also negatively correlated with D2/3R availability in the ventral striatum and globus pallidus. Socialization was positively correlated with D2/3R availability in the ventral striatum and putamen. After controlling for age and gender, the relationship between socialization and D2/3R availability in these regions survived correction for multiple comparisons (p-threshold=.003). Thus, within the same persons, different personality traits are differentially related to in vivo D2/3R availability in different striatal sub-regions. PMID:26944295

  6. Vegetation of the Hantam-Tanqua-Roggeveld subregion, South Africa Part 2: Succulent Karoo Biome related vegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helga van der Merwe

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The Hantam-Tanqua-Roggeveld subregion lies within the Succulent Karoo Hotspot that stretches along the western side of the Republic of South Africa and Namibia. This project, carried out to document the botanical diversity in the Hantam-Tanqua-Roggeveld subregion, was part of a project identified as a priority during the SKEP (Succulent Karoo Ecosystem Programme initiative in this Hotspot. Botanical surveys were conducted in an area covering over three million hectares. Satellite images of the area and topocadastral, land type and geology maps were used to stratify the area into relatively homogeneous units. An analysis of the floristic data of 390 sample plots identified two major floristic units, i.e. the Fynbos Biome related vegetation and the Succulent Karoo Biome related vegetation. A description of the vegetation related to the Succulent Karoo Biome is presented in this article. Seven associations, 16 subassociations and several mosaic vegetation units, consisting of more than one vegetation unit, were identified and mapped. Various threats to the vegetation in the region were identified during the survey and are briefly discussed.

  7. De-escalation techniques used, and reasons for seclusion and restraint, in a forensic psychiatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuivalainen, Satu; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri; Louheranta, Olavi; Putkonen, Anu; Repo-Tiihonen, Eila; Tiihonen, Jari

    2017-10-01

    In Finland, the Mental Health Act determines the legal basis for seclusion and restraint. Restrictive measures are implemented to manage challenging situations and should be used as a last resort in psychiatric inpatient care. In the present study, we examined the reasons for seclusion and restraint, as well as whether any de-escalation techniques were used to help patients calm down. Seclusion and restraint files from a 4-year period (1 June 2009-31 May 2013) were retrospectively investigated and analysed by content analysis. Descriptive statistics were calculated. A total of 144 episodes of seclusion and restraint were included to analyse the reasons for seclusion and restraint, and 113 episodes were analysed to examine unsuccessful de-escalation techniques. The most commonly-used techniques were one-to-one interaction with a patient (n = 74, 65.5% of n = 113) and administration of extra medication (n = 37, 32.7% of n = 113). The reasons for seclusion and restraint were threatening harmful behaviour (n = 51, 35.4% of n = 144), direct harmful behaviour (n = 43, 29.9%), indirect harmful behaviour (n = 42, 29.1%), and other behaviours (n = 8, 5.6%). In general, the same de-escalation techniques were used with most patients. Most episodes of seclusion or restraint were due to threats of violence or direct violence. Individual means of self-regulation and patient guidance on these techniques are needed. Additionally, staff should be educated on a diverse range of de-escalation techniques. Future studies should focus on examining de-escalation techniques for the prevention of seclusion. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  8. Student nurses' de-escalation of patient aggression: a pretest-posttest intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau, Johannes; Halfens, Ruud; Needham, Ian; Dassen, Theo

    2010-06-01

    Experts recommend staff training to prevent and manage aggressive situations involving patients or their relatives. However, in many countries this subject is not covered in pre-registration nursing education. In addition, the evidence regarding its impact on practical placements remains weak. This study examines the influence of an aggression management training programme for nursing students on their performance in de-escalating aggressive patients. Pretest-posttest within-and-between-groups design. A School of Nursing in Germany. Convenience sample out of six classes of nursing students at differing educational levels (10th to 28th month of nursing education, n=78, mean age=22). In a cross-sectional and longitudinal two groups before and after design nursing students encountered two scenarios (A or B) with simulation patients. After completing the training, each student was confronted with the unknown other scenario. De-escalation experts from three German-speaking countries evaluated 156 video scenes using the De-escalating Aggressive Behaviour Scale (DABS), not knowing whether the videos had been recorded before or after the training. Mean values and statistical significance tests were computed to compare the results. The performance levels of students who had been trained rose significantly from 2.74 to 3.65 as measured by the DABS on a 5-point Likert scale (Wilcoxon test pstudents managed scenario A significantly better than the untrained students (untrained 2.50, trained 3.70; Mann-Whitney-U-test pstudents' age or duration of previous nursing education. Aggression management training is able to improve nursing students' performance in de-escalating aggressive behaviour. A maturation-effect on the de-escalating performance due to general nursing education or age is unlikely. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of antibiotic de-escalation on clinical outcomes in community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viasus, Diego; Simonetti, Antonella F; Garcia-Vidal, Carolina; Niubó, Jordi; Dorca, Jordi; Carratalà, Jordi

    2017-02-01

    Although antibiotic de-escalation is regarded as a measure that reduces selection pressure, adverse drug effects and costs, evidence supporting this practice in community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia (CAPP) is lacking. We carried out a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of a cohort of hospitalized adults with CAPP. Pneumococcal aetiology was established in patients with one or more positive cultures for Streptococcus pneumoniae obtained from blood, sterile fluids or sputum, and/or a positive urinary antigen test. De-escalation therapy was considered when the initial antibiotic therapy was narrowed to penicillin, amoxicillin or amoxicillin/clavulanate within the first 72 h after admission. The primary outcomes were 30 day mortality and length of hospital stay (LOS). Adjustment for confounders was performed with multivariate and propensity score analyses. Of 1410 episodes of CAPP, antibiotic de-escalation within the first 72 h after admission was performed in 166 cases. After adjustment, antibiotic de-escalation was not associated with a higher risk of mortality (OR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.24-2.81), but it was found to be a protective factor for prolonged LOS (above the median) (OR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.30-0.70). Similar results were found in patients classified into high-risk pneumonia severity index classes (IV-V), those with clinical instability and those with bacteraemia. No significant differences were documented in adverse drug reactions or readmission (Antibiotic de-escalation seems to be safe and effective in reducing the duration of LOS, and did not adversely affect outcomes of patients with CAPP, even those with bacteraemia and severe disease, and those who were clinically unstable. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Amygdala 14-3-3ζ as a novel modulator of escalating alcohol intake in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi M B Lesscher

    Full Text Available Alcoholism is a devastating brain disorder that affects millions of people worldwide. The development of alcoholism is caused by alcohol-induced maladaptive changes in neural circuits involved in emotions, motivation, and decision-making. Because of its involvement in these processes, the amygdala is thought to be a key neural structure involved in alcohol addiction. However, the molecular mechanisms that govern the development of alcoholism are incompletely understood. We have previously shown that in a limited access choice paradigm, C57BL/6J mice progressively escalate their alcohol intake and display important behavioral characteristic of alcohol addiction, in that they become insensitive to quinine-induced adulteration of alcohol. This study used the limited access choice paradigm to study gene expression changes in the amygdala during the escalation to high alcohol consumption in C57BL/6J mice. Microarray analysis revealed that changes in gene expression occurred predominantly after one week, i.e. during the initial escalation of alcohol intake. One gene that stood out from our analysis was the adapter protein 14-3-3ζ, which was up-regulated during the transition from low to high alcohol intake. Independent qPCR analysis confirmed the up-regulation of amygdala 14-3-3ζ during the escalation of alcohol intake. Subsequently, we found that local knockdown of 14-3-3ζ in the amygdala, using RNA interference, dramatically augmented alcohol intake. In addition, knockdown of amygdala 14-3-3ζ promoted the development of inflexible alcohol drinking, as apparent from insensitivity to quinine adulteration of alcohol. This study identifies amygdala 14-3-3ζ as a novel key modulator that is engaged during escalation of alcohol use.

  11. Suicide Attempts in a Longitudinal Sample of Adolescents Followed Through Adulthood: Evidence of Escalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldston, David B.; Daniel, Stephanie S.; Erkanli, Alaattin; Heilbron, Nicole; Doyle, Otima; Weller, Bridget; Sapyta, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study was designed to examine escalation in repeat suicide attempts from adolescence through adulthood, as predicted by sensitization models (and reflected in increasing intent and lethality with repeat attempts, decreasing amount of time between attempts, and decreasing stress to trigger attempts) Method In a prospective study of 180 adolescents followed through adulthood after a psychiatric hospitalization, suicide attempts and antecedent life events were repeatedly assessed (M = 12.6 assessments, SD = 5.1) over an average of 13 years, 6 months (SD = 4 years, 5 months). Multivariate logistic, multiple linear, and negative binomial regression models were used to examine patterns over time. Results After age 17-18, the majority of suicide attempts were repeat attempts (i.e., made by individuals with prior suicidal behavior). Intent increased both with increasing age, and with number of prior attempts. Medical lethality increased as a function of age but not recurrent attempts. The time between successive suicide attempts decreased as a function of number of attempts. The amount of precipitating life stress was not related to attempts. Conclusions Adolescents and young adults show evidence of escalation of recurrent suicidal behavior, with increasing suicidal intent and decreasing time between successive attempts. However, evidence that sensitization processes account for this escalation was inconclusive. Effective prevention programs that reduce the likelihood of individuals attempting suicide for the first time (and entering this cycle of escalation), and relapse prevention interventions that interrupt the cycle of escalating suicidal behavior among individuals who already have made attempts are critically needed. PMID:25622200

  12. Suicide attempts in a longitudinal sample of adolescents followed through adulthood: Evidence of escalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldston, David B; Daniel, Stephanie S; Erkanli, Alaattin; Heilbron, Nicole; Doyle, Otima; Weller, Bridget; Sapyta, Jeffrey; Mayfield, Andrew; Faulkner, Madelaine

    2015-04-01

    This study was designed to examine escalation in repeat suicide attempts from adolescence through adulthood, as predicted by sensitization models (and reflected in increasing intent and lethality with repeat attempts, decreasing amount of time between attempts, and decreasing stress to trigger attempts). In a prospective study of 180 adolescents followed through adulthood after a psychiatric hospitalization, suicide attempts, and antecedent life events were repeatedly assessed (M = 12.6 assessments, SD = 5.1) over an average of 13 years 6 months (SD = 4 years 5 months). Multivariate logistic, multiple linear, and negative binomial regression models were used to examine patterns over time. After age 17-18, the majority of suicide attempts were repeat attempts (i.e., made by individuals with prior suicidal behavior). Intent increased both with increasing age, and with number of prior attempts. Medical lethality increased as a function of age but not recurrent attempts. The time between successive suicide attempts decreased as a function of number of attempts. The amount of precipitating life stress was not related to attempts. Adolescents and young adults show evidence of escalation of recurrent suicidal behavior, with increasing suicidal intent and decreasing time between successive attempts. However, evidence that sensitization processes account for this escalation was inconclusive. Effective prevention programs that reduce the likelihood of individuals attempting suicide for the first time (and entering this cycle of escalation), and relapse prevention interventions that interrupt the cycle of escalating suicidal behavior among individuals who already have made attempts are critically needed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Two experiments focusing on de-escalation oriented coverage of post-war conflicts

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    Wilhelm Kempf

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available War coverage has a strong bias towards the promotion of conflict escalation and - though less pronounced - this bias often survives in post-war coverage as well. Even after the end of war, only a minority of journalists frame conflict in a firmly de-escalation oriented way. Do they have a chance to reach the public? Will their reports be respected by the audience as more balanced and unbiased? Will they have an impact on the audience's mental models of the conflict? Or will the audience continue to cling to its prejudices and reject news articles which do not affirm the enemy images that emerged during wartime? The present paper investigates these questions by means of two experimental studies. In the first experiment, news articles on three events in former Yugoslavia after the fall of Milosevic were presented to a total of n = 128 subjects, representative of the readership of the German quality press: (1 violent conflicts in Southern Serbia (December 2000, (2 the extradition of Milosevic to The Hague (June, 2001 and (3 the treaty between Serbia and Montenegro (March 2003. For each of the events, four different types of articles were used: moderately escalation oriented articles from prestigious German newspapers (Die Welt, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Süddeutsche Zeitung and three variants of these articles, (a with increased escalation-oriented framing, (b with moderate de-escalation oriented framing and (c with more strongly de-escalation oriented framing of the events. Each subject was asked to read one article on each of the three events in chronological order and after each article (a to narrate the reported events in their own words and (b to fill out a questionnaire designed to measure the acceptance of the articles as unbiased, well-balanced, interesting, etc. The subjects' mental models of the reported events were inferred from their narratives by means of quantitative content analysis. The second experiment measured the

  14. Irradiation of FDG-PET–Defined Active Bone Marrow Subregions and Acute Hematologic Toxicity in Anal Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemoradiation

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