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  1. Restricted Gene Flow among Hospital Subpopulations of Enterococcus faecium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Rob J. L.; Top, Janetta; van Schaik, Willem; Leavis, Helen; Bonten, Marc; Sirén, Jukka; Hanage, William P.; Corander, Jukka

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterococcus faecium has recently emerged as an important multiresistant nosocomial pathogen. Defining population structure in this species is required to provide insight into the existence, distribution, and dynamics of specific multiresistant or pathogenic lineages in particular environments, like the hospital. Here, we probe the population structure of E. faecium using Bayesian-based population genetic modeling implemented in Bayesian Analysis of Population Structure (BAPS) software. The analysis involved 1,720 isolates belonging to 519 sequence types (STs) (491 for E. faecium and 28 for Enterococcus faecalis). E. faecium isolates grouped into 13 BAPS (sub)groups, but the large majority (80%) of nosocomial isolates clustered in two subgroups (2-1 and 3-3). Phylogenetic and eBURST analysis of BAPS groups 2 and 3 confirmed the existence of three separate hospital lineages (17, 18, and 78), highlighting different evolutionary trajectories for BAPS 2-1 (lineage 78) and 3-3 (lineage 17 and lineage 18) isolates. Phylogenomic analysis of 29 E. faecium isolates showed agreement between BAPS assignment of STs and their relative positions in the phylogenetic tree. Odds ratio calculation confirmed the significant association between hospital isolates with BAPS 3-3 and lineages 17, 18, and 78. Admixture analysis showed a scarce number of recombination events between the different BAPS groups. For the E. faecium hospital population, we propose an evolutionary model in which strains with a high propensity to colonize and infect hospitalized patients arise through horizontal gene transfer. Once adapted to the distinct hospital niche, this subpopulation becomes isolated, and recombination with other populations declines. PMID:22807567

  2. Bistable expression of virulence genes in salmonella leads to the formation of an antibiotic-tolerant subpopulation.

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    Markus Arnoldini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic heterogeneity can confer clonal groups of organisms with new functionality. A paradigmatic example is the bistable expression of virulence genes in Salmonella typhimurium, which leads to phenotypically virulent and phenotypically avirulent subpopulations. The two subpopulations have been shown to divide labor during S. typhimurium infections. Here, we show that heterogeneous virulence gene expression in this organism also promotes survival against exposure to antibiotics through a bet-hedging mechanism. Using microfluidic devices in combination with fluorescence time-lapse microscopy and quantitative image analysis, we analyzed the expression of virulence genes at the single cell level and related it to survival when exposed to antibiotics. We found that, across different types of antibiotics and under concentrations that are clinically relevant, the subpopulation of bacterial cells that express virulence genes shows increased survival after exposure to antibiotics. Intriguingly, there is an interplay between the two consequences of phenotypic heterogeneity. The bet-hedging effect that arises through heterogeneity in virulence gene expression can protect clonal populations against avirulent mutants that exploit and subvert the division of labor within these populations. We conclude that bet-hedging and the division of labor can arise through variation in a single trait and interact with each other. This reveals a new degree of functional complexity of phenotypic heterogeneity. In addition, our results suggest a general principle of how pathogens can evade antibiotics: Expression of virulence factors often entails metabolic costs and the resulting growth retardation could generally increase tolerance against antibiotics and thus compromise treatment.

  3. Markers of Increased Cardiovascular Risk in Postmenopausal Women: Focus on Oxidized-LDL and HDL Subpopulations

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    Mascarenhas-Melo, Filipa; Sereno, José; Teixeira-Lemos, Edite; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Teixeira, Frederico; Reis, Flávio

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effect of gender and menopause in cardiovascular risk (CVR) in a healthy population based on both classical and nontraditional markers. Methods. 56 men and 68 women (48 pre- and 20 postmenopause) were enrolled in the study. The following markers were analyzed: blood pressure (BP), body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), glucose, total cholesterol (total-c), triglycerides (TGs), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), oxidized-LDL (Ox-LDL), HDL-c and subpopulations, paraoxonase-1 activity, hsCRP, uric acid, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), adiponectin, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and intercellular adhesion molecular 1 (ICAM1). Results. Relative to the women, men present significantly increased BMI, WC, BP, glucose, total-c, TGs, LDL-c, Ox-LDL, uric acid, and TNF-α and reduced adiponectin and total and large HDL-c. The protective profile of women is lost after menopause with a significantly increased BMI, WC, BP, glucose, LDL-c, Ox-LDL, hsCRP, and VEGF and decreased total and large HDL-c. Significant correlations were found in women population and in postmenopausal women between Ox-LDL and total, large, and small HDL-c and between TNF-α and total, large, and small HDL-c, LDL-c, and Ox-LDL. Conclusions. Men present higher CVR than women who lost protection after menopause, evidenced by nontraditional markers, including Ox-LDL and HDL subpopulations. PMID:24167352

  4. Markers of Increased Cardiovascular Risk in Postmenopausal Women: Focus on Oxidized-LDL and HDL Subpopulations

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    Filipa Mascarenhas-Melo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the effect of gender and menopause in cardiovascular risk (CVR in a healthy population based on both classical and nontraditional markers. Methods. 56 men and 68 women (48 pre- and 20 postmenopause were enrolled in the study. The following markers were analyzed: blood pressure (BP, body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC, glucose, total cholesterol (total-c, triglycerides (TGs, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c, oxidized-LDL (Ox-LDL, HDL-c and subpopulations, paraoxonase-1 activity, hsCRP, uric acid, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, adiponectin, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, and intercellular adhesion molecular 1 (ICAM1. Results. Relative to the women, men present significantly increased BMI, WC, BP, glucose, total-c, TGs, LDL-c, Ox-LDL, uric acid, and TNF-α and reduced adiponectin and total and large HDL-c. The protective profile of women is lost after menopause with a significantly increased BMI, WC, BP, glucose, LDL-c, Ox-LDL, hsCRP, and VEGF and decreased total and large HDL-c. Significant correlations were found in women population and in postmenopausal women between Ox-LDL and total, large, and small HDL-c and between TNF-α and total, large, and small HDL-c, LDL-c, and Ox-LDL. Conclusions. Men present higher CVR than women who lost protection after menopause, evidenced by nontraditional markers, including Ox-LDL and HDL subpopulations.

  5. Fine scale gene flow and individual movements among subpopulations of Centrolene prosoblepon (Anura: Centrolenidae).

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    Robertson, Jeanne M; Lips, Karen R; Heist, Edward J

    2008-03-01

    Dispersal capabilities determine and maintain local gene flow, and this has implications for population persistence and/or recolonization following environmental perturbations (natural or anthropogenic), disease outbreaks, or other demographic collapses. To predict recolonization and understand dispersal capacity in a stream-breeding frog, we examined individual movement patterns and gene flow among four subpopulations of the Neotropical glassfrog, Centrolene prosoblepon, at a mid-elevation cloud forest site at El Copé, Panama. We measured male movement directly during a two year mark-recapture study, and indirectly with gene flow estimates from mitochondrial DNA sequences (mtDNA). Individuals of this species showed strong site fidelity: over two years, male frogs in all four headwater streams moved very little (mean = 2.33 m; mode = 0 m). Nine individuals changed streams within one or two years, moving 675-1,108 m. For those males moving more than 10 m, movement was biased upstream (p < 0.001). Using mtDNA ND1 gene sequences, we quantified gene flow within and among headwater streams at two spatial scales: among headwater streams within two adjacent watersheds (2.5 km2) and among streams within a longitudinal gradient covering 5.0 km2. We found high gene flow among headwater streams (phi(ST) = 0.007, p = 0.325) but gene flow was more limited across greater distances (phi(CT) = 0.322, p = 0.065), even within the same drainage network. Lowland populations of C. prosoblepon potentially act as an important source of colonists for upland populations in this watershed.

  6. B-cell subpopulations from normal human secondary lymphoid tissues with specific gene expression profiles and phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Hans Erik; Schmitz, Alexander; Perez Andres, Martin

    In order to improve insights into the B-cell biology and thereby B-cell myelomagenesis we have established a MSCNET standard for multiparametric flow cytometry (MFC) and cell sorting (FACS) for subsequent genetic analysis. The material analysed was fresh tonsils, blood and bone marrow. The method...... and single gene expression analysis (qRT-PCR) for transcription factors as well as global gene expression profiling (GEP; GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST Array). For example for tonsils, based on the immunophenotypic presentation (including CD3/44/CXCR4 in the panel), B-cell subsets were identified and sorted......-cell subpopulations identified have distinct gene expression profiles reflecting their functions but also revealing genes with subpopulation specific exon splicing. In conclusion a combination of surface markers expressed antigens and gene expression analysis of B cell subsets confirm a strong methodology to be used...

  7. Expected Shannon Entropy and Shannon Differentiation between Subpopulations for Neutral Genes under the Finite Island Model.

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    Chao, Anne; Jost, Lou; Hsieh, T C; Ma, K H; Sherwin, William B; Rollins, Lee Ann

    2015-01-01

    Shannon entropy H and related measures are increasingly used in molecular ecology and population genetics because (1) unlike measures based on heterozygosity or allele number, these measures weigh alleles in proportion to their population fraction, thus capturing a previously-ignored aspect of allele frequency distributions that may be important in many applications; (2) these measures connect directly to the rich predictive mathematics of information theory; (3) Shannon entropy is completely additive and has an explicitly hierarchical nature; and (4) Shannon entropy-based differentiation measures obey strong monotonicity properties that heterozygosity-based measures lack. We derive simple new expressions for the expected values of the Shannon entropy of the equilibrium allele distribution at a neutral locus in a single isolated population under two models of mutation: the infinite allele model and the stepwise mutation model. Surprisingly, this complex stochastic system for each model has an entropy expressable as a simple combination of well-known mathematical functions. Moreover, entropy- and heterozygosity-based measures for each model are linked by simple relationships that are shown by simulations to be approximately valid even far from equilibrium. We also identify a bridge between the two models of mutation. We apply our approach to subdivided populations which follow the finite island model, obtaining the Shannon entropy of the equilibrium allele distributions of the subpopulations and of the total population. We also derive the expected mutual information and normalized mutual information ("Shannon differentiation") between subpopulations at equilibrium, and identify the model parameters that determine them. We apply our measures to data from the common starling (Sturnus vulgaris) in Australia. Our measures provide a test for neutrality that is robust to violations of equilibrium assumptions, as verified on real world data from starlings.

  8. Fine scale gene flow and individual movements among subpopulations of Centrolene prosoblepon (Anura: Centrolenidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne M Robertson

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Dispersal capabilities determine and maintain local gene flow, and this has implications for population persistence and/or recolonization following environmental perturbations (natural or anthropogenic, disease outbreaks, or other demographic collapses. To predict recolonization and understand dispersal capacity in a stream-breeding frog, we examined individual movement patterns and gene flow among four subpopulations of the Neotropical glassfrog, Centrolene prosoblepon, at a mid-elevation cloud forest site at El Copé, Panama. We measured male movement directly during a two year mark-recapture study, and indirectly with gene flow estimates from mitochondrial DNA sequences (mtDNA. Individuals of this species showed strong site fidelity: over two years, male frogs in all four headwater streams moved very little (mean = 2.33 m; mode = 0 m. Nine individuals changed streams within one or two years, moving 675-1 108 m. For those males moving more than 10 m, movement was biased upstream (p ST = 0.007, p = 0.325 but gene flow was more limited across greater distances (CT = 0.322, p = 0.065, even within the same drainage network. Lowland populations of C. prosoblepon potentially act as an important source of colonists for upland populations in this watershed. Rev. Biol. Trop. 56 (1: 13-26. Epub 2008 March 31.La capacidad de dispersión determina y mantiene el flujo genético local, y esto tiene implicaciones para la persistencia poblacional y/o la recolonización que sigue a perturbaciones ambientales. Examinamos patrones individuales de movimiento y flujo genético entre subpoblaciones de Centrolene prosoblepon (Anura: Centrolenidae en un sitio de elevación media en El Copé, Panamá. Medimos directamente el movimiento de los machos durante un estudio de marcado-recaptura, e indirectamente con estimaciones de flujo genético a partir de secuencias de ADN mitocondrial (mtDNA. Los individuos mostraron fuerte fidelidad a su lugar: por más de dos a

  9. Association of the Porcine Cluster of Differentiation 4 Gene with T Lymphocyte Subpopulations and Its Expression in Immune Tissues

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    Jingen Xu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4 is mainly expressed on CD4+ T cells, which plays an important role in immune response. The aim of this study was to detect the association between polymorphisms of the CD4 gene and T lymphocyte subpopulations in pigs, and to investigate the effects of genetic variation on the CD4 gene expression level in immune tissues. Five missense mutations in the CD4 gene were identified using DNA pooling sequencing assays, and two main haplotypes (CCTCC and AGCTG in strong linkage disequilibrium (with frequencies of 50.26% and 46.34%, respectively were detected in the population of Large White pigs. Our results indicated that the five SNPs and the two haplotypes were significantly associated with the proportions of CD4−CD8−, CD4+CD8+, CD4+CD8−, CD4+ and CD4+/CD8+ in peripheral blood (p0.05. These results indicate that the CD4 gene may influence T lymphocyte subpopulations and can be considered as a candidate gene affecting immunity in pigs.

  10. B-cell subpopulations from normal human secondary lymphoid tissues with specific gene expression profiles and phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Hans Erik; Schmitz, Alexander; Perez Andres, Martin

    included homogenization, isolation of mononuclear cells, MFC and FACS sorting using multicolour fluorescence single tube panels.of antibodies against surface molecules as CD10/20/27/38/45, supplemented with tissue related antibodies. Isolated B-cell subpopulations were evaluated by morphological inspection......In order to improve insights into the B-cell biology and thereby B-cell myelomagenesis we have established a MSCNET standard for multiparametric flow cytometry (MFC) and cell sorting (FACS) for subsequent genetic analysis. The material analysed was fresh tonsils, blood and bone marrow. The method...... and single gene expression analysis (qRT-PCR) for transcription factors as well as global gene expression profiling (GEP; GeneChip Human Exon 1.0 ST Array). For example for tonsils, based on the immunophenotypic presentation (including CD3/44/CXCR4 in the panel), B-cell subsets were identified and sorted...

  11. Plastic and Evolutionary Gene Expression Responses Are Correlated in European Grayling (Thymallus thymallus) Subpopulations Adapted to Different Thermal Environments.

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    Mäkinen, Hannu; Papakostas, Spiros; Vøllestad, Leif Asbjørn; Leder, Erica H; Primmer, Craig R

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how populations adapt to changing environmental conditions is a long-standing theme in evolutionary biology. Gene expression changes have been recognized as an important driver of local adaptation, but relatively little is known regarding the direction of change and in particular, about the interplay between plastic and evolutionary gene expression. We have previously shown that the gene expression profiles of European grayling (Thymallus thymallus) populations inhabiting different thermal environments include both plastic and evolutionary components. However, whether the plastic and evolutionary responses were in the same direction was not investigated in detail, nor was the identity of the specific genes involved. In this study, we show that the plastic changes in protein expression in response to different temperatures are highly correlated with the evolutionary response in grayling subpopulations adapted to different thermal environments. This finding provides preliminary evidence that the plastic response most likely facilitates adaptation during the early phases of colonization of thermal environments. The proteins that showed significant changes in expression level between warm and cold temperature treatments were mostly related to muscle development, which is consistent with earlier findings demonstrating muscle mass differentiation between cold and warm grayling populations. © The American Genetic Association. 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. TMPRSS2- driven ERG expression in vivo increases self-renewal and maintains expression in a castration resistant subpopulation.

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    Orla M Casey

    Full Text Available Genomic rearrangements commonly occur in many types of cancers and often initiate or alter the progression of disease. Here we describe an in vivo mouse model that recapitulates the most frequent rearrangement in prostate cancer, the fusion of the promoter region of TMPRSS2 with the coding region of the transcription factor, ERG. A recombinant bacterial artificial chromosome including an extended TMPRSS2 promoter driving genomic ERG was constructed and used for transgenesis in mice. TMPRSS2-ERG expression was evaluated in tissue sections and FACS-fractionated prostate cell populations. In addition to the anticipated expression in luminal cells, TMPRSS2-ERG was similarly expressed in the Sca-1(hi/EpCAM(+ basal/progenitor fraction, where expanded numbers of clonogenic self-renewing progenitors were found, as assayed by in vitro sphere formation. These clonogenic cells increased intrinsic self renewal in subsequent generations. In addition, ERG dependent self-renewal and invasion in vitro was demonstrated in prostate cell lines derived from the model. Clinical studies have suggested that the TMPRSS2-ERG translocation occurs early in prostate cancer development. In the model described here, the presence of the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion alone was not transforming but synergized with heterozygous Pten deletion to promote PIN. Taken together, these data suggest that one function of TMPRSS2-ERG is the expansion of self-renewing cells, which may serve as targets for subsequent mutations. Primary prostate epithelial cells demonstrated increased post transcriptional turnover of ERG compared to the TMPRSS2-ERG positive VCaP cell line, originally isolated from a prostate cancer metastasis. Finally, we determined that TMPRSS2-ERG expression occurred in both castration-sensitive and resistant prostate epithelial subpopulations, suggesting the existence of androgen-independent mechanisms of TMPRSS2 expression in prostate epithelium.

  13. Propofol Increases Host Susceptibility to Microbial Infection by Reducing Subpopulations of Mature Immune Effector Cells at Sites of Infection

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    Visvabharathy, Lavanya; Xayarath, Bobbi; Weinberg, Guy; Shilling, Rebecca A.; Freitag, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Anesthetics are known to modulate host immune responses, but separating the variables of surgery from anesthesia when analyzing hospital acquired infections is often difficult. Here, the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) was used to assess the impact of the common anesthetic propofol on host susceptibility to infection. Brief sedation of mice with physiologically relevant concentrations of propofol increased bacterial burdens in target organs by more than 10,000-fold relative to infected control animals. The adverse effects of propofol sedation on immune clearance of Lm persisted after recovery from sedation, as animals given the drug remained susceptible to infection for days following anesthesia. In contrast to propofol, sedation with alternative anesthetics such as ketamine/xylazine or pentobarbital did not increase susceptibility to systemic Lm infection. Propofol altered systemic cytokine and chemokine expression during infection, and prevented effective bacterial clearance by inhibiting the recruitment and/or activity of immune effector cells at sites of infection. Propofol exposure induced a marked reduction in marginal zone macrophages in the spleens of Lm infected mice, resulting in bacterial dissemination into deep tissue. Propofol also significantly increased mouse kidney abscess formation following infection with the common nosocomial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Taken together, these data indicate that even brief exposure to propofol severely compromises host resistance to microbial infection for days after recovery from sedation. PMID:26381144

  14. Treatment with low doses of aspirin during chronic phase of experimental Chagas' disease increases oesophageal nitrergic neuronal subpopulation in mice.

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    Massocatto, Cristina Lorena; Martins Moreira, Neide; Muniz, Eliane; Marques de Araújo, Silvana; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Rossi, Robson Marcelo; de Almeida Araújo, Eduardo José; de Mello Gonçales Sant'ana, Débora

    2018-01-19

    Patients with Chagas' disease may develop dysfunctions of oesophageal and colonic motility resulting from the degeneration or loss of the myenteric neurons of the enteric nervous system. Studies have shown that the use of aspirin, also known as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), influences the pathogenesis of the disease. However, this remains controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the consequences of treatment with low doses of aspirin during the chronic phase of Chagas' disease on oesophageal function. Twenty male Swiss mice, 60 days of age, were used. The animals were infected with Y strain of Trypanosoma cruzi, injected intraperitoneally. Aspirin was given at a dose of 50 mg/kg to some of the infected animals, from the 55th to 63rd day after inoculation on consecutive days, and from the 65th to 75th day on alternate days. We investigated food passage of time, wall structure and nitrergic neuronal population of the distal oesophagus. Our data revealed that the use of low doses of aspirin in chronic Chagas' disease caused an increase in the number of nitrergic neurons and partially prevented hypertrophy of the oesophagus. In addition, the aspirin administration impeded Chagas' diseases associated changes in intestinal transit time. Thus treatment with aspirin in the chronic phase of Chagas' disease changes the natural history of the disease and raises the possibility of using it as a new therapeutic approach to the treatment of this aspect of Chagas' disease pathology. © 2018 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2018 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  15. Paclitaxel-induced increase in NCX activity in subpopulations of nociceptive afferents: A protective mechanism against chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy?

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    Yilmaz, Eser; Gold, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    We recently demonstrated, in a rat model of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), that there is a significant decrease in the duration of the depolarization-evoked Ca(2+) transient in isolated somata of putative nociceptive afferents innervating the glabrous skin of the hindpaw, but no change in transient magnitude or the resting concentration of intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i). Because the Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) only contributes to the regulation of the duration of the evoked Ca(2+) transient, in putative nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, we hypothesized that an increase in NCX activity underlies the CIPN-induced change in this subpopulation of neurons. Acutely dissociated retrogradely labeled sensory neurons from naïve, vehicle-, and paclitaxel-treated rats were studied with fura-2 based Ca(2+) imaging. There was no difference in the relative level of NCX activity between glabrous neurons from paclitaxel-treated or control rats. However, in contrast to the relatively large and long lasting Ca(2+) transients needed to evoke NCX activity in neurons from naïve rats, there was evidence of resting NCX activity in glabrous neurons from both vehicle- and paclitaxel-treated rats. More interestingly, there was a paclitaxel-induced increase in NCX activity in putative nociceptive neurons innervating the thigh, neurons in which there is no evidence of a change in the depolarization-induced Ca(2+) transient, or a body site in which there was a change in nociceptive threshold. Furthermore, while the majority of NCX activity in glabrous neurons is sensitive to the NCX3-preferring blocker KB-R7943, the increase in NCX activity in thigh neurons was resistant to KB-R7943 but sensitive to the NCX1-preferring blocker SEA0400. These results suggest that a mechanism(s) other than NCX underlies the paclitaxel-induced decrease in the duration of the evoked Ca(2+) transient in putative nociceptive glabrous skin neurons. However, the compensatory

  16. Validation and implementation of a method for microarray gene expression profiling of minor B-cell subpopulations in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergkvist, Kim Steve; Nyegaard, Mette; Bøgsted, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND: This report describes a method for the generation of global gene expression profiles from low frequent B-cell subsets by using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and RNA amplification. However, some of the differentiating compartments involve a low number of cells and theref...

  17. Prevalence of Escherichia coli virulence genes in patients with diarrhea and a subpopulation of healthy volunteers in Madrid, Spain

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    Adriana eCabal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Etiological diagnosis of diarrheal diseases may be complicated by their multi-factorial nature. In addition, Escherichia coli strains present in the gut can occasionally harbor VGs without causing disease, which complicates the assessment of their clinical significance in particular.The aim of this study was to detect and quantify nine VGs (stx1, stx2, eae, aggR, ehxA, invA, est and elt typically present in five E. coli enteric pathotypes (EHEC, ETEC, EPEC, EAEC and EIEC in fecal samples collected from 49 patients with acute diarrhea and 32 healthy controls from Madrid, Spain. In addition, the presence of four serotype-related genes (wzxO104 and fliCH4, rbfO157 and fliCH7 was also determined. Presence of target genes was assessed using a quantitative real-time PCR assay previously developed, and the association of presence and burden of VGs with clinical disease and/or other risk factors was explored. Prevalence of ehxA (typically associated with STEC and EPEC, invA (EIEC and the rbfO157+fliCH7 (STEC and/or STEC/EAEC combination were significantly (p<0.02 higher in the diarrheic group, while the wzxO104+fliCH4 combination was significantly (p=0.014 more prevalent in the control group. On the other hand, eae was detected in more than 90% of the individuals in both patient and control populations, and it was not associated with bfpA, suggesting the absence of typical EPEC. No significant differences in the quantitative values were detected for any VG among study groups, but the difference in the load of aggR (EAEC and invA in the patients with respect to the controls was close to the significance, suggesting a potential role of these VGs in the clinical signs observed when they are present at high levels.

  18. CD133/CD15 defines distinct cell subpopulations with differential in vitro clonogenic activity and stem cell-related gene expression profile in in vitro propagated glioblastoma multiforme-derived cell line with a PNET-like component.

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    Kahlert, Ulf D; Bender, Noemi O; Maciaczyk, Donata; Bogiel, Tomasz; Bar, Eli E; Eberhart, Charles G; Nikkhah, Guido; Maciaczyk, Jarosław

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), as many other solid tumours, contains a subpopulation of cells termed cancer stem-like cells responsible for the initiation and propagation of tumour growth. However, a unique immunophenotype/surface antigen composition for the clear identification of brain tumour stem cells (BTSC) has not yet been found. Here we report a novel code of cell surface markers for the identification of different cell subpopulations in neurospheres derived from a GBM with a primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET)-like component (GBM-PNET). These subgroups differ in their CD133/CD15 expression pattern and resemble cells with different stem-like genotype and developmental pathway activation levels. Strikingly, clonogenic analysis of cultures differentially expressing the investigated markers enabled the identification of distinct subpopulations of cells endowed with stem cell characteristics. High clonogenicity could be found in CD133(-)/CD15(-) and CD133(+)/CD15(+) but not in CD133(-)/CD15(+) cells. Moreover, cell subpopulations with pronounced clonogenic growth were characterized by high expression of stem cell-related genes. Interestingly, these observations were unique for GBM-PNET and differed from ordinary GBM cultures derived from tumours lacking a PNET component. This work elucidates the complex molecular heterogeneity of in vitro propagated glioblastoma-derived cells and potentially contributes to the development of novel diagnostic modalities aiming at the identification of the brain tumour stem-like cell population in a subgroup of GBMs.

  19. Human corneal epithelial subpopulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Chris Bath

    2013-01-01

    subpopulations in human corneal epithelium using a combination of laser capture microdissection and RNA sequencing for global transcriptomic profiling. We compared dissociation cultures, using either expansion on γ-irradiated NIH/3T3 feeder cells in serum-rich medium or expansion directly on plastic in serum......-free EpiLife medium, using a range of physiologically relevant oxygen concentrations (2%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%). Using immunocytochemistry and advanced fluorescence microscopy, cells were characterized regarding growth, cell cycle distribution, colony-forming efficiency (CFE), phenotypes...... was not dependent on the system used for propagation (Bath et al. 2013a). Laser capture microdissection was used to isolate cellular subpopulations in situ from the spatially defined differentiation pathway in human corneal epithelium according to an optimized protocol for maintenance of expression profiles...

  20. Intratumoral Heterogeneity as a Therapy Resistance Mechanism: Role of Melanoma Subpopulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somasundaram, Rajasekharan; Villanueva, Jessie; Herlyn, Meenhard

    2013-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is an aggressive form of skin cancer whose incidence continues to increase worldwide. Increased exposure to sun, ultraviolet radiation and the use of tanning beds can increase the risk of melanoma. Early detection of melanomas is the key to successful treatment mainly through surgical excision of the primary tumor lesion. But in advanced stage melanomas, once the disease has spread beyond the primary site to distant organs, the tumors are difficult to treat and quickly develop resistance to most available forms of therapy. The advent of molecular and cellular techniques has led to a better characterization of tumor cells revealing the presence of heterogeneous melanoma subpopulations. The discovery of gene mutations and alterations of cell-signaling pathways in melanomas has led to the development of new targeted drugs that show dramatic response rates in patients. Single agent therapies generally target one subpopulation of tumor cells while leaving others unharmed. The surviving subpopulations will have the ability to repopulate the original tumors that can continue to progress. Thus, a rational approach to target multiple subpopulations of tumor cells with a combination of drugs instead of single agent therapy will be necessary for long-lasting inhibition of melanoma lesions. In this context, the recent development of immune checkpoint reagents provides an additional armor that can be used in combination with targeted drugs to expand the presence of melanoma reactive T-cells in circulation to prevent tumor recurrence. PMID:22959031

  1. Genetic analysis of scattered populations of the Indian eri silkworm, Samia cynthia ricini Donovan: differentiation of subpopulations

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    Appukuttannair R. Pradeep

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Deforestation and exploitation has led to the fragmentation of habitats and scattering of populations of the economically important eri silkworm, Samia cynthia ricini, in north-east India. Genetic analysis of 15 eri populations, using ISSR markers, showed 98% inter-population, and 23% to 58% intra-population polymorphism. Nei's genetic distance between populations increased significantly with altitude (R² = 0.71 and geographic distance (R² = 0.78. On the dendrogram, the lower and upper Assam populations were clustered separately, with intermediate grouping of those from Barpathar and Chuchuyimlang, consistent with geographical distribution. The Nei's gene diversity index was 0.350 in total populations and 0.121 in subpopulations. The genetic differentiation estimate (Gst was 0.276 among scattered populations. Neutrality tests showed deviation of 118 loci from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The number of loci that deviated from neutrality increased with altitude (R² = 0.63. Test of linkage disequilibrium showed greater contribution of variance among eri subpopulations to total variance. D'2IS exceeded D'2ST, showed significant contribution of random genetic drift to the increase in variance of disequilibrium in subpopulations. In the Lakhimpur population, the peripheral part was separated from the core by a genetic distance of 0.260. Patchy habitats promoted low genetic variability, high linkage disequilibrium and colonization by new subpopulations. Increased gene flow and habitat-area expansion are required to maintain higher genetic variability and conservation of the original S. c. ricini gene pool.

  2. Functional heterogeneity with respect to oestrogen treatment in prolactin cell subpopulations separated by Percoll gradient centrifugation.

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    Velkeniers, B; Kazemzadeh, M; Vanhaelst, L; Hooghe-Peters, E L

    1994-05-01

    The effects of oestradiol on prolactin gene expression were studied by quantitative in situ hybridization histochemistry in different prolactin pituitary cell (sub)populations, which had been obtained by separation on a discontinuous Percoll gradient. When cells were incubated in vitro in the presence of oestradiol (10(-8) M) for a period of 4, 24, 48 and 72 h, there was an increase in the amount of prolactin mRNA, from 24 h on, only in high-density prolactin cells and lactotrophs of the total cell suspension. In contrast, the amount of prolactin mRNA in lactotrophs of low density did not change upon treatment with oestradiol. Pharmacological treatment with 50 micrograms oestradiol/day (s.c.) of random cycling female rats in vivo for 14 days increased the total number of prolactin gene-expressing cells and more lactotrophs were recovered at high density after Percoll gradient centrifugation. These results suggest a preferential stimulatory effect of oestradiol on prolactin gene transcription on a subpopulation of lactotrophs. Changes observed in prolactin cell layers after oestradiol treatment in vivo may represent a preferential effect in situ on a particular mammotroph cell subpopulation.

  3. Housekeeping Gene Sequencing and Multilocus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis To Identify Subpopulations within Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato That Correlate with Host Specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gironde, S.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola causes bacterial spot on Brassicaceae worldwide, and for the last 10 years severe outbreaks have been reported in the Loire Valley, France. P. syringae pv. maculicola resembles P. syringae pv. tomato in that it is also pathogenic for tomato and causes the same types of symptoms. We used a collection of 106 strains of P. syringae to characterize the relationships between P. syringae pv. maculicola and related pathovars, paying special attention to P. syringae pv. tomato. Phylogenetic analysis of gyrB and rpoD gene sequences showed that P. syringae pv. maculicola, which causes diseases in Brassicaceae, forms six genetic lineages within genomospecies 3 of P. syringae strains as defined by L. Gardan et al. (Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 49[Pt 2]:469–478, 1999), whereas P. syringae pv. tomato forms two distinct genetic lineages. A multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) conducted with eight minisatellite loci confirmed the genetic structure obtained with rpoD and gyrB sequence analyses. These results provide promising tools for fine-scale epidemiological studies on diseases caused by P. syringae pv. maculicola and P. syringae pv. tomato. The two pathovars had distinct host ranges; only P. syringae pv. maculicola strains were pathogenic for Brassicaceae. A subpopulation of P. syringae pv. maculicola strains that are pathogenic for Pto-expressing tomato plants were shown to lack avrPto1 and avrPtoB or to contain a disrupted avrPtoB homolog. Taking phylogenetic and pathological features into account, our data suggest that the DC3000 strain belongs to P. syringae pv. maculicola. This study shows that P. syringae pv. maculicola and P. syringae pv. tomato appear multiclonal, as they did not diverge from a single common ancestral group within the ancestral P. syringae genomospecies 3, and suggests that pathovar specificity within P. syringae may be due to independent genetic events. PMID:22389364

  4. Demographic and traditional knowledge perspectives on the current status of Canadian polar bear subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Jordan; Dowsley, Martha; Cornwell, Adam; Kuc, Miroslaw; Taylor, Mitchell

    2016-05-01

    Subpopulation growth rates and the probability of decline at current harvest levels were determined for 13 subpopulations of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) that are within or shared with Canada based on mark-recapture estimates of population numbers and vital rates, and harvest statistics using population viability analyses (PVA). Aboriginal traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) on subpopulation trend agreed with the seven stable/increasing results and one of the declining results, but disagreed with PVA status of five other declining subpopulations. The decline in the Baffin Bay subpopulation appeared to be due to over-reporting of harvested numbers from outside Canada. The remaining four disputed subpopulations (Southern Beaufort Sea, Northern Beaufort Sea, Southern Hudson Bay, and Western Hudson Bay) were all incompletely mark-recapture (M-R) sampled, which may have biased their survival and subpopulation estimates. Three of the four incompletely sampled subpopulations were PVA identified as nonviable (i.e., declining even with zero harvest mortality). TEK disagreement was nonrandom with respect to M-R sampling protocols. Cluster analysis also grouped subpopulations with ambiguous demographic and harvest rate estimates separately from those with apparently reliable demographic estimates based on PVA probability of decline and unharvested subpopulation growth rate criteria. We suggest that the correspondence between TEK and scientific results can be used to improve the reliability of information on natural systems and thus improve resource management. Considering both TEK and scientific information, we suggest that the current status of Canadian polar bear subpopulations in 2013 was 12 stable/increasing and one declining (Kane Basin). We do not find support for the perspective that polar bears within or shared with Canada are currently in any sort of climate crisis. We suggest that monitoring the impacts of climate change (including sea ice decline) on polar bear

  5. Analysis of nuclear and organellar genomes of Plasmodium knowlesi in humans reveals ancient population structure and recent recombination among host-specific subpopulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Diez Benavente

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The macaque parasite Plasmodium knowlesi is a significant concern in Malaysia where cases of human infection are increasing. Parasites infecting humans originate from genetically distinct subpopulations associated with the long-tailed (Macaca fascicularis (Mf or pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina (Mn. We used a new high-quality reference genome to re-evaluate previously described subpopulations among human and macaque isolates from Malaysian-Borneo and Peninsular-Malaysia. Nuclear genomes were dimorphic, as expected, but new evidence of chromosomal-segment exchanges between subpopulations was found. A large segment on chromosome 8 originating from the Mn subpopulation and containing genes encoding proteins expressed in mosquito-borne parasite stages, was found in Mf genotypes. By contrast, non-recombining organelle genomes partitioned into 3 deeply branched lineages, unlinked with nuclear genomic dimorphism. Subpopulations which diverged in isolation have re-connected, possibly due to deforestation and disruption of wild macaque habitats. The resulting genomic mosaics reveal traits selected by host-vector-parasite interactions in a setting of ecological transition.

  6. Analysis of nuclear and organellar genomes of Plasmodium knowlesi in humans reveals ancient population structure and recent recombination among host-specific subpopulations

    KAUST Repository

    Diez Benavente, Ernest

    2017-09-18

    The macaque parasite Plasmodium knowlesi is a significant concern in Malaysia where cases of human infection are increasing. Parasites infecting humans originate from genetically distinct subpopulations associated with the long-tailed (Macaca fascicularis (Mf)) or pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina (Mn)). We used a new high-quality reference genome to re-evaluate previously described subpopulations among human and macaque isolates from Malaysian-Borneo and Peninsular-Malaysia. Nuclear genomes were dimorphic, as expected, but new evidence of chromosomal-segment exchanges between subpopulations was found. A large segment on chromosome 8 originating from the Mn subpopulation and containing genes encoding proteins expressed in mosquito-borne parasite stages, was found in Mf genotypes. By contrast, non-recombining organelle genomes partitioned into 3 deeply branched lineages, unlinked with nuclear genomic dimorphism. Subpopulations which diverged in isolation have re-connected, possibly due to deforestation and disruption of wild macaque habitats. The resulting genomic mosaics reveal traits selected by host-vector-parasite interactions in a setting of ecological transition.

  7. Increasingly branched rolling circle amplification for the cancer gene detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongling; Xu, Jianguo; Wang, Zhenmeng; Wu, Zai-Sheng; Jia, Lee

    2016-12-15

    An increasingly branched rolling circle amplification (IB-RCA) which contains a padlock probe (PP) and a structurally tailored molecular beacon (MB) was innovatively developed for highly sensitive detection of cancer gene, Kras gene codon 12. In this system, the PP can be circularized after hybridization with the precisely-matched target DNA, while the stem of MB can be also opened by target DNA, resulting in hybridization with the circularized PP to generate a long tandem single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) product. Since the MB is also designed to hybridize with ssDNA product, the newly-opened MBs are able to trigger the next RCA reactions, therapy producing branched rolling circle amplification (RCA) products and in turn leading to the increasingly branched RCA (IB-RCA). This alternately and continuously operates hybridization-based MB opening and opened MBs-triggered RCA. As a result, a great number of MBs are opened that is associated with a dramatically amplified fluorescent signal, enabling to quantify target DNA down to 100 fM. This sensing method demonstrates a new concept of IB-RCA amplification even in a simple way to efficiently transduce the fluorescence signal, accomplishing the highly sensitive and selective detection of cancer gene. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Positive selection of gene-modified cells increases the efficacy of pancreatic cancer suicide gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Quintanilla, Jordi; Cascallo, Manel; Gros, Alena; Fillat, Cristina; Alemany, Ramon

    2009-11-01

    Thymidine kinase (TK)-mediated suicide gene therapy has been considered for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, despite a bystander effect, the proportion of transduced tumor cells has proven too low to result in efficacy. We propose the use of a drug-selectable marker (MDR1) to enrich TK-expressing cells using chemotherapy. This enrichment or positive selection phase may increase the efficacy of suicide gene therapy. To test this strategy, we generated stable NP18MDR/TK-GFP transfectants and showed docetaxel resistance in vivo. Mixed tumors of MDR/TK-expressing cells and parental NP18 cells were established and docetaxel was used to increase the proportion of TK-expressing cells. After this positive selection phase, suicide gene therapy with ganciclovir was applied. Upon positive selection, the proportion of TK-expressing cells increased from 4% to 22%. Subsequent suicide gene therapy was more effective compared with a control group without positive selection. Starting with 10% of TK-expressing cells the positive-negative selection strategy completely inhibited tumor growth. Taken together, these results suggest that a positive-negative selection strategy based on MDR and TK genes represents an efficient way to increase the proportion of TK-expressing cells in the tumor and the efficacy of TK-mediated suicide gene therapy.

  9. Selective proteomic analysis of antibiotic-tolerant cellular subpopulations in pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babin, Brett M.; Atangcho, Lydia; van Eldijk, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    to determine the dynamic proteomic response of the tolerant subpopulation to supra-MIC treatment with the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin. The adaptive response included the upregulation of proteins required for sensing and repairing DNA damage and substantial changes in the expression of enzymes...... involved in central carbon metabolism. We differentiated the immediate proteomic response, characterized by an increase in flagellar motility, from the long-term adaptive strategy, which included the upregulation of purine synthesis. This targeted, selective analysis of a bacterial subpopulation......, in which distinct cellular subpopulations can respond differently to stresses, including subpopulations of pathogenic biofilms that are more tolerant to antibiotics. Global proteomic analysis affords insights into cellular physiology but cannot identify proteins expressed in a particular subpopulation...

  10. Subminimal Inhibitory Concentrations of the Disinfectant Benzalkonium Chloride Select for a Tolerant Subpopulation of Escherichia coli with Inheritable Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solveig Langsrud

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Exposure of Escherichia coli to a subminimal inhibitory concentration (25% below MIC of benzalkonium chloride (BC, an antimicrobial membrane-active agent commonly used in medical and food-processing environments, resulted in cell death and changes in cell morphology (filamentation. A small subpopulation (1–5% of the initial population survived and regained similar morphology and growth rate as non-exposed cells. This subpopulation maintained tolerance to BC after serial transfers in medium without BC. To withstand BC during regrowth the cells up regulated a drug efflux associated gene (the acrB gene, member of the AcrAB-TolC efflux system and changed expression of outer membrane porin genes (ompFW and several genes involved in protecting the cell from the osmotic- and oxidative stress. Cells pre-exposed to osmotic- and oxidative stress (sodium chloride, salicylic acid and methyl viologen showed higher tolerance to BC. A control and two selected isolates showing increased BC-tolerance after regrowth in BC was genome sequenced. No common point mutations were found in the BC- isolates but one point mutation in gene rpsA (Ribosomal protein S1 was observed in one of the isolates. The observed tolerance can therefore not solely be explained by the observed point mutation. The results indicate that there are several different mechanisms responsible for the regrowth of a tolerant subpopulation in BC, both BC-specific and general stress responses, and that sub-MIC of BC may select for phenotypic variants in a sensitive E. coli culture.

  11. Connectivity among subpopulations of Louisiana black bears as estimated by a step selection function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Joseph D.; Jared S. Laufenberg,; Maria Davidson,; Jennifer L. Murrow,

    2015-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation is a fundamental cause of population decline and increased risk of extinction for many wildlife species; animals with large home ranges and small population sizes are particularly sensitive. The Louisiana black bear (Ursus americanus luteolus) exists only in small, isolated subpopulations as a result of land clearing for agriculture, but the relative potential for inter-subpopulation movement by Louisiana black bears has not been quantified, nor have characteristics of effective travel routes between habitat fragments been identified. We placed and monitored global positioning system (GPS) radio collars on 8 female and 23 male bears located in 4 subpopulations in Louisiana, which included a reintroduced subpopulation located between 2 of the remnant subpopulations. We compared characteristics of sequential radiolocations of bears (i.e., steps) with steps that were possible but not chosen by the bears to develop step selection function models based on conditional logistic regression. The probability of a step being selected by a bear increased as the distance to natural land cover and agriculture at the end of the step decreased and as distance from roads at the end of a step increased. To characterize connectivity among subpopulations, we used the step selection models to create 4,000 hypothetical correlated random walks for each subpopulation representing potential dispersal events to estimate the proportion that intersected adjacent subpopulations (hereafter referred to as successful dispersals). Based on the models, movement paths for males intersected all adjacent subpopulations but paths for females intersected only the most proximate subpopulations. Cross-validation and genetic and independent observation data supported our findings. Our models also revealed that successful dispersals were facilitated by a reintroduced population located between 2 distant subpopulations. Successful dispersals for males were dependent on natural land

  12. Cells release subpopulations of exosomes with distinct molecular and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willms, Eduard; Johansson, Henrik J; Mäger, Imre; Lee, Yi; Blomberg, K Emelie M; Sadik, Mariam; Alaarg, Amr; Smith, C I Edvard; Lehtiö, Janne; El Andaloussi, Samir; Wood, Matthew J A; Vader, Pieter

    2016-03-02

    Cells release nano-sized membrane vesicles that are involved in intercellular communication by transferring biological information between cells. It is generally accepted that cells release at least three types of extracellular vesicles (EVs): apoptotic bodies, microvesicles and exosomes. While a wide range of putative biological functions have been attributed to exosomes, they are assumed to represent a homogenous population of EVs. We hypothesized the existence of subpopulations of exosomes with defined molecular compositions and biological properties. Density gradient centrifugation of isolated exosomes revealed the presence of two distinct subpopulations, differing in biophysical properties and their proteomic and RNA repertoires. Interestingly, the subpopulations mediated differential effects on the gene expression programmes in recipient cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate that cells release distinct exosome subpopulations with unique compositions that elicit differential effects on recipient cells. Further dissection of exosome heterogeneity will advance our understanding of exosomal biology in health and disease and accelerate the development of exosome-based diagnostics and therapeutics.

  13. Identification of subpopulations of prairie voles differentially susceptible to peer influence to decrease high alcohol intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anacker, Allison M J; Ryabinin, Andrey E

    2013-01-01

    Peer influences are critical in the decrease of alcohol (ethanol) abuse and maintenance of abstinence. We previously developed an animal model of inhibitory peer influences on ethanol drinking using prairie voles and here sought to understand whether this influential behavior was due to specific changes in drinking patterns and to variation in a microsatellite sequence in the regulatory region of the vasopressin receptor 1a gene (avpr1a). Adult prairie voles' drinking patterns were monitored in a lickometer apparatus that recorded each lick a subject exhibited during continuous access to water and 10% ethanol during periods of isolation, pair housing of high and low drinkers, and subsequent isolation. Analysis of fluid consumption confirmed previous results that high drinkers typically decrease ethanol intake when paired with low drinkers, but that a subset of voles do not decrease. Analysis of bout structure revealed differences in the number of ethanol drinking bouts in the subpopulations of high drinkers when paired with low drinkers. Lickometer drinking patterns analyzed by visual and by cross-correlation analyses demonstrated that pair housing did not increase the rate of subjects drinking in bouts occurring at the same time. The length of the avpr1a microsatellite did not predict susceptibility to peer influence or any other drinking behaviors. In summary, subpopulations of high drinkers were identified, by fluid intake and number of drinking bouts, which did or did not lower their ethanol intake when paired with a low drinking peer, and these subpopulations should be explored for testing the efficacy of treatments to decrease ethanol use in groups that are likely to be responsive to different types of therapy.

  14. Identification of subpopulations of prairie voles differentially susceptible to peer influence to decrease high alcohol intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison M.J. Anacker

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Peer influences are critical in the decrease of alcohol (ethanol abuse and maintenance of abstinence. We previously developed an animal model of inhibitory peer influences on ethanol drinking using prairie voles and here sought to understand whether this influential behavior was due to specific changes in drinking patterns and to variation in a microsatellite sequence in the regulatory region of the vasopressin receptor 1a gene (avpr1a. Adult prairie voles’ drinking patterns were monitored in a lickometer apparatus that recorded each lick a subject exhibited during continuous access to water and 10% ethanol during periods of isolation, pair housing of high and low drinkers, and subsequent isolation. Analysis of fluid consumption confirmed previous results that high drinkers typically decrease ethanol intake when paired with low drinkers, but that a subset of voles do not decrease. Analysis of bout structure revealed differences in the number of ethanol drinking bouts in the subpopulations of high drinkers when paired with low drinkers. Lickometer drinking patterns analyzed by visual and by cross-correlation analyses demonstrated that pair housing did not increase the rate of subjects drinking in bouts occurring at the same time. The length of the avpr1a microsatellite did not predict susceptibility to peer influence or any other drinking behaviors. In summary, subpopulations of high drinkers were identified by fluid intake and number of drinking bouts, which did or did not lower their ethanol intake when paired with a low drinking peer, and these subpopulations should be explored for testing the efficacy of treatments to decrease ethanol use in groups that are likely to be responsive to different types of therapy.

  15. Subpopulations Within Juvenile Psoriatic Arthritis: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L. Stoll

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The presentation of juvenile psoriatic arthritis (JPsA has long been recognized to be clinically heterogeneous. As the definition of JPsA expanded to accommodate atypical manifestations of psoriasis in young children, studies began to reflect an increasingly clear biphasic distribution of age of onset, with peaks in the first few years of life and again in early adolescence. These two subpopulations differ in gender ratio, pattern of joint involvement, laboratory findings and potentially response to therapy. Intriguingly, a similar distribution of age of onset has been observed in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA, and correlates with patterns of HLA association. While a secure classification of subpopulations within JPsA awaits improved pathophysiologic understanding, future research must consider the possibility that different disease mechanisms may be operative in distinct subsets of patients with this disorder.

  16. Chemical communication of antibiotic resistance by a highly resistant subpopulation of bacterial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar M El-Halfawy

    Full Text Available The overall antibiotic resistance of a bacterial population results from the combination of a wide range of susceptibilities displayed by subsets of bacterial cells. Bacterial heteroresistance to antibiotics has been documented for several opportunistic Gram-negative bacteria, but the mechanism of heteroresistance is unclear. We use Burkholderia cenocepacia as a model opportunistic bacterium to investigate the implications of heterogeneity in the response to the antimicrobial peptide polymyxin B (PmB and also other bactericidal antibiotics. Here, we report that B. cenocepacia is heteroresistant to PmB. Population analysis profiling also identified B. cenocepacia subpopulations arising from a seemingly homogenous culture that are resistant to higher levels of polymyxin B than the rest of the cells in the culture, and can protect the more sensitive cells from killing, as well as sensitive bacteria from other species, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. Communication of resistance depended on upregulation of putrescine synthesis and YceI, a widely conserved low-molecular weight secreted protein. Deletion of genes for the synthesis of putrescine and YceI abrogate protection, while pharmacologic inhibition of putrescine synthesis reduced resistance to polymyxin B. Polyamines and YceI were also required for heteroresistance of B. cenocepacia to various bactericidal antibiotics. We propose that putrescine and YceI resemble "danger" infochemicals whose increased production by a bacterial subpopulation, becoming more resistant to bactericidal antibiotics, communicates higher level of resistance to more sensitive members of the population of the same or different species.

  17. Single nucleotide polymorphisms that differentiate two subpopulations of Salmonella enteritidis within phage type

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Salmonella Enteritidis is currently the world's leading cause of salmonellosis, in part because of its ability to contaminate the internal contents of eggs. Previous analyses have shown that it is an exceptionally clonal serotype, which nonetheless generates considerable phenotypic heterogeneity. Due to its clonality, whole genome analysis is required to find genetic determinants that contribute to strain heterogeneity of Salmonella Enteritidis. Comparative whole genome mutational mapping of two PT13a strains that varied in the ability to contaminate eggs and to form biofilm was achieved using a high-density tiling platform with primers designed from a PT4 reference genome. Confirmatory Sanger sequencing was used on each putative SNP identified by mutational mapping to confirm its presence and location as compared to the reference sequence. High coverage pyrosequencing was used as a supporting technology to review results. Results A total of 250 confirmed SNPs were detected that differentiated the PT13a strains. From these 250 SNPS, 247 were in the chromosome and 3 were in the large virulence plasmid. SNPs ranged from single base pair substitutions to a deletion of 215 bp. A total of 15 SNPs (3 in egg-contaminating PT13a 21046 and 12 in biofilm forming PT13a 21027) altered coding sequences of 16 genes. Pyrosequencing of the two PT13a subpopulations detected 8.9% fewer SNPs than were detected by high-density tiling. Deletions and ribosomal gene differences were classes of SNPs not efficiently detected by pyrosequencing. Conclusions These results increase knowledge of evolutionary trends within Salmonella enterica that impact the safety of the food supply. Results may also facilitate designing 2nd generation vaccines, because gene targets were identified that differentiate subpopulations with variant phenotypes. High-throughput genome sequencing platforms should be assessed for the ability to detect classes of SNPs equivalently, because each platform has

  18. Increased mitochondrial calcium sensitivity and abnormal expression of innate immunity genes precede dopaminergic defects in Pink1-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi S Akundi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1 is linked to recessive Parkinsonism (EOPD. Pink1 deletion results in impaired dopamine (DA release and decreased mitochondrial respiration in the striatum of mice. To reveal additional mechanisms of Pink1-related dopaminergic dysfunction, we studied Ca²+ vulnerability of purified brain mitochondria, DA levels and metabolism and whether signaling pathways implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD display altered activity in the nigrostriatal system of Pink1⁻/⁻ mice.Purified brain mitochondria of Pink1⁻/⁻ mice showed impaired Ca²+ storage capacity, resulting in increased Ca²+ induced mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT that was rescued by cyclosporine A. A subpopulation of neurons in the substantia nigra of Pink1⁻/⁻ mice accumulated phospho-c-Jun, showing that Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK activity is increased. Pink1⁻/⁻ mice 6 months and older displayed reduced DA levels associated with increased DA turnover. Moreover, Pink1⁻/⁻ mice had increased levels of IL-1β, IL-12 and IL-10 in the striatum after peripheral challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, and Pink1⁻/⁻ embryonic fibroblasts showed decreased basal and inflammatory cytokine-induced nuclear factor kappa-β (NF-κB activity. Quantitative transcriptional profiling in the striatum revealed that Pink1⁻/⁻ mice differentially express genes that (i are upregulated in animals with experimentally induced dopaminergic lesions, (ii regulate innate immune responses and/or apoptosis and (iii promote axonal regeneration and sprouting.Increased mitochondrial Ca²+ sensitivity and JNK activity are early defects in Pink1⁻/⁻ mice that precede reduced DA levels and abnormal DA homeostasis and may contribute to neuronal dysfunction in familial PD. Differential gene expression in the nigrostriatal system of Pink1⁻/⁻ mice supports early dopaminergic dysfunction and shows that Pink1 deletion causes aberrant expression of genes that regulate

  19. Deletion of the DNA Ligase IV Gene in Candida glabrata Significantly Increases Gene-Targeting Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Yuke; Fiori, Alessandro; Van Dijck, Patrick

    2015-08-01

    Candida glabrata is reported as the second most prevalent human opportunistic fungal pathogen in the United States. Over the last decades, its incidence increased, whereas that of Candida albicans decreased slightly. One of the main reasons for this shift is attributed to the inherent tolerance of C. glabrata toward the commonly used azole antifungal drugs. Despite a close phylogenetic distance to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, homologous recombination works with poor efficiency in C. glabrata compared to baker's yeast, in fact limiting targeted genetic alterations of the pathogen's genome. It has been shown that nonhomologous DNA end joining is dominant over specific gene targeting in C. glabrata. To improve the homologous recombination efficiency, we have generated a strain in which the LIG4 gene has been deleted, which resulted in a significant increase in correct gene targeting. The very specific function of Lig4 in mediating nonhomologous end joining is the reason for the absence of clear side effects, some of which affect the ku80 mutant, another mutant with reduced nonhomologous end joining. We also generated a LIG4 reintegration cassette. Our results show that the lig4 mutant strain may be a valuable tool for the C. glabrata research community. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Subpopulações dos reticulócitos e fração de reticulócitos imaturos como indicadores de aumento da eritropoese em doentes com anemia por deficiência de ferro Reticulocyte subpopulations and immature reticulocyte fractions as indicators of increased erythropoiesi in patients with iron deficiency anaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana R. João

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho é o de estudar as subpopulações dos reticulócitos e a fração de reticulócitos imaturos (IFR enquanto indicadores de atividade eritropoética em pacientes com anemia por deficiência de ferro e determinar o seu grau de correlação com os marcadores tradicionais de deficiência de ferro. Estudamos um total de 96 indivíduos, com idades compreendidas entre os 20 e os 86 anos, divididos em dois grupos: indivíduos controle (n=30 e indivíduos com anemia por deficiência de ferro (n=66. A todos eles foi efetuado hemograma completo, incluindo contagem de reticulócitos e os seus índices de maturação, ferro, transferrina, ferritina e capacidade total de fixação do ferro. Os indivíduos com anemia por deficiência de ferro mostraram um aumento da proporção de IFR quando comparados com o grupo controle (15.02 ± 9.70% vs 6.43 ± 3.98%, pThe aim of this work is to investigate reticulocyte subpopulations and immature reticulocyte fractions as indicators of bone marrow erythropoietic activity in patients with iron-deficiency anemia and their correlations with traditional hematological and biochemical markers of iron deficiency. A total of 96 individuals, aged 20 to 86 years old, were included in this study. These individuals were divided into two groups: healthy controls (n=30 and iron-deficiency anemia (n=66. Complete blood counts including reticulocytes and their subpopulations, iron, ferritin and transferrin and total binding capacity were determined in all individuals. Patients with iron-deficiency anemia had an increased proportion of immature reticulocyte fractions when compared with controls (15.02 ± 9.70% vs. 6.43 ± 3.98%, p<0.01, respectively. Comparing patients with healthy controls, the investigation of the subpopulations revealed higher medium-fluorescent reticulocyte (12.69 ± 6.69% vs. 5.88 ± 3.59%, respectively p<0.01 and high-fluorescent reticulocyte (1.45 [0.38-3.10] vs. 0.40 [0.00-0.90], p<0

  1. A mutant gene that increases gibberellin production in Brassica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rood, S.B. (Univ. of Lethbridge, Alberta (Canada)); Williams, P.H. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (USA)); Pearce, D.; Pharis, R.P. (Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Murofushi, Noboru (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)); Mander, L.N. (Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia))

    1990-07-01

    A single gene mutant (elongated internode (ein/ein)) with accelerated shoot elongation was identified from a rapid cycling line of Brassica rapa. Relative to normal plants, mutant plants had slightly accelerated floral development, greater stem dry weights, and particularly, increased internode and inflorescence elongation. The application of the triazole plant growth retardant, paclobutrazol, inhibited shoot elongation, returning ein to a more normal phenotype. Conversely, exogenous gibberellin A{sub 3} (GA{sub 3}) can convert normal genotypes to a phenotype resembling ein. The content of endogenous GA{sub 1} and GA{sub 3} were estimated by gas chromatography-selected ion monitoring using ({sup 2}H)GA{sub 1} as a quantitative internal standard and at day 14 were 1.5- and 12.1-fold higher per stem, respectively, in ein than in normal plants, although GA concentrations were more similar. The endogenous levels of GA{sub 20} and GA{sub 1}, and the rate of GA{sub 19} metabolism were simultaneously analyzed. Levels of GA{sub 1} and GA{sub 20} were 4.6- and 12.9-fold higher, respectively, and conversions to GA{sub 20} and GA{sub 1} were 8.3 and 1.3 times faster in ein than normal plants. Confirming the enhanced rate of GA{sub 1} biosynthesis in ein, the conversion of ({sup 3}H)GA{sub 20} to ({sup 3}H) GA{sub 1} was also faster in ein than in the normal genotype. Thus, the ein allele results in accelerated GA{sub 1} biosynthesis and an elevated content of endogenous GAs, including the dihydroxylated GAs A{sub 1} and A{sub 3}.

  2. Subpopulation-proteomics in prokaryotic populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Michael; Seifert, Jana; von Bergen, Martin; Schmid, Andreas; Bühler, Bruno; Müller, Susann

    2013-02-01

    Clonal microbial cells do not behave in an identical manner and form subpopulations during cultivation. Besides varying micro-environmental conditions, cell inherent features like cell cycle dependent localization and concentration of regulatory proteins as well as epigenetic properties are well accepted mechanisms creating cell heterogeneity. Another suspected reason is molecular noise on the transcriptional and translational level. A promising tool to unravel reasons for cell heterogeneity is the combination of cell sorting and subpopulation proteomics. This review summarizes recent developments in prokaryotic single-cell analytics and provides a workflow for selection of single cells, low cell number mass spectrometry, and proteomics evaluation. This approach is useful for understanding the dependency of individual cell decisions on inherent protein profiles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Low penetrance genes associated with increased risk for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, B L; Nathanson, K L

    2000-06-01

    Much effort in recent years has been focused on understanding the factors that contribute to breast cancer risk. Two major susceptibility alleles, BRCA1 and BRCA2, have been identified, and the prevalence and penetrance of mutations in these genes have been studied extensively. However, this work highlights the fact that only a small proportion of breast cancer is due to mutations in the genes. Evidence for additional high penetrance genes exists, but it is becoming clear that an understanding of multiple lower penetrance alleles will be necessary to fully define breast cancer risk. Work in this area has focused on the analysis of polymorphisms of potential functional significance in several classes of genes, including those involved in carcinogen metabolism, oestrogen metabolite biosynthesis, steroid hormone receptor activation and DNA damage response. These studies are reviewed and a strategy to use modification of breast cancer penetrance in families with known mutations in BRCA1 as a means of identifying additional low penetrance, or modifier, genes is discussed.

  4. Increasing the complexity: new genes and new types of albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoliu, Lluís; Grønskov, Karen; Wei, Ai-Hua; Martínez-García, Mónica; Fernández, Almudena; Arveiler, Benoît; Morice-Picard, Fanny; Riazuddin, Saima; Suzuki, Tamio; Ahmed, Zubair M; Rosenberg, Thomas; Li, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Albinism is a rare genetic condition globally characterized by a number of specific deficits in the visual system, resulting in poor vision, in association with a variable hypopigmentation phenotype. This lack or reduction in pigment might affect the eyes, skin, and hair (oculocutaneous albinism, OCA), or only the eyes (ocular albinism, OA). In addition, there are several syndromic forms of albinism (e.g. Hermansky-Pudlak and Chediak-Higashi syndromes, HPS and CHS, respectively) in which the described hypopigmented and visual phenotypes coexist with more severe pathological alterations. Recently, a locus has been mapped to the 4q24 human chromosomal region and thus represents an additional genetic cause of OCA, termed OCA5, while the gene is eventually identified. In addition, two new genes have been identified as causing OCA when mutated: SLC24A5 and C10orf11, and hence designated as OCA6 and OCA7, respectively. This consensus review, involving all laboratories that have reported these new genes, aims to update and agree upon the current gene nomenclature and types of albinism, while providing additional insights from the function of these new genes in pigment cells. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Selection of a MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cell Subpopulation with High Sensitivity to IL-1β: Characterization of and Correlation between Morphological and Molecular Changes Leading to Increased Invasiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloy Andres Pérez-Yépez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer and inflammation are closely related in tumor malignancy prognosis. Breast cancer MCF-7 cells have a poor invasive phenotype, although, under IL-1β stimulus, acquire invasive features. Cell response heterogeneity has precluded precise evaluation of the malignant transition. MCF-7A3 cells were selected for high sensitivity to IL-1β stimulus, uniform expression of CXCR4, and stability of IL1-RI. Structural changes, colony formation ability, proliferation rate, chemotaxis, Matrigel invasion, E-cadherin mRNA expression and protein localization were determined in these cells and in MCF-7 parental cells under the stimulus of IL-1β. Selected MCF-7A3 cells showed a uniform response to IL-1β stimulation increasing features of invasive cells such as scattering, colony formation, proliferation, chemokinesis and invasion. Basal expression of E-cadherin mRNA was higher, and IL-1β stimulus had no further effect at early times of cytokine exposure. Total E-cadherin levels remained unchanged in parental cells, whereas levels decreased, as MCF-7A3 cells became fibroblastoid or scattered. Triton X-100 soluble/insoluble E-cadherin ratios were highly increased in these cells, while, in MCF-7pl cells, ratios could not be correlated with morphology changes. MCF-7A3 cells uniform response to IL-1β allowed characterization of changes induced by the cytokine that had not been assessed when using heterogeneous cell lines.

  6. The Gulliver Effect: The Impact of Error in an Elephantine Subpopulation on Estimates for Lilliputian Subpopulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micceri, Theodore; Parasher, Pradnya; Waugh, Gordon W.; Herreid, Charlene

    2009-01-01

    An extensive review of the research literature and a study comparing over 36,000 survey responses with archival true scores indicated that one should expect a minimum of at least three percent random error for the least ambiguous of self-report measures. The Gulliver Effect occurs when a small proportion of error in a sizable subpopulation exerts…

  7. Trypanosoma cruzi: effect of parasite subpopulation on murine pregnancy outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solana, María Elisa; Celentano, Ana María; Tekiel, Valeria; Jones, Marta; González Cappa, Stella Maris

    2002-02-01

    C3H/HeN female mice infected with distinct Trypanosoma cruzi subpopulations (RA strain [pantropic/reticulotropic] and K98 clone of the CA-I strain [myotropic]) show differences both in inflammatory compromise of the genital tract and in the outcome of pregnancy. The group of mice infected with the K98 clone show lymphomononuclear infiltrates in pelvian fat and in uterus interstitium, coexisting with the presence of T. cruzi DNA, and show moderate oophoritis, perioophoritis, and vasculitis. However, neither parasite DNA nor inflammatory foci were detected in the uterus, and only mild oophoritis was observed among RA-infected mice at mating time. Independently from the parasite subpopulation, females developed estrous 30 days postinoculation (PI), and at the same time, parasite counts were similar for K98 and for RA-infected mice. However, fertility was significantly diminished in K98-infected females. On day 14 of gestation, fetal resorptions increased in this group and cannot be attributed to hormonal disbalance because similar serum progesterone levels were found in all groups. At this time (44 days PI), parasitemia was higher in K98- than in RA-infected mice. However, resorptions were not triggered by massive infection because polymerase chain reaction failed to prove parasite DNA in resorbing fetuses. In contrast with K98 females, RA-infected mice delivered T. cruzi-infected newborns.

  8. Reactive microgliosis engages distinct responses by microglial subpopulations after minor central nervous system injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirenfeldt, Martin; Babcock, Alicia Anne; Ladeby, Rune

    2005-01-01

    that was induced to express CD34. The proportion of immigrant GFP(+) microglia (CD11b(+)CD45(dim)) increased signficantly by 3 and 5 days postlesion and reached a maximum of 13% by 7 days. These cells expressed lower CD11b levels than resident microglia, forming a distinct subpopulation on CD11b/CD45 profiles....... The proportion of CD34(+)CD11b(+) microglia was significantly increased at 3 days postlesion but had normalized by 5 and 7 days, when the microglial reaction is known to be at its maximum. Our results show that distinct subpopulations of microglia respond to minor CNS injury. The heterogeneity in microglial...

  9. Genetic structure and variation of Petrosimonia sibirica subpopulations in oasis-desert transitional zone in Fukang, Xinjiang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiling; Xu, Li; Yan, Guiqin; Gu, Fengxue; Pan, Xiaoling; Yue, Ming; Zhao, Guifang

    2003-07-01

    Population genetic structure and genetic diversity were studied using RAPD in five samples of Petrosimonia sibirica in Fukang, XinJiang. The results showed that amplification of 14 random primers detected 76 of 77 loci were polymorphic. The mean proportion of ploymorphic loci (P) of P. sibirica was 98.7%. It showed the higher genetic diversity existed in the subpopulations of P. sibirica. Furthermore, the study discussed the Shannon information index (HPOP/HSP =0.6933), Nei gene diversity index (HS/HT=0.6948) and gene differentiation index (GST=0.3052). The analysis presented that the ratio of molecular variation was over 30% among subpopulations and about 70% within subpopulations. Therefore the genetic differentiation had happened among subpopulations of P. sibirica. On the other hand, the gene flow of P. sibirica (Nm=1.138) was less than that of cosmopolite species (Nm=1.881), and much lower than that of of Caragana spp. populations over Maowusu sandy grassland (Nm=5.9529). Additionally, through the correlation analysis, the relationship between the genetic distance of P. sibirica and latitude, longitude and altitude was not significant. It showed the geographical difference was not one of the potential factors, which affected the genetic differentiation of P. sibirica. At the same time, the soluble salt in soil of the oasis desert transitional zone might play a role in maintaining the genetic diversity of P. sibirica. The paper indicated that the mean proportion of ploymorphic loci (P)and Nei gene diversity index (H) of P. sibirica had the remarkably negative relationship (pgenetic variation existed within the subpopulations, the genetic differentiation occurred among subpopulations. The natural selection may have a determinate effect on keeping the genetic variation and differentiation of the subpopulations of P. sibirica.

  10. Assessing the Viability of Tiger Subpopulations in a Fragmented Landscape

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matthew Linkie; Guillaume Chapron; Deborah J. Martyr; Jeremy Holden; Nigel Leader-Williams

    2006-01-01

    .... This study aimed to provide such information for tigers in the Kerinci Seblat (KS) region, Sumatra, by identifying and assessing subpopulation viability under different management strategies. 2...

  11. Increased exopolysaccharide production in Lactococcuc lactis due to increased levels of expression of the NIZO B40 eps gene cluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boels, I.C.; Kranenburg, van R.; Kanning, M.W.; Chong, B.F.; Vos, de W.M.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2003-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPS) play an important role in the rheology and texture of fermented food products. This is the first report demonstrating that homologous overexpression of a complete eps gene cluster in Lactococcus lactis leads to increased EPS production levels. A ninefold-elevated EPS plasmid

  12. MicroRNA-181a* Targets Nanog in a Subpopulation of CD34+ Cells Isolated From Peripheral Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Mintz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Exploiting the properties of stem cells by microRNA (miRNA profiling offers an attractive approach to identify new regulators of stem cell fate. Although numerous miRNA have been screened from hematopoietic stem cells (HSC, the targets corresponding to many of these miRNA have not yet been fully elucidated. By miRNA profiling in a subpopulation of CD34+ cells isolated from peripheral blood, we have identified eight clusters of miRNA that were differentially expressed. Further analysis of one of the clusters by bioinformatics revealed that a miRNA, miR-181a*, which is highly expressed in the adherent CD34+ cells, affects the expression levels of Nanog, a stem cell surrogate marker. We show specifically by reporter assay and mutational analysis that miR-181a* targets a seedless 3′ compensatory site in the 3′UTR of Nanog and affects gene expression. We demonstrate that inhibiting miR-181a* upregulates the Nanog expression level, in addition to an increase in alkaline phosphatase activity. Our studies suggest that miR-181a* may be important in controlling the expression level of Nanog in a subpopulation of CD34+ cells.

  13. The use of 16S rRNA gene metagenetic monitoring of refrigerated food products for understanding the kinetics of microbial subpopulations at different storage temperatures: the example of white pudding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauchie, Emilie; Gand, Mathieu; Kergourlay, Gilles; Taminiau, Bernard; Delhalle, Laurent; Korsak, Nicolas; Daube, Georges

    2017-04-17

    In order to control food losses and wastage, monitoring the microbial diversity of food products, during processing and storage is important, as studies have highlighted the metabolic activities of some microorganisms which can lead to spoilage. Knowledge of this diversity can be greatly improved by using a metagenetic approach based on high throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing, which enables a much higher resolution than culture-based methods. Moreover, the Jameson effect, a phenomenon described by Jameson in 1962, is often used to classify bacterial strains within an ecosystem. According to this, we have studied the bacterial microbiota of Belgian white pudding during storage at different temperatures using culture-dependent and independent methods. The product was inoculated with a mix of dominant strains previously isolated from this foodstuff at the end of its shelf life (Carnobacterium maltaromaticum, Lactobacillus fuchuensis, Lactobacillus graminis, Lactobacillus oligofermentans, Lactococcus lactis, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Raoultella terrigena and Serratia sp.). Daily during 16days, the absolute abundance of inoculated strain was monitored by combining total count on plate agar and metagenetic analysis. The results were confirmed by qPCR analysis. The growth of each species was modelled for each temperature conditions, representative of good or bad storage practices. These data allowed the bacterial strains subdivision into three classes based on criteria of growth parameters for the studied temperature: the "dominant", the "subdominant" and the "inhibited" bacterial species, according to their maximal concentration (Nmax, log CFU/g), growth rate (μmax, 1/h) and time to reach the stationary phase (TRSP, days). Thereby, depending on the storage conditions, these data have permitted to follow intrinsically the evolution of each strain on the bacterial ecosystem of Belgian white pudding. Interestingly, it has shown that the reliability of the Jameson effect

  14. Simulation Study for Transfer of Antibiotic Resistance via Mutator Subpopulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipsen, Kirsten Riber; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    Evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacterial populations is an increasing problem having fatal consequences for treatment of diseases. Therefore it is very important to understand this evolution. Traditionally evolution is considered to happen by single point mutations, where each mutant must...... have a growth advantage over the parent strain and grow to a sufficient number before a second mutation can occur. However, when multiple mutations are necessary for development of resistance, single mutations occurring with a normal mutation rate can not always explain the observed resistance. We...... introduce an alternative hypothesis by which a subpopulation of mutators drives the evolution process. Resistance is acquired by a subpoplution of mutators, for which the mutation rate is much higher than the wild-type. If the resistance is located on a transferable plasmid it can subsequently...

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa AES-1 exhibits increased virulence gene expression during chronic infection of cystic fibrosis lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Sharna; Parker, Dane; Seemann, Torsten; Thomas, Torsten; Turnbull, Lynne; Rose, Barbara; Bye, Peter; Cordwell, Stuart; Whitchurch, Cynthia; Manos, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in people with cystic fibrosis (CF), adapts for survival in the CF lung through both mutation and gene expression changes. Frequent clonal strains such as the Australian Epidemic Strain-1 (AES-1), have increased ability to establish infection in the CF lung and to superimpose and replace infrequent clonal strains. Little is known about the factors underpinning these properties. Analysis has been hampered by lack of expression array templates containing CF-strain specific genes. We sequenced the genome of an acute infection AES-1 isolate from a CF infant (AES-1R) and constructed a non-redundant micro-array (PANarray) comprising AES-1R and seven other sequenced P. aeruginosa genomes. The unclosed AES-1R genome comprised 6.254Mbp and contained 6957 putative genes, including 338 not found in the other seven genomes. The PANarray contained 12,543 gene probe spots; comprising 12,147 P. aeruginosa gene probes, 326 quality-control probes and 70 probes for non-P. aeruginosa genes, including phage and plant genes. We grew AES-1R and its isogenic pair AES-1M, taken from the same patient 10.5 years later and not eradicated in the intervening period, in our validated artificial sputum medium (ASMDM) and used the PANarray to compare gene expression of both in duplicate. 675 genes were differentially expressed between the isogenic pairs, including upregulation of alginate, biofilm, persistence genes and virulence-related genes such as dihydroorotase, uridylate kinase and cardiolipin synthase, in AES-1M. Non-PAO1 genes upregulated in AES-1M included pathogenesis-related (PAGI-5) genes present in strains PACS2 and PA7, and numerous phage genes. Elucidation of these genes' roles could lead to targeted treatment strategies for chronically infected CF patients.

  16. Autism and increased paternal age related changes in global levels of gene expression regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D Alter

    Full Text Available A causal role of mutations in multiple general transcription factors in neurodevelopmental disorders including autism suggested that alterations in global levels of gene expression regulation might also relate to disease risk in sporadic cases of autism. This premise can be tested by evaluating for changes in the overall distribution of gene expression levels. For instance, in mice, variability in hippocampal-dependent behaviors was associated with variability in the pattern of the overall distribution of gene expression levels, as assessed by variance in the distribution of gene expression levels in the hippocampus. We hypothesized that a similar change in variance might be found in children with autism. Gene expression microarrays covering greater than 47,000 unique RNA transcripts were done on RNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL of children with autism (n = 82 and controls (n = 64. Variance in the distribution of gene expression levels from each microarray was compared between groups of children. Also tested was whether a risk factor for autism, increased paternal age, was associated with variance. A decrease in the variance in the distribution of gene expression levels in PBL was associated with the diagnosis of autism and a risk factor for autism, increased paternal age. Traditional approaches to microarray analysis of gene expression suggested a possible mechanism for decreased variance in gene expression. Gene expression pathways involved in transcriptional regulation were down-regulated in the blood of children with autism and children of older fathers. Thus, results from global and gene specific approaches to studying microarray data were complimentary and supported the hypothesis that alterations at the global level of gene expression regulation are related to autism and increased paternal age. Global regulation of transcription, thus, represents a possible point of convergence for multiple etiologies of autism and other

  17. Rapid evolution of distinct Helicobacter pylori subpopulations in the Americas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaisa Thorell

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available For the last 500 years, the Americas have been a melting pot both for genetically diverse humans and for the pathogenic and commensal organisms associated with them. One such organism is the stomach-dwelling bacterium Helicobacter pylori, which is highly prevalent in Latin America where it is a major current public health challenge because of its strong association with gastric cancer. By analyzing the genome sequence of H. pylori isolated in North, Central and South America, we found evidence for admixture between H. pylori of European and African origin throughout the Americas, without substantial input from pre-Columbian (hspAmerind bacteria. In the US, strains of African and European origin have remained genetically distinct, while in Colombia and Nicaragua, bottlenecks and rampant genetic exchange amongst isolates have led to the formation of national gene pools. We found three outer membrane proteins with atypical levels of Asian ancestry in American strains, as well as alleles that were nearly fixed specifically in South American isolates, suggesting a role for the ethnic makeup of hosts in the colonization of incoming strains. Our results show that new H. pylori subpopulations can rapidly arise, spread and adapt during times of demographic flux, and suggest that differences in transmission ecology between high and low prevalence areas may substantially affect the composition of bacterial populations.

  18. Gene activities that mediate increased life span of C. elegans insulin-like signaling mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelson, Andrew V; Carr, Christopher E; Ruvkun, Gary

    2007-11-15

    Genetic and RNA interference (RNAi) screens for life span regulatory genes have revealed that the daf-2 insulin-like signaling pathway plays a major role in Caenorhabditis elegans longevity. This pathway converges on the DAF-16 transcription factor and may regulate life span by controlling the expression of a large number of genes, including free-radical detoxifying genes, stress resistance genes, and pathogen resistance genes. We conducted a genome-wide RNAi screen to identify genes necessary for the extended life span of daf-2 mutants and identified approximately 200 gene inactivations that shorten daf-2 life span. Some of these gene inactivations dramatically shorten daf-2 mutant life span but less dramatically shorten daf-2; daf-16 mutant or wild-type life span. Molecular and behavioral markers for normal aging and for extended life span in low insulin/IGF1 (insulin-like growth factor 1) signaling were assayed to distinguish accelerated aging from general sickness and to examine age-related phenotypes. Detailed demographic analysis, molecular markers of aging, and insulin signaling mutant test strains were used to filter progeric gene inactivations for specific acceleration of aging. Highly represented in the genes that mediate life span extension in the daf-2 mutant are components of endocytotic trafficking of membrane proteins to lysosomes. These gene inactivations disrupt the increased expression of the DAF-16 downstream gene superoxide dismutase sod-3 in a daf-2 mutant, suggesting trafficking between the insulin-like receptor and DAF-16. The activities of these genes may normally decline during aging.

  19. Changes in transcriptional orientation are associated with increases in evolutionary rates of enterobacterial genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiung Chao

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in transcriptional orientation (“CTOs” occur frequently in prokaryotic genomes. Such changes usually result from genomic inversions, which may cause a conflict between the directions of replication and transcription and an increase in mutation rate. However, CTOs do not always lead to the replication-transcription confrontation. Furthermore, CTOs may cause deleterious disruptions of operon structure and/or gene regulations. The currently existing CTOs may indicate relaxation of selection pressure. Therefore, it is of interest to investigate whether CTOs have an independent effect on the evolutionary rates of the affected genes, and whether these genes are subject to any type of selection pressure in prokaryotes. Methods Three closely related enterbacteria, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, were selected for comparisons of synonymous (dS and nonsynonymous (dN substitution rate between the genes that have experienced changes in transcriptional orientation (changed-orientation genes, “COGs” and those that do not (same-orientation genes, “SOGs”. The dN/dS ratio was also derived to evaluate the selection pressure on the analyzed genes. Confounding factors in the estimation of evolutionary rates, such as gene essentiality, gene expression level, replication-transcription confrontation, and decreased dS at gene terminals were controlled in the COG-SOG comparisons. Results We demonstrate that COGs have significantly higher dN and dS than SOGs when a series of confounding factors are controlled. However, the dN/dS ratios are similar between the two gene groups, suggesting that the increase in dS can sufficiently explain the increase in dN in COGs. Therefore, the increases in evolutionary rates in COGs may be mainly mutation-driven. Conclusions Here we show that CTOs can increase the evolutionary rates of the affected genes. This effect is independent of the

  20. Potential of gene drives with genome editing to increase genetic gain in livestock breeding programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonen, Serap; Jenko, Janez; Gorjanc, Gregor; Mileham, Alan J; Whitelaw, C Bruce A; Hickey, John M

    2017-01-04

    This paper uses simulation to explore how gene drives can increase genetic gain in livestock breeding programs. Gene drives are naturally occurring phenomena that cause a mutation on one chromosome to copy itself onto its homologous chromosome. We simulated nine different breeding and editing scenarios with a common overall structure. Each scenario began with 21 generations of selection, followed by 20 generations of selection based on true breeding values where the breeder used selection alone, selection in combination with genome editing, or selection with genome editing and gene drives. In the scenarios that used gene drives, we varied the probability of successfully incorporating the gene drive. For each scenario, we evaluated genetic gain, genetic variance [Formula: see text], rate of change in inbreeding ([Formula: see text]), number of distinct quantitative trait nucleotides (QTN) edited, rate of increase in favourable allele frequencies of edited QTN and the time to fix favourable alleles. Gene drives enhanced the benefits of genome editing in seven ways: (1) they amplified the increase in genetic gain brought about by genome editing; (2) they amplified the rate of increase in the frequency of favourable alleles and reduced the time it took to fix them; (3) they enabled more rapid targeting of QTN with lesser effect for genome editing; (4) they distributed fixed editing resources across a larger number of distinct QTN across generations; (5) they focussed editing on a smaller number of QTN within a given generation; (6) they reduced the level of inbreeding when editing a subset of the sires; and (7) they increased the efficiency of converting genetic variation into genetic gain. Genome editing in livestock breeding results in short-, medium- and long-term increases in genetic gain. The increase in genetic gain occurs because editing increases the frequency of favourable alleles in the population. Gene drives accelerate the increase in allele frequency

  1. Membrane fusion inducers, chloroquine and spermidine increase lipoplex-mediated gene transfection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong-Baeza, Carlos; Bustos, Israel; Serna, Manuel; Tescucano, Alonso; Alcantara-Farfan, Veronica; Ibanez, Miguel [Biochemistry Department, National Polytechnic Institute (IPN), Mexico City 11340 (Mexico); Montanez, Cecilia [Department of Genetics and Molecular Biology, Centre for Research and Advanced Studies (CINVESTAV), IPN, Mexico City 07360 (Mexico); Wong, Carlos [Biochemistry Department, National Polytechnic Institute (IPN), Mexico City 11340 (Mexico); Baeza, Isabel, E-mail: ibaeza@encb.ipn.mx [Biochemistry Department, National Polytechnic Institute (IPN), Mexico City 11340 (Mexico)

    2010-05-28

    Gene transfection into mammalian cells can be achieved with viral and non-viral vectors. Non-viral vectors, such as cationic lipids that form lipoplexes with DNA, are safer and more stable than viral vectors, but their transfection efficiencies are lower. Here we describe that the simultaneous treatment with a membrane fusion inducer (chlorpromazine or procainamide) plus the lysosomotropic agent chloroquine increases lipoplex-mediated gene transfection in human (HEK293 and C-33 A) and rat (PC12) cell lines (up to 9.2-fold), as well as in situ in BALB/c mice spleens and livers (up to 6-fold); and that the polyamine spermidine increases lipoplex-mediated gene transfection and expression in cell cultures. The use of these four drugs provides a novel, safe and relatively inexpensive way to considerably increase lipoplex-mediated gene transfection efficiency.

  2. Artificial neural networks for the definition of kinetic subpopulations in electroejaculated and epididymal spermatozoa in the domestic cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contri, Alberto; Zambelli, Daniele; Faustini, Massimo; Cunto, Marco; Gloria, Alessia; Carluccio, Augusto

    2012-09-01

    This study was designed for the identification of different sperm kinetic subpopulations in feline semen using artificial neural networks (ANNs) and for the evaluation of the effect of ejaculation on motility patterns of these subpopulations. Seven tomcats presented for routine orchiectomy were electroejaculated, and after 5 days, orchiectomized and epididymal tail sperms were collected. Sperm motility characteristics were evaluated using a computer-assisted sperm analyzer that provided individual kinetic characteristics of each spermatozoon. A total of 23 400 spermatozoa for electroejaculated and 9200 for epididymal tail samples were evaluated using a multivariate approach, comprising principal component analysis and ANN classification. The multivariate approach allowed the identification and characterization of three different and well-defined sperm subpopulations. There were significant differences before (epididymal tail spermatozoa) and after (electroejaculated sperm) ejaculation in sperm kinetic subpopulation characteristics. In both epididymal and ejaculated samples, the majority of subpopulation was characterized by high velocity and progressiveness; however, the electroejaculated samples showed significantly higher values, suggesting that the microenvironment of the epididymal tail could affect the sperm motility or, alternatively, seminal plasma could increase the kinetic characteristics of the spermatozoa, indicating that only after ejaculation, the spermatozoa express their motility potential. Nevertheless, further studies are required to clarify the functional significance of each kinetic subpopulation.

  3. Increased glycopeptide production after overexpression of shikimate pathway genes being part of the balhimycin biosynthetic gene cluster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thykær, Jette; Nielsen, Jens; Wohlleben, W.

    2010-01-01

    Amycolatopsis balhimycina produces the vancomycin-analogue balhimycin. The strain therefore serves as a model strain for glycopeptide antibiotic production. Previous characterisation of the balhimycin biosynthetic cluster had shown that the border sequences contained both, a putative 3-deoxy......-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (dahp), and a prephenate dehydrogenase (pdh) gene. In a metabolic engineering approach for increasing the precursor supply for balhimycin production, the dahp and pdh genes from the biosynthetic cluster were overexpressed both individually and together and the resulting strains...... production levels similar to the parent strain. Based on these results the relation between primary and secondary metabolism with regards to Dahp and Pdh is discussed....

  4. Calcium gluconate in phosphate buffered saline increases gene delivery with adenovirus type 5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko T Ahonen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adenoviruses are attractive vectors for gene therapy because of their stability in vivo and the possibility of production at high titers. Despite exciting preclinical data with various approaches, there are only a few examples of clear efficacy in clinical trials. Effective gene delivery to target cells remains the key variable determining efficacy and thus enhanced transduction methods are important. METHODS/RESULTS: We found that heated serum could enhance adenovirus 5 mediated gene delivery up to twentyfold. A new protein-level interaction was found between fiber knob and serum transthyretin, but this was not responsible for the observed effect. Instead, we found that heating caused the calcium and phosphate present in the serum mix to precipitate, and this was responsible for enhanced gene delivery. This finding could have relevance for designing preclinical experiments with adenoviruses, since calcium and phosphate are present in many solutions. To translate this into an approach potentially testable in patients, we used calcium gluconate in phosphate buffered saline, both of which are clinically approved, to increase adenoviral gene transfer up to 300-fold in vitro. Gene transfer was increased with or without heating and in a manner independent from the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor. In vivo, in mouse studies, gene delivery was increased 2-, 110-, 12- and 13-fold to tumors, lungs, heart and liver and did not result in increased pro-inflammatory cytokine induction. Antitumor efficacy of a replication competent virus was also increased significantly. CONCLUSION: In summary, adenoviral gene transfer and antitumor efficacy can be enhanced by calcium gluconate in phosphate buffered saline.

  5. Identification and manipulation of the pleuromutilin gene cluster from Clitopilus passeckerianus for increased rapid antibiotic production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Andy M.; Alberti, Fabrizio; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Collins, Catherine M.; de Mattos-Shipley, Kate; Hartley, Amanda J.; Hayes, Patrick; Griffin, Alison; Lazarus, Colin M.; Cox, Russell J.; Willis, Christine L.; O'Dwyer, Karen; Spence, David W.; Foster, Gary D.

    2016-05-01

    Semi-synthetic derivatives of the tricyclic diterpene antibiotic pleuromutilin from the basidiomycete Clitopilus passeckerianus are important in combatting bacterial infections in human and veterinary medicine. These compounds belong to the only new class of antibiotics for human applications, with novel mode of action and lack of cross-resistance, representing a class with great potential. Basidiomycete fungi, being dikaryotic, are not generally amenable to strain improvement. We report identification of the seven-gene pleuromutilin gene cluster and verify that using various targeted approaches aimed at increasing antibiotic production in C. passeckerianus, no improvement in yield was achieved. The seven-gene pleuromutilin cluster was reconstructed within Aspergillus oryzae giving production of pleuromutilin in an ascomycete, with a significant increase (2106%) in production. This is the first gene cluster from a basidiomycete to be successfully expressed in an ascomycete, and paves the way for the exploitation of a metabolically rich but traditionally overlooked group of fungi.

  6. Interleukin-10 gene rs1800896 polymorphism increases risk of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongmei; Liu, Ailing; Zhou, Bingzhi; Zhao, Cunxin; Jin, Guangjun

    2017-12-01

    The association between interleukin-10 (IL-10) gene rs1800896 polymorphism and susceptibility to acute pancreatitis (AP) has been investigated in several studies, but with contradictory findings. Therefore, a comprehensive meta-analysis is needed to assess the strength of such association. Literatures on PubMed, EMBASE, and CNKI were searched to identify relevant studies. The strength of association between IL-10 gene rs1800896 polymorphism and AP risk was assessed using pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Totally 7 case-control studies involving 1527 cases and 1511 controls were identified. Analyses proved that IL-10 gene rs1800896 polymorphism was significantly associated with an increased risk of AP. Stratification analysis of ethnicity found such significant association only among Asians, but not Caucasians. IL-10 gene rs1800896 polymorphism increases the risk of AP.

  7. Dramatic Increases of Soil Microbial Functional Gene Diversity at the Treeline Ecotone of Changbai Mountain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Congcong; Shi, Yu; Ni, Yingying; Deng, Ye; Van Nostrand, Joy D; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Chu, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    The elevational and latitudinal diversity patterns of microbial taxa have attracted great attention in the past decade. Recently, the distribution of functional attributes has been in the spotlight. Here, we report a study profiling soil microbial communities along an elevation gradient (500-2200 m) on Changbai Mountain. Using a comprehensive functional gene microarray (GeoChip 5.0), we found that microbial functional gene richness exhibited a dramatic increase at the treeline ecotone, but the bacterial taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing did not exhibit such a similar trend. However, the β-diversity (compositional dissimilarity among sites) pattern for both bacterial taxa and functional genes was similar, showing significant elevational distance-decay patterns which presented increased dissimilarity with elevation. The bacterial taxonomic diversity/structure was strongly influenced by soil pH, while the functional gene diversity/structure was significantly correlated with soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC). This finding highlights that soil DOC may be a good predictor in determining the elevational distribution of microbial functional genes. The finding of significant shifts in functional gene diversity at the treeline ecotone could also provide valuable information for predicting the responses of microbial functions to climate change.

  8. REM sleep deprivation increases the expression of interleukin genes in mice hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Won Sub; Park, Hae Jeong; Chung, Joo-Ho; Kim, Jong Woo

    2013-11-27

    Recently, evidence has suggested the possible involvement of inflammatory cytokines in sleep deprivation (SD). In this study, we assessed the patterns of inflammatory gene regulation in the hypothalamus of REM SD mice. C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to two groups, SD (n=15) and control groups (n=15). Mice in the SD group were sleep-deprived for 72h using modified multiple platforms. Microarray analysis on inflammatory genes was performed in mice hypothalamus. In addition, interleukin 1 beta (IL1β) protein expression was analyzed by the immunochemistry method. Through microarray analysis, we found that expressions of IL subfamily genes, such as IL1β (2.55-fold), IL18 (1.92-fold), IL11 receptor alpha chain 1 (1.48-fold), IL5 (1.41-fold), and IL17E genes (1.31-fold), were up-regulated in the hypothalamus of SD mice compared to the control. The increase in the expression of these genes was also confirmed by RT-PCR. Among these genes, the expression of IL1β was particularly increased in the hypothalamus of SD mice. Interestingly, we found that the protein expression of endogenous IL1β was also elevated in the hypothalamus of SD mice compared to the control mice. These results implicate that IL subfamily genes, and in particular, IL1β, may play a role in sleep regulation in the hypothalamus of REM SD mice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Increased fat oxidation and regulation of metabolic genes with ultraendurance exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, Jørn Wulff; Rehrer, N J; Pilegaard, H

    2007-01-01

    AIM: Regular endurance exercise stimulates muscle metabolic capacity, but effects of very prolonged endurance exercise are largely unknown. This study examined muscle substrate availability and utilization during prolonged endurance exercise, and associated metabolic genes. METHODS: Data were...... exercise markedly increases plasma fatty acid availability and fat utilization during exercise. Exercise-induced regulation of genes encoding proteins involved in fatty acid recruitment and oxidation may contribute to these changes....

  10. Fight or flight? - Flight increases immune gene expression but does not help to fight an infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woestmann, L; Kvist, J; Saastamoinen, M

    2017-03-01

    Flight represents a key trait in most insects, being energetically extremely demanding, yet often necessary for foraging and reproduction. Additionally, dispersal via flight is especially important for species living in fragmented landscapes. Even though, based on life-history theory, a negative relationship may be expected between flight and immunity, a number of previous studies have indicated flight to induce an increased immune response. In this study, we assessed whether induced immunity (i.e. immune gene expression) in response to 15-min forced flight treatment impacts individual survival of bacterial infection in the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia). We were able to confirm previous findings of flight-induced immune gene expression, but still observed substantially stronger effects on both gene expression levels and life span due to bacterial infection compared to flight treatment. Even though gene expression levels of some immunity-related genes were elevated due to flight, these individuals did not show increased survival of bacterial infection, indicating that flight-induced immune activation does not completely protect them from the negative effects of bacterial infection. Finally, an interaction between flight and immune treatment indicated a potential trade-off: flight treatment increased immune gene expression in naïve individuals only, whereas in infected individuals no increase in immune gene expression was induced by flight. Our results suggest that the up-regulation of immune genes upon flight is based on a general stress response rather than reflecting an adaptive response to cope with potential infections during flight or in new habitats. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology Published by John Wiley & Sons ltd on behalf of European Society for Evolutionary Biology.

  11. Effects of microwave radiation on peripheral lymphocyte subpopulations in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-ling YIN

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effects and mechanisms of microwave radiation on peripheral lymphocyte subpopulations in Wistar rats.Methods A total of 100 Wistar rats(180-220g were exposed to microwave with different average power densities of 5,10,30 and 60 mW/cm2,and sham exposure of 0mW/cm2 was performed in a control group at the same time.At day 1,7,14 and 28 after microwave irradiation,the changes in peripheral CD3+,CD4+,CD8+ T cells,ratio of CD4+/CD8+ and CD45RA+ B lymphocyte in rats were analyzed by flow cytometry(FCM.Results The CD3+ T cells decreased significantly in 10-30mW/cm2 groups at day 7 and in 5-30 mW/cm2 groups at day 14 after radiation as compared with control group(P < 0.05,and CD4+ T cells decreased significantly in 10mW/cm2 group at day 14 after radiation as compared with control group(P < 0.01.From day 1 to day 14 after radiation,CD8+ T cells showed a reduction in number in all irradiated groups when compared with the control,but statistical significance was only found in the 30mW/cm2 group(P < 0.05.The CD4+/CD8+ ratio increased in 5mW/cm2 group on day 1,while decreased significantly in 5-30mW/cm2 groups on day 14 after radiation as compared with control group(P < 0.05.After microwave exposure,however,CD45RA+ B cells in 30mW/cm2 group at day 1 and in 30-60mW/cm2 groups at day 14 after radiation increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner.Conclusion A definite dosage of microwave radiation,ranging from 5-60mW/cm2,may induce changes in subpopulations of peripheral lymphocytes and cause acute immune function impairment in rats.

  12. Lymphocyte subpopulations during cytomegalovirus disease in renal transplant recipients

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    S.M. Castro

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available We have determined the number of circulating T, B and natural killer cells in renal transplant recipients in order to detect changes during cytomegalovirus (CMV infections. Serial blood samples were taken from 61 patients on standard triple immunosuppression therapy (cyclosporin A, azathioprine and prednisone. Using two-color flow cytometry analysis, the absolute number of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD19+, CD3+HLA-DR+ and CD16+56+ cells was determined. Forty-eight patients (78.7% developed active CMV infection, and all of them subsequently recovered. Twenty of the infected patients (32.8% presented symptoms compatible with CMV disease during the infectious process. The number of lymphocytes and their main subpopulations were normal before the onset of CMV disease. During the disease there was a decrease followed by a significant increase (P<0.005 in the number of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ and CD3+HLA-DR+ cells. No significant changes were observed in natural killer cells or B lymphocytes during the disease. We conclude, as observed in all viremic patients recovering from infection, that recovery is associated with an increase in the number of T cell subsets. The monitoring of different lymphocyte subsets along with antigenemia can be extremely useful in the detection of patients at high risk of developing CMV symptoms, allowing the early introduction of antiviral therapy or the reduction of immunosuppression therapy.

  13. Dorsomedial SCN neuronal subpopulations subserve different functions in human dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, David G.; Stopa, Edward G.; Kuo-Leblanc, Victoria; McKee, Ann C.; Asayama, Kentaro; Volicer, Ladislav; Kowall, Neil; Satlin, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) are necessary and sufficient for the maintenance of circadian rhythms in primate and other mammalian species. The human dorsomedial SCN contains populations of non-species-specific vasopressin and species-specific neurotensin neurons. We made time-series recordings of core body temperature and locomotor activity in 19 elderly, male, end-stage dementia patients and 8 normal elderly controls. Following the death of the dementia patients, neuropathological diagnostic information and tissue samples from the hypothalamus were obtained. Hypothalamic tissue was also obtained from eight normal control cases that had not had activity or core temperature recordings previously. Core temperature was analysed for parametric, circadian features, and activity was analysed for non-parametric and parametric circadian features. These indices were then correlated with the degree of degeneration seen in the SCN (glia/neuron ratio) and neuronal counts from the dorsomedial SCN (vasopressin, neurotensin). Specific loss of SCN neurotensin neurons was associated with loss of activity and temperature amplitude without increase in activity fragmentation. Loss of SCN vasopressin neurons was associated with increased activity fragmentation but not loss of amplitude. Evidence for a circadian rhythm of vasopressinergic activity was seen in the dementia cases but no evidence was seen for a circadian rhythm in neurotensinergic activity. These results provide evidence that the SCN is necessary for the maintenance of the circadian rhythmin humans, information on the role of neuronal subpopulations in subserving this function and the utility of dementia in elaborating brain–behaviour relationships in the human. PMID:18372313

  14. Sonoporation Increases Therapeutic Efficacy of Inducible and Constitutive BMP2/7 In Vivo Gene Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Anna T.; Slezak, Paul; Schuetzenberger, Sebastian; Kaipel, Martin; Schwartz, Ernst; Neef, Anne; Nomikou, Nikolitsa; Nau, Thomas; van Griensven, Martijn; McHale, Anthony P.; Redl, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Abstract An ideal novel treatment for bone defects should provide regeneration without autologous or allogenous grafting, exogenous cells, growth factors, or biomaterials while ensuring spatial and temporal control as well as safety. Therefore, a novel osteoinductive nonviral in vivo gene therapy approach using sonoporation was investigated in ectopic and orthotopic models. Constitutive or regulated, doxycycline-inducible, bone morphogenetic protein 2 and 7 coexpression plasmids were repeatedly applied for 5 days. Ectopic and orthotopic gene transfer efficacy was monitored by coapplication of a luciferase plasmid and bioluminescence imaging. Orthotopic plasmid DNA distribution was investigated using a novel plasmid-labeling method. Luciferase imaging demonstrated an increased trend (61% vs. 100%) of gene transfer efficacy, and micro-computed tomography evaluation showed significantly enhanced frequency of ectopic bone formation for sonoporation compared with passive gene delivery (46% vs. 100%) dependent on applied ultrasound power. Bone formation by the inducible system (83%) was stringently controlled by doxycycline in vivo, and no ectopic bone formation was observed without induction or with passive gene transfer without sonoporation. Orthotopic evaluation in a rat femur segmental defect model demonstrated an increased trend of gene transfer efficacy using sonoporation. Investigation of DNA distribution demonstrated extensive binding of plasmid DNA to bone tissue. Sonoporated animals displayed a potentially increased union rate (33%) without extensive callus formation or heterotopic ossification. We conclude that sonoporation of BMP2/7 coexpression plasmids is a feasible, minimally invasive method for osteoinduction and that improvement of bone regeneration by sonoporative gene delivery is superior to passive gene delivery. PMID:24164605

  15. Rapamycin increases oxidative stress response gene expression in adult stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofman, Amber E.; McGraw, Margeaux R.; Payne, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Balancing quiescence with proliferation is of paramount importance for adult stem cells in order to avoid hyperproliferation and cell depletion. In some models, stem cell exhaustion may be reversed with the drug rapamycin, which was shown can suppress cellular senescence in vitro and extend lifespan in animals. We hypothesized that rapamycin increases the expression of oxidative stress response genes in adult stem cells, and that these gene activities diminish with age. To test our hypothesis, we exposed mice to rapamycin and then examined the transcriptome of their spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). Gene expression microarray analysis revealed that numerous oxidative stress response genes were upregulated upon rapamycin treatment, including superoxide dismutase 1, glutathione reductase, and delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase. When we examined the expression of these genes in 55-week-old wild type SSCs, their levels were significantly reduced compared to 3-week-old SSCs, suggesting that their downregulation is coincident with the aging process in adult stem cells. We conclude that rapamycin-induced stimulation of oxidative stress response genes may promote cellular longevity in SSCs, while a decline in gene expression in aged stem cells could reflect the SSCs' diminished potential to alleviate oxidative stress, a hallmark of aging. PMID:22529334

  16. Distinct DNA methylation epigenotypes in bladder cancer from different Chinese sub-populations and its implication in cancer detection using voided urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Joanna HM

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bladder cancer is the sixth most common cancer in the world and the incidence is particularly high in southwestern Taiwan. Previous studies have identified several tumor-related genes that are hypermethylated in bladder cancer; however the DNA methylation profile of bladder cancer in Taiwan is not fully understood. Methods In this study, we compared the DNA methylation profile of multiple tumor suppressor genes (APC, DAPK, E-cadherin, hMLH1, IRF8, p14, p15, RASSF1A, SFRP1 and SOCS-1 in bladder cancer patients from different Chinese sub-populations including Taiwan (104 cases, Hong Kong (82 cases and China (24 cases by MSP. Two normal human urothelium were also included as control. To investigate the diagnostic potential of using DNA methylation in non-invasive detection of bladder cancer, degree of methylation of DAPK, IRF8, p14, RASSF1A and SFRP1 was also accessed by quantitative MSP in urine samples from thirty bladder cancer patients and nineteen non-cancer controls. Results There were distinct DNA methylation epigenotypes among the different sub-populations. Further, samples from Taiwan and China demonstrated a bimodal distribution suggesting that CpG island methylator phentotype (CIMP is presented in bladder cancer. Moreover, the number of methylated genes in samples from Taiwan and Hong Kong were significantly correlated with histological grade (P SFRP1, IRF8, APC and RASSF1A were significantly associated with increased tumor grade, stage. Methylation of RASSF1A was associated with tumor recurrence. Patients with methylation of APC or RASSF1A were also significantly associated with shorter recurrence-free survival. For methylation detection in voided urine samples of cancer patients, the sensitivity and specificity of using any of the methylated genes (IRF8, p14 or sFRP1 by qMSP was 86.7% and 94.7%. Conclusions Our results indicate that there are distinct methylation epigenotypes among different Chinese sub-populations

  17. B-cell subpopulations in children: National reference values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchamp, Marie; Sterlin, Delphine; Diabate, Aminata; Uring-Lambert, Béatrice; Guérin-El Khourouj, Valérie; Le Mauff, Brigitte; Monnier, Delphine; Malcus, Christophe; Labalette, Myriam; Picard, Capucine

    2014-11-01

    Peripheral B-lymphocytes undergo a series of changes during the first few years of life. Encounters with foreign antigens lead to maturation and differentiation. Several primary antibody deficiencies (PADs) affecting B-cell development are associated with abnormalities in the composition and/or differentiation of B-cell compartments. The most recent international classifications of primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) and common variable immunodeficiencies (CVID) have highlighted the importance of B-cell immunophenotyping and age-specific reference intervals for diagnostic purposes. We established national reference values for memory B-cell subpopulations, on the basis of CD27 and surface IgD expression in the peripheral blood of 242 healthy children. We report here the absolute counts and percentages of naive, switched and non-switched memory B-cells for seven age groups, from neonates to adults. We found that the naive B-cells percentage declined between the ages of 6 months and 8 years, after which it remained stable at about 70-80%. Memory B-cells are already present at birth and their numbers increase throughout childhood, stabilizing between the ages of 12 and 18 years. The definition of reference intervals for pediatric B-cell levels should facilitate the screening and diagnosis of various B-cell immunodeficiencies. This multicenter study, providing national reference values, should thus facilitate immunological diagnosis in children.

  18. Patients with systemic sclerosis present increased DNA damage differentially associated with DNA repair gene polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomino, Gustavo Martelli; Bassi, Carmen L; Wastowski, Isabela J; Xavier, Danilo J; Lucisano-Valim, Yara M; Crispim, Janaina C O; Rassi, Diane M; Marques-Neto, Joao F; Sakamoto-Hojo, Elza T; Moreau, Philippe; Sampaio-Barros, Percival D; Donadi, Eduardo A

    2014-03-01

    Patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) exhibit increased toxicity when exposed to genotoxic agents. In our study, we evaluated DNA damage and polymorphic sites in 2 DNA repair genes (XRCC1 Arg399Gln and XRCC4 Ile401Thr) in patients with SSc. A total of 177 patients were studied for DNA repair gene polymorphisms. Fifty-six of them were also evaluated for DNA damage in peripheral blood cells using the comet assay. Compared to controls, the patients as a whole or stratified into major clinical variants (limited or diffuse skin involvement), irrespective of the underlying treatment schedule, exhibited increased DNA damage. XRCC1 (rs: 25487) and XRCC4 (rs: 28360135) allele and genotype frequencies observed in patients with SSc were not significantly different from those observed in controls; however, the XRCC1 Arg399Gln allele was associated with increased DNA damage only in healthy controls and the XRCC4 Ile401Thr allele was associated with increased DNA damage in both patients and controls. Further, the XRCC1 Arg399Gln allele was associated with the presence of antinuclear antibody and anticentromere antibody. No association was observed between these DNA repair gene polymorphic sites and clinical features of patients with SSc. These results corroborate the presence of genomic instability in SSc peripheral blood cells, as evaluated by increased DNA damage, and show that polymorphic sites of the XRCC1 and XRCC4 DNA repair genes may differentially influence DNA damage and the development of autoantibodies.

  19. Profile of PRMT-1 gene polymorphism in hemodialysis patients with increased ADMA levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaha, Mochammad; Nilamsari, Wenny P; Yusuf, Mochammad; Amin, M

    2014-04-01

    to determine the distribution of PRMT-1 gene polymorphism and ADMA levels among continuing hemodialysis patients. genotyping of PRMT-1 polymorphism was performed in 57 hemodialysis patients at Al Irsjad Hospital. All participants were recruited for physical examination, questionnaire, and collection of 5 mL fasting venous blood. The blood was treated with phenol-chloroform extraction of genomic DNA. The candidate's single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped by using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). The ADMA plasma levels was determined by ELISA and all biochemical indicators of serum were examined. fifty-seven hemodialysis patients participated in our study, 54 (95.4%) of them had increased ADMA plasma levels. DNA sequencing analysis of 13 patients showed a suspected PRMT-1 gene polymorphism at sequence 5837 as there were different genotypes between C and G. the increased levels of ADMA might be caused by PRMT-1 gene polymorphism.

  20. [Study of interaction of wild soybean subpopulations (Glycine soja) in the valley of the Tsukanovka river in the south of Far East of Russia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, A V; Martynov, V V; Dorokhov, D B

    2011-01-01

    A comparative study of the genetic structure of natural and anthropogenic populations of G. soja gives significant information about formation of different populations, and allows developing measures for preservation of unique natural gene bank of wild soybean, the species closely related to cultivated soybean. In this study, ISSR markers were used to carry out a comparative analysis of genetic structure of natural and anthropogenic subpopulations of G. soja for studying possible mutual influence of subpopulations of anthropogenic and natural phytocenosis on the formation of their genetic diversity and to study genetic structure of natural subpopulations of wild soybean in the contact places between the two types ofcenoses. As a result, the characteristics that describe the genetic diversity of studied populations have been identified and the important role of an interaction between subpopulations of different phytocenoses on formation of the spatial genetic structure of population in the valley of Tsukanovka river has been demonstrated.

  1. Absence of functional TolC protein causes increased stress response gene expression in Sinorhizobium meliloti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreira Leonilde M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The TolC protein from Sinorhizobium meliloti has previously been demonstrated to be required for establishing successful biological nitrogen fixation symbiosis with Medicago sativa. It is also needed in protein and exopolysaccharide secretion and for protection against osmotic and oxidative stresses. Here, the transcriptional profile of free-living S. meliloti 1021 tolC mutant is described as a step toward understanding its role in the physiology of the cell. Results Comparison of tolC mutant and wild-type strains transcriptomes showed 1177 genes with significantly increased expression while 325 had significantly decreased expression levels. The genes with an increased expression suggest the activation of a cytoplasmic and extracytoplasmic stress responses possibly mediated by the sigma factor RpoH1 and protein homologues of the CpxRA two-component regulatory system of Enterobacteria, respectively. Stress conditions are probably caused by perturbation of the cell envelope. Consistent with gene expression data, biochemical analysis indicates that the tolC mutant suffers from oxidative stress. This is illustrated by the elevated enzyme activity levels detected for catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase. The observed increase in the expression of genes encoding products involved in central metabolism and transporters for nutrient uptake suggests a higher metabolic rate of the tolC mutant. We also demonstrated increased swarming motility in the tolC mutant strain. Absence of functional TolC caused decreased expression mainly of genes encoding products involved in nitrogen metabolism and transport. Conclusion This work shows how a mutation in the outer membrane protein TolC, common to many bacterial transport systems, affects expression of a large number of genes that act in concert to restore cell homeostasis. This finding further underlines the fundamental role of this protein in Sinorhizobium meliloti biology.

  2. Increased Rrm2 gene dosage reduces fragile site breakage and prolongs survival of ATR mutant mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez-Contreras, Andres J; Specks, Julia; Barlow, Jacqueline H

    2015-01-01

    of the RNR regulatory subunit RRM2 (Rrm2(TG)) present supraphysiological RNR activity and reduced chromosomal breakage at fragile sites. Moreover, increased Rrm2 gene dosage significantly extends the life span of ATR mutant mice. Our study reveals the first genetic condition in mammals that reduces fragile...

  3. Expressions of Machismo in Colorectal Cancer Screening Among New Mexico Hispanic Subpopulations

    OpenAIRE

    Getrich, Christina M.; Sussman, Andrew L.; Helitzer, Deborah L.; Hoffman, Richard M.; Warner, Teddy D.; Sánchez, Victoria; Solares, Angélica; Rhyne, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    Although national colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence rates have steadily decreased, the rate for New Mexico Hispanics has been increasing and screening rates are low. We conducted an exploratory qualitative study to determine barriers to CRC screening for New Mexico Hispanics. We found that machismo served as a dynamic influence on men’s health seeking behaviors; however, it was conceptualized differently by two distinct Hispanic subpopulations and therefore appeared to play a different role i...

  4. Placental genetic variations in circadian clock-related genes increase the risk of placental abruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Chunfang; Gelaye, Bizu; Denis, Marie; Tadesse, Mahlet G; Enquobahrie, Daniel A; Ananth, Cande V; Pacora, Percy N; Salazar, Manuel; Sanchez, Sixto E; Williams, Michelle A

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of placental abruption (PA) remains poorly understood. We examined variations in SNPs of circadian clock-related genes in placenta with PA risk. We also explored placental and maternal genomic contributions to PA risk. Placental genomic DNA samples were isolated from 280 PA cases and 244 controls. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina Cardio-MetaboChip. We examined 116 SNPs in 13 genes known to moderate circadian rhythms. Logistic regression models were fit to estimate odds ratios (ORs). The combined effect of multiple SNPs on PA risk was estimated using a weighted genetic risk score. We examined independent and joint associations of wGRS derived from placental and maternal genomes with PA. Seven SNPs in five genes (ARNTL2, CRY2, DEC1, PER3 and RORA), in the placental genome, were associated with PA risk. Each copy of the minor allele (G) of a SNP in the RORA gene (rs2899663) was associated with a 30% reduced odds of PA (95% CI 0.52-0.95). The odds of PA increased with increasing placental-wGRS (Ptrendcircadian clock-related genes are associated with PA risk; and the association persists after control of genetic variants in the maternal genome.

  5. Increasing galactose consumption by Saccharomyces cerevisiae through metabolic engineering of the GAL gene regulatory network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Simon; Olsson, Lisbeth; Johnston, M.

    2000-01-01

    Increasing the flux through central carbon metabolism is difficult because of rigidity in regulatory structures, at both the genetic and the enzymatic levels. Here we describe metabolic engineering of a regulatory network to obtain a balanced increase in the activity of all the enzymes...... in the pathway, and ultimately, increasing metabolic flux through the pathway of interest, By manipulating the GAL gene regulatory network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is a tightly regulated system, we produced prototroph mutant strains, which increased the flux through the galactose utilization pathway...

  6. Increased salt tolerance with overexpression of cation/proton antiporter 1 genes: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuan-Chun; Augé, Robert M; Dong, Chao; Cheng, Zong-Ming Max

    2017-02-01

    Cation/proton antiporter 1 (CPA1) genes encode cellular Na(+) /H(+) exchanger proteins, which act to adjust ionic balance. Overexpression of CPA1s can improve plant performance under salt stress. However, the diversified roles of the CPA1 family and the various parameters used in evaluating transgenic plants over-expressing CPA1s make it challenging to assess the complex functions of CPA1s and their physiological mechanisms in salt tolerance. Using meta-analysis, we determined how overexpression of CPA1s has influenced several plant characteristics involved in response and resilience to NaCl stress. We also evaluated experimental variables that favour or reduce CPA1 effects in transgenic plants. Viewed across studies, overexpression of CPA1s has increased the magnitude of 10 of the 19 plant characteristics examined, by 25% or more. Among the ten moderating variables, several had substantial impacts on the extent of CPA1 influence: type of culture media, donor and recipient type and genus, and gene family. Genes from monocotyledonous plants stimulated root K(+) , root K(+) /Na(+) , total chlorophyll, total dry weight and root length much more than genes from dicotyledonous species. Genes transformed to or from Arabidopsis have led to smaller CPA1-induced increases in plant characteristics than genes transferred to or from other genera. Heterogeneous expression of CPA1s led to greater increases in leaf chlorophyll and root length than homologous expression. These findings should help guide future investigations into the function of CPA1s in plant salt tolerance and the use of genetic engineering for breeding of resistance. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Tracking Functional Tumor Cell Subpopulations of Malignant Glioma by Phasor Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy of NADH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew L. Trinh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Intra-tumoral heterogeneity is associated with therapeutic resistance of cancer and there exists a need to non-invasively identify functional tumor subpopulations responsible for tumor recurrence. Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH is a metabolic coenzyme essential in cellular respiration. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM of NADH has been demonstrated to be a powerful label-free indicator for inferring metabolic states of living cells. Using FLIM, we identified a significant shift towards longer NADH fluorescence lifetimes, suggesting an increase in the fraction of protein-bound NADH, in the invasive stem-like tumor-initiating cell (STIC subpopulation relative to the tumor mass-forming cell (TMC subpopulation of malignant gliomas. By applying our previously studied model to transition glioma from a majority of STIC to a majority of TMC in serum-adherent culture conditions following serial passages, we compared changes in NADH states, cellular respirations (oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis, EGFR expression, and cell-growth speed over passages. We identified a significant positive correlation between free-NADH fraction and cell growth, which was related to an increase of TMC fraction. In comparison, the increase of EGFR and cellular respirations preceded all these changes. In conclusion, FLIM of NADH provides a non-invasive method to monitor the dynamics of tumor heterogeneity before and after treatment.

  8. Bicarbonate Increases Binding Affinity of Vibrio cholerae ToxT to Virulence Gene Promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Joshua J.

    2014-01-01

    The major Vibrio cholerae virulence gene transcription activator, ToxT, is responsible for the production of the diarrhea-inducing cholera toxin (CT) and the major colonization factor, toxin coregulated pilus (TCP). In addition to the two primary virulence factors mentioned, ToxT is responsible for the activation of accessory virulence genes, such as aldA, tagA, acfA, acfD, tcpI, and tarAB. ToxT activity is negatively modulated by bile and unsaturated fatty acids found in the upper small intestine. Conversely, previous work identified another intestinal signal, bicarbonate, which enhances the ability of ToxT to activate production of CT and TCP. The work presented here further elucidates the mechanism for the enhancement of ToxT activity by bicarbonate. Bicarbonate was found to increase the activation of ToxT-dependent accessory virulence promoters in addition to those that produce CT and TCP. Bicarbonate is taken up into the V. cholerae cell, where it positively affects ToxT activity by increasing DNA binding affinity for the virulence gene promoters that ToxT activates regardless of toxbox configuration. The increase in ToxT binding affinity in the presence of bicarbonate explains the elevated level of virulence gene transcription. PMID:25182489

  9. Overexpression of a Chitinase Gene from Trichoderma asperellum Increases Disease Resistance in Transgenic Soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fuli; Ruan, Xianle; Wang, Xian; Liu, Zhihua; Hu, Lizong; Li, Chengwei

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, a chi gene from Trichoderma asperellum, designated Tachi, was cloned and functionally characterized in soybean. Firstly, the effects of sodium thiosulfate on soybean Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation with embryonic tip regeneration system were investigated. The transformation frequency was improved by adding sodium thiosulfate in co-culture medium for three soybean genotypes. Transgenic soybean plants with constitutive expression of Tachi showed increased resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum compared to WT plants. Meanwhile, overexpression of Tachi in soybean exhibited increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) level as well as peroxidase (POD) and catalase (SOD) activities, decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) content, along with diminished electrolytic leakage rate after S. sclerotiorum inoculation. These results suggest that Tachi can improve disease resistance in plants by enhancing ROS accumulation and activities of ROS scavenging enzymes and then diminishing cell death. Therefore, Tachi represents a candidate gene with potential application for increasing disease resistance in plants.

  10. Expressions of machismo in colorectal cancer screening among New Mexico Hispanic subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getrich, Christina M; Sussman, Andrew L; Helitzer, Deborah L; Hoffman, Richard M; Warner, Teddy D; Sánchez, Victoria; Solares, Angélica; Rhyne, Robert L

    2012-04-01

    Although national colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence rates have steadily decreased, the rate for New Mexico Hispanics has been increasing, and screening rates are low. We conducted an exploratory qualitative study to determine barriers to CRC screening for New Mexico Hispanics. We found that machismo served as a dynamic influence on men's health-seeking behaviors; however, it was conceptualized differently by two distinct Hispanic subpopulations, and therefore appeared to play a different role in shaping their screening attitudes and behaviors. Machismo emerged as more of an influence for Mexican men, who expressed concern over colonoscopies being potentially transformative and/or stigmatizing, but was not as salient for Hispanos, who viewed the colonoscopy as "strictly medical," and were more concerned with discomfort and pain. Findings from the study highlight the importance of identifying varying characteristics among subpopulations to better understand screening barriers and provide optimal CRC screening counseling in primary care settings.

  11. TIMP-1 gene deficiency increases tumour cell sensitivity to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, M L; Würtz, S Ø; Rømer, M U

    2006-01-01

    in cancer. In this regard, several studies have demonstrated an antiapoptotic effect of TIMP-1 in a number of different cell types. Since chemotherapy works by inducing apoptosis in cancer cells, we raised the hypothesis that TIMP-1 promotes resistance against chemotherapeutic drugs. In order to investigate...... this hypothesis, we have established TIMP-1 gene-deficient and TIMP-1 wild-type fibrosarcoma cells from mouse lung tissue. We have characterised these cells with regard to TIMP-1 genotype, TIMP-1 expression, malignant transformation and sensitivity to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. We show that TIMP-1 gene...... deficiency increases the response to chemotherapy considerably, confirming that TIMP-1 protects the cells from apoptosis. This is to our knowledge the first study investigating TIMP-1 and chemotherapy-induced apoptosis employing a powerful model system comprising TIMP-1 gene-deficient cells...

  12. Adaptive evolution of mitochondrial energy metabolism genes associated with increased energy demand in flying insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunxia; Xu, Shixia; Xu, Junxiao; Guo, Yan; Yang, Guang

    2014-01-01

    Insects are unique among invertebrates for their ability to fly, which raises intriguing questions about how energy metabolism in insects evolved and changed along with flight. Although physiological studies indicated that energy consumption differs between flying and non-flying insects, the evolution of molecular energy metabolism mechanisms in insects remains largely unexplored. Considering that about 95% of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is supplied by mitochondria via oxidative phosphorylation, we examined 13 mitochondrial protein-encoding genes to test whether adaptive evolution of energy metabolism-related genes occurred in insects. The analyses demonstrated that mitochondrial DNA protein-encoding genes are subject to positive selection from the last common ancestor of Pterygota, which evolved primitive flight ability. Positive selection was also found in insects with flight ability, whereas no significant sign of selection was found in flightless insects where the wings had degenerated. In addition, significant positive selection was also identified in the last common ancestor of Neoptera, which changed its flight mode from direct to indirect. Interestingly, detection of more positively selected genes in indirect flight rather than direct flight insects suggested a stronger selective pressure in insects having higher energy consumption. In conclusion, mitochondrial protein-encoding genes involved in energy metabolism were targets of adaptive evolution in response to increased energy demands that arose during the evolution of flight ability in insects.

  13. Horizontal gene transfer is more frequent with increased heterotrophy and contributes to parasite adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Yeting; Wafula, Eric K.; Honaas, Loren A.; Ralph, Paula E.; Jones, Sam; Clarke, Christopher R.; Liu, Siming; Su, Chun; Zhang, Huiting; Altman, Naomi S.; Schuster, Stephan C.; Timko, Michael P.; Yoder, John I.; dePamphilis, Claude W.

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is the transfer of genetic material across species boundaries and has been a driving force in prokaryotic evolution. HGT involving eukaryotes appears to be much less frequent, and the functional implications of HGT in eukaryotes are poorly understood. We test the hypothesis that parasitic plants, because of their intimate feeding contacts with host plant tissues, are especially prone to horizontal gene acquisition. We sought evidence of HGTs in transcriptomes of three parasitic members of Orobanchaceae, a plant family containing species spanning the full spectrum of parasitic capabilities, plus the free-living Lindenbergia. Following initial phylogenetic detection and an extensive validation procedure, 52 high-confidence horizontal transfer events were detected, often from lineages of known host plants and with an increasing number of HGT events in species with the greatest parasitic dependence. Analyses of intron sequences in putative donor and recipient lineages provide evidence for integration of genomic fragments far more often than retro-processed RNA sequences. Purifying selection predominates in functionally transferred sequences, with a small fraction of adaptively evolving sites. HGT-acquired genes are preferentially expressed in the haustorium—the organ of parasitic plants—and are strongly biased in predicted gene functions, suggesting that expression products of horizontally acquired genes are contributing to the unique adaptive feeding structure of parasitic plants. PMID:27791104

  14. Testosterone increases renal anti-aging klotho gene expression via the androgen receptor-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shih-Che; Huang, Shih-Ming; Lin, Shih-Hua; Ka, Shuk-Man; Chen, Ann; Shih, Meng-Fu; Hsu, Yu-Juei

    2014-12-01

    Gender is known to be associated with longevity and oestrogen administration induced longevity-associated gene expression is one of the potential mechanisms underlying the benefits of oestrogen on lifespan, whereas the role of testosterone in the regulation of longevity-associated gene expressions remains largely unclear. The klotho gene, predominantly expressed in the kidney, has recently been discovered to be an aging suppressor gene. In the present study, we investigated the regulatory effects of testosterone on renal klotho gene expression in vivo and in vitro. In testosterone-administered mouse kidney and NRK-52E cells, increased klotho expression was accompanied by the up-regulation of the nuclear androgen receptor (AR). Overexpression of AR enhanced the expression of klotho mRNA and protein. Conversely, testosterone-induced klotho expression was attenuated in the presence of flutamide, an AR antagonist. A reporter assay and a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated that AR directly binds to the klotho promoter via androgen response elements (AREs) which reconfirmed its importance for AR binding via the element mutation. In summary, our study demonstrates that testosterone up-regulates anti-aging klotho together with AR expression in the kidney in vivo and in vitro by recruiting AR on to the AREs of the klotho promoter.

  15. Global genome splicing analysis reveals an increased number of alternatively spliced genes with aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Sofía A; Grochová, Diana; McKenna, Tomás; Borate, Bhavesh; Trivedi, Niraj S; Erdos, Michael R; Eriksson, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a key regulatory mechanism for the development of different tissues; however, not much is known about changes to alternative splicing during aging. Splicing events may become more frequent and widespread genome-wide as tissues age and the splicing machinery stringency decreases. Using skin, skeletal muscle, bone, thymus, and white adipose tissue from wild-type C57BL6/J male mice (4 and 18 months old), we examined the effect of age on splicing by AS analysis of the differential exon usage of the genome. The results identified a considerable number of AS genes in skeletal muscle, thymus, bone, and white adipose tissue between the different age groups (ranging from 27 to 246 AS genes corresponding to 0.3-3.2% of the total number of genes analyzed). For skin, skeletal muscle, and bone, we included a later age group (28 months old) that showed that the number of alternatively spliced genes increased with age in all three tissues (P aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome was performed. The results show that expression of the mutant protein, progerin, is associated with an impaired developmental splicing. As progerin accumulates, the number of genes with AS increases compared to in wild-type skin. Our results indicate the existence of a mechanism for increased AS during aging in several tissues, emphasizing that AS has a more important role in the aging process than previously known. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Common Polymorphism in the LRP5 Gene May Increase the Risk of Bone Fracture and Osteoporosis

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    Guang-Yue Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 gene (LRP5 was identified to be linked to the variation in bone mineral density and types of bone diseases. The present study was aimed at examining the association of LRP5 rs3736228 C>T gene with bone fracture and osteoporosis by meta-analysis. A systematic electronic search of literature was conducted to identify all published studies in English or Chinese on the association of the LRP5 gene with bone fracture and osteoporosis risks. All analyses were calculated using the Version 12.0 STATA software. Odds ratios (ORs and their corresponding 95% confidence interval (95% CI were calculated. An updated meta-analysis was currently performed, including seven independent case-control studies. Results identified that carriers of rs3736228 C>T variant in the LRP5 gene were associated with an increased risk of developing osteoporosis and fractures under 4 genetic models but not under the dominant model (OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 0.97~1.46, and P=0.103. Ethnicity-subgroup analysis implied that LRP5 rs3736228 C>T mutation was more likely to develop osteoporosis and fractures among Asians and Caucasians in majority of subgroups. These results suggest that there is a modest effect of the LRP5 rs3736228 C>T on the increased susceptibility of bone fracture and osteoporosis.

  17. Cocaine place conditioning increases pro-opiomelanocortin gene expression in rat hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y; Kruyer, A; Ho, A; Kreek, M J

    2012-11-14

    Recent research suggests an involvement of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) gene products in modulating cocaine reward and addiction-like behaviors in rodents. In this study, we investigated whether cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) alters POMC gene expression in the brain or pituitary of rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were conditioned with 4 injections of 0, 10 or 30 mg/kg cocaine (i.p.) over 8 days and tested 4 days after the last conditioning session. Another group received the same pattern of cocaine injections without conditioning. POMC mRNA levels in the hypothalamus (including arcuate nucleus), amygdala and anterior pituitary, as well as plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels were measured. Cocaine place conditioning at 10 and 30 mg/kg doses increased POMC mRNA levels in a dose-dependent manner in the hypothalamus, with no effect in the amygdala. Cocaine CPP had no effect on POMC mRNA levels in the anterior pituitary or on plasma ACTH or corticosterone levels. In rats that received cocaine at 30 mg/kg without conditioning, there was no such effect on hypothalamic POMC mRNA levels. Alteration of POMC gene expression in the hypothalamus is region-specific after cocaine place conditioning, and dose-dependent. The increased POMC gene expression in the hypothalamus suggests that it is involved in the reward/learning process of cocaine-induced conditioning. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Increased biomass production of industrial bakers' yeasts by overexpression of Hap4 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueñas-Sánchez, Rafael; Codón, Antonio C; Rincón, Ana M; Benítez, Tahía

    2010-10-15

    HAP4 encodes a transcriptional activator of respiration-related genes and so, redirection from fermentation to respiration flux should give rise to an increase in biomass production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae transformants that overexpress HAP4. With this aim, three bakers' yeasts, that is, V1 used for lean doughs, its 2-deoxy-D-glucose resistant derivative DOG21, and V3 employed for sweet doughs, were transformed with integrative cassettes that carried HAP4 gene under the control of constitutive promoter pTEF2; in addition VTH, DTH and 3TH transformants were selected and characterized. Transformants showed increased expression of HAP4 and respiration-related genes such as QCR7 and QCR8 with regard to parental, and similar expression of SUC2 and MAL12; these genes are relevant in bakers' industry. Invertase (Suc2p) and maltase (Mal12p) activities, growth and sugar consumption rates in laboratory (YPD) or industrial media (MAB) were also comparable in bakers' strains and their transformants, but VTH, DTH and 3TH increased their final biomass production by 9.5, 5.0 and 5.0% respectively as compared to their parentals in MAB. Furthermore, V1 and its transformant VTH had comparable capacity to ferment lean doughs (volume increase rate and final volume) while V3 and its transformant 3TH fermented sweet doughs in a similar manner. Therefore transformants possessed increased biomass yield and appropriate characteristics to be employed in bakers' industry because they lacked drug resistant markers and bacterial DNA, and were genetically stable. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of increased milking frequency on gene expression in the bovine mammary gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonstegard Tad S

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research has demonstrated that increased milking frequency of dairy cattle during the first few weeks of lactation enhances milk yield, and that the effect persists throughout the entire lactation period. The specific mechanisms controlling this increase in milk production are unknown, but suggested pathways include increased mammary epithelial cell number, secretory capacity, and sensitivity to lactogenic hormones. We used serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE and microarray analysis to identify changes in gene expression in the bovine mammary gland in response to 4× daily milking beginning at d 4 of lactation (IMF4 relative to glands milked 2× daily (Control to gain insight into physiological changes occurring within the gland during more frequent milking. Results Results indicated changes in gene expression related to cell proliferation and differentiation, extracellular matrix (ECM remodeling, metabolism, nutrient transport, and immune function in IMF4 versus Control cows. In addition, pathways expected to promote neovascularization within the gland appeared to be up regulated in IMF4 cows. To validate this finding, immunolocalization of Von Willebrandt's factor (VWF, an endothelial cell marker, and its co-localization with the nuclear proliferation antigen Ki67 were evaluated in mammary tissue sections at approximately d 7 and d 14 of lactation in cows milked 4× daily versus Controls to estimate endothelial cell abundance and proliferation within the gland. Consistent with expression of genes related to neovascularization, both abundance of VWF and its co-localization with Ki67 appeared to be elevated in cows milked 4× daily, suggesting persistent increased milk yield in response to increased milking frequency may be mediated or complemented by enhanced mammary ECM remodeling and neovascularization within the gland. Conclusion Additional study is needed to determine whether changes in ECM remodeling and

  20. Phenotypic, genomic and functional characterization reveals no differences between CD138++ and CD138low subpopulations in multiple myeloma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paíno, Teresa; Sarasquete, María E; Paiva, Bruno; Krzeminski, Patryk; San-Segundo, Laura; Corchete, Luis A; Redondo, Alba; Garayoa, Mercedes; García-Sanz, Ramón; Gutiérrez, Norma C; Ocio, Enrique M; San-Miguel, Jesús F

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), it remains an incurable disease potentially due to the presence of resistant myeloma cancer stem cells (MM-CSC). Although the presence of clonogenic cells in MM was described three decades ago, the phenotype of MM-CSC is still controversial, especially with respect to the expression of syndecan-1 (CD138). Here, we demonstrate the presence of two subpopulations--CD138++ (95-99%) and CD138low (1-5%)--in eight MM cell lines. To find out possible stem-cell-like features, we have phenotypically, genomic and functionally characterized the two subpopulations. Our results show that the minor CD138low subpopulation is morphologically identical to the CD138++ fraction and does not represent a more immature B-cell compartment (with lack of CD19, CD20 and CD27 expression). Moreover, both subpopulations have similar gene expression and genomic profiles. Importantly, both CD138++ and CD138low subpopulations have similar sensitivity to bortezomib, melphalan and doxorubicin. Finally, serial engraftment in CB17-SCID mice shows that CD138++ as well as CD138low cells have self-renewal potential and they are phenotypically interconvertible. Overall, our results differ from previously published data in MM cell lines which attribute a B-cell phenotype to MM-CSC. Future characterization of clonal plasma cell subpopulations in MM patients' samples will guarantee the discovery of more reliable markers able to discriminate true clonogenic myeloma cells.

  1. Constitutive expression of cell wall invertase genes increases grain yield and starch content in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bei; Liu, Hua; Zhang, Yue; Kang, Tao; Zhang, Li; Tong, Jianhua; Xiao, Langtao; Zhang, Hongxia

    2013-12-01

    Grain size, number and starch content are important determinants of grain yield and quality. One of the most important biological processes that determine these components is the carbon partitioning during the early grain filling, which requires the function of cell wall invertase. Here, we showed the constitutive expression of cell wall invertase-encoding gene from Arabidopsis, rice (Oryza sativa) or maize (Zea mays), driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter, all increased cell wall invertase activities in different tissues and organs, including leaves and developing seeds, and substantially improved grain yield up to 145.3% in transgenic maize plants as compared to the wild-type plants, an effect that was reproduced in our 2-year field trials at different locations. The dramatically increased grain yield is due to the enlarged ears with both enhanced grain size and grain number. Constitutive expression of the invertase-encoding gene also increased total starch content up to 20% in the transgenic kernels. Our results suggest that cell wall invertase gene can be genetically engineered to improve both grain yield and grain quality in crop plants. © 2013 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Oral Administration of Recombinant Lactococcus lactis Expressing the Cellulase Gene Increases Digestibility of Fiber in Geese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Haizhu; Gao, Yunhang; Gao, Guang; Lou, Yujie

    2015-12-01

    Enhancing cellulose digestibility in animals is important for improving the utilization of forage, which can decrease the amount of food used in animal production. The aim of the present study was to achieve recombinant expression of the cellulase gene in Lactococcus lactis and evaluate the effects of oral administration of the recombinant L. lactis on fiber digestibility in geese. Cellulase (Cell) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) genes were cloned into a L. lactis expression vector (pNZ8149) to construct the recombinant expression plasmid (pNZ8149-GFP-Cell). Then, the recombinant expression plasmid was transformed into L. lactis (NZ3900) competent cells by electroporation to obtain recombinant L. lactis (pNZ8149-GFP-Cell/NZ3900) in which protein expression was induced by Nisin. Expression of GFP and Cell by the recombinant L. lactis was confirmed using SDS-PAGE, fluorescence detection, and Congo red assays. A feeding experiment showed that oral administration of pNZ8149-GFP-Cell/NZ3900 significantly increased the digestibility of dietary fiber in geese fed either a maize stalk diet or a rice chaff diet. Therefore, oral administration of recombinant L. lactis cells expressing the cellulase gene increases fiber digestibility in geese, offering a way to increase the utilization of dietary fiber in geese.

  3. Polymorphism of the AHSG gene is associated with increased adipocyte beta2-adrenoceptor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavebratt, Catharina; Dungner, Elisabeth; Hoffstedt, Johan

    2005-10-01

    The alpha(2) Heremans-Schmid glycoprotein (AHSG) gene is implicated in the regulation of body fat and insulin sensitivity. The Met/Met genotype of the common single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs4917, in the AHSG gene has been shown to be associated with reduced plasma levels as well as lower body fat. Here, we studied the association of this variation with subcutaneous adipocyte lipolysis. Ninety-three obese and nonobese healthy men were genotyped for Thr230Met, and subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies were analyzed for lipolysis characteristics. The Met/Met genotype was associated with a marked increase of 1.5 log units in the lipolytic sensitivity to the beta2-adrenoceptor agonist terbutaline (P=0.0008) as compared with the Thr/Thr and Thr/Met genotypes. This corresponds to an approximately 35-fold increase in beta2-adrenoceptor function. The genotype effect was independent of body mass index and waist circumference. In contrast, lipolytic sensitivity to both the beta1-adrenoceptor agonist dobutamine (P=0.25) and the alpha2A-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine (P=0.54) was unaffected by the Thr230Met variation. Moreover, no difference in either maximal stimulation or inhibition of lipolysis was found between genotypes. We conclude that a common variation (Thr230Met) in the AHSG gene is associated with a marked increase in beta2-adrenoceptor sensitivity in subcutaneous fat cells, which may be of importance in body weight regulation.

  4. Phagocytic activity of monocytes, their subpopulations and granulocytes during post-transplant adverse events after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, Michaela; Cabanillas Stanchi, Karin Melanie; Erbacher, Annika; Haufe, Susanne; Schwarze, Carl Philipp; Handgretinger, Rupert; Hofbeck, Michael; Kerst, Gunter

    2015-05-01

    Phagocytosis of granulocytes and monocytes presents a major mechanism that contributes to the clearance of pathogens and cell debris. We analyzed the phagocytic activity of the peripheral blood cell monocytes, three monocyte subpopulations and granulocytes before and up to one year after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, as well as during transplant-related adverse events. 25 pediatric patients and young adults (median age of 11.0 years) with hemato-oncological malignancies and non malignancies were enrolled in the prospective study. Ingestion of fluorescence-labeled Escherichia coli bacteria was used to assess the phagocytic activity of monocytes and their subpopulations and granulocytes by means of flow cytometry in the patient group as well as in a control group (n=36). During sepsis, a significant increase of phagocytic activity of monocytes (P=0.0003) and a significant decrease of the phagocytic activity of granulocytes (P=0.0003) and the CD14+ CD16++ monocyte subpopulation (P=0.0020) occurred. At the onset of a veno-occlusive disease, a significant increase of phagocytic activity in the CD14++ CD16+ monocyte subpopulation (P=0.001) and a significant decrease in the phagocytic activity of the CD14++ CD16- monocyte subpopulation (P=0.0048) were observed. In conclusion, the phagocytic activity of monocytes, their subpopulations and granulocytes might be a useful and easy determinable parameter that enables identification of post-transplant complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The alterations of phagocytic activity contribute to the altered immune response that accompanies adverse events after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Deletion of Rictor in brain and fat alters peripheral clock gene expression and increases blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drägert, Katja; Bhattacharya, Indranil; Pellegrini, Giovanni; Seebeck, Petra; Azzi, Abdelhalim; Brown, Steven A; Georgiopoulou, Stavroula; Held, Ulrike; Blyszczuk, Przemyslaw; Arras, Margarete; Humar, Rok; Hall, Michael N; Battegay, Edouard; Haas, Elvira

    2015-08-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) contains the essential protein RICTOR and is activated by growth factors. mTORC2 in adipose tissue contributes to the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism. In the perivascular adipose tissue, mTORC2 ensures normal vascular reactivity by controlling expression of inflammatory molecules. To assess whether RICTOR/mTORC2 contributes to blood pressure regulation, we applied a radiotelemetry approach in control and Rictor knockout (Rictor(aP2KO)) mice generated using adipocyte protein-2 gene promoter-driven CRE recombinase expression to delete Rictor. The 24-hour mean arterial pressure was increased in Rictor(aP2KO) mice, and the physiological decline in mean arterial pressure during the dark period was impaired. In parallel, heart rate and locomotor activity were elevated during the dark period with a pattern similar to blood pressure changes. This phenotype was associated with mild cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, decreased cardiac natriuretic peptides, and their receptor expression in adipocytes. Moreover, clock gene expression was reduced or phase-shifted in perivascular adipose tissue. No differences in clock gene expression were observed in the master clock suprachiasmatic nucleus, although Rictor gene expression was also lower in brain of Rictor(aP2KO) mice. Thus, this study highlights the importance of RICTOR/mTORC2 for interactions between vasculature, adipocytes, and brain to tune physiological outcomes, such as blood pressure and locomotor activity. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. [Expression of cecropin P1 gene increases resistance of Camelina sativa (L.) plants to microbial phytopathogenes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharchenko, N S; Kaliaeva, M A; Bur'ianov, Ia I

    2013-05-01

    Transgenic plants of camelina (Camelina sativa (L.) Crantz) with the synthetic gene of antimicrobial peptide cecropin P1 (cecP1) were obtained. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is performed using the binary vector pGA482::cecP1 by vacuum infiltration of flower buds. The presence of the cecP1 gene in the genome of plants was confirmed by PCR. cecP1 gene expression in transgenic plants was shown by Western blot analysis and by antimicrobial activity of plant extracts against the bacterial phytopathogene Erwinia carotovora. The plants of F0 and F1 generations had the normal phenotype and retained the ability to form viable seeds in self-pollination. cecP1 plants exhibit enhanced resistance to bacterial and fungal phytopathogens: Erwinia carotovora and Fusarium sporotrichioides. The increased sustainability of cecropin P1-expressing plants against salt stress is shown. The possibility of the integration of the cecP1 gene into the overall protective system of plants against biotic and abiotic stresses is discussed.

  7. Increased expression of a set of genes enriched in oxygen binding function discloses a predisposition of breast cancer bone metastases to generate metastasis spread in multiple organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capulli, Mattia; Angelucci, Adriano; Driouch, Keltouma; Garcia, Teresa; Clement-Lacroix, Philippe; Martella, Francesco; Ventura, Luca; Bologna, Mauro; Flamini, Stefano; Moreschini, Oreste; Lidereau, Rosette; Ricevuto, Enrico; Muraca, Maurizio; Teti, Anna; Rucci, Nadia

    2012-11-01

    Bone is the preferential site of distant metastasis in breast carcinoma (BrCa). Patients with metastasis restricted to bone (BO) usually show a longer overall survival compared to patients who rapidly develop multiple metastases also involving liver and lung. Hence, molecular predisposition to generate bone and visceral metastases (BV) represents a clear indication of poor clinical outcome. We performed microarray analysis with two different chip platforms, Affymetrix and Agilent, on bone metastasis samples from BO and BV patients. The unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the resulting transcriptomes correlated with the clinical progression, segregating the BO from the BV profiles. Matching the twofold significantly regulated genes from Affymetrix and Agilent chips resulted in a 15-gene signature with 13 upregulated and two downregulated genes in BV versus BO bone metastasis samples. In order to validate the resulting signature, we isolated different MDA-MB-231 clonal subpopulations that metastasize only in the bone (MDA-BO) or in bone and visceral tissues (MDA-BV). Six of the signature genes were also significantly upregulated in MDA-BV compared to MDA-BO clones. A group of upregulated genes, including Hemoglobin B (HBB), were involved in oxygen metabolism, and in vitro functional analysis of HBB revealed that its expression in the MDA subpopulations was associated with a reduced production of hydrogen peroxide. Expression of HBB was detected in primary BrCa tissue but not in normal breast epithelial cells. Metastatic lymph nodes were frequently more positive for HBB compared to the corresponding primary tumors, whereas BO metastases had a lower expression than BV metastases, suggesting a positive correlation between HBB and ability of bone metastasis to rapidly spread to other organs. We propose that HBB, along with other genes involved in oxygen metabolism, confers a more aggressive metastatic phenotype in BrCa cells disseminated to bone. Copyright © 2012

  8. A viral suppressor P1/HC-pro increases the GFP gene expression in agrobacterium-mediated transient assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Pengda; Liu, Jinying; He, Hongxia; Yang, Meiying; Li, Meina; Zhu, Xiaojuan; Wang, Xingzhi

    2009-08-01

    More than 20 post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) suppressors have been found since HC-Pro, the first gene silencing suppressor, was found in 1998. The silencing suppressor strongly suggested that gene silencing functions as natural defense mechanisms against viruses. It also represented a valuable tool for the dissection of the gene silencing pathway. We have used P1/HC-Pro RNA silencing suppressor activity to increase green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression in tobacco using an Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression system. P1/HC-Pro stimulated GFP-gene expression but not dsGFP-gene expression was shown by RT-PCR, Northern and Western blot analysis. Expression of the gene silencing suppressor and the target gene provided a new strategy of heterogeneous gene expressing in plants. It may be of commercial significance to produce foreign proteins using plant bioreactors.

  9. Suicide Gene Therapy to Increase the Safety of Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected T Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Casucci, Attilio Bondanza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding motif of a monoclonal antibody (mAb with the signal transduction machinery of the T-cell receptor (TCR. The genetic modification of T lymphocytes with chimeric receptors specific for tumor-associated antigens (TAAs allows for the redirection towards tumor cells. Clinical experience with CAR-redirected T cells suggests that antitumor efficacy associates with some degree of toxicity, especially when TAA expression is shared with healthy tissues. This situation closely resembles the case of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT, wherein allorecognition causes both the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL effect and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. Suicide gene therapy, i.e. the genetic induction of a conditional suicide phenotype into donor T cells, enables dissociating the GVL effect from GVHD. Applying suicide gene modification to CAR-redirected T cells may therefore greatly increase their safety profile and facilitate their clinical development.

  10. I171V germline mutation in the NBS1 gene significantly increases risk of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roznowski, Krzysztof; Januszkiewicz-Lewandowska, Danuta; Mosor, Maria; Pernak, Monika; Litwiniuk, Maria; Nowak, Jerzy

    2008-07-01

    Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome (NBS) is a rare autosomal, recessive disease caused by homozygous mutations in the NBS1 gene. The most common deletion of 5 bp (657del5) in exon 6, which affects mostly the population of Central Europe is observed. Among the typical features of this disorder is that NBS patients experience a high incidence of lymphoid malignancies as well. An increased risk of solid tumors development for 657del5 carriers was the reason to investigate the role of NBS1 gene as a susceptible one for the breast cancer. The purpose of this work is to identify mutations in all 16 exons of the NBS1 gene in the group of the patients with diagnosed breast cancer and the control group of healthy individuals. In the group of 270 women with breast cancer, seven cases of mutated NBS1 gene were revealed. In the subgroup presenting mutated NBS1 gene, the mutation I171V in 5th exon occurred in five cases. It is the first such a discovery concerning breast cancer patients because this mutation had been previously observed only in the course of lymphoid or hematological malignancies. The rate of I171V mutation in the group of breast cancer patients was significantly higher than in the controls (OR: 9.42; 95% CI: 1.09-81.05; P = 0.02). The conclusion is that heterozygous germline mutation I171V in NBS1 gene is a significant risk factor for breast cancer development. It concerns especially the women whose first degree relatives had a previously diagnosed breast cancer (OR: 6.00; 95% CI: 0.98-38.07; P = 0.04). The histopathological and clinical features of breast cancer with I171V mutation suggest accumulation of the negative prognostic factors. The treatment's results however were unexpectedly satisfactory, that is why further investigations are necessary to assess the role of I171V mutation in NBS1 gene as a prognostic and predictive factor for breast cancer.

  11. Increasing the amylose content of durum wheat through silencing of the SBEIIa genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masci Stefania

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High amylose starch has attracted particular interest because of its correlation with the amount of Resistant Starch (RS in food. RS plays a role similar to fibre with beneficial effects for human health, providing protection from several diseases such as colon cancer, diabetes, obesity, osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases. Amylose content can be modified by a targeted manipulation of the starch biosynthetic pathway. In particular, the inactivation of the enzymes involved in amylopectin synthesis can lead to the increase of amylose content. In this work, genes encoding starch branching enzymes of class II (SBEIIa were silenced using the RNA interference (RNAi technique in two cultivars of durum wheat, using two different methods of transformation (biolistic and Agrobacterium. Expression of RNAi transcripts was targeted to the seed endosperm using a tissue-specific promoter. Results Amylose content was markedly increased in the durum wheat transgenic lines exhibiting SBEIIa gene silencing. Moreover the starch granules in these lines were deformed, possessing an irregular and deflated shape and being smaller than those present in the untransformed controls. Two novel granule bound proteins, identified by SDS-PAGE in SBEIIa RNAi lines, were investigated by mass spectrometry and shown to have strong homologies to the waxy proteins. RVA analysis showed new pasting properties associated with high amylose lines in comparison with untransformed controls. Finally, pleiotropic effects on other starch genes were found by semi-quantitative and Real-Time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Conclusion We have found that the silencing of SBEIIa genes in durum wheat causes obvious alterations in granule morphology and starch composition, leading to high amylose wheat. Results obtained with two different methods of transformation and in two durum wheat cultivars were comparable.

  12. Increased gene delivery efficiency and specificity of a lipid-based nanosystem incorporating a glycolipid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Mariana; Farinha, Dina; Pedroso de Lima, Maria Conceição; Faneca, Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third most common cause of death related to cancer diseases worldwide. The current treatment options have many limitations and reduced success rates. In this regard, advances in gene therapy have shown promising results in novel therapeutic strategies. However, the success of gene therapy depends on the efficient and specific delivery of genetic material into target cells. In this regard, the main goal of this work was to develop a new lipid-based nanosystem formulation containing the lipid lactosyl-PE for specific and efficient gene delivery into HCC cells. The obtained results showed that incorporation of 15% of lactosyl-PE into liposomes induces a strong potentiation of lipoplex biological activity in HepG2 cells, not only in terms of transgene expression levels but also in terms of percentage of transfected cells. In the presence of galactose, which competes with lactosyl-PE for the binding to the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R), a significant reduction in biological activity was observed, showing that the potentiation of transfection induced by the presence of lactosyl-PE could be due to its specific interaction with ASGP-R, which is overexpressed in HCC. In addition, it was found that the incorporation of lactosyl-PE in the nanosystems promotes an increase in their cell binding and uptake. Regarding the physicochemical properties of lipoplexes, the presence of lactosyl-PE resulted in a significant increase in DNA protection and in a substantial decrease in their mean diameter and zeta potential, conferring them suitable characteristics for in vivo application. Overall, the results obtained in this study suggest that the potentiation of the biological activity induced by the presence of lactosyl-PE is due to its specific binding to the ASGP-R, showing that this novel formulation could constitute a new gene delivery nanosystem for application in therapeutic strategies in HCC.

  13. Testing for Local Adaptation to Spawning Habitat in Sympatric Subpopulations of Pike by Reciprocal Translocation of Embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Berggren

    Full Text Available We tested for local adaption in early life-history traits by performing a reciprocal translocation experiment with approximately 2,500 embryos of pike (Esox lucius divided in paired split-family batches. The experiment indicated local adaptation in one of the two subpopulations manifested as enhanced hatching success of eggs in the native habitat, both when compared to siblings transferred to a non-native habitat, and when compared to immigrant genotypes from the other subpopulation. Gene-by-environment effects on viability of eggs and larvae were evident in both subpopulations, showing that there existed genetic variation allowing for evolutionary responses to divergent selection, and indicating a capacity for plastic responses to environmental change. Next, we tested for differences in female life-history traits. Results uncovered that females from one population invested more resources into reproduction and also produced more (but smaller eggs in relation to their body size compared to females from the other population. We suggest that these females have adjusted their reproductive strategies as a counter-adaptation because a high amount of sedimentation on the eggs in that subpopulations spawning habitat might benefit smaller eggs. Collectively, our findings point to adaptive divergence among sympatric subpopulations that are physically separated only for a short period during reproduction and early development-which is rare. These results illustrate how combinations of translocation experiments and field studies of life-history traits might infer about local adaptation and evolutionary divergence among populations. Local adaptations in subdivided populations are important to consider in management and conservation of biodiversity, because they may otherwise be negatively affected by harvesting, supplementation, and reintroduction efforts targeted at endangered populations.

  14. Mice lacking the kf-1 gene exhibit increased anxiety- but not despair-like behavior

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    Atsushi Tsujimura

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available KF-1 was originally identified as a protein encoded by human gene with increased expression in the cerebral cortex of a patient with Alzheimer’s disease. In mouse brain, kf-1 mRNA is detected predominantly in the hippocampus and cerebellum, and kf-1 gene expression is elevated also in the frontal cortex of rats after chronic antidepressant treatments. KF-1 mediates E2-dependent ubiquitination and may modulate cellular protein levels as an E3 ubiquitin ligase, though its target proteins are not yet identified. To elucidate the role of kf-1 in the central nervous system, we generated kf-1 knockout mice by gene targeting, using Cre-lox recombination. The resulting kf-1−/− mice were normal and healthy in appearance. Behavioral analyses revealed that kf-1−/− mice showed significantly increased anxiety-like behavior compared with kf-1+/+ littermates in the light/dark transition and elevated plus maze tests; however, no significant differences were observed in exploratory locomotion using the open field test or in behavioral despair using the forced swim and tail suspension tests. These observations suggest that KF-1 suppresses selectively anxiety under physiological conditions probably through modulating protein levels of its unknown target(s. Interestingly, kf-1−/− mice exhibited significantly increased prepulse inhibition, which is usually reduced in human schizophrenic patients. Thus, the kf-1−/− mice provide a novel animal model for elucidating molecular mechanisms of psychiatric diseases such as anxiety/depression, and may be useful for screening novel anxiolytic/antidepressant compounds.

  15. Mice Lacking the kf-1 Gene Exhibit Increased Anxiety- but not Despair-Like Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Atsushi; Matsuki, Masato; Takao, Keizo; Yamanishi, Kiyofumi; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Hashimoto-Gotoh, Tamotsu

    2008-01-01

    KF-1 was originally identified as a protein encoded by human gene with increased expression in the cerebral cortex of a patient with Alzheimer's disease. In mouse brain, kf-1 mRNA is detected predominantly in the hippocampus and cerebellum, and kf-1 gene expression is elevated also in the frontal cortex of rats after chronic antidepressant treatments. KF-1 mediates E2-dependent ubiquitination and may modulate cellular protein levels as an E3 ubiquitin ligase, though its target proteins are not yet identified. To elucidate the role of kf-1 in the central nervous system, we generated kf-1 knockout mice by gene targeting, using Cre-lox recombination. The resulting kf-1−/− mice were normal and healthy in appearance. Behavioral analyses revealed that kf-1−/− mice showed significantly increased anxiety-like behavior compared with kf-1+/+ littermates in the light/dark transition and elevated plus maze tests; however, no significant differences were observed in exploratory locomotion using the open field test or in behavioral despair using the forced swim and tail suspension tests. These observations suggest that KF-1 suppresses selectively anxiety under physiological conditions probably through modulating protein levels of its unknown target(s). Interestingly, kf-1−/− mice exhibited significantly increased prepulse inhibition, which is usually reduced in human schizophrenic patients. Thus, the kf-1−/− mice provide a novel animal model for elucidating molecular mechanisms of psychiatric diseases such as anxiety/depression, and may be useful for screening novel anxiolytic/antidepressant compounds. PMID:18958194

  16. Expression of an extracellular ribonuclease gene increases resistance to Cucumber mosaic virus in tobacco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teppei Sugawara

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The apoplast plays an important role in plant defense against pathogens. Some extracellular PR-4 proteins possess ribonuclease activity and may directly inhibit the growth of pathogenic fungi. It is likely that extracellular RNases can also protect plants against some viruses with RNA genomes. However, many plant RNases are multifunctional and the direct link between their ribonucleolytic activity and antiviral defense still needs to be clarified. In this study, we evaluated the resistance of Nicotiana tabacum plants expressing a non-plant single-strand-specific extracellular RNase against Cucumber mosaic virus. Results Severe mosaic symptoms and shrinkage were observed in the control non-transgenic plants 10 days after inoculation with Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV, whereas such disease symptoms were suppressed in the transgenic plants expressing the RNase gene. In a Western blot analysis, viral proliferation was observed in the uninoculated upper leaves of control plants, whereas virus levels were very low in those of transgenic plants. These results suggest that resistance against CMV was increased by the expression of the heterologous RNase gene. Conclusion We have previously shown that tobacco plants expressing heterologous RNases are characterized by high resistance to Tobacco mosaic virus. In this study, we demonstrated that elevated levels of extracellular RNase activity resulted in increased resistance to a virus with a different genome organization and life cycle. Thus, we conclude that the pathogen-induced expression of plant apoplastic RNases may increase non-specific resistance against viruses with RNA genomes.

  17. IGF-I gene variability is associated with an increased risk for AD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Teo; Martinez-Garcia, Ana; Antequera, Desiree; Vilella, Elisabet; Clarimon, Jordi; Mateo, Ignacio; Sanchez-Juan, Pascual; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Eloy; Frank, Ana; Rosich-Estrago, Marcel; Lleo, Alberto; Molina-Porcel, Laura; Blesa, Rafael; Gomez-Isla, Teresa; Combarros, Onofre; Bermejo-Pareja, Felix; Valdivieso, Fernando; Bullido, Maria Jesus; Carro, Eva

    2011-03-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), a neuroprotective factor with a wide spectrum of actions in the adult brain, is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Circulating levels of IGF-I change in AD patients and are implicated in the clearance of brain amyloid beta (Aβ) complexes. To investigate this hypothesis, we screened the IGF-I gene for various well known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering % of the gene variability in a population of 2352 individuals. Genetic analysis indicated different distribution of genotypes of 1 single nucleotide polymorphism, and 1 extended haplotype in the AD population compared with healthy control subjects. In particular, the frequency of rs972936 GG genotype was significantly greater in AD patients than in control subjects (63% vs. 55%). The rs972936 GG genotype was associated with an increased risk for disease, independently of apolipoprotein E genotype, and with enhanced circulating levels of IGF-I. These findings suggest that polymorphisms within the IGF-I gene could infer greater risk for AD through their effect on IGF-I levels, and confirm the physiological role IGF-I in the pathogenesis of AD. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Echinochrome A Increases Mitochondrial Mass and Function by Modulating Mitochondrial Biogenesis Regulatory Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Hun Jeong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Echinochrome A (Ech A is a natural pigment from sea urchins that has been reported to have antioxidant properties and a cardio protective effect against ischemia reperfusion injury. In this study, we ascertained whether Ech A enhances the mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation in rat cardio myoblast H9c2 cells. To study the effects of Ech A on mitochondrial biogenesis, we measured mitochondrial mass, level of oxidative phosphorylation, and mitochondrial biogenesis regulatory gene expression. Ech A treatment did not induce cytotoxicity. However, Ech A treatment enhanced oxygen consumption rate and mitochondrial ATP level. Likewise, Ech A treatment increased mitochondrial contents in H9c2 cells. Furthermore, Ech A treatment up-regulated biogenesis of regulatory transcription genes, including proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator (PGC-1α, estrogen-related receptor (ERR-α, peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor (PPAR-γ, and nuclear respiratory factor (NRF-1 and such mitochondrial transcription regulatory genes as mitochondrial transcriptional factor A (TFAM, mitochondrial transcription factor B2 (TFB2M, mitochondrial DNA direct polymerase (POLMRT, single strand binding protein (SSBP and Tu translation elongation factor (TUFM. In conclusion, these data suggest that Ech A is a potentiated marine drug which enhances mitochondrial biogenesis.

  19. Methods to increase reproducibility in differential gene expression via meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Timothy E; Haynes, Winston A; Vallania, Francesco; Ioannidis, John P; Khatri, Purvesh

    2017-01-09

    Findings from clinical and biological studies are often not reproducible when tested in independent cohorts. Due to the testing of a large number of hypotheses and relatively small sample sizes, results from whole-genome expression studies in particular are often not reproducible. Compared to single-study analysis, gene expression meta-analysis can improve reproducibility by integrating data from multiple studies. However, there are multiple choices in designing and carrying out a meta-analysis. Yet, clear guidelines on best practices are scarce. Here, we hypothesized that studying subsets of very large meta-analyses would allow for systematic identification of best practices to improve reproducibility. We therefore constructed three very large gene expression meta-analyses from clinical samples, and then examined meta-analyses of subsets of the datasets (all combinations of datasets with up to N/2 samples and K/2 datasets) compared to a 'silver standard' of differentially expressed genes found in the entire cohort. We tested three random-effects meta-analysis models using this procedure. We showed relatively greater reproducibility with more-stringent effect size thresholds with relaxed significance thresholds; relatively lower reproducibility when imposing extraneous constraints on residual heterogeneity; and an underestimation of actual false positive rate by Benjamini-Hochberg correction. In addition, multivariate regression showed that the accuracy of a meta-analysis increased significantly with more included datasets even when controlling for sample size. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Restoration using Azolla imbricata increases nitrogen functional bacterial groups and genes in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao-Ming; Lu, Peng-Zhen; Yang, Ke

    2017-05-01

    Microbial groups are major factors that influence soil function. Currently, there is a lack of studies on microbial functional groups. Although soil microorganisms play an important role in the nitrogen cycle, systematic studies of the effects of environmental factors on microbial populations in relation to key metabolic processes in the nitrogen cycle are seldom reported. In this study, we conducted a systematic analysis of the changes in nitrogen functional groups in mandarin orange garden soil treated with Azolla imbricata. The structures of the major functional bacterial groups and the functional gene abundances involved in key processes of the soil nitrogen cycle were analyzed using high-throughput sequencing (HTS) and quantitative real-time PCR, respectively. The results indicated that returning A. imbricata had an important influence on the composition of soil nitrogen functional bacterial communities. Treatment with A. imbricata increased the diversity of the nitrogen functional bacteria. The abundances of nitrogen functional genes were significantly higher in the treated soil compared with the control soil. Both the diversity of the major nitrogen functional bacteria (nifH bacteria, nirK bacteria, and narG bacteria) and the abundances of nitrogen functional genes in the soil showed significant positive correlations with the soil pH, the organic carbon content, available nitrogen, available phosphorus, and NH4+-N and NO3--N contents. Treatment with 12.5 kg fresh A. imbricata per mandarin orange tree was effective to improve the quality of the mandarin orange garden soil. This study analyzed the mechanism of the changes in functional bacterial groups and genes involved in key metabolic processes of the nitrogen cycle in soil treated by A. imbricata.

  1. Wood Smoke Exposure and Gene Promoter Methylation Are Associated with Increased Risk for COPD in Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Akshay; Petersen, Hans; Blanchette, Christopher M.; Meek, Paula; Picchi, Maria A.; Belinsky, Steven A.; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Wood smoke–associated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is common in women in developing countries but has not been adequately described in developed countries. Objectives: Our objective was to determine whether wood smoke exposure was a risk factor for COPD in a population of smokers in the United States and whether aberrant gene promoter methylation in sputum may modify this association. Methods: For this cross-sectional study, 1,827 subjects were drawn from the Lovelace Smokers' Cohort, a predominantly female cohort of smokers. Wood smoke exposure was self-reported. Postbronchodilator spirometry was obtained, and COPD outcomes studied included percent predicted FEV1, airflow obstruction, and chronic bronchitis. Effect modification of wood smoke exposure with current cigarette smoke, ethnicity, sex, and promoter methylation of lung cancer-related genes in sputum on COPD outcomes were separately explored. Multivariable logistic and poisson regression models were used for binary and rate-based outcomes, respectively. Measurements and Main Results: Self-reported wood smoke exposure was independently associated with a lower percent predicted FEV1 (point estimate [± SE] −0.03 ± 0.01) and a higher prevalence of airflow obstruction and chronic bronchitis (odds ratio, 1.96; 95% confidence interval, 1.52–2.52 and 1.64 (95% confidence interval, 1.31–2.06, respectively). These associations were stronger among current cigarette smokers, non-Hispanic whites, and men. Wood smoke exposure interacted in a multiplicative manner with aberrant promoter methylation of the p16 or GATA4 genes on lower percent predicted FEV1. Conclusions: These studies identify a novel link between wood smoke exposure and gene promoter methylation that synergistically increases the risk for reduced lung function in cigarette smokers. PMID:20595226

  2. Distinct neutrophil subpopulations phenotype by flow cytometry in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikentiou, Myrofora; Psarra, Katerina; Kapsimali, Violetta; Liapis, Konstantinos; Michael, Michalis; Tsionos, Konstantinos; Lianidou, Evi; Papasteriades, Chryssa

    2009-03-01

    The cardinal feature of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is dysplasia involving one or more myeloid cell lineages. In the present study, we used 4-color flow cytometric analysis to investigate dysgranulopoiesis in bone marrow specimens from 65 patients with MDS. The antigen expression patterns of total neutrophil granulocytes (TNG) and of the two distinct neutrophil granulocytic subpopulations (NGSs), NGS-1 (dimmer CD45 expression) and NGS-2 (stronger CD45 expression) identified on the side scatter (SS) vs. CD45-intensity plot, were studied. The neutrophil granulocytes from patients with MDS showed characteristic antigen expression aberrancies which were more pronounced in NGS-2 subpopulation. Studying separately the NGS-2 subpopulation with the CD16/MPO/LF combination, the low CD16(+)/MPO(+) and low CD16(+)/LF(+) percentages seemed to discriminate between lower-risk and higher-risk patients with MDS in most occasions. Furthermore, a detailed assessment of the NGS-1 and NGS-2 immunophenotypic patterns revealed early dysplastic changes, not otherwise observed by standard TNG analysis, especially in cases of lower-risk MDS.

  3. Reproductive gene expression in a coral reef fish exposed to increasing temperature across generations

    KAUST Repository

    Veilleux, Heather D

    2017-12-07

    Reproduction in marine fish is generally tightly linked with water temperature. Consequently, when adults are exposed to projected future ocean temperatures, reproductive output of many species declines precipitously. Recent research has shown that in the common reef fish, Acanthochromis polyacanthus, step-wise exposure to higher temperatures over two generations (parents: +1.5°C, offspring: +3.0°C) can improve reproductive output in the F2 generation compared to F2 fish that have experienced the same high temperatures over two generations (F1 parents: +3.0°C, F2 offspring: +3.0°C). To investigate how a step-wise increase in temperature between generations improved reproductive capacity, we tested the expression of well-known teleost reproductive genes in the brain and gonads of F2 fish using quantitative reverse transcription PCR and compared it among control (+0.0°C for two generations), developmental (+3.0°C in second generation only), step (+1.5°C in first generation and +3.0°C in second generation), and transgenerational (+3.0°C for two generations) treatments. We found that levels of gonadotropin receptor gene expression (Fshr and Lhcgr) in the testes were reduced in developmental and transgenerational temperature treatments, but were similar to control levels in the step treatment. This suggests Fshr and Lhcgr may be involved in regulating male reproductive capacity in A. polyacanthus. In addition, lower Fshb expression in the brain of females in all temperature treatments compared to control, suggests that Fshb expression, which is involved in vitellogenesis, is sensitive to high temperatures. Our results help elucidate key genes that facilitate successful reproduction in reef fishes when they experience a gradual increase in temperature across generations consistent with the trajectory of climate change.

  4. Impaired barrier function by dietary fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS in rats is accompanied by increased colonic mitochondrial gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramer Evelien

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary non-digestible carbohydrates stimulate the gut microflora and are therefore presumed to improve host resistance to intestinal infections. However, several strictly controlled rat infection studies showed that non-digestible fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS increase, rather than decrease, translocation of Salmonella towards extra-intestinal sites. In addition, it was shown that FOS increases intestinal permeability already before infection. The mechanism responsible for this adverse effect of FOS is unclear. Possible explanations are altered mucosal integrity due to changes in tight junctions or changes in expression of defense molecules such as antimicrobials and mucins. To examine the mechanisms underlying weakening of the intestinal barrier by FOS, a controlled dietary intervention study was performed. Two groups of 12 rats were adapted to a diet with or without FOS. mRNA was collected from colonic mucosa and changes in gene expression were assessed for each individual rat using Agilent rat whole genome microarrays. Results Among the 997 FOS induced genes we observed less mucosal integrity related genes than expected with the clear permeability changes. FOS did not induce changes in tight junction genes and only 8 genes related to mucosal defense were induced by FOS. These small effects are unlikely the cause for the clear increase in intestinal permeability that is observed. FOS significantly increased expression of 177 mitochondria-related genes. More specifically, induced expression of genes involved in all five OXPHOS complexes and the TCA cycle was observed. These results indicate that dietary FOS influences intestinal mucosal energy metabolism. Furthermore, increased expression of 113 genes related to protein turnover, including proteasome genes, ribosomal genes and protein maturation related genes, was seen. FOS upregulated expression of the peptide hormone proglucagon gene, in agreement with previous studies, as

  5. Use of commercial organic fertilizer increases the abundance of antibiotic resistance genes and antibiotics in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xue; Qiao, Min; Wang, Feng-Hua; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2017-01-01

    The application of manure-based commercial organic fertilizers (COFs) is becoming increasingly extensive because of the expanding market for organic food. The present study examined the effects of repeated applications of chicken or swine manure-based COFs on the fate of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in soil by conducting a soil microcosm experiment. Application of COFs significantly increased antibiotics residues, as well as the relative abundance of ARGs and the integrase gene of class 1 integrons (intΙ1) in soil. Two months after each application, antibiotics and ARGs dissipated in amended soils, but they still remained at an elevated level, compared with the control. And, the accumulation of antibiotics was found due to repeated COF applications. However, the relative abundance of ARGs in most COF-amended soils did not differ significantly between the first application and the repeated application. The results imply that 2 months are not sufficient for ARGs to approach background levels, and that animal manure must be treated more effectively prior to using it in agriculture ecosystems.

  6. A Semiquantitative Framework for Gene Regulatory Networks: Increasing the Time and Quantitative Resolution of Boolean Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Kerkhofs

    Full Text Available Boolean models have been instrumental in predicting general features of gene networks and more recently also as explorative tools in specific biological applications. In this study we introduce a basic quantitative and a limited time resolution to a discrete (Boolean framework. Quantitative resolution is improved through the employ of normalized variables in unison with an additive approach. Increased time resolution stems from the introduction of two distinct priority classes. Through the implementation of a previously published chondrocyte network and T helper cell network, we show that this addition of quantitative and time resolution broadens the scope of biological behaviour that can be captured by the models. Specifically, the quantitative resolution readily allows models to discern qualitative differences in dosage response to growth factors. The limited time resolution, in turn, can influence the reachability of attractors, delineating the likely long term system behaviour. Importantly, the information required for implementation of these features, such as the nature of an interaction, is typically obtainable from the literature. Nonetheless, a trade-off is always present between additional computational cost of this approach and the likelihood of extending the model's scope. Indeed, in some cases the inclusion of these features does not yield additional insight. This framework, incorporating increased and readily available time and semi-quantitative resolution, can help in substantiating the litmus test of dynamics for gene networks, firstly by excluding unlikely dynamics and secondly by refining falsifiable predictions on qualitative behaviour.

  7. A Semiquantitative Framework for Gene Regulatory Networks: Increasing the Time and Quantitative Resolution of Boolean Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkhofs, Johan; Geris, Liesbet

    2015-01-01

    Boolean models have been instrumental in predicting general features of gene networks and more recently also as explorative tools in specific biological applications. In this study we introduce a basic quantitative and a limited time resolution to a discrete (Boolean) framework. Quantitative resolution is improved through the employ of normalized variables in unison with an additive approach. Increased time resolution stems from the introduction of two distinct priority classes. Through the implementation of a previously published chondrocyte network and T helper cell network, we show that this addition of quantitative and time resolution broadens the scope of biological behaviour that can be captured by the models. Specifically, the quantitative resolution readily allows models to discern qualitative differences in dosage response to growth factors. The limited time resolution, in turn, can influence the reachability of attractors, delineating the likely long term system behaviour. Importantly, the information required for implementation of these features, such as the nature of an interaction, is typically obtainable from the literature. Nonetheless, a trade-off is always present between additional computational cost of this approach and the likelihood of extending the model's scope. Indeed, in some cases the inclusion of these features does not yield additional insight. This framework, incorporating increased and readily available time and semi-quantitative resolution, can help in substantiating the litmus test of dynamics for gene networks, firstly by excluding unlikely dynamics and secondly by refining falsifiable predictions on qualitative behaviour.

  8. Increased IMP dehydrogenase gene expression in solid tumor tissues and tumor cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collart, F.R.; Chubb, C.B.; Mirkin, B.L.; Huberman, E.

    1992-07-10

    IMP dehydrogenase, a regulatory enzyme of guanine nucleotide biosynthesis, may play a role in cell proliferation and malignancy. To assess this possibility, we examined IMP dehydrogenase expression in a series of human solid tumor tissues and tumor cell lines in comparison with their normal counterparts. Increased IMP dehydrogenase gene expression was observed in brain tumors relative to normal brain tissue and in sarcoma cells relative to normal fibroblasts. Similarly, in several B- and T-lymphoid leukemia cell lines, elevated levels of IMP dehydrogenase mRNA and cellular enzyme were observed in comparison with the levels in peripheral blood lymphocytes. These results are consistent with an association between increased IMP dehydrogenase expression and either enhanced cell proliferation or malignant transformation.

  9. Receptor-like protein-tyrosine phosphatase alpha specifically inhibits insulin-increased prolactin gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacob, K K; Sap, J; Stanley, F M

    1998-01-01

    A physiologically relevant response to insulin, stimulation of prolactin promoter activity in GH4 pituitary cells, was used as an assay to study the specificity of protein-tyrosine phosphatase function. Receptor-like protein-tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPalpha) blocks the effect of insulin...... to increase prolactin gene expression but potentiates the effects of epidermal growth factor and cAMP on prolactin promoter activity. RPTPalpha was the only protein-tyrosine phosphatase tested that did this. Thus, the effect of RPTPalpha on prolactin-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) promoter activity...... is specific by two criteria. A number of potential RPTPalpha targets were ruled out by finding (a) that they are not affected or (b) that they are not on the pathway to insulin-increased prolactin-CAT activity. The negative effect of RPTPalpha on insulin activation of the prolactin promoter is not due...

  10. Placental triglyceride accumulation in maternal type 1 diabetes is associated with increased lipase gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Marie Louise Skakkebæk; Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2006-01-01

    Maternal diabetes can cause fetal macrosomia and increased risk of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease in adulthood of the offspring. Although increased transplacental lipid transport could be involved, the impact of maternal type 1 diabetes on molecular mechanisms for lipid transport...... in placenta is largely unknown. To examine whether maternal type 1 diabetes affects placental lipid metabolism, we measured lipids and mRNA expression of lipase-encoding genes in placentas from women with type 1 diabetes (n = 27) and a control group (n = 21). The placental triglyceride (TG) concentration......RNA expression of lipoprotein lipase and lysosomal lipase were similar in women with diabetes and the control group. Immunohistochemistry showed EL protein in syncytiotrophoblasts facing the maternal blood and endothelial cells facing the fetal blood in placentas from both normal women and women with diabetes...

  11. In vitro analysis of SERCA2 gene regulation in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes and increasing transfection efficiency by gene-gun biolistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Eizema (Karin); H.A. van Heugten (Han); K. Bezstarosti (Karel); M.C. van Setten (Marga); J.M.J. Lamers (Jos)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThe transcriptional downregulation of the SERCA2 gene is studied using neonatal rat cardiomyocytes stimulated with endothelin-1 to induce hypertrophy. Liposome-based transfection of cells with a 1.9 kb SERCA2 promoter fragment directed expression of a reporter gene identical to the

  12. Preservation of Gene Duplication Increases the Regulatory Spectrum of Ribosomal Protein Genes and Enhances Growth under Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Parenteau

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In baker’s yeast, the majority of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs are duplicated, and it was recently proposed that such duplications are preserved via the functional specialization of the duplicated genes. However, the origin and nature of duplicated RPGs’ (dRPGs functional specificity remain unclear. In this study, we show that differences in dRPG functions are generated by variations in the modality of gene expression and, to a lesser extent, by protein sequence. Analysis of the sequence and expression patterns of non-intron-containing RPGs indicates that each dRPG is controlled by specific regulatory sequences modulating its expression levels in response to changing growth conditions. Homogenization of dRPG sequences reduces cell tolerance to growth under stress without changing the number of expressed genes. Together, the data reveal a model where duplicated genes provide a means for modulating the expression of ribosomal proteins in response to stress.

  13. Elevated CO2 increases photosynthesis, biomass and productivity, and modifies gene expression in sugarcane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Souza, Amanda Pereira; Gaspar, Marilia; Da Silva, Emerson Alves; Ulian, Eugênio César; Waclawovsky, Alessandro Jaquiel; Nishiyama, Milton Yutaka; Dos Santos, Renato Vicentini; Teixeira, Marcelo Menossi; Souza, Glaucia Mendes; Buckeridge, Marcos Silveira

    2008-08-01

    Because of the economical relevance of sugarcane and its high potential as a source of biofuel, it is important to understand how this crop will respond to the foreseen increase in atmospheric [CO(2)]. The effects of increased [CO(2)] on photosynthesis, development and carbohydrate metabolism were studied in sugarcane (Saccharum ssp.). Plants were grown at ambient (approximately 370 ppm) and elevated (approximately 720 ppm) [CO(2)] during 50 weeks in open-top chambers. The plants grown under elevated CO(2) showed, at the end of such period, an increase of about 30% in photosynthesis and 17% in height, and accumulated 40% more biomass in comparison with the plants grown at ambient [CO(2)]. These plants also had lower stomatal conductance and transpiration rates (-37 and -32%, respectively), and higher water-use efficiency (c.a. 62%). cDNA microarray analyses revealed a differential expression of 35 genes on the leaves (14 repressed and 22 induced) by elevated CO(2). The latter are mainly related to photosynthesis and development. Industrial productivity analysis showed an increase of about 29% in sucrose content. These data suggest that sugarcane crops increase productivity in higher [CO(2)], and that this might be related, as previously observed for maize and sorghum, to transient drought stress.

  14. Increased antioxidant capacity in tomato by ectopic expression of the strawberry D-galacturonate reductase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Iraida; Osorio, Sonia; Martinez-Ferri, Elsa; Lima-Silva, Viviana; Doblas, Veronica G; Fernández-Muñoz, Rafael; Fernie, Alisdair R; Botella, Miguel A; Valpuesta, Victoriano

    2015-03-01

    Increasing L-ascorbic acid (AsA, vitamin C) content in fruits is a common goal in current breeding programs due to its beneficial effect on human health. Attempts to increase AsA content by genetic engineering have resulted in variable success likely due to AsA's complex regulation. Here, we report the effect of ectopically expressing in tomato the D-galacturonate reductase (FaGalUR) gene from strawberry, involved in AsA biosynthesis, either under the control of the constitutive 35S or the tomato fruit-specific polygalucturonase (PG) promoters. Although transgenic lines showed a moderate increase on AsA content, complex changes in metabolites were found in transgenic fruits. Metabolomic analyses of ripe fruits identified a decrease in citrate, glutamate, asparagine, glucose, and fructose, accompanied by an increase of sucrose, galactinol, and chlorogenic acid. Significant metabolic changes also occurred in leaves of 35S-FaGalUR lines, which showed higher non-photochemical fluorescence quenching (NPQ), indicative of a higher constitutive photo-protective capacity. Overall, overexpression of FaGalUR increased total antioxidant capacity in fruits and the results suggest a tight control of AsA content, probably linked to a complex regulation of cellular redox state and metabolic adjustment. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. A Single Oral Administration of Theaflavins Increases Energy Expenditure and the Expression of Metabolic Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoto Kudo

    Full Text Available Theaflavins are polyphenols found in black tea, whose physiological activities are not well understood. This study on mice evaluated the influence of a single oral administration of theaflavins on energy metabolism by monitoring the initial metabolic changess in skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue (BAT. Oxygen consumption (VO2 and energy expenditure (EE were increased significantly in mice treated with theaflavin rich fraction (TF compared with the group administered vehicle alone. There was no difference in locomotor activity. Fasting mice were euthanized under anesthesia before and 2 and 5, 20-hr after treatment with TF or vehicle. The mRNA levels of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP-1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α in BAT were increased significantly 2-hr after administration ofTF. The levels of UCP-3 and PGC-1α in the gastrocnemius muscle were increased significantly 2 and 5-hr after administration of TF. The concentration of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK 1α was also increased significantly in the gastrocnemius 2 and 5-hr after treatment with TF. These results indicate that TF significantly enhances systemic energy expenditure, as evidenced by an increase in expression of metabolic genes.

  16. Abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, and colon carcinogenesis are increased in mutant mice lacking gastrin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowey, Stephanie L; Quast, Michael; Belalcazar, Ligia Maria; Wei, Jingwa; Deng, Xiaoling; Given, Randall; Singh, Pomila

    2005-06-15

    The authors recently reported that gastrin gene knockout (GAS-KO) mice had an increased risk for colon carcinogenesis in response to azoxymethane (AOM) compared with their wild type (WT) littermates. In the current report, the authors discuss the predisposition of GAS-KO mice to develop obesity and metabolic hormonal changes that may contribute to their increased risk of colon carcinogenesis. The weight and deposition of fat was monitored in the mice over a 14 month period, using magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. Changes in plasma concentrations of ghrelin, leptin, insulin, and glucose were assessed using radioimmunoassay analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Preneoplastic markers of colon carcinogenesis (aberrant crypt foci [ACFs]), in response to AOM, were measured in a subset of obese versus lean GAS-KO mice and were compared with the markers in WT mice. Increases in visceral adiposity were evident by age 2 months in GAS-KO mice, resulting in macroscopic obesity by age 7 months. Hyperinsulinemia and insulin:glucose ratios were increased significantly in GAS-KO mice as young as 1 month and preceded alterations in nonfasting leptin and ghrelin levels. The number of ACFs per mouse colon were increased significantly in the following order: obese GAS-KO mice > lean GAS-KO mice > WT mice. Fasting plasma insulin levels were 0.88 +/- 0.1 ng/mL, 1.45 +/- 0.3, and 2.76 +/- 0.9 ng/mL in the WT, GAS-KO lean, and GAS-KO obese mice, respectively. The current results suggest the novel possibility that loss of amidated gastrins may increase adipogenesis, hyperinsulinemia, and colon carcinogenesis in GAS-KO mice. The increase in colon carcinogenesis may be due in part to hyperinsulinemia, increased obesity, and other associated hormone changes that were measured in GAS-KO mice. Copyright 2005 American Cancer Society.

  17. Mitochondrial gene expression and increased oxidative metabolism: role in increased lifespan of fat-specific insulin receptor knock-out mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katic, Masa; Kennedy, Adam R.; Leykin, Igor; Norris, Andrew; McGettrick, Aileen; Gesta, Stephane; Russell, Steven J.; Bluher, Matthias; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2009-01-01

    Summary Caloric restriction, leanness and decreased activity of insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) receptor signaling are associated with increased longevity in a wide range of organisms from Caenorhabditis elegans to humans. Fat-specific insulin receptor knock-out (FIRKO) mice represent an interesting dichotomy, with leanness and increased lifespan, despite normal or increased food intake. To determine the mechanisms by which a lack of insulin signaling in adipose tissue might exert this effect, we performed physiological and gene expression studies in FIRKO and control mice as they aged. At the whole body level, FIRKO mice demonstrated an increase in basal metabolic rate and respiratory exchange ratio. Analysis of gene expression in white adipose tissue (WAT) of FIRKO mice from 6 to 36 months of age revealed persistently high expression of the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes involved in glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, β-oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation as compared to expression of the same genes in WAT from controls that showed a tendency to decline in expression with age. These changes in gene expression were correlated with increased cytochrome c and cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV at the protein level, increased citrate synthase activity, increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) and PGC-1β, and an increase in mitochondrial DNA in WAT of FIRKO mice. Together, these data suggest that maintenance of mitochondrial activity and metabolic rates in adipose tissue may be important contributors to the increased lifespan of the FIRKO mouse. PMID:18001293

  18. Flow cytometric analysis of lymphocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations in induced sputum from patients with asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaro Shiota

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Study objectives were to compare the numbers of lymphocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations in induced sputum from asthmatic patients and from healthy subjects, and to determine the effect of inhaled anti-asthmatic steroid therapy on these cell numbers. Hypertonic saline inhalation was used to non-invasively induce sputum samples in 34 patients with bronchial asthma and 21 healthy subjects. The sputum samples were reduced with dithioerythritol and absolute numbers of lymphocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations were assessed by direct immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. To assess the effect of beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP on induced sputum, numbers of lymphocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations in sputum also were evaluated after 4 weeks of BDP inhalation treatment in seven asthmatic patients. An adequate sample was obtained in 85.3% of patients with asthma and in 79.2% of the healthy subjects. Induced sputum from patients with asthma had increased numbers of lymphocytes (P = 0.009; CD4+ cells (P = 0.044; CD4+ cells-bearing interleukin-2 receptor (CD25; P = 0.016; and CD4+ cells bearing human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR (P = 0.033. CD8+ cells were not increased in asthmatic patients. In patients treated with inhaled steroids, numbers of lymphocytes, CD4+ cells, CD25-bearing CD4+ cells and HLA-DR-bearing CD4+ cells in sputum decreased from pretreatment numbers (P = 0.016, 0.002, 0.003 and 0.002, respectively. Analysis of lymphocytes in induced sputum by flow cytometry is useful in assessing bronchial inflammation, and activated CD4+ lymphocytes may play a key role in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation in bronchial asthma.

  19. Alpha-synuclein gene ablation increases docosahexaenoic acid incorporation and turnover in brain phospholipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golovko, Mikhail Y; Rosenberger, Thad A; Feddersen, Søren

    2007-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that ablation of alpha-synuclein (Snca) reduces arachidonate (20:4n-6) turnover in brain phospholipids through modulation of an endoplasmic reticulum-localized acyl-CoA synthetase (Acsl). The effect of Snca ablation on docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3) metabolism is unknown....... In the present study, we examined the effect of Snca gene ablation on brain 22:6n-3 metabolism. We determined 22:6n-3 uptake and incorporation into brain phospholipids by infusing awake, wild-type and Snca-/- mice with [1-14C]22:6n-3 using steady-state kinetic modeling. In addition, because Snca modulates 20:4n......-6-CoA formation, we assessed microsomal Acsl activity using 22:6n-3 as a substrate. Although Snca gene ablation does not affect brain 22:6n-3 uptake, brain 22:6n-3-CoA mass was elevated 1.5-fold in the absence of Snca. This is consistent with the 1.6- to 2.2-fold increase in the incorporation rate...

  20. Increased lipid accumulation and adipogenic gene expression of adipocytes in 3D bioprinted nanocellulose scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, I; Gatenholm, P; Hägg, D A

    2017-02-21

    Compared to standard 2D culture systems, new methods for 3D cell culture of adipocytes could provide more physiologically accurate data and a deeper understanding of metabolic diseases such as diabetes. By resuspending living cells in a bioink of nanocellulose and hyaluronic acid, we were able to print 3D scaffolds with uniform cell distribution. After one week in culture, cell viability was 95%, and after two weeks the cells displayed a more mature phenotype with larger lipid droplets than standard 2D cultured cells. Unlike cells in 2D culture, the 3D bioprinted cells did not detach upon lipid accumulation. After two weeks, the gene expression of the adipogenic marker genes PPARγ and FABP4 was increased 2.0- and 2.2-fold, respectively, for cells in 3D bioprinted constructs compared with 2D cultured cells. Our 3D bioprinted culture system produces better adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells and a more mature cell phenotype than conventional 2D culture systems.

  1. Arsenic exposure from drinking water is associated with decreased gene expression and increased DNA methylation in peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameer, Syeda Shegufta; Engström, Karin; Hossain, Mohammad Bakhtiar; Concha, Gabriela; Vahter, Marie; Broberg, Karin

    2017-04-15

    Exposure to inorganic arsenic increases the risk of cancer and non-malignant diseases. Inefficient arsenic metabolism is a marker for susceptibility to arsenic toxicity. Arsenic may alter gene expression, possibly by altering DNA methylation. To elucidate the associations between arsenic exposure, gene expression, and DNA methylation in peripheral blood, and the modifying effects of arsenic metabolism. The study participants, women from the Andes, Argentina, were exposed to arsenic via drinking water. Arsenic exposure was assessed as the sum of arsenic metabolites in urine (U-As), using high performance liquid-chromatography hydride-generation inductively-coupled-plasma-mass-spectrometry, and arsenic metabolism efficiency was assessed by the urinary fractions (%) of the individual metabolites. Genome-wide gene expression (N=80 women) and DNA methylation (N=93; 80 overlapping with gene expression) in peripheral blood were measured using Illumina DirectHyb HumanHT-12 v4.0 and Infinium Human-Methylation 450K BeadChip, respectively. U-As concentrations, ranging 10-1251μg/L, was associated with decreased gene expression: 64% of the top 1000 differentially expressed genes were down-regulated with increasing U-As. U-As was also associated with hypermethylation: 87% of the top 1000CpGs were hypermethylated with increasing U-As. The expression of six genes and six individual CpG sites were significantly associated with increased U-As concentration. Pathway analyses revealed enrichment of genes related to cell death and cancer. The pathways differed somewhat depending on arsenic metabolism efficiency. We found no overlap between arsenic-related gene expression and DNA methylation for individual genes. Increased arsenic exposure was associated with lower gene expression and hypermethylation in peripheral blood, but with no evident overlap. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A genetic variant in CAMKK2 gene is possibly associated with increased risk of bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atakhorrami, Minoo; Rahimi-Aliabadi, Simin; Jamshidi, Javad; Moslemi, Elham; Movafagh, Abolfazl; Ohadi, Mina; Mirabzadeh, Arash; Emamalizadeh, Babak; Ghaedi, Hamid; Gholipour, Fatemeh; Fazeli, Atena; Motallebi, Marzieh; Taghavi, Shaghayegh; Ahmadifard, Azadeh; Mohammadihosseinabad, Saeed; Shafiei Zarneh, Amir Ehtesham; Shahmohammadibeni, Neda; Madadi, Faranak; Andarva, Monavvar; Darvish, Hossein

    2016-03-01

    A recent large-scale study have reported that rs1063843, a single nucleotide polymorphism located in the CAMKK2 gene is highly associated with schizophrenia in European and Han Chinese populations. Increasing evidences show that schizophrenia and bipolar disorder have some common genetic variance. Here, we evaluated the association of this variant with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder in Iranian population. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood of 500 schizophrenic patients, 500 bipolar patients and 500 normal controls and all were genotyped for the rs1063843 using a PCR-RFLP method. The allele frequency of rs1063843 was significantly different in both schizophrenia and bipolar patients comparing to control group. For the first time, we showed that rs1063843 is highly associated with bipolar disorder, although more replication studies are needed to confirm our findings. Our results also support the findings of previous studies suggesting a significant association between rs1063843 and schizophrenia.

  3. A gene stacking approach leads to engineered plants with highly increased galactan levels in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondolf, Vibe M; Stoppel, Rhea; Ebert, Berit; Rautengarten, Carsten; Liwanag, April Jm; Loqué, Dominique; Scheller, Henrik V

    2014-12-10

    Engineering of plants with a composition of lignocellulosic biomass that is more suitable for downstream processing is of high interest for next-generation biofuel production. Lignocellulosic biomass contains a high proportion of pentose residues, which are more difficult to convert into fuels than hexoses. Therefore, increasing the hexose/pentose ratio in biomass is one approach for biomass improvement. A genetic engineering approach was used to investigate whether the amount of pectic galactan can be specifically increased in cell walls of Arabidopsis fiber cells, which in turn could provide a potential source of readily fermentable galactose. First it was tested if overexpression of various plant UDP-glucose 4-epimerases (UGEs) could increase the availability of UDP-galactose and thereby increase the biosynthesis of galactan. Constitutive and tissue-specific expression of a poplar UGE and three Arabidopsis UGEs in Arabidopsis plants could not significantly increase the amount of cell wall bound galactose. We then investigated co-overexpression of AtUGE2 together with the β-1,4-galactan synthase GalS1. Co-overexpression of AtUGE2 and GalS1 led to over 80% increase in cell wall galactose levels in Arabidopsis stems, providing evidence that these proteins work synergistically. Furthermore, AtUGE2 and GalS1 overexpression in combination with overexpression of the NST1 master regulator for secondary cell wall biosynthesis resulted in increased thickness of fiber cell walls in addition to the high cell wall galactose levels. Immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed that the increased galactose was present as β-1,4-galactan in secondary cell walls. This approach clearly indicates that simultaneous overexpression of AtUGE2 and GalS1 increases the cell wall galactose to much higher levels than can be achieved by overexpressing either one of these proteins alone. Moreover, the increased galactan content in fiber cells while improving the biomass composition had no impact

  4. MicroRNA gene polymorphisms and environmental factors increase patient susceptibility to hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Hung Chu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Micro RNAs (miRNAs are small RNA fragments that naturally exist in the human body. Through various physiological mechanisms, miRNAs can generate different functions for regulating RNA protein levels and balancing abnormalities. Abnormal miRNA expression has been reported to be highly related to several diseases and cancers. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in miRNAs have been reported to increase patient susceptibility and affect patient prognosis and survival. We adopted a case-control research design to verify the relationship between miRNAs and hepatocellular carcinoma. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 525 subjects, including 377 controls and 188 hepatocellular carcinoma patients, were selected. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP and real-time PCR were used to analyze miRNA146a (rs2910164, miRNA149 (rs2292832, miRNA196 (rs11614913, and miRNA499 (rs3746444 genetic polymorphisms between the control group and the case group. The results indicate that people who carry the rs3746444 CT or CC genotypes may have a significantly increased susceptibility to hepatocellular carcinoma (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.84, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.88-4.30. In addition, when combined with environmental risk factors, such as smoking and alcohol consumption, interaction effects were observed between gene polymorphisms and environmental factors (odds ratio [OR] = 4.69, 95% CI = 2.52-8.70; AOR = 3.38, 95% CI = 1.68-6.80. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that a significant association exists between miRNA499 SNPs and hepatocellular carcinoma. Gene-environment interactions of miRNA499 polymorphisms, smoking, and alcohol consumption might alter hepatocellular carcinoma susceptibility.

  5. Low AMY1 Gene Copy Number Is Associated with Increased Body Mass Index in Prepubertal Boys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Loredana Marcovecchio

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 60 single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with Body Mass Index (BMI. Additional genetic variants, such as copy number variations (CNV, have also been investigated in relation to BMI. Recently, the highly polymorphic CNV in the salivary amylase (AMY1 gene, encoding an enzyme implicated in the first step of starch digestion, has been associated with obesity in adults and children. We assessed the potential association between AMY1 copy number and a wide range of BMI in a population of Italian school-children.744 children (354 boys, 390 girls, mean age (±SD: 8.4±1.4years underwent anthropometric assessments (height, weight and collection of saliva samples for DNA extraction. AMY1 copies were evaluated by quantitative PCR.A significant increase of BMI z-score by decreasing AMY1 copy number was observed in boys (β: -0.117, p = 0.033, but not in girls. Similarly, waist circumference (β: -0.155, p = 0.003, adjusted for age was negatively influenced by AMY1 copy number in boys. Boys with 8 or more AMY1 copy numbers presented a significant lower BMI z-score (p = 0.04 and waist circumference (p = 0.01 when compared to boys with less than 8 copy numbers.In this pediatric-only, population-based study, a lower AMY1 copy number emerged to be associated with increased BMI in boys. These data confirm previous findings from adult studies and support a potential role of a higher copy number of the salivary AMY1 gene in protecting from excess weight gain.

  6. Increased Incidence of Mitochondrial Cytochrome C Oxidase 1 Gene Mutations in Patients with Primary Ovarian Insufficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiumei Zhen

    Full Text Available Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI, also known as premature ovarian failure (POF, is defined as more than six months of cessation of menses before the age of 40 years, with two serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH levels (at least 1 month apart falling in the menopause range. The cause of POI remains undetermined in the majority of cases, although some studies have reported increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS in idiopathic POF. The role of mitochondrial DNA in the pathogenesis of POI has not been studied extensively. This aim of this study was to uncover underlying mitochondrial genetic defects in patients with POI. The entire region of the mitochondrial genome was amplified in subjects with idiopathic POI (n=63 and age-matched healthy female controls (n=63 using nine pair sets of primers, followed by screening of the mitochondrial genome using an Illumina MiSeq. We identified a total of 96 non-synonymous mitochondrial variations in POI patients and 93 non-synonymous variations in control subjects. Of these, 21 (9 in POI and 12 in control non-synonymous variations had not been reported previously. Eight mitochondrial cytochrome coxidase 1 (MT-CO1 missense variants were identified in POI patients, whereas only four missense mutations were observed in controls. A high incidence of MT-CO1 missense variants were identified in POI patients compared with controls, and the difference between the groups was statistically significant (13/63 vs. 5/63, p=0.042. Our results show that patients with primary ovarian insufficiency exhibit an increased incidence of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 gene mutations, suggesting that MT-CO1 gene mutation may be causal in POI.

  7. Cloning of a Gene Whose Expression is Increased in Scrapie and in Senile Plaques in Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wietgrefe, S.; Zupancic, M.; Haase, A.; Chesebro, B.; Race, R.; Frey, W.; Rustan, T.; Friedman, R. L.

    1985-12-01

    A complementary DNA library was constructed from messenger RNA's extracted from the brains of mice infected with the scrapie agent. The library was differentially screened with the objectives of finding clones that might be used as markers of infection and finding clones of genes whose increased expression might be correlated with the pathological changes common to scrapie and Alzheimer's disease. A gene was identified whose expression is increased in scrapie. The complementary DNA corresponding to this gene hybridized preferentially and focally to cells in the brains of scrapie-infected animals. The cloned DNA also hybridized to the neuritic plaques found with increased frequency in brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Inflammatory cytokine gene polymorphisms increase the risk of atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong-Wu; Wu, Ying; Sun, Yu; Liu, Lu-Ying; Tian, Meng-Meng; Feng, Guo-Shuang; You, Wei-Cheng; Li, Ji-You

    2010-04-14

    To investigate the effects of interleukin-8 (IL-8), macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) gene polymorphisms, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, on the risk of developing severe chronic atrophic gastritis (SCAG) and intestinal metaplasia (IM). A total of 372 cases were selected from a cohort study in Linqu County, a high risk area for gastric cancer (GC) in northern China. To obtain a sufficient group size, patients with normal or superficial gastritis were included. Based on an average follow-up period of 56 mo, the 372 cases were divided into no progression group (no histological progression from normal or superficial gastritis, n = 137), group I (progressed from normal or superficial gastritis to SCAG, n = 134) and group II (progressed from normal or superficial gastritis to IM, n = 101). IL-8, MIF gene polymorphisms were detected by polymerase chain reaction-based denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography analysis and DNA sequencing. An increased risk of SCAG was found in subjects with IL-8-251 AA genotype [odds ratio (OR) = 2.62, 95% CI: 1.23-5.72] or IL-8-251 A allele carriers (AA + AT) (OR = 1.81, 95% CI: 1.06-3.09). An elevated risk of IM was found in subjects with IL-8-251 AT genotype (OR = 2.27, 95% CI: 1.25-4.14) or IL-8-251 A allele carriers (OR = 2.07, 95% CI: 1.16-3.69). An increased risk of SCAG was found in subjects with MIF-173 GC genotype (OR = 2.36, 95% CI: 1.38-4.02) or MIF-173 C allele carriers (GC + CC) (OR = 2.07, 95% CI: 1.21-3.55). An elevated risk of IM was found in subjects with MIF-173 CC genotype (OR = 2.27, 95% CI: 1.16-4.46) or MIF-173 C allele carriers (OR = 3.84, 95% CI: 1.58-9.34). The risk of SCAG and IM was more evident in subjects carrying IL-8-251 A allele (OR = 6.70, 95% CI: 1.29-9.78) or MIF-173 C allele (OR = 6.54, 95% CI: 2.97-14.20) and positive for H. pylori infection. IL-8-251 and MIF-173 gene polymorphisms are significantly associated with the risk of SCAG and IM in a population with a high risk

  9. 3D culture increases pluripotent gene expression in mesenchymal stem cells through relaxation of cytoskeleton tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Chen, Haiyan; Li, Hong; Wu, Yaojiong

    2017-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture has been shown to improve pluripotent gene expression in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), but the underlining mechanisms were poorly understood. Here, we found that the relaxation of cytoskeleton tension of MSCs in 3D culture was critically associated with the expressional up-regulation of Nanog. Cultured in spheroids, MSCs showed decreased integrin-based cell-matrix adhesion but increased cadherin-based cell-cell interaction. Different from that in 2D culture, where MSCs exhibited branched and multiple-directed F-actin stress bundles at the cell edge and strengthened stress fibres transversing the cell body, MSCs cultured in spheroids showed compact cell body, relaxed cytoskeleton tension with very thin cortical actin filament outlining the cell, and increased expression of Nanog along with reduced levels of Suv39h1 (H3K9 methyltransferase) and H3K9me3. Notably, pharmaceutical inhibition of actin polymerization with cytochalasin D or silencing Suv39h1 expression with siRNA in 2D-cultured MSCs elevated the expression of Nanog via H3K9 demethylation. Thus, our data suggest that 3D culture increases the expression of Nanog through the relaxation of actin cytoskeleton, which mediates reduced Suv39h1 and H3K9me3 levels. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  10. Enhanced generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from a subpopulation of human fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A Byrne

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs provides new possibilities for basic research and novel cell-based therapies. Limitations, however, include our current lack of understanding regarding the underlying mechanisms and the inefficiency of reprogramming. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we report identification and isolation of a subpopulation of human dermal fibroblasts that express the pluripotency marker stage specific embryonic antigen 3 (SSEA3. Fibroblasts that expressed SSEA3 demonstrated an enhanced iPSC generation efficiency, while no iPSC derivation was obtained from the fibroblasts that did not express SSEA3. Transcriptional analysis revealed NANOG expression was significantly increased in the SSEA3 expressing fibroblasts, suggesting a possible mechanistic explanation for the differential reprogramming. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: To our knowledge, this study is the first to identify a pluripotency marker in a heterogeneous population of human dermal fibroblasts, to isolate a subpopulation of cells that have a significantly increased propensity to reprogram to pluripotency and to identify a possible mechanism to explain this differential reprogramming. This discovery provides a method to significantly increase the efficiency of reprogramming, enhancing the feasibility of the potential applications based on this technology, and a tool for basic research studies to understand the underlying reprogramming mechanisms.

  11. The Ser311Cys variation in the paraoxonase 2 gene increases the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T2DM (type 2 diabetes mellitus) susceptibility genes associ- ated with glucose absorption were mapped to chromosome. 7q21-22 where paraoxonase gene family is located (Proc- hazka et al. 1995) by molecular marker linkage analyses in. Pima Indians raising the possibility of paraoxonase genes as potential candidates ...

  12. Fabp1 gene ablation inhibits high-fat diet-induced increase in brain endocannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gregory G; Landrock, Danilo; Chung, Sarah; Dangott, Lawrence J; Seeger, Drew R; Murphy, Eric J; Golovko, Mikhail Y; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2017-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system shifts energy balance toward storage and fat accumulation, especially in the context of diet-induced obesity. Relatively little is known about factors outside the central nervous system that may mediate the effect of high-fat diet (HFD) on brain endocannabinoid levels. One candidate is the liver fatty acid binding protein (FABP1), a cytosolic protein highly prevalent in liver, but not detected in brain, which facilitates hepatic clearance of fatty acids. The impact of Fabp1 gene ablation (LKO) on the effect of high-fat diet (HFD) on brain and plasma endocannabinoid levels was examined and data expressed for each parameter as the ratio of high-fat diet/control diet. In male wild-type mice, HFD markedly increased brain N-acylethanolamides, but not 2-monoacylglycerols. LKO blocked these effects of HFD in male mice. In female wild-type mice, HFD slightly decreased or did not alter these endocannabinoids as compared with male wild type. LKO did not block the HFD effects in female mice. The HFD-induced increase in brain arachidonic acid-derived arachidonoylethanolamide in males correlated with increased brain-free and total arachidonic acid. The ability of LKO to block the HFD-induced increase in brain arachidonoylethanolamide correlated with reduced ability of HFD to increase brain-free and total arachidonic acid in males. In females, brain-free and total arachidonic acid levels were much less affected by either HFD or LKO in the context of HFD. These data showed that LKO markedly diminished the impact of HFD on brain endocannabinoid levels, especially in male mice. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  13. Characterization of a migrative subpopulation of adult human nasoseptal chondrocytes with progenitor cell features and their potential for in vivo cartilage regeneration strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaesser, A F; Schwarz, S; Joos, H; Koerber, L; Brenner, R E; Rotter, N

    2016-01-01

    Progenitor cells display interesting features for tissue repair and reconstruction. In the last years, such cells have been identified in different cartilage types. In this study, we isolated a migrative subpopulation of adult human nasoseptal chondrocytes with progenitor cell features by outgrowth from human nasal septum cartilage. These putative progenitor cells were comparatively characterized with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and human nasal septum chondrocytes with respect to their cellular characteristics as well as surface marker profile using flow cytometric analyses. Differentiation capacity was evaluated on protein and gene expression levels. The migrative subpopulation differentiated into osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages with distinct differences to chondrocytes and MSC. Cells of the migrative subpopulation showed an intermediate surface marker profile positioned between MSC and chondrocytes. Significant differences were found for CD9, CD29, CD44, CD90, CD105 and CD106. The cells possessed a high migratory ability in a Boyden chamber assay and responded to chemotactic stimulation. To evaluate their potential use in tissue engineering applications, a decellularized septal cartilage matrix was either seeded with cells from the migrative subpopulation or chondrocytes. Matrix production was demonstrated immunohistochemically and verified on gene expression level. Along with secretion of matrix metalloproteinases, cells of the migrative subpopulation migrated faster into the collagen matrix than chondrocytes, while synthesis of cartilage specific matrix was comparable. Cells of the migrative subpopulation, due to their migratory characteristics, are a potential cell source for in vivo regeneration of nasal cartilage. The in vivo mobilization of nasal cartilage progenitor cells is envisioned to be the basis for in situ tissue engineering procedures, aiming at the use of unseeded biomaterials which are able to recruit local progenitor cells for cartilage

  14. Genomic epidemiology of Lineage 4 Mycobacterium tuberculosis subpopulations in New York City and New Jersey, 1999-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Tyler S; Narechania, Apurva; Walker, John R; Planet, Paul J; Bifani, Pablo J; Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Mathema, Barun

    2016-11-21

    Whole genome sequencing (WGS) has rapidly become an important research tool in tuberculosis epidemiology and is likely to replace many existing methods in public health microbiology in the near future. WGS-based methods may be particularly useful in areas with less diverse Mycobacterium tuberculosis populations, such as New York City, where conventional genotyping is often uninformative and field epidemiology often difficult. This study applies four candidate strategies for WGS-based identification of emerging M. tuberculosis subpopulations, employing both phylogenomic and population genetics methods. M. tuberculosis subpopulations in New York City and New Jersey can be distinguished via phylogenomic reconstruction, evidence of demographic expansion and subpopulation-specific signatures of selection, and by determination of subgroup-defining nucleotide substitutions. These methods identified known historical outbreak clusters and previously unidentified subpopulations within relatively monomorphic M. tuberculosis endemic clone groups. Neutrality statistics based on the site frequency spectrum were less useful for identifying M. tuberculosis subpopulations, likely due to the low levels of informative genetic variation in recently diverged isolate groups. In addition, we observed that isolates from New York City endemic clone groups have acquired multiple non-synonymous SNPs in virulence- and growth-associated pathways, and relatively few mutations in drug resistance-associated genes, suggesting that overall pathoadaptive fitness, rather than the acquisition of drug resistance mutations, has played a central role in the evolutionary history and epidemiology of M. tuberculosis subpopulations in New York City. Our results demonstrate that some but not all WGS-based methods are useful for detection of emerging M. tuberculosis clone groups, and support the use of phylogenomic reconstruction in routine tuberculosis laboratory surveillance, particularly in areas with

  15. Percutaneous intracoronary delivery of SERCA gene increases myocardial function: a tissue Doppler imaging echocardiographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logeart, Damien; Vinet, Laurent; Ragot, Thierry; Heimburger, Michèle; Louedec, Liliane; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Escoubet, Brigitte; Mercadier, Jean-Jacques

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the efficiency of adenovirus-mediated overexpression of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA1a) gene in a realistic model based on percutaneous intracoronary delivery and on noninvasive functional monitoring. Catheter-based selective coronary delivery of saline or adenoviruses (Ad.CMV.SERCA1a or Ad.CMV.lacZ, 10(10) plaque-forming units) was performed in the circumflex artery of rabbits. Effects were assessed and compared by using serial Doppler echocardiography, hemodynamics, and measurements of SERCA protein and Ca(2+) uptake activity. On day 3, a 21% increase in SERCA proteins and a 37% increase in the maximal rate of Ca(2+) uptake were observed in the transfected left ventricular (LV) walls of Ad.CMV.SERCA1a rabbits. Baseline hemodynamics and conventional echographic measurements of global LV function were poorly affected. In contrast, tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) was able to assess a strong increase in the baseline function of transfected LV walls, as assessed with maximal wall velocities (+32% and +43%, respectively) and strain rates (+18% and +30%, respectively). TDI parameters were closely related to the maximal rate of Ca(2+) uptake (r(2) = 0.68 for the systolic strain rate). Serial TDI analysis during follow-up showed that the effects lasted for 7 days and were no longer detectable 15 days after adenoviruses injection. In conclusion, LV function can be increased by adenovirus-mediated overexpression of SERCA in a clinically relevant model, and TDI provides an accurate and noninvasive tool for monitoring effects on global as well as regional myocardial function.

  16. In vitro lymphocyte-differentiating effects of thymulin (Zn-FTS) on lymphocyte subpopulations of severely malnourished children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, G; Chevalier, P; Zalles, L; Sevilla, R; Bustos, M; Dhenin, J M; Jambon, B

    1994-08-01

    This work investigates how thymic dysfunction contributes to the depression of cell-mediated immunity in protein-energy malnutrition (PEM). In Bolivian children hospitalized for severe PEM, the size of the thymus was measured by echography, and the lymphocyte subpopulations were detected by using monoclonal antibodies. These data were compared with those obtained from healthy control subjects. Regardless of the clinical form of PEM, our results show a high degree of T lymphocyte immaturity in severely malnourished children, which correlates with a severe involution of the thymus. Before in vitro incubation with thymulin, this significant increase in the percentage of circulating immature T lymphocytes was concomitant with a decrease in mature T lymphocytes and a slight increase in cytotoxic T subpopulations. After in vitro incubation with thymulin, immature T lymphocytes decreased and mature T lymphocytes increased.

  17. Increased isobutanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by overexpression of genes in valine metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao; Nielsen, Kristian F; Borodina, Irina; Kielland-Brandt, Morten C; Karhumaa, Kaisa

    2011-07-28

    Isobutanol can be a better biofuel than ethanol due to its higher energy density and lower hygroscopicity. Furthermore, the branched-chain structure of isobutanol gives a higher octane number than the isomeric n-butanol. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was chosen as the production host because of its relative tolerance to alcohols, robustness in industrial fermentations, and the possibility for future combination of isobutanol production with fermentation of lignocellulosic materials. The yield of isobutanol was improved from 0.16 to 0.97 mg per g glucose by simultaneous overexpression of biosynthetic genes ILV2, ILV3, and ILV5 in valine metabolism in anaerobic fermentation of glucose in mineral medium in S. cerevisiae. Isobutanol yield was further improved by twofold by the additional overexpression of BAT2, encoding the cytoplasmic branched-chain amino-acid aminotransferase. Overexpression of ILV6, encoding the regulatory subunit of Ilv2, in the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain decreased isobutanol production yield by threefold. In aerobic cultivations in shake flasks in mineral medium, the isobutanol yield of the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain and the reference strain were 3.86 and 0.28 mg per g glucose, respectively. They increased to 4.12 and 2.4 mg per g glucose in yeast extract/peptone/dextrose (YPD) complex medium under aerobic conditions, respectively. Overexpression of genes ILV2, ILV3, ILV5, and BAT2 in valine metabolism led to an increase in isobutanol production in S. cerevisiae. Additional overexpression of ILV6 in the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain had a negative effect, presumably by increasing the sensitivity of Ilv2 to valine inhibition, thus weakening the positive impact of overexpression of ILV2, ILV3, and ILV5 on isobutanol production. Aerobic cultivations of the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain and the reference strain showed that supplying amino acids in cultivation media gave a substantial improvement in isobutanol production

  18. Increased isobutanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by overexpression of genes in valine metabolism

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    Karhumaa Kaisa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Isobutanol can be a better biofuel than ethanol due to its higher energy density and lower hygroscopicity. Furthermore, the branched-chain structure of isobutanol gives a higher octane number than the isomeric n-butanol. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was chosen as the production host because of its relative tolerance to alcohols, robustness in industrial fermentations, and the possibility for future combination of isobutanol production with fermentation of lignocellulosic materials. Results The yield of isobutanol was improved from 0.16 to 0.97 mg per g glucose by simultaneous overexpression of biosynthetic genes ILV2, ILV3, and ILV5 in valine metabolism in anaerobic fermentation of glucose in mineral medium in S. cerevisiae. Isobutanol yield was further improved by twofold by the additional overexpression of BAT2, encoding the cytoplasmic branched-chain amino-acid aminotransferase. Overexpression of ILV6, encoding the regulatory subunit of Ilv2, in the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain decreased isobutanol production yield by threefold. In aerobic cultivations in shake flasks in mineral medium, the isobutanol yield of the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain and the reference strain were 3.86 and 0.28 mg per g glucose, respectively. They increased to 4.12 and 2.4 mg per g glucose in yeast extract/peptone/dextrose (YPD complex medium under aerobic conditions, respectively. Conclusions Overexpression of genes ILV2, ILV3, ILV5, and BAT2 in valine metabolism led to an increase in isobutanol production in S. cerevisiae. Additional overexpression of ILV6 in the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain had a negative effect, presumably by increasing the sensitivity of Ilv2 to valine inhibition, thus weakening the positive impact of overexpression of ILV2, ILV3, and ILV5 on isobutanol production. Aerobic cultivations of the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain and the reference strain showed that supplying amino acids in cultivation media

  19. How aluminum adjuvants could promote and enhance non-target IgE synthesis in a genetically-vulnerable sub-population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terhune, Todd D; Deth, Richard C

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum-containing adjuvants increase the effectiveness of vaccination, but their ability to augment immune responsiveness also carries the risk of eliciting non-target responses, especially in genetically susceptible individuals. This study reviews the relevant actions of aluminum adjuvants and sources of genetic risk that can combine to adversely affect a vulnerable sub-population. Aluminum adjuvants promote oxidative stress and increase inflammasome activity, leading to the release of IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-33, but not the important regulatory cytokine IL-12. In addition, they stimulate macrophages to produce PGE₂, which also has a role in regulating immune responses. This aluminum-induced cytokine context leads to a T(H)2 immune response, characterized by the further release of IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-9, IL-13, and IgE-potentiating factors such as sCD23. Genetic variants in cytokine genes, such as IL-4, IL-13, IL-33, and IL-18 influence the response to vaccines in children and are also associated with atopy. These genetic factors may therefore define a genetically-vulnerable sub-population, children with a family history of atopy, who may experience an exaggerated T(H)2 immune response to aluminum-containing vaccines. IL-4, sCD23, and IgE are common factors for both atopy and the immune-stimulating properties of aluminum adjuvants. IL-4 is critical in the production of IgE and total IgE up-regulation. IL-4 has also been reported to induce the production of sCD23 and trigger resting sIgM+, sIgD+ B-cells to switch to sIgE+ B-cells, making them targets for IgE-potentiating factors. Further, the actions of IgE-potentiating factors on sIgE+ B-cells are polyclonal and unrestricted, triggering their differentiation into IgE-forming plasma cells. These actions provide a mechanism for aluminum-adjuvant promotion and enhancement of non-target IgE in a genetically vulnerable sub-population. Identification of these individuals may decrease the risk of adverse events

  20. The Increasing Complexity of the Oncofetal H19 Gene Locus: Functional Dissection and Therapeutic Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Hochberg

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The field of the long non-coding RNA (lncRNA is advancing rapidly. Currently, it is one of the most popular fields in the biological and medical sciences. It is becoming increasingly obvious that the majority of the human transcriptome has little or no-protein coding capacity. Historically, H19 was the first imprinted non-coding RNA (ncRNA transcript identified, and the H19/IGF2 locus has served as a paradigm for the study of genomic imprinting since its discovery. In recent years, we have extensively investigated the expression of the H19 gene in a number of human cancers and explored the role of H19 RNA in tumor development. Here, we discuss recently published data from our group and others that provide further support for a central role of H19 RNA in the process of tumorigenesis. Furthermore, we focus on major transcriptional modulators of the H19 gene and discuss them in the context of the tumor-promoting activity of the H19 RNA. Based on the pivotal role of the H19 gene in human cancers, we have developed a DNA-based therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancers that have upregulated levels of H19 expression. This approach uses a diphtheria toxin A (DTA protein expressed under the regulation of the H19 promoter to treat tumors with significant expression of H19 RNA. In this review, we discuss the treatment of four cancer indications in human subjects using this approach, which is currently under development. This represents perhaps one of the very few examples of an existing DNA-based therapy centered on an lncRNA system. Apart from cancer, H19 expression has been reported also in other conditions, syndromes and diseases, where deregulated imprinting at the H19 locus was obvious in some cases and will be summarized below. Moreover, the H19 locus proved to be much more complicated than initially thought. It houses a genomic sequence that can transcribe, yielding various transcriptional outputs, both in sense and antisense directions. The

  1. Significantly increased risk of carotid atherosclerosis with arsenic exposure and polymorphisms in arsenic metabolism genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Yi-Chen [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wusing St., Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Lien, Li-Ming [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Neurology, Shin Kong WHS Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chung, Wen-Ting [Department of Neurology, Wanfang Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Fang-I; Hsieh, Pei-Fan [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wusing St., Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Wu, Meei-Maan [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wusing St., Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Basic Medicine, College of Medicine, Fu-Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tseng, Hung-Pin [Department of Neurology, Lotung Poh-Ai Hospital, I-Lan, Taiwan (China); Chiou, Hung-Yi, E-mail: hychiou@tmu.edu.tw [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wusing St., Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chien-Jen [Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2011-08-15

    Individual susceptibility to arsenic-induced carotid atherosclerosis might be associated with genetic variations in arsenic metabolism. The purpose of this study is to explore the interaction effect on risk of carotid atherosclerosis between arsenic exposure and risk genotypes of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP), arsenic (+3) methyltransferase (As3MT), and glutathione S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1) and omega 2 (GSTO2). A community-based case-control study was conducted in northeastern Taiwan to investigate the arsenic metabolic-related genetic susceptibility to carotid atherosclerosis. In total, 863 subjects, who had been genotyped and for whom the severity of carotid atherosclerosis had been determined, were included in the present study. Individual well water was collected and arsenic concentration determined using hydride generation combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The result showed that a significant dose-response trend (P=0.04) of carotid atherosclerosis risk associated with increasing arsenic concentration. Non-significant association between genetic polymorphisms of PNP Gly51Ser, Pro57Pro, As3MT Met287Thr, GSTO1 Ala140Asp, and GSTO2 A-183G and the risk for development of carotid atherosclerosis were observed. However, the significant interaction effect on carotid atherosclerosis risk was found for arsenic exposure (>50 {mu}g/l) and the haplotypes of PNP (p=0.0115). A marked elevated risk of carotid atherosclerosis was observed in subjects with arsenic exposure of >50 {mu}g/l in drinking water and those who carried the PNP A-T haplotype and at least either of the As3MT risk polymorphism or GSTO risk haplotypes (OR, 6.43; 95% CI, 1.79-23.19). In conclusion, arsenic metabolic genes, PNP, As3MT, and GSTO, may exacerbate the formation of atherosclerosis in individuals with high levels of arsenic concentration in well water (>50 {mu}g/l). - Highlights: {yields}Arsenic metabolic genes might be associated with carotid atherosclerosis. {yields

  2. Increased anxiety and impaired pain response in puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase gene-deficient mice obtained by a mouse gene-trap method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, T; Ikegami, S; Takiguchi-Hayashi, K; Yamazaki, Y; Katoh-Fukui, Y; Higashinakagawa, T; Sakaki, Y; Takeuchi, T

    1999-07-15

    A mouse mutation, termed goku, was generated by a gene-trap strategy. goku homozygous mice showed dwarfism, a marked increase in anxiety, and an analgesic effect. Molecular analysis indicated that the mutated gene encodes a puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase (Psa; EC 3. 4.11.14), whose functions in vivo are unknown. Transcriptional arrest of the Psa gene and a drastic decrease of aminopeptidase activity indicated that the function of Psa is disrupted in homozygous mice. Together with the finding that the Psa gene is strongly expressed in the brain, especially in the striatum and hippocampus, these results suggest that the Psa gene is required for normal growth and the behavior associated with anxiety and pain.

  3. Haplotypes in BMP4 and FGF Genes Increase the Risk of Peri-Implantitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Renata Barboza; Gonçalves, Roberto; Villas-Boas, Ricardo de Mello; Bonato, Leticia Ladeira; Quinelato, Valquiria; Pinheiro, Aristides da Rosa; Machado, Aldir; Nunes, Carlos Henrique Ramirez; Gonçalves, Rackel; Vieira, Alexandre Resende; Granjeiro, José Mauro; Casado, Priscila Ladeira

    2016-01-01

    Despite the success of osseointegrated implants, failures have increased significantly, associated with development of peri-implantitis. Multiple factors influence the peri-implant bone loss, including environmental and genetic causes. BMPs (Bone morphogenetic proteins) are growth factors that induce bone formation. FGF (fibroblast growth factors) and their receptors (FGFRs) play important roles by controlling the levels of cell proliferation, differentiation and migration. BMP/FGF relationship is responsible for promoting bone regeneration and bone loss. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between BMP4, FGF3, FGF10 and FGFR1 genes and peri-implant bone loss. Two hundred and fifteen volunteers, with 754 dental implants, were submitted to oral examination and divided in healthy group (n=129) and peri-implantitis group (n=86). Thirteen polymorphisms in BMP4, FGF3, FGF10 and FGFR1 genes were analyzed individually and in haplotype. The chi-square test correlated genotypes, allelic and haplotype frequencies. Values of pimplantitis demonstrated high incidence of total edentulism (pimplant phenotype (pimplant mobility was observed in peri-implantitis group (pimplant (p=0.01). FGF3 rs4631909 (TT+CT genotype) also showed association with the control group (p=0.04). The frequency of C allele for FGF3 rs4631909 showed a tendency for association with peri-implantitis (p=0.08). FGF10 CCTG (p=0.03), BMP4 GAAA (p=0.05) and GGGA (p=0.02) haplotypes were associated with peri-implantitis (p=0.03). Therefore, it may be concluded that BMP4 and FGF10 haplotypes are associated with peri-implantitis.

  4. Gene Deletions Resulting in Increased Nitrogen Release by Azotobacter vinelandii: Application of a Novel Nitrogen Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhart, Lauren J.; Ohlert, Janet M.; Knutson, Carolann M.; Plunkett, Mary H.

    2015-01-01

    Azotobacter vinelandii is a widely studied model diazotrophic (nitrogen-fixing) bacterium and also an obligate aerobe, differentiating it from many other diazotrophs that require environments low in oxygen for the function of the nitrogenase. As a free-living bacterium, A. vinelandii has evolved enzymes and transporters to minimize the loss of fixed nitrogen to the surrounding environment. In this study, we pursued efforts to target specific enzymes and further developed screens to identify individual colonies of A. vinelandii producing elevated levels of extracellular nitrogen. Targeted deletions were done to convert urea into a terminal product by disrupting the urease genes that influence the ability of A. vinelandii to recycle the urea nitrogen within the cell. Construction of a nitrogen biosensor strain was done to rapidly screen several thousand colonies disrupted by transposon insertional mutagenesis to identify strains with increased extracellular nitrogen production. Several disruptions were identified in the ammonium transporter gene amtB that resulted in the production of sufficient levels of extracellular nitrogen to support the growth of the biosensor strain. Further studies substituting the biosensor strain with the green alga Chlorella sorokiniana confirmed that levels of nitrogen produced were sufficient to support the growth of this organism when the medium was supplemented with sufficient sucrose to support the growth of the A. vinelandii in coculture. The nature and quantities of nitrogen released by urease and amtB disruptions were further compared to strains reported in previous efforts that altered the nifLA regulatory system to produce elevated levels of ammonium. These results reveal alternative approaches that can be used in various combinations to yield new strains that might have further application in biofertilizer schemes. PMID:25888177

  5. Increased leukemia-associated gene expression in benzene-exposed workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Keqiu; Jing, Yaqing; Yang, Caihong; Liu, Shasha; Zhao, Yuxia; He, Xiaobo; Li, Fei; Han, Jiayi; Li, Guang

    2014-01-01

    Long-term exposure to benzene causes several adverse health effects, including an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia. This study was to identify genetic alternations involved in pathogenesis of leukemia in benzene-exposed workers without clinical symptoms of leukemia. This study included 33 shoe-factory workers exposed to benzene at levels from 1 ppm to 10 ppm. These workers were divided into 3 groups based on the benzene exposure time, 1- benzene exposure history were recruited as controls. Cytogenetic analysis using Affymetrix Cytogenetics Array found copy-number variations (CNVs) in several chromosomes of benzene-exposed workers. Expression of targeted genes in these altered chromosomes, NOTCH1 and BSG, which play roles in leukemia pathogenesis, was further examined using real-time PCR. The NOTCH1 mRNA level was significantly increased in all 3 groups of workers, and the NOTCH1 mRNA level in the 12- benzene-exposed workers. PMID:24993241

  6. Increased spinal prodynorphin gene expression in reinflammation-associated hyperalgesia after neonatal inflammatory insult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Yeong-Ray

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroplasticity induced by neonatal inflammation is the consequence of a combination of activity-dependent changes in neurons. We investigated neuronal sensitivity to a noxious stimulus in a rat model of neonatal hind-paw peripheral inflammation and assessed changes in pain behaviour at the physiological and molecular levels after peripheral reinflammation in adulthood. Results A decrease in paw withdrawal latency (PWL after a heat stimulus was documented in rats that received inflammatory injections in their left hind paws on postnatal day one (P1 and a reinflammation stimulus at postnatal 6-8 weeks of age, compared with normal rats. An increase in the expression of the prodynorphin (proDYN gene was noted after reinflammation in the spinal cord ipsilateral to the afferents of the neonatally treated hind paw. The involvement of the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK in peripheral inflammatory pain hypersensitivity was evidenced evident by the increase in phospho-ERK (pERK activity after reinflammation. Conclusions Our results indicate that peripheral inflammation in neonates can permanently alter the pain processing pathway during the subsequent sensory stimulation of the region. Elucidation of the mechanism underlying the developing pain circuitry will provide new insights into the understanding of the early pain behaviours and the subsequent adaptation to pain.

  7. Increased locomotor and thermogenic activity in mice with targeted ablation of the GHRH gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Sheila; Chiavaroli, Annalisa; Shohreh, Rugia; Ferrante, Claudio; Ricciuti, Adriana; Manippa, Fabio; Recinella, Lucia; Di Nisio, Chiara; Orlando, Giustino; Salvatori, Roberto; Vacca, Michele; Brunetti, Luigi

    2015-04-01

    Growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD) leads to growth failure and changes in body composition, including increased fat accumulation and reduced lean body mass in both humans and rodents. The aim of this study was to examine the factors that contribute to energy imbalance in the GH releasing hormone knock out (GHRHKO) mice, a well established model of GHD. We evaluated food intake (of standard laboratory chow), total body weight (TBW), locomotor activity, body temperature and interscapular brown adipose tissue (BAT) weight in 8 adult male mice homozygous for the GHRHKO allele (-/-) and 8 heterozygous (+/-) animals as controls. The gene expression of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP-1) in BAT and the levels of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) in the ventral striatum were measured by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis, respectively. Throughout 2 months of observation -/- mice consumed approximately 40% more food (normalized to TBW; Pfood intake observed in GHRH ablated animals is associated with increased locomotor and thermogenic activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Multidrug Resistance 1 Gene Variants, Pesticide Exposure, and Increased Risk of DNA Damage

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    Chun-Chieh Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The P-glycoprotein, encoded by the multidrug resistance (MDR1 gene, extrudes fat-soluble compounds to the extracellular environment. However, the DNA damage of pesticides in subjects with genetic variation in MDR1 has not been investigated. In this study, the comet assay was applied to examine the extent of DNA damage in the peripheral blood of 195 fruit growers who had been exposed to pesticides and 141 unexposed controls. The MDR1 polymorphisms were identified. Questionnaires were administered to obtain demographic data and occupational history. Results showed subjects experiencing high (2.14 μm/cell, P<0.01 or low pesticide exposure (2.18 μm/cell, P<0.01 had a significantly greater DNA tail moment than controls (1.28 μm/cell. Compared to the MDR1 T-129C (rs3213619 TC/CC carriers, the TT carriers had increased DNA tail moment in controls (1.30 versus 1.12 μm/cell, P<0.01. Similar results were observed in the high and low pesticide-exposed groups. Combined analysis revealed that pesticide-exposed fruit growers with MDR1 -129 TT genotype had the greatest DNA damage in the subjects with the combinations of pesticide exposure and MDR1 -129 genotypes. In conclusion, pesticide exposed individuals with susceptible MDR1 -129 genotypes may experience increased risk of DNA damage.

  9. Genome-wide association mapping revealed a diverse genetic basis of seed dormancy across subpopulations in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magwa, Risper Auma; Zhao, Hu; Xing, Yongzhong

    2016-01-25

    Seed dormancy is an adaptive trait employed by flowering plants to avoid harsh environmental conditions for the continuity of their next generations. In cereal crops, moderate seed dormancy could help prevent pre-harvest sprouting and improve grain yield and quality. We performed a genome wide association study (GWAS) for dormancy, based on seed germination percentage (GP) in freshly harvested seeds (FHS) and after-ripened seeds (ARS) in 350 worldwide accessions that were characterized with strong population structure of indica, japonica and Aus subpopulations. The germination tests revealed that Aus and indica rice had stronger seed dormancy than japonica rice in FHS. Association analysis revealed 16 loci significantly associated with GP in FHS and 38 in ARS. Three out of the 38 loci detected in ARS were also detected in FHS and 13 of the ARS loci were detected near previously mapped dormancy QTL. In FHS, three of the association loci were located within 100 kb around previously cloned GA/IAA inactivation genes such as GA2ox3, EUI1 and GH3-2 and one near dormancy gene, Sdr4. In ARS, an association signal was detected near ABA signaling gene ABI5. No association peaks were commonly detected among the sub-populations in FHS and only one association peak was detected in both indica and japonica populations in ARS. Sdr4 and GA2OX3 haplotype analysis showed that Aus and indica II (IndII) varieties had stronger dormancy alleles whereas indica I (IndI) and japonica had weak or non-dormancy alleles. The association study and haplotype analysis together, indicate an involvement of independent genes and alleles contributing towards regulation and natural variation of seed dormancy among the rice sub-populations.

  10. CD133+ subpopulation of the HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cell line exhibits cancer stem-like characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Bao-Hua; Liu, Ai-Guo; Gu, Wen-Guang; Deng, Liang; Cheng, Xian-Gyang; Tong, Tie-Jun; Zhang, Hong-Zhi

    2013-08-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) theory holds that a minority population within tumors possesses stem cell properties of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation capacity and provides the initiating cells from which tumors are derived and sustained. However, verifying the existence of these CSCs has been a significant challenge. The CD133 antigen is a pentaspan membrane glycoprotein proposed to be a CSC marker for cancer-initiating subpopulations in the brain, colon and various other tissues. Here, CD133+ cells were obtained and characterized from the HT1080 cell line to determine the utility of this marker for isolating CSCs from human fibrosarcoma cells. In this study, CD133+ cells were separated from HT1080 cells using magnetic beads and characterized for their proliferation rate and resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, cisplatin and doxorubicin, by MTS assay. Relative expression of tumor-associated genes Sox2, Oct3/4, Nanog, c-Myc, Bmi-1 and ABCG2 was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Clonal sphere formation and the ability of CD133+ cells to initiate tumors in BALB/c nude mice was also evaluated. We found that CD133+ cells showed a high proliferation rate, increased resistance to chemotherapy drugs and overexpression of tumor-associated genes compared with these features in CD133- cells. Additionally, CD133+ cells were able to form spherical clusters in serum-free medium with high clonogenic efficiency, indicating a significantly greater tumor-initiating potential when compared with CD133- cells. These findings indicate that CD133+ cells identified within the HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cell line possess many CSC properties and may facilitate the development of improved therapies for fibrosarcoma.

  11. Emergent patterns in interacting neuronal sub-populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Neeraj Kumar; Sinha, Sudeshna

    2015-05-01

    We investigate an ensemble of coupled model neurons, consisting of groups of varying sizes and intrinsic dynamics, ranging from periodic to chaotic, where the inter-group coupling interaction is effectively like a dynamic signal from a different sub-population. We observe that the minority group can significantly influence the majority group. For instance, when a small chaotic group is coupled to a large periodic group, the chaotic group de-synchronizes. However, counter-intuitively, when a small periodic group couples strongly to a large chaotic group, it leads to complete synchronization in the majority chaotic population, which also spikes at the frequency of the small periodic group. It then appears that the small group of periodic neurons can act like a pacemaker for the whole network. Further, we report the existence of varied clustering patterns, ranging from sets of synchronized clusters to anti-phase clusters, governed by the interplay of the relative sizes and dynamics of the sub-populations. So these results have relevance in understanding how a group can influence the synchrony of another group of dynamically different elements, reminiscent of event-related synchronization/de-synchronization in complex networks.

  12. Emergence of bursting activity in connected neuronal sub-populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Bisio

    Full Text Available Uniform and modular primary hippocampal cultures from embryonic rats were grown on commercially available micro-electrode arrays to investigate network activity with respect to development and integration of different neuronal populations. Modular networks consisting of two confined active and inter-connected sub-populations of neurons were realized by means of bi-compartmental polydimethylsiloxane structures. Spontaneous activity in both uniform and modular cultures was periodically monitored, from three up to eight weeks after plating. Compared to uniform cultures and despite lower cellular density, modular networks interestingly showed higher firing rates at earlier developmental stages, and network-wide firing and bursting statistics were less variable over time. Although globally less correlated than uniform cultures, modular networks exhibited also higher intra-cluster than inter-cluster correlations, thus demonstrating that segregation and integration of activity coexisted in this simple yet powerful in vitro model. Finally, the peculiar synchronized bursting activity shown by confined modular networks preferentially propagated within one of the two compartments ('dominant', even in cases of perfect balance of firing rate between the two sub-populations. This dominance was generally maintained during the entire monitored developmental frame, thus suggesting that the implementation of this hierarchy arose from early network development.

  13. Differential Gene Expression Analysis of Placentas with Increased Vascular Resistance and Pre-Eclampsia Using Whole-Genome Microarrays

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    M. Centlow

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-eclampsia is a pregnancy complication characterized by hypertension and proteinuria. There are several factors associated with an increased risk of developing pre-eclampsia, one of which is increased uterine artery resistance, referred to as “notching”. However, some women do not progress into pre-eclampsia whereas others may have a higher risk of doing so. The placenta, central in pre-eclampsia pathology, may express genes associated with either protection or progression into pre-eclampsia. In order to search for genes associated with protection or progression, whole-genome profiling was performed. Placental tissue from 15 controls, 10 pre-eclamptic, 5 pre-eclampsia with notching, and 5 with notching only were analyzed using microarray and antibody microarrays to study some of the same gene product and functionally related ones. The microarray showed 148 genes to be significantly altered between the four groups. In the preeclamptic group compared to notch only, there was increased expression of genes related to chemotaxis and the NF-kappa B pathway and decreased expression of genes related to antigen processing and presentation, such as human leukocyte antigen B. Our results indicate that progression of pre-eclampsia from notching may involve the development of inflammation. Increased expression of antigen-presenting genes, as seen in the notch-only placenta, may prevent this inflammatory response and, thereby, protect the patient from developing pre-eclampsia.

  14. Bionomics of Aedes aegypti subpopulations (Diptera: Culicidae) from Misiones Province, northeastern Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejerina, Edmundo Fabricio; Almeida, Francisco Felipe Ludueña; Almirón, Walter Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    Life statistics of four Aedes aegypti subpopulations from the subtropical province of Misiones were studied during autumn and winter, under semi-natural conditions, coming from the localities of Posadas (SW), San Javier (SE), Bernardo de Irigoyen (NE) and Puerto Libertad (NW). The eastern subpopulations are geographically separated by the central mountain system of the province from the western subpopulations. High percentages of larval and pupal survival (97-100%) were recorded, and no significant differences were detected among the four subpopulations. Larvae and pupae lasted approximately 8 days to complete their development, no significant differences being detected among the four subpopulations studied. Sex ratio recorded did not differ significantly from 1:1. Male longevity did not show difference among the different subpopulations, but female longevity was remarkably different among the four subpopulations (F=16.27; d.f.=(3;8); P=0.0009), ranging among 11.45 days for San Javier and 57.87 days for Posadas. Fecundity also varied considerably among subpopulations, the greatest number (307.44 eggs/female) being recorded for Posadas (F=4.13; d.f.=(3;8); P=0.04). Ae. aegypti females of the western subpopulations lived longer than the eastern subpopulations studied, therefore, the risk of dengue outbreak would be greater on the Misiones Province border with Paraguay.

  15. Graphical modeling of gene expression in monocytes suggests molecular mechanisms explaining increased atherosclerosis in smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdugo, Ricardo A; Zeller, Tanja; Rotival, Maxime; Wild, Philipp S; Münzel, Thomas; Lackner, Karl J; Weidmann, Henri; Ninio, Ewa; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Cambien, François; Blankenberg, Stefan; Tiret, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Smoking is a risk factor for atherosclerosis with reported widespread effects on gene expression in circulating blood cells. We hypothesized that a molecular signature mediating the relation between smoking and atherosclerosis may be found in the transcriptome of circulating monocytes. Genome-wide expression profiles and counts of atherosclerotic plaques in carotid arteries were collected in 248 smokers and 688 non-smokers from the general population. Patterns of co-expressed genes were identified by Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and network structure of the pattern-specific gene modules was inferred by the PC-algorithm. A likelihood-based causality test was implemented to select patterns that fit models containing a path "smoking→gene expression→plaques". Robustness of the causal inference was assessed by bootstrapping. At a FDR ≤0.10, 3,368 genes were associated to smoking or plaques, of which 93% were associated to smoking only. SASH1 showed the strongest association to smoking and PPARG the strongest association to plaques. Twenty-nine gene patterns were identified by ICA. Modules containing SASH1 and PPARG did not show evidence for the "smoking→gene expression→plaques" causality model. Conversely, three modules had good support for causal effects and exhibited a network topology consistent with gene expression mediating the relation between smoking and plaques. The network with the strongest support for causal effects was connected to plaques through SLC39A8, a gene with known association to HDL-cholesterol and cellular uptake of cadmium from tobacco, while smoking was directly connected to GAS6, a gene reported to have anti-inflammatory effects in atherosclerosis and to be up-regulated in the placenta of women smoking during pregnancy. Our analysis of the transcriptome of monocytes recovered genes relevant for association to smoking and atherosclerosis, and connected genes that before, were only studied in separate contexts. Inspection of

  16. Meta-analysis of gene expression in the mouse liver reveals biomarkers associated with inflammation increased early during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Janice S; Ward, William O; Ren, Hongzu; Vallanat, Beena; Darlington, Gretchen J; Han, Eun-Soo; Laguna, Juan C; DeFord, James H; Papaconstantinou, John; Selman, Colin; Corton, J Christopher

    2012-07-01

    Aging is associated with a loss of cellular homeostasis, a decline in physiological function and an increase in various pathologies. Employing a meta-analysis, hepatic gene expression profiles from four independent mouse aging studies were interrogated. There was little overlap in the number of genes or canonical pathways perturbed, suggesting that independent study-specific factors may play a significant role in determining age-dependent gene expression. However, 43 genes were consistently altered during aging in three or four of these studies, including those that (1) exhibited progressively increased expression starting from 12 months of age, (2) exhibited similar expression changes in models of progeria at young ages and dampened or no changes in old longevity mouse models, (3) were associated with inflammatory tertiary lymphoid neogenesis (TLN) associated with formation of ectopic lymphoid structures observed in chronically inflamed tissues, and (4) overlapped with genes perturbed by aging in brain, muscle, and lung. Surprisingly, around half of the genes altered by aging in wild-type mice exhibited similar expression changes in adult long-lived mice compared to wild-type controls, including those associated with intermediary metabolism and feminization of the male-dependent gene expression pattern. Genes unique to aging in wild-type mice included those linked to TLN. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Increased Expression of the GLUT-1 Gene is Associated With Worse Overall Survival in Resected Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis-Yadley, Ashley H.; Abbott, Andrea M.; Pimiento, Jose M.; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Malafa, Mokenge P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives There is currently no reliable method to predict the risk of relapse after curative resection of early-stage pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Increased glucose metabolism observed on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) by malignant cells, the Warburg effect, is a well-known characteristic of the malignant phenotype. We investigated the role of glucose transporter type 1 (GLUT-1) gene expression, a glucose cell plasma membrane transporter, in early-stage pancreatic cancer. Methods Associations between GLUT-1 gene expression with PET maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) and histologic grade were investigated in early-stage pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients. Multivariate analysis was conducted to determine predictors of prognosis. Cox proportional hazards model was used for survival analysis. Results Sixty-three patients had GLUT-1 gene analysis performed, and 50 patients had both GLUT-1 analysis and PET scan. Patients with high GLUT-1 gene expression had a decreased overall survival by univariate analysis using Cox proportional hazards model (HR=2.82, p=0.001) and remained significant on multivariate analysis (HR=2.54, p=0.03). There was no correlation of GLUT-1 gene expression with histologic grade or PET SUVmax. Conclusion Increased GLUT-1 gene expression was associated with a decreased overall survival in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. This supports increased GLUT-1 gene expression as a potential prognostic marker in resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:26692443

  18. A mutation in the myostatin gene increases muscle mass and enhances racing performance in heterozygote dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana S Mosher

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Double muscling is a trait previously described in several mammalian species including cattle and sheep and is caused by mutations in the myostatin (MSTN gene (previously referred to as GDF8. Here we describe a new mutation in MSTN found in the whippet dog breed that results in a double-muscled phenotype known as the "bully" whippet. Individuals with this phenotype carry two copies of a two-base-pair deletion in the third exon of MSTN leading to a premature stop codon at amino acid 313. Individuals carrying only one copy of the mutation are, on average, more muscular than wild-type individuals (p = 7.43 x 10(-6; Kruskal-Wallis Test and are significantly faster than individuals carrying the wild-type genotype in competitive racing events (Kendall's nonparametric measure, tau = 0.3619; p approximately 0.00028. These results highlight the utility of performance-enhancing polymorphisms, marking the first time a mutation in MSTN has been quantitatively linked to increased athletic performance.

  19. Zataria multiflora increases insulin sensitivity and PPARγ gene expression in high fructose fed insulin resistant rats

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    Abbas Mohammadi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s:In insulin resistance, the insulin action in liver, muscles and adipocytes decreases and result in hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and hyperinsulinemia. In this study we evaluate the effect of Zataria multiflora extract on insulin sensitivity in high fructose fed insulin resistant rats, since this extract was shown antihyperglycemic effect in streptozotocin induced diabetes in rats.   Materials and Methods:Experimental rats were fed with high fructose diet for 6 weeks and then were treated with Z. multiflora extractor a pioglitazone solution for 2 weeks. Blood and tissue samples were collected for analysis at the end of two weeks. Blood glucose, serum level of triglyceride and cholesterol were measured by auto analyzer. Insulin and adiponectin levels were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method. Plasma free fatty acids profile was studied by gas chromatography.  Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR.γ and Glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT.4 gene expressions were assessed by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR and western blotting. Results: Animals were treated by Z. multiflora extractshowed insulin (43±11pmol/l, adiponectin (5.3±0.5 μg/ml, glucose (144±9.8 mg/dl, and triglyceride (120±10 mg/dl levels significantly improved as compare with the control group [insulin (137±34 pmol/l, adiponectin (3.9±0.15 μg/ml, glucose (187±15mg/dl, and triglycerides (217±18 mg/dl]. PPARγ protein level, also significantly increased in Zataria multiflora treated group. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the beneficial effects of Zataria multiflora extract on insulin resistance in rats fed with a high-fructose diet through at least three mechanisms including direct insulin like effect, increasing in adiponectin and of PPARγ protein expression.   

  20. A comparison between protein profiles of B cell subpopulations and mantle cell lymphoma cells

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    Lehtiö Janne

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background B-cell lymphomas are thought to reflect different stages of B-cell maturation. Based on cytogenetics and molecular markers, mantle cell lymphoma (MCL is presumed to derive predominantly from naïve, pre-germinal centre (pre-GC B lymphocytes. The aim of this study was to develop a method to investigate the similarity between MCL cells and different B-cell compartments on a protein expression level. Methods Subpopulations of B cells representing the germinal centre (GC, the pre-GC mantle zone and the post-GC marginal zone were isolated from tonsils using automated magnetic cell sorting (AutoMACS of cells based on their expression of CD27 and IgD. Protein profiling of the B cell subsets, of cell lines representing different lymphomas and of primary MCL samples was performed using top-down proteomics profiling by surface-enhanced laser detection/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS. Results Quantitative MS data of significant protein peaks (p-value Conclusion AutoMACS sorting generates sufficient purity to enable a comparison between protein profiles of B cell subpopulations and malignant B lymphocytes applying SELDI-TOF-MS. Further validation with an increased number of patient samples and identification of differentially expressed proteins would enable a search for possible treatment targets that are expressed during the early development of MCL.

  1. Raman spectroscopy of single extracellular vesicles reveals subpopulations with varying membrane content (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Zachary J.; Lee, Changwon; Rojalin, Tatu; Carney, Randy P.; Hazari, Sidhartha; Knudson, Alisha; Lam, Kit S.; Saari, Heikki; Lazaro Ibañez, Elisa; Viitala, Tapani; Laaksonen, Timo; Yliperttula, Marjo; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    Exosomes are small (~100nm) membrane bound vesicles excreted by cells as part of their normal biological processes. These extracellular vesicles are currently an area of intense research, since they were recently found to carry functional mRNA that allows transfer of proteins and other cellular instructions between cells. Exosomes have been implicated in a wide range of diseases, including cancer. Cancer cells are known to have increased exosome production, and may use those exosomes to prepare remote environments for metastasis. Therefore, there is a strong need to develop characterization methods to help understand the structure and function of these vesicles. However, current techniques, such as proteomics and genomics technologies, rely on aggregating a large amount of exosome material and reporting on chemical content that is averaged over many millions of exosomes. Here we report on the use of laser-tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) to probe individual vesicles, discovering distinct heterogeneity among exosomes both within a cell line, as well as between different cell lines. Through principal components analysis followed by hierarchical clustering, we have identified four "subpopulations" of exosomes shared across seven cell lines. The key chemical differences between these subpopulations, as determined by spectral analysis of the principal component loadings, are primarily related to membrane composition. Specifically, the differences can be ascribed to cholesterol content, cholesterol to phospholipid ratio, and surface protein expression. Thus, we have shown LTRS to be a powerful method to probe the chemical content of single extracellular vesicles.

  2. TIMP-1 gene deficiency increases tumour cell sensitivity to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Marie Louise; Würts, S.Ø.; Rømer, Maria Unni Koefoed

    2006-01-01

    this hypothesis, we have established TIMP-1 gene-deficient and TIMP-1 wild-type fibrosarcoma cells from mouse lung tissue. We have characterised these cells with regard to TIMP-1 genotype, TIMP-1 expression, malignant transformation and sensitivity to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. We show that TIMP-1 gene...

  3. TOP1 gene copy numbers are increased in cancers of the bile duct and pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Mie; Calatayud, Dan; Schultz, Nicolai Aa.

    2015-01-01

    ) poison. Top1 protein, TOP1 gene copy number and mRNA expression, respectively, have been proposed as predictive biomarkers of response to irinotecan in other cancers. Here we investigate the occurrence of TOP1 gene aberrations in cancers of the bile ducts and pancreas. Material and methods. TOP1...

  4. Embryonic Stem Cell-Like Subpopulations in Venous Malformation

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    Elysia M. S. Tan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundVenous malformation (VM consists of a network of ectatic anomalous thin-walled venous channels. A role for an activating TIE2 mutation in the development of the dilated luminal vessels in VM, and its proposed involvement of embryonic stem cells (ESCs, led us to investigate the expression of ESC markers in subcutaneous VM (SCVM and intramuscular VM (IMVM.MethodsFormalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections of SCVM from seven patients and IMVM samples from seven patients were analyzed for the expression of Nanog, pSTAT3, OCT4, SOX2, SALL4, and CD44, using 3,3′-diaminobenzidine (DAB immunohistochemical (IHC staining. All these samples did not express lymphatic marker D2-40. NanoString mRNA analysis and RT-PCR were performed on snap-frozen samples of SCVM (n = 3 and IMVM (n = 3 from the respective original cohorts of patients included in DAB IHC staining. To confirm co-expression of two proteins, immunofluorescent (IF IHC staining on two representative samples of IMVM and SCVM samples from the original cohorts of patients included for DAB IHC staining was performed.ResultsDAB IHC staining demonstrated expression of all of the above ESC markers in both SCVM and IMVM samples. IF IHC staining showed that these markers were localized to the endothelium within these lesions and that Nanog, pSTAT3, SOX2, and CD44 were also expressed by cells outside of the endothelium. NanoString mRNA analysis confirmed transcription activation of pSTAT3, OCT4, and CD44. RT-qPCR confirmed transcription activation of Nanog, SOX2, and SALL4.ConclusionOur findings support the presence of two ESC-like subpopulations, one within and one outside of the endothelium, of both SCVM and IMVM. Given that the endothelial ESC-like subpopulation expresses the more primitive marker, OCT4, it is exciting to speculate that they give rise to the non-endothelial subpopulation.

  5. Increased gene dosage of Ube3a results in autism traits and decreased glutamate synaptic transmission in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen E P; Zhou, Yu-Dong; Zhang, Guangping; Jin, Zhe; Stoppel, David C; Anderson, Matthew P

    2011-10-05

    People with autism spectrum disorder are characterized by impaired social interaction, reduced communication, and increased repetitive behaviors. The disorder has a substantial genetic component, and recent studies have revealed frequent genome copy number variations (CNVs) in some individuals. A common CNV that occurs in 1 to 3% of those with autism--maternal 15q11-13 duplication (dup15) and triplication (isodicentric extranumerary chromosome, idic15)--affects several genes that have been suggested to underlie autism behavioral traits. To test this, we tripled the dosage of one of these genes, the ubiquitin protein ligase Ube3a, which is expressed solely from the maternal allele in mature neurons, and reconstituted the three core autism traits in mice: defective social interaction, impaired communication, and increased repetitive stereotypic behavior. The penetrance of these autism traits depended on Ube3a gene copy number. In animals with increased Ube3a gene dosage, glutamatergic, but not GABAergic, synaptic transmission was suppressed as a result of reduced presynaptic release probability, synaptic glutamate concentration, and postsynaptic action potential coupling. These results suggest that Ube3a gene dosage may contribute to the autism traits of individuals with maternal 15q11-13 duplication and support the idea that increased E3A ubiquitin ligase gene dosage results in reduced excitatory synaptic transmission.

  6. Linkage of the VNTR/insulin-gene and type I diabetes mellitus: Increased gene sharing in affected sibling pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owerbach, D.; Gabbay, K.H. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States))

    1994-05-01

    Ninety-six multiplex type I diabetic families were typed at the 5' flanking region of the insulin gene by using a PCR assay that better resolves the VNTR into multiple alleles. Affected sibling pairs shared 2, 1, and 0 VNTR alleles - identical by descent - at a frequency of .47, .45, and .08, respectively, a ratio that deviated from the expected 1:2:1 ratio (P<.001). These results confirm linkage of the chromosome 11p15.5 region with type I diabetes mellitus susceptibility. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  7. Increased Transcript Complexity in Genes Associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

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    Lela Lackey

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies aim to correlate genotype with phenotype. Many common diseases including Type II diabetes, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD are complex genetic traits with hundreds of different loci that are associated with varied disease risk. Identifying common features in the genes associated with each disease remains a challenge. Furthermore, the role of post-transcriptional regulation, and in particular alternative splicing, is still poorly understood in most multigenic diseases. We therefore compiled comprehensive lists of genes associated with Type II diabetes, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and COPD in an attempt to identify common features of their corresponding mRNA transcripts within each gene set. The SERPINA1 gene is a well-recognized genetic risk factor of COPD and it produces 11 transcript variants, which is exceptional for a human gene. This led us to hypothesize that other genes associated with COPD, and complex disorders in general, are highly transcriptionally diverse. We found that COPD-associated genes have a statistically significant enrichment in transcript complexity stemming from a disproportionately high level of alternative splicing, however, Type II Diabetes, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease genes were not significantly enriched. We also identified a subset of transcriptionally complex COPD-associated genes (~40% that are differentially expressed between mild, moderate and severe COPD. Although the genes associated with other lung diseases are not extensively documented, we found preliminary data that idiopathic pulmonary disease genes, but not cystic fibrosis modulators, are also more transcriptionally complex. Interestingly, complex COPD transcripts are more often the product of alternative acceptor site usage. To verify the biological importance of these alternative transcripts, we used RNA-sequencing analyses to determine that COPD-associated genes are

  8. Increased Transcript Complexity in Genes Associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackey, Lela; McArthur, Evonne; Laederach, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies aim to correlate genotype with phenotype. Many common diseases including Type II diabetes, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) are complex genetic traits with hundreds of different loci that are associated with varied disease risk. Identifying common features in the genes associated with each disease remains a challenge. Furthermore, the role of post-transcriptional regulation, and in particular alternative splicing, is still poorly understood in most multigenic diseases. We therefore compiled comprehensive lists of genes associated with Type II diabetes, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and COPD in an attempt to identify common features of their corresponding mRNA transcripts within each gene set. The SERPINA1 gene is a well-recognized genetic risk factor of COPD and it produces 11 transcript variants, which is exceptional for a human gene. This led us to hypothesize that other genes associated with COPD, and complex disorders in general, are highly transcriptionally diverse. We found that COPD-associated genes have a statistically significant enrichment in transcript complexity stemming from a disproportionately high level of alternative splicing, however, Type II Diabetes, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease genes were not significantly enriched. We also identified a subset of transcriptionally complex COPD-associated genes (~40%) that are differentially expressed between mild, moderate and severe COPD. Although the genes associated with other lung diseases are not extensively documented, we found preliminary data that idiopathic pulmonary disease genes, but not cystic fibrosis modulators, are also more transcriptionally complex. Interestingly, complex COPD transcripts are more often the product of alternative acceptor site usage. To verify the biological importance of these alternative transcripts, we used RNA-sequencing analyses to determine that COPD-associated genes are frequently

  9. Increased Production of Fatty Acids and Triglycerides in Aspergillus oryzae by Enhancing Expressions of Fatty Acid Synthesis-Related Genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamano, Koichi; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Karagiosis, Sue A.; Culley, David E.; Deng, Shuang; Collett, James R.; Umemura, Myco; Koike, Hideaki; Baker, Scott E.; Machida, Masa

    2013-01-01

    Microbial production of fats and oils is being developedas a means of converting biomass to biofuels. Here we investigate enhancing expression of enzymes involved in the production of fatty acids and triglycerides as a means to increase production of these compounds in Aspergillusoryzae. Examination of the A.oryzaegenome demonstrates that it contains twofatty acid synthases and several other genes that are predicted to be part of this biosynthetic pathway. We enhancedthe expressionof fatty acid synthesis-related genes by replacing their promoters with thepromoter fromthe constitutively highly expressedgene tef1. We demonstrate that by simply increasing the expression of the fatty acid synthasegenes we successfullyincreasedtheproduction of fatty acids and triglyceridesby more than two fold. Enhancement of expression of the fatty acid pathway genes ATP-citrate lyase and palmitoyl-ACP thioesteraseincreasedproductivity to a lesser extent.Increasing expression ofacetyl-CoA carboxylase caused no detectable change in fatty acid levels. Increases in message level for each gene were monitored usingquantitative real-time RT-PCR. Our data demonstrates that a simple increase in the abundance of fatty acid synthase genes can increase the detectable amount of fatty acids.

  10. Improvement of lentiviral transfer vectors using cis-acting regulatory elements for increased gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, Gonçalo; Monteiro, Francisca; Burger, Christa; Alves, Paula M

    2011-09-01

    Lentiviral vectors are an important tool for gene delivery in vivo and in vitro. The success of gene transfer approaches relies on high and stable levels of gene expression. To this end, several molecular strategies have been employed to manipulate these vectors towards improving gene expression in the targeted animal cells. Low gene expression can be accepted due to the weak transcription from the majority of available mammalian promoters; however, this obstacle can be in part overcome by the insertion of cis-acting elements that enhance gene expression in various expression contexts. In this work, we created different lentiviral vectors in which several posttranscriptional regulatory elements, namely the Woodchuck hepatitis posttranscriptional regulatory element (WPRE) and different specialized poly(A) termination sequences (BGH and SV40) were used to develop vectors leading to improved transgene expression. These vectors combine the advantages of restriction enzyme/ligation-independent cloning eliminating the instability and recombinogenic problems occurring from traditional cloning methods in lentiviral expression vectors and were tested by expressing GFP and the firefly Luciferase reporter gene from different cellular promoters in different cell lines. We show that the promoter activity varies between cell lines and is affected by the lentiviral genomic context. Moreover, we show that the combination of the WPRE element with the BGH poly(A) signal significantly enhances transgene expression. The vectors herein created can be easily modified and adapted without the need for extensive recloning making them a valuable tool for viral vector development.

  11. Subpopulation structure of caribou (Rangifer tarandus L.) in arctic and subarctic Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, John A; Johnson, Deborah L; Larter, Nicholas C; Campbell, Mitch W; Derocher, Andrew E; Kelly, Allicia; Dumond, Mathieu; Allaire, Danny; Croft, Bruno

    2011-09-01

    Effective management and conservation of species, subspecies, or ecotypes require an understanding of how populations are structured in space. We used satellite-tracking locations and hierarchical and fuzzy clustering to quantify subpopulations within the behaviorally different barren-ground caribou (Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus), Dolphin and Union island caribou (R. t. groenlandicus x pearyi), and boreal (R. t. caribou) caribou ecotypes in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut, Canada. Using a novel approach, we verified that the previously recognized Cape Bathurst, Bluenose-West, Bluenose-East, Bathurst, Beverly, Qamanirjuaq, and Lorillard barren-ground subpopulations were robust and that the Queen Maude Gulf and Wager Bay barren-ground subpopulations were organized as individuals. Dolphin and Union island and boreal caribou formed one and two distinct subpopulation, respectively, and were organized as individuals. Robust subpopulations were structured by strong annual spatial affiliation among females; subpopulations organized as individuals were structured by migratory connectivity, barriers to movement, and/or habitat discontinuity. One barren-ground subpopulation used two calving grounds, and one calving ground was used by two barren-ground subpopulations, indicating that these caribou cannot be reliably assigned to subpopulations solely by calving-ground use. They should be classified by annual spatial affiliation among females. Annual-range size and path lengths varied significantly among ecotypes, including mountain woodland caribou (R. t. caribou), and reflected behavioral differences. An east-west cline in annual-range sizes and path lengths among migratory barren-ground subpopulations likely reflected differences in subpopulation size and habitat conditions and further supported the subpopulation structure identified.

  12. Boric acid increases the expression levels of human anion exchanger genes SLC4A2 and SLC4A3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbas, F; Aydin, Z

    2012-04-03

    Boron is an important micronutrient in plants and animals. The role of boron in living systems includes coordinated regulation of gene expression, growth and proliferation of higher plants and animals. There are several well-defined genes associated with boron transportation and tolerance in plants and these genes show close homology with human anion exchanger genes. Mutation of these genes also characterizes some genetic disorders. We investigated the toxic effects of boric acid on HEK293 cells and mRNA expression of anion exchanger (SLC4A1, SLC4A2 and SLC4A3) genes. Cytotoxicity of boric acid at different concentrations was tested by using the methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay. Gene expression profiles were examined using quantitative real-time PCR. In the HEK293 cells, the nontoxic upper concentration of boric acid was 250 μM; more than 500 μM caused cytotoxicity. The 250 μM boric acid concentration increased gene expression level of SLC4A2 up to 8.6-fold and SLC4A3 up to 2.6-fold, after 36-h incubation. There was no significant effect of boric acid on SLC4A1 mRNA expression levels.

  13. Chronic stress, leukocyte subpopulations, and humoral response to latent viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinnon, W.; Weisse, C.S.; Reynolds, C.P.; Bowles, C.A.; Baum, A. (Uniformed Services Univ. of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Psychological stress has been shown to affect immune system status and function, but most studies of this relationship have focused on acute stress and/or laboratory situations. The present study compared total numbers of leukocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations (determined by flow cytometry) and antibody titers to latent and nonlatent viruses among a group of chronically stressed individuals living near the damaged Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant with those of a demographically comparable control group. Urinary catecholamine and cortisol levels were also examined. Residents of the TMI area exhibited greater numbers of neutrophils, which were positively correlated with epinephrine levels. The TMI group also exhibited fewer B lymphocytes, T-suppressor/cytotoxic lymphocytes, and natural killer cells. Antibody titers to herpes simplex were significantly different across groups as well, whereas titers to nonlatent rubella virus as well as IgG and IgM levels were comparable.

  14. Aberrations in lymphocyte subpopulations and function during psychological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorian, B; Garfinkel, P; Brown, G; Shore, A; Gladman, D; Keystone, E

    1982-10-01

    Eight trainees in psychiatry taking their final oral fellowship examinations were compared with 16 controls to determine the effect of stress on their immune system. Two measures of stress were utilized to distinguish the highly stressed subjects from those minimally stressed. T cell subpopulations, B cell numbers, mitogen reactivity, natural killer cell activity, plaque forming cell responsiveness, antigen specific T suppressor cell activity, and hormone levels were studied 2 weeks before and 2 weeks after the exam. The results demonstrated transiently elevated numbers of T and B lymphocytes but impaired plaque forming cell and mitogen responsiveness in the highly stressed group prior to their exam which normalized later. The results support the concept that stress may significantly alter the immune response in man.

  15. Extensive innate immune gene activation accompanies brain aging, increasing vulnerability to cognitive decline and neurodegeneration: a microarray study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cribbs, David H; Berchtold, Nicole C; Perreau, Victoria; Coleman, Paul D; Rogers, Joseph; Tenner, Andrea J; Cotman, Carl W

    2012-07-23

    This study undertakes a systematic and comprehensive analysis of brain gene expression profiles of immune/inflammation-related genes in aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). In a well-powered microarray study of young (20 to 59 years), aged (60 to 99 years), and AD (74 to 95 years) cases, gene responses were assessed in the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, superior frontal gyrus, and post-central gyrus. Several novel concepts emerge. First, immune/inflammation-related genes showed major changes in gene expression over the course of cognitively normal aging, with the extent of gene response far greater in aging than in AD. Of the 759 immune-related probesets interrogated on the microarray, approximately 40% were significantly altered in the SFG, PCG and HC with increasing age, with the majority upregulated (64 to 86%). In contrast, far fewer immune/inflammation genes were significantly changed in the transition to AD (approximately 6% of immune-related probesets), with gene responses primarily restricted to the SFG and HC. Second, relatively few significant changes in immune/inflammation genes were detected in the EC either in aging or AD, although many genes in the EC showed similar trends in responses as in the other brain regions. Third, immune/inflammation genes undergo gender-specific patterns of response in aging and AD, with the most pronounced differences emerging in aging. Finally, there was widespread upregulation of genes reflecting activation of microglia and perivascular macrophages in the aging brain, coupled with a downregulation of select factors (TOLLIP, fractalkine) that when present curtail microglial/macrophage activation. Notably, essentially all pathways of the innate immune system were upregulated in aging, including numerous complement components, genes involved in toll-like receptor signaling and inflammasome signaling, as well as genes coding for immunoglobulin (Fc) receptors and human leukocyte antigens I and II. Unexpectedly, the extent of

  16. Extensive innate immune gene activation accompanies brain aging, increasing vulnerability to cognitive decline and neurodegeneration: a microarray study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cribbs David H

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study undertakes a systematic and comprehensive analysis of brain gene expression profiles of immune/inflammation-related genes in aging and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Methods In a well-powered microarray study of young (20 to 59 years, aged (60 to 99 years, and AD (74 to 95 years cases, gene responses were assessed in the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, superior frontal gyrus, and post-central gyrus. Results Several novel concepts emerge. First, immune/inflammation-related genes showed major changes in gene expression over the course of cognitively normal aging, with the extent of gene response far greater in aging than in AD. Of the 759 immune-related probesets interrogated on the microarray, approximately 40% were significantly altered in the SFG, PCG and HC with increasing age, with the majority upregulated (64 to 86%. In contrast, far fewer immune/inflammation genes were significantly changed in the transition to AD (approximately 6% of immune-related probesets, with gene responses primarily restricted to the SFG and HC. Second, relatively few significant changes in immune/inflammation genes were detected in the EC either in aging or AD, although many genes in the EC showed similar trends in responses as in the other brain regions. Third, immune/inflammation genes undergo gender-specific patterns of response in aging and AD, with the most pronounced differences emerging in aging. Finally, there was widespread upregulation of genes reflecting activation of microglia and perivascular macrophages in the aging brain, coupled with a downregulation of select factors (TOLLIP, fractalkine that when present curtail microglial/macrophage activation. Notably, essentially all pathways of the innate immune system were upregulated in aging, including numerous complement components, genes involved in toll-like receptor signaling and inflammasome signaling, as well as genes coding for immunoglobulin (Fc receptors and human

  17. Placental genetic variations in circadian clock-related genes increase the risk of placental abruption

    OpenAIRE

    Chunfang, Qiu; GELAYE, Bizu; Denis, Marie; Tadesse, Mahlet G.; Enquobahrie, Daniel A.; Ananth, Cande V.; Pacora, Percy N; Salazar, Manuel; Sanchez, Sixto E.; Williams, Michelle A

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of placental abruption (PA) remains poorly understood. We examined variations in SNPs of circadian clock-related genes in placenta with PA risk. We also explored placental and maternal genomic contributions to PA risk. Placental genomic DNA samples were isolated from 280 PA cases and 244 controls. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina Cardio-MetaboChip. We examined 116 SNPs in 13 genes known to moderate circadian rhythms. Logistic regression models were fit to e...

  18. A Mutation in the Myostatin Gene Increases Muscle Mass and Enhances Racing Performance in Heterozygote Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Mosher, Dana S.; Pascale Quignon; Carlos D. Bustamante; Sutter, Nathan B; Mellersh, Cathryn S; Heidi G Parker; Ostrander, Elaine A.

    2007-01-01

    Author Summary An individual's genetic profile can play a role in defining their natural skills and talents. The canine species presents an excellent system in which to find such associative genes. The purebred dog has a long history of selective breeding, which has produced specific breeds of extraordinary strength, intelligence, and speed. We have discovered a mutation in the canine myostatin gene, a negative regulator of muscle mass, which affects muscle composition, and hence racing speed...

  19. Cytokinins and Expression of SWEET, SUT, CWINV and AAP Genes Increase as Pea Seeds Germinate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula E. Jameson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Transporter genes and cytokinins are key targets for crop improvement. These genes are active during the development of the seed and its establishment as a strong sink. However, during germination, the seed transitions to being a source for the developing root and shoot. To determine if the sucrose transporter (SUT, amino acid permease (AAP, Sugar Will Eventually be Exported Transporter (SWEET, cell wall invertase (CWINV, cytokinin biosynthesis (IPT, activation (LOG and degradation (CKX gene family members are involved in both the sink and source activities of seeds, we used RT-qPCR to determine the expression of multiple gene family members, and LC-MS/MS to ascertain endogenous cytokinin levels in germinating Pisum sativum L. We show that genes that are actively expressed when the seed is a strong sink during its development, are also expressed when the seed is in the reverse role of being an active source during germination and early seedling growth. Cytokinins were detected in the imbibing seeds and were actively biosynthesised during germination. We conclude that, when the above gene family members are targeted for seed yield improvement, a downstream effect on subsequent seed germination or seedling vigour must be taken into consideration.

  20. Cytokinins and Expression of SWEET, SUT, CWINV and AAP Genes Increase as Pea Seeds Germinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Paula E; Dhandapani, Pragatheswari; Novak, Ondrej; Song, Jiancheng

    2016-12-01

    Transporter genes and cytokinins are key targets for crop improvement. These genes are active during the development of the seed and its establishment as a strong sink. However, during germination, the seed transitions to being a source for the developing root and shoot. To determine if the sucrose transporter (SUT), amino acid permease (AAP), Sugar Will Eventually be Exported Transporter (SWEET), cell wall invertase (CWINV), cytokinin biosynthesis (IPT), activation (LOG) and degradation (CKX) gene family members are involved in both the sink and source activities of seeds, we used RT-qPCR to determine the expression of multiple gene family members, and LC-MS/MS to ascertain endogenous cytokinin levels in germinating Pisum sativum L. We show that genes that are actively expressed when the seed is a strong sink during its development, are also expressed when the seed is in the reverse role of being an active source during germination and early seedling growth. Cytokinins were detected in the imbibing seeds and were actively biosynthesised during germination. We conclude that, when the above gene family members are targeted for seed yield improvement, a downstream effect on subsequent seed germination or seedling vigour must be taken into consideration.

  1. Variation in dicer gene is associated with increased survival in T-cell lymphoma.

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    Xi Li

    Full Text Available Dicer, an endonuclease in RNase III family, is essential for the RNA interference (RNAi pathway. Aberrant expression of Dicer has been shown in various cancers including some subtypes of T cell lymphoma (TCL, which influences patient prognosis. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs3742330A>G has been identified in the Dicer gene, located in the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR that is important for mRNA transcript stability. We investigated whether rs3742330 is associated with the survival in 163 TCL patients. Significant association between Dicer rs3742330 and TCL survival were found. Patients carrying the GG genotype (n = 12 had a significantly increased overall survival (OS compared with those carrying the GA and AA genotypes (n = 70 and n = 81, respectively; p = 0.031. Moreover, the significant association was maintained for patients with mature T type (n = 134; p = 0.026. In multivariate Cox-regression analysis, rs3742330 proved to be an independent predictor for OS, together with the commonly used International Prognostic Index (IPI and BAFF rs9514828, another SNP we have previously reported to be associated with TCL survival, with hazard ratios (HRs for patient death rate of 8.956 (95% CI, 1.210 to 66.318; p = 0.032 for the GA genotype and 10.145 (95% CI, 1.371 to 75.084; p = 0.023 for the AA genotype. Furthermore, we observed cumulative effects of Dicer rs3742330 and BAFF rs9514828 on TCL survival. Compared with patients carrying zero unfavorable genotype, those carrying one and two unfavorable genotypes had an increased risk of death with a HR of 7.104 (95% CI, 0.969-53.086; p = 0.054 and 14.932 (95% CI, 1.950-114.354; p = 0.009, respectively, with a significant dose-response trend (p(trend  = 0.004. In conclusion, Dicer rs3742330 is associated with TCL survival, suggesting that genetic variation might play a role in predicting prognosis of TCL patients.

  2. Repression of Stress-Induced LINE-1 Expression Protects Cancer Cell Subpopulations from Lethal Drug Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, Gulfem Dilek; Tindell, Charles Albert; Pitti, Robert; Wilson, Catherine; Nichols, Katrina; KaiWai Cheung, Tommy; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Wongchenko, Matthew; Yan, Yibing; Haley, Benjamin; Cuellar, Trinna; Webster, Joshua; Alag, Navneet; Hegde, Ganapati; Jackson, Erica; Nance, Tracy Leah; Giresi, Paul Garrett; Chen, Kuan-Bei; Liu, Jinfeng; Jhunjhunwala, Suchit; Settleman, Jeff; Stephan, Jean-Philippe; Arnott, David; Classon, Marie

    2017-08-14

    Maintenance of phenotypic heterogeneity within cell populations is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that underlies population survival upon stressful exposures. We show that the genomes of a cancer cell subpopulation that survives treatment with otherwise lethal drugs, the drug-tolerant persisters (DTPs), exhibit a repressed chromatin state characterized by increased methylation of histone H3 lysines 9 and 27 (H3K9 and H3K27). We also show that survival of DTPs is, in part, maintained by regulators of H3K9me3-mediated heterochromatin formation and that the observed increase in H3K9me3 in DTPs is most prominent over long interspersed repeat element 1 (LINE-1). Disruption of the repressive chromatin over LINE-1 elements in DTPs results in DTP ablation, which is partially rescued by reducing LINE-1 expression or function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Expression of colSR Genes Increased in the rpf Mutants of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae KACC10859

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    Young-Hee Noh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The rpf genes and colSXOO1207/colRXOO1208 were known to require for virulence of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo. In Xoo KACC10331 genome, two more colS/colR genes, colSXOO3534 (raxH/colRXOO3535 (raxR and colSXOO3762/colRXOO3763 were annotated. The colSXOO3534/colRXOO3535 were known to control AvrXa21 activity and functions of colSXOO3762/colRXOO3763 were unknown in Xoo. To characterize the relationship between rpf and colS/colR genes, expression of colS/colR genes in Rpf mutants of Xoo were analyzed with quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR. Expressions of all three colS/colR genes increased in the rpfF mutant in which DSF synthesis is defective. Expression of colSXOO1207/colRXOO1208, colSXOO3534/colRXOO3535 and colSXOO3762/colRXOO3763 increased 2, 2–7, 3–13 folds respectively. Expression of colSXOO3534 and colSXOO3762 also increased 2–4 folds in the rpfG mutant in which the signal from DSF is no longer transferred to down-stream. Expression of the other colS/colR genes was not significantly changed in the rpfG mutant compared to the wild type. Since RpfF and RpfG are responsible for DSF synthesis and signal transfer from DSF to down-stream to regulate virulence gene expression, these results suggest that the DSF and DSF-mediated signal regulate negatively three colS/colR genes in Xoo.

  4. Both superficial and deep zone articular chondrocyte subpopulations exhibit the Crabtree effect but have different basal oxygen consumption rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heywood, Hannah K; Knight, Martin M; Lee, David A

    2010-06-01

    In the absence of in vivo measurements, the oxygen concentration within articular cartilage is calculated from the balance between cellular oxygen consumption and mass transfer. Current estimates of the oxygen tension within articular cartilage are based on oxygen consumption data from full-depth tissue samples. However, superficial and deep cell subpopulations of articular cartilage express intrinsic metabolic differences. We test the hypothesis that the subpopulations differ with respect to their intrinsic oxygen consumption rate. Chondrocytes from the full cartilage thickness demonstrate enhanced oxygen consumption when deprived of glucose, consistent with the Crabtree phenomena. Chondrocyte subpopulations differ in the prevailing availability of oxygen and glucose, which decrease with distance from the cartilage-synovial fluid interface. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that the oxygen consumption of each subpopulation is modulated by nutrient availability, by examining the expression of the Crabtree effect. The deep cells had a greater oxygen consumption than the superficial cells (V(max) of 6.6 compared to 3.2 fmol/cell/h), consistent with our observations of mitochondrial volume (mean values 52.0 vs. 36.4 microm(3)/cell). Both populations expressed the Crabtree phenomena, with oxygen consumption increasing approximately 2.5-fold in response to glycolytic inhibition by glucose deprivation or 2-deoxyglucose. Over 90% of this increase was oligomycin-sensitive and thus accounted for by oxidative phosphorylation. The data contributes towards our understanding of chondrocyte energy metabolism and provides information valuable for the accurate calculation of the oxygen concentration that the cells experience in vivo. The work has further application to the optimisation of bioreactor design and engineered tissues. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Stress-responsive gene RsICE1 from Raphanus sativus increases cold tolerance in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Lili; Xiang, Dianjun; Wang, Lina; Zhang, Weiwei; Wang, Xiaodong; Qi, Guochao

    2017-03-01

    The ICE1 transcription factor plays a critical role in plant cold tolerance via triggering CBF/DREB1 cold-regulated signal networks. In this work, a novel MYC-type ICE1-like gene, RsICE1, was isolated from radish (Raphanus sativus L.), and its function in cold tolerance was characterized in rice. The RsICE1 gene was expressed constitutively with higher transcriptional levels in the roots and stems of radish seedlings. The NaCl, cold, and ABA treatments could significantly upregulate RsICE1 expression levels, but dehydration stress had a weak effect on its expression. Ectopic expression of the RsICE1 gene in rice conferred enhanced tolerance to low-temperature stress grounded on a higher survival rate, higher accumulation of soluble sugars and free proline content, a decline in electrolyte leakage and MDA levels, and higher chlorophyll levels relative to control plants. OsDREBL and OsTPP1, downstream cold-regulated genes, were remarkably upregulated at transcription levels in rice overexpressing RsICE1 under low-temperature stress, which indicated that RsICE1 was involved in CBF/DREB1 cold-regulated signal networks. Overall, the above data showed that RsICE1 played an active role in improving rice cold tolerance, most likely resulting from the upregulation of OsDREBL and OsTPP1 expression levels by interacting with the RsICE1 gene under low-temperature stress.

  6. Transgenic Suppression of AGAMOUS Genes in Apple Reduces Fertility and Increases Floral Attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klocko, Amy L; Borejsza-Wysocka, Ewa; Brunner, Amy M; Shevchenko, Olga; Aldwinckle, Herb; Strauss, Steven H

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the ability of RNA interference (RNAi) directed against two co-orthologs of AGAMOUS (AG) from Malus domestica (domestic apple, MdAG) to reduce the risks of invasiveness and provide genetic containment of transgenes, while also promoting the attractiveness of flowers for ornamental usage. Suppression of two MdAG-like genes, MdMADS15 and MdMADS22, led to the production of trees with highly showy, polypetalous flowers. These "double-flowers" had strongly reduced expression of both MdAG-like genes. Members of the two other clades within in the MdAG subfamily showed mild to moderate differences in gene expression, or were unchanged, with the level of suppression approximately proportional to the level of sequence identity between the gene analyzed and the RNAi fragment. The double-flowers also exhibited reduced male and female fertility, had few viable pollen grains, a decreased number of stigmas, and produced few viable seeds after cross-pollination. Despite these floral alterations, RNAi-AG trees with double-flowers set full-sized fruit. Suppression or mutation of apple AG-like genes appears to be a promising method for combining genetic containment with improved floral attractiveness.

  7. Transgenic Suppression of AGAMOUS Genes in Apple Reduces Fertility and Increases Floral Attractiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L Klocko

    Full Text Available We investigated the ability of RNA interference (RNAi directed against two co-orthologs of AGAMOUS (AG from Malus domestica (domestic apple, MdAG to reduce the risks of invasiveness and provide genetic containment of transgenes, while also promoting the attractiveness of flowers for ornamental usage. Suppression of two MdAG-like genes, MdMADS15 and MdMADS22, led to the production of trees with highly showy, polypetalous flowers. These "double-flowers" had strongly reduced expression of both MdAG-like genes. Members of the two other clades within in the MdAG subfamily showed mild to moderate differences in gene expression, or were unchanged, with the level of suppression approximately proportional to the level of sequence identity between the gene analyzed and the RNAi fragment. The double-flowers also exhibited reduced male and female fertility, had few viable pollen grains, a decreased number of stigmas, and produced few viable seeds after cross-pollination. Despite these floral alterations, RNAi-AG trees with double-flowers set full-sized fruit. Suppression or mutation of apple AG-like genes appears to be a promising method for combining genetic containment with improved floral attractiveness.

  8. A positive circuit of VEGF increases Glut-1 expression by increasing HIF-1α gene expression in human retinal endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Kyung

    2017-12-01

    Treatment of human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRMECs) with vascular endothelial growth factor 165 (VEGF 165 ) increased hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), VEGF, and glucose transporter 1 (Glut-1) mRNA expression and Glut-1 protein localization to the membrane. In contrast, treatment of human retinal pigment epithelium cells with VEGF 165 did not induce HIF-1α, VEGF, and Glut-1 gene expression. Microvascular endothelial cells are surrounded by astrocytic end feet in the retina. Astrocyte-derived A-kinase anchor protein 12 overexpression during hypoxia downregulated VEGF secretion, and this conditioned medium reduced VEGF and Glut-1 expression in HRMECs, suggesting that communications between astrocytes and endothelial cells may be the determinants of the blood vessel network. In HRMECs, HIF-1α small interfering RNA transfection blocked the VEGF 165 -mediated increase in VEGF and Glut-1 gene expression. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) with inhibitor GF109203X or with a small interfering RNA targeting PKCζ attenuated the VEGF 165 -induced Glut-1 protein expression and VEGF and Glut-1 mRNA expression. In addition, results of an immunoprecipitation assay imply an interaction between VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and PKCζ in HRMECs. Therefore, VEGF secretion by hypoxic astrocytes may upregulate HIF-1α gene expression, inducing VEGF and Glut-1 expression via the VEGFR2-PKCζ axis in HRMECs.

  9. RECOVERY IN VIVO OF NONCULTURABLE SUBPOPULATION OF SALMONELLA ENTERICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudin I.P.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. As one of mesophilic, easily cultivated species of pathogenic bacteria, Salmonella enterica transformed into viable but nonculturable (VNC state in response to environmental stresses, including action of biocides. The cells in this state, preserve the integrity of membranes and metabolism of some, but not detected by conventional methods of cultivation. Some researchers suggest that the evolutionary significance of this phenomenon is part of an adaptive response aimed at long-term survival of bacteria in adverse conditions; others argue that it is the result of stochastic cellular damage, in which nonculturable cells are in a state of gradual death. In any case, the phenomenon of existence VNC pathogens if they retain the ability to restore its growth in vivo is a significant problem in medicine, pharmaceutical, veterinary, food industry. VNC subpopulation of S. enterica was obtained under action of ethanol. In this paper was investigated in vivo resuscitation VNC S. enterica using intraperitoneal injection of mice. Materials and methods. Obtaining of stressful S. enterica populations. Bacteria were grown to exponential phase in broth Luria–Bertani (LB. To 1.0 ml sample suspension diluted to 1.5 × 106 cells/ml was added 1.0 ml of ethanol at a concentration of 40 % (v/v. After exposure of 10 to 600 minutes in the suspension were added 8.0 ml of phosphate buffered saline (FBS, washed by centrifugation (4500 g for 5 minutes and serially diluted at a ratio of 1:10 (v/v samples were stained with LIVE/DEAD BacLight (produced by "Invitrogen", USA, filtrated on membrane filters for fluorescence microscopy and parallel plated on LB agar cup to determine colony-forming units (CFU per ml. In vivo resuscitation VNC S. enterica was made following way. Three groups of animals were inoculated by intraperitoneal injection: 1 103 culturable cells (0.1 ml suspension containing 104 CFU / ml; 2 103 VNC cells (0.1 ml suspension containing 104 cells

  10. Disruption of the GH Receptor Gene in Adult Mice Increases Maximal Lifespan in Females

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junnila, Riia K.; Duran-Ortiz, Silvana; Suer, Ozan

    2016-01-01

    GH and IGF-1 are important for a variety of physiological processes including growth, development, and aging. Mice with reduced levels of GH and IGF-1 have been shown to live longer than wild-type controls. Our laboratory has previously found that mice with a GH receptor gene knockout (GHRKO) from...... affect metabolism and longevity. Thus, we produced adult-onset GHRKO (aGHRKO) mice by disrupting the Ghr gene at 6 weeks of age. We found that aGHRKO mice replicate many of the beneficial effects observed in long-lived GHRKO mice. For example, aGHRKO mice, like GHRKO animals, displayed retarded growth...... carry germline mutations. Importantly, the effect of a long-term suppression of the GH/IGF-1 axis during adulthood, as would be considered for human therapeutic purposes, has not been tested. The goal of this study was to determine whether temporally controlled Ghr gene deletion in adult mice would...

  11. Effects of vitamin A deficiency and Newcastle disease virus infection on lymphocyte subpopulations in chicken blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombout, J H; van Rens, B T; Sijtsma, S R; van der Weide, M C; West, C E

    1992-02-15

    The effect of vitamin A deficiency and Newcastle disease virus (NDV)-infection on peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) was studied by differential cell counting and flow cytometry. Day-old chickens were fed purified diets containing either marginal or adequate levels of vitamin A and at 26 days of age half of the chickens in each group were infected with NDV. The absolute numbers of PBL and their subpopulations were studied until 10 days after infection. Vitamin A deficiency resulted in significantly lower numbers of PBL throughout the experiment. NDV-infection produced lymphopenia during the first 3 days, followed by a strong increase in PBL numbers after 6 days. Both changes in PBL were less pronounced in vitamin A-deficient birds. For flow cytometric analysis monoclonal antibodies reacting specifically with B-cells or a subpopulation of T-cells were used. Vitamin A-induced lymphopenia could be attributed to a decreased number of PBL, negative for both antibodies, and to the absence of an increase in B-cells which normally occurs at this age. The negative cells are suggested to represent, at least partially, cytotoxic T-cells, which may explain the impaired cytotoxic T-cell-activity found in earlier studies. NDV-induced lymphopenia and subsequent increase of PBL could be attributed to all cell types investigated. However, in vitamin A-deficient birds negative cells did not show these reactions. Therefore, it can be concluded that vitamin A deficiency has a detrimental effect on PBL, negative for both antibodies used, and on the normal growth of the number of B-cells at this age.

  12. How complexity increases in development: An analysis of the spatial-temporal dynamics of Gene expression in Ciona intestinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador-Martínez, Irepan; Salazar-Ciudad, Isaac

    2017-04-01

    The increase in complexity in an embryo over developmental time is perhaps one of the most intuitive processes of animal development. It is also intuitive that the embryo becomes progressively compartmentalized over time and space. In spite of this intuitiveness, there are no systematic attempts to quantify how this occurs. Here, we present a quantitative analysis of the compartmentalization and spatial complexity of Ciona intestinalis over developmental time by analyzing thousands of gene expression spatial patterns from the ANISEED database. We measure compartmentalization in two ways: as the relative volume of expression of genes and as the disparity in gene expression between body parts. We also use a measure of the curvature of each gene expression pattern in 3D space. These measures show a similar increase over time, with the most dramatic change occurring from the 112-cell stage to the early tailbud stage. Combined, these measures point to a global pattern of increase in complexity in the Ciona embryo. Finally, we cluster the different regions of the embryo depending on their gene expression similarity, within and between stages. Results from this clustering analysis, which partially correspond to known fate maps, provide a global quantitative overview about differentiation and compartmentalization between body parts at each developmental stage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Gene expression profiling of preovulatory follicle in the buffalo cow: effects of increased IGF-I concentration on periovulatory events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Jyotsna U; Shah, Kunal B; Puttaiah, Jayaram; Rudraiah, Medhamurthy

    2011-01-01

    The preovulatory follicle in response to gonadotropin surge undergoes dramatic biochemical, and morphological changes orchestrated by expression changes in hundreds of genes. Employing well characterized bovine preovulatory follicle model, granulosa cells (GCs) and follicle wall were collected from the preovulatory follicle before, 1, 10 and 22 h post peak LH surge. Microarray analysis performed on GCs revealed that 450 and 111 genes were differentially expressed at 1 and 22 h post peak LH surge, respectively. For validation, qPCR and immunocytochemistry analyses were carried out for some of the differentially expressed genes. Expression analysis of many of these genes showed distinct expression patterns in GCs and the follicle wall. To study molecular functions and genetic networks, microarray data was analyzed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis which revealed majority of the differentially expressed genes to cluster within processes like steroidogenesis, cell survival and cell differentiation. In the ovarian follicle, IGF-I is established to be an important regulator of the above mentioned molecular functions. Thus, further experiments were conducted to verify the effects of increased intrafollicular IGF-I levels on the expression of genes associated with the above mentioned processes. For this purpose, buffalo cows were administered with exogenous bGH to transiently increase circulating and intrafollicular concentrations of IGF-I. The results indicated that increased intrafollicular concentrations of IGF-I caused changes in expression of genes associated with steroidogenesis (StAR, SRF) and apoptosis (BCL-2, FKHR, PAWR). These results taken together suggest that onset of gonadotropin surge triggers activation of various biological pathways and that the effects of growth factors and peptides on gonadotropin actions could be examined during preovulatory follicle development.

  14. Antibiotic-induced replication stress triggers bacterial competence by increasing gene dosage near the origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slager, Jelle; Kjos, Morten; Attaiech, Laetitia; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) kills nearly 1 million children annually, and the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains poses a serious threat to human health. Because pneumococci can take up DNA from their environment by a process called competence, genes associated with antibiotic

  15. Technical brief: Optimized pipeline for isolation of high-quality RNA from corneal cell subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bath, Chris; Fink, Trine; Vorum, Henrik; Hjortdal, Jesper; Zachar, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Attempts to determine the transcriptional profile of discrete subsets of limbal epithelial cells in situ using laser capture microdissection (LCM) face two major challenges. First, the transcriptional profile of cells within a tissue may rapidly change as the tissue is excised and exposed to cold ischemia. Second, there is a risk of degradation of the RNA as the cellular compartment is separated from the remaining tissue. An optimized protocol for LCM of corneal epithelium is presented to address these issues. Experiments using porcine eye globes were carried out to determine both optimal procedures and settings for tissue harvest, transport, storage, histology, LCM, and RNA isolation. The optimized protocol was validated using human corneal epithelium. To facilitate preservation of the gene expression profile, we have developed a mechanical tool for dissection of cornea that, in combination with flash freezing, enables tissue to be stored within 5 min of enucleation of the eye. Furthermore, we describe how RNA from limbal crypt cells may be obtained using a procedure involving cryosectioning, histological staining, and LCM. In this paper, we describe an optimized method for isolating high-quality RNA from cellular subpopulations confined to the limbal crypts of the cornea. The procedure yields RNA in amounts and quality suitable for downstream gene expression analyses, such as microarrays or next generation sequencing.

  16. A common haplotype in the G-protein-coupled receptor gene GPR74 is associated with leanness and increased lipolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlman, Ingrid; Dicker, Andrea; Jiao, Hong

    2007-01-01

    The G-protein-coupled receptor GPR74 is a novel candidate gene for body weight regulation. In humans, it is predominantly expressed in brain, heart, and adipose tissue. We report a haplotype in the GPR74 gene, ATAG, with allele frequency ~4% in Scandinavian cohorts, which was associated...... 0.36; P=.036) among those selected for obese or lean phenotypes. The ATAG haplotype was associated with increased adipocyte lipid mobilization (lipolysis) in vivo and in vitro. In human fat cells, GPR74 receptor stimulation and inhibition caused a significant and marked decrease and increase......, respectively, of lipolysis, which could be linked to catecholamine stimulation of adipocytes through beta -adrenergic receptors. These findings suggest that a common haplotype in the GPR74 gene protects against obesity, which, at least in part, is caused by a relief of inhibition of lipid mobilization from...

  17. Inactivation of MarR gene homologs increases susceptibility to antimicrobials in Bacteroides fragilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Clara Maria Guimarães; Silva, Déborah Nascimento Dos Santos; Costa, Scarlathe Bezerra da; Almeida, Juliana Soares de Sá; Boente, Renata Ferreira; Teixeira, Felipe Lopes; Domingues, Regina Maria Cavalcanti Pilotto; Lobo, Leandro Araujo

    Bacteroides fragilis is the strict anaerobic bacteria most commonly found in human infections, and has a high mortality rate. Among other virulence factors, the remarkable ability to acquire resistance to a variety of antimicrobial agents and to tolerate nanomolar concentrations of oxygen explains in part their success in causing infection and colonizing the mucosa. Much attention has been given to genes related to multiple drug resistance derived from plasmids, integrons or transposon, but such genes are also detected in chromosomal systems, like the mar (multiple antibiotic resistance) locus, that confer resistance to a range of drugs. Regulators like MarR, that control expression of the locus mar, also regulate resistance to organic solvents, disinfectants and oxygen reactive species are important players in these events. Strains derived from the parental strain 638R, with mutations in the genes hereby known as marRI (BF638R_3159) and marRII (BF638R_3706) were constructed by gene disruption using a suicide plasmid. Phenotypic response of the mutant strains to hydrogen peroxide, cell survival assay against exposure to oxygen, biofilm formation, resistance to bile salts and resistance to antibiotics was evaluated. The results showed that the mutant strains exhibit statistically significant differences in their response to oxygen stress, but no changes were observed in survival when exposed to bile salts. Biofilm formation was not affected by either gene disruption. Both mutant strains however, became more sensitive to multiple antimicrobial drugs tested. This indicates that as observed in other bacterial species, MarR are an important resistance mechanism in B. fragilis. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Morphometric and kinematic sperm subpopulations in split ejaculates of normozoospermic men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Santolaria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to analyze the sperm kinematic and morphometric subpopulations in the different fractions of the ejaculate in normozoospermic men. Ejaculates from eight normozoospermic men were collected by masturbation in three fractions after 3-5 days of sexual abstinence. Analyses of sperm motility by computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA-Mot, and of sperm morphometry by computer-assisted sperm morphometry analysis (CASA-Morph using fluorescence were performed. Clustering and discriminant procedures were performed to identify sperm subpopulations in the kinematic and morphometric data obtained. Clustering procedures resulted in the classification of spermatozoa into three kinematic subpopulations (slow with low ALH [35.6% of all motile spermatozoa], with circular trajectories [32.0%], and rapid with high ALH [32.4%], and three morphometric subpopulations (large-round [33.9% of all spermatozoa], elongated [32.0%], and small [34.10%]. The distribution of kinematic sperm subpopulations was different among ejaculate fractions (P < 0.001, with higher percentages of spermatozoa exhibiting slow movements with low ALH in the second and third portions, and with a more homogeneous distribution of kinematic sperm subpopulations in the first portion. The distribution of morphometric sperm subpopulations was also different among ejaculate fractions (P < 0.001, with more elongated spermatozoa in the first, and of small spermatozoa in the third, portion. It is concluded that important variations in the distribution of kinematic and morphometric sperm subpopulations exist between ejaculate fractions, with possible functional implications.

  19. DENTAL INFECTIONS AND THE ATHEROSCLEROSIS RISK IN A SUBPOPULATION OF SOUTH ROMANIA

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    Alexandru Andrei ILIESCU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease and chronic apical periodontitis are considered risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. This cross-sectional study, performed in a subpopulation living in the South area of Romania, investigated the association between the afore-mentioned oral lesions and atherosclerosis. The research was focused on common carotid artery intima-media wall thickness IMT and dislipidemia, in a batch of 30 hypertensive subjects, age 41-50. Over 40% of the patients diagnosed with periodontal disease and/or chronic apical periodontitis developed subclinical atherosclerosis. Associated dyslipidemia to an increased IMT over 0.9 mm in subjects affected by periodontal disease or combined lesions with chronic apical periodontitis might be considered a strong predictor of future cardiovascular events.

  20. Increasing the ex vivo antigen-specific IFN-γ production in subpopulations of T cells and NKp46+ cells by anti-CD28, anti-CD49d and recombinant IL-12 costimulation in cattle vaccinated with recombinant proteins from Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thakur, Aneesh; Riber, Ulla; Davis, William C.

    2013-01-01

    -γ secretion by CD4, CD8, γδ T cells and NK cells. Age matched male jersey calves, experimentally infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), were vaccinated with a cocktail of recombinant MAP proteins or left unvaccinated. Vaccine induced ex vivo recall responses were measured through Ag......-specific IFN-γ production by ELISA and flow cytometry. There was a significant increase in production of IFN-γ by T cell subsets or NKp46+ cells cultured in the presence of Ag and aCD28/aCD49d. The increase was accompanied by an increase in the integrated median fluorescence intensity (iMFI) of activated T...... cells. Addition of rIL-12 induced a significant additive effect leading to a maximum increase in responder frequency of Ag-specific T cell subsets or NKp46+ cells with a heavy bias toward IFN-γ production by CD4 T cells. We provide the first description of using aCD28/aCD49d costimulation to potentiate...

  1. Model-driven in Silico glpC Gene Knockout Predicts Increased Succinate Production from Glycerol in Escherichia Coli

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    Bashir Sajo Mienda

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic engineered targeting for increased succinate production in Escherichia coli using glycerol as a low cost carbon source has attracted global attention in recent years. Succinate production in engineered E. coli has progressed significantly using an experimental trial and error approach. The use of a model-guided, targeted metabolic gene knockout prediction for increased succinate production from glycerol under anaerobic conditions in E. coli still remains largely underexplored. In this study, we applied a model-driven, targeted glpC/b2243 in silico metabolic gene knockout using E. coli genome scale model iJO1366 under the OptFlux software platform with the aim of predicting high succinate flux. The results indicated that the mutant model lacking the glpC/b2243 gene will demonstrate increased succinate flux that is 30% higher than its wild-type control model. We can hypothesize that an additional NADH molecule was generated following the deletion of the gene and/or the alternatively preferred GldA-DhaKLM fermentative route for glycerol metabolism in E. coli may have been activated. Although the exact metabolic mechanism involved in increasing the succinate flux still remains obscure; the current study informs other studies that a model-driven, metabolic glpC/b2243 gene knockout could be applicable in filling our knowledge gap using a comprehensive experimental inquiry in the future; leading to a better understanding of the underlying metabolic function of this gene in relation to succinate production in E. coli from glycerol.

  2. Preeclampsia: novel insights from global RNA profiling of trophoblast subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormley, Matthew; Ona, Katherine; Kapidzic, Mirhan; Garrido-Gomez, Tamara; Zdravkovic, Tamara; Fisher, Susan J

    2017-08-01

    The maternal signs of preeclampsia, which include the new onset of high blood pressure, can occur because of faulty placentation. We theorized that transcriptomic analyses of trophoblast subpopulations in situ would lend new insights into the role of these cells in preeclampsia pathogenesis. Our goal was to enrich syncytiotrophoblasts, invasive cytotrophoblasts, or endovascular cytotrophoblasts from the placentas of severe preeclampsia cases. Total RNA was subjected to global transcriptional profiling to identify RNAs that were misexpressed compared with controls. This was a cross-sectional analysis of placentas from women who had been diagnosed with severe preeclampsia. Gestational age-matched controls were placentas from women who had a preterm birth with no signs of infection. Laser microdissection enabled enrichment of syncytiotrophoblasts, invasive cytotrophoblasts, or endovascular cytotrophoblasts. After RNA isolation, a microarray approach was used for global transcriptional profiling. Immunolocalization identified changes in messenger RNA expression that carried over to the protein level. Differential expression of non-protein-coding RNAs was confirmed by in situ hybridization. A 2-way analysis of variance of non-coding RNA expression identified particular classes that distinguished trophoblasts in cases vs controls. Cajal body foci were visualized by coilin immunolocalization. Comparison of the trophoblast subtype data within each group (severe preeclampsia or noninfected preterm birth) identified many highly differentially expressed genes. They included molecules that are known to be expressed by each subpopulation, which is evidence that the method worked. Genes that were expressed differentially between the 2 groups, in a cell-type-specific manner, encoded a combination of molecules that previous studies associated with severe preeclampsia and those that were not known to be dysregulated in this pregnancy complication. Gene ontology analysis of the

  3. Cancer stem cells: a minor cancer subpopulation that redefines global cancer features

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    Heiko eEnderling

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years cancer stem cells (CSCs have been hypothesized to comprise only a minor subpopulation in solid tumors that drives tumor initiation, development and metastasis; the so-called cancer stem cell hypothesis. While a seemingly trivial statement about numbers, much is put at stake. If true, the conclusions of many studies of cancer cell populations could be challenged, as the bulk assay methods upon which they depend have, by and large, taken for granted the notion that a ‘typical’ cell of the population possesses the attributes of a cell capable of perpetuating the cancer, i.e., a CSC. In support of the CSC hypothesis, populations enriched for so-called ‘tumor-initiating’ cells have demonstrated a corresponding increase in tumorigenicity as measured by dilution assay, although estimates have varied widely as to what the fractional contribution of tumor-initiating cells is in any given population. Some have taken this variability to suggest the CSC fraction may be nearly 100% after all, countering the CSC hypothesis, and that there are simply assay-dependent error rates in our ability to ‘reconfirm’ CSC status at the cell level. To explore this controversy more quantitatively, we developed a simple theoretical model of cancer stem cell-driven tumor growth dynamics. Assuming CSC and non-stem cancer cell subpopulations coexist to some degree, we evaluated the impact of an environmentally-dependent cancer stem cell symmetric division probability and a non-stem cancer cell proliferation capacity on tumor progression and morphology. Our model predicts, as expected, that the frequency of CSC divisions that are symmetric highly influences the frequency of CSCs in the population, but goes on to predict the two frequencies can be widely divergent, and that spatial constraints will tend to increase the CSC fraction over time.

  4. Particle size-density relationships in pyroclastic deposits: using component subpopulations to elucidate depositional conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackaman-Lofland, C. A.; Brand, B. D.; Taddeucci, J.

    2012-12-01

    increase in pumice content relative to the lithic and crystal subpopulations with distance from source for all lithofacies. We also find that the proportion of pumice is greater along flow transects with less surface roughness than along transects that interact with topography. The relative component population and size-density trends we observe in the MSH deposits indicate that component size, density, and shape characteristics may be used to effectively reconstruct emplacement processes, even where outcrop exposure is limited. Such methods will enable a better quantitative understanding of current dynamics and transport mechanisms, and ultimately a more accurate evaluation of volcanic hazards.

  5. Sulfamethoxazole and COD increase abundance of sulfonamide resistance genes and change bacterial community structures within sequencing batch reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xueping; Pang, Weihai; Dou, Chunling; Yin, Daqiang

    2017-05-01

    The abundant microbial community in biological treatment processes in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) may potentially enhance the horizontal gene transfer of antibiotic resistance genes with the presence of antibiotics. A lab-scale sequencing batch reactor was designed to investigate response of sulfonamide resistance genes (sulI, sulII) and bacterial communities to various concentrations of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) of wastewater. The SMX concentrations (0.001 mg/L, 0.1 mg/L and 10 mg/L) decreased with treatment time and higher SMX level was more difficult to remove. The presence of SMX also significantly reduced the removal efficiency of ammonia nitrogen, affecting the normal function of WWTPs. All three concentrations of SMX raised both sulI and sulII genes with higher concentrations exhibiting greater increases. The abundance of sul genes was positive correlated with treatment time and followed the second-order reaction kinetic model. Interestingly, these two genes have rather similar activity. SulI and sulII gene abundance also performed similar response to COD. Simpson index and Shannon-Weiner index did not show changes in the microbial community diversity. However, the 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing results showed the bacterial community structures varied during different stages. The results demonstrated that influent antibiotics into WWTPs may facilitate selection of ARGs and affect the wastewater conventional treatment as well as the bacteria community structures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Glutathione S-Transferase P1 (GSTP1 gene polymorphism increases age-related susceptibility to hepatocellular carcinoma

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    Kuo Wu-Hsien

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most frequent malignant neoplasms in the world. Genetic polymorphism has been reported to be a factor increasing the risk of HCC. Phase II enzymes such as glutathione s-transferases (GSTP1, GSTA1 play important roles in protecting cells against damage induced by carcinogens. The aim of this study was to estimate the relationship of the GSTP1 and GSTA1 gene polymorphisms to HCC risk and clinico-pathological status. Methods Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP was used to measure GSTP1 (A→G and GSTA1 (C→T gene polymorphisms in 386 healthy controls and 177 patients with HCC. Results Neither gene polymorphism was associated with the clinico-pathological status of HCC and serum expression of liver-related clinico-pathological markers. No association between the GSTA1 gene polymorphism and HCC susceptibility was found. However, in the younger group, aged ≤ 57 years, individuals with AG or GG alleles of GSTP1 had a 2.18-fold (95%CI = 1.09-4.36; p = 0.02 and 5.64-fold (95%CI = 1.02-31.18; p = 0.04 risk, respectively, of developing HCC compared to individuals with AA alleles, after adjusting for other confounders. Conclusion AG and GG alleles of GSTP1 gene polymorphisms may be considered as factors increasing the susceptibility to and risk of HCC in Taiwanese aged ≤ 57 years.

  7. Altered gene expression by sedaxane increases PSII efficiency, photosynthesis and growth and improves tolerance to drought in wheat seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajigboye, Olubukola O; Lu, Chungui; Murchie, Erik H; Schlatter, Christian; Swart, Gina; Ray, Rumiana V

    2017-04-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor (SDHI) fungicides have been shown to increase PSII efficiency and photosynthesis under drought stress in the absence of disease to enhance the biomass and yield of winter wheat. However, the molecular mechanism of improved photosynthetic efficiency observed in SDHI-treated wheat has not been previously elucidated. Here we used a combination of chlorophyll fluorescence, gas exchange and gene expression analysis, to aid our understanding of the basis of the physiological responses of wheat seedlings under drought conditions to sedaxane, a novel SDHI seed treatment. We show that sedaxane increased the efficiency of PSII photochemistry, reduced non-photochemical quenching and improved the photosynthesis and biomass in wheat correlating with systemic changes in the expression of genes involved in defense, chlorophyll synthesis and cell wall modification. We applied a coexpression network-based approach using differentially expressed genes of leaves, roots and pregerminated seeds from our wheat array datasets to identify the most important hub genes, with top ranked correlation (higher gene association value and z-score) involved in cell wall expansion and strengthening, wax and pigment biosynthesis and defense. The results indicate that sedaxane confers tolerant responses of wheat plants grown under drought conditions by redirecting metabolites from defense/stress responses towards growth and adaptive development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Germline heterozygous variants in genes associated with familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis as a cause of increased bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fager Ferrari, Marcus; Leinoe, Eva; Rossing, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) is caused by biallelic variants in genes regulating granule secretion in cytotoxic lymphocytes. In FHL3-5, the affected genes UNC13D, STX11 and STXBP2 have further been shown to regulate the secretion of platelet granules, giving rise to compromised...... platelet function. Therefore, we aimed to investigate platelet degranulation in patients heterozygous for variants in UNC13D, STX11 and STXBP2. During the work-up of patients referred to the Coagulation Unit, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden and the Department of Hematology, Rigshospitalet......, Copenhagen, Denmark due to bleeding tendencies, 12 patients harboring heterozygous variants in UNC13D, STX11 or STXBP2 were identified using targeted whole exome sequencing. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to assess the secretion of platelet dense granules following thrombin stimulation...

  9. Multiparametric characterization of neuronal subpopulations in the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubourget, Romain; Sangare, Aude; Geoffroy, Hélène; Gallopin, Thierry; Rancillac, Armelle

    2017-04-01

    The characterization of neuronal properties is a necessary first step toward understanding how the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO) neuronal network regulates slow-wave sleep (SWS). Indeed, the electrophysiological heterogeneity of VLPO neurons suggests the existence of subtypes that could differently contribute in SWS induction and maintenance. The aim of the present study was to define cell classes in the VLPO using an unsupervised clustering classification method. Electrophysiological features extracted from 289 neurons recorded in whole-cell patch-clamp allowed the identification of three main classes of VLPO neurons subdivided into five distinct subpopulations (cluster 1, 2a, 2b, 3a and 3b). The high occurrence of a low-threshold calcium spike (LTS) was one of the most distinctive features of cluster 1 and 3. Since sleep-promoting neurons are generally identified by their ability to generate an LTS and by their inhibitory response to noradrenaline (NA), 189 neurons from our dataset were also tested for this neurotransmitter. Neurons from cluster 3 were the most frequently inhibited by NA. Biocytin labeling and Neurolucida reconstructions of 112 neurons furthermore revealed a small dendritic arbor of cluster 3b neurons compared, in particular, to cluster 2b neurons. Altogether, we performed an exhaustive characterization of VLPO neuronal subtypes that is a crucial step toward a better understanding of the neuronal network within the VLPO and thereby sleep physiology.

  10. Identification of drug-resistant subpopulations in canine hemangiosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khammanivong, A; Gorden, B H; Frantz, A M; Graef, A J; Dickerson, E B

    2016-09-01

    Canine hemangiosarcoma is a rapidly progressive disease that is poorly responsive to conventional chemotherapy. Despite numerous attempts to advance treatment options and improve outcomes, drug resistance remains a hurdle to successful therapy. To address this problem, we used recently characterized progenitor cell populations derived from canine hemangiosarcoma cell lines and grown as non-adherent spheres to identify potential drug resistance mechanisms as well as drug-resistant cell populations. Cells from sphere-forming cultures displayed enhanced resistance to chemotherapy drugs, expansion of dye-excluding side populations and altered ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter expression. Invasion studies demonstrated variability between cell lines as well as between sphere and monolayer cell populations. Collectively, our results suggest that sphere cell populations contain distinct subpopulations of drug-resistant cells that utilize multiple mechanisms to evade cytotoxic drugs. Our approach represents a new tool for the study of drug resistance in hemangiosarcoma, which could alter approaches for treating this disease. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Identification of adaptive mutations in the influenza A virus non-structural 1 gene that increase cytoplasmic localization and differentially regulate host gene expression.

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    Nicole Forbes

    Full Text Available The NS1 protein of influenza A virus (IAV is a multifunctional virulence factor. We have previously characterized gain-of-function mutations in the NS1 protein arising from the experimental adaptation of the human isolate A/Hong Kong/1/1968(H3N2 (HK to the mouse. The majority of these mouse adapted NS1 mutations were demonstrated to increase virulence, viral fitness, and interferon antagonism, but differ in binding to the post-transcriptional processing factor cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 30 (CPSF30. Because nuclear trafficking is a major genetic determinant of influenza virus host adaptation, we assessed subcellular localization and host gene expression of NS1 adaptive mutations. Recombinant HK viruses with adaptive mutations in the NS1 gene were assessed for NS1 protein subcellular localization in mouse and human cells using confocal microscopy and cellular fractionation. In human cells the HK wild-type (HK-wt virus NS1 protein partitioned equivalently between the cytoplasm and nucleus but was defective in cytoplasmic localization in mouse cells. Several adaptive mutations increased the proportion of NS1 in the cytoplasm of mouse cells with the greatest effects for mutations M106I and D125G. The host gene expression profile of the adaptive mutants was determined by microarray analysis of infected mouse cells to show either high or low extents of host-gene regulation (HGR or LGR phenotypes. While host genes were predominantly down regulated for the HGR group of mutants (D2N, V23A, F103L, M106I+L98S, L98S, M106V, and M106V+M124I, the LGR phenotype mutants (D125G, M106I, V180A, V226I, and R227K were characterized by a predominant up regulation of host genes. CPSF30 binding affinity of NS1 mutants did not predict effects on host gene expression. To our knowledge this is the first report of roles of adaptive NS1 mutations that impact intracellular localization and regulation of host gene expression.

  12. A common mutation of the MYH gene is associated with increased DNA oxidation and age-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Caixia; Chen, Huimei; Guo, Wenwen; Zhang, Kui; Qi, Qiufeng; Gu, Xin; Zhu, Dalong; Wang, Yaping

    2010-02-01

    We describe a common mutation of the MYH gene, which is involved in the repair of oxidative damage to DNA, and its relationship to age, levels of 8-OHdG, and circulating levels of interleukin-1. We studied 1146 "healthy" and 562 unselected Chinese subjects. We observed a reverse insertion of the AluYb8 sequence (AluYb8MYH) to be homozygous in approximately 25.8% of the healthy Chinese population age 20-29 years, with the incidence of homozygosity decreasing to 15.7% by age 50-59 years. Because subjects were selected on the basis of absence of disease during medical screening, this suggests that homozygosity for this gene has a marked impact on the development of age-related or chronic diseases or mortality. Because the MYH gene is involved in DNA repair we assessed whether homozygous carriage of this gene was associated with increased levels of 8-OHdG in the leukocytic DNA of carriers. The level of 8-OHdG increased from 3.8 8-OHdG/10(6) dG in wild-type carriers to 10.8 8-OHdG/10(6) dG in homozygous carriers, suggesting that the presence of the mutation was associated with impaired DNA repair. Because this mutation might be associated with the increased development of age-related or chronic disease and inflammation, we also measured plasma concentrations of interleukin-1, which increases with aging and chronic disease. We observed a highly significant increase in plasma interleukin-1 in patients homozygous for the AluYb8 insertion in the MYH gene consistent with accelerated aging or development of undiagnosed disease in homozygous subjects. Screening for this genetic variation may have predictive value in assessing potential longevity of subjects in China, as well as in the Western world. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ghrelin increases neuropeptide Y and agouti-related peptide gene expression in the arcuate nucleus in rat hypothalamic organotypic cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Motomitsu; Arima, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Minemori; Hayashi, Masayuki; Banno, Ryouichi; Sato, Ikuko; Nagasaki, Hiroshi; Oiso, Yutaka

    2006-11-01

    Ghrelin, which was identified from the rat stomach, is a potent stimulant for food intake. Several lines of evidence suggest that the orexigenic action of ghrelin is mediated via the neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons in the arcuate nucleus, although the detailed mechanisms by which ghrelin stimulates NPY neurons are not clear. In this study, we examined the gene regulation of NPY and agouti-related peptide (AGRP), another orexigenic peptide synthesized in the NPY neurons, in the arcuate nucleus by ghrelin in hypothalamic organotypic cultures. Incubation of the hypothalamic explants with ghrelin significantly increased NPY and AGRP mRNA expression in the presence, but not absence, of dexamethasone. Glucocorticoids were also necessary for ghrelin action in vivo because an intracerebroventricular injection of ghrelin significantly increased NPY and AGRP mRNA expression in the arcuate nucleus only in sham-operated, but not in adrenalectomized rats. The stimulatory effects of ghrelin on gene expression were not blocked by a sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin in the organotypic cultures. Ghrelin also increased NPY heteronuclear (hn) RNA expression, the first transcript that has been used as an indicator for gene transcription. The stimulatory effects of ghrelin on NPY gene expression were abolished in the presence of cycloheximide, which blocks translation, suggesting that de novo protein synthesis is required for ghrelin action. These data suggest that ghrelin stimulates NPY and AGRP gene expression independently of action potentials only in the presence of glucocorticoids. Furthermore, our data demonstrate stimulatory action of ghrelin on NPY gene transcription, which requires de novo protein synthesis.

  14. Genome-wide association study for T lymphocyte subpopulations in swine

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    Lu Xin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lymphocytes act as a major component of the adaptive immune system, taking very crucial responsibility for immunity. Differences in proportions of T-cell subpopulations in peripheral blood among individuals under same conditions provide evidence of genetic control on these traits, but little is known about the genetic mechanism of them, especially in swine. Identification of the genetic control on these variants may help the genetic improvement of immune capacity through selection. Results To identify genomic regions responsible for these immune traits in swine, a genome-wide association study was conducted. A total of 675 pigs of three breeds were involved in the study. At 21 days of age, all individuals were vaccinated with modified live classical swine fever vaccine. Blood samples were collected when the piglets were 20 and 35 days of age, respectively. Seven traits, including the proportions of CD4+, CD8+, CD4+CD8+, CD4+CD8−, CD4−CD8+, CD4−CD8− and the ratio of CD4+ to CD8+ T cells were measured at the two ages. All the samples were genotyped for 62,163 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP using the Illumina porcineSNP60k BeadChip. 40833 SNPs were selected after quality control for association tests between SNPs and each immune trait considered based on a single-locus regression model. To tackle the issue of multiple testing in GWAS, 10,000 permutations were performed to determine the chromosome-wise and genome-wise significance levels of association tests. In total, 61 SNPs with chromosome-wise significance level and 3 SNPs with genome-wise significance level were identified. 27 significant SNPs were located within the immune-related QTL regions reported in previous studies. Furthermore, several significant SNPs fell into the regions harboring known immunity-related genes, 14 of them fell into the regions which harbor some known T cell-related genes. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that genome-wide association

  15. Carboxylesterase 1A2 encoding gene with increased transcription and potential rapid drug metabolism in Asian populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Madsen, Majbritt Busk; Lyauk, Yassine Kamal

    2017-01-01

    The carboxylesterase 1 gene (CES1) encodes a hydrolase implicated in the metabolism of commonly used drugs. CES1A2, a hybrid of CES1 and a CES1-like pseudogene, has a promoter that is weak in most individuals. However, some individuals harbor a promoter haplotype of this gene with two overlapping...... Sp1 sites that confer significantly increased transcription potentially leading to rapid drug metabolism. This CES1A2 haplotype has previously been reported to be common among Asians. Using polymerase chain reaction followed by sequencing, the present study examined variation in the promoter and 5...

  16. Wounding stimulates ALLENE OXIDE SYNTHASE gene and increases the level of jasmonic acid in Ipomoea nil cotyledons

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    Emilia Wilmowicz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Allene oxide synthase (AOS encodes the first enzyme in the lipoxygenase pathway, which is responsible for jasmonic acid (JA formation. In this study we report the molecular cloning and characterization of InAOS from Ipomoea nil. The full-length gene is composed of 1662 bp and encodes for 519 amino acids. The predicted InAOS contains PLN02648 motif, which is evolutionarily conserved and characteristic for functional enzymatic proteins. We have shown that wounding led to a strong stimulation of the examined gene activity in cotyledons and an increase in JA level, which suggest that this compound may be a modulator of stress responses in I. nil.

  17. Differential gene expression in liver and small intestine from lactating rats compared to age-matched virgin controls detects increased mRNA of cholesterol biosynthetic genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungsuwadee Paiboon

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lactation increases energy demands four- to five-fold, leading to a two- to three-fold increase in food consumption, requiring a proportional adjustment in the ability of the lactating dam to absorb nutrients and to synthesize critical biomolecules, such as cholesterol, to meet the dietary needs of both the offspring and the dam. The size and hydrophobicity of the bile acid pool increases during lactation, implying an increased absorption and disposition of lipids, sterols, nutrients, and xenobiotics. In order to investigate changes at the transcriptomics level, we utilized an exon array and calculated expression levels to investigate changes in gene expression in the liver, duodenum, jejunum, and ileum of lactating dams when compared against age-matched virgin controls. Results A two-way mixed models ANOVA was applied to detect differentially expressed genes. Significance calls were defined as a p Cyp7a1, which catalyzes the rate limiting step in the bile acid biosynthetic pathway, was also significantly increased in liver. In addition, decreased levels of mRNA associated with T-cell signaling were found in the jejunum and ileum. Several members of the Solute Carrier (SLC and Adenosine Triphosphate Binding Cassette (ABC superfamilies of membrane transporters were found to be differentially expressed; these genes may play a role in differences in nutrient and xenobiotic absorption and disposition. mRNA expression of SLC39a4_predicted, a zinc transporter, was increased in all tissues, suggesting that it is involved in increased zinc uptake during lactation. Microarray data are available through GEO under GSE19175. Conclusions We detected differential expression of mRNA from several pathways in lactating dams, including upregulation of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway in liver and intestine, consistent with Srebp activation. Differential T-Cell signaling in the two most distal regions of the small intestine (ileum and

  18. Increased asthma and adipose tissue inflammatory gene expression with obesity and Inuit migration to a western country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, Vibeke; Baines, Katherine J; Powell, Heather; Porsbjerg, Celeste; Gibson, Peter G

    2016-02-01

    An overlap between obesity and asthma exists, and inflammatory cells in adipose tissue could drive the development of asthma. Comparison of adipose tissue gene expression among Inuit living in Greenland to those in Denmark provides an opportunity to assess how changes in adipose tissue inflammation can be modified by migration and diet. To examine mast cell and inflammatory markers in adipose tissue and the association with asthma. Two Inuit populations were recruited, one living in Greenland and another in Denmark. All underwent adipose subcutaneous biopsy, followed by clinical assessment of asthma, and measurement of AHR. Adipose tissue biopsies were homogenised, RNA extracted, and PCR was performed to determine the relative gene expression of mast cell (tryptase, chymase, CPA3) and inflammatory markers (IL-6, IL-1β, and CD163). Of the 1059 Greenlandic Inuit participants, 556 were living in Greenland and 6.4% had asthma. Asthma was increased in Denmark (9%) compared to Greenland (3.6%, p asthma and adipose tissue mast cell gene expression. Pro-inflammatory gene expression (IL-6, IL-1β) was higher in those living in Denmark, and with increasing BMI and dietary changes. The anti-inflammatory (M2) macrophage marker, CD163, was higher in Greenland-dwelling Inuit (p asthma. Among Greenlandic Inuit, adipose tissue inflammation is also increased in those who migrate to Denmark, possibly as a result of dietary changes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Estimating the abundance of the Southern Hudson Bay polar bear subpopulation with aerial surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obbard, Martyn E.; Stapleton, Seth P.; Middel, Kevin R.; Thibault, Isabelle; Brodeur, Vincent; Jutras, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The Southern Hudson Bay (SH) polar bear subpopulation occurs at the southern extent of the species’ range. Although capture–recapture studies indicate abundance was likely unchanged between 1986 and 2005, declines in body condition and survival occurred during the period, possibly foreshadowing a future decrease in abundance. To obtain a current estimate of abundance, we conducted a comprehensive line transect aerial survey of SH during 2011–2012. We stratified the study site by anticipated densities and flew coastal contour transects and systematically spaced inland transects in Ontario and on Akimiski Island and large offshore islands in 2011. Data were collected with double-observer and distance sampling protocols. We surveyed small islands in James Bay and eastern Hudson Bay and flew a comprehensive transect along the Québec coastline in 2012. We observed 667 bears in Ontario and on Akimiski Island and nearby islands in 2011, and we sighted 80 bears on offshore islands during 2012. Mark–recapture distance sampling and sight–resight models yielded an estimate of 860 (SE = 174) for the 2011 study area. Our estimate of abundance for the entire SH subpopulation (943; SE = 174) suggests that abundance is unlikely to have changed significantly since 1986. However, this result should be interpreted cautiously because of the methodological differences between historical studies (physical capture–recapture) and this survey. A conservative management approach is warranted given previous increases in duration of the ice-free season, which are predicted to continue in the future, and previously documented declines in body condition and vital rates.

  20. Estimating abundance of the Southern Hudson Bay polar bear subpopulation using aerial surveys, 2011 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obbard, Martyn E.; Middel, Kevin R.; Stapleton, Seth P.; Thibault, Isabelle; Brodeur, Vincent; Jutras, Charles

    2013-01-01

    The Southern Hudson Bay (SH) polar bear subpopulation occurs at the southern extent of the species’ range. Although capture-recapture studies indicate that abundance remained stable between 1986 and 2005, declines in body condition and survival were documented during the period, possibly foreshadowing a future decrease in abundance. To obtain a current estimate of abundance, we conducted a comprehensive line transect aerial survey of SH during 2011–2012. We stratified the study site by anticipated densities and flew coastal contour transects and systematically spaced inland transects in Ontario and on Akimiski Island and large offshore islands in 2011. Data were collected with double observer and distance sampling protocols. We also surveyed small islands in Hudson Bay and James Bay and flew a comprehensive transect along the Québec coastline in 2012. We observed 667 bears in Ontario and on Akimiski Island and nearby islands in 2011, and we sighted 80 bears on offshore islands during 2012. Mark-recapture distance sampling and sightresight models yielded a model-averaged estimate of 868 (SE: 177) for the 2011 study area. Our estimate of abundance for the entire SH subpopulation (951; SE: 177) suggests that abundance has remained unchanged. However, this result should be interpreted cautiously because of the methodological differences between historical studies (physical capture) and this survey. A conservative management approach is warranted given the previous increases in the duration of the ice-free season, which are predicted to continue in the future, and previously documented declines in body condition and vital rates.

  1. Quinapril treatment increases insulin-stimulated endothelial function and adiponectin gene expression in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Thomas S; Li, Weijie; Dominguez, Helena

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors reduce cardiovascular mortality and improve endothelial function in type 2 diabetic patients. We hypothesized that 2 months of quinapril treatment would improve insulin-stimulated endothelial function and glucose uptake in type 2 diabetic subjects...... and simultaneously increase the expression of genes that are pertinent for endothelial function and metabolism. METHODS: Twenty-four type 2 diabetic subjects were randomized to receive 2 months of quinapril 20 mg daily or no treatment in an open parallel study. Endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation...... occlusion plethysmography. Gene expression was measured by real-time PCR. RESULTS: Quinapril treatment increased insulin-stimulated endothelial function in the type 2 diabetic subjects (P = 0.005), whereas forearm glucose uptake was unchanged. Endothelial function was also increased by quinapril (P = 0...

  2. Arbuscular mycorrhiza increase artemisinin accumulation in Artemisia annua by higher expression of key biosynthesis genes via enhanced jasmonic acid levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Shantanu; Upadhyay, Shivangi; Wajid, Saima; Ram, Mauji; Jain, Dharam Chand; Singh, Ved Pal; Abdin, Malik Zainul; Kapoor, Rupam

    2015-07-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that the formation of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) enhances secondary metabolite production in shoots. Despite mounting evidence, relatively little is known about the underlying mechanisms. This study suggests that increase in artemisinin concentration in Artemisia annua colonized by Rhizophagus intraradices is due to altered trichome density as well as transcriptional patterns that are mediated via enhanced jasmonic acid (JA) levels. Mycorrhizal (M) plants had higher JA levels in leaf tissue that may be due to induction of an allene oxidase synthase gene (AOS), encoding one of the key enzymes for JA production. Non-mycorrhizal (NM) plants were exogenously supplied with a range of methyl jasmonic acid concentrations. When leaves of NM and M plants with similar levels of endogenous JA were compared, these matched closely in terms of shoot trichome density, artemisinin concentration, and transcript profile of artemisinin biosynthesis genes. Mycorrhization increased artemisinin levels by increasing glandular trichome density and transcriptional activation of artemisinin biosynthesis genes. Transcriptional analysis of some rate-limiting enzymes of mevalonate and methyl erythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways revealed that AM increases isoprenoids by induction of the MEP pathway. A decline in artemisinin concentration in shoots of NM and M plants treated with ibuprofen (an inhibitor of JA biosynthesis) further confirmed the implication of JA in the mechanism of artemisinin production.

  3. Transgenic Suppression of AGAMOUS Genes in Apple Reduces Fertility and Increases Floral Attractiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Klocko, Amy L.; Borejsza-Wysocka, Ewa; Brunner, Amy M.; Shevchenko, Olga; Aldwinckle, Herb; Strauss, Steven H.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the ability of RNA interference (RNAi) directed against two co-orthologs of AGAMOUS (AG) from Malus domestica (domestic apple, MdAG) to reduce the risks of invasiveness and provide genetic containment of transgenes, while also promoting the attractiveness of flowers for ornamental usage. Suppression of two MdAG-like genes, MdMADS15 and MdMADS22, led to the production of trees with highly showy, polypetalous flowers. These "double-flowers" had strongly reduced expression of bot...

  4. Reduced diversity and increased virulence-gene carriage in intestinal enterobacteria of coeliac children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Ester; Nadal, Inmaculada; Donat, Ester; Ribes-Koninckx, Carmen; Calabuig, Miguel; Sanz, Yolanda

    2008-01-01

    Background Coeliac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathology triggered by the ingestion of cereal gluten proteins. This disorder is associated with imbalances in the composition of the gut microbiota that could be involved in its pathogenesis. The aim of the present study was to determine whether intestinal Enterobacteriaceae populations of active and non-active coeliac patients and healthy children differ in diversity and virulence-gene carriage, so as to establish a possible link between the pathogenic potential of enterobacteria and the disease. Methods Enterobacteriaceae clones were isolated on VRBD agar from faecal samples of 31 subjects (10 active coeliac patients, 10 symptom-free coeliac patients and 11 healthy controls) and identified at species level by the API 20E system. Escherichia coli clones were classified into four phylogenetic groups A, B1, B2 and D and the prevalence of eight virulence-associated genes (type-1 fimbriae [fimA], P fimbriae [papC], S fimbriae [sfaD/E], Dr haemagglutinin [draA], haemolysin [hlyA], capsule K1 [neuB], capsule K5 [KfiC] and aerobactin [iutA]) was determined by multiplex PCR. Results A total of 155 Enterobacteriaceae clones were isolated. Non-E. coli clones were more commonly isolated in healthy children than in coeliac patients. The four phylogenetic E. coli groups were equally distributed in healthy children, while in both coeliac patients most commensal isolates belonged to group A. Within the virulent groups, B2 was the most prevalent in active coeliac disease children, while D was the most prevalent in non-active coeliac patients. E coli clones of the virulent phylogenetic groups (B2+D) from active and non-active coeliac patients carried a higher number of virulence genes than those from healthy individuals. Prevalence of P fimbriae (papC), capsule K5 (sfaD/E) and haemolysin (hlyA) genes was higher in E. coli isolated from active and non-active coeliac children than in those from control subjects. Conclusion This

  5. Increased in vitro and in vivo gene transfer by adenovirus vectors containing chimeric fiber proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Wickham, T.J.; E.; Tzeng; Shears, L. L.; Roelvink, P. W.; Li, Y; Lee, G. M.; Brough, D E; Lizonova, A; Kovesdi, I

    1997-01-01

    Alteration of the natural tropism of adenovirus (Ad) will permit gene transfer into specific cell types and thereby greatly broaden the scope of target diseases that can be treated by using Ad. We have constructed two Ad vectors which contain modifications to the Ad fiber coat protein that redirect virus binding to either alpha(v) integrin [AdZ.F(RGD)] or heparan sulfate [AdZ.F(pK7)] cellular receptors. These vectors were constructed by a novel method involving E4 rescue of an E4-deficient Ad...

  6. SND2, a NAC transcription factor gene, regulates genes involved in secondary cell wall development in Arabidopsis fibres and increases fibre cell area in Eucalyptus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussey Steven G

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NAC domain transcription factors initiate secondary cell wall biosynthesis in Arabidopsis fibres and vessels by activating numerous transcriptional regulators and biosynthetic genes. NAC family member SND2 is an indirect target of a principal regulator of fibre secondary cell wall formation, SND1. A previous study showed that overexpression of SND2 produced a fibre cell-specific increase in secondary cell wall thickness in Arabidopsis stems, and that the protein was able to transactivate the cellulose synthase8 (CesA8 promoter. However, the full repertoire of genes regulated by SND2 is unknown, and the effect of its overexpression on cell wall chemistry remains unexplored. Results We overexpressed SND2 in Arabidopsis and analyzed homozygous lines with regards to stem chemistry, biomass and fibre secondary cell wall thickness. A line showing upregulation of CesA8 was selected for transcriptome-wide gene expression profiling. We found evidence for upregulation of biosynthetic genes associated with cellulose, xylan, mannan and lignin polymerization in this line, in agreement with significant co-expression of these genes with native SND2 transcripts according to public microarray repositories. Only minor alterations in cell wall chemistry were detected. Transcription factor MYB103, in addition to SND1, was upregulated in SND2-overexpressing plants, and we detected upregulation of genes encoding components of a signal transduction machinery recently proposed to initiate secondary cell wall formation. Several homozygous T4 and hemizygous T1 transgenic lines with pronounced SND2 overexpression levels revealed a negative impact on fibre wall deposition, which may be indirectly attributable to excessive overexpression rather than co-suppression. Conversely, overexpression of SND2 in Eucalyptus stems led to increased fibre cross-sectional cell area. Conclusions This study supports a function for SND2 in the regulation of cellulose and

  7. Interactions among genes in the ErbB-Neuregulin signalling network are associated with increased susceptibility to schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGinnis Ralph

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence of genetic association between the NRG1 (Neuregulin-1 gene and schizophrenia is now well-documented. Furthermore, several recent reports suggest association between schizophrenia and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in ERBB4, one of the receptors for Neuregulin-1. In this study, we have extended the previously published associations by investigating the involvement of all eight genes from the ERBB and NRG families for association with schizophrenia. Methods Eight genes from the ERBB and NRG families were tested for association to schizophrenia using a collection of 396 cases and 1,342 blood bank controls ascertained from Aberdeen, UK. A total of 365 SNPs were tested. Association testing of both alleles and genotypes was carried out using the fast Fisher's Exact Test (FET. To understand better the nature of the associations, all pairs of SNPs separated by ≥ 0.5 cM with at least nominal evidence of association (P Results 42 out of 365 tested SNPs in the eight genes from the ERBB and NRG gene families were significantly associated with schizophrenia (P Conclusion These new findings suggest that observed associations between NRG1 and schizophrenia may be mediated through functional interaction not just with ERBB4, but with other members of the NRG and ERBB families. There is evidence that genetic interaction among these loci may increase susceptibility to schizophrenia.

  8. Identification of cancer stem cell subpopulations of CD34(+) PLC/PRF/5 that result in three types of human liver carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Su Cheol; Nguyen, Ngoc Tue; Eun, Jong Ryeol; Zhang, Yanling; Jung, Yong Jin; Tschudy-Seney, Benjamin; Trotsyuk, Artem; Lam, Alexander; Ramsamooj, Rajendra; Zhang, Yanghong; Theise, Neil D; Zern, Mark A; Duan, Yuyou

    2015-04-15

    CD34(+) stem cells play an important role during liver development and regeneration. Thus, we hypothesized that some human liver carcinomas (HLCs) might be derived from transformed CD34(+) stem cells. Here, we determined that a population of CD34(+) cells isolated from PLC/PRF/5 hepatoma cells (PLC) appears to function as liver cancer stem cells (LCSCs) by forming HLCs in immunodeficient mice with as few as 100 cells. Moreover, the CD34(+) PLC subpopulation cells had an advantage over CD34(-) PLCs at initiating tumors. Three types of HLCs were generated from CD34(+) PLC: hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs); cholangiocarcinomas (CC); and combined hepatocellular cholangiocarcinomas (CHCs). Tumors formed in mice transplanted with 12 subpopulations and 6 progeny subpopulations of CD34(+) PLC cells. Interestingly, progenies with certain surface antigens (CD133, CD44, CD90, or EPCAM) predominantly yielded HCCs. CD34(+) PLCs that also expressed OV6 and their progeny OV6(+) cells primarily produced CHC and CC. This represents the first experiment to demonstrate that the OV6(+) antigen is associated with human CHC and CC. CD34(+) PLCs that also expressed CD31 and their progeny CD31(+) cells formed CHCs. Gene expression patterns and tumor cell populations from all xenografts exhibited diverse patterns, indicating that tumor-initiating cells (TICs) with distinct antigenic profiles contribute to cancer cell heterogeneity. Therefore, we identified CD34(+) PLC cells functioning as LCSCs generating three types of HLCs. Eighteen subpopulations from one origin had the capacity independently to initiate tumors, thus functioning as TICs. This finding has broad implications for better understanding of the multistep model of tumor initiation and progression. Our finding also indicates that CD34(+) PLCs that also express OV6 or CD31 result in types of HLCs. This is the first report that PLC/PRF/5 subpopulations expressing CD34 in combination with particular antigens defines categories of

  9. The metabolically active subpopulation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms survives exposure to membrane-targeting antimicrobials via distinct molecular mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Pamp, Sünje Johanna; Nilsson, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are reported to be inherently refractory toward antimicrobial attack and, therefore, cause problems in industrial and medical settings. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms contain subpopulations that exhibit high metabolic activity and subpopulations that exhibit low metabolic activity. We h...

  10. Fire-induced population reduction and landscape opening increases gene flow via pollen dispersal in Pinus halepensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shohami, D; Nathan, R

    2014-01-01

    Population reduction and disturbances may alter dispersal, mating patterns and gene flow. Rather than taking the common approach of comparing different populations or sites, here we studied gene flow via wind-mediated effective pollen dispersal on the same plant individuals before and after a fire-induced population drop, in a natural stand of Pinus halepensis. The fire killed 96% of the pine trees in the stand and cleared the vegetation in the area. Thirteen trees survived in two groups separated by ~80 m, and seven of these trees had serotinous (closed) prefire cones that did not open despite the fire. We analysed pollen from closed pre and postfire cones using microsatellites. The two groups of surviving trees were highly genetically differentiated, and the pollen they produced also showed strong among-group differentiation and very high kinship both before and after the fire, indicating limited and very local pollen dispersal. The pollen not produced by the survivors also showed significant prefire spatial genetic structure and high kinship, indicating mainly within-population origin and limited gene flow from outside, but became spatially homogeneous with random kinship after the fire. We suggest that postfire gene flow via wind-mediated pollen dispersal increased by two putative mechanisms: (i) a drastic reduction in local pollen production due to population thinning, effectively increasing pollen immigration through reduced dilution effect; (ii) an increase in wind speeds in the vegetation-free postfire landscape. This research shows that dispersal can alleviate negative genetic effects of population size reduction and that disturbances might enhance gene flow, rather than reduce it. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Planting increases the abundance and structure complexity of soil core functional genes relevant to carbon and nitrogen cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Liang, Yuting; Jiang, Yuji; Yang, Yunfeng; Xue, Kai; Xiong, Jinbo; Zhou, Jizhong; Sun, Bo

    2015-09-23

    Plants have an important impact on soil microbial communities and their functions. However, how plants determine the microbial composition and network interactions is still poorly understood. During a four-year field experiment, we investigated the functional gene composition of three types of soils (Phaeozem, Cambisols and Acrisol) under maize planting and bare fallow regimes located in cold temperate, warm temperate and subtropical regions, respectively. The core genes were identified using high-throughput functional gene microarray (GeoChip 3.0), and functional molecular ecological networks (fMENs) were subsequently developed with the random matrix theory (RMT)-based conceptual framework. Our results demonstrated that planting significantly (P soils and 83.5% of microbial alpha-diversity can be explained by the plant factor. Moreover, planting had significant impacts on the microbial community structure and the network interactions of the microbial communities. The calculated network complexity was higher under maize planting than under bare fallow regimes. The increase of the functional genes led to an increase in both soil respiration and nitrification potential with maize planting, indicating that changes in the soil microbial communities and network interactions influenced ecological functioning.

  12. Biochemical phenotypes to discriminate microbial subpopulations and improve outbreak detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Galar

    Full Text Available Clinical microbiology laboratories worldwide constitute an invaluable resource for monitoring emerging threats and the spread of antimicrobial resistance. We studied the growing number of biochemical tests routinely performed on clinical isolates to explore their value as epidemiological markers.Microbiology laboratory results from January 2009 through December 2011 from a 793-bed hospital stored in WHONET were examined. Variables included patient location, collection date, organism, and 47 biochemical and 17 antimicrobial susceptibility test results reported by Vitek 2. To identify biochemical tests that were particularly valuable (stable with repeat testing, but good variability across the species or problematic (inconsistent results with repeat testing, three types of variance analyses were performed on isolates of K. pneumonia: descriptive analysis of discordant biochemical results in same-day isolates, an average within-patient variance index, and generalized linear mixed model variance component analysis.4,200 isolates of K. pneumoniae were identified from 2,485 patients, 32% of whom had multiple isolates. The first two variance analyses highlighted SUCT, TyrA, GlyA, and GGT as "nuisance" biochemicals for which discordant within-patient test results impacted a high proportion of patient results, while dTAG had relatively good within-patient stability with good heterogeneity across the species. Variance component analyses confirmed the relative stability of dTAG, and identified additional biochemicals such as PHOS with a large between patient to within patient variance ratio. A reduced subset of biochemicals improved the robustness of strain definition for carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae. Surveillance analyses suggest that the reduced biochemical profile could improve the timeliness and specificity of outbreak detection algorithms.The statistical approaches explored can improve the robust recognition of microbial subpopulations with

  13. Mechanisms of topoisomerase I (TOP1 gene copy number increase in a stage III colorectal cancer patient cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Hersi Smith

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Topoisomerase I (Top1 is the target of Top1 inhibitor chemotherapy. The TOP1 gene, located at 20q12-q13.1, is frequently detected at elevated copy numbers in colorectal cancer (CRC. The present study explores the mechanism, frequency and prognostic impact of TOP1 gene aberrations in stage III CRC and how these can be detected by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH. METHODS: Nine CRC cell line metaphase spreads were analyzed by FISH with a TOP1 probe in combination with a reference probe covering either the centromeric region of chromosome 20 (CEN-20 or chromosome 2 (CEN-2. Tissue sections from 154 chemonaive stage III CRC patients, previously studied with TOP1/CEN-20, were analyzed with TOP1/CEN-2. Relationships between biomarker status and overall survival (OS, time to recurrence (TTR in CRC and time to local recurrence (LR; rectal cancer only were determined. RESULTS: TOP1 aberrations were observed in four cell line metaphases. In all cell lines CEN-2 was found to reflect chromosomal ploidy levels and therefore the TOP1/CEN-2 probe combination was selected to identify TOP1 gene gains (TOP1/CEN-2≥1.5. One hundred and three patients (68.2% had TOP1 gain, of which 15 patients (14.6% harbored an amplification (TOP1/CEN-20≥2.0. TOP1 gene gain did not have any association with clinical endpoints, whereas TOP1 amplification showed a non-significant trend towards longer TTR (multivariate HR: 0.50, p = 0.08. Once amplified cases were segregated from other cases of gene gain, non-amplified gene increases (TOP1/CEN-2≥1.5 and TOP1/CEN-20<2.0 showed a trend towards shorter TTR (univariate HR: 1.57, p = 0.07. CONCLUSIONS: TOP1 gene copy number increase occurs frequently in stage III CRC in a mechanism that often includes CEN-20. Using CEN-2 as a measurement for tumor ploidy levels, we were able to discriminate between different mechanisms of gene gain, which appeared to differ in prognostic impact. TOP1 FISH guidelines have

  14. Type I Interferon Gene Response Is Increased in Early and Established Rheumatoid Arthritis and Correlates with Autoantibody Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Delgado, Julio E; Bastián-Hernandez, Yadira; Macias-Segura, Noe; Santiago-Algarra, David; Castillo-Ortiz, Jose D; Alemán-Navarro, Ana L; Martínez-Tejada, Pedro; Enciso-Moreno, Leonor; Garcia-De Lira, Yolanda; Olguín-Calderón, Diana; Trouw, Leendert A; Ramos-Remus, Cesar; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory debilitating disease that affects the joints in the early and productive phases of an individual's life. Several cytokines have been linked to the disease pathogenesis and are known to contribute to the inflammatory state characteristic of RA. The participation of type I interferon (IFN) in the pathogenesis of the disease has been already described as well as the identity of the genes that are regulated by this molecule, which are collectively known as the type I IFN signature. These genes have several functions associated with apoptosis, transcriptional regulation, protein degradation, Th2 cell induction, B cell proliferation, etc. This article evaluated the expression of several genes of the IFN signature in different stages of disease and their correlation with the levels of anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) anticarbamylated protein (Anti-CarP) antibodies. Samples from individuals with early and established RA, high-risk individuals (ACPA+ and ACPA-), and healthy controls were recruited at "Unidad de Artritis y Rheumatismo" (Rheumatism and Arthritis Unit) in Guadalajara Jalisco Mexico. Determinations of ACPA were made with Eurodiagnostica ACPA plus kit. Anti-CarP determinations were made according to previously described protocols. RNA was isolated, and purity and integrity were determined according to RNA integrity number >6. Gene expression analysis was made by RT-qPCR using specific primers for mRNAs of the type I IFN signature. Relative gene expression was calculated according to Livak and Schmitgen. Significant differences in gene expression were identified when comparing the different groups for MXA and MXB (P < 0.05), also when comparing established RA and ACPA- in both IFIT 1 and G15. An increased expression of ISG15 was identified (P < 0.05), and a clear tendency toward increase was identified for HERC5. EPSTRI1, IFI6, and IFI35 were found to be elevated in the chronic/established RA and

  15. Increased gene expression of histone deacetylases in patients with Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Vibe; Larsen, Thomas Stauffer; Thomassen, Mads

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Myeloproliferation, myeloaccumulation (decreased apoptosis), inflammation, bone marrow fibrosis and angiogenesis are cardinal features of the Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms: essential thrombocythemia (ET), polycythemia vera (PV) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF...... proteins in favor of apoptosis (enhanced apoptosis) and also to inhibit angiogenesis. Recently, enhanced HDAC enzyme activity has been found in CD34+cells from patients with PMF, enzyme activity levels highly exceeding those recorded in other chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (CMPNs). The raised levels...... correlated to the degree of splenomegaly, suggesting that HDAC might be recruited as ET or PV progresses into myelofibrosis or PMF progresses into a more advanced stage. Accordingly, HDAC inhibition is an obvious novel therapeutic approach in these neoplasms. Using global gene expression profiling of whole...

  16. Increased conjugation frequencies in clinical Enterococcus faecium strains harbouring the enterococcal surface protein gene esp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, B; Billström, H; Edlund, C

    2006-06-01

    This study compared the in-vitro ability of Enterococcus faecium isolates of different origin to acquire vanA by conjugation in relation to the occurrence of the esp gene. In total, 29 clinical isolates (15/29 esp+), 30 normal intestinal microflora isolates (2/30 esp+) and one probiotic strain (esp-) were studied with a filter-mating assay. Conjugation events were confirmed by PCR and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Among the infection-derived isolates, the esp+ isolates had higher conjugation frequencies compared with esp- isolates (p < 0.001), with a median value of 6.4 x 10(-6) transconjugants/donor. The probiotic strain was shown to acquire vanA vancomycin resistance in in-vitro filter mating experiments.

  17. Increased isobutanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by overexpression of genes in valine metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xiao; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Borodina, Irina

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Isobutanol can be a better biofuel than ethanol due to its higher energy density and lower hygroscopicity. Furthermore, the branched-chain structure of isobutanol gives a higher octane number than the isomeric n-butanol. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was chosen as the production host because...... overexpression of biosynthetic genes ILV2, ILV3, and ILV5 in valine metabolism in anaerobic fermentation of glucose in mineral medium in S. cerevisiae. Isobutanol yield was further improved by twofold by the additional overexpression of BAT2, encoding the cytoplasmic branched-chain amino-acid aminotransferase....... Overexpression of ILV6, encoding the regulatory subunit of Ilv2, in the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain decreased isobutanol production yield by threefold. In aerobic cultivations in shake flasks in mineral medium, the isobutanol yield of the ILV2 ILV3 ILV5 overexpression strain and the reference strain...

  18. Placental triglyceride accumulation in maternal type 1 diabetes is associated with increased lipase gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Marie Louise Skakkebæk; Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2006-01-01

    Maternal diabetes can cause fetal macrosomia and increased risk of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease in adulthood of the offspring. Although increased transplacental lipid transport could be involved, the impact of maternal type 1 diabetes on molecular mechanisms for lipid transport...

  19. Smaller, scale-free gene networks increase quantitative trait heritability and result in faster population recovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob W Malcom

    Full Text Available One of the goals of biology is to bridge levels of organization. Recent technological advances are enabling us to span from genetic sequence to traits, and then from traits to ecological dynamics. The quantitative genetics parameter heritability describes how quickly a trait can evolve, and in turn describes how quickly a population can recover from an environmental change. Here I propose that we can link the details of the genetic architecture of a quantitative trait--i.e., the number of underlying genes and their relationships in a network--to population recovery rates by way of heritability. I test this hypothesis using a set of agent-based models in which individuals possess one of two network topologies or a linear genotype-phenotype map, 16-256 genes underlying the trait, and a variety of mutation and recombination rates and degrees of environmental change. I find that the network architectures introduce extensive directional epistasis that systematically hides and reveals additive genetic variance and affects heritability: network size, topology, and recombination explain 81% of the variance in average heritability in a stable environment. Network size and topology, the width of the fitness function, pre-change additive variance, and certain interactions account for ∼75% of the variance in population recovery times after a sudden environmental change. These results suggest that not only the amount of additive variance, but importantly the number of loci across which it is distributed, is important in regulating the rate at which a trait can evolve and populations can recover. Taken in conjunction with previous research focused on differences in degree of network connectivity, these results provide a set of theoretical expectations and testable hypotheses for biologists working to span levels of organization from the genotype to the phenotype, and from the phenotype to the environment.

  20. Saccharomyces cerevisiae FLO1 Gene Demonstrates Genetic Linkage to Increased Fermentation Rate at Low Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca C. Deed

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Low fermentation temperatures are of importance to food and beverage industries working with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Therefore, the identification of genes demonstrating a positive impact on fermentation kinetics is of significant interest. A set of 121 mapped F1 progeny, derived from a cross between haploid strains BY4716 (a derivative of the laboratory yeast S288C and wine yeast RM11-1a, were fermented in New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc grape juice at 12.5°. Analyses of five key fermentation kinetic parameters among the F1 progeny identified a quantitative trait locus (QTL on chromosome I with a significant degree of linkage to maximal fermentation rate (Vmax at low temperature. Independent deletions of two candidate genes within the region, FLO1 and SWH1, were constructed in the parental strains (with S288C representing BY4716. Fermentation of wild-type and deletion strains at 12.5 and 25° confirmed that the genetic linkage to Vmax corresponds to the S288C version of the FLO1 allele, as the absence of this allele reduced Vmax by ∼50% at 12.5°, but not at 25°. Reciprocal hemizygosity analysis (RHA between S288C and RM11-1a FLO1 alleles did not confirm the prediction that the S288C version of FLO1 was promoting more rapid fermentation in the opposing strain background, suggesting that the positive effect on Vmax derived from S288C FLO1 may only provide an advantage in haploids, or is dependent on strain-specific cis or trans effects. This research adds to the growing body of evidence demonstrating the role of FLO1 in providing stress tolerance to S. cerevisiae during fermentation.

  1. Variation of seed protein of Alkanna orientalis subpopulations in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Geographically, the first four sites are closed wadi systems (narrow wadi beds bounded by high mountains) and hence probably having very restricted gene flow with each other, while the last two sites (El-Rasis and El-Sheikh) are open flat areas expected to be subjected to occasional gene flow via seed transport from the ...

  2. Optimal allocation of conservation effort among subpopulations of a threatened species: how important is patch quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvenet, Aliénor L M; Baxter, Peter W J; McDonald-Madden, Eve; Possingham, Hugh P

    2010-04-01

    Money is often a limiting factor in conservation, and attempting to conserve endangered species can be costly. Consequently, a framework for optimizing fiscally constrained conservation decisions for a single species is needed. In this paper we find the optimal budget allocation among isolated subpopulations of a threatened species to minimize local extinction probability. We solve the problem using stochastic dynamic programming, derive a useful and simple alternative guideline for allocating funds, and test its performance using forward simulation. The model considers subpopulations that persist in habitat patches of differing quality, which in our model is reflected in different relationships between money invested and extinction risk. We discover that, in most cases, subpopulations that are less efficient to manage should receive more money than those that are more efficient to manage, due to higher investment needed to reduce extinction risk. Our simple investment guideline performs almost as well as the exact optimal strategy. We illustrate our approach with a case study of the management of the Sumatran tiger, Panthera tigris sumatrae, in Kerinci Seblat National Park (KSNP), Indonesia. We find that different budgets should be allocated to the separate tiger subpopulations in KSNP. The subpopulation that is not at risk of extinction does not require any management investment. Based on the combination of risks of extinction and habitat quality, the optimal allocation for these particular tiger subpopulations is an unusual case: subpopulations that occur in higher-quality habitat (more efficient to manage) should receive more funds than the remaining subpopulation that is in lower-quality habitat. Because the yearly budget allocated to the KSNP for tiger conservation is small, to guarantee the persistence of all the subpopulations that are currently under threat we need to prioritize those that are easier to save. When allocating resources among subpopulations

  3. Altered intestinal functions and increased local inflammation in insulin-resistant obese subjects: a gene-expression profile analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veilleux, Alain; Mayeur, Sylvain; Bérubé, Jean-Christophe; Beaulieu, Jean-François; Tremblay, Eric; Hould, Frédéric-Simon; Bossé, Yohan; Richard, Denis; Levy, Emile

    2015-09-16

    Metabolic alterations relevant to postprandial dyslipidemia were previously identified in the intestine of obese insulin-resistant subjects. The aim of the study was to identify the genes deregulated by systemic insulin resistance in the intestine of severely obese subjects. Transcripts from duodenal samples of insulin-sensitive (HOMA-IR insulin-resistant (HOMA-IR > 7, n = 9) obese subjects were assayed by microarray (Illumina HumanHT-12). A total of 195 annotated genes were identified as differentially expressed between these two groups (Fold change > 1.2). Of these genes, 36 were found to be directly involved in known intestinal functions, including digestion, extracellular matrix, endocrine system, immunity and cholesterol metabolism. Interestingly, all differentially expressed genes (n = 8) implicated in inflammation and oxidative stress were found to be upregulated in the intestine of insulin-resistant compared to insulin-sensitive subjects. Metabolic pathway analysis revealed that several signaling pathways involved in immunity and inflammation were significantly enriched in differently expressed genes and were predicted to be activated in the intestine of insulin-resistant subjects. Using stringent criteria (Fold change > 1.5; FDR insulin-resistant compared to insulin-sensitive subjects: the transcripts of the insulinotropic glucose-dependant peptide (GIP) and of the β-microseminoprotein (MSMB) were significantly reduced, but that of the humanin like-1 (MTRNR2L1) was significantly increased. These results underline that systemic insulin resistance is associated with remodeling of key intestinal functions. Moreover, these data indicate that small intestine metabolic dysfunction is accompanied with a local amplification of low-grade inflammatory process implicating several pathways. Genes identified in this study are potentially triggered throughout the development of intestinal metabolic abnormalities, which could contribute to

  4. Over-expression of a novel JAZ family gene from Glycine soja, increases salt and alkali stress tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Dan; Cai, Hua; Luo, Xiao; Bai, Xi [Plant Bioengineering Laboratory, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin 150030 (China); Deyholos, Michael K. [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada T6G 2E9 (Canada); Chen, Qin [Lethbridge Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, 5403-1 Ave., South P.O. Box 3000, Lethbridge, AB, Canada T1J 4B1 (Canada); Chen, Chao; Ji, Wei [Plant Bioengineering Laboratory, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin 150030 (China); Zhu, Yanming, E-mail: ymzhu@neau.edu.cn [Plant Bioengineering Laboratory, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin 150030 (China)

    2012-09-21

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We isolated and characterized a novel JAZ family gene, GsJAZ2, from Glycine soja. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of GsJAZ2 enhanced plant tolerance to salt and alkali stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The transcriptions of stress marker genes were higher in GsJAZ2 overexpression lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GsJAZ2 was localized to nucleus. -- Abstract: Salt and alkali stress are two of the main environmental factors limiting crop production. Recent discoveries show that the JAZ family encodes plant-specific genes involved in jasmonate signaling. However, there is only limited information about this gene family in abiotic stress response, and in wild soybean (Glycine soja), which is a species noted for its tolerance to alkali and salinity. Here, we isolated and characterized a novel JAZ family gene, GsJAZ2, from G. soja. Transcript abundance of GsJAZ2 increased following exposure to salt, alkali, cold and drought. Over-expression of GsJAZ2 in Arabidopsis resulted in enhanced plant tolerance to salt and alkali stress. The expression levels of some alkali stress response and stress-inducible marker genes were significantly higher in the GsJAZ2 overexpression lines as compared to wild-type plants. Subcellular localization studies using a GFP fusion protein showed that GsJAZ2 was localized to the nucleus. These results suggest that the newly isolated wild soybean GsJAZ2 is a positive regulator of plant salt and alkali stress tolerance.

  5. The Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Gene AhLPAT2 Increases the Lipid Content of Transgenic Arabidopsis Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Silong; Lei, Yong; Xu, Xian; Huang, Jiaquan; Jiang, Huifang; Wang, Jin; Cheng, Zengshu; Zhang, Jianan; Song, Yahui; Liao, Boshou; Li, Yurong

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAT), which converts lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) to phosphatidic acid (PA), catalyzes the addition of fatty acyl moieties to the sn-2 position of the LPA glycerol backbone in triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis. We recently reported the cloning and temporal-spatial expression of a peanut (Arachis hypogaea) AhLPAT2gene, showing that an increase in AhLPAT2 transcript levels was closely correlated with an increase in seed oil levels. However, the function of the enzyme encoded by the AhLPAT2 gene remains unclear. Here, we report that AhLPAT2 transcript levels were consistently higher in the seeds of a high-oil cultivar than in those of a low-oil cultivar across different seed developmental stages. Seed-specific overexpression of AhLPAT2 in Arabidopsis results in a higher percentage of oil in the seeds and greater-than-average seed weight in the transgenic plants compared with the wild-type plants, leading to a significant increase in total oil yield per plant. The total fatty acid (FA) content and the proportion of unsaturated FAs also increased. In the developing siliques of AhLPAT2-overexpressing plants, the expression levels of genes encoding crucial enzymes involved in de novo FA synthesis, acetyl-CoA subunit (AtBCCP2) and acyl carrier protein 1 (AtACP1) were elevated. AhLPAT2 overexpression also promoted the expression of several key genes related to TAG assembly, sucrose metabolism, and glycolysis. These results demonstrate that the expression of AhLPAT2 plays an important role in glycerolipid production in peanuts.

  6. The Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. Gene AhLPAT2 Increases the Lipid Content of Transgenic Arabidopsis Seeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silong Chen

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAT, which converts lysophosphatidic acid (LPA to phosphatidic acid (PA, catalyzes the addition of fatty acyl moieties to the sn-2 position of the LPA glycerol backbone in triacylglycerol (TAG biosynthesis. We recently reported the cloning and temporal-spatial expression of a peanut (Arachis hypogaea AhLPAT2gene, showing that an increase in AhLPAT2 transcript levels was closely correlated with an increase in seed oil levels. However, the function of the enzyme encoded by the AhLPAT2 gene remains unclear. Here, we report that AhLPAT2 transcript levels were consistently higher in the seeds of a high-oil cultivar than in those of a low-oil cultivar across different seed developmental stages. Seed-specific overexpression of AhLPAT2 in Arabidopsis results in a higher percentage of oil in the seeds and greater-than-average seed weight in the transgenic plants compared with the wild-type plants, leading to a significant increase in total oil yield per plant. The total fatty acid (FA content and the proportion of unsaturated FAs also increased. In the developing siliques of AhLPAT2-overexpressing plants, the expression levels of genes encoding crucial enzymes involved in de novo FA synthesis, acetyl-CoA subunit (AtBCCP2 and acyl carrier protein 1 (AtACP1 were elevated. AhLPAT2 overexpression also promoted the expression of several key genes related to TAG assembly, sucrose metabolism, and glycolysis. These results demonstrate that the expression of AhLPAT2 plays an important role in glycerolipid production in peanuts.

  7. IBD-associated TL1A gene (TNFSF15 haplotypes determine increased expression of TL1A protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin S Michelsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The recently identified member of the TNF superfamily TL1A (TNFSF15 increases IFN-gamma production by T cells in peripheral and mucosal CCR9+ T cells. TL1A and its receptor DR3 are up-regulated during chronic intestinal inflammation in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease (CD. TL1A gene haplotypes increase CD susceptibility in Japanese, European, and US cohorts. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report that the presence of TL1A gene haplotype B increases risk in Jewish CD patients with antibody titers for the E. coli outer membrane porin C (OmpC+ (Haplotype B frequency in Jewish CD patients: 24.9% for OmpC negative and 41.9% for OmpC positive patients, respectively, P< or =0.001. CD14+ monocytes isolated from Jewish OmpC+ patients homozygous for TL1A gene haplotype B express higher levels of TL1A in response to FcgammaR stimulation, a known inducing pathway of TL1A, as measured by ELISA. Furthermore, the membrane expression of TL1A is increased on peripheral monocytes from Jewish but not non-Jewish CD patients with the risk haplotype. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that TL1A gene variation exacerbates induction of TL1A in response to FcgammaR stimulation in Jewish CD patients and this may lead to chronic intestinal inflammation via overwhelming T cell responses. Thus, TL1A may provide an important target for therapeutic intervention in this subgroup of IBD patients.

  8. Increased cortical area and thickness in the distal radius in subjects with SHOX-gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, A L; Hansen, S; Brixen, K; Frost, M

    2014-12-01

    Short-stature homeobox (SHOX) gene haploinsufficiency may cause skeletal dysplasia including Léri-Weill Dyschondrosteosis (LWD), a clinical entity characterised by the triad of low height, mesomelic disproportion and Madelung's deformity of the wrist. Bone microarchitecture and estimated strength in adult SHOX mutation carriers have not been examined. Twenty-two subjects with a SHOX mutation including 7 males and 15 females with a median age of 38.8 [21.1-52.2] years were recruited from five unrelated families. The control group consisted of 22 healthy subjects matched on age and sex. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Bone geometry, volumetric density, microarchitecture and finite element estimated (FEA) bone strength were measured using high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT). A full region of interest (ROI) image analysis and height-matched ROI analyses adjusting for differences in body height between the two groups were performed. Areal BMD and T-scores showed no significant differences between cases and controls. Total radius area was smaller in cases than controls (207 [176-263] vs. 273 [226-298] mm, pRadius cortical bone area (74 ± 20 vs. 58 ± 17 mm(2), p=0.01) and thickness (1.16 ± 0.30 vs. 0.84 ± 0.26 mm, pRadius trabecular bone area (119 [103-192] vs. 202 [168-247] mm(2), pradius and tibia cortical porosity or FEA failure load between groups. A segment of cortical bone defect was identified in the distal radius adjacent to ulna in five unrelated SHOX mutation carriers. Subjects with a SHOX mutation presented with a different bone geometry in radius and tibia while there were no differences in BMD or failure load compared to controls, suggesting that mutations in SHOX gene may have an impact on bone microarchitecture albeit not bone strength. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hemizygosity of transsulfuration genes confers increased vulnerability against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagiya, Yoshifumi; Kamata, Shotaro; Mitsuoka, Saya; Okada, Norihiko; Yoshida, Saori; Yamamoto, Junya; Ohkubo, Rika [Department of Biochemistry, Keio University School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokyo 105-8512 (Japan); Abiko, Yumi [Environmental Biology Laboratory, School of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575 (Japan); Yamada, Hidenori [Jobu Hospital for Respiratory Diseases, Maebashi 371-0048 (Japan); Akahoshi, Noriyuki [Department of Immunology, Akita University Graduate School of Medicine, Akita 010-8543 (Japan); Kasahara, Tadashi [Department of Biochemistry, Keio University School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokyo 105-8512 (Japan); Kumagai, Yoshito [Environmental Biology Laboratory, School of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575 (Japan); Ishii, Isao, E-mail: isao-ishii@umin.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, Keio University School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokyo 105-8512 (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    The key mechanism for acetaminophen hepatotoxicity is cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent formation of N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine, a potent electrophile that forms protein adducts. Previous studies revealed the fundamental role of glutathione, which binds to and detoxifies N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine. Glutathione is synthesized from cysteine in the liver, and N-acetylcysteine is used as a sole antidote for acetaminophen poisoning. Here, we evaluated the potential roles of transsulfuration enzymes essential for cysteine biosynthesis, cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CTH), in acetaminophen hepatotoxicity using hemizygous (Cbs{sup +/−} or Cth{sup +/−}) and homozygous (Cth{sup −/−}) knockout mice. At 4 h after intraperitoneal acetaminophen injection, serum alanine aminotransferase levels were highly elevated in Cth{sup −/−} mice at 150 mg/kg dose, and also in Cbs{sup +/−} or Cth{sup +/−} mice at 250 mg/kg dose, which was associated with characteristic centrilobular hepatocyte oncosis. Hepatic glutathione was depleted while serum malondialdehyde accumulated in acetaminophen-injected Cth{sup −/−} mice but not wild-type mice, although glutamate–cysteine ligase (composed of catalytic [GCLC] and modifier [GCLM] subunits) became more activated in the livers of Cth{sup −/−} mice with lower K{sub m} values for Cys and Glu. Proteome analysis using fluorescent two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis revealed 47 differentially expressed proteins after injection of 150 mg acetaminophen/kg into Cth{sup −/−} mice; the profiles were similar to 1000 mg acetaminophen/kg-treated wild-type mice. The prevalence of Cbs or Cth hemizygosity is estimated to be 1:200–300 population; therefore, the deletion or polymorphism of either transsulfuration gene may underlie idiosyncratic acetaminophen vulnerability along with the differences in Cyp, Gclc, and Gclm gene activities. - Highlights: • Cbs{sup +/−}, Cth{sup +/−}, and

  10. Fluorescent porphyrin with an increased uptake in peripheral blood cell subpopulations from colon cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, Carolina; Neagu, Monica

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic fluorescence of synthetic or natural porphyrins is regarded as an attractive characteristic exploited for assisting early cancer diagnosis and/or tumor localization. Single tumor cells circulating in the blood stream can be considered a major step in depicting dissemination of primary tumors, an event of clinical relevance for prognosis, staging or therapy monitoring of cancer. The third leading cause of cancer death in men is colorectal cancer and the hematogenous spreading of primary tumor cells is one of the main events in metastasis of this type of cancer. Hidden in the myriad of circulating blood cells, tumor cells need both a sensitive and affordable detection technique. 5- (3-methoxy)-4-methoxycarbonylphenyl)-10, 15, 20-tris-(4- methoxycarbonylphenyl) - 21, 23-H porphyne is a synthetic porphyrin with a noticeable preference of accumulation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from cancer patients as assessed by flow cytometry analysis. In addition, we found distinct accumulation of porphyrin depending on cancer type (cutaneous melanoma versus colorectal cancer). These data lead to the possibility of identifying circulating cells based on preferential accumulation of this new porphyrin in circulating tumor cells because, even accumulated in low percentage of cells the registered intensity of fluorescence was high. Selecting the genetic markers for circulating tumor cells is an option, but high costs and high level of know-how can be somewhat a hurdle for a rapid evaluation. Thus our approach with a new porphyrin can be developed in an accurate and innovative fast tracking method for circulating cancer cells, at least in colorectal cancer patients.

  11. A functional brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene variant increases the risk of moderate-to-severe allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Peng; Andiappan, Anand Kumar; Quek, Jia Min; Lee, Bernett; Au, Bijin; Sio, Yang Yie; Irwanto, Astrid; Schurmann, Claudia; Grabe, Hans Jörgen; Suri, Bani Kaur; Matta, Sri Anusha; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; Esko, Tonu; Sun, Liangdan; Zhang, Xuejun; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Furen; Larbi, Anis; Xu, Xin; Poidinger, Michael; Liu, Jianjun; Chew, Fook Tim; Rotzschke, Olaf; Shi, Li; Wang, De Yun

    2015-06-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a secretory protein that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis (AR), atopic asthma, and eczema, but it is currently unknown whether BDNF polymorphisms influence susceptibility to moderate-to-severe AR. We sought to identify disease associations and the functional effect of BDNF genetic variants in patients with moderate-to-severe AR. Tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning the BDNF gene were selected from the human HapMap Han Chinese from Beijing (CHB) data set, and associations with moderate-to-severe AR were assessed in 2 independent cohorts of Chinese patients (2216 from Shandong province and 1239 living in Singapore). The functional effects of the BDNF genetic variants were determined by using both in vitro and ex vivo assays. The tagging SNP rs10767664 was significantly associated with the risk of moderate-to-severe AR in both Singapore Chinese (P = .0017; odds ratio, 1.324) and Shandong Chinese populations (P = .039; odds ratio, 1.180). The coding nonsynonymous SNP rs6265 was in perfect linkage with rs10767664 and conferred increased BDNF protein secretion by a human cell line in vitro. Subjects bearing the AA genotype of rs10767664 exhibited increased risk of moderate-to-severe AR and displayed increased BDNF protein and total IgE levels in plasma. Using a large-scale expression quantitative trait locus study, we demonstrated that BDNF SNPs are significantly associated with altered BDNF concentrations in peripheral blood. A common genetic variant of the BDNF gene is associated with increased risk of moderate-to-severe AR, and the AA genotype is associated with increased BDNF mRNA levels in peripheral blood. Together, these data indicate that functional BDNF gene variants increase the risk of moderate-to-severe AR. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Nitric oxide synthase localized in a subpopulation of vestibular efferents with NADPH diaphorase histochemistry and nitric oxide synthase immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysakowski, A; Singer, M

    2000-11-27

    Efferent innervation of the vestibular labyrinth is known to be cholinergic. More recent studies have also demonstrated the presence of the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide in this system. Nitric oxide is one of a new class of neurotransmitters, the gaseous transmitters. It acts as a second messenger and neurotransmitter in diverse physiological systems. We decided to investigate the anatomical distribution of the synthetic enzyme for nitric oxide, nitric oxide synthase (NOS), to clarify the role of nitric oxide in the vestibular periphery. NADPH diaphorase histochemical and NOS I immunohistochemical studies were done in the adult chinchilla and rat vestibular brainstem; diaphorase histochemistry was done in the chinchilla periphery. Retrograde tracing studies to verify the presence of NOS in brainstem efferent neurons were performed in young chinchillas. Our light microscopic results show that NOS I, as defined mainly by the presence of NADPH diaphorase, is present in a subpopulation of both brainstem efferent neurons and peripheral vestibular efferent boutons. Our ultrastructural results confirm these findings in the periphery. NADPH diaphorase is also present in a subpopulation of type I hair cells, suggesting that nitric oxide might be produced in and act locally upon these cells and other elements in the sensory epithelium. A hypothesis about how nitric oxide is produced in the vestibular periphery and how it may interact with other elements in the vestibular sensory apparatus is presented in the discussion. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP1) gene expression is similarly increased in polycystic ovary syndrome and endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiee, Mohamad N; Mongan, Nigel; Seedhouse, Claire; Chapman, Caroline; Deen, Suha; Abu, Jafaru; Atiomo, William

    2017-05-01

    Women with polycystic ovary syndrome have a three-fold higher risk of endometrial cancer. Insulin resistance and hyperlipidemia may be pertinent factors in the pathogenesis of both conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate endometrial sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 gene expression in polycystic ovary syndrome and endometrial cancer endometrium, and to correlate endometrial sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 gene expression with serum lipid profiles. A cross-sectional study was performed at Nottingham University Hospital, UK. A total of 102 women (polycystic ovary syndrome, endometrial cancer and controls; 34 participants in each group) were recruited. Clinical and biochemical assessments were performed before endometrial biopsies were obtained from all participants. Taqman real-time polymerase chain reaction for endometrial sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 gene and its systemic protein expression were analyzed. The body mass indices of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (29.28 ± 2.91 kg/m 2 ) and controls (28.58 ± 2.62 kg/m 2 ) were not significantly different. Women with endometrial cancer had a higher mean body mass index (32.22 ± 5.70 kg/m 2 ). Sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 gene expression was significantly increased in polycystic ovary syndrome and endometrial cancer endometrium compared with controls (p polycystic ovary syndrome, but this was not statistically significant. Similarly, statistically insignificant positive correlations were found between endometrial sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 gene expression and body mass index in endometrial cancer (r = 0.643, p = 0.06) and waist-hip ratio (r = 0.096, p = 0.073). Sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 gene expression was significantly positively correlated with triglyceride in both polycystic ovary syndrome and endometrial cancer (p = 0.028 and p = 0.027, respectively). Quantitative serum sterol regulatory

  14. Genome Plasticity and Polymorphisms in Critical Genes Correlate with Increased Virulence of Dutch Outbreak-Related Coxiella burnetii Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runa Kuley

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii is an obligate intracellular bacterium and the etiological agent of Q fever. During 2007–2010 the largest Q fever outbreak ever reported occurred in The Netherlands. It is anticipated that strains from this outbreak demonstrated an increased zoonotic potential as more than 40,000 individuals were assumed to be infected. The acquisition of novel genetic factors by these C. burnetii outbreak strains, such as virulence-related genes, has frequently been proposed and discussed, but is not proved yet. In the present study, the whole genome sequence of several Dutch strains (CbNL01 and CbNL12 genotypes, a few additionally selected strains from different geographical locations and publicly available genome sequences were used for a comparative bioinformatics approach. The study focuses on the identification of specific genetic differences in the outbreak related CbNL01 strains compared to other C. burnetii strains. In this approach we investigated the phylogenetic relationship and genomic aspects of virulence and host-specificity. Phylogenetic clustering of whole genome sequences showed a genotype-specific clustering that correlated with the clustering observed using Multiple Locus Variable-number Tandem Repeat Analysis (MLVA. Ortholog analysis on predicted genes and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP analysis of complete genome sequences demonstrated the presence of genotype-specific gene contents and SNP variations in C. burnetii strains. It also demonstrated that the currently used MLVA genotyping methods are highly discriminatory for the investigated outbreak strains. In the fully reconstructed genome sequence of the Dutch outbreak NL3262 strain of the CbNL01 genotype, a relatively large number of transposon-linked genes were identified as compared to the other published complete genome sequences of C. burnetii. Additionally, large numbers of SNPs in its membrane proteins and predicted virulence-associated genes were identified

  15. Genome Plasticity and Polymorphisms in Critical Genes Correlate with Increased Virulence of Dutch Outbreak-Related Coxiella burnetii Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuley, Runa; Kuijt, Eric; Smits, Mari A.; Roest, Hendrik I. J.; Smith, Hilde E.; Bossers, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is an obligate intracellular bacterium and the etiological agent of Q fever. During 2007–2010 the largest Q fever outbreak ever reported occurred in The Netherlands. It is anticipated that strains from this outbreak demonstrated an increased zoonotic potential as more than 40,000 individuals were assumed to be infected. The acquisition of novel genetic factors by these C. burnetii outbreak strains, such as virulence-related genes, has frequently been proposed and discussed, but is not proved yet. In the present study, the whole genome sequence of several Dutch strains (CbNL01 and CbNL12 genotypes), a few additionally selected strains from different geographical locations and publicly available genome sequences were used for a comparative bioinformatics approach. The study focuses on the identification of specific genetic differences in the outbreak related CbNL01 strains compared to other C. burnetii strains. In this approach we investigated the phylogenetic relationship and genomic aspects of virulence and host-specificity. Phylogenetic clustering of whole genome sequences showed a genotype-specific clustering that correlated with the clustering observed using Multiple Locus Variable-number Tandem Repeat Analysis (MLVA). Ortholog analysis on predicted genes and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis of complete genome sequences demonstrated the presence of genotype-specific gene contents and SNP variations in C. burnetii strains. It also demonstrated that the currently used MLVA genotyping methods are highly discriminatory for the investigated outbreak strains. In the fully reconstructed genome sequence of the Dutch outbreak NL3262 strain of the CbNL01 genotype, a relatively large number of transposon-linked genes were identified as compared to the other published complete genome sequences of C. burnetii. Additionally, large numbers of SNPs in its membrane proteins and predicted virulence-associated genes were identified in all Dutch

  16. Over-expression of a novel JAZ family gene from Glycine soja, increases salt and alkali stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dan; Cai, Hua; Luo, Xiao; Bai, Xi; Deyholos, Michael K; Chen, Qin; Chen, Chao; Ji, Wei; Zhu, Yanming

    2012-09-21

    Salt and alkali stress are two of the main environmental factors limiting crop production. Recent discoveries show that the JAZ family encodes plant-specific genes involved in jasmonate signaling. However, there is only limited information about this gene family in abiotic stress response, and in wild soybean (Glycine soja), which is a species noted for its tolerance to alkali and salinity. Here, we isolated and characterized a novel JAZ family gene, GsJAZ2, from G. soja. Transcript abundance of GsJAZ2 increased following exposure to salt, alkali, cold and drought. Over-expression of GsJAZ2 in Arabidopsis resulted in enhanced plant tolerance to salt and alkali stress. The expression levels of some alkali stress response and stress-inducible marker genes were significantly higher in the GsJAZ2 overexpression lines as compared to wild-type plants. Subcellular localization studies using a GFP fusion protein showed that GsJAZ2 was localized to the nucleus. These results suggest that the newly isolated wild soybean GsJAZ2 is a positive regulator of plant salt and alkali stress tolerance. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. FEATURES OF IMMUNE RESPONSE AMONG MAJOR LYMPHOCYTE SUBPOPULATIONS FROM PERIPHERAL BLOOD DURING EXACERBATION OF CHRONIC GASTRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Matveeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify and evaluate the features of immune response for main subpopulations of peripheral blood lymphocytes during exacerbation of chronic gastritis, depending on the severity of gastric mucosal atrophy. A comprehensive survey of 122 patients with acute exacerbation of chronic gastritis was performed. The patients with chronic focal-atrophic and atrophic gastritis in acute stage were characterized by increased numbers of CD3+ lymphocytes, CD4+, CD8+ and CD16+ cell populations, decreased CD19+ lymphocyte counts in peripheral blood. During exacerbation of non-atrophic gastritis, an increase of CD4+ and CD16+ cell counts was associated with a decrease in the CD8+ and CD19+ lymphocytes. A concomitant increase in CD4+ cell numbers, as well as elevated IL-2 and IFNγ levels in peripheral blood of patients may reflect activation of cellular immunity, which could be induced by the dysplasia of gastric mucosa and co-infection with Helicobacter/herpesvirus. Domination of increased IL-2 and IFNγ over IL-4 and IL-10 levels suggests the Th1-profile of cellular immune response. Upon exacerbation of non-atrophic gastritis, the immunoregulatory index exceeded the values of clinically healthy subjects and those of patients with atrophic gastritis. We observed statistically significant differences for CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD19+ lymphocytes, immunoregulatory index, and serum levels of IL-2, depending on presence and severity of gastric mucosal atrophy. 

  18. Amygdala electrical stimulation inducing spatial memory recovery produces an increase of hippocampal bdnf and arc gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercerón-Martínez, D; Almaguer-Melian, W; Alberti-Amador, E; Estupiñán, B; Fernández, I; Bergado, J A

    2016-06-01

    Amygdala seems to promote the consolidation of plastic modification in different brain areas and these long-term brain changes require a rapid de novo RNA and protein synthesis. We have previously shown that basolateral amygdala electrical stimulation produces a partial recovery of spatial memory in fimbria-fornix lesioned animals and it is also able to increase the BDNF protein content in the hippocampus. The emerging question is whether these increased BDNF protein content arises from previously synthesized RNA or from de novo RNA expression. Now we address the question if amygdala electrical stimulation 15min after daily water maze training produces a rapid de novo RNA synthesis in the hippocampus, a critical brain area for spatial memory recovery in fimbria-fornix lesioned animals. In addition, we also study RNA arc expression, a gene which is essential for memory and neural plasticity processes. To this purpose, we study amygdala stimulation effects on the expression of plasticity related-early-genes bdnf and arc in the hippocampus of fimbria-fornix lesioned animals trained in a water-maze for 4days. We also checked on the expression of both genes in non-lesioned, untrained animals (acute condition) at 0.5, 1, 2 and 24h after basolateral amygdala electrical stimulation. Our data from trained animals confirm that daily amygdala electrical stimulation 15min after water maze training produces a partial memory recovery and that is coupled to an increase of bdnf and arc genes expression in the hippocampus. Additionally, the acute study shows that a single session of amygdala stimulation induces a transient increase of both genes (peaking at 30min). These results confirm the memory improving effect of amygdala stimulation in fimbria-fornix-lesioned animals and sustain the assumption that the memory improving effect is mediated by newly synthetized BDNF acting on a memory relevant structure like the hippocampus. The increased amount of BDNF within the hippocampus

  19. Changes in natural killer cell subpopulations over a winter training season in elite swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rama, Luís; Teixeira, Ana Maria; Matos, Alice; Borges, Grasiely; Henriques, Ana; Gleeson, Michael; Pedreiro, Susana; Filaire, Edith; Alves, Francisco; Paiva, Artur

    2013-04-01

    Immune changes and increased susceptibility to infection are often reported in elite athletes. Infectious episodes can often impair training and performance with consequences for health and sporting success. This study monitored the occurrence of episodes of upper respiratory symptoms (URS) and the variation in circulating NK cells, CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells subpopulations, over a winter swimming season. Nineteen national elite swimmers and 11 non-athlete controls participated in this study. URS episodes were monitored using daily log books. Blood samples were taken at rest at four time points during the season: before the start of the season (t1--middle September), after 7 weeks of an initial period of gradually increasing training load (t2--early November), after 6 weeks of an intense training cycle (t3--late February) and 48 h after the main competition (t4--early April) and from the controls at three similar time points (t1--early November; t2--late February; t3--early April). In the swimmers, the occurrence of URS clustered around the periods of elevated training load (67 %). No URS were reported at equivalent time points in the non-athletes. Athletes showed a decrease in the percentage (t2 = 21 %; t3 = 27 %; t4 = 17 %) and absolute counts of circulating NK cells (t2 = 35 %; t3 = 22 %; t4 = 22 %), coinciding with the periods of increased training load, never recovering to the initial values observed at the start of the season. The reduction in the CD56(dim) and an increase in the CD56(bright) NK cell subpopulations were significant at t2 and t3 (p < 0.05). Concomitant with the fall in values of NK cells, in athletes that shown more than three URS episodes, a moderate correlation (r = 0.493; p = 0.036) was found between CD56(bright)/CD56(dim) ratio and the number of URS episodes after the more demanding training phase (t3). At t3, a lower value of CD56 cell counts was found in the group who reported three or more URS episodes (t = 2.239; p = 0.032). A

  20. Over expression of Zmda1-1 gene increases seed mass of corn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic engineering of seed size and increasing biomass in crop plants has an important significant contribution to the world. Arabidopsis DA1 is one of the key factors that negatively control seed and organ size by restricting the period of cell proliferation, and the mutant of Arabidopsis DA1, da1-1 (DA1R358K) can ...

  1. Escherichia coli genome-scale metabolic gene knockout of lactate dehydrogenase (ldhA), increases succinate production from glycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mienda, Bashir Sajo

    2017-11-06

    Genome-scale metabolic model (GEM) of Escherichia coli has been published with applications in predicting metabolic engineering capabilities on different carbon sources and directing biological discovery. The use of glycerol as an alternative carbon source is economically viable in biorefinery. The use of GEM for predicting metabolic gene deletion of lactate dehydrogenase (ldhA) for increasing succinate production in Escherichia coli from glycerol carbon source remained largely unexplored. Here, I hypothesized that metabolic gene knockout of ldhA in E. coli from glycerol could increase succinate production. A proof-of-principle strain was constructed and designated as E. coli BMS5 (ΔldhA), by predicting increased succinate production in E. coli GEM and confirmed the predicted outcomes using wet cell experiments. The mutant GEM (ΔldhA) predicted 11% increase in succinate production from glycerol compared to its wild-type model (iAF1260), and the E. coli BMS5 (ΔldhA) showed 1.05 g/l and its corresponding wild-type produced .05 g/l (23-fold increase). The proof-of-principle strain constructed in this study confirmed the aforementioned hypothesis and further elucidated the fact that E. coli GEM can prospectively and effectively predict metabolic engineering interventions using glycerol as substrate and could serve as platform for new strain design strategies and biological discovery.

  2. IMPACT OF THERAPY WITH BIOLOGICAL AGENTS ON B-LYMPHOCYTE SUBPOPULATIONS IN RHEUMATIC DISEASES: NEW EVIDENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Suponitskaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the mechanisms of action of biological agents and their effect on peripheral blood B-lymphocyte subpopulations in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. Differential impact of tobacco control policies on youth sub-populations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tauras, John A; Huang, Jidong; Chaloupka, Frank J

    2013-01-01

    ...), race/ethnicity, and gender. We examined the relationship between state-level cigarette prices and smoke-free air laws and youth smoking prevalence and intensity for various youth sub-populations in the United States...

  4. Statin-Induced Increases in Atrophy Gene Expression Occur Independently of Changes in PGC1α Protein and Mitochondrial Content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig A Goodman

    Full Text Available One serious side effect of statin drugs is skeletal muscle myopathy. Although the mechanism(s responsible for statin myopathy remains to be fully determined, an increase in muscle atrophy gene expression and changes in mitochondrial content and/or function have been proposed to play a role. In this study, we examined the relationship between statin-induced expression of muscle atrophy genes, regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, and markers of mitochondrial content in slow- (ST and fast-twitch (FT rat skeletal muscles. Male Sprague Dawley rats were treated with simvastatin (60 or 80 mg·kg(-1·day(-1 or vehicle control via oral gavage for 14 days. In the absence of overt muscle damage, simvastatin treatment induced an increase in atrogin-1, MuRF1 and myostatin mRNA expression; however, these were not associated with changes in peroxisome proliferator gamma co-activator 1 alpha (PGC-1α protein or markers of mitochondrial content. Simvastatin did, however, increase neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS, endothelial NOS (eNOS and AMPK α-subunit protein expression, and tended to increase total NOS activity, in FT but not ST muscles. Furthermore, simvastatin induced a decrease in β-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase (β-HAD activity only in FT muscles. These findings suggest that the statin-induced activation of muscle atrophy genes occurs independent of changes in PGC-1α protein and mitochondrial content. Moreover, muscle-specific increases in NOS expression and possibly NO production, and decreases in fatty acid oxidation, could contribute to the previously reported development of overt statin-induced muscle damage in FT muscles.

  5. Acute resistance exercise reduces increased gene expression in muscle atrophy of ovariectomised arthritic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Furlanetto Jr

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We studied the effect of resistance exercise (RE on mRNA levels of atrogin-1, MuRF-1, and myostatin in the gastrocnemius muscle of arthritic rats after loss of ovarian function (LOF. Material and methods : Thirty female Wistar rats (nine weeks old, 195.3 ±17.4 grams were randomly allocated into five groups: control group (CT-Sham; n = 6; group with rheumatoid arthritis (RA; n = 6; group with rheumatoid arthritis subjected to RE (RAEX; n = 6; ovariectomy group with rheumatoid arthritis (RAOV; n = 6; and an ovariectomy group with rheumatoid arthritis subjected to RE (RAOVEX; n = 6. After 15 days of intra-articular injections with Met-BSA the animals were subjected to RE and six hours after workout were euthanised. Results : The rheumatoid arthritis provoked reduction in the cross-sectional area (CSA of muscle fibres, but the CSA was lower in the RAOV when compared to the RA groups. Skeletal muscle atrogin-1 mRNA level was increased in arthritic rats (RA and RAOV, but the atrogin-1 level was higher in RAOV group when compared to other arthritic groups. The Muscle MuRF-1 mRNA level was also increased in the RAOV group. The increased atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 mRNA levels were lower in the RAOVEX group than in the RAOV group. The myostatin mRNA level was similar in all groups, except for the RAOVEX group, in which it was lower than the other groups. Conclusions : LOF results in increased loss of skeletal muscle-related ubiquitin ligases (atrogin-1 and MuRF-1. However, the RE reduces the atrogin-1, MuRF-1, and myostatin mRNA levels in muscle of arthritic rats affected by LOF.

  6. Influenza A virus NS1 gene mutations F103L and M106I increase replication and virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Jihui

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To understand the evolutionary steps required for a virus to become virulent in a new host, a human influenza A virus (IAV, A/Hong Kong/1/68(H3N2 (HK-wt, was adapted to increased virulence in the mouse. Among eleven mutations selected in the NS1 gene, two mutations F103L and M106I had been previously detected in the highly virulent human H5N1 isolate, A/HK/156/97, suggesting a role for these mutations in virulence in mice and humans. Results To determine the selective advantage of these mutations, reverse genetics was used to rescue viruses containing each of the NS1 mouse adapted mutations into viruses possessing the HK-wt NS1 gene on the A/PR/8/34 genetic backbone. Both F103L and M106I NS1 mutations significantly enhanced growth in vitro (mouse and canine cells and in vivo (BALB/c mouse lungs as well as enhanced virulence in the mouse. Only the M106I NS1 mutation enhanced growth in human cells. Furthermore, these NS1 mutations enhanced early viral protein synthesis in MDCK cells and showed an increased ability to replicate in mouse interferon β (IFN-β pre-treated mouse cells relative to rPR8-HK-NS-wt NS1. The double mutant, rPR8-HK-NS-F103L + M106I, demonstrated growth attenuation late in infection due to increased IFN-β induction in mouse cells. We then generated a rPR8 virus possessing the A/HK/156/97 NS gene that possesses 103L + 106I, and then rescued the L103F + I106M mutant. The 103L + 106I mutations increased virulence by >10 fold in BALB/c mice. We also inserted the avian A/Ck/Beijing/1/95 NS1 gene (the source lineage of the A/HK/156/97 NS1 gene that possesses 103L + 106I, onto the A/WSN/33 backbone and then generated the L103F + I106M mutant. None of the H5N1 and H9N2 NS containing viruses resulted in increased IFN-β induction. The rWSN-A/Ck/Beijing/1/95-NS1 gene possessing 103L and 106I demonstrated 100 fold enhanced growth and >10 fold enhanced virulence that was associated with increased tropism for lung

  7. Differential impact of tobacco control policies on youth sub-populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauras, John A; Huang, Jidong; Chaloupka, Frank J

    2013-09-12

    While previous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of tobacco control interventions in reducing tobacco use among youth overall, there have been very few studies that examine the potential differential impact of tobacco control policies on various youth subgroups, defined by socio-economic status (SES), race/ethnicity, and gender. We examined the relationship between state-level cigarette prices and smoke-free air laws and youth smoking prevalence and intensity for various youth sub-populations in the United States. We estimated a 2-part model of cigarette demand using data from the 1991 through 2010 nationally representative surveys of 8th-, 10th-, and 12th-grade students as part of the Monitoring the Future project. We found that real cigarette prices are strong determinants of youth smoking. Blacks, females, Hispanics, and low-SES subpopulations are found to have a larger price response with respect to smoking prevalence than the full sample. Smoke-free air laws are found to have a negative effect on smoking prevalence for the full sample and for the male, white, and high-SES sub-populations. This research concludes that higher cigarette prices will reduce smoking prevalence rates of Blacks, Hispanics, females, and low-SES subpopulations faster than the overall youth population and other youth sub-populations. Moreover, this research concludes that smoke-free air laws will reduce smoking prevalence for the overall youth population with the largest reductions in high SES and male subpopulations.

  8. Normozoospermic versus teratozoospermic domestic cats: differential testicular volume, sperm morphometry, and subpopulation structure during epididymal maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Reinoso, Miguel Angel; García-Herreros, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Teratozoospermia (sperm morphometric traits, and potential differences regarding the sperm subpopulational structure during epididymal sperm maturation in teratozoospermic feline donors. Epididymal sperm samples were collected from the caput (R1), corpus (R2), and cauda (R3) epididymidis in two donor groups (N: normozoospermic; T: teratozoospermic). Aliquots were assessed for concentration, viability, motility, and acrosomal integrity. Sperm morphometric descriptors from CASA-Morph analysis were analyzed by the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and clustering analyses. Irrespective of the group analyzed, PCA revealed two Principal Components (PCs) for each epididymal region explaining more than the 93% of the variance. Surprisingly, the number of subpopulations remained constant in regions R1-R2-R3 irrespective of the donor group analyzed. However, the distribution of these subpopulations was found to be structurally different and strongly influenced by the epididymal region and the donor group. In conclusion, testicular morphometry and the sperm subpopulation structure were different in N and T donors. The alterations in subpopulations during epididymal maturation could be used as a potential clinical indicator of teratozoospermic individuals since an important influence of teratozoospermia on sperm subpopulation structure has been demonstrated.

  9. Methamphetamine-induced psychosis is associated with DNA hypomethylation and increased expression of AKT1 and key dopaminergic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohesara, Shabnam; Ghadirivasfi, Mohammad; Barati, Mahmood; Ghasemzadeh, Mohammad-Reza; Narimani, Samira; Mousavi-Behbahani, Zohreh; Joghataei, Mohammadtaghi; Soleimani, Mansoureh; Taban, Mozhgan; Mehrabi, Soraya; Thiagalingam, Sam; Abdolmaleky, Hamid Mostafavi

    2016-12-01

    Methamphetamine, one of the most frequently used illicit drugs worldwide, can induce psychosis in a large fraction of abusers and it is becoming a major problem for the health care institutions. There is some evidence that genetic and epigenetic factors may play roles in methamphetamine psychosis. In this study, we examined methamphetamine-induced epigenetic and expression changes of several key genes involved in psychosis. RNA and DNA extracted from the saliva samples of patients with methamphetamine dependency with and without psychosis as well as control subjects (each group 25) were analyzed for expression and promoter DNA methylation status of DRD1, DRD2, DRD3, DRD4, MB-COMT, GAD1, and AKT1 using qRT-PCR and q-MSP, respectively. We found statistically significant DNA hypomethylation of the promoter regions of DRD3 (P = 0.032), DRD4 (P = 0.05), MB-COMT (P = 0.009), and AKT1 (P = 0.0008) associated with increased expression of the corresponding genes in patients with methamphetamine psychosis (P = 0.022, P = 0.034, P = 0.035, P = 0.038, respectively), and to a lesser degree in some of the candidate genes in non-psychotic patients versus the control subjects. In general, methamphetamine dependency is associated with reduced DNA methylation and corresponding increase in expression of several key genes involved in the pathogenesis of psychotic disorders. While these epigenetic changes can be useful diagnostic biomarkers for psychosis in methamphetamine abusers, it is also consistent with the use of methyl rich diet for prevention or suppression of psychosis in these patients. However, this needs to be confirmed in future studies. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Recently introduced qacA/B genes in Staphylococcus epidermidis do not increase chlorhexidine MIC/MBC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovgaard, Sissel; Larsen, Marianne Halberg; Nielsen, Lene Nørby; Skov, Robert Leo; Wong, Christian; Westh, Henrik; Ingmer, Hanne

    2013-10-01

    Chlorhexidine is used as a disinfectant to prevent surgical infections. Recently, studies have indicated that chlorhexidine usage has selected methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains that are tolerant to chlorhexidine and that this may be related to the presence of the qacA/B-encoded efflux pumps. Here, we evaluated if high-level exposure to chlorhexidine selects for tolerant colonizing Staphylococcus epidermidis and we addressed the consequences of long-term exposure to chlorhexidine. Chlorhexidine susceptibility and carriage of qacA/B was determined for colonizing S. epidermidis isolated from scrub nurses heavily exposed to chlorhexidine and were compared with isolates from non-users of chlorhexidine hand rubs. S. epidermidis blood isolates from the 1960s, before the wider introduction of chlorhexidine to the market, were also tested and compared with recently collected S. epidermidis blood isolates. There was no correlation between the use of chlorhexidine in scrub nurses and the presence of qacA/B genes in S. epidermidis isolates or increased MICs/MBCs of chlorhexidine for S. epidermidis isolates. While 55% of current blood isolates harboured the qacA/B genes, none of the 33 historical S. epidermidis isolates did, although their MICs and MBCs of chlorhexidine were comparable to those for current isolates. Chlorhexidine used as a hand rub does not select for S. epidermidis isolates with increased MICs or MBCs of chlorhexidine. However, the absence of qacA/B genes in S. epidermidis isolates obtained in the 1960s suggests that long-term use of biocides like chlorhexidine or related compounds may select for the presence of qacA/B genes.

  11. Western environment/lifestyle is associated with increased genome methylation and decreased gene expression in Chinese immigrants living in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guicheng; Wang, Kui; Schultz, Ennee; Khoo, Siew-Kim; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Annamalay, Alicia; Laing, Ingrid A; Hales, Belinda J; Goldblatt, Jack; Le Souëf, Peter N

    2016-01-01

    Several human diseases and conditions are disproportionally distributed in the world with a significant "Western-developed" vs. "Eastern-developing" gradient. We compared genome-wide DNA methylation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in 25 newly arrived Chinese immigrants living in a Western environment for less than 6 months ("Newly arrived") with 23 Chinese immigrants living in the Western environment for more than two years ("Long-term") with a mean of 8.7 years, using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. In a sub-group of both subject groups (n = 12 each) we also investigated genome-wide gene expression using a Human HT-12 v4 expression beadChip. There were 62.5% probes among the total number of 382,250 valid CpG sites with greater mean Beta (β) in "Long-term" than in "Newly arrived". In the regions of CpG islands and gene promoters, compared with the CpG sites in all other regions, lower percentages of CpG sites with mean methylation levels in "Long-term" greater than "Newly arrived" were observed, but still >50%. The increase of methylation was associated with a general decrease of gene expression in Chinese immigrants living in the Western environment for a longer period of time. After adjusting for age, gender and other confounding factors the findings remained. Chinese immigrants living in Australia for a longer period of time have increased overall genome methylation and decreased overall gene expression compared with newly arrived immigrants. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Silencing of Soybean Raffinose Synthase Gene Reduced Raffinose Family Oligosaccharides and Increased True Metabolizable Energy of Poultry Feed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle F. Valentine

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Soybean [Glycine max (L. Merr.] is the number one oil and protein crop in the United States, but the seed contains several anti-nutritional factors that are toxic to both humans and livestock. RNA interference technology has become an increasingly popular technique in gene silencing because it allows for both temporal and spatial targeting of specific genes. The objective of this research is to use RNA-mediated gene silencing to down-regulate the soybean gene raffinose synthase 2 (RS2, to reduce total raffinose content in mature seed. Raffinose is a trisaccharide that is indigestible to humans and monogastric animals, and as monogastric animals are the largest consumers of soy products, reducing raffinose would improve the nutritional quality of soybean. An RNAi construct targeting RS2 was designed, cloned, and transformed to the soybean genome via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Resulting plants were analyzed for the presence and number of copies of the transgene by PCR and Southern blot. The efficiency of mRNA silencing was confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. Total raffinose content was determined by HPLC analysis. Transgenic plant lines were recovered that exhibited dramatically reduced levels of raffinose in mature seed, and these lines were further analyzed for other phenotypes such as development and yield. Additionally, a precision-fed rooster assay was conducted to measure the true metabolizable energy (TME in full-fat soybean meal made from the wild-type or transgenic low-raffinose soybean lines. Transgenic low-raffinose soy had a measured TME of 2,703 kcal/kg, an increase as compared with 2,411 kcal/kg for wild-type. As low digestible energy is a major limiting factor in the percent of soybean meal that can be used in poultry diets, these results may substantiate the use of higher concentrations of low-raffinose, full-fat soy in formulated livestock diets.

  13. Overexpression of a Gene Involved in Phytic Acid Biosynthesis Substantially Increases Phytic Acid and Total Phosphorus in Rice Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Tagashira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The manipulation of seed phosphorus is important for seedling growth and environmental P sustainability in agriculture. The mechanism of regulating P content in seed, however, is poorly understood. To study regulation of total P, we focused on phytic acid (inositol hexakisphosphate; InsP6 biosynthesis-related genes, as InsP6 is a major storage form of P in seeds. The rice (Oryza sativa L. low phytic acid mutant lpa1-1 has been identified as a homolog of archael 2-phosphoglycerate kinase. The homolog might act as an inositol monophosphate kinase, which catalyzes a key step in InsP6 biosynthesis. Overexpression of the homolog in transgenic rice resulted in a significant increase in total P content in seed, due to increases in InsP6 and inorganic phosphates. On the other hand, overexpression of genes that catalyze the first and last steps of InsP6 biosynthesis could not increase total P levels. From the experiments using developing seeds, it is suggested that the activation of InsP6 biosynthesis in both very early and very late periods of seed development increases the influx of P from vegetative organs into seeds. This is the first report from a study attempting to elevate the P levels of seed through a transgenic approach.

  14. Pigs fed camelina meal increase hepatic gene expression of cytochrome 8b1, aldehyde dehydrogenase, and thiosulfate transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadus, William Jon; Duff, Pascale; McDonald, Tanya; Caine, William R

    2014-01-03

    Camelina sativa is an oil seed crop which can be grown on marginal lands. Camelina seed oil is rich in omega-3 fatty acids (>35%) and γ-tocopherol but is also high in erucic acid and glucosinolates. Camelina meal, is the by-product after the oil has been extracted. Camelina meal was fed to 28 d old weaned pigs at 3.7% and 7.4% until age 56 d. The camelina meal supplements in the soy based diets, improved feed efficiency but also significantly increased the liver weights. Gene expression analyses of the livers, using intra-species microarrays, identified increased expression of phase 1 and phase 2 drug metabolism enzymes. The porcine versions of the enzymes were confirmed by real time PCR. Cytochrome 8b1 (CYP8B1), aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (Aldh2), and thiosulfate transferase (TST) were all significantly stimulated. Collectively, these genes implicate the camelina glucosinolate metabolite, methyl-sulfinyldecyl isothiocyanate, as the main xeniobiotic, causing increased hepatic metabolism and increased liver weight.

  15. Heme oxygenase-1 gene expression modulates angiotensin II-induced increase in blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liming; Quan, Shuo; Nasjletti, Alberto; Laniado-Schwartzman, Michal; Abraham, Nader G

    2004-06-01

    The heme-heme oxygenase (HO) system has been implicated in the regulation of vascular reactivity and blood pressure. This study examines the notion that overexpression of HO decreases pressor responsiveness to angiotensin II (Ang II). Five-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats received an intraleft ventricular injection of approximately 5x10(9) cfu/mL of retroviruses containing human HO-1 sense (LSN-HHO-1), rat HO-1 antisense (LSN-RHO-1-AS), or control retrovirus (LXSN). Three months later, rats were instrumented with femoral arterial and venous catheters for mean arterial pressure (MAP) determination and Ang II administration, respectively. Rats injected with LSN-HHO-1, but not with LXSN, expressed human HO-1 mRNA and protein in several tissues. BP increased with administration of Ang II in rats expressing and not expressing human HO-1. However, the Ang II-induced pressor response (mm Hg) in LSN-HHO-1 rats (16+/-3, 27+/-3, and 38+/-3 at 0.5, 2, and 10 ng) was surpassed (PHHO-1 rats with the HO inhibitor tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP) enhanced (P<0.05) the Ang II-induced pressor response to a level not different from that observed in LXSN rats. Rats injected with LSN-RHO-1-AS showed a decrease in renal HO-1 protein expression and HO activity relative to control LXSN rats. Administration of Ang II (0.1 to 2 ng) caused small (4 to 5 mm Hg) but significant increases in MAP in rats injected with LSN-RHO-1-AS (P<0.05) compared with rats injected with LXSN. These data demonstrate that overexpression of HO-1 brings about a reduction in pressor responsiveness to Ang II, which is most likely due to increased generation of an HO-1 product, presumably CO, with the ability to inhibit vascular reactivity to constrictor stimuli.

  16. It Remains Unknown Whether Filaggrin Gene Mutations Evolved to Increase Cutaneous Synthesis of Vitamin D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Elias, Peter M

    2017-01-01

    encountered in Northern Europeans. Importantly, FLG mutation carriers have 10% increased serum vitamin D concentrations compared to controls. Based on these observations, we have proposed that this latitude-dependent gradient of FLG mutations across Europe, Asia and Africa could have provided an evolutionary......About 8-10% of normal Northern Europeans are heterozygous carriers of common FLG mutations, while only 1-4% of southern Europeans display these mutations, and only very rarely are mutations detected in African populations. Although mutations are found in Asians, they are different from those...

  17. ASSOCIATION OF CTLA-4 AND PTPN-22 GENES POLYMORPHISMS WITH INCREASED RISK OF AUTOIMMUNE THYROIDITIS IN TATAR POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Biktagirova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aspects of autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT remain quite actual, since many issues of etiology, pathogenesis, morphology, classification, diagnostics, therapy and prediction of this disorder are far from final solution. Since disturbances of fine molecular immune mechanisms underlie pathogenesis of either immune disorder, the genes coding its main components, are regarded as potential candidate genes predisposing for AIT, e.g., genes of surface antigen (CTLA-4 and protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor 22 (PTPN-22. We have performed genotyping of 298 Tatar women in Tatar Republic (Russia with respect to age and biochemical parameters (control group, 137 persons; AIT group, 161 patients. The following gene polymorphisms were tested: +49 А/G, -318 С/Т, -1661 А/G of СТLA-4 gene, and 1858 С/Т polymorphism of PTPN-22 gene. Genotyрing was performed by PCR-RFLP method as described earlier. The data were analyzed using Chi-square test and 95% confidential interval (CI. The frequencies of CTLA-4 -1661 G allele and genotype A/G and +49 G/A G allele and genotype GG carriers were significantly higher in AIT patients than in controls (P = 0.04, OR 1.84, 95% CI 2.31-1.4; P = 0.001, OR 2,0 95% CI 1.62-2.31 respectively, with increased contents of serum antibodies to thyroglobulin (OR, 1.56, 95% CI 2.25-3.6; OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.9-2.75, respectively and to thyroperoxidase (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.5-4.1 for G/G genotype of +49 A/G polymorphism, independently of age (р < 0,05. We showed that the combinations of A/G, T/C and G/G genotypes of -1661 A/G, -318 T/C and +49 G/A polymorphisms is associated with increased risk of genetic predisposition to ITD in Tatar women (OR 7.87, 95% CI 2.03-3.25. A strong association was also observed between the increased level of antibodies to TPO (> 1000 ME/l and GG genotype of +49 G/A polymorphism (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.5-4.1 and antibodies to TG (> 100 ME/l and genotypes A/G and G/G of CTLA-4 -1661 A/G and +49 G/A polymorphisms

  18. Tibial loading increases osteogenic gene expression and cortical bone volume in mature and middle-aged mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Silva

    Full Text Available There are conflicting data on whether age reduces the response of the skeleton to mechanical stimuli. We examined this question in female BALB/c mice of different ages, ranging from young to middle-aged (2, 4, 7, 12 months. We first assessed markers of bone turnover in control (non-loaded mice. Serum osteocalcin and CTX declined significantly from 2 to 4 months (p<0.001. There were similar age-related declines in tibial mRNA expression of osteoblast- and osteoclast-related genes, most notably in late osteoblast/matrix genes. For example, Col1a1 expression declined 90% from 2 to 7 months (p<0.001. We then assessed tibial responses to mechanical loading using age-specific forces to produce similar peak strains (-1300 µε endocortical; -2350 µε periosteal. Axial tibial compression was applied to the right leg for 60 cycles/day on alternate days for 1 or 6 weeks. qPCR after 1 week revealed no effect of loading in young (2-month mice, but significant increases in osteoblast/matrix genes in older mice. For example, in 12-month old mice Col1a1 was increased 6-fold in loaded tibias vs. controls (p = 0.001. In vivo microCT after 6 weeks revealed that loaded tibias in each age group had greater cortical bone volume (BV than contralateral control tibias (p<0.05, due to relative periosteal expansion. The loading-induced increase in cortical BV was greatest in 4-month old mice (+13%; p<0.05 vs. other ages. In summary, non-loaded female BALB/c mice exhibit an age-related decline in measures related to bone formation. Yet when subjected to tibial compression, mice from 2-12 months have an increase in cortical bone volume. Older mice respond with an upregulation of osteoblast/matrix genes, which increase to levels comparable to young mice. We conclude that mechanical loading of the tibia is anabolic for cortical bone in young and middle-aged female BALB/c mice.

  19. Increased gastrin gene expression provides a physiological advantage to mice under hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laval, Marie; Baldwin, Graham S; Shulkes, Arthur; Marshall, Kathryn M

    2015-01-15

    Hypoxia, or a low concentration of O2, is encountered in humans undertaking activities such as mountain climbing and scuba diving and is important pathophysiologically as a limiting factor in tumor growth. Although data on the interplay between hypoxia and gastrins are limited, gastrin expression is upregulated by hypoxia in gastrointestinal cancer cell lines, and gastrins counterbalance hypoxia by stimulating angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. The aim of this study was to determine if higher concentrations of the gastrin precursor progastrin are protective against hypoxia in vivo. hGAS mice, which overexpress progastrin in the liver, and mice of the corresponding wild-type FVB/N strain were exposed to normoxia or hypoxia. Iron status was assessed by measurement of serum iron parameters, real-time PCR for mRNAs encoding critical iron regulatory proteins, and Perls' stain and atomic absorption spectrometry for tissue iron concentrations. FVB/N mice lost weight at a faster rate and had higher sickness scores than hGAS mice exposed to hypoxia. Serum iron levels were lower in hGAS than FVB/N mice and decreased further when the animals were exposed to hypoxia. The concentration of iron in the liver was strikingly lower in hGAS than FVB/N mice. We conclude that increased circulating concentrations of progastrin provide a physiological advantage against systemic hypoxia in mice, possibly by increasing the availability of iron stores. This is the first report of an association between progastrin overexpression, hypoxia, and iron homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Modest increased sensitivity to radiation oncogenesis in ATM heterozygous versus wild-type mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilenov, L. B.; Brenner, D. J.; Hall, E. J.

    2001-01-01

    Subpopulations that are genetically predisposed to radiation-induced cancer could have significant public health consequences. Individuals homozygous for null mutations at the ataxia telangiectasia gene are indeed highly radiosensitive, but their numbers are very small. Ataxia Telangiectasia heterozygotes (1-2% of the population) have been associated with somewhat increased radiosensitivity for some end points, but none directly related to carcinogenesis. Here, intralitter comparisons between wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts and mouse embryo fibroblasts carrying ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) null mutation indicate that the heterozygous cells are more sensitive to radiation oncogenesis than their normal, litter-matched, counterparts. From these data we suggest that Ataxia Telangiectasia heterozygotes could indeed represent a societally-significant radiosensitive human subpopulation.

  1. Peripuberty stress leads to abnormal aggression, altered amygdala and orbitofrontal reactivity and increased prefrontal MAOA gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Márquez, C; Poirier, G L; Cordero, M I

    2013-01-01

    Although adverse early life experiences have been found to increase lifetime risk to develop violent behaviors, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying these long-term effects remain unclear. We present a novel animal model for pathological aggression induced by peripubertal exposure to stress...... with face, construct and predictive validity. We show that male rats submitted to fear-induction experiences during the peripubertal period exhibit high and sustained rates of increased aggression at adulthood, even against unthreatening individuals, and increased testosterone/corticosterone ratio...... in the serotonergic system in the prefrontal cortex-and pointing at epigenetic control of the MAOA gene-in the establishment of the link between peripubertal stress and later pathological aggression. Our data emphasize the impact of biological factors triggered by peripubertal adverse experiences on the emergence...

  2. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor -173G/C gene polymorphism increases the risk of renal disease: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xiang; He, Jie; Liu, Sitong; Peng, Shifeng; Yan, Zhipeng; Zhang, Yonggang; Fan, Hong

    2015-02-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) -173G/C (rs755622) gene polymorphism has been associated with renal disease risk. However, lots of studies have reported inconclusive results. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to investigate the relationship between MIF -173G/C gene polymorphism and renal disease susceptibility. We conducted a search in PubMed, Embase (OvidSP), Wanfang databases and China National Knowledge Internet (CNKI) up to 20 June 2014. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were used to test the association. Statistical analyses were performed with STATA version 11.0 software. In total, 2755 participants from eight case-control studies were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled results indicated the significant association between MIF -173G/C polymorphism and renal disease risk (CC + CG vs GG, OR = 1.77, P renal disease risk in Asians and Caucasians were observed. Additionally, we found that the heterozygote (CG) may strongly increase renal disease risk in children, while the homozygote (CC) may increase the renal disease susceptibility more significantly in adults. Surprisingly, the results found a significant association between MIF -173G/C polymorphism and glucocorticoid resistance in child patients with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS) (C vs G, OR: 3.83, P renal disease, especially in children. Furthermore, the meta-analysis also indicated that this gene polymorphism may increase risk of glucocorticoid resistance in child patients with INS. © 2014 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  3. Clinical and Pathologic Correlation of Increased MYC Gene Copy Number in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haws, Bryn T; Cui, Wei; Persons, Diane L; Zhang, Da

    2016-12-01

    Only a few studies have investigated the presence of increased MYC gene copy number (ICN) as a prognostic indicator in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), and the results have been variable. We compared overall survival in patients with ICN to MYC-negative patients and investigated the prognostic significance of increased MYC gene copy number. Two groups, those with MYC ICN (n = 33) and those with no MYC aberrations (n = 43), identified by fluorescence in-situ hybridization DNA probes for the MYC region at 8q24, were compared for survival (1-9 years), MYC immunohistochemical (IHC) protein expression, and treatment protocol. Comparison of cases of DLBCL with MYC ICN to those with no MYC aberration demonstrated no significant difference in survival (P = .58). Additionally, no difference in survival was found between patients with increased MYC protein expression (IHC MYC ≥ 40%) compared to those with IHC MYC  .05). Importantly, the majority of patients in both groups (79% of patients with ICN and 81% of patients with no MYC aberrations) were treated with rituximab-based therapies. No significant difference in survival was found between patients with DLBCL with MYC ICN and patients with no MYC aberrations (P = .58). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Surgery increases cell death and induces changes in gene expression compared with anesthesia alone in the developing piglet brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin D Broad

    Full Text Available In a range of animal species, exposure of the brain to general anaesthesia without surgery during early infancy may adversely affect its neural and cognitive development. The mechanisms mediating this are complex but include an increase in brain cell death. In humans, attempts to link adverse cognitive development to infantile anaesthesia exposure have yielded ambiguous results. One caveat that may influence the interpretation of human studies is that infants are not exposed to general anaesthesia without surgery, raising the possibility that surgery itself, may contribute to adverse cognitive development. Using piglets, we investigated whether a minor surgical procedure increases cell death and disrupts neuro-developmental and cognitively salient gene transcription in the neonatal brain. We randomly assigned neonatal male piglets to a group who received 6h of 2% isoflurane anaesthesia or a group who received an identical anaesthesia plus 15 mins of surgery designed to replicate an inguinal hernia repair. Compared to anesthesia alone, surgery-induced significant increases in cell death in eight areas of the brain. Using RNAseq data derived from all 12 piglets per group we also identified significant changes in the expression of 181 gene transcripts induced by surgery in the cingulate cortex, pathway analysis of these changes suggests that surgery influences the thrombin, aldosterone, axonal guidance, B cell, ERK-5, eNOS and GABAA signalling pathways. This suggests a number of novel mechanisms by which surgery may influence neural and cognitive development independently or synergistically with the effects of anaesthesia.

  5. Over-Expression of SlSHN1 Gene Improves Drought Tolerance by Increasing Cuticular Wax Accumulation in Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayed M. Al-Abdallat

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasing cuticular wax accumulation in plants has been associated with improving drought tolerance in plants. In this study, a cDNA clone encoding the SlSHN1 transcription factor, the closest ortholog to WIN/SHN1 gene in Arabidopsis, was isolated from tomato plant. Expression analysis of SlSHN1 indicated that it is induced in response to drought conditions. The over-expression of SlSHN1 in tomato under the control of the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter produced plants that showed mild growth retardation phenotype with shiny and dark green leaves. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the over-expression of SlSHN1 in tomato resulted in higher cuticular wax deposition on leaf epidermial tissue when compared to non-transformed plants. Expression analysis in transgenic lines over-expressing SlSHN1 indicated that several wax-related synthesis genes were induced. Transgenic tomato plants over-expressing SlSHN1 showed higher drought tolerance when compared with wild type plants; this was reflected in delayed wilting of transgenic lines, improved water status and reduced water loss rate when compared with wild type plants. In conclusion, the SlSHN1 gene can modulate wax accumulation and could be utilized to enhance drought tolerance in tomato plant.

  6. Hypotonic resistance of boar spermatozoa: sperm subpopulations and relationship with epididymal maturation and fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druart, Xavier; Gatti, Jean-Luc; Huet, Sylvie; Dacheux, Jean-Louis; Humblot, Patrice

    2009-02-01

    Hypotonic resistance of boar spermatozoa was investigated by measuring the ratio of live/dead spermatozoa (SYBR-14/propidium iodide) by flow cytometry after hypotonic stress. The survival rate of ejaculated spermatozoa incubated in hypotonic solutions ranging from 3 to 330 mmol/kg followed a sigmoid curve that fitted a simple logistic model. The critical osmolality value (Osm(crit)) at which 50% of spermatozoa died was determined with this model. Hypotonic resistance of spermatozoa increased with temperature between 15 and 39 degrees C and decreased after hydrogen superoxide treatment, but was not modified during 8 days of preservation in Beltsville thawing solution. Hypotonic resistance markedly decreased during epididymal maturation and after ejaculation as Osm(crit) at 15 degrees C was 54.7+/-3.2, 68.5+/-10.6, 116.7+/-2.1 and 194.3+/-3.7 mmol/kg for the caput, corpus, cauda and ejaculated spermatozoa respectively. Hypo-osmotic stress of 100 mmol/kg revealed a sperm subpopulation exhibiting increased hypotonic resistance compared with the whole ejaculate (Osm(crit)=67.8+/-2.1 mmol/kg). Consistent differences were observed between lean and standard breeds (Pietrain versus Large White) and between boars within the same breed. According to data collected by artificial insemination centers during a large-scale field trial, hypotonic resistance of ejaculates was found to be positively correlated with in vivo fertility.

  7. Perfusion of veins at arterial pressure increases the expression of KLF5 and cell cycle genes in smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amirak, Emre [Section of Molecular Medicine, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, Sir Alexander Fleming Building, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Zakkar, Mustafa; Evans, Paul C. [Cardiovascular Sciences, Bywaters Center for Vascular Inflammation, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, London W12 ONN (United Kingdom); Kemp, Paul R., E-mail: p.kemp@imperial.ac.uk [Section of Molecular Medicine, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, Sir Alexander Fleming Building, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation remains a major cause of veno-arterial graft failure. We hypothesised that exposure of venous SMCs to arterial pressure would increase KLF5 expression and that of cell cycle genes. Porcine jugular veins were perfused at arterial or venous pressure in the absence of growth factors. The KLF5, c-myc, cyclin-D and cyclin-E expression were elevated within 24 h of perfusion at arterial pressure but not at venous pressure. Arterial pressure also reduced the decline in SM-myosin heavy chain expression. These data suggest a role for KLF5 in initiating venous SMCs proliferation in response to arterial pressure.

  8. Differential dopamine-induced prolactin mRNA levels in various prolactin-secreting cell (sub)populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemzadeh, M; Velkeniers, B; Herregodts, P; Collumbien, R; Finné, E; Derde, M P; Vanhaelst, L; Hooghe-Peters, E L

    1992-03-01

    We have examined the effects of dopamine on prolactin gene expression using quantitative in-situ hybridization histochemistry in different pituitary cell (sub)populations separated according to their density on a discontinuous Percoll gradient. Administration of dopamine resulted in a drastic reduction in hybridization of 35S-labelled DNA probe complementary to prolactin mRNA in total pituitary cells and in lactotrophs with low density. In contrast, dopamine significantly stimulated mRNA accumulation in prolactin-secreting cells with high density compared with other cell layers. The combined use of Percoll gradient and quantitative in-situ hybridization is a valuable and sensitive method with which to examine prolactin-secreting cell response to a given stimulation. Prolactin-secreting cells with high and low density clearly show functional heterogeneity in their response to dopamine.

  9. Decay of linkage disequilibrium within genes across HGDP-CEPH human samples: most population isolates do not show increased LD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navarro Arcadi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well known that the pattern of linkage disequilibrium varies between human populations, with remarkable geographical stratification. Indirect association studies routinely exploit linkage disequilibrium around genes, particularly in isolated populations where it is assumed to be higher. Here, we explore both the amount and the decay of linkage disequilibrium with physical distance along 211 gene regions, most of them related to complex diseases, across 39 HGDP-CEPH population samples, focusing particularly on the populations defined as isolates. Within each gene region and population we use r2 between all possible single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP pairs as a measure of linkage disequilibrium and focus on the proportion of SNP pairs with r2 greater than 0.8. Results Although the average r2 was found to be significantly different both between and within continental regions, a much higher proportion of r2 variance could be attributed to differences between continental regions (2.8% vs. 0.5%, respectively. Similarly, while the proportion of SNP pairs with r2 > 0.8 was significantly different across continents for all distance classes, it was generally much more homogenous within continents, except in the case of Africa and the Americas. The only isolated populations with consistently higher LD in all distance classes with respect to their continent are the Kalash (Central South Asia and the Surui (America. Moreover, isolated populations showed only slightly higher proportions of SNP pairs with r2 > 0.8 per gene region than non-isolated populations in the same continent. Thus, the number of SNPs in isolated populations that need to be genotyped may be only slightly less than in non-isolates. Conclusion The "isolated population" label by itself does not guarantee a greater genotyping efficiency in association studies, and properties other than increased linkage disequilibrium may make these populations interesting in

  10. Decay of linkage disequilibrium within genes across HGDP-CEPH human samples: most population isolates do not show increased LD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Elena; Laayouni, Hafid; Morcillo-Suarez, Carlos; Casals, Ferran; Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Ferrer-Admetlla, Anna; Gardner, Michelle; Rosa, Araceli; Navarro, Arcadi; Comas, David; Graffelman, Jan; Calafell, Francesc; Bertranpetit, Jaume

    2009-07-28

    It is well known that the pattern of linkage disequilibrium varies between human populations, with remarkable geographical stratification. Indirect association studies routinely exploit linkage disequilibrium around genes, particularly in isolated populations where it is assumed to be higher. Here, we explore both the amount and the decay of linkage disequilibrium with physical distance along 211 gene regions, most of them related to complex diseases, across 39 HGDP-CEPH population samples, focusing particularly on the populations defined as isolates. Within each gene region and population we use r2 between all possible single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) pairs as a measure of linkage disequilibrium and focus on the proportion of SNP pairs with r2 greater than 0.8. Although the average r2 was found to be significantly different both between and within continental regions, a much higher proportion of r2 variance could be attributed to differences between continental regions (2.8% vs. 0.5%, respectively). Similarly, while the proportion of SNP pairs with r2 > 0.8 was significantly different across continents for all distance classes, it was generally much more homogenous within continents, except in the case of Africa and the Americas. The only isolated populations with consistently higher LD in all distance classes with respect to their continent are the Kalash (Central South Asia) and the Surui (America). Moreover, isolated populations showed only slightly higher proportions of SNP pairs with r2 > 0.8 per gene region than non-isolated populations in the same continent. Thus, the number of SNPs in isolated populations that need to be genotyped may be only slightly less than in non-isolates. The "isolated population" label by itself does not guarantee a greater genotyping efficiency in association studies, and properties other than increased linkage disequilibrium may make these populations interesting in genetic epidemiology.

  11. Antibiotic resistant bacteria/genes dissemination in lacustrine sediments highly increased following cultural eutrophication of Lake Geneva (Switzerland).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevenon, Florian; Adatte, Thierry; Wildi, Walter; Poté, John

    2012-02-01

    This study investigates faecal indicator bacteria (FIB), multiple antibiotic resistant (MAR), and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), of sediment profiles from different parts of Lake Geneva (Switzerland) over the last decades. MARs consist to expose culturable Escherichia coli (EC) and Enterococcus (ENT) to mixed five antibiotics including Ampicillin, Tetracycline, Amoxicillin, Chloramphenicol and Erythromycin. Culture-independent is performed to assess the distribution of ARGs responsible for, β-lactams (blaTEM; Amoxicillin/Ampicillin), Streptomycin/Spectinomycin (aadA), Tetracycline (tet) Chloramphenicol (cmlA) and Vancomycin (van). Bacterial cultures reveal that in the sediments deposited following eutrophication of Lake Geneva in the 1970s, the percentage of MARs to five antibiotics varied from 0.12% to 4.6% and 0.016% to 11.6% of total culturable EC and ENT, respectively. In these organic-rich bacteria-contaminated sediments, the blaTEM resistant of FIB varied from 22% to 48% and 16% to 37% for EC and ENT respectively, whereas the positive PCR assays responsible for tested ARGs were observed for EC, ENT, and total DNA from all samples. The aadA resistance gene was amplified for all the sediment samples, including those not influenced by WWTP effluent water. Our results demonstrate that bacteria MARs and ARGs highly increased in the sediments contaminated with WWTP effluent following the cultural eutrophication of Lake Geneva. Hence, the human-induced changing limnological conditions highly enhanced the sediment microbial activity, and therein the spreading of antibiotic resistant bacteria and genes in this aquatic environment used to supply drinking water in a highly populated area. Furthermore, the presence of the antibiotic resistance gene aadA in all the studied samples points out a regional dissemination of this emerging contaminant in freshwater sediments since at least the late nineteenth century. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Moderate exercise increases expression for sensory, adrenergic, and immune genes in chronic fatigue syndrome patients but not in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Alan R; White, Andrea T; Hughen, Ronald W; Light, Kathleen C

    2009-10-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is characterized by debilitating fatigue, often accompanied by widespread muscle pain that meets criteria for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). Symptoms become markedly worse after exercise. Previous studies implicated dysregulation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), and immune system (IS) in CFS and FMS. We recently demonstrated that acid sensing ion channel (probably ASIC3), purinergic type 2X receptors (probably P2X4 and P2X5) and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) are molecular receptors in mouse sensory neurons detecting metabolites that cause acute muscle pain and possibly muscle fatigue. These molecular receptors are found on human leukocytes along with SNS and IS genes. Real-time, quantitative PCR showed that 19 CFS patients had lower expression of beta-2 adrenergic receptors but otherwise did not differ from 16 control subjects before exercise. After a sustained moderate exercise test, CFS patients showed greater increases than control subjects in gene expression for metabolite detecting receptors ASIC3, P2X4, and P2X5, for SNS receptors alpha-2A, beta-1, beta-2, and COMT and IS genes for IL10 and TLR4 lasting from 0.5 to 48 hours (P fatigue, mental fatigue, and pain. These new findings suggest dysregulation of metabolite detecting receptors as well as SNS and IS in CFS and CFS-FMS. Muscle fatigue and pain are major symptoms of CFS. After moderate exercise, CFS and CFS-FMS patients show enhanced gene expression for receptors detecting muscle metabolites and for SNS and IS, which correlate with these symptoms. These findings suggest possible new causes, points for intervention, and objective biomarkers for these disorders.

  13. Differential gene expression in Rhododendron fortunei roots colonized by an ericoid mycorrhizal fungus and increased nitrogen absorption and plant growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangying Wei

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ericoid mycorrhizal (ERM fungi are specifically symbiotic with plants in the family Ericaceae. Little is known thus far about their symbiotic establishment and subsequent nitrogen (N uptake at the molecular level. The present study devised a system for establishing a symbiotic relationship between Rhododendron fortunei Lindl. and an ERM fungus (Oidiodendron maius var. maius strain Om19, quantified seedling growth and N uptake, and compared transcriptome profiling between colonized and uncolonized roots using RNA-Seq. The Om19 colonization induced 16,892 genes that were differentially expressed in plant roots, of which 14,364 were upregulated and 2,528 were downregulated. These genes included those homologous to ATP-binding cassette transporters, calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases, and symbiosis receptor-like kinases. N metabolism was particularly active in Om19-colonized roots, and 51 genes were upregulated, such as nitrate transporters, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, ammonium transporters, glutamine synthetase, and glutamate synthase. Transcriptome analysis also identified a series of genes involving endocytosis, Fc-gamma R-mediated phagocytosis, glycerophospholipid metabolism, and GnRH signal pathway that have not been reported previously. Their roles in the symbiosis require further investigation. The Om19 colonization significantly increased N uptake and seedling growth. Total N content and dry weight of colonized seedlings were 36.6% and 46.6% greater than control seedlings. This is the first transcriptome analysis of a species from the family Ericaceae colonized by an ERM fungus. The findings from this study will shed light on the mechanisms underlying symbiotic relationships of ericaceous species with ERM fungi and the symbiosis-resultant N uptake and plant growth.

  14. Intermittent Fasting Promotes Fat Loss With Lean Mass Retention, Increased Hypothalamic Norepinephrine Content, and Increased Neuropeptide Y Gene Expression in Diet-Induced Obese Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotthardt, Juliet D; Verpeut, Jessica L; Yeomans, Bryn L; Yang, Jennifer A; Yasrebi, Ali; Roepke, Troy A; Bello, Nicholas T

    2016-02-01

    Clinical studies indicate alternate-day, intermittent fasting (IMF) protocols result in meaningful weight loss in obese individuals. To further understand the mechanisms sustaining weight loss by IMF, we investigated the metabolic and neural alterations of IMF in obese mice. Male C57/BL6 mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD; 45% fat) ad libitum for 8 weeks to promote an obese phenotype. Mice were divided into four groups and either maintained on ad libitum HFD, received alternate-day access to HFD (IMF-HFD), and switched to ad libitum low-fat diet (LFD; 10% fat) or received IMF of LFD (IMF-LFD). After 4 weeks, IMF-HFD (∼13%) and IMF-LFD (∼18%) had significantly lower body weights than the HFD. Body fat was also lower (∼40%-52%) in all diet interventions. Lean mass was increased in the IMF-LFD (∼12%-13%) compared with the HFD and IMF-HFD groups. Oral glucose tolerance area under the curve was lower in the IMF-HFD (∼50%), whereas the insulin tolerance area under the curve was reduced in all diet interventions (∼22%-42%). HPLC measurements of hypothalamic tissue homogenates indicated higher (∼55%-60%) norepinephrine (NE) content in the anterior regions of the medial hypothalamus of IMF compared with the ad libitum-fed groups, whereas NE content was higher (∼19%-32%) in posterior regions in the IMF-LFD group only. Relative gene expression of Npy in the arcuate nucleus was increased (∼65%-75%) in IMF groups. Our novel findings indicate that intermittent fasting produces alterations in hypothalamic NE and neuropeptide Y, suggesting the counterregulatory processes of short-term weight loss are associated with an IMF dietary strategy.

  15. Association of CD4+ T cell subpopulations and psychological stress measures in women living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehm, Kristina E; Konkle-Parker, Deborah

    2017-09-01

    Psychological stress is a known immunomodulator. In individuals with HIV, depression, the most common manifestation of increased psychological stress, can affect immune function with lower CD4+ T cell counts correlating with higher levels of depression. It is unknown how other forms of psychological stress can impact immune markers in people living with HIV. We conducted a cross-sectional study to determine how CD4+ T cell subpopulations correlated with different forms of psychological stress. We recruited 50 HIV-positive women as part of the Women's Interagency HIV Study. We assessed perceived stress, worry, acute anxiety, trait anxiety, and depression through self-report questionnaires and CD4+ T cell subpopulations using flow cytometry. Our sample was 96% African-American with a mean ± SD age and body mass index of 42 ± 8.8 years and 36.6 ± 11.5 kg/m2, respectively. The mean ± SD scores on the psychological measures were as follows: Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), 16.5 ± 6.4; Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ), 47.7 ± 13.8; State-Trait Anxiety Inventory - State (STAIS), 39.1 ± 12.3; State-Trait Anxiety Inventory - Trait (STAIT), 40.2 ± 11.4; Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), 15.6 ± 11.4. The mean + SD values for the immune parameters were as follows: regulatory T cells (Treg), 1.25% ± 0.7; T helper 1 (Th1), 14.9% ± 6.1; T helper 2 (Th2), 3.8% ± 2; Th1/Th2 ratio, 4.6 ± 3; and CD4+ T cell count (cells/mm3), 493 ± 251. Treg levels positively correlated with PSS, STAIS, and STAIT. CD4+ T cell count negatively correlated with PSS, PSWQ, STAIS, STAIT, and CES-D. These data suggest that immune function may be impacted by various forms of psychological stress in HIV-positive women. Interventions that target stress reduction may be useful in improving immune parameters and quality of life.

  16. The ectopic expression of the wheat Puroindoline genes increase germ size and seed oil content in transgenic corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinrui; Martin, John M; Beecher, Brian; Lu, Chaofu; Hannah, L Curtis; Wall, Michael L; Altosaar, Illimar; Giroux, Michael J

    2010-11-01

    Plant oil content and composition improvement is a major goal of plant breeding and biotechnology. The Puroindoline a and b (PINA and PINB) proteins together control whether wheat seeds are soft or hard textured and share a similar structure to that of plant non-specific lipid-transfer proteins. Here we transformed corn (Zea mays L.) with the wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) puroindoline genes (Pina and Pinb) to assess their effects upon seed oil content and quality. Pina and Pinb coding sequences were introduced into corn under the control of a corn Ubiquitin promoter. Three Pina/Pinb expression positive transgenic events were evaluated over two growing seasons. The results showed that Pin expression increased germ size significantly without negatively impacting seed size. Germ yield increased 33.8% while total seed oil content was increased by 25.23%. Seed oil content increases were primarily the result of increased germ size. This work indicates that higher oil content corn hybrids having increased food or feed value could be produced via puroindoline expression.

  17. Sperm kinematic, head morphometric and kinetic-morphometric subpopulations in the blue fox (Alopex lagopus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carles Soler

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work provides information on the blue fox ejaculated sperm quality needed for seminal dose calculations. Twenty semen samples, obtained by masturbation, were analyzed for kinematic and morphometric parameters by using CASA-Mot and CASA-Morph system and principal component (PC analysis. For motility, eight kinematic parameters were evaluated, which were reduced to PC1, related to linear variables, and PC2, related to oscillatory movement. The whole population was divided into three independent subpopulations: SP1, fast cells with linear movement; SP2, slow cells and nonoscillatory motility; and SP3, medium speed cells and oscillatory movement. In almost all cases, the subpopulation distribution by animal was significantly different. Head morphology analysis generated four size and four shape parameters, which were reduced to PC1, related to size, and PC2, related to shape of the cells. Three morphometric subpopulations existed: SP1: large oval cells; SP2: medium size elongated cells; and SP3: small and short cells. The subpopulation distribution differed between animals. Combining the kinematic and morphometric datasets produced PC1, related to morphometric parameters, and PC2, related to kinematics, which generated four sperm subpopulations - SP1: high oscillatory motility, large and short heads; SP2: medium velocity with small and short heads; SP3: slow motion small and elongated cells; and SP4: high linear speed and large elongated cells. Subpopulation distribution was different in all animals. The establishment of sperm subpopulations from kinematic, morphometric, and combined variables not only improves the well-defined fox semen characteristics and offers a good conceptual basis for fertility and sperm preservation techniques in this species, but also opens the door to use this approach in other species, included humans.

  18. Sperm kinematic, head morphometric and kinetic-morphometric subpopulations in the blue fox (Alopex lagopus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Carles; Contell, Jesús; Bori, Lorena; Sancho, María; García-Molina, Almudena; Valverde, Anthony; Segarvall, Jan

    2017-01-01

    This work provides information on the blue fox ejaculated sperm quality needed for seminal dose calculations. Twenty semen samples, obtained by masturbation, were analyzed for kinematic and morphometric parameters by using CASA-Mot and CASA-Morph system and principal component (PC) analysis. For motility, eight kinematic parameters were evaluated, which were reduced to PC1, related to linear variables, and PC2, related to oscillatory movement. The whole population was divided into three independent subpopulations: SP1, fast cells with linear movement; SP2, slow cells and nonoscillatory motility; and SP3, medium speed cells and oscillatory movement. In almost all cases, the subpopulation distribution by animal was significantly different. Head morphology analysis generated four size and four shape parameters, which were reduced to PC1, related to size, and PC2, related to shape of the cells. Three morphometric subpopulations existed: SP1: large oval cells; SP2: medium size elongated cells; and SP3: small and short cells. The subpopulation distribution differed between animals. Combining the kinematic and morphometric datasets produced PC1, related to morphometric parameters, and PC2, related to kinematics, which generated four sperm subpopulations – SP1: high oscillatory motility, large and short heads; SP2: medium velocity with small and short heads; SP3: slow motion small and elongated cells; and SP4: high linear speed and large elongated cells. Subpopulation distribution was different in all animals. The establishment of sperm subpopulations from kinematic, morphometric, and combined variables not only improves the well-defined fox semen characteristics and offers a good conceptual basis for fertility and sperm preservation techniques in this species, but also opens the door to use this approach in other species, included humans. PMID:27751987

  19. Stem Cell Factor-Based Identification and Functional Properties of In Vitro-Selected Subpopulations of Malignant Mesothelioma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Blum

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Malignant mesothelioma (MM is an aggressive neoplasm characterized by a poor patient survival rate, because of rapid tumor recurrence following first-line therapy. Cancer stem cells (CSCs are assumed to be responsible for initiating tumorigenesis and driving relapse after therapeutic interventions. CSC-enriched MM cell subpopulations were identified by an OCT4/SOX2 reporter approach and were characterized by (1 increased resistance to cisplatin, (2 increased sensitivity toward the FAK inhibitor VS-6063 in vitro, and (3 a higher tumor-initiating capacity in vivo in orthotopic xenograft and allograft mouse models. Overexpression of NF2 (neurofibromatosis 2, merlin, a tumor suppressor often mutated or lost in MM, did not affect proliferation and viability of CSC-enriched MM populations but robustly decreased the viability of reporter-negative cells. In contrast, downregulation of calretinin strongly decreased proliferation and viability of both populations. In summary, we have enriched and characterized a small MM cell subpopulation that bears the expected CSC characteristics.

  20. Overexpression of the apple MpNPR1 gene confers increased disease resistance in Malus x domestica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malnoy, M; Jin, Q; Borejsza-Wysocka, E E; He, S Y; Aldwinckle, H S

    2007-12-01

    The NPR1 gene plays a pivotal role in systemic acquired resistance in plants. Its overexpression in Arabidopsis and rice results in increased disease resistance and elevated expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes. An NPR1 homolog, MpNPR1-1, was cloned from apple (Malus x domestica) and overexpressed in two important apple cultivars, Galaxy and M26. Apple leaf pieces were transformed with the MpNPR1 cDNA under the control of the inducible Pin2 or constitutive Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV)35S promoter using Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Overexpression of MpNPR1 mRNA was shown by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Activation of some PR genes (PR2, PR5, and PR8) was observed. Resistance to fire blight was evaluated in a growth chamber by inoculation of the shoot tips of our own rooted 30-cm-tall plants with virulent strain Ea273 of Erwinia amylovora. Transformed Galaxy lines overexpressing MpNPR1 had 32 to 40% of shoot length infected, compared with 80% in control Galaxy plants. Transformed M26 lines overexpressing MpNPR1 under the control of the CaMV35S promoter also showed a significant reduction of disease compared with control M26 plants. Some MpNPR-overexpressing Galaxy lines also exhibited increased resistance to two important fungal pathogens of apple, Venturia inaequalis and Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae. Selected transformed lines have been propagated for field trials for disease resistance and fruit quality.

  1. Increased 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase activity enhances Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated gene delivery into plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Someya, Tatsuhiko; Nonaka, Satoko; Nakamura, Kouji; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2013-10-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is a useful tool for the genetic modification in plants, although its efficiency is low for several plant species. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation has three major steps in laboratory-controlled experiments: the delivery of T-DNA into plant cells, the selection of transformed plant cells, and the regeneration of whole plants from the selected cells. Each of these steps must be optimized to improve the efficiency of Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation. It has been reported that increasing the number of cells transformed by T-DNA delivery can improve the frequency of stable transformation. Previously, we demonstrated that a reduction in ethylene production by plant cells during cocultivation with A. tumefaciens-expressing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase resulted in increased T-DNA delivery into the plant cells. In this study, to further improve T-DNA delivery by A. tumefaciens, we modified the expression cassette of the ACC deaminase gene using vir gene promoter sequences. The ACC deaminase gene driven by the virD1 promoter was expressed at a higher level, resulting in a higher ACC deaminase activity in this A. tumefaciens strain than in the strain with the lac promoter used in a previous study. The newly developed A. tumefaciens strain improves the delivery of T-DNA into Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) and Erianthus ravennae plants and thus may be a powerful tool for the Agrobacterium-mediated genetic engineering of plants. © 2013 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Interaction between obesity-related genes, FTO and MC4R, associated to an increase of breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Patrícia Amorim; de Carlos Back, Lia Kubelka; Sereia, Aline Fernanda Rodrigues; Kubelka, Clara; Ribeiro, Maria Cecíia Menks; Fernandes, Bráulio Leal; de Souza, Ilíada Rainha

    2013-12-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is a complex disease and obesity is a well-known risk factor for its development, especially after menopause. Several studies have shown Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) linked to overweight and obesity, such as: rs1121980 (T/C) and rs9939609 (A/T) in Fat Mass and Obesity Associated gene (FTO) and rs17782313 (T/C) in Melanocortin 4 Receptor gene (MC4R). Thus, we aimed to investigate the association between these obesity-related SNPs and BC risk. One hundred BC patients and 148 healthy women from Santa Catarina, Brazil entered the study. SNPs were genotyped using Taqman assays. For statistical analyses SNPStats and SPSS softwares were used. Association analyses were performed by logistic regression and were adjusted for age and Body mass index (BMI). Multiple SNPs inheritance models (log-additive, dominant, recessive, codominant) were performed to determine odds ratios (ORs), assuming 95 % confidence interval (CI) and P value = 0.05 as the significance limit. When analyzed alone, FTO rs1121980 and rs9939609 did not show significant associations with BC development, however MC4R rs17782313 showed increased risk for BC even after adjustments (P-value = 0.032). Interestingly, the interaction of FTO and MC4R polymorphisms showed a powerful association with BC. We observed a 4.59-fold increased risk for woman who have the allele combination C/T/C (FTO rs1121980/FTO rs9939609/MC4R rs17782313) (P-value = 0.0011, adjusted for age and BMI). We found important and unpublished associations between these obesity-related genes and BC risk. These associations seem to be independent of their effect on BMI, indicating a direct role of the interaction between FTO and MC4R polymorphisms in BC development.

  3. Selective neurofilament (SMI-32, FNP-7 and N200) expression in subpopulations of layer V pyramidal neurons in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelker, Courtney C J; Garin, Nathalie; Taylor, Jeremy S H; Gähwiler, Beat H; Hornung, Jean-Pierre; Molnár, Zoltán

    2004-11-01

    There are two main types of layer V pyramidal neurons in rat cortex. Type I neurons have tufted apical dendrites extending into layer I, produce bursts of action potentials and project to subcortical targets (spinal cord, superior colliculus and pontine nuclei). Type II neurons have apical dendrites, which arborize in layers II-IV, do not produce bursts of action potentials and project to ipsilateral and contralateral cortex. The specific expression of different genes and proteins in these two distinct layer V neurons is unknown. To distinguish between distinct subpopulations, fluorescent microspheres were injected into subcortical targets (labeling type I neurons) or primary somatosensory cortex (labeling type II neurons) of adult rats. After transport, cortical sections were processed for immunohistochemistry using various antibodies. This study demonstrated that antigens recognized by SMI-32, N200 and FNP-7 antibodies were only expressed in subcortical (type I)--but not in contralateral (type II)--projecting neurons. NR1, NR2a/b, PLCbeta1, BDNF, NGF and TrkB antigens were highly expressed in all neuronal subpopulations examined. Organotypic culture experiments demonstrated that the development of neurofilament expression and laminar specificity does not depend on the presence of the subcortical targets. This study suggests specific markers for the subcortical projecting layer V neuron subpopulations.

  4. Adenosine A(2A) receptor gene (ADORA2A) variants may increase autistic symptoms and anxiety in autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Christine M; Agelopoulos, Konstantin; Huy, Ellen; Rothermundt, Matthias; Krakowitzky, Petra; Meyer, Jobst; Deckert, Jürgen; von Gontard, Alexander; Hohoff, Christa

    2010-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are heterogeneous disorders presenting with increased rates of anxiety. The adenosine A(2A) receptor gene (ADORA2A) is associated with panic disorder and is located on chromosome 22q11.23. Its gene product, the adenosine A(2A) receptor, is strongly expressed in the caudate nucleus, which also is involved in ASD. As autistic symptoms are increased in individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, and large 22q11.2 deletions and duplications have been observed in ASD individuals, in this study, 98 individuals with ASD and 234 control individuals were genotyped for eight single-nucleotide polymorphisms in ADORA2A. Nominal association with the disorder was observed for rs2236624-CC, and phenotypic variability in ASD symptoms was influenced by rs3761422, rs5751876 and rs35320474. In addition, association of ADORA2A variants with anxiety was replicated for individuals with ASD. Findings point toward a possible mediating role of ADORA2A variants on phenotypic expression in ASD that need to be replicated in a larger sample.

  5. Increased gene dosage for β- and κ-casein in transgenic cattle improves milk composition through complex effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laible, Götz; Smolenski, Grant; Wheeler, Thomas; Brophy, Brigid

    2016-01-01

    We have previously generated transgenic cattle with additional copies of bovine β- and κ casein genes. An initial characterisation of milk produced with a hormonally induced lactation from these transgenic cows showed an altered milk composition with elevated β-casein levels and twofold increased κ-casein content. Here we report the first in-depth characterisation of the composition of the enriched casein milk that was produced through a natural lactation. We have analyzed milk from the high expressing transgenic line TG3 for milk composition at early, peak, mid and late lactation. The introduction of additional β- and κ-casein genes resulted in the expected expression of the transgene derived proteins and an associated reduction in the size of the casein micelles. Expression of the transgenes was associated with complex changes in the expression levels of other milk proteins. Two other major milk components were affected, namely fat and micronutrients. In addition, the sialic acid content of the milk was increased. In contrast, the level of lactose remained unchanged. This novel milk with its substantially altered composition will provide insights into the regulatory processes synchronizing the synthesis and assembly of milk components, as well as production of potentially healthier milk with improved dairy processing characteristics. PMID:27876865

  6. Increased frequency of DNA deletions in pink-eyed unstable mice carrying a mutation in the Werner syndrome gene homologue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebel, Michel

    2002-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by genomic instability and the premature onset of a number of age-related diseases, including cancers. Accumulating evidence indicates that the WS gene product is involved in resolving aberrant DNA structures that may arise during the process of DNA replication and/or transcription. To estimate the frequency of DNA deletions directly in the skin of mouse embryos, mice with a deletion of part of the murine WRN helicase domain were created. These mutant mice were then crossed to the pink-eyed unstable animals, which have a 70 kb internal duplication at the pink-eyed dilution (p) gene. This report indicates that the frequency of deletion of the duplicated sequence at the p locus is elevated in mice with a mutation in the WRN allele when compared with wild-type mice. In addition, the inhibitor of topoisomerase I camptothecin also increases the frequency of deletion at the p locus. This frequency is even more elevated in WRN mutant mice treated with camptothecin. In contrast, while the inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activity by 3-aminobenzamide increases the frequency of DNA deletion, mutant WRN mice are not significantly more sensitive to the inhibition of PARP activity than wild-type animals.

  7. Secretion of thymidine kinase to increase the effectivity of suicide gene therapy results in the loss of enzymatic activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerens, A. M. J.; Rots, M. G.; Bermudez, B.; De Vries, E. F. J.; Haisma, H. J.

    2008-01-01

    Low efficiency of gene transfer is one of the major limitations of gene therapy. A solution to this problem may be transmission; by modification of the transgene, the gene product can be secreted and internalized by the surrounding cells. Cancer gene therapy using the herpes simplex thymidine kinase

  8. Clinical trials in hospitalized heart failure patients: targeting interventions to optimal phenotypic subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Butler, Javed; Roessig, Lothar; Fonarow, Gregg C; Greene, Stephen J; Metra, Marco; Cotter, Gadi; Kupfer, Stuart; Zalewski, Andrew; Sato, Naoki; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2015-07-01

    With one possible exception, the last decade of clinical trials in hospitalized heart failure (HHF) patients has failed to demonstrate improvement in long-term clinical outcomes. This trend necessitates a need to evaluate optimal drug development strategies and standards of trial conduct. It has become increasingly important to recognize the heterogeneity among HHF patients and the differential characterization of novel drug candidates. Targeting these agents to specific subpopulations may afford optimal net response related to the particular mode of action of the drug. Analyses of previous trials demonstrate profound differences in the baseline characteristics of patients enrolled across global regions and participating sites. Such differences may influence risks for events and interpretation of results. Therefore, the actual execution of trials and the epidemiology of HHF populations at the investigative sites must be taken into consideration. Collaboration among participating sites including the provision of registry data tailored to the planned development program will optimize trial conduct. Observational data prior to study initiation may enable sites to feedback and engage in protocol development to allow for feasible and valid clinical trial conduct. This site-centered, epidemiology-based network environment may facilitate studies in specific patient populations and promote optimal data collection and clear interpretation of drug safety and efficacy. This review summarizes the roundtable discussion held by a multidisciplinary team of representatives from academia, National Institutes of Health, industry, regulatory agencies, payers, and contract and academic research organizations to answer the question: Who should be targeted for novel therapies in HHF?

  9. Changes in Leukocyte Subpopulations with Decline in Glomerular Filtration Rate in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manouchehr Nakhjavani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggested the role of white blood cells (WBCs in the pathogenesis and complications of type 2 diabetes. Increased WBC counts predict mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. In this study alterations in WBC subpopulations in diabetic patients with non-dialysis dependent CKD are investigated. This was a cross-sectional study  on 376 participants, including   272 diabetic  patients  and  104  healthy  controls.  Total  and  differential  WBC  counts  were  compared  among diabetics with CKD, diabetics without CKD and controls. Among patients with type 2 diabetes, there was no significant difference in total WBC count between those with and without CKD. Diabetic patients with CKD had higher neutrophil, monocyte and eosinophil and lower lymphocyte count compared with both diabetic patients without CKD and healthy controls. Except for monocytes, a significant association was observed between GFR and differential WBC counts, which persisted after adjustment for conventional diabetes riskfactors (R2=0.272, P P

  10. Latent national subpopulations of early education classroom disengagement of children from underresourced families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Paul A; Rovine, Michael J; Watkins, Marley W; Chao, Jessica L; Irwin, Clare W; Reyes, Roland

    2017-12-01

    This research examined the latent developmental patterns for early classroom disengagement among children from some of the most underresourced families in the nation. Based on standardized teacher observations from the Head Start Impact Study, a nationally representative sample of children (N=1377) was assessed for manifestations of reticent/withdrawn and low energy behavior over four years spanning prekindergarten through first grade. For each form of disengagement, latent growth mixture modeling revealed three distinct subpopulations of change patterns featuring a dominant class associated with generally good classroom adjustment, a medial class that varied close to the population average over time, and a more extreme class (about 10% of the population) whose adjustment was relatively marginal and sometimes reached problematic levels. Whereas reticent/withdrawn behavior ordinarily subsided over time, low energy behavior increased. More extreme low energy behaviors tended to dissipate through schooling and extreme reticence/withdrawal became more accentuated, with both types associated with later academic and social problems. Attendant risk and protective factors are identified and mitigating assessment and prevention measures are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. When stress predicts a shrinking gene pool, trading early reproduction for longevity can increase fitness, even with lower fecundity.

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    William C Ratcliff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stresses like dietary restriction or various toxins increase lifespan in taxa as diverse as yeast, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila and rats, by triggering physiological responses that also tend to delay reproduction. Food odors can reverse the effects of dietary restriction, showing that key mechanisms respond to information, not just resources. Such environmental cues can predict population trends, not just individual prospects for survival and reproduction. When population size is increasing, each offspring produced earlier makes a larger proportional contribution to the gene pool, but the reverse is true when population size is declining. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show mathematically that natural selection can favor facultative delay in reproduction when environmental cues predict a decrease in total population size, even if lifetime fecundity decreases with delay. We also show that increased reproduction from waiting for better conditions does not increase fitness (proportional representation when the whole population benefits similarly. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that the beneficial effects of stress on longevity (hormesis in diverse taxa are a side-effect of delaying reproduction in response to environmental cues that population size is likely to decrease. The reversal by food odors of the effects of dietary restriction can be explained as a response to information that population size is less likely to decrease, reducing the chance that delaying reproduction will increase fitness.

  12. Sperm subpopulational dinamycs during the cryopreservation procedure in caprine (Capra aegagrus hircus ejaculates

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    Barbas JP

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present research was to determine specific sperm subpopulational dynamics in different processing steps during cryopreservation process by using objective functional sperm kinematic descriptors in goat ejaculates. Fresh ejaculates (n=40 collected from eight bucks were analised for volume, concentration, sperm viability, acrosome integrity, and sperm motility using computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA system. Eight sperm kinematic descriptors (VCL, VSL, VAP, LIN, STR, BCF, ALH, and WOB were assessed using CASA system after five different handling step (1st: fresh semen collection (F; 2nd: 1st washing/centrifugation step (1WC; 3rd: 2nd washing / centrifugation step (2WC; 4th: cooling step at 4ºC (CL; and 5th: post-thawing step at 37ºC (PT during a standard cryopreservation protocol for goat semen. The results obtained from the kinematic parameters were analysed by using Principal Component Analysis (PCA and multivariate clustering procedures to identify specific kinematic subpopulations and establish the relationship between the distribution of the subpopulations found and the functional sperm motility in each step. Except for the 1st (SbpF1-SbpF3 and 4th (SbpCL1-SbpCL3 intervals, four sperm kinematic subpopulations (Sbp1LC1-Sbp1LC4, Sbp2LC1-Sbp2LC4 and SbpPD1-SbpPD4 were observed. Based on kinematic velocity parameters and the subpopulation disclosed, rapid, slow, vigorous, passive, non-progressive and progressive sperm were discerned. Moreover, based on kinematic linearity parameters and depending on the subpopulation uncovered, curvilinear, regular-linear, parabolic and erratic-non-linear trajectories were detected. Subpopulations remained varible throughout handling steps and multiple significant differences among the sperm kinematic parameters were observed (p<0.001 as well as in the frequency of distribution of kinematic subpopulations among steps (p<0.05. In conclusion, this study confirms the variability and

  13. Identification of subpopulations in mesenchymal stem cell-like cultures from human umbilical cord

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    Majore Ingrida

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A variety of cell types can be identified in the adherent fraction of bone marrow mononuclear cells including more primitive and embryonic-like stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC, lineage-committed progenitors as well as mature cells such as osteoblasts and fibroblasts. Different methods are described for the isolation of single bone marrow stem cell subpopulations – beginning from ordinary size sieving, long term cultivation under specific conditions to FACS-based approaches. Besides bone marrow-derived subpopulations, also other tissues including human umbilical cord (UC have been recently suggested to provide a potential source for MSC. Although of clinical importance, these UC-derived MSC populations remain to be characterized. It was thus the aim of the present study to identify possible subpopulations in cultures of MSC-like cells obtained from UC. We used counterflow centrifugal elutriation (CCE as a novel strategy to successfully address this question. Results UC-derived primary cells were separated by CCE and revealed differentially-sized populations in the fractions. Thus, a subpopulation with an average diameter of about 11 μm and a small flat cell body was compared to a large sized subpopulation of about 19 μm average diameter. Flow cytometric analysis revealed the expression of certain MSC stem cell markers including CD44, CD73, CD90 and CD105, respectively, although these markers were expressed at higher levels in the small-sized population. Moreover, this small-sized subpopulation exhibited a higher proliferative capacity as compared to the total UC-derived primary cultures and the large-sized cells and demonstrated a reduced amount of aging cells. Conclusion Using the CCE technique, we were the first to demonstrate a subpopulation of small-sized UC-derived primary cells carrying MSC-like characteristics according to the presence of various mesenchymal stem cell markers. This is also supported by the

  14. Quantitative analysis of monocyte subpopulations in murine atherosclerotic plaques by multiphoton microscopy.

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    Abigail S Haka

    Full Text Available The progressive accumulation of monocyte-derived cells in the atherosclerotic plaque is a hallmark of atherosclerosis. However, it is now appreciated that monocytes represent a heterogeneous circulating population of cells that differ in functionality. New approaches are needed to investigate the role of monocyte subpopulations in atherosclerosis since a detailed understanding of their differential mobilization, recruitment, survival and emigration during atherogenesis is of particular importance for development of successful therapeutic strategies. We present a novel methodology for the in vivo examination of monocyte subpopulations in mouse models of atherosclerosis. This approach combines cellular labeling by fluorescent beads with multiphoton microscopy to visualize and monitor monocyte subpopulations in living animals. First, we show that multiphoton microscopy is an accurate and timesaving technique to analyze monocyte subpopulation trafficking and localization in plaques in excised tissues. Next, we demonstrate that multiphoton microscopy can be used to monitor monocyte subpopulation trafficking in atherosclerotic plaques in living animals. This novel methodology should have broad applications and facilitate new insights into the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and other inflammatory diseases.

  15. Quantitative analysis of monocyte subpopulations in murine atherosclerotic plaques by multiphoton microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haka, Abigail S; Potteaux, Stephane; Fraser, Haley; Randolph, Gwendalyn J; Maxfield, Frederick R

    2012-01-01

    The progressive accumulation of monocyte-derived cells in the atherosclerotic plaque is a hallmark of atherosclerosis. However, it is now appreciated that monocytes represent a heterogeneous circulating population of cells that differ in functionality. New approaches are needed to investigate the role of monocyte subpopulations in atherosclerosis since a detailed understanding of their differential mobilization, recruitment, survival and emigration during atherogenesis is of particular importance for development of successful therapeutic strategies. We present a novel methodology for the in vivo examination of monocyte subpopulations in mouse models of atherosclerosis. This approach combines cellular labeling by fluorescent beads with multiphoton microscopy to visualize and monitor monocyte subpopulations in living animals. First, we show that multiphoton microscopy is an accurate and timesaving technique to analyze monocyte subpopulation trafficking and localization in plaques in excised tissues. Next, we demonstrate that multiphoton microscopy can be used to monitor monocyte subpopulation trafficking in atherosclerotic plaques in living animals. This novel methodology should have broad applications and facilitate new insights into the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and other inflammatory diseases.

  16. Morphometric and kinematic sperm subpopulations in split ejaculates of normozoospermic men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santolaria, Pilar; Soler, Carles; Recreo, Pilar; Carretero, Teresa; Bono, Araceli; Berné, José M; Yániz, Jesús L

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to analyze the sperm kinematic and morphometric subpopulations in the different fractions of the ejaculate in normozoospermic men. Ejaculates from eight normozoospermic men were collected by masturbation in three fractions after 3–5 days of sexual abstinence. Analyses of sperm motility by computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA-Mot), and of sperm morphometry by computer-assisted sperm morphometry analysis (CASA-Morph) using fluorescence were performed. Clustering and discriminant procedures were performed to identify sperm subpopulations in the kinematic and morphometric data obtained. Clustering procedures resulted in the classification of spermatozoa into three kinematic subpopulations (slow with low ALH [35.6% of all motile spermatozoa], with circular trajectories [32.0%], and rapid with high ALH [32.4%]), and three morphometric subpopulations (large-round [33.9% of all spermatozoa], elongated [32.0%], and small [34.10%]). The distribution of kinematic sperm subpopulations was different among ejaculate fractions (P functional implications. PMID:27624985

  17. Reduced Intracellular c-di-GMP Content Increases Expression of Quorum Sensing-Regulated Genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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    Song Lin Chua

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP is an intracellular secondary messenger which controls the biofilm life cycle in many bacterial species. High intracellular c-di-GMP content enhances biofilm formation via the reduction of motility and production of biofilm matrix, while low c-di-GMP content in biofilm cells leads to increased motility and biofilm dispersal. While the effect of high c-di-GMP levels on bacterial lifestyles is well studied, the physiology of cells at low c-di-GMP levels remains unclear. Here, we showed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells with high and low intracellular c-di-GMP contents possessed distinct transcriptome profiles. There were 535 genes being upregulated and 432 genes downregulated in cells with low c-di-GMP, as compared to cells with high c-di-GMP. Interestingly, both rhl and pqs quorum-sensing (QS operons were expressed at higher levels in cells with low intracellular c-di-GMP content compared with cells with higher c-di-GMP content. The induced expression of pqs and rhl QS required a functional PqsR, the transcriptional regulator of pqs QS. Next, we observed increased production of pqs and rhl-regulated virulence factors, such as pyocyanin and rhamnolipids, in P. aeruginosa cells with low c-di-GMP levels, conferring them with increased intracellular survival rates and cytotoxicity against murine macrophages. Hence, our data suggested that low intracellular c-di-GMP levels in bacteria could induce QS-regulated virulence, in particular rhamnolipids that cripple the cellular components of the innate immune system.

  18. Leukemia inhibitory factor increases the proliferation of human endometrial stromal cells and expression of genes related to pluripotency

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    Mojdeh Salehnia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Concerning the low population of human endometrial mesenchymal cells within the tissue and their potential application in the clinic and tissue engineering, some researches have been focused on their in vitro expansion. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF as a proliferative factor on the expansion and proliferation of human endometrial stromal cells. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, the isolated and cultured human endometrial stromal cells from women at ovulatory phase aged 20-35 years, after fourth passage were divided into control and LIF-treated groups. In the experimental group, the endometrial cells were treated by 10 ng/ml LIF in culture media and the cultured cells without adding LIF considered as control group. Both groups were evaluated and compared for proliferation rate using MTT assay, for CD90 marker by flow cytometric analysis and for the expression of Oct4, Nanog, PCNA and LIFr genes using real-time RT-PCR. Results: The proliferation rate of control and LIF-treated groups were 1.17±0.17 and 1.61±0.06 respectively and there was a significant increase in endometrial stromal cell proliferation following in vitro treatment by LIF compared to control group (p=0.049. The rate of CD90 positive cells was significantly increased in LIFtreated group (98.96±0.37% compared to control group (94.26±0.08% (p=0.0498. Also, the expression ratio of all studied genes was significantly increased in the LIFtreated group compared to control group (p=0.0479. Conclusion: The present study showed that LIF has a great impact on proliferation, survival, and maintenance of pluripotency of human endometrial stromal cells and it could be applicable in cell therapies.

  19. Leukemia inhibitory factor increases the proliferation of human endometrial stromal cells and expression of genes related to pluripotency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehnia, Mojdeh; Fayazi, Mehri; Ehsani, Shokreya

    2017-04-01

    Concerning the low population of human endometrial mesenchymal cells within the tissue and their potential application in the clinic and tissue engineering, some researches have been focused on their in vitro expansion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) as a proliferative factor on the expansion and proliferation of human endometrial stromal cells. In this experimental study, the isolated and cultured human endometrial stromal cells from women at ovulatory phase aged 20-35 years, after fourth passage were divided into control and LIF-treated groups. In the experimental group, the endometrial cells were treated by 10 ng/ml LIF in culture media and the cultured cells without adding LIF considered as control group. Both groups were evaluated and compared for proliferation rate using MTT assay, for CD90 marker by flow cytometric analysis and for the expression of Oct4, Nanog, PCNA and LIFr genes using real-time RT-PCR. The proliferation rate of control and LIF-treated groups were 1.17±0.17 and 1.61±0.06 respectively and there was a significant increase in endometrial stromal cell proliferation following in vitro treatment by LIF compared to control group (p=0.049). The rate of CD90 positive cells was significantly increased in LIF-treated group (98.96±0.37%) compared to control group (94.26±0.08%) (p=0.0498). Also, the expression ratio of all studied genes was significantly increased in the LIF-treated group compared to control group (p=0.0479). The present study showed that LIF has a great impact on proliferation, survival, and maintenance of pluripotency of human endometrial stromal cells and it could be applicable in cell therapies.

  20. Maternal obesity programs increased leptin gene expression in rat male offspring via epigenetic modifications in a depot-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoutre, Simon; Oger, Frederik; Pourpe, Charlène; Butruille, Laura; Marousez, Lucie; Dickes-Coopman, Anne; Laborie, Christine; Guinez, Céline; Lesage, Jean; Vieau, Didier; Junien, Claudine; Eberlé, Delphine; Gabory, Anne; Eeckhoute, Jérôme; Breton, Christophe

    2017-08-01

    According to the Developmental Origin of Health and Disease (DOHaD) concept, maternal obesity and accelerated growth in neonates predispose offspring to white adipose tissue (WAT) accumulation. In rodents, adipogenesis mainly develops during lactation. The mechanisms underlying the phenomenon known as developmental programming remain elusive. We previously reported that adult rat offspring from high-fat diet-fed dams (called HF) exhibited hypertrophic adipocyte, hyperleptinemia and increased leptin mRNA levels in a depot-specific manner. We hypothesized that leptin upregulation occurs via epigenetic malprogramming, which takes place early during development of WAT. As a first step, we identified in silico two potential enhancers located upstream and downstream of the leptin transcription start site that exhibit strong dynamic epigenomic remodeling during adipocyte differentiation. We then focused on epigenetic modifications (methylation, hydroxymethylation, and histone modifications) of the promoter and the two potential enhancers regulating leptin gene expression in perirenal (pWAT) and inguinal (iWAT) fat pads of HF offspring during lactation (postnatal days 12 (PND12) and 21 (PND21)) and in adulthood. PND12 is an active period for epigenomic remodeling in both deposits especially in the upstream enhancer, consistent with leptin gene induction during adipogenesis. Unlike iWAT, some of these epigenetic marks were still observable in pWAT of weaned HF offspring. Retained marks were only visible in pWAT of 9-month-old HF rats that showed a persistent "expandable" phenotype. Consistent with the DOHaD hypothesis, persistent epigenetic remodeling occurs at regulatory regions especially within intergenic sequences, linked to higher leptin gene expression in adult HF offspring in a depot-specific manner.

  1. Hydrochlorothiazide compared to candesartan treatment increases adipose tissue gene expression and circulating levels of serum amyloid A in hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palming, J; Jansson, P-A; Renström, F; Johansson, A; Johansson, L; Karlsson, C; Lind, L; Eriksson, J W

    2011-05-01

    Treatment of hypertension with angiotensin receptor blockers has been shown to reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in comparison to thiazide diuretics and beta adrenergic blockers. Therefore, we wanted to study the effect of antihypertensive drugs on adipose tissue with respect to insulin resistance. In the MEDICA (MEchanisms for the DIabetes preventing effects of CAndesartan) study, 22 hypertensive, nondiabetic patients with abdominal obesity (10 men, 12 women) were randomized into 12-week treatment periods with candesartan, hydrochlorothiazide, and placebo according to a 3-way cross-over design. Subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies were taken after 8 weeks treatment to analyze gene expression, glucose uptake capacity, insulin-signaling, and adipocyte size. Adipose tissue gene expression of serum amyloid A (SAA) was higher after hydrochlorothiazide treatment compared to candesartan (p=0.036), and this was in accordance with our previous finding on circulating SAA levels. Serum levels of E selectin were increased after hydrochlorothiazide compared to candesartan treatment (p=0.002) and lower after candesartan compared to placebo (p=0.002). In adipocytes, there were no significant differences between the treatments with respect to cell size, glucose uptake capacity, or insulin-signaling. In comparison to candesartan, hydrochlorothiazide raised the adipose tissue gene expression of SAA and the serum level of SAA as well as E selectin in hypertensive patients. Less adipose and systemic inflammation may be one explanation why candesartan is favorable in comparison to thiazide diuretics with respect to development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Salt stress increases the expression of p5cs gene and induces proline accumulation in cactus pear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Ortega, Claudia O; Ochoa-Alfaro, Ana E; Reyes-Agüero, Juan A; Aguado-Santacruz, Gerardo A; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan F

    2008-01-01

    Proline (Pro) is one of the most accumulated osmolytes in salinity and water deficit conditions in plants. In the present study, we measured the Pro content, the activity and the expression level of delta 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CS: gamma-glutamyl kinase, EC 2.7.2.11 and glutamate-5-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, EC 1.2.1.41), a key regulatory enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of Pro, in cactus pear (Opuntia streptacantha) subjected to 6, 9 and 11 days of salt stress. Treatment with NaCl of O. streptacantha young plants resulted in a decrease in the cladode thickness and root length, and in a significant and gradual accumulation of Pro in young cladodes, in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. P5CS activity, studied as gamma-glutamyl kinase, was reduced at all times as a consequence of salt treatment, except at the sixth day at 75 and 150mM of NaCl, where a slight increase was observed. We isolated an open reading frame (ORF) fragment of p5cs gene. The deduced amino acid sequence of the P5CS protein exhibited 90.4% of identity with the P5CS protein from Mesembryanthemum crystallinum. RT-PCR analysis revealed that the Osp5cs gene of O. streptacantha was induced by salt stress at 9 and 11 days of treatment. Furthermore, ABA-induced Osp5cs gene expression was observed in cladodes of cactus pear young plants. We observed an evident correlation between the transcript up-regulation and the Pro accumulation under salt stress; however, these results do not parallel with the changes in P5CS enzymatic activity. This Pro accumulation might function as an osmolyte for the intracellular osmotic adjustment and might be playing a critical role in protecting photosynthetic activity in O. streptacantha plants under salt stress.

  3. A Distinct Slow-Cycling Cancer Stem-like Subpopulation of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Cells is maintained in Vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dembinski, Jennifer L., E-mail: jennifer.dembinski@rr-research.no; Krauss, Stefan [Cellular and Genetic Therapy, Department of Microbiology, Cancer Stem Cell Innovation Center (CAST), Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway)

    2010-11-29

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma has the worst prognosis of any major malignancy, with <5% of patients surviving five years. This can be contributed to the often late diagnosis, lack of sufficient treatment and metastatic spread. Heterogeneity within tumors is increasingly becoming a focus in cancer research, as novel therapies are required to target the most aggressive subpopulations of cells that are frequently termed cancer stem cells (CSCs). In the current study, we describe the identification of a slow-cycling cancer stem-like population of cells in vivo in BxPC-3 and Panc03.27 xenografts. A distinct slow-cycling label-retaining population of cells (DiI+/SCC) was found both at the edge of tumors, and in small circumscribed areas within the tumors. DiI+/SCC in these areas display an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) fingerprint, including an upregulation of the mesenchymal markers vimentin and N-cadherin and a loss of the epithelial marker E-cadherin. DiI+/SCC also displayed a critical re-localization of beta-catenin from the membrane to the nucleus. Additionally, the DiI+/SCC population was found to express the developmental signaling molecule sonic hedgehog. This study represents a novel step in defining the biological activities of a tumorigenic subpopulation within the heterogeneous tumor microenvironment in vivo. Understanding the interactions and functions of a CSC population within the context of the tumor microenvironment is critical to design targeted therapeutics.

  4. Annuity payments can increase patient access to innovative cell and gene therapies under England’s net budget impact test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Jesper; Kefalas, Panos

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Cell and gene therapies have the potential to provide therapeutic breakthroughs, but the high costs of researching, developing, manufacturing and delivering them translate into prices that may challenge healthcare budgets. Various measures exist that aim to address the affordability challenge, including reducing price, limiting patient numbers and/or linking remuneration to product performance. Objective: To explore how the net budget impact test recently introduced in England can affect patient access to high-value, one-off cell and gene therapies, and how managed entry agreements can improve access. Methods: We use a hypothetical example where a new high-value, one-off therapy launches in an indication where it displaces a relatively low cost chronic treatment. We calculate the number of patients that can be treated without exceeding the £20 million net budget impact threshold, and compare results for scenarios where a full upfront payment is used, and where annuity-based payments are used. Results: Charging a full upfront payment at the time of treatment can lead to suboptimal patient access. Conclusion: Annuity-based payments in combination with an outcomes-based remuneration scheme reduce consequences of decision uncertainty and can increase patient access, without exceeding the net budget impact test. PMID:28839525

  5. Increase in radiation-induced HPRT gene mutation frequency after nonthermal exposure to nonionizing 60 Hz electromagnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walleczek, J; Shiu, E C; Hahn, G M

    1999-04-01

    It is widely accepted that moderate levels of nonionizing electric or magnetic fields, for example 50/60 Hz magnetic fields of about 1 mT, are not mutagenic. However, it is not known whether such fields can enhance the action of known mutagens. To explore this question, a stringent experimental protocol, which included blinding and systematic negative controls, was implemented, minimizing the possibility of observer bias or experimental artifacts. As a model system, we chose to measure mutation frequencies induced by 2 Gy gamma rays in the redox-sensitive hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) gene in Chinese hamster ovary cells. We tested whether a 12-h exposure to a 60 Hz sinusoidally oscillating magnetic-flux density (Brms = 0.7 mT) could affect the mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation on the HPRT gene locus. We determined that the magnetic-field exposure induced an approximate 1.8-fold increase in HPRT mutation frequency. Additional experiments at Brms = 0.23 and 0.47 mT revealed that the effect was reduced at lower flux densities. The field exposure did not enhance radiation-induced cytotoxicity or mutation frequencies in cells not exposed to ionizing radiation. These results suggest that moderate-strength, oscillating magnetic fields may act as an enhancer of mutagenesis in mammalian cells.

  6. Different loci and mRNA copy number of the increased serum survival gene of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wang-Ye; Li, Yi-Jing; Fan, Chen

    2018-02-01

    The increased serum survival gene (iss) has been identified as a virulence trait associated with the virulence of Escherichia coli, causing colibacillosis in poultry. However, it remains unclear as to whether iss mRNA copy number and sequence affect virulence. To examine these influences, we assessed the presence of iss, sequence analysis, iss mRNA copy number, and serum resistance. The iss gene was detected in 88 (all) E. coli isolates from different sources, and sequencing identified 16 alleles (32 different loci) and 10 amino acid sequences (10 different loci). Nested polymerase chain reaction improved iss detection. The isolates from sick chickens had >68% livability in serum resistance tests and higher iss mRNA copy number. The iss mRNA copy number highly correlated with mortality and E. coli livability. Student's t tests confirmed the relationship between the different loci to iss transcription, serum resistance, and virulence. These data suggest that iss mRNA copy number and different loci affect the virulence and serum resistance. These findings could be useful in further studies on the prevalence of iss among E. coli isolates and other virulence factors.

  7. Annuity payments can increase patient access to innovative cell and gene therapies under England's net budget impact test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Jesper; Kefalas, Panos

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cell and gene therapies have the potential to provide therapeutic breakthroughs, but the high costs of researching, developing, manufacturing and delivering them translate into prices that may challenge healthcare budgets. Various measures exist that aim to address the affordability challenge, including reducing price, limiting patient numbers and/or linking remuneration to product performance. Objective: To explore how the net budget impact test recently introduced in England can affect patient access to high-value, one-off cell and gene therapies, and how managed entry agreements can improve access. Methods: We use a hypothetical example where a new high-value, one-off therapy launches in an indication where it displaces a relatively low cost chronic treatment. We calculate the number of patients that can be treated without exceeding the £20 million net budget impact threshold, and compare results for scenarios where a full upfront payment is used, and where annuity-based payments are used. Results: Charging a full upfront payment at the time of treatment can lead to suboptimal patient access. Conclusion: Annuity-based payments in combination with an outcomes-based remuneration scheme reduce consequences of decision uncertainty and can increase patient access, without exceeding the net budget impact test.

  8. Selection of a breast cancer subpopulation-specific antibody using phage display on tissue sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Asbjørn; Meldgaard, Theresa; Fridriksdottir, Agla J

    2015-01-01

    on cryostat sections of human breast cancer tissue. This method allows for selection of recombinant antibodies binding to antigens specifically expressed in a small part of the tissue section. In this case, a CD271(+) subpopulation of breast cancer cells was targeted, and these may be potential breast cancer...... it is possible to better target cellular heterogeneity in proteomic studies. The identification of novel biomarkers is relevant for our understanding and intervention in human diseases. The selection of the breast cancer-specific antibody fragment LH 7 may reveal novel subpopulation-specific biomarkers, which......Breast cancer tumors are composed of heterogeneous cell populations. These populations display a high variance in morphology, growth and metastatic propensity. They respond differently to therapeutic interventions, and some may be more prone to cause recurrence. Studying individual subpopulations...

  9. Raising an Antibody Specific to Breast Cancer Subpopulations Using Phage Display on Tissue Sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Asbjørn; Meldgaard, Theresa; Fridriksdottir, Agla Jael Rubner

    2016-01-01

    fragments specific against breast cancer subpopulations, aiding the discovery of novel biomarkers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Recombinant antibody fragments were selected by phage display. A novel shadowstick technology enabled the direct selection using tissue sections of antibody fragments specific against......BACKGROUND/AIM: Primary tumors display a great level of intra-tumor heterogeneity in breast cancer. The current lack of prognostic and predictive biomarkers limits accurate stratification and the ability to predict response to therapy. The aim of the present study was to select recombinant antibody...... small subpopulations of breast cancer cells. Selections were performed against a subpopulation of breast cancer cells expressing CD271(+), as these previously have been indicated to be potential breast cancer stem cells. The selected antibody fragments were screened by phage ELISA on both breast cancer...

  10. The contribution of specific cell subpopulations to submandibular salivary gland branching morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hae Ryong; Larsen, Melinda

    2015-06-01

    Branching morphogenesis is the developmental program responsible for generating a large surface to volume ratio in many secretory and absorptive organs. To accomplish branching morphogenesis, spatiotemporal regulation of specific cell subpopulations is required. Here, we review recent studies that define the contributions of distinct cell subpopulations to specific cellular processes during branching morphogenesis in the mammalian submandibular salivary gland, including the initiation of the gland, the coordination of cleft formation, and the contribution of stem/progenitor cells to morphogenesis. In conclusion, we provide an overview of technological advances that have opened opportunities to further probe the contributions of specific cell subpopulations and to define the integration of events required for branching morphogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Increased asthma and adipose tissue inflammatory gene expression with obesity and Inuit migration to a western country

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backer, Vibeke; Baines, Katherine J; Powell, Heather

    2016-01-01

    inflammation can be modified by migration and diet. OBJECTIVE: To examine mast cell and inflammatory markers in adipose tissue and the association with asthma. METHODS: Two Inuit populations were recruited, one living in Greenland and another in Denmark. All underwent adipose subcutaneous biopsy, followed...... of mast cell markers in adipose tissue and asthma. Among Greenlandic Inuit, adipose tissue inflammation is also increased in those who migrate to Denmark, possibly as a result of dietary changes....... by clinical assessment of asthma, and measurement of AHR. Adipose tissue biopsies were homogenised, RNA extracted, and PCR was performed to determine the relative gene expression of mast cell (tryptase, chymase, CPA3) and inflammatory markers (IL-6, IL-1β, and CD163). RESULTS: Of the 1059 Greenlandic Inuit...

  12. Increased expression of the dyslexia candidate gene DCDC2 affects length and signaling of primary cilia in neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satu Massinen

    Full Text Available DCDC2 is one of the candidate susceptibility genes for dyslexia. It belongs to the superfamily of doublecortin domain containing proteins that bind to microtubules, and it has been shown to be involved in neuronal migration. We show that the Dcdc2 protein localizes to the primary cilium in primary rat hippocampal neurons and that it can be found within close proximity to the ciliary kinesin-2 subunit Kif3a. Overexpression of DCDC2 increases ciliary length and activates Shh signaling, whereas downregulation of Dcdc2 expression enhances Wnt signaling, consistent with a functional role in ciliary signaling. Moreover, DCDC2 overexpression in C. elegans causes an abnormal neuronal phenotype that can only be seen in ciliated neurons. Together our results suggest a potential role for DCDC2 in the structure and function of primary cilia.

  13. Identifying the relative priorities of subpopulations for containing infectious disease spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Shang; Liu, Jiming; Cheung, William

    2013-01-01

    In response to the outbreak of an emerging infectious disease, e.g., H1N1 influenza, public health authorities will take timely and effective intervention measures to contain disease spread. However, due to the scarcity of required resources and the consequent social-economic impacts, interventions may be suggested to cover only certain subpopulations, e.g., immunizing vulnerable children and the elderly as well as closing schools or workplaces for social distancing. Here we are interested in addressing the question of how to identify the relative priorities of subpopulations for two measures of disease intervention, namely vaccination and contact reduction, especially when these measures are implemented together at the same time. We consider the measure of vaccination that immunizes susceptible individuals in different age subpopulations and the measure of contact reduction that cuts down individuals' effective contacts in different social settings, e.g., schools, households, workplaces, and general communities. In addition, we construct individuals' cross-age contact frequency matrix by inferring basic contact patterns respectively for different social settings from the socio-demographical census data. By doing so, we present a prioritization approach to identifying the target subpopulations that will lead to the greatest reduction in the number of disease transmissions. We calculate the relative priorities of subpopulations by considering the marginal effects of reducing the reproduction number for the cases of vaccine allocation by age and contact reduction by social setting. We examine the proposed approach by revisiting the real-world scenario of the 2009 Hong Kong H1N1 influenza epidemic and determine the relative priorities of subpopulations for age-specific vaccination and setting-specific contact reduction. We simulate the influenza-like disease spread under different settings of intervention. The results have shown that the proposed approach can improve

  14. Identifying the relative priorities of subpopulations for containing infectious disease spread.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang Xia

    Full Text Available In response to the outbreak of an emerging infectious disease, e.g., H1N1 influenza, public health authorities will take timely and effective intervention measures to contain disease spread. However, due to the scarcity of required resources and the consequent social-economic impacts, interventions may be suggested to cover only certain subpopulations, e.g., immunizing vulnerable children and the elderly as well as closing schools or workplaces for social distancing. Here we are interested in addressing the question of how to identify the relative priorities of subpopulations for two measures of disease intervention, namely vaccination and contact reduction, especially when these measures are implemented together at the same time. We consider the measure of vaccination that immunizes susceptible individuals in different age subpopulations and the measure of contact reduction that cuts down individuals' effective contacts in different social settings, e.g., schools, households, workplaces, and general communities. In addition, we construct individuals' cross-age contact frequency matrix by inferring basic contact patterns respectively for different social settings from the socio-demographical census data. By doing so, we present a prioritization approach to identifying the target subpopulations that will lead to the greatest reduction in the number of disease transmissions. We calculate the relative priorities of subpopulations by considering the marginal effects of reducing the reproduction number for the cases of vaccine allocation by age and contact reduction by social setting. We examine the proposed approach by revisiting the real-world scenario of the 2009 Hong Kong H1N1 influenza epidemic and determine the relative priorities of subpopulations for age-specific vaccination and setting-specific contact reduction. We simulate the influenza-like disease spread under different settings of intervention. The results have shown that the proposed

  15. Differential Impact of Tobacco Control Policies on Youth Sub-Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Tauras

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: While previous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of tobacco control interventions in reducing tobacco use among youth overall, there have been very few studies that examine the potential differential impact of tobacco control policies on various youth subgroups, defined by socio-economic status (SES, race/ethnicity, and gender. Objective: We examined the relationship between state-level cigarette prices and smoke-free air laws and youth smoking prevalence and intensity for various youth sub-populations in the United States. Methods: We estimated a 2-part model of cigarette demand using data from the 1991 through 2010 nationally representative surveys of 8th-, 10th-, and 12th-grade students as part of the Monitoring the Future project. Findings: We found that real cigarette prices are strong determinants of youth smoking. Blacks, females, Hispanics, and low-SES subpopulations are found to have a larger price response with respect to smoking prevalence than the full sample. Smoke-free air laws are found to have a negative effect on smoking prevalence for the full sample and for the male, white, and high-SES sub-populations. Conclusions: This research concludes that higher cigarette prices will reduce smoking prevalence rates of Blacks, Hispanics, females, and low-SES subpopulations faster than the overall youth population and other youth sub-populations. Moreover, this research concludes that smoke-free air laws will reduce smoking prevalence for the overall youth population with the largest reductions in high SES and male subpopulations.

  16. Simultaneous POMC gene transfer to hypothalamus and brainstem increases physical activity, lipolysis and reduces adult-onset obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Rodrigues, Enda; Li, Gang; Gao, Yongxin; King, Michael; Carter, Christy S; Tumer, Nihal; Cheng, Kit-Yan; Scarpace, Philip J

    2011-04-01

    Pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons are identified in two brain sites, the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus and nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in brainstem. Earlier pharmacological and POMC gene transfer studies demonstrate that melanocortin activation in either site alone improves insulin sensitivity and reduces obesity. The present study, for the first time, investigated the long-term efficacy of POMC gene transfer concurrently into both sites in the regulation of energy metabolism in aged F344xBN rats bearing adult-onset obesity. Pair feeding was included to reveal food-independent POMC impact on energy expenditure. We introduced adeno-associated virus encoding either POMC or green fluorescence protein to the two brain areas in 22-month-old rats, then recorded food intake and body weight, assessed oxygen consumption, serum leptin, insulin and glucose, tested voluntary wheel running, analysed POMC expression, and examined fat metabolism in brown and white adipose tissues. POMC mRNA was significantly increased in both the hypothalamus and NTS region at termination. Relative to pair feeding, POMC caused sustained weight reduction and additional fat loss, lowered fasting insulin and glucose, and augmented white fat hormone-sensitive lipase activity and brown fat uncoupling protein 1 level. By wheel running assessment, the POMC animals ran twice the distance as the Control or pair-fed rats. Thus, the dual-site POMC treatment ameliorated adult-onset obesity effectively, involving a moderate hypophagia lasting ∼60 days, enhanced lipolysis and thermogenesis, and increased physical activity in the form of voluntary wheel running. The latter finding provides a clue for countering age-related decline in physical activity. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2011 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd. No claim to original US government works.

  17. Long-term field application of sewage sludge increases the abundance of antibiotic resistance genes in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qinglin; An, Xinli; Li, Hu; Su, Jianqiang; Ma, Yibing; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2016-01-01

    Sewage sludge and manure are common soil amendments in crop production; however, their impact on the abundance and diversity of the antibiotic resistome in soil remains elusive. In this study, by using high-throughput sequencing and high-throughput quantitative PCR, the patterns of bacterial community and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in a long-term field experiment were investigated to gain insights into these impacts. A total of 130 unique ARGs and 5 mobile genetic elements (MGEs) were detected and the long-term application of sewage sludge and chicken manure significantly increased the abundance and diversity of ARGs in the soil. Genes conferring resistance to beta-lactams, tetracyclines, and multiple drugs were dominant in the samples. Sewage sludge or chicken manure applications caused significant enrichment of 108 unique ARGs and MGEs with a maximum enrichment of up to 3845 folds for mexF. The enrichment of MGEs suggested that the application of sewage sludge or manure may accelerate the dissemination of ARGs in soil through horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Based on the co-occurrence pattern of ARGs subtypes revealed by network analysis, aacC, oprD and mphA-02, were proposed to be potential indicators for quantitative estimation of the co-occurring ARGs subtypes abundance by power functions. The application of sewage sludge and manure resulted in significant increase of bacterial diversity in soil, Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi were the dominant phyla (>10% in each sample). Five bacterial phyla (Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes and Bacteroidetes) were found to be significantly correlated with the ARGs in soil. Mantel test and variation partitioning analysis (VPA) suggested that bacterial community shifts, rather than MGEs, is the major driver shaping the antibiotic resistome. Additionally, the co-occurrence pattern between ARGs and microbial taxa revealed by network analysis indicated that four

  18. Transcriptome analysis of mammary epithelial subpopulations identifies novel determinants of lineage commitment and cell fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvelebil Marketa

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the molecular control of cell lineages and fate determination in complex tissues is key to not only understanding the developmental biology and cellular homeostasis of such tissues but also for our understanding and interpretation of the molecular pathology of diseases such as cancer. The prerequisite for such an understanding is detailed knowledge of the cell types that make up such tissues, including their comprehensive molecular characterisation. In the mammary epithelium, the bulk of the tissue is composed of three cell lineages, namely the basal/myoepithelial, luminal epithelial estrogen receptor positive and luminal epithelial estrogen receptor negative cells. However, a detailed molecular characterisation of the transcriptomic differences between these three populations has not been carried out. Results A whole transcriptome analysis of basal/myoepithelial cells, luminal estrogen receptor negative cells and luminal estrogen receptor positive cells isolated from the virgin mouse mammary epithelium identified 861, 326 and 488 genes as highly differentially expressed in the three cell types, respectively. Network analysis of the transcriptomic data identified a subpopulation of luminal estrogen receptor negative cells with a novel potential role as non-professional immune cells. Analysis of the data for potential paracrine interacting factors showed that the basal/myoepithelial cells, remarkably, expressed over twice as many ligands and cell surface receptors as the other two populations combined. A number of transcriptional regulators were also identified that were differentially expressed between the cell lineages. One of these, Sox6, was specifically expressed in luminal estrogen receptor negative cells and functional assays confirmed that it maintained mammary epithelial cells in a differentiated luminal cell lineage. Conclusion The mouse mammary epithelium is composed of three main cell types with

  19. EAAC1 Gene Deletion Increases Neuronal Death and Blood Brain Barrier Disruption after Transient Cerebral Ischemia in Female Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Young Choi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available EAAC1 is important in modulating brain ischemic tolerance. Mice lacking EAAC1 exhibit increased susceptibility to neuronal oxidative stress in mice after transient cerebral ischemia. EAAC1 was first described as a glutamate transporter but later recognized to also function as a cysteine transporter in neurons. EAAC1-mediated transport of cysteine into neurons contributes to neuronal antioxidant function by providing cysteine substrates for glutathione synthesis. Here we evaluated the effects of EAAC1 gene deletion on hippocampal blood vessel disorganization after transient cerebral ischemia. EAAC1−/− female mice subjected to transient cerebral ischemia by common carotid artery occlusion for 30 min exhibited twice as much hippocampal neuronal death compared to wild-type female mice as well as increased reduction of neuronal glutathione, blood–brain barrier (BBB disruption and vessel disorganization. Pre-treatment of N-acetyl cysteine, a membrane-permeant cysteine prodrug, increased basal glutathione levels in the EAAC1−/− female mice and reduced ischemic neuronal death, BBB disruption and vessel disorganization. These findings suggest that cysteine uptake by EAAC1 is important for neuronal antioxidant function under ischemic conditions.

  20. Increasing alpha 7 beta 1-integrin promotes muscle cell proliferation, adhesion, and resistance to apoptosis without changing gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianming; Burkin, Dean J; Kaufman, Stephen J

    2008-02-01

    The dystrophin-glycoprotein complex maintains the integrity of skeletal muscle by associating laminin in the extracellular matrix with the actin cytoskeleton. Several human muscular dystrophies arise from defects in the components of this complex. The alpha(7)beta(1)-integrin also binds laminin and links the extracellular matrix with the cytoskeleton. Enhancement of alpha(7)-integrin levels alleviates pathology in mdx/utrn(-/-) mice, a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and thus the integrin may functionally compensate for the absence of dystrophin. To test whether increasing alpha(7)-integrin levels affects transcription and cellular functions, we generated alpha(7)-integrin-inducible C2C12 cells and transgenic mice that overexpress the integrin in skeletal muscle. C2C12 myoblasts with elevated levels of integrin exhibited increased adhesion to laminin, faster proliferation when serum was limited, resistance to staurosporine-induced apoptosis, and normal differentiation. Transgenic expression of eightfold more integrin in skeletal muscle did not result in notable toxic effects in vivo. Moreover, high levels of alpha(7)-integrin in both myoblasts and in skeletal muscle did not disrupt global gene expression profiles. Thus increasing integrin levels can compensate for defects in the extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton linkage caused by compromises in the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex without triggering apparent overt negative side effects. These results support the use of integrin enhancement as a therapy for muscular dystrophy.

  1. Genomic mosaicism with increased amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene copy number in single neurons from sporadic Alzheimer's disease brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushman, Diane M; Kaeser, Gwendolyn E; Siddoway, Benjamin; Westra, Jurgen W; Rivera, Richard R; Rehen, Stevens K; Yung, Yun C; Chun, Jerold

    2015-02-04

    Previous reports have shown that individual neurons of the brain can display somatic genomic mosaicism of unknown function. In this study, we report altered genomic mosaicism in single, sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) neurons characterized by increases in DNA content and amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene copy number. AD cortical nuclei displayed large variability with average DNA content increases of ~8% over non-diseased controls that were unrelated to trisomy 21. Two independent single-cell copy number analyses identified amplifications at the APP locus. The use of single-cell qPCR identified up to 12 copies of APP in sampled neurons. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes targeting APP, combined with super-resolution microscopy detected primarily single fluorescent signals of variable intensity that paralleled single-cell qPCR analyses. These data identify somatic genomic changes in single neurons, affecting known and unknown loci, which are increased in sporadic AD, and further indicate functionality for genomic mosaicism in the CNS.

  2. Both decrease in ACL1 gene expression and increase in ICL1 gene expression in marine-derived yeast Yarrowia lipolytica expressing INU1 gene enhance citric acid production from inulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Yan; Chi, Zhe; Liu, Guang-Lei; Madzak, Catherine; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2013-02-01

    In this study, some of the ATP-citrate lyase genes (ACL1) were deleted and the copy number of the iso-citrate lyase gene (ICL1) was increased in the marine-derived yeast Yarrowia lipolytica SWJ-1b displaying the recombinant inulinase. It was found that lipid content and iso-citric acid in the transformant 30 obtained were greatly reduced and citric acid production was greatly enhanced. It was also found that the ACL1 gene expression and ATP-citrate lyase activity in the transformant 30 were declined and the ICL1 gene expression and iso-citrate lyase activity were promoted. During the 2-l fermentation, 84.0 g/l of citric acid and 1.8 g/l of iso-citric acid in the fermented medium were attained from 10.0 % of inulin by the transformant 30 within 214 h. The results showed that only 0.36 % of the residual reducing sugar and 1.0 % of the residual total sugar were left in the fermented medium, suggesting that 89.6 % of the total sugar was used for citric acid production and cell growth by the transformant 30.

  3. Survival of Bactericidal Antibiotic Treatment by a Persister Subpopulation of Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Gitte Maegaard; Ng, Yin; Gram, Lone

    2013-01-01

    to 108 CFU ml−1, and 103 to 104 CFU ml−1 survived 72-h treatment with 100 μg of norfloxacin ml−1, indicating a persister subpopulation. This survival was not caused by antibiotic resistance as regrown persisters were as sensitive to norfloxacin as the parental strain. Higher numbers of persisters (105...... persisters could be activated by the addition of fermentable carbohydrates and subsequently killed by gentamicin; however, a stable surviving subpopulation of 103 CFU ml−1 remained. Nitrofurantoin that has a growth-independent mode of action was effective against both growing and dormant cells, suggesting...

  4. Characteristics and Travel Patterns of New York Residents: Subpopulations of Persons with a Disability in 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Ho-Ling [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Reuscher, Tim [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilson, Daniel W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-08-01

    In this study, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the NYS Department of Transportation (DOT) to conduct a detailed examination of travel behaviors, and identify patterns and trends, on several NYS subpopulations, including disabled persons. Unlike other studies that concentrated on national level statistics, this research is focused on examining issues associated with travelers among NYS residents only. For each special subpopulation group, ORNL will identify differences, if any, in travel patterns that are attributable to demographic characteristics, household characteristics, modal characteristics, geographic location, and other concepts. Focus will be given to trip frequency, trip chaining, as well as travel by time of day, trip purpose, and mode choice.

  5. A slow-cycling subpopulation of melanoma cells with highly invasive properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perego, M; Maurer, M; Wang, J X

    2017-01-01

    as label-retaining cells (LRC), with strong invasive properties. We demonstrate through live imaging that LRC are leaving the primary tumor mass at a very early stage and disseminate to peripheral organs. Through global proteome analyses, we identified the secreted protein SerpinE2/protease nexin-1......Melanoma is a heterogeneous tumor with different subpopulations showing different proliferation rates. Slow-cycling cells were previously identified in melanoma, but not fully biologically characterized. Using the label-retention method, we identified a subpopulation of slow-cycling cells, defined...

  6. Analysis of marker-defined HNSCC subpopulations reveals a dynamic regulation of tumor initiating properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Bragado

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous carcinoma (HNSCC tumors carry dismal long-term prognosis and the role of tumor initiating cells (TICs in this cancer is unclear. We investigated in HNSCC xenografts whether specific tumor subpopulations contributed to tumor growth. We used a CFSE-based label retentions assay, CD49f (α6-integrin surface levels and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH activity to profile HNSCC subpopulations. The tumorigenic potential of marker-positive and -negative subpopulations was tested in nude (Balb/c nu/nu and NSG (NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid Il2rg(tm1Wjl/SzJ mice and chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM assays. Here we identified in HEp3, SQ20b and FaDu HNSCC xenografts a subpopulation of G0/G1-arrested slow-cycling CD49f(high/ALDH1A1(high/H3K4/K27me3(low subpopulation (CD49f+ of tumor cells. A strikingly similar CD49f(high/H3K27me3(low subpopulation is also present in primary human HNSCC tumors and metastases. While only sorted CD49f(high/ALDH(high, label retaining cells (LRC proliferated immediately in vivo, with time the CD49f(low/ALDH(low, non-LRC (NLRC tumor cell subpopulations were also able to regain tumorigenic capacity; this was linked to restoration of CD49f(high/ALDH(high, label retaining cells. In addition, CD49f is required for HEp3 cell tumorigenicity and to maintain low levels of H3K4/K27me3. CD49f+ cells also displayed reduced expression of the histone-lysine N-methyltransferase EZH2 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. This suggests that although transiently quiescent, their unique chromatin structure is poised for rapid transcriptional activation. CD49f- cells can "reprogram" and also achieve this state eventually. We propose that in HNSCC tumors, epigenetic mechanisms likely driven by CD49f signaling dynamically regulate HNSCC xenograft phenotypic heterogeneity. This allows multiple tumor cell subpopulations to drive tumor growth suggesting that their dynamic nature renders them a "moving target" and their eradication might require

  7. Analysis of Marker-Defined HNSCC Subpopulations Reveals a Dynamic Regulation of Tumor Initiating Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragado, Paloma; Estrada, Yeriel; Sosa, Maria Soledad; Avivar-Valderas, Alvaro; Cannan, David; Genden, Eric; Teng, Marita; Ranganathan, Aparna C.; Wen, Huei-Chi; Kapoor, Avnish; Bernstein, Emily; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A.

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous carcinoma (HNSCC) tumors carry dismal long-term prognosis and the role of tumor initiating cells (TICs) in this cancer is unclear. We investigated in HNSCC xenografts whether specific tumor subpopulations contributed to tumor growth. We used a CFSE-based label retentions assay, CD49f (α6-integrin) surface levels and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity to profile HNSCC subpopulations. The tumorigenic potential of marker-positive and -negative subpopulations was tested in nude (Balb/c nu/nu) and NSG (NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ) mice and chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays. Here we identified in HEp3, SQ20b and FaDu HNSCC xenografts a subpopulation of G0/G1-arrested slow-cycling CD49fhigh/ALDH1A1high/H3K4/K27me3low subpopulation (CD49f+) of tumor cells. A strikingly similar CD49fhigh/H3K27me3low subpopulation is also present in primary human HNSCC tumors and metastases. While only sorted CD49fhigh/ALDHhigh, label retaining cells (LRC) proliferated immediately in vivo, with time the CD49flow/ALDHlow, non-LRC (NLRC) tumor cell subpopulations were also able to regain tumorigenic capacity; this was linked to restoration of CD49fhigh/ALDHhigh, label retaining cells. In addition, CD49f is required for HEp3 cell tumorigenicity and to maintain low levels of H3K4/K27me3. CD49f+ cells also displayed reduced expression of the histone-lysine N-methyltransferase EZH2 and ERK1/2phosphorylation. This suggests that although transiently quiescent, their unique chromatin structure is poised for rapid transcriptional activation. CD49f− cells can “reprogram” and also achieve this state eventually. We propose that in HNSCC tumors, epigenetic mechanisms likely driven by CD49f signaling dynamically regulate HNSCC xenograft phenotypic heterogeneity. This allows multiple tumor cell subpopulations to drive tumor growth suggesting that their dynamic nature renders them a “moving target” and their eradication might require more

  8. Clonal dominance between subpopulations of mixed small cell lung cancer xenografts implanted ectopically in nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabo, K; Vindeløv, L L; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1995-01-01

    Clonal evolution of neoplastic cells during solid tumour growth leads to the emergence of new tumour cell subpopulations with diverging phenotypic characteristics which may alter the behaviour of a malignant disease. Cellular interaction was studied in mixed xenografts in nude mice and during...... in vitro growth of two sets of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) subpopulations (54A, 54B and NYH, NYH2). The tumour cell lines differed in cellular DNA content enabling flow cytometric DNA analysis (FCM) to be used to monitor changes in the fractional composition of the mixed cell populations. The progeny...

  9. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  10. Polymorphisms of the CRP gene inhibit inflammatory response and increase susceptibility to depression: the Health in Men Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Osvaldo P; Norman, Paul E; Allcock, Richard; van Bockxmeer, Frank; Hankey, Graeme J; Jamrozik, Konrad; Flicker, Leon

    2009-08-01

    Depression has been associated with chronic changes in the serum concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP) in observational studies, but it is unclear if this association is causal or is due to confounding and bias. Genetic studies are less subject to this type of error and offer an opportunity to investigate if CRP is causally linked to depression, particularly because known polymorphisms of the CRP gene have been associated with high- and low-basal serum concentrations of CRP [single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs1130864 and rs1205, respectively]. The aim of this study is to determine if polymorphisms of SNPs rs1130864 and rs1205 are associated with prevalent depression. We completed a cross-sectional study of a community sample of 3700 men aged > or = 70 years, and used the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15) to assess depressive symptoms. A GDS-15 score 7 or more indicates the presence of clinically significant depressive symptoms. Physical morbidity was assessed with the physical component summary score (PCS) of the SF-36 Health Survey. We collected fasting blood samples to measure high sensitivity CRP and to extract DNA for the genotyping of SNPs rs1130864 and rs1205 of the CRP gene. One hundred and eighty-two men were depressed (4.9%). The odds of depression increased by 2% (95% CI = 1-4%) for every unit (mg/l) increase of CRP and nearly doubled for men with CRP > or = 3 mg/l vs or = 3 mg/l) and depression was no longer significant after the analyses were adjusted for smoking, age, body mass index (BMI) and PCS. Men with the CT and TT genotypes of rs1130864 had 1.36 (95% CI = 1.13-1.63) and 2.31 (95% CI = 1.65-3.24) greater odds of CRP > or = 3 mg/l than CC carriers, but there was no association between this polymorphism and the presence of prevalent depression. The G > A polymorphism of SNP rs1205 was associated with 24% (95% CI = 16-32%) lower concentration of CRP compared with other genotypes. Men with the rs1205 AA genotype had 1.66 (95% CI

  11. Aerobic training increases the expression of adiponectin receptor genes in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of young men

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    SH Lee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the effect of exercise training on the expression of adiponectin receptor genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. In this study, we investigated the effects of aerobic training on the expression of AdipoR1 and AidpoR2 mRNAs in PBMCs, whole body insulin sensitivity, and circulating adiponectins in men. Thirty young men were randomly assigned to either a control (n=15 or an exercise (n=15 group. Subjects assigned to the exercise group underwent a 12-week jogging and/or running programme on a motor-driven treadmill at an intensity of 60%-75% of the age-based maximum heart rate with duration of 40 minutes per session and a frequency of 5 days per week. Two-way mixed ANOVA with repeated measures was used to test any significant time-by-group interaction effects for the measured variables at p=0.05. We found significant time-by-group interaction effects for waist circumference (p=0.001, VO2 max (p<0.001, fasting insulin (p=0.016, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR (p=0.010, area under the curve (AUC for insulin response during the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (p=0.002, high-molecular weight (HMW adiponectin (p=0.016, and the PBMC mRNA levels of AdipoR1 (p<0.001 and AdipoR2 (p=0.001. The exercise group had significantly increased mRNA levels of AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 in PBMCs, along with increased whole body insulin sensitivity and HMW adiponectin, decreased waist circumference, and increased VO2 max compared with the control group. In summary, the current findings suggest that exercise training modulates the expression of AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 mRNAs in PBMCs, implying that manipulation of the expression of these genes could be a potential surrogate for lifestyle intervention-mediated improvements of whole body insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis.

  12. The defH9-iaaM auxin-synthesizing gene increases plant fecundity and fruit production in strawberry and raspberry

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    Pandolfini Tiziana

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The DefH9-iaaM gene fusion which is expressed specifically in placenta/ovules and promotes auxin-synthesis confers parthenocarpic fruit development to eggplant, tomato and tobacco. Transgenic DefH9-iaaM eggplants and tomatoes show increased fruit production due mainly to an improved fruit set. However, the weight of the fruits is also frequently increased. Results DefH9-iaaM strawberry and raspberry plants grown under standard cultivation conditions show a significant increase in fruit number and size and fruit yield. In all three Rosaceae species tested, Fragaria vesca, Fragaria x ananassa and Rubus idaeus, DefH9-iaaM plants have an increased number of flowers per inflorescence and an increased number of inflorescences per plant. This results in an increased number of fruits per plant. Moreover, the weight and size of transgenic fruits was also increased. The increase in fruit yield was approximately 180% in cultivated strawberry, 140% in wild strawberry, and 100% in raspberry. The DefH9-iaaM gene is expressed in the flower buds of all three species. The total IAA (auxin content of young flower buds of strawberry and raspberry expressing the DefH9-iaaM gene is increased in comparison to untransformed flower buds. The DefH9-iaaM gene promotes parthenocarpy in emasculated flowers of both strawberry and raspberry. Conclusions The DefH9-iaaM gene is expressed and biologically active in Rosaceae. The DefH9-iaaM gene can be used, under cultivation conditions that allow pollination and fertilization, to increase fruit productivity significantly in Rosaceae species. The finding that the DefH9-iaaM auxin-synthesizing gene increases the number of inflorescences per plant and the number of flowers per inflorescence indicates that auxin plays a role in plant fecundity in these three perennial Rosaceae species.

  13. The defH9-iaaM auxin-synthesizing gene increases plant fecundity and fruit production in strawberry and raspberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzetti, Bruno; Landi, Lucia; Pandolfini, Tiziana; Spena, Angelo

    2004-03-15

    The DefH9-iaaM gene fusion which is expressed specifically in placenta/ovules and promotes auxin-synthesis confers parthenocarpic fruit development to eggplant, tomato and tobacco. Transgenic DefH9-iaaM eggplants and tomatoes show increased fruit production due mainly to an improved fruit set. However, the weight of the fruits is also frequently increased. DefH9-iaaM strawberry and raspberry plants grown under standard cultivation conditions show a significant increase in fruit number and size and fruit yield. In all three Rosaceae species tested, Fragaria vesca, Fragaria x ananassa and Rubus idaeus, DefH9-iaaM plants have an increased number of flowers per inflorescence and an increased number of inflorescences per plant. This results in an increased number of fruits per plant. Moreover, the weight and size of transgenic fruits was also increased. The increase in fruit yield was approximately 180% in cultivated strawberry, 140% in wild strawberry, and 100% in raspberry. The DefH9-iaaM gene is expressed in the flower buds of all three species. The total IAA (auxin) content of young flower buds of strawberry and raspberry expressing the DefH9-iaaM gene is increased in comparison to untransformed flower buds. The DefH9-iaaM gene promotes parthenocarpy in emasculated flowers of both strawberry and raspberry. The DefH9-iaaM gene is expressed and biologically active in Rosaceae. The DefH9-iaaM gene can be used, under cultivation conditions that allow pollination and fertilization, to increase fruit productivity significantly in Rosaceae species. The finding that the DefH9-iaaM auxin-synthesizing gene increases the number of inflorescences per plant and the number of flowers per inflorescence indicates that auxin plays a role in plant fecundity in these three perennial Rosaceae species.

  14. The defH9-iaaM auxin-synthesizing gene increases plant fecundity and fruit production in strawberry and raspberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzetti, Bruno; Landi, Lucia; Pandolfini, Tiziana; Spena, Angelo

    2004-01-01

    Background The DefH9-iaaM gene fusion which is expressed specifically in placenta/ovules and promotes auxin-synthesis confers parthenocarpic fruit development to eggplant, tomato and tobacco. Transgenic DefH9-iaaM eggplants and tomatoes show increased fruit production due mainly to an improved fruit set. However, the weight of the fruits is also frequently increased. Results DefH9-iaaM strawberry and raspberry plants grown under standard cultivation conditions show a significant increase in fruit number and size and fruit yield. In all three Rosaceae species tested, Fragaria vesca, Fragaria x ananassa and Rubus idaeus, DefH9-iaaM plants have an increased number of flowers per inflorescence and an increased number of inflorescences per plant. This results in an increased number of fruits per plant. Moreover, the weight and size of transgenic fruits was also increased. The increase in fruit yield was approximately 180% in cultivated strawberry, 140% in wild strawberry, and 100% in raspberry. The DefH9-iaaM gene is expressed in the flower buds of all three species. The total IAA (auxin) content of young flower buds of strawberry and raspberry expressing the DefH9-iaaM gene is increased in comparison to untransformed flower buds. The DefH9-iaaM gene promotes parthenocarpy in emasculated flowers of both strawberry and raspberry. Conclusions The DefH9-iaaM gene is expressed and biologically active in Rosaceae. The DefH9-iaaM gene can be used, under cultivation conditions that allow pollination and fertilization, to increase fruit productivity significantly in Rosaceae species. The finding that the DefH9-iaaM auxin-synthesizing gene increases the number of inflorescences per plant and the number of flowers per inflorescence indicates that auxin plays a role in plant fecundity in these three perennial Rosaceae species. PMID:15113427

  15. Combined inactivation of the Clostridium cellulolyticum lactate and malate dehydrogenase genes substantially increases ethanol yield from cellulose and switchgrass fermentations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yongchao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The model bacterium Clostridium cellulolyticum efficiently degrades crystalline cellulose and hemicellulose, using cellulosomes to degrade lignocellulosic biomass. Although it imports and ferments both pentose and hexose sugars to produce a mixture of ethanol, acetate, lactate, H2 and CO2, the proportion of ethanol is low, which impedes its use in consolidated bioprocessing for biofuels production. Therefore genetic engineering will likely be required to improve the ethanol yield. Plasmid transformation, random mutagenesis and heterologous expression systems have previously been developed for C. cellulolyticum, but targeted mutagenesis has not been reported for this organism, hindering genetic engineering. Results The first targeted gene inactivation system was developed for C. cellulolyticum, based on a mobile group II intron originating from the Lactococcus lactis L1.LtrB intron. This markerless mutagenesis system was used to disrupt both the paralogous L-lactate dehydrogenase (Ccel_2485; ldh and L-malate dehydrogenase (Ccel_0137; mdh genes, distinguishing the overlapping substrate specificities of these enzymes. Both mutations were then combined in a single strain, resulting in a substantial shift in fermentation toward ethanol production. This double mutant produced 8.5-times more ethanol than wild-type cells growing on crystalline cellulose. Ethanol constituted 93% of the major fermentation products, corresponding to a molar ratio of ethanol to organic acids of 15, versus 0.18 in wild-type cells. During growth on acid-pretreated switchgrass, the double mutant also produced four times as much ethanol as wild-type cells. Detailed metabolomic analyses identified increased flux through the oxidative branch of the mutant's tricarboxylic acid pathway. Conclusions The efficient intron-based gene inactivation system produced the first non-random, targeted mutations in C. cellulolyticum. As a key component of the genetic toolbox

  16. Using targeted enrichment of nuclear genes to increase phylogenetic resolution in the neotropical rain forest genus Inga (Leguminosae: Mimosoideae

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    James A Nicholls

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary radiations are prominent and pervasive across many plant lineages in diverse geographical and ecological settings; in neotropical rainforests there is growing evidence suggesting that a significant fraction of species richness is the result of recent radiations. Understanding the evolutionary trajectories and mechanisms underlying these radiations demands much greater phylogenetic resolution than is currently available for these groups. The neotropical tree genus Inga (Leguminosae is a good example, with ~300 extant species and a crown age of 2-10 MY, yet over 6kb of plastid and nuclear DNA sequence data gives only poor phylogenetic resolution among species. Here we explore the use of larger-scale nuclear gene data obtained though targeted enrichment to increase phylogenetic resolution within Inga. Transcriptome data from three Inga species were used to select 264 nuclear loci for targeted enrichment and sequencing. Following quality control to remove probable paralogs from these sequence data, the final dataset comprised 259,313 bases from 194 loci for 24 accessions representing 22 Inga species and an outgroup (Zygia. Bayesian phylogenies reconstructed using either all loci concatenated or a subset of 60 loci in a gene-tree/species-tree approach yielded highly resolved phylogenies. We used coalescent approaches to show that the same targeted enrichment data also have significant power to discriminate among alternative within-species population histories in the widespread species I. umbellifera. In either application, targeted enrichment simplifies the informatics challenge of identifying orthologous loci associated with de novo genome sequencing. We conclude that targeted enrichment provides the large volumes of phylogenetically-informative sequence data required to resolve relationships within recent plant species radiations, both at the species level and for within-species phylogeographic studies.

  17. Using targeted enrichment of nuclear genes to increase phylogenetic resolution in the neotropical rain forest genus Inga (Leguminosae: Mimosoideae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, James A; Pennington, R Toby; Koenen, Erik J M; Hughes, Colin E; Hearn, Jack; Bunnefeld, Lynsey; Dexter, Kyle G; Stone, Graham N; Kidner, Catherine A

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary radiations are prominent and pervasive across many plant lineages in diverse geographical and ecological settings; in neotropical rainforests there is growing evidence suggesting that a significant fraction of species richness is the result of recent radiations. Understanding the evolutionary trajectories and mechanisms underlying these radiations demands much greater phylogenetic resolution than is currently available for these groups. The neotropical tree genus Inga (Leguminosae) is a good example, with ~300 extant species and a crown age of 2-10 MY, yet over 6 kb of plastid and nuclear DNA sequence data gives only poor phylogenetic resolution among species. Here we explore the use of larger-scale nuclear gene data obtained though targeted enrichment to increase phylogenetic resolution within Inga. Transcriptome data from three Inga species were used to select 264 nuclear loci for targeted enrichment and sequencing. Following quality control to remove probable paralogs from these sequence data, the final dataset comprised 259,313 bases from 194 loci for 24 accessions representing 22 Inga species and an outgroup (Zygia). Bayesian phylogenies reconstructed using either all loci concatenated or a gene-tree/species-tree approach yielded highly resolved phylogenies. We used coalescent approaches to show that the same targeted enrichment data also have significant power to discriminate among alternative within-species population histories within the widespread species I. umbellifera. In either application, targeted enrichment simplifies the informatics challenge of identifying orthologous loci associated with de novo genome sequencing. We conclude that targeted enrichment provides the large volumes of phylogenetically-informative sequence data required to resolve relationships within recent plant species radiations, both at the species level and for within-species phylogeographic studies.

  18. Single nucleotide polymorphism of SREBF-1 gene associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer in Chinese women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ping Qiu

    Full Text Available Elevated levels of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1 have been found in endometrial cancer (EC, suggesting that it is essential to the development of EC. Obesity and diabetes have been established as known risk factors of EC, while SREBF-1 gene polymorphisms have also been found to be associated with obesity and type II diabetes. Therefore, we hypothesize that single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in SREBF-1 gene may be associated with increased risk of EC.We analyzed the sequence of SREBF-1 in tissue samples from 30 EC cases and 6 benign controls using high throughput method. Based on the primary results, we selected one SNP (rs2297508 as a genetic marker to conduct a hospital-based case-control study with 139 EC cases and 129 benign controls. The samples were examined under the microscope to determine their histopathology prior to the SNP analysis using RT-PCR.Through sequence analysis, we found 10 SNPs of SREBF-1 associated with EC, including 3 new SNPs. Fourteen percent of EC showed the rs2297508 SNP with C allele, while only 7% had the C allele was present in benign controls (p = 0.027, OR = 1.983. Additionally, the C allele was associated with cancer differentiation (p<0.05 and the depth of myometrial invasion (p<0.05.Our study indicates that SNP (rs2297508 of SREBF-1 may serve as a genetic predisposition factor for the development of EC and screening of such genetic marker may be helpful in its early detection.

  19. Enhancing production of L-serine by increasing the glyA gene expression in Methylobacterium sp. MB200.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Peihong; Chao, Hongjun; Jiang, Chengjian; Long, Zhangde; Wang, Changhao; Wu, Bo

    2010-03-01

    Microbial fermentation using methylotrophic bacteria is one of the most promising methods for L-serine production. Here we describe the metabolic engineering of a Methylobacterium strain to increase the production of L-serine. The glyA gene, encoding serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT), was isolated from the genomic DNA of Methylobacterium sp. MB200, using a DNA fragment encoding Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 SHMT as a probe, and inserted into the vector pLAFR3. The resulting construct was transformed into Methylobacterium sp. MB200 using triparental mating. The genetic-engineered strain, designated as Methylobacterium sp. MB202, was shown to produce 11.4 + or - 0.6 mg/ml serine in resting cell reactions from 30 mg/ml wet cells, 20 mg/ml glycine, and 70 mg/ml methanol in 2 days, representing a 4.4-fold increase from that of the wild strain. The results demonstrated the potential for improving L-serine production by manipulating the glyA in bacteria and should facilitate the production of L-serine using Methylobacterium sp. strains.

  20. Ten novel mutations in the erythroid transcription factor KLF1 gene associated with increased fetal hemoglobin levels in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallienne, Alice E.; Dréau, Hélène M.P.; Schuh, Anna; Old, John M.; Henderson, Shirley

    2012-01-01

    We investigated whether mutations in the KLF1 gene are associated with increased Hb F levels in ethnically diverse patients referred to our laboratory for hemoglobinopathy investigation. Functionally effective KLF1 mutations were identified in 11 out of 131 adult samples with an elevated Hb F level (1.5–25.0%). Eleven different mutations were identified, 9 of which were previously unreported. KLF1 mutations were not identified in a matched cohort of 121 samples with normal Hb F levels (<1.0%). A further novel KLF1 mutation was also found in a sickle cell disease patient with a Hb F level of 20.3% who had a particularly mild phenotype. Our results indicate KLF1 mutations could make a significant contribution to Hb F variance in malarial regions where hemogobinopathies are common. All the mutations identified were heterozygous providing further in vivo evidence that a single altered KLF1 allele is sufficient to increase Hb F levels. PMID:22102705

  1. The thiazolidinedione pioglitazone increases cholesterol biosynthetic gene expression in primary cortical neurons by a PPARgamma-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocks, Graham; Wilde, Jonathan I; Graham, Simon J; Bousgouni, Vicky; Virley, David; Lovestone, Simon; Richardson, Jill

    2010-01-01

    In a recent clinical study, the thiazolidinedione (TZD) pioglitazone (Actos was reported to preserve cognitive function in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes mellitus. TZDs are agonists of the nuclear hormone receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma), are peripheral insulin sensitizers, and have recently been reported to increase mitochondrial biogenesis in the central nervous system and dendritic spine density. We report a transcriptional profile of the TZD pioglitazone and the non-TZD PPARgamma agonist GW347845 in primary cortical culture. We observed that pioglitazone, but not GW347845, increased cholesterol biosynthetic and lipogenic gene expression after 6 h, and the expression of the cholesterol efflux transporters Abca1 and Abcg1 after 24 h. Co-treatment of pioglitazone with the PPARgamma antagonist GW9662 did not significantly reduce these effects, suggesting a PPARgamma-independent mechanism. These findings suggest a novel effect of TZDs in neurons that may be of relevance as a novel approach against Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Identification of a sub-population of B cells that proliferates after infection with epstein-barr virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Jianjiang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-driven B cell proliferation is critical to its subsequent persistence in the host and is a key event in the development of EBV-associated B cell diseases. Thus, inquiry into early cellular events that precede EBV-driven proliferation of B cells is essential for understanding the processes that can lead to EBV-associated B cell diseases. Methods Infection with high titers of EBV of mixed, primary B cells in different stages of differentiation occurs during primary EBV infection and in the setting of T cell-immunocompromise that predisposes to development of EBV-lymphoproliferative diseases. Using an ex vivo system that recapitulates these conditions of infection, we correlated expression of selected B cell-surface markers and intracellular cytokines with expression of EBV latency genes and cell proliferation. Results We identified CD23, CD58, and IL6, as molecules expressed at early times after EBV-infection. EBV differentially infected B cells into two distinct sub-populations of latently infected CD23+ cells: one fraction, marked as CD23hiCD58+IL6- by day 3, subsequently proliferated; another fraction, marked as CD23loCD58+, expressed IL6, a B cell growth factor, but failed to proliferate. High levels of LMP1, a critical viral oncoprotein, were expressed in individual CD23hiCD58+ and CD23loCD58+ cells, demonstrating that reduced levels of LMP1 did not explain the lack of proliferation of CD23loCD58+ cells. Differentiation stage of B cells did not appear to govern this dichotomy in outcome either. Memory or naïve B cells did not exclusively give rise to either CD23hi or IL6-expressing cells; rather memory B cells gave rise to both sub-populations of cells. Conclusions B cells are differentially susceptible to EBV-mediated proliferation despite expression of viral gene products known to be critical for continuous B cell growth. Cellular events, in addition to viral gene expression, likely play a

  3. [Peripheral blood neutrophil subpopulations and capacities of NBT test in the diagnosis of neonatal diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimov, I G

    2011-04-01

    By analyzing the data available in the literature, the author shows new capacities of the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) test in the diagnosis of neonatal diseases and conditions. The findings versus the, data obtained in adult patients are characterized. The NBT test has been used to determine changes in neutrophil subpopulations. The kinetic parameters of the process are analyzed.

  4. Evaluation of a multicolor, single-tube technique to enumerate lymphocyte subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, F; Cattaneo, A; Lopa, R; Portararo, P; Rebulla, P; Porretti, L

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the fully automated FACSCanto software, we compared lymphocyte subpopulation counts obtained using three-color FACSCalibur-CELLQuest and six-color FACSCanto-FACSCanto software techniques. High correlations were observed between data obtained with these techniques. Our study indicated that FACSCanto clinical software is accurate and sensitive in single-platform lymphocyte immunophenotyping.

  5. Pyoverdine and PQS Mediated Subpopulation Interactions Involved in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Nilsson, Martin; Gjermansen, Morten

    2009-01-01

    Using flow chamber-grown Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms as model system, we show in the present study that formation of heterogeneous biofilms may occur through mechanisms that involve complex subpopulation interactions. One example of this phenomenon is expression of the iron...

  6. Disentangling subpopulations in single-molecule FRET and ALEX experiments with photon distribution analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomov, Toma E; Tsukanov, Roman; Masoud, Rula; Liber, Miran; Plavner, Noa; Nir, Eyal

    2012-03-07

    Among the advantages of the single-molecule approach when used to study biomolecular structural dynamics and interaction is its ability to distinguish between and independently observe minor subpopulations. In a single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and alternating laser excitation diffusion experiment, the various populations are apparent in the resultant histograms. However, because histograms are calculated based on the per-burst mean FRET and stoichiometry ratio and not on the internal photon distribution, much of the acquired information is lost, thereby reducing the capabilities of the method. Here we suggest what to our knowledge is a novel statistical analysis tool that significantly enhances these capabilities, and we use it to identify and isolate static and dynamic subpopulations. Based on a kernel density estimator and a proper photon distribution analysis, for each individual burst, we calculate scores that reflect properties of interest. Specifically, we determine the FRET efficiency and brightness ratio distributions and use them to reveal 1), the underlying structure of a two-state DNA-hairpin and a DNA hairpin that is bound to DNA origami; 2), a minor doubly labeled dsDNA subpopulation concealed in a larger singly labeled dsDNA; and 3), functioning DNA origami motors concealed within a larger subpopulation of defective motors. Altogether, these findings demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed approach. The method was developed and tested using simulations, its rationality is described, and a computer algorithm is provided. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Connecting endangered brown bear subpopulations in the Cantabrian Range (north-western Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. C. Mateo-Sanchez; Samuel Cushman; S. Saura

    2014-01-01

    The viability of many species depends on functional connectivity of their populations through dispersal across broad landscapes. This is particularly the case for the endangered brown bear in north-western Spain, with a total population of about 200 individuals in two subpopulations that are separated by a wide gap with low permeability. Our goal in this paper...

  8. Changes in circulating lymphocyte subpopulations in pigs receiving therapeutic doses of ceftiofur and tulathromycin

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    Czyżewska-Dors Ewelina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of administration of therapeutic doses of ceftiofur and tulathromycin on the circulating lymphocyte subpopulations in healthy pigs. Material and Methods: The study was conducted on thirty healthy 7- to 10-week-old pigs, assigned to three groups: the TUL group, injected with tulathromycin (n = 10; the CEF group, injected with ceftiofur (n = 10; and the C group, the control with no antibiotic administration (n = 10. Blood samples were collected before, during, and after treatment with antimicrobials. Lymphocyte subpopulations circulating in the blood were determined by immunostaining and flow cytometry analyses. Results: Following administration of a therapeutic dose of tulathromycin, there were no changes in the lymphocyte subpopulations circulating in blood. In contrast, administration of ceftiofur at the recommended dose decreased the absolute number of CD3+, CD21+, CD4+CD8-, CD4-CD8+, and double positive CD4CD8 cells. Conclusion: Results from the study indicate that ceftiofur possesses the ability to modulate the immune system in healthy pigs by decreasing lymphocyte subpopulations circulating in blood.

  9. Analysis by mass spectrometry of POMC-derived peptides in amphibian melanotrope subpopulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vázquez-Martínez, R.M.; Malagón, M.M.; Strien, F.J.C. van; Jespersen, S.; Greef, J. van der; Roubos, E.W.; Gracia-Navarro, F.

    1999-01-01

    We have previously shown that the melanotrope population of the pituitary intermediate lobe of Rana ridibunda is composed of two subpopulations, of low (LD) and high density (HD), that show distinct ultrastructural features and display different synthetic and secretory rates. To investigate whether

  10. Carotenoids located in human lymphocyte subpopulations and Natural Killer cells by Raman microspectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puppels, G.J.; Puppels, G.J.; Garritsen, H.S.P.; Garritsen, H.S.P.; Kummer, J.A.; Greve, Jan

    1993-01-01

    The presence and subcellular location of carotenoids in human lymphocyte sub-populations (CD4+, CD8+, T-cell receptor-γδ+, and CD19+ ) and natural killer cells (CD16+ ) were studied by means of Raman microspectroscopy. In CD4+ lymphocytes a high concentration (10-3M) of carotenoids was found in the

  11. State-dependent propagation of neuronal sub-population in spontaneous synchronized bursts.

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    Yuichiro eYada

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Repeating stable spatiotemporal patterns emerge in synchronized spontaneous activity in neuronal networks. The repertoire of such patterns can serve as memory, or a reservoir of information, in a neuronal network; moreover, the variety of patterns may represent the network memory capacity. However, a neuronal substrate for producing a repertoire of patterns in synchronization remains elusive. We herein hypothesize that state-dependent propagation of a neuronal sub-population is the key mechanism. By combining high-resolution measurement with a 4,096-channel complementary metal-oxide semiconductor microelectrode array and dimensionality reduction with non-negative matrix factorization, we investigated synchronized bursts of dissociated rat cortical neurons at approximately three weeks in vitro. We found that bursts had a repertoire of repeating spatiotemporal patterns, and different patterns shared a partially similar sequence of sub-population, supporting the idea of sequential structure of neuronal sub-populations during synchronized activity. We additionally found that similar spatiotemporal patterns tended to appear successively and periodically, suggesting a state-dependent fluctuation of propagation, which has been overlooked in existing literature. Thus, such a state-dependent property within the sequential sub-population structure is a plausible neural substrate for performing a repertoire of stable patterns during synchronized activity.

  12. Fatness-associated FTO gene variant increases mortality independent of fatness--in cohorts of Danish men.

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    Esther Zimmermann

    Full Text Available The A-allele of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, rs9939609, in the FTO gene is associated with increased fatness. We hypothesized that the SNP is associated with morbidity and mortality through the effect on fatness.In a population of 362,200 Danish young men, examined for military service between 1943 and 1977, all obese (BMI>or=31.0 kg/m(2 and a random 1% sample of the others were identified. In 1992-94, at an average age of 46 years, 752 of the obese and 876 of the others were re-examined, including measurements of weight, fat mass, height, and waist circumference, and DNA sampling. Hospitalization and death occurring during the following median 13.5 years were ascertained by linkage to national registers. Cox regression analyses were performed using a dominant effect model (TT vs. TA or AA. In total 205 men died. Mortality was 42% lower (p = 0.001 with the TT genotype than in A-allele carriers. This phenomenon was observed in both the obese and the randomly sampled cohort when analysed separately. Adjustment for fatness covariates attenuated the association only slightly. Exploratory analyses of cause-specific mortality and morbidity prior to death suggested a general protective effect of the TT genotype, whereas there were only weak associations with disease incidence, except for diseases of the nervous system.Independent of fatness, the A-allele of the FTO SNP appears to increase mortality of a magnitude similar to smoking, but without a particular underlying disease pattern barring an increase in the risk of diseases of the nervous system.

  13. Registration of Durum Wheat Germplasm Lines with Combined Mutations in SBEIIa and SBEIIb Genes Conferring Increased Amylose and Resistant Starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazard, Brittany; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Naemeh, Mahmoudreza; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2014-08-25

    Durum wheat [Triticum turgidum L. subsp. durum (Desf.) Husn.], used in pasta, couscous, and flatbread production, is an important source of starch food products worldwide. The amylose portion of the starch forms resistant starch complexes that resist digestion and contribute to dietary fiber. Increasing the amount of amylose and resistant starch in wheat by mutating the STARCH BRANCHING ENZYME II (SBEII) genes has potential to provide human health benefits. Ethyl methane sulfonate mutations in the linked SBEIIa and SBEIIb paralogs were combined on chromosomes 2A (SBEIIa/b-A; Reg. No. GP-968, PI 670159), 2B (SBEIIa/b-B; Reg. No. GP-970, PI 670161), and on both chromosomes (SBEIIa/b-AB; Reg. No. GP-969, PI 670160) in the tetraploid wheat cultivar Kronos, a semidwarf durum wheat cultivar that has high yield potential and excellent pasta quality. These three double and quadruple SBEII-mutant lines were compared with a control sib line with no SBEII mutations in two field locations in California. The SBEIIa/b-AB line with four mutations showed dramatic increases in amylose (average 66%) and resistant starch (average 753%) relative to the control. However, the SBEIIa/b-AB line also showed an average 7% decrease in total starch and an 8% decrease in kernel weight. The release by the University of California-Davis of the durum wheat germplasm combining four SBEIIa and SBEIIb mutations will accelerate the deployment of these mutations in durum wheat breeding programs and the development of durum wheat varieties with increased resistant starch.

  14. Genome-Wide Analysis of the AP2/ERF Gene Family in Physic Nut and Overexpression of the JcERF011 Gene in Rice Increased Its Sensitivity to Salinity Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuehui; Qin, Shanshan; Guo, Yali; Chen, Yanbo; Wu, Pingzhi; Chen, Yaping; Li, Meiru; Jiang, Huawu; Wu, Guojiang

    2016-01-01

    The AP2/ERF transcription factors play crucial roles in plant growth, development and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. A total of 119 AP2/ERF genes (JcAP2/ERFs) have been identified in the physic nut genome; they include 16 AP2, 4 RAV, 1 Soloist, and 98 ERF genes. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that physic nut AP2 genes could be divided into 3 subgroups, while ERF genes could be classed into 11 groups or 43 subgroups. The AP2/ERF genes are non-randomly distributed across the 11 linkage groups of the physic nut genome and retain many duplicates which arose from ancient duplication events. The expression patterns of several JcAP2/ERF duplicates in the physic nut showed differences among four tissues (root, stem, leaf, and seed), and 38 JcAP2/ERF genes responded to at least one abiotic stressor (drought, salinity, phosphate starvation, and nitrogen starvation) in leaves and/or roots according to analysis of digital gene expression tag data. The expression of JcERF011 was downregulated by salinity stress in physic nut roots. Overexpression of the JcERF011 gene in rice plants increased its sensitivity to salinity stress. The increased expression levels of several salt tolerance-related genes were impaired in the JcERF011-overexpressing plants under salinity stress.

  15. Novel rat Alzheimer's disease models based on AAV-mediated gene transfer to selectively increase hippocampal Aβ levels

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    Dicker Bridget L

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by a decline in cognitive function and accumulation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ in extracellular plaques. Mutations in amyloid precursor protein (APP and presenilins alter APP metabolism resulting in accumulation of Aβ42, a peptide essential for the formation of amyloid deposits and proposed to initiate the cascade leading to AD. However, the role of Aβ40, the more prevalent Aβ peptide secreted by cells and a major component of cerebral Aβ deposits, is less clear. In this study, virally-mediated gene transfer was used to selectively increase hippocampal levels of human Aβ42 and Aβ40 in adult Wistar rats, allowing examination of the contribution of each to the cognitive deficits and pathology seen in AD. Results Adeno-associated viral (AAV vectors encoding BRI-Aβ cDNAs were generated resulting in high-level hippocampal expression and secretion of the specific encoded Aβ peptide. As a comparison the effect of AAV-mediated overexpression of APPsw was also examined. Animals were tested for development of learning and memory deficits (open field, Morris water maze, passive avoidance, novel object recognition three months after infusion of AAV. A range of impairments was found, with the most pronounced deficits observed in animals co-injected with both AAV-BRI-Aβ40 and AAV-BRI-Aβ42. Brain tissue was analyzed by ELISA and immunohistochemistry to quantify levels of detergent soluble and insoluble Aβ peptides. BRI-Aβ42 and the combination of BRI-Aβ40+42 overexpression resulted in elevated levels of detergent-insoluble Aβ. No significant increase in detergent-insoluble Aβ was seen in the rats expressing APPsw or BRI-Aβ40. No pathological features were noted in any rats, except the AAV-BRI-Aβ42 rats which showed focal, amorphous, Thioflavin-negative Aβ42 deposits. Conclusion The results show that AAV-mediated gene transfer is a valuable tool to model aspects of AD pathology in

  16. TRANSGENIC PLANTS OF RAPE (BRASSICA NAPUS L. WITH GENE OSMYB4 HAVE INCREASED RESISTANCE TO SALTS OF HEAVY METALS

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    Raldugina G.N.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to study the response of the transgenic spring rape plants (Brassica napus L. var. ‘Westar’ with the rice transfactor-encoding gene Osmyb4 to treatment with salts of heavy metals (HM CuSO4 or ZnSO4 and accumulation in the leaves of biomass, metals, photosynthetic pigments, lipid peroxidation, and antioxidant compounds: total phenols, anthocyanins, and antioxidant enzyme activity superoxide dismutase (SOD and guaiacol peroxidase (POX were determined. Vegetatively propagated transgenic plants and wild-type plants were grown on Hoagland-Snyder medium at 24°C, then at the 5-6th leaves-stage, CuSO4 (in concentration 25-150 mM or ZnSO4 (500 - 5000 mM were added to the growth medium, and plants were exposed to the salts for 15 days. Under the action of small concentrations of salts, the results obtained for the transgenic and untransformed plants did not differ, but at high concentrations strong differences between transgenic and untransformed plants were observed. In transgenic plants, accumulation of biomass was greater. Carotene and xanthophyll were destroyed in transgenic plants less than in the untransformed plants. They have accumulated in their leaves more metal, especially Zn, reaching almost to the accumulation of 7 mg per g of dry biomass, bringing these plants to the hyperaccumulation of Zn. In the tissues of transgenic plants exposed to high concentrations of salts, the content of total phenols, anthocyanins, and low molecular weight compounds, that are responsible for protection against ROS, increased significantly. All these results indicate a greater stability of the transgenic plants to the action of heavy metals, as evidenced also by less activity of lipid peroxidases in their tissue: at high salt concentrations, malondialdehyde (MDA accumulated significantly less in transgenic plants than in non-transformed plant tissues. The greater stability of transgenic plants to stressful effect of HM is also evidenced by the

  17. Effect of long-term sleep restriction and subsequent recovery sleep on the diurnal rhythms of white blood cell subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasselin, Julie; Rehman, Javaid-Ur; Åkerstedt, Torbjorn; Lekander, Mats; Axelsson, John

    2015-07-01

    While acute modifications of sleep duration induces a wide array of immune function alterations, less is known of how longer periods with insufficient sleep affect immune functions and how they return to normal once recovery sleep is obtained. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of five days of restricted sleep and a subsequent 7-day period of sleep recovery on white blood cell (WBC) subpopulation count and diurnal rhythms. Nine healthy males participated in a sleep protocol consisting of two baseline days (8h of sleep/night), five nights with restricted sleep (4h of sleep/night) and seven days of recovery sleep (8h of sleep/night). During nine of these days, blood was drawn hourly during night-time end every third hour during daytime, and differential WBC count was analyzed. Gradual increase across the days of sleep restriction was observed for total WBC (psleep resulted in a gradual decrease in monocytes (psleep being associated with higher levels during the night and at awakening, resulting in a flattening of the rhythm. The diurnal alterations were reversed when recovery sleep was allowed, although the amplitude of total WBC, neutrophils and monocytes was increased at the end of the recovery period in comparison to baseline. Altogether, these data show that long-term sleep restriction leads to a gradual increase of circulating WBC subpopulations and alterations of the respective diurnal rhythms. Although some of the effects caused by five days of restricted sleep were restored within the first days of recovery, some parameters were not back to baseline even after a period of seven recovery days. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Recent and projected increases in atmospheric CO2 concentration can enhance gene flow between wild and genetically altered rice (Oryza sativa.

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    Lewis H Ziska

    Full Text Available Although recent and projected increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide can alter plant phenological development, these changes have not been quantified in terms of floral outcrossing rates or gene transfer. Could differential phenological development in response to rising CO(2 between genetically modified crops and wild, weedy relatives increase the spread of novel genes, potentially altering evolutionary fitness? Here we show that increasing CO(2 from an early 20(th century concentration (300 µmol mol(-1 to current (400 µmol mol(-1 and projected, mid-21(st century (600 µmol mol(-1 values, enhanced the flow of genes from wild, weedy rice to the genetically altered, herbicide resistant, cultivated population, with outcrossing increasing from 0.22% to 0.71% from 300 to 600 µmol mol(-1. The increase in outcrossing and gene transfer was associated with differential increases in plant height, as well as greater tiller and panicle production in the wild, relative to the cultivated population. In addition, increasing CO(2 also resulted in a greater synchronicity in flowering times between the two populations. The observed changes reported here resulted in a subsequent increase in rice dedomestication and a greater number of weedy, herbicide-resistant hybrid progeny. Overall, these data suggest that differential phenological responses to rising atmospheric CO(2 could result in enhanced flow of novel genes and greater success of feral plant species in agroecosystems.

  19. Dynamics of peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations in the acute and subacute phase of Legionnaires' disease.

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    Cornelis P C de Jager

    Full Text Available STUDY OBJECTIVE: Absolute lymphocytopenia is recognised as an important hallmark of the immune response to severe infection and observed in patients with Legionnaires' disease. To explore the immune response, we studied the dynamics of peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations in the acute and subacute phase of LD. METHODS AND RESULTS: EDTA-anticoagulated blood was obtained from eight patients on the day the diagnosis was made through detection of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 antigen in urine. A second blood sample was obtained in the subacute phase. Multiparametric flow cytometry was used to calculate lymphocyte counts and values for B-cells, T-cells, NK cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. Expression of activation markers was analysed. The values obtained in the subacute phase were compared with an age and gender matched control group. Absolute lymphocyte count (×10⁹/l, median and range significantly increased from 0.8 (0.4-1.6 in the acute phase to 1.4 (0.8-3.4 in the subacute phase. B-cell count showed no significant change, while T-cell count (×10⁶/l, median and range significantly increased in the subacute phase (495 (182-1024 versus 979 (507-2708, p = 0.012 as a result of significant increases in both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell counts (374 (146-629 versus 763 (400-1507, p = 0.012 and 119 (29-328 versus 224 (107-862, p = 0.012. In the subacute phase of LD, significant increases were observed in absolute counts of activated CD4+ T-cells, naïve CD4+ T-cells and memory CD4+ T-cells. In the CD8+ T-cell compartment, activated CD8+ T-cells, naïve CD8+ T-cell and memory CD8+ T-cells were significantly increased (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: The acute phase of LD is characterized by absolute lymphocytopenia, which recovers in the subacute phase with an increase in absolute T-cells and re-emergence of activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These observations are in line with the suggested role for T-cell activation in the immune response to LD.

  20. Passive smoking alters circulating naïve/memory lymphocyte T-cell subpopulations in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardavas, Constantine I; Plada, Maria; Tzatzarakis, Manolis; Marcos, Ascension; Warnberg, Julia; Gomez-Martinez, Sonia; Breidenassel, Christina; Gonzalez-Gross, Marcela; Tsatsakis, Aristeidis M; Saris, Wim H; Moreno, Luis A; Kafatos, Anthony G

    2010-12-01

    While it has been indicated that exposure to second-hand smoke (SHS) can cause a local in vivo response, limited evidence exists on its possible systemic effects from population-based levels of exposure. We investigated into a possible systemic response in the immune parameters and lymphocyte subsets, i.e. B cell (CD19+), T cell (CD4+CD45RO+, CD4+CD45RA+, CD3+CD45RO+, CD3+CD45RA+) and natural killer (CD3+CD16CD56+) lymphocyte subsets relative to exposure to SHS. Blood was drawn from healthy, verified non-smoker, adolescent subjects (n = 68, mean age 14.2) and analysed for cotinine, antioxidants and lymphocyte immunophenotyping. SHS exposure was assessed using serum cotinine. Biomarker quantified exposure to SHS was correlated with a linear dose-response reduction in the percentages of memory CD4+CD45RO+ (p = 0.005) and CD3+CD45RO+ T-cell subsets (p = 0.005 and p = 0.003, respectively) and a linear increase in the percentage of naïve CD4+CD45RA+ and CD3+CD45RA+ T-cell subsets (p = 0.006 and p = 0.003, respectively). Additionally, higher exposure to SHS was associated with a higher CD4+CD45RA+ count (532 vs. 409 cells/ml, p = 0.017). Moreover, after controlling for age, gender, body mass index and plasma antioxidants, SHS exposure was found to be associated with the percentage of circulating naïve and memory CD4+ and CD3+ T-cell subpopulations, as revealed through a linear regression analysis. These findings indicate a systemic immunological response in healthy adolescents exposed to population-based levels of SHS exposure and imply an additional biological pathway for the interaction between exposure to SHS and its adverse effects on human health. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Inactivation of the gbpA Gene of Streptococcus mutans Increases Virulence and Promotes In Vivo Accumulation of Recombinations between the Glucosyltransferase B and C Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazlett, Karsten R. O.; Michalek, Suzanne M.; Banas, Jeffrey A.

    1998-01-01

    Glucan-binding protein A (GbpA) of Streptococcus mutans has been hypothesized to promote sucrose-dependent adherence and the cohesiveness of plaque and therefore to contribute to caries formation. We have analyzed the adherence properties and virulence of isogenic gbpA mutants relative to those of wild-type S. mutans. Contrary to expectations, the gbpA mutant strains displayed enhanced sucrose-dependent adherence in vitro and enhanced cariogenicity in vivo. In vitro, S. mutans was grown in the presence of [3H]thymidine and sucrose within glass vials. When grown with constant rotation, significantly higher levels of gbpA mutant organisms than of wild type remained adherent to the vial walls. Postgrowth vortexing of rotated cultures significantly decreased adherence of wild-type organisms, whereas the adherence of gbpA mutant organisms was unaffected. In the gnotobiotic rat model, the gbpA mutant strain was hypercariogenic though the colonization levels were not significantly different from those of the wild type. The gbpA mutant strain became enriched in vivo with organisms that had undergone a recombination involving the gtfB and gtfC genes. The incidence of gtfBC recombinant organisms increased as a function of dietary sucrose availability and was inversely correlated with caries development. We propose that the absence of GbpA elevates the cariogenic potential of S. mutans by altering the structure of plaque. However, the hypercariogenic plaque generated by gbpA mutant organisms may be suboptimal for S. mutans, leading to the accumulation of gtfBC recombinants whose reduced glucosyltransferase activity restores a less cariogenic plaque structure. PMID:9573105

  2. Low adherent cancer cell subpopulations are enriched in tumorigenic and metastatic epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-induced cancer stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morata-Tarifa, Cynthia; Jiménez, Gema; García, María A; Entrena, José M; Griñán-Lisón, Carmen; Aguilera, Margarita; Picon-Ruiz, Manuel; Marchal, Juan A

    2016-01-11

    Cancer stem cells are responsible for tumor progression, metastasis, therapy resistance and cancer recurrence, doing their identification and isolation of special relevance. Here we show that low adherent breast and colon cancer cells subpopulations have stem-like properties. Our results demonstrate that trypsin-sensitive (TS) breast and colon cancer cells subpopulations show increased ALDH activity, higher ability to exclude Hoechst 33342, enlarged proportion of cells with a cancer stem-like cell phenotype and are enriched in sphere- and colony-forming cells in vitro. Further studies in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells reveal that TS subpopulation expresses higher levels of SLUG, SNAIL, VIMENTIN and N-CADHERIN while show a lack of expression of E-CADHERIN and CLAUDIN, being this profile characteristic of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The TS subpopulation shows CXCL10, BMI-1 and OCT4 upregulation, differing also in the expression of several miRNAs involved in EMT and/or cell self-renewal such as miR-34a-5p, miR-34c-5p, miR-21-5p, miR-93-5p and miR-100-5p. Furthermore, in vivo studies in immunocompromised mice demonstrate that MDA-MB-231 TS cells form more and bigger xenograft tumors with shorter latency and have higher metastatic potential. In conclusion, this work presents a new, non-aggressive, easy, inexpensive and reproducible methodology to isolate prospectively cancer stem-like cells for subsequent biological and preclinical studies.

  3. Reducing cytoplasmic polyamine oxidase activity in Arabidopsis increases salt and drought tolerance by reducing reactive oxygen species production and increasing defense gene expression

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    G.H.M. eSagor

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The link between polyamine oxidases (PAOs, which function in polyamine catabolism, and stress responses remains elusive. Here, we address this issue using Arabidopsis pao mutants in which the expression of the five PAO genes is knocked-out or knocked-down. As the five single pao mutants and wild type (WT showed similar response to salt stress, we tried to generate the mutants that have either the cytoplasmic PAO pathway (pao1 pao5 or the peroxisomal PAO pathway (pao2 pao3 pao4 silenced. However, the latter triple mutant was not obtained. Thus, in this study, we used two double mutants, pao1 pao5 and pao2 pao4. Of interest, pao1 pao5 mutant was NaCl- and drought-tolerant, whereas pao2 pao4 showed similar sensitivity to those stresses as WT. To reveal the underlying mechanism of salt tolerance, further analyses were performed. Na uptake of the mutant (pao1 pao5 decreased to 75% of WT. PAO activity of the mutant was reduced to 62% of WT. The content of reactive oxygen species (ROS such as hydrogen peroxide, a reaction product of PAO action, and superoxide anion in the mutant became 81% and 72% of the levels in WT upon salt treatment. The mutant contained 2.8-fold higher thermospermine compared to WT. Moreover, the mutant induced the genes of salt overly sensitive-, abscisic acid (ABA-dependent- and ABA-independent- pathways more strongly than WT upon salt treatment. The results suggest that the Arabidopsis plant silencing cytoplasmic PAOs shows salinity tolerance by reducing ROS production and strongly inducing subsets of stress-responsive genes under stress conditions.

  4. Differences in cancer incidence among predominantly Muslim and Buddhist subpopulations in Songkhla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriplung, Hutcha; Bilheem, Surichai; Kuntipundee, Tirada; Geater, Sarayut Lucian

    2014-01-01

    The population of Songkhla, a province in Southern Thailand, can be divided into a predominantly Muslim subpopulation (PMSP, approximately 70% Muslim) and a predominantly Buddhist subpopulation (PBSP, around 14% Muslim). This study was conducted to 1) describe the incidence of various cancers in both PMSP and PBSP, and 2) compare the incidence of various cancers between the two subpopulations. Cancer cases diagnosed between 1990 and 2010 were drawn from the database of Songkhla Cancer Registry. Population denominators were estimated from the 3 population censuses surveyed by the National Statistical Office of Thailand in 1990, 2000, and 2010. The age-standardized incidence rates (ASR) of the 5 commonest male cancers among both subpopulations were calculated. In females, a lower incidence of cancers of the cervix and breast in PMSP compared to PBSP, with odds ratios of 0.54 (95% CI: 0.45-0.64) and 0.51 (95% CI: 0.43-0.60) respectively, was observed. In males, the incidence of cancers of the lung, liver, colon-rectum, and some other cancers were significantly different between the two populations in the past, but only prostate cancer showed a lower incidence among males in PMSP in recent years. Independent of sex and year of diagnosis, the incidence of lung, liver, NHL, and colorectal cancers was lower in MPSP compared to BPSP, with odds ratios of 0.75 (95% CI: 0.65-0.85), 0.74 (95% CI: 0.62-0.88), 0.74 (95% CI: 0.60-0.91), and 0.67 (95% CI: 0.56-0.78) respectively. The differences in incidence of some cancers and religion- related culture between the two subpopulations need 2 sets of cancer-control plans and goals to fit the unique population context in deep Southern Thailand. This plan can be used in the 3 southernmost provinces of Thailand where the percentage of Muslims is over 85%.

  5. The Oct1 homolog Nubbin is a repressor of NF-κB-dependent immune gene expression that increases the tolerance to gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantoft, Widad; Davis, Monica M; Lindvall, Jessica M; Tang, Xiongzhuo; Uvell, Hanna; Junell, Anna; Beskow, Anne; Engström, Ylva

    2013-09-06

    Innate immune responses are evolutionarily conserved processes that provide crucial protection against invading organisms. Gene activation by potent NF-κB transcription factors is essential both in mammals and Drosophila during infection and stress challenges. If not strictly controlled, this potent defense system can activate autoimmune and inflammatory stress reactions, with deleterious consequences for the organism. Negative regulation to prevent gene activation in healthy organisms, in the presence of the commensal gut flora, is however not well understood. We show that the Drosophila homolog of mammalian Oct1/POU2F1 transcription factor, called Nubbin (Nub), is a repressor of NF-κB/Relish-driven antimicrobial peptide gene expression in flies. In nub1 mutants, which lack Nub-PD protein, excessive expression of antimicrobial peptide genes occurs in the absence of infection, leading to a significant reduction of the numbers of cultivatable gut commensal bacteria. This aberrant immune gene expression was effectively blocked by expression of Nub from a transgene. We have identified an upstream regulatory region, containing a cluster of octamer sites, which is required for repression of antimicrobial peptide gene expression in healthy flies. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that Nub binds to octamer-containing promoter fragments of several immune genes. Gene expression profiling revealed that Drosophila Nub negatively regulates many genes that are involved in immune and stress responses, while it is a positive regulator of genes involved in differentiation and metabolism. This study demonstrates that a large number of genes that are activated by NF-κB/Relish in response to infection are normally repressed by the evolutionarily conserved Oct/POU transcription factor Nub. This prevents uncontrolled gene activation and supports the existence of a normal gut flora. We suggest that Nub protein plays an ancient role, shared with mammalian Oct

  6. Radiation-sensitive genetically susceptible pediatric sub-populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinerman, Ruth A. [National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS, Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Rockville, MD (United States)

    2009-02-15

    Major advances in pediatric cancer treatment have resulted in substantial improvements in survival. However, concern has emerged about the late effects of cancer therapy, especially radiation-related second cancers. Studies of childhood cancer patients with inherited cancer syndromes can provide insights into the interaction between radiation and genetic susceptibility to multiple cancers. Children with retinoblastoma (Rb), neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS), and nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) are at substantial risk of developing radiation-related second and third cancers. A radiation dose-response for bone and soft-tissue sarcomas has been observed in hereditary Rb patients, with many of these cancers occurring in the radiation field. Studies of NF1 patients irradiated for optic pathway gliomas have reported increased risks of developing another cancer associated with radiotherapy. High relative risks for second and third cancers were observed for a cohort of 200 LFS family members, especially children, possibly related to radiotherapy. Children with NBCCS are very sensitive to radiation and develop multiple basal cell cancers in irradiated areas. Clinicians following these patients should be aware of their increased genetic susceptibility to multiple primary malignancies enhanced by sensitivity to ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  7. Plasma levels of HDL subpopulations and remnant lipoproteins predict the extent of angiographically defined disease in post-menopausal women

    Science.gov (United States)

    The association of coronary heart disease (CHD) with subpopulations of triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) is established in men, but has not been well characterized in women. Plasma HDL subpopulation concentrations, quantified by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis...

  8. Development of a versatile Cas9-driven subpopulation-selection toolbox inLactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Els, Simon; James, Jennelle K; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Bron, Peter A

    2018-02-16

    CRISPR-Cas9 technology has been exploited for the removal or replacement of genetic elements in a wide range of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Here we describe the extension of the Cas9 application toolbox to the industrially important dairy species Lactococcus lactis The Cas9 expression vector pLABTarget was constructed, encoding the Streptocccus pyogenes Cas9 under control of a constitutive promoter, and allowing plug and play introduction of sgRNA sequences to target specific genetic loci. Introduction of a pepN -targeting derivative of pLABTarget into L. lactis MG1363 led to a strong reduction in the number of transformants obtained, which did not occur in a pepN deletion derivative of the same strain, demonstrating the specificity and lethality of the Cas9 mediated double strand breaks in the lactococcal chromosome. Moreover, the same pLABTarget derivative allowed the selection of a pepN deletion subpopulation from its corresponding single crossover plasmid integrant precursor, accelerating the construction and selection of gene-specific deletion derivatives in L. lactis Finally, pLABTarget containing sgRNAs designed to target mobile genetic elements, allowed the effective curing of plasmids, prophages and integrative conjugative elements (ICE). These results establish that pLABTarget enables the effective exploitation of Cas9 targeting in L. lactis , while the broad host range vector used suggests that this toolbox could be readily expanded to other Gram-positive bacteria. Significance statement Mobile genetic elements in Lactococcus lactis and other lactic acid bacteria play an important role in dairy fermentation, having both positive and detrimental effects during the production of fermented dairy products. The pLABTarget vector offers an efficient cloning platform for Cas9 application in lactic acid bacteria. Targeting Cas9 towards mobile genetic elements enabled their effective curing, which is of particular interest in the context of potentially

  9. Reactivation of proliferin gene expression is associated with increased angiogenesis in a cell culture model of fibrosarcoma tumor progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toft, Daniel J.; Rosenberg, Suzanne B.; Bergers, Gabriele; Volpert, Olga; Linzer, Daniel I. H.

    2001-01-01

    Proliferin (PLF) is an angiogenic placental hormone. We now report that PLF gene expression can also occur in a progressive fibrosarcoma mouse tumor cell model. PLF mRNA and protein are detectable at very low levels in cell lines derived from the mild noninvasive stage of tumor development. Expression is greatly augmented in cell lines from the aggressively invasive stage of development, a stage at which the tumor becomes highly angiogenic, and PLF expression remains high in cell lines from the end stage of fibrosarcoma. Activator protein 1 factors present at high levels in the more invasive stages of the tumor may in part allow for increased PLF expression, as cells from the mild stage in which c-jun and junB are stably expressed secrete levels of PLF comparable to that of the advanced stages. Secreted PLF protein is functionally important in tumor cell angiogenic activity, as demonstrated by the reduction of angiogenic activity in fibrosarcoma cell culture medium by immunodepletion of PLF. These results suggest that an extraembryonic genetic program, which has evolved to support fetal growth, may be reactivated in certain tumors and contribute to tumor growth. PMID:11606769

  10. Delayed neuromotor recovery and increased memory acquisition dysfunction following experimental brain trauma in mice lacking the DNA repair gene XPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasevic, Gregor; Laurer, Helmut L; Mattiasson, Gustav; van Steeg, Harry; Wieloch, Tadeusz; McIntosh, Tracy K

    2012-06-01

    This study investigates the outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in mice lacking the essential DNA repair gene xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA). As damage to DNA has been implicated in neuronal cell death in various models, the authors sought to elucidate whether the absence of an essential DNA repair factor would affect the outcome of TBI in an experimental setting. Thirty-seven adult mice of either wild-type (n = 18) or XPA-deficient ("knock-out" [n = 19]) genotype were subjected to controlled cortical impact experimental brain trauma, which produced a focal brain injury. Sham-injured mice of both genotypes were used as controls (9 in each group). The mice were subjected to neurobehavoral tests evaluating learning/acquisition (Morris water maze) and motor dysfunction (Rotarod and composite neuroscore test), pre- and postinjury up to 4 weeks. The mice were killed after 1 or 4 weeks, and cortical lesion volume, as well as hippocampal and thalamic cell loss, was evaluated. Hippocampal staining with doublecortin antibody was used to evaluate neurogenesis after the insult. Brain-injured XPA(-/-) mice exhibited delayed recovery from impairment in neurological motor function, as well as pronounced cognitive dysfunction in a spatial learning task (Morris water maze), compared with injured XPA(+/+) mice (p recovery after TBI, although they do not support the notion that this DNA repair deficiency results in increased cell or tissue death in the posttraumatic brain.

  11. Fetal alcohol exposure alters proopiomelanocortin gene expression and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function via increasing MeCP2 expression in the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangisetty, Omkaram; Bekdash, Rola; Maglakelidze, George; Sarkar, Dipak K

    2014-01-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) is a precursor gene of the neuropeptide β-endorphin in the hypothalamus and is known to regulate various physiological functions including stress response. Several recent reports showed that fetal alcohol exposure programs the hypothalamus to produce lower levels of POMC gene transcripts and to elevate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis response to stressful stimuli. We investigated the role of methyl CpG binding protein (MeCP2) in the effects of prenatal ethanol on POMC gene expression and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function. Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were fed between GD 7 and 21 with a liquid diet containing 6.7% alcohol, pair-fed with isocaloric liquid diet, or fed ad libitum with rat chow, and their male offsprings were used at 60 days after birth in this study. Fetal alcohol exposure reduced the level of POMC mRNA, but increased the level of DNA methylation of this gene in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the hypothalamus where the POMC neuronal cell bodies are located. Fetal alcohol exposed rats showed a significant increase in MeCP2 protein levels in POMC cells, MeCP2 gene transcript levels as well as increased MeCP2 protein binding on the POMC promoter in the arcuate nucleus. Lentiviral delivery of MeCP2 shRNA into the third ventricle efficiently reduced MeCP2 expression and prevented the effect of prenatal ethanol on POMC gene expression in the arcuate nucleus. MeCP2-shRNA treatment also normalized the prenatal ethanol-induced increase in corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) gene expression in the hypothalamus and elevated plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone hormone responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. These results suggest that fetal alcohol programming of POMC gene may involve recruitment of MeCP2 on to the methylated promoter of the POMC gene to suppress POMC transcript levels and contribute to HPA axis dysregulation.

  12. Common variants in MAGI2 gene are associated with increased risk for cognitive impairment in schizophrenic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayoshi Koide

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a complex psychiatric disorder characterized by positive symptoms, negative symptoms, and cognitive impairment. MAGI2, a relatively large gene (∼1.5 Mbps that maps to chromosome 7q21, is involved in recruitment of neurotransmitter receptors such as AMPA- and NMDA-type glutamate receptors. A genetic association study designed to evaluate the association between MAGI2 and cognitive performance or schizophrenia has not been conducted. In this case-control study, we examined the relationship of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP variations in MAGI2 and risk for schizophrenia in a large Japanese sample and explored the potential relationships between variations in MAGI2 and aspects of human cognitive function related to glutamate activity. Based on the result of first schizophrenia genome-wide association study in a Japanese population (JGWAS, we selected four independent SNPs and performed an association study using a large independent Japanese sample set (cases 1624, controls 1621. Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST was used to evaluate executive function in 114 cases and 91 controls. We found suggestive evidence for genetic association of common SNPs within MAGI2 locus and schizophrenia in Japanese population. Furthermore in terms of association between MAGI2 and cognitive performance, we observed that genotype effect of rs2190665 on WCST score was significant (p = 0.034 and rs4729938 trended toward significance (p = 0.08. In conclusion, although we could not detect strong genetic evidence for association of common variants in MAGI2 and increased schizophrenia risk in a Japanese population, these SNPs may increase risk of cognitive impairment in schizophrenic patients.

  13. Gene polymorphism linked to increased asthma and IBD risk alters gasdermin-B structure, a sulfatide and phosphoinositide binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Kinlin L; Kulakova, Liudmila; Herzberg, Osnat

    2017-02-14

    The exact function of human gasdermin-B (GSDMB), which regulates differentiation and growth of epithelial cells, is yet to be elucidated. In human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer, GSDMB gene amplification and protein overexpression indicate a poor response to HER2-targeted therapy. Genome-wide association studies revealed a correlation between GSDMB SNPs and an increased susceptibility to Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and asthma. The N- and C-terminal domains of all gasdermins possess lipid-binding and regulatory activities, respectively. Inflammatory caspases cleave gasdermin-D in the interdomain linker but not GSDMB. The cleaved N-terminal domain binds phosphoinositides and cardiolipin, forms membrane-disrupting pores, and executes pyroptosis. We show that both full-length GSDMB and the N-terminal domain bind to nitrocellulose membranes immobilized with phosphoinositides or sulfatide, but not with cardiolipin. In addition, the GSDMB N-terminal domain binds liposomes containing sulfatide. The crystal structure of the GSDMB C-terminal domain reveals the structural impact of the amino acids encoded by SNPs that are linked to asthma and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). A loop that carries the polymorphism amino acids corresponding to healthy individuals (Gly299:Pro306) exhibits high conformational flexibility, whereas the loop carrying amino acids found in individuals with increased disease risk (Arg299:Ser306) exhibits a well-defined conformation and higher positive surface charge. Apoptotic executioner caspase-3, -6, and -7, but not the inflammatory caspases, cleave GSDMB at 88DNVD91 within the N-terminal domain. Selective sulfatide binding may indicate possible function for GSDMB in the cellular sulfatide transport.

  14. Functional polymorphisms of the CCL2 and MBL genes cumulatively increase susceptibility to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Xinyi; Chong, Wai Po; Zhai, Yun; Zhang, Hongxing; Zhang, Fang; Wang, Shixin; Liu, Wei; Wei, Maoti; Siu, Nora Ho On; Yang, Hao; Yang, Wanling; Cao, Wuchun; Lau, Yu Lung; He, Fuchu; Zhou, Gangqiao

    2015-07-01

    To assess associations between the functional polymorphisms G-2518A at the chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 gene (CCL2) and mannose binding lectin (MBL) codon 54 variant (A/B) and susceptibility to SARS. We genotyped the CCL2 G-2518A and MBL codon 54 variant (A/B) in 4 case-control populations of Chinese descent, totally consisting of 932 patients with SARS and 982 control subjects. Both the high-CCL2-producing GG genotype and the low-MBL-producing B allele were consistently associated with increased risks of SARS-CoV infection in all 4 case-control populations (joint P = 1.6 × 10(-4) and 4.9 × 10(-8), for CCL2 and MBL respectively), with no interaction between polymorphisms could be detected. Furthermore, all the 4 case-control studies demonstrated a cumulative effect on risk of SARS-CoV infection for the combination of polymorphisms (joint P = 1.3 × 10(-10)). However, tests using the area under the curve (AUC) indicated that at this stage, the polymorphisms were unlikely to be appropriate for risk prediction testing because of low AUC values (all <66%). Additionally, no association was observed between the polymorphisms and severity of SARS. The CCL2 G-2518A and MBL codon 54 variant have a significantly cumulative effect on increased risk of SARS-CoV infection. Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. High temperature, differentiation, and endoplasmic reticulum stress decrease but epigenetic and antioxidative agents increase Aspergillus ribosomal protein gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genome-wide gene expression assays using next-generation sequencing techniques have allowed the identification of transcriptomes in many species. Transcript abundance of ribosomal protein (RP) genes can serve as a proxy for the capacity of general transcription and synthesis of cellular proteins tha...

  16. Transgenic expression of a maize geranyl geranyl transferase gene sequence in maize callus increases resistance to ear rot pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Determining the genes responsible for pest resistance in maize can allow breeders to develop varieties with lower losses and less contamination with undesirable toxins. A gene sequence coding for a geranyl geranyl transferase-like protein located in a fungal ear rot resistance quantitative trait loc...

  17. Poorly differentiated breast carcinoma is associated with increased expression of the human polycomb group EZH2 gene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaphorst, F.M.; Meijer, C.J.L.M.; Fieret, E; Blokzijl, T; Mommers, E; Buerger, H; Packeisen, J; Sewalt, RA; Otte, AP; Diest, van P.J.

    2003-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) genes contribute to the maintenance of cell identity, cell cycle regulation, and oncogenesis. We describe the expression of five PcG genes (BMI-1, RING1, HPC1, HPC2, and EZH2) innormal breast tissues, invasive breast carcinomas, and their precursors. Members of the HPC-HPH/PRC1

  18. Mechanisms of topoisomerase I (TOP1) gene copy number increase in a stage III colorectal cancer patient cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, David Hersi; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Jensen, Niels Frank

    2013-01-01

    Topoisomerase I (Top1) is the target of Top1 inhibitor chemotherapy. The TOP1 gene, located at 20q12-q13.1, is frequently detected at elevated copy numbers in colorectal cancer (CRC). The present study explores the mechanism, frequency and prognostic impact of TOP1 gene aberrations in stage III CRC...

  19. DHEA and non-alcoholic fat liver disease: increased gene expression of peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor γ (PPARγ and fatty acid synthase (FAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Natali Almeida

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Dehydroespiandrosterone (DHEA is associated with improvements in chronic degenerative diseases, including obesity, insulin resistance, and cardiovascular diseases. Nevertheless, it is observed an increase in its concentration in individuals with liver lipid infiltration, but it is not precise if this condition emerges as a cause or a consequence. In this way, we aimed to identify gene expression alterations in lipid and glucose liver metabolism markers, as well as oxidative stress markers. For this purpose, male Wistar rats, 12-14 months old were treated with subcutaneous injections of DHEA (only dose of 10 mg kg-1; and after 7 days, hepatic gene expression by PCR real time were performed for the following genes:  G6Pase, PEPCK, FAS, PPARγ, malic enzyme, ChREBP, LXR, catalase, GPx, iNOS, NADPH oxidase subunits and PCNA. We observed a tendency of reduction in G6Pase gene expression in treated group (p = 0.08. In addition, it was identified an increase in liver PPARγ and FAS gene expressions, two markers of increased activity of lipogenic pathway. We also observed an increase in iNOS gene expression, a known inductor of systemic and hepatic insulin resistance. In conclusion, our data indicates that the treatment with DHEA can be associated with the development of liver lipid infiltration and hepatic insulin resistance.

  20. Overexpression of the Squalene Epoxidase Gene Alone and in Combination with the 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Gene Increases Ganoderic Acid Production in Ganoderma lingzhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, De-Huai; Jiang, Lu-Xi; Li, Na; Yu, Xuya; Zhao, Peng; Li, Tao; Xu, Jun-Wei

    2017-06-14

    The squalene epoxidase (SE) gene from the biosynthetic pathway of ganoderic acid (GA) was cloned and overexpressed in Ganoderma lingzhi. The strain that overexpressed the SE produced approximately 2 times more GA molecules than the wild-type (WT) strain. Moreover, SE overexpression upregulated lanosterol synthase gene expression in the biosynthetic pathway. These results indicated that SE stimulates GA accumulation. Then, the SE and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMGR) genes were simultaneously overexpressed in G. lingzhi. Compared with the individual overexpression of SE or HMGR, the combined overexpression of the two genes further enhanced individual GA production. The overexpressing strain produced maximum GA-T, GA-S, GA-Mk, and GA-Me contents of 90.4 ± 7.5, 35.9 ± 5.4, 6.2 ± 0.5, and 61.8 ± 5.8 μg/100 mg dry weight, respectively. These values were 5.9, 4.5, 2.4, and 5.8 times higher than those produced by the WT strain. This is the first example of the successful manipulation of multiple biosynthetic genes to improve GA content in G. lingzhi.

  1. Increases in iPS Transcription Factor (Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc, and Klf4) Gene Expression after Modified Electroconvulsive Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, Masaki; Kikuyama, Hiroki; Kanazawa, Tetsufumi; Tsutsumi, Atsushi; Kaneko, Takao; Uenishi, Hiroyuki; Kawabata, Yasuo; Kawashige, Seiya; Koh, Jun; Yoneda, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a reasonable option for intractable depression or schizophrenia, but a mechanism of action has not been established. One credible hypothesis is related to neural plasticity. Three genes (Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc) involved in the induction of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are Wnt-target genes, which constitute a key gene group involved in neural plasticity through the TCF family. Klf4 is the other gene among Yamanaka's four transcription factors, and increases in its expression are induced by stimulation of the canonical Wnt pathway. We compared the peripheral blood gene expression of the four iPS genes (Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc, and Klf4) before and after modified ECT (specifically ECT with general anesthesia) of patients with intractable depression (n=6) or schizophrenia (n=6). Using Thymatron ten times the total bilateral electrical stimulation was evoked. Both assessments of the symptoms demonstrated significant improvement after mECT stimulation. Expression of all four genes was confirmed to increase after initial stimulation. The gene expression levels after treatment were significantly different from the initial gene expression in all twelve cases at the following treatment stages: at the 3rd mECT for Oct4; at the 6th and 10th mECT for Sox2; and at the 3rd, 6th and 10th mECT for c-Myc. These significant differences were not present after correction for multiple testing; however, our data have the potential to explain the molecular mechanisms of mECT from a unique perspective. Further studie should be conducted to clarify the pathophysiological involvement of iPS-inducing genes in ECT.

  2. Distinguishing subpopulations of marijuana users with latent profile analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Matthew R; Bravo, Adrian J; Conner, Bradley T

    2017-03-01

    Although marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug in the United States, little is known about the effects of typical marijuana use patterns and whether there are distinct subgroups of marijuana users. The present study used latent profile analysis to determine the number of distinct subgroups of marijuana users in a large sample of college students (n=2129 past month marijuana users across 11 universities). We also examined how these distinct groups differ on several putative risk/protective factors (e.g., personality traits, perceptions of marijuana, and motives for using marijuana). Using the Lo-Mendell-Rubin Likelihood Ratio Test, we identified four latent classes with the largest class consisting of infrequent marijuana users, and three other classes demonstrating increasingly frequent use and more negative consequences with the most severe class being the smallest class. We found the largest between-class differences (i.e., distinctions across classes) to be on identification with being a marijuana user and use of protective behavioral strategies (PBS), such that the heavier user classes showed higher identification with marijuana users and lower use of PBS. Our findings demonstrate that college student marijuana users are a heterogeneous group with different profiles of risk/protective factors and that those who use marijuana a few times per month are different from those who are near-daily or daily users. Our findings also serve as a call to action for the field to consider examining identification with being a marijuana user and the use of PBS in future marijuana studies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Characterization of the Culturable Subpopulations of Lactobacillus in the Chicken Intestinal Tract as a Resource for Probiotic Development

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    Bishnu Adhikari

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available To gain better understanding of the distributions of the culturable Lactobacillus species in the chicken intestinal tract, we collected ceca, and distal ileum from 10 3-weeks-old broiler chickens. Lactobacillus strains from cecal lumen contents (M-CL, and those associated with mucosa of ceca (M-CM and ileum (M-IM were recovered on de Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS agar plates, and used for microbiota analysis. The total cecal content (T-CL was also used directly for microbiota analysis. We purposefully focused on MRS-recovered populations to gain understanding of the culturable subpopulations of Lactobacillus, since the culturability is an important phenotype in order to exploit the chicken gut microbiota as a resource for development of probiotics. The V1–V3 regions of 16S rRNA gene was amplified from genomic DNA samples, and the pooled amplicons were analyzed by MiSeq sequencing with paired-end read 300 cycle option. Among MRS groups, Firmicutes were significantly higher in M-IM and M-CL as compared to M-CM, whereas Proteobacteria were significantly higher in M-CM as compared to M-IM and M-CL at p < 0.05. Among Lactobacillus, L. salivarius (36% and L. johnsonii (21% were higher in M-IM as compared to M-CL (L. salivarius, 28%; L. johnsonii, 15%, and M-CM (L. salivarius, 20%; L. johnsonii, 11%. L. crispatus was found significantly higher in M-CL as compared to M-IM (p < 0.01 whereas L. gasseri was found significantly higher in M-IM as compared to M-CM (p < 0.05. L. aviarius, and L. fornicalis were only observed in T-CL. In summary, Lactobacillus populations recovered on MRS vary with different regions and locations in chicken GIT, which might indicate their distinct functional roles in different gastrointestinal tract (GIT niches, and some species of Lactobacillus are not culturable on MRS agar media. This study is the first attempt to define culturable Lactobacillus subpopulations in the chicken intestinal tract comprehensively using 16S r

  4. Over-expression of a tobacco nitrate reductase gene in wheat (Triticum aestivum L. increases seed protein content and weight without augmenting nitrogen supplying.

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    Xiao-Qiang Zhao

    Full Text Available Heavy nitrogen (N application to gain higher yield of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. resulted in increased production cost and environment pollution. How to diminish the N supply without losing yield and/or quality remains a challenge. To meet the challenge, we integrated and expressed a tobacco nitrate reductase gene (NR in transgenic wheat. The 35S-NR gene was transferred into two winter cultivars, "Nongda146" and "Jimai6358", by Agrobacterium-mediation. Over-expression of the transgene remarkably enhanced T1 foliar NR activity and significantly augmented T2 seed protein content and 1000-grain weight in 63.8% and 68.1% of T1 offspring (total 67 individuals analyzed, respectively. Our results suggest that constitutive expression of foreign nitrate reductase gene(s in wheat might improve nitrogen use efficiency and thus make it possible to increase seed protein content and weight without augmenting N supplying.

  5. Selective regain of egfr gene copies in CD44+/CD24-/low breast cancer cellular model MDA-MB-468

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    Andreas Antje

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased transcription of oncogenes like the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is frequently caused by amplification of the whole gene or at least of regulatory sequences. Aim of this study was to pinpoint mechanistic parameters occurring during egfr copy number gains leading to a stable EGFR overexpression and high sensitivity to extracellular signalling. A deeper understanding of those marker events might improve early diagnosis of cancer in suspect lesions, early detection of cancer progression and the prediction of egfr targeted therapies. Methods The basal-like/stemness type breast cancer cell line subpopulation MDA-MB-468 CD44high/CD24-/low, carrying high egfr amplifications, was chosen as a model system in this study. Subclones of the heterogeneous cell line expressing low and high EGF receptor densities were isolated by cell sorting. Genomic profiling was carried out for these by means of SNP array profiling, qPCR and FISH. Cell cycle analysis was performed using the BrdU quenching technique. Results Low and high EGFR expressing MDA-MB-468 CD44+/CD24-/low subpopulations separated by cell sorting showed intermediate and high copy numbers of egfr, respectively. However, during cell culture an increase solely for egfr gene copy numbers in the intermediate subpopulation occurred. This shift was based on the formation of new cells which regained egfr gene copies. By two parametric cell cycle analysis clonal effects mediated through growth advantage of cells bearing higher egfr gene copy numbers could most likely be excluded for being the driving force. Subsequently, the detection of a fragile site distal to the egfr gene, sustaining uncapped telomere-less chromosomal ends, the ladder-like structure of the intrachromosomal egfr amplification and a broader range of egfr copy numbers support the assumption that dynamic chromosomal rearrangements, like breakage-fusion-bridge-cycles other than proliferation drive the gain

  6. The genetic position of the autochthonous subpopulation of Northern Navarre (Spain) in relation to other basque subpopulations. A study based on GM and KM immunoglobulin allotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, R; Perez-Miranda, A; Peña, J A; Vidales, C; Aresti, U; Dugoujon, J M

    2000-08-01

    GM and KM immunoglobulin (Ig) allotypes were tested in 118 autochthonous Basques from northern Navarre. The results are compared to those obtained for the same genetic markers in 6 other Basque subpopulations, 3 from Spain (Guipúzcoa, Vizcaya, and Alava) and 3 from France: Macaye, Saint-Jean Pied de Port, and Mauleon. The northern Navarrese appear genetically closer to the Alava and Saint-Jean Pied de Port subpopulations. The Basques present 3 GM haplotypes that are uncommon in Caucasian populations, suggesting that they have not been completely isolated either from Asian or African populations. The GM*1,17 23' 10,11,13,15,16 north Asian haplotype was probably the first to be introduced into the Basque area. The GM*1,17 23' 5* haplotype, considered an African genetic marker although also detected in Central Asia, would have reached the Iberian Peninsula through consecutive historic migrations from North Africa. The rare haplotype GM*1,17 23 21,28 results probably from a genetic recombination or crossing-over between the 2 common haplotypes GM*1, 17 23' 21,28 and GM*3 23 5*. It is also found with a low frequency in other neighboring regions and countries; but the possibility of its having been introduced through the main passage connecting western France and Spain during the Roman Empire and Middle Ages cannot be ruled out.

  7. Retrieving composition and sizes of oceanic particle subpopulations from the volume scattering function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Twardowski, Michael; Lewis, Marlon

    2011-03-20

    For a particle population with known size, composition, structure, and shape distributions, its volume scattering function (VSF) can be estimated from first principles through a governing relationship, the Fredholm linear integral equation of the first kind. Inverting the Fredholm equation to derive the composition and size distribution of particles from measured VSFs remains challenging because 1) the solution depends on the kernel function, and 2) the kernel function needs to be constructed to avoid singularity. In this study, a thorough review of the earlier and current inversion techniques is provided. An inversion method based on nonnegative least squares is presented and evaluated using the VSFs measured by a prototype volume scattering meter at the LEO-15 site off the New Jersey coast. The kernel function was built by a compilation of individual subpopulations, each of which follows a lognormal size distribution and whose characteristic size and refractive index altogether cover the entire ranges of natural variability of potential marine particles of the region. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to ensure the kernel function being constructed is neither singular nor pathological. A total of 126 potential subpopulations were identified, among which 11 are common in more than half of the inversions and only five consistently present (>90% of measurements). These five subpopulations can be interpreted as small colloidal type particles of sizes around 0.02 μm, submicrometer detritus-type particles (n(r)=1.02, r(mode)=0.2 μm), two micrometer-sized subpopulations with one relatively soft (n(r)=1.04 and r(mode)=1.6 μm) and the other relatively refringent (n(r)=1.10 and r(mode)=3.2 μm), and bubbles of relatively large sizes (n(r)=0.75 and r(mode)=10 μm). Reconstructed PSDs feature a bimodal shape, with the smaller peak dominated by the colloidal subpopulations and the larger particles closely approximated by a power-law function. The Junge

  8. A genetic polymorphism of the osteoprotegerin gene is associated with an increased risk of advanced prostate cancer

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    Horikawa Yohei

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of osteoprotegerin gene (OPG polymorphisms as genetic modifiers in the etiology of prostate cancer (PCa and disease progression. Methods Three hundred and sixty one patients with PCa and 195 normal controls were enrolled in the study, and two genetic polymorphisms, 149 T/C and 950 T/C in the putative promoter region of OPG, were genotyped. Results There was no significant difference in the genotype frequencies between PCa patients and controls (P = 0.939 and 0.294 for 149 T/C and 950 T/C polymorphisms, respectively. However, those patients with TC and TT genotypes in the 950 T/C polymorphism had a significantly increased risk of extraprostatic (age-adjusted odds ratio; aOR = 1.74 and 2.03 for TC and TT genotypes compared with the CC genotype, P = 0.028 and metastatic disease (aOR = 1.72 and 2.76 for TC and TT genotypes compared with the CC genotype, P = 0.009 compared with those with the CC genotype. In addition, analysis of the metastatic PCa patients (Stage D showed that the presence of the T allele of the OPG 950 T/C polymorphism was an independent risk factor predicting survival by Cox proportional hazard regression analyses (P = 0.031. Conclusion Progression of PCa may be influenced by an intrinsic genetic factor of the host's bone metabolism. The variant C allele of 950 T/C in the OPG promoter may play a major role as a genetic safe guard against progression in patients with PCa.

  9. Reduced expression of the SHORT-ROOT gene increases the rates of growth and development in hybrid poplar and Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiehua; Andersson-Gunnerås, Sara; Gaboreanu, Ioana; Hertzberg, Magnus; Tucker, Matthew R; Zheng, Bo; Leśniewska, Joanna; Mellerowicz, Ewa J; Laux, Thomas; Sandberg, Göran; Jones, Brian

    2011-01-01

    SHORT-ROOT (SHR) is a well characterized regulator of cell division and cell fate determination in the Arabidopsis primary root. However, much less is known about the functions of SHR in the aerial parts of the plant. In this work, we cloned SHR gene from Populus trichocarpa (PtSHR1) as an AtSHR ortholog and down-regulated its expression in hybrid poplar (Populus tremula×P. tremuloides Michx-clone T89) in order to determine its physiological functions in shoot development. Sharing a 90% similarity to AtSHR at amino acid level, PtSHR1 was able to complement the Arabidopsis shr mutant. Down regulation of PtSHR1 led to a strong enhancement of primary (height) and secondary (girth) growth rates in the transgenic poplars. A similar approach in Arabidopsis showed a comparable accelerated growth and development phenotype. Our results suggest that the response to SHR could be dose-dependent and that a partial down-regulation of SHR could lead to enhanced meristem activity and a coordinated acceleration of plant growth in woody species. Therefore, SHR functions in plant growth and development as a regulator of cell division and meristem activity not only in the roots but also in the shoots. Reducing SHR expression in transgenic poplar was shown to lead to significant increases in primary and secondary growth rates. Given the current interest in bioenergy crops, SHR has a broader role as a key regulator of whole plant growth and development and SHR suppression has considerable potential for accelerating biomass accumulation in a variety of species.

  10. Reduced expression of the SHORT-ROOT gene increases the rates of growth and development in hybrid poplar and Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiehua Wang

    Full Text Available SHORT-ROOT (SHR is a well characterized regulator of cell division and cell fate determination in the Arabidopsis primary root. However, much less is known about the functions of SHR in the aerial parts of the plant. In this work, we cloned SHR gene from Populus trichocarpa (PtSHR1 as an AtSHR ortholog and down-regulated its expression in hybrid poplar (Populus tremula×P. tremuloides Michx-clone T89 in order to determine its physiological functions in shoot development. Sharing a 90% similarity to AtSHR at amino acid level, PtSHR1 was able to complement the Arabidopsis shr mutant. Down regulation of PtSHR1 led to a strong enhancement of primary (height and secondary (girth growth rates in the transgenic poplars. A similar approach in Arabidopsis showed a comparable accelerated growth and development phenotype. Our results suggest that the response to SHR could be dose-dependent and that a partial down-regulation of SHR could lead to enhanced meristem activity and a coordinated acceleration of plant growth in woody species. Therefore, SHR functions in plant growth and development as a regulator of cell division and meristem activity not only in the roots but also in the shoots. Reducing SHR expression in transgenic poplar was shown to lead to significant increases in primary and secondary growth rates. Given the current interest in bioenergy crops, SHR has a broader role as a key regulator of whole plant growth and development and SHR suppression has considerable potential for accelerating biomass accumulation in a variety of species.

  11. A promoter variant of the APOA5 gene increases atherogenic LDL levels and arterial stiffness in hypertriglyceridemic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjoo Kim

    Full Text Available Hypertriglyceridemia is recognized as an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease. The apolipoprotein A5 gene (APOA5 is a key regulator of triglyceride levels. We aimed to evaluate the associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in APOA5, including -1131T>C and c.553G>T, with hypertriglyceridemia, apoA5 concentrations, atherogenic LDL cholesterol levels, and arterial stiffness in hypertriglyceridemic patients. The study population included 599 hypertriglyceridemic patients (case and 1,549 untreated normotriglyceridemic subjects (control. We genotyped two APOA5 variants, -1131T>C (rs662799 and c.553G>T (rs2075291. The frequencies of the CC genotype of -1131T>C (0.165 and the T allele of c.553G>T (0.119 were significantly higher in hypertriglyceridemic patients than in normotriglyceridemic subjects (0.061 and 0.070, respectively; all pC and c.553G>T variants were associated with higher triglyceride and lower HDL cholesterol levels. Controls with the -1131CC variant had lower apoA5 concentrations than controls with the -1131TT variant. Similar effects of the -1131T>C variant on apoA5 were observed in the cases. In the hypertriglyceridemic group, the -1131T>C variant was associated with a smaller LDL particle size, higher levels of oxidized LDL and malondialdehyde, and higher brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity. The -1131T>C and c.553G>T polymorphisms were associated with hypertriglyceridemia in the study population, but only the -1131T>C polymorphism directly affected apoA5 concentrations. Hypertriglyceridemic patients carrying the APOA5 -1131T>C polymorphism exhibited increased atherogenic LDL levels and arterial stiffness, probably due to an effect of the -1131T>C polymorphism on apoA5 concentrations.

  12. Maternal obesity programs increased leptin gene expression in rat male offspring via epigenetic modifications in a depot-specific manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Lecoutre

    2017-08-01

    Conclusions: Consistent with the DOHaD hypothesis, persistent epigenetic remodeling occurs at regulatory regions especially within intergenic sequences, linked to higher leptin gene expression in adult HF offspring in a depot-specific manner.

  13. Genes encoding novel lipid transporters and their use to increase oil production in vegetative tissues of plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Changcheng; Fan, Jilian; Yan, Chengshi; Shanklin, John

    2017-12-26

    The present invention discloses a novel gene encoding a transporter protein trigalactosyldiacylglycerol-5 (TGD5), mutations thereof and their use to enhance TAG production and retention in plant vegetative tissue.

  14. Curd development associated gene (CDAG1) in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis) could result in enlarged organ size and increased biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Qingli; Qin, Erjun; Jin, Chuan; Wang, Yu; Wu, Mei; Shen, Guangshuang; Chen, Chengbin; Song, Wenqin; Wang, Chunguo

    2017-01-01

    The curd is a specialized organ and the most important product organ of cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis). However, the mechanism underlying the regulation of curd formation and development remains largely unknown. In the present study, a novel homologous gene containing the Organ Size Related (OSR) domain, namely, CDAG1 (Curd Development Associated Gene 1) was identified in cauliflower. Quantitative analysis indicated that CDAG1 showed significantly higher transcript levels in young tissues. Functional analysis demonstrated that the ectopic overexpression of CDAG1 in Arabidopsis and cauliflower could significantly promote organ growth and result in larger organ size and increased biomass. Organ enlargement was predominantly due to increased cell number. In addition, 228 genes involved in the CDAG1-mediated regulatory network were discovered by transcriptome analysis. Among these genes, CDAG1 was confirmed to inhibit the transcriptional expression of the endogenous OSR genes, ARGOS and ARL, while a series of ethylene-responsive transcription factors (ERFs) were found to increased expression in 35S:CDAG1 transgenic Arabidopsis plants. This implies that CDAG1 may function in the ethylene-mediated signal pathway. These findings provide new insight into the function of OSR genes, and suggest potential applications of CDAG1 in breeding high-yielding crops. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Overexpression of the PP2A-C5 gene confers increased salt tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rongbin; Zhu, Yinfeng; Shen, Guoxin; Zhang, Hong

    2017-02-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) was shown to play important roles in biotic and abiotic stress signaling pathways in plants. PP2A is made of 3 subunits: a scaffolding subunit A, a regulatory subunit B, and a catalytic subunit C. It is believed that the B subunit recognizes specific substrates and the C subunit directly acts on the selected substrates, whereas the A subunit brings a B subunit and a C subunit together to form a specific PP2A holoenzyme. Because there are multiple isoforms for each PP2A subunit, there could be hundreds of novel PP2A holoenzymes in plants. For an example, there are 3 A subunits, 17 B subunits, and 5 C subunits in Arabidopsis, which could form 255 different PP2A holoenzymes. Understanding the roles of these PP2A holoenzymes in various signaling pathways is a challenging task. In a recent study, 1 we discovered that PP2A-C5, the catalytic subunit 5 of PP2A, plays an important role in salt tolerance in Arabidopsis. We found that a knockout mutant of PP2A-C5 (i.e. pp2a-c5-1) was very sensitive to salt treatments, whereas PP2A-C5-overexpressing plants were more tolerant to salt stresses. Genetic analyses between pp2a-c5-1 and Salt-Overly-Sensitive (SOS) mutants indicated that PP2A-C5 does not function in the same pathway as SOS genes. Using yeast 2-hybrid analysis, we found that PP2A-C5 interacts with several vacuolar membrane bound chloride channel proteins. We hypothesize that these vacuolar chloride channel proteins might be PP2A-C5's substrates in vivo, and the action of PP2A-C5 on these channel proteins could increase or activate their activities, thereby result in accumulation of the chloride and sodium contents in vacuoles, leading to increased salt tolerance in plants.

  16. Variants within MECP2, a key transcription regulator, are associated with increased susceptibility to lupus and differential gene expression in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Ryan; Wren, Jonathan D; Jeffries, Matlock; Kelly, Jennifer A; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Tang, Yuhong; Frank, Mark Barton; Merrill, Joan; Kimberly, Robert P; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Petri, Michelle; Reveille, John D; Alarcón, Graciela S; Vilá, Luis M; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; James, Judith A; Vyse, Timothy J; Moser, Kathy L; Gaffney, Patrick M; Gilkeson, Gary S; Harley, John B; Sawalha, Amr H

    2009-04-01

    Both genetic and epigenetic factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of lupus. The aim of this study was to examine methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 gene (MECP2) polymorphisms in a large cohort of patients with lupus and control subjects, and to determine the functional consequences of the lupus-associated MECP2 haplotype. We genotyped 18 single-nucleotide polymorphisms within MECP2, located on chromosome Xq28, in a large cohort of patients with lupus and control subjects of European descent. We studied the functional effects of the lupus-associated MECP2 haplotype by determining gene expression profiles in B cell lines in female lupus patients with and those without the lupus-associated MECP2 risk haplotype. We confirmed, replicated, and extended the genetic association between lupus and genetic markers within MECP2 in a large independent cohort of lupus patients and control subjects of European descent (odds ratio 1.35, P = 6.65 x 10(-11)). MECP2 is a dichotomous transcription regulator that either activates or represses gene expression. We identified 128 genes that are differentially expressed in lupus patients with the disease-associated MECP2 haplotype; most ( approximately 81%) were up-regulated. Genes that were up-regulated had significantly more CpG islands in their promoter regions compared with genes that were down-regulated. Gene ontology analysis using the differentially expressed genes revealed significant association with epigenetic regulatory mechanisms, suggesting that these genes are targets for MECP2 regulation in B cells. Furthermore, at least 13 of the 104 up-regulated genes are regulated by interferon. The disease-risk MECP2 haplotype was associated with increased expression of the MECP2 transcription coactivator CREB1 and decreased expression of the corepressor histone deacetylase 1. Polymorphism in the MECP2 locus is associated with lupus and, at least in part, contributes to the interferon signature observed in lupus patients.