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Sample records for subpolar north pacific

  1. Subpolar North Atlantic glider observations for OSNAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, C.; Hodges, B.; Bower, A. S.; Yang, J.; Lin, X.

    2016-02-01

    OSNAP is an international program designed to provide a continuous record of the full-water-column, trans-basin fluxes of heat, mass, and freshwater in the subpolar North Atlantic. The observational efforts of this program are focused largely along lines connecting Labrador to Greenland, and Greenland to Scotland. The OSNAP experimental plan includes continuous sampling by Slocum G2 gliders along the latter (easternmost) of these two sections, specifically across the northeastward-flowing North Atlantic Current in the Iceland Basin. The glider observations, a collaboration between the Ocean University of China and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, provide higher spatial resolution of water properties than is possible from moorings alone. These observations commenced in June 2015 with a mission to fly back and forth along a section between two OSNAP moorings, profiling from the surface to 1000-m depth. As of September 2015, five sections (including over 240 profiles) have been recorded. As expected, the data indicates energetic intraseasonal variability at smaller scales than can be captured by the OSNAP mooring array. We are investigating how this variability may impact calculated fluxes of heat, mass, and freshwater. The glider repeatedly crossed a cyclonic eddy between the two moorings, enabling study of fine thermohaline structure during the development and dissipation of mesoscale eddies in the subpolar North Atlantic. With additional sensors measuring fluorescence, dissolved oxygen, nitrate, and multispectral light, the dataset also has the potential to significantly advance our understanding of the biogeochemical processes of mesoscale and submesoscale eddies in the subpolar North Atlantic.

  2. Unexpected winter phytoplankton blooms in the North Atlantic subpolar gyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacour, L.; Ardyna, M.; Stec, K. F.; Claustre, H.; Prieur, L.; Poteau, A.; D'Alcala, M. Ribera; Iudicone, D.

    2017-11-01

    In mid- and high-latitude oceans, winter surface cooling and strong winds drive turbulent mixing that carries phytoplankton to depths of several hundred metres, well below the sunlit layer. This downward mixing, in combination with low solar radiation, drastically limits phytoplankton growth during the winter, especially that of the diatoms and other species that are involved in seeding the spring bloom. Here we present observational evidence for widespread winter phytoplankton blooms in a large part of the North Atlantic subpolar gyre from autonomous profiling floats equipped with biogeochemical sensors. These blooms were triggered by intermittent restratification of the mixed layer when mixed-layer eddies led to a horizontal transport of lighter water over denser layers. Combining a bio-optical index with complementary chemotaxonomic and modelling approaches, we show that these restratification events increase phytoplankton residence time in the sunlight zone, resulting in greater light interception and the emergence of winter blooms. Restratification also caused a phytoplankton community shift from pico- and nanophytoplankton to phototrophic diatoms. We conclude that transient winter blooms can maintain active diatom populations throughout the winter months, directly seeding the spring bloom and potentially making a significant contribution to over-winter carbon export.

  3. The Dynamics of the North Atlantic Subpolar Gyre Introduces Predictability to the Breeding Success of Kittiwakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hjálmar Hátún

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the open-ocean subpolar Atlantic is amongst the most predictable regions in the world, our results hold promise for predicting the general production to seabird populations over a large geographical region adjacent to the northern North Atlantic and the Arctic Mediterranean. Colonies of black-legged kittiwakes Rissa tridactyla in the North Atlantic have declined markedly since the mid-1990s, partly due to repeatedly failing breeding seasons. We show a close link between the breeding success of a kittiwake colony in the Faroe Islands and the subpolar gyre index. Successful breeding follows winters with an expanded subpolar gyre and, by inference, increased zooplankton abundances southwest of Iceland. The environmental conditions in the northwestern Atlantic during the non-breeding and pre-breeding seasons might therefore be important. Furthermore, the subpolar gyre dynamics might influence the local food abundance on the Faroe shelf during the breeding season.

  4. EEG CHARACTERISTICS AND THYROID PROFILE RATIO IN ADOLESCENTS OF SUBPOLAR AND POLAR EUROPEAN NORTH AREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Demin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Features of brain bioelectric activity and thyroid system in adolescents living in Subpolar andPolar regionsof the North are considered. Hyperactivity of subcortical diencephalic brain structures in adolescents of the Polar region is revealed. Adolescents of Subpolar region have more intensive age optimization of neurodynamic processes. There are noted latitude distinctions of thyroid hormones role for age formation of brain bioelectric activity in adolescents.

  5. Response of the North Atlantic subpolar gyre to persistent North Atlantic oscillation like forcing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmann, Katja; Bentsen, Mats [Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center, Bergen (Norway); Bjerknes Center for Climate Research, Bergen (Norway); Drange, Helge [Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center, Bergen (Norway); Bjerknes Center for Climate Research, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Geophysical Institute, Bergen (Norway); Nansen-Zhu International Research Center, Beijing (China)

    2009-02-15

    The response of the North Atlantic subpolar gyre (SPG) to a persistent positive (or negative) phase of the North Atlantic oscillation (NAO) is investigated using an ocean general circulation model forced with idealized atmospheric reanalysis fields. The integrations are analyzed with reference to a base-line integration for which the model is forced with idealized fields representing a neutral state of the NAO. In the positive NAO case, the results suggest that the well-known cooling and strengthening of the SPG are, after about 10 years, replaced by a warming and subsequent weakening of the SPG. The latter changes are caused by the advection of warm water from the subtropical gyre (STG) region, driven by a spin-up of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) and the effect of an anomalous wind stress curl in the northeastern North Atlantic, which counteracts the local buoyancy forcing of the SPG. In the negative NAO case, however, the SPG response does not involve a sign reversal, but rather shows a gradual weakening throughout the integration. The asymmetric SPG-response to the sign of persistent NAO-like forcing and the different time scales involved demonstrate strong non-linearity in the North Atlantic Ocean circulation response to atmospheric forcing. The latter finding indicates that analysis based on the arithmetic difference between the two NAO-states, e.g. NAO+ minus NAO-, may hide important aspects of the ocean response to atmospheric forcing. (orig.)

  6. Unusual subpolar North Atlantic phytoplankton bloom in 2010: Volcanic fertilization or North Atlantic Oscillation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Stephanie A.; Painter, Stuart C.; Penny Holliday, N.; Stinchcombe, Mark C.; Giering, Sarah L. C.

    2013-10-01

    In summer and autumn 2010, a highly anomalous phytoplankton bloom, with chlorophyll concentration more than double that of previous years, was observed in the Irminger Basin, southwest of Iceland. Two unusual events occurred during 2010 which had the potential to promote the unusual bloom. First, in spring 2010, the Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland erupted, depositing large quantities of tephra into the subpolar North Atlantic. Second, during the winter of 2009/2010 the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) became extremely negative, developing into the second strongest negative NAO on record. Hydrographic conditions were highly anomalous in the region, with an influx of freshwater spreading through the basin, and unusual nutrient and mixed layer depth conditions. Here we use a combination of satellite, modeled and in situ data to investigate whether the input of iron from the volcanic eruption or change in hydrographic conditions due to the extreme negative NAO were responsible for the anomalous phytoplankton bloom. We conclude that changes in physical forcing driven by the NAO, and not the volcanic eruption, stimulated the unusual bloom.

  7. Evolution of subpolar North Atlantic surface circulation since the early Holocene inferred from planktic foraminifera faunal and stable isotope records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staines-Urías, Francisca; Kuijpers, Antoon; Korte, Christoph

    2013-09-01

    Past changes in the surface flow regime of two main eastern North Atlantic warm water pathways toward the Nordic seas were reconstructed based on faunal analyses in combination with carbon and oxygen stable isotope measurements in planktic foraminifera. The investigated sites, in the surroundings of the Faroe Islands, are located in the transitional area where surface waters of subpolar and subtropical origin mix before entering the Arctic Mediterranean. In these areas, large-amplitude millennial variability in the characteristics of the upper-water column appears modulated by changes in the intensity of the Subpolar Gyre circulation. From 7.8 to 6 ka BP, faunal records indicate a deep mixed-layer which, in conjunction with lighter δ18O values, suggest that the inflowing Atlantic waters were dominated by a relatively cooler and fresher water mass, reflecting a strengthening of the Subpolar Gyre under conditions of enhanced positive NAO-like forcing and reduced meltwater input. A shift in the hydrographic conditions occurred during the Mid-Holocene (centered at 5 ka BP). At this time, increasing upper water column stratification and the incipient differentiation of the stable isotopic signal of the Iceland-Faroe and Faroe-Shetland surface water masses, suggest increasing influx of warmer, more saline surface waters from the Subtropical Gyre, as Subpolar Gyre circulation weakened. The mid-Holocene decline in Subpolar Gyre strength is presumably related to a shift toward a low state of the NAO-like forcing associated with decreased solar irradiance. Later in the Holocene, from 4 ka BP to present, the increased frequency and reduced amplitude of the surface hydrographic changes reflect corresponding fluctuations in Subpolar Gyre circulation. These high frequency oscillations in Subpolar Gyre strength suggest increased surface circulation sensitivity to moderate freshwater fluxes to the Labrador-Irminger Sea basin, highlighting the importance of the salinity balance in

  8. Seasonal and Interannual Variability of Calcite in the Sub-Polar North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorini, S. R.; McClain, C. R.

    2008-12-01

    Coccolithophores, among which Emiliania huxleyi (E. huxleyi) is the most abundant and widespread species, are considered to be the most productive calcifying organisms on Earth. They inhabit the surface layer (MLD ~20m) in highly stratified waters where light intensity is high. E. huxleyi often forms massive blooms in temperate and sub-polar oceans. Coupling of the coccolithophore organic carbon and carbonate pumps interact to consume (photosynthesis) and produce (calcification) CO2. The so-called Rain Ratio, defined as the ratio of particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) to particulate organic carbon (POC) in exported biogenic matter, determines the relative strength of the two biological carbon pumps and influences the flux of CO2 across the surface ocean - atmosphere interface. Here we use a combination of satellite ocean color algorithms and numerical model products to describe the seasonal and interannual variability of PIC in the sub-polar North Atlantic. Phytoplankton and calcite production have strong spatial variability. Nutrient supply, biomass and calcite concentrations are modulated by light and MLD seasonal cycle. The size, intensity, and location of coccolithophore blooms vary from year to year, but the peak bloom is always in June in the Central Basin (45°W - 10°W, 50°N - 65°N) and August in the Barents Sea. Calcification rates range from 5% to 27% of net primary production. The Barents Sea PIC production is about twice that of the Central Basin. Predicted freshening and warming of polar seas may increase stratification, thus favoring an increase in coccolithophore bloom development. However, although significant interannual changes were identified, there were no obvious trends in the satellite-derived PIC concentrations over the past 10 years.

  9. Time dependency of the prediction skill for the North Atlantic subpolar gyre in initialized decadal hindcasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, Sebastian; Düsterhus, André; Pohlmann, Holger; Müller, Wolfgang A.; Baehr, Johanna

    2017-11-01

    We analyze the time dependency of decadal hindcast skill in the North Atlantic subpolar gyre within the time period 1961-2013. We compare anomaly correlation coefficients and temporal interquartile ranges of total upper ocean heat content and sea surface temperature for three differently initialized sets of hindcast simulations with the global coupled model MPI-ESM. All initializations use weakly coupled assimilation with the same full value nudging in the atmospheric component and different assimilation techniques for oceanic temperature and salinity: (1) ensemble Kalman filter assimilating EN4 observations and HadISST data, (2) nudging of anomalies to ORAS4 reanalysis, (3) nudging of full values to ORAS4 reanalysis. We find that hindcast skill depends strongly on the evaluation time period, with higher hindcast skill during strong multiyear trends, especially during the warming in the 1990s and lower hindcast skill in the absence of such trends. Differences between the prediction systems are more pronounced when investigating any 20-year subperiod within the entire hindcast period. In the ensemble Kalman filter initialized hindcasts, we find significant correlation skill for up to 5-8 lead years, albeit along with an overestimation of the temporal interquartile range. In the hindcasts initialized by anomaly nudging, significant correlation skill for lead years greater than two is only found in the 1980s and 1990s. In the hindcasts initialized by full value nudging, correlation skill is consistently lower than in the hindcasts initialized by anomaly nudging in the first lead years with re-emerging skill thereafter. The Atlantic meridional overturning circulation reacts on the density changes introduced by oceanic nudging, this limits the predictability in the subpolar gyre in the first lead years. Overall, we find that a model-consistent assimilation technique can improve hindcast skill. Further, the evaluation of 20 year subperiods within the full hindcast period

  10. Subpolar Atlantic cooling and North American east coast warming linked to AMOC slowdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmstorf, Stefan; Caesar, Levke; Feulner, Georg; Saba, Vincent

    2017-04-01

    Reconstructing the history of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is difficult due to the limited availability of data. One approach has been to use instrumental and proxy data for sea surface temperature (SST), taking multi-decadal and longer SST variations in the subpolar gyre region as indicator for AMOC changes [Rahmstorf et al., 2015]. Recent high-resolution global climate model results [Saba et al., 2016] as well as dynamical theory and conceptual modelling [Zhang and Vallis, 2007] suggest that an AMOC weakening will not only cool the subpolar Atlantic but simultaneously warm the Northwest Atlantic between Cape Hatteras and Nova Scotia, thus providing a characteristic SST pattern associated with AMOC variations. We analyse sea surface temperature (SST) observations from this region together with high-resolution climate model simulations to better understand the linkages of SST variations to AMOC variability and to provide further evidence for an ongoing AMOC slowdown. References Rahmstorf, S., J. E. Box, G. Feulner, M. E. Mann, A. Robinson, S. Rutherford, and E. J. Schaffernicht (2015), Exceptional twentieth-century slowdown in Atlantic Ocean overturning circulation, Nature Climate Change, 5(5), 475-480, doi: 10.1038/nclimate2554. Saba, V. S., et al. (2016), Enhanced warming of the Northwest Atlantic Ocean under climate change, Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans, 121(1), 118-132, doi: 10.1002/2015JC011346. Zhang, R., and G. K. Vallis (2007), The Role of Bottom Vortex Stretching on the Path of the North Atlantic Western Boundary Current and on the Northern Recirculation Gyre, Journal of Physical Oceanography, 37(8), 2053-2080, doi: 10.1175/jpo3102.1.

  11. Phytoplankton bloom and subpolar gyre induced dynamics in the North Atlantic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Ana Sofia; Hátún, Hjálmar; Counillion, Francois

    blooms are expected in years of a strong subpolar gyre, i.e. strong atmospheric forcing, and cold and low saline conditions. We apply novel phenology algorithms to satellite ocean colour data, and analyse the outcome together with the subpolar gyre index. We find that the relationship between the bloom...

  12. The impact of warm summers on winter convection in the subpolar North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltmanns, Marilena; Karstensen, Johannes; Fischer, Jürgen

    2017-04-01

    The subpolar North Atlantic (SPNA) is one of the few locations where deep ocean convection occurs and an integral part of the climate system. Some studies have indicated that ocean convection in the SPNA is threatened by enhanced melt water input from Greenland into the Irminger and Labrador Seas. Others have suggested that increased sea surface temperatures in the North Atlantic will lead to a negative North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) setting several months later. As a negative NAO is associated with decreased ocean heat losses and a larger throughput of warm saline water from the subtropics into the SPNA, both mechanisms — the surface freshening and the warming in a warm summer — could combine to impede ocean convection in the following winter. However, the link between the summer forcing and winter convection has not yet been investigated. Here we present the analysis of a variety of oceanic and atmospheric data sets, including more than a decade long records of moored observations in the Irminger and Labrador Seas, Argo float profiles, remote sensing data and an atmospheric reanalysis, that have been used to investigate the atmospheric and upper ocean variability from summer through winter. We show that particularly warm summers are associated with distinct fresh surface patches in the SPNA that intensify in fall through increased precipitation and persist long into winter while heat losses are reduced. At the same time, the subsurface water is warmer and more saline than after cold summers. Based on the summer forcing, we identify a significant predictive skill of the atmospheric circulation and ocean stratification in winter and illustrate the consequences with regard to the warming, melting and heat flux trends over the last 25 years.

  13. Direct observations of formation and propagation of subpolar eddies into the subtropical North Atlantic

    CERN Document Server

    Bower, A S; Amrhein, D E; Lilly, J M

    2011-01-01

    Subsurface float and moored observations are presented to show for the first time the formation and propagation of anticyclonic submesoscale coherent vortices that transport relatively cold, fresh subpolar water to the interior subtropical North Atlantic. Acoustically tracked RAFOS floats released in the southward-flowing Western Boundary Current at the exit of the Labrador Sea reveal the formation of three of these eddies at the southern tip of the Grand Banks (42 N, 50 W). Using a recently developed method to detect eddies in float trajectories and estimate their kinematic properties, it was found that the eddies had average rotation periods of 5--7 days at radii of 1025 km, with mean rotation speeds of up to 0.3 m/s. One especially long-lived (5.1 months) eddy crossed under the Gulf Stream path and translated southwestward in the subtropical recirculation to at least 35 N, where it hit one of the Corner Rise Seamounts. Velocity, temperature and salinity measurements from a nine-month deployment of two moor...

  14. Assessing variability in the size and strength of the North Atlantic subpolar gyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foukal, Nicholas P.; Lozier, M. Susan

    2017-08-01

    Recent studies on the size and strength of the North Atlantic subpolar gyre (SPG) offer contrasting assessments of the gyre's temporal variability: studies that use empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analyses of satellite sea-surface height (SSH) report a rapid decline in SPG size and strength since 1992 (˜20% per decade), while concurrent in situ observations report either no trend or a slight decline. Here we investigate this discrepancy by analyzing the size and strength of the SPG with satellite SSH from 1993 to 2015 with two separate methods: indirectly via EOF analysis and more directly through measurements of the gyre center and boundary. We define the boundary of the gyre as the largest closed contour of SSH, the center as the minimum SSH, and the strength as the difference between the SSH at the boundary and the center. We identify a linear decline over the study period in the SPG strength (5.1% per decade), but find no statistically significant trend in the SPG area. The trend in the gyre strength is weaker than the EOF-based trend and is most likely below the level of detection of the in situ measurements. We conclude that the variability previously identified as a sharp decline in SPG circulation can be more appropriately attributed to basin-wide sea level rise during the satellite altimetry period. In addition, we find that the properties of the eastern SPG do not covary with the SPG size, suggesting that SPG dynamics do not control the strength of the intergyre throughput.Plain Language SummaryFor over a decade there has been a discrepancy in the observed variability of the size and strength of the subpolar gyre: satellite estimates based on the height of the sea-surface were interpreted as showing a rapid decline in the gyre since the early 1990s, while direct measurements from ships and moorings showed the gyre to be quite stable over the same time period. In this work, we reconcile these two measurement techniques by subtracting the long-term sea

  15. On the significance of nitrification within the euphotic zone of the subpolar North Atlantic (Iceland basin) during summer 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Stuart C.

    2011-11-01

    The oxidation of ammonium to nitrite was investigated within surface waters (< 125 m) of the sub-polar North Atlantic (~ 60°N, 20°W) during late summer 2007. Sampling occurred within a mesoscale eddy dipole system and a definite bias towards waters beneath the euphotic zone as the focus for nitrification was evident. The patchy occurrence of significant nitrification rates within the euphotic zone is interpreted as providing minimal indication for widespread nitrification within surface waters of the sub-polar gyre. However, isolated occurrences of significant nitrification rates within the euphotic zone above the cyclonic eddy were sufficient to account for observed in-situ NO 3-concentrations. It is proposed that the deeper mixed layer associated with the cyclonic eddy enhanced the likelihood of nitrification within the euphotic zone through the vertical displacement of sub-euphotic zone bacterial communities.

  16. Overflow Water Pathways in the Subpolar North Atlantic Observed with Deep Floats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Amy; Furey, Heather; Lozier, Susan

    2017-04-01

    As part of the Overturning in the Subpolar North Atlantic Program (OSNAP), a total of 135 acoustically tracked RAFOS floats have been deployed in the deep boundary currents of the Iceland, Irminger and Labrador Basins, and in the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone, to investigate the pathways of Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water (ISOW) and Denmark Strait Overflow Water (DSOW). Floats were released annually in 2014, 2015 and 2016 at depths between 1800 and 2800 m for two-year missions. The array of sound sources used for tracking was expanded from 10 to 13 moorings in 2016 when it was discovered that wintertime surface roughness was negatively impacting acoustic ranges. The floats from the first setting reveal several examples of persistent , deep coherent eddy motion, including a cyclonic eddy spinning off the tip of Eirik Ridge (southwest of Cape Farewell), a cyclonic eddy in the northeastern Labrador Basin near where anticyclonic Irminger Rings are formed, and an anticyclonic eddy under the North Atlantic Current (NAC) in the central Iceland Basin. A consistent region of boundary-interior exchange was observed near Hamilton Bank on the western boundary of the Labrador Sea. Deep cyclonic recirculation gyres are revealed in all three basins. Floats released in the southward-flowing deep boundary current over the eastern flank of the Reykjanes Ridge show that shallower layers of ISOW peel off to the west and cross the Ridge into the Irminger Basin through various gaps south of 60°N, including the Bight Fracture Zone. These floats tend to turn northward and continue along the slope in the Irminger Basin. Interestingly, floats released at the ISOW level in the CGFZ did not turn into the Irminger Basin as often depicted in deep circulation schematics, but rather drifted west-northwestward toward the Labrador Sea, or eddied around west of the CGFZ and (in some cases) turned southward. This result is consistent with some previous hydrographic and high-resolution model results

  17. Can Empirical Algorithms Successfully Estimate Aragonite Saturation State in the Subpolar North Atlantic?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Turk

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aragonite saturation state (ΩAr in the subpolar North Atlantic was derived using new regional empirical algorithms. These multiple regression algorithms were developed using the bin-averaged GLODAPv2 data of commonly observed oceanographic variables [temperature (T, salinity (S, pressure (P, oxygen (O2, nitrate (NO3-, phosphate (PO43-, silicate (Si(OH4, and pH]. Five of these variables are also frequently observed using autonomous platforms, which means they are widely available. The algorithms were validated against independent shipboard data from the OVIDE2012 cruise. It was also applied to time series observations of T, S, P, and O2 from the K1 mooring (56.5°N, 52.6°W to reconstruct for the first time the seasonal variability of ΩAr. Our study suggests: (i linear regression algorithms based on bin-averaged carbonate system data can successfully estimate ΩAr in our study domain over the 0–3,500 m depth range (R2 = 0.985, RMSE = 0.044; (ii that ΩAr also can be adequately estimated from solely non-carbonate observations (R2 = 0.969, RMSE = 0.063 and autonomous sensor variables (R2 = 0.978, RMSE = 0.053. Validation with independent OVIDE2012 data further suggests that; (iii both algorithms, non-carbonate (MEF = 0.929 and autonomous sensors (MEF = 0.995 have excellent predictive skill over the 0–3,500 depth range; (iv that in deep waters (>500 m observations of T, S, and O2 may be sufficient predictors of ΩAr (MEF = 0.913; and (iv the importance of adding pH sensors on autonomous platforms in the euphotic and remineralization zone (<500 m. Reconstructed ΩAr at Irminger Sea site, and the K1 mooring in Labrador Sea show high seasonal variability at the surface due to biological drawdown of inorganic carbon during the summer, and fairly uniform ΩAr values in the water column during winter convection. Application to time series sites shows the potential for regionally tuned algorithms, but they need to be further compared against

  18. North Pacific Pelagic Seabird Database (NPPSD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The North Pacific Pelagic Seabird Database (NPPSD) was created in 2005 to consolidate data on the oceanic distribution of marine bird species in the North Pacific....

  19. Overturning in the Subpolar North Atlantic Program : a new international ocean observing system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozier, M.S.; Bacon, S.; Bower, A.S.; Cunningham, S.A.; de Jong, M.F.; de Steur, L.; de Young, B.; Fischer, J.; Gary, S.F.; Greenan, B.J.W.; Heimbach, P.; Holliday, N.P.; Houpert, L.; Inall, M.E.; Johns, W.E.; Johnson, H.L.; Karstensen, J.; Li, F.; Lin, X.; Mackay, N.; Marshall, D.P.; Mercier, H.; Myers, P.G.; Pickart, R.S.; Pillar, H.R.; Straneo, F.; Thierry, V.; Weller, R.A.; Williams, R.G.; Wilson, C.; Yang, J.; Zhao, J.; Zika, J.D.

    2017-01-01

    A new ocean observing system has been launched in the North Atlantic in order to understand the linkage between the meridional overturning circulation and deep water formation.For decades oceanographers have understood the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) to be primarily driven by

  20. How the Subpolar gyre strength influences phytoplankton blooms dynamics in the North Atlantic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Ana Sofia; Payne, Mark; MacKenzie, Brian

    2012-01-01

    height (SSH, from the AVISO project) as a proxy of current strength. Three regions were strategically chosen to characterize positions relative to the NASPG, describing: region 1—the northern part of NASPG, including the Irminger Current (IC); region 2—the North Atlantic Current (NAC), its northwards...

  1. Large bio-geographical shifts in the north-eastern Atlantic Ocean: From the subpolar gyre, via plankton, to blue whiting and pilot whales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hátún, H.; Payne, M. R.; Beaugrand, G.; Reid, P. C.; Sandø, A. B.; Drange, H.; Hansen, B.; Jacobsen, J. A.; Bloch, D.

    2009-03-01

    Pronounced changes in fauna, extending from the English Channel in the south to the Barents Sea in the north-east and off Greenland in the north-west, have occurred in the late 1920s, the late 1960s and again in the late 1990s. We attribute these events to exchanges of subarctic and subtropical water masses in the north-eastern North Atlantic Ocean, associated with changes in the strength and extent of the subpolar gyre. These exchanges lead to variations in the influence exerted by the subarctic or Lusitanian biomes on the intermediate faunistic zone in the north-eastern Atlantic. This strong and persistent bottom-up bio-physical link is demonstrated using a numerical ocean general circulation model and data on four trophically connected levels in the food chain - phytoplankton, zooplankton, blue whiting, and pilot whales. The plankton data give a unique basin-scale depiction of these changes, and a long pilot whale record from the Faroe Islands offers an exceptional temporal perspective over three centuries. Recent advances in simulating the dynamics of the subpolar gyre suggests a potential for predicting the distribution of the main faunistic zones in the north-eastern Atlantic a few years into the future, which might facilitate a more rational management of the commercially important fisheries in this region.

  2. Studies of Labrador Sea Water formation and variability in the subpolar North Atlantic in the light of international partnership and collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieke, Dagmar; Yashayaev, Igor

    2015-03-01

    Labrador Sea Water (LSW), the lightest contribution to North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) and one of the most prominent water masses of the subpolar North Atlantic, has seen remarkable changes over the past century. LSW originates in the Labrador Sea, where it is formed through wintertime ocean convection of varying intensity, depth and spatial extent. Formation of LSW, followed by its respective injection into the mid-depth circulation system, is mandatory for ventilating and renewing water layers of the interior ocean. Indispensably important for unraveling the history of variability in formation and properties of LSW as well as for mapping its large-scale spreading and export are sustained physical and chemical observations from the deep ocean. These observations started at the beginning of the 20th century from occasional mostly national surveys and today constitute large-scale multi-national collaborative efforts including a vast arsenal of sophisticated instrumentation. In a historical context, we revisit major milestones over the past 100 years which have established and are constantly adding to shaping today's knowledge on LSW, and present first details on the latest vintage of LSW generated during the strong winter of 2013/2014. Respective Argo data reveal mixed-layer depths greater than 1700 m marking formation of a new cold and fresh anomaly that has spread since then over the subpolar North Atlantic. We further summarize the on-going observational efforts in the subpolar North Atlantic and present a compilation of hydrographic standard lines that serve to provide top-to-bottom information on NADW components.

  3. Evolution of subpolar North Atlantic surface circulation since the early Holocene inferred from planktic foraminifera faunal and stable isotope records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staines-Urias, Francisca; Kuijpers, Antoon; Korte, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    of the Faroe Islands, are located in the transitional area where surface waters of subpolar and subtropical origin mix before entering the Arctic Mediterranean. In these areas, large-amplitude millennial variability in the characteristics of the upper-water column appears modulated by changes in the intensity...

  4. Sea surface temperature and sea ice variability in the sub-polar North Atlantic from explosive volcanism of the late thirteenth century

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sicre, M.-A.; Khodri, M.; Mignot, J.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we use IP25 and alkenone biomarker proxies to document the subdecadal variations of sea ice and sea surface temperature in the subpolar North Atlantic induced by the decadally paced explosive tropical volcanic eruptions of the second half of the thirteenth century. The short-and lo...... and subsurface heat buildup due to sea ice capping. As volcanic forcing relaxes, the surface ocean rapidly warms, likely amplified by subsurface heat, and remains almost ice free for several decades.......In this study, we use IP25 and alkenone biomarker proxies to document the subdecadal variations of sea ice and sea surface temperature in the subpolar North Atlantic induced by the decadally paced explosive tropical volcanic eruptions of the second half of the thirteenth century. The short-and long......-term evolutions of both variables were investigated by cross analysis with a simulation of the IPSL-CM5A LR model. Our results show short-term ocean cooling and sea ice expansion in response to each volcanic eruption. They also highlight that the long response time of the ocean leads to cumulative surface cooling...

  5. Extreme winds in the Western North Pacific

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Søren

    2006-01-01

    A statistical model for extreme winds in the western North Pacific is developed, the region on the Planet where tropical cyclones are most common. The model is based on best track data derived mostly from satellite images of tropical cyclones. The methodsused to estimate surface wind speeds from...

  6. Environmental Controls on Mg/Ca in Neogloboquadrina incompta: A Core-Top Study From the Subpolar North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Audrey; Babila, Tali L.; Wright, James; Ninnemann, Ulysses; Kleiven, Kikki; Irvali, Nil; Rosenthal, Yair

    2017-12-01

    Magnesium/calcium paleothermometry is an established tool for reconstructing past surface and deep-sea temperatures. However, our understanding of nonthermal environmental controls on the uptake of Mg into the calcitic lattice of foraminiferal tests remains limited. Here we present a combined analysis of multiple trace element/calcium ratios and stable isotope (δ18O and δ13C) geochemistry on the subpolar planktonic foraminifera Neogloboquadrina incompta to assess the validity of Mg/Ca as a proxy for surface ocean temperature. We identify small size-specific offsets in Mg/Ca and δ18Oc values for N. incompta that are consistent with depth habitat migration patterns throughout the life cycle of this species. Additionally, an assessment of nonthermal controls on Mg/Ca values reveals that (1) the presence of volcanic ash, (2) the addition of high-Mg abiotic overgrowths, and (3) ambient seawater carbonate chemistry can have a significant impact on the Mg/Ca-to-temperature relationship. For carbonate-ion concentrations of values > 200 μmol kg-1, we find that temperature exerts the dominant control on Mg/Ca values, while at values < 200 μmol kg-1 the carbonate-ion concentration of seawater increases the uptake of Mg, thereby resulting in higher-than-expected Mg/Ca values at low temperatures. We propose two independent correction schemes to remove the effects of volcanic ash and carbonate-ion concentration on Mg/Ca values in N. incompta within the calibration data set. Applying the corrections improves the fidelity of past ocean temperature reconstructions.

  7. Interannual variability of western North Pacific SST anomalies and its impact on North Pacific and North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae-Heung; An, Soon-Il; Kug, Jong-Seong

    2017-12-01

    In this study, the interannual variability of sea surface temperature (SST) and its atmospheric teleconnection over the western North Pacific (WNP) toward the North Pacific/North America during boreal winter are investigated. First, we defined the WNP mode as the first empirical orthogonal function (EOF) mode of SST anomalies over the WNP region (100-165°E, 0-35°N), of which the principle component time-series are significantly correlated with several well-known climate modes such as the warm pool mode which is the second EOF mode of the tropical to North Pacific SST anomalies, North Pacific oscillation (NPO), North Pacific gyre oscillation (NPGO), and central Pacific (CP)-El Niño at 95% confidence level, but not correlated with the eastern Pacific (EP)-El Niño. The warm phase of the WNP mode (sea surface warming) is initiated by anomalous southerly winds through reduction of wind speed with the background of northerly mean winds over the WNP during boreal winter, i.e., reduced evaporative cooling. Meanwhile, the atmospheric response to the SST warming pattern and its diabatic heating further enhance the southerly wind anomaly, referred to the wind-evaporation-SST (WES) feedback. Thus, the WNP mode is developed and maintained through winter until spring, when the northerly mean wind disappears. Furthermore, it is also known that anomalous upper-level divergence associated with WNP mode leads to the NPO-like structure over the North Pacific and the east-west pressure contrast pattern over the North America through Rossby wave propagation, impacting the climate over the North Pacific and North America.

  8. The GEOVIDE cruise in May–June 2014 reveals an intense Meridional Overturning Circulation over a cold and fresh subpolar North Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Zunino

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The GEOVIDE cruise was carried out in the subpolar North Atlantic (SPNA along the OVIDE section and across the Labrador Sea in May–June 2014. It was planned to clarify the distribution of the trace elements and their isotopes in the SPNA as part of the GEOTRACES international program. This paper focuses on the state of the circulation and distribution of thermohaline properties during the cruise. In terms of circulation, the comparison with the 2002–2012 mean state shows a more intense Irminger Current and also a weaker North Atlantic Current, with a transfer of volume transport from its northern to its central branch. However, those anomalies are compatible with the variability already observed along the OVIDE section in the 2000s. In terms of properties, the surface waters of the eastern SPNA were much colder and fresher than the averages over 2002–2012. In spite of negative temperature anomalies in the surface waters, the heat transport across the OVIDE section estimated at 0.56 ± 0.06 PW was the largest measured since 2002. This relatively large value is related to the relatively strong Meridional Overturning Circulation measured across the OVIDE section during GEOVIDE (18.7 ± 3.0 Sv. By analyzing the air–sea heat and freshwater fluxes over the eastern SPNA in relation to the heat and freshwater content changes observed during 2013 and 2014, we concluded that on a short timescale these changes were mainly driven by air–sea heat and freshwater fluxes rather than by ocean circulation.

  9. The GEOVIDE cruise in May-June 2014 reveals an intense Meridional Overturning Circulation over a cold and fresh subpolar North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunino, Patricia; Lherminier, Pascale; Mercier, Herlé; Daniault, Nathalie; García-Ibáñez, Maribel I.; Pérez, Fiz F.

    2017-11-01

    The GEOVIDE cruise was carried out in the subpolar North Atlantic (SPNA) along the OVIDE section and across the Labrador Sea in May-June 2014. It was planned to clarify the distribution of the trace elements and their isotopes in the SPNA as part of the GEOTRACES international program. This paper focuses on the state of the circulation and distribution of thermohaline properties during the cruise. In terms of circulation, the comparison with the 2002-2012 mean state shows a more intense Irminger Current and also a weaker North Atlantic Current, with a transfer of volume transport from its northern to its central branch. However, those anomalies are compatible with the variability already observed along the OVIDE section in the 2000s. In terms of properties, the surface waters of the eastern SPNA were much colder and fresher than the averages over 2002-2012. In spite of negative temperature anomalies in the surface waters, the heat transport across the OVIDE section estimated at 0.56 ± 0.06 PW was the largest measured since 2002. This relatively large value is related to the relatively strong Meridional Overturning Circulation measured across the OVIDE section during GEOVIDE (18.7 ± 3.0 Sv). By analyzing the air-sea heat and freshwater fluxes over the eastern SPNA in relation to the heat and freshwater content changes observed during 2013 and 2014, we concluded that on a short timescale these changes were mainly driven by air-sea heat and freshwater fluxes rather than by ocean circulation.

  10. Deep oceanic circulation in subpolar North Atlantic over the last 60 ka : a synthesis of multi-proxy approach based on Marion Dufresne cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissel, Catherine; Laj, Carlo; Van Toer, Aurélie; Wandres, Camille; Michel, Elisabeth

    2015-04-01

    Different cruises on board the R. V. Marion Dufresne allowed to take cores along the paths of the main overflow waters in sub-polar North Atlantic. The cores studied for glacial period are characterized by deposition rates ranging from 8 to 24 cm/ka and those studied for the Holocene period have sedimentation rates between about 90 and 15 cm/ka. Multi-proxy approach was conducted each time with the magnetic properties as the common studied parameters, used as bottom-current tracer. These properties were coupled, depending on the cores, with oxygen and carbon isotopes of planktonic and benthic foraminifera, sortable silt, IRD counting. The rationale for the study of magnetic properties is linked to the path of the overflow waters over the sills between Greenland and Iceland and between Iceland-Faeroe and Scotland after they form in the Nordic seas. These sills are rich in magnetic particles deposited from the volcanic-rich surrounding areas and they are then more or less efficiently transported in sub-polar North Atlantic by the overflow waters depending on the intensity of the later. During the last glacial period, all the CALYPSO cores distributed from the Norwegian sea to the Bermuda Rise exhibit the same pattern of variations in magnetic concentration. The age models are based on correlation between planktonic delta18O of a core nearby Greenland and delta18O in Greenland ice (Voelker et al., 1998) and confirmed by a perfect fit between the continuous earth magnetic field intensity profile retrieved from sediments and from ice via cosmogenic isotopes. It shows that every minimum in magnetic concentration, also characterized by high IRD content, fresh surface waters, fine mean grain size in the sortable silt range, coincides with cold periods in Greenland. A synthetic "contourite drift deposit" curve has been constructed and illustrate continuously the variations in the intensity of the overflow waters during glacial time. They mimic in phase and in relative

  11. Climate Prediction Center (CPC) East Pacific/ North Pacific Teleconnection Pattern Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly tabulated index of the East Pacific/ North Pacific teleconnection pattern. The data spans the period 1950 to present. The index is derived from a rotated...

  12. Circum-North Pacific tectonostratigraphic terrane map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokleberg, Warren J.; Parfenov, Leonid M.; Monger, James W.H.; Baranov, Boris B.; Byalobzhesky, Stanislav G.; Bundtzen, Thomas K.; Feeney, Tracey D.; Fujita, Kazuya; Gordey, Steven P.; Grantz, Arthur; Khanchuk, Alexander I.; Natal'in, Boris A.; Natapov, Lev M.; Norton, Ian O.; Patton, William W.; Plafker, George; Scholl, David W.; Sokolov, Sergei D.; Sosunov, Gleb M.; Stone, David B.; Tabor, Rowland W.; Tsukanov, Nickolai V.; Vallier, Tracy L.; Wakita, Koji

    1994-01-01

    The companion tectonostratigraphic terrane and overlap assemblage of map the Circum-North Pacific presents a modern description of the major geologic and tectonic units of the region. The map illustrates both the onshore terranes and overlap volcanic assemblages of the region, and the major offshore geologic features. The map is the first collaborative compilation of the geology of the region at a scale of 1:5,000,000 by geologists of the Russian Far East, Japanese, Alaskan, Canadian, and U.S.A. Pacific Northwest. The map is designed to be a source of geologic information for all scientists interested in the region, and is designed to be used for several purposes, including regional tectonic analyses, mineral resource and metallogenic analyses (Nokleberg and others, 1993, 1994a), petroleum analyses, neotectonic analyses, and analyses of seismic hazards and volcanic hazards. This text contains an introduction, tectonic definitions, acknowledgments, descriptions of postaccretion stratified rock units, descriptions and stratigraphic columns for tectonostratigraphic terranes in onshore areas, and references for the companion map (Sheets 1 to 5). This map is the result of extensive geologic mapping and associated tectonic studies in the Russian Far East, Hokkaido Island of Japan, Alaska, the Canadian Cordillera, and the U.S.A. Pacific Northwest in the last few decades. Geologic mapping suggests that most of this region can be interpreted as a collage of fault-bounded tectonostratigraphic terranes that were accreted onto continental margins around the Circum-

  13. Influence of the Atlantic subpolar gyre on the thermohaline circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hátún, Hjálmar; Sandø, Anne Britt; Drange, Helge; Hansen, Bogi; Valdimarsson, Hedinn

    2005-09-16

    During the past decade, record-high salinities have been observed in the Atlantic Inflow to the Nordic Seas and the Arctic Ocean, which feeds the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation (THC). This may counteract the observed long-term increase in freshwater supply to the area and tend to stabilize the North Atlantic THC. Here we show that the salinity of the Atlantic Inflow is tightly linked to the dynamics of the North Atlantic subpolar gyre circulation. Therefore, when assessing the future of the North Atlantic THC, it is essential that the dynamics of the subpolar gyre and its influence on the salinity are taken into account.

  14. On North Pacific circulation and associated marine debris concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Evan A; Bograd, Steven J; Morishige, Carey; Seki, Michael P; Polovina, Jeffrey J

    2012-01-01

    Marine debris in the oceanic realm is an ecological concern, and many forms of marine debris negatively affect marine life. Previous observations and modeling results suggest that marine debris occurs in greater concentrations within specific regions in the North Pacific Ocean, such as the Subtropical Convergence Zone and eastern and western "Garbage Patches". Here we review the major circulation patterns and oceanographic convergence zones in the North Pacific, and discuss logical mechanisms for regional marine debris concentration, transport, and retention. We also present examples of meso- and large-scale spatial variability in the North Pacific, and discuss their relationship to marine debris concentration. These include mesoscale features such as eddy fields in the Subtropical Frontal Zone and the Kuroshio Extension Recirculation Gyre, and interannual to decadal climate events such as El Niño and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation/North Pacific Gyre Oscillation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Marine proxy evidence linking decadal North Pacific and Atlantic climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hetzinger, S. [University of Toronto Mississauga, CPS-Department, Mississauga, ON (Canada); Leibniz Institute of Marine Sciences, IFM-GEOMAR, Kiel (Germany); Halfar, J. [University of Toronto Mississauga, CPS-Department, Mississauga, ON (Canada); Mecking, J.V.; Keenlyside, N.S. [Leibniz Institute of Marine Sciences, IFM-GEOMAR, Kiel (Germany); University of Bergen, Geophysical Institute and Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Bergen (Norway); Kronz, A. [University of Goettingen, Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum, Goettingen (Germany); Steneck, R.S. [University of Maine, Darling Marine Center, Walpole, ME (United States); Adey, W.H. [Smithsonian Institution, Department of Botany, Washington, DC (United States); Lebednik, P.A. [ARCADIS U.S. Inc., Walnut Creek, CA (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Decadal- to multidecadal variability in the extra-tropical North Pacific is evident in 20th century instrumental records and has significant impacts on Northern Hemisphere climate and marine ecosystems. Several studies have discussed a potential linkage between North Pacific and Atlantic climate on various time scales. On decadal time scales no relationship could be confirmed, potentially due to sparse instrumental observations before 1950. Proxy data are limited and no multi-centennial high-resolution marine geochemical proxy records are available from the subarctic North Pacific. Here we present an annually-resolved record (1818-1967) of Mg/Ca variations from a North Pacific/Bering Sea coralline alga that extends our knowledge in this region beyond available data. It shows for the first time a statistically significant link between decadal fluctuations in sea-level pressure in the North Pacific and North Atlantic. The record is a lagged proxy for decadal-scale variations of the Aleutian Low. It is significantly related to regional sea surface temperature and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index in late boreal winter on these time scales. Our data show that on decadal time scales a weaker Aleutian Low precedes a negative NAO by several years. This atmospheric link can explain the coherence of decadal North Pacific and Atlantic Multidecadal Variability, as suggested by earlier studies using climate models and limited instrumental data. (orig.)

  16. Northern North Pacific Regional Climatology (NCEI Accession 0156768)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Northern North Pacific (NNP) plays a significant role in long-term earth and ocean climate change. It is also a region of high importance for regional marine...

  17. 75 FR 23244 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-03

    ... Hotel Captain Cook, 939 W 5th Avenue, Anchorage, AK 99501. Council address: North Pacific Fishery... budget and other budget issues, 2010 National SSC workshop, National Standard 2 Guidelines; Council/ NMFS...

  18. Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Daily Pacific North American Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Pacific-North American pattern (PNA) is one of the leading teleconnection patterns in the Northern Hemisphere circulation. It is calculated as a Rotated...

  19. 77 FR 52315 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The North Pacific Fishery Management... recommendations on deployment plan; Electronic monitoring; Update on national white papers on electronic...

  20. Status of marine mammals in the eastern North Pacific Ocean

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the status or marine mammals in the eastern north Pacific Ocean. Species covered are: sea otter, northern, Guadalupe fur seals, stellar,...

  1. 76 FR 2084 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... Species Report (including update on Steller Sea Lion (SSL); Endangered Species Act (ESA) listed salmon... following issues: 1. Salmon Bycatch. 2. EFH. 3. AI Pacific Cod. 4. BSAI Crab Management. 5. Miscellaneous... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA139 North Pacific Fishery Management Council...

  2. Why the spring North Pacific Oscillation is a predictor of typhoon activity over the Western North Pacific

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Dong; Wang, Huijun; Liu, Jiping; Li, Guoping

    2015-01-01

    ... ) during the period 1968–2010, with a correlation coefficient of 0.62 (above the 99% significance level). When the Northern Low and Southern High pattern over the north Pacific weakens, the TNWNP tends to increase...

  3. Marine debris collects within the North Pacific Subtropical Convergence Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichel, William G; Churnside, James H; Veenstra, Timothy S; Foley, David G; Friedman, Karen S; Brainard, Russell E; Nicoll, Jeremy B; Zheng, Quanan; Clemente-Colón, Pablo

    2007-08-01

    Floating marine debris, particularly derelict fishing gear, is a hazard to fish, marine mammals, turtles, sea birds, coral reefs, and even human activities. To ameliorate the economic and environmental impact of marine debris, we need to efficiently locate and retrieve dangerous debris at sea. Guided by satellite-derived information, we made four flights north of Hawaii in March and April 2005. During these aerial surveys, we observed over 1800 individual pieces of debris, including 122 derelict fishing nets. The largest debris concentrations were found just north of the North Pacific Transition Zone Chlorophyll Front (TZCF) within the North Pacific Subtropical Convergence Zone (STCZ). Debris densities were significantly correlated with sea-surface temperature (SST), chlorophyll-a concentration (Chla), and the gradient of Chla. A Debris Estimated Likelihood Index (DELI) was developed to predict where high concentrations of debris would be most likely in the North Pacific during spring and early summer.

  4. North Pacific decadal variability: insights from a biennial ENSO environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achuthavarier, Deepthi; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Vikhliaev, Yury V.

    2017-08-01

    This study examines the mechanisms of the Pacific decadal oscillation (PDO) in the NASA GEOS-5 general circulation model (GCM). Similar to several other state-of-the-art GCMs, the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) simulated by the GEOS-5 has a strong biennial periodicity. Since this is a model bias that precludes a strong role of ENSO, it provides a unique environment to assess the other leading mechanisms of North Pacific decadal variability. Despite the biennial ENSO periodicity, the model simulates a realistic PDO pattern in the North Pacific that is resolved as the first empirical orthogonal function (EOF) of winter mean sea surface temperature (SST). The spectrum of the PDO indicates no preferred periodicity. The SST anomalies associated with the PDO, particularly its basin wide structure, are primarily forced by the Aleutian low through Ekman transport. The slow geostrophic transport in association with the meridional adjustment of the subtropical gyre is limited to a narrow region in the Kuroshio-Oyashio extension, north of 40°N. The atmosphere's response to the PDO, while weak, projects onto the North Pacific Oscillation (NPO), a meridional dipole in sea level pressure. Both the lack of preferred periodicity and the weak atmospheric response indicate an air-sea coupled oscillation is an unlikely mechanism in this model. In agreement with recent studies, the NPO is correlated with the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation, which is another leading EOF of North Pacific SST variability. The results emphasize the role of atmospheric variability in the North Pacific SST modes, thereby bringing into question the potential for their predictability.

  5. Albatross species demonstrate regional differences in North Pacific marine contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Myra; Keitt, Bradford S; Croll, Donald A; Tershy, Bernie; Jarman, Walter M; Rodriguez-Pastor, Sue; Anderson, David J; Sievert, Paul R; Smith, Donald R

    2006-04-01

    Recent concern about negative effects on human health from elevated organochlorine and mercury concentrations in marine foods has highlighted the need to understand temporal and spatial patterns of marine pollution. Seabirds, long-lived pelagic predators with wide foraging ranges, can be used as indicators of regional contaminant patterns across large temporal and spatial scales. Here we evaluate contaminant levels, carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios, and satellite telemetry data from two sympatrically breeding North Pacific albatross species to demonstrate that (1) organochlorine and mercury contaminant levels are significantly higher in the California Current compared to levels in the high-latitude North Pacific and (2) levels of organochlorine contaminants in the North Pacific are increasing over time. Black-footed Albatrosses (Phoebastria nigripes) had 370-460% higher organochlorine (polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs], dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes [DDTs]) and mercury body burdens than a closely related species, the Laysan Albatross (P. immutabilis), primarily due to regional segregation of their North Pacific foraging areas. PCBs (the sum of the individual PCB congeners analyzed) and DDE concentrations in both albatross species were 130-360% higher than concentrations measured a decade ago. Our results demonstrate dramatically high and increasing contaminant concentrations in the eastern North Pacific Ocean, a finding relevant to other marine predators, including humans.

  6. Extreme winds in the Western North Pacific

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, S.

    2006-11-15

    A statistical model for extreme winds in the western North Pacific is developed, the region on the Planet where tropical cyclones are most common. The model is based on best track data derived mostly from satellite images of tropical cyclones. The methods used to estimate surface wind speeds from satellite images is discussed with emphasis on the empirical basis, which, unfortunately, is not very strong. This is stressed by the fact that Japanese and US agencies arrive at markedly different estimates. On the other hand, best track data records cover a long period of time and if not perfect they are at least coherent over time in their imperfections. Applying the the Holland model to the best track data, wind profiles can be assigned along the tracks. From this annual wind speed maxima at any particular point in the region can be derived. The annual maxima, in turn, are fitted to a Gumbel distribution using a generalization Abild's method that allows for data wind collected from multiple positions. The choice of this method is justified by a Monte Carlo simulation comparing it to two other methods. The principle output is a map showing fifty year winds in the region. The method is tested against observed winds from Philippine synoptic stations and fair agreement is found for observed and predicted 48 year maxima. However, the almost biasfree performance of the model could be fortuitous, since precise definitions of 'windspeed' in terms averaging time, height above ground and assumed surface roughness are not available, neither for best tracks nor for the synoptic data. The work has been carried out under Danish Research Agency grant 2104-04-0005 'Offshore wind power' and it also covers the findings and analysis carried out in connection with task 1.6 of the project 'Feasibility Assessment and Capacity Building for Wind Energy Development in Cambodia, The Philippines and Vietnam' during 2005-06 under contract 125-2004 with EU

  7. Legacy and contemporary persistent organic pollutants in North Pacific albatross.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwani, Suhash; Henry, Robert W; Rhee, Alexandra; Kappes, Michelle A; Croll, Donald A; Petreas, Myrto; Park, June-Soo

    2011-11-01

    Here we report the first measurements of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE 47, 99, and 153) alongside 11 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and 28 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the plasma of albatross from breeding colonies distributed across a large spatial east-west gradient in the North Pacific Ocean. North Pacific albatross are wide-ranging, top-level consumers that forage in pelagic regions of the North Pacific Ocean, making them an ideal sentinel species for detection and distribution of marine contaminants. Our work on contaminant burdens in albatross tissue provides information on transport of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) to the remote North Pacific and serves as a proxy for regional environmental quality. We sampled black-footed (Phoebastria nigripes; n = 20) and Laysan albatross (P. immutabilis; n = 19) nesting on Tern Island, Hawaii, USA, and Laysan albatross (n = 16) nesting on Guadalupe Island, Mexico. Our results indicate that North Pacific albatross are highly exposed to both PCBs and OCPs, with levels ranging from 8.8 to 86.9 ng/ml wet weight and 7.4 to 162.3 ng/ml wet weight, respectively. A strong significant gradient exists between Laysan albatross breeding in the Eastern Pacific, having approximately 1.5-fold and 2.5-fold higher levels for PCBs and OCPs, respectively, compared to those from the Central Pacific. Interspecies levels of contaminants within the same breeding site also showed high variation, with Tern black-footed albatross having approximately threefold higher levels of both PCBs and OCPs than Tern Laysan albatross. Surprisingly, while PBDEs are known to travel long distances and bioaccumulate in wildlife of high trophic status, we detected these three PBDE congeners only at trace levels ranging from not detectable (ND) to 0.74 ng/ml wet weight in these albatross. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  8. Trends and Variability of North Pacific Polar Lows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The 6-hourly 1948–2010 NCEP 1 reanalyses have been dynamically downscaled for the region of the North Pacific. With a detecting-and-tracking algorithm, the climatology of North Pacific Polar Lows has been constructed. This derived climatology is consistent with the limited observational evidence in terms of frequency and spatial distribution. The climatology exhibits strong year-to-year variability but weak decadal variability and a small positive trend. A canonical correlation analysis describes the conditioning of the formation of Polar Lows by characteristic seasonal mean flow regimes, which favor, or limit, cold air outbreaks and upper air troughs.

  9. Western North Pacific Typhoons with Concentric Eyewalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-19

    information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE APR 2009 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00...Pacific CE typhoons between 1997 and 2006. Section 2 describes the data, the analysis method, and the clima - tology. The results regarding the

  10. North Pacific Process Study (JGOFS) (NODC Accession 0001873)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This NPPS Data Set is comprised of JGOFS data set obtained during the JGOFS NPPS as well as the JGOFS related data sets in the North Pacific. All of these data were...

  11. Conservation of native Pacific trout diversity in Western North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke E. Penaluna; Alicia Abadía-Cardoso; Jason B. Dunham; Francisco J. García-Dé León; Robert E. Gresswell; Arturo Ruiz Luna; Eric B. Taylor; Bradley B. Shepard; Robert Al-Chokhachy; Clint C. Muhlfeld; Kevin R. Bestgen; Kevin Rogers; Marco A. Escalante; Ernest R. Keeley; Gabriel M. Temple; Jack E. Williams; Kathleen R. Matthews; Ron Pierce; Richard L. Mayden; Ryan P. Kovach; John Carlos Garza; Kurt D. Fausch

    2016-01-01

    Pacific trout Oncorhynchus spp. in western North America are strongly valued in ecological, socioeconomic, and cultural views, and have been the subject of substantial research and conservation efforts. Despite this, the understanding of their evolutionary histories, overall diversity, and challenges to their conservation is incomplete. We review...

  12. 76 FR 10008 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The North Pacific Fishery..., as well as discuss development of a potential electronic monitoring system design for less than 60...

  13. 78 FR 16660 - North Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The North Pacific Fishery Management...; receive an update on national electronic monitoring (EM) initiatives; and review an outline of the EM...

  14. Pollutants in Plastics within the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Qiqing; Reisser, Julia; Cunsolo, Serena; Kwadijk, Christiaan; Kotterman, M.J.J.; Proietti, Maira; Slat, Boyan; Ferrari, Francesco; Schwarz, Anna; Levivier, Aurore; Yin, Daqiang; Hollert, Henner; Koelmans, A.A.

    2018-01-01

    Here we report concentrations of pollutants in floating plastics from the North Pacific accumulation zone (NPAC). We compared chemical concentrations in plastics of different types and sizes, assessed ocean plastic potential risks using sediment quality criteria, and discussed the implications of

  15. 78 FR 4835 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Recovery Plan for the North Pacific Right Whale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-23

    ... Plan for the North Pacific Right Whale AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and... Plan (Plan) for the North Pacific right whale (Eubalaena japonica). NMFS is soliciting review and... West Highway, Silver Spring, MD 20910, Attn: North Pacific Right Whale Recovery Plan. Instructions: All...

  16. The Sub-Polar Gyre Index - a community data set for application in fisheries and environment research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berx, Barbara; Payne, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Scientific interest in the sub-polar gyre of the North Atlantic Ocean has increased in recent years. The sub-polar gyre has contracted and weakened, and changes in circulation pathways have been linked to changes in marine ecosystem productivity. To aid fisheries and environmental scientists, we...

  17. Marine geotechnical data for North Pacific sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Adrian F.

    1978-01-01

    Geotechnical data from the published and unpublished literature are compiled in SI units and tabulated in a standardized format. Eight data sets are presented from a geographic area approximately bounded by 5° and 32° north latitude and 120° and 170° west longitude. The data exist in machine-readable form in the data bank of the Marine Geotechnical Laboratory, Lehigh University.

  18. Freshwater influx, hydrographic reorganisation and the dispersal of ice rafted detritus in the sub-polar North Atlantic Ocean during the last deglaciation

    OpenAIRE

    Small, D; Austin, W.; Rinterknecht, V.

    2013-01-01

    A sediment core from the north-east North Atlantic contains high-resolution co-registered foraminiferal δ18O and ice-rafted detritus (IRD) records for the last deglaciation. These reveal a distinct ice-rafting event that occurred at the time of Greenland Interstade 1d (GI-1d), a feature also seen in other high-resolution cores from the North Atlantic. The occurrence of a geographically widespread peak in IRD at ice distal sites at a time when increased freshwater flux to the surface ocean is ...

  19. Phanerozoic tectonic evolution of the Circum-North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokleberg, Warren J.; Parfenov, Leonid M.; Monger, James W.H.; Norton, Ian O.; Khanchuk, Alexander I.; Stone, David B.; Scotese, Christopher R.; Scholl, David W.; Fujita, Kazuya

    2000-01-01

    The Phanerozoic tectonic evolution of the Circum-North Pacific is recorded mainly in the orogenic collages of the Circum-North Pacific mountain belts that separate the North Pacific from the eastern part of the North Asian Craton and the western part of the North American Craton. These collages consist of tectonostratigraphic terranes that are composed of fragments of igneous arcs, accretionary-wedge and subduction-zone complexes, passive continental margins, and cratons; they are overlapped by continental-margin-arc and sedimentary-basin assemblages. The geologic history of the terranes and overlap assemblages is highly complex because of postaccretionary dismemberment and translation during strike-slip faulting that occurred subparallel to continental margins.We analyze the complex tectonics of this region by the following steps. (1) We assign tectonic environments for the orogenic collages from regional compilation and synthesis of stratigraphic and faunal data. The types of tectonic environments include cratonal, passive continental margin, metamorphosed continental margin, continental-margin arc, island arc, oceanic crust, seamount, ophiolite, accretionary wedge, subduction zone, turbidite basin, and metamorphic. (2) We make correlations between terranes. (3) We group coeval terranes into a single tectonic origin, for example, a single island arc or subduction zone. (4) We group igneous-arc and subduction- zone terranes, which are interpreted as being tectonically linked, into coeval, curvilinear arc/subduction-zone complexes. (5) We interpret the original positions of terranes, using geologic, faunal, and paleomagnetic data. (6) We construct the paths of tectonic migration. Six processes overlapping in time were responsible for most of the complexities of the collage of terranes and overlap assemblages around the Circum-North Pacific, as follows. (1) During the Late Proterozoic, Late Devonian, and Early Carboniferous, major periods of rifting occurred along

  20. Indicators of Marine Pollution in the North Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Tanya M; Takada, Hideshige

    2017-08-01

    The complex nature of ocean pollution underscores the utility in identifying and characterizing a limited number of "indicators" that enables scientists and managers to track trends over space and time. This paper introduces a special issue on indicators of marine pollution in the North Pacific Ocean and builds on a scientific session that was held at the North Pacific Marine Science Organization. The special issue highlights studies using a variety of indicators to provide insight into the identification of legacy and emerging contaminants, the ranking of priority pollutants from various sources, and the effects of contaminants on ecosystem health in the North Pacific Ocean. Examples include the use of mussels to illustrate spatial and temporal trends of a number of contaminants following the 2011 tsunami in Japan, the use of molecular marker (linear alkylbenzenes, hopanes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) profiles to identify pollution sources, and the use of plastic resin pellets to illustrate spatial trends of petroleum pollution around the world. Stable isotopes were used to strengthen the utility of the Glaucous-winged gull (Larus glaucescens) as an indicator of marine pollution. Examples also demonstrate the development and application of biomarker approaches, including gene transcripts, oxidative stress, estradiol, hatchability, and respiration and swimming behavior abnormalities, as a function of exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls, sulfur-diesel, Pinghu crude oil, galaxolide and antifouling biocides. We provide a brief review of indicators of marine pollution, identify research gaps, and summarize key findings from the articles published within the issue. This special issue represents the first compilation of research pertaining to marine pollution indicators in the North Pacific Ocean and provides guidance to inform mitigation and monitoring efforts of contaminants in the region.

  1. Vertical distribution of236U in the North Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigl, R; Steier, P; Sakata, K; Sakaguchi, A

    2017-04-01

    The first extensive study on 236 U in the North Pacific Ocean has been conducted. The vertical distribution of 236 U/ 238 U isotopic ratios and the 236 U concentrations were analysed on seven depth profiles, and large variations with depth were found. The range of 236 U/ 238 U isotopic ratios was from (0.09 ± 0.03) × 10 -10 to (14.1 ± 2.2) × 10 -10 , which corresponds to 236 U concentrations of (0.69 ± 0.24) × 10 5 atoms/kg and (119 ± 21) × 10 5 atoms/kg, respectively. The variations in 236 U concentrations could mainly be attributed to the different water masses in the North Pacific Ocean and their formation processes. Uranium-236 inventories on the water column of each sampling station were calculated and varied between (3.89 ± 0.08) × 10 12 atoms/m 2 and (7.03 ± 0.50) × 10 12 atoms/m 2 , which is lower than in former studies on comparable latitudes in the North Atlantic Ocean and the Sea of Japan. The low inventories of 236 U found for the North Pacific Ocean in this study can be explained by the lack of additional input sources of artificial radionuclides, apart from global and regional/local fallout. This study expands the use of 236 U as oceanographic circulation tracer to yet another ocean basin and shows that this isotope can be used for tracing circulation patterns of water masses in the Pacific Ocean. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Rising climate variability and synchrony in North Pacific ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Bryan

    2017-04-01

    Rising climate variability and synchrony in North Pacific ecosystems Evidence is growing that climate variability of the northeast Pacific Ocean has increased over the last century, culminating in such events as the record-breaking El Niño years 1983, 1998, and 2016 and the unusually persistent 2014/15 North Pacific Ocean heat wave known as "The Blob." Of particular concern is that rising variability could increase synchrony within and among North Pacific ecosystems, which could reduce the diversity of biological responses to climate (i.e. the "portfolio effect"), diminish resilience, and leave populations more prone to extirpation. To test this phenomenon, we use a network of multidecadal fish otolith growth-increment chronologies that were strongly correlated to records of winter (Jan-Mar) sea level. These biological and physical datasets spanned the California Current through the Gulf of Alaska. Synchrony was quantified as directional changes in running (31-year window) mean pairwise correlation within sea level and then within otolith time series. Synchrony in winter sea level at the nine stations with the longest records has increased by more than 40% over the 1950-2015 interval. Likewise, synchrony among the eight longest otolith chronologies has increased more than 100% over a comparable time period. These directional changes in synchrony are highly unlikely due to chance alone, as confirmed by comparing trends in observed data to those in simulated data (n = 10,000 iterations) with time series of identical number, length, and autocorrelation. Ultimately, this trend in rising synchrony may be linked to increased impacts of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on mid-latitude ecosystems of North America, and may therefore reflect a much broader, global-scale signature.

  3. Tropospheric Ozone Over the North Pacific from Ozonesdonde Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltmans, S. J.; Johnson, B. J.; Harris, J. M.; Thompson, A. M.; Liu, H. Y.; Voemel, H.; Chan, C. Y.; Fujimoto, T.; Brackett, V. G.; Chang, W. L.

    2003-01-01

    As part of the TRACE-P mission, ozone vertical profile measurements were made at a number of locations in the North Pacific. At most of the sites there is also a multi-year record of ozonesonde observations. From seven locations in the western Pacific (Hong Kong; Taipei; Jeju Island, Korea; and Naha, Kagoshima, Tsukuba, and Sapporo, Japan), a site in the central Pacific (Hilo, HI), and a site on the west coast of the U.S. (Trinidad Head, CA) both a seasonal and event specific picture of tropospheric ozone over the North Pacific emerges. At all of the sites there is a pronounced spring maximum through the troposphere. There are, however, differences in the timing and strength of this feature. Over Japan the northward movement of the jet during the spring and summer influences the timing of the seasonal maximum. The ozone profiles suggest that transport of ozone rich air from the stratosphere plays a strong role in the development of this maximum. During March and April at Hong Kong ozone is enhanced in a layer that extends from the lower free troposphere into the upper troposphere that likely has its origin in biomass burning in northern Southeast Asia and equatorial Africa. During the winter the Pacific subtropical sites (latitude -25N) are dominated by air with a low-latitude, marine source that gives low ozone amounts particularly in the upper troposphere. In the summer in the boundary layer at all of the sites marine air dominates and ozone amounts are generally quite low (less than 25 ppb). The exception is near large population centers (Tokyo and Taipei but not Hong Kong) where pollution events can give amounts in excess of 80 ppb. During the TRACE-P intensive campaign period (February-April 2001) tropospheric ozone amounts were rather typical of those seen in the long-term records of the stations with multi-year soundings.

  4. AFSC/RACE/GAP/Conrath: Delayed discard mortality of the North Pacific giant octopus

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The majority of octopus bycatch occurs in Pacific cod pot fisheries and recent data collected by North Pacific Groundfish Observers indicate that immediate mortality...

  5. Relative motions of the Pacific, Rivera, North American, and Cocos plates since 0.78 Ma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DeMets, Charles; Wilson, Douglas S

    1997-01-01

    We use magnetic anomaly and fracture zone crossings from 3°N–24°N along the East Pacific Rise to define the boundaries and relative velocities of the rigid Pacific, Rivera, North American, and Cocos plates...

  6. Epipelagic nekton of the North Pacific Subarctic and Transition Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodeur, Richard; McKinnell, Skip; Nagasawa, Kazuya; Pearcy, William; Radchenko, Vladimir; Takagi, Shogo

    1999-03-01

    During the 1980s and 1990s, scientific research cruises and commercial gillnet operations with scientific observers aboard were conducted throughout much of the Subarctic and Transition Zones of the North Pacific Ocean. These studies produced one of the most extensive databases ever collected on the relative species composition and trophic structure of epipelagic nekton of the Subarctic and Transition Zones in the North Pacific Ocean. Data from Japanese high-seas gillnet research surveys (1981-1991) were examined using multivariate analytical techniques to analyse community structure of nektonic cephalopods, elasmobranchs, and teleosts in the North Pacific Subarctic and Transition Zones during the summer months, emphasizing differences between the eastern and western Subarctic Gyres. Species diversity generally increased going from west to east, which was apparently associated with the greater range of temperatures in the east. Discriminant analysis was able to correctly classify about half the catch locations into their respective regions. Catches from multinational drift gillnet commercial fisheries operations in 1990-1991 mainly in the Transition Zone were also examined. Classification techniques were employed to determine species associations and multivariate analyses were used to examine relationships of these assemblages to environmental data. We found that some species are often captured in the same gillnet sets and form species associations that are distinct in ordination space, but these associations are loose and may vary appreciably from year to year. We review recent studies on the feeding habits and daily ration of the dominant species and construct food webs for the eastern and western Subarctic and Transition Zone systems emphasizing the role that nekton play in these pelagic ecosystems.

  7. Taxonomy Icon Data: North Pacific right whale [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available North Pacific right whale Eubalaena japonica Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eu...theria/Cetacea Eubalaena_japonica_L.png Eubalaena_japonica_NL.png Eubalaena_japonica_S.png Eubalaena_japonic...a_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Eubalaena+japonica&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/tax...onomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Eubalaena+japonica&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_ic...on/icon.cgi?i=Eubalaena+japonica&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Eubalaena+japonica&t=NS ...

  8. Denali Ice Core Record of North Pacific Sea Surface Temperatures and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polashenski, D.; Osterberg, E. C.; Winski, D.; Ferris, D. G.; Kreutz, K. J.; Wake, C. P.; Introne, D.

    2015-12-01

    Ice cores collected from high elevation alpine glaciers in the Alaska Range provide a unique opportunity to investigate changes in the regional climate of southern Alaska and the north Pacific over the past millennium. In this study, we seek to investigate changes in sea surface temperature (SST) in the north-central Pacific Ocean using the deuterium excess (d-excess) record from the Mt. Hunter ice cores collected in Denali National Park, Alaska. A collaborative research team from Dartmouth College and the Universities of Maine and New Hampshire collected two parallel ice cores to bedrock (208 m long) in May-June 2013 from the Mt. Hunter summit plateau (63º N, 151º W, 4,000 m above sea level). The cores were melted on a continuous melter system in the Dartmouth ice core lab and then analyzed for concentrations of major ions and trace elements, as well as stable water isotope ratios. The depth-age scale of the cores was determined using annual layer counting of δ18O and the concentrations of Mg, NH4, and Methanesulfonic acid (MSA) obtained by ion chromatography. The depth-age scale was validated using large, well-dated volcanic eruptions and the spike in 137Cs concentrations associated with nuclear weapons testing in 1963. Preliminary analyses indicate that the full record spans the past millennium. Analysis of the isotope data set extending back to 1938 using reanalysis data shows a positive correlation (p<0.05) between d-excess at the core site and the north-central Pacific SST. The north-central Pacific region of positive SST-d-excess correlation occurs at one node of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), and thus the Denali cores are sensitive to PDO variability with low (high) d-excess associated with positive (negative) PDO index values. We also note a significant (p<0.05) declining trend in d-excess from 1938-2012, which we hypothesize to represent a rising proportion of Arctic moisture sources influencing Denali as Arctic temperatures and evaporation

  9. Ice core record of rising lead pollution in the North Pacific atmosphere

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Osterberg, E; Mayewski, P; Kreutz, K; Fisher, D; Handley, M; Sneed, S; Zdanowicz, C; Zheng, J; Demuth, M; Waskiewicz, M; Bourgeois, J

    2008-01-01

    .... The largest rise in North Pacific Pb pollution from 1970 - 1998 (end of record) is contemporaneous with a decrease in Eurasian and North American Pb pollution as documented in ice core records from Greenland, Devon Island, and the European Alps...

  10. [Principal stages in the Cenozoic diversification of shallow-water molluscan faunas in the North Pacific].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafanov, A I

    2006-01-01

    Cluster analysis of bivalve species recorded in Cenozoic deposits in Sakhalin Island, western Kamchatka, Hokkaido, and California was used to determine geological age of the modem North Pacific biogeographic region and its constituent subregions (Japan-Mandchurian, Beringian, and Oregon-Sitkan). The North Pacific region developed during the Paleogene-Neogene transition due to Drake Passage opening to deep-water movement, formation of the deep-water Antarctic Circumpolar Current, and the change in climate from greenhouse to psychospheric. Differentiation of the three subregions within the North Pacific Region seems to have occurred in late Miocene-early Pliocene, about 5.6 millions years ago and was probably due to the flooding of the Bering Land Bridge and development of the present configuration of circulation in the North Pacific. In the Northwest Pacific, during Paleogene and early Neogene, the faunal diversification occurred more rapidly and was more extensive than in the Northeast Pacific.

  11. 50 CFR 226.215 - Critical habitat for the North Pacific Right Whale (Eubalaena japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Right Whale (Eubalaena japonica). 226.215 Section 226.215 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE... DESIGNATED CRITICAL HABITAT § 226.215 Critical habitat for the North Pacific Right Whale (Eubalaena japonica). (a) Primary Constituent Elements. The primary constituent elements of the North Pacific right whale...

  12. Chemical oceanography. Increasing anthropogenic nitrogen in the North Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Il-Nam; Lee, Kitack; Gruber, Nicolas; Karl, David M; Bullister, John L; Yang, Simon; Kim, Tae-Wook

    2014-11-28

    The recent increase in anthropogenic emissions of reactive nitrogen from northeastern Asia and the subsequent enhanced deposition over the extensive regions of the North Pacific Ocean (NPO) have led to a detectable increase in the nitrate (N) concentration of the upper ocean. The rate of increase of excess N relative to phosphate (P) was found to be highest (~0.24 micromoles per kilogram per year) in the vicinity of the Asian source continent, with rates decreasing eastward across the NPO, consistent with the magnitude and distribution of atmospheric nitrogen deposition. This anthropogenically driven increase in the N content of the upper NPO may enhance primary production in this N-limited region, potentially leading to a long-term change of the NPO from being N-limited to P-limited. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. The plastic-associated microorganisms of the North Pacific Gyre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Henry S; Nerheim, Magnus S; Carroll, Katherine A; Eriksen, Marcus

    2013-10-15

    Microorganisms likely mediate processes affecting the fate and impacts of marine plastic pollution, including degradation, chemical adsorption, and colonization or ingestion by macroorganisms. We investigated the relationship between plastic-associated microorganism communities and factors such as location, temperature, salinity, plankton abundance, plastic concentration, item size, surface roughness, and polymer type. Small plastic items from the surface of the North Pacific Gyre in 2011 were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Bacillus bacteria (mean 1664 ± 247 individuals mm(-2)) and pennate diatoms (1097 ± 154 mm(-2)) were most abundant, with coccoid bacteria, centric diatoms, dinoflagellates, coccolithophores, and radiolarians present. Bacterial abundance was patchy, but increased on foamed polystyrene. Diatom abundance increased on items with rough surfaces and at sites with high plastic concentrations. Morphotype richness increased slightly on larger fragments, and a biogeographic transition occurred between pennate diatom groups. Better characterizing this community will aid in understanding how it interacts with plastic pollution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A seabird monitoring program for the North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, S.A.; Kaiser, G.W.; Kondratyev, Alexander V.; Byrd, G.V.

    1994-01-01

    Seabird monitoring is the accumulation of time series data on any aspect of seabird distribution, abundance, demography, or behavior. Typical studies include annual or less frequent measures of numbers or productivity; less commonly, the focus is on marine habitat use, phenology, food habits, or survival. The key requirement is that observations are replicated over time and made with sufficient precision and accuracy to permit the meaningful analysis of variability and trends. Along the Pacific coast of North America, seabird monitoring has consumed substantial amounts of public funding since the early 1970s. The effort has been largely uncoordinated among the many entities involved, including provincial, state, and federal agencies, some private organizations, university faculty, and students. We reaffirm the rationale for monitoring seabirds, review briefly the nature and accomplishments of the existing effort, and suggest actions needed to improve the effectiveness of seabird monitoring in the Pacific. In particular, we propose and describe a comprehensive Seabird Monitoring Database designed specifically to work with observations on seabird population parameters that are replicated over time.

  15. 75 FR 70903 - Eastern North Pacific Gray Whale; Notice of Extension of Public Comment Period on Marine Mammal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-19

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA018 Eastern North Pacific Gray Whale; Notice of... petition to designate the Eastern North Pacific population of gray whales (Eschrichtius robustus) as a... assessment report for Eastern North Pacific gray whales is available on the Internet at the following address...

  16. Paleogene Carbonate Dissolution Events in the North Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, J.; Dickens, G. R.

    2016-12-01

    A series of carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) mark variations in the global carbon cycle and significant changes in climate through the early Paleogene. The Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) ca. 56 Ma is the most pronounced and well documented of these events, having been described in many sections across the globe. The large CIE across the PETM is marked by a clay rich layer in many deep-sea sections, resulting from widespread carbonate dissolution on the seafloor, which is in turn related to shoaling of the carbonate compensation depth and lysocline. Several studies have suggested that other CIEs have a similar response, but this information is sparse. There is also debate as to how carbonate saturation in the ocean varied over the long-term. Importantly, we observe that though the Eocene climate shows an overall cooling trend, yet it is punctuated by several short term hyperthermals which have been studied sparsely. Here we document changes in carbonate preservation in Eocene sediments at ODP Site 1209A (Shatsky Rise, North Pacific Ocean). This site presently lies in a middle bathyal (2387m) water depth but has undergone negligible subsidence since the Cretaceous. We generate a record of carbonate content, and couple this with magnetic susceptibility (MS) and gamma ray attenuation (GRA) records to locate possible intervals of reduced carbonate accumulation. We then examine the planktonic foraminiferal assemblages for their fragmentation which helps us to better constrain the dynamics of lysoclinal depth at this location of North Pacific Ocean in the Eocene. Throughout the Eocene there are long-term variations in carbonate preservation, as well as some pronounced events of carbonate dissolution. Such documentation allows us to better constrain models for early Paleogene carbon cycling.

  17. Deglacial variability in Okhotsk Sea Intermediate Water ventilation and biogeochemistry: Implications for North Pacific nutrient supply and productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembke-Jene, Lester; Tiedemann, Ralf; Nürnberg, Dirk; Kokfelt, Ulla; Kozdon, Reinhard; Max, Lars; Röhl, Ursula; Gorbarenko, Sergey A.

    2017-03-01

    The modern North Pacific plays a critical role in marine biogeochemical cycles, as an oceanic sink of CO2 and by bearing some of the most productive and least oxygenated waters of the World Ocean. The capacity to sequester CO2 is limited by efficient nutrient supply to the mixed layer, particularly from deeper water masses in the Pacific's subarctic and marginal seas. The region is in addition only weakly ventilated by North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW), which receives its characteristics from Okhotsk Sea Intermediate Water (OSIW). Here, we present reconstructions of intermediate water ventilation and productivity variations in the Okhotsk Sea that cover the last glacial termination between eight and 18 ka, based on a set of high-resolution sediment cores from sites directly downstream of OSIW formation. In a multi-proxy approach, we use total organic carbon (TOC), chlorin, biogenic opal, and CaCO3 concentrations as indicators for biological productivity. C/N ratios and XRF scanning-derived elemental ratios (Si/K and Fe/K), as well as chlorophycean algae counts document changes in Amur freshwater and sediment discharge that condition the OSIW. Stable carbon isotopes of epi- and shallow endobenthic foraminifera, in combination with 14C analyses of benthic and planktic foraminifera imply decreases in OSIW oxygenation during deglacial warm phases from c. 14.7 to 13 ka (Bølling-Allerød) and c. 11.4 to 9 ka (Preboreal). No concomitant decreases in Okhotsk Sea benthic-planktic ventilation ages are observed, in contrast to nearby, but southerly locations on the Japan continental margin. We attribute Okhotsk Sea mid-depth oxygenation decreases in times of enhanced organic matter supply to maxima in remineralization within OSIW, in line with multi-proxy evidence for maxima in primary productivity and supply of organic matter. Sedimentary C/N and Fe/K ratios indicate more effective entrainment of nutrients into OSIW and thus an increased nutrient load of OSIW during

  18. The response of the North Pacific Decadal Variability to strong tropical volcanic eruptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tao [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nansen-Zhu International Research Center, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Beijing (China); Otteraa, Odd Helge [Uni Bjerknes Centre, Uni Research, Bergen (Norway); Bjerknes Center for Climate Research, Bergen (Norway); Gao, Yongqi [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nansen-Zhu International Research Center, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Beijing (China); Bjerknes Center for Climate Research, Bergen (Norway); Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center, Bergen (Norway); Wang, Huijun [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nansen-Zhu International Research Center, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Beijing (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Climate Change Research Center, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Beijing (China)

    2012-12-15

    In this study, the effects of volcanic forcing on North Pacific climate variability, on interannual to decadal time scales, are examined using climate model simulations covering the last 600 years. The model used is the Bergen Climate Model, a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model. It is found that natural external forcings, such as tropical strong volcanic eruptions (SVEs) and variations in total solar irradiance, play an important role in regulating North Pacific Decadal Variability (NPDV). In response to tropical SVEs the lower stratospheric pole-to-equator temperature gradient is enhanced. The North polar vortex is strengthened, which forces a significant positive Arctic Oscillation. At the same time, dipole zonal wind anomalies associated with strong polar vortex propagate downward from the lower stratosphere. Through positive feedbacks in the troposphere, the surface westerly winds across the central North Pacific are significantly weakened, and positive sea level pressure anomalies are formed in the North Pacific. This anomalous surface circulation results in changes in the net heat fluxes and the oceanic advection across the North Pacific. As a result of this, warm water converges in the subtropical western North Pacific, where the surface waters in addition are heated by significantly reduced latent and sensible heat fluxes from the ocean. In the eastern and high-latitude North Pacific the ocean loses more heat, and large-scale decreases in sea surface temperatures are found. The overall response of this chain of events is that the North Pacific enters a negative phase of the Pacific decadal oscillation (PDO), and this negative phase of the PDO is maintained for several years. It is thus concluded that the volcanic forcing plays a key role in the phasing of the PDO. The model results furthermore highlight the important role of troposphere-stratosphere coupling, tropical-extratropical teleconnections and extratropical ocean

  19. Trans-Pacific and trans-Arctic pathways of the intertidal macroalga Fucus distichus L. reveal multiple glacial refugia and colonizations from the North Pacific to the North Atlantic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coyer, James A.; Hoarau, Galice; Van Schaik, Jaap; Luijckx, Pepijn; Olsen, Jeanine L.

    Aim We examined the phylogeography of the cold-temperate macroalgal species Fucus distichus L., a key foundation species in rocky intertidal shores and the only Fucus species to occur naturally in both the North Pacific and the North Atlantic. Location North Pacific and North Atlantic oceans (42

  20. Solar Influence on Tropical Cyclone in Western North Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Hee; Kim, Ki-Beom; Chang, Heon-Young

    2017-12-01

    Solar activity is known to be linked to changes in the Earth’s weather and climate. Nonetheless, for other types of extreme weather, such as tropical cyclones (TCs), the available evidence is less conclusive. In this study the modulation of TC genesis over the western North Pacific by the solar activity is investigated, in comparison with a large-scale environmental parameter, i.e., El-Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). For this purpose, we have obtained the best track data for TCs in the western North Pacific from 1977 to 2016, spanning from the solar cycle 21 to the solar cycle 24. We have confirmed that in the El-Niño periods TCs tend to form in the southeast, reach its maximum strength in the southeast, and end its life as TSs in the northeast, compared with the La-Niña periods. TCs occurring in the El-Niño periods are found to last longer compared with the La-Niña periods. Furthermore, TCs occurring in the El-Niño periods have a lower central pressure at their maximum strength than those occurring in the La-Niña periods. We have found that TCs occurring in the solar maximum periods resemble those in the El-Niño periods in their properties. We have also found that TCs occurring in the solar descending periods somehow resemble those in the El-Niño periods in their properties. To make sure that it is not due to the ENSO effect, we have excluded TCs both in the El-Niño periods and in the La-Niña periods from the data set and repeated the analysis. In addition to this test, we have also reiterated our analysis twice with TCs whose maximum sustained winds speed exceeds 17 m/s, instead of 33 m/s, as well as TCs designated as a typhoon, which ends up with the same conclusions.

  1. Eelgrass (Zostera marina) Microsatellite DNA Data; Pacific Coast of North America, 2000-2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set contains genetic information collected from eelgrass (Zostera marina) populations along the Pacific coast of North America from Alaska to Baha...

  2. North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory: Analysis of Shadow Zone Arrivals and Acoustic Propagation in Numerical Ocean Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dushaw, Brian

    2009-01-01

    ... depth of the receiver lies well below the depths of the predicted cusps. Several models for the temperature and salinity in the North Pacific Ocean were obtained and processed to enable simulations of acoustic propagation for comparison to the observations...

  3. Historical Eastern North Pacific Tropical Cyclone Tracks, 1949-2004 - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This Historical Eastern North Pacific Tropical Cyclone Tracks file contains the six-hourly (0000, 0600, 1200, 1800 UTC) center locations and intensities for all...

  4. Air Refueling Operations in the North Pacific: Is There a More Efficient Method?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rauenhorst, Michael

    1998-01-01

    ... in new mission areas and optimizing the reverse associate unit. The best location to attempt either a KC-135 reverse associate unit or a non-traditional Air National Guard KC-135 squadron might be in the North Pacific Theater...

  5. Two centuries of coherent decadal climate variability across the Pacific North American region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, S. C.; Charles, C. D.; Carriquiry, J. D.; Villaescusa, J. A.

    2016-09-01

    The decadal variability of the Pacific Ocean and North American hydroclimate are subjects of immediate concern for society, yet the length of the instrumental record limits full mechanistic understanding of this variability. Here we introduce a 178 year, seasonally resolved coral oxygen isotopic record from Clarion Island (18°N, 115°W), a sampling a subtropical region that is strongly influenced by the decadal-scale fluctuations of the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation and a region that serves as a critical locus for the communication of climate anomalies with the tropics. This Mexican Pacific coral record is highly correlated to coral records from the central tropical Pacific and tree ring records from western North America. Significant changes in the amplitude of oceanic decadal variability in the early nineteenth century are mirrored in the drought reconstructions in western North America. The spatial manifestation of this relationship was relatively invariant, despite notable changes in the climatic mean state.

  6. AFSC/NMML: North Pacific Right Whale Vessel Surveys in the Southeastern Bering Sea, 2007 - 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The North Pacific right whale (NPRW) was heavily hunted between the 17th and the 20th centuries. Protection was supposedly afforded by international treaties in the...

  7. North Pacific driftnet conference: proceedings, volume 1, July 17-19, 1989, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1989-01-01

    ... : to assemble factual information available on the nature and impact of the North Pacific Driftnet Fisheries and, in particular, to identify any lack of information and the means of generating required data...

  8. AFSC/NMML: North Pacific Right Whale Photo-ID Catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The eastern population of the North Pacific right whale (Eubalaena japonica) is the most endangered stock of whales in the world, with recent abundance estimates...

  9. Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Monthly Pacific North American Teleconnection Pattern Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly tabulated index of the Pacific/ North American teleconnection pattern. The data spans the period 1950 to present. The index is derived from a rotated...

  10. 78 FR 34347 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Recovery Plan for the North Pacific Right Whale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-07

    ... Plan for the North Pacific Right Whale AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and... Pacific right whale (Eubalaena japonica). ADDRESSES: Electronic copies of the Final Recovery Plan are... recovery. The Northern right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) has been listed as ``endangered'' under the...

  11. Tropical Pacific sea-surface temperatures and preceding sea level pressure anomalies in the subtropical North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Bruce T.

    2003-12-01

    The correspondence of sea-surface temperature (SST) anomalies to changes in antecedent large-scale sea level pressure anomalies is investigated using reanalysis data. By statistically examining linearly coupled precursor sea level pressure fields and subsequent SST fields for different lag periods, it is possible to isolate a precursor mode of sea level pressure (SLP) variability in the central subtropical North Pacific that precedes variations in the January-March El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) by approximately 12-15 months. A sea level pressure index, which captures the important characteristics of this precursor mode of variability, is developed and evaluated. It is shown that both analyzed and observed versions of the index are significantly correlated with the January-March ENSO one year later. The SLP index is then used to examine the evolution of the surface circulation and temperature structures leading up to mature ENSO events. Initially, the January-March subtropical North Pacific SLP anomalies are associated with changes in the intensity of the subtropical trade wind regime over the North Pacific, as well as with SST anomalies over the eastern equatorial Pacific and subtropical central Pacific. In agreement with the correlation statistics associated with the SLP and lagged NINO3.4 indices, both the sea level pressure field and the SST field subsequently develop ENSO-like structures over the course of the following year. Significant discussion of these results and pertinent areas of future research are provided within the broader context of the ENSO system.

  12. Pollutants in Plastics within the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiqing; Reisser, Julia; Cunsolo, Serena; Kwadijk, Christiaan; Kotterman, Michiel; Proietti, Maira; Slat, Boyan; Ferrari, Francesco F; Schwarz, Anna; Levivier, Aurore; Yin, Daqiang; Hollert, Henner; Koelmans, Albert A

    2018-01-16

    Here we report concentrations of pollutants in floating plastics from the North Pacific accumulation zone (NPAC). We compared chemical concentrations in plastics of different types and sizes, assessed ocean plastic potential risks using sediment quality criteria, and discussed the implications of our findings for bioaccumulation. Our results suggest that at least a fraction of the NPAC plastics is not in equilibrium with the surrounding seawater. For instance, "hard plastic" samples had significantly higher PBDE concentrations than "nets and ropes" samples, and 29% of them had PBDE composition similar to a widely used flame-retardant mixture. Our findings indicate that NPAC plastics may pose a chemical risk to organisms as 84% of the samples had at least one chemical exceeding sediment threshold effect levels. Furthermore, our surface trawls collected more plastic than biomass (180 times on average), indicating that some NPAC organisms feeding upon floating particles may have plastic as a major component of their diets. If gradients for pollutant transfer from NPAC plastic to predators exist (as indicated by our fugacity ratio calculations), plastics may play a role in transferring chemicals to certain marine organisms.

  13. Contrail properties over the eastern North Pacific from AVHRR data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minnis, P. [Sciences Directorate, NASA Langley Research Center (United States); Palikonda, R.; Walter, B.J.; Kirk Ayers, J. [AS and M, Inc., Hampton, VA (United States); Mannstein, H. [DLR Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere, Oberpfaffenhofen, Wessling (Germany)

    2005-08-01

    An increase of air traffic over the North Pacific during the last 30 years has been accompanied by an increase in cirrus coverage. To help alleviate the uncertainty in the contribution of air traffic to the cirrus increase, an analysis of linear contrail coverage over the region has been initiated using afternoon NOAA-16 AVHRR data taken during 4 months in 2002 and 2003. Manual evaluation of the automated contrail detection method revealed that it misclassified, on average, 32% of the pixels as contrails and missed 15% of the contrail pixels. After correction for detection errors, the contrail coverage over the domain between 25 and 55 N and between 120 and 150 W varied from a minimum of 0.37% in February to a maximum of 0.56% in May, respectively. The annual mean coverage, after correcting for the diurnal cycle of air traffic, is 0.31%, a value very close to earlier theoretical estimates for the region. Contrail optical depths for the 4 months average 0.24 resulting in a mean unit contrail longwave radiative forcing of 14.2 Wm{sup -2}. The contrail optical depths are twice the mean value expected from theoretical estimates. (orig.)

  14. Estimating historical eastern North Pacific blue whale catches using spatial calling patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cole C Monnahan

    Full Text Available Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus were exploited extensively around the world and remain endangered. In the North Pacific their population structure is unclear and current status unknown, with the exception of a well-studied eastern North Pacific (ENP population. Despite existing abundance estimates for the ENP population, it is difficult to estimate pre-exploitation abundance levels and gauge their recovery because historical catches of the ENP population are difficult to separate from catches of other populations in the North Pacific. We collated previously unreported Soviet catches and combined these with known catches to form the most current estimates of North Pacific blue whale catches. We split these conflated catches using recorded acoustic calls from throughout the North Pacific, the knowledge that the ENP population produces a different call than blue whales in the western North Pacific (WNP. The catches were split by estimating spatiotemporal occurrence of blue whales with generalized additive models fitted to acoustic call patterns, which predict the probability a catch belonged to the ENP population based on the proportion of calls of each population recorded by latitude, longitude, and month. When applied to the conflated historical catches, which totaled 9,773, we estimate that ENP blue whale catches totaled 3,411 (95% range 2,593 to 4,114 from 1905-1971, and amounted to 35% (95% range 27% to 42% of all catches in the North Pacific. Thus most catches in the North Pacific were for WNP blue whales, totaling 6,362 (95% range 5,659 to 7,180. The uncertainty in the acoustic data influence the results substantially more than uncertainty in catch locations and dates, but the results are fairly insensitive to the ecological assumptions made in the analysis. The results of this study provide information for future studies investigating the recovery of these populations and the impact of continuing and future sources of anthropogenic

  15. Estimating historical eastern North Pacific blue whale catches using spatial calling patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnahan, Cole C; Branch, Trevor A; Stafford, Kathleen M; Ivashchenko, Yulia V; Oleson, Erin M

    2014-01-01

    Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) were exploited extensively around the world and remain endangered. In the North Pacific their population structure is unclear and current status unknown, with the exception of a well-studied eastern North Pacific (ENP) population. Despite existing abundance estimates for the ENP population, it is difficult to estimate pre-exploitation abundance levels and gauge their recovery because historical catches of the ENP population are difficult to separate from catches of other populations in the North Pacific. We collated previously unreported Soviet catches and combined these with known catches to form the most current estimates of North Pacific blue whale catches. We split these conflated catches using recorded acoustic calls from throughout the North Pacific, the knowledge that the ENP population produces a different call than blue whales in the western North Pacific (WNP). The catches were split by estimating spatiotemporal occurrence of blue whales with generalized additive models fitted to acoustic call patterns, which predict the probability a catch belonged to the ENP population based on the proportion of calls of each population recorded by latitude, longitude, and month. When applied to the conflated historical catches, which totaled 9,773, we estimate that ENP blue whale catches totaled 3,411 (95% range 2,593 to 4,114) from 1905-1971, and amounted to 35% (95% range 27% to 42%) of all catches in the North Pacific. Thus most catches in the North Pacific were for WNP blue whales, totaling 6,362 (95% range 5,659 to 7,180). The uncertainty in the acoustic data influence the results substantially more than uncertainty in catch locations and dates, but the results are fairly insensitive to the ecological assumptions made in the analysis. The results of this study provide information for future studies investigating the recovery of these populations and the impact of continuing and future sources of anthropogenic mortality.

  16. Seasonal variability of extratropical North Pacific Wind stress, Ekman Pumping and Sverdrup Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Christopher S.

    2001-01-01

    The annual cycle of the North Pacific wind stress, Ekman pumping and Sverdrup transport is investigated by means of empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis techniques. Fifty-two years of National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP, formerly "NMC") and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Reanalysis daily averaged surface wind components covering the extratropical North Pacific are used to calculate daily averaged wind stress components. These wind stress components...

  17. Towards understanding North Pacific climate variabilty with instrumental and ice core records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Eric P.

    Reconstructing climate variability prior to the instrumental era is critical to advance our understanding of the Earth's climate system. Although many paleoclimate records from the North Atlantic basin have been studied, relatively few paleoclimate records have been recovered in the North Pacific leaving a gap in our knowledge concerning North Pacific climate variability. The Eclipse and Mount Logan Prospector-Russell ice cores are favorably located in the St. Elias Mountains, Yukon, Canada to document North Pacific climate variability over the late Holocene. Detailed analysis reveals a consistent relationship of surface air temperature (SAT) anomalies associated with extreme Arctic Oscillation (AO) and Pacific-North America (PNA) index values, and a consistent relationship of North Pacific sea level pressure (SLP) anomalies associated with extreme Mt. Logan annual [Na+] and Eclipse cold season accumulation values. Spatial SAT anomaly patterns are most consistent for AO and PNA index values ≥1.5 and ≤-1.5 during the period 1872-2010. The highest and lowest ˜10% of Eclipse warm and cold season stable isotopes are associated with distinct atmospheric circulation patterns. The most-fractionated isotope values occur with a weaker Aleutian Low, and the least-fractionated isotope values occur with an amplification of the Aleutian Low and northwestern North American ridge. The assumption of stationarity between ice core records and sea-level pressure was tested for the Eclipse cold season accumulation and Mt. Logan annual sodium concentration records for 1872-2001. A stationary relationship was found for ≥95% of years when Mt. Logan sodium concentrations were ≤1.32 microg/L, with positive SLP anomalies in the eastern North Pacific. This high frequency supports the use of low sodium values at Mt. Logan for a reconstruction of SLP prior to 1872. Negative SLP anomalies in the North Pacific occurred for extreme high sodium concentration years and positive SLP

  18. Spatial segregation in eastern North Pacific skate assemblages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph J Bizzarro

    Full Text Available Skates (Rajiformes: Rajoidei are common mesopredators in marine benthic communities. The spatial associations of individual species and the structure of assemblages are of considerable importance for effective monitoring and management of exploited skate populations. This study investigated the spatial associations of eastern North Pacific (ENP skates in continental shelf and upper continental slope waters of two regions: central California and the western Gulf of Alaska. Long-term survey data were analyzed using GIS/spatial analysis techniques and regression models to determine distribution (by depth, temperature, and latitude/longitude and relative abundance of the dominant species in each region. Submersible video data were incorporated for California to facilitate habitat association analysis. We addressed three main questions: 1 Are there regions of differential importance to skates?, 2 Are ENP skate assemblages spatially segregated?, and 3 When skates co-occur, do they differ in size? Skate populations were highly clustered in both regions, on scales of 10s of kilometers; however, high-density regions (i.e., hot spots were segregated among species. Skate densities and frequencies of occurrence were substantially lower in Alaska as compared to California. Although skates are generally found on soft sediment habitats, Raja rhina exhibited the strongest association with mixed substrates, and R. stellulata catches were greatest on rocky reefs. Size segregation was evident in regions where species overlapped substantially in geographic and depth distribution (e.g., R. rhina and Bathyraja kincaidii off California; B. aleutica and B. interrupta in the Gulf of Alaska. Spatial niche differentiation in skates appears to be more pronounced than previously reported.

  19. Spatial segregation in eastern North Pacific skate assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzarro, Joseph J; Broms, Kristin M; Logsdon, Miles G; Ebert, David A; Yoklavich, Mary M; Kuhnz, Linda A; Summers, Adam P

    2014-01-01

    Skates (Rajiformes: Rajoidei) are common mesopredators in marine benthic communities. The spatial associations of individual species and the structure of assemblages are of considerable importance for effective monitoring and management of exploited skate populations. This study investigated the spatial associations of eastern North Pacific (ENP) skates in continental shelf and upper continental slope waters of two regions: central California and the western Gulf of Alaska. Long-term survey data were analyzed using GIS/spatial analysis techniques and regression models to determine distribution (by depth, temperature, and latitude/longitude) and relative abundance of the dominant species in each region. Submersible video data were incorporated for California to facilitate habitat association analysis. We addressed three main questions: 1) Are there regions of differential importance to skates?, 2) Are ENP skate assemblages spatially segregated?, and 3) When skates co-occur, do they differ in size? Skate populations were highly clustered in both regions, on scales of 10s of kilometers; however, high-density regions (i.e., hot spots) were segregated among species. Skate densities and frequencies of occurrence were substantially lower in Alaska as compared to California. Although skates are generally found on soft sediment habitats, Raja rhina exhibited the strongest association with mixed substrates, and R. stellulata catches were greatest on rocky reefs. Size segregation was evident in regions where species overlapped substantially in geographic and depth distribution (e.g., R. rhina and Bathyraja kincaidii off California; B. aleutica and B. interrupta in the Gulf of Alaska). Spatial niche differentiation in skates appears to be more pronounced than previously reported.

  20. Ecological context for the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Andrea; Taylor, Audrey; Weekes, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative (NPLCC) encompasses the temperate coastal rainforest and extends from the coastal mountains to the near-shore from the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska to Bodega Bay, California. The area spans multiple agency, state, and international boundaries over more than 22 degrees of latitude, including a wide range of type and intensity of human land-use activities. Development of NPLCC goals and administrative structures will be facilitated by a shared ecological context for discussing this expansive, diverse, and complex landscape. In support of activities to organize the NPLCC, we provided conceptual models to describe the ecological structure of the NPLCC. Recognizing that the boundaries of LCCs were primarily based on Level 2 of the hierarchical ecoregional classification of Omernik (Comission for Environmental Cooperation 1997), we used nested Level 3 ecoregions to define subregions within the NPLCC. Rather than develop conceptual models for all nine constituent subregions, we opted to consider five groups: Puget-Georgia Basin Lowland and Willamette Valley, Alaska-British Columbia Coast, Alaska-British Columbia Mountains, Klamath-Olympic-Cascade Mountains, and Washington-Oregon-Northern California Coast. At the conclusion of the project, we felt that the close relationship between mountain and coastal areas support combining them to create three major subregions: Alaska-British Columbia coast and mountains, Washington-Oregon-Northern California coast and mountains, and the lowlands of the Georgia Basin and Willamette Valley. The following figures present the Omernik Level 3 ecoregions comprising the NPLCC; how the ecoregions were grouped to create conceptual models; and conceptual models for each group. The five models each consist of a table listing resources, stressors, potential climate change impacts; a landcover map; and a cartoon to summarize the table and evoke the landscape. A final figure summarizes resources

  1. The probability of tropical cyclone landfalls in Western North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonazzi, A.; Bellone, E.; Khare, S.

    2012-04-01

    The Western North Pacific (WNP) is the most active basin in terms of tropical cyclone and typhoon occurrences. The densely populated countries that form the western boundary of WNP basin -- e.g. China, Japan and the Philippines -- are exposed to extreme wind gusts, storm surge and fresh water flooding eventually triggered by Tropical Cyclones (TC) events. Event-based catastrophe models (hereafter cat models) are extensively used by the insurance industry to manage their exposure against low-frequency/high-consequence events such as natural catastrophes. Cat models provide their users with a realistic set of stochastic events that expands the scope of a historical catalogue. Confidence in a cat model ability to extrapolate peril and loss statistics beyond the period covered by observational data requires good agreement between stochastic and historical peril characteristics at shorter return periods. In WNP risk management practitioners are faced with highly uncertain data to base their decisions. Albeit 4 national agencies maintain best track catalogues, data are generally based on satellite imageries with very limited central pressure (CP) and maximum velocity (VMAX) measurements -- regular flight reconnaissance missions stopped in 1987. As a result differences up to 20 knots are found in estimates of VMAX from different agencies as documented in experiment IOP-10 during Typhoon Megi in 2010. In this work we present a comprehensive analysis of CP and VMAX probability distributions at landfall across the WNP basin along a set of 150 gates (100 km coast segments) based on best track catalogues from Japan Meteorological Agency, Joint Typhoon Warning Center, China Meteorological Agency and Hong Meteorological Agency. Landfall distributions are then used to calibrate a random-walk statistical track model. A long simulation of 100,000 years of statistical TC tracks will ultimately constitute the central building block of a basin-wide stochastic catalogue of synthetic TC

  2. Vertical distribution of scandium in the north central Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amakawa, Hiroshi; Nomura, Miho; Sasaki, Kazunori; Oura, Yasuji; Ebihara, Mitsuru

    2007-06-01

    The concentrations of scandium (Sc) in seawater, which have remained unreported since the early 1970s, were determined together with those of yttrium (Y) and lanthanides (Ln) with samples from the north central Pacific Ocean (St. BO-3). The Sc concentration shows a so-called nutrient-like profile: it increases gradually from the surface (about 2 pmol/kg) to the ocean floor (about 20 pmol/kg). That pattern closely resembles those of Y and Ln (correlation coefficient (r) > 0.92). Some light-to-middle Ln (Pr-Tb) exhibit a closer correlation with Sc than do Y, La, or heavy Ln (Ho-Lu). In contrast, Y/Sc and Ln/Sc ratios (elemental abundance ratios) indicate that Sc is depleted compared to either Y or Ln in seawater more than in loess, which represents chemical compositions of crustal material. These observations offer a conflicting view of chemical reactivity related Y, Ln, and Sc: r values show that the chemical reactivity of Sc resembles those of Y and Ln, but differences of Y/Sc and Ln/Sc ratios in seawater and in loess suggest that the chemical reactivity of Sc differs from those of Y and Ln. More Sc data for seawater are necessary to clarify the chemical reactivity of Sc in the ocean. We also propose that comparative studies of vertical profiles of Sc and such elements as Fe, Ti, Zr, and Hf showing so-called nutrient-like profiles at the same oceanic stations would be helpful and effective for clarifying the behavior of Sc in the ocean.

  3. The concurrence of atmospheric rivers and explosive cyclogenesis in the North Atlantic and North Pacific basins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Eiras-Barca

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The explosive cyclogenesis of extratropical cyclones and the occurrence of atmospheric rivers are characteristic features of a baroclinic atmosphere, and are both closely related to extreme hydrometeorological events in the mid-latitudes, particularly on coastal areas on the western side of the continents. The potential role of atmospheric rivers in the explosive cyclone deepening has been previously analysed for selected case studies, but a general assessment from the climatological perspective is still missing. Using ERA-Interim reanalysis data for 1979–2011, we analyse the concurrence of atmospheric rivers and explosive cyclogenesis over the North Atlantic and North Pacific basins for the extended winter months (ONDJFM. Atmospheric rivers are identified for almost 80 % of explosive deepening cyclones. For non-explosive cyclones, atmospheric rivers are found only in roughly 40 % of the cases. The analysis of the time evolution of the high values of water vapour flux associated with the atmospheric river during the cyclone development phase leads us to hypothesize that the identified relationship is the fingerprint of a mechanism that raises the odds of an explosive cyclogenesis occurrence and not merely a statistical relationship. These new insights on the relationship between explosive cyclones and atmospheric rivers may be helpful to a better understanding of the associated high-impact weather events.

  4. Enhanced warming of the subtropical mode water in the North Pacific and North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Shusaku; Hanawa, Kimio; Watanabe, Tomowo; Suga, Toshio; Xie, Shang-Ping

    2017-09-01

    Over the past six decades, the subtropical surface ocean has warmed at rates close to those of global mean surface ocean temperature except in western boundary current regions where the surface warming is locally enhanced by a factor of two. Changes in the subsurface ocean, however, remain unclear because of lack of data. Compiling historical temperature measurements--some available for the first time--here we show that the subtropical mode water has warmed over the past six decades in both the North Pacific and North Atlantic. The rate of the warming is twice as large in the mode waters than at the surface. Subtropical mode waters are important water masses of vertically uniform temperature that are a few hundred metres thick and distributed widely in the main thermocline of the subtropical oceans. The enhanced warming of subtropical mode waters can be traced back to the surface warming in the formation regions along the western boundary current extensions. Furthermore, we detect increased temperature stratification and decreased dissolved oxygen in the subtropical mode waters. The latter change has clear implications for predicting biogeochemical responses to climate warming.

  5. Ancient Fungal Life in North Pacific Eocene Oceanic Crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, G.; Manz, W.; Reitner, J.; Lustrino, M.

    2003-12-01

    Little is known about the manifold life forms of the deep biosphere although there is increasing scientific evidence that an extensive biosphere does exist in extreme environments such as the rocks below the seafloor. The ODP Leg 200 was devoted to the study of Eocene oceanic crust of the North Pacific Ocean. Within a massive tholeiitic lava flow unit, at depth of 51 mbsf underneath a water column of about 5000 m, we found unique filamentous structures. Based on morphological traits like branching, septa and central pores the filaments are interpreted as fungi. These filaments were found within carbonate-filled vesicles ranging in size from 0.5 to 3 mm in diameter. The net of fungal hyphae completely fills the whole pore space from the basalt-carbonate boundary towards the center of the pores. The cross section dimension of these filaments is about 5-10 micrometer and the length differ from 50 to several hundreds micrometer. Thereby the cell septa of the hyphae are clearly visible. The number of hyphae ranges from some tenth to some hundreds per particular pore. The presence of pyrite within the carbonate cements points out anaerobic conditions in this habitat. After removing the carbonate by etching the vesicles with diluted formic acid, the 3-dimensional structure of the fungus could be clearly visualized. Fine structure analysis of the hyphae obtained by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) revealed a network of tiny small fibers coating the surface of the hyphae. Semi-quantitative chemical analyses of the etched hyphae were conducted with an energy dispersive spectrometer system (EDS) coupled with the FE-SEM. The results evidence a chemical composition of the hyphae different from the surrounding carbonate matrix. Undisturbed filamentous growth through different calcite crystals within the vesicles and small open space between the fungi and matrix indicate endolithic fungal growth after the calcium carbonate filling of the vesicles. To the best

  6. Interannual variability of the subtropical countercurrent eddies in the North Pacific associated with the Western-Pacific teleconnection pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Chun Hoe; Tseng, Yu-heng; Hsu, Huang-Hsiung; Young, Chih-Chieh

    2017-07-01

    The connection and the relevant dynamical processes between oceanic eddies in the North Pacific Subtropical Countercurrent (STCC) region and the atmospheric Western-Pacific (WP) teleconnection is investigated on interannual timescales. North of the STCC region, the local northerly surface wind anomalies cool the ocean surface during negative phases of the WP teleconnection. The local surface cooling modifies the meridional gradient of sea surface temperature (SST), strengthening the SST front at its south. In the STCC region, we show the meridional gradient of surface-heat-flux forcing caused by the local surface cooling is the same order as the Ekman-convergence forcing. The strengthened SST front then leads to the pycnocline shoaling in the STCC region, which can also enhance the growth of baroclinic instability to produce more oceanic eddies, in addition to the enhanced STCC proposed previously. These dynamics are reversed during the positive phases of WP teleconnection.

  7. Late-Quaternary climatic change on the American North Pacific Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusser, C. J.; Heusser, L. E.; Peteet, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    The late Quaternary climate of the North Pacific, where according to modelling the solar radiation in the early Holocene at the time of the summer solstice is high and in the late Holocene is relatively low, is investigated. Quantitative temperature and precipitation estimates from southern Alaska are compared with estimates from western Washington and British Columbia. Data extending over more than 10,000 years show a broadly consistent pattern of climatic change in general agreement with predicted variations in solar radiation and their effect on atmospheric circulation and seasonal duration of pressure systems over the North Pacific Ocean. In the early Holocene, the subtropical North Pacific anticyclone annually regulated climate for a longer period at higher latitudes than at present, so that warmth and dryness increased in southern Alaska. The Aleutian low-pressure center intensified during the late Holocene, resulting in colder and more humid coastal climate and increased frequency of glacier growth in the cordillera.

  8. Changing central Pacific El Niños reduce stability of North American salmon survival rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilduff, D Patrick; Di Lorenzo, Emanuele; Botsford, Louis W; Teo, Steven L H

    2015-09-01

    Pacific salmon are a dominant component of the northeast Pacific ecosystem. Their status is of concern because salmon abundance is highly variable--including protected stocks, a recently closed fishery, and actively managed fisheries that provide substantial ecosystem services. Variable ocean conditions, such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), have influenced these fisheries, while diminished diversity of freshwater habitats have increased variability via the portfolio effect. We address the question of how recent changes in ocean conditions will affect populations of two salmon species. Since the 1980s, El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events have been more frequently associated with central tropical Pacific warming (CPW) rather than the canonical eastern Pacific warming ENSO (EPW). CPW is linked to the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO), whereas EPW is linked to the PDO, different indicators of northeast Pacific Ocean ecosystem productivity. Here we show that both coho and Chinook salmon survival rates along western North America indicate that the NPGO, rather than the PDO, explains salmon survival since the 1980s. The observed increase in NPGO variance in recent decades was accompanied by an increase in coherence of local survival rates of these two species, increasing salmon variability via the portfolio effect. Such increases in coherence among salmon stocks are usually attributed to controllable freshwater influences such as hatcheries and habitat degradation, but the unknown mechanism underlying the ocean climate effect identified here is not directly subject to management actions.

  9. Contributions of Asian pollution and SST forcings on precipitation change in the North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Sang-Wook; So, Jihyeon; Lee, Jong-Won; Kim, Minjoong J.; Jeong, Jaein I.; Park, Rokjin J.

    2017-08-01

    East Asia has a significant concentration of pollutant aerosols, mostly due to rapid industrialization. Previous research indicates that the aerosol effect from Asian pollution outflow could account for the trend of increasing deep convective clouds, as well as an intensification of the storm track, over the North Pacific Ocean in winter since the mid-1990s. However, it is not clear whether such change is solely due to Asian pollutant forcings or not. To understand the relative roles of Asian pollutant aerosols and sea surface temperature (SST) forcings on the precipitation change in the North Pacific, we examine the interannual variation of particulate matter 2.5 (PM2.5) simulated in the global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) and the idealized experiments using the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) for 1986-2010. The composite analysis indicates that the changes in precipitation amount and storm track intensity in the southwestern North Pacific might be associated with the increase in PM2.5 concentration in East China. However, El Niño-like warming during the years of high PM2.5 concentration may also influence the precipitation amount, as well as the storm track intensity in the central and eastern North Pacific. Model experiments also indicate that the El Niño-like warming and the Asian pollutant aerosols have different effects on precipitation amounts in the North Pacific. Therefore, the precipitation changes, as well as the intensification of the storm track, in the North Pacific might be attributed to both Asian pollutant aerosols and SST forcing in the tropics.

  10. Diversity of Pseudo-nitzschia H. Peragallo from the western North Pacific

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stonik, Inna V.; Orlova, Tatiana Yu; Lundholm, Nina

    2011-01-01

    Asurvey focusing on species belonging to the diatom genus Pseudo-nitzschia was conducted in the western North Pacific (the northwestern Sea of Japan and the Sea of Okhotsk). Light and electron microscopic examination of 314 phytoplankton field samples collected from 1995 to 2006 revealed the pres......Asurvey focusing on species belonging to the diatom genus Pseudo-nitzschia was conducted in the western North Pacific (the northwestern Sea of Japan and the Sea of Okhotsk). Light and electron microscopic examination of 314 phytoplankton field samples collected from 1995 to 2006 revealed...

  11. North Pacific Mesoscale Coupled Air-Ocean Simulations Compared with Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerovecki, Ivana [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Scripps Inst. of Oceanography; McClean, Julie [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Scripps Inst. of Oceanography; Koracin, Darko [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States). Division of Atmospheric Sciences

    2014-11-14

    The overall objective of this study was to improve the representation of regional ocean circulation in the North Pacific by using high resolution atmospheric forcing that accurately represents mesoscale processes in ocean-atmosphere regional (North Pacific) model configuration. The goal was to assess the importance of accurate representation of mesoscale processes in the atmosphere and the ocean on large scale circulation. This is an important question, as mesoscale processes in the atmosphere which are resolved by the high resolution mesoscale atmospheric models such as Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF), are absent in commonly used atmospheric forcing such as CORE forcing, employed in e.g. the Community Climate System Model (CCSM).

  12. Advection in polar and sub-polar environments: Impacts on high latitude marine ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, George L.; Drinkwater, Kenneth F.; Arrigo, Kevin; Berge, Jørgen; Daly, Kendra L.; Danielson, Seth; Daase, Malin; Hop, Haakon; Isla, Enrique; Karnovsky, Nina; Laidre, Kristin; Mueter, Franz J.; Murphy, Eugene J.; Renaud, Paul E.; Smith, Walker O.; Trathan, Philip; Turner, John; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter

    2016-12-01

    We compare and contrast the ecological impacts of atmospheric and oceanic circulation patterns on polar and sub-polar marine ecosystems. Circulation patterns differ strikingly between the north and south. Meridional circulation in the north provides connections between the sub-Arctic and Arctic despite the presence of encircling continental landmasses, whereas annular circulation patterns in the south tend to isolate Antarctic surface waters from those in the north. These differences influence fundamental aspects of the polar ecosystems from the amount, thickness and duration of sea ice, to the types of organisms, and the ecology of zooplankton, fish, seabirds and marine mammals. Meridional flows in both the North Pacific and the North Atlantic oceans transport heat, nutrients, and plankton northward into the Chukchi Sea, the Barents Sea, and the seas off the west coast of Greenland. In the North Atlantic, the advected heat warms the waters of the southern Barents Sea and, with advected nutrients and plankton, supports immense biomasses of fish, seabirds and marine mammals. On the Pacific side of the Arctic, cold waters flowing northward across the northern Bering and Chukchi seas during winter and spring limit the ability of boreal fish species to take advantage of high seasonal production there. Southward flow of cold Arctic waters into sub-Arctic regions of the North Atlantic occurs mainly through Fram Strait with less through the Barents Sea and the Canadian Archipelago. In the Pacific, the transport of Arctic waters and plankton southward through Bering Strait is minimal. In the Southern Ocean, the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and its associated fronts are barriers to the southward dispersal of plankton and pelagic fishes from sub-Antarctic waters, with the consequent evolution of Antarctic zooplankton and fish species largely occurring in isolation from those to the north. The Antarctic Circumpolar Current also disperses biota throughout the Southern Ocean

  13. Coupling of North Pacific Productivity, Beringian Precipitation, and Antarctic Bottom Water Formation: an Atmospheric Link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caissie, B.; Wilkie, K. M. K.

    2016-12-01

    Changes in primary productivity in the North Pacific occur on a variety of timescales from seasonal to orbital. A prime indicator of this productivity is expressed as laminated intervals deposited simultaneously in intermediate-depth waters across the North Pacific and its marginal seas at Glacial Terminations. Debate continues regarding the mechanism that triggered this anoxia in the North Pacific. Some argue for a change in intermediate water ventilation, and others for simply an increase in primary productivity. While little evidence has been found for a change in ventilation of intermediate waters, primary productivity increased dramatically at Terminations. However, the cause of this primary productivity is currently unknown. Some have suggested increasing aeolian iron deposition, increasing nutrient input due to rising sea level, or changes in stratification. Here we show that although there is no change in intermediate water ventilation during laminated intervals, there is a significant change in the rate of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) Formation. We use new diatom records from the Bering Sea and previously published sediment records from the South Pacific and Lake El'gygytgyn, Russia to show that AABW formation is coupled with primary productivity in the North Pacific and terrestrial precipitation in Beringia. During three interglacials (MIS 1, MIS 5, and MIS 11), primary productivity, driven by increased upwelling, is high when AABW formation is high. This increased upwelling in turn increases the open water area of the Bering Sea, pushes sea ice farther north and increases moisture supply to the Beringian continent. At peak interglacials, productivity in the North Pacific and Beringian temperatures decrease simultaneously with a decrease in AABW formation. We attribute these changes to large-scale atmospheric climate modes linking changes in the strength and position of the Aleutian Low to upwelling of nutrient-rich waters in the North Pacific and Bering

  14. Estimate of radiocaesium derived FNPP1 accident in the North Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomata, Yayoi; Aoyama, Michio; Tsubono, Takaki; Tsumune, Daisuke; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2017-04-01

    134Cs and 137Cs (radiocaesium) were released to the North Pacific Ocean by direct discharge and atmospheric deposition released from the TEPCO Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP1) accident in 2011. After the FNPP1 accident, measurements of 134Cs and 137Cs were conducted by many researches. However, those results are only snapshots in order to interpret the distribution and transport of the released radiocaesium on a basin scale. It is recognized that estimation of the total amount of released 134Cs and 137Cs is necessary to assess the radioecological impacts of their release on the environment. It was reported that the inventory of 134Cs or 137Cs on the North Pacific Ocean after the FNPP1 accident was 15.2-18.3 PBq based on the observations (Aoyama et al., 2016a), 15.3±1.6 PBq by OI analysis (Inomata et al., 2016), 16.1±1.64 PBq by global ocean model (Tsubono et al., 2016). These suggest that more than 75 % of the atmospheric-released radiocaesium (15.2-20.4 PBq; Aoyama et al., 2016a) were deposited on the North Pacific Ocean. The radiocaesium from the atmospheric fallout and direct discharge were expected to mixing as well as diluting near the coastal region and transported eastward across the North Pacific Ocean in the surface layer. Furthermore, radicaesium were rapidly mixed and penetrated into the subsurface water in the North Pacific Ocean in winter. It was revealed that these radiocaesium existed in the Subtropical Mode Water (STMW, Aoyama et al., 2016b; Kaeriyama et al., 2016) and Central Mode Water (CMW, Aoyama et al., 2016b), suggesting that mode water formation and subduction are efficient pathway for the transport of FNPP1 derived radiocaesium into the ocean interior within 1-year timescale. Kaeriyama et al. (2016) estimated the total amount of FNPP1 derived radiocaesium in the STMW was 4.2 ± 1.1 PBq in October-November 2012. However, there is no estimation of the amount of radiocaesium in the CMW. Therefore, it is impossible to discuss

  15. Characteristics of Atmospheric Circulation and Hydrologic Cycle over the North Pacific on Sub-seasonal Timescale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, X.

    2016-12-01

    The air-sea system over the North Pacific region has multi-scale processes. Among them, the sub-seasonal timescale process has attracted literature due to its close linkage with persistent cold event or heavy rainfall event over east Asia and North American. In this study, we focused on the atmospheric circulation and hydrologic cycle over the North Pacific on sub-seasonal timescale. The EOF results showed that, there are two dominant modes of latent heat fluxes (evaporation) anomaly over the North Pacific ocean region on sub-seasonal timescale. The first mode exhibits an above normal/below normal latent heat release along the East Asian coastal region between 10º-45ºN, and below normal/above one to the east side. The first modes propagates downstream like the wave-train. The second mode shows a see-saw pattern, with positive anomaly over the Kuroshio and its extending region and negative one over the Northeast Pacific. It is seen that the associated anomalies in integrated vapor transport (IVT) and precipitation exhibit opposite sign with the anomaly in evaporation: increased/decreased evaporation from the ocean to the air is linkage with decreased/increased IVT and precipitation locally. Additionally, for the second mode, the increased IVT extends to the northwest part of the North America. The precipitation along the North American northwest coast increase significantly. The influences of the first mode is mainly located over the northwest Pacific and fades to the east of the dateline. The driver of the first mode is the southeastward propagation of a wave train across Eurasian mid and high latitudes. The invasion of the wave train into the northwest Pacific contributes to the first mode of latent heat anomaly over the North Pacific ocean region. The driver of the second mode is the intensified/weakened Aleutian low. When the Aleutian low is intensified on sub-seasonal timescale, the increased wind speed and colder air temperature induce above

  16. Enhanced Late Holocene ENSO/PDO expression along the margins of the eastern North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, John A.; Anderson, Lesleigh

    2011-01-01

    Pacific climate is known to have varied during the Holocene, but spatial patterns remain poorly defined. This paper compiles terrestrial and marine proxy data from sites along the northeastern Pacific margins and proposes that they indicate 1) suppressed ENSO conditions during the middle Holocene between ∼8000 and 4000 cal BP with a North Pacific that generally resembled a La Niña-like or more negative PDO phase and 2) a climate transition between ∼4200 and 3000 cal BP that appears to be the teleconnected expression to a more modern-like ENSO Pacific. Compared to modern day conditions, the compiled data suggest that during the middle Holocene, the Aleutian Low was generally weaker during the winter and/or located more to the west, while the North Pacific High was stronger during the summer and located more to the north. Coastal upwelling off California was more enhanced during the summer and fall but suppressed during the spring. Oregon and California sea surface temperatures (SSTs) were cooler. The Santa Barbara Basin had an anomalous record, suggesting warmer SSTs.

  17. Statistical Characteristics of Mesoscale Eddies in the North Pacific Derived from Satellite Altimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hsin Cheng

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The sea level anomaly data derived from satellite altimetry are analyzed to investigate statistical characteristics of mesoscale eddies in the North Pacific. Eddies are detected by a free-threshold eddy identification algorithm. The results show that the distributions of size, amplitude, propagation speed, and eddy kinetic energy of eddy follow the Rayleigh distribution. The most active regions of eddies are the Kuroshio Extension region, the Subtropical Counter Current zone, and the Northeastern Tropical Pacific region. By contrast, eddies are seldom observed around the center of the eastern part of the North Pacific Subarctic Gyre. The propagation speed and kinetic energy of cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies are almost the same, but anticyclonic eddies possess greater lifespans, sizes, and amplitudes than those of cyclonic eddies. Most eddies in the North Pacific propagate westward except in the Oyashio region. Around the northeastern tropical Pacific and the California currents, cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies propagate westward with slightly equatorward (197° average azimuth relative to east and poleward (165° deflection, respectively. This implies that the background current may play an important role in formation of the eddy pathway patterns.

  18. A database of paleoceanographic sediment cores from the North Pacific, 1951–2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Borreggine

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We assessed sediment coring, data acquisition, and publications from the North Pacific (north of 30° N from 1951 to 2016. There are 2134 sediment cores collected by American, French, Japanese, Russian, and international research vessels across the North Pacific (including the Pacific subarctic gyre, Alaskan gyre, Japan margin, and California margin; 1391 cores, the Sea of Okhotsk (271 cores, the Bering Sea (123 cores, and the Sea of Japan (349 cores reported here. All existing metadata associated with these sediment cores are documented here, including coring date, location, core number, cruise number, water depth, vessel metadata, and coring technology. North Pacific sediment core age models are built with isotope stratigraphy, radiocarbon dating, magnetostratigraphy, biostratigraphy, tephrochronology, % opal, color, and lithological proxies. Here, we evaluate the iterative generation of each published age model and provide comprehensive documentation of the dating techniques used, along with sedimentation rates and age ranges. We categorized cores according to the availability of a variety of proxy evidence, including biological (e.g., benthic and planktonic foraminifera assemblages, geochemical (e.g., major trace element concentrations, isotopic (e.g., bulk sediment nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon isotopes, and stratigraphic (e.g., preserved laminations proxies. This database is a unique resource to the paleoceanographic and paleoclimate communities and provides cohesive accessibility to sedimentary sequences, age model development, and proxies. The data set is publicly available through PANGAEA at https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.875998.

  19. Variations in North Pacific sea surface temperature caused by Arctic stratospheric ozone anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fei; Li, Jianping; Zhang, Jiankai; Tian, Wenshou; Hu, Yongyun; Zhao, Sen; Sun, Cheng; Ding, Ruiqing; Feng, Juan; Yang, Yun

    2017-11-01

    Recently, observations and simulations have shown that Arctic stratospheric ozone (ASO) variations affect the middle–high latitude tropospheric climate in the Northern Hemisphere. In particular, a connection from the ASO to El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) has been reported. However, no detailed study has been made of a key process in the connection, the influence of ASO on the North Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) and its underlying mechanism. Using observations, reanalysis and simulations, it is found that the ASO changes in March have the strongest connection with North Pacific SST variations in April. This implies a leading effect of ASO on North Pacific SST. The stratospheric circulation anomalies caused by March ASO changes can rapidly extend to the lower troposphere in the region 60°–90°N, 180°–120°W. Nevertheless, a theoretical analysis indicates that circulation anomalies from the region 60°–90°N, 180°–120°W in the lower troposphere would take about a month to propagate horizontally to the North Pacific middle latitudes (30°–60°N, 180°–120°W).

  20. A database of paleoceanographic sediment cores from the North Pacific, 1951-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borreggine, Marisa; Myhre, Sarah E.; Mislan, K. Allison S.; Deutsch, Curtis; Davis, Catherine V.

    2017-09-01

    We assessed sediment coring, data acquisition, and publications from the North Pacific (north of 30° N) from 1951 to 2016. There are 2134 sediment cores collected by American, French, Japanese, Russian, and international research vessels across the North Pacific (including the Pacific subarctic gyre, Alaskan gyre, Japan margin, and California margin; 1391 cores), the Sea of Okhotsk (271 cores), the Bering Sea (123 cores), and the Sea of Japan (349 cores) reported here. All existing metadata associated with these sediment cores are documented here, including coring date, location, core number, cruise number, water depth, vessel metadata, and coring technology. North Pacific sediment core age models are built with isotope stratigraphy, radiocarbon dating, magnetostratigraphy, biostratigraphy, tephrochronology, % opal, color, and lithological proxies. Here, we evaluate the iterative generation of each published age model and provide comprehensive documentation of the dating techniques used, along with sedimentation rates and age ranges. We categorized cores according to the availability of a variety of proxy evidence, including biological (e.g., benthic and planktonic foraminifera assemblages), geochemical (e.g., major trace element concentrations), isotopic (e.g., bulk sediment nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon isotopes), and stratigraphic (e.g., preserved laminations) proxies. This database is a unique resource to the paleoceanographic and paleoclimate communities and provides cohesive accessibility to sedimentary sequences, age model development, and proxies. The data set is publicly available through PANGAEA at https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.875998" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.875998.

  1. Mechanisms and predictability of multiyear ecosystem variability in the North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikamoto, Megumi O.; Timmermann, Axel; Chikamoto, Yoshimitsu; Tokinaga, Hiroki; Harada, Naomi

    2015-11-01

    Aleutian Low variations provide vorticity, buoyancy, and heat-flux forcing to the North Pacific Ocean, which in turn cause changes in ocean circulation, mixed layer characteristics and sea ice coverage. In this process the white noise atmospheric characteristics are integrated dynamically and thermodynamically to generate red noise ocean spectra. Using the Community Earth System Model (version 1.0.3) we study the resulting biogeochemical and ecosystem responses in the North Pacific. We find that ocean dynamical variables have an impact on the tendencies of key nutrients and biological production, which leads to a further reddening of biogeochemical spectra resulting in potential predictability on time scales of 2-4 years. However, this low-pass filtering does not apply to all biogeochemical variables and is regionally dependent. It is shown that phytoplankton biomass in the Central North Pacific adjusts to the much shorter-term variability associated with changes in mixed layer depth, light availability, and zooplankton grazing, thus limiting the predictability of phytoplankton anomalies to about 1 year. In the eastern North Pacific the slow advection of anomalous nutrient concentrations leads to longer persistence of phytoplankton variability and increased potential predictability of up to 3 years.

  2. Evolution of biogeography in the 21st Century - Development of a North Pacific Nonindigenous Species Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquatic invasive species are one of the major ecological threats to the ecological integrity of estuarine and near-coastal waters. However, lack of systematic inventories of nonindigenous species across the North Pacific countries limits our ability to assess how the extent of i...

  3. Atlas of Nonindigenous Marine and Estuarine Species in the North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    The product consists of a report synthesizing available information on nonindigenous species in the North Pacific. We note that while this product focuses on invasive species, the tools and approaches developed for this research are the precursors on how we will address identifyi...

  4. North Pacific Spiny Dogfish (Squalus suckleyi) presence in Eelgrass habitat in the Salish Sea, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke E. Penaluna; Leo R. Bodensteiner

    2015-01-01

    Eelgrass (Zostera marina) is the dominant seagrass along the Pacific North American Coast, providing complex physical structure, high trophic productivity, and protection from predators (Phillips 1984; Simenstad 1994). Because of these multiple functions, many fish species and life stages use Eelgrass beds more than other nearshore habitat types (...

  5. Northern fulmars as biological monitors of trends of plastic pollution in the eastern North Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery-Gomm, Stephanie; O'Hara, Patrick D; Kleine, Lydia; Bowes, Victoria; Wilson, Laurie K; Barry, Karen L

    2012-09-01

    Marine plastic debris is a global issue, which highlights the need for internationally standardized methods of monitoring plastic pollution. The stomach contents of beached northern fulmar (Fulmarus glacialis) have proven a cost-effective biomonitor in Europe. However, recent information on northern fulmar plastic ingestion is lacking in the North Pacific. We quantified the stomach contents of 67 fulmars from beaches in the eastern North Pacific in 2009-2010 and found that 92.5% of fulmars had ingested an average of 36.8 pieces, or 0.385 g of plastic. Plastic ingestion in these fulmars is among the highest recorded globally. Compared to earlier studies in the North Pacific, our findings indicate an increase in plastic ingestion over the past 40 years. This study substantiates the use of northern fulmar as biomonitors of plastic pollution in the North Pacific and suggests that the high levels of plastic pollution in this region warrant further monitoring. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. New genera and species of antipatharian corals (Cnidaria: Anthozoa) from the North Pacific

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opresko, D.M.

    2005-01-01

    New taxa of deep water antipatharian corals of the North Pacific are described. Represented in the family Schizopathidae are: Bathypathes seculata spec. nov.; Umbellapathes gen. nov.; U. helioanthes spec. nov.; U. bipinnata spec. nov.; Dendrobathypathes boutillieri spec. nov.; D. fragilis spec.

  7. Characteristics of the Nonoccurrence of Tropical Cyclones in the Western North Pacific in August 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Won Choi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study identified the causes of the nonoccurrence of tropical cyclones (TCs in August 2014 by examining large-scale environments. First, over the previous 30 years, the TC genesis frequency in August showed an overall statistically significant decline. In the tropical and subtropical western Pacific, the outgoing longwave radiation anomaly index also exhibited an overall increase until recently. Regarding precipitable water and precipitation, an analysis was performed on the difference between the mean values for August 2014 and the mean values for August over the previous 30 years. As a result, while convective activities were suppressed in the tropical and subtropical western Pacific, convective activities were strong in the mid-latitudes of East Asia. This indicates that while the western North Pacific summer monsoon was weakened in August 2014, the East Asian summer monsoon was strengthened. The weakening of the western North Pacific summer monsoon may have made it difficult for TCs to occur. An analysis of 850 hPa and 500 hPa stream flows showed the strengthening of anomalous huge anticyclonic circulations in the tropical and subtropical western Pacific, whereas anomalously cyclonic circulations were reinforced in the mid-latitudes of East Asia. This was associated with the result that the western North Pacific subtropical high (WNPSH showed further westward and southward expansion in August 2014 compared to the climatological mean WNPSH. Therefore, TCs were unlikely to occur in the tropical and subtropical western Pacific, but anomalous cold northerlies and anomalous warm southerlies converged in the Japanese Islands after originating in China’s central region and passing the East China Sea. Therefore, a favorable environment for the occurrence of precipitation had been formed.

  8. Environmental drivers of mesozooplankton biomass variability in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Bellineth; Landry, Michael R.; Décima, Moira; Hannides, Cecelia C. S.

    2016-12-01

    The environmental drivers of zooplankton variability are poorly explored for the central subtropical Pacific, where a direct bottom-up food-web connection is suggested by increasing trends in primary production and mesozooplankton biomass at station ALOHA (A Long-term Oligotrophic Habitat Assessment) over the past 20 years (1994-2013). Here we use generalized additive models (GAMs) to investigate how these trends relate to the major modes of North Pacific climate variability. A GAM based on monthly mean data explains 43% of the temporal variability in mesozooplankton biomass with significant influences from primary productivity (PP), sea surface temperature (SST), North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO), and El Niño. This result mainly reflects the seasonal plankton cycle at station ALOHA, in which increasing light and SST lead to enhanced nitrogen fixation, productivity, and zooplankton biomass during summertime. Based on annual mean data, GAMs for two variables suggest that PP and 3-4 year lagged NPGO individually account for 40% of zooplankton variability. The full annual mean GAM explains 70% of variability of zooplankton biomass with significant influences from PP, 4 year lagged NPGO, and 4 year lagged Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). The NPGO affects wind stress, sea surface height, and subtropical gyre circulation and has been linked to mideuphotic zone anomalies in salinity and PP at station ALOHA. Our study broadens the known impact of this climate mode on plankton dynamics in the North Pacific. While lagged transport effects are also evident for subtropical waters, our study highlights a strong coupling between zooplankton fluctuations and PP, which differs from the transport-dominated climate influences that have been found for North Pacific boundary currents.

  9. A revised estimate of Pacific-North America motion and implications for Western North America plate boundary zone tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demets, Charles; Gordon, Richard G.; Stein, Seth; Argus, Donald F.

    1987-01-01

    Marine magnetic profiles from the Gulf of Californa are studied in order to revise the estimate of Pacific-North America motion. It is found that since 3 Ma spreading has averaged 48 mm/yr, consistent with a new global plate motion model derived without any data. The present data suggest that strike-slip motion on faults west of the San Andreas is less than previously thought, reducing the San Andreas discrepancy with geodetic, seismological, and other geologic observations.

  10. Mesoscale cyclogenesis over the western north Pacific Ocean during TPARC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A. Davis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Three cases of mesoscale marine cyclogenesis over the subtropics of the Western Pacific Ocean are investigated. Each case occurred during the THORPEX Pacific Asia Regional Campaign and Tropical Cyclone Structure (TCS-08 field phases in 2008. Each cyclone developed from remnants of disturbances that earlier showed potential for tropical cyclogenesis within the tropics. Two of the cyclones produced gale-force surface winds, and one, designated as a tropical cyclone, resulted in a significant coastal storm over eastern Japan. Development was initiated by a burst of organized mesoscale convection that consolidated and intensified the surface cyclonic circulation over a period of 12–24 h. Upper-tropospheric potential vorticity anomalies modulated the vertical wind shear that, in turn, influenced the periods of cyclone intensification and weakening. Weak baroclinicity associated with vertical shear was also deemed important in organizing mesoscale ascent and the convection outbreaks. The remnant tropical disturbances contributed exceptional water vapour content to higher latitudes that led to strong diabatic heating, and the tropical remnants contributed vorticity that was the seed of the development in the subtropics. Predictability of these events more than three days in advance appears to be minimal.

  11. Comparative Resilience in Five North Pacific Regional Salmon Fisheries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xanthippe Augerot

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the past century, regional fisheries for Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp. have been managed primarily for their provisioning function, not for ecological support and cultural significance. We examine the resilience of the regional salmon fisheries of Japan, the Russian Far East, Alaska, British Columbia, and Washington-Oregon-California (WOC in terms of their provisioning function. Using the three dimensions of the adaptive cycle - capital, connectedness, and resilience - we infer the resilience of the five fisheries based on a qualitative assessment of capital accumulation and connectedness at the regional scale. In our assessment, we evaluate natural capital and connectedness and constructed capital and connectedness. The Russian Far East fishery is the most resilient, followed by Alaska, British Columbia, Japan, and WOC. Adaptive capacity in the fisheries is contingent upon high levels of natural capital and connectedness and moderate levels of constructed capital and connectedness. Cross-scale interactions and global market demand are significant factors in reduced resilience. Greater attention to ecological functioning and cultural signification has the potential to increase resilience in Pacific salmon ecosystems.

  12. Modeling of North Pacific Climate Variability Forced by Oceanic Heat Flux Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulaeva, Elena; Schneider, Niklas; Pierce, David W.; Barnett, Tim P.

    2001-10-01

    Potential predictability of low-frequency climate changes in the North Pacific depends on two main factors. The first is the sensitivity of the atmosphere to ocean-induced anomalies at the sea surface in midlatitudes. The second is the degree of teleconnectivity of the tropical low-frequency variability to midlatitudes. In contrast to the traditional approach of prescribing sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies, the response of a coupled atmospheric general circulation (CCM3)-mixed layer ocean model to oceanic perturbations of the mixed layer heat budget is examined. Since positive oceanic heat flux perturbations partially increase SST anomalies (locally), and partially are vented directly into the atmosphere, expressing boundary forcing on the atmosphere by prescribing upper-ocean heat flux anomalies allows for better understanding of the physical mechanism of low-frequency variability in midlatitudes. In the framework of this approach SST is considered to be a part of the adjustment of the coupled system rather than an external forcing. Wintertime model responses to mixed layer heat budget perturbations of up to 40 W m2 in the Kuroshio extension region and in the tropical central Pacific show statistically significant anomalies of 500-mb geopotential height (Z500) in the midlatitudes. The response to the tropical forcing resembles the well-known Pacific-North American pattern, one of the leading modes of internal variability of the control run. The amplitude of the Z500 geopotential height reaches 40 m in the region of the Aleutian low. The response of Z500 to forcing in the Kuroshio Current extension region resembles the mixture of western Pacific and Pacific-North American patterns, the first two modes of the internal variability of the atmosphere. In midlatitudes this response is equivalent barotropic, with the maximum of 80 m at (60°N, 160°W). Examination of the vorticity and thermodynamic budgets reveals the crucial role of submonthly transient eddies in

  13. North Pacific decadal variability in the CMIP5 last millennium simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Laura E.; Anchukaitis, Kevin J.

    2016-12-01

    The Pacific ocean-atmosphere system exerts an important influence on the climate of Asia and North America, but the limited length of the observational record prevents a complete understanding of its bidecadal and multidecadal time scales. Paleoclimate reconstructions provide one source of information on longer time scales, although they differ in their estimation of the behavior of the Pacific decadal oscillation (PDO) prior to the instrumental period. Forced general circulation model simulations offer complementary long-term perspectives on both the history and dynamics of this important mode of variability. Here, we analyze the PDO in the ensemble of CMIP5/PMIP3 last millennium (past1000 + historical) simulations. We evaluate the modeled spatial, temporal, and spectral characteristics of this mode, as well as teleconnections between North Pacific variability and global climate. All models produce a mode of North Pacific variability over the last millennium with spatial patterns and spectral power density similar to observations. CCSM, FGOALS, and IPSL best reproduce observed spatial patterns, spectral characteristics, and teleconnections to terrestrial regions used in paleoclimate proxy reconstructions. In these simulations, the PDO shows no consistent response to solar or volcanic forcing.

  14. Shifting Pacific storm tracks as stressors to ecosystems of western North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannenberg, Matthew P; Wise, Erika K

    2017-11-01

    Much of the precipitation delivered to western North America arrives during the cool season via midlatitude Pacific storm tracks, which may experience future shifts in response to climate change. Here, we assess the sensitivity of the hydroclimate and ecosystems of western North America to the latitudinal position of cool-season Pacific storm tracks. We calculated correlations between storm track variability and three hydroclimatic variables: gridded cool-season standardized precipitation-evapotranspiration index, April snow water equivalent, and water year streamflow from a network of USGS stream gauges. To assess how historical storm track variability affected ecosystem processes, we derived forest growth estimates from a large network of tree-ring widths and land surface phenology and wildfire estimates from remote sensing. From 1980 to 2014, cool-season storm tracks entered western North America between approximately 41°N and 53°N. Cool-season moisture supply and snowpack responded strongly to storm track position, with positive correlations to storm track latitude in eastern Alaska and northwestern Canada but negative correlations in the northwestern U.S. Ecosystems of the western United States were greener and more productive following winters with south-shifted storm tracks, while Canadian ecosystems were greener in years when the cool-season storm track was shifted to the north. On average, larger areas of the northwestern United States were burned by moderate to high severity wildfires when storm tracks were displaced north, and the average burn area per fire also tended to be higher in years with north-shifted storm tracks. These results suggest that projected shifts of Pacific storm tracks over the 21st century would likely alter hydroclimatic and ecological regimes in western North America, particularly in the northwestern United States, where moisture supply and ecosystem processes are highly sensitive to the position of cool-season storm tracks.

  15. North pacific right whale surveys conducted in the Bering Sea and North Pacific Ocean by Alaska Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Mammal Laboratory from 2007-08-01 to 2011-09-10 (NCEI Accession 0133935)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The North Pacific right whale (NPRW) was heavily hunted between the 17th and the 20th centuries. Protection was supposedly afforded by international treaties in the...

  16. A teleconnection between Atlantic sea surface temperature and eastern and central North Pacific tropical cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricola, Christina M.; Saravanan, R.; Chang, Ping

    2017-01-01

    The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a major source of seasonal tropical cyclone (TC) predictability in both local and remote ocean basins. Unusually warm eastern-central equatorial Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) during El Niño tends to enhance eastern and central North Pacific (ECNP) TCs and suppress Atlantic TCs. Here we demonstrate that Atlantic SST variability likewise influences remote TC activity in the eastern-central Pacific through a Walker Circulation-type response analogous to the ENSO-Atlantic TC teleconnection, using observations and 27 km resolution tropical channel model (TCM) simulations. Observed and simulated ECNP TC activity is reduced during the positive Atlantic Meridional Mode (AMM), which is characterized by warm northern and cool southern tropical Atlantic SST anomalies, and vice versa during the negative AMM. Large ensembles of TCM simulations indicate that SST variability, rather than internal atmospheric variability, drives extreme ECNP hurricane seasons.

  17. Oceanography. Centennial changes in North Pacific anoxia linked to tropical trade winds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Curtis; Berelson, William; Thunell, Robert; Weber, Thomas; Tems, Caitlin; McManus, James; Crusius, John; Ito, Taka; Baumgartner, Timothy; Ferreira, Vicente; Mey, Jacob; van Geen, Alexander

    2014-08-08

    Climate warming is expected to reduce oxygen (O2) supply to the ocean and expand its oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). We reconstructed variations in the extent of North Pacific anoxia since 1850 using a geochemical proxy for denitrification (δ(15)N) from multiple sediment cores. Increasing δ(15)N since ~1990 records an expansion of anoxia, consistent with observed O2 trends. However, this was preceded by a longer declining δ(15)N trend that implies that the anoxic zone was shrinking for most of the 20th century. Both periods can be explained by changes in winds over the tropical Pacific that drive upwelling, biological productivity, and O2 demand within the OMZ. If equatorial Pacific winds resume their predicted weakening trend, the ocean's largest anoxic zone will contract despite a global O2 decline. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Impacts of the Atlantic Multidecadal Variability on the North Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruprich-Robert, Yohan; Msadek, Rym; Castruccio, Frederic; Yeager, Stephen; Delworth, Thomas; Danabasoglu, Gokhan

    2017-04-01

    The Atlantic Multidecadal Variability (AMV) is associated with marked modulations of climate anomalies over many areas of the globe. This includes droughts in Africa and North America, decline in sea ice, changes of tropical cyclone activity in the Atlantic, and changes in the atmospheric large-scale circulation. However, the shortness of the historical observations compared to the AMV period ( 60-80yr) makes it difficult to show that the AMV is a direct driver of these variations. To isolate the AMV climate response, we use a suite of global coupled models from GFDL and NCAR, in which the North Atlantic sea surface temperatures are restored to the observed AMV pattern, while the other ocean basins are left fully coupled. In order to explore and robustly isolate the AMV impacts, we use large ensemble simulations (between 30 and 100 members depending on the model) that are integrated for 10 years. All models show that during boreal summer the AMV alters the Walker Circulation and generates precipitation anomalies over the whole tropical belt. During boreal winter, the AMV warming is associated with large anomalies over the Pacific, with a response that projects onto a negative phase of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). In this presentation, we focus on a hierarchy of experiments in which the ocean-atmosphere coupling is globally or regionally precluded to extract the physical mechanisms leading to the Pacific response. We show that the PDO response comes from a lagged adjustment of the tropical Pacific Ocean to the AMV forcing in summer, and it is reinforced by ocean-atmosphere coupling over the extratropical Pacific. It is then show that the PDO response contribute to precipitation and temperature anomalies over North America. Therefore, our study highlights the importance of using a global coupled framework to investigate the climate impacts of the AMV.

  19. Interannual Variability of Methane and Nitrous Oxide in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Samuel T.; Ferrón, Sara; Karl, David M.

    2017-10-01

    The temporal variability of two important greenhouse gases, methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), is reported for the upper water column at Station ALOHA in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre. Measured concentrations of N2O conform to predicted values with an increase in saturation during the summer period. In contrast, CH4 is less predictable and shows an approximate 2 year transition from a state of oversaturation in surface waters to equilibrium values in 2015, implying a change in net CH4 production. The decrease in CH4 followed on from fluctuations in phosphate concentrations supporting the hypothesized link between microbial metabolism of phosphorus and the global biogeochemical cycle of CH4. At this current time, future trends in the net CH4 production in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre are uncertain and specifically whether the surface ocean will be a net source or sink for CH4.

  20. Marine Environmental Emergencies in the North Pacific Ocean: Lessons Learned from Recent Oil Spills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Un Hyuk; Short, Jeffrey

    2017-07-01

    Increasing marine vessel traffic, and oil and gas exploration and development throughout the North Pacific basin brings increasing risks of oil spills. Recognizing the serious challenges presented to response authorities, this Special Issue was organized by the North Pacific Marine Science Organization to provide an introduction to the current state of scientific understanding regarding the environmental effects of oil spills. Because interactions of spilled oils with biota and their habitats are complex, the most serious environmental damages from these spills are not necessarily those of greatest immediate concern by the public. Our overarching goal for this Special Issue is to provide an efficient introduction to the most important ways that oil spills can harm biota, habitats, and ecosystems through invited, targeted mini-reviews augmented by original research articles. We provide a brief background on the challenges posed by large oil spills to response authorities, summarize findings from the articles published in this Special Issue, and highlight some key research needs.

  1. Influence of North Pacific decadal variability on the western Canadian Arctic over the past 700 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe, François; Francus, Pierre; Lamoureux, Scott F.; Vuille, Mathias; Jenny, Jean-Philippe; Bradley, Raymond S.; Massa, Charly

    2017-04-01

    Understanding how internal climate variability influences arctic regions is required to better forecast future global climate variations. This paper investigates an annually-laminated (varved) record from the western Canadian Arctic and finds that the varves are negatively correlated with both the instrumental Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) during the past century and also with reconstructed PDO over the past 700 years, suggesting drier Arctic conditions during high-PDO phases, and vice versa. These results are in agreement with known regional teleconnections, whereby the PDO is negatively and positively correlated with summer precipitation and mean sea level pressure respectively. This pattern is also evident during the positive phase of the North Pacific Index (NPI) in autumn. Reduced sea-ice cover during summer-autumn is observed in the region during PDO- (NPI+) and is associated with low-level southerly winds that originate from the northernmost Pacific across the Bering Strait and can reach as far as the western Canadian Arctic. These climate anomalies are associated with the PDO- (NPI+) phase and are key factors in enhancing evaporation and subsequent precipitation in this region of the Arctic. Collectively, the sedimentary evidence suggests that North Pacific climate variability has been a persistent regulator of the regional climate in the western Canadian Arctic. Since projected sea-ice loss will contribute to enhanced future warming in the Arctic, future negative phases of the PDO (or NPI+) will likely act to amplify this positive feedback.

  2. Tropic dynamics of albatrosses associated with squid and large-mesh driftnet fisheries in the North Pacific Ocean

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Diets of Laysan (LAA) and Black-footed albatrosses (BFA) killed in squid and large-mesh driftnets in the transitional zone of the North Pacific Ocean were...

  3. Multi-year tracking reveals extensive pelagic phase of juvenile loggerhead sea turtles in the North Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscoe, D K; Parker, D M; Bograd, S; Hazen, E; Scales, K; Balazs, G H; Kurita, M; Saito, T; Okamoto, H; Rice, M; Polovina, J J; Crowder, L B

    2016-01-01

    The juvenile stage of loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) can last for decades. In the North Pacific Ocean, much is known about their seasonal movements in relation to pelagic habitat, yet understanding their multi-year, basin-scale movements has proven more difficult. Here, we categorize the large-scale movements of 231 turtles satellite tracked from 1997 to 2013 and explore the influence of biological and environmental drivers on basin-scale movement. Results show high residency of juvenile loggerheads within the Central North Pacific and a moderate influence of the Earth's magnetic field, but no real-time environmental driver to explain migratory behavior. We suggest the Central North Pacific acts as important developmental foraging grounds for young juvenile loggerhead sea turtles, rather than just a migratory corridor. We propose several hypotheses that may influence the connectivity between western and eastern juvenile loggerhead foraging grounds in the North Pacific Ocean.

  4. AFSC/NMML: Shore-based counts of the Eastern North Pacific gray whale stock from central California, 1967 - 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) has conducted shore-based counts of the Eastern North Pacific stock of gray whales (Eschrichtius robustus) 26 years from...

  5. AFSC/RACE/GAP/Conrath: Notes on the Reproductive Biology of Female Salmon Sharks in the Eastern North Pacific Ocean

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Little information has previously been published on the reproductive biology of the salmon shark in the Eastern North Pacific ocean. This data set incorporates basic...

  6. Marine Animal Sound Database. Twelve Years of Tracking 52-Hz Whale Calls from a Unique Source in the North Pacific

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Watkins, William

    2004-01-01

    Long-term monitoring of underwater sounds using U.S. Navy SOSUS and other hydrophone arrays allowed us to follow the seasonal distribution of underwater calls produced by blue, fin and humpback whales across the North Pacific...

  7. Abrupt North Pacific Anoxic Events Caused by Enhanced Primary Productivity and Iron Fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, K. P.; Ravelo, A. C.; Aiello, I. W.; Drake, M. K.; Sakamoto, T.

    2016-12-01

    Changes in nutrient cycling, including iron fertilization events, represent important potential influences on North Pacific anoxia that merit further evaluation. Previous work over the last glacial cycle has revealed that the deglaciation was marked by pronounced, widespread expansions of oxygen minimum zones throughout the North Pacific; however, the cause of these synchronous, abrupt anoxic events is still unresolved, and it is unclear whether deoxygenation was a consistent, recurring feature of past deglaciations. To date, no previous North Pacific oxygen minimum zone studies have looked past the last glacial cycle. Long paleoceanographic records containing abrupt deoxygenation events are needed to better understand the mechanisms and climatic conditions that control nutrient cycling and oceanic oxygen concentrations on long and short timescales. The main objective of this study is to provide the first high-resolution analyses of abrupt North Pacific anoxic events over multiple glacial-interglacial cycles, in order to determine whether changes in climate, productivity, and/or ventilation consistently affected anoxia. Here, we present continuous, high-resolution records of primary productivity and bulk sediment nitrogen isotopes (δ15Nbulk) from the last 1.2 Myr from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site U1342 (818 m water depth), a site in the Bering Sea that shows abrupt changes in oxygen concentrations over time. Punctuated laminated intervals, representing anoxic conditions, occur primarily within interglacial climates and are correlated with high productivity and high nitrate utilization, indicated by δ15Nbulk. These results indicate that abrupt anoxia at intermediate depths within the Bering Sea was related to high productivity events in the surface waters and suggest that iron fertilization likely played an important role in stimulating primary productivity, as no other mechanism could explain the correlation between high productivity and high nitrate

  8. Distribution Patterns and Phylogeny of Marine Stramenopiles in the North Pacific Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yun-Chi; Campbell, Tracy; Chung, Chih-Ching; Gong, Gwo-Ching; Chiang, Kuo-Ping; Worden, Alexandra Z.

    2012-01-01

    Marine stramenopiles (MASTs) are a diverse suite of eukaryotic microbes found in marine environments. Several MAST lineages are thought to contain heterotrophic nanoflagellates. However, MASTs remain uncultured and data on distributions and trophic modes are limited. We investigated MASTs in provinces on the west and east sides of the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre, specifically the East China Sea (ECS) and the California Current system (CALC). For each province, DNA was sampled from three zo...

  9. Critically endangered western gray whales migrate to the eastern North Pacific

    OpenAIRE

    Mate, Bruce R.; Ilyashenko, Valentin Yu.; Bradford, Amanda L.; Vertyankin, Vladimir V.; Tsidulko, Grigory A.; Rozhnov, Vyacheslav V.; Irvine, Ladd M.

    2015-01-01

    Western North Pacific gray whales (WGWs), once considered extinct, are critically endangered with unknown migratory routes and reproductive areas. We attached satellite-monitored tags to seven WGWs on their primary feeding ground off Sakhalin Island, Russia, three of which subsequently migrated to regions occupied by non-endangered eastern gray whales (EGWs). A female with the longest-lasting tag visited all three major EGW reproductive areas off Baja California, Mexico, before returning to S...

  10. Migratory behavior of eastern North Pacific gray whales tracked using a hydrophone array

    OpenAIRE

    Guazzo, Regina A.; Helble, Tyler A.; D’Spain, Gerald L.; Weller, David W.; Wiggins, Sean M.; Hildebrand, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Eastern North Pacific gray whales make one of the longest annual migrations of any mammal, traveling from their summer feeding areas in the Bering and Chukchi Seas to their wintering areas in the lagoons of Baja California, Mexico. Although a significant body of knowledge on gray whale biology and behavior exists, little is known about their vocal behavior while migrating. In this study, we used a sparse hydrophone array deployed offshore of central California to investigate how gray whales b...

  11. Physical and underway data collected aboard the MELVILLE during cruise MV1007 in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2010-05-17 to 2010-06-16 (NODC Accession 0089615)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0089615 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the MELVILLE during cruise MV1007 in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from...

  12. Physical and underway data collected aboard the ATLANTIS during cruise AT15-63 in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2010-03-15 to 2010-04-14 (NODC Accession 0103918)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0103918 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the ATLANTIS during cruise AT15-63 in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean...

  13. Chemical, optical and other data collected aboard the MELVILLE during cruise MV1105 in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2011-04-29 to 2011-05-28 (NODC Accession 0116958)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0116958 includes chemical, optical and other data collected aboard the MELVILLE during cruise MV1105 in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific...

  14. Physical and underway data collected aboard the KNORR during cruise KN195-03 in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2009-01-12 to 2009-02-23 (NODC Accession 0104265)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0104265 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the KNORR during cruise KN195-03 in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from...

  15. Physical and underway data collected aboard the ATLANTIS during cruise AT15-43 in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2009-01-09 to 2009-02-16 (NODC Accession 0103873)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0103873 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the ATLANTIS during cruise AT15-43 in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean...

  16. PARTICULATE ORGANIC CARBON, cloud amount/frequency and other data from KAIMALINO and MOANA WAVE in the TOGA Area - Pacific and North Pacific Ocean from 1988-10-30 to 1989-11-29 (NODC Accession 9300009)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, Depth, Salinity, dissolved Oxygen (CTD), and Fluorescence data collected in North Pacific Ocean and TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) between October...

  17. Community structures of actively growing bacteria shift along a north-south transect in the western North Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Akito; Hamasaki, Koji

    2008-04-01

    Bacterial community structures and their activities in the ocean are tightly coupled with organic matter fluxes and thus control ocean biogeochemical cycles. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), halogenated nucleoside and thymidine analogue, has been recently used to monitor actively growing bacteria (AGB) in natural environments. We labelled DNA of proliferating cells in seawater bacterial assemblages with BrdU and determined community structures of the bacteria that were possible key species in mediating biochemical reactions in the ocean. Surface seawater samples were collected along a north-south transect in the North Pacific in October 2003 and subjected to BrdU magnetic beads immunocapture and PCR-DGGE (BUMP-DGGE) analysis. Change of BrdU-incorporated community structures reflected the change of water masses along a north-south transect from subarctic to subtropical gyres in the North Pacific. We identified 25 bands referred to AGB as BrdU-incorporated phylotypes, belonging to Alphaproteobacteria (5 bands), Betaproteobacteria (1 band), Gammaproteobacteria (4 bands), Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides (CFB) group bacteria (5 bands), Gram-positive bacteria (6 bands), and Cyanobacteria (4 bands). BrdU-incorporated phylotypes belonging to Vibrionales, Alteromonadales and Gram-positive bacteria appeared only at sampling stations in a subtropical gyre, while those belonging to Roseobacter-related bacteria and CFB group bacteria appeared at the stations in both subarctic and subtropical gyres. Our result revealed phylogenetic affiliation of AGB and their dynamic change along with north-south environmental gradients in open oceans. Different species of AGB utilize different amount and kinds of substrates, which can affect the change of organic matter fluxes along transect.

  18. Tropical Pacific influences on the North Atlantic Thermohaline Circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Latif

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Most global climate models simulate a weakening of the North Atlantic Thermohaline Circulation (THC in response to enhanced greenhouse warming. Both surface warming and freshening in high latitudes, the so-called sinking region, contribute to the weakening of the THC. Some models simulate even a complete breakdown of the THC at sufficiently strong forcing. Here results from a state-of-the-art global climate model are presented that does not simulate a weakening of the THC in response to greenhouse warming. Large-scale air-sea interactions in the tropics, similar to those operating during present-day El Niños, lead to anomalously high salinities in the tropical Atlantic. These are advected into the sinking region, thereby increasing the surface density and compensating the effects of the local warming and freshening. The results of the model study are corroborated by the analysis of observations.

  19. Accumulation status of persistent organochlorines in albatrosses from the North Pacific and the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guruge, K S; Watanabe, M; Tanaka, H; Tanabe, S

    2001-01-01

    Current status of contamination by persistent organochlorines (OCs) such as polychlorinated biphenyles (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs), isomers of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCHs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and chlordane compounds (CHLs) were examined in 61 individuals belonging to eight albatross species collected from the North Pacific and the Southern Ocean. Generally high OC concentrations were found in albatrosses from the North Pacific than those from the Southern Oceans. Black-footed albatrosses had noticeably high PCBs and DDTs concentrations with mean values of 92 and 33 micrograms/g wet weight in subcutaneous fat, respectively. Among the other OCs, concentration of CHLs was higher than that of HCB in North Pacific albatrosses. HCHs accumulation was the lowest among all the OCs analyzed. Species-specific differences were observed for HCB, CHLs and DDTs in some species in the Southern Ocean. No significant difference of gender and age-related accumulation was observed in total OCs. However, PCB concentrations were higher in mature birds than those from immature ones in the Southern Ocean. Species-specific accumulation patterns of OCs in albatrosses were closely related with their feeding, migration, age and geographical ranges.

  20. Role of Low Clouds in Summertime Atmosphere-Ocean Interactions over the North Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Joel R.; Zhang, Yuan; Wallace, John M.

    1998-10-01

    The summer-to-summer variability of the areal extent of marine stratiform cloudiness (MSC; stratus, stratocumulus, and fog) over the North Pacific is examined for the period of record 1952-92 using a dataset based on surface observations. Variability is largest in two regions: the central and western Pacific along 35°N coincident with a strong meridional gradient in climatological MSC amount, and the eastern Pacific near 15°N downstream of the persistent stratocumulus deck off Baja California. The MSC amount in both regions tends to be negatively correlated with local sea surface temperature (SST), suggestive of a positive cloud feedback on SST. The MSC amounts in the two regions also tend to be negatively correlated by virtue of their relationship to the basin-wide sea level pressure (SLP) field: a strengthening of the seasonal mean subtropical anticyclone is accompanied by increased cloudiness in the trade wind regime and decreased cloudiness in the southerly flow farther toward the west. These relationships are reflected in the leading modes derived from empirical orthogonal function analysis and singular value decomposition analysis of the MSC, SST, and SLP fields.From the 1950s to the 1980s, summertime MSC amounts increased in the central and western Pacific and decreased in the trade wind region, while SST exhibited the opposite tendencies. Although these trends contributed to the relationships described above, similar patterns are obtained when the analysis is performed on 1-yr difference fields (e.g., 1953 minus 1952, 1954 minus 1953, etc.). Hence, it appears that MSC plays an important role in atmosphere-ocean coupling over the North Pacific during the summer season when latent and sensible heat fluxes are not as dominant and the coupling between atmospheric circulation and SST is not as strong as in winter.

  1. On the unstable ENSO-Western North Pacific Monsoon relation during the 20th Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega Martín, Inmaculada; Gallego Puyol, David; Ribera Rodriguez, Pedro; Gómez Delgado, Francisco de Paula; Peña-Ortiz, Cristina

    2017-04-01

    The concept of the Western North Pacific Summer Monsoon (WNPSM) appeared for the first time in 1987. Unlike the Indian Summer Monsoon and the East Asian summer monsoon, the WNPSM is an oceanic monsoon driven essentially by the meridional gradient of sea surface temperature. Its circulation is characterized by a northwest-southeast oriented monsoon trough with intense precipitation and low-level southwesterlies and upper-tropospheric easterlies in the region [100°-130° E, 5°-15°N]. Although this monsoon is mainly oceanic, it modulates the precipitation of densely populated areas such as the Philippines. To date, the WNPSM has been quantified by the so-called Western North Pacific Monsoon Index (WNPMI), an index based on wind anomalies over large domains of the Western Pacific. The requirement of continuous observed wind over remote oceanic areas to compute the WNPMI has limited its availability to the 1949-2014 period. In this work we have extended the index by almost 100 years by using historical observations of wind direction taken aboard ships. Our Western North Pacific Directional Index (WNPDI), is defined as the sum of the persistence of the low-level westerly winds in [5°-15°N, 100°-130°E] and easterly winds in [20°-30°N, 110°-140°E]. The new WNPDI index is highly correlated to the existent WNPMI for the concurrent period (1948-2014). (r=+0.88, pCompetitividad through the project INCITE (CGL2013-44530-P, BES-2014-069733).

  2. Iodine-129 concentrations in marginal seas of the North Pacific and Pacific-influenced waters of the Arctic Ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Lee W.; Grebmeier, Jacqueline M. [Tennessee Univ., Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Knoxville, TN (United States); Hong, Gi H. [Korea Ocean Research and Development Inst., Seoul (Korea); Beasley, Tom M. [US Dept. of Energy, New York, NY (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Water sampling during the 1993 IV Russian-US Joint Expedition to the Bering and Chukchi Seas (BERPAC) indicates that Pacific Ocean burdens of the long-lived radionuclide {sup 129}I are relatively low in the Pacific-influenced Arctic, particularly compared to high latitude water influenced by the North Atlantic. These low concentrations occur despite the presence of potential submerged anthropogenic sources in the East Sea (Sea of Japan), and in the northwest Pacific Ocean, east of the Kamchatka Peninsula. The concentration of {sup 129}I entering the Arctic Ocean through Bering Strait, {approx}0.7x10{sup 8} atoms kg {sup -1}, is only slightly higher than observed in deep Pacific water. Similar concentrations (0.44-0.76x10{sup 8}atoms kg{sup -1}) measured in Long Strait indicate no significant transfer of {sup 129}I eastward into the Chukchi Sea in the Siberian Coastal Current from the Siberian marginal seas to the west, However, the concentrations reported here are more than an order to magnitude higher than the Bering Strait input concentration estimated (1.0x10{sup 6}atoms kg{sup -1}) from bomb fallout mass balances, which supports other existing evidence for a significant atmospheric deposition term for this radionuclide in surface ocean waters. Near-bottom water samples collected in productive waters of the Bering and Chukchi Seas also suggest that sediment regeneration may locally elevate {sup 129}I concentrations, and impact its utility as a water mass tracer. As part of this study, two deep {sup 129}I profiles were also measured in the East Sea in 1993-1994. The near-surface concentration of {sup 129}I ranged from 0.12 to 0.31x10{sup 8}atoms kg{sup -1}. The {sup 129}I concentration showed a steady decrease with depth, although because of active deep water ventilation, the entire 3000 m water column exceeded natural concentrations of the radionuclide. Atom ratios of {sup 129}I/{sup 137}Cs in the East Sea also suggest an excess of {sup 129}I above bomb fallout

  3. Calibration and application of B/Ca, Cd/Ca, and δ11B in Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (sinistral) to constrain CO2 uptake in the subpolar North Atlantic during the last deglaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jimin; Thornalley, David J. R.; Rae, James W. B.; McCave, Nick I.

    2013-06-01

    The North Atlantic and Norwegian Sea are prominent sinks of atmospheric CO2 today, but their roles in the past remain poorly constrained. In this study, we attempt to use B/Ca and δ11B ratios in the planktonic foraminifera Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (sinistral variety) to reconstruct subsurface water pH and pCO2 changes in the polar North Atlantic during the last deglaciation. Comparison of core-top results with nearby hydrographic data shows that B/Ca in N. pachyderma (s) is mainly controlled by seawater B(OH)4-/HCO3- with a roughly constant partition coefficient KD=B>/CaCaCO3BOH 4->/HCO3>¯seawater of 1.48 ± 0.15 × 10-3 (2σ), and δ11B in this species is offset below δ11B of the borate in seawater by 3.38 ± 0.71‰ (2σ). These values represent our best estimates with the sparse available hydrographic data close to our core-tops. More culturing and sediment trap work is needed to improve our understanding of boron incorporation into N. pachyderma (s). Application of a constant KD of 1.48 × 10-3 to high resolution N. pachyderma (s) B/Ca records from two adjacent cores off Iceland shows that subsurface pCO2 at the habitat depth of N. pachyderma (s) ( 50 m) generally followed the atmospheric CO2 trend but with negative offsets of 10-50 ppmv during 19-10 ka. These B/Ca-based reconstructions are supported by independent estimates from low-resolution δ11B measurements in the same cores. We also calibrate and apply Cd/Ca in N. pachyderma (s) to reconstruct nutrient levels for the same down cores. Like today's North Atlantic, past subsurface pCO2 variability off Iceland was significantly correlated with nutrient changes that might be linked to surface nutrient utilization and mixing within the upper water column. Because surface pCO2 (at 0 m water depth) is always lower than at deeper depths and if the application of a constant KD is valid, our results suggest that the polar North Atlantic has remained a CO2 sink during the calcification seasons of N. pachyderma

  4. Investigating the 'Iron Hypothesis' in the North Pacific: Trans-Pacific Dust and Methanesulfonate (MSA) in the Denali Ice Core, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylor, P. L.; Osterberg, E. C.; Winski, D.; Ferris, D. G.; Koffman, B. G.; Kreutz, K. J.; Wake, C. P.; Campbell, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    Oceanic deposition of Asian-sourced, Iron-rich dust particulate has been linked to enhanced phytoplankton productivity in regions of the Pacific Ocean. High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) ocean regions, such as the North Pacific, are hypothesized to play a significant role in changing atmospheric CO­2 concentrations on glacial-interglacial timescales. Phytoplankton blooms generate methanesulfonate (MSA), an atmospheric oxidation product of dimethylsulfide (DMS) that is readily aerosolized and deposited in nearby glacial ice. In the summer of 2013, an NSF-funded team from Dartmouth College and the Universities of Maine and New Hampshire collected two 1000 year-long parallel ice cores to bedrock from the summit plateau of Mount Hunter in Denali National Park, Alaska (62.940° N, 151.088° W, 3912 m elevation). The Mt. Hunter ice core site is well situated to record changes in trans-Pacific dust flux and MSA emissions in the North Pacific. Here we investigate the history of dust flux to Denali over the last millennium using major and trace element chemistry and microparticle concentration and size distribution data from the Mt. Hunter cores. We evaluate potential controlling mechanisms on Denali dust flux including conditions at Asian dust sources (storminess, wind speed, precipitation), the strength of the Aleutian Low, and large-scale climate modes such as the El Niño-Southern Oscillation and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. We also evaluate the Mt. Hunter record for relationships between dust flux and MSA concentrations to investigate whether dust fertilization enhanced North Pacific phytoplankton production over the past 1000 years. Future work will create a composite North Pacific dust record using new and existing Mt. Logan ice core records to evaluate these relationships over the entire Holocene.

  5. Can solar cycle modulate the ENSO effect on the Pacific/North American pattern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Delin; Xiao, Ziniu

    2018-01-01

    The ENSO effect on the Pacific/North American pattern (PNA) is well-known robust. Recent studies from observations and model simulations have reported that some important atmospheric circulation systems of extratropics are markedly modulated by the 11-year solar cycle. But less effort has been devoted to revealing the solar influence on the PNA. We thus hypothesize that the instability and uncertainty in the relationship between solar activity and PNA could be due to the ENSO impacts. In this study, solar cycle modulation of the ENSO effect on the PNA has been statistically examined by the observations from NOAA and NCEP/NCAR for the period of 1950-2014. Results indicate that during the high solar activity (HS) years, the PNA has stronger relevance to the ENSO, and the response of tropospheric geopotential height to ENSO variability is broadly similar to the typical positive PNA pattern. However, in the case of low solar activity (LS) years, the correlation between ENSO and PNA decreases relatively and the response has some resemblance to the negative phase of Arctic Oscillation (AO). Also, we find the impacts of solar activity on the middle troposphere are asymmetric during the different solar cycle phases, and the weak PNA-like response to solar activity only presents in the HS years. Closer inspection suggests that the higher solar activity has a much more remarkable modulation on the PNA-like response to the warm ENSO (WE) than that to the cold ENSO (CE), particularly over the Northeast Pacific region. The possible cause of the different responses might be the solar influence on the subtropical westerlies of upper troposphere. When the sea surface temperature (SST) of east-central tropical Pacific is anomalously warm, the upper tropospheric westerlies are significantly modulated by the higher solar activity, resulting in the acceleration and eastward shift of the North Pacific subtropical jet, which favors the propagation of WE signal from the tropical Pacific

  6. Transition Fault and the Yakutat-Pacific-North American Triple Junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulick, S. P.; Christeson, G. L.; Norton, I. O.; Pavlis, T. L.; Reece, R.; van Avendonk, H.; Worthington, L. L.

    2011-12-01

    In the Gulf of Alaska the Pacific Plate, Yakutat Terrane, and North American Plate interact in a complexly deformed zone on the continental slope near Kayak Island. This zone can be viewed as a fault-trench-trench (FTT) triple junction that can only be stable if the two trench segments are aligned. In this case the trench segments are: the deformation front along which the Pacific Plate subducts beneath North America (the Aleutian Trench) and the deformation front along which the Yakutat Terrane subducts at a more westerly direction (when compared to the Pacific subduction) beneath North America (the Pamplona Zone). These two deformation fronts are, to a first order, locally aligned. The complex member of the system is the Transition Fault which is a long-lived strike-slip fault separating the 15-30 km thick Yakutat oceanic plateau crust from the 5-7 km thick Pacific Plate crust, which is itself deforming along the north-south trending Gulf of Alaska Shear Zone (GASZ). A series of seismic reflection profiles crossing the Transition Fault allow us to examine the evolution of deformation as a function of proximity to the triple junction. East of the triple junction and the GASZ, the Transition Fault is a single near vertical strike-slip zone. Moving west to the area where the GASZ interacts with the Transition Fault, three seismic profiles show that the Fault bifurcates into a southern transpressional strand with a few 100 meters of seafloor relief and a northern strike-slip dominated strand. West of the GASZ and within the region proximal to the triple junction, two seismic lines show that the Transition Fault is expressed as a southern transpressional structure with significant amounts shortening (seafloor expression increased to ~1.8 km) and a northern dominantly strike-slip fault with minor transpression. Mapping the top of basement shows that the southern arm lies within and deforms the Pacific oceanic crust with the top of ocean crust reflection to the north

  7. Synchronous seasonal change in fin whale song in the North Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleson, Erin M; Širović, Ana; Bayless, Alexandra R; Hildebrand, John A

    2014-01-01

    Fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus) song consists of down-swept pulses arranged into stereotypic sequences that can be characterized according to the interval between successive pulses. As in blue (B. musculus) and humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae), these song sequences may be geographically distinct and may correlate with population boundaries in some regions. We measured inter-pulse intervals of fin whale songs within year-round acoustic datasets collected between 2000 and 2006 in three regions of the eastern North Pacific: Southern California, the Bering Sea, and Hawaii. A distinctive song type that was recorded in all three regions is characterized by singlet and doublet inter-pulse intervals that increase seasonally, then annually reset to the same shorter intervals at the beginning of each season. This song type was recorded in the Bering Sea and off Southern California from September through May and off Hawaii from December through April, with the song interval generally synchronized across all monitoring locations. The broad geographic and seasonal occurrence of this particular fin whale song type may represent a single population broadly distributed throughout the eastern Pacific with no clear seasonal migratory pattern. Previous studies attempting to infer population structure of fin whales in the North Pacific using synchronous individual song samples have been unsuccessful, likely because they did not account for the seasonal lengthening in song intervals observed here.

  8. Decadal sea level variability in the East China Sea linked to the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jae-Hong; Song, Y. Tony

    2017-07-01

    In view of coastal community's need for adapting to sea level rise (SLR), understanding and predicting regional variability on decadal to longer time scales still remain a challenging issue in SLR research. Here, we have examined the low-frequency sea level signals in the East China Sea (ECS) from the 50-year hindcast of a non-Boussinesq ocean model in comparison with data sets from altimeters, tide-gauges, and steric sea level produced by in-situ profiles. It is shown that the mean sea levels in the ECS represent significant decadal fluctuations over the past 50 years, with a multi-decadal trend shift since the mid-1980s compared to the preceding 30 years. The decadal fluctuations in sea level are more closely linked to the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO) rather than the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, which reflects the multi-decadal trend shift. A composite analysis indicates that wind patterns associated with the NPGO is shown to control the decadal variability of the western subtropical North Pacific. A positive NPGO corresponds to cyclonic wind stress curl anomaly in the western subtropical regions that results in a higher sea level in the ECS, particularly along the continental shelf, and lower sea levels off the ECS. The reverse occurs in years of negative NPGO.

  9. Role of Western Hemisphere Warm Pool in Rapid Climate Changes over the Western North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kug, Jong-Seong; Park, Jae-Heung; An, Soon-Il

    2017-04-01

    Oceanic states over the western North Pacific (WNP), which is surrounded by heavily populated countries, are closely tied to the lives of the people in East Asia in regards to both climate and socioeconomics. As global warming continues, remarkable increases in sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface height (SSH) have been observed in the WNP in recent decades. Here, we show that the SST increase in the western hemisphere warm pool (WHWP), which is the second largest warm pool on the globe, has contributed considerably to the rapid surface warming and sea level rise in the WNP via its remote teleconnection along the Pacific Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). State-of-the-art climate models strongly support the role of the WHWP not only on interannual time sales but also in long-term climate projections. We expect that understanding the processes initiated by the WHWP-SST could permit better forecasts of western North Pacific climate and the further development of the socioeconomics of East Asia.

  10. Synchronous seasonal change in fin whale song in the North Pacific.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin M Oleson

    Full Text Available Fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus song consists of down-swept pulses arranged into stereotypic sequences that can be characterized according to the interval between successive pulses. As in blue (B. musculus and humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae, these song sequences may be geographically distinct and may correlate with population boundaries in some regions. We measured inter-pulse intervals of fin whale songs within year-round acoustic datasets collected between 2000 and 2006 in three regions of the eastern North Pacific: Southern California, the Bering Sea, and Hawaii. A distinctive song type that was recorded in all three regions is characterized by singlet and doublet inter-pulse intervals that increase seasonally, then annually reset to the same shorter intervals at the beginning of each season. This song type was recorded in the Bering Sea and off Southern California from September through May and off Hawaii from December through April, with the song interval generally synchronized across all monitoring locations. The broad geographic and seasonal occurrence of this particular fin whale song type may represent a single population broadly distributed throughout the eastern Pacific with no clear seasonal migratory pattern. Previous studies attempting to infer population structure of fin whales in the North Pacific using synchronous individual song samples have been unsuccessful, likely because they did not account for the seasonal lengthening in song intervals observed here.

  11. PDO modulation of ENSO effect on tropical cyclone rapid intensification in the western North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xidong; Liu, Hailong

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates how the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) modulates the effect of El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on tropical cyclone rapid intensification (RI) in the western North Pacific. The analysis shows that the interannual relationship between ENSO and annual RI number in warm PDO phases is strong and statistically significant. In cold PDO phases, however, there is no significant correlation between ENSO and RI on the interannual timescale. The enhancement of the interannual ENSO-RI relationship in warm PDO phases is mainly attributable to the change of the environmental vertical wind shear. The PDO in warm (cold) phases can strengthen (weaken) an El Niño event to increase (reduce) the effects of the warm pool of water over the equatorial Pacific in typhoon season by local diabatic heating. El Niño events are accompanied by the stronger Walker circulation in the equatorial Pacific in the warm PDO phase than in the cold PDO phase. In contrast, the Walker circulation pattern and amplitude associated with La Niña events is less affected by the alternate PDO phase. This tends to make the atmospheric response to ENSO stronger (weaker) in warm (cold) PDO phase, and so is the atmospheric teleconnection of ENSO. Our results indicate that the stratification of ENSO-based statistical RI forecast by the PDO can greatly improve the accuracy of statistical RI predictions.

  12. Whales, Dolphins, and Porpoises of the Eastern North Pacific and Adjacent Arctic Waters: A Guide to Their Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leatherwood, Stephen; And Others

    This field guide is designed to permit observers to identify the cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises) they see in the waters of the eastern North Pacific, including the Gulf of California, Hawaii, and the western Arctic of North America. The animals described are grouped not by scientific relationships but by similarities in appearance in…

  13. Oxygen distribution and aerobic respiration in the north and south eastern tropical Pacific oxygen minimum zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiano, Laura; Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; Dalsgaard, Tage

    2014-01-01

    Highly sensitive STOX O-2 sensors were used for determination of in situ O-2 distribution in the eastern tropical north and south Pacific oxygen minimum zones (ETN/SP OMZs), as well as for laboratory determination of O-2 uptake rates of water masses at various depths within these OMZs. Oxygen...... was generally below the detection limit (few nmol L-1) in the core of both OMZs, suggesting the presence of vast volumes of functionally anoxic waters in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Oxygen was often not detectable in the deep secondary chlorophyll maximum found at some locations, but other secondary maxima...... contained up to similar to 0.4 mu mol L-1. Directly measured respiration rates were high in surface and subsurface oxic layers of the coastal waters, reaching values up to 85 nmol L-1 O-2 h(-1). Substantially lower values were found at the depths of the upper oxycline, where values varied from 2 to 33 nmol...

  14. Clustering analysis of western North Pacific Tropical Cyclone tracks using the Self Organizing Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.; Seo, K.

    2013-12-01

    A cluster analysis using Self Organizing Map (SOM) is used to characterize tropical cyclone (TC) tracks over the western North Pacific. A False Discovery Rate (FDR) method is used to objectively determine an optimum cluster number. For 620 TC tracks over the WNP from June-October during 1979-2010, the five clusters for TC tracks are selected. These can further be categorized into three major patterns: straight-moving track, recurving track, and quasi-random pattern. Each pattern is characterized by land falling regions: near South and East China, East Asia, and off-shore of Japan. In addition, each pattern shows distinctive properties in its traveling distance, lifetime, intensity (mean minimum sea level pressure), and genesis location. It is revealed that these three patterns are associated with the large-scale dynamics such as variability of the western Pacific subtropical high and the Madden-Julian Oscillation. The impacts of El Nino and NAO will be discussed.

  15. A model of loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta habitat and movement in the oceanic North Pacific.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Abecassis

    Full Text Available Habitat preferences for juvenile loggerhead turtles in the North Pacific were investigated with data from two several-year long tagging programs, using 224 satellite transmitters deployed on wild and captive-reared turtles. Animals ranged between 23 and 81 cm in straight carapace length. Tracks were used to investigate changes in temperature preferences and speed of the animals with size. Average sea surface temperatures along the tracks ranged from 18 to 23 °C. Bigger turtles generally experienced larger temperature ranges and were encountered in warmer surface waters. Seasonal differences between small and big turtles suggest that the larger ones dive deeper than the mixed layer and subsequently target warmer surface waters to rewarm. Average swimming speeds were under 1 km/h and increased with size for turtles bigger than 30 cm. However, when expressed in body lengths per second (bl s(-1, smaller turtles showed much higher swimming speeds (>1 bl s (-1 than bigger ones (0.5 bl s(-1. Temperature and speed values at size estimated from the tracks were used to parameterize a habitat-based Eulerian model to predict areas of highest probability of presence in the North Pacific. The model-generated habitat index generally matched the tracks closely, capturing the north-south movements of tracked animals, but the model failed to replicate observed east-west movements, suggesting temperature and foraging preferences are not the only factors driving large-scale loggerhead movements. Model outputs could inform potential bycatch reduction strategies.

  16. Dynamic computer model for the metallogenesis and tectonics of the Circum-North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotese, Christopher R.; Nokleberg, Warren J.; Monger, James W.H.; Norton, Ian O.; Parfenov, Leonid M.; Khanchuk, Alexander I.; Bundtzen, Thomas K.; Dawson, Kenneth M.; Eremin, Roman A.; Frolov, Yuri F.; Fujita, Kazuya; Goryachev, Nikolai A.; Pozdeev, Anany I.; Ratkin, Vladimir V.; Rodinov, Sergey M.; Rozenblum, Ilya S.; Scholl, David W.; Shpikerman, Vladimir I.; Sidorov, Anatoly A.; Stone, David B.

    2001-01-01

    The digital files on this report consist of a dynamic computer model of the metallogenesis and tectonics of the Circum-North Pacific, and background articles, figures, and maps. The tectonic part of the dynamic computer model is derived from a major analysis of the tectonic evolution of the Circum-North Pacific which is also contained in directory tectevol. The dynamic computer model and associated materials on this CD-ROM are part of a project on the major mineral deposits, metallogenesis, and tectonics of the Russian Far East, Alaska, and the Canadian Cordillera. The project provides critical information on bedrock geology and geophysics, tectonics, major metalliferous mineral resources, metallogenic patterns, and crustal origin and evolution of mineralizing systems for this region. The major scientific goals and benefits of the project are to: (1) provide a comprehensive international data base on the mineral resources of the region that is the first, extensive knowledge available in English; (2) provide major new interpretations of the origin and crustal evolution of mineralizing systems and their host rocks, thereby enabling enhanced, broad-scale tectonic reconstructions and interpretations; and (3) promote trade and scientific and technical exchanges between North America and Eastern Asia.

  17. Mercury in tunas and blue marlin in the North Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drevnick, Paul E; Brooks, Barbara A

    2017-05-01

    Models and data from the North Pacific Ocean indicate that mercury concentrations in water and biota are increasing in response to (global or hemispheric) anthropogenic mercury releases. In the present study, we provide an updated record of mercury in yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) caught near Hawaii that confirms an earlier conclusion that mercury concentrations in these fish are increasing at a rate similar to that observed in waters shallower than 1000 m. We also compiled and reanalyzed data from bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus) and blue marlin (Makaira nigricans) caught near Hawaii in the 1970s and 2000s. Increases in mercury concentrations in bigeye tuna are consistent with the trend found in yellowfin tuna, in both timing and magnitude. The data available for blue marlin do not allow for a fair comparison among years, because mercury concentrations differ between sexes for this species, and sex was identified (or reported) in only 3 of 7 studies. Also, mercury concentrations in blue marlin may be insensitive to modest changes in mercury exposure, because this species appears to have the ability to detoxify mercury. The North Pacific Ocean is a region of both relatively high rates of atmospheric mercury deposition and capture fisheries production. Other data sets that allow temporal comparisons in mercury concentrations, such as pacific cod (Gadus macrocephalus) in Alaskan waters and albacore tuna (Thunnus alalunga) off the US Pacific coast, should be explored further, to aid in understanding human health and ecological risks and to develop additional baseline knowledge for assessing changes in a region expected to respond strongly to reductions in anthropogenic mercury emissions. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1365-1374. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  18. A Robustness Analysis of CMIP5 Models over the East Asia-Western North Pacific Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianjun Zhou

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP is an international community-based infrastructure that supports climate model intercomparison, climate variability, climate prediction, and climate projection. Improving the performance of climate models over East Asia and the western North Pacific has been a challenge for the climate-modeling community. In this paper, we provide a synthesis robustness analysis of the climate models participating in CMIP-Phase 5 (CMIP5. The strengths and weaknesses of the CMIP5 models are assessed from the perspective of climate mean state, interannual variability, past climate change during the mid-Pliocene (MP and the last millennium, and climate projection. The added values of regional climate models relative to the driving global climate models are also assessed. Although an encouraging increase in credibility and an improvement in the simulation of mean states, interannual variability, and past climate changes are visible in the progression from CMIP3 to CMIP5, some previously noticed biases such as the ridge position of the western North Pacific subtropical high and the associated rainfall bias are still evident in CMIP5 models. Weaknesses are also evident in simulations of the interannual amplitude, such as El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO-monsoon relationships. Coupled models generally show better results than standalone atmospheric models in simulating both mean states and interannual variability. Multi-model intercomparison indicates significant uncertainties in the future projection of climate change, although precipitation increases consistently across models constrained by the Clausius-Clapeyron relation. Regional ocean-atmosphere coupled models are recommended for the dynamical downscaling of climate change projections over the East Asia-western North Pacific domain.

  19. Blue Intensity based experiments for reconstructing North Pacific temperatures along the Gulf of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rob; D'Arrigo, Rosanne; Andreu-Hayles, Laia; Oelkers, Rose; Wiles, Greg; Anchukaitis, Kevin; Davi, Nicole

    2017-04-01

    The Gulf of Alaska (GOA) is highly sensitive to the variability of the North Pacific climate system. Ring-width (RW) records from the GOA have yielded a valuable long-term perspective for North Pacific changes on decadal to longer time scales in previous studies, but can be less robust on interannual time scales due to autocorrelation and other factors. Similar to maximum latewood density (MXD), the novel Blue Intensity (BI) parameter has recently been shown to correlate strongly with year-to-year warm-season temperatures for a number of sites at northern latitudes. Since BI is much less expensive and labor intensive to generate than MXD, it has much value for future tree-ring studies in the GOA where few MXD records have been developed. Here we highlight the potential for improvement of reconstruction models using various combinations of RW and BI-related parameters (latewood BI and delta BI) measured from eight hemlock (Tsuga mertensiana) sites along the GOA. This is the first such study for the hemlock genus using BI data. We find that a combined experimental model using RW, delta BI and latewood BI best reflects inter-annual to multi-decadal temperature variability for the North Pacific sector, particularly during the warm-season months. A resulting test reconstruction (1792-1989 CE) of GOA CRUT 3.24 land JJAS temperatures (57-60°N/154-134°W) is significantly improved over that based on RW alone (58% vs 36% variance explained). Significant validation is also found with 19th century temperature data from Sitka, Alaska and using the BEST gridded data product. We therefore find that BI has considerable potential to become a sensitive, readily accessible alternative proxy for understanding past ocean-atmosphere variability in the GOA and elsewhere around the globe. A key need in furthering the utility of BI as a proxy is experimentation in the extraction of lower frequency variability.

  20. User’s guide to the North Pacific Pelagic Seabird Database 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Gary S.; Piatt, John F.; Renner, Martin

    2015-07-13

    The North Pacific Pelagic Seabird Database (NPPSD) was created in 2005 to consolidate data on the oceanic distribution of marine bird species in the North Pacific. Most of these data were collected on surveys by counting species within defined areas and at known locations (that is, on strip transects). The NPPSD also contains observations of other bird species and marine mammals. The original NPPSD combined data from 465 surveys conducted between 1973 and 2002, primarily in waters adjacent to Alaska. These surveys included 61,195 sample transects with location, environment, and metadata information, and the data were organized in a flat-file format. In developing NPPSD 2.0, our goals were to add new datasets, to make significant improvements to database functionality and to provide the database online. NPPSD 2.0 includes data from a broader geographic range within the North Pacific, including new observations made offshore of the Russian Federation, Japan, Korea, British Columbia (Canada), Oregon, and California. These data were imported into a relational database, proofed, and structured in a common format. NPPSD 2.0 contains 351,674 samples (transects) collected between 1973 and 2012, representing a total sampled area of 270,259 square kilometers, and extends the time series of samples in some areas—notably the Bering Sea—to four decades. It contains observations of 16,988,138 birds and 235,545 marine mammals and is available on the NPPSD Web site. Supplementary materials include an updated set of standardized taxonomic codes, reference maps that show the spatial and temporal distribution of the survey efforts and a downloadable query tool.

  1. Structure and dynamics of decadal anomalies in the wintertime midlatitude North Pacific ocean-atmosphere system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jiabei; Yang, Xiu-qun

    2017-04-01

    The structure and dynamics of decadal anomalies in the wintertime midlatitude North Pacific ocean-atmosphere system are examined in this study, using the NCEP/NCAR atmospheric reanalysis, HadISST SST and Simple Ocean Data Assimilation data for 1960-2010. The midlatitude decadal anomalies associated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation are identified, being characterized by an equivalent barotropic atmospheric low (high) pressure over a cold (warm) oceanic surface. Such a unique configuration of decadal anomalies can be maintained by an unstable ocean-atmosphere interaction mechanism in the midlatitudes, which is hypothesized as follows. Associated with a warm PDO phase, an initial midlatitude surface westerly anomaly accompanied with intensified Aleutian low tends to force a negative SST anomaly by increasing upward surface heat fluxes and driving southward Ekman current anomaly. The SST cooling tends to increase the meridional SST gradient, thus enhancing the subtropical oceanic front. As an adjustment of the atmospheric boundary layer to the enhanced oceanic front, the low-level atmospheric meridional temperature gradient and thus the low-level atmospheric baroclinicity tend to be strengthened, inducing more active transient eddy activities that increase transient eddy vorticity forcing. The vorticity forcing that dominates the total atmospheric forcing tends to produce an equivalent barotropic atmospheric low pressure north of the initial westerly anomaly, intensifying the initial anomalies of the midlatitude surface westerly and Aleutian low. Therefore, it is suggested that the midlatitude ocean-atmosphere interaction can provide a positive feedback mechanism for the development of initial anomaly, in which the oceanic front and the atmospheric transient eddy are the indispensable ingredients. Such a positive ocean-atmosphere feedback mechanism is fundamentally responsible for the observed decadal anomalies in the midlatitude North Pacific ocean

  2. A new centennial index to study the Western North Pacific Monsoon decadal variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Inmaculada; Gómez-Delgado, F. de Paula; Gallego, David; Ribera, Pedro; Peña-Ortiz, Cristina; García-Herrera, Ricardo

    2016-04-01

    The concept of the Western North Pacific Summer Monsoon (WNPSM) appeared for the first time in 1987. It is, unlike the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) and the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM), an oceanic monsoon mostly driven by the meridional gradient of sea surface temperature. Its circulation is characterized by a northwest-southeast oriented monsoon trough with intense precipitation and low-level southwesterlies and upper-tropospheric easterlies in the region [100°-130° E, 5°-15°N]. Up to now, the primary index to characterize the WNPSM has been the Western North Pacific Monsoon Index (WNPMI) which covers the 1949-2013 period. The original WNPMI was defined as the difference of 850-hPa westerlies between two regions: D1 [5°-15°N, 100°-130°E] and D2 [20°-30°N, 110°-140°E]. Both domains are included in the main historical ship routes circumnavigating Asia for hundreds of years. Many of the logbooks of these ships have been preserved in historical archives and they usually contain daily observations of wind force and direction. Therefore, it has been possible to compute a new index of instrumental character, which reconstructs the WNPSM back to the middle of the 19th Century, by using solely historical wind direction records preserved in logbooks. We define the monthly Western North Pacific Directional Index (WNPDI) as the sum of the persistence of the low-level westerly winds in D1 and easterly winds in D2. The advantages of this new index are its nature (instrumental) and its length (1849-2013), which is 100 years longer than the WNPMI (which was based on reanalysis data). Our WNPDI shows a high correlation (r=+0.87, pCompetitividad through the project INCITE (CGL2013-44530-P, BES-2014-069733).

  3. Ventilation changes in the western North Pacific since the last glacial period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Okazaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We reconstructed the ventilation record of deep water at 2100 m depth in the mid-latitude western North Pacific over the past 25 kyr from radiocarbon measurements of coexisting planktic and benthic foraminiferal shells in sediment with a high sedimentation rate. The 14C data on fragile and robust planktic foraminiferal shells were concordant with each other, ensuring high quality of the reconstructed ventilation record. The radiocarbon activity changes were consistent with the atmospheric record, suggesting that no massive mixing of old carbon from the abyssal reservoir occurred throughout the glacial to deglacial periods.

  4. Four Years of North Pacific Mode Water Evolution: A Fukushima Tracer Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Alison M.; Yoshida, Sachiko; Pike, Steven; Buesseler, Ken O.; Rypina, Irina I.; Jayne, Steven

    2017-04-01

    Here we presents the results of a investigation which uses the tracer information provided by the 2011 direct ocean release of radio-isotopes, (137Cs, 30-year half-life and 134Cs, 2-year half-life) from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant to better understand the pathways, mixing and transport of water in the North Pacific Ocean. The main focus is the analysis of cesium observations obtained from the spring 2015 CLIVAR/GO-SHIP occupation of the P16N line in the eastern North Pacific. Nearly four hundred 20 L radionuclide samples were obtained on this cruise between 29 April and 26 June 2015 covering the 152°W line from 3°N to the Alaskan Shelf off Kodiak (56.4°N), crossing the Alaska Gyre at 55°N and making a short (200 nm) line extending from the outer edge of U.S. EEZ coming into Seattle, just to the south of the Canadian border and Line-P. Samples include both profiles from the surface to 1000 m and surface/subsurface pairs that provide an average 1° latitude spacing along 152°W. A clear Fukushima signal is apparent from the surface down to 400 m. The core signal lies at between 0-200 m at about 40°N where Subtropical Mode Water density water outcrops. The densest waters with Fukushima isotopes lie at 440 m in the bottom density range of Dense-Central Mode Water. There is a weak, but detectable signal in the Alaska Current to the north off both Kodiak and Sitka. The deepest detectable 137Cs (weapon's testing) signals are found at and to the north of 45°N at 900-1000 m. There is detectable, background level 137Cs as far south as 3°N, but as of spring 2015 the southernmost 134C signal was found above 200 m at 30°N. This horizontal and vertical pattern of Fukushima radionuclides traces the path of mode waters from their formation regions in the western North Pacific to their outcrop in eastern basin over the four years since their release.

  5. Trans-Pacific Transport of Saharan Dust to Western North America: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendry, Ian G. M.; Strawbridge, Kevin B.; O'Neill, Norman; Macdonald, Anne Marie; Liu, Peter S. K.; Leaitch, W. Richard; Anlauf, Kurt G.; Jaegle, Lyatt; Fairlie, T. Duncan; Westphal, Douglas L.

    2007-01-01

    The first documented case of long range transport of Saharan dust over a pathway spanning Asia and the Pacific to Western North America is described. Crustal material generated by North African dust storms during the period 28 February - 3 March 2005 reached western Canada on 13-14 March 2005 and was observed by lidar and sunphotometer in the Vancouver region and by high altitude aerosol instrumentation at Whistler Peak. Global chemical models (GEOS-CHEM and NRL NAAPS) confirm the transport pathway and suggest source attribution was simplified in this case by the distinct, and somewhat unusual, lack of dust activity over Eurasia (Gobi and Takla Makan deserts) at this time. Over western North America, the dust layer, although subsiding close to the boundary layer, did not appear to contribute to boundary layer particulate matter concentrations. Furthermore, sunphotometer observations (and associated inversion products) suggest that the dust layer had only subtle optical impact (Aerosol Optical Thickness (Tau(sub a500)) and Angstrom exponent (Alpha(sub 440-870) were 0.1 and 1.2 respectively) and was dominated by fine particulate matter (modes in aerodynamic diameter at 0.3 and 2.5microns). High Altitude observations at Whistler BC, confirm the crustal origin of the layer (rich in Ca(++) ions) and the bi-modal size distribution. Although a weak event compared to the Asian Trans-Pacific dust events of 1998 and 2001, this novel case highlights the possibility that Saharan sources may contribute episodically to the aerosol burden in western North America.

  6. Distribution and size composition of the arctic lamprey Lethenteron camtschaticum in the North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, A. M.; Baitalyuk, A. A.; Pelenev, D. V.

    2014-03-01

    Results of the long-term study of the spatial and vertical distribution of the parasitic anadromous Arctic lamprey Lethenteron camtschaticum (Tilesius, 1811) (Petromyzontidae) in the North Pacific and data on its size composition are given. This species is most frequent in the northwestern Sea of Japan and the western Bering Sea. The maximum concentrations are noted in waters of southern Primorye, southwestern Sakhalin, the northwestern part of the Sea of Okhotsk, and the northern part of the Bering Sea, which is probably explained by the increased number of its victims, Pacific salmon. Near the bottom, Pacific lampreys are extremely few and are primarily encountered at depths less that 400 m, and in the Pelagic zone, in the 100-m layer. The catches have contained Arctic lampreys having a total length of 15-79 cm. The lampreys of several size groups in the catches may indicate that L. camtschaticum spends not less than four years in the sea. No relationship has been found between the body length and the capture depth. Analyzed are the relationships between the body length and weight and the body length and the condition factor. The seasonal dynamics of these indices are considered.

  7. Denali Ice Core Record of North Pacific Sea Surface Temperatures and Marine Primary Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polashenski, D.; Osterberg, E. C.; Kreutz, K. J.; Winski, D.; Wake, C. P.; Ferris, D. G.; Introne, D.; Campbell, S. W.

    2016-12-01

    Chemical analyses of precipitation preserved in glacial ice cores provide a unique opportunity to study changes in atmospheric circulation patterns and ocean surface conditions through time. In this study, we aim to investigate changes in both the physical and biological parameters of the north-central Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea over the twentieth century using the deuterium excess (d-excess) and methanesulfonic acid (MSA) records from the Mt. Hunter ice cores drilled in Denali National Park, Alaska. These parallel, 208 m-long ice cores were drilled to bedrock during the 2013 field season on the Mt. Hunter plateau (63° N, 151° W, 3,900 m above sea level) by a collaborative research team consisting of members from Dartmouth College and the Universities of Maine and New Hampshire. The cores were sampled on a continuous melter system at Dartmouth College and analyzed for the concentrations major ions (Dionex IC) and trace metals (Element2 ICPMS), and for stable water isotope ratios (Picarro). The depth-age scale has been accurately dated to 400 AD using annual layer counting of several chemical species and further validated using known historical volcanic eruptions and the Cesium-137 spike associated with nuclear weapons testing in 1963. We use HYSPLIT back trajectory modeling to identify likely source areas of moisture and aerosol MSA being transported to the core site. Satellite imagery allows for a direct comparison between chlorophyll a concentrations in these source areas and MSA concentrations in the core record. Preliminary analysis of chlorophyll a and MSA concentrations, both derived almost exclusively from marine biota, suggest that the Mt. Hunter ice cores reflect changes in North Pacific and Bering Sea marine primary productivity. Analysis of the water isotope and MSA data in conjunction with climate reanalysis products shows significant correlations (p<0.05) between d-excess and MSA in the ice record and sea surface temperatures in the Bering Sea and

  8. Variability in the correlation between Asian dust storms and chlorophyll a concentration from the North to Equatorial Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sai-Chun; Yao, Xiaohong; Gao, Hui-Wang; Shi, Guang-Yu; Yue, Xu

    2013-01-01

    A long-term record of Asian dust storms showed seven high-occurrence-frequency centers in China. The intrusion of Asian dust into the downwind seas, including the China seas, the Sea of Japan, the subarctic North Pacific, the North Pacific subtropical gyre, and the western and eastern Equatorial Pacific, has been shown to add nutrients to ocean ecosystems and enhance their biological activities. To explore the relationship between the transported dust from various sources to the six seas and oceanic biological activities with different nutrient conditions, the correlation between monthly chlorophyll a concentration in each sea and monthly dust storm occurrence frequencies reaching the sea during 1997-2007 was examined in this study. No correlations were observed between dust and chlorophyll a concentration in the dust sources and many sea areas, suggesting a link between dust and chlorophyll a concentration in those seas. However, the correlation coefficients were highly variable. In general, the correlation coefficients (0.54-0.63) for the Sea of Japan were highest, except for that between the subarctic Pacific and the Taklimakan Desert, where it was as high as 0.7. For the >50 m China seas and the North Pacific subtropical gyre, the correlation coefficients were in the range 0.32-0.57. The correlation coefficients for the western and eastern Equatorial Pacific were relatively low (dust sources, the transport pathways, the dust deposition, the nutrient conditions of oceans, and the probability of dust storms reaching the seas.

  9. Transport and diagenesis of dissolved and particulate terrigenous organic matter in the North Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernes, Peter J.; Benner, Ronald

    2002-12-01

    Lignin measurements were made on suspended particulate organic matter (POM), total dissolved organic matter (DOM), high-molecular-weight (HMW) DOM, and low-molecular-weight (LMW) DOM in the North Pacific at Station Aloha. Carbon-normalized yields of lignin and δ13C measurements indicate that while terrigenous organic matter accounts only for ˜1% of DOM in seawater, submicron POM has a substantial terrigenous component. The apparent size distribution and terrigenous nature of the particles is consistent with an aerosol source, but these particles could also be delivered to the ocean via rivers. Ratios of syringyl to vanillyl phenols as well as the fraction of dissolved lignin in HMW DOM provide molecular evidence of photochemical oxidation. Several differences in lignin composition and concentrations were evident between water masses. In particular, concentrations in North Pacific Intermediate Water were a factor of two greater than at all other depths. This is likely a reflection of higher riverine input via the Sea of Okhotsk. These trends suggest that lignin could serve as a general circulation tracer in addition to tracing riverine input and diagenetic processing of terrigenous organic matter in the ocean.

  10. Summer diatom blooms in the North Pacific subtropical gyre: 2008-2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy A Villareal

    Full Text Available The summertime North Pacific subtropical gyre has widespread phytoplankton blooms between Hawaii and the subtropical front (∼30°N that appear as chlorophyll (chl increases in satellite ocean color data. Nitrogen-fixing diatom symbioses (diatom-diazotroph associations: DDAs often increase 10(2-10(3 fold in these blooms and contribute to elevated export flux. In 2008 and 2009, two cruises targeted satellite chlorophyll blooms to examine DDA species abundance, chlorophyll concentration, biogenic silica concentration, and hydrography. Generalized observations that DDA blooms occur when the mixed layer depth is 10 µm chl a fraction (∼40-90+% of total chl a. Integrated diatom abundance varied 10-fold over 10 µm size fraction, and increased up to 5-fold in the blooms. The two years differed in the magnitude of the surface chl a increase (2009>2008, the abundance of pennate diatoms within the bloom (2009>2008, and the substantially greater mixed layer depth in 2009. Only the 2009 bloom had sufficient chl a in the >10 µm fraction to produce the observed ocean color chl increase. Blooms had high spatial variability; ocean color images likely average over numerous small events over time and space scales that exceed the individual event scale. Summertime DDA export flux noted at the Hawaii time-series Sta. ALOHA is probably a generalized feature of the eastern N. Pacific north to the subtropical front.

  11. Modulation of western North Pacific tropical cyclone activity by the Atlantic Meridional Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Vecchi, Gabriel A.; Villarini, Gabriele; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Rosati, Anthony; Yang, Xiaosong; Jia, Liwei; Zeng, Fanrong

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the year-to-year modulation of the western North Pacific (WNP) tropical cyclones (TC) activity by the Atlantic Meridional Mode (AMM) using both observations and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Forecast-oriented Low Ocean Resolution Version of CM2.5 (FLOR) global coupled model. 1. The positive (negative) AMM phase suppresses (enhances) WNP TC activity in observations. The anomalous occurrence of WNP TCs results mainly from changes in TC genesis in the southeastern part of the WNP. 2. The observed responses of WNP TC activity to the AMM are connected to the anomalous zonal vertical wind shear (ZVWS) caused by AMM-induced changes to the Walker circulation. During the positive AMM phase, the warming in the North Atlantic induces strong descending flow in the tropical eastern and central Pacific, which intensifies the Walker cell in the WNP. The intensified Walker cell is responsible for the suppressed (enhanced) TC genesis in the eastern (western) part of the WNP by strengthening (weakening) ZVWS. 3. The observed WNPTC-AMM linkage is examined by the long-term control and idealized perturbations experiment with FLOR-FA. A suite of sensitivity experiments strongly corroborate the observed WNPTC-AMM linkage and underlying physical mechanisms.

  12. Tidal constituent database. West Coast of the United States and Eastern North pacific ocean. Technical note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    This technical note describes a database of tidal elevation boundary condition information generated in support of the `Long-Term Fate of Dredged Material Disposed in Open Water` research of the Dredging Research Program (DRP), being conducted at the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station. The database, described in detail by Hench and others (1994), allows the user to manually generate time series of tidal elevations or to use a program to access the full database to generate time series of both tidal elevations and currents for any location along the West Coast of the United States and Eastern North Pacific Ocean, extending from Seal Cape on Unimak Island, Alaska, in the North to Punta Parada, Peru, in the South. The land boundary includes the Pacific shorelines of Alaska, Canada, mainland United States, Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Columbia, and Northern Peru. Although the capability to generate these time series was developed to provide input to the Long-Term Fate and Stability Model (LTFATE), the generated time series can be used for any application requiring tidal forcing data.

  13. Temporal separation of two fin whale call types across the eastern North Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirović, Ana; Williams, Lauren N; Kerosky, Sara M; Wiggins, Sean M; Hildebrand, John A

    2013-01-01

    Fin whales ( Balaenoptera physalus ) produce a variety of low-frequency, short-duration, frequency-modulated calls. The differences in temporal patterns between two fin whale call types are described from long-term passive acoustic data collected intermittently between 2005 and 2011 at three locations across the eastern North Pacific: the Bering Sea, off Southern California, and in Canal de Ballenas in the northern Gulf of California. Fin whale calls were detected at all sites year-round, during all periods with recordings. At all three locations, 40-Hz calls peaked in June, preceding a peak in 20-Hz calls by 3-5 months. Monitoring both call types may provide a more accurate insight into the seasonal presence of fin whales across the eastern North Pacific than can be obtained from a single call type. The 40-Hz call may be associated with a foraging function, and temporal separation between 40- and 20-Hz calls may indicate the separation between predominately feeding behavior and other social interactions.

  14. Mineral Dust Transport to the North Atlantic and the North Pacific Oceans: Temporal Variability and the Link to Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prospero, J. M.; Arimoto, R.

    2004-05-01

    The North Atlantic and the North Pacific are heavily impacted by dust transport from North Africa and Asia respectively. The University of Miami, often in cooperation with other groups, has operated networks of aerosol sampling stations in these ocean regions for many years. In this presentation we present an overview of dust concentration data from these networks focusing on the temporal and geographical variability. Our objective is a better understanding of this variability in terms of source and transport processes. We place emphasis on two stations where we have a long record of aerosol measurements: Barbados, West Indies, (13.17N, 59.43W) and Midway (28.22N,177.35W) in the central North Pacific. The Barbados record is continuous from 1965 to present and Midway from 1981 to 2001. Dust concentrations show considerable variation over decadal and shorter time-scales. Prospero and Lamb [2003] recently showed that Barbados dust concentrations varied over a large range in a coherent way that is closely linked to rainfall (or the meteorology associated with rainfall) in the Soudano-Sahel region of North Africa. The dust record from Midway also shows large excursions especially over 1999 to 2001 reflecting intensified dust activity in Asia. During this period, large areas of China were impacted by drought. Thus both the Barbados and Midway data suggest that dust emissions increase sharply with the onset of drought. The question arises about the cause of increased dust emissions and transport. Is it simply due to drought conditions or does it reflect the combined effects of drought and human impacts? We suggest that poor land-use practices do not appear to be a major factor in these two examples. In the case of the North African dust sources, satellite images show that the major dust sources are located in exceedingly remote environments. In the case of Chinese dust sources, much literature has attributed increased dust to vastly increased agriculture and grazing in

  15. Puffins reveal contrasting relationships between forage fish and ocean climate in the North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydeman, William J.; Piatt, John F.; Thompson, Sarah Ann; Garcia-Reyes, Marisol; Hatch, Scott A.; Arimitsu, Mayumi; Slater, Leslie; Williams, Jeffrey C.; Rojek, Nora A.; Zador, Stephani G.; Renner, Heather M.

    2017-01-01

    Long-term studies of predator food habits (i.e., ‘predator-based sampling’) are useful for identifying patterns of spatial and temporal variability of forage nekton in marine ecosystems. We investigated temporal changes in forage fish availability and relationships to ocean climate by analyzing diet composition of three puffin species (horned puffin Fratercula corniculata, tufted puffin Fratercula cirrhata, and rhinoceros auklet Cerorhinca monocerata) from five sites in the North Pacific from 1978–2012. Dominant forage species included squids and hexagrammids in the western Aleutians, gadids and Pacific sand lance (Ammodytes personatus) in the eastern Aleutians and western Gulf of Alaska (GoA), and sand lance and capelin (Mallotus villosus) in the northern and eastern GoA. Interannual fluctuations in forage availability dominated variability in the western Aleutians, whereas lower-frequency shifts in forage fish availability dominated elsewhere. We produced regional multivariate indicators of sand lance, capelin, and age-0 gadid availability by combining data across species and sites using Principal Component Analysis, and related these indices to environmental factors including sea level pressure (SPL), winds, and sea surface temperature (SST). There was coherence in the availability of sand lance and capelin across the study area. Sand lance availability increased linearly with environmental conditions leading to warmer ocean temperatures, whereas capelin availability increased in a non-linear manner when environmental changes led to lower ocean temperatures. Long-term studies of puffin diet composition appear to be a promising tool for understanding the availability of these difficult-to-survey forage nekton in remote regions of the North Pacific.

  16. North Pacific Mesoscale Coupled Air-Ocean Simulations Compared with Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koracin, Darko; Cerovecki, Ivana; Vellore, Ramesh; Mejia, John; Hatchett, Benjamin; McCord, Travis; McLean, Julie; Dorman, Clive

    2013-04-11

    Executive summary The main objective of the study was to investigate atmospheric and ocean interaction processes in the western Pacific and, in particular, effects of significant ocean heat loss in the Kuroshio and Kuroshio Extension regions on the lower and upper atmosphere. It is yet to be determined how significant are these processes are on climate scales. The understanding of these processes led us also to development of the methodology of coupling the Weather and Research Forecasting model with the Parallel Ocean Program model for western Pacific regional weather and climate simulations. We tested NCAR-developed research software Coupler 7 for coupling of the WRF and POP models and assessed its usability for regional-scale applications. We completed test simulations using the Coupler 7 framework, but implemented a standard WRF model code with options for both one- and two-way mode coupling. This type of coupling will allow us to seamlessly incorporate new WRF updates and versions in the future. We also performed a long-term WRF simulation (15 years) covering the entire North Pacific as well as high-resolution simulations of a case study which included extreme ocean heat losses in the Kuroshio and Kuroshio Extension regions. Since the extreme ocean heat loss occurs during winter cold air outbreaks (CAO), we simulated and analyzed a case study of a severe CAO event in January 2000 in detail. We found that the ocean heat loss induced by CAOs is amplified by additional advection from mesocyclones forming on the southern part of the Japan Sea. Large scale synoptic patterns with anomalously strong anticyclone over Siberia and Mongolia, deep Aleutian Low, and the Pacific subtropical ridge are a crucial setup for the CAO. It was found that the onset of the CAO is related to the breaking of atmospheric Rossby waves and vertical transport of vorticity that facilitates meridional advection. The study also indicates that intrinsic parameterization of the surface fluxes

  17. Temperature, salinity, and nutrients data from bottle, CTD, and XBT casts from the JOHN P. TULLY and other vessels in the North Atlantic and North Pacific Oceans from 03 August 1959 to 01 July 2001 (NODC Accession 0000664)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bottle, CTD, and XBT data were collected in the North Atlantic and North Pacific Oceans from the John P. Tully and other vessels from 03 August 1959 to 01 July 2001....

  18. Temperature, salinity, and nutrients data from CTD and bottle casts in the Arctic, North Atlantic and North Pacific Oceans from multiple platforms from 1963-04-30 to 1999-02-15 (NODC Accession 0000418)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CTD, bottle, and other data were collected from the Arctic Ocean, North Atlantic Ocean, and North Pacific from multiple platforms from 30 April 1963 to 15 February...

  19. Temperature, salinity, and nutrients data from CTD, MBT, and bottle casts in the Arctic, North Atlantic and North Pacific Oceans from the SACKVILLE and other platforms from 1928-05-12 to 1998-11-03 (NODC Accession 0000448)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CTD, MBT, bottle and other data were collected in the Arctic, North Atlantic, and North Pacific Oceans from the SACKVILLE and other platforms from 12 May 1928 to 03...

  20. Nutrients and other data from bottle, MBT, XBT, and CTD casts in the North Atlantic and North Pacific Ocean from 08 May 1956 to 14 December 1999 (NODC Accession 0000717)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Nutrients and other data were collected using bottle, MBT, XBT, and CTD casts in the North Atlantic and North Pacific Ocean from 08 May 1956 to 14 December 1999....

  1. Pu isotopes in the western North Pacific Ocean before the accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, M.; Zheng, J.; Aono, T.

    2011-12-01

    Anthropogenic radionuclides such as Pu-239 (half-life: 24100 yr), Pu-240 (half-life: 6560 yr) and Pu-241 (half-life: 14.325 yr) mainly have been released into the environment as the result of atmospheric nuclear weapons testing. In the North Pacific Ocean, two distinct sources of Pu isotopes can be identified; i.e., the global stratospheric fallout and close-in tropospheric fallout from nuclear weapons testing at the Pacific Proving Grounds in the Marshall Islands. The atom ratio of Pu-240/Pu-239 is a powerful fingerprint to identify the sources of Pu in the ocean. The Pu-240/Pu-239 atom ratios in seawater and marine sediment samples collected in the western North Pacific before the accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station will provide useful background data for understanding the process controlling Pu transport and for distinguishing future Pu sources. The atom ratios of Pu-240/Pu-239 in water columns from the Yamato and Tsushima Basins in the Japan Sea were significantly higher than the mean global fallout ratio of 0.18; however, there were no temporal variation of atom ratios during the period from 1984 to 1993 in the Japan Sea. The total Pu-239+240 inventories in the whole water columns were approximately doubled during the period from 1984 to 1993 in the two basins. The atom ratio of Pu-240/Pu-239 in surface water from Sagami Bay, western North Pacific Ocean, was 0.224 and showed no notable variation from the surface to the bottom with the mean atom ratio being 0.234. The atom ratios for the Pacific coast, near the Rokkasho nuclear fuel reprocessing plant, were approximately the same as the 0.224 ratio obtained from Sagami Bay, western North Pacific margin. The atom ratios in the surficial sediments from Sagami Bay ranged from 0.229 to 0.247. The mean atom ratio in the sediment columns in the East China Sea ranged from 0.248 for the Changjiang estuary to 0.268 for the shelf edge. The observed atom ratios were significantly higher than the mean

  2. The THORPEX-Pacific Asian Regional Campaign and Affiliated Field Campaigns over the Tropical Western North Pacific during August-September 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harr, P.

    2008-12-01

    The THORPEX (THe Observing Research and Predictability EXperiment) Pacific Asian Regional Campaign (T-PARC) is a multi-national field campaign that addresses the shorter-range dynamics and forecast skill associated with high-impact weather events of one region (Eastern Asian and the western North Pacific) and their downstream impacts on the medium-range dynamics and forecast skill of another region (in particular, the eastern North Pacific and North America). Although many significant weather events occur over eastern Asia and the western North Pacific, the focus of T-PARC is on various aspects of typhoon activity, which include formation, intensification, structure change, motion, and extratropical transition. Because of the significant impact of typhoon activity on the region of eastern Asia and the western North Pacific, T-PARC is comprised of several affiliated programs. These programs and their national sponsor include: - Tropical Cyclone Structure-2008 (TCS-08) [United States]; - Typhoon Hunter-2008 (TH-08) [Japan]; - Predictability and Observation Experiment (PROBEX) [South Korea]; - Tibetan Plateau Experiment [China]; - The South China Sea Experiment [China]; - Dropsonde Observations for Typhoon Surveillance near the Taiwan Region (DOTSTAR) [Taiwan]. In addition to the above list of field campaigns, a significant international component existed via contribution of specific observation platforms. A high-altitude jet aircraft (FALCON) will be operated by the Deutches Zentrum fur Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR). Driftsonde balloon operations will be conducted by the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) of France. Although the region of the western North Pacific plays an important and unique role in defining many characteristics of the midlatitude circulation of the Northern Hemisphere, the near-global participation in T-PARC is an indication that the scientific principles being examined with respect to the impacts on downstream weather by significant events

  3. Possible relationship between NAO and tropical cyclone genesis frequency in the western North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Won; Cha, Yumi

    2017-03-01

    This study examined a strong positive correlation between the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index during June and the total tropical cyclone (TC) genesis frequency in the western North Pacific during July and August. To investigate a possible cause for this relation, the mean difference between highest positive NAO years and lowest negative NAO years was analyzed by dividing into when the El Niño and La Niña years were included and when the El Niño and La Niña years were not included. When the El Niño and La Niña years were included, for positive NAO years, the TCs mostly occurred in the northwestern region of tropical and subtropical western Pacific, and showed a pattern that migrate from the sea northeast of the Philippines, pass the East China Sea, and move toward the mid-latitudes of East Asia. In contrast, for negative NAO years, the TCs mostly occurred in the southeastern region of tropical and subtropical western Pacific, and showed a pattern that migrate westward from the sea southeast of the Philippines, pass the South China Sea, and move toward the southern coast of China and Indochinese peninsula. These two different TC migration patterns affect the recurving location of TC, and for positive NAO years, the recurving of TC was averagely found to take place in the further northeast. In addition, the migration patterns also affect the TC intensity, and the TCs of positive NAO years had stronger intensity than the TCs of negative NAO years as sufficient energy can be absorbed from the ocean while moving north in the mid-latitudes of East Asia. The TCs of negative NAO years showed weak intensity as they weaken or disappear shortly while landing on the southern coast of China and Indochinese peninsula. On the other hand, the above result of analysis is also similarly observed when the El Niño and La Niña years were not included.

  4. Variability in the correlation between Asian dust storms and chlorophyll a concentration from the North to Equatorial Pacific.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai-Chun Tan

    Full Text Available A long-term record of Asian dust storms showed seven high-occurrence-frequency centers in China. The intrusion of Asian dust into the downwind seas, including the China seas, the Sea of Japan, the subarctic North Pacific, the North Pacific subtropical gyre, and the western and eastern Equatorial Pacific, has been shown to add nutrients to ocean ecosystems and enhance their biological activities. To explore the relationship between the transported dust from various sources to the six seas and oceanic biological activities with different nutrient conditions, the correlation between monthly chlorophyll a concentration in each sea and monthly dust storm occurrence frequencies reaching the sea during 1997-2007 was examined in this study. No correlations were observed between dust and chlorophyll a concentration in the 50 m China seas and the North Pacific subtropical gyre, the correlation coefficients were in the range 0.32-0.57. The correlation coefficients for the western and eastern Equatorial Pacific were relatively low (<0.36. These correlation coefficients were further interpreted in terms of the geographical distributions of dust sources, the transport pathways, the dust deposition, the nutrient conditions of oceans, and the probability of dust storms reaching the seas.

  5. Two new species and a remarkable record of the genus Dendronotus from the North Pacific and Arctic oceans (Nudibranchia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Korshunova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Two new species of the nudibranch genus Dendronotus, D. arcticus sp. n. and D. robilliardi sp. n., are described from the Arctic and North Pacific oceans respectively, based on morphological and molecular data, and the North Pacific D. albus is revealed to be a species complex. The species D. robilliardi sp. n. is described from the northwestern Pacific (Kamchatka differing from the northeastern Pacific D. albus by molecular and morphological data. The synonymy of D. diversicolor with D. albus is confirmed by analysis of their original descriptions. An endemic Arctic species D. arcticus sp. n. is also described here, differing substantially from all species of the genus Dendronotus using morphological and molecular data. An unusual record of the recently described D. kamchaticus Ekimova, Korshunova, Schepetov, Neretina, Sanamyan, Martynov, 2015 is also presented, the first from the northeastern Pacific, geographically separated from the type locality of this species in the northwestern Pacific by a distance ca. 6000 km; molecular data show them to belong to the same species.

  6. Pre-bomb marine reservoir ages in the western north Pacific : Preliminary result on Kyoto University collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoneda, M; Kitagawa, H; van der Plicht, J; Uchida, M; Tanaka, A; Uehiro, T; Shibata, Y; Morita, M; Ohno, T

    2000-01-01

    The calibration of radiocarbon dates on marine materials involves a global marine calibration with regional corrections. The marine reservoir ages in the Western North Pacific have not been discussed, while it is quite important to determine the timing of palaeo-environmental changes as well as

  7. A new genus and species of stoloniferous octocoral (Anthozoa: Clavulariidae) from the Pacific coast of North America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, G.C.

    2000-01-01

    A new genus and species of intertidal octocoral is described from the Pacific coast of North America. The new taxon is placed in the stolonbearing family Clavulariidae, and although superficially similar in appearance to species in both the genera Clavularia and Sarcodictyon, it exhibits some unique

  8. Tree growth and climate in the Pacific Northwest, North America: a broad-scale analysis of changing growth environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney L. Albright; David L. Peterson

    2013-01-01

    Climate change in the 21st century will affect tree growth in the Pacific Northwest region of North America, although complex climate–growth relationships make it difficult to identify how radial growth will respond across different species distributions. We used a novel method to examine potential growth responses to climate change at a broad geographical scale with a...

  9. The developmental biogeography of hawksbill sea turtles in the North Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Houtan, Kyle S; Francke, Devon L; Alessi, Sarah; Jones, T Todd; Martin, Summer L; Kurpita, Lauren; King, Cheryl S; Baird, Robin W

    2016-04-01

    High seas oceanic ecosystems are considered important habitat for juvenile sea turtles, yet much remains cryptic about this important life-history period. Recent progress on climate and fishery impacts in these so-called lost years is promising, but the developmental biogeography of hawksbill sea turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata) has not been widely described in the Pacific Ocean. This knowledge gap limits the effectiveness of conservation management for this globally endangered species. We address this with 30 years of stranding observations, 20 years of bycatch records, and recent simulations of natal dispersal trajectories in the Hawaiian Archipelago. We synthesize the analyses of these data in the context of direct empirical observations, anecdotal sightings, and historical commercial harvests from the insular Pacific. We find hawksbills 0-4 years of age, measuring 8-34 cm straight carapace length, are found predominantly in the coastal pelagic waters of Hawaii. Unlike other species, we find no direct evidence of a prolonged presence in oceanic habitats, yet satellite tracks of passive drifters (simulating natal dispersal) and our small sample sizes suggest that an oceanic phase for hawksbills cannot be dismissed. Importantly, despite over 600 million hooks deployed and nearly 6000 turtle interactions, longline fisheries have never recorded a single hawksbill take. We address whether the patterns we observe are due to population size and gear selectivity. Although most sea turtle species demonstrate clear patterns of oceanic development, hawksbills in the North Pacific may by contrast occupy a variety of ecosystems including coastal pelagic waters and shallow reefs in remote atolls. This focuses attention on hazards in these ecosystems - entanglement and ingestion of marine debris - and perhaps away from longline bycatch and decadal climate regimes that affect sea turtle development in oceanic regions.

  10. The role of subpolar atmosphere-ice-ocean interactions in D-O cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Camille; Born, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Sea ice has long been thought to play an important role in D-O cycles because of its strong influence on regional temperature and its ability to grow and melt rapidly in response to relatively weak forcings. One recent idea based on modelling experiments is that D-O-related sea ice displacements are part of an unforced, coupled oscillation of the North Atlantic atmosphere-ice-ocean system. Here, we present an overview of key components of this system, as well as observational and modelling results addressing how they function in today's climate, and how glacial climate conditions might alter their functioning to allow D-O cycles to occur. Of specific interest are the necessary changes in the subpolar gyre, the thermohaline structure and stratification of the Nordic Seas, the existence of an Arctic-like cold halocline at subpolar latitudes, and the accessibility of the subsurface ocean heat reservoir to the atmosphere. Broader consequences for the Atlantic thermohaline circulation and Southern Hemisphere climate signals will be discussed.

  11. Ingestion of plastic marine debris by longnose lancetfish (Alepisaurus ferox) in the North Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantz, Lesley A; Morishige, Carey L; Bruland, Gregory L; Lepczyk, Christopher A

    2013-04-15

    Plastic marine debris affects species on most trophic levels, including pelagic fish. While plastic debris ingestion has been investigated in planktivorous fish in the North Pacific Ocean, little knowledge exists on piscivorous fish. The objectives of this study were to determine the frequency of occurrence and the composition of ingested plastic marine debris in longnose lancetfish (Alepisaurus ferox), a piscivorous fish species captured in the Hawaii-based pelagic longline fishery. Nearly a quarter (47 of 192) of A. ferox sampled contained plastic marine debris, primarily in the form of plastic fragments (51.9%). No relationship existed between size (silhouette area) or amount of plastic marine debris ingested and morphometrics of A. ferox. Although A. ferox are not consumed by humans, they are common prey for fish commercially harvested for human consumption. Further research is needed to determine residence time of ingested plastic marine debris and behavior of toxins associated with plastic debris. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Millennial-scale plankton regime shifts in the subtropical North Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Kelton W; McCarthy, Matthew D; Sherwood, Owen A; Larsen, Thomas; Guilderson, Thomas P

    2015-12-18

    Climate change is predicted to alter marine phytoplankton communities and affect productivity, biogeochemistry, and the efficacy of the biological pump. We reconstructed high-resolution records of changing plankton community composition in the North Pacific Ocean over the past millennium. Amino acid-specific δ(13)C records preserved in long-lived deep-sea corals revealed three major plankton regimes corresponding to Northern Hemisphere climate periods. Non-dinitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria dominated during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (950-1250 Common Era) before giving way to a new regime in which eukaryotic microalgae contributed nearly half of all export production during the Little Ice Age (~1400-1850 Common Era). The third regime, unprecedented in the past millennium, began in the industrial era and is characterized by increasing production by dinitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria. This picoplankton community shift may provide a negative feedback to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. Population dynamics of the Laysan and other albatrosses in the North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Patrick J.; Hobbs, Rod; Ito, J.; Shaw, W.; Burgner, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    Laysan albatrosses (Diomedea immutabilis) are among the most prominent bird species which interact with commercial fisheries in the North Pacific. They are attracted to fishing nets and vessels and feed extensively on animals caught in nets, waste fish, offal, and refuse discarded from vessels. Approximately 17,500 individuals were killed in the five major high seas driftnet fisheries in 1990. Laysan albatross numbers are still increasing after being decimated in the early 1900's. Mortality in the high seas driftnet fisheries is reducing the recover rate by an estimated 0.4 to 1.6% per year depending on the intrinsic growth rate of the population. The impact of the fisheries is thought to be more severe on the less abundant black-footed albatross (Diomedea nigripes) which is also increasing but at a lower rate. No driftnet mortalities have been reported for the short-tailed albatross (Diomedea albatrus).

  14. Forecasting California precipitation using a cointegrated relationship with the North Pacific High sea level pressure anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, J.; Costa-Cabral, M. C.; Roy, S.

    2016-12-01

    A cointegrated relationship has been identified between the sea level pressure anomaly at the climatological location of the North Pacific High (NPH) and seasonal precipitation over California (Costa-Cabral et al., J. Clim., 2016). Here we demonstrate how this cointegration can be used for seasonal precipitation forecasting at different California locations including all main runoff-producing basins. We apply the new methodology to a) northern Sierra Nevada stations of the "eight station index" (8SI), b) the central Sierra Nevada stations of the "five-station index" (5SI), c) the southern Sierra Nevada stations "six station index" (6SI), d) at a San Francisco Bay station. We demonstrate that season-to-season precipitation forecasts based on the cointegrated relationship with the NPH have higher measures of skill than those based on regression methods incorporating the NPH anomaly. The new methodology is a powerful approach for forecasting California winter precipitation.

  15. Intraseasonal oscillation enhancing C5 typhoon occurrence over the tropical western North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Chun-Hsiung; Hsu, Huang-Hsiung

    2017-04-01

    This study reveals that the atmosphere-ocean coupled intraseasonal oscillation (ISO) enhances the occurrence frequency of Category 5 (C5) typhoons in the western North Pacific (WNP). Climatologically, the major region of C5 typhoon occurrence in the WNP is collocated with the intraseasonal variance of outgoing longwave radiation and tropical cyclone heat potential. The active convection and large ocean heat content associated with ISO create an environment conducive to the occurrence of C5 typhoons. Between 1980 and 2009, approximately 82% of C5 typhoons occurred when one or both of the two conditions were fulfilled. Our results suggest that compared with the thermodynamic factor of ocean heat content, dynamic factors (i.e., convection and near-surface moisture convergence) within the favorable intraseasonal background state likely play a more influential role in inducing C5 typhoons.

  16. Defying Dissolution: Discovery of Deep-Sea Scleractinian Coral Reefs in the North Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baco, Amy R; Morgan, Nicole; Roark, E Brendan; Silva, Mauricio; Shamberger, Kathryn E F; Miller, Kelci

    2017-07-14

    Deep-sea scleractinian coral reefs are protected ecologically and biologically significant areas that support global fisheries. The absence of observations of deep-sea scleractinian reefs in the Central and Northeast Pacific, combined with the shallow aragonite saturation horizon (ASH) and high carbonate dissolution rates there, fueled the hypothesis that reef formation in the North Pacific was improbable. Despite this, we report the discovery of live scleractinian reefs on six seamounts of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands and Emperor Seamount Chain at depths of 535-732 m and aragonite saturation state (Ωarag) values of 0.71-1.33. Although the ASH becomes deeper moving northwest along the chains, the depth distribution of the reefs becomes shallower, suggesting the ASH is having little influence on their distribution. Higher chlorophyll moving to the northwest may partially explain the geographic distribution of the reefs. Principle Components Analysis suggests that currents are also an important factor in their distribution, but neither chlorophyll nor the available current data can explain the unexpected depth distribution. Further environmental data is needed to elucidate the reason for the distribution of these reefs. The discovery of reef-forming scleractinians in this region is of concern because a number of the sites occur on seamounts with active trawl fisheries.

  17. Biological communities in San Francisco Bay track large-scale climate forcing over the North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloern, James E.; Hieb, Kathryn A.; Jacobson, Teresa; Sansó, Bruno; Di Lorenzo, Emanuele; Stacey, Mark T.; Largier, John L.; Meiring, Wendy; Peterson, William T.; Powell, Thomas M.; Winder, Monika; Jassby, Alan D.

    2010-11-01

    Long-term observations show that fish and plankton populations in the ocean fluctuate in synchrony with large-scale climate patterns, but similar evidence is lacking for estuaries because of shorter observational records. Marine fish and invertebrates have been sampled in San Francisco Bay since 1980 and exhibit large, unexplained population changes including record-high abundances of common species after 1999. Our analysis shows that populations of demersal fish, crabs and shrimp covary with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO), both of which reversed signs in 1999. A time series model forced by the atmospheric driver of NPGO accounts for two-thirds of the variability in the first principal component of species abundances, and generalized linear models forced by PDO and NPGO account for most of the annual variability of individual species. We infer that synchronous shifts in climate patterns and community variability in San Francisco Bay are related to changes in oceanic wind forcing that modify coastal currents, upwelling intensity, surface temperature, and their influence on recruitment of marine species that utilize estuaries as nursery habitat. Ecological forecasts of estuarine responses to climate change must therefore consider how altered patterns of atmospheric forcing across ocean basins influence coastal oceanography as well as watershed hydrology.

  18. North Pacific Ventilation Changes and Expansion of the Oxygen Minimum Zone During Deglaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, T. M.; Kennett, J. P.; Behl, R.; Sarnthein, M.; Ohkushi, K.

    2006-12-01

    Sediment cores from within (570 m) and above (440 m) the modern oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) in the Santa Barbara Basin provide a depth transect of Pacific intermediate water temperature and oxygenation strength during the past 25ky. Intermediate waters (300-2500m) are critically important to the earth's climate system for the transport of heat and salt around the globe, as well as influencing the carbon cycle via the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Oxygen isotopic values of benthic and planktonic foraminifera from these sites reflect a two-step deglaciation (including Terminations IA and IB). Oxygen isotopic values of benthic foraminifera suggest 2-3degC of intermediate water warming during deglaciation. Records of lamination strength indicate that the OMZ dramatically expanded during the Bolling-Allerod (B/A) extending to above the modern basin sill depth. Coincident with the sedimentary record of oxygenation changes is evidence for poorly ventilated waters (increase or plateau in 14C age), increased methane seepage to the basin (tar in sediments and carbon isotopic composition of foraminifera), and response of benthic species assemblages to the environmental changes at this time. These results indicate that intermediate waters experienced changes in temperature, oxygenation, ventilation and methane flux during Termination IA and the B/A. The significant expansion of the OMZ in the North Pacific during the B/A appears to have been forced by an upheaval in local (including surface productivity and methane seepage) and global carbon cycling at this time.

  19. Nuclear and mitochondrial patterns of population structure in North Pacific false killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martien, Karen K; Chivers, Susan J; Baird, Robin W; Archer, Frederick I; Gorgone, Antoinette M; Hancock-Hanser, Brittany L; Mattila, David; McSweeney, Daniel J; Oleson, Erin M; Palmer, Carol; Pease, Victoria L; Robertson, Kelly M; Schorr, Gregory S; Schultz, Mark B; Webster, Daniel L; Taylor, Barbara L

    2014-01-01

    False killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens) are large delphinids typically found in deep water far offshore. However, in the Hawaiian Archipelago, there are 2 resident island-associated populations of false killer whales, one in the waters around the main Hawaiian Islands (MHI) and one in the waters around the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI). We use mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences and genotypes from 16 nuclear DNA (nucDNA) microsatellite loci from 206 individuals to examine levels of differentiation among the 2 island-associated populations and offshore animals from the central and eastern North Pacific. Both mtDNA and nucDNA exhibit highly significant differentiation between populations, confirming limited gene flow in both sexes. The mtDNA haplotypes exhibit a strong pattern of phylogeographic concordance, with island-associated populations sharing 3 closely related haplotypes not found elsewhere in the Pacific. However, nucDNA data suggest that NWHI animals are at least as differentiated from MHI animals as they are from offshore animals. The patterns of differentiation revealed by the 2 marker types suggest that the island-associated false killer whale populations likely share a common colonization history, but have limited contemporary gene flow. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Genetic Association 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  20. Resource manager information needs regarding hydrologic regime shifts for the North Pacific Landscape Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Andrea; Jenni, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) are a network of 22 public-private partnerships, defined by ecoregion, that share and provide science to ensure the sustainability of land, water, wildlife, and cultural resources in North America. LCCs were established by the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) in recognition of the fact that response to climate change must be coordinated on a landscape-level basis because important resources, ecosystem processes, and resource management challenges extend beyond most of the boundaries considered in current natural resource management. The North Pacific LCC (NPLCC) covers the range of the Pacific coastal temperate rainforest, including an area of 528,360 km2 spanning 22 degrees of latitude from the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska, to Bodega Bay, California. The coverage area includes parts of four States, two Canadian provinces, and more than 100 Tribes and First Nation language groups. It extends from alpine areas at the crest of coastal mountains across subalpine, montane, and lowland forests to the nearshore marine environment. This wide range of latitudes and elevation zones; terrestrial, freshwater, and marine habitats; and complex jurisdictional boundaries hosts a diversity of natural resources and their corresponding management issues are equally diverse. As evidenced by the Science and Traditional Ecological Knowledge (S-TEK) Strategy guiding principles, identifying and responding to the needs of resource managers is key to the success of the NPLCC. To help achieve this goal of the NPLCC, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has organized several workshops with resource managers and resource scientists to identify management information needs relevant to the priority topics identified in the S-TEK Strategy. Here, we detail the results from a first workshop to address the effects of changes in hydrologic regime on rivers, streams, and riparian corridors. The workshop focused on a subset of the full NPLCC geography and was

  1. Incidental catch of marine birds in the north pacific high seas driftnet fisheries in 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D.H.; Shaffer, T.L.; Gould, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    The incidental take of marine birds was estimated for the following North Pacific driftnet fisheries in 1990: Japanese squid, Japanese large-mesh, Korean squid, and Taiwanese squid and large-mesh combined. The take was estimated by assuming that the data represented a random sample from an unstratified population of all driftnet fisheries in the North Pacific. Estimates for 13 species or species groups are presented, along with some discussion of inadequacies of the design. About 416,000 marine birds were estimated to be taken incidentally during the 1990 season; 80% of these were in the Japanese squid fishery. Sooty Shearwaters, Short-tailed Shearwaters, and Laysan Albatrosses were the most common species in the bycatch.Regression models were also developed to explore the relations between bycatch rate of three groups--Black-footed Albatross, Laysan Albatross, and 'dark' shearwaters--and various explanatory variables, such as latitude, longitude, month, vessel, sea surface temperature, and net soak time (length of time nets were in the water). This was done for only the Japanese squid fishery, for which the most complete information was available. For modelling purposes, fishing operations for each vessel were grouped into 5-degree blocks of latitude and longitude.Results of model building indicated that vessel had a significant influence on bycatch rates of all three groups. This finding emphasizes the importance of the sample of vessels being representative of the entire fleet. In addition, bycatch rates of all three groups varied spatially and temporally. Bycatch rates for Laysan Albatrosses tended to decline during the fishing season, whereas those for Black-footed Albatrosses and dark shearwaters tended to increase as the season progressed. Bycatch rates were positively related to net soak time for Laysan Albatrosses and dark shearwaters. Bycatch rates of dark shearwaters were lower for higher sea surface temperatures.

  2. Estimation of the marine boundary layer height over the central North Pacific using GPS radio occultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winning, Thomas E.; Chen, Yi-Leng; Xie, Feiqin

    2017-01-01

    Global positioning system radio occultation (GPS RO) refractivity data obtained from the first Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) for the years 2007 to 2012 were used to estimate an overall climatology for the height of the marine boundary layer (MBL) over the central North Pacific Ocean including the Hawaiian Island region (10°N-45°N; 125°W-175°W). The trade wind days are identified based on the six-year National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) global analysis for the same period. About 87% of the RO soundings in summer (June-July-August, JJA) and 47% in winter (December-January-February, DJF) are under trade wind conditions. The MBL height climatology under trade wind conditions is derived and compared to the overall climatology. In general, MBL heights are lowest adjacent to the southern coast of California and gradually increase to the south and west. During the summer (JJA) when the northeasterly trade winds are the dominant surface flow, the median MBL height decreases from 2.0 km over Kauai to 1.9 km over the Big Island with an approximate 2 km maximum that progresses from southwest to northeast throughout the year. If the surface flow is restricted to trade winds only, the maximum MBL heights are located over the same areas, but they increase to a median height of 1.8 km during DJF and 2.1 km during JJA. For the first time, the GPS RO technique allows the depiction of the spatial variations of the MBL height climatology over the central North Pacific.

  3. Evolution of the North Pacific Subtropical Mode Water in Anticyclonic Eddies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lixiao; Xie, Shang-Ping; Liu, Qinyu; Liu, Cong; Li, Peiliang; Lin, Xiaopei

    2017-12-01

    Anticyclonic eddies (AEs) trap and transport the North Pacific subtropical mode water (STMW), but the evolution of the STMW trapped in AEs has not been fully studied due to the lack of eddy-tracking subsurface observations. Here we analyze profiles from special-designed Argo floats that follow two STMW-trapping AEs for more than a year. The enhanced daily sampling by these Argo floats swirling around the eddies enables an unprecedented investigation into the structure and evolution of the trapped STMW. In the AEs, the upper (lower) thermocline domes up (concaves downward), and this lens-shaped double thermocline encompasses the thick STMW within the eddy core. The lighter STMW (25.0 ˜ 25.2 σθ) trapped in AEs dissipates quickly after the formation in winter because of the deepening seasonal thermocline, but the denser STMW (25.2 ˜ 25.4 σθ) remains largely unchanged except when the AE passes across the Izu Ridge. The enhanced diapycnal mixing over the ridge weakens the denser STMW appreciably. While many AEs decay upon hitting the ridge, some pass through a bathymetric gap between the Hachijojima and Bonin Islands, forming a cross-ridge pathway for STMW transport. By contrast, the North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW) underneath is deeper than the eddy trapping depth (600 m), and hence left behind east of the Izu Ridge. In Argo climatology, the shallow STMW (< 400 m) intrudes through the gap westward because of the eddy transport, while the NPIW (800 m) is blocked by the Izu Ridge.

  4. Determination of dissolved Fe(II) in seawater of the western North Pacific with luminol chemiluminescence method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, H.; Mase, A.; Gamo, T.; Nishioka, J.; Takeda, S.

    2010-12-01

    Determination of dissolved Fe(II) in seawater of the western North Pacific with luminol chemiluminescence method Hajime Obata, Akira Mase, Toshitaka Gamo (Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo, Japan), Jun Nishioka (Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, Japan), Shigenobu Takeda (Faculty of Fisheries, Nagasaki University, Japan) Speciation of iron in the ocean is now important topics because the bioavailability of iron depends on its chemical form in seawater. However, marine biogeochemical process of Fe(II) has not been fully investigated. In this study, we determined Fe(II) in seawaters using the luminol chemiluminescence method after acidifying the samples to pH 6(Hansard and Landing, 2009). The same samples collected in the western North Pacific were analyzed by the flow chemiluminescence methods with acidification to pH 6 and without acidification. The results with both methods were almost identical. Time variation of Fe(II) in seawater after acidifying the samples to pH 6 were examined in the western North Pacific and the Bering Sea. Within 10 minutes, variations of Fe(II) were small in the open ocean waters, whereas Fe(II) concentrations increased rapidly in surface waters collected in the Bering Sea. The acidification method is not always applicable for seawater samples, especially in the marginal sea. Surface distributions of Fe(II) in the western subarctic North Pacific were investigated by using a continuous clean sampling system for surface waters. The Fe(II) concentrations ranged from temperatures. The oxidation rates were slower in the Bering Sea than those in the western North Pacific, implying that the oxidation rates were controlled not only by water temperature but also by organic compounds, such as humic substances.

  5. Ocean warming since 1982 has expanded the niche of toxic algal blooms in the North Atlantic and North Pacific oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobler, Christopher J; Doherty, Owen M; Hattenrath-Lehmann, Theresa K; Griffith, Andrew W; Kang, Yoonja; Litaker, R Wayne

    2017-05-09

    Global ocean temperatures are rising, yet the impacts of such changes on harmful algal blooms (HABs) are not fully understood. Here we used high-resolution sea-surface temperature records (1982 to 2016) and temperature-dependent growth rates of two algae that produce potent biotoxins, Alexandrium fundyense and Dinophysis acuminata, to evaluate recent changes in these HABs. For both species, potential mean annual growth rates and duration of bloom seasons significantly increased within many coastal Atlantic regions between 40°N and 60°N, where incidents of these HABs have emerged and expanded in recent decades. Widespread trends were less evident across the North Pacific, although regions were identified across the Salish Sea and along the Alaskan coastline where blooms have recently emerged, and there have been significant increases in the potential growth rates and duration of these HAB events. We conclude that increasing ocean temperature is an important factor facilitating the intensification of these, and likely other, HABs and thus contributes to an expanding human health threat.

  6. Diversity and Activity of Communities Inhabiting Plastic Debris in the North Pacific Gyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Jessica A.; Clemente, Tara M.; Viviani, Donn A.; Fong, Allison A.; Thomas, Kimberley A.; Kemp, Paul; Karl, David M.; White, Angelicque E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Marine plastic debris has become a significant concern in ocean ecosystems worldwide. Little is known, however, about its influence on microbial community structure and function. In 2008, we surveyed microbial communities and metabolic activities in seawater and on plastic on an oceanographic expedition through the “great Pacific garbage patch.” The concentration of plastic particles in surface seawater within different size classes (2 to 5 mm and >5 mm) ranged from 0.35 to 3.7 particles m−3 across sampling stations. These densities and the particle size distribution were consistent with previous values reported in the North Pacific Ocean. Net community oxygen production (NCP = gross primary production − community respiration) on plastic debris was positive and so net autotrophic, whereas NCP in bulk seawater was close to zero. Scanning electron microscopy and metagenomic sequencing of plastic-attached communities revealed the dominance of a few metazoan taxa and a diverse assemblage of photoautotrophic and heterotrophic protists and bacteria. Bryozoa, Cyanobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes dominated all plastic particles, regardless of particle size. Bacteria inhabiting plastic were taxonomically distinct from the surrounding picoplankton and appeared well adapted to a surface-associated lifestyle. Genes with significantly higher abundances among plastic-attached bacteria included che genes, secretion system genes, and nifH genes, suggesting enrichment for chemotaxis, frequent cell-to-cell interactions, and nitrogen fixation. In aggregate, our findings suggest that plastic debris forms a habitat for complex microbial assemblages that have lifestyles, metabolic pathways, and biogeochemical activities that are distinct from those of free-living planktonic microbial communities. IMPORTANCE Marine plastic debris is a growing concern that has captured the general public’s attention. While the negative impacts of plastic debris on

  7. Little Ice Age wintertime climate cooling linked to N-Atlantic subpolar gyre warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijpers, Antoon; Seidenkrantz, Marit-Solveig; Sicre, Marie-Alexandrine; Andresen, Camilla S.; Staines-Urías, Francisca

    2015-04-01

    Traditionally, the Little Ice Age (LIA) in the North Atlantic is believed to have been marked by negative Sea Surface Temperature (SST) anomalies. In apparent contrast, we present evidence from sediment core records from the N-Atlantic Subpolar Gyre showing prevalence of warm SST conditions. Our proxy data include both alkenone-based SST reconstructions and results from faunal and geochemical foraminiferal studies. Subpolar Gyre SST warming after the Medieval Climate Anomaly is observed in the Labrador Current close to the Gulf Stream boundary off Newfoundland, which agrees with previously reported increased influence of warmer, Gulf Stream-derived Slope Water off southern Newfoundland(1). Our core records from the West- and East Greenland Current realm off southern Greenland, as well as sites in Faroese waters, correspondingly indicate increased influence of warm, saline North Atlantic / Irminger Current waters. Other recently published studies also report LIA SST warming in the northern subpolar North Atlantic(2) as well as increased heat transport into the Arctic via the West Spitsbergen Current(3). Growing evidence indicates that positive SST anomalies in the North Atlantic Ocean can promote negative NAO conditions, thus be linked with cold wintertime conditions in Northwestern Europe. A published modeling study using ensemble simulations with an atmospheric GCM forced with reconstructed SST data for the period 1871-1999 shows weakening of the westerly winds around 60o N with SST anomalies that have the same sign across the North Atlantic(4). Six other climate models show that with some years of delay, an intensified Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation leads to a weak negative North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) phase during winter(5). Furthermore, it was recently found that the stratosphere is a key element of extra-tropical response to ocean variability. Observational analysis and atmospheric model experiments indicate that large-scale Atlantic Ocean

  8. Arcane epipelagic fishes of the subtropical North Pacific and factors associated with their distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnell, Skip; Seki, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    In 1992, a moratorium was declared by the United Nations General Assembly to end the practice of large-scale pelagic driftnet fishing. During two years leading up to the moratorium, three scientific research and fishery observer programs involving Canada, Japan, Korea, China-Taipei and the United States had collected significant amounts of information about the distribution and abundance of the epipelagic fauna in the subtropical North Pacific Ocean. The pan-regional distributions of the fishes in 1990 and 1991, most of which were taken as bycatch in 9910 fishing operations (357,150 km of driftnet) are described. More species were observed per fishing operation in 1991 than in 1990. Principal coordinate analysis of the incidence of the commonly caught fish species was used to show that, except for an anomaly in the region of the Shatsky Rise (165°E), the composition of the catch changed from the coast of Japan across more than 6000 km to the eastern boundary of the fishery (145°W). The analysis suggested that the fish species composition changed rather little with increasing latitude within the southern part of the domain (25-35°N), before changing more rapidly north of the Kuroshio Extension region to a more subarctic, transition zone fauna.

  9. Critically endangered western gray whales migrate to the eastern North Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mate, Bruce R; Ilyashenko, Valentin Yu; Bradford, Amanda L; Vertyankin, Vladimir V; Tsidulko, Grigory A; Rozhnov, Vyacheslav V; Irvine, Ladd M

    2015-04-01

    Western North Pacific gray whales (WGWs), once considered extinct, are critically endangered with unknown migratory routes and reproductive areas. We attached satellite-monitored tags to seven WGWs on their primary feeding ground off Sakhalin Island, Russia, three of which subsequently migrated to regions occupied by non-endangered eastern gray whales (EGWs). A female with the longest-lasting tag visited all three major EGW reproductive areas off Baja California, Mexico, before returning to Sakhalin Island the following spring. Her 22 511 km round-trip is the longest documented mammal migration and strongly suggests that some presumed WGWs are actually EGWs foraging in areas historically attributed to WGWs. The observed migration routes provide evidence of navigational skills across open water that break the near-shore north-south migratory paradigm of EGWs. Despite evidence of genetic differentiation, these tagging data indicate that the population identity of whales off Sakhalin Island needs further evaluation. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  10. Deglacial shift in subsurface watermass source in the subtropcal South Pacific North of New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiraldi, B.; Sikes, E. L.; Elmore, A. C.; Cook, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    Glacial-interglacial changes in global temperature are linked with shifts in atmospheric winds and oceanic fronts. Climatic shifts associated with last glacial conditions include a northward shift of the southern hemisphere westerlies, a southward shift of the inter-tropical convergence zone (ITCZ), and a northward shift of the subtropical front (STF) from their modern day locations. These shifts would compress the transition zone in the subtropical south Pacific affecting the source of surface waters. Here we present a δ18Oseawater and δ13C reconstruction from surface dwelling Globogerina bulloides from Bay of Plenty core 87JPC from North of New Zealand to illustrate changes in subtropical South Pacific surface water mass structure over the past 30 ka. Age control is based on tephra stratigraphy benthic foraminiferal δ18O and 14C dates. Sea level reconstruction and surface temperature (SST) reconstructions based on Mg/Ca were used to remove the temperature effect and the ice volume effect was removed from δ18O yielding an estimate of δ18Oseawater of surface-mixed layer water in the Bay of Plenty for the deglaciation. Early in the last glacial period (27-24 ka), reconstructed δ18Oseawater averaged -0.2‰ increasing at 24-21 ka to reach 0.5‰ for 1.2 kyr at the height of the LGM (21-19ka). At 19ka there is a rapid depletion of δ18Oseawater to -0.2‰ after which values average 0.2‰ into the Holocene. More depleted δ18Oseawater values during the LGM suggest surface waters were sourced at high latitudes and were fresher relative to modern. The enrichment through the height of the LGM suggests gradual shift in source waters to more saline and/or lower latitudes. Glacial δ13C holds steady at ~-0.5‰ with a late glacial enrichment maximum of -0.3‰ at 21-20 ka. A subsequent depletion of 0.6‰ at 19.8 ka marks a step change after which δ13C is level through the deglaciation at an average value of -0.8‰ and through the Holocene at -1.0‰. The δ13C

  11. Autonomous Sampling of Remote Phytoplankton Blooms in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (July-Aug. 2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, E. E.; Wilson, C.; Villareal, T. A.

    2016-12-01

    Satellite ocean color data regularly reveals the existence of large (103 km2) phytoplankton blooms in the North Pacific Ocean that can persist for weeks to months and are often associated with N2 fixing diatom symbioses. The basin size and inability to accurately forecast these blooms makes sampling these events difficult outside of the time series at Station ALOHA. We used an autonomous Wave Glider surface vehicle (Honey Badger) to conduct a large regional survey well north of HI to examine bloom composition and key species distribution. Honey Badger was equipped with a gpCTD, downward looking camera, 2 C3 fluorometers, wind and wave sensors, a Turner Designs' Phytoflash, and a Sequoia Scientific LISST-Holo for imaging cells. Most of the data collected was available in near-real time through NOAA's ERDDAP data server. The 159 day mission began 1 June 2015 and covered 6800 km. From 1 July 2015 to 31 August 2015, Honey Badger transited from low levels of chlorophyll-a (chl) (0.06±0.01 mg m-3), through a mesoscale­ bloom, and then into a broad regional chl increase (0.08±0.01 mg m-3) as noted by the AQUA MODIS satellite. Phytoplankton cell counts (> 14,000 Hemiaulus cells L-1) and increased nocturnal Fv:Fm yields (maximum > 0.61) were concurrent with the 0.1 µg Chl L-1 bloom. A separate bloom of the Rhizosolenia-Richelia symbiosis was noted (> 3,000 Rhizosolenia-Richelia cells L-1) within a smaller, short-lived bloom with a biovolume 2.1 times higher than the rest of the southern transect. The broad regional chl increase in the southern leg of the transit was concurrent with a sustained Hemiaulus increase to 102 cells L-1. Diel patterns in Fv:Fm did not suggest Fe limitation anywhere in the transect. Elevated yields were found only in the diatom increases. Honey Badger and the instruments it carried were useful tools for the investigation of remote bloom dynamics in the Eastern North Pacific Subtropical Gyre.

  12. Plate boundary deformation between the Pacific and North America in the Explorer region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreemer, Corné; Govers, Rob; Furlong, Kevin P.; Holt, William E.

    1998-08-01

    One of the consequences of plate tectonics is that a spreading ridge will eventually approach a subduction zone. The problem whether the possible break-up of the approaching ridge will lead to the development of independent micro-plates, or not, is still unresolved. Some 4 million years ago the interaction between the Juan de Fuca Ridge and the Cascadia subduction zone resulted in ridge fragmentation in the Explorer region. There are two proposed post-Miocene kinematic models: one that proposes the presence of a micro-plate and the other that treats the region as a transform deformation zone, or so-called pseudo-plate. We use earthquake strain rates derived from 74 events since 1948 to estimate a long-term velocity field for the region. By comparing this result with the predicted velocity fields for both models we try to discriminate between the two. The earthquake strain rates indicate the presence of a transform deformation zone between the North American (NAM) and Pacific (PAC) plates. The velocity field derived from the inversion of the earthquake strain rates indicates that seismic activity takes up 50±30% (1 σ) of the PAC-NAM relative motion (NUVEL-1A; DeMets et al., 1994. Effect of recent revisions to the geomagnetic reversal time scale on estimates of current plate motions. Geophys. Res. Lett. 21, 2191-2194.) within the seismogenic layer of this zone and is indistinguishable in direction from the NUVEL-1A PAC-NAM model. The presence of this Explorer transform zone is consistent with the strain rate and velocity field for the `pseudo-plate model' and indicates that seismicity defines a (new) plate boundary zone between the Pacific and North American plates. Earthquake-derived strain rates are low along the Nootka Transform, which accommodates relative motion between the Juan de Fuca and North American plates. The cause for the absence of significant seismic slip along this transform is unclear and may be closely linked to the fact that the adjacent

  13. Variability in the Correlation between Asian Dust Storms and Chlorophyll a Concentration from the North to Equatorial Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sai-Chun; Yao, Xiaohong; Gao, Hui-Wang; Shi, Guang-Yu; Yue, Xu

    2013-01-01

    A long-term record of Asian dust storms showed seven high-occurrence-frequency centers in China. The intrusion of Asian dust into the downwind seas, including the China seas, the Sea of Japan, the subarctic North Pacific, the North Pacific subtropical gyre, and the western and eastern Equatorial Pacific, has been shown to add nutrients to ocean ecosystems and enhance their biological activities. To explore the relationship between the transported dust from various sources to the six seas and oceanic biological activities with different nutrient conditions, the correlation between monthly chlorophyll a concentration in each sea and monthly dust storm occurrence frequencies reaching the sea during 1997–2007 was examined in this study. No correlations were observed between dust and chlorophyll a concentration in the China seas because atmospheric deposition is commonly believed to exert less impact on coastal seas. Significant correlations existed between dust sources and many sea areas, suggesting a link between dust and chlorophyll a concentration in those seas. However, the correlation coefficients were highly variable. In general, the correlation coefficients (0.54–0.63) for the Sea of Japan were highest, except for that between the subarctic Pacific and the Taklimakan Desert, where it was as high as 0.7. For the >50 m China seas and the North Pacific subtropical gyre, the correlation coefficients were in the range 0.32–0.57. The correlation coefficients for the western and eastern Equatorial Pacific were relatively low (<0.36). These correlation coefficients were further interpreted in terms of the geographical distributions of dust sources, the transport pathways, the dust deposition, the nutrient conditions of oceans, and the probability of dust storms reaching the seas. PMID:23460892

  14. Climatic forcing of Quaternary deep-sea benthic communities in the North Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, Moriaki; Hunt, G.; Cronin, T. M.; Hokanishi, N.; Kawahata, H.; Tsujimoto, Akira; Ishitake, M.

    2012-01-01

    There is growing evidence that changes in deep-sea benthic ecosystems are modulated by climate changes, but most evidence to date comes from the North Atlantic Ocean. Here we analyze new ostracod and published foraminiferal records for the last 250,000 years on Shatsky Rise in the North Pacific Ocean. Using linear models, we evaluate statistically the ability of environmental drivers (temperature, productivity, and seasonality of productivity) to predict changes in faunal diversity, abundance, and composition. These microfossil data show glacial-interglacial shifts in overall abundances and species diversities that are low during glacial intervals and high during interglacials. These patterns replicate those previously documented in the North Atlantic Ocean, suggesting that the climatic forcing of the deep-sea ecosystem is widespread, and possibly global in nature. However, these results also reveal differences with prior studies that probably reflect the isolated nature of Shatsky Rise as a remote oceanic plateau. Ostracod assemblages on Shatsky Rise are highly endemic but of low diversity, consistent with the limited dispersal potential of these animals. Benthic foraminifera, by contrast, have much greater dispersal ability and their assemblages at Shatsky Rise show diversities typical for deep-sea faunas in other regions. Statistical analyses also reveal ostracod-foraminferal differences in relationships between environmental drivers and biotic change. Rarefied diversity is best explained as a hump-shaped function of surface productivity in ostracods, but as having a weak and positive relationship with temperature in foraminifera. Abundance shows a positive relationship with both productivity and seasonality of productivity in foraminifera, and a hump-shaped relationship with productivity in ostracods. Finally, species composition in ostracods is influenced by both temperature and productivity, but only a temperature effect is evident in foraminifera. Though

  15. Nutrients, temperature, and salinity from bottle cats in the North Pacific Ocean by the Pacific Research Institute of Fisheries and Oceanography from 27 August 1950 to 17 November 1997 (NODC Accession 0000843)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Nutrients, temperature, and salinity data were collected using bottle casts in the North Pacific Ocean from 27 August 1950 to 17 November 1997. Data were submitted...

  16. Pressure, temperature, and salinity collected by CTDs from ships in the North Pacific and South Pacific Oceans from 6/30/1999 to 12/14/1999 (NODC Accession 0000003)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and pressure data were collected using CTD casts in the North/South Pacific Ocean from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN AND NOAA Ship KA'IMIMOANA from...

  17. Physical, profile and underway data collected aboard the ROGER REVELLE during cruise RR1213 in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2012-10-04 to 2012-11-05 (NCEI Accession 0129851)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0129851 includes physical, profile and underway data collected aboard the ROGER REVELLE during cruise RR1213 in the North Pacific Ocean and South...

  18. Reduced admixture of North Atlantic Deep Water to the deep central South Pacific during the last two glacial periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Kescher, Mario; Frank, Martin; Tapia, Raúl; Ronge, Thomas A.; Nürnberg, Dirk; Tiedemann, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    The South Pacific is a sensitive location for the variability of the global oceanic thermohaline circulation given that deep waters from the Atlantic Ocean, the Southern Ocean, and the Pacific Basin are exchanged. Here we reconstruct the deep water circulation of the central South Pacific for the last two glacial cycles (from 240,000 years ago to the Holocene) based on radiogenic neodymium (Nd) and lead (Pb) isotope records complemented by benthic stable carbon data obtained from two sediment cores located on the flanks of the East Pacific Rise. The records show small but consistent glacial/interglacial changes in all three isotopic systems with interglacial average values of -5.8 and 18.757 for ɛNd and 206Pb/204Pb, respectively, whereas glacial averages are -5.3 and 18.744. Comparison of this variability of Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) to previously published records along the pathway of the global thermohaline circulation is consistent with reduced admixture of North Atlantic Deep Water to CDW during cold stages. The absolute values and amplitudes of the benthic δ13C variations are essentially indistinguishable from other records of the Southern Hemisphere and confirm that the low central South Pacific sedimentation rates did not result in a significant reduction of the amplitude of any of the measured proxies. In addition, the combined detrital Nd and strontium (87Sr/86Sr) isotope signatures imply that Australian and New Zealand dust has remained the principal contributor of lithogenic material to the central South Pacific.

  19. The Baja California Borderland and the Neogene Evolution of the Pacific-North American Plate Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, J. M.; Eakins, B. W.

    2001-12-01

    New observational data on Neogene faulting in the borderland of Baja California places important constraints on tectonic models for the evolution of the Pacific-North American (P-NA) plate boundary and rifting in the Gulf of California. Neogene faults in the borderland range from strike slip to normal slip and accommodate integrated transtension. Most have east-facing escarpments and likely reactivate the former east-dipping accretionary complex. Numerous lines of evidence indicate that Neogene faults are still active and accomplish a significant component ( ~1-5 mm/yr) of Pacific-North American shearing. Quaternary volcanoes are found offshore and along the Pacific coastal margin, Quaternary marine terraces are warped and uplifted as high as 200 masl. Many of the offshore faults have fresh escarpments and cut Holocene sediments. Extensive arrays of Quaternary fault scarps are found throughout the coastal region and in Bahia Magdalena they are clearly associated with major faults that bound recently uplifted islands. A prominent band of seismicity follows the coast and eight earthquakes (Ms>5.0) were teleseismically recorded between 1973 and 1998. This evidence for active shearing indicates that the Baja microplate has not yet been completely transferred to the Pacific plate. The best lithologic correlation that can be used to define the total Neogene slip across the borderland faults is the offset between the Magdalena submarine fan and its Baja source terrane. The distal facies of the fan drilled during DSDP leg 63 is dominated by mudstone and siltstone that contain reworked Paleogene cocoliths derived from strata correlative with the Tepetate formation found throughout the borderland and fine-grained sandstone derived from a source terrane of granitoid basement. The Middle Miocene La Calera formation of the Cabo trough is one of many granitoid-clast syn-rift alluvial deposits that could form the continental counterpart of the submarine fan near the mouth of the

  20. Export production in the subarctic North Pacific over the last 800 kyrs: No evidence for iron fertilization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienast, S.S.; Hendy, I.L.; Crusius, J.; Pedersen, Thomas F.; Calvert, S.E.

    2004-01-01

    The subarctic North Pacific is a high nitrate-low chlorophyll (HNLC) region, where phytoplankton growth rates, especially those of diatoms, are enhanced when micro-nutrient Fe is added. Accordingly, it has been suggested that glacial Fe-laden dust might have increased primary production in this region. This paper reviews published palaeoceanographic records of export production over the last 800 kyrs from the open North Pacific (north of ???35??N). We find different patterns of export production change over time in the various domains of the North Pacific (NW and NE subarctic gyres, the marginal seas and the transition zone). However, there is no compelling evidence for an overall increase in productivity during glacials in the subarctic region, challenging the paradigm that dust-born Fe fertilization of this region has contributed to the glacial draw down of atmospheric CO2. Potential reasons for the lack of increased glacial export production include the possibility that Fe-fertilization rapidly drives the ecosystem towards limitation by another nutrient. This effect would have been exacerbated by an even more stable mixed layer compared to today. ?? The Oceanographic Society of Japan.

  1. Post-Glacial Development of Western North Atlantic - Labrador Sea Oceanographic Circulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheldon, Christina

    2015-01-01

    The subpolar North Atlantic Ocean – Labrador Sea region is an important site for both oceanographic and atmospheric circulation. The convergence of ocean currents causes downwelling of cold, saline water in the subpolar gyre, helping to drive the world-wide thermohaline circulation system. The main......, the subpolar gyre weakened, which carried less Gulf Stream-derived water to the western North Atlantic Ocean via the West Greenland Current and the Slopewater Current, south of Newfoundland. Changes in the subpolar gyre circulation had developed to be analogous to the modern climate by approximately 2 cal kyr...

  2. Comparisons of The Habitat Utilization Of Top Predators In The Southern Ocean And The North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, D. P.; Robinson, P.; Huckstadt, L. E.; Crocker, D. E.; Goebel, M. E.

    2010-12-01

    Northern and Southern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris, M. leonina) separated some 4 MYA. While these congeners are physiologically very similar and thus have the potential to forage in similar ways they inhabit very different habitats. While southern elephant seals (SES) are distributed throughout the southern ocean, northern elephant seals (NES) are limited to the Northeast Pacific Ocean and range over lower latitudes than SES. In order to compare and contrast the physiological capability and response to different habitats we compared the foraging behavior of 167 adult female northern elephant seals (Año Nuevo and San Benitos Islands) and 55 southern elephant seals (Livingston Island, Antarctic Peninsula) using satellite telemetry and dive recorders. As expected both species carried out very similar dive depths (NES 509m ± 166 vs SES 345m±79) and dive durations (NES 23.0 min ± 6.7; SES 22.5 min ± 5.0). However, there were significant differences in their foraging pattern that we attribute to differences in the availability of continental shelf and suitable foraging habitat. While 85% of NES females foraged offshore, the dominant strategy for SES was benthic foraging on the continental shelf. Even with the differences in habitat, the fundamental components of their foraging patterns remained the same as when they foraged pelagically they both species relied on persistent large scale oceanographic features where mixing enhances productivity such as the North Pacific Transition zone (NES) and the Southern Antarctic Circumpolar Current Front (SES). Given the very different habitats and prey species consumed by these two species their overall foraging behavior is surprisingly similar suggesting that as a mesopelagic predator the elephant seal design is rather robust.

  3. Relationship Between the Northern Hemisphere Polar Vortext ,North Pacific Storm Track and the West Wind Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Y.; Li, S.; Liu, Z.; Shen, B.; Yang, Q.

    2007-12-01

    : For this study, we use the daily and the monthly data from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction- National Centers for Atmospheric Research(NCEP-NCAR) reanalysis. In addition, we employ the monthly sea surface temperature data and the area index of the polar vortex in the Pacific sector from Beijing Climate Center. The time of the data set covers from 1951 to 2002.We study the relationship between the polar area in the northern hemisphere and the sea surface temperature in the west wind drift( we also do the same work between the storm track and the polar area) in the spring, the result shows that: (1) In the Pacific sector (150° E - 120° W), there is obvious negative correlation between the area index of the polar vortex and the index of sea surface temperature in west wind drift area in spring. Moreover, we also find the same phenomenon between the Pacific sector polar vortex area index and the storm track in the spring. With respect to the definition of the storm track index and the index of the west wind drift area sea surface temperature, we will give some explanation at the end of the paper. (2)By using the M-K(Mann-Kendall) test method, we found that the spring polar area index in the Pacific sector and the spring storm track index all have an abrupt change in 1969. The value of the spring polar area index is smaller than that of the average throughout the 1950s and 1960's,but during the 1970s and 1980s it is on the contrary. Analysing the index variety we can conclude that the location of the Pacific storm track is more northward throughout the 1950's and 1960's but more southward during the 1970s and 1980s.Using the M-K(Mann-Kendall) test method ,we also found the spring index of the sea surface temperature in the west wind drift area have an abrupt change in 1973.It means that the sea surface temperature of the west wind drift is colder during the 1950s and 1960's,but during the 1970s and 1980s it is warmer. (3)During the 1950s and 1960s

  4. Asymmetric response of tropical cyclone activity to global warming over the North Atlantic and western North Pacific from CMIP5 model projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Doo-Sun R.; Ho, Chang-Hoi; Chan, Johnny C. L.; Ha, Kyung-Ja; Kim, Hyeong-Seog; Kim, Jinwon; Kim, Joo-Hong

    2017-01-01

    Recent improvements in the theoretical understanding of the relationship between tropical cyclones (TCs) and their large-scale environments have resulted in significant improvements in the skill for forecasting TC activity at daily and seasonal time-scales. However, future changes in TC activity under a warmer climate remain uncertain, particularly in terms of TC genesis locations and subsequent pathways. Applying a track-pattern-based statistical model to 22 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) model runs for the historical period and the future period corresponding to the Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 emissions scenarios, this study shows that in future climate conditions, TC passage frequency will decrease over the North Atlantic, particularly in the Gulf of Mexico, but will increase over the western North Pacific, especially that hits Korea and Japan. Unlike previous studies based on fine-resolution models, an ensemble mean of CMIP5 models projects an increase in TC activity in the western North Pacific, which is owing to enhanced subtropical deep convection and favorable dynamic conditions therein in conjunction with the expansion of the tropics and vice versa for the North Atlantic. Our results suggest that North America will experience less TC landfalls, while northeast Asia will experience more TCs than in the present-day climate. PMID:28134343

  5. Asymmetric response of tropical cyclone activity to global warming over the North Atlantic and western North Pacific from CMIP5 model projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Doo-Sun R; Ho, Chang-Hoi; Chan, Johnny C L; Ha, Kyung-Ja; Kim, Hyeong-Seog; Kim, Jinwon; Kim, Joo-Hong

    2017-01-30

    Recent improvements in the theoretical understanding of the relationship between tropical cyclones (TCs) and their large-scale environments have resulted in significant improvements in the skill for forecasting TC activity at daily and seasonal time-scales. However, future changes in TC activity under a warmer climate remain uncertain, particularly in terms of TC genesis locations and subsequent pathways. Applying a track-pattern-based statistical model to 22 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) model runs for the historical period and the future period corresponding to the Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 emissions scenarios, this study shows that in future climate conditions, TC passage frequency will decrease over the North Atlantic, particularly in the Gulf of Mexico, but will increase over the western North Pacific, especially that hits Korea and Japan. Unlike previous studies based on fine-resolution models, an ensemble mean of CMIP5 models projects an increase in TC activity in the western North Pacific, which is owing to enhanced subtropical deep convection and favorable dynamic conditions therein in conjunction with the expansion of the tropics and vice versa for the North Atlantic. Our results suggest that North America will experience less TC landfalls, while northeast Asia will experience more TCs than in the present-day climate.

  6. Living benthic foraminifera of the Hess Rise and Suiko Seamount, central North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkushi, Ken'ichi; Natori, Hiro'o.

    2001-05-01

    Rose-Bengal-stained benthic foraminifera in six pilot-core samples and one multicore sample collected from the Hess Rise and Suiko Seamount in August 1994 were studied in order to understand foraminiferal distributions between two areas divided by an oceanic front in the central North Pacific. Samples from the Hess Rise were collected in depths of 2167-3354 m under the warm, saline Kuroshio Extension, while samples from Suiko Seamount came from depths of 1811-1955 m under the cold, less-saline subarctic current. Sediment-trap results for the year prior to our sediment sampling show that organic matter fluxes were about 2.5 times greater at Suiko Seamount than at the Hess Rise. However, the hydrographic structure between 1800 and 3400 m, based on CTD observations, is almost the same at both sites. Temperature decreases from 2.2 to 1.7°C over the depth range of 1800-3400 m, salinity increases from 34.5 to 34.7, and the dissolved oxygen content gradually increases from 1.5 to 3.0 ml l -1. The faunal populations at the Hess Rise are quite different from those at Suiko Seamount. The abundant species at the Hess Rise are Epistominella exigua, Brizalina pacifica, Fursenkoina cedrosensis and Alabaminella weddellensis. These species characteristically inhabit phytodetrital aggregates deposited on an oligotrophic seafloor. The populations at Suiko Seamount are dominated by Triloculina frigida, Lagenammina cf. arenulata, Reophax subfusiformis, and Reophax scorpiurus. The reason for differences between these populations is unclear. However, the typical phytodetritus-dwelling species E. exigua is dominant at the Hess Rise, which is located in a subtropical area that has a pulsed supply of settling organic matter in the spring. On the other hand, E. exigua is rare at Suiko Seamount, a subarctic site where there are more stable and greater fluxes of organic matter in summer and autumn. Occurrences of this species may be related to the seasonally short supply of organic matter

  7. Fault Trends and the Evolution of the Pacific-North America Transform in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, M. R.; Kamerling, M. J.

    2004-12-01

    The Pacific-North America (PAC-NOAM) transform boundary evolved during the past 30 Ma, lengthening more than 1000 km and spanning a zone exceeding 200-km across southern California. The relative plate motion vector has been estimated using seafloor magnetic anomaly patterns. Orientations of major transform fault segments within this boundary provide direct evidence of the relative motion at the time these faults formed, where the faults preserve their original orientations. Avoiding areas of known vertical-axis block rotations, we find at least three major fault trends that document past and present tectonic kinematics. A northwest trend of 330 degrees is related to subduction trends in the forearc region that defined the late Mesozoic and early Tertiary coastline and has subsequently controlled the orientation of oblique rifting during the Neogene initiation and growth of the PAC-NOAM transform. This trend is manifest in the San Diego Trough and adjacent coastal rifts and associated fault zones including the Coronado Bank and Newport-Inglewood. The middle Miocene transform orientation appears to be 300-310 degrees, which imparted extensional character to faults reactivated with older subduction trends. Major faults inferred to represent Neogene transform fault segments with this trend include the Whittier, Palos Verdes Hills, Santa Cruz-Catalina Ridge, Catalina Escarpment, and possibly the Mojave segment of the San Andreas fault. In late Miocene time, the plate motion vector rotated clockwise eventually achieving its modern orientation of about 320 degrees. Active faulting showing pure strike-slip character on the San Clemente - San Isidro fault zone and the Imperial Fault show this trend, as do transform faults in the northern Gulf of California. An intermediate trend is apparent in some areas along the San Clemente fault zone in the Borderland, and along the Elsinore and San Jacinto fault zones, which transect the Peninsular Ranges. The intermediate trends may

  8. Albian-Paleocene flora of the north pacific: Systematic composition, palaeofloristics and phytostratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, A. B.

    2013-12-01

    Principal attention is focused on phytostratigraphy and comparative palaeofloristics of the Anadyr-Koryak (AKSR) and Northern Alaska (NASR) subregions of the North Pacific Region. The high-resolution Upper Albian-Paleocene phytostratigraphic schemes of these subregions are based on perceived stages of their floral evolution. In the AKSR the scheme includes seven subdivisions of subregional extent: the Early Ginter (upper Albian), Grebenka (upper Albian-Cenomanian-lower Turonian), Penzhina (upper Turonian), Kaivayam (Coniacian), Barykov (Santonian-lower to ?middle Campanian), Gornorechenian (?upper Campanian-lower Maastrichtian), and Koryak (lower to upper Maastrichtian-?Danian) phytostratigraphic horizons. The phytostratigraphic scheme of the NASR includes three subregional phytostratigraphic horizons and five plant-bearing beds. These are the Kukpowruk (?lower to middle-?upper Albian), Niakogon (upper Albian-Cenomanian), Kaolak (Turonian) horizons and beds with the Tuluvak (Coniacian), Early Kogosukruk (upper Santonian-Campanian), Late Kogosukruk (Campanian-Maastrichtian), Early Sagwon (Danian-Selandian), and Late Sagwon (Selandian-Thanetian) floras. The comparative analysis of coeval (or close in age) floras distinguished in the AKSR and NASR shows that they are either similar to each other (floras Early Ginter and Kukpowruk, Grebenka and Niakogon, Penzhina and Kaolak, Koryak and Early Sagwon) or different in systematic composition (floras Kaivayam and Tuluvak, Gornorechenian and Kogosukruk). Similarities between the floras imply that plant assemblages of two subregions evolved under comparable climatic conditions and freely intercommunicated via the Bering Land Bridge during the Albian-Turonian and terminal Maastrichtian-Paleocene. Floras of the AKSR and NASR, which are of different composition, existed in particular intervals of geological history when trans-Beringian plant migrations were limited or even ceased because of palaeoclimatic difference between the

  9. Principles underlying the epizootiology of viral hemorrhagic septicemia in Pacific herring and other fishes throughout the North Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershberger, Paul K.; Garver, Kyle A.; Winton, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Although viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) typically occurs at low prevalence and intensity in natural populations of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) and other marine fishes in the Northeast Pacific Ocean, epizootics of the resulting disease (VHS) periodically occur, often in association with observed fish kills. Here we identify a list of principles, based on a combination of field studies, controlled laboratory experiments, and previously unpublished observations, that govern the epizootiology of VHS in Pacific herring. A thorough understanding of these principles provides the basis for identifying risk factors that predispose certain marine fish populations to VHS epizootics, including the lack of population resistance, presence of chronic viral carriers in a population, copious viral shedding by infected individuals, cool water temperatures, limited water circulation patterns, and gregarious host behavioral patterns. Further, these principles are used to define the epizootiological stages of the disease in Pacific herring, including the susceptible (where susceptible individuals predominate a school or subpopulation), enzootic (where infection prevalence and intensity are often below the limits of reasonable laboratory detection), disease amplification (where infection prevalence and intensity increase rapidly), outbreak (often accompanied by host mortalities with high virus loads and active shedding), recovery (in which the mortality rate and virus load decline owing to an active host immune response), and refractory stages (characterized by little or no susceptibility and where viral clearance occurs in most VHS survivors). In addition to providing a foundation for quantitatively assessing the potential risks of future VHS epizootics in Pacific herring, these principles provide insights into the epizootiology of VHS in other fish communities where susceptible species exist.

  10. [Cloacal and nasal bacterial flora of Lepidochelys olivacea (Testudines: Cheloniidae) from the North Pacific Coast of Costa Rica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Mario; Orrego, Carlos Mario; Hernández Gómez, Giovanna

    2006-03-01

    Cloacal and nasal bacterial flora of Lepidochelys olivacea (Testudines: Cheloniidae) from the North Pacific coast of Costa Rica. The aerobic cloacal and nasal bacterial flora of 45 apparently healthy female olive ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea) was studied at Nancite nesting beach, in Santa Rosa National Park (Costa Rican North Pacific) during July and August 2002. Bacterial samples were obtained by inserting sterile swabs directly into the cloaca and the nasal cavities of the turtles. Ninety-nine aerobic bacterial isolates, including 10 Gram-negative and 5 Gram-positive bacteria, were recovered. The most common bacteria cultured were Aeromonas spp. (13/45) and Citrobacter freundi (6/45) from cloacal samples and Bacillus spp. (32/45), Staphylococcus aureus (6/45) and Corynebacterium spp. (5/45) from nasal ducts. The results of the present study showed that the aerobic bacterial flora of nesting female olive ridleys was composed of several potential human and animal microbe pathogens.

  11. Dynamic controls on the subarctic North Pacific productivity peak during the Bølling-Allerød

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xun; Lembke-Jene, Lester; Tiedemann, Ralf; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2016-04-01

    Prominent maxima of biological productivity are recorded in both the Northwest and Northeast Pacific during the deglacial, interstadial Bølling-Allerød. These have been linked to a suite of differing causes and mechanisms, such as preservation effects, iron fertilization, riverine fluxes, upper ocean stratification and coastal upwelling. There is also widespread evidence for shifts in the subarctic Pacific ocean circulation during the deglaciation. However, while the dynamics of nutrient provision and limitation within the photic zone are certainly of high significance, the important role of physical circulation changes in the subsurface to deep ocean in replenishing nutrient supplies to the upper ocean, and of upper ocean temperature changes in fostering productivity peaks, remain largely unconstrained over the course of the last deglaciation. Here, using an Earth System Model COSMOS, we conducted a simulation representing the climate transition from the Last Glacial Maximum to the Bølling-Allerød. In association with marine proxy evidence, we will discuss the deglacial evolution of the surface to deep ocean circulation and mixing in the North Pacific, and examine their respective roles in determining the upwelling of nutrients from deeper layers, along with the formation of the North Pacific Intermediate water.

  12. Biological, chemical, and physical data from CTD/XCTD from five Japanese R/Vs in the North Pacific Ocean from January to December 2002 (NODC Accession 0001334)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile, nutrients, and other data were collected using XCTD and CTD casts from KOFU MARU and other platforms in the North Pacific Ocean from 01 January...

  13. North and South Pacific Ocean Temperature Profile Data collected by the SCRIPPS Institute of Oceanography from 17 February 2000 to 11 August 2002 (NODC Accession 0000925)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical data were collected from XBT casts from the North and South Pacific Oceans. Data were collected from 17 February 2000 to 11 August 2002. Data were collected...

  14. Physical and underway data collected aboard the NEW HORIZON during cruise NH1502 in the North Pacific Ocean on 2015-02-18 (NCEI Accession 0145830)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0145830 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the NEW HORIZON during cruise NH1502 in the North Pacific Ocean on 2015-02-18. These data...

  15. Physical and underway data collected aboard the ROBERT GORDON SPROUL during cruise SP1211 in the North Pacific Ocean on 2012-07-14 (NCEI Accession 0134541)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0134541 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the ROBERT GORDON SPROUL during cruise SP1211 in the North Pacific Ocean on 2012-07-14....

  16. Current direction data from moored current meter casts in the North Pacific Ocean from 30 June 1979 - 16 August 1979 (NODC Accession 8200104)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction data were collected using moored current meter casts in the North Pacific Ocean from June 30, 1979 to August 16, 1979. Data were submitted by...

  17. Physical and underway data collected aboard the ROBERT GORDON SPROUL during cruise SP1318 in the North Pacific Ocean on 2013-12-13 (NCEI Accession 0135463)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0135463 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the ROBERT GORDON SPROUL during cruise SP1318 in the North Pacific Ocean on 2013-12-13....

  18. Physical and underway data collected aboard the ROBERT GORDON SPROUL during cruise SP1406 in the North Pacific Ocean on 2014-10-22 (NCEI Accession 0150629)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0150629 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the ROBERT GORDON SPROUL during cruise SP1406 in the North Pacific Ocean on 2014-10-22....

  19. Salmon research cruises of five vessels operated by the fish and wildlife service in the North Pacific and Bering Sea during the 1956 season

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The United States Fish and Wildlife Service as a research agency of the International North Pacific Fisheries Commission, is engaged in a study to determine the...

  20. Zooplankton data collected using net casts from the FRANCISCO DE ULLOA in the North Pacific Ocean from 01 January 1999 to 31 January 1999 (NODC Accession 0000912)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton data were collected using net casts in the North Pacific Ocean from FRANCISCO DE ULLOA. Data were collected from 01 January 1999 to 31 January 1999. Data...

  1. Plankton data collected using net casts from the FRANCISCO DE ULLOA in the North Pacific Ocean from 15 July 1998 to 30 July 1998 (NODC Accession 0000911)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Plankton data were collected using net casts in the North Pacific Ocean from FRANCISCO DE ULLOA. Data were collected from 15 July 1998 to 30 July 1998. Data were...

  2. Current direction data from moored current meter casts in the North Pacific Ocean from 1984-04-24 to 1984-06-01 (NODC Accession 8500122)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction data were collected using moored current meter casts in the North Pacific Ocean from April 24, 1984 to June 1, 1984. Data were submitted by...

  3. Nutrient Concentrations collected from OSCAR ELTON SETTE in North Pacific Ocean from 2008-03-01 to 2011-04-30

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Laboratory analysis of water samples collected aboard the NOAA Ship Oscar Elton Sette along a 158W transect from 26-36N in the central North Pacific. Laboratory...

  4. Physical and underway data collected aboard the NEW HORIZON during cruise NH1313 in the North Pacific Ocean on 2013-06-04 (NCEI Accession 0132108)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0132108 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the NEW HORIZON during cruise NH1313 in the North Pacific Ocean on 2013-06-04. These data...

  5. Physical, nutrients, and other data from CTD and bottle casts from the North Pacific Ocean from 19 February 1991 to 31 December 2000 (NODC Accession 0000472)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, nutrients, and other data were collected from CTD and bottle casts from the North Pacific Ocean from 19 February 1991 to 31 December 2000. Parameters...

  6. Carbon dioxide, temperature, salinity, and atmospheric pressure from surface underway survey in the North Pacific from January 1998 to January 2004 (NODC Accession 0045502)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sea surface pCO2, sea surface temperature, sea surface salinity, and atmospheric pressure measurements collected in the North Pacific as part of the NOAA Office of...

  7. Settlement Agreement for Recovery of Past Response Costs at the Georgia-Pacific Hardwood Site, Plymouth, Washington County, North Carolina - Docket Number CERCLA-04-2008-3774

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contains legal agreement for the Georgia-Pacific Hardwood site under CERCLA Section 122(h)(1), Plymouth, Washington County, North Carolina, September 5, 2008 Region ID: 04 DocID: 10452729, DocDate: 09-05-2008

  8. Physical and underway data collected aboard the ROBERT GORDON SPROUL during cruise SP1301 in the North Pacific Ocean on 2013-06-17 (NCEI Accession 0153498)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0153498 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the ROBERT GORDON SPROUL during cruise SP1301 in the North Pacific Ocean on 2013-06-17....

  9. BAROMETRIC PRESSURE and Other Data from MOANA WAVE and Other Platforms From North Pacific Ocean from 19900103 to 19901220 (NODC Accession 9300148)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, Depth, Salinity, dissolved Oxygen (CTD); and Ocean chemistry data collected in North Pacific Ocean between January 3, 1990 and December 20, 1990 during...

  10. Chemical and temperature profile data from CTD casts in the East China Sea, Sea of Japan, and North Pacific Ocean (NODC Accession 9700022)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical and temperature profile data were collected from CTD casts in the East China Sea, Sea of Japan, and North Pacific Ocean. Data were submitted by the Japan...

  11. Current direction and CTD data from moored current meter and CTD casts in the North Pacific Ocean from 05 February 1979 - 01 December 1980 (NODC Accession 8300042)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction and CTD data were collected using moored current meter and CTD casts in the North Pacific Ocean from February 5, 1979 to December 1, 1980. Data...

  12. The potential effects of global climate change on the distribution of native and introduced Zostera seagrasses on the Pacific Coast of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    At least two seagrass species in the genus Zostera occur on the Pacific coast of North America: the native species Zostera marina L., and an introduced species, Z. japonica Ascher. & Graeb. Z. marina occurs along the entire Pacific coast of the United States and Canada. Zos...

  13. Nineteenth-century Ship-based Catches of Gray Whales, Eschrichtius robustus, in the Eastern North Pacific

    OpenAIRE

    Reeves, Randall R.; Smith, Tim D.; Lund, Judith N.; Lebo, Susan A.; Josephson , Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    The 19th century commercial ship-based fishery for gray whales, Eschrichtius robustus, in the eastern North Pacific began in 1846 and continued until the mid 1870’s in southern areas and the 1880’s in the north. Henderson identified three periods in the southern part of the fishery: Initial, 1846–1854; Bonanza, 1855–1865; and Declining, 1866–1874. The largest catches were made by “lagoon whaling” in or immediately outside the whale population’s main wintering areas in Mexico—Magdalena Bay, Sc...

  14. NOAA marine environmental buoy data from the National Data Buoy Center in the Gulf of Alaska, Gulf of Mexico, Bering Sea, North Atlantic Ocean, North Pacific Ocean, Coastal Waters of SE Alaska, Coastal Waters of Western U.S., Great Lakes, North American Coastline-North, and North American Coastline-South from 2002-10-01 to 2002-10-31 (NCEI Accession 0000400)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Pressure, temperature, and other data were collected from fixed platforms in the Gulf of Alaska, Gulf of Mexico, Bering Sea, North Atlantic Ocean, North Pacific...

  15. Monitoring cetaceans in the North Pacific: analysis of retrospective SOSUS data and acoustic detection on the Northern Edge Range

    OpenAIRE

    Stafford, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    To comply with environmental laws, the U.S. Navy has increasingly relied on acoustic detection and tracking for marine mammal monitoring/mitigation. In the North Pacific, much of what is known about large whale seasonal occurrence comes from Sound Surveillance System (SOSUS) arrays. SOSUS provides broad basin-scale assessments of large whale seasonal occurrence, but cannot provide detail at the regional level, in particular here for the Navy's Northern Edge (Training) Range in the northern...

  16. Principal modes and related frequencies of sea surface temperature variability in the Pacific coast of North America

    OpenAIRE

    Lluch Cota, Daniel B.; Wooster, W.S.; Hare, S.R.; Lluch Belda, Daniel; Pares Sierra, A.

    2003-01-01

    We examined monthly time-series (1950 to 1999) of sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies in 47 quadrants (2° 2°) along the Pacific coast of North America. Correlation, clustering and principal components analyses were applied to identify the spatial structure in coastal SST. The resulting modes and the individual series were investigated using spectral analysis to identify the most significant time-scales of variability, and the propagation of the main signals was explored by computing the w...

  17. Moisture transport from the Atlantic to the Pacific basin and its response to North Atlantic cooling and global warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Ingo [University of Hawaii at Manoa, International Pacific Research Center, Honolulu, HI (United States); Xie, Shang-Ping [University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Meteorology, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Atmospheric moisture transport from the Atlantic to the Pacific basin plays an important role in regulating North Atlantic salinity and thus the strength of the thermohaline circulation. Potential changes in the strength of this moisture transport are investigated for two different climate-change scenarios: North Atlantic cooling representative of Heinrich events, and increased greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing. The effect of North Atlantic cooling is studied using a coupled regional model with comparatively high resolution that successfully simulates Central American gap winds and other important aspects of the region. Cooler North Atlantic sea surface temperature (SST) in this model leads to a regional decrease of atmospheric moisture but also to an increase in wind speed across Central America via an anomalous pressure gradient. The latter effect dominates, resulting in a 0.13 Sv (1 Sv = 10{sup 6} m{sup 3} s{sup -1}) increase in overall moisture transport to the Pacific basin. In fresh water forcing simulations with four different general circulation models, the wind speed effect is also present but not strong enough to completely offset the effect of moisture decrease except in one model. The influence of GHG forcing is studied using simulations from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change archive. In these simulations atmospheric moisture increases globally, resulting in an increase of moisture transport by 0.25 Sv from the Atlantic to Pacific. Thus, in both scenarios, moisture transport changes act to stabilize the thermohaline circulation. The notion that the Andes effectively block moisture transport from the Atlantic to the Pacific basin is not supported by the simulations and atmospheric reanalyses examined here. This indicates that such a blocking effect does not exist or else that higher resolution is needed to adequately represent the steep orography of the Andes. (orig.)

  18. Selenium and mercury in pelagic fish in the central north pacific near Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, J John; Ralston, Nicholas V C

    2007-12-01

    Protective effects of selenium against mercury toxicity have been demonstrated in all animal models evaluated. As interactions between selenium and mercury and their molar ratios in seafood are essential factors in evaluating risks associated with dietary mercury exposure, considering mercury content alone is inadequate. In this study, the absolute and molar concentrations of mercury and selenium were determined in edible portions from 420 individual fish representing 15 species of pelagic fish collected from the central North Pacific Ocean near Hawaii. Selenium was in molar excess of mercury in almost all fish species evaluated. The rank order of mean Se/Hg molar ratios was striped marlin (17.6) > yellowfin tuna (14.1) > mahimahi (13.1) > skipjack tuna (12.8) > spearfish (11.4) > wahoo (10.8) > sickle pomfret (6.7) > albacore tuna (5.3) > bigeye tuna (5.2) > blue marlin (4.1) > escolar (2.4) > opah (2.3) > thresher shark (1.5) > swordfish (1.2) > mako shark (0.5). With a Se/Hg molar ratio of less than 1, mako shark was the only fish containing a net molar excess of mercury. A selenium health benefit value based on the absolute amounts and relative proportions of selenium and mercury in seafood is proposed as a more comprehensive seafood safety criterion.

  19. Steroid geochemistry in the oxygen minimum zone of the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeham, Stuart G.

    1987-11-01

    Particulate matter was collected in the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean, an area characterized by a shallow and intense oxygen minimum zone, in order to investigate the geochemistry of particulate organic matter in the ocean. Sinking, large particles and suspended, small particles were analyzed for sterols, 3-ketosteroids, 3-methoxy-steroids and sterenes. Vertical fluxes of steroid classes in sinking particles and concentrations of steroids in suspended particles decreased rapidly below the euphotic zone consistent with upper ocean sources and deep water decomposition. Significant compositional changes were observed with increasing depth and as a function of particle size. Sinking particles were enriched in C 27-Sterols but deficient in C 28 and C 29-sterols compared to the suspended particles. Suspended particles, especially in the oxygen minimum zone, were enriched in steroidal ketones and sterenes compared to sinking particles. Steroid distributions suggest that the oxygen minimum zone is the site of active "diagenetic" transformations, most likely microbially-mediated, of stenols to steroidal ketones, stanols and sterenes. These transformations occur preferentially in suspended particles relative to sinking particles.

  20. Photic zone changes in the north-west Pacific Ocean from MIS 4–5e

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. A. Swann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In comparison to other sectors of the marine system, the palaeoceanography of the subarctic North Pacific Ocean is poorly constrained. New diatom isotope records of δ13C, δ18O, δ30Si (δ13Cdiatom, δ18Odiatom, and δ30Sidiatom are presented alongside existing geochemical and isotope records to document changes in photic zone conditions, including nutrient supply and the efficiency of the soft-tissue biological pump, between Marine Isotope Stage (MIS 4 and MIS 5e. Peaks in opal productivity in MIS 5b/c and MIS 5e are both associated with the breakdown of the regional halocline stratification and increased nutrient supply to the photic zone. Whereas the MIS 5e peak is associated with low rates of nutrient utilisation, the MIS 5b/c peak is associated with significantly higher rates of nutrient utilisation. Both peaks, together with other smaller increases in productivity in MIS 4 and 5a, culminate with a significant increase in freshwater input which strengthens/re-establishes the halocline and limits further upwelling of sub-surface waters to the photic zone. Whilst δ30Sidiatom and previously published records of diatom δ15N (δ15Ndiatom (Brunelle et al., 2007, 2010 show similar trends until the latter half of MIS 5a, the records become anti-correlated after this juncture and into MIS 4, suggesting a possible change in photic zone state such as may occur with a shift to iron or silicon limitation.

  1. Gooseneck barnacles (Lepas spp. ingest microplastic debris in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam C. Goldstein

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Substantial quantities of small plastic particles, termed “microplastic,” have been found in many areas of the world ocean, and have accumulated in particularly high densities on the surface of the subtropical gyres. While plastic debris has been documented on the surface of the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG since the early 1970s, the ecological implications remain poorly understood. Organisms associated with floating objects, termed the “rafting assemblage,” are an important component of the NPSG ecosystem. These objects are often dominated by abundant and fast-growing gooseneck barnacles (Lepas spp., which predate on plankton and larval fishes at the sea surface. To assess the potential effects of microplastic on the rafting community, we examined the gastrointestinal tracts of 385 barnacles collected from the NPSG for evidence of plastic ingestion. We found that 33.5% of the barnacles had plastic particles present in their gastrointestinal tract, ranging from one plastic particle to a maximum of 30 particles. Particle ingestion was positively correlated to capitulum length, and no blockage of the stomach or intestines was observed. The majority of ingested plastic was polyethylene, with polypropylene and polystyrene also present. Our results suggest that barnacle ingestion of microplastic is relatively common, with unknown trophic impacts on the rafting community and the NPSG ecosystem.

  2. Gooseneck barnacles (Lepas spp.) ingest microplastic debris in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Miriam C; Goodwin, Deborah S

    2013-01-01

    Substantial quantities of small plastic particles, termed "microplastic," have been found in many areas of the world ocean, and have accumulated in particularly high densities on the surface of the subtropical gyres. While plastic debris has been documented on the surface of the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG) since the early 1970s, the ecological implications remain poorly understood. Organisms associated with floating objects, termed the "rafting assemblage," are an important component of the NPSG ecosystem. These objects are often dominated by abundant and fast-growing gooseneck barnacles (Lepas spp.), which predate on plankton and larval fishes at the sea surface. To assess the potential effects of microplastic on the rafting community, we examined the gastrointestinal tracts of 385 barnacles collected from the NPSG for evidence of plastic ingestion. We found that 33.5% of the barnacles had plastic particles present in their gastrointestinal tract, ranging from one plastic particle to a maximum of 30 particles. Particle ingestion was positively correlated to capitulum length, and no blockage of the stomach or intestines was observed. The majority of ingested plastic was polyethylene, with polypropylene and polystyrene also present. Our results suggest that barnacle ingestion of microplastic is relatively common, with unknown trophic impacts on the rafting community and the NPSG ecosystem.

  3. Gooseneck barnacles (Lepas spp.) ingest microplastic debris in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Deborah S.

    2013-01-01

    Substantial quantities of small plastic particles, termed “microplastic,” have been found in many areas of the world ocean, and have accumulated in particularly high densities on the surface of the subtropical gyres. While plastic debris has been documented on the surface of the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG) since the early 1970s, the ecological implications remain poorly understood. Organisms associated with floating objects, termed the “rafting assemblage,” are an important component of the NPSG ecosystem. These objects are often dominated by abundant and fast-growing gooseneck barnacles (Lepas spp.), which predate on plankton and larval fishes at the sea surface. To assess the potential effects of microplastic on the rafting community, we examined the gastrointestinal tracts of 385 barnacles collected from the NPSG for evidence of plastic ingestion. We found that 33.5% of the barnacles had plastic particles present in their gastrointestinal tract, ranging from one plastic particle to a maximum of 30 particles. Particle ingestion was positively correlated to capitulum length, and no blockage of the stomach or intestines was observed. The majority of ingested plastic was polyethylene, with polypropylene and polystyrene also present. Our results suggest that barnacle ingestion of microplastic is relatively common, with unknown trophic impacts on the rafting community and the NPSG ecosystem. PMID:24167779

  4. Decadal change of Tropical Cyclone Activity over western North Pacific around late-1990s

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, H.; Yang, J.; Mao, R.; Wang, Y.; Gong, D.

    2014-12-01

    A pronounced decadal change of tropical cyclone (TC) activity was identified over western North Pacific (WNP) around late-1990s. After late-1990s, the WNP total TC genesis number exhibited an evident decrease, particularly over southern WNP region (S-WNP: 5oN-20oN), which was mainly caused by reduced vorticity and descending anomalies. We also detected a significant northward migration of TC genesis from 17.2°N to 18.7°N. The above TC genesis change is attributed to the weakening of monsoon trough and local Hadley cell that is associated with sea surface temperature climate shift around the late-1990s. In terms of three prevailing TC tracks changes, the northwestward-moving track (II) became the most dominant prevailing track mode while the westward-moving track (I) became weaker, and the northeastward-recurving track (III) had a westward shift. The track shifts primarily resulted from the large-scale steering flows change, which also had played a vital role in the modulation of TC regional duration. Thus, the subtropical East Asia tended to have a higher risk of encountering TC while the Southern China had a lower risk. Additionally, a visual reduction was seen in both number and proportion of typhoons reaching categories 1 and 2, and a remarkable poleward migration was also recognized in the average latitudes where TCs have achieved their lifetime-maximum intensity.

  5. Geographic patterns of genetic differentiation among killer whales in the northern North Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Kim M; Durban, John W; Burdin, Alexander M; Burkanov, Vladimir N; Pitman, Robert L; Barlow, Jay; Barrett-Lennard, Lance G; LeDuc, Richard G; Robertson, Kelly M; Matkin, Craig O; Wade, Paul R

    2013-01-01

    The difficulties associated with detecting population boundaries have long constrained the conservation and management of highly mobile, wide-ranging marine species, such as killer whales (Orcinus orca). In this study, we use data from 26 nuclear microsatellite loci and mitochondrial DNA sequences (988bp) to test a priori hypotheses about population subdivisions generated from a decade of killer whale surveys across the northern North Pacific. A total of 462 remote skin biopsies were collected from wild killer whales primarily between 2001 and 2010 from the northern Gulf of Alaska to the Sea of Okhotsk, representing both the piscivorous "resident" and the mammal-eating "transient" (or Bigg's) killer whales. Divergence of the 2 ecotypes was supported by both mtDNA and microsatellites. Geographic patterns of genetic differentiation were supported by significant regions of genetic discontinuity, providing evidence of population structuring within both ecotypes and corroborating direct observations of restricted movements of individual whales. In the Aleutian Islands (Alaska), subpopulations, or groups with significantly different mtDNA and microsatellite allele frequencies, were largely delimited by major oceanographic boundaries for resident killer whales. Although Amchitka Pass represented a major subdivision for transient killer whales between the central and western Aleutian Islands, several smaller subpopulations were evident throughout the eastern Aleutians and Bering Sea. Support for seasonally sympatric transient subpopulations around Unimak Island suggests isolating mechanisms other than geographic distance within this highly mobile top predator.

  6. DNA barcoding for squids of the family Gonatidae (Cephalopoda: Teuthida) from the boreal North Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katugin, Oleg N; Chichvarkhina, Olga V; Zolotova, Anna O; Chichvarkhin, Anton Yu

    2017-01-01

    A fragment of cytochrome c oxidase I was used to assess whether species of the squid family Gonatidae from the North Pacific could be identified using DNA barcoding approach. Pairwise intra- and interspecific p-distances were assessed, and systematic relationships among species were estimated by NJ analysis. Examined species formed well-differentiated species-specific clades on the neighbor-joining and Bayesian trees. Multiple taxa formed clades supported by both tree topologies and species hypothesis-free ABGD method. Species morphologically identified as Gonatus tinro and Gonatopsis okutanii demonstrated intraspecific level of molecular genetic divergence (0.2-0.3%) indicating that they are conspecific. Genetic differences between the G. berryi clade and a squid morphologically close to that species may indicate a new cryptic species. High levels (>6.2%) of genetic differentiation within B. borealis suggested the existence of two cryptic species. This study confirms the usefulness of DNA barcoding for identifying species as well as discovering cryptic diversity in the gonatid squids, and indicates the need for further deeper insights into the phylogeny of the Gonatidae.

  7. Satellite radiance data assimilation for binary tropical cyclone cases over the western North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yonghan; Cha, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Myong-In; Kim, Joowan; Jin, Chun-Sil; Park, Sang-Hun; Joh, Min-Su

    2017-06-01

    A total of three binary tropical cyclone (TC) cases over the Western North Pacific are selected to investigate the effects of satellite radiance data assimilation on analyses and forecasts of binary TCs. Two parallel cycling experiments with a 6 h interval are performed for each binary TC case, and the difference between the two experiments is whether satellite radiance observations are assimilated. Satellite radiance observations are assimilated using the Weather Research and Forecasting Data Assimilation (WRFDA)'s three-dimensional variational (3D-Var) system, which includes the observation operator, quality control procedures, and bias correction algorithm for radiance observations. On average, radiance assimilation results in slight improvements of environmental fields and track forecasts of binary TC cases, but the detailed effects vary with the case. When there is no direct interaction between binary TCs, radiance assimilation leads to better depictions of environmental fields, and finally it results in improved track forecasts. However, positive effects of radiance assimilation on track forecasts can be reduced when there exists a direct interaction between binary TCs and intensities/structures of binary TCs are not represented well. An initialization method (e.g., dynamic initialization) combined with radiance assimilation and/or more advanced DA techniques (e.g., hybrid method) can be considered to overcome these limitations.

  8. Global phylogeography of the widely introduced North West Pacific ascidian Styela clava.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharyn J Goldstien

    Full Text Available The solitary ascidian Styela clava Herdman, 1882 is considered to be native to Japan, Korea, northern China and the Russian Federation in the NW Pacific, but it has spread globally over the last 80 years and is now established as an introduced species on the east and west coasts of North America, Europe, Australia and New Zealand. In eastern Canada it reaches sufficient density to be a serious pest to aquaculture concerns. We sequenced a fragment of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I mitochondrial gene (COI from a total of 554 individuals to examine the genetic relationships of 20 S. clava populations sampled throughout the introduced and native ranges, in order to investigate invasive population characteristics. The data presented here show a moderate level of genetic diversity throughout the northern hemisphere. The southern hemisphere (particularly New Zealand displays a greater amount of haplotype and nucleotide diversity in comparison. This species, like many other invasive species, shows a range of genetic diversities among introduced populations independent of the age of incursion. The successful establishment of this species appears to be associated with multiple incursions in many locations, while other locations appear to have experienced rapid expansion from a potentially small population with reduced genetic diversity. These contrasting patterns create difficulties when attempting to manage and mitigate a species that continues to spread among ports and marinas around the world.

  9. Sequential megafaunal collapse in the North Pacific Ocean: an ongoing legacy of industrial whaling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, A M; Estes, J A; van Vliet, G B; Williams, T M; Doak, D F; Danner, E M; Forney, K A; Pfister, B

    2003-10-14

    Populations of seals, sea lions, and sea otters have sequentially collapsed over large areas of the northern North Pacific Ocean and southern Bering Sea during the last several decades. A bottom-up nutritional limitation mechanism induced by physical oceanographic change or competition with fisheries was long thought to be largely responsible for these declines. The current weight of evidence is more consistent with top-down forcing. Increased predation by killer whales probably drove the sea otter collapse and may have been responsible for the earlier pinniped declines as well. We propose that decimation of the great whales by post-World War II industrial whaling caused the great whales' foremost natural predators, killer whales, to begin feeding more intensively on the smaller marine mammals, thus "fishing-down" this element of the marine food web. The timing of these events, information on the abundance, diet, and foraging behavior of both predators and prey, and feasibility analyses based on demographic and energetic modeling are all consistent with this hypothesis.

  10. Sequential megafaunal collapse in the North Pacific Ocean: An ongoing legacy of industrial whaling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, A.M.; Estes, J.A.; Van Vliet, Gus B.; Williams, T.M.; Doak, D.F.; Danner, E.M.; Forney, K.A.; Pfister, B.

    2003-01-01

    Populations of seals, sea lions, and sea otters have sequentially collapsed over large areas of the northern North Pacific Ocean and southern Bering Sea during the last several decades. A bottom-up nutritional limitation mechanism induced by physical oceanographic change or competition with fisheries was long thought to be largely responsible for these declines. The current weight of evidence is more consistent with top-down forcing. Increased predation by killer whales probably drove the sea otter collapse and may have been responsible for the earlier pinniped declines as well. We propose that decimation of the great whales by post-World War II industrial whaling caused the great whales' foremost natural predators, killer whales, to begin feeding more intensively on the smaller marine mammals, thus "fishing-down" this element of the marine food web. The timing of these events, information on the abundance, diet, and foraging behavior of both predators and prey, and feasibility analyses based on demographic and energetic modeling are all consistent with this hypothesis.

  11. Water budget and rapidly intensifying tropical cyclones over the western North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, S.; Zhai, S.; Chen, B.; Li, T.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) relative humidity, Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) 3B42 precipitation, Institut Français pour la Recherche et l'Exploitation de la Mer (IFREMER) evaporation, National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) FNL reanalysis and Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) tropical cyclone (TC) best track data are used to examine azimuthal mean and shear-relative water budget components associated with western North Pacific TCs of five intensity change categories: weakening, neutral, slowly intensifying, rapidly intensifying (initial) and rapid intensifying (continuing). The results show that: 1) In terms of azimuthal mean, evaporation plays an important role in both of the onset and continuation of storm rapid intensification (RI) and mid-level environmental relative humidity (ERH) within 600 km plays an important role in continuing RI. 2) Downshear left mid-level ERH and downshear right and upshear right evaporation are crucial for the onset of storm RI. 3) Upshear mid-level ERH, evaporation at all quadrants, upshear inner-core moisture flux convergence (MFC) and precipitation at all quadrants except for downshear left are important for continuing RI. 4) Storms undergoing continuing RI have more symmetric distributions of all the water budget components (i.e., ERH, precipitation, evaporation and MFC) than other storms. Our results suggest that different portions of water budget components play different roles in storm RI.

  12. Plastic ingestion in marine-associated bird species from the eastern North Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery-Gomm, S; Provencher, J F; Morgan, K H; Bertram, D F

    2013-07-15

    In addition to monitoring trends in plastic pollution, multi-species surveys are needed to fully understand the pervasiveness of plastic ingestion. We examined the stomach contents of 20 bird species collected from the coastal waters of the eastern North Pacific, a region known to have high levels of plastic pollution. We observed no evidence of plastic ingestion in Rhinoceros Auklet, Marbled Murrelet, Ancient Murrelet or Pigeon Guillemot, and low levels in Common Murre (2.7% incidence rate). Small sample sizes limit our ability to draw conclusions about population level trends for the remaining fifteen species, though evidence of plastic ingestion was found in Glaucous-Winged Gull and Sooty Shearwater. Documenting levels of plastic ingestion in a wide array of species is necessary to gain a comprehensive understanding about the impacts of plastic pollution. We propose that those working with bird carcasses follow standard protocols to assess the levels of plastic ingestion whenever possible. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Contributions of tropical waves to tropical cyclone genesis over the western North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liang; Takahashi, Masaaki

    2017-09-01

    The present study investigates the relationship between the tropical waves and the tropical cyclone (TC) genesis over the western North Pacific (WNP) for the period 1979-2011. Five wave types are considered in this study. It is shown that the TC genesis is strongly related to enhanced low-level vorticity and convection of tropical waves and significant difference are detected in the TC modulation by dynamic and thermodynamic components of the waves. More TCs tend to form in regions of waves with overlapping cyclonic vorticity and active convection. About 83.2% of TCs form within active phase of tropical waves, mainly in a single wave and two coexisting waves. Each wave type-related genesis accounts for about 30% of all TC geneses except for the Kelvin waves that account for only 25.2% of TC geneses. The number of each wave type-related TC genesis consistently varies seasonally with peak in the TC season (July-November), which is attributed to a combined effect of active wave probability and intensity change. The interannual variation in the TC genesis is well reproduced by the tropical wave-related TC genesis, especially in the region east of 150°E. An eastward extension of the enhanced monsoon trough coincides with increased tropical wave activity by accelerated wave-mean flow interaction.

  14. Physical forcing of late summer chlorophyll a blooms in the oligotrophic eastern North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Takahiro; Okamoto, Suguru

    2017-03-01

    We investigated physical forcing of late summer chlorophyll a (chl a) blooms in the oligotrophic eastern North Pacific Ocean by using ocean reanalysis and satellite data. Relatively large chl a blooms as defined in this study occurred in August-October following sea surface temperature (SST) anomaly (SSTA) decreases, mixed layer deepening, and temperature and salinity increases at the bottom of the mixed layer. These physical conditions were apparently induced by the entrainment of subsurface water resulting from the destabilization of the surface layer caused by anomalous northward Ekman transport of subtropical waters of higher salinity. Salinity-normalized total alkalinity data provide supporting evidence for nutrient supply by the entrainment process. We next investigated the impact of including information about the entrainment on bloom identification. The results of analyses using reanalysis data and of those using only satellite data showed large SSTA decreases when the northward Ekman salinity transports were large, implying that the entrainment of subsurface water is well represented in both types of data. After surface-destabilizing conditions were established, relatively high surface chl a concentrations were observed. The use of SST information can further improve the detection of high chl a concentrations. Although the detection of high chl a concentrations would be enhanced by finer data resolution and the inclusion of biogeochemical parameters in the ocean reanalysis, our results obtained by using existing reanalysis data as well as recent satellite data are valuable for better understanding and prediction of lower trophic ecosystem variability.

  15. Slow acidification of the winter mixed layer in the subarctic western North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakita, Masahide; Nagano, Akira; Fujiki, Tetsuichi; Watanabe, Shuichi

    2017-08-01

    We used carbon dioxide (CO2) system data collected during 1999-2015 to investigate ocean acidification at time series sites in the western subarctic region of the North Pacific Ocean. The annual mean pH at station K2 decreased at a rate of 0.0025 ± 0.0010 year-1 mostly in response to oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2. The Revelle factor increased rapidly (0.046 ± 0.022 year-1), an indication that the buffering capacity of this region of the ocean has declined faster than at other time series sites. In the western subarctic region, the pH during the winter decline at a slower rate of 0.0008 ± 0.0004 year-1. This was attributed to a reduced rate of increase of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and an increase of total alkalinity (TA). The reduction of DIC increase was caused by the decline of surface water density associated with the pycnocline depression and the reduction of vertical diffusion flux from the upper pycnocline. These physical changes were probably caused by northward shrinkage of the western subarctic gyre and global warming. Meanwhile, the contribution of the density decline to the TA increase is canceled out by that of the reduced vertical diffusive flux. We speculated that the winter TA increase is caused mainly by the accumulation of TA due to the weakened calcification by organisms during the winter.

  16. A Statistical Model of Tropical Cyclone Tracks in the Western North Pacific with ENSO-Dependent Cyclogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonekura, Emmi; Hall, Timothy M.

    2011-01-01

    A new statistical model for western North Pacific Ocean tropical cyclone genesis and tracks is developed and applied to estimate regionally resolved tropical cyclone landfall rates along the coasts of the Asian mainland, Japan, and the Philippines. The model is constructed on International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship (IBTrACS) 1945-2007 historical data for the western North Pacific. The model is evaluated in several ways, including comparing the stochastic spread in simulated landfall rates with historic landfall rates. Although certain biases have been detected, overall the model performs well on the diagnostic tests, for example, reproducing well the geographic distribution of landfall rates. Western North Pacific cyclogenesis is influenced by El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). This dependence is incorporated in the model s genesis component to project the ENSO-genesis dependence onto landfall rates. There is a pronounced shift southeastward in cyclogenesis and a small but significant reduction in basinwide annual counts with increasing ENSO index value. On almost all regions of coast, landfall rates are significantly higher in a negative ENSO state (La Nina).

  17. Geographic variation of persistent organic pollutant levels in humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) feeding areas of the North Pacific and North Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfes, Cristiane T; Vanblaricom, Glenn R; Boyd, Daryle; Calambokidis, John; Clapham, Phillip J; Pearce, Ronald W; Robbins, Jooke; Salinas, Juan Carlos; Straley, Janice M; Wade, Paul R; Krahn, Margaret M

    2010-04-01

    Seasonal feeding behavior and high fidelity to feeding areas allow humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) to be used as biological indicators of regional contamination. Biopsy blubber samples from male individuals (n = 67) were collected through SPLASH, a multinational research project, in eight North Pacific feeding grounds. Additional male samples (n = 20) were collected from one North Atlantic feeding ground. Persistent organic pollutants were measured in the samples and used to assess contaminant distribution in the study areas. North Atlantic (Gulf of Maine) whales were more contaminated than North Pacific whales, showing the highest levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and chlordanes. The highest dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) levels were detected in whales feeding off southern California, USA. High-latitude regions were characterized by elevated levels of hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) but generally nondetectable concentrations of PBDEs. Age was shown to have a positive relationship with SigmaPCBs, SigmaDDTs, Sigmachlordanes, and total percent lipid. Contaminant levels in humpback whales were comparable to other mysticetes and lower than those found in odontocete cetaceans and pinnipeds. Although these concentrations likely do not represent a significant conservation threat, levels in the Gulf of Maine and southern California may warrant further study. (c) 2009 SETAC.

  18. Tree-ring based mass balance estimates along the North Pacific Rim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcomb, N.; Wiles, G. C.

    2009-12-01

    Glacier mass balance reconstructions provide a means of placing short-term mass balance observations into a longer-term context. In western North America, most instrumental records of mass balance are limited in duration and capture only a narrow window of glacial behavior over an interval that is dominated by warming and ablation. Tree-ring series from northwestern North America are used to reconstruct annual mass balance for Gulkana and Wolverine Glaciers in Alaska, Peyto and Place Glaciers in British Columbia, and South Cascade and Blue Glaciers in Washington State. Mass balance models rely on the temperature and precipitation sensitivity of the tree-ring chronologies and mass balance records, as well as teleconnections along the North Pacific sector. The reconstructions extend through the latter portions of the Little Ice Age (LIA) and highlight the role of decadal and secular-scale climate change in forcing mass balance. Net mass balance reconstructions are broadly consistent with the moraine record that coincides with two major intervals of positive mass balance and with cooling related to the Maunder and Dalton solar minima. Secular warming in the later portions of the 19th and the 20th centuries corresponds with a pronounced interval of negative mass balance, and model instability after 1980. These trends show that the marked changes in glacier systems over recent decades throughout the Northwestern Cordillera are unique for the last several centuries and furthermore, suggest that modest gains forced by increasing precipitation over the latter 20th century in coastal settings are not sufficient to force glacier expansion or moraine building. Reconstructed (blue) and instrumental (red) net mass balances, Northern Hemisphere Temperature anomalies (Wilson et al., 2007), and PDO index (MacDonald and Case, 2005). A= Gulkana Glacier, B=Wolverine Glacier, C=Peyto Glacier, D=Place Glacier, E=South Cascade, F=Blue Glacier, G=PDO index, and H=Northern Hemisphere

  19. Influences of sea surface temperature in the tropical Pacific and Indian Oceans on tropical cyclone genesis over the western North Pacific in May

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huangfu, Jingliang; Chen, Wen; Ma, Tianjiao; Huang, Ronghui

    2017-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of sea surface temperature (SST) in different tropical regions on tropical cyclone (TC) genesis over the western North Pacific (WNP) in May. The results revealed that positive SST anomalies over the tropical Pacific (Indian) Ocean in March may lead to increased (decreased) numbers of TCs over the WNP in May by affecting the atmospheric circulation anomalies over the WNP. Warmer SSTs over the tropical Pacific Ocean (TPO) may lead to stronger low-level southwesterly winds and enhanced convection. However, warmer SSTs over the tropical Indian Ocean (TIO) may enhance the western part of the western Pacific subtropical high (WPSH) and suppress convection. Further analysis suggests that changes in the atmospheric circulation anomalies over the WNP are related to changes in environmental factors. Concomitantly with the positive SST anomalies over the TPO, a favorable environment for TC genesis in May is present, with stronger low-level relative vorticity and upper-level divergence, smaller vertical wind shear and abundant water vapor. In contrast, the positive SST anomalies over the TIO might lead to an unfavorable environment for TC genesis over the WNP. This study also investigated the joint contributions of the TPO and TIO, and the results indicate that positive SST anomalies over the TPO and negative SST anomalies over the TIO may lead to an increased number of TC geneses. The analysis of the energy budget suggests that the joint activity of the TPO and TIO influences the barotropic eddy kinetic energy conversions and is mainly attributed to the contributions from the meridional shear of the mean zonal winds and the zonal wind convergence.

  20. Nd Isotopic Evidence of Deglacial Antarctic Intermediate Water in the North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, C.; Martin, E. E.; Marchitto, T. M.

    2008-12-01

    may allow us to estimate the percent contribution of AAIW before, during, and after deglaciation, and thereby enhance our understanding of the deep ocean circulation in the North Pacific and carbon redistribution during the deglaciation. Reference: Marchitto, T.M., S.J. Lehman, J.D. Ortiz, J. Fluckiger, and A. van Geen, Marine Radiocarbon Evidence for the Mechanism of Deglacial Atmospheric CO2 Rise 10.1126/science.1138679, Science, 316 (5830), 1456- 1459, 2007.

  1. ENSO and Western North Pacific tropical cyclone activity simulated in a CGCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iizuka, Satoshi; Matsuura, Tomonori [National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2008-06-15

    A high-resolution (T213) coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (CGCM) has been used to examine the relationship between El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and tropical cyclone (TC) activity over the western North Pacific (WNP). The model simulates ENSO-like events similar to those observed, though the amplitude of the simulated Nino34 sea surface temperature (SST) anomaly is twice as large as observed. In El Nino (La Nina) years, the annual number of model TCs in the southeast quadrant of the WNP increases (decreases), while it decreases (increases) in the northwest quadrant. In spite of the significant difference in the mean genesis location of model TCs between El Nino and La Nina years, however, there is no significant simultaneous correlation between the annual number of model TCs over the entire WNP and model Nino34 SST anomalies. The annual number of model TCs, however, tends to decrease in the years following El Nino, relating to the development of anticyclonic circulation around the Philippine Sea in response to the SST anomalies in the central and eastern equatorial Pacific. Furthermore, it seems that the number of model TCs tends to increase in the years before El Nino. It is also shown that the number of TCs moving into the East Asia is fewer in October of El Nino years than La Nina years, related to the anomalous southward shift of mid-latitude westerlies, though no impact of ENSO on TC tracks is found in other months. It is found that model TCs have longer lifetimes due to the southeastward shift of mean TC genesis location in El Nino years than in La Nina years. As the result of longer fetch of TCs over warm SST, model TCs appear to be more intense in El Nino years. These relationships between ENSO and TC activity in the WNP are in good agreement with observational evidence, suggesting that a finer-resolution CGCM may become a powerful tool for understanding interannual variability of TC activity. (orig.)

  2. North Pacific Sea Surface Temperature, Western U.S. Vegetation, and the Demise of the Miocene Rocky Mountain Monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyle, M.; Wilkins, D.; Barron, J.; Heusser, L.

    2003-12-01

    Between 15 Ma and 5 Ma the vegetation of the western U.S. suffered a profound transition from summer-wet to summer-dry flora. In the middle Miocene extensive deciduous forests covered the region, reminiscent of modern forests of the SE United States. By the beginning of the Pliocene, however, these western `monsoon' forests disappeared and were replaced by vegetation adapted to a Mediterranean climate regime (summer-dry, winter-wet) or by desert vegetation. The change was largely gradual--the west began drying out by about 12 Ma. Extensive grasslands first appeared in eastern Oregon about 7-8 Ma, and the last of the `exotic' Miocene deciduous forest disappeared from the northern California coastal region by 5 Ma. The disappearance of summer precipitation in the west has traditionally been attributed to either the development of a rain shadow to the east of the mountains and/or cooling of the north Pacific Ocean. However, two important lines of evidence indicate that the development of a Sierra/Cascade rain shadow cannot have been the dominant process in the drying out of the western U.S. The gradual drying trend from at least 12 Ma to 5 Ma does not coincide with the known tectonic histories of either the Cascades or the Sierra Nevada range. More importantly, the disappearance of the Miocene flora on the coastal side of the mountain ranges cannot be attributed to a developing rain shadow. Instead the disappearance of coastal flora require a weakening of the moisture source from the north Pacific. We suggest that the drying of the west resulted from stepwise cooling of the north Pacific, which caused the gradual disappearance of a Miocene Rocky Mountain monsoon and a gradual but drastic reduction of summer precipitation. During the middle Miocene, summer sea surface temperatures were relatively warm off the West Coast, feeding moist air into the interior of the western U.S. During the late Miocene, a gradual cooling trend in the north Pacific related to

  3. A review of interaction between neon flying squid ( Ommastrephes bartramii) and oceanographic variability in the North Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei; Chen, Xinjun; Yi, Qian; Tian, Siquan

    2015-08-01

    The neon flying squid ( Ommastrephes bartramii) is a short-lived opportunistic species widely distributed in subtropical and temperate waters in the North Pacific Ocean. The life cycle of O. bartramii from planktonic eggs to nektonic adults is closely linked to oceanographic conditions. The fluctuations in O. bartramii abundance and distribution tend to increase and widen continuously due to the heavy influences of ocean-climate events on various spatio-temporal scales. In this study, we reviewed the interaction between O. bartramii and oceanography variability in the North Pacific with respect to large-scale climatic-oceanic phenomena including El Niño, La Niña, Kuroshio, Oyashio and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), as well as regional environmental variables such as sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface height (SSH), sea surface salinity (SSS), chlorophyll-a (Chl- a) concentration, and plankton density. The population dynamics of O. bartramii is mediated mainly by meso- and large-scale climatic-oceanic events ( e.g., Kuroshio and Oyashio Currents) rather than other local environmental conditions ( e.g., SST and Chl- a concentration), because all of the oceanographic influences are imposed on the context of large-scale climate changes ( e.g., PDO). An unstructured-grid finite-volume coastal ocean model coupled with an individual-based model is proposed to simulate relevant physical-biological oceanographic processes for identifying ocean-climate influence and predicting O. bartramii distribution and abundance in the North Pacific. Future research needs to be focused on improving the knowledge about early life history of O. bartramii and evaluating the relationship between marine physical environment and two separate passive drifting life stages of O. bartramii including free-floating eggs and planktonic paralarvae.

  4. Carbon dioxide, temperature, salinity and other variables collected via time series monitoring from MOORINGS in the North Pacific Ocean from 1998-06-22 to 2004-11-23 (NODC Accession 0100079)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0100079 includes chemical, time series and underway - surface data collected from MOORINGS in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from...

  5. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from BAINBRIDGE using BT and XBT casts in the North Pacific Ocean from 03 July 1975 to 31 October 1977 (NODC Accession 8900230)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the BAINBRIDGE in the North Pacific Ocean and TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean. Data...

  6. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from AMERICAN RESERVIST using BT and XBT casts in the North Pacific Ocean from 20 January 1974 to 29 September 1977 (NODC Accession 8900287)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the AMERICAN RESERVIST in the North Pacific Ocean and TOGA Area - Pacific Ocean....

  7. Low-frequency variability of meridional transport in the divergence zone of the North Atlantic subtropical and subpolar gyres. The WOCE section A2; Niederfrequente Variabilitaet meridionaler Transporte in der Divergenzzone des nordatlantischen Subtropen- und Subpolarwirbels. Der WOCE-Schnitt A2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorbacher, K.

    2000-07-01

    The subinertial, climate relevant variability of the large-scale ocean circulation in the northern North Atlantic and its integral key parameters such as the advective transports of mass (volume), heat and freshwater are determined from observations alone using the hydrographic data from seven realisations of the so-called '48 N'-section between the English Channel and the Grand Banks of Newfoundland. The data consist of five available sets of the WOCE/A2-section during the Nineties for the years 1993, 1994, 1996, 1997, 1998 and of two previous transatlantic cruises in April of 1957 and 1982. The realisations of the WOCE/A2-section were carried out in the same season (May to July), except for the cruise in October 1994. The '48 N'-section follows the divergence zone of the mainly wind-driven subtropical gyre and the more complex, with respect to the forcing, subpolar gyre. In the central Westeuropean and Newfoundland Basins the section runs a few degrees south of the line of zero wind stress curl (curl{sub z}{tau}). In the West, the WOCE/A2-section turns northwest to cross the boundary current regime perpendicularly. Therefore, this quasi-zonal hydrographic section covers all large-scale circulation elements on the regional scale that contribute essentially to the ocean circulation on the global scale - the Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC). The transport estimates are given as the sum of the three transport components of a quasi-steady, large-scale ocean circulation: The ageostrophic Ekman-, and the two geostrophic components, the depth-independent, barotropic or Sverdrup- and the baroclinic component. To maintain the mass balance over the plane of the section the compensation of each component is assumed. In the case of the baroclinic component the balance is achieved through a suitable choice for a surface of 'no-motion'. The absolute meridional velocity as a function of the zonal distance along the section and depth is

  8. On the dominant intra-seasonal modes over the East Asia-western North Pacific summer monsoon region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Kyung-Ja; Oh, Hyoeun

    2017-04-01

    Intra-seasonal monsoon prediction is the most imperative task due to high impact on 2/3 of world populations' daily life, but there remains an enduring challenge in climate science. The present study aims to provide a physical understanding of the sources for prediction of dominant intra-seasonal modes in the East Asian-western North Pacific summer monsoon (EA-WNPSM): preMeiyu&Baiu, Changma&Meiyu, WNPSM, and monsoon gyre modes classified by the self-organizing map analysis. The major modes tend to be dominated by the moisture convergence of the moisture budget equation along the rain-band. The preMeiyu-Baiu mode is strongly linked to both the anomalous low-level convergence and vertical wind shear through baroclinic instability, and the Changma&Meiyu mode has a strengthened tropic-subtropics connection along the western north Pacific subtropical high, which induces vertical destabilization and strong convective instability. The WNPSM and monsoon gyre modes are characterized by anomalous southeasterly flow of warm and moist air from western north Pacific monsoon, and low-level easterly flow, respectively. Prominent difference in response to the ENSO leads to different effects of the Indian Ocean and western Pacific thermal state, and consequently, the distinct moisture supply and instability variations for the EASM intra-seasonal modes. We discuss the major driving forces of sub-seasonal variability over EA-WNPSM regions. Lastly we attempted to determine the predictability sources for the four modes in the EA-WNPSM. The selected predictors are based on the persistent and tendency signals of the SST/2m air temperature and sea level pressure fields, which reflect the asymmetric response to the ENSO and the ocean and land surface anomalous conditions. For the preMeiyu&Baiu mode, the SST cooling tendency over the WNP, which persists into summer, is the distinguishing contributor that results in strong baroclinic instability. A major precursor for the Changma&Meiyu mode

  9. Export stoichiometry and migrant-mediated flux of phosphorus in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannides, Cecelia C. S.; Landry, Michael R.; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia R.; Styles, Renée M.; Montoya, Joseph P.; Karl, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Export processes play a major role in regulating global marine primary production by reducing the efficiency of nutrient cycling and turnover in surface waters. Most studies of euphotic zone export focus on passive fluxes, that is, sinking particles. However, active transport, the vertical transfer of material by migrating zooplankton, can also be an important component of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) removal from the surface ocean. Here we demonstrate that active transport is an especially important mechanism for phosphorus (P) removal from the euphotic zone at Station ALOHA (Hawaii Ocean Time-series program; 22°45'N, 158°W), a P-stressed site in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre. Migrant excretions in this region are P-rich (C 51:N 12:P 1) relative to sinking particles (C 250:N 31:P 1), and migrant-mediated P fluxes are almost equal in magnitude (82%) to P fluxes from sediment traps. Migrant zooplankton biomass and therefore the importance of this P removal pathway relative to sinking fluxes has increased significantly over the past 12 years, suggesting that active transport may be a major driving force for enhanced P-limitation of biological production in the NPSG. We further assess the C:N:P composition of zooplankton size fractions at Station ALOHA (C 88:N 18:P 1, on average) and discuss migrant-mediated P export in light of the balance between zooplankton and suspended particle stoichiometries. We conclude that, because active transport is such a large component of the total P flux and significantly impacts ecosystem stoichiometry, export processes involving migrant zooplankton must be included in large-scale efforts to understand biogeochemical cycles.

  10. Microbial community structure and function on sinking particles in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina M. Fontanez

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Sinking particles mediate the transport of carbon and energy to the deep-sea, yet the specific microbes associated with sedimenting particles in the ocean’s interior remain largely uncharacterized. In this study, we used particle interceptor traps (PITs to assess the nature of particle-associated microbial communities collected at a variety of depths in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre. Comparative metagenomics was used to assess differences in microbial taxa and functional gene repertoires in PITs containing a preservative (poisoned traps compared to preservative-free traps where growth was allowed to continue in situ (live traps. Live trap microbial communities shared taxonomic and functional similarities with bacteria previously reported to be enriched in dissolved organic matter (DOM microcosms (e.g., Alteromonas and Methylophaga, in addition to other particle and eukaryote-associated bacteria (e.g., Flavobacteriales and Pseudoalteromonas. Poisoned trap microbial assemblages were enriched in Vibrio and Campylobacterales likely associated with eukaryotic surfaces and intestinal tracts as symbionts, pathogens or saprophytes. The functional gene content of microbial assemblages in poisoned traps included a variety of genes involved in virulence, anaerobic metabolism, attachment to chitinaceaous surfaces, and chitin degradation. The presence of chitinaceaous surfaces was also accompanied by the co-existence of bacteria which encoded the capacity to attach to, transport and metabolize chitin and its derivatives. Distinctly different microbial assemblages predominated in live traps, which were largely represented by copiotrophs and eukaryote-associated bacterial communities. These data indicate the central role of eukaryotic taxa in structuring sinking particle microbial assemblages, as well as the rapid responses of indigenous microbial species in the degradation of marine particulate organic matter in situ in the ocean’s interior.

  11. Variability in photosynthetic production of dissolved and particulate organic carbon in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donn A. Viviani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The partitioning of photosynthetically-derived organic carbon between particulate and dissolved phases has important implications for marine carbon cycling. In this study we utilized 14C-bicarbonate assimilation to quantify rates of photosynthetic production of both particulate and dissolved organic carbon (DOC at Station ALOHA (22˚45’N, 158˚W in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG. At near-monthly time scales over ~5 years, we examined retention of 14C-labeled organic matter by both glass fiber filters and 0.2 µm pore size polycarbonate membrane filters that are commonly used for measurements of 14C-based plankton productivity. Use of polycarbonate filters resulted in significantly lower (averaging 60% estimates of 14C-production compared to glass fiber filters. Coincident measurements of chlorophyll a concentrations from both 0.2 µm polycarbonate and glass fiber filters were not significantly different, suggesting the differences in 14C-productivity between these filter-types did not derive from differences in retention of photosynthetic biomass by these filters. Moreover, consistent with previous studies, results from experiments aimed at quantifying retention of organic matter by these filters suggested the difference between these two types of filters resulted from retention of DOC by glass fiber filters. We also quantified rates of 14C-DOC production to evaluate the partitioning of photosynthetic production between dissolved and particulate phases over daily to monthly time scales in this ecosystem. Unlike the strong depth-dependence observed in measurements of particulate organic carbon production, measured rates of 14C-DOC demonstrated no clear depth-dependence. On average, depth-integrated (0-75 m rates of 14C-DOC production rates were equivalent to 18 ± 10% of the total (particulate and dissolved productivity. Our findings indicate that in this oligotrophic ecosystem, rates of dissolved and particulate production can be

  12. Phenology of particle size distributions and primary productivity in the North Pacific subtropical gyre (Station ALOHA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Angelicque E.; Letelier, Ricardo M.; Whitmire, Amanda L.; Barone, Benedetto; Bidigare, Robert R.; Church, Matthew J.; Karl, David M.

    2015-11-01

    The particle size distribution (PSD) is a critical aspect of the oceanic ecosystem. Local variability in the PSD can be indicative of shifts in microbial community structure and reveal patterns in cell growth and loss. The PSD also plays a central role in particle export by influencing settling speed. Satellite-based models of primary productivity (PP) often rely on aspects of photophysiology that are directly related to community size structure. In an effort to better understand how variability in particle size relates to PP in an oligotrophic ecosystem, we collected laser diffraction-based depth profiles of the PSD and pigment-based classifications of phytoplankton functional types (PFTs) on an approximately monthly basis at the Hawaii Ocean Time-series Station ALOHA, in the North Pacific subtropical gyre. We found a relatively stable PSD in the upper water column. However, clear seasonality is apparent in the vertical distribution of distinct particle size classes. Neither laser diffraction-based estimations of relative particle size nor pigment-based PFTs was found to be significantly related to the rate of 14C-based PP in the light-saturated upper euphotic zone. This finding indicates that satellite retrievals of particle size, based on particle scattering or ocean color would not improve parameterizations of present-day bio-optical PP models for this region. However, at depths of 100-125 m where irradiance exerts strong control on PP, we do observe a significant linear relationship between PP and the estimated carbon content of 2-20 μm particles.

  13. Simulation of tropical cyclone activity over the western North Pacific based on CMIP5 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Haibo; Zhou, Weican; Zhao, Haikun

    2017-09-01

    Based on the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project 5 (CMIP5) models, the tropical cyclone (TC) activity in the summers of 1965-2005 over the western North Pacific (WNP) is simulated by a TC dynamically downscaling system. In consideration of diversity among climate models, Bayesian model averaging (BMA) and equal-weighed model averaging (EMA) methods are applied to produce the ensemble large-scale environmental factors of the CMIP5 model outputs. The environmental factors generated by BMA and EMA methods are compared, as well as the corresponding TC simulations by the downscaling system. Results indicate that BMA method shows a significant advantage over the EMA. In addition, impacts of model selections on BMA method are examined. To each factor, ten models with better performance are selected from 30 CMIP5 models and then conduct BMA, respectively. As a consequence, the ensemble environmental factors and simulated TC activity are similar with the results from the 30 models' BMA, which verifies the BMA method can afford corresponding weight for each model in the ensemble based on the model's predictive skill. Thereby, the existence of poor performance models will not particularly affect the BMA effectiveness and the ensemble outcomes are improved. Finally, based upon the BMA method and downscaling system, we analyze the sensitivity of TC activity to three important environmental factors, i.e., sea surface temperature (SST), large-scale steering flow, and vertical wind shear. Among three factors, SST and large-scale steering flow greatly affect TC tracks, while average intensity distribution is sensitive to all three environmental factors. Moreover, SST and vertical wind shear jointly play a critical role in the inter-annual variability of TC lifetime maximum intensity and frequency of intense TCs.

  14. Regionality and seasonality of submesoscale and mesoscale turbulence in the North Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Hideharu; Klein, Patrice; Sasai, Yoshikazu; Qiu, Bo

    2017-09-01

    The kinetic energy (KE) seasonality has been revealed by satellite altimeters in many oceanic regions. Question about the mechanisms that trigger this seasonality is still challenging. We address this question through the comparison of two numerical simulations. The first one, with a 1/10° horizontal grid spacing, 54 vertical levels, represents dynamics of physical scales larger than 50 km. The second one, with a 1/30° grid spacing, 100 vertical levels, takes into account the dynamics of physical scales down to 16 km. Comparison clearly emphasizes in the whole North Pacific Ocean, not only a significant KE increase by a factor up to three, but also the emergence of seasonal variability when the scale range 16-50 km (called submesoscales in this study) is taken into account. But the mechanisms explaining these KE changes display strong regional contrasts. In high KE regions, such the Kuroshio Extension and the western and eastern subtropics, frontal mixed-layer instabilities appear to be the main mechanism for the emergence of submesoscales in winter. Subsequent inverse kinetic energy cascade leads to the KE seasonality of larger scales. In other regions, in particular in subarctic regions, results suggest that the KE seasonality is principally produced by larger-scale instabilities with typical scales of 100 km and not so much by smaller-scale mixed-layer instabilities. Using arguments from geostrophic turbulence, the submesoscale impact in these regions is assumed to strengthen mesoscale eddies that become more coherent and not quickly dissipated, leading to a KE increase.

  15. Contributions from DMS and ship emissions to CCN observed over the summertime North Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Langley

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN made over the North Pacific Ocean in July 2002 are analysed with concurrent measurements of aerosol number, mass and composition. Overall the CCN are controlled by the sulphate, including one case that suggests particle nucleation and growth resulting from dimethyl sulphide oxidation that enhanced CCN concentrations. Hourly CCN concentrations are correlated with concentrations of sulphate plus methanesulphonic acid (MSA over the entire study period (r2=0.43 and 0.52 for supersaturations of 0.34% and 0.19%, respectively, and are not well correlated with other organics (r2<0.2. One case study reveals elevated mass and number concentrations of ultrafine and fine organic particles due to regional ship emissions, identified through quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS measurements, during which organic mass concentrations are correlated with CCN values (r2=0.39 and 0.46 for supersaturations of 0.19% and 0.34%, respectively. The evolution of the time series and mass distributions of organics, sulphate and MSA over this timeframe indicate that the regional distribution of small, diffuse ship-sourced organic particles act as condensation sites for sulphur species, resulting in a subsequent increase in number concentrations of CCN. We conclude that, where present, direct emissions of anthropogenic organic particles may exert a strong control on marine CCN concentrations once diffused into the marine atmosphere, by acting as condensation sites for biogenic and anthropogenic sulphur species.

  16. Subseasonal shift in tropical cyclone genesis over the western North Pacific in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yumi; Ha, Kyung-Ja

    2017-09-01

    The 2013 subseasonal asymmetry in tropical cyclone (TC) genesis over the western North Pacific (WNP) was investigated by using the 1979-2013 RSMC best track dataset. The genesis frequency of the 2013 WNP TCs between June-August (summer) and September-November (fall) manifested an abnormal temporal asymmetry: fewer typhoons (more tropical storms) in summer and more typhoons (normal tropical storms) in fall. The 2013 active summer-tropical storm genesis arose from both a failure of eastward extension of monsoon confluence region, especially in August and a lack of moisture supply for TC genesis over the eastern part of WNP, and consequently from fewer probability to reach typhoon intensity due to the westward movement of favorable location for genesis. Thereafter, the eastward extension of monsoon shear line in September and the establishment of monsoon gyre in October induced the eastward movement of favorable location for genesis which increased probability to reach typhoon intensity. The relative contribution of mid-level relative humidity to the positive GPI change played a major role in favorable condition for typhoon genesis in September (45.2%) and October (50.9%). The monsoon gyre pattern played a leading role in the most active fall-typhoon in 2013 contributing to the highest number of October-typhoon. The eastward-migration of convection mainly contributed to the subseasonal shift of TC genesis location following eastward movement of local SST warming from summer to fall under the La Nina-like neutral state. The enhanced active boreal summer intraseasonal oscillation (BSISO) in fall provided more favorable conditions for TC genesis showing about twice as many TCs occurred regarding BSISO in fall than those in summer. This spatiotemporal asymmetry in the large-scale circulations and moisture conditions between summer and fall accounted for the subseasonal shift of genesis location of TCs, and consequently for the active summer-tropical storm genesis and the

  17. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ocean sediments from the North Pacific to the Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuxin; Halsall, Crispin J; Xie, Zhiyong; Koetke, Danijela; Mi, Wenying; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Gao, Guoping

    2017-08-01

    Eighteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured in surficial sediments along a marine transect from the North Pacific into the Arctic Ocean. The highest average Σ 18 PAHs concentrations were observed along the continental slope of the Canada Basin in the Arctic (68.3 ± 8.5 ng g -1 dw), followed by sediments in the Chukchi Sea shelf (49.7 ± 21.2 ng g -1 dw) and Bering Sea (39.5 ± 11.3 ng g -1 dw), while the Bering Strait (16.8 ± 7.1 ng g -1 dw) and Central Arctic Ocean sediments (13.1 ± 9.6 ng g -1 dw) had relatively lower average concentrations. The use of principal components analysis with multiple linear regression (PCA/MLR) indicated that on average oil related or petrogenic sources contributed ∼42% of the measured PAHs in the sediments and marked by higher concentrations of two methylnaphthalenes over the non-alkylated parent PAH, naphthalene. Wood and coal combustion contributed ∼32%, and high temperature pyrogenic sources contributing ∼26%. Petrogenic sources, such as oil seeps, allochthonous coal and coastally eroded material such as terrigenous sediments particularly affected the Chukchi Sea shelf and slope of the Canada Basin, while biomass and coal combustion sources appeared to have greater influence in the central Arctic Ocean, possibly due to the effects of episodic summertime forest fires. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Migratory behavior of eastern North Pacific gray whales tracked using a hydrophone array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guazzo, Regina A; Helble, Tyler A; D'Spain, Gerald L; Weller, David W; Wiggins, Sean M; Hildebrand, John A

    2017-01-01

    Eastern North Pacific gray whales make one of the longest annual migrations of any mammal, traveling from their summer feeding areas in the Bering and Chukchi Seas to their wintering areas in the lagoons of Baja California, Mexico. Although a significant body of knowledge on gray whale biology and behavior exists, little is known about their vocal behavior while migrating. In this study, we used a sparse hydrophone array deployed offshore of central California to investigate how gray whales behave and use sound while migrating. We detected, localized, and tracked whales for one full migration season, a first for gray whales. We verified and localized 10,644 gray whale M3 calls and grouped them into 280 tracks. Results confirm that gray whales are acoustically active while migrating and their swimming and acoustic behavior changes on daily and seasonal time scales. The seasonal timing of the calls verifies the gray whale migration timing determined using other methods such as counts conducted by visual observers. The total number of calls and the percentage of calls that were part of a track changed significantly over both seasonal and daily time scales. An average calling rate of 5.7 calls/whale/day was observed, which is significantly greater than previously reported migration calling rates. We measured a mean speed of 1.6 m/s and quantified heading, direction, and water depth where tracks were located. Mean speed and water depth remained constant between night and day, but these quantities had greater variation at night. Gray whales produce M3 calls with a root mean square source level of 156.9 dB re 1 μPa at 1 m. Quantities describing call characteristics were variable and dependent on site-specific propagation characteristics.

  19. Migratory behavior of eastern North Pacific gray whales tracked using a hydrophone array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina A Guazzo

    Full Text Available Eastern North Pacific gray whales make one of the longest annual migrations of any mammal, traveling from their summer feeding areas in the Bering and Chukchi Seas to their wintering areas in the lagoons of Baja California, Mexico. Although a significant body of knowledge on gray whale biology and behavior exists, little is known about their vocal behavior while migrating. In this study, we used a sparse hydrophone array deployed offshore of central California to investigate how gray whales behave and use sound while migrating. We detected, localized, and tracked whales for one full migration season, a first for gray whales. We verified and localized 10,644 gray whale M3 calls and grouped them into 280 tracks. Results confirm that gray whales are acoustically active while migrating and their swimming and acoustic behavior changes on daily and seasonal time scales. The seasonal timing of the calls verifies the gray whale migration timing determined using other methods such as counts conducted by visual observers. The total number of calls and the percentage of calls that were part of a track changed significantly over both seasonal and daily time scales. An average calling rate of 5.7 calls/whale/day was observed, which is significantly greater than previously reported migration calling rates. We measured a mean speed of 1.6 m/s and quantified heading, direction, and water depth where tracks were located. Mean speed and water depth remained constant between night and day, but these quantities had greater variation at night. Gray whales produce M3 calls with a root mean square source level of 156.9 dB re 1 μPa at 1 m. Quantities describing call characteristics were variable and dependent on site-specific propagation characteristics.

  20. Particle distributions and dynamics in the euphotic zone of the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Benedetto; Bidigare, Robert R.; Church, Matthew J.; Karl, David M.; Letelier, Ricardo M.; White, Angelicque E.

    2015-05-01

    During the summer of 2012, we used laser diffractometry to investigate the temporal and vertical variability of the particle size spectrum (1.25-100 µm in equivalent diameter) in the euphotic zone of the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre. Particles measured with this optical method accounted for ˜40% of the particulate carbon stocks (<202 µm) in the upper euphotic zone (25-75 m), as estimated using an empirical formula to transform particle volume to carbon concentrations. Over the entire vertical layer considered (20-180 m), the largest contribution to particle volume corresponded to particles between 3 and 10 µm in diameter. Although the exponent of a power law parameterization suggested that larger particles had a lower relative abundance than in other regions of the global ocean, this parameter and hence conclusions about relative particle abundance are sensitive to the shape of the size distribution and to the curve fitting method. Results on the vertical distribution of particles indicate that different size fractions varied independently with depth. Particles between 1.25 and 2 µm reached maximal abundances coincident with the depth of the chlorophyll a maximum (averaging 121 ± 10 m), where eukaryotic phytoplankton abundances increased. In contrast, particles between 2 and 20 µm tended to accumulate just below the base of the mixed layer (41 ± 14 m). Variability in particle size tracked changes in the abundance of specific photoautotrophic organisms (measured with flow cytometry and pigment concentration), suggesting that phytoplankton population dynamics are an important control of the spatiotemporal variability in particle concentration in this ecosystem.

  1. Using eddy geopotential height to measure the western North Pacific subtropical high in a warming climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chao; Lin, Ailan; Gu, Dejun; Li, Chunhui; Zheng, Bin; Wu, Bo; Zhou, Tianjun

    2018-01-01

    The western North Pacific subtropical high (WNPSH) is crucial to the East Asian summer climate, and geopotential height ( H) is widely used to measure the WPNSH. However, a rapidly rising trend of H in the future is projected by the models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). Diagnoses based on the hypsometric equation suggest that more than 80% of the rise in H are attributable to zonal uniform warming. Because circulation is determined by the gradient of H rather than its absolute magnitude, the spatially uniform rising trend of H gives rise to difficulties when measuring the WNPSH with H. These difficulties include an invalid western boundary of WNPSH in the future and spurious information regarding long-term trends and interannual variability of WNPSH. Using CMIP5 model simulations and reanalysis data, the applicability of a metric based on eddy geopotential height ( H e ) to the warming climate is investigated. The results show that the H e metric outperforms the H metric under warming climate conditions. First, the mean state rainfall- H e relationship is more robust than the rainfall- H relationship. Second, the area, intensity, and western boundary indices of WNPSH can be effectively defined by the H e = 0-m contour in future warming climate scenarios without spurious trends. Third, the interannual variability of East Asian summer rainfall is more closely related to the H e -based WNPSH indices. We recommend that the H e metric be adopted as an operational metric on the WNPSH under the current warming climate.

  2. Genetic diversity of bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops sp.) populations in the western North Pacific and the conservation implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ing; Nishida, Shin; Yang, Wei-Cheng; Isobe, Tomohiko; Tajima, Yuko; Hoelzel, A Rus

    2017-01-01

    The evolutionary processes that shape patterns of diversity in highly mobile marine species are poorly understood, but important towards transferable inference on their effective conservation. In this study, bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops sp.) are studied to address this broader question. They exhibit remarkable geographical variation for morphology, life history, and genetic diversity, and this high level of variation has made the taxonomy of the genus controversial. A significant population structure has been reported for the most widely distributed species, the common bottlenose dolphin (T. truncatus), in almost all ocean basins, though no data have been available for the western North Pacific Ocean (WNP). The genetic diversity of bottlenose dolphins in the WNP was investigated based on 20 microsatellite and one mitochondrial DNA markers for samples collected from Taiwanese, Japanese, and Philippine waters (9°-39°N, 120°-140°E) during 1986-2012. The results indicated that there are at least four genetically differentiated populations of common bottlenose dolphins in the western and central North Pacific Ocean. The pattern of differentiation appears to correspond to habitat types, resembling results seen in other populations of the same species. Our analyses also showed that there was no evident gene flow between the two "sister species", the common bottlenose dolphins, and the Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (T. aduncus) occurring sympatrically in our study region.

  3. Trophic relationships of albatrosses associated with squid and large-mesh drift-net fisheries in the North Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Patrick J.; Ostrom, Peggy H.; Walker, William

    1997-01-01

    The diets of Laysan (Diomedea immutabilis) and black-footed albatrosses (D. nigripes) killed in squid and large-mesh drift nets in the transitional zone of the North Pacific Ocean were investigated by examining the contents of the digestive tracts and determining δ13C and δ15N values in breast-muscle tissue. The results show that (i) the combined prey of the two species of albatross consists of over 46 species of marine organisms including coelenterates, arthropods, mollusks, fish, and marine mammals; (ii) both species supplement their traditional diets with food made available by commercial fishing operations (e.g., net-caught squid and offal); (iii) while obtained from drift nets, diets of nonbreeding Laysan and black-footed albatrosses are dominated by neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartrami); (iv) in the absence of drift-net-related food, Laysan albatrosses feed most heavily on fish and black-footed albatrosses feed most heavily on squid; and (v) based on δ15N values, nonbreeding adult Laysan albatrosses from the transitional zone of the North Pacific Ocean and Laysan albatross nestlings fed by adults from Midway Island in the subtropical Pacific feed at one trophic level and one-third of a trophic level lower than black-footed albatrosses, respectively.

  4. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the Hakuho Maru in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1991-09-17 to 1991-10-02 (NODC Accession 0115596)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115596 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from Hakuho Maru in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean...

  5. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2002-12-17 to 2003-02-14 (NODC Accession 0113608)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113608 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from...

  6. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the KNORR in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1992-10-06 to 1993-04-13 (NODC Accession 0115156)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115156 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KNORR in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from...

  7. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the Hakuho Maru in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1991-08-13 to 1991-09-01 (NODC Accession 0115591)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115591 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from Hakuho Maru in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean...

  8. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the Kaiyo in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1994-01-06 to 1994-02-05 (NODC Accession 0112362)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112362 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from Kaiyo in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from...

  9. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN in the North Pacific Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2007-12-15 to 2008-02-23 (NODC Accession 0109903)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0109903 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN in the North Pacific Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and...

  10. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from WECOMA and GYRE in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1979-02-07 to 1980-06-14 (NCEI Accession 0143951)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0143951 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from WECOMA and GYRE in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1979-02-07 to...

  11. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway, discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from MIRAI in the Bering Sea, North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2007-10-08 to 2007-12-26 (NODC Accession 0108123)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108123 includes Surface underway, discrete sample and profile data collected from MIRAI in the Bering Sea, North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific...

  12. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from SOUTHERN SURVEYOR in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2009-02-03 to 2009-03-24 (NODC Accession 0108082)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108082 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from SOUTHERN SURVEYOR in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific...

  13. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the Kaiyo in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1997-11-29 to 1997-12-25 (NODC Accession 0112363)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112363 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from Kaiyo in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from...

  14. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1999-10-13 to 1999-11-20 (NODC Accession 0112253)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112253 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from...

  15. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the THOMAS WASHINGTON in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1991-08-31 to 1991-10-01 (NODC Accession 0115174)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115174 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from THOMAS WASHINGTON in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific...

  16. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2004-11-17 to 2004-12-09 (NODC Accession 0112263)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112263 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from...

  17. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1992-09-06 to 1992-12-08 (NODC Accession 0000193)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0000193 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific...

  18. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from L'ATALANTE in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1994-09-23 to 1994-10-30 (NCEI Accession 0157463)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157463 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from L'ATALANTE in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific...

  19. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from L'ATALANTE in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1994-11-05 to 1994-11-29 (NCEI Accession 0157470)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157470 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from L'ATALANTE in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific...

  20. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2000-12-27 to 2001-02-08 (NODC Accession 0112353)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112353 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific...

  1. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2007-02-16 to 2007-03-26 (NODC Accession 0112269)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112269 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MIRAI in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from...

  2. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from Investigator in the North Pacific Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2016-04-26 to 2016-06-29 (NCEI Accession 0160555)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0160555 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from Investigator in the North Pacific Ocean, South Pacific...

  3. Oceanographic profile data collected from sound velocimeter - moving vessel profiler casts aboard Pacific Storm as part of project M-M928-KR-09 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2009-08-07 to 2009-09-23 (NCEI Accession 0130793)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0130793 includes physical and profile data collected aboard the Pacific Storm during project M-M928-KR-09 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2009-08-07...

  4. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER in the North Pacific Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 1994-01-26 to 1994-04-27 (NODC Accession 0115152)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0115152 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER in the North Pacific Ocean, South Pacific...

  5. The Eurasia-North Pacific Oscillation in atmospheric mass variations independent of both IHO and AO and its possible impacts on winter climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Guan, Zhaoyong; Li, Minggang

    2017-09-01

    Using NCEP/NCAR reanalysis, we have investigated the features of migrations of atmospheric mass (AM) between land and ocean in Eurasia-North Pacific domain in boreal winter after having both signals of Inter-hemispheric Oscillation and Arctic Oscillation removed from the physical quantities. It is found that there is a Eurasia-North Pacific Oscillation (ENPO) in surface air pressure anomalies. This ENPO pattern characterizes with two oppositely signed anomalous surface pressure centers over Eurasia and North Pacific respectively, indicating strong connections between Siberian high and Aleutian low during period 1979-2012. The maintenance of this ENPO teleconnection is significantly associated with three factors including the anomalous AM flows and zonal circulation cell over Eurasia-North Pacific domain, the Rossby wave energy propagations, and the thermal forcing contrasts near the surface between Eurasia and North Pacific during boreal winter. The variations of both wintertime rainfall and temperature over Eurasia may be strongly affected by ENPO. When the ENPO index is positive (negative), there occurs the AM accumulation (depletion) over Eurasia with simultaneous depletion (accumulation) over mid-latitude North-Pacific. Correspondingly, this anomalous surface pressure pattern along with the related circulation anomalies at different isobaric levels possibly results in winter precipitation decreases (increases) over Siberian Plain and East China, whereas increases (decreases) over southeastern Europe, Xinjiang of China, and the west coast of Sea of Okhotsk. On the other hand, surface air temperature decreases (increases) over large areas of Eurasia. These results are helpful for our better understanding the mechanisms behind circulation and winter climate variations over Eurasia-North Pacific region.

  6. Significant Aerosol Influence on the Recent Decadal Decrease in Tropical Cyclone Activity Over the Western North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Chiharu; Watanabe, Masahiro; Mori, Masato

    2017-09-01

    Over the past two decades, the number of tropical cyclones (TCs) has decreased markedly in the southeastern part of the western North Pacific (WNP) as a component of the interdecadal variation. This decrease has partially been explained by an internal low-frequency variability of sea surface temperature (SST) in the Pacific, but influences of external forcing remain unclear. Here we show that past changes in sulfate aerosol emissions contributed approximately 60% of the observed decreasing trends in TC genesis frequency in the southeastern WNP for 1992-2011, using multiple simulations by a global climate model. This decrease was mainly attributed to the increased vertical wind shear and decreased low-level vorticity, associated with a trans-basin multidecadal SST change driven by aerosol forcing. The near-future projection shows that the aerosol forcing still has some potential influence on decadal TC change, but the projected decreasing frequency is mainly due to increasing greenhouse gases forcing.

  7. Size-resolved sulfate and ammonium measurements in marine boundary layer over the North and South Pacific

    OpenAIRE

    Ooki, Atsushi; Uematsu, Mitsuo; NORIKI, Shinichiro

    2007-01-01

    Marine background levels of non-sea-salt- (nss-) SO42− (5.0–9.7 neq m−3), NH4+ (2.1–4.4 neq m−3) and elemental carbon (EC) (40–80 ngC m−3) in aerosol samples were measured over the equatorial and South Pacific during a cruise by the R/V Hakuho-maru from November 2001 to March 2002. High concentrations of nss-SO42− (47–94 neq m−3), NH4+ (35–94 neq m−3) and EC (130–460 ngC m−3) were found in the western North Pacific near the coast of the Asian continent under the influence of the Asian winter ...

  8. The role of atmospheric internal variability on the prediction skill of interannual North Pacific sea-surface temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narapusetty, Balachandrudu

    2017-06-01

    The sensitivity of the sea-surface temperature (SST) prediction skill to the atmospheric internal variability (weather noise) in the North Pacific (20∘-60∘N;120∘E-80∘W) on decadal timescales is examined using state-of-the-art Climate Forecasting System model version 2 (CFS) and a variation of CFS in an Interactive Ensemble approach (CFSIE), wherein six copies of atmospheric components with different perturbed initial states of CFS are coupled with the same ocean model by exchanging heat, momentum and fresh water fluxes dynamically at the air-sea interface throughout the model integrations. The CFSIE experiments are designed to reduce weather noise and using a few ten-year long forecasts this study shows that reduction in weather noise leads to lower SST forecast skill. To understand the pathways that cause the reduced SST prediction skill, two twenty-year long forecasts produced with CFS and CFSIE for 1980-2000 are analyzed for the ocean subsurface characteristics that influence SST due to the reduction in weather noise in the North Pacific. The heat budget analysis in the oceanic mixed layer across the North Pacific reveals that weather noise significantly impacts the heat transport in the oceanic mixed layer. In the CFSIE forecasts, the reduced weather noise leads to increased variations in heat content due to shallower mixed layer, diminished heat storage and enhanced horizontal heat advection. The enhancement of the heat advection spans from the active Kuroshio regions of the east coast of Japan to the west coast of continental United States and significantly diffuses the basin-wide SST anomaly (SSTA) contrasts and leads to reduction in the SST prediction skill in decadal forecasts.

  9. Physical and chemical effects of ingested plastic debris on short-tailed shearwaters, Puffinus tenuirostris, in the North Pacific Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashita, Rei; Takada, Hideshige; Fukuwaka, Masa-aki; Watanuki, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the plastics ingested by short-tailed shearwaters, Puffinus tenuirostris, that were accidentally caught during experimental fishing in the North Pacific Ocean in 2003 and 2005. The mean mass of plastics found in the stomach was 0.23 g per bird (n = 99). Plastic mass did not correlate with body weight. Total PCB (sum of 24 congeners) concentrations in the abdominal adipose tissue of 12 birds ranged from 45 to 529 ng/g-lipid. Although total PCBs or higher-chlorinated congeners, ...

  10. Radiocesium in the western subarctic area of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea, and Arctic Ocean in 2013 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumamoto, Yuichiro; Aoyama, Michio; Hamajima, Yasunori; Nishino, Shigeto; Murata, Akihiko; Kikuchi, Takashi

    2017-08-01

    We measured radiocesium ( 134 Cs and 137 Cs) in seawater from the western subarctic area of the North Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea, and Arctic Ocean in 2013 and 2014. Fukushima-derived 134 Cs in surface seawater was observed in the western subarctic area and Bering Sea but not in the Arctic Ocean. Vertical profile of 134 Cs in the Canada Basin of the Arctic Ocean implies that Fukushima-derived 134 Cs intruded into the basin from the Bering Sea through subsurface (150m depth) in 2014. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Summer phytoplankton blooms in the oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre: Historical perspective and recent observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dore, John E.; Letelier, Ricardo M.; Church, Matthew J.; Lukas, Roger; Karl, David M.

    2008-01-01

    The export of organic matter from the oceanic euphotic zone is a critical process in the global biogeochemical cycling of bioelements (C, N, P, Si). Much of this export occurs in the form of sinking particles, which rain down into the unlit waters of the deep sea. Classical models of oceanic production and export balance this gravitational loss of particulate bioelements with an upward flux of dissolved nutrients, and they describe reasonably well those areas of the ocean where deep winter mixing occurs. The surface waters of the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG), however, are strongly stratified and chronically nutrient-depleted, especially in summer. Nevertheless, there is ample evidence that blooms of phytoplankton and subsequent pulses of particle export occur during the height of summer stratification in these waters, especially to the northeast of the Hawaiian Islands. These blooms impact regional bioelemental cycling and act as a food source to the deep-sea benthos. We review here numerous published observations of these events in the NPSG, and present new data collected at Station ALOHA (22.75°N, 158°W) during the first 176 cruises of the Hawaii Ocean Time-series program (1988-2005), along with results from transect cruises conducted in the region in 1996 and 2005. We suggest that the summer phytoplankton bloom can be considered a frequent, perhaps annual feature in the northeastern NPSG, and that its perceived stochastic nature is a manifestation of chronic undersampling in time and space. The bloom is typically dominated by only a few genera of large diatoms and the cyanobacterium Trichodesmium. It appears to be consistently supported by dinitrogen fixation, but the fate of the organic matter produced during the summer depends critically on the species composition of the responsible diazotrophs. We estimate that the summer bloom is responsible for up to 38% of N 2 fixation and up to 18% of N-based new production annually at Station ALOHA. We

  12. A comparison of mesopelagic mesozooplankton community structure in the subtropical and subarctic North Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Deborah K.; Cope, Joseph S.; Wilson, Stephanie E.; Kobari, T.

    2008-07-01

    Mesopelagic mesozooplankton communities of an oligotrophic (Hawaii Ocean Time series-HOT station ALOHA) and a mesotrophic (Japanese time-series station K2) environment in the North Pacific Ocean are compared as part of a research program investigating the factors that control the efficiency of particle export to the deep sea (VERtical Transport In the Global Ocean—VERTIGO). We analyzed zooplankton (>350 μm) collected from net tows taken between 0 and 1000 m at each site to investigate the biomass size structure and the abundance of the major taxonomic groups in discrete depth intervals throughout the water column. Biomass of zooplankton at K2 over all depths was approximately an order of a magnitude higher than at ALOHA, with a significantly higher proportion of the biomass at K2 in the larger (>2 mm) size classes. This difference was mostly due to the abundance at K2 of the large calanoid copepods Neocalanus spp. and Eucalanus bungii, which undergo ontogenetic (seasonal) vertical migration. The overall strength of diel vertical migration was higher at K2, with a mean night:day biomass ratio in the upper 150 m of 2.5, vs. a ratio of 1.7 at ALOHA. However, the amplitude of the diel migration (change in weighted mean depth between day and night) was higher at ALOHA for all biomass size classes, perhaps due to deeper light penetration causing deeper migration to avoid visual predators. A number of taxa known to feed on suspended or sinking detritus showed distinct peaks in the mesopelagic zone, which affects particle transport efficiency at both sites. These taxa include calanoid and poecilostomatoid (e.g., Oncaea spp.) copepods, salps, polychaetes, and phaeodarian radiolaria at K2, harpacticoid copepods at ALOHA, and ostracods at both sites. We found distinct layers of carnivores (mainly gelatinous zooplankton) in the mesopelagic at K2 including chaetognaths, hydrozoan medusae, polychaetes, and gymnosome pteropods, and, in the upper mesopelagic zone, of

  13. Differential assimilation of inorganic carbon and leucine by Prochlorococcus in the oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin M. Björkman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The light effect on photoheterotrophic processes in Prochlorococcus, and primary and bacterial productivity in the oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre was investigated using 14C-bicarbonate and 3H-leucine. Light and dark incubation experiments were conducted in situ throughout the euphotic zone (0-175 m on nine expeditions to Station ALOHA over a three-year period. Photosynthetrons were also used to elucidate rate responses in leucine and inorganic carbon assimilation as a function of light intensity. Taxonomic group and cell-specific rates were assessed using flow cytometric sorting. The light:dark assimilation rate ratios of leucine in the top 150 m were ~7:1 for Prochlorococcus, whereas the light:dark ratio for the non-pigmented bacteria was not significant different from 1:1. Prochlorococcus assimilated leucine in the dark at per cell rates similar to the non-pigmented bacteria, with a contribution to the total community bacterial production, integrated over the euphotic zone, of approximately 20% in the dark and 60% in the light. Depth-resolved primary productivity and leucine incorporation showed that the ratio of Prochlorococcus leucine:primary production peaked at 100 m then declined steeply below the deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM. The photosynthetron experiments revealed that, for Prochlorococcus at the DCM, the saturating irradiance (Ek for leucine incorporation was reached at approximately half the light intensity required for light saturation of 14C-bicarbonate assimilation. Additionally, high and low red fluorescing Prochlorococcus populations (HRF and LRF, co-occurring at the DCM, had similar Ek values for their respective substrates, however, maximum assimilation rates, for both leucine and inorganic carbon, were two times greater for HRF cells. Our results show that Prochlorococcus contributes significantly to bacterial production estimates using 3H-leucine, whether or not the incubations are conducted in the dark or

  14. A new gyrodactylid (Monogenea) parasitizing bay pipefish (Syngnathus leptorhynchus) from the Pacific Coast of North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, David K; Appy, Ralph; Baggett, Lisa; King, Stanley; Gilmore, Scott; Abbott, Cathryn

    2013-04-01

    Gyrodactylus leptorhynchi n. sp. (Monogenea) is described from bay pipefish ( Syngnathus leptorhynchus ) (Syngnathidae) in coastal waters of southern California and British Columbia, and from an outbreak of gyrodactylosis at the Cabrillo Marine Aquarium in California. Gyrodactylus leptorhynchi is morphologically similar (stout hamuli, superficial bar with no anterolateral processes, and a small, triangular membrane, similarly shaped marginal hook sickles, and a male copulatory organ [MCO] with numerous small spines) to the other 6 species of Gyrodactylus known from pipefish in north and south regions of the Atlantic Ocean. It resembles most closely Gyrodactylus corleonis Paladini, Cable, Fioravanti, Faria, and Shinn, 2010 , parasitizing Syngnathus typhle L. from the French Mediterranean in having relatively large hamuli (58 μm). However, in G. leptorhynchi, the marginal hook sickle has a reduced heel and a ledged toe, while in G. corleonis, it has a noticeable heel and a toe with no distinct ledge. DNA sequence data of a partial ITS1 (700+ bp), complete 5.8S (157 bp), complete ITS2 (392 bp), and a partial 18S (441 bp) are included in the description; the data are distinct from those available for other species of Gyrodactylus. The molecular data reveal that G. leptorhynchi is a member of a basal lineage of marine species within Gyrodactylus sensu lato that is known to have radiated among coastal syngnathid, anguillid, and gobiid fishes throughout the Atlantic Ocean and some adjacent waters. Occurrence of G. leptorhynchi in the eastern Pacific supports the idea that such lineages may have global distributions. Sixty-three percent (15 of 24) of bay pipefish caught at Inner Cabrillo Beach, California, were infected with 1-3 worms, predominately located on the dorsal fin, but also on the anterior body surfaces. Intensely infected pipefish at the marine aquarium had parasites distributed all over the body surface, including the open edge of the brood pouch and, on 2

  15. Sedimentation Rates in the Central North Pacific Pelagic Clay Province Using Strontium Isotope Stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T. M.; Gleason, J. D.; Rea, D. K.; Owen, R. M.; Moore, T. C.; Blum, J. D.; Hovan, S. A.; Jones, C. E.

    2002-12-01

    In this study, we present an age-depth profile for a large diameter piston core collected by the R/V Ewing in 1997 sampled at 8.8 ° N, 135.4 ° W in the central North Pacific Ocean. Most of this core (EW9709-PC07) is not datable by conventional biostratigraphic methods. Fish teeth ichthyoliths are abundant throughout the core, while radiolarians are present in the bottom portion. Downcore evaluation of sedimentation rates and sources for the pelagic clay component is hindered by inability to obtain accurate stratigraphic ages. To generate an age-depth profile, strontium isotopic compositions were determined on ichthyoliths previously cleaned of contaminants using a newly improved reductive cleaning procedure. Ages were determined by reference to the recently refined Sr isotope curve for Neogene seawater. Red clays dominate the uppermost portion (top 350 cm) of this 16 m core. Lower in the core, silicious clays and carbonate-rich intervals occur. This lower section includes datable radiolarians, allowing some cross-calibration with the Sr isotope method. Our data suggests a very good correlation between the radiolarian biostratigraphy and the Sr isotope technique employed here. Most of the scatter in the data can be attributed to either analytical error or diagenesis. ICP analysis of selected intervals showed high Ca/P ratios indicating some ichthyoliths have undergone diagenetic alteration. The age-depth curve for PC-07 indicates two distinct sedimentation rates for this site with a transition period in between due to a change in lithology. From 1500 cm to approximately 650 cm (early to mid-Miocene) there is a high sedimentation rate of 1.35 mm/ky. The rate appears to decrease abruptly around 650 cm (15 Ma), increase around 550 cm (11 Ma) and decrease again during the uppermost 350 cm pelagic clay interval (10 Ma). The average sedimentation rate for the red clay interval (mid-Miocene to present) is an order of magnitude lower (0.25 mm/ky), reflecting northward

  16. Experiments based on blue intensity for reconstructing North Pacific temperatures along the Gulf of Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wilson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Ring-width (RW records from the Gulf of Alaska (GOA have yielded a valuable long-term perspective for North Pacific changes on decadal to longer timescales in prior studies but contain a broad winter to late summer seasonal climate response. Similar to the highly climate-sensitive maximum latewood density (MXD proxy, the blue intensity (BI parameter has recently been shown to correlate well with year-to-year warm-season temperatures for a number of sites at northern latitudes. Since BI records are much less labour intensive and expensive to generate than MXD, such data hold great potential value for future tree-ring studies in the GOA and other regions in mid- to high latitudes. Here we explore the potential for improving tree-ring-based reconstructions using combinations of RW- and BI-related parameters (latewood BI and delta BI from an experimental subset of samples at eight mountain hemlock (Tsuga mertensiana sites along the GOA. This is the first study for the hemlock genus using BI data. We find that using either inverted latewood BI (LWBinv or delta BI (DB can improve the amount of explained temperature variance by > 10 % compared to RW alone, although the optimal target season shrinks to June–September, which may have implications for studying ocean–atmosphere variability in the region. One challenge in building these BI records is that resin extraction did not remove colour differences between the heartwood and sapwood; thus, long term trend biases, expressed as relatively warm temperatures in the 18th century, were noted when using the LWBinv data. Using DB appeared to overcome these trend biases, resulting in a reconstruction expressing 18th–19th century temperatures ca. 0.5 °C cooler than the 20th–21st centuries. This cool period agrees well with previous dendroclimatic studies and the glacial advance record in the region. Continuing BI measurement in the GOA region must focus on sampling and measuring more trees per

  17. Latitudinal distributions of organic nitrogen and organic carbon in marine aerosols over the western North Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Miyazaki

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Marine aerosol samples were collected over the western North Pacific along the latitudinal transect from 44° N to 10° N in late summer 2008 for measurements of organic nitrogen (ON and organic carbon (OC as well as isotopic ratios of total nitrogen (TN and total carbon (TC. Increased concentrations of methanesulfonic acid (MSA and diethylammonium (DEA+ at 40–44° N and subtropical regions (10–20° N together with averaged satellite chlorophyll-a data and 5-day back trajectories suggest a significant influence of marine biological activities on aerosols in these regions. ON exhibited increased concentrations up to 260 ngN m−3 in these marine biologically influenced aerosols. Water-insoluble organic nitrogen (WION was found to be the most abundant nitrogen in the aerosols, accounting for 55 ± 16% of total aerosol nitrogen. In particular, the average WION/ON ratio was as high as 0.93 ± 0.07 at 40–44° N. These results suggest that marine biological sources significantly contributed to ON, a majority of which is composed of water-insoluble fractions in the study region. Analysis of the stable carbon isotopic ratios (δ13C indicated that, on average, marine-derived carbon accounted for ~88 ± 12% of total carbon in the aerosols. In addition, the δ13C showed higher values (from −22 to −20‰ when ON/OC ratios increased from 0.15 to 0.35 in marine biologically influenced aerosols. These results clearly show that organic nitrogen is enriched in organic aerosols originated from an oceanic region with high biological productivity, indicating a preferential transfer of nitrogen-containing organic compounds from the sea surface to the marine atmosphere. Both WION concentrations and WION/water-insoluble organic carbon (WIOC ratios tended to increase with increasing local wind speeds, indicating that sea-to-air emissions of ON via sea spray contribute significantly to the marine organic

  18. Marketing Remote Sensing Data for North Pacific Fisheries Development and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Fish poaching, drug trafficking, ocean dumping, and other illegal activities are important problems on the high seas and in national economic zones. The primary thrust of the EOCAP II project, "Marketing Remote Sensing Data for North Pacific Fisheries Development and Management", was to use space-based sensors to improve the effectiveness of marine monitoring, control, and surveillance (MCS). Our initial objectives were to concentrate on the development of MCS tools using Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometry (AVHRR) and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data. Although we have successfully completed development of an initial version of our SAR-based monitoring tool (OmniVision), project activity has resulted in a much broader application of space-based assets to marine applications. Based in part on work commenced within EOCAP II, a new company, Ocean and Coastal Environmental Sensing, Inc. (OCENS), has been launched and the development of several new software products outside of the MCS arena initiated. One of those products, SeaStation, is near completion with a Fall, 1995 release date. Equity investment in OCENS now totals $70,000-with an additional amount being sought in the first round of financing. One of the pre-eminent objectives of EOCAP II is to make contributions to the US economy and job growth through the expansion of commercial uses of remotely sensed data. OCENS and the software products it is introducing into marine and coastal zone markets responds to this primary object*e. EOCAP II funding leveraged the market and technical know-how of OCENS founders into smart products that benefit marine and coastal zone users. Although technical difficulties and geopolitical shifts damaged the commercial feasibility of initial project objectives, the flexibility of the EOCAP II program now permits long-term business success. This in no small part stems from the fact that the EOCAP program recognizes the realities of small and start-up businesses and does not

  19. Assessing linkages between ice sheet calving, subpolar gyre density and deep water ventilation during the last glaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledal, Sunniva; Ninnemann, Ulysses S.; Kleiven, Helga (Kikki) F.; Irvali, Nil

    2017-04-01

    Deep ocean circulation plays an important role in the Earth's climate system and is postulated to be closely linked to ice sheet dynamics and abrupt climate oscillations. However, the nature of this coupling remains unclear. Iceberg and freshwater pulses have been hypothesized as both the trigger for, and the response to, reduced Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). Differentiating between these two hypotheses requires high-resolution records constraining the relative timing of ice sheet, freshwater, and ocean circulation changes. Here we assess the relative timing and linkages between iceberg discharge, surface water physical properties in the subpolar gyre, and North Atlantic deep water ventilation using proxy records co-registered in the same sediment sequence. High-resolution stable isotope analysis (δ18O & δ13C ) of planktonic (N. pachyderma (s)) and benthic (C. wuellerstorfi) foraminifera and ice-rafted debris (IRD) records from the core GS15-196-02GC taken in the Irminger basin (59o37.1 N, 40o44.25 W, 2468 water depth) document a clear relationship between increasing freshwater fluxes (IRD and planktonic δ18O), decreasing deep water ventilation (benthic δ13C), and temperature and salinity changes in the subpolar gyre surface waters (planktonic δ18O). Our benthic (C. wuellerstorfi) carbon isotope record documents clear variability in deep ocean ventilation throughout the last glacial and deglacial periods. Notably, periods of high iceberg discharge and freshening of the subpolar gyre surface waters are preceded by decreases in deep water ventilation (benthic δ13C); consistent with the hypothesis that reduced AMOC is important for triggering ice sheet melting/collapse. However, ventilation decreases of similar scale occur without accompanying peaks in IRD, suggesting circulation changes do not always trigger ice sheet collapse. In addition, the periods of weakest ventilation (low benthic δ13C ) are clearly coincident with the largest IRD

  20. Mesoscale and synoptic scale features of North Pacific weather systems observed with the scanning multichannel microwave radiometer on Nimbus 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsaros, K. B.; Lewis, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    Employing data on integrated atmospheric water vapor, total cloud liquid water and rain rate obtainable from the Nimbus 7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR), the frontal structure of several mid-latitude cyclones over the North Pacific Ocean as they approach the West Coast of North America in the winter of 1979. The fronts, analyzed with all available independent data, are consistently located at the leading edge of the strongest gradient in integrated water vapor. The cloud liquid water content, which unfortunately has received very little in situ verification, has patterns which are consistent with the structure seen in visible and infrared imagery. The rain distribution is also a good indicator of frontal location and rain amounts are generally within a factor of two of what is observed with rain gauges on the coast. Furthermore, the onset of rain on the coast can often be accurately forecast by simple advection of the SMMR observed rain areas.

  1. Roles of tropical SST anomalies in modulating the western north Pacific anomalous cyclone during strong La Niña decaying years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zesheng; Wen, Zhiping; Wu, Renguang; Du, Yan

    2017-07-01

    This study re-explores the roles of tropical SST anomalies in modulating the anomalous cyclone over the Indo-western Pacific during strong La Niña decaying years via a series of numerical experiments. The results suggest that central to eastern equatorial Pacific cooling, western north Pacific (WNP) warming, and Indian Ocean cooling all contribute to the Indo-western Pacific cyclonic wind anomalies. The WNP SST anomalies play a role via a Rossby wave-type response. As the positive SST anomalies in the WNP decay, the local forcing effect decays as well. The Indian Ocean remote forcing seems to play an important role during boreal summer via cold Kelvin wave induced cyclonic shear and boundary layer convergence. During strong La Niña decaying years, the negative SST anomalies in the equatorial central to eastern Pacific can maintain and persist into summer. Such cooling could induce anomalous Walker circulation with ascending branch over the Maritime Continent to Philippines and descending branch over central to eastern Pacific, which links the WNP climate to the equatorial central and eastern Pacific SST anomalies. The convective heating over the WNP induced remotely by central to eastern Pacific cooling in turn forces atmospheric Rossby wave to its west, which may amplify the anomalous cyclone over the Indo-western Pacific.

  2. Geographic information system (GIS) compilation of geophysical, geologic, and tectonic data for the Circum-North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greninger, Mark L.; Klemperer, Simon L.; Nokleberg, Warren J.

    1999-01-01

    The accompanying directory structure contains a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) compilation of geophysical, geological, and tectonic data for the Circum-North Pacific. This area includes the Russian Far East, Alaska, the Canadian Cordillera, linking continental shelves, and adjacent oceans. This GIS compilation extends from 120?E to 115?W, and from 40?N to 80?N. This area encompasses: (1) to the south, the modern Pacific plate boundary of the Japan-Kuril and Aleutian subduction zones, the Queen Charlotte transform fault, and the Cascadia subduction zone; (2) to the north, the continent-ocean transition from the Eurasian and North American continents to the Arctic Ocean; (3) to the west, the diffuse Eurasian-North American plate boundary, including the probable Okhotsk plate; and (4) to the east, the Alaskan-Canadian Cordilleran fold belt. This compilation should be useful for: (1) studying the Mesozoic and Cenozoic collisional and accretionary tectonics that assembled this continental crust of this region; (2) studying the neotectonics of active and passive plate margins in this region; and (3) constructing and interpreting geophysical, geologic, and tectonic models of the region. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) programs provide powerful tools for managing and analyzing spatial databases. Geological applications include regional tectonics, geophysics, mineral and petroleum exploration, resource management, and land-use planning. This CD-ROM contains thematic layers of spatial data-sets for geology, gravity field, magnetic field, oceanic plates, overlap assemblages, seismology (earthquakes), tectonostratigraphic terranes, topography, and volcanoes. The GIS compilation can be viewed, manipulated, and plotted with commercial software (ArcView and ArcInfo) or through a freeware program (ArcExplorer) that can be downloaded from http://www.esri.com for both Unix and Windows computers using the button below.

  3. Variation of the Tropical Upper-tropospheric Trough and Its Linkage to the Asian-Pacific-North American Summer Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Kaiqiang; Yang, Song

    2016-04-01

    The tropical upper-tropospheric trough (TUTT) is one of the most prominent features in Northern Hemisphere (NH) summer, which peaks at 200-150 hPa in July and August. It is found that the TUTT varies largely from year to year, which indicates that the TUTT may exert great effects on the NH summer climate. In order to explore the causes that lead to the interannual variations of the TUTT, an area-weighted empirical orthogonal function decomposition analysis was applied to. The first mode reflects the northeastward-southwestward displacement of the TUTT, which is significantly related to the planetary wave originating from the Indo-western Pacific during a developing La Niña. The second mode presents the intensity change of the TUTT, which is attributed to the enhanced convection over the central Pacific where the anomalous warming sea surface temperature is appearing. The third mode shows the northwestward-southeastward displacement of the TUTT, which is correlated well with the north-south direction shift of east Asian westerly jet. Anomalous warming over the midlatitudes and cooling over the subtropics suggests a decreased meridional temperature gradient, which results in the northward displacement of westerly jet. The variations of TUTT's location and strength have distinct effects on the variation of South Asian high, the northwestern Pacific subtropical high, and the Mexican high, which subsequently modulate the climate anomalies in different regions.

  4. Nonspecific organic compounds in peat soils of the Subpolar Urals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizovtsev, N. A.; Kholodov, V. A.; Ivanov, V. A.; Farkhodov, Yu. R.; Dymov, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    Specific features of organic matter, molecular composition and distribution of oxygen-containing nonspecific organic compounds (fatty acids, long-chain aliphatic alcohols, and ketones) were revealed in two peat soils on slopes of the Subpolar Urals: the eutrophic peat soil of the spring mire (Hemic Histosols) and the peat soil of a slope mire (Fibric Histosols). Compounds that can serve as molecular markers for some evolutionary stages of peats were determined for this area. Based on the data obtained, the most probable causes of differences in the composition of organic compounds in the peats studied were found to be the following: environmental conditions, water and mineral regime of bog, and differences in the composition of peat-forming plants.

  5. Rodent communities in the sub-polar Ural mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berdyugin, K. I.

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of the rodent communities in the Sub-polar Urals is analysed. This part of the range, between 64° and 66°N, includes the highest peaks, is very scarcely settled and has been rarely studied. However, the area is interesting for biogeography, being a border zone separating European and Siberian lowland faunas. Comparison of results with those from expeditions undertaken in 1927 and in 1972, allows to evaluate changing trends in the local rodent communities, and to relate these trends to changes in the environmental conditions. The results help to emphasize the barrier role played by Sub-polar Urals for the species of rodents inhabiting both sides of the range, and also show the shifting of southern rodent forms northwards, or the moving upwards of other lowland species. This could be seen as an additional evidence of current climate warming trends.

    [fr]
    On analyse la répartition des communautés de rongeurs dans les Durais Subpolaires, une section de la chaîne comprise entre les 64° et les 66° de latitude N. Cette partie est très peu peuplée, elle possède les pics les plus hauts de la chaîne et a été rarement étudiée. Il s'agit d'une région intéressante, car c'est la frontière entre les plaines européennes et les plaines orientales de la Sibérie. En comparant les observations effectuées en 1927 et en 1972 avec celles des dernières années, on peut voir les tendances de changement des groupements de rongeurs de la région, et les interpréter en fonction des changements dans l'environnement. Les résultats permettent de mieux comprendre le rôle de barrière qui jouent les Durais Subpolaires pour les espèces de rongeurs situées d'un coté et d'autre de la chaîne. Aussi, ils permettent de verifier le déplacement vers le nord deformes méridionales et l'élévation en altitude d'autres, ce qui pourrait être vu comme une preuve additionnelle de la tendance au réchauffement global.
    [es]
    Se

  6. Climate change is projected to reduce carrying capacity and redistribute species richness in North Pacific pelagic marine ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth-Jefcoats, Phoebe A; Polovina, Jeffrey J; Drazen, Jeffrey C

    2017-03-01

    Climate change is expected to impact all aspects of marine ecosystems, including fisheries. Here, we use output from a suite of 11 earth system models to examine projected changes in two ecosystem-defining variables: temperature and food availability. In particular, we examine projected changes in epipelagic temperature and, as a proxy for food availability, zooplankton density. We find that under RCP8.5, a high business-as-usual greenhouse gas scenario, increasing temperatures may alter the spatial distribution of tuna and billfish species richness across the North Pacific basin. Furthermore, warmer waters and declining zooplankton densities may act together to lower carrying capacity for commercially valuable fish by 2-5% per decade over the 21st century. These changes have the potential to significantly impact the magnitude, composition, and distribution of commercial fish catch across the pelagic North Pacific. Such changes will in turn ultimately impact commercial fisheries' economic value. Fishery managers should anticipate these climate impacts to ensure sustainable fishery yields and livelihoods. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Seaglider surveys at Ocean Station Papa: Circulation and water mass properties in a meander of the North Pacific Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelland, Noel A.; Eriksen, Charles C.; Cronin, Meghan F.

    2016-09-01

    A Seaglider autonomous underwater vehicle augmented the Ocean Station Papa (OSP; 50°N, 145°W) surface mooring, measuring spatial structure on scales relevant to the monthly evolution of the moored time series. During each of three missions from June 2008 to January 2010, a Seaglider made biweekly 50 km × 50 km surveys in a bowtie-shaped survey track. Horizontal temperature and salinity gradients measured by these surveys were an order of magnitude stronger than climatological values and sometimes of opposite sign. Geostrophically inferred circulation was corroborated by moored acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements and AVISO satellite altimetry estimates of surface currents, confirming that glider surveys accurately resolved monthly scale mesoscale spatial structure. In contrast to climatological North Pacific Current circulation, upper-ocean flow was modestly northward during the first half of the 18 month survey period, and weakly westward during its latter half, with Rossby number O>(0.01>). This change in circulation coincided with a shift from cool and fresh to warm, saline, oxygen-rich water in the upper-ocean halocline, and an increase in vertical fine structure there and in the lower pycnocline. The anomalous flow and abrupt water mass transition were due to the slow growth of an anticyclonic meander within the North Pacific Current with radius comparable to the scale of the survey pattern, originating to the southeast of OSP.

  8. Projected changes of the low-latitude north-western Pacific wind-driven circulation under global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jing; Chen, Zhaohui; Wu, Lixin

    2017-05-01

    Based on the outputs of 25 models participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5, the projected changes of the wind-driven circulation in the low-latitude north-western Pacific are evaluated. Results demonstrate that there will be a decrease in the mean transport of the North Equatorial Current (NEC), Mindanao Current, and Kuroshio Current in the east of the Philippines, accompanied by a northward shift of the NEC bifurcation Latitude (NBL) off the Philippine coast with over 30% increase in its seasonal south-north migration amplitude. Numerical simulations using a 1.5-layer nonlinear reduced-gravity ocean model show that the projected changes of the upper ocean circulation are predominantly determined by the robust weakening of the north-easterly trade winds and the associated wind stress curl under the El Niño-like warming pattern. The changes in the wind forcing and intensified upper ocean stratification are found equally important in amplifying the seasonal migration of the NBL.

  9. Ichthyolith strontium isotope stratigraphy of a Neogene red clay sequence: calibrating eolian dust accumulation rates in the central North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, James D.; Moore, Theodore C.; Rea, David K.; Johnson, Tina M.; Owen, Robert M.; Blum, Joel D.; Hovan, Steven A.; Jones, Charles E.

    2002-09-01

    Cenozoic pelagic ('red') clays of predominantly eolian and hydrogenous origin blanket much of the central North Pacific ocean basin. The eolian component is a key indicator of past paleoclimatic conditions; thus, Cenozoic atmospheric circulation can potentially be reconstructed through provenance studies of Pacific red clays, provided there are precise age controls. Methods commonly employed in the past to date red clay cores have included cobalt accumulation rates, ichthyolith biostratigraphy, magnetostratigraphy, and ichthyolith strontium isotope stratigraphy. The first two dating methods yield ages with large uncertainties, while magnetostratigraphy is only relevant to cores with accumulation rates in excess of 1 mm/kyr. Ichthyolith strontium isotope stratigraphy has shown promise as a chronological tool in marine studies, but has been only sparingly employed in the dating of marine red clay sequences. In this study, we present a complete age-depth profile for a large diameter piston core from the central North Pacific Ocean (EW9709 PC-01, 32.5°N, 141.2°W), consisting of 11 m of primarily wind-deposited dust. To generate this age-depth profile, strontium isotopic compositions were determined on fish teeth ichthyoliths previously cleaned of contaminants using a newly modified reductive cleaning procedure. Ages were determined by reference to the recently refined Sr isotope curve for Neogene seawater. Comparison with nearby giant piston core LL44-GPC3 reinforces the accuracy of our methods. The data for EW9709 PC-01 indicate a fairly constant sediment accumulation rate of ∼0.45 mm/kyr over most of the 24 Myr time period represented by this core.

  10. Climatological analysis of passage-type tropical cyclones from the Western North Pacific into the South China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jau-Ming Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tropical cyclone (TC climatological characteristics with passage from the Western North Pacific (WNP into the South China Sea (SCS during the June - November season are analyzed in this study. These TCs tend to form in the WNP west of 150°E, and on average westward by 7 - 12° in longitude than TCs that do not track into the SCS. Their formation locations migrate with the monsoon trough, moving northward from June to August, and southward from September to November. The probability of a WNP TC moving into the SCS varies seasonally, with only 12 - 18% of the WNP TCs doing so during August-September due to more northern TC formation. However, this probability rises to 25 - 26% in June - July and 25 - 32% in October - November with more southern TC formation. The passage-type TCs generally form in the eastern part of an elongated lower-level cyclonic anomaly of the 10-day low-pass filtered environmental circulation in the 10 - 20°N zone, which is paired with an anticyclonic anomaly to the north. Between this circulation pair, anomalous easterly flows steer these TCs westward, giving them a westward track into the SCS. The formation of these passage-type TCs is associated with a southward displacement of the monsoon trough and a westward intensification of the Pacific subtropical high in August and September. During June - July (October - November, the associated features appear as a southeastward (meridional expansion of the monsoon trough and a northward displacement of the Pacific subtropical high.

  11. Status Assessment of Laysan and Black-Footed Albatrosses, North Pacific Ocean, 1923-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, Javier A.; Sievert, Paul R.; Naughton, Maura B.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past century, Laysan (Phoebastria immutabilis) and black-footed (Phoebastria nigripes) albatrosses have been subjected to high rates of mortality and disturbance at the breeding colonies and at sea. Populations were greatly reduced and many colonies were extirpated around the turn of the 20th century as a result of feather hunting. Populations were recovering when military occupation of several breeding islands during World War II led to new population declines at these islands and additional colony extirpations. At sea, thousands of Laysan and black-footed albatrosses were killed each year in high-seas driftnet fisheries, especially from 1978 until the fisheries were banned in 1992. Through the 1990s, there was a growing awareness of the large numbers of albatrosses that were being killed in longline fisheries. During the 1990s, other anthropogenic factors, such as predation by non-native mammals and exposure to contaminants, also were documented to reduce productivity or increase mortality. In response to the growing concerns over the impacts of these threats on albatross populations, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service contracted with the U.S. Geological Survey to conduct an assessment of Laysan and black-footed albatross populations. This assessment includes a review of the taxonomy, legal status, geographic distribution, natural history, habitat requirements, threats, and monitoring and management activities for these two species. The second part of the assessment is an analysis of population status and trends from 1923 to 2005. Laysan and black-footed albatrosses forage throughout the North Pacific Ocean and nest on tropical and sub-tropical oceanic islands from Mexico to Japan. As of 2005, 21 islands support breeding colonies of one or both species. The core breeding range is the Hawaiian Islands, where greater than 99 percent of the World's Laysan albatrosses and greater than 95 percent of the black-footed albatrosses nest on the small islands and

  12. Identifying Pelagic Habitat Hotspots of Neon Flying Squid in the Temperate Waters of the Central North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabia, Irene D.; Saitoh, Sei-Ichi; Mugo, Robinson; Igarashi, Hiromichi; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Usui, Norihisa; Kamachi, Masafumi; Awaji, Toshiyuki; Seito, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    We identified the pelagic habitat hotspots of the neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) in the central North Pacific from May to July and characterized the spatial patterns of squid aggregations in relation to oceanographic features such as mesoscale oceanic eddies and the Transition Zone Chlorophyll-a Front (TZCF). The data used for the habitat model construction and analyses were squid fishery information, remotely-sensed and numerical model-derived environmental data from May to July 1999–2010. Squid habitat hotspots were deduced from the monthly Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) models and were identified as regions of persistent high suitable habitat across the 12-year period. The distribution of predicted squid habitat hotspots in central North Pacific revealed interesting spatial and temporal patterns likely linked with the presence and dynamics of oceanographic features in squid’s putative foraging grounds from late spring to summer. From May to June, the inferred patches of squid habitat hotspots developed within the Kuroshio-Oyashio transition zone (KOTZ; 37–40°N) and further expanded north towards the subarctic frontal zone (SAFZ; 40–44°N) in July. The squid habitat hotspots within the KOTZ and areas west of the dateline (160°W-180°) were likely influenced and associated with the highly dynamic and transient oceanic eddies and could possibly account for lower squid suitable habitat persistence obtained from these regions. However, predicted squid habitat hotspots located in regions east of the dateline (180°-160°W) from June to July, showed predominantly higher squid habitat persistence presumably due to their proximity to the mean position of the seasonally-shifting TZCF and consequent utilization of the highly productive waters of the SAFZ. PMID:26571118

  13. Identifying Pelagic Habitat Hotspots of Neon Flying Squid in the Temperate Waters of the Central North Pacific.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene D Alabia

    Full Text Available We identified the pelagic habitat hotspots of the neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii in the central North Pacific from May to July and characterized the spatial patterns of squid aggregations in relation to oceanographic features such as mesoscale oceanic eddies and the Transition Zone Chlorophyll-a Front (TZCF. The data used for the habitat model construction and analyses were squid fishery information, remotely-sensed and numerical model-derived environmental data from May to July 1999-2010. Squid habitat hotspots were deduced from the monthly Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt models and were identified as regions of persistent high suitable habitat across the 12-year period. The distribution of predicted squid habitat hotspots in central North Pacific revealed interesting spatial and temporal patterns likely linked with the presence and dynamics of oceanographic features in squid's putative foraging grounds from late spring to summer. From May to June, the inferred patches of squid habitat hotspots developed within the Kuroshio-Oyashio transition zone (KOTZ; 37-40°N and further expanded north towards the subarctic frontal zone (SAFZ; 40-44°N in July. The squid habitat hotspots within the KOTZ and areas west of the dateline (160°W-180° were likely influenced and associated with the highly dynamic and transient oceanic eddies and could possibly account for lower squid suitable habitat persistence obtained from these regions. However, predicted squid habitat hotspots located in regions east of the dateline (180°-160°W from June to July, showed predominantly higher squid habitat persistence presumably due to their proximity to the mean position of the seasonally-shifting TZCF and consequent utilization of the highly productive waters of the SAFZ.

  14. Identifying Pelagic Habitat Hotspots of Neon Flying Squid in the Temperate Waters of the Central North Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabia, Irene D; Saitoh, Sei-Ichi; Mugo, Robinson; Igarashi, Hiromichi; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Usui, Norihisa; Kamachi, Masafumi; Awaji, Toshiyuki; Seito, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    We identified the pelagic habitat hotspots of the neon flying squid (Ommastrephes bartramii) in the central North Pacific from May to July and characterized the spatial patterns of squid aggregations in relation to oceanographic features such as mesoscale oceanic eddies and the Transition Zone Chlorophyll-a Front (TZCF). The data used for the habitat model construction and analyses were squid fishery information, remotely-sensed and numerical model-derived environmental data from May to July 1999-2010. Squid habitat hotspots were deduced from the monthly Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) models and were identified as regions of persistent high suitable habitat across the 12-year period. The distribution of predicted squid habitat hotspots in central North Pacific revealed interesting spatial and temporal patterns likely linked with the presence and dynamics of oceanographic features in squid's putative foraging grounds from late spring to summer. From May to June, the inferred patches of squid habitat hotspots developed within the Kuroshio-Oyashio transition zone (KOTZ; 37-40°N) and further expanded north towards the subarctic frontal zone (SAFZ; 40-44°N) in July. The squid habitat hotspots within the KOTZ and areas west of the dateline (160°W-180°) were likely influenced and associated with the highly dynamic and transient oceanic eddies and could possibly account for lower squid suitable habitat persistence obtained from these regions. However, predicted squid habitat hotspots located in regions east of the dateline (180°-160°W) from June to July, showed predominantly higher squid habitat persistence presumably due to their proximity to the mean position of the seasonally-shifting TZCF and consequent utilization of the highly productive waters of the SAFZ.

  15. Techno-Arrogance and Halfway Technologies: Salmon Hatcheries on the Pacific Coast of North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meffe, Gary K.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses an attempt to recover Pacific salmonid fisheries with hatcheries as an example of a human attitude toward nature that places technological mastery over nature at the forefront of our approach to many environmental problems. Points out how this approach addresses the symptoms but not the causes of the salmon population decline. Suggests…

  16. Overview of surface ozone variability in East Asia-North Pacific region during IGAC/APARE (1994--1996).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, K S; Wang, T J; Wang, T; Tang, J; Kajii, Y; Liu, C M; Shim, S G

    2004-01-01

    Surface ozone (O3) was measured at Oki Island (Japan), Cheju Island (South Korea), Lanyu Island (Taiwan Province, China), Cape D'Aguilar (Hong Kong SAR) and Lin'an, Longfenshan, Waliguan (China mainland) during January 1994--December 1996 as a component of IGAC/APARE (International Global Atmospheric Chemistry/East Asia-North Pacific Regional Experiment). This paper gave a joint discussion on the observational results at these stations over the study region. Investigations showed that the average of surface O3 mixing ratios at the seven sites are 47.9+/-15.8, 48.1+/-17.9, 30.2+/-16.4, 31.6+/-17.5, 36.3+/-17.5, 34.8+/-11.5 and 48.2+/-9.5 ppbv, respectively. Significant diurnal variations of surface O3 have been observed at Oki, Cheju, D'Aguilar, Lin'an and Longfenshan. Their annual averaged diurnal differences range from 8 to 23 ppbv and differ in each season. Surface O3 at Lanyu and Waliguan do not show strong diurnal variability. Seasonal cycles of surface O3 showed difference at the temperate and the subtropical remote sites. Oki has a summer minimum-spring maximum, while Lanyu has a summer minimum-autumn maximum. The suburban sites at D'Aguilar and Lin'an report high-level O3 in autumn and low level O3 in summer. Surface O3 remains-high in autumn and low in winter at the rural site Longfenshan. For the global background station Waliguan, surface O3 exhibits a broad spring-summer maximum and autumn-winter minimum. The backward air trajectories to these sites have shown different pathways of long-range transport of air pollution from East Asia Continent to North Pacific Ocean. Surface O3 was found to be strongly and positively correlated with CO at Oki and Lanyu, especially in spring and autumn, reflecting the substantial photochemical buildup of O3 on a regional scale. It is believed that the regional sources of pollution in East Asia have enhanced the average surface O3 concentrations in the background atmosphere of North Pacific.

  17. Direct observation of 134Cs and 137Cs in surface seawater in the western and central North Pacific after the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kaeriyama

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The horizontal distribution of radioactive cesium (Cs derived from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FNPP in the North Pacific is still unclear due to the limitation of direct measurement of the seawater in the open ocean. We present the result of direct observation of radioactive Cs in surface seawater collected from a broad area in the western and central North Pacific in July 2011, October 2011 and July 2012. We also conducted a simple particle tracking experiment to estimate the qualitative spatial distribution of radioactive Cs in the North Pacific. 134Cs was detected at 94 stations out of 123 stations, and 137Cs was detected at all stations. High 134Cs and 137Cs concentrations more than 10 m Bq kg−1 were observed in the area of the northern part of Kuroshio Extension at 144° E and 155° E in July 2011, in the area 147–175° E around 40° N in October 2011, and the northern part of Kuroshio Extension at 155° E and 175°30´ E in July 2012. Combining the result of direct observations and particle tracking experiment, the radioactive Cs derived from the FNPP had been dispersed eastward to the central North Pacific during 2011. It was considered from the horizontal distribution that radioactive Cs was dispersed not only eastward but also north- and southward in the central North Pacific. Pronounced dilution process of radioactive Cs from the FNPP during study period is suggested from temporal change in the activity ratio of 134Cs / 137Cs, which was decay-corrected on 6 April 2011, and relationships between radioactive Cs and temperature.

  18. Adjustments of a global Finite-Element Sea Ice Ocean Model configuration to improve the general ocean circulation in the North Pacific and its marginal seas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Patrick; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2017-04-01

    The sub-Arctic oceans like the Sea of Okhotsk, the Bering Sea, the Labrador Sea or the Greenland- Irminger-Norwegian (GIN) Sea react particularly sensitive to global climate changes and have the potential to reversely regulate climate change by CO2 uptake in the other areas of the world. So far, the natural processes in the Arctic and Subarctic system, especially over the Pacific realm, remain poorly understood in terms of numerical modeling. As such, in this study we focus on the North Pacific and its adjacent marginal seas (e.g. the Sea of Okhotsk, the Bering Sea and the Sea of Japan), which have nowadays a significant role in the climate system of the Northwest Pacific by influencing the atmospheric and oceanic circulation as well as the hydrology of the Pacific water masses. The Sea of Okhotsk, in particular, is characterized by a highly dynamical sea-ice coverage, where, in autumn and winter, due to massive sea ice formation and brine rejection, the Sea of Okhotsk Intermediate Water (SOIW) is formed which contributes to the mid-depth (500-1000m) water layer of the North Pacific known as newly formed North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW). By employing a Finite-Element Sea-Ice Ocean Model (FESOM), in a global configuration, but with high resolution over the marginal seas of the Northwest Pacific Ocean ( 7 km), we tested different meshes and forcing improvements to correct the general ocean circulation in the North Pacific realm towards a more realistic pattern. By using different forcing data (e.g. CORE2, ERA-40/interim, CCMP-correction), adapting the mesh resolutions in the tropical and subtropical North Pacific and changing the bathymetry over important inflow straits (e.g. Amukta Passage, Kruzenstern Strait), we show that the better results are obtained (when compared with observational data) via a combination of CCMP corrected COREv2 forcing with increased resolution in the pathway of the Kuroshio Extension Current and Northern Equatorial Current.

  19. Identifying Stratospheric Air Intrusions and Associated Hurricane-Force Wind Events over the North Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloy, Kelsey; Folmer, Michael J.; Phillips, Joseph; Sienkiewicz, Joseph M.; Berndt, Emily

    2017-01-01

    Motivation: Ocean data is sparse: reliance on satellite imagery for marine forecasting; Ocean Prediction Center (OPC) –“mariner’s weather lifeline”. Responsible for: Pacific, Atlantic, Pacific Alaska surface analyses –24, 48, 96 hrs.; Wind & wave analyses –24, 48, 96 hrs.; Issue warnings, make decisions, Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite –R Series (now GOES-16), Compared to the old GOES: 3 times spectral resolution, 4 times spatial resolution, 5 times faster coverage; Comparable to Japanese Meteorological Agency’s Himawari-8, used a lot throughout this research. Research Question: How can integrating satellite data imagery and derived products help forecasters improve prognosis of rapid cyclogenesis and hurricane-force wind events? Phase I –Identifying stratospheric air intrusions: Water Vapor –6.2, 6.9, 7.3 micron channels; Airmass RGB Product; AIRS, IASI, NUCAPS total column ozone and ozone anomaly; ASCAT (A/B) and AMSR-2 wind data.

  20. Numerical simulation on the long-term variation of radioactive cesium concentration in the North Pacific due to the Fukushima disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Hideyuki; Kobayashi, Takuya; Furuno, Akiko; Usui, Norihisa; Kamachi, Masafumi

    2014-10-01

    Numerical simulations on oceanic (134)Cs and (137)Cs dispersions were intensively conducted in order to assess an effect of the radioactive cesium on the North Pacific environment with a focus on the long-term variation of the radioactive cesium concentration after the Fukushima disaster that occurred in March 2011. The amounts of (134)Cs and (137)Cs released into the ocean were estimated using oceanic monitoring data, whereas the atmospheric deposition was calculated through atmospheric dispersion simulations. The highly accurate ocean current reanalyzed through a three-dimensional variational data assimilation enabled us to clarify the time series of the (134)Cs and (137)Cs concentrations in the North Pacific. It was suggested that the main radioactive cesium cloud due to the direct oceanic release reached the central part of the North Pacific, crossing 170°W one year after the Fukushima disaster. The radioactive cesium was efficiently diluted by meso-scale eddies in the Kuroshio Extension region and its concentration in the surface, intermediate, and deep layers had already been reduced to the pre-Fukushima background value in the wide area within the North Pacific 2.5 years after the Fukushima disaster. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Population differentiation and hybridisation of Australian snubfin (Orcaella heinsohni) and Indo-Pacific humpback (Sousa chinensis) dolphins in North-Western Australia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, Alexander M.; Kopps, Anna M.; Allen, Simon J.; Bejder, Lars; Littleford-Colquhoun, Bethan; Parra, Guido J.; Cagnazzi, Daniele; Thiele, Deborah; Palmer, Carol; Frere, Celine H.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the Australian snubfin (Orcaella heinsohni) and Indo-Pacific humpback (Sousa chinensis) dolphins ('snubfin' and 'humpback dolphins', hereafter) of north-western Australia. While both species are listed as 'near threatened' by the IUCN, data deficiencies are impeding rigorous

  2. An Assessment of Multimodel Simulations for the Variability of Western North Pacific Tropical Cyclones and Its Association with ENSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Rongqing; Wang, Hui; Hu, Zeng-Zhen; Kumar, Arun; Li, Weijing; Long, Lindsey N.; Schemm, Jae-Kyung E.; Peng, Peitao; Wang, Wanqiu; Si, Dong; hide

    2016-01-01

    An assessment of simulations of the interannual variability of tropical cyclones (TCs) over the western North Pacific (WNP) and its association with El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), as well as a subsequent diagnosis for possible causes of model biases generated from simulated large-scale climate conditions, are documented in the paper. The model experiments are carried out by the Hurricane Work Group under the U.S. Climate Variability and Predictability Research Program (CLIVAR) using five global climate models (GCMs) with a total of 16 ensemble members forced by the observed sea surface temperature and spanning the 28-yr period from 1982 to 2009. The results show GISS and GFDL model ensemble means best simulate the interannual variability of TCs, and the multimodel ensemble mean (MME) follows. Also, the MME has the closest climate mean annual number of WNP TCs and the smallest root-mean-square error to the observation. Most GCMs can simulate the interannual variability of WNP TCs well, with stronger TC activities during two types of El Niño-namely, eastern Pacific (EP) and central Pacific (CP) El Niño-and weaker activity during La Niña. However, none of the models capture the differences in TC activity between EP and CP El Niño as are shown in observations. The inability of models to distinguish the differences in TC activities between the two types of El Niño events may be due to the bias of the models in response to the shift of tropical heating associated with CP El Niño.

  3. Distribution of {delta}{sup 14}C in western North Pacific and tracing carbons of human origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aramaki, Takafumi; Mizushima, Toshihiko; Togawa, Orihiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Mutsu, Aomori (Japan). Mutsu Establishment; Watanabe, Shuichi; Tsunogai, Shizuo [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan); Kuji, Tomoyuki [Japan marine Sience Fundation, Mutsu, Aomori (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    Seawater were collected at six points, 0deg to 48degN around 165degE. Dissolved inorganic carbonates was reduced into graphite. The ratio C-11/C-12 was measured by the accelerator mass analyzer. {sup 14}C concentration was calculated from {delta}{sup 13}C value calculated from the {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio. {sup 14}C resulting from the nuclear weapon test was calculated by comparing estimated {sup 14}C and real {sup 14}C concentration. It was compared with that in 1970s. {sup 14}Cbomb has dissolved into North Pacific Intermediate Water in Arctic latitude, which has moved to Mid-latitude. (A. Yamamoto)

  4. Study of the diversity of culturable actinomycetes in the North Pacific and Caribbean coasts of Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Godofredo; Rojas-Jiménez, Keilor; Jaspars, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    In this study, 137 actinomycetes were isolated from subtidal marine sediments in the North Pacific and Caribbean coasts of Costa Rica. Bioinformatics analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences assigned the isolates to 15 families and 21 genera. Streptomyces was the dominant genus while the remaining 20 genera were poorly represented. Nearly 70% of the phylotypes presented a coastal-restricted distribution whereas the other 30% were common inhabitants of both shores. The coastal tropical waters of Costa Rica showed a high diversity of actinomycetes, both in terms of the number of species and phylogenetic composition, although significant differences were observed between and within shores. The observed pattern of species distribution might be the result of several factors including the characteristics of the ecosystems, presence of endemic species and the influence of terrestrial runoff. PMID:19365710

  5. Study of the diversity of culturable actinomycetes in the North Pacific and Caribbean coasts of Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Godofredo; Rojas-Jiménez, Keilor; Jaspars, Marcel; Tamayo-Castillo, Giselle

    2009-06-01

    In this study, 137 actinomycetes were isolated from subtidal marine sediments in the North Pacific and Caribbean coasts of Costa Rica. Bioinformatics analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences assigned the isolates to 15 families and 21 genera. Streptomyces was the dominant genus while the remaining 20 genera were poorly represented. Nearly 70% of the phylotypes presented a coastal-restricted distribution whereas the other 30% were common inhabitants of both shores. The coastal tropical waters of Costa Rica showed a high diversity of actinomycetes, both in terms of the number of species and phylogenetic composition, although significant differences were observed between and within shores. The observed pattern of species distribution might be the result of several factors including the characteristics of the ecosystems, presence of endemic species and the influence of terrestrial runoff.

  6. Physical and chemical effects of ingested plastic debris on short-tailed shearwaters, Puffinus tenuirostris, in the North Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Rei; Takada, Hideshige; Fukuwaka, Masa-aki; Watanuki, Yutaka

    2011-12-01

    We investigated the plastics ingested by short-tailed shearwaters, Puffinus tenuirostris, that were accidentally caught during experimental fishing in the North Pacific Ocean in 2003 and 2005. The mean mass of plastics found in the stomach was 0.23 g per bird (n=99). Plastic mass did not correlate with body weight. Total PCB (sum of 24 congeners) concentrations in the abdominal adipose tissue of 12 birds ranged from 45 to 529 ng/g-lipid. Although total PCBs or higher-chlorinated congeners, the mass of ingested plastic correlated positively with concentrations of lower-chlorinated congeners. The effects of toxic chemicals present in plastic debris on bird physiology should be investigated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Using hierarchical models to estimate effects of ocean anomalies on north-west Pacific Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R; Liermann, M

    2010-11-01

    The high variability in survival over the past three decades of north-west Pacific Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha is summarized for 24 stocks and analysed using hierarchical Bayesian models. Results from a simple model indicate that recruitment anomalies appear to be correlated in time and space. A simple model with a covariate based on basin-scale effects (Pacific Decadal Oscillation and El Niño Southern Oscillation) and local-scale effects (sea surface temperature, SST anomaly) was introduced to explain this variability. The model still exhibited residual patterns that were removed when a random-walk component was added to the model. The analysis indicates that recruitment is negatively related to SST anomaly for all stocks and the effect of basin-scale variables is negligible. The effect of climate over the next century is expected to result in estimated recruitment declining by an average of 13% for O. tshawytscha stocks coastwide. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2010 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  8. The Structure of Genetic Diversity in Eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) along the North Pacific and Bering Sea Coasts of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Sandra; Sage, Kevin; Rearick, Jolene; Fowler, Megan C.; Muñiz-Salazar, Raquel; Baibak, Bethany; Wyllie-Echeverria, Sandy; Cabello-Pasini, Alehandro; Ward, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Eelgrass (Zostera marina) populations occupying coastal waters of Alaska are separated by a peninsula and island archipelago into two Large Marine Ecosystems (LMEs). From populations in both LMEs, we characterize genetic diversity, population structure, and polarity in gene flow using nuclear microsatellite fragment and chloroplast and nuclear sequence data. An inverse relationship between genetic diversity and latitude was observed (heterozygosity: R2 = 0.738, P < 0.001; allelic richness: R2 = 0.327, P = 0.047), as was significant genetic partitioning across most sampling sites (θ = 0.302, P < 0.0001). Variance in allele frequency was significantly partitioned by region only in cases when a population geographically in the Gulf of Alaska LME (Kinzarof Lagoon) was instead included with populations in the Eastern Bering Sea LME (θp = 0.128–0.172; P < 0.003), suggesting gene flow between the two LMEs in this region. Gene flow among locales was rarely symmetrical, with notable exceptions generally following net coastal ocean current direction. Genetic data failed to support recent proposals that multiple Zostera species (i.e. Z. japonica and Z. angustifolia) are codistributed with Z. marina in Alaska. Comparative analyses also failed to support the hypothesis that eelgrass populations in the North Atlantic derived from eelgrass retained in northeastern Pacific Last Glacial Maximum refugia. These data suggest northeastern Pacific populations are derived from populations expanding northward from temperate populations following climate amelioration at the terminus of the last Pleistocene glaciation.

  9. Promising prediction of the monsoon trough and its implication for tropical cyclone activity over the western North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaofan; Lu, Riyu; Chen, Guanghua

    2017-07-01

    The monsoon trough (MT) is generally recognized as a feeding ground for tropical cyclones (TCs) over the western North Pacific (WNP). In view of the many challenges that remain in current seasonal TC forecasting, it would be a profound benefit to understand the predictability of variations in the MT and the implications of this for the seasonal prediction of TC activity. This study reveals that high predictability of the MT is shown by the current atmosphere-ocean coupled forecasting system, with the correlation coefficient being 0.84 for the model-ensemble prediction with observations from 1960 to 2005. This high predictability arises mainly from the tropical dipole sea surface temperature over the Maritime Continent and tropical Pacific Ocean, which favors convection around the warm pool and further excites the vorticity anomalies over the WNP. It is further found that good knowledge of the MT could provide promising prediction of TC activity over the WNP, including the occurrence and energy of TCs. The findings of this study suggest that coupling between the WNP circulation and tropical ocean acts as an important source of seasonal predictability in the WNP, and highlight the importance of the MT for seasonal prediction of TCs over the WNP.

  10. RS and GIS based analysis of Ommastrephes bartrami resources in the North Pacific Ocean : A case study for 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, R.; Chen, G.

    The Ommastrephes bartrami is the second important fish in the North Pacific Ocean which is the main catch of China because of its large amount and important value in economy With the development of RS GIS and GPS more convenient and exact data can be gained to pioneer a new field of ocean fishery research The article first summarizes some researches and their results of the Ommastrephes bartrami resources in the Pacific Ocean by Chinese scholars then researches the catch of Ommastrephes bartrami from 1995 to 2001 using SST and chlorophyll-a data derived from remote sensing images and statistical production data collected from fishery companies in this area and specially analyzes the causes of severe reduce in harvest in 2001 In order to illustrate the reasons the environment structure the Dorsal mantle length compositions of Ommastrephes bartrami and the stomach contents of some harvested Ommastrephes bartrami have been analyzed The wandering of Kuroshio in south of Japan the puniness of Kuroshio and the cooler of water in the northern part of the ocean are the disadvantageous facts in hydrologic structure The reduction in abundance of Ommastrephes bartrami in the western part of the ocean was the important reason for declining of the catch in the area The poor food abundance happened to be another unfavorable factor But in the eastern part of the ocean what worked most on the failure of production was the poor acknowledgment with the schools which caused an earlier withdrawing of fishing vessels from the waters when

  11. Distribution and sources of dissolved black carbon in surface waters of the Chukchi Sea, Bering Sea, and the North Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakane, Motohiro; Ajioka, Taku; Yamashita, Youhei

    2017-05-01

    Pyrogenic carbon, also called black carbon (BC), is an important component in the global carbon cycle. BC produced by biomass burning or fossil fuel combustion is transported to oceans by the atmosphere or rivers. However, environmental dynamics (i.e., major sources and sinks) of BC in marine environments have not been well documented. In this study, dissolved BC (DBC) collected from surface waters of the Chukchi Sea, the Bering Sea, and the subarctic and subtropical North Pacific were analyzed using the benzene polycarboxylic acid (BPCA) method. The DBC concentration and the ratio of B5CA and B6CA to all BPCAs (an index of the DBC condensation degree) ranged from 4.8 to 15.5 µg-C L-1 and from 0.20 to 0.43, respectively, in surface waters of the Chukchi/Bering Seas and the North Pacific Ocean. The concentration and condensation degree of DBC in the Chukchi/Bering Seas were higher and more variable than those in the subarctic and subtropical North Pacific, which implies that the major factors controlling DBC distribution were different in these marine provinces. In the Chukchi/Bering Seas, the DBC concentration was negatively correlated to salinity but positively correlated to chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) quantity and total dissolved lignin phenol concentration estimated by CDOM parameters. These correlations indicated that the possible major source of DBC in the Chukchi/Bering Seas was Arctic rivers. However, in the North Pacific, where riverine inputs are negligible for most sampling sites, DBC was possibly derived from the atmosphere. Although spectral slopes of CDOM at 275-295 nm (an index of the photodegradation degree of CDOM) differed widely between the subarctic and subtropical North Pacific, the concentration and condensation degrees of DBC were similar between the subarctic and subtropical North Pacific, which suggests that photodegradation was not the only major factor controlling DBC distribution. Therefore, DBC distributions of the

  12. Distribution and Sources of Dissolved Black Carbon in Surface Waters of the Chukchi Sea, Bering Sea, and the North Pacific Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motohiro Nakane

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Pyrogenic carbon, also called black carbon (BC, is an important component in the global carbon cycle. BC produced by biomass burning or fossil fuel combustion is transported to oceans by the atmosphere or rivers. However, environmental dynamics (i.e., major sources and sinks of BC in marine environments have not been well-documented. In this study, dissolved BC (DBC collected from surface waters of the Chukchi Sea, the Bering Sea, and the subarctic and subtropical North Pacific were analyzed using the benzene polycarboxylic acid (BPCA method. The DBC concentration and the ratio of B5CA and B6CA to all BPCAs (an index of the DBC condensation degree ranged from 4.8 to 15.5 μg-C L−1 and from 0.20 to 0.43, respectively, in surface waters of the Chukchi/Bering Seas and the North Pacific Ocean. The concentration and condensation degree of DBC in the Chukchi/Bering Seas were higher and more variable than those in the subarctic and subtropical North Pacific, which implies that the major factors controlling DBC distribution were different in these marine provinces. In the Chukchi/Bering Seas, the DBC concentration was negatively correlated to salinity but positively correlated to chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM quantity and total dissolved lignin phenol concentration estimated by CDOM parameters. These correlations indicated that the possible major source of DBC in the Chukchi/Bering Seas was Arctic rivers. However, in the North Pacific, where riverine inputs are negligible for most sampling sites, DBC was possibly derived from the atmosphere. Although spectral slopes of CDOM at 275–295 nm (an index of the photodegradation degree of CDOM differed widely between the subarctic and subtropical North Pacific, the concentration and condensation degrees of DBC were similar between the subarctic and subtropical North Pacific, which suggests that photodegradation was not the only major factor controlling DBC distribution. Therefore, DBC

  13. Temperature, salinity, oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, silicate, dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, carbon dioxide, pH collected by CTD profile from NOAA Ship MALCOLM BALDRIGE and other platforms in the North Atlantic Ocean and North Pacific Ocean from 1981-06-15 to 1994-04-25 (NCEI Accession 9900046)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and chemical data were collected using bottle casts in the North Atlantic Ocean and North Pacific Ocean from NOAA Ship MALCOLM BALDRIGE and other platforms...

  14. Temperature profile data collected using BT and XBT casts in the North/South Pacific Ocean and North/South Atlantic Ocean from NOAA Ship MALCOLM BALDRIGE and other platforms from 1988-05-04 to 1990-12-18 (NODC Accession 9100058)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using XBT and BT casts from NOAA Ship MALCOLM BALDRIGE and other platforms in the North/South Pacific Ocean and North/South...

  15. Temperature profile data from XBT and BT casts in the North/South Pacific Ocean and North/South Atlantic Ocean from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other platforms from 1987-04-02 to 1987-11-24 (NODC Accession 8800007)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using XBT and BT casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER and other platforms in the North/South Pacific Ocean and North/South...

  16. Western North Pacific Monsoon Depressions: Formation, Structure, and Transition to Tropical Cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    vorticity lobes to form an elliptical monsoon depression circulation. While these trajectories are useful to indicate the source regions for the airstreams...formation time, the elliptical monsoon depressions on average are 1098 km east-west and 812 km north-south, and have vorticity maxima on either end...contributes to the formations. At the formation time, the elliptical monsoon depressions on average are 1098 km east-west and 812 km north-south, and have

  17. Transport of East Asian dust storms to the marginal seas of China and the southern North Pacific in spring 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sai-Chun; Li, Jiawei; Che, Huizheng; Chen, Bin; Wang, Hong

    2017-01-01

    The transport of a super-severe dust storm that occurred in East Asia from 19 to 22 March 2010 has been well documented by both model simulations and surface observations. We investigated the transport of this severe dust storm and several other spring 2010 dust storms using model simulations, backward trajectories, and measurements from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite. The model simulations indicated that the emission of dust in spring 2010 was about 35% higher than that in spring 2006 and was twice that of the 44-year average from 1960 to 2003. The dust emissions over two major source regions (western China and the Gobi Desert) in spring 2010 accounted for 86% of the total amount of dust. The simulated depositional flux over the two major source regions was c.2.7-9.0 times that over two marginal seas (the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea) and more than two magnitudes higher than that over the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre. The mean extinction coefficient observed by the CALIPSO satellite over the two source regions was c.1.3-3.7 times that over the two marginal seas and one magnitude higher than that over the North Pacific. This was consistent with the result from our model, suggesting that this model is able to capture the major features of dust storms. The vertical profiles recorded by the CALIPSO satellite indicated that the dust aerosol mainly floated from the ground to 13 km above ground level over the source regions and above the seas. A multiple dust layer appeared over the seas and the backward trajectories suggested that the dust aerosol in different layers may have been sourced from different regions.

  18. Thirteen years of observations on primary sugars and sugar alcohols over remote Chichijima Island in the western North Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Verma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the atmospheric transport of bioaerosols, we conducted long-term observations of primary sugars and sugar alcohols over remote Chichijima Island in the western North Pacific from 2001 to 2013. Our results showed that concentrations of total sugar compounds for 13 years ranged from 1.2 to 310 ng m−3 (average of 46 ± 49 ng m−3. We found that atmospheric circulations significantly affect the seasonal variations of bioaerosol distributions over the western North Pacific. The primary sugars (glucose and fructose maximized in summer, possibly due to an increased emission of the vegetation products from local vascular plants in Chichijima. We also found higher concentrations of sugar components (arabitol, mannitol, and trehalose in more recent years during summer and autumn, suggesting an enhanced emission of fungal and microbial species over the island. Sucrose peaked in late winter to early spring, indicating a springtime pollen contribution by long-range atmospheric transport, while elevated concentrations of sucrose in early summer could be explained by long-range transport of soil dust from Southeast Asia to Chichijima. Sucrose and trehalose were found to present increasing trends from 2001 to 2013, while total sugar components did not show any clear trends during the 13-year period. Positive matrix factorization analyses suggested the locally emitted sugar compounds as well as long-range-transported airborne pollen grains, microbes, and fungal spores are the major contributors to total sugar compounds in the Chichijima aerosols. Backward air mass trajectories support the atmospheric transport of continental aerosols from the Asian continent during winter and spring over Chichijima.

  19. Dissolved phosphorus pools and alkaline phosphatase activity in the euphotic zone of the western North Pacific Ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro eSuzumura

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We measured pools of dissolved phosphorus (P, including dissolved inorganic P (DIP, dissolved organic P (DOP and alkaline phosphatase (AP-hydrolyzable labile DOP (L-DOP, and kinetic parameters of AP activity (APA in the euphotic zone in the western North Pacific Ocean. Samples were collected from one coastal station in Sagami Bay, Japan, and three offshore stations between the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG and the Kuroshio region. Although DIP concentrations in the euphotic zone at all stations were equally low, around the nominal method detection limit of 20 nmol L−1, chlorophyll a (Chl a concentrations were one order of magnitude greater at the coastal station. DOP was the dominant P pool, comprising 62–92% of total dissolved P at and above the Chl a maximum layer (CML. L-DOP represented 22–39% of the total DOP at the offshore stations, whereas it accounted for a much higher proportion (about 85% in the coastal surface layers. Significant correlations between maximum potential AP hydrolysis rates and DIP concentrations or bacterial cell abundance in the offshore euphotic zone suggest that major APA in the oligotrophic surface ocean is from bacterial activity and regulated largely by DIP availability. Although the range of maximum potential APA was comparable among the environmental conditions, the in situ hydrolysis rate of L-DOP in the coastal station was 10 times those in the offshore stations. L-DOP turnover time at the CML ranged from 4.5 d at the coastal station to 84.4 d in the NPSG. The ratio of the APA half saturation constant to the ambient L-DOP concentration decreased markedly from the NPSG to the coastal station. There were substantial differences in the rate end efficiency of DOP remineralization and its contribution as the potential P source between the low-phosphate/high biomass coastal ecosystem and the low-phosphate/low biomass oligotrophic ocean.

  20. Dissolved phosphorus pools and alkaline phosphatase activity in the euphotic zone of the Western north pacific ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzumura, Masahiro; Hashihama, Fuminori; Yamada, Namiha; Kinouchi, Shinko

    2012-01-01

    We measured pools of dissolved phosphorus (P), including dissolved inorganic P (DIP), dissolved organic P (DOP) and alkaline phosphatase (AP)-hydrolyzable labile DOP (L-DOP), and kinetic parameters of AP activity (APA) in the euphotic zone in the western North Pacific Ocean. Samples were collected from one coastal station in Sagami Bay, Japan, and three offshore stations between the North Pacific subtropical gyre (NPSG) and the Kuroshio region. Although DIP concentrations in the euphotic zone at all stations were equally low, around the nominal method detection limit of 20 nmol L(-1), chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations were one order of magnitude greater at the coastal station. DOP was the dominant P pool, comprising 62-92% of total dissolved P at and above the Chl a maximum layer (CML). L-DOP represented 22-39% of the total DOP at the offshore stations, whereas it accounted for a much higher proportion (about 85%) in the coastal surface layers. Significant correlations between maximum potential AP hydrolysis rates and DIP concentrations or bacterial cell abundance in the offshore euphotic zone suggest that major APA in the oligotrophic surface ocean is from bacterial activity and regulated largely by DIP availability. Although the range of maximum potential APA was comparable among the environmental conditions, the in situ hydrolysis rate of L-DOP in the coastal station was 10 times those in the offshore stations. L-DOP turnover time at the CML ranged from 4.5 days at the coastal station to 84.4 days in the NPSG. The ratio of the APA half-saturation constant to the ambient L-DOP concentration decreased markedly from the NPSG to the coastal station. There were substantial differences in the rate and efficiency of DOP remineralization and its contribution as the potential P source between the low-phosphate/high-biomass coastal ecosystem and the low-phosphate/low biomass oligotrophic ocean.

  1. Surface constraints on the temporal and spatial evolution of the Farallon-Pacific-North America plate boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuarrie, N.; Oskin, M.

    2009-05-01

    Extension and volcanism are two surface derived data sets used to infer mantle processes back in time. We integrate two new large GIS-based datasets to create palinspastic restorations of extension and volcanism allowing us to readdress the relationship between plate-boundary deformation, intra-plate extension and magmatism in western North America. Using ArcGIS and custom software, we retrodeformed the NAVDat (North American Volcanic Database, navdat.geongrid.org) using the western North America reconstruction of McQuarrie and Wernicke (2005). We compare this data to strain rates calculated over a 50 km-grid forward- deformed from 36 Ma to present. With the deformed grid and palinspastically restored volcanic dataset we quantitatively compare rates of magmatism and deformation and evaluate the age, location, and migration of Cenozoic volcanic arcs. A first order conclusion from this study is that magmatism, throughout the Basin and Range, is primarily driven by plate boundary effects. The plate boundary effects include subduction and rollback of the Farallon plate, creation and expansion of slab windows as the Pacific plate intercepts the North American plate and re-establishment of the ancestral Cascade arc along the eastern margin of the Sierra Nevada at ˜ 15 Ma. Notable exceptions include the Yellowstone hotspot system along the northern boarder of our study area and late-stage (<8 Ma) passive, extension related asthenospheric upwelling that accompanied a thinning lithosphere along the eastern and western margins of the Basin and Range. The palinspastic reconstructions presented here highlight that the classic, high-angle, Basin and Range faulting that comprises most of the physiographic Basin and Range province commenced during a remarkably amagmatic period. These observations largely contradicts the active rifting model where magmatism triggers Basin and Range extension

  2. Effects of extratropical solar penetration on North Atlantic Ocean circulation and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xi; Wu, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    Effects of extratropical solar penetration on the North Atlantic Ocean circulation and climate are investigated using a coupled ocean-atmosphere model. In this model, solar penetration generates basinwide cooling and warming in summer and winter, respectively. Associated with SST changes, annual mean surface wind stress is intensified in both the subtropical and subpolar North Atlantic, which leads to acceleration of both subtropical and subpolar gyres. Owing to warming in the subtropics and significant saltiness in the subpolar region, potential density decreases (increases) in the subtropical (subpolar) North Atlantic. The north-south meridional density gradient is thereby enlarged, accelerating the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). In addition, solar penetration reduces stratification in the upper ocean and favors stronger vertical convection, which also contributes to acceleration of the AMOC.

  3. Effect of biomass burning over the western North Pacific Rim: wintertime maxima of anhydrosugars in ambient aerosols from Okinawa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, C.; Kawamura, K.; Kunwar, B.

    2015-02-01

    Biomass burning (BB) largely modifies the chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols on the globe. We collected aerosol samples (TSP) at Cape Hedo, on subtropical Okinawa Island, from October 2009 to February 2012 to study anhydrosugars as BB tracers. Levoglucosan was detected as the dominant anhydrosugar followed by its isomers, mannosan and galactosan. We found a clear seasonal trend of levoglucosan and mannosan with winter maxima and summer minima. Positive correlation was found between levoglucosan and nss-K+ (r = 0.38, p Asian continent. We found winter maxima of anhydrosugars, which may be associated with open burning and domestic heating and cooking in northern and northeastern China, Mongolia and Russia and with the enhanced westerly winds. The monthly averaged levoglucosan / mannosan ratios were lower (2.1-4.8) in May-June and higher (13.3-13.9) in November-December. The lower values may be associated with softwood burning in northern China, Korea and southwestern Japan whereas the higher values are probably caused by agricultural waste burning of maize straw in the North China Plain. Anhydrosugars comprised 0.22% of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and 0.13% of organic carbon (OC). The highest values to WSOC (0.37%) and OC (0.25%) were found in winter, again indicating an important BB contribution to Okinawa aerosols in winter. This study provides useful information to better understand the effect of East Asian biomass burning on the air quality in the western North Pacific Rim.

  4. Effect of Wind Speed on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth over the North Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Merkulova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The surface-wind speed influences on aerosol optical depth (AOD, derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS Aqua daily observations over the central North Pacific during the period 2003–2016, have been investigated in this study. The cloud coverage is relatively low over the present investigation area compared to other marine areas, which favors AOD derived from passive remote sensing from space. In this study, we have combined MODIS AOD with 2 m wind speed (U2m on a satellite-pixel basis, which has been interpolated from National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP reanalysis. In addition, daily averaged AOD derived from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET measurements in the free-troposphere at the Mauna Loa Observatory (3397 m above sea level, Hawaii, was subtracted from the MODIS column AOD values. The latter was to reduce the contribution of aerosols above the planetary boundary layer. This study shows relatively strong power-law relationships between MODIS mean AOD and surface-wind speed for marine background conditions in summer, fall and winter of the current period. However, previous established relationships between AOD and surface-wind speed deviate substantially. Even so, for similar marine conditions the present relationship agrees reasonable well with a power-law relationship derived for north-east Atlantic conditions. The present MODIS retrievals of AOD in the marine atmosphere agree reasonably well with ground-based remote sensing of AOD.

  5. The importance of genetic verification for determination of Atlantic salmon in north Pacific waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, J.L.; Williams, I.; Sage, G.K.; Zimmerman, C.E.

    2003-01-01

    Genetic analyses of two unknown but putative Atlantic salmon Salmo salar captured in the Copper River drainage, Alaska, demonstrated the need for validation of morphologically unusual fishes. Mitochondrial DNA sequences (control region and cytochrome b) and data from two nuclear genes [first internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) sequence and growth hormone (GH1) amplification product] indicated that the fish caught in fresh water on the Martin River was a coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch, while the other fish caught in the intertidal zone of the Copper River delta near Grass Island was an Atlantic salmon. Determination of unusual or cryptic fish based on limited physical characteristics and expected seasonal spawning run timing will add to the controversy over farmed Atlantic salmon and their potential effects on native Pacific species. It is clear that determination of all putative collections of Atlantic salmon found in Pacific waters requires validation. Due to uncertainty of fish identification in the field using plastic morphometric characters, it is recommended that genetic analyses be part of the validation process. ?? 2003 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  6. Radiocaesium derived FNPP1 accident in the ocean interior of the western North Pacific Ocean through 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Michio; Hamajima, Yasunori; Inomata, Yayoi; Kumamoto, Yuichiro; Oka, Eitarou; Tsubono, Takaki; Tsumune, Daisuke

    2017-04-01

    134Cs and 137Cs, hereafter radiocaesium, were released to the North Pacific Ocean by two major pathways, direct discharge and atmospheric deposition released from the TEPCO Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP1) accident in 2011. Activities of radiocaesium released from FNPP1 accident were measured as vertical profiles at 11 stations in 2011, at 14 stations in 2012, at 13 station in 2015 and at 6 stations in 2016 in the North Pacific Ocean to study transport processes in the ocean interior of the North Pacific Ocean. The major pathway from surface to ocean interior after injected in the ocean surface can be considered subduction of central mode water (CMW) and subduction of subduction of subtropical mode water (STMW) at potential densities of 26.1-26.3 for CMW and 25.1-25.3 for STMW, respectively. In June 2012 at 34°N-39°N along 165°E corresponding to the formation region of central mode water (CMW) located north of the Kuroshio Extension, 134Cs activity showed a maximum at around potential density= 26.3 kg m-3. 134Cs activity was higher in CMW than in any of the surrounding waters, including STMW. These observations also indicate that the most effective pathway by which FNPP1-derived radiocaesium is introduced into the ocean interior on a 1-year time scale is CMW formation and subduction. In June-July 2015 at 36 deg. N-44 deg. N along 165 deg. E and June 2016 at 38-40N, 165-170 deg. E, there are only very week signal of subduction of Fukushima derived radiocaesium at in the CMW formation region, which means that subducted radiocaesium might have moved eastward from this region. In June 2012, 134Cs activity reached a maximum of 6.12 ± 0.50 Bq m-3 at a 151-m depth (potential density, 25.3 kg m-3) at 29 deg. N, 165 deg. E. This subsurface maximum, which was also observed along 149°E, might reflect the southward transport of FNPP1-derived radiocaesium in association with the formation and subduction of subtropical mode water (STMW) from the region south

  7. Glacial Isostatic Adjustment Along the Pacific Coast of Central North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, G. A.; Yousefi, M.; Love, R.; Tarasov, L.; Latychev, K.; Austermann, J.

    2016-12-01

    We consider recently compiled late glacial and Holocene relative sea-level (RSL) data (Engelhart et al., Quaternary Science Reviews, 113, 78-92, 2014) to constrain the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) signal and it's uncertainty along the North-America coastline from northern Vancouver Island to central California. A primary motivation for this work is to include the GIA signal into regional RSL projections for this coastline. GIA model parameters were optimized over a large parameter space, consisting of 400 1-D Earth viscosity models and 25 North American ice histories, by comparing the model-derived sea-level changes to the historical RSL data. The results suggest that mantle viscosity is lowest in the northern region: plate boundary from subduction in the north to strike-slip motion in the south. Given the importance of lateral structure in this region, we are currently developing models of 3-D viscous structure that explicitly incorporate the subducted lithosphere as well as low-viscosity material in the so-called "mantle wedge." We aim to demonstrate that the lateral variability in the observed RSL response is consistent with subduction-related structure north of Cape Mendocino, California.

  8. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from time series observations using Bubble type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from MOORING_TAO165E0N in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2010-02-23 to 2013-02-03 (NODC Accession 0113238)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0113238 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and time series data collected from MOORING_TAO165E0N in the North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific...

  9. Cloud condensation nuclei characteristics of Asian dust particles over the western and central North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, M.; Furutani, H.; Kawata, R.; Nakayama, H.

    2015-12-01

    Marine aerosols, such as sea salt particles, and sulfate and organic particles originated from marine biotas, exist in the marine atmosphere. Additionally, continental aerosols, such as dust and anthropogenic substances are transported over the open oceans. Variation of number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) depends on the number-size distribution and chemical compositions of aerosols, and affects the lifetime and the reflectivity of clouds over the open oceans. During the R/V Hakuho Maru KH-12-1 cruise from Callao to Tokyo via Honolulu in the Pacific Ocean (23 January - 7 March 2012), aerosol number-size distribution and CCN number concentration were continuously measured, and the marine aerosols for chemical analysis were collected on shipboard. In the marine atmosphere over the Pacific, averaged aerosol total number concentration (TN) was 280 cm-3. Bimodal number-size distributions were observed frequently with peaks at 40-60 nm (Aitken mode) and 160-230 nm (accumulation mode). CCN concentrations were categorized by assuming three types of particles by chemical compositions (i.e., NaCl; a major component of sea salt particles, (NH4)2SO4; a sulfur oxide originated from the marine biotas, and Oxalic acid; a major component among organic carbon (OC) originated from the marine biotas). Activation Rate (AR), which is defined as the ratio of the number concentrations of CCN against TN, varied mainly because of the number-size distribution. Chemical composition was the factor that determined AR values. However, the AR variations caused by changes of the chemical composition were much smaller than those caused changes of the particle size distribution even when Asian dust were observed over the region on 27-29 February. During the long range transport, rapid coagulation among mineral dust, organics and sea salt particles may accelerate the gravitational setting of marine aerosols and supplies the terrestrial substances to the ocean environment.

  10. Aerosol concentrations and composition in the North Pacific marine boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yongjoo; Rhee, Tae Siek; Collett, Jeffrey L.; Park, Taehyun; Park, Seung-Myung; Seo, Beom-Keun; Park, Gyutae; Park, Keyhong; Lee, Taehyoung

    2017-12-01

    Ship-borne measurements of inorganic and organic aerosols, including methanesulfonic acid (MSA), were conducted over the Northern Pacific using a High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS). This study, conducted aboard the Korean ice breaker R/V Araon, was part of the SHIP-borne Pole-to-Pole Observations (SHIPPO) project. Based on air mass source region, the cruise track could be divided into five sections. Overall, the South Asia and Northern Japan ship transects showed higher aerosol concentrations due to continental pollution and biomass burning sources, respectively. In all five regions, the average mass concentrations of sulfate and organic aerosols (OA) were much higher than concentrations of nitrate and ammonium. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis distinguished two organic aerosol factors as hydrocarbon-like and oxidized OA (HOA and OOA). HOA peaked in South Asia under the influence of anthropogenic pollution source areas, such as China and Korea, and generally decreased with increasing latitude across the full study region. OOA concentrations peaked in Northern Japan near the Tsugaru Strait and appear to reflect fine particle contributions from biomass burning. The mean HOA concentration in the clean marine area (Aleutian Island to Siberia) was 0.06 μg/m3 and comprised approximately 8% of the OA mass fraction. The highest MSA concentrations peaked in the Aleutian Islands at nearly 15 μg/m3, suggesting influence from higher dimethyl sulfide (DMS) emissions resulting from biological nutrient uptake during summer. The MSA/sulfate ratio, an indicator of the relative fine particle contributions of DMS and anthropogenic sources, revealed a sharp gradient as the ship approached the clean marine areas where the dominance of DMS increased. The patterns in OOA, HOA, and MSA concentrations found in this study provide a better understanding of the characteristics of inorganic and organic aerosols in the Northern Pacific Ocean.

  11. Variation in phytoplankton composition between two North Pacific frontal zones along 158°W during winter-spring 2008-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Evan A.; Bograd, Steven J.; Hoover, Aimee L.; Seki, Michael P.; Polovina, Jeffrey J.

    2017-01-01

    Data from three research cruises along the 158°W meridian through the North Pacific Subtropical Frontal Zone (STF) during spring 2008, 2009, and 2011 were used to estimate phytoplankton functional types and size classes. These groups were used to describe phytoplankton composition at the North Pacific Subtropical (STF) and Transition Zone Chlorophyll (TZCF) Fronts, which represent ecologically important large-scale features in the central North Pacific. Phytoplankton class composition was consistent at each front through time, yet significantly different between fronts. The STF contained lower integrated chlorophyll-a concentrations, with surface waters dominated by picophytoplankton and a deep chlorophyll maximum equally comprised of pico- and nanophytoplankton. The TZCF contained significantly higher concentrations of nanophytoplankton through the water column, specifically the prymnesiophyte group. Integrated chlorophyll-a concentrations at the TZCF were 30-90% higher than at the STF, with the dominant increase in the signal from the nanophytoplanktonic prymnesiophyte group. The meridional position of the STF was consistently located near 32°N through these three years, with the more spatially variable TZCF ranging from 2° to 4° further north of the STF. This variability in the frontal position of the TZCF may lead to ecological impacts though the food web. Continued in-situ and remote monitoring, specifically during El Niño and ENSO neutral phases, will provide additional ecological information to help understand mechanistic causes of phytoplankton variability in this important ecological region.

  12. Migratory patterns of pelagic fishes and possible linkages between open ocean and coastal ecosystems off the Pacific coast of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamish, R. J.; McFarlane, G. A.; King, J. R.

    2005-03-01

    We review studies relevant to the migration of pelagic fishes between the coastal and open-ocean ecosystems off the subarctic coast of North America. We review the life history strategies of these migratory fish and to compare to the life history strategies of major coastal migrants. The oceanography in this region is dominated by north and south currents that provide a boundary between the offshore and coastal waters. Commercial fisheries off the west coast of North America are virtually all inshore of this oceanographic separation. Migrations for some species in these major fisheries are also north and south rather than east and west. However, exceptions occur for Pacific salmon, species associated with seamounts, and for transitional pelagic species such as tuna, squid and sharks. Three species of Pacific salmon, sockeye, pink and chum salmon, migrate along the coast in their first marine year and move off shore in the fall and winter in their first marine year. Three other species, coho salmon, chinook salmon, and steelhead trout, also migrate offshore, although they are less abundant and some stocks remain within the coastal regions. Pacific salmon species are a dominant daytime biomass in the surface waters in the offshore areas. It is known that albacore tuna and some sharks migrate between the offshore and coastal areas, but more research is needed to assess the relative importance of these migrations. Although the biomass of species on seamounts is small relative to coastal areas, the similarity in fauna is evidence that there is recruitment from coastal ecosystems.

  13. The metabolic response of thecosome pteropods from the North Atlantic and North Pacific oceans to high CO2 and low O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Amy E.; Lawson, Gareth L.; Aleck Wang, Zhaohui

    2016-11-01

    As anthropogenic activities directly and indirectly increase carbon dioxide (CO2) and decrease oxygen (O2) concentrations in the ocean system, it becomes important to understand how different populations of marine animals will respond. Water that is naturally low in pH, with a high concentration of carbon dioxide (hypercapnia) and a low concentration of oxygen, occurs at shallow depths (200-500 m) in the North Pacific Ocean, whereas similar conditions are absent throughout the upper water column in the North Atlantic. This contrasting hydrography provides a natural experiment to explore whether differences in environment cause populations of cosmopolitan pelagic calcifiers, specifically the aragonitic-shelled pteropods, to have a different physiological response when exposed to hypercapnia and low O2. Using closed-chamber end-point respiration experiments, eight species of pteropods from the two ocean basins were exposed to high CO2 ( ˜ 800 µatm) while six species were also exposed to moderately low O2 (48 % saturated, or ˜ 130 µmol kg-1) and a combined treatment of low O2/high CO2. None of the species tested showed a change in metabolic rate in response to high CO2 alone. Of those species tested for an effect of O2, only Limacina retroversa from the Atlantic showed a response to the combined treatment, resulting in a reduction in metabolic rate. Our results suggest that pteropods have mechanisms for coping with short-term CO2 exposure and that there can be interactive effects between stressors on the physiology of these open ocean organisms that correlate with natural exposure to low O2 and high CO2. These are considerations that should be taken into account in projections of organismal sensitivity to future ocean conditions.

  14. The metabolic response of thecosome pteropods from the North Atlantic and North Pacific oceans to high CO2 and low O2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Maas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available As anthropogenic activities directly and indirectly increase carbon dioxide (CO2 and decrease oxygen (O2 concentrations in the ocean system, it becomes important to understand how different populations of marine animals will respond. Water that is naturally low in pH, with a high concentration of carbon dioxide (hypercapnia and a low concentration of oxygen, occurs at shallow depths (200–500 m in the North Pacific Ocean, whereas similar conditions are absent throughout the upper water column in the North Atlantic. This contrasting hydrography provides a natural experiment to explore whether differences in environment cause populations of cosmopolitan pelagic calcifiers, specifically the aragonitic-shelled pteropods, to have a different physiological response when exposed to hypercapnia and low O2. Using closed-chamber end-point respiration experiments, eight species of pteropods from the two ocean basins were exposed to high CO2 ( ∼  800 µatm while six species were also exposed to moderately low O2 (48 % saturated, or  ∼  130 µmol kg−1 and a combined treatment of low O2/high CO2. None of the species tested showed a change in metabolic rate in response to high CO2 alone. Of those species tested for an effect of O2, only Limacina retroversa from the Atlantic showed a response to the combined treatment, resulting in a reduction in metabolic rate. Our results suggest that pteropods have mechanisms for coping with short-term CO2 exposure and that there can be interactive effects between stressors on the physiology of these open ocean organisms that correlate with natural exposure to low O2 and high CO2. These are considerations that should be taken into account in projections of organismal sensitivity to future ocean conditions.

  15. ENPAC 2003: A Tidal Constituent Database for Eastern North Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    tidal model. The model domain for this project extended from Unimak Island, AK, to Punta Parada, Peru, covering an area of approximately 2.1 X 107 km and...redefining the domain. The new domain began at the same location, Unimak Island, AK, but extended only to Acapulco, Mexico, stopping short of...domain are shown in Figure 3. This domain extends from Unimak Island, AK, to Chamela, Mexico, approximately 650 km north of Acapulco, Mexico, along the

  16. Tracking fluctuations in the intensity of the eastern tropical north Pacific oxygen minimum zone using a multi-proxy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tems, C.

    2015-12-01

    Naturally occurring oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) are permanent midwater features that are associated with highly productive regions of the ocean, key microbial mediated biogeochemical cycling, and the deposition of organic rich sediments. The intensity of OMZs varies on glacial to interglacial time scales, indicating a relationship between the climate system and the expanse of OMZs, however, high-resolution studies tracking the fluctuations of OMZs on a near annual basis are lacking. In the Gulf of California (Pescadero Slope), the eastern tropical north Pacific OMZ impinges on basin slopes depositing laminated, hemipelagic sediments that record useful proxies of OMZ fluctuations. In an OMZ, low O2 content promotes water column denitrification, imparting an elevated 15N/14N isotopic signature on the residual nitrate in the water column. The elevated 15NO3- is upwelled and incorporated into particulate organic mater (POM) during primary production. The exported POM δ15Nsed then reflects the intensity of the regional OMZ at the time it was deposited. The Pescadero Slope record shows distinct temporal fluctuations in the δ15Nsed with decadal to multi-decadal and centennial cyclicity over the past 1200 years. The record reveals that the OMZ contracts during warmer climatic periods, including the Medieval Climate Optimum and the Industrial Revolution, and expands during cooler climates, specifically the Little Ice Age. The local mechanisms that are influencing fluctuations in the OMZ are investigated through an analysis of productivity proxies, including weight percent organic carbon and weight percent biogenic silica, and indicate OMZ expansion during periods of high productivity. Local productivity is driven by the intensity in the easterly trade winds in the Pacific, and thus the relationship between regional trade wind intensity and fluctuations in the intensity of the OMZ over the past 160 years will be discussed.

  17. Extended-range forecast for the temporal distribution of clustering tropical cyclogenesis over the western North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhiwei; Li, Tim; Bai, Long; Gao, Jianyun

    2017-11-01

    Based on outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), an index for clustering tropical cyclogenesis (CTC) over the western North Pacific (WNP) was defined. Around 76 % of total CTC events were generated during the active phase of the CTC index, and 38 % of the total active phase was concurrent with CTC events. For its continuous property, the CTC index was used as the representative predictand for extended-range forecasting the temporal distribution of CTC events. The predictability sources for CTC events were detected via correlation analyses of the previous 35-5-day lead atmospheric fields against the CTC index. The results showed that the geopotential height at different levels and the 200 hPa zonal wind over the global tropics possessed large predictability sources, whereas the predictability sources of other variables, e.g., OLR, zonal wind, and relatively vorticity at 850 hPa and relatively humility at 700 hPa, were mainly confined to the tropical Indian Ocean and western Pacific Ocean. Several spatial-temporal projection model (STPM) sets were constructed to carry out the extended-range forecast for the CTC index. By combining the output of STPMs separately conducted for the two dominant modes of intraseasonal variability, e.g., the 10-30 and the 30-80 day mode, useful forecast skill could be achieved for a 30-day lead time. The combined output successfully captured both the 10-30 and 30-80 day mode at least 10 days in advance. With a relatively low rate of false alarm, the STPM achieved hits for 80 % (69 %) of 54 CTC events during 2003-2014 at the 10-day (20-day) lead time, suggesting a practical value of the STPM for real-time forecasting WNP CTC events at an extended range.

  18. 3-D modelling and analysis of Dst C-responses in the North Pacific Ocean region, revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuvshinov, Alexei; Utada, Hisashi; Avdeev, Dmitry; Koyama, Takao

    2005-02-01

    During the last decade a number of one-dimensional (1-D) conductivity profiles have been constructed for the upper and mid-mantle of the North Pacific Ocean region. These profiles differ significantly, and from our point of view it is still unclear which profile is the best candidate for the upper and mid-mantle conductivity reference model for this region. Keeping the differences in mind, and inspired by recent findings that the ocean effect is a major contributor to the anomalous behaviour of C-responses up to the period of 20 days (especially at coastal observatories), the goal of this paper has been three-fold: (1) to understand, on the basis of systematic model studies using 3-D ocean models, which of the published 1-D upper and mid-mantle profiles is in best agreement with the available observations. (2) To try to reduce the misfit between the observed and modelled responses by using dense grids in modelling, by considering 3-D models which include not only an inhomogeneous surface layer but also inhomogeneous deeper structures. (3) To derive an alternative 1-D upper and mid-mantle section for the North Pacific Ocean by carefully selecting the data for interpretation and by using 3-D models that are as realistic and detailed as possible. In order to perform the simulations using realistic 3-D models on a routine basis a novel 3-D `spherical' forward solution has been elaborated in this paper. The solution combines the modified iterative-dissipative method with a conjugate gradient iteration and allows one to compute efficiently the electromagnetic fields in full 3-D spherical models with very high lateral contrasts of conductivity and for very dense grids. During the 3-D simulations a systematic shift of observed C-responses at Honolulu compared with those at other observatories was detected. The reason for this shift is still unclear. Even if a very detailed grid of 0.3°× 0.3° is used, the 3-D simulations using a model of the inhomogeneous surface has no

  19. Role of scale interactions in the abrupt change of tropical cyclone in autumn over the Western North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Pang-Chi; Lee, Ting-Hui; Tsou, Chih-Hua; Chu, Pao-Shin; Qian, Yitian; Bi, Mingyu

    2017-01-01

    Tropical cyclone (TC) activity in autumn (September-November) over the western North Pacific experienced an abrupt change in 1998, which can be detected by the Bayesian change-point analysis. During the decade before the regime shift (1988-1997), the occurrence frequency of TC genesis increased significantly over the tropical western Pacific, where the seasonal cyclonic flow, intraseasonal oscillation (ISO) and synoptic-scale eddy (SSE) were all strengthened, compared to those observed in the decade after 1998 (1998-2007). The TC trajectories also exhibited spatial differences. During the active decade, the TCs had a higher probability to move westward into the Philippine Sea and the South China Sea, and recurved northeastward toward the east of Japan. Meanwhile, the northwestward propagating TCs approaching Taiwan and southeastern coast of China were reduced. To understand the role of mean flow-ISO-SSE interaction in the decadal changes of SSE and associated TC activity, we diagnosed a newly proposed SSE kinetic energy (KE) equation that separates the contributions of seasonal-mean circulation and ISO to the SSE. The results show that, during the active TC decade, the SSE obtained higher KE from both mean flow and ISO through eddy barotropic energy conversion when the enhanced SSE momentum flux interacted with the strengthened monsoon trough and vigorous ISO cyclonic anomaly over the western tropical Pacific. The increased SSE KE contributed positively to the increased TC genesis over the main genesis region (7.5°-20°N, 130°-170°E). It also benefited the growth of TCs over the Philippine Sea and the South China Sea during the active decade. The decadal change in TC frequency over the extratropics was related to the eddy baroclinic energy conversion instead of the barotropic conversion associated with scale interaction. During the active TC decade, SSE gained more (less) KE from the SSE available potential energy over the east of Japan (the East China Sea

  20. Role of scale interactions in the abrupt change of tropical cyclone in autumn over the Western North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Pang-Chi; Lee, Ting-Hui; Tsou, Chih-Hua; Chu, Pao-Shin; Qian, Yitian; Bi, Mingyu

    2017-11-01

    Tropical cyclone (TC) activity in autumn (September-November) over the western North Pacific experienced an abrupt change in 1998, which can be detected by the Bayesian change-point analysis. During the decade before the regime shift (1988-1997), the occurrence frequency of TC genesis increased significantly over the tropical western Pacific, where the seasonal cyclonic flow, intraseasonal oscillation (ISO) and synoptic-scale eddy (SSE) were all strengthened, compared to those observed in the decade after 1998 (1998-2007). The TC trajectories also exhibited spatial differences. During the active decade, the TCs had a higher probability to move westward into the Philippine Sea and the South China Sea, and recurved northeastward toward the east of Japan. Meanwhile, the northwestward propagating TCs approaching Taiwan and southeastern coast of China were reduced. To understand the role of mean flow-ISO-SSE interaction in the decadal changes of SSE and associated TC activity, we diagnosed a newly proposed SSE kinetic energy (KE) equation that separates the contributions of seasonal-mean circulation and ISO to the SSE. The results show that, during the active TC decade, the SSE obtained higher KE from both mean flow and ISO through eddy barotropic energy conversion when the enhanced SSE momentum flux interacted with the strengthened monsoon trough and vigorous ISO cyclonic anomaly over the western tropical Pacific. The increased SSE KE contributed positively to the increased TC genesis over the main genesis region (7.5°-20°N, 130°-170°E). It also benefited the growth of TCs over the Philippine Sea and the South China Sea during the active decade. The decadal change in TC frequency over the extratropics was related to the eddy baroclinic energy conversion instead of the barotropic conversion associated with scale interaction. During the active TC decade, SSE gained more (less) KE from the SSE available potential energy over the east of Japan (the East China Sea

  1. Long term behavior of TEPCO FNPP1 derived radiocaesium in the North Pacific Ocean through the end of 2016: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Michio; Hamajima, Yasunori; Inomata, Yayoi; Kumamoto, Yuichiro; Oka, Eitarou; Tsubono, Takaki; Tsumune, Daisuke

    2017-04-01

    1, Two major source terms of radiocaesium to the Ocean There are two major sources of radionuclides to the environment derived by the TEPCO Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP1) accident in 2011. The largest and earliest source of artificial radionuclide was atmospheric release from three melt down cores of FNPP1, which led to atmospheric deposition on both land and in the ocean. Total amount of atmospheric release of 137Cs was estimated to be 15.2-20.4 PBq ( and same amount of 134Cs) (Aoyama et al., 2016). About 20 % of released radiocaesium fell on land and 80% of released radiocaesium fell on the ocean. Therefore 11.7-14.8 PBq of 137Cs was injected in the North Pacific as atmospheric deposition. Second largest source was the direct discharge of contaminated waters to the ocean since 26 March 2011 and peaked on 6 April 2011 (Tsumune et al., 2012). Total amount of directly released 137Cs was estimated to be 3.5 +- 0.7 PBq. A combined input to the North Pacific was therefore 15.2 - 18.3 PBq. 2, Three major pathways of FNPP1 derived radiocaesium in the North Pacific The fastest pathway of radiocaesium might be surface. FNPP1-derived radiocaesium injected at north of Kuroshio front by atmospheric deposition and direct discharge spread eastward in surface water by the North Pacific Current across the mid-latitude North Pacific (Aoyama et al., 2016). A model simulation by Tsubono et al.(2016) also shows good agreement with the observed radiocaesium activities in the North Pacific. The second pathway is formation of central mode water (CMW). A maximum of radiocaesium activity in June/July 2012 was observed at potential densities of 26.1-26.3 at 34 deg. N-39 deg. N along 165 deg. E, which correspond to 400 meters depth. The density is in a range of density of CMW and radiocaesium activity was higher than those in the surrounding waters, including STMW. In June-July 2015 and June 2016 at 36 deg. N-44 deg.N, 165 deg. E - 170 deg. E, we observe very week signal of

  2. Dynamics of decadal variability in the Atlantic subpolar gyre: a stochastically forced oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Born, Andreas [University of Bern, Climate and Environmental Physics, Physics Institute, Bern (Switzerland); Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, Bern (Switzerland); Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Geophysical Institute, Bergen (Norway); Mignot, Juliette [IPSL/UPMC/CNRS/IRD/MNHN, Laboratoire d' Oceanographie et du Climat, Experimentation et Approches Numeriques, Paris (France)

    2012-07-15

    Internal variability of the Atlantic subpolar gyre is investigated in a 600 years control simulation of a comprehensive coupled climate model. The subpolar gyre shows irregular oscillations of decadal time scale with most spectral power between 15 and 20 years. Positive and negative feedback mechanisms act successively on the circulation leading to an internal oscillation. This involves periodically enhanced deep convection in the subpolar gyre center and intermittently enhanced air-sea thermal coupling. As a result, anomalies of the large-scale atmospheric circulation can be transferred to the ocean on the ocean's intrinsic time scale, exciting the oscillator stochastically. A detailed understanding of oscillatory mechanisms of the ocean and their sensitivity to atmospheric forcing holds considerable potential for decadal predictions as well as for the interpretation of proxy data records. (orig.)

  3. Downcore Contrasts in the Provenance of Cenozoic Pelagic and Hemipelagic Sediment, Central North Pacific: Deep Ocean vs. Near-Continental Margin Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, J. D.; Rea, D. K.; Hall, C. M.; Moore, T. C.; Owen, R. M.; Blum, J. D.; Hovan, S. A.

    2003-12-01

    We are currently investigating the source characteristics and downcore variation of detrital components extracted from pelagic and hemipelagic clays covering a large area of the central Pacific Ocean basin. Eolian dust is the primary component of red clays forming in the Pacific pelagic clay province today. We have begun assembling a database from 14 new piston cores that span some 30 degrees of latitude in the central North Pacific. These cores contain a record of Neogene pelagic sedimentation that will allow us to track changes in the source and flux of eolian dust over time. Stratigraphic ages and continental source areas can be precisely determined for the extracted dust component using radiogenic isotopes. We have developed a reliable method for dating red clay cores by matching the strontium isotopic composition of cleaned fish teeth with the Cenozoic seawater strontium isotope curve. Age-resolution down to the ñ0.5 m.y. level can be obtained this way for intervals younger than 40 Ma. Radiogenic isotopic signatures of the associated eolian dust extract can then be used to identify distinct continental source areas for this component. Nd-Sr-Pb-Ar isotopic analysis the sub 5-micron dust fraction in these cores demonstrates the increasing dominance of Chinese loess as the primary source of Pacific dust deposited north of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) during the Neogene. This Asian component, becoming dominant in the late Pliocene, is characterized by an average 40Ar/39Ar retention age of ~220 Ma. The longest, most continuous record of eolian dust accumulation comes from Giant Piston Core LL44-GPC3, recovered near 30 degrees North in the central Pacific. The 70 m.y. record from LL44-GPC3 reveals systematic downcore changes in the provenance of the dust component which, when corrected for plate motion, are suggestive of significant latitudinal excursions of the paleo ITCZ. Work is proceeding to improve the age-resolution for these apparent excursions

  4. Mitochondrial and nuclear genetic variation across calving lagoons in Eastern North Pacific gray whales (Eschrichtius robustus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, S Elizabeth; Ramirez, Sergio Flores; Nigenda, Sergio; Ramirez, Jorge Urbán; Bracho, Lorenzo Rojas; Palumbi, Stephen R

    2009-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of population structure in cetaceans is critical for preserving and managing breeding habitat, particularly when habitat is not uniformly protected. Most eastern gray whales return to their major breeding range each winter along the Pacific coast of Baja California, Mexico, concentrating in 3 major calving lagoons, but it is unknown whether genetic differences exist between lagoons. Previous photo-identification studies and genetic studies suggest that gray whales may return to their natal lagoons to breed, potentially resulting in the buildup of genetic differences. However, an earlier genetic study used only one genetic marker and did not include samples from Bahia Magdalena, a major calving lagoon not currently designated as a wildlife refuge. To expand on this previous study, we collected genetic data from the mitochondrial control region (442 bp) and 9 microsatellite markers from 112 individuals across all 3 major calving lagoons. Our data suggest that migration rates between calving lagoons are high but that a small but significant departure from panmixia exists between Bahia Magdalena and Laguna San Ignacio (Fisher's Exact test, P 10% per generation). In addition, microsatellite data showed evidence of a severe population bottleneck. Eastern gray whales are still recovering from the impacts of whaling on their breeding grounds, and these populations should be protected and monitored for future genetic changes.

  5. The first dinosaur from Washington State and a review of Pacific coast dinosaurs from North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peecook, Brandon R; Sidor, Christian A

    2015-01-01

    We describe the first diagnostic dinosaur fossil from Washington State. The specimen, which consists of a proximal left femur, was recovered from the shallow marine rocks of the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Cedar District Formation (Nanaimo Group) and is interpreted as pertaining to a large theropod on the basis of its hollow medullary cavity and proximally placed fourth trochanter. The Washington theropod represents one of the northernmost occurrences of a Mesozoic dinosaur on the west coast of the United States and one of only a handful from the Pacific coast of Laramidia during the Cretaceous. Its isolated nature and preservation in marine rocks suggest that the element was washed in from a nearby fluvial system. If the femur pertains to a tyrannosauroid, which seems likely given its size and the widespread occurrence of the group across Laramidia during Late Cretaceous times, then it would represent an earlier occurrence of large body size than previously recognized (complete femur length estimated at 1.2 meters). Uncertainty surrounding the latitude of deposition of the Nanaimo Group (i.e., the Baja-British Columbia hypothesis) precludes assigning the Washington theropod to either of the putative northern or southern biogeographic provinces of Laramidia.

  6. Impact of the Fukushima accident on tritium, radiocarbon and radiocesium levels in seawater of the western North Pacific Ocean: A comparison with pre-Fukushima situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinec, P P; Liong Wee Kwong, L; Kaizer, J; Molnár, M; Nies, H; Palcsu, L; Papp, L; Pham, M K; Jean-Baptiste, P

    2017-01-01

    Tritium, radiocarbon and radiocesium concentrations in water column samples in coastal waters offshore Fukushima and in the western North Pacific Ocean collected in 2011-2012 during the Ka'imikai-o-Kanaloa (KoK) cruise are compared with other published results. The highest levels in surface seawater were observed for 134Cs and 137Cs in seawater samples collected offshore Fukushima (up to 1.1 Bq L-1), which represent an increase by about three orders of magnitude when compared with the pre-Fukushima concentration. Tritium levels were much lower (up to 0.15 Bq L-1), representing an increase by about a factor of 6. The impact on the radiocarbon distribution was measurable, but the observed levels were only by about 9% above the global fallout background. The 137Cs (and similarly 134Cs) inventory in the water column of the investigated western North Pacific region was (2.7 ± 0.4) PBq, while for 3H it was only (0.3 ± 0.2) PBq. Direct releases of highly contaminated water from the damaged Fukushima NPP, as well as dry and wet depositions of these radionuclides over the western North Pacific considerably changed their distribution patterns in seawater. Presently we can distinguish Fukushima labeled waters from global fallout background thanks to short-lived 134Cs. However, in the long-term perspective when 134Cs will decay, new distribution patterns of 3H, 14C and 137Cs in the Pacific Ocean should be established for future oceanographic and climate change studies in the Pacific Ocean. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Reassessing regime shifts in the North Pacific: incremental climate change and commercial fishing are necessary for explaining decadal-scale biological variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litzow, Michael A; Mueter, Franz J; Hobday, Alistair J

    2014-01-01

    In areas of the North Pacific that are largely free of overfishing, climate regime shifts - abrupt changes in modes of low-frequency climate variability - are seen as the dominant drivers of decadal-scale ecological variability. We assessed the ability of leading modes of climate variability [Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO), Arctic Oscillation (AO), Pacific-North American Pattern (PNA), North Pacific Index (NPI), El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO)] to explain decadal-scale (1965-2008) patterns of climatic and biological variability across two North Pacific ecosystems (Gulf of Alaska and Bering Sea). Our response variables were the first principle component (PC1) of four regional climate parameters [sea surface temperature (SST), sea level pressure (SLP), freshwater input, ice cover], and PCs 1-2 of 36 biological time series [production or abundance for populations of salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), groundfish, herring (Clupea pallasii), shrimp, and jellyfish]. We found that the climate modes alone could not explain ecological variability in the study region. Both linear models (for climate PC1) and generalized additive models (for biology PC1-2) invoking only the climate modes produced residuals with significant temporal trends, indicating that the models failed to capture coherent patterns of ecological variability. However, when the residual climate trend and a time series of commercial fishery catches were used as additional candidate variables, resulting models of biology PC1-2 satisfied assumptions of independent residuals and out-performed models constructed from the climate modes alone in terms of predictive power. As measured by effect size and Akaike weights, the residual climate trend was the most important variable for explaining biology PC1 variability, and commercial catch the most important variable for biology PC2. Patterns of climate sensitivity and exploitation history for taxa strongly associated with biology

  8. Holocene Climate Variability in the Central North Pacific: An Organic Geochemical Record from Ka'au Crater Swamp, O'ahu, Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, J. H.; Beilman, D.; Timmermann, A.; Gaidos, E.; Paytan, A.

    2010-12-01

    North Pacific climate is known to have varied during the Holocene, with significant “downstream” effects on the regional climate and hydrology of western North America. Evidence from paleoclimatic studies along the northeast Pacific margin hints at several broad-scale regime shifts since the early Holocene, with spatial expressions analogous to those observed during phase shifts of the modern ENSO and PDO, though occurring on much longer (centennial to millennial) timescales. Nonetheless, the timing, magnitude and spatial patterns of Holocene rearrangements in oceanic and atmospheric circulation in the North Pacific remain incompletely defined. The main Hawaiian Islands (19 - 22 °N, 155 - 160 °W) are uniquely situated to “sample” climate variability in the subtropical, central North Pacific. Precipitation in Hawai’i is strongly influenced by the seasonal migration of the Pacific Anticyclone and the associated trade winds, and, during the winter, the frequency and intensity of westerly moisture-bearing storms. On interannual to decadal timescales, basin-wide circulation changes related to ENSO and PDO modulate trade wind strength and the occurrence of winter storm patterns, leading to local variations in precipitation. Terrestrial paleoclimatic records from Hawai’i are rare, but of great potential value to reconstruct aspects of central North Pacific atmospheric circulation during the Holocene, including the influence of the tropical ENSO system. In this study we present initial results from a 4.5 m, ~14 kyr sedimentary sequence recovered from Ka’au Crater Swamp, located near the leeward crest of the Ko’olau range of southeastern O’ahu, in a zone of high precipitation (>330 cm/yr). We utilize carbon and nitrogen elemental abundances (TOC, TN, C/N) and isotopic compositions (δ13C, δ15N) of bulk organic matter and ratios of biomarker compounds to reconstruct changes in vegetation, organic matter sources, and biogeochemical cycling in relation to

  9. The dependence on atmospheric resolution of ENSO and related East Asian-western North Pacific summer climate variability in a coupled model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Zhao, Guijie; Huang, Gang; Wang, Pengfei; Yan, Bangliang

    2017-08-01

    The authors present results for El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and East Asian-western North Pacific climate variability simulated in a new version high-resolution coupled model (ICM.V2) developed at the Center for Monsoon System Research of the Institute of Atmospheric Physics (CMSR, IAP), Chinese Academy of Sciences. The analyses are based on the last 100-year output of a 1000-year simulation. Results are compared to an earlier version of the same coupled model (ICM.V1), reanalysis, and observations. The two versions of ICM have similar physics but different atmospheric resolution. The simulated climatological mean states show marked improvement over many regions, especially the tropics in ICM.V2 compared to those in ICM.V1. The common bias in the cold tongue has reduced, and the warm biases along the ocean boundaries have improved as well. With improved simulation of ENSO, including its period and strength, the ENSO-related western North Pacific summer climate variability becomes more realistic compared to the observations. The simulated East Asian summer monsoon anomalies in the El Niño decaying summer are substantially more realistic in ICM.V2, which might be related to a better simulation of the Indo-Pacific Ocean capacitor (IPOC) effect and Pacific decadal oscillation (PDO).

  10. Impacts of Interannual Ocean Circulation Variability on Japanese Eel Larval Migration in the Western North Pacific Ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Lin Chang

    Full Text Available The Japanese eel larvae hatch near the West Mariana Ridge seamount chain and travel through the North Equatorial Current (NEC, the Kuroshio, and the Subtropical Countercurrent (STCC region during their shoreward migration toward East Asia. The interannual variability of circulation over the subtropical and tropical regions of the western North Pacific Ocean is affected by the Philippines-Taiwan Oscillation (PTO. This study examines the effect of the PTO on the Japanese eel larval migration routes using a three-dimensional (3D particle tracking method, including vertical and horizontal swimming behavior. The 3D circulation and hydrography used for particle tracking are from the ocean circulation reanalysis produced by the Japan Coastal Ocean Predictability Experiment 2 (JCOPE2. Our results demonstrate that bifurcation of the NEC and the strength and spatial variation of the Kuroshio affect the distribution and migration of eel larvae. During the positive phase of PTO, more virtual eels ("v-eels" can enter the Kuroshio to reach the south coast of Japan and more v-eels reach the South China Sea through the Luzon Strait; the stronger and more offshore swing of the Kuroshio in the East China Sea leads to fewer eels entering the East China Sea and the onshore movement of the Kuroshio to the south of Japan brings the eels closer to the Japanese coast. Significant differences in eel migration routes and distributions regulated by ocean circulation in different PTO phases can also affect the otolith increment. The estimated otolith increment suggests that eel age tends to be underestimated after six months of simulation due to the cooler lower layer temperature. Underestimation is more significant in the positive PTO years due to the wide distribution in higher latitudes than in the negative PTO years.

  11. Physical and underway data collected aboard the ROBERT GORDON SPROUL during cruise SP1304 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2013-07-19 to 2013-07-20 (NCEI Accession 0135460)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0135460 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the ROBERT GORDON SPROUL during cruise SP1304 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2013-07-19...

  12. Physical, profile and underway data collected aboard the MELVILLE during cruise MV1210 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2012-07-28 to 2012-08-26 (NCEI Accession 0129827)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0129827 includes physical, profile and underway data collected aboard the MELVILLE during cruise MV1210 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2012-07-28 to...

  13. Physical and underway data collected aboard the WECOMA during cruise W1010C in the Coastal Waters of SE Alaska and North Pacific Ocean from 2010-10-22 to 2010-11-01 (NODC Accession 0104380)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0104380 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the WECOMA during cruise W1010C in the Coastal Waters of SE Alaska and North Pacific...

  14. Physical and underway data collected aboard the MELVILLE during cruise MV0910 in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine Sea from 2009-10-31 to 2009-11-04 (NODC Accession 0089651)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0089651 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the MELVILLE during cruise MV0910 in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine Sea from...

  15. Physical and underway data collected aboard the ROBERT GORDON SPROUL during cruise SP1310 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2013-10-19 to 2013-10-20 (NCEI Accession 0138188)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0138188 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the ROBERT GORDON SPROUL during cruise SP1310 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2013-10-19...

  16. Physical and underway data collected aboard the NEW HORIZON during cruise NH1421 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2014-10-31 to 2014-11-03 (NCEI Accession 0132117)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0132117 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the NEW HORIZON during cruise NH1421 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2014-10-31 to...

  17. Physical and underway data collected aboard the ROBERT GORDON SPROUL during cruise SP1526 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2015-11-07 to 2015-11-08 (NCEI Accession 0150569)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0150569 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the ROBERT GORDON SPROUL during cruise SP1526 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2015-11-07...

  18. Physical and underway data collected aboard the ROBERT GORDON SPROUL during cruise SP1314 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2013-11-16 to 2013-11-17 (NCEI Accession 0137263)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0137263 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the ROBERT GORDON SPROUL during cruise SP1314 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2013-11-16...

  19. Physical and underway data collected aboard the ROBERT GORDON SPROUL during cruise SP1528 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2015-11-13 to 2015-11-15 (NCEI Accession 0150571)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0150571 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the ROBERT GORDON SPROUL during cruise SP1528 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2015-11-13...

  20. Physical and profile data collected aboard the NEW HORIZON during cruise NH1315 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2013-06-13 to 2013-06-28 (NCEI Accession 0132110)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0132110 includes physical and profile data collected aboard the NEW HORIZON during cruise NH1315 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2013-06-13 to...

  1. Physical, profile and underway data collected aboard the NEW HORIZON during cruise NH1410 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2014-05-10 to 2014-06-08 (NCEI Accession 0152500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0152500 includes physical, profile and underway data collected aboard the NEW HORIZON during cruise NH1410 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2014-05-10...

  2. Physical and profile data collected aboard the NEW HORIZON during cruise NH1407 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2014-04-20 to 2014-04-21 (NCEI Accession 0138167)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0138167 includes physical and profile data collected aboard the NEW HORIZON during cruise NH1407 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2014-04-20 to...

  3. Physical and underway data collected aboard the OCEANUS during cruise OC1503B in the North Pacific Ocean from 2015-03-10 to 2015-03-14 (NCEI Accession 0150565)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0150565 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the OCEANUS during cruise OC1503B in the North Pacific Ocean from 2015-03-10 to...

  4. Physical and underway data collected aboard the Marcus G. Langseth during cruise MGL1204 in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine Sea from 2012-02-01 to 2012-02-29 (NODC Accession 0104311)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0104311 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the Marcus G. Langseth during cruise MGL1204 in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine...

  5. WATER TEMPERATURE and other data from OLIVE BANK, POLYNESIA and other platforms in the North Pacific Ocean from 1996-03-28 to 1997-06-18 (NODC Accession 9700171)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperatures profiles were collected from XBT casts in North Pacific Ocean from the Sea-Land Navigator and other platforms from 28 March 1996 to 18 June 1997. Data...

  6. North and South Pacific Ocean Temperature Profile Data for the High Resolution XBT Network for PX37, PX10, and PX44 were collected by the Scripps Institute of Oceanography from March 2001 to June 2009 (NODC Accession 0056790)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical data were collected from XBT casts from the North and South Pacific Oceans. Data were collected from March 2001 to June 2009. Data were collected and...

  7. Physical and underway data collected aboard the Marcus G. Langseth during cruise MGL1205 in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine Sea from 2012-03-03 to 2012-03-21 (NODC Accession 0104312)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0104312 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the Marcus G. Langseth during cruise MGL1205 in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine...

  8. Physical and underway data collected aboard the ROBERT GORDON SPROUL during cruise SP1219 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2012-10-11 to 2012-10-12 (NCEI Accession 0138185)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0138185 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the ROBERT GORDON SPROUL during cruise SP1219 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2012-10-11...

  9. Physical and underway data collected aboard the Marcus G. Langseth during cruise MGL1109 in the Gulf of Alaska and North Pacific Ocean from 2011-06-06 to 2011-06-26 (NODC Accession 0104306)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0104306 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the Marcus G. Langseth during cruise MGL1109 in the Gulf of Alaska and North Pacific...

  10. Biological, chemical and other data collected aboard the THOMAS G. THOMPSON during cruise TN259 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2010-11-23 to 2010-12-22 (NODC Accession 0117399)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0117399 includes biological, chemical, optical and physical data collected aboard the THOMAS G. THOMPSON during cruise TN259 in the North Pacific...

  11. Biological, chemical and other data collected aboard the THOMAS G. THOMPSON during cruise TN278 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2012-03-17 to 2012-04-23 (NODC Accession 0117419)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0117419 includes biological, chemical, optical and physical data collected aboard the THOMAS G. THOMPSON during cruise TN278 in the North Pacific...

  12. Physical and underway data collected aboard the ROBERT GORDON SPROUL during cruise SP1503 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2015-04-06 to 2015-04-07 (NCEI Accession 0145844)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0145844 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the ROBERT GORDON SPROUL during cruise SP1503 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2015-04-06...

  13. Current and other data from meters attached to fixed platforms in the North Pacific as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 20 April 1976 to 24 July 1976 (NODC Accession 7800688)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current and other data were collected from meters attached to fixed platforms in the North Pacific by the University of Alaska - Fairbanks; Institute of Marine...

  14. Physical and underway data collected aboard the ATLANTIS during cruise AT15-38 in the Gulf of California and North Pacific Ocean from 2008-10-10 to 2008-11-05 (NODC Accession 0113854)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0113854 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the ATLANTIS during cruise AT15-38 in the Gulf of California and North Pacific Ocean from...

  15. Physical and underway data collected aboard the ATLANTIS during cruise AT15-67 in the Coastal Waters of SE Alaska and North Pacific Ocean from 2010-07-06 to 2010-07-27 (NODC Accession 0103934)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0103934 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the ATLANTIS during cruise AT15-67 in the Coastal Waters of SE Alaska and North Pacific...

  16. Depth, temperature, salinity, and sound velocity profiles taken from R/V ROGER REVELLE in the North Pacific from 2004-06-03 to 2004-06-17 (NCEI Accession 0001933)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is a collection of 15 CTD casts taken in the North Pacific in early June, 2004. The purpose of the cruise was the deployment of acoustic sources and...

  17. Physical and underway data collected aboard the ROBERT GORDON SPROUL during cruise SP1210 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2012-07-11 to 2012-07-12 (NCEI Accession 0138182)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0138182 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the ROBERT GORDON SPROUL during cruise SP1210 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2012-07-11...

  18. Physical and underway data collected aboard the Marcus G. Langseth during cruise MGL1206 in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine Sea from 2012-03-23 to 2012-04-16 (NODC Accession 0104313)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0104313 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the Marcus G. Langseth during cruise MGL1206 in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine...

  19. Historical bottle data collected from the Sea of Okhotsk, Bering Sea, Japan Sea, and North Pacific Ocean by multiple Russian, Former Soviet Union, and Japan platforms in 1888 - 1936 years (NODC Accession 0101422)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Historical bottle data collected from the Sea of Okhotsk,Bering Sea, Japan Sea, and North Pacific Ocean in 1888 - 1936 years by multiple Russian, Former Soviet...

  20. Physical, profile and underway data collected aboard the NEW HORIZON during cruise NH1411 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2014-06-17 to 2014-06-18 (NCEI Accession 0153193)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0153193 includes physical, profile and underway data collected aboard the NEW HORIZON during cruise NH1411 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2014-06-17...

  1. Temperature and salinity profiles from CTD casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms from the North Pacific Ocean and other locations from 1968-04-01 to 1993-06-26 (NODC Accession 9400182)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CTD data were collected from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms from the North Pacific Ocean and other locations. Data were collected from 01 April 1968 to 26...

  2. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the SHOYO in the North Pacific Ocean from 1993-10-14 to 1993-11-27 (NODC Accession 0115607)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115607 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from SHOYO in the North Pacific Ocean from 1993-10-14 to 1993-11-27...

  3. Physical and underway data collected aboard the ATLANTIS during cruise AT15-44 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2009-02-18 to 2009-03-09 (NODC Accession 0103874)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0103874 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the ATLANTIS during cruise AT15-44 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2009-02-18 to...

  4. Physical and underway data collected aboard the Marcus G. Langseth during cruise MGL1115 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2011-11-26 to 2011-12-29 (NODC Accession 0104309)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0104309 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the Marcus G. Langseth during cruise MGL1115 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2011-11-26...

  5. Physical and underway data collected aboard the ATLANTIS during cruise AT15-59 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2010-01-04 to 2010-01-13 (NODC Accession 0103915)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0103915 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the ATLANTIS during cruise AT15-59 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2010-01-04 to...

  6. Moored current meter data collected from the Bering Sea, Gulf of Alaska, and North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fisheries Oceanography Cooperative Investigations (FOCI) project, from 16 February 1994 to 25 May 2002 (NODC Accession 0001014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Moored current meter data were collected from the Bering Sea, Gulf of Alaska, and North Pacific Ocean from February 16, 1994 to May 25, 2002. Data were collected by...

  7. Physical and underway data collected aboard the ROBERT GORDON SPROUL during cruise SP1525 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2015-10-21 to 2015-10-23 (NCEI Accession 0150568)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0150568 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the ROBERT GORDON SPROUL during cruise SP1525 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2015-10-21...

  8. Physical and underway data collected aboard the KILO MOANA during cruise KM0903 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2009-01-30 to 2009-02-04 (NODC Accession 0089507)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0089507 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the KILO MOANA during cruise KM0903 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2009-01-30 to...

  9. Physical and underway data collected aboard the ROBERT GORDON SPROUL during cruise SP1531 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2015-12-08 to 2015-12-10 (NCEI Accession 0150574)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0150574 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the ROBERT GORDON SPROUL during cruise SP1531 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2015-12-08...

  10. Physical and underway data collected aboard the KILO MOANA during cruise KM0906 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2009-02-12 to 2009-02-16 (NODC Accession 0089590)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0089590 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the KILO MOANA during cruise KM0906 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2009-02-12 to...

  11. Physical and underway data collected aboard the MELVILLE during cruise MV1006 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2010-04-13 to 2010-05-11 (NODC Accession 0089614)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0089614 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the MELVILLE during cruise MV1006 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2010-04-13 to...

  12. Physical and underway data collected aboard the KILO MOANA during cruise KM0918 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2009-07-23 to 2009-07-27 (NODC Accession 0089598)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0089598 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the KILO MOANA during cruise KM0918 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2009-07-23 to...

  13. Physical and underway data collected aboard the ATLANTIS during cruise AT15-28 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2007-12-26 to 2008-01-19 (NODC Accession 0113823)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0113823 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the ATLANTIS during cruise AT15-28 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2007-12-26 to...

  14. Physical and underway data collected aboard the Sikuliaq during cruise SKQ201402S in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine Sea from 2014-12-16 to 2015-01-15 (NCEI Accession 0146214)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0146214 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the Sikuliaq during cruise SKQ201402S in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine Sea from...

  15. Physical and profile data collected aboard the NEW HORIZON during cruise NH1312 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2013-05-26 to 2013-05-30 (NCEI Accession 0132107)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0132107 includes physical and profile data collected aboard the NEW HORIZON during cruise NH1312 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2013-05-26 to...

  16. Temperature profile and other data collected using CTD casts in the North/South Pacific Ocean from NOAA Ship MALCOLM BALDRIGE and other platform from 1990-02-23 to 1990-12-06 (NODC Accession 9200013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using CTD casts from NOAA Ship MALCOLM BALDRIGE and NOAA Ship DISCOVERER in the North/South Pacific Ocean from 23...

  17. Current meter and other data from current meter casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the North and South Pacific Ocean from 1984-06-28 to 1984-07-01 (NODC Accession 8500226)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter and other data were collected using current meter casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the North/South Pacific Ocean from June 28, 1984 to July 1, 1984....

  18. Temperature profile and other data collected using CTD casts in the North/South Pacific Ocean from NOAA Ship MALCOLM BALDRIGE and other platform from 16 February 1991 to 98 December 1991 (NODC Accession 9200156)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and other data were collected using CTD casts from NOAA Ship MALCOLM BALDRIGE and NOAA Ship DISCOVERER in the North/South Pacific Ocean from 16...

  19. Temperature profile and chemical data collected using BT and XBT casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the North/South Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Sea from 1987-04-07 to 1987-09-30 (NODC Accession 8700382)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and chemical data were collected using XBT and BT casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the North/South Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Sea from 07...

  20. Phytoplankton and zooplankton data from bottle and nets casts in the coastal North Pacific (180-limit) from the OSHORO MARU by the Faculty of Fisheries/Hokkaido University from 23 April 1967 to 25 April 1967 (NODC Accession 0000503)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Phytoplankton and zooplankton data were collected from the OSHORO MARU in the coastal North Pacific (limit-180) from 23 April 1967 to 25 April 1967. Phytoplankton...

  1. Plankton and nutrients data collected using net and CTD casts from the OSHORO MARU in the Bering Sea and North Pacific Ocean from 07 June 1997 to 31 July 1999 (NODC Accession 0000803)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Plankton and nutrients data were collected using net and CTD casts in the Bering Sea and North Pacific Ocean from the OSHORO MARU. Data were collected from 07 June...

  2. Shore-based counts of the Eastern North Pacific gray whale stock from central California conducted from 1967-12-18 to 2007-02-22 (NCEI Accession 0138007)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) has conducted shore-based counts of the Eastern North Pacific stock of gray whales (Eschrichtius robustus) 26 years from...

  3. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the Hakuho Maru in the North Pacific Ocean from 1993-05-13 to 1993-05-30 (NODC Accession 0115496)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115496 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from Hakuho Maru in the North Pacific Ocean from 1993-05-13 to...

  4. Physical and underway data collected aboard the ATLANTIS during cruise AT15-51 in the Coastal Waters of SE Alaska and North Pacific Ocean from 2009-08-19 to 2009-09-06 (NODC Accession 0103880)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0103880 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the ATLANTIS during cruise AT15-51 in the Coastal Waters of SE Alaska and North Pacific...

  5. Zooplankton, physical, and other data collected from net and bottle casts in North Pacific Ocean from HAKUHO-MARU; 22 November 1982 to 14 February 1983 (NODC Accession 9600145)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton species identities, physical, and other data were collected using net and bottle casts in the North Pacific Ocean from HAKUHO-MARU. Data were collected...

  6. Fish survey, fishing duration, and other data from net trawls from the NORTH PACIFIC as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 25 April 1975 to 07 August 1975 (NODC Accession 7601822)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish survey, fishing duration, and other data were collected from net trawls from the NORTH PACIFIC from 25 April 1975 to 07 August 1975. Data were collected by the...

  7. Fish survey, fishing duration, and other data from net trawls in the Gulf of Alaska from the NORTH PACIFIC as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 03 May 1975 to 07 August 1975 (NODC Accession 7601886)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish survey, fishing duration, and other data were collected from net trawls in the Gulf of Alaska from the NORTH PACIFIC from 03 May 1975 to 07 August 1975. Data...

  8. Fish survey, fishing duration, and other data from net trawls in the Gulf of Alaska from the NORTH PACIFIC as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 03 May 1975 to 07 August 1975 (NODC Accession 7601885)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish survey, fishing duration, and other data were collected from net trawls in the Gulf of Alaska from the NORTH PACIFIC from 03 May 1975 to 07 August 1975. Data...

  9. Physical, chemical, and other data from bottle, CTD, and XBT casts from the SHOYO and other platforms from the North Pacific Ocean by the Japanese Hydrographic Office from 1975-12-17 to 1989-05-24 (NODC Accession 9000117)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, chemical, and other data from bottle, CTD, and XBT casts from the SHOYO and other platforms from North Pacific Ocean. Data were collected by the Japanese...

  10. Physical and profile data collected aboard the NEW HORIZON during cruise NH1322 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2013-09-17 to 2013-10-02 (NCEI Accession 0132112)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0132112 includes physical and profile data collected aboard the NEW HORIZON during cruise NH1322 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2013-09-17 to...

  11. Physical and underway data collected aboard the ATLANTIS during cruise AT15-45 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2009-02-18 to 2009-03-23 (NODC Accession 0103875)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0103875 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the ATLANTIS during cruise AT15-45 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2009-02-18 to...

  12. Physical and underway data collected aboard the Marcus G. Langseth during cruise MGL1211 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2012-06-11 to 2012-07-08 (NODC Accession 0104315)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0104315 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the Marcus G. Langseth during cruise MGL1211 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2012-06-11...

  13. Physical and underway data collected aboard the ROGER REVELLE during cruise RR0913 in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine Sea from 2009-10-17 to 2009-11-01 (NODC Accession 0089631)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0089631 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the ROGER REVELLE during cruise RR0913 in the North Pacific Ocean and Philippine Sea from...

  14. Physical and underway data collected aboard the KILO MOANA during cruise KM0925 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2009-11-29 to 2009-12-01 (NODC Accession 0089604)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0089604 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the KILO MOANA during cruise KM0925 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2009-11-29 to...

  15. Physical and underway data collected aboard the HEALY during cruise HLY11TE in the Bering Sea, Gulf of Alaska and North Pacific Ocean from 2011-10-29 to 2011-11-01 (NODC Accession 0104264)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0104264 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the HEALY during cruise HLY11TE in the Bering Sea, Gulf of Alaska and North Pacific Ocean...

  16. Physical and underway data collected aboard the MELVILLE during cruise MGLN45MV in the Bering Sea and North Pacific Ocean from 2008-08-24 to 2008-09-11 (NODC Accession 0098584)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0098584 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the MELVILLE during cruise MGLN45MV in the Bering Sea and North Pacific Ocean from...

  17. Physical and profile data collected aboard the MELVILLE during cruise MV1313 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2013-10-03 to 2013-10-27 (NCEI Accession 0132018)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0132018 includes physical and profile data collected aboard the MELVILLE during cruise MV1313 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2013-10-03 to...

  18. Physical and underway data collected aboard the NEW HORIZON during cruise NH1210 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2012-09-26 to 2012-10-15 (NCEI Accession 0138160)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0138160 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the NEW HORIZON during cruise NH1210 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2012-09-26 to...

  19. Physical and profile data collected aboard the NEW HORIZON during cruise NH1314 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2013-06-06 to 2013-06-07 (NCEI Accession 0132109)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0132109 includes physical and profile data collected aboard the NEW HORIZON during cruise NH1314 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2013-06-06 to...

  20. Physical, profile and underway data collected aboard the NEW HORIZON during cruise NH1423 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2014-12-02 to 2014-12-04 (NCEI Accession 0153299)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0153299 includes physical, profile and underway data collected aboard the NEW HORIZON during cruise NH1423 in the North Pacific Ocean from 2014-12-02...