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Sample records for subpicosecond compression experiments

  1. Experiments with automata compression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daciuk, J.; Yu, S; Daley, M; Eramian, M G

    2001-01-01

    Several compression methods of finite-state automata are presented and evaluated. Most compression methods used here are already described in the literature. However, their impact on the size of automata has not been described yet. We fill that gap, presenting results of experiments carried out on

  2. Designing experiments through compressed sensing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Joseph G.; Ridzal, Denis

    2013-06-01

    In the following paper, we discuss how to design an ensemble of experiments through the use of compressed sensing. Specifically, we show how to conduct a small number of physical experiments and then use compressed sensing to reconstruct a larger set of data. In order to accomplish this, we organize our results into four sections. We begin by extending the theory of compressed sensing to a finite product of Hilbert spaces. Then, we show how these results apply to experiment design. Next, we develop an efficient reconstruction algorithm that allows us to reconstruct experimental data projected onto a finite element basis. Finally, we verify our approach with two computational experiments.

  3. Subpicosecond, high-brightness excimer laser systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, A.J.; Gosnell, T.R.; Roberts, J.P.; Lester, C.S.; Gibson, R.B.; Harper, S.E.; Tallman, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    Subpicosecond, high-brightness excimer laser systems are being used to explore the interaction of intense coherent ultraviolet radiation with matter. Applications of current systems include generation of picosecond x-ray pulses, investigation of possible x-ray laser pumping schemes, studies of multiphoton phenomena in atomic species, and time-resolved photochemistry. These systems, based on the amplification of subpicosecond pulses in small aperture (/approximately/1 cm/sup 2/) XeCl or KrF amplifiers, deliver focal spot intensities of /approximately/10/sup 17/ W/cm/sup 2/. Scaling to higher intensities, however, will require an additional large aperture amplifier which preserves near-diffraction-limited beam quality and subpicosecond pulse duration. We describe here both a small aperture KrF system which routinely provides intensities >10/sup 17/ W/cm/sup 2/ to several experiments, and a large aperture XeCl system designed to deliver /approximately/1 J subpicosecond pulses and yield intensities on target in excess of 10/sup 19/W/cm/sup 2/. We also discuss the effects of two-photon absorption on large-aperture, high-brightness excimer lasers. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  4. MHD simulation of plasma compression experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Meritt; Barsky, Sandra; de Vietien, Peter

    2017-10-01

    General Fusion (GF) is working to build a magnetized target fusion (MTF) power plant based on compression of magnetically-confined plasma by liquid metal. GF is testing this compression concept by collapsing solid aluminum liners onto plasmas formed by coaxial helicity injection in a series of experiments called PCS (Plasma Compression, Small). We simulate the PCS experiments using the finite-volume MHD code VAC. The single-fluid plasma model includes temperature-dependent resistivity and anisotropic heat transport. The time-dependent curvilinear mesh for MHD simulation is derived from LS-DYNA simulations of actual field tests of liner implosion. We will discuss how 3D simulations reproduced instability observed in the PCS13 experiment and correctly predicted stabilization of PCS14 by ramping the shaft current during compression. We will also present a comparison of simulated Mirnov and x-ray diagnostics with experimental measurements indicating that PCS14 compressed well to a linear compression ratio of 2.5:1.

  5. Results of subscale MTF compression experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Stephen; Mossman, A.; Donaldson, M.; Fusion Team, General

    2016-10-01

    In magnetized target fusion (MTF) a magnetized plasma torus is compressed in a time shorter than its own energy confinement time, thereby heating to fusion conditions. Understanding plasma behavior and scaling laws is needed to advance toward a reactor-scale demonstration. General Fusion is conducting a sequence of subscale experiments of compact toroid (CT) plasmas being compressed by chemically driven implosion of an aluminum liner, providing data on several key questions. CT plasmas are formed by a coaxial Marshall gun, with magnetic fields supported by internal plasma currents and eddy currents in the wall. Configurations that have been compressed so far include decaying and sustained spheromaks and an ST that is formed into a pre-existing toroidal field. Diagnostics measure B, ne, visible and x-ray emission, Ti and Te. Before compression the CT has an energy of 10kJ magnetic, 1 kJ thermal, with Te of 100 - 200 eV, ne 5x1020 m-3. Plasma was stable during a compression factor R0/R >3 on best shots. A reactor scale demonstration would require 10x higher initial B and ne but similar Te. Liner improvements have minimized ripple, tearing and ejection of micro-debris. Plasma facing surfaces have included plasma-sprayed tungsten, bare Cu and Al, and gettering with Ti and Li.

  6. Subpicosecond conformational dynamics of small peptides probed by two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woutersen, Sander; Mu, Yuguang; Stock, Gerhard; Hamm, Peter

    2001-01-01

    The observation of subpicosecond fluctuations in the conformation of a small peptide in water is demonstrated. We use an experimental method that is specifically sensitive to conformational dynamics taking place on an ultrafast time scale. Complementary molecular-dynamics simulations confirm that the conformational fluctuations exhibit a subpicosecond component, the time scale and amplitude of which agree well with those derived from the experiment. PMID:11553784

  7. Transient interference implications on the subpicosecond laser damage of multidielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallais, Laurent; Mangote, Benoît; Commandré, Mireille; Melninkaitis, Andrius; Mirauskas, Julius; Jeskevic, Maksim; Sirutkaitis, Valdas

    2010-08-01

    Laser-induced damage in optical thin films with subpicosecond pulses is investigated. A model dedicated to optical interference coatings and based on the rate equation for free electron generation is introduced. It takes into account the transient interference effects induced by changes in the dielectric function during the laser pulse and its feedback effect on the electron density distribution in the multilayer stack. Simulations are compared to experiments on HfO2 and Ta2O5 films with pulses ranging from 45 fs to 1 ps. It is shown that this approach can improve the interpretation of femtosecond and picosecond laser induced damage in thin films.

  8. Experiments of cylindrical isentropic compression by ultrahigh magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zhuowei; Zhou, Zhongyu; Zhang, Chunbo; Tang, Xiaosong; Tong, Yanjin; Zhao, Jianheng; Sun, Chengwei

    2015-09-01

    The high Explosive Magnetic Flux Implosion Compression Generator (EMFICG) is a kind of unique high energy density dynamic technique with characters like ultrahigh pressure and low temperature rising and could be suitable as a tool of cylindrical isentropic compression. The Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (IFP, CAEP) have developed EMFICG technique and realized cylindrical isentropic compression. In the experiments, a seed magnetic field of 5-6 Tesla were built first and compressed by a stainless steel liner which is driven by high explosive. The inner free surface velocity of sample was measured by PDV. The isentropic compression of a copper sample was verified and the isentropic pressure is over 100 GPa. The cylindrical isentropic compression process has been numerical simulated by 1D MHD code and the simulation results were compared with the experiments. Compared with the transitional X-ray flash radiograph measurement, this method will probably promote the data accuracy.

  9. Experiments of cylindrical isentropic compression by ultrahigh magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Zhuowei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The high Explosive Magnetic Flux Implosion Compression Generator (EMFICG is a kind of unique high energy density dynamic technique with characters like ultrahigh pressure and low temperature rising and could be suitable as a tool of cylindrical isentropic compression. The Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (IFP, CAEP have developed EMFICG technique and realized cylindrical isentropic compression. In the experiments, a seed magnetic field of 5–6 Tesla were built first and compressed by a stainless steel liner which is driven by high explosive. The inner free surface velocity of sample was measured by PDV. The isentropic compression of a copper sample was verified and the isentropic pressure is over 100 GPa. The cylindrical isentropic compression process has been numerical simulated by 1D MHD code and the simulation results were compared with the experiments. Compared with the transitional X-ray flash radiograph measurement, this method will probably promote the data accuracy.

  10. Conceptual design of a laser wakefield acceleration experiment with external bunch injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; Luttikhof, M.J.H.; Irman, A.; van Goor, F.A.; Verschuur, Jeroen W.J.; Bastiaens, Hubertus M.J.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2006-01-01

    We present a conceptual design of a laser wakefield acceleration experiment where a sub-picosecond electron bunch from a photo-cathode RF linac is injected into a plasma channel just before a laser pulse. The pulse overtakes the bunch which is then trapped, compressed and accelerated in the laser

  11. Multiwavelength optical pyrometer for shock compression experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyzenga, G A; Ahrens, T J

    1979-11-01

    A system for measurement of the spectral radiance of materials shocked to high pressures ( approximately 100 GPa) by impact using a light gas gun is described. Thermal radiation from the sample is sampled at six wavelength bands in the visible spectrum, and each signal is separately detected by solid-state photodiodes, and recorded with a time resolution of approximately 10 ns. Interpretation of the records in terms of temperature of transparent sample materials is discussed. Results of a series of exploratory experiments with metals are also given. Shock temperatures in the range 4000-8000 K have been reliably measured. Spectral radiance and temperatures have been determined with uncertainties of 2%.

  12. Experiments on Cascaded Quadratic Soliton Compression in Unpoled LN Waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Hairun; Zhou, Binbin; Zeng, Xianglong

    2014-01-01

    Experiments on cascaded quadratic soliton compression in unpoled phasemismatched lithium niobate waveguides are presented. Pulse self-phasemodulation dominated by an overall self-defocusing nonlinearity is observed, with an variation of pump wavelength and waveguide core width. © 2014 Optical...... Society of America...

  13. The VELOCE pulsed power generator for isentropic compression experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ao, Tommy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dynamic Material Properties; Asay, James Russell [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dynamic Material Properties; Chantrenne, Sophie J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dynamic Material Properties; Hickman, Randall John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dynamic Material Properties; Willis, Michael David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dynamic Material Properties; Shay, Andrew W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dynamic Material Properties; Grine-Jones, Suzi A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dynamic Material Properties; Hall, Clint Allen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dynamic Material Properties; Baer, Melvin R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Engineering Sciences Center

    2007-12-01

    Veloce is a medium-voltage, high-current, compact pulsed power generator developed for isentropic and shock compression experiments. Because of its increased availability and ease of operation, Veloce is well suited for studying isentropic compression experiments (ICE) in much greater detail than previously allowed with larger pulsed power machines such as the Z accelerator. Since the compact pulsed power technology used for dynamic material experiments has not been previously used, it is necessary to examine several key issues to ensure that accurate results are obtained. In the present experiments, issues such as panel and sample preparation, uniformity of loading, and edge effects were extensively examined. In addition, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations using the ALEGRA code were performed to interpret the experimental results and to design improved sample/panel configurations. Examples of recent ICE studies on aluminum are presented.

  14. Sub-picosecond dynamics in liquid Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosokawa, S [Institut fuer Physikalische-, Kern-, und Makromolekulare Chemie, Philipps Universitaet Marburg, D-35032 Marburg (Germany); Pilgrim, W-C [Institut fuer Physikalische-, Kern-, und Makromolekulare Chemie, Philipps Universitaet Marburg, D-35032 Marburg (Germany); Kawakita, Y [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Ohshima, K [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Takeda, S [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Ishikawa, D [SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Tsutsui, S [SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Tanaka, Y [SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Baron, A Q R [SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2003-10-15

    We are the first group to succeed in measuring the dynamic structure factor S(Q,{omega}) of liquid Si close to melting using high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering. The spectra clearly demonstrate the existence of propagating short wavelength modes in the melt with a Q-{omega} relation similar to those in other liquid metal systems. A specific variation of the quasi-elastic line shape with increasing Q is observed close to the structure factor maximum. This observation is related to the onset of atomic correlations on the sub-picosecond timescale in the vicinity of a metal-to-insulator transition. Such observations have been made previously only in computer simulations of metallic systems with increasing covalent character. Our data provide the first experimental evidence for these ultrashort density correlations. (letter to the editor)

  15. Magnetic Compression Experiment at General Fusion with Simulation Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlea, Carl; Khalzov, Ivan; Hirose, Akira; Xiao, Chijin; Fusion Team, General

    2017-10-01

    The magnetic compression experiment at GF was a repetitive non-destructive test to study plasma physics applicable to Magnetic Target Fusion compression. A spheromak compact torus (CT) is formed with a co-axial gun into a containment region with an hour-glass shaped inner flux conserver, and an insulating outer wall. External coil currents keep the CT off the outer wall (levitation) and then rapidly compress it inwards. The optimal external coil configuration greatly improved both the levitated CT lifetime and the rate of shots with good compressional flux conservation. As confirmed by spectrometer data, the improved levitation field profile reduced plasma impurity levels by suppressing the interaction between plasma and the insulating outer wall during the formation process. We developed an energy and toroidal flux conserving finite element axisymmetric MHD code to study CT formation and compression. The Braginskii MHD equations with anisotropic heat conduction were implemented. To simulate plasma / insulating wall interaction, we couple the vacuum field solution in the insulating region to the full MHD solution in the remainder of the domain. We see good agreement between simulation and experiment results. Partly funded by NSERC and MITACS Accelerate.

  16. Design of a miniature explosive isentropic compression experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasker, Douglas G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this design study is to adapt the High Explosive Pulsed Power Isentropic Compression Experiment (HEPP-ICE) to milligram quantities of materials at stresses of {approx}100 GPa. For this miniature application we assume that a parallel plate stripline of {approx}2.5 mm width is needed to compress the samples. In any parallel plate load, the rising currents flow preferentially along the outside edges of the load where the specific impedance is a minimum [1]. Therefore, the peak current must be between 1 and 2 MA to reach a stress of 100 GPa in the center of a 2.5 mm wide parallel plate load; these are small relative to typical HEPP-ICE currents. We show that a capacitor bank alone exceeds the requirements of this miniature ICE experiment and a flux compression generator (FCG) is not necessary. The proposed circuit will comprise one half of the 2.4-MJ bank, i.e., the 6-mF, 20-kV, 1.2 MJ capacitor bank used in the original HEPP-ICE circuit. Explosive opening and closing switches will still be required because the rise time of the capacitor circuit would be of the order of 30 {micro}s without them. For isentropic loading in these small samples, stress rise times of {approx}200 ns are required.

  17. Sub-picosecond Resolution Time-to-Digital Converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratov, Vladimir [Advanced Science and Novel Technology Company, Rancho Palos Verdes, CA (United States); Katzman, Vladimir [Advanced Science and Novel Technology Company, Rancho Palos Verdes, CA (United States); Binkley, Jeb [Advanced Science and Novel Technology Company, Rancho Palos Verdes, CA (United States)

    2006-03-30

    Time-to-digital converters with sub-picosecond resolutions are needed to satisfy the requirements of time-on-flight measurements of the next generation of high energy and nuclear physics experiments. The converters must be highly integrated, power effective, low cost, and feature plug-and-play capabilities to handle the increasing number of channels (up to hundreds of millions) in future Department of Energy experiments. Current state-off-the-art time-to-digital converter integrated circuits do not have the sufficient degree of integration and flexibility to fulfill all the described requirements. During Phase I, the Advanced Science and Novel Technology Company in cooperation with the nuclear physics division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed the architecture of a novel time-to-digital converter with multiple channels connected to an external processor through a special interfacing block and synchronized by clock signals generated by an internal phase-locked loop. The critical blocks of the system including signal delay lines and delay-locked loops with proprietary differential delay cells, as well as the required digital code converter and the clock period counter have been designed and simulated using the advanced SiGe120 BiCMOS technological process. The results of investigations demonstrate a possibility to achieve the digitization accuracy within 1ps. ADSANTEC has demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed concept in computer simulations. The proposed system will be a critical component for the next generation of NEP experiments.

  18. Initial Results on Neutralized Drift Compression Experiments (NDCX-IA) for High Intensity Ion Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Prabir K; Baca, David; Bieniosek, Frank; Coleman, Joshua E; Davidson, Ronald C; Efthimion, Philip; Eylon, Shmuel; Gilson, Erik P; Grant Logan, B; Greenway, Wayne; Henestroza, Enrique; Kaganovich, Igor D; Leitner, Matthaeus; Rose, David; Sefkow, Adam; Sharp, William M; Shuman, Derek; Thoma, Carsten H; Vanecek, David; Waldron, William; Welch, Dale; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    Ion beam neutralization and compression experiments are designed to determine the feasibility of using compressed high intensity ion beams for high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments and for inertial fusion power. To quantitatively ascertain the various mechanisms and methods for beam compression, the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) facility is being constructed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). In the first compression experiment, a 260 KeV, 25 mA, K+ ion beam of centimeters size is radially compressed to a mm size spot by neutralization in a meter-long plasma column and beam peak current is longitudinally compressed by an induction velocity tilt core. Instrumentation, preliminary results of the experiments, and practical limits of compression are presented. These include parameters such as emittance, degree of neutralization, velocity tilt time profile, and accuracy of measurements (fast and spatially high resolution diagnostic) are discussed.

  19. Sub-picosecond x-ray streak camera development for laser fusion diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lieber, A.J.; Sutphin, H.D.; Webb, C.B.; Williams, A.H.

    1976-01-01

    In laser-fusion interactions the effectiveness of coupling laser energy into target compression can be followed by obtaining spatial and temporal information on x-radiation emitted by the target. Microballoon targets now used require temporal resolution of better than a few picoseconds to track accurately target collapse and disassembly. Instabilities of two picoseconds or less are predicted for the process. Most streak cameras are based upon a sector-focused streak tube, which in the design limit is capable of only about 10 ps x-ray resolution. Therefore, a new tube, based upon the proximity-focused or wafer intensifier was developed as a laser-fusion diagnostic capable in the design limit of delivering truly sub-picosecond x-ray resolution. A new power supply was also developed to drive the streak tube. Together, a camera has resulted with true picosecond capability, small size, high sensitivity, broad dynamic range, high spatial resolution, and very low jitter. The system has proved 98 percent reliable in over 300 laser shots providing data on the collapse of microballoons when irradiated by a dual beam Nd:YAG laser. Theoretical predictions of 2.5 to 3 ps resolution are consistent with experimental data. A visible variant of the design now under construction is expected to give sub-picosecond resolution with advantages similar to the x-ray system.

  20. Adaptation of existing facilities to isentropic compression experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasker, Douglas G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mielke, Charles H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rickel, Dwight G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-07

    We demonstrate that the established pulsed power infrastructure at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory - Pulsed Field Facility (NHMFL-PFF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory can be adapted to obtain high quality isentropic compression experiment (ICE) data on materials in extreme conditions of dynamic high pressure. Experiments utilized a single-turn magnet pulsed power system at the NHMFL-PFF that was originally designed to measure actinide samples in extremes of high magnetic field (to 300 Tesla). A simple modification to the single-turn magnet has converted it to a fast turnaround dynamic high pressure measurement system. This paper details the work done including important background details that indicate that much more can be accomplished with optimization of the load characteristics in terms of ultimate peak pressures. To match the rise time of the NHMFL capacitor bank ({approx}2 {mu}s versus {approx}0.5 {mu}s for the Sandia Z-machine) the sample dimensions can be relatively large, i.e., up to 5 mm thickness. The maximum stresses are {approx}50GPa (0.5 Mbar) at the maximum bank voltage (60 kV) and higher pressures may be possible if the sample is tamped. For the design and predictions of performance of the NHMFL-ICE experiment it is important to have good predictive models. A SPICE code simulation was chosen to model all aspects of the experiment, electrical and physical. To this end, accurate dynamic load models were developed to simulate the compression and expansion of the dynamic load at high pressures using shock physics principles. A series experiments have been performed which demonstrated the feasibility of the NHMFL-ICE technique. The results will be shown and discussed. The NHMFL-ICE technique is an excellent method for measuring equations of state (EOS) at megabar pressures. Because a complete EOS can be obtained in one experiment from zero to the peak pressure, and because many shots can be fired in one day, the technique promises to

  1. Recent advance in Isentropic compression experiments on PTS facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guilin; Zhang, Zhaohui; Guo, Shuai; Sun, Qizhi; Wang, Meng; Magnetically Loading techiniques Team

    2017-06-01

    The Primary Test Stand (PTS) facility is a pulsed power machine capable of delivering currents to loads of 5 8 MA over times of 200-620 ns. As current flows in the opposite direction electrode plates, smoothly rising, time dependent magnetic pressures were generated on each electrode plates. With pulse shaping techniques, the ramped compression waves can propagate in electrodes and specimens without forming a shock. Photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) have application in shockless, free-surface or sample/window interface velocity measurements of different thickness samples, which were used for equation-of-state (EOS) studies of condensed matter. Analysis the velocity data with a backward integration techniques, the quasi-isentrope to 1 Mbar of OFHC were inferred. Based on the application performance, confirms that PTS is a good experiment equipment for EOS and dynamic properties of different materials.

  2. Improving throughput and user experience for information intensive websites by applying HTTP compression technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malla, Ratnakar

    2008-11-06

    HTTP compression is a technique specified as part of the W3C HTTP 1.0 standard. It allows HTTP servers to take advantage of GZIP compression technology that is built into latest browsers. A brief survey of medical informatics websites show that compression is not enabled. With compression enabled, downloaded files sizes are reduced by more than 50% and typical transaction time is also reduced from 20 to 8 minutes, thus providing a better user experience.

  3. Bayesian model calibration of ramp compression experiments on Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Justin; Hund, Lauren

    2017-06-01

    Bayesian model calibration (BMC) is a statistical framework to estimate inputs for a computational model in the presence of multiple uncertainties, making it well suited to dynamic experiments which must be coupled with numerical simulations to interpret the results. Often, dynamic experiments are diagnosed using velocimetry and this output can be modeled using a hydrocode. Several calibration issues unique to this type of scenario including the functional nature of the output, uncertainty of nuisance parameters within the simulation, and model discrepancy identifiability are addressed, and a novel BMC process is proposed. As a proof of concept, we examine experiments conducted on Sandia National Laboratories' Z-machine which ramp compressed tantalum to peak stresses of 250 GPa. The proposed BMC framework is used to calibrate the cold curve of Ta (with uncertainty), and we conclude that the procedure results in simple, fast, and valid inferences. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. Compressed natural gas fueled vehicles: The Houston experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    The report describes the experience of the City of Houston in defining the compressed natural gas fueled vehicle research scope and issues. It details the ways in which the project met initial expectations, and how the project scope, focus, and duration were adjusted in response to unanticipated results. It provides examples of real world successes and failures in efforts to commercialize basic research in adapting a proven technology (natural gas) to a noncommercially proven application (vehicles). Phase one of the demonstration study investigates, develops, documents, and disseminates information regarding the economic, operational, and environmental implications of utilizing compressed natural gas (CNG) in various truck fueling applications. The four (4) truck classes investigated are light duty gasoline trucks, medium duty gasoline trucks, medium duty diesel trucks and heavy duty diesel trucks. The project researches aftermarket CNG conversions for the first three vehicle classes and original equipment manufactured (OEM) CNG vehicles for light duty gasoline and heavy duty diesel classes. In phase two of the demonstration project, critical issues are identified and assessed with respect to implementing use of CNG fueled vehicles in a large vehicle fleet. These issues include defining changes in local, state, and industry CNG fueled vehicle related codes and standards; addressing vehicle fuel storage limitations; using standardized vehicle emission testing procedures and results; and resolving CNG refueling infrastructure implementation issues and related cost factors. The report identifies which CNG vehicle fueling options were tried and failed and which were tried and succeeded, with and without modifications. The conclusions include a caution regarding overly optimistic assessments of CNG vehicle technology at the initiation of the project.

  5. Ultrashort X-ray pulse generation using subpicosecond electron linac

    CERN Document Server

    Harano, H; Yoshii, K; Ueda, T; Okita, S; Uesaka, M

    2000-01-01

    As a promising tool for ultrafast material analyses, we propose to utilize the X-ray pulse which may be generated in a quite simple manner using subpicosecond electron linacs. The properties of the X-ray were numerically studied with the EGS4 code. Verification of the X-ray generation was also conducted at the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory (NERL) linac and clear diffraction patterns of characteristic X-ray were obtained for typical single crystals.

  6. Compressive Sensing Radar: Simulation and Experiments for Target Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Rossum, W.L. van; Otten, M.P.G.; Maleki, A.; Baraniuk, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the performance of a combined Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) Compressive Sensing (CS) radar detector is investigated Using the properties of the Complex Approximate Message Passing (CAMP) algorithm, it is demonstratedthat the behavior of the CFAR processor can be separated from that

  7. Experiments on Metamaterials with Negative Effective Static Compressibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyuan Qu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The volume of ordinary materials decreases in response to a pressure increase exerted by a surrounding gas or liquid, i.e., the material volume compressibility is positive. Recently, poroelastic metamaterial architectures have been suggested theoretically that allow for an unusual negative effective static volume compressibility—which appears to be forbidden for reasons of energy conservation at first sight. The challenge in the three-dimensional (3D fabrication of these blueprints lies in the necessary many hollow 3D crosses sealed by thin membranes, which we realize in this work by using 3D laser microlithography combined with a serendipitous mechanism. By using optical-microscopy cross-correlation analysis, we determine an extraordinarily large negative metamaterial effective volume compressibility of κ_{eff}=-0.8%  bar^{-1}=-80  GPa^{-1} under pressure control.

  8. The effects of video compression on acceptability of images for monitoring life sciences experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Richard F.; Chuang, Sherry L.

    1992-01-01

    Future manned space operations for Space Station Freedom will call for a variety of carefully planned multimedia digital communications, including full-frame-rate color video, to support remote operations of scientific experiments. This paper presents the results of an investigation to determine if video compression is a viable solution to transmission bandwidth constraints. It reports on the impact of different levels of compression and associated calculational parameters on image acceptability to investigators in life-sciences research at ARC. Three nonhuman life-sciences disciplines (plant, rodent, and primate biology) were selected for this study. A total of 33 subjects viewed experimental scenes in their own scientific disciplines. Ten plant scientists viewed still images of wheat stalks at various stages of growth. Each image was compressed to four different compression levels using the Joint Photographic Expert Group (JPEG) standard algorithm, and the images were presented in random order. Twelve and eleven staffmembers viewed 30-sec videotaped segments showing small rodents and a small primate, respectively. Each segment was repeated at four different compression levels in random order using an inverse cosine transform (ICT) algorithm. Each viewer made a series of subjective image-quality ratings. There was a significant difference in image ratings according to the type of scene viewed within disciplines; thus, ratings were scene dependent. Image (still and motion) acceptability does, in fact, vary according to compression level. The JPEG still-image-compression levels, even with the large range of 5:1 to 120:1 in this study, yielded equally high levels of acceptability. In contrast, the ICT algorithm for motion compression yielded a sharp decline in acceptability below 768 kb/sec. Therefore, if video compression is to be used as a solution for overcoming transmission bandwidth constraints, the effective management of the ratio and compression parameters

  9. Subpicosecond laser ablation of copper and fused silica: Initiation threshold and plasma expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axente, E., E-mail: emanuel.axente@inflpr.ro [Lasers Department, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, P.O. Box MG 36, RO-77125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Laboratoire LP3, CNRS - Universite Aix-Marseille II, Luminy, 13288 Marseille (France); Noel, S.; Hermann, J.; Sentis, M. [Laboratoire LP3, CNRS - Universite Aix-Marseille II, Luminy, 13288 Marseille (France); Mihailescu, I.N. [Lasers Department, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, P.O. Box MG 36, RO-77125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2009-09-30

    We investigated the subpicosecond laser ablation of copper and fused silica under 100 fs laser irradiation at 800 nm in vacuum by means of fast plume imaging and time- and space-resolved optical emission spectroscopy. We found that, to the difference of copper ablation, the laser-generated plasma from a fused silica target exhibited one 'main' component only. The 'slow' plasma component, observed during copper ablation and usually assigned to optical emission from nanoparticles was not detected by either plasma fast imaging or optical emission spectroscopy even when fused silica targets were submitted to the highest incident fluences used in our experiments. The characteristic expansion velocity of this unique component was about three times larger than the velocity of the fast plume component observed during copper ablation. The dependence of laser fluence on both plasma expansion and ablation rate was investigated and discussed in terms of ablation efficiency and initiation mechanisms.

  10. First measurements of subpicosecond electron beam structure by autocorrelation of coherent diffraction radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Lumpkin, Alex H; Rule, D W

    2001-01-01

    We report the initial measurements of subpicosecond electron beam structure using a nonintercepting technique based on the autocorrelation of coherent diffraction radiation (CDR). A far infrared (FIR) Michelson interferometer with a Golay detector was used to obtain the autocorrelation. The radiation was generated by a thermionic rf gun beam at 40 MeV as it passed through a 5-mm-tall slit/aperture in a metal screen whose surface was at 45 deg. to the beam direction. For the observed bunch lengths of about 450 fs (FWHM) with a shorter time spike on the leading edge, peak currents of about 100 A are indicated. Also a model was developed and used to calculate the CDR from the back of two metal strips separated by a 5-mm vertical gap. The demonstrated nonintercepting aspect of this method could allow on-line bunch length characterizations to be done during free-electron laser experiments.

  11. Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) - II Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwan, J.W.

    2009-10-01

    LBNL has received American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding to construct a new accelerator at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to significantly increase the energy on target, which will allow both the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) and Warm Dense Matter (WDM) research communities to explore scientific conditions that have not been available in any other device. For NDCX-II, a new induction linear accelerator (linac) will be constructed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). NDCX-II will produce nano-second long ion beam bunches to hit thin foil targets. The final kinetic energy of the ions arriving at the target varies according to the ion mass. For atomic mass unit of 6 or 7 (Lithium ions), useful kinetic energies range from 1.5 to 5 or more MeV. The expected beam charge in the 1 ns (or shorter) pulse is about 20 nanoCoulombs. The pulse repetition rate will be about once or twice per minute (of course, target considerations will often reduce this rate). Our approach to building the NDCX-II ion accelerator is to make use of the available induction modules and 200 kV pulsers from the retired ATA electron linac at LLNL. Reusing this hardware will maximize the ion energy on target at a minimum cost. Some modification of the cells (e.g., reduce the bore diameter and replace with higher field pulsed solenoids) are needed in order to meet the requirements of this project. The NDCX-II project will include the following tasks: (1) Physics design to determine the required ion current density at the ion source, the injector beam optics, the layout of accelerator cells along the beam line, the voltage waveforms for beam acceleration and compression, the solenoid focusing, the neutralized drift compression and the final focus on target; (2) Engineering design and fabrication of the accelerator components, pulsed power system, diagnostic system, and control and data acquisition system; (3) Conventional facilities; and (4) Installation and integration

  12. Historical Background of Ultrahigh Pressure Shock Compression Experiments at LLNL: 1973 to 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nellis, W.J.

    2000-10-09

    My purpose is to recount the historical development of ultrahigh pressure shock compression experiments at LLNL, which I experienced in the period 1973 to 2000. I used several experimental techniques: shock-impedance-match experiments using planar shock waves driven by nuclear explosives (NIMs), the Janus Laser, a railgun, and a two-stage light-gas gun.

  13. Hydrodynamic Liner Experiments Using the Ranchero Flux Compression Generator System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goforth, J.H.; Atchison, W.L.; Fowler, C.M.; Lopez, E.A.; Oona, H.; Tasker, D.G.; King, J.C.; Herrera, D.H.; Torres, D.T.; Sena, F.C.; McGuire, J.A.; Reinovsky, R.E.; Stokes, J.L.; Tabaka, L.J.; Garcia, O.F.; Faehl, R.J.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Keinigs, R.K.; Broste, B.

    1998-10-18

    The authors have developed a system for driving hydrodynamic liners at currents approaching 30 MA. Their 43 cm module will deliver currents of interest, and when fully developed, the 1.4 m module will allow similar currents with more total system inductance. With these systems they can perform interesting physics experiments and support the Atlas development effort.

  14. Shock Compression Experiments with in situ Ellipsometry Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, Lior; Eliezer, Shalom; Nissim, Noaz; Perelmutter, Lior; Sudai, Moris; Mond, Michael

    2009-06-01

    Knowledge about the optical properties of materials at high pressure and high temperature is needed for EOS research. Ellipsometry measures the change in the polarization of a probe beam reflected from a surface. From the change in polarization, the real and imaginary parts of the time dependent complex index of refraction can be extracted. From the measured optical properties, fundamental physical properties of the material, such as emissivity, phase transitions, and electrical conductivity can be extracted. A dynamic ellipsometry measurement system with nanosecond resolution was built in order to measure all four stocks parameters. Gas gun was used to accelerate the impact flyer. Our experiments concentrated on the optical properties of 1020 steel targets with impact pressure range of 40-250 kbar. Free surface measurements as well as window-target interface measurements were preformed. Although there are intrinsic difficulties with dynamic ellipsometric measurements, distinct changes were observed for shock wave pressures larger than 130kbar, the α->ɛ phase transition.

  15. Measurement of the Compressibility Factor of Gases: A Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varberg, Thomas D.; Bendelsmith, Andrew J.; Kuwata, Keith T.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we describe an experiment for the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory in which students measure the compressibility factor of two gases, helium and carbon dioxide, as a function of pressure at constant temperature. The experimental apparatus is relatively inexpensive to construct and is described and diagrammed in detail.…

  16. Dynamic Compression Sector: Time-Resolved Synchrotron X-Ray Measurements in Shock Wave Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigg, P. A.; Arganbright, N.; Klug, J.; Konrad, C.; Li, Y.; Rickerson, D.; Schuman, A.; Sethian, J.; Sinclair, N.; Toyoda, Y.; Turneaure, S.; Williams, B.; Zdanowicz, E.; Zimmerman, K.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2017-06-01

    The Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) located at Argonne National Laboratory - a first-of-its-kind user facility - has been established to address long standing scientific questions regarding atomistic - and micro/meso - scale mechanisms governing condensed matter changes under high stress, dynamic loading. By linking a diverse set of dynamic compression drivers to 80 ps bright, hard x-ray pulses from a synchrotron, the temporal evolution (or ``movies'') of material phenomena (structural changes, inelastic deformation, chemical changes) can be observed in single event, dynamic compression experiments. An overview of the DCS capabilities, operational guidelines, and representative results will be presented. Work supported by DOE/NNSA.

  17. Sample pre-heating in magnetic ramp compression experiments on the GEPI high pulsed power driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Almeida, Thierry; Chanal, Pierre-Yves; Zinszner, Jean-Luc; Daulhac, Gaetan

    2017-10-01

    GEPI is a 3 MA, 500 ns, high pulsed power driver operated by the CEA and mainly used for dynamically compressing materials in a quasi-isentropic regime at stress levels up to 100 GPa. Usually, materials are loaded starting from ambient temperature conditions, thus, following a single thermodynamic path near an isentrope. Dynamically loading samples from non-ambient initial conditions, either in pressure or temperature, can significantly improve our ability to obtain direct measurements over specific thermodynamic paths of interest. For instance, ramp-compressing multiphase metallic materials from various initial temperatures can help constrain their Equation of State. We have recently equipped the GEPI facility with a preheating device capable of pre-heating metallic samples up to 1100 K prior to their loading. We present results from preliminary experiments on copper and iron ramp compressed starting from temperatures ranging from 300 K to 900 K.

  18. Creep and cracking of concrete hinges: insight from centric and eccentric compression experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlappal, Thomas; Schweigler, Michael; Gmainer, Susanne; Peyerl, Martin; Pichler, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Existing design guidelines for concrete hinges consider bending-induced tensile cracking, but the structural behavior is oversimplified to be time-independent. This is the motivation to study creep and bending-induced tensile cracking of initially monolithic concrete hinges systematically. Material tests on plain concrete specimens and structural tests on marginally reinforced concrete hinges are performed. The experiments characterize material and structural creep under centric compression as well as bending-induced tensile cracking and the interaction between creep and cracking of concrete hinges. As for the latter two aims, three nominally identical concrete hinges are subjected to short-term and to longer-term eccentric compression tests. Obtained material and structural creep functions referring to centric compression are found to be very similar. The structural creep activity under eccentric compression is significantly larger because of the interaction between creep and cracking, i.e. bending-induced cracks progressively open and propagate under sustained eccentric loading. As for concrete hinges in frame-like integral bridge construction, it is concluded (i) that realistic simulation of variable loads requires consideration of the here-studied time-dependent behavior and (ii) that permanent compressive normal forces shall be limited by 45% of the ultimate load carrying capacity, in order to avoid damage of concrete hinges under sustained loading.

  19. Sub-picosecond optical switching with a negative index metamaterial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dani, Keshav M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Upadhya, Prashant C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zahyum, Ku [CHTM-UNM

    2009-01-01

    Development of all-optical signal processing, eliminating the performance and cost penalties of optical-electrical-optical conversion, is important for continu,ing advances in Terabits/sec (Tb/s) communications.' Optical nonlinearities are generally weak, traditionally requiring long-path, large-area devicesl,2 or very high-Q, narrow-band resonator structures.3 Optical metamaterials offer unique capabilities for optical-optical interactions. Here we report 600 femtosecond (fs) all-optical modulation using a fIShnet (2D-perforated metallamorphous-Si (a-Si)/metal film stack) negative-index meta material with a structurally tunable broad-band response near 1.2 {micro}m. Over 20% modulation (experimentally limited) is achieved in a path length of only 116 nm by photo-excitation of carriers in the a-Si layer. This has the potential for Tb/s aU-optical communication and will lead to other novel, compact, tunable sub-picosecond (ps) photonic devices.

  20. Picosecond and subpicosecond pulsed laser deposition of Pb thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gontad

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pb thin films were deposited on Nb substrates by means of pulsed laser deposition (PLD with UV radiation (248 nm, in two different ablation regimes: picosecond (5 ps and subpicosecond (0.5 ps. Granular films with grain size on the micron scale have been obtained, with no evidence of large droplet formation. All films presented a polycrystalline character with preferential orientation along the (111 crystalline planes. A maximum quantum efficiency (QE of 7.3×10^{-5} (at 266 nm and 7 ns pulse duration was measured, after laser cleaning, demonstrating good photoemission performance for Pb thin films deposited by ultrashort PLD. Moreover, Pb thin film photocathodes have maintained their QE for days, providing excellent chemical stability and durability. These results suggest that Pb thin films deposited on Nb by ultrashort PLD are a noteworthy alternative for the fabrication of photocathodes for superconductive radio-frequency electron guns. Finally, a comparison with the characteristics of Pb films prepared by ns PLD is illustrated and discussed.

  1. Assessment of eddy current effects on compression experiments in the TFTR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, K.L.; Park, W.

    1986-05-01

    The eddy current induced on the TFTR vacuum vessel during compression experiments is estimated based on a cylindrical model. It produces an error magnetic field that generates magnetic islands at the rational magnetic surfaces. The widths of these islands are calculated and found to have some effect on electron energy confinement. However, resistive MHD simulation results indicate that the island formation process can be slowed down by plasma rotation.

  2. Gasoline surrogate modeling of gasoline ignition in a rapid compression machine and comparison to experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehl, M; Kukkadapu, G; Kumar, K; Sarathy, S M; Pitz, W J; Sung, S J

    2011-09-15

    The use of gasoline in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines (HCCI) and in duel fuel diesel - gasoline engines, has increased the need to understand its compression ignition processes under engine-like conditions. These processes need to be studied under well-controlled conditions in order to quantify low temperature heat release and to provide fundamental validation data for chemical kinetic models. With this in mind, an experimental campaign has been undertaken in a rapid compression machine (RCM) to measure the ignition of gasoline mixtures over a wide range of compression temperatures and for different compression pressures. By measuring the pressure history during ignition, information on the first stage ignition (when observed) and second stage ignition are captured along with information on the phasing of the heat release. Heat release processes during ignition are important because gasoline is known to exhibit low temperature heat release, intermediate temperature heat release and high temperature heat release. In an HCCI engine, the occurrence of low-temperature and intermediate-temperature heat release can be exploited to obtain higher load operation and has become a topic of much interest for engine researchers. Consequently, it is important to understand these processes under well-controlled conditions. A four-component gasoline surrogate model (including n-heptane, iso-octane, toluene, and 2-pentene) has been developed to simulate real gasolines. An appropriate surrogate mixture of the four components has been developed to simulate the specific gasoline used in the RCM experiments. This chemical kinetic surrogate model was then used to simulate the RCM experimental results for real gasoline. The experimental and modeling results covered ultra-lean to stoichiometric mixtures, compressed temperatures of 640-950 K, and compression pressures of 20 and 40 bar. The agreement between the experiments and model is encouraging in terms of first

  3. Waste Heat Approximation for Understanding Dynamic Compression in Nature and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanloz, R.

    2015-12-01

    Energy dissipated during dynamic compression quantifies the residual heat left in a planet due to impact and accretion, as well as the deviation of a loading path from an ideal isentrope. Waste heat ignores the difference between the pressure-volume isentrope and Hugoniot in approximating the dissipated energy as the area between the Rayleigh line and Hugoniot (assumed given by a linear dependence of shock velocity on particle velocity). Strength and phase transformations are ignored: justifiably, when considering sufficiently high dynamic pressures and reversible transformations. Waste heat mis-estimates the dissipated energy by less than 10-20 percent for volume compressions under 30-60 percent. Specific waste heat (energy per mass) reaches 0.2-0.3 c02 at impact velocities 2-4 times the zero-pressure bulk sound velocity (c0), its maximum possible value being 0.5 c02. As larger impact velocities are implied for typical orbital velocities of Earth-like planets, and c02 ≈ 2-30 MJ/kg for rock, the specific waste heat due to accretion corresponds to temperature rises of about 3-15 x 103 K for rock: melting accompanies accretion even with only 20-30 percent waste heat retained. Impact sterilization is similarly quantified in terms of waste heat relative to the energy required to vaporize H2O (impact velocity of 7-8 km/s, or 4.5-5 c0, is sufficient). Waste heat also clarifies the relationship between shock, multi-shock and ramp loading experiments, as well as the effect of (static) pre-compression. Breaking a shock into 2 steps significantly reduces the dissipated energy, with minimum waste heat achieved for two equal volume compressions in succession. Breaking a shock into as few as 4 steps reduces the waste heat to within a few percent of zero, documenting how multi-shock loading approaches an isentrope. Pre-compression, being less dissipative than an initial shock to the same strain, further reduces waste heat. Multi-shock (i.e., high strain-rate) loading of pre-compressed

  4. Modeling ramp compression experiments using large-scale molecular dynamics simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Grest, Gary Stephen; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Jones, Reese E.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Baskes, Michael I. (University of California, San Diego); Winey, J. Michael (Washington State University); Gupta, Yogendra Mohan (Washington State University); Lane, J. Matthew D.; Ditmire, Todd (University of Texas at Austin); Quevedo, Hernan J. (University of Texas at Austin)

    2011-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation (MD) is an invaluable tool for studying problems sensitive to atomscale physics such as structural transitions, discontinuous interfaces, non-equilibrium dynamics, and elastic-plastic deformation. In order to apply this method to modeling of ramp-compression experiments, several challenges must be overcome: accuracy of interatomic potentials, length- and time-scales, and extraction of continuum quantities. We have completed a 3 year LDRD project with the goal of developing molecular dynamics simulation capabilities for modeling the response of materials to ramp compression. The techniques we have developed fall in to three categories (i) molecular dynamics methods (ii) interatomic potentials (iii) calculation of continuum variables. Highlights include the development of an accurate interatomic potential describing shock-melting of Beryllium, a scaling technique for modeling slow ramp compression experiments using fast ramp MD simulations, and a technique for extracting plastic strain from MD simulations. All of these methods have been implemented in Sandia's LAMMPS MD code, ensuring their widespread availability to dynamic materials research at Sandia and elsewhere.

  5. Optical pulse compression reflectometry: proposal and proof-of-concept experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Weiwen; Yang, Shuo; Long, Xin; Chen, Jianping

    2015-01-12

    This paper proposes a novel reflectometry based on the frequency modulation pulse-compression technology, called optical pulse compression reflectometry (OPCR). Linear frequency modulation (LFM) pulse is taken as an example to implement the OPCR. Its working principle and theoretical analysis are demonstrated. The spatial resolution is determined by the sweeping range of the LFM rather than the pulse width, which overcomes the tradeoff between spatial resolution and measurement range in the conventional pulse-based optical time domain reflectometry. The influence of the laser's phase noise on the integrated side lobe ratio and peak side lobe ratio is theoretically studied. Thanks to the continuous acquisition nature of the OPCR, time averaging is valid to eliminate the influence and results in the measurement range of the OPCR beyond a few times of the source coherent length. A proof-of-concept experiment of the OPCR is carried out to verify the spatial resolution and measurement range.

  6. Zero Suppression and Data Compression for SDD Output in the ALICE Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Alberici, G; De Remigis, P; Mazza, G; Rivetti, A; Tosello, F; Werbrouck, A E

    1999-01-01

    We describe a proposal for the zero suppression and data compression for the Silicon Drift Detectors in the ALICE experiment. The proposal seeks to maintain maximum precision within the limits of data transmission bandwidth, to retain two-dimensional cluster reconstructability and to monitor statistically the background. Two thresholds (high and low) are employed to facilitate understanding of the cluster neighbourhoods. This choice also helps to suppress single high background peaks and provides a statistically cleaner sample for background monitoring. Background average and standard deviation are monitored by counting the zero signal (due to negative inputs to the ADCs) and the signals above the thresholds, then using a minimisation algorithm. Background counts which overflow the small counter ranges are discarded to avoid wasting bits and then corrected statistically offline.First the 10-bit output of the ADCs is compressed to 8 bits using a quasi-parabolic monotonic characteristic which requires no conver...

  7. Computational modeling of joint U.S.-Russian experiments relevant to magnetic compression/magnetized target fusion (MAGO/MTF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheehey, P.T.; Faehl, R.J.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Lindemuth, I.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) experiments, in which a preheated and magnetized target plasma is hydrodynamically compressed to fusion conditions, present some challenging computational modeling problems. Recently, joint experiments relevant to MTF (Russian acronym MAGO, for Magnitnoye Obzhatiye, or magnetic compression) have been performed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and the All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF). Modeling of target plasmas must accurately predict plasma densities, temperatures, fields, and lifetime; dense plasma interactions with wall materials must be characterized. Modeling of magnetically driven imploding solid liners, for compression of target plasmas, must address issues such as Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth in the presence of material strength, and glide plane-liner interactions. Proposed experiments involving liner-on-plasma compressions to fusion conditions will require integrated target plasma and liner calculations. Detailed comparison of the modeling results with experiment will be presented.

  8. PERCUTANEOUS BALLOON COMPRESSION OF GASSERIAN GANGLION FOR THE TREATMENT OF TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA: AN EXPERIENCE FROM INDIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Anurag; Dhama, Vipin; Manik, Yogesh K; Upadhyaya, M K; Singh, C S; Rastogi, V

    2015-02-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is characterized by unilateral, lancinating, paroxysmal pain in the dermatomal distribution area of trigeminal nerve. Percutaneous balloon compression (PBC) of Gasserian ganglion is an effective, comparatively cheaper and simple therapeutic modality for treatment of TN. Compression secondary to PBC selectively injures the large myelinated A-alfa (afferent) fibers that mediate light touch and does not affect A-delta and C-fibres, which carry pain sensation. Balloon compression reduces the sensory neuronal input, thus turning off the trigger to the neuropathic trigeminal pain. In this current case series, we are sharing our experience with PBC of Gasserian Ganglion for the treatment of idiopathic TN in our patients at an academic university-based medical institution in India. During the period of August 2012 to October 2013, a total of twelve PBCs of Gasserian Ganglion were performed in eleven patients suffering from idiopathic TN. There were nine female patients and two male patients with the age range of 35-70 years (median age: 54 years). In all patients cannulation of foramen ovale was done successfully in the first attempt. In eight out of eleven (72.7%) patients ideal 'Pear-shaped' balloon visualization could be achieved. In the remaining three patients (27.3%), inflated balloon was 'Bullet-shaped'. In one patient final placement of Fogarty balloon was not satisfactory and it ruptured during inflation. This case was deferred for one week when it was completed successfully with 'Pear-shaped' balloon inflation. During the follow up period of 1-13 months, there have been no recurrences of TN. Eight out of eleven patients (72.7%) are completely off medicines (carbamazepine and baclofen) and other two patients are stable on very low doses of carbamazepine. All patients have reported marked improvement in quality of life. This case series shows that percutaneous balloon compression is a useful minimally invasive intervention for the

  9. Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Transit Bus Experience Survey: April 2009--April 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, R.; Horne, D. B.

    2010-09-01

    This survey was commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect and analyze experiential data and information from a cross-section of U.S. transit agencies with varying degrees of compressed natural gas (CNG) bus and station experience. This information will be used to assist DOE and NREL in determining areas of success and areas where further technical or other assistance might be required, and to assist them in focusing on areas judged by the CNG transit community as priority items.

  10. Subpicosecond-pulse generation through cross-phase-modulation-induced modulational instability in optical fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia-Neto, A S; Faldon, M E; Sombra, A S; Wigley, P G; Taylor, J R

    1988-10-01

    We report subpicosecond-pulse generation at 1.319 microm in a single-mode optical fiber by modulational instability induced through cross-phase modulation by 1.06-microm pulses propagating in the normal dispersion regime. Pulse-repetition rates approaching 300 GHz were achieved.

  11. Patient's experiences of being discharged home from hospital following a diagnosis of malignant spinal cord compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, Jane; Warnock, Clare; Crowther, Lesley

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore experiences in the days and weeks following discharge home following diagnosis and treatment for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). Eleven participants took part in audio-recorded semi-structured interviews about their experiences at 1 and 3-4 weeks post-discharge home following a diagnosis of MSCC. Transcripts were analysed using a framework approach. Time emerged as an overarching theme within the framework of four time points: past, present, near future and distant future. Themes included getting home, challenges at home, community support, getting back to normal, in limbo, long-term goals and coping strategies. Getting to a level of coping at home after discharge following MSCC can take time. Services need to address this so that patients can live well within the limitations they face.

  12. Li+ alumino-silicate ion source development for the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W.; Seidl, Peter A.; Waldron, William L.; Wu, James K.

    2010-10-01

    We report results on lithium alumino-silicate ion source development in preparation for warmdense-matter heating experiments on the new Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCXII). The practical limit to the current density for a lithium alumino-silicate source is determined by the maximum operating temperature that the ion source can withstand before running into problems of heat transfer, melting of the alumino-silicate material, and emission lifetime. Using small prototype emitters, at a temperature of ~;;1275 oC, a space-charge-limited Li+ beam current density of J ~;;1 mA/cm2 was obtained. The lifetime of the ion source was ~;;50 hours while pulsing at a rate of 0.033 Hz with a pulse duration of 5-6 mu s.

  13. Characterization of compression strength of granite-epoxy composites using design of experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Piratelli-Filho

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a processing study of the polymer matrix composite (PMC developed with an epoxy polymeric matrix reinforced with particulate ceramic granite. This PMC composite has been reported to be used as structural parts of machine tools and Coordinate Measuring Machines due to its superior vibration damping characteristics and reduced processing cycle over cast iron. The investigated processing variables were epoxy content and particle size and the mechanical characterization was carried out by compressive tests. Rejects of granite with particle size smaller than 500 µm were prepared by crushing, milling and classification operations. The powder was mixed with different compositions of epoxy resin, between 15 and 20% in weight. An experiment was planned and executed according to the Factorial design technique using two variables at two levels. The obtained cylindrical samples were submitted to compressive strength tests and the results showed a maximum resistance of 114.23 MPa at 20 wt. (% epoxy, value close to that of the literature.

  14. Quasi-Isentropic Compression of Vapor Deposited Hexanitroazobenzene (HNAB): Experiments and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarrington, Cole; Tappan, Alexander; Specht, Paul; Knepper, Robert

    2017-06-01

    Vapor-deposited hexanitroazobenzene (HNAB) is an explosive with unique physical characteristics resulting from the deposition process that make it desirable for the study of microstructure effects. A relatively understudied high explosive (HE), few data are available on the equation of state (EOS) of HNAB reactants or products. HNAB samples exhibiting high density and sub-micron porosity and grain size were prepared using physical vapor deposition onto polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and lithium fluoride (LiF) substrates. The samples were quasi-isentropically ramp compressed using VELOCE, a compact pulsed power generator. Evidence of a low pressure phase transition was observed in HNAB. Interferometric measurements of reference and sample interface velocities enabled inference of the unreacted EOS for HNAB using DAKOTA, an optimization toolkit. Initial simulations of the HNAB critical thickness experiment have been carried out using the parameterized EOS, and a products EOS from thermal equilibrium calculations.

  15. Disposition of transuranic residues from plutonium isentropic compression experiment (Pu-ice) conducted at Z machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, Kapil K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; French, David M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Humphrey, Betty J [WESTON SOLUTIONS INC.; Gluth, Jeffry [SNL

    2010-01-01

    In 1992, the U.S. Congress passed legislation to discontinue above- and below-ground testing of nuclear weapons. Because of this, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) must rely on laboratory experiments and computer-based calculations to verify the reliability of the nation's nuclear stockpile. The Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) Z machine was developed by the DOE to support its science-based approach to stockpile stewardship. SNL/NM researchers also use the Z machine to test radiation effects on various materials in experiments designed to mimic nuclear explosions. Numerous components, parts, and materials have been tested. These experiments use a variety of radionuclides; however, plutonium (Pu) isotopes with greater than ninety-eight percent enrichment are the primary radionuclides used in the experiments designed for stockpile stewardship. In May 2006, SNL/NM received authority that the Z Machine Isentropic Compression Experiments could commence. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) provided the plutonium targets and loaded the target assemblies, which were fabricated by SNL/NM. LANL shipped the loaded assemblies to SNL/NM for Z machine experiments. Three experiments were conducted from May through July 2006. The residues from each experiment, which weighed up to 913 pounds, were metallic and packaged into a respective 55-gallon drum each. Based on a memorandum of understanding between the two laboratories, LANL provides the plutonium samples and the respective radio-isotopic information. SNL/NM conducts the experiments and provides temporary storage for the drums until shipment to LANL for final waste certification for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico. This paper presents a comprehensive approach for documenting generator knowledge for characterization of waste in cooperation with scientists at the two laboratories and addresses a variety of topics such as material control and accountability

  16. Microscale Mechanical Deformation Behaviors and Mechanisms in Bulk Metallic Glasses Investigated with Micropillar Compression Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jianchao

    2011-12-01

    Over the past years of my PhD study, the focused-ion-beam (FIB) based microcompression experiment has been thoroughly investigated with respect to the small-scale deformation in metallic glasses. It was then utilized to explore the elastic and plastic deformation mechanisms in metallic glasses. To this end, micropillars with varying sample sizes and aspect ratios were fabricated by the FIB technique and subsequently compressed on a modified nanoindentation system. An improved formula for the measurement of the Young's modulus was derived by adding a geometrical prefactor to the Sneddon's solution. Through the formula, geometry-independent Young's moduli were extracted from microcompression experiments, which are consistent with nanoindentation results. Furthermore, cyclic microcompression was developed, which revealed reversible inelastic deformation in the apparent elastic regime through high-frequency cyclic loading. The reversible inelastic deformation manifests as hysteric loops in cyclic microcompression and can be captured by the Kelvin-type viscoelastic model. The experimental results indicate that the free-volume zones behave essentially like supercooled liquids with an effective viscosity on the order of 1 x 108 Pas. The microscopic yield strengths were first extracted with a formula derived based on the Mohr-Coulomb law to account for the geometrical effects from the tapered micropillar and the results showed a weak size effect on the yield strengths of a variety of metallic-glass alloys, which can be attributed to Weibull statistics. The nature of the yielding phenomenon was explored with the cyclic micro-compression approach. Through cyclic microcompression of a Zr-based metallic glass, it can be demonstrated that its yielding stress increases at higher applied stress rate but its yielding strain is kept at a constant of ~ 2%. The room-temperature post-yielding deformation behavior of metallic glasses is characterized by flow serrations, which were

  17. INTERRUPTED IN-SITU COMPRESSIVE DEFORMATION EXPERIMENTS ON MMC FOAMS IN AN XCT: EXPERIMENTS AND ESTIMATION OF DISPLACEMENT FIELDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Losch

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of a metal-matrix composite foam are investigated by interrupted in-situ compressive deformation experiments within an X-ray computed tomography device (XCT. Each in-situ experiment generates a sequence of reconstructed 3D images of the foam microstructure. From these data, the deformation field is estimated by registring the images corresponding to three consecutive steps. To this end, the generic registration framework of the itk software suite is exploited and combined with several image preprocessing steps. Both segmented (binary images having just two grey values for foreground (strut structure and background (pore space and the result of the Euclidean distance transform (EDT on pore space and solid phase are used. The estimation quality is evaluated based on a sequence of synthetic data sets, where the foam’s microstructure is modelled by a random Laguerre tessellation. For large deformations, a combination of non-rigid registration for the EDT images and partwise-rigid registration on strongly deformed regions of the binary images, yields surprisingly small estimation errors.

  18. Experiments in a flighted conveyor comparing shear rates in compressed versus free surface flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlman, Nicholas; Higgins, Hannah; Krupiarz, Kamila; O'Connor, Ryan

    2017-11-01

    Uniformity of granular flow rate is critical in industry. Experiments in a flighted conveyor system aim to fill a gap in knowledge of achieving steady mass flow rate by correlating velocity profile data with mass flow rate measurements. High speed images were collected for uniformly-shaped particles in a bottom-driven flow conveyor belt system from which the velocity profiles can be generated. The correlation of mass flow rates from the velocity profiles to the time-dependent mass measurements will determine energy dissipation rates as a function of operating conditions. The velocity profiles as a function of the size of the particles, speed of the belt, and outlet size, will be compared to shear rate relationships found in past experiments that focused on gravity-driven systems. The dimension of the linear shear and type of decaying transition to the stationary bed may appear different due to the compression versus dilation space in open flows. The application of this research can serve to validate simulations in discrete element modeling and physically demonstrate a process that can be further developed and customized for industry applications, such as feeding a biomass conversion reactor. Sponsored by NIU's Office of Student Engagement and Experiential Learning.

  19. Alvar engine. An engine with variable compression ratio. Experiments and tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlandsson, Olof

    1998-09-01

    This report is focused on tests with Variable Compression Ratio (VCR) engines, according to the Alvar engine principle. Variable compression ratio means an engine design where it is possible to change the nominal compression ratio. The purpose is to increase the fuel efficiency at part load by increasing the compression ratio. At maximum load, and maybe supercharging with for example turbocharger, it is not possible to keep a high compression ratio because of the knock phenomena. Knock is a shock wave caused by self-ignition of the fuel-air mix. If knock occurs, the engine will be exposed to a destructive load. Because of the reasons mentioned it would be an advantage if it would be possible to change the compression ratio continuously when the load changes. The Alvar engine provides a solution for variable compression ratio based on well-known engine components. This paper provides information about efficiency and emission characteristics from tests with two Alvar engines. Results from tests with a phase shift mechanism (for automatic compression ratio control) for the Alvar engine are also reviewed Examination paper. 5 refs, 23 figs, 2 tabs, 5 appendices

  20. In-Fiber Subpicosecond Pulse Shaping for Nonlinear Optical Telecommunication Data Processing at 640 Gbit/s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Azaña

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We review recent work on all-fiber (long-period fiber grating devices for optical pulse shaping, particularly flat-top pulse generation, down to the subpicosecond range and their application for nonlinear switching (demultiplexing of optical time-division multiplexed (OTDM data signals in fiber-optic telecommunication links operating up to 640 Gbit/s. Experiments are presented demonstrating error-free 640-to-10 Gbit/s demultiplexing of the 64 tributary channels using the generated flat-top pulses for temporal gating in a Kerr-effect-based nonlinear optical loop mirror. The use of flat-top pulses has critical benefits in the demultiplexing process, including a significantly increased timing-jitter tolerance (up to ~500 fs, i.e., 30% of the bit period and the associated improvement in the bit-error-rate performance (e.g., with a sensitivity increase of up to ~13 dB as compared with the use of Gaussian-like gating pulses. Long-period fiber grating pulse shapers with reduced polarization dependence are fabricated and successfully used for polarization-independent 640-to-10 Gbit/s demultiplexing experiments.

  1. Optimization of current waveform tailoring for magnetically driven isentropic compression experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisman, E. M.; Reisman, D. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Stygar, W. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Haill, T. A.; Davis, J.-P.; Brown, J. L.; Seagle, C. T.; Spielman, R. B.

    2016-06-01

    The Thor pulsed power generator is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The design consists of up to 288 decoupled and transit time isolated capacitor-switch units, called "bricks," that can be individually triggered to achieve a high degree of pulse tailoring for magnetically driven isentropic compression experiments (ICE) [D. B. Reisman et al., Phys. Rev. Spec. Top.-Accel. Beams 18, 090401 (2015)]. The connecting transmission lines are impedance matched to the bricks, allowing the capacitor energy to be efficiently delivered to an ICE strip-line load with peak pressures of over 100 GPa. Thor will drive experiments to explore equation of state, material strength, and phase transition properties of a wide variety of materials. We present an optimization process for producing tailored current pulses, a requirement for many material studies, on the Thor generator. This technique, which is unique to the novel "current-adder" architecture used by Thor, entirely avoids the iterative use of complex circuit models to converge to the desired electrical pulse. We begin with magnetohydrodynamic simulations for a given material to determine its time dependent pressure and thus the desired strip-line load current and voltage. Because the bricks are connected to a central power flow section through transit-time isolated coaxial cables of constant impedance, the brick forward-going pulses are independent of each other. We observe that the desired equivalent forward-going current driving the pulse must be equal to the sum of the individual brick forward-going currents. We find a set of optimal brick delay times by requiring that the L2 norm of the difference between the brick-sum current and the desired forward-going current be a minimum. We describe the optimization procedure for the Thor design and show results for various materials of interest.

  2. Optimization of current waveform tailoring for magnetically driven isentropic compression experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waisman, E. M.; Reisman, D. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Stygar, W. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Haill, T. A.; Davis, J.-P.; Brown, J. L.; Seagle, C. T. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Spielman, R. B. [Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho 83201 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The Thor pulsed power generator is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The design consists of up to 288 decoupled and transit time isolated capacitor-switch units, called “bricks,” that can be individually triggered to achieve a high degree of pulse tailoring for magnetically driven isentropic compression experiments (ICE) [D. B. Reisman et al., Phys. Rev. Spec. Top.–Accel. Beams 18, 090401 (2015)]. The connecting transmission lines are impedance matched to the bricks, allowing the capacitor energy to be efficiently delivered to an ICE strip-line load with peak pressures of over 100 GPa. Thor will drive experiments to explore equation of state, material strength, and phase transition properties of a wide variety of materials. We present an optimization process for producing tailored current pulses, a requirement for many material studies, on the Thor generator. This technique, which is unique to the novel “current-adder” architecture used by Thor, entirely avoids the iterative use of complex circuit models to converge to the desired electrical pulse. We begin with magnetohydrodynamic simulations for a given material to determine its time dependent pressure and thus the desired strip-line load current and voltage. Because the bricks are connected to a central power flow section through transit-time isolated coaxial cables of constant impedance, the brick forward-going pulses are independent of each other. We observe that the desired equivalent forward-going current driving the pulse must be equal to the sum of the individual brick forward-going currents. We find a set of optimal brick delay times by requiring that the L{sub 2} norm of the difference between the brick-sum current and the desired forward-going current be a minimum. We describe the optimization procedure for the Thor design and show results for various materials of interest.

  3. Compression algorithm for data analysis in a radio link (preparation of PACEM 2 experiment)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, G.; Sylvain, M.

    1982-11-01

    The Hadamard transformation for image compression is applied to a radio data transmission system. The programs used and the performance obtained are described. The algorithms use PASCAL and the listed programs are written in FORTRAN 77. The experimental results of 62 images of 64 lines, show a standard deviation of 1.5% with a compression rate of 18.5, which is in accordance with the proposed goals.

  4. Challenges in QCD matter physics. The scientific programme of the Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ablyazimov, T. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR-LIT), Dubna (Russian Federation). Lab. of Information Technologies; Abuhoza, A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Adak, R.P. [Bose Institute, Kolkata (India). Dept. of Physics; and others

    2017-03-15

    Substantial experimental and theoretical efforts worldwide are devoted to explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter. At LHC and top RHIC energies, QCD matter is studied at very high temperatures and nearly vanishing net-baryon densities. There is evidence that a Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP) was created at experiments at RHIC and LHC. The transition from the QGP back to the hadron gas is found to be a smooth cross over. For larger net-baryon densities and lower temperatures, it is expected that the QCD phase diagram exhibits a rich structure, such as a first-order phase transition between hadronic and partonic matter which terminates in a critical point, or exotic phases like quarkyonic matter. The discovery of these landmarks would be a breakthrough in our understanding of the strong interaction and is therefore in the focus of various high-energy heavy-ion research programs. The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR will play a unique role in the exploration of the QCD phase diagram in the region of high net-baryon densities, because it is designed to run at unprecedented interaction rates. High-rate operation is the key prerequisite for high-precision measurements of multi-differential observables and of rare diagnostic probes which are sensitive to the dense phase of the nuclear fireball. The goal of the CBM experiment at SIS100 (√(s{sub NN}) = 2.7-4.9 GeV) is to discover fundamental properties of QCD matter: the phase structure at large baryon-chemical potentials (μ{sub B} > 500 MeV), effects of chiral symmetry, and the equation of state at high density as it is expected to occur in the core of neutron stars. In this article, we review the motivation for and the physics programme of CBM, including activities before the start of data taking in 2024, in the context of the worldwide efforts to explore high-density QCD matter. (orig.)

  5. Subpicosecond infrared spectroscopy on the photoisomerisation of the protonated Schiff base of all-trans retinal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, P.; Zurek, M.; Röschinger, T.; Patzelt, H.; Oesterhelt, D.; Zinth, W.

    1997-04-01

    The light induced isomerisation reaction of the protonated Schiff base retinal with butylamine was studied in solution by subpicosecond infrared spectroscopy in the spectral range of the CC, CC and CNH + stretching modes. Upon heating by the internal S 1 → S 0 conversion process, vibrationally hot molecules are formed which are characterized by pronounced red-shifts of the CC, the CC and CNH + stretching modes. The frequency shifts can be used to estimate an intramolecular temperature of the chromophore of 550 K immediately after the S 1 → S 0 transition.

  6. Sub-picosecond snapshots of fast electrons from high intensity laser-matter interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompili, R; Anania, M P; Bisesto, F; Botton, M; Castellano, M; Chiadroni, E; Cianchi, A; Curcio, A; Ferrario, M; Galletti, M; Henis, Z; Petrarca, M; Schleifer, E; Zigler, A

    2016-12-26

    The interaction of a high-intensity short-pulse laser with thin solid targets produces electron jets that escape the target and positively charge it, leading to the formation of the electrostatic potential that in turn governs the ion acceleration. The typical timescale of such phenomena is on the sub-picosecond level. Here we show, for the first time, temporally-resolved measurements of the first released electrons that escaped from the target, so-called fast electrons. Their total charge, energy and temporal profile are provided by means of a diagnostics based on Electro-Optical Sampling with temporal resolution below 100 fs.

  7. Characterization of short-pulse laser-produced x-rays for diagnosing magnetically driven cylindrical isentropic compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Hiroshi; Daykin, Tyler; Bauer, Bruno; Beg, Farhat

    2017-10-01

    We have developed an experimental platform to study material properties of magnetically compressed cylinder using a 1 MA pulsed power generator Zebra and a 50 TW subpicosecond short-pulse laser Leopard at the UNR's Nevada Terawatt Facility. According to a MHD simulation, strong magnetic fields generated by 100 ns rise time Zebra current can quasi-isentropically compress a material to the strongly coupled plasma regime. Taking advantage of the cylindrical geometry, a metal rod can be brought to higher pressures than that in the planar geometry. To diagnose the compressed rod with high precision x-ray measurements, an initial laser-only experiment was carried out to characterize laser-produced x-rays. Interaction of a high-intensity, short-pulse laser with solids produces broadband and monochromatic x-rays with photon energies high enough to probe dense metal rods. Bremsstrahlung was measured with Imaging plate-based filter stack spectrometers and monochromatic 8.0 keV Cu K-alpha was recorded with an absolutely calibrated Bragg crystal spectrometer. The broadband x-ray source was applied to radiography of thick metal objects and different filter materials were tested. The experimental results and a design of a coupled experiment will be presented.

  8. Hayman uterine compression stitch for arresting atonic postpartum hemorrhage: 5 years experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smiti Nanda

    2011-06-01

    Conclusion: Two parallel vertical compression sutures (Hayman stitch placed in the uterus controls bleeding effectively. The technique is easy, rapid and requires less skill and this simple procedure be tried first before other complex measures like uterine artery ligation are undertaken particularly for those obstetricians who lack sufficient training and skill.

  9. Time-Dependent Material Data Essential for the Durability Analysis of Composite Flywheels Provided by Compressive Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thesken, John C.; Bowman, Cheryl L.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2003-01-01

    Successful spaceflight operations require onboard power management systems that reliably achieve mission objectives for a minimal launch weight. Because of their high specific energies and potential for reduced maintenance and logistics, composite flywheels are an attractive alternative to electrochemical batteries. The Rotor Durability Team, which comprises members from the Ohio Aerospace Institute (OAI) and the NASA Glenn Research Center, completed a program of elevated temperature testing at Glenn' s Life Prediction Branch's Fatigue Laboratory. The experiments provided unique design data essential to the safety and durability of flywheel energy storage systems for the International Space Station and other manned spaceflight applications. Analysis of the experimental data (ref. 1) demonstrated that the compressive stress relaxation of composite flywheel rotor material is significantly greater than the commonly available tensile stress relaxation data. Durability analysis of compression preloaded flywheel rotors is required for accurate safe-life predictions for use in the International Space Station.

  10. Optimization of a transition radiation detector for the compressed baryonic matter experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arend, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) of the compressed baryonic matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR has to provide electron-pion separation as well as charged-particle tracking. Within this work, thin and symmetric Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers (MWPCs) without additional drift region were proposed. the proposed prototypes feature a foil-based entrance window to minimize the material budget and to reduce the absorption probability of the generated TR photon. Based on the conceptual design of thin and symmetric MWPCs without drift region, multiple prototypes were constructed and their performance presented within this thesis. With the constructed prototypes of generations II and III the geometries of the wire and cathode planes were determined to be 4+4 mm and 5+5 mm. Based on the results of a performed test beam campaign in 2011 with this prototypes new prototypes of generation IV were manufactured and tested in a subsequent test beam campaign in 2012. Prototypes of different radiators were developed together with the MWPC prototypes. Along with regular foil radiators, foam-based radiator types made of polyethylene foam were utilized. Also radiators constructed in a sandwich design, which used different fiber materials confined with solid foam sheets, were used. For the prototypes without drift region, simulations of the electrostatic and mechanical properties were performed. The GARFIELD software package was used to simulate the electric field and to determine the resulting drift lines of the generated electrons. The mean gas amplification depending on the utilized gas and the applied anode voltage was simulated and the gas-gain homogeneity was verified. Since the thin foil-based entrance window experiences a deformation due to pressure differences inside and outside the MWPC, the variation on the gas gain depending on the deformation was simulated. The mechanical properties focusing on the stability of the entrance window was determined with a finiteelement

  11. Advanced plasma flow simulations of cathodic-arc and ferroelectric plasma sources for neutralized drift compression experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B. Sefkow

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Large-space-scale and long-time-scale plasma flow simulations are executed in order to study the spatial and temporal evolution of plasma parameters for two types of plasma sources used in the neutralized drift compression experiment (NDCX. The results help assess the charge neutralization conditions for ion beam compression experiments and can be employed in more sophisticated simulations, which previously neglected the dynamical evolution of the plasma. Three-dimensional simulations of a filtered cathodic-arc plasma source show the coupling efficiency of the plasma flow from the source to the drift region depends on geometrical factors. The nonuniform magnetic topology complicates the well-known general analytical considerations for evaluating guiding-center drifts, and particle-in-cell simulations provide a self-consistent evaluation of the physics in an otherwise challenging scenario. Plasma flow profiles of a ferroelectric plasma source demonstrate that the densities required for longitudinal compression experiments involving ion beams are provided over the drift length, and are in good agreement with measurements. Simulations involving azimuthally asymmetric plasma creation conditions show that symmetric profiles are nevertheless achieved at the time of peak on-axis plasma density. Also, the ferroelectric plasma expands upstream on the thermal expansion time scale, and therefore avoids the possibility of penetration into the acceleration gap and transport sections, where partial neutralization would increase the beam emittance. Future experiments on NDCX will investigate the transverse focusing of an axially compressing intense charge bunch to a sub-mm spot size with coincident focal planes using a strong final-focus solenoid. In order to fill a multi-tesla solenoid with the necessary high-density plasma for beam charge neutralization, the simulations predict that supersonically injected plasma from the low-field region will penetrate and

  12. Time-resolved electron thermal conduction by probing of plasma formation in transparent solids with high power subpicosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vu, Brian -Tinh Van [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1994-02-01

    This dissertation work includes a series of experimental measurements in a search for better understanding of high temperature (104-106K) and high density plasmas (1022-1024cm-3) produced by irradiating a transparent solid target with high intensity (1013 - 1015W/cm2) and subpicosecond (10-12-10-13s) laser pulses. Experimentally, pump and probe schemes with both frontside (vacuum-plasma side) and backside (plasma-bulk material side) probes are used to excite and interrogate or probe the plasma evolution, thereby providing useful insights into the plasma formation mechanisms. A series of different experiments has been carried out so as to characterize plasma parameters and the importance of various nonlinear processes. Experimental evidence shows that electron thermal conduction is supersonic in a time scale of the first picosecond after laser irradiation, so fast that it was often left unresolved in the past. The experimental results from frontside probing demonstrate that upon irradiation with a strong (pump) laser pulse, a thin high temperature (~40eV) super-critical density (~1023/cm3) plasma layer is quickly formed at the target surface which in turn becomes strongly reflective and prevents further transmission of the remainder of the laser pulse. In the bulk region behind the surface, it is also found that a large sub-critical (~1018/cm3) plasma is produced by inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption and collisional ionization. The bulk underdense plasma is evidenced by large absorption of the backside probe light. A simple and analytical model, modified from the avalanche model, for plasma evolution in transparent materials is proposed to explain the experimental results. Elimination of the bulk plasma is then experimentally illustrated by using targets overcoated with highly absorptive films.

  13. High-intensity coherent FIR radiation from sub-picosecond electron bunches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kung, P.H.; Lihn, Hung-chi; Wiedemann, H.; Bocek, D.

    1994-01-01

    A facility to generate high-intensity, ultra-short pulses of broad-band far-infrared radiation has been assembled and tested at Stanford. The device uses sub-picosecond relativistic electron bunches to generate coherent radiation through transition or synchrotron radiation in the far-infrared (FIR) regime between millimeter waves and wavelengths of about 100 {mu}m and less. Experimental results show a peak radiation power of greater than 0.33 MW within a micro-bunch and an average FIR radiation power of 4 mW. The average bunch length of 2856 micro-bunches within a 1 {mu}sec macro-pulse is estimated to be about 480 sec. Simulations experimental setup and results will be discussed.

  14. Measurement of Sub-Picosecond Electron Bunches via Electro-Optic Sampling of Coherent Transition Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, Timothy John [Northern Illinois U.

    2012-01-01

    Future collider applications as well as present high-gradient laser plasma wakefield accelerators and free-electron lasers operating with picosecond bunch durations place a higher demand on the time resolution of bunch distribution diagnostics. This demand has led to significant advancements in the field of electro-optic sampling over the past ten years. These methods allow the probing of diagnostic light such as coherent transition radiation or the bunch wakefields with sub-picosecond time resolution. We present results on the single-shot electro-optic spectral decoding of coherent transition radiation from bunches generated at the Fermilab A0 photoinjector laboratory. A longitudinal double-pulse modulation of the electron beam is also realized by transverse beam masking followed by a transverse-to-longitudinal phase-space exchange beamline. Live profile tuning is demonstrated by upstream beam focusing in conjunction with downstream monitoring of single-shot electro-optic spectral decoding of the coherent transition radiation.

  15. Sub-picosecond pulse break-up in an InGaAsP optical amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romstad, Francis Pascal

    For high-speed optical communication systems with data speed higher than 200 Gb/s sub-picosecond pulse dynamics, coherent effects become important. We have, experimentally and theoretically, investigated the pulse distortion of a 150 fs pulse due to amplification in a 250 μm long InGaAsP ridge...... broadening and eventual break-up for input pulse energies on the order of picoJoules. This break-up is present in the gain region (6-14 dB), while for absorption (-6 dB9 and transparency, pulse narrowing by a factor of two is evidenced. We observe that not only the amplitude is modulated, but also the linear...

  16. Sub-picosecond pulse break-up in an InGaAsP optical amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romstad, Francis Pascal

    1999-01-01

    For high speed optical communication system with data speed higher than 200 Gb/s sub-picosecond pulse dynamics, coherent effects become important.We have, experimentally and theoretically, investigated the pulse distortion of an 150 fs pulse due to amplification in a 250 ìm long InGaAsP ridge...... broadening and eventual break-up for input pulse energies on the order of picoJoules. This break-up is present in the gain region (6-14 dB), while for absorption (-6 dB) and transparency, pulse narrowing by a factor of two is evidenced. We observe that not only the amplitude is modulated, but also the linear...

  17. Subpicosecond resolution studies of solvation dynamics in polar aprotic and alcohol solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castner, Edward W., Jr.; Maroncelli, Mark; Fleming, Graham R.

    1987-02-01

    Subpicosecond resolution measurements of the kinetics of dipolar solvation have been made. The time resolved Stokes shift of a dye molecule, LDS-750 was measured using the fluorescence upconversion technique in the solvents acetonitrile, DMSO, nitrobenzene, methanol, and n-butanol. The solvation dynamics in both aprotic and alcohol solvents occur on a time scale roughly given by the longitudinal relaxation time as predicted by simple continuum theories. The relaxation in nitrobenzene and butanol is nonexponential and the relaxation in methanol is significantly faster than the calculated time. These deviations from simple theory are discussed in the context of (i) the significance of high frequency dispersions in the dielectric response, (ii) translational contributions to the solvent relaxation, and (iii) molecular aspects of the solvation not accounted in the continuum description.

  18. All-Optical Switching of Magnetic Tunnel Junctions with Single Subpicosecond Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun-Yang; He, Li; Wang, Jian-Ping; Li, Mo

    2017-02-01

    The magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) is one of the most important building blocks of spintronic logic and memory components for beyond-CMOS computation and communication. Although switching of MTJs without magnetic field has been achieved by charge and spin current injection, the operation speed is limited fundamentally by the spin-precession time to many picoseconds. We report the demonstration of ultrafast all-optical switching of an MTJ using single subpicosecond infrared laser pulses. This optically switchable MTJ uses ferrimagnetic Gd(Fe,Co) as the free layer and its switching is read out by measuring its tunneling magnetoresistance with a Δ R /R ratio of 0.6%. A switching repetition rate at MHz has been demonstrated, but the fundamental upper limit should be higher than tens of GHz rate. This result represents an important step toward integrated optospintronic devices that combines spintronics and photonics technologies to enable ultrafast conversion between fundamental information carriers of electron spins and photons.

  19. Injection of Compressed Diced Cartilage in the Correction of Secondary and Primary Rhinoplasty: A New Technique with 12 Years' Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, O Onur

    2017-11-01

    There are instances where small or large pockets are filled with diced cartilage in the nose, without use of wrapping materials. For this purpose, 1-cc commercial syringes were used. The obtained results were partial and incomplete. For better and improved results, the author designed new syringes, with two different sizes, which compress the diced cartilage for injection. The author presents his experience accrued over the past 12 years with 2366 primary, 749 secondary, 67 cleft lip and nose, and a total of 3182 rhinoplasties, using his new syringe design, which compresses diced cartilage and injects the diced cartilages as a conglutinate mass, simulating carved costal cartilage, but a malleable one. In 3125 patients, the take of cartilage graft was complete (98.2 percent) and a smooth surface was obtained, giving them a natural appearance. In 21 patients (0.65 percent), there was partial resorption of cartilage. Correction was performed with touch-up surgery by reinjection of a small amount of diced cartilage. In 36 patients (1.13 percent), there was overcorrection that, 1 year later, was treated by simple rasping. Compared with diced cartilage wrapped with Surgicel or fascia, the amount of injected cartilage graft is predictable because it consists purely of cartilage. The injected diced cartilage, because it is compressed and becomes a conglutinated mass, resembles a wood chip and simulates carved cartilage. It is superior to carved cartilage in that it is moldable, time saving, and gives a good result with no late show or warping. The injection takes only a few minutes.

  20. Nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and magnesium release from two compressed fertilizers: column experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Sanjurjo, M. J.; Alvarez-Rodríguez, E.; Núñez-Delgado, A.; Fernández-Marcos, M. L.; Romar-Gasalla, A.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this work was to study nutrients release from two compressed nitrogen-potassium-phosphorous (NPK) fertilizers. In the Lourizán Forest Center, tablet-type controlled-release fertilizers (CRF) were prepared by compressing various mixtures of fertilizers without covers or binders. We used soil columns (50 cm long and 7.3 cm inner diameter) that were filled with soil from the surface layer (0-20 cm) of an A horizon corresponding to a Cambic Umbrisol. Tablets of two slow-release NPK fertilizers (11-18-11 or 8-8-16) were placed into the soil (within the first 3 cm), and then water was percolated through the columns in a saturated regime for 80 days. Percolates were analyzed for N, P, K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+. These elements were also determined in soil and fertilizer tablets at the end of the trials. Nutrient concentrations were high in the first leachates and reached a steady state when 1426 mm of water had been percolated, which is equivalent to approximately 1.5 years of rainfall in this geographic area. In the whole trial, both tablets lost more than 80% of their initial N, P and K contents. However, K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+ were the most leached, whereas N and P were lost in leachates to a lesser extent. Nutrient release was slower from the tablet with a composition of 8-8-16 than from the 11-18-11 fertilizer. In view of that, the 8-8-16 tablet can be considered more adequate for crops with a nutrient demand sustained over time. At the end of the trial, the effects of these fertilizers on soil chemical parameters were still evident, with a significant increase of pH, available Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, P and effective cation exchange capacity (eCEC) in the fertilized columns, as well as a significant decrease in exchangeable Al3+, reaching values < 0.08 cmol (+) kg-1.

  1. Dual-phase steel sheets under cyclic tension-compression to large strains: Experiments and crystal plasticity modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecevic, Milovan; Korkolis, Yannis P.; Kuwabara, Toshihiko; Knezevic, Marko

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we develop a physically-based crystal plasticity model for the prediction of cyclic tension-compression deformation of multi-phase materials, specifically dual-phase (DP) steels. The model is elasto-plastic in nature and integrates a hardening law based on statistically stored dislocation density, localized hardening due to geometrically necessary dislocations (GNDs), slip-system-level kinematic backstresses, and annihilation of dislocations. The model further features a two level homogenization scheme where the first level is the overall response of a two-phase polycrystalline aggregate and the second level is the homogenized response of the martensite polycrystalline regions. The model is applied to simulate a cyclic tension-compression-tension deformation behavior of DP590 steel sheets. From experiments, we observe that the material exhibits a typical decreasing hardening rate during forward loading, followed by a linear and then a non-linear unloading upon the load reversal, the Bauschinger effect, and changes in hardening rate during strain reversals. To predict these effects, we identify the model parameters using a portion of the measured data and validate and verify them using the remaining data. The developed model is capable of predicting all the particular features of the cyclic deformation of DP590 steel, with great accuracy. From the predictions, we infer and discuss the effects of GNDs, the backstresses, dislocation annihilation, and the two-level homogenization scheme on capturing the cyclic deformation behavior of the material.

  2. Vapor Compression and Thermoelectric Heat Pump Heat Exchangers for a Condensate Distillation System: Design and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Lisa R.; Ungar, Eugene K.

    2013-01-01

    Maximizing the reuse of wastewater while minimizing the use of consumables is critical in long duration space exploration. One of the more promising methods of reclaiming urine is the distillation/condensation process used in the cascade distillation system (CDS). This system accepts a mixture of urine and toxic stabilizing agents, heats it to vaporize the water and condenses and cools the resulting water vapor. The CDS wastewater flow requires heating and its condensate flow requires cooling. Performing the heating and cooling processes separately requires two separate units, each of which would require large amounts of electrical power. By heating the wastewater and cooling the condensate in a single heat pump unit, mass, volume, and power efficiencies can be obtained. The present work describes and compares two competing heat pump methodologies that meet the needs of the CDS: 1) a series of mini compressor vapor compression cycles and 2) a thermoelectric heat exchanger. In the paper, the system level requirements are outlined, the designs of the two heat pumps are described in detail, and the results of heat pump performance tests are provided. A summary is provided of the heat pump mass, volume and power trades and a selection recommendation is made.

  3. Vapor Compression and Thermoelectric Heat Pumps for a Cascade Distillation Subsystem: Design and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Lisa R.; Ungar, Eugene K.

    2012-01-01

    Humans on a spacecraft require significant amounts of water for drinking, food, hydration, and hygiene. Maximizing the reuse of wastewater while minimizing the use of consumables is critical for long duration space exploration. One of the more promising consumable-free methods of reclaiming wastewater is the distillation/condensation process used in the Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS). The CDS heats wastewater to the point of vaporization then condenses and cools the resulting water vapor. The CDS wastewater flow requires heating for evaporation and the product water flow requires cooling for condensation. Performing the heating and cooling processes separately would require two separate units, each of which would demand large amounts of electrical power. Mass, volume, and power efficiencies can be obtained by heating the wastewater and cooling the condensate in a single heat pump unit. The present work describes and compares two competing heat pump methodologies that meet the needs of the CDS: 1) a series of mini compressor vapor compression cycles and 2) a thermoelectric heat exchanger. In the paper, the CDS system level requirements are outlined, the designs of the two heat pumps are described in detail, and the results of heat pump analysis and performance tests are provided. The mass, volume, and power requirement for each heat pump option is compared and the advantages and disadvantages of each system are listed.

  4. Magnetic compression anastomosis for biliary obstruction: review and experience at Tokyo Medical University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoi, Takao; Kasuya, Kazuhiko; Sofuni, Atsushi; Itokawa, Fumihide; Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Kurihara, Toshio; Ikeuchi, Nobuhito; Takeuchi, Mami; Nagano, Takeshi; Iwamoto, Hitoshi; Yamanouchi, Eigoro; Shimazu, Motohide; Tsuchida, Akihiko

    2011-05-01

    Magnetic compression anastomosis (MCA) is a revolutionary, minimally invasive method of performing choledochoenterostomy or choledochocholedochostomy without using surgical techniques in patients with biliary stricture or obstruction. Herein, we describe a case series of MCA for severe biliary stricture or obstruction, which could not be treated with conventional therapies. Two patients with biliary obstruction were treated using MCA for choledochocholedochostomy and choledochoenterostomy at Tokyo Medical University Hospital and Tokyo Medical University Hachioji Medical Center. Endoscopically, a samarium-cobalt (Sm-Co) rare-earth magnet was placed at the superior site of obstruction through the percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage route and another Sm-Co magnet was placed at the inferior site of obstruction. A comprehensive computer-aided literature search for MCA was performed up to September 2009 by using MEDLINE and EMBASE. MCA techniques enabled complete anastomosis in both cases without procedure-related complications. The MCA technique is a revolutionary method of performing choledochocholedochostomy and choledochoenterostomy interventionally in patients with biliary obstruction, for whom the conventional endoscopic procedure is not available, or in candidates who are deemed unsuitable for surgery.

  5. An experiment study of homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion and emission in a gasoline engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jianyong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI technology has exhibited high potential to reduce fuel consumption and NOx emissions over normal spark ignition engines significantly. Optimized kinetic process (OKP technology is implemented to realize HCCI combustion in a port fuel injection gasoline engine. The combustion and emission characteristics are investigated with variation of intake air temperature, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR rate and intake air pressure. The results show that intake air temperature has great influence on HCCI combustion characteristic. Increased intake air temperature results in advance combustion phase, shorten combustion duration, and lower indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP. Increased EGR rate retards combustion start phase and prolongs combustion duration, while maximum pressure rising rate and NOx emission are reduced with increase of EGR rate. In the condition with constant fuel flow quantity, increased air pressure leads to retarded combustion phase and lower pressure rising rate, which will reduce the engine knocking tendency. In the condition with constant air fuel ratio condition, fuel injection quantity increases as intake air pressure increases, which lead to high heat release rate and high emission level. The optimal intake air temperature varies in different operating area, which can be tuned from ambient temperature to 220℃ by heat management system. The combination of EGR and air boost technology could expand operating area of HCCI engine, which improve indicated mean effective pressure from maximum 510kPa to 720kPa.

  6. Time- and space-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy of aluminum irradiated by a subpicosecond high-power laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzortzakis, S.; Audebert, P.; Renaudin, P.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Geindre, J. P.; Chenais-Popovics, C.; Nagels, V.; Gary, S.; Shepherd, R.; Girard, F.; Matsushima, I.; Peyrusse, O.; Gauthier, J.-C.

    2006-05-01

    The ionization and recombination dynamics of transient aluminum plasmas was measured using point projection K-shell absorption spectroscopy. An aluminum plasma was produced with a subpicosecond beam of the 100-TW laser at the LULI facility and probed at different times with a picosecond X-ray backlighter created with a synchronized subpicosecond laser beam. Fourier-Domain-Interferometry (FDI) was used to measure the electron temperature at the peak of the heating laser pulse. Absorption X-ray spectra at early times are characteristic of a dense and rather homogeneous plasma, with limited longitudinal gradients as shown by hydrodynamic simulations. The shift of the Al K-edge was measured in the cold dense plasma located at the edge of the heated plasma. From the 1s 2p absorption spectra, the average ionization was measured as a function of time and was also modeled with a collisional-radiative atomic physics code coupled with hydrodynamic simulations.

  7. Time- and space-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy of aluminum irradiated by a subpicosecond high-power laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzortzakis, S. [Laboratoire pour l' Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI), UMR 7605, CNRS-CEA-Universite Paris VI-Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)]. E-mail: gauthier@celia.ubordeaux1.fr; Audebert, P. [Laboratoire pour l' Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI), UMR 7605, CNRS-CEA-Universite Paris VI-Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Renaudin, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel Cedex (France); Bastiani-Ceccotti, S. [Laboratoire pour l' Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI), UMR 7605, CNRS-CEA-Universite Paris VI-Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Geindre, J.P. [Laboratoire pour l' Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI), UMR 7605, CNRS-CEA-Universite Paris VI-Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Chenais-Popovics, C. [Laboratoire pour l' Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI), UMR 7605, CNRS-CEA-Universite Paris VI-Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Nagels, V. [Laboratoire pour l' Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI), UMR 7605, CNRS-CEA-Universite Paris VI-Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Gary, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel Cedex (France); Shepherd, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Girard, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel Cedex (France); Matsushima, I. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba 3058568 (Japan); Peyrusse, O. [CELIA, UMR 5107, CNRS-CEA-Universite Bordeaux 1, 33405 Talence (France); Gauthier, J.-C. [CELIA, UMR 5107, CNRS-CEA-Universite Bordeaux 1, 33405 Talence (France)

    2006-05-15

    The ionization and recombination dynamics of transient aluminum plasmas was measured using point projection K-shell absorption spectroscopy. An aluminum plasma was produced with a subpicosecond beam of the 100-TW laser at the LULI facility and probed at different times with a picosecond X-ray backlighter created with a synchronized subpicosecond laser beam. Fourier-Domain-Interferometry (FDI) was used to measure the electron temperature at the peak of the heating laser pulse. Absorption X-ray spectra at early times are characteristic of a dense and rather homogeneous plasma, with limited longitudinal gradients as shown by hydrodynamic simulations. The shift of the Al K-edge was measured in the cold dense plasma located at the edge of the heated plasma. From the 1s-2p absorption spectra, the average ionization was measured as a function of time and was also modeled with a collisional-radiative atomic physics code coupled with hydrodynamic simulations.

  8. Overall comparison of subpicosecond electron beam diagnostics by the polychromator, the interferometer and the femtosecond streak camera

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, T; Yoshimatsu, T; Sasaki, S; Sugiyama, Y; Ishi, K; Shibata, Y; Kondo, Y; Yoshii, K; Ueda, T; Uesaka, M

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of longitudinal bunch length of subpicosecond and picosecond electron beams have been performed by three methods with three radiation sources at the 35 MeV S-band twin liner accelerators at Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo. The methods we adopt are the femtosecond streak camera with a nondispersive reflective optics, the coherent transition radiation (CTR) Michelson interferometer and the 10 ch polychromator that detects the spectrum of CTR and coherent diffraction radiation (CDR). The measurements by the two CTR methods were independently done with the streak camera and their results were consistent with one another. As a result, the reliability of the polychromator for the diagnostics of less than picosecond electron bunch and the usefulness of the diagnostics for the single shot measurement were verified. Furthermore, perfect nondestructive diagnostics for subpicosecond bunches was performed utilizing CDR interferometry. Then the good agreement between CDR interfero...

  9. An Analysis of the X-Ray Diffraction Signal for the (alpha) - (epsilon) Transition in Shock-Compressed Iron: Simulation and Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawreliak, J; Colvin, J D; Kalantar, D H; Lorenzana, H E; Stolken, J S; Davies, H M; Germann, T C; Holian, B L; Kadau, K; Lomdahl, P S; Higginbotham, A; Rosolankova, K; Sheppard, J; Wark, J S

    2006-04-10

    Recent published work has shown that the phase change of shock compressed iron along the [001] direction does transform to the {epsilon} (HCP) phase similar to the case for static measurements. This article provides an indepth analysis of the experiment and NEMD simulations, using x-ray diffraction in both cases to study the crystal structure upon transition. Both simulation and experiment are consistent with a compression and shuffle mechanism responsible for the phase change from BCC to HCP. Also both show a polycrystalline structure upon the phase transition, due to the four degenerate directions the phase change can occur on, with grain sizes measured of 4nm in the NEMD simulations and {approx} 2nm in the experiment. And looking at the time scale of the transition the NEMD shows the transition from the compressed BCC to HCP is less then 1.2 ps where the experimental data places an upper limit on the transition of 80 ps.

  10. Freeze-bond strength experiments,: radially confined compression tests on saline and fresh water samples.

    OpenAIRE

    Bueide, Ida Mari

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents and analyses the method and results from strength experiments on freeze- bonds conducted on radially confined cylindrical samples (tri-axial tests). In total sixty samples were tested successfully, divided on twenty configurations. The variables consisted of confinement, submersion time, initial temperature and salinity (8 configurations with fresh water ice and 12 with 2-3ppt saline ice). The test set-up was similar to that of Møllegaard [2012] and Shafrova and Høyland [...

  11. Results of explosively-driven isentropic compression experiments (HEPP-ICE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasker, D. G. (Douglas G.); Goforth, J. H. (James H.); Oona, H. (Henn); Rigg, P. A. (Paulo A.); Dennis-Koller, D. (Darcie); King, J. C. (James Carrel); Torres, D. T. (David T); Herrera, D. H. (Dennis H.); Sena, F. C. (Francis C.); Abeyta, F. G. (Frank G.); Tabaka, L. J. (Leonard J.)

    2004-01-01

    Using the Los Alamos high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) system, isentropic equation of state (EOS) data may be obtained for a wide range of materials. Current pulses with risetimes of {approx}500 ns and current densities exceeding 400 MA/m, create continuous magnetic loading of samples at megabar pressures. We will summarize the technique and the problems that had to be overcome to perform the HEPP-ICE experiments at these pressures. We will then present our EOS results obtained with the conventional Lagrangian analysis and the Hayes 'Backward' integration method, and compare the data with the published principal isentrope of OFHC copper.

  12. Dynamic Compression System: An Effective Nonoperative Treatment for Pectus Carinatum: A Single Center Experience in Basel, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesia, Sergio B; Holland-Cunz, Stefan; Häcker, Frank-Martin

    2016-12-01

    Background Several nonoperative treatments are currently available for the correction of pectus carinatum (PC). Objective The objective of this study is to report our single center experience with the dynamic compression system (DCS). Materials and Methods The DCS is a rigid aluminum brace. PC is reshaped into a normal appearance through anterior-posterior pressure and lateral expansion of the chest. Patients with chondrogladiolar PC were considered suitable for the nonoperative treatment with DCS. Results In this study, 53 of 68 children (78%) with chondrogladiolar PC were assessed retrospectively: 2 children were corrected by surgery, 12/53 (23%) treated by a conventional orthesis, 11/53 (21%) remained without therapy because of minor PC, and 36/53 (68%) were treated using the DCS. Of these 36 patients, 17 (47%) are already cured with a good (7/17) to excellent (10/17) cosmetic result after a median treatment period of 9 months (range, 2.5-16 months). The mean daily time of wearing of the device for those 17 patients was 9 hours (range, 5-18). None abandoned the treatment and there were almost no complications. Conclusions Lateral expansion of the chest and the possibility to measure the applied pressure seemed to be the key to DCSs success. We propose the DCS as first choice in the treatment of chondrogladiolar PC in children. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Preamplifier-shaper prototype for the Fast Transition Detector of the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR

    CERN Document Server

    Soltveit, Hans Kristian

    2007-01-01

    In this work a preamplifier-shaper prototype for the Fast Transition Detector of the Compressed BaryonicMatter (CBM) experiment at FAIR fabricated using a 0.35 μm CMOS technology will be presented. The ASIC integrates 16 identical Charge Sensitive Amplifiers (CSA) followed by a Pole-Zero network, two bridged-T filters, Common-Mode FeedBack (CMFB) network and two non-inverting level shifting stages. The circuit is optimized for a detector capacitance Cd of (5-10)pF. Measurement results confirm the noise of 330 e− + 12 e−/pF obtained in simulations for a pulse with a Full Width Half Maximum (FWHM) of 71 ns. The circuit recovers to the baseline within 200 ns. The conversion gain is 12.64 mV/fC. An integral nonlinearity of 0.7% is also achieved. The maximum output swing is 2 V. The power consumption is 16 mW/channel where the main contributors are the input transistor and the level shifting stage with 5.3 mW and 6.6 mW, respectively. The total area of the chip is 12 mm2. Although the circuit was designed for...

  14. Laser-driven shock experiments in pre-compressed water: Implications for magnetic field generation in Icy Giant planets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K; Benedetti, L R; Jeanloz, R; Celliers, P M; Eggert, J H; Hicks, D G; Moon, S J; Mackinnon, A; Henry, E; Koenig, M; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A; Collins, G W

    2005-11-10

    Laser-driven shock compression of pre-compressed water (up to 1 GPa precompression) produces high-pressure, -temperature conditions in the water inducing two optical phenomena: opacity and reflectivity in the initially transparent water. The onset of reflectivity at infrared wavelengths can be interpreted as a semi-conductor to electronic conductor transition in water and is found at pressures above {approx}130 GPa for single-shocked samples pre-compressed to 1 GPa. This electronic conduction provides an additional contribution to the conductivity required for magnetic field generation in Icy Giant planets like Uranus and Neptune.

  15. Observation of coherently enhanced tunable narrow-band terahertz transition radiation from a relativistic sub-picosecond electron bunch train

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piot, P. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Sun, Y. -E [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Maxwell, T. J. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Ruan, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Lumpkin, A. H. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Rihaoui, M. M. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Thurman-Keup, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2011-06-27

    We experimentally demonstrate the production of narrow-band (δf/f ~ =20% at f ~ = 0.5 THz) THz transition radiation with tunable frequency over [0.37, 0.86] THz. The radiation is produced as a train of sub-picosecond relativistic electron bunches transits at the vacuum-aluminum interface of an aluminum converter screen. In addition, we show a possible application of modulated beams to extend the dynamical range of a popular bunch length diagnostic technique based on the spectral analysis of coherent radiation.

  16. In-Fiber Subpicosecond Pulse Shaping for Nonlinear Optical Telecommunication Data Processing at 640 Gbit/s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azaña, J.; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Palushani, Evarist

    2012-01-01

    We review recent work on all-fiber (long-period fiber grating) devices for optical pulse shaping, particularly flat-top pulse generation, down to the subpicosecond range and their application for nonlinear switching (demultiplexing) of optical time-division multiplexed (OTDM) data signals in fiber...... benefits in the demultiplexing process, including a significantly increased timing-jitter tolerance (up to ~500 fs, i.e., 30% of the bit period) and the associated improvement in the bit-error-rate performance (e.g., with a sensitivity increase of up to ~13 dB as compared with the use of Gaussian...

  17. Benefit from non-linear frequency compression hearing aids in a clinical setting: the effects of duration of experience and severity of high-frequency hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Kathryn; Khanom, Mumtaz; Dickinson, Ann-Marie; Munro, Kevin J

    2014-04-01

    To determine whether non-linear frequency compression (NLFC) is effective for hearing-impaired adults in a clinical setting. To determine whether benefit from NLFC is related to duration of NLFC experience or severity of high-frequency hearing loss. Participants were fitted with Phonak frequency compression hearing aids as part of their standard clinical care, using the manufacturer's default fitting settings. Participants had been using NLFC for between 1 and 121 weeks at the time of testing. Speech recognition thresholds in noise and consonant recognition in quiet were measured with and without NLFC enabled. Forty-six experienced adult hearing-aid users. Consonant recognition in quiet, but not speech recognition in noise was significantly better with NLFC enabled. There was no significant correlation between duration of frequency compression experience and benefit. Benefit for consonant recognition was negatively correlated with mean audiometric thresholds from 2-6 kHz. NLFC was beneficial for consonant recognition but not speech recognition in noise. There was no evidence to support the idea that a long period of acclimatization is necessary to gain full benefit. The relation between benefit and high-frequency thresholds might be explained by the poor audibility of compressed information for some listeners with severe loss.

  18. Fiber Optical Parametric Chirped Pulse Amplification of Sub-Picosecond Pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cristofori, Valentina; Lali-Dastjerdi, Zohreh; Da Ros, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally, for the first time to our knowledge, fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplification of 400-fs pulses. The 400-fs signal is stretched, amplified by 26 dB and compressed back to 500 fs.......We demonstrate experimentally, for the first time to our knowledge, fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplification of 400-fs pulses. The 400-fs signal is stretched, amplified by 26 dB and compressed back to 500 fs....

  19. Single-shot measurement of subpicosecond KrF pulse width by three-photon fluorescence of the XeF visible transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarukura, N; Watanabe, M; Endoh, A; Watanabe, S

    1988-11-01

    The intensity of the XeF C-A transition induced by a subpicosecond KrF laser is shown to have a cubic dependence on KrF laser intensity. The third-order autocorrelation technique for measuring the duration of a single KrF subpicosecond pulse has been developed utilizing this visible transition. A pulse width of 220 fsec was successfully measured with a high contrast of ~10. The visible fluorescence is more useful to researchers than vacuum-UV fluorescences. Furthermore, this simple technique may be applied over a wide UV wavelength region from 204 to 306 nm.

  20. Technical Review Report for the Application for Contents Amendment for Shipping Isentropic Compression Experiment (ICE) Apparatus in 9977 Packaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, M

    2009-04-16

    This report documents the review of Application for Contents Amendment for Shipping Isentropic Compression Experiment (ICE) Apparatus in 9977 Packaging, prepared by Savannah River Packaging Technology (SRPT) of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) of Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, -- the Submittal -- at the request of the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Agency's (NNSA) Albuquerque Facility Operations Division, for the shipment of the ICE apparatus from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). The ICE apparatus consists of a stainless steel assembly containing about 8 grams of {sup 239}Pu or its dose equivalent as noted in Table 1, Comparison of 9977 Content C.1 and the ICE Radioactive Contents, of the Submittal. The ICE target is mounted on the transport container assembly base. A Viton{sup R} O-ring seals the transport container base to the transport container body. Another Viton{sup R} O-ring seals the transport container handle to the transport container body. The ICE apparatus weighs less than 30 pounds and has less than 0.6 watts decay heat rate. For the Model 9977 Package, the maximum payload weight is 100 pounds and the maximum decay heat rate is 19 watts. Thus, the maximum payload weight and the maximum decay heat rate for the Model 9977 Package easily bound those for the ICE apparatus. This Addendum supplements the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), Revision 2, for the Model 9977 Package and Addendum 1, Revision 2, to Revision 2 of the Model 9977 Package SARP. The ICE apparatus is considered as part of Content Envelope C.6, Samples and Sources, under the submittal for the Model 9978 Package SARP currently under review. The Staff at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) recommends that the Submittal be approved by the DOE-Headquarters Certifying Official (EM-60), and incorporated into a subsequent revision to the current Certificate of Compliance (CoC), to the

  1. Compression embedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-07-07

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique are disclosed. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%. 21 figs.

  2. Dynamic characterization and amplification of sub-picosecond pulses in fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cristofori, Valentina; Lali-Dastjerdi, Zohreh; Rishøj, Lars Søgaard

    2013-01-01

    We show a first-time demonstration of amplification of 400 fs pulses in a fiber optical parametric amplifier. The 400 fs signal is stretched in time, amplified by 26 dB and compressed back to 500 fs. A significant broadening of the pulses is experimentally shown due to dispersion and limited gain...... bandwidth both in saturated and unsaturated gain regimes....

  3. The co-evolution of alternative fuel infrastructure and vehicles. A study of the experience of Argentina with compressed natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collantes, Gustavo [Renergh Consulting and Department of Commerce, State of Washington, 2001 6th Ave, Suite 2600, Seattle, WA 98121 (United States); Melaina, Marc W. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (United States)

    2011-02-15

    In a quest for strategic and environmental benefits, the developed countries have been trying for many years to increase the share of alternative fuels in their transportation fuel mixes. They have met very little success though. In this paper, we examine the experience of Argentina with compressed natural gas. We conducted interviews with a wide range of stakeholders and analyzed econometrically data collected in Argentina to investigate the factors, economic, political, and others that determined the high rate of adoption of this fuel. A central objective of this research was to identify lessons that could be useful to developed countries in their efforts to deploy alternative fuel vehicles. We find that fuel price regulation was a significant determinant of the adoption of compressed natural gas, while, contrary to expectations, government financing of refueling infrastructure was minimal. (author)

  4. First test experiment to produce the slowed-down RI beam with the momentum-compression mode at RIBF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumikama, T., E-mail: sumikama@ribf.riken.jp [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Ahn, D.S.; Fukuda, N.; Inabe, N.; Kubo, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Aoi, N. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Beaumel, D. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire d’Orsay (IPNO), CNRS/IN2P3, 91405 Orsay (France); Hasegawa, K. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Ideguchi, E. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Imai, N. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, RIKEN Campus, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0298 (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Matsushita, M.; Michimasa, S. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, RIKEN Campus, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0298 (Japan); Otsu, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Shimoura, S. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, RIKEN Campus, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0298 (Japan); Teranishi, T. [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2016-06-01

    The {sup 82}Ge beam has been produced by the in-flight fission reaction of the {sup 238}U primary beam with 345 MeV/u at the RIKEN RI beam factory, and slowed down to about 15 MeV/u using the energy degraders. The momentum-compression mode was applied to the second stage of the BigRIPS separator to reduce the momentum spread. The energy was successfully reduced down to 13 ± 2.5 MeV/u as expected. The focus was not optimized at the end of the second stage, therefore the beam size was larger than the expectation. The transmission of the second stage was half of the simulated value mainly due to out of focus. The two-stage separation worked very well for the slowed-down beam with the momentum-compression mode.

  5. Influence of High-Current-Density Impulses on the Compression Behavior: Experiments with Iron and a Nickel-Based Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demler, E.; Gerstein, G.; Dalinger, A.; Epishin, A.; Rodman, D.; Nürnberger, F.

    2017-01-01

    Difficulties of processing of high strength and/or brittle materials by plastic deformation, e.g., by forging, require to develop new industrial technologies. In particular, the feasible deformation rates are limited for low-ductile metallic materials. For this reason, processes were investigated to improve the deformability in which electrical impulses are to be applied to lower the yield strength. However, owing to the impulse duration and low current densities, concomitant effects always occur, e.g., as a result of Joule heating. Current developments in power electronics allow now to transmit high currents as short pulses. By reducing the impulse duration and increasing the current density, the plasticity of metallic materials can be correspondingly increased. Using the examples of polycrystalline iron and a single-crystal, nickel-based alloy (PWA 1480), current advances in the development of methods for forming materials by means of high-current-density impulses are demonstrated. For this purpose, appropriate specimens were loaded in compression and, using novel testing equipment, subjected to a current strength of 10 kA with an impulse duration of 2 ms. For a pre-defined strain, the test results show a significant decrease in the compressive stress during the compression test and a significant change in the dislocation distribution following the current impulse treatment.

  6. Evaluation of surgical outcome of Jack vertebral dilator kyphoplasty for osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture-clinical experience of 218 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jin; Shen, Yimin; Zhang, Ning; Ren, Yongxin; Cai, Weihua; Yu, Lipeng; Wu, Naiqing; Yin, Guoyong

    2016-04-30

    Osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture is a serious complication of osteoporosis. Various vertebral kyphoplasty surgeries, which have their own unique features, are commonly used for osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture. Based on the anatomic property of the thoracolumbar vertebral pedicle that its horizontal diameter is twice that of the vertical diameter, we designed Jack vertebral dilator for better restoration of the vertebral height by manipulating the mechanical force. A total of 218 patients (236 vertebrae) with osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture were treated with Jack vertebral dilator. Surgery was successfully completed in all cases, and all the 218 patients were followed up for an average of 14.2 months (range 3 to 30 months). Bone cement leakage occurred in 12 cases, but no symptoms were reported. No other complications were noticed. The VAS scores were 8.2 ± 1.3, 1.7 ± 0.9, and 1.8 ± 0.8 and the ODI was 78.2 ± 13.3 %, 18.5 ± 7.3 %, and 20.9 ± 6.8 % before surgery and 1 week after surgery and at the final follow-up, respectively. The anterior vertebral body height was 19.3 ± 3.2, 25.1 ± 2.6, and 24.9 ± 2.6 mm and the central vertebral body height was 18.7 ± 3.0, 24.8 ± 3.0, and 24.5 ± 2.9 mm before surgery and 1 week after surgery and at the final follow-up, respectively. Cobb angle was 16.2° ± 6.6°, 8.1° ± 5.6°, and 8.5° ± 5.6° before surgery and 1 week after surgery and at the final follow-up, respectively. Jack vertebral dilator kyphoplasty for osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture is safe, feasible, and effective and has the prospect of further broad application in the future.

  7. The co-evolution of alternative fuel infrastructure and vehicles: A study of the experience of Argentina with compressed natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collantes, Gustavo, E-mail: gustavo.collantes@commerce.wa.go [Renergh Consulting and Department of Commerce, State of Washington, 2001 6th Ave, Suite 2600, Seattle, WA 98121 (United States); Melaina, Marc W. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (United States)

    2011-02-15

    In a quest for strategic and environmental benefits, the developed countries have been trying for many years to increase the share of alternative fuels in their transportation fuel mixes. They have met very little success though. In this paper, we examine the experience of Argentina with compressed natural gas. We conducted interviews with a wide range of stakeholders and analyzed econometrically data collected in Argentina to investigate the factors, economic, political, and others that determined the high rate of adoption of this fuel. A central objective of this research was to identify lessons that could be useful to developed countries in their efforts to deploy alternative fuel vehicles. We find that fuel price regulation was a significant determinant of the adoption of compressed natural gas, while, contrary to expectations, government financing of refueling infrastructure was minimal. - Research Highlights: {yields}The broad scale adoption of CNG for transportation in Argentina was initiated by a market demand for an effective fuel that was priced at a significantly lower level compared to the mainstream alternatives. {yields}The Argentine played a marginal role in the development of refueling infrastructure. {yields}The role of the government focused on sending clear signals to the marketplace and developing effective codes and standards. {yields}Consumers willingness to switch to CNG increases as state of the economy deteriorates and disposable incomes decrease.

  8. Correlation of the dynamics of native human acetylcholinesterase and its inhibited huperzine A counterpart from sub-picoseconds to nanoseconds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapp, M.; Tehei, M.; Trovaslet, M.; Nachon, F.; Martinez, N.; Koza, M. M.; Weik, M.; Masson, P.; Peters, J.

    2014-01-01

    It is a long debated question whether catalytic activities of enzymes, which lie on the millisecond timescale, are possibly already reflected in variations in atomic thermal fluctuations on the pico- to nanosecond timescale. To shed light on this puzzle, the enzyme human acetylcholinesterase in its wild-type form and complexed with the inhibitor huperzine A were investigated by various neutron scattering techniques and molecular dynamics simulations. Previous results on elastic neutron scattering at various timescales and simulations suggest that dynamical processes are not affected on average by the presence of the ligand within the considered time ranges between 10 ps and 1 ns. In the work presented here, the focus was laid on quasi-elastic (QENS) and inelastic neutron scattering (INS). These techniques give access to different kinds of individual diffusive motions and to the density of states of collective motions at the sub-picoseconds timescale. Hence, they permit going beyond the first approach of looking at mean square displacements. For both samples, the autocorrelation function was well described by a stretched-exponential function indicating a linkage between the timescales of fast and slow functional relaxation dynamics. The findings of the QENS and INS investigation are discussed in relation to the results of our earlier elastic incoherent neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:24872501

  9. Measuring sub-picosecond optical propagation delay changes on optical fibre using photonics and radio frequency components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julie, Roufurd P. M.; Abbott, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    To synchronise the elements of a radio interferometer array, a phase stable reference frequency from a central clock is disseminated to the different elements of array. The reference frequency is modulated onto an optical carrier and transported over optical fibre over a distance of up to 12 km. For radio interferometric efficiency, the propagation delay of the transferred reference frequency is required to be stable to less than 3 picoseconds (ps) over 20 minutes. To enable this, the optical fibre transmission line is thermally shielded to minimise length changes due to thermal expansion and contraction on the optical fibre. A test setup and procedure, that measures propagation delay changes to the required accuracy and precision, is required to verify the efficiency of the thermal shielding on the installed optical fibre. This paper describes a method using photonic and radio frequency (RF) components together with an RF vector network analyser (VNA) and post-processing to measure changes in propagation delay on the optical fibre link to sub-picosecond levels. The measurement system has been tested to a stability of < 200 femtoseconds (fs) and a resolution of < 10 fs.

  10. Large optical nonlinearity of ITO nanorods for sub-picosecond all-optical modulation of the full-visible spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peijun; Schaller, Richard D; Ocola, Leonidas E; Diroll, Benjamin T; Ketterson, John B; Chang, Robert P H

    2016-09-29

    Nonlinear optical responses of materials play a vital role for the development of active nanophotonic and plasmonic devices. Optical nonlinearity induced by intense optical excitation of mobile electrons in metallic nanostructures can provide large-amplitude, dynamic tuning of their electromagnetic response, which is potentially useful for all-optical processing of information and dynamic beam control. Here we report on the sub-picosecond optical nonlinearity of indium tin oxide nanorod arrays (ITO-NRAs) following intraband, on-plasmon-resonance optical pumping, which enables modulation of the full-visible spectrum with large absolute change of transmission, favourable spectral tunability and beam-steering capability. Furthermore, we observe a transient response in the microsecond regime associated with slow lattice cooling, which arises from the large aspect-ratio and low thermal conductivity of ITO-NRAs. Our results demonstrate that all-optical control of light can be achieved by using heavily doped wide-bandgap semiconductors in their transparent regime with speed faster than that of noble metals.

  11. Large optical nonlinearity of ITO nanorods for sub-picosecond all-optical modulation of the full-visible spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peijun; Schaller, Richard D.; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Diroll, Benjamin T.; Ketterson, John B.; Chang, Robert P. H.

    2016-09-01

    Nonlinear optical responses of materials play a vital role for the development of active nanophotonic and plasmonic devices. Optical nonlinearity induced by intense optical excitation of mobile electrons in metallic nanostructures can provide large-amplitude, dynamic tuning of their electromagnetic response, which is potentially useful for all-optical processing of information and dynamic beam control. Here we report on the sub-picosecond optical nonlinearity of indium tin oxide nanorod arrays (ITO-NRAs) following intraband, on-plasmon-resonance optical pumping, which enables modulation of the full-visible spectrum with large absolute change of transmission, favourable spectral tunability and beam-steering capability. Furthermore, we observe a transient response in the microsecond regime associated with slow lattice cooling, which arises from the large aspect-ratio and low thermal conductivity of ITO-NRAs. Our results demonstrate that all-optical control of light can be achieved by using heavily doped wide-bandgap semiconductors in their transparent regime with speed faster than that of noble metals.

  12. Anisotropic Concrete Compressive Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustenhoff Hansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Henrik Brøner; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2017-01-01

    When the load carrying capacity of existing concrete structures is (re-)assessed it is often based on compressive strength of cores drilled out from the structure. Existing studies show that the core compressive strength is anisotropic; i.e. it depends on whether the cores are drilled parallel...... correlation to the curing time. The experiments show no correlation between the anisotropy and the curing time and a small strength difference between the two drilling directions. The literature shows variations on which drilling direction that is strongest. Based on a Monto Carlo simulation of the expected...

  13. Nonoperative active management of critical limb ischemia: initial experience using a sequential compression biomechanical device for limb salvage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sultan, Sherif

    2008-01-01

    Critical limb ischemia (CLI) patients are at high risk of primary amputation. Using a sequential compression biomechanical device (SCBD) represents a nonoperative option in threatened limbs. We aimed to determine the outcome of using SCBD in amputation-bound nonreconstructable CLI patients regarding limb salvage and 90-day mortality. Thirty-five patients with 39 critically ischemic limbs (rest pain = 12, tissue loss = 27) presented over 24 months. Thirty patients had nonreconstructable arterial outflow vessels, and five were inoperable owing to severe comorbidity scores. All were Rutherford classification 4 or 5 with multilevel disease. All underwent a 12-week treatment protocol and received the best medical treatment. The mean follow-up was 10 months (SD +\\/- 6 months). There were four amputations, with an 18-month cumulative limb salvage rate of 88% (standard error [SE] +\\/- 7.62%). Ninety-day mortality was zero. Mean toe pressures increased from 38.2 to 67 mm Hg (SD +\\/- 33.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 55-79). Popliteal artery flow velocity increased from 45 to 47.9 cm\\/s (95% CI 35.9-59.7). Cumulative survival at 12 months was 81.2% (SE +\\/- 11.1) for SCBD, compared with 69.2% in the control group (SE +\\/- 12.8%) (p = .4, hazards ratio = 0.58, 95% CI 0.15-2.32). The mean total cost of primary amputation per patient is euro29,815 ($44,000) in comparison with euro13,900 ($20,515) for SCBD patients. SCBD enhances limb salvage and reduces length of hospital stay, nonoperatively, in patients with nonreconstructable vessels.

  14. Compressive beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Sound source localization with sensor arrays involves the estimation of the direction-of-arrival (DOA) from a limited number of observations. Compressive sensing (CS) solves such underdetermined problems achieving sparsity, thus improved resolution, and can be solved efficiently with convex...

  15. Speech Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry D. Gibson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Speech compression is a key technology underlying digital cellular communications, VoIP, voicemail, and voice response systems. We trace the evolution of speech coding based on the linear prediction model, highlight the key milestones in speech coding, and outline the structures of the most important speech coding standards. Current challenges, future research directions, fundamental limits on performance, and the critical open problem of speech coding for emergency first responders are all discussed.

  16. Still image and video compression with MATLAB

    CERN Document Server

    Thyagarajan, K

    2010-01-01

    This book describes the principles of image and video compression techniques and introduces current and popular compression standards, such as the MPEG series. Derivations of relevant compression algorithms are developed in an easy-to-follow fashion. Numerous examples are provided in each chapter to illustrate the concepts. The book includes complementary software written in MATLAB SIMULINK to give readers hands-on experience in using and applying various video compression methods. Readers can enhance the software by including their own algorithms.

  17. Initial clinical experience with a novel vertebral augmentation system for treatment of symptomatic vertebral compression fractures: A case series of 26 consecutive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Larry E

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Minimally invasive vertebral augmentation procedures are widely used to treat vertebral compression fractures although procedural polymethylmethacrylate cement leakage remains common. We report herein our initial experience with a novel vertebral augmentation technique designed to treat symptomatic vertebral osteoporotic fractures and osteolytic metastases with minimal cement extravasation. Methods Forty-two vertebral fractures were identified in 26 consecutive patients (mean age 74 ± 9 years. All patients were treated with a novel percutaneous vertebral augmentation device (Kiva® VCF Treatment System, Benvenue Medical, Santa Clara, CA, USA. Indications for surgery included recent (≤ 3 months symptomatic osteoporotic vertebral fracture (n = 34 and pathologic vertebral fractures (e.g. metabolic bone disease, myeloma, metastasis (n = 8 located between T10 and S1. Patient outcomes were evaluated pre-treatment and at 2- and 6-month follow-up visits. Postoperative cement extravasation was assessed with computed tomography. Patient-reported back pain was quantified using an 11-point numeric scale. Back-specific functional disability was self-reported with the Oswestry Disability Index on a 0 to 100% scale. Results No cases of intraoperative hypotension, respiratory disturbance, neurological deterioration, infection, or death were observed. There were 2 (4.8% levels where anterior cement leakage was visible radiographically in patients with osteolyses. No intracanal leakage was observed. Back pain scores improved 71% (p Conclusions The initial clinical experience with the Kiva® System demonstrated significant improvements in back pain and function with minimal and clinically insignificant procedural cement leakage.

  18. Shock compression experiment for gold at an extreme pressure of 0.36Gbar driven by radiation on the Shenguang-III prototype laser facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Z.; Yang, D.; Li, S.; Jiang, X.; Liu, Y.; Yi, R.; Song, T.; Guo, L.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, H.; Li, Z.; Jiang, S.; Liu, S.; Yang, J.; Ding, Y.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Lan, K.; Zheng, W.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we report a radiation-driven shock compression experiment for gold at an extreme pressure around 0.36 Gbar. In order to obtain such high pressure with relatively low laser energy, two main proposals were used in the target design: a smaller-size cavity to obtain higher temperature radiation resource, and impedance-match technique for pressure enhancement. The present experiment was carried out on the Shenguang-III prototype laser facility which is located at the research center of laser fusion, Mianyang, China. Eight laser beams (a total energy of 6.4 kJ of 0.35 μm light in 1 nsec) were injected into a cavity and heat its inner wall, and then the generated x-ray radiation was used to ablate an aluminum substrate and generate shock waves. For using the impedance-match, the gold stepped sample was placed on the aluminum substrate. The shock wave velocity of 49.6 km/s was measured by a streaked optical pyrometer, and then the shock-induced pressure of 0.36 Gbar was deduced using Hugoniot data of gold.

  19. Numerical experiments on thermal convection of highly compressible fluids with variable viscosity and thermal conductivity: Implications for mantle convection of super-Earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, Masanori; Yamamoto, Mayumi

    2018-01-01

    We conduct a series of numerical experiments of thermal convection of highly compressible fluids in a two-dimensional rectangular box, in order to study the mantle convection on super-Earths. The thermal conductivity and viscosity are assumed to exponentially depend on depth and temperature, respectively, while the variations in thermodynamic properties (thermal expansivity and reference density) with depth are taken to be relevant for the super-Earths with 10 times the Earth's. From our experiments we identified a distinct regime of convecting flow patterns induced by the interplay between the adiabatic temperature change and the spatial variations in viscosity and thermal conductivity. That is, for the cases with strong temperature-dependent viscosity and depth-dependent thermal conductivity, a "deep stratosphere" of stable thermal stratification is formed at the base of the mantle, in addition to thick stagnant lids at their top surfaces. In the "deep stratosphere", the fluid motion is insignificant particularly in the vertical direction in spite of smallest viscosity owing to its strong dependence on temperature. Our finding may further imply that some of super-Earths which are lacking in mobile tectonic plates on their top surfaces may have "deep stratospheres" at the base of their mantles.

  20. Subpicosecond Nd:glass CPA laser system for kilovolt x-ray generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, T.; Sharma, L.B.; Daido, H.; Uematsu, H.; Ninomiya, S.; Murai, K.; Kato, Y.; Nakatsuka, M.; Izawa, Y.; Nakai, S. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565 (Japan); Kitada, T. [The Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., 3-11-20 Naoji, Amagasaki 661 (Japan); Yamanaka, C. [Institute for Laser Technology, 1-8-4 Utsubohonmachi, Nishiku Osaka 550 (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    We describe an experiment on second-harmonic generation of a picosecond Nd:glass laser pulse with time predelay at intensities of up to 200 GW/cm{sup 2} and a wavelength of 1.053 {mu}m. Duration of the second-harmonic pulse was reduced to 0.6 ps from 1.5 ps width of the fundamental pulse at an optimum intensity of 50 GW/cm{sup 2}. The spatial profile of the laser beam is not degraded by self-focusing at an input intensity of {approximately}50 GW/cm{sup 2}. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. An Algorithm for the Numerical Solution of the Pseudo Compressible Navier-stokes Equations Based on the Experimenting Fields Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Salama, Amgad

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the experimenting fields approach is applied to the numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation for incompressible viscous flow. In this work, the solution is sought for both the pressure and velocity fields in the same time. Apparently, the correct velocity and pressure fields satisfy the governing equations and the boundary conditions. In this technique a set of predefined fields are introduced to the governing equations and the residues are calculated. The flow according to these fields will not satisfy the governing equations and the boundary conditions. However, the residues are used to construct the matrix of coefficients. Although, in this setup it seems trivial constructing the global matrix of coefficients, in other setups it can be quite involved. This technique separates the solver routine from the physics routines and therefore makes easy the coding and debugging procedures. We compare with few examples that demonstrate the capability of this technique.

  2. Centrifugal Gas Compression Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fultun, Roy

    2002-11-01

    A centrifuged gas of kinetic, elastic hard spheres compresses isothermally and without flow of heat in a process that reverses free expansion. This theorem follows from stated assumptions via a collection of thought experiments, theorems and other supporting results, and it excludes application of the reversible mechanical adiabatic power law in this context. The existence of an isothermal adiabatic centrifugal compression process makes a three-process cycle possible using a fixed sample of the working gas. The three processes are: adiabatic mechanical expansion and cooling against a piston, isothermal adiabatic centrifugal compression back to the original volume, and isochoric temperature rise back to the original temperature due to an influx of heat. This cycle forms the basis for a Thomson perpetuum mobile that induces a loop of energy flow in an isolated system consisting of a heat bath connectable by a thermal path to the working gas, a mechanical extractor of the gas's internal energy, and a device that uses that mechanical energy and dissipates it as heat back into the heat bath. We present a simple experimental procedure to test the assertion that adiabatic centrifugal compression is isothermal. An energy budget for the cycle provides a criterion for breakeven in the conversion of heat to mechanical energy.

  3. Cavity-less sub-picosecond pulse generation for the demultiplexing of a 640 Gbaud OTDM signal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kong, Deming; Guan, Pengyu; Hu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    A 703 fs cavity-less pulse source based on pulse carving and pulse compression is demonstrated and utilized for demultiplexing a 640 Gbaud OTDM signal. Timing jitter is found to be the main limiting factor.......A 703 fs cavity-less pulse source based on pulse carving and pulse compression is demonstrated and utilized for demultiplexing a 640 Gbaud OTDM signal. Timing jitter is found to be the main limiting factor....

  4. Notion Of Artificial Labs Slow Global Warming And Advancing Engine Studies Perspectives On A Computational Experiment On Dual-Fuel Compression-Ignition Engine Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonye K. Jack

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available To appreciate clean energy applications of the dual-fuel internal combustion engine D-FICE with pilot Diesel fuel to aid public policy formulation in terms of present and future benefits to the modern transportation stationary power and promotion of oil and gas green- drilling the brief to an engine research team was to investigate the feasible advantages of dual-fuel compression-ignition engines guided by the following concerns i Sustainable fuel and engine power delivery ii The requirements for fuel flexibility iii Low exhausts emissions and environmental pollution iv Achieving low specific fuel consumption and economy for maximum power v The comparative advantages over the conventional Diesel engines vi Thermo-economic modeling and analysis for the optimal blend as basis for a benefitcost evaluation Planned in two stages for reduced cost and fast turnaround of results - initial preliminary stage with basic simple models and advanced stage with more detailed complex modeling. The paper describes a simplified MATLAB based computational experiment predictive model for the thermodynamic combustion and engine performance analysis of dual-fuel compression-ignition engine studies operating on the theoretical limited-pressure cycle with several alternative fuel-blends. Environmental implications for extreme temperature moderation are considered by finite-time thermodynamic modeling for maximum power with predictions for pollutants formation and control by reaction rates kinetics analysis of systematic reduced plausible coupled chemistry models through the NCN reaction pathway for the gas-phase reactions classes of interest. Controllable variables for engine-out pollutants emissions reduction and in particular NOx elimination are identified. Verifications and Validations VampV through Performance Comparisons were made using a clinical approach in selection of StrokeBore ratios greater-than and equal-to one amp88051 low-to-high engine speeds and medium

  5. TEM Video Compressive Sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Andrew; Kovarik, Libor; Abellan, Patricia; Yuan, Xin; Carin, Lawrence; Browning, Nigel D.

    2015-08-01

    One of the main limitations of imaging at high spatial and temporal resolution during in-situ TEM experiments is the frame rate of the camera being used to image the dynamic process. While the recent development of direct detectors has provided the hardware to achieve frame rates approaching 0.1ms, the cameras are expensive and must replace existing detectors. In this paper, we examine the use of coded aperture compressive sensing methods [1, 2, 3, 4] to increase the framerate of any camera with simple, low-cost hardware modifications. The coded aperture approach allows multiple sub-frames to be coded and integrated into a single camera frame during the acquisition process, and then extracted upon readout using statistical compressive sensing inversion. Our simulations show that it should be possible to increase the speed of any camera by at least an order of magnitude. Compressive Sensing (CS) combines sensing and compression in one operation, and thus provides an approach that could further improve the temporal resolution while correspondingly reducing the electron dose rate. Because the signal is measured in a compressive manner, fewer total measurements are required. When applied to TEM video capture, compressive imaging couled improve acquisition speed and reduce the electron dose rate. CS is a recent concept, and has come to the forefront due the seminal work of Candès [5]. Since the publication of Candès, there has been enormous growth in the application of CS and development of CS variants. For electron microscopy applications, the concept of CS has also been recently applied to electron tomography [6], and reduction of electron dose in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging [7]. To demonstrate the applicability of coded aperture CS video reconstruction for atomic level imaging, we simulate compressive sensing on observations of Pd nanoparticles and Ag nanoparticles during exposure to high temperatures and other environmental conditions

  6. COMPRESSION WAVES AND PHASE PLOTS: SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlikowski, D; Minich, R

    2011-08-01

    Compression wave analysis started nearly 50 years ago with Fowles. Coperthwaite and Williams gave a method that helps identify simple and steady waves. We have been developing a method that gives describes the non-isentropic character of compression waves, in general. One result of that work is a simple analysis tool. Our method helps clearly identify when a compression wave is a simple wave, a steady wave (shock), and when the compression wave is in transition. This affects the analysis of compression wave experiments and the resulting extraction of the high-pressure equation of state.

  7. Subpicosecond Electrooptic Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Vector Fields, 1990, p. 114. 2.7 S. Ramo, J. R. Whinnery, and T. Van Duzer , Fields and Waves in Communication Electronics, New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc...1984, ch. 8. 2.8 S. Ramo, J. R. Whinnery, and T. Van Duzer , Fields and Waves in Communication Electronics, New York : John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1984...Ramo, J. R. Whinnery, and T. Van Duzer , Fields and Waves in Communication Electronics, New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1984, ch. 8. 5.14 S. Ramo, J

  8. Compression limits in cascaded quadratic soliton compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Bang, Ole; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2008-01-01

    Cascaded quadratic soliton compressors generate under optimal conditions few-cycle pulses. Using theory and numerical simulations in a nonlinear crystal suitable for high-energy pulse compression, we address the limits to the compression quality and efficiency.......Cascaded quadratic soliton compressors generate under optimal conditions few-cycle pulses. Using theory and numerical simulations in a nonlinear crystal suitable for high-energy pulse compression, we address the limits to the compression quality and efficiency....

  9. Longitudinal bunch compression study with induction voltage modulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakayama Akira

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available For the beam driver of inertial confinement fusion, the technology to compress a charged particle beam in longitudinal direction is crucially important. However, the quality of the beam is expected to be deteriorated when the beam is rapidly compressed in longitudinal direction. In order to investigate the beam dynamics during bunch compression, we made a compact beam compression system and carried out beam compression experiments. In this paper, we show the background of our study and recent progress of the beam compression experiments.

  10. Energy efficiency improvements in Chinese compressed airsystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKane, Aimee; Li, Li; Li, Yuqi; Taranto, T.

    2007-06-01

    Industrial compressed air systems use more than 9 percent ofall electricity used in China. Experience in China and elsewhere hasshown that these systems can be much more energy efficient when viewed asa whole system and rather than as isolated components.This paper presentsa summary and analysis of several compressed air system assessments.Through these assessments, typical compressed air management practices inChina are analyzed. Recommendations are made concerning immediate actionsthat China s enterprises can make to improve compressed air systemefficiency using best available technology and managementstrategies.

  11. Lightness compression and hue changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillo, Julio; Moreira, Humberto

    2006-11-01

    Two experiments were performed to relate the Bezold-Brücke (B-B) and lightness compression effects. The first used a calibrated screen to present an achromatic luminance staircase. In addition, it reproduced, the methodology and the essential aspects the lightness compression effect discovered by Cataliotti and Gilchrist (1995). That is, observers perceived a truncated grey scale (from white to medium grey) when the staircase was the only stimulation in the near background (Gelb condition), but not when presented on a Mondrian background, because of the high articulation level provided by this background. Experiment 1 design also included two other backgrounds that produced a partial compression effect. In Experiment 2, two chromatic staircases were used. Employing a naming task, changes in hue perception were only observed for the susceptible staircase. The observed changes were of two types. First, for the full staircase presentations, a Gelb background produced maximum lightness compression (more similarity in the lightness of the staircase stimuli) and, also, a minimum B-B effect (fewer differences in hue). Second, only for the Gelb condition, there were changes in the hue of the lowest luminance staircase stimuli depending on the staircase extension. Results are discussed in the framework of the anchoring theory of lightness perception.

  12. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Bradley E. (Air Force Research Laboratory, Eglin, FL); Kabir, Md. E. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)

    2010-04-01

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  13. Compressive Sensing DNA Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Mona A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressive sensing microarrays (CSMs are DNA-based sensors that operate using group testing and compressive sensing (CS principles. In contrast to conventional DNA microarrays, in which each genetic sensor is designed to respond to a single target, in a CSM, each sensor responds to a set of targets. We study the problem of designing CSMs that simultaneously account for both the constraints from CS theory and the biochemistry of probe-target DNA hybridization. An appropriate cross-hybridization model is proposed for CSMs, and several methods are developed for probe design and CS signal recovery based on the new model. Lab experiments suggest that in order to achieve accurate hybridization profiling, consensus probe sequences are required to have sequence homology of at least 80% with all targets to be detected. Furthermore, out-of-equilibrium datasets are usually as accurate as those obtained from equilibrium conditions. Consequently, one can use CSMs in applications in which only short hybridization times are allowed.

  14. A Compressive Superresolution Display

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2014-06-22

    In this paper, we introduce a new compressive display architecture for superresolution image presentation that exploits co-design of the optical device configuration and compressive computation. Our display allows for superresolution, HDR, or glasses-free 3D presentation.

  15. Compressing Binary Decision Diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rune Hansen, Esben; Srinivasa Rao, S.; Tiedemann, Peter

    The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to 1......-2 bits per node. Empirical results for our compression technique are presented, including comparisons with previously introduced techniques, showing that the new technique dominate on all tested instances....

  16. Compressing Binary Decision Diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Esben Rune; Satti, Srinivasa Rao; Tiedemann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to 1......-2 bits per node. Empirical results for our compression technique are presented, including comparisons with previously introduced techniques, showing that the new technique dominate on all tested instances...

  17. Hyperspectral data compression

    CERN Document Server

    Motta, Giovanni; Storer, James A

    2006-01-01

    Provides a survey of results in the field of compression of remote sensed 3D data, with a particular interest in hyperspectral imagery. This work covers topics such as compression architecture, lossless compression, lossy techniques, and more. It also describes a lossless algorithm based on vector quantization.

  18. Impact of frequency compression on music perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussoi, Bruna S S; Bentler, Ruth A

    2015-01-01

    To determine the effects of frequency compression on music perception, and the impact of previous music training and hearing status. It was hypothesized that lesser amounts of compression would be preferred, and that this pattern of preference would be more evident in the musically trained groups. A paired-comparison paradigm was used. Subjects listened to pairs of musical passages as processed by a hearing aid with different frequency-compression settings. Subjects indicated their preferred passage and the strength of their preference. Fifty-seven subjects divided in four groups, according to hearing status (normal hearing, mild-to-moderate hearing loss), and previous music experience (trained, not trained). Subjects generally preferred the conditions with the lesser amount of compression. Listeners in the group with previous music training showed stronger preference for less compression than those without training, as did listeners with normal hearing when compared to subjects with hearing loss. Although less frequency compression was in general preferred, there was more variability in the comparisons involving the default settings for a 50-dB hearing loss (i.e. start frequency 4000 Hz, compression ratio 2.5:1) and no compression, suggesting that mild amounts of compression may not be detrimental to perceived sound quality.

  19. Development, simulation and test of transition radiation detector prototypes for the compressed baryonic matter experiment at the facility for antiproton and ion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergmann, Cyrano S.H.

    2014-07-01

    The focus of this thesis is the development of a Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) for the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR. The TRD sub-detector will contribute to the global particle identification and track reconstruction of charged particles. The technical design goal for the TRD is to identify 90% electrons with a maximum pion contamination of 1%. The TRD and Ring Image CHerenkov (RICH) detector should reach a common pion rejection of 10{sup 4}, in order to measure charmonium and low-mass vector mesons. The position resolution should be between 200 and 300 μm in the anode wire direction. The most demanding aspect of the CBM TRD design is the high interaction rate of up to 10{sup 7} Hz resulting in a charged particle rate of up to 100 kHz/cm{sup 2} in the central part of the detector planes at SIS300 conditions. It is crucial to find the optimal radiator detector combination with a minimum material budget to limit scattering and background due to conversions and at the same time reach a sufficient pion rejection and position resolution. In this thesis it is confirmed that a Multi-Wire Proportional Counter (MWPC) with a Xe/CO{sub 2} gas thickness of 12mm provides sufficient absorption probability for TR-photons in combination with self-supporting low density PE foam or micro-structured foil radiators. A continuous investigation aiming at an optimal wire and pad-plane geometry, as well as a minimization of the material budget between active gas and radiator has been presented in hard- and software. A minimum photon absorption cross-section of the entrance window was realized with a thermally stretched aluminized Kapton foil, glued to a G11 support grid support frame. This structure limits the mechanical deformation of the entire window to 1mm/mbar. All MWPC prototypes include two wire planes. A symmetric amplification region of 2 x (3, 3.5 or 4)mm is followed by a short drift region of 6, 5 or 4 mm. The drift region reduces the gain

  20. Isentropic Compression of Argon and Krypton Using an MC1 Flux Compression Generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veeser, L.; Ekdahl, C.; Oona, H.; Rodriguez, P.; Schmitt, G.; Solem, J.; Younger, S.; Baker, S.; Hudson, C.; Lewis, W.; Marshall, B.; Turley, W.; Bykov, A.; Boriskov, G.; Dolotenko, M.; Egorov, N.; Kolokol' chikov, N.; Kozlov, M.; Kuropatkin, Y.; Volkov, A.

    1998-10-18

    LANL and VNIIEF are performing a set of joint experiments to explore the conductivity and possible metalization of argon and krypton compressed to up to five times normal solid density. The experiments use a magnetic field of several megagauss, generated by a Russian MC1 generator, to compress a metallic tube containing solidified argon or krypton. A probe in the center of the tube measures the electrical conductivity to the walls, and a 70-MeV betatron serves as an x-ray source for three radiographic measurements of the compression. Several of these experiments for argon compressed to around 4 to 5 times solid density indicate a conductivity in the range of 10 to 100 {Omega}{sup -1}cm{sup -1}, well below that of a metal. For krypton preliminary results show a conductivity of order 1000 or more, indicating likely metalization of the compressed sample.

  1. Search for Supersymmetry with a Highly Compressed Mass Spectrum in the Single Soft Lepton Channel with the CMS Experiment at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Zarucki, Mateusz

    2017-01-01

    Models with compressed mass spectra target a very interesting region of the SUSY parameter space and are very well motivated by theoretical considerations, such as dark matter constraints and naturalness. The presented analysis focuses on signal events containing a single low-momentum lepton and moderate missing transverse energy. The search targets a simplified model in which the signal consists of stop (supersymmetric partner of the top quark) pair-production, followed by 4-body decays into a lepton-neutrino (quark-antiquark) pair, a b-quark and a neutralino, which is considered the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP), and with a mass gap between the stop and the LSP that is smaller than the W-boson mass. The LSPs and the neutrino escape the detector, leading to a missing transverse energy signature. Compressed regions are challenging to study, as the visible decay products have low momentum and generally do not pass detector acceptance thresholds. This difficulty can be mitigated by requiring the presen...

  2. Compression of space for low visibility probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine eBorn

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Stimuli briefly flashed just before a saccade are perceived closer to the saccade target, a phenomenon known as perisaccadic compression of space (Ross, Morrone, & Burr, 1997. More recently, we have demonstrated that brief probes are attracted towards a visual reference when followed by a mask, even in the absence of saccades (Zimmermann, Born, Fink, & Cavanagh, 2014. Here, we ask whether spatial compression depends on the transient disruptions of the visual input stream caused by either a mask or a saccade. Both of these degrade the probe visibility but we show that low probe visibility alone causes compression in the absence of any disruption. In a first experiment, we varied the regions of the screen covered by a transient mask, including areas where no stimulus was presented and a condition without masking. In all conditions, we adjusted probe contrast to make the probe equally hard to detect. Compression effects were found in all conditions. To obtain compression without a mask, the probe had to be presented at much lower contrasts than with masking. Comparing mislocalizations at different probe detection rates across masking, saccades and low contrast conditions without mask or saccade, Experiment 2 confirmed this observation and showed a strong influence of probe contrast on compression. Finally, in Experiment 3, we found that compression decreased as probe duration increased both for masks and saccades although here we did find some evidence that factors other than simply visibility as we measured it contribute to compression. Our experiments suggest that compression reflects how the visual system localizes weak targets in the context of highly visible stimuli.

  3. Compression of Space for Low Visibility Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Sabine; Krüger, Hannah M; Zimmermann, Eckart; Cavanagh, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Stimuli briefly flashed just before a saccade are perceived closer to the saccade target, a phenomenon known as perisaccadic compression of space (Ross et al., 1997). More recently, we have demonstrated that brief probes are attracted towards a visual reference when followed by a mask, even in the absence of saccades (Zimmermann et al., 2014a). Here, we ask whether spatial compression depends on the transient disruptions of the visual input stream caused by either a mask or a saccade. Both of these degrade the probe visibility but we show that low probe visibility alone causes compression in the absence of any disruption. In a first experiment, we varied the regions of the screen covered by a transient mask, including areas where no stimulus was presented and a condition without masking. In all conditions, we adjusted probe contrast to make the probe equally hard to detect. Compression effects were found in all conditions. To obtain compression without a mask, the probe had to be presented at much lower contrasts than with masking. Comparing mislocalizations at different probe detection rates across masking, saccades and low contrast conditions without mask or saccade, Experiment 2 confirmed this observation and showed a strong influence of probe contrast on compression. Finally, in Experiment 3, we found that compression decreased as probe duration increased both for masks and saccades although here we did find some evidence that factors other than simply visibility as we measured it contribute to compression. Our experiments suggest that compression reflects how the visual system localizes weak targets in the context of highly visible stimuli.

  4. Exploring compression techniques for ROOT IO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Bockelman, B.

    2017-10-01

    ROOT provides an flexible format used throughout the HEP community. The number of use cases - from an archival data format to end-stage analysis - has required a number of tradeoffs to be exposed to the user. For example, a high “compression level” in the traditional DEFLATE algorithm will result in a smaller file (saving disk space) at the cost of slower decompression (costing CPU time when read). At the scale of the LHC experiment, poor design choices can result in terabytes of wasted space or wasted CPU time. We explore and attempt to quantify some of these tradeoffs. Specifically, we explore: the use of alternate compressing algorithms to optimize for read performance; an alternate method of compressing individual events to allow efficient random access; and a new approach to whole-file compression. Quantitative results are given, as well as guidance on how to make compression decisions for different use cases.

  5. Deformation and material dynamics under ultrafast compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael

    2012-02-01

    For decades, dynamic compression experiments have been used to determine the equation of state of materials, and examine material deformation at high strain rates. Within the last 15 years, ultrafast optical methods have been used to characterize deformation at strain rates in excess of 10^10/s. Recently such experiments have found broad consistency with empirical laws formulated at orders of magnitude lower strain rates, but have also discovered intriguing phenomena on short time scales, such as elastic stress orders of magnitude beyond the yield strength. These experiments explore the ultimate limits of material relaxation via deformation, and the results suggest exciting possibilities for practical and scientific application of ultrafast compression, including nonequilibrium material synthesis, determination of the equation of state with a small scale experiment, and the investigation of ultrahigh density with a table top laser. Here we will talk about our experiments on the ultrafast deformation of metals, including aluminum and iron, and the ultrafast compression of deuterium.

  6. Celiac Artery Compression Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Muqeetadnan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac artery compression syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by episodic abdominal pain and weight loss. It is the result of external compression of celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament. We present a case of celiac artery compression syndrome in a 57-year-old male with severe postprandial abdominal pain and 30-pound weight loss. The patient eventually responded well to surgical division of the median arcuate ligament by laparoscopy.

  7. Compressed Gas Safety for Experimental Fusion Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2004-09-01

    Experimental fusion facilities present a variety of hazards to the operators and staff. There are unique or specialized hazards, including magnetic fields, cryogens, radio frequency emissions, and vacuum reservoirs. There are also more general industrial hazards, such as a wide variety of electrical power, pressurized air, and cooling water systems in use, there are crane and hoist loads, working at height, and handling compressed gas cylinders. This paper outlines the projectile hazard assoicated with compressed gas cylinders and mthods of treatment to provide for compressed gas safety. This information should be of interest to personnel at both magnetic and inertial fusion experiments.

  8. Wavelet image compression

    CERN Document Server

    Pearlman, William A

    2013-01-01

    This book explains the stages necessary to create a wavelet compression system for images and describes state-of-the-art systems used in image compression standards and current research. It starts with a high level discussion of the properties of the wavelet transform, especially the decomposition into multi-resolution subbands. It continues with an exposition of the null-zone, uniform quantization used in most subband coding systems and the optimal allocation of bitrate to the different subbands. Then the image compression systems of the FBI Fingerprint Compression Standard and the JPEG2000 S

  9. Compressed sensing & sparse filtering

    CERN Document Server

    Carmi, Avishy Y; Godsill, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    This book is aimed at presenting concepts, methods and algorithms ableto cope with undersampled and limited data. One such trend that recently gained popularity and to some extent revolutionised signal processing is compressed sensing. Compressed sensing builds upon the observation that many signals in nature are nearly sparse (or compressible, as they are normally referred to) in some domain, and consequently they can be reconstructed to within high accuracy from far fewer observations than traditionally held to be necessary. Apart from compressed sensing this book contains other related app

  10. Breast compression in mammography: pressure distribution patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dustler, Magnus; Froejd, Patrik; Mattsson, Soeren; Tingberg, Anders; Foernvik, Daniel [Medical Radiation Physics, Lund Univ., Skaane Univ. Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden)], E-mail: Magnus.Dustler@med.lu.se; Andersson, Ingvar; Zackrisson, Sophia [Diagnostic Centre of Imaging and Functional Medicine, Lund Univ., Skaane Univ. Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden); Brorson, Haakan [Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Dept. of Clinical Sciences Malmoe, Lund Univ., Skaane Univ. Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden)

    2012-11-15

    Background Breast compression is important in mammography in order to improve image quality, better separate tissue components, and reduce absorbed dose to the breast. In this study we use a method to measure and visualize the distribution of pressure over a compressed breast in mammography. Purpose To measure and describe the pressure distribution over the breast as a result of applied breast compression in mammography. Material and Methods One hundred and three women aged 40.7-74.3 years (median, 48.9 years) invited for mammographic screening consented to take part in this study. They were subjected to two additional breast compressions of the left breast (standard force and approximately 50% reduction). Pressure images of the compressed breast were obtained using force sensing resistor (FSR) sensors placed underneath the compression plate. Subjects rated their experience of pain on a visual analogue scale (VAS). Results Four pressure patterns were identified, fitting 81 of the 103 breasts, which were grouped accordingly. The remaining 22 breasts were found to correspond to a combination of any two patterns. Two groups (43 breasts) showed pressure mainly over the juxtathoracic part of the breast, had significantly greater breast thickness (P = 0.003) and had a lower mean pressure over dense tissue (P < 0.0001) than those with more evenly distributed pressure. Reducing compression force increased average breast thickness by 1.8 mm (P < 0.0001). Conclusion The distribution of pressure differed greatly between breasts. In a large proportion of breasts the compression plate did not provide optimal compression of the breast, the compression force being absorbed in juxtathoracic structures.

  11. Optimization of Error-Bounded Lossy Compression for Hard-to-Compress HPC Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di, Sheng; Cappello, Franck

    2018-01-01

    Since today’s scientific applications are producing vast amounts of data, compressing them before storage/transmission is critical. Results of existing compressors show two types of HPC data sets: highly compressible and hard to compress. In this work, we carefully design and optimize the error-bounded lossy compression for hard-tocompress scientific data. We propose an optimized algorithm that can adaptively partition the HPC data into best-fit consecutive segments each having mutually close data values, such that the compression condition can be optimized. Another significant contribution is the optimization of shifting offset such that the XOR-leading-zero length between two consecutive unpredictable data points can be maximized. We finally devise an adaptive method to select the best-fit compressor at runtime for maximizing the compression factor. We evaluate our solution using 13 benchmarks based on real-world scientific problems, and we compare it with 9 other state-of-the-art compressors. Experiments show that our compressor can always guarantee the compression errors within the user-specified error bounds. Most importantly, our optimization can improve the compression factor effectively, by up to 49% for hard-tocompress data sets with similar compression/decompression time cost.

  12. Breaking of rod-shaped model material during compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Kulaviak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The breakage of a model anisometric dry granular material caused by uniaxial compression was studied. The bed of uniform rod-like pasta particles (8 mm long, aspect ratio 1:8 was compressed (Gamlen Tablet Press and their size distribution was measured after each run (Dynamic Image Analysing. The compression dynamics was recorded and the effect of several parameters was tested (rate of compression, volume of granular bed, pressure magnitude and mode of application. Besides the experiments, numerical modelling of the compressed breakable material was performed as well, employing the DEM approach (Discrete Element Method. The comparison between the data and the model looks promising.

  13. Breaking of rod-shaped model material during compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, Kulaviak; Vera, Penkavova; Marek, Ruzicka; Miroslav, Puncochar; Petr, Zamostny; Zdenek, Grof; Frantisek, Stepanek; Marek, Schongut; Jaromir, Havlica

    2017-06-01

    The breakage of a model anisometric dry granular material caused by uniaxial compression was studied. The bed of uniform rod-like pasta particles (8 mm long, aspect ratio 1:8) was compressed (Gamlen Tablet Press) and their size distribution was measured after each run (Dynamic Image Analysing). The compression dynamics was recorded and the effect of several parameters was tested (rate of compression, volume of granular bed, pressure magnitude and mode of application). Besides the experiments, numerical modelling of the compressed breakable material was performed as well, employing the DEM approach (Discrete Element Method). The comparison between the data and the model looks promising.

  14. Shock compression of liquid hydrazine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, B.O. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chavez, D.J. [Rockwell White Sands Test Facility, Las Cruces, NM (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Liquid hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}) is a propellant used by the Air Force and NASA for aerospace propulsion and power systems. Because the propellant modules that contain the hydrazine can be subject to debris impacts during their use, the shock states that can occur in the hydrazine need to be characterized to safely predict its response. Several shock compression experiments have been conducted in an attempt to investigate the detonability of liquid hydrazine; however, the experiments results disagree. Therefore, in this study, we reproduced each experiment numerically to evaluate in detail the shock wave profiles generated in the liquid hydrazine. This paper presents the results of each numerical simulation and compares the results to those obtained in experiment. We also present the methodology of our approach, which includes chemical kinetic experiments, chemical equilibrium calculations, and characterization of the equation of state of liquid hydrazine.

  15. Tree compression with top trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Landau, Gad M.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new compression scheme for labeled trees based on top trees. Our compression scheme is the first to simultaneously take advantage of internal repeats in the tree (as opposed to the classical DAG compression that only exploits rooted subtree repeats) while also supporting fast...... navigational queries directly on the compressed representation. We show that the new compression scheme achieves close to optimal worst-case compression, can compress exponentially better than DAG compression, is never much worse than DAG compression, and supports navigational queries in logarithmic time....

  16. Tree compression with top trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Landau, Gad M.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new compression scheme for labeled trees based on top trees [3]. Our compression scheme is the first to simultaneously take advantage of internal repeats in the tree (as opposed to the classical DAG compression that only exploits rooted subtree repeats) while also supporting fast...... navigational queries directly on the compressed representation. We show that the new compression scheme achieves close to optimal worst-case compression, can compress exponentially better than DAG compression, is never much worse than DAG compression, and supports navigational queries in logarithmic time....

  17. Anisotropic Concrete Compressive Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustenhoff Hansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Henrik Brøner; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2017-01-01

    When the load carrying capacity of existing concrete structures is (re-)assessed it is often based on compressive strength of cores drilled out from the structure. Existing studies show that the core compressive strength is anisotropic; i.e. it depends on whether the cores are drilled parallel...

  18. A passively mode-locked sub-picosecond Ho3+,Pr3+-doped fluoride fiber laser operating at 2.86 µm(Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipov, Sergei; Jackson, Stuart D.; Withford, Michael J.; Fürbach, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate a passively mode-locked holmium-praseodymium co-doped ring fiber laser that produces an estimated 950 fs pulsewidth and peak power of 4.3 kW at a pulse repetition rate of 74 MHz. The measured center wavelength was 2.86 µm which overlaps more strongly with liquid water whilst better avoiding atmospheric water vapor which overlaps more strongly with previously reported ultrafast Er3+ fiber lasers operating at 2.8. Thus the present system should display better long term stability compared to the Er3+-based system and at the same time, be a more practical tool for interaction with biological tissues. The laser was constructed using a 1.2 m long double-clad fluoride fiber doped with Ho3+ and Pr3+ ions and arranged into a unidirectional ring resonator that was resistant to instabilities associated with back reflections. Two semiconductor 1150 nm laser diodes with the maximum combined output of 7.5 W were used to pump the fiber. Mode-locking was achieved using the combination of two techniques: sub-picosecond pulses were produced by nonlinear polarization evolution after longer pulses were initially obtained using an in-cavity GaAs saturable absorber having a modulation depth of 90% and a relaxation time of 10 ps. A standard arrangement employing two waveplates and an optical isolator was introduced into the resonator to carry out nonlinear polarization rotation. The average power of the mode-locked laser reached 350 mW after the 50% outcoupling mirror. The RF signal-to-noise ratio reached 67 dB for the first peak at the resolution bandwidth of 10 kHz.

  19. Compression techniques in tele-radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tianyu; Xiong, Zixiang; Yun, David Y.

    1999-10-01

    This paper describes a prototype telemedicine system for remote 3D radiation treatment planning. Due to voluminous medical image data and image streams generated in interactive frame rate involved in the application, the importance of deploying adjustable lossy to lossless compression techniques is emphasized in order to achieve acceptable performance via various kinds of communication networks. In particular, the compression of the data substantially reduces the transmission time and therefore allows large-scale radiation distribution simulation and interactive volume visualization using remote supercomputing resources in a timely fashion. The compression algorithms currently used in the software we developed are JPEG and H.263 lossy methods and Lempel-Ziv (LZ77) lossless methods. Both objective and subjective assessment of the effect of lossy compression methods on the volume data are conducted. Favorable results are obtained showing that substantial compression ratio is achievable within distortion tolerance. From our experience, we conclude that 30dB (PSNR) is about the lower bound to achieve acceptable quality when applying lossy compression to anatomy volume data (e.g. CT). For computer simulated data, much higher PSNR (up to 100dB) is expectable. This work not only introduces such novel approach for delivering medical services that will have significant impact on the existing cooperative image-based services, but also provides a platform for the physicians to assess the effects of lossy compression techniques on the diagnostic and aesthetic appearance of medical imaging.

  20. On the compressibility effects in mixing layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khlifi Hechmi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies of compressible flows carried out in the past few years have shown that the pressure-strain is the main indicator of the structural compressibility effects. Undoubtedly, this terms plays a key role toward strongly changing magnitude of the turbulent Reynolds stress anisotropy. On the other hand, the incompressible models of the pressure-strain correlation have not correctly predicted compressible turbulence at high speed shear flow. Consequently, a correction of these models is needed for precise prediction of compressibility effects. In the present work, a compressibility correction of the widely used incompressible Launder Reece and Rodi model making their standard coefficients dependent on the turbulent and convective Mach numbers is proposed. The ability of the model to predict the developed mixing layers in different cases from experiments of Goebel and Dutton is examined. The predicted results with the proposed model are compared with DNS and experimental data and those obtained by the compressible model of Adumitroiae et al. and the original LRR model. The results show that the essential compressibility effects on mixing layers are well captured by the proposed model.

  1. Compression fractures of the back

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most effective way to prevent compression or insufficiency fractures. Getting regular load-bearing exercise (such as walking) can help you avoid bone loss. Alternative Names Vertebral compression fractures Images Compression fracture References Cosman F, de Beur ...

  2. EEG data compression to monitor DoA in telemedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palendeng, Mario E; Zhang, Qing; Pang, Chaoyi; Li, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Data compression techniques have been widely used to process and transmit huge amount of EEG data in real-time and remote EEG signal processing systems. In this paper we propose a lossy compression technique, F-shift, to compress EEG signals for remote depth of Anaesthesia (DoA) monitoring. Compared with traditional wavelet compression techniques, our method not only preserves valuable clinical information with high compression ratios, but also reduces high frequency noises in EEG signals. Moreover, our method has negligible compression overheads (less than 0.1 seconds), which can greatly benefit real-time EEG signal monitoring systems. Our extensive experiments demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed compression method.

  3. Preliminary experience with balloon kyphoplasty for the treatment of painful osteoporotic compression fractures; Ballon-Kyphoplastie zur Behandlung schmerzhafter osteoporotischer Wirbelkoerperfrakturen - Technik und erste Ergebnisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelm, K.; Urbach. H. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Klinik; Stoffel, M; Ringel, F.; Rao, G.; Roesseler, L.; Meyer, B. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Neurochirurgische Klinik

    2003-12-01

    Purpose: To describe the technique and to evaluate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous kyphoplasty as a new treatment in patients with painful osteoporotic vertebral body compression fractures of the lumbar and thoracic spine. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study balloon kyphoplasty was performed in 34 consecutive patients (25 females, 9 males; mean age 75 years) with 56 painful osteoporotic vertebral fractures (from T6-L5), of which 22 showed a posterior wall involvement and -retropulsion on preoperative CT. The median duration of symptoms was 9.7 weeks. Symtomatic levels were identified by correlating the clinical presentation with MRI, conventional radiographs and CT including bone-densitometry. Pre- and postoperative examinations (radiographs, CT) as well as Karnofsky and visual analogy pain scores (Visual Analog Scale=VAS) were documented and compared to evaluate the success of the procedure. Results: The median Karnofsky score improved from 40% (pre-) to 70% (post-treatment). Simultaneously, median pain scores (VAS) decreased from 64 (pre-) to 21 (post-treatment) (p<0.001). Perioperative morbidity included one transient L2 nerve root bruise. The procedure led to a partial restoration of the height of the vertebral body by reducing the median sagittal index from 11.5 to 5 . In none of our patients, the procedure led to worsening of the fracture-induced narrowing of the spinal canal. Clinically asymptomatic cement leakage occurred in 10 cases, with leakage 4 times into the paraspinal space, 3 times into the spinal canal and 3 times into the disc space. Conclusion: Balloon kyphoplasty is a safe and effective procedure. It is applicable even in fractures with posterior wall involvement since it is a low-pressure technique in contrast to vertebroplasty and restores vertebral body height partially. It results in immediate clinical improvement of mobility and pain relief. While short-term results are excellent, follow-up data have to be awaited for

  4. Compressed Video Segmentation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kobla, Vikrant; Doermann, David S; Rosenfeld, Azriel

    1996-01-01

    ... changes in content and camera motion. The analysis is performed in the compressed domain using available macroblock and motion vector information, and if necessary, discrete cosine transform (DCT) information...

  5. Compressive light field displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzstein, Gordon; Lanman, Douglas; Hirsch, Matthew; Heidrich, Wolfgang; Raskar, Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    Light fields are the multiview extension of stereo image pairs: a collection of images showing a 3D scene from slightly different perspectives. Depicting high-resolution light fields usually requires an excessively large display bandwidth; compressive light field displays are enabled by the codesign of optical elements and computational-processing algorithms. Rather than pursuing a direct "optical" solution (for example, adding one more pixel to support the emission of one additional light ray), compressive displays aim to create flexible optical systems that can synthesize a compressed target light field. In effect, each pixel emits a superposition of light rays. Through compression and tailored optical designs, fewer display pixels are necessary to emit a given light field than a direct optical solution would require.

  6. Reference Based Genome Compression

    CERN Document Server

    Chern, Bobbie; Manolakos, Alexandros; No, Albert; Venkat, Kartik; Weissman, Tsachy

    2012-01-01

    DNA sequencing technology has advanced to a point where storage is becoming the central bottleneck in the acquisition and mining of more data. Large amounts of data are vital for genomics research, and generic compression tools, while viable, cannot offer the same savings as approaches tuned to inherent biological properties. We propose an algorithm to compress a target genome given a known reference genome. The proposed algorithm first generates a mapping from the reference to the target genome, and then compresses this mapping with an entropy coder. As an illustration of the performance: applying our algorithm to James Watson's genome with hg18 as a reference, we are able to reduce the 2991 megabyte (MB) genome down to 6.99 MB, while Gzip compresses it to 834.8 MB.

  7. Compressive Optical Image Encryption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Sheng Li, Jiao; Yang Pan, Yang; Li, Rong

    2015-01-01

    An optical image encryption technique based on compressive sensing using fully optical means has been proposed. An object image is first encrypted to a white-sense stationary noise pattern using a double random phase encoding (DRPE) method in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Then, the encrypted image is highly compressed to a signal using single-pixel compressive holographic imaging in the optical domain. At the receiving terminal, the encrypted image is reconstructed well via compressive sensing theory, and the original image can be decrypted with three reconstructed holograms and the correct keys. The numerical simulations show that the method is effective and suitable for optical image security transmission in future all-optical networks because of the ability of completely optical implementation and substantially smaller hologram data volume. PMID:25992946

  8. Structure and Properties of Silica Glass Densified in Cold Compression and Hot Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerette, Michael; Ackerson, Michael R.; Thomas, Jay; Yuan, Fenglin; Bruce Watson, E.; Walker, David; Huang, Liping

    2015-01-01

    Silica glass has been shown in numerous studies to possess significant capacity for permanent densification under pressure at different temperatures to form high density amorphous (HDA) silica. However, it is unknown to what extent the processes leading to irreversible densification of silica glass in cold-compression at room temperature and in hot-compression (e.g., near glass transition temperature) are common in nature. In this work, a hot-compression technique was used to quench silica glass from high temperature (1100 °C) and high pressure (up to 8 GPa) conditions, which leads to density increase of ~25% and Young’s modulus increase of ~71% relative to that of pristine silica glass at ambient conditions. Our experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide solid evidences that the intermediate-range order of the hot-compressed HDA silica is distinct from that of the counterpart cold-compressed at room temperature. This explains the much higher thermal and mechanical stability of the former than the latter upon heating and compression as revealed in our in-situ Brillouin light scattering (BLS) experiments. Our studies demonstrate the limitation of the resulting density as a structural indicator of polyamorphism, and point out the importance of temperature during compression in order to fundamentally understand HDA silica. PMID:26469314

  9. Deep Blind Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Shikha; Singhal, Vanika; Majumdar, Angshul

    2016-01-01

    This work addresses the problem of extracting deeply learned features directly from compressive measurements. There has been no work in this area. Existing deep learning tools only give good results when applied on the full signal, that too usually after preprocessing. These techniques require the signal to be reconstructed first. In this work we show that by learning directly from the compressed domain, considerably better results can be obtained. This work extends the recently proposed fram...

  10. Compressed Sensing in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobin, Jérôme; Starck, Jean-Luc; Ottensamer, Roland

    2008-11-01

    Recent advances in signal processing have focused on the use of sparse representations in various applications. A new field of interest based on sparsity has recently emerged: compressed sensing. This theory is a new sampling framework that provides an alternative to the well-known Shannon sampling theory. In this paper, we investigate how compressed sensing (CS) can provide new insights into astronomical data compression. We first give a brief overview of the compressed sensing theory which provides very simple coding process with low computational cost, thus favoring its use for real-time applications often found onboard space mission. In practical situations, owing to particular observation strategies (for instance, raster scans) astronomical data are often redundant; in that context, we point out that a CS-based compression scheme is flexible enough to account for particular observational strategies. Indeed, we show also that CS provides a new fantastic way to handle multiple observations of the same field view, allowing us to recover low level details, which is impossible with standard compression methods. This kind of CS data fusion concept could lead to an elegant and effective way to solve the problem ESA is faced with, for the transmission to the earth of the data collected by PACS, one of the instruments onboard the Herschel spacecraft which will launched in late 2008/early 2009. We show that CS enables to recover data with a spatial resolution enhanced up to 30% with similar sensitivity compared to the averaging technique proposed by ESA.

  11. The Effect of Amplitude Compression on the Perception of Speech in Noise by the Hearing Impaired

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houben, A.C.H.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of several compression parameters on speech intelligibility in stationary and fluctuating speech-shaped noise was systematically investigated. The experiment was designed to investigate possible interaction effects between compression parameters on the speech reception threshold (SRT)

  12. Ultrafast compression: past, present, and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael

    2015-06-01

    In the nearly 20 years since the first sub-ps time resolution compression wave measurements, ultrafast compression experiments have progressed from simple demonstrations to robust discoveries of extreme phenomena spanning material plasticity, solid-solid phase transitions, and shock induced chemistry. At strain rates above 109 s-1, many usual assumptions about material response no longer apply - virtually every system investigated on sub-ns time scales exhibits phenomena which are unfamiliar to conventional intuition about compression waves. This diverse of range of phenomena reflects the fundamental complexity of dynamic material behavior, but it has also been a significant impediment to a full understanding of material compression. Nonetheless, ultrafast experiments afford a number of practical advantages, primarily related to scale. Using an inexpensive table-top laser, it is possible to obtain information on materials at extreme conditions with a low laser pulse energy and a high data rate. In this talk, I will briefly review the history of ultrafast compression, significant results, and future opportunities. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. Compressed Sensing Of Complex Sinusoids Off The Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Cheng; Liu, Shi; Jiaqun, Zhao

    2015-07-01

    To solve off-grid problem in compressed sensing, a new reconstruction algorithm for complex sinusoids is proposed. The compressed sensing reconstruction problem is transformed into a joint optimized problem. Based on coordinate descent approach and linear estimator, a new iteration algorithm is proposed. The results of experiments verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  14. DISCRETE ELEMENT MODELLING OF THE COMPRESSIVE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Having developed and validated a code based on the Discrete Element Method principle with physical experiments the code was used to study and predict the behaviour (parametric changes) during compression of four bulk systems of particulates with the properties of canola seed, palm kernel and soyabean. The porosity ...

  15. Storage analysis and compression of signals with application in medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomaryov, Volodymyr I.; Badillo, Leonardo; Juarez, Cristina; Sanchez, Jose L.; Igartua, Luis

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the use of Wavelet function technique to compress and storage the electroencephalographic (EEG) signal into a multichannel EEG system. The system consists of such components: multichannel bio-amplifier, analog filters, ADC, microprocessor, DSP, PCMCIA memory, etc. The algorithms to compress EEG signal have been implemented using language C/C++. The proposed digital FIR filter to compress the signal has own coefficients chosen as the coefficients of Daubechies Wavelets. The results of the experiments with implemented procedures have shown the compression ratio and SNR values for EEG signal in the case of real time compression. Values of real time compressing and storing parameters are presented when DSP and AMD586 processor used. The Backpropagation Neural Network was used to carry out the identification of EEG Patterns in the case of epilepsy illness.

  16. Graph Compression by BFS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Apostolico

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The Web Graph is a large-scale graph that does not fit in main memory, so that lossless compression methods have been proposed for it. This paper introduces a compression scheme that combines efficient storage with fast retrieval for the information in a node. The scheme exploits the properties of the Web Graph without assuming an ordering of the URLs, so that it may be applied to more general graphs. Tests on some datasets of use achieve space savings of about 10% over existing methods.

  17. Compressive Sensing for Spread Spectrum Receivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fyhn, Karsten; Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Larsen, Torben

    2013-01-01

    to a decrease in the two design parameters. This paper investigates the use of Compressive Sensing (CS) in a general Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) receiver. We show that when using spread spectrum codes in the signal domain, the CS measurement matrix may be simplified. This measurement scheme, named...... Compressive Spread Spectrum (CSS), allows for a simple, effective receiver design. Furthermore, we numerically evaluate the proposed receiver in terms of bit error rate under different signal to noise ratio conditions and compare it with other receiver structures. These numerical experiments show that though...

  18. Nonlinear Frequency Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollie, Susan; Glista, Danielle; Seelisch, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Frequency lowering technologies offer an alternative amplification solution for severe to profound high frequency hearing losses. While frequency lowering technologies may improve audibility of high frequency sounds, the very nature of this processing can affect the perceived sound quality. This article reports the results from two studies that investigated the impact of a nonlinear frequency compression (NFC) algorithm on perceived sound quality. In the first study, the cutoff frequency and compression ratio parameters of the NFC algorithm were varied, and their effect on the speech quality was measured subjectively with 12 normal hearing adults, 12 normal hearing children, 13 hearing impaired adults, and 9 hearing impaired children. In the second study, 12 normal hearing and 8 hearing impaired adult listeners rated the quality of speech in quiet, speech in noise, and music after processing with a different set of NFC parameters. Results showed that the cutoff frequency parameter had more impact on sound quality ratings than the compression ratio, and that the hearing impaired adults were more tolerant to increased frequency compression than normal hearing adults. No statistically significant differences were found in the sound quality ratings of speech-in-noise and music stimuli processed through various NFC settings by hearing impaired listeners. These findings suggest that there may be an acceptable range of NFC settings for hearing impaired individuals where sound quality is not adversely affected. These results may assist an Audiologist in clinical NFC hearing aid fittings for achieving a balance between high frequency audibility and sound quality. PMID:23539261

  19. Distributed Compressive Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    more powerful algorithms like SOMP can be used. The ACIE algorithm is similar in spirit to other iterative estimation algorithms, such as turbo...Mitchell, “JPEG: Still image data compression standard,” Van Nostrand Reinhold , 1993. [11] D. S. Taubman and M. W. Marcellin, JPEG 2000: Image

  20. Temporal compressive sensing systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Bryan W.

    2017-12-12

    Methods and systems for temporal compressive sensing are disclosed, where within each of one or more sensor array data acquisition periods, one or more sensor array measurement datasets comprising distinct linear combinations of time slice data are acquired, and where mathematical reconstruction allows for calculation of accurate representations of the individual time slice datasets.

  1. Compression of Infrared images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantel, Claire; Forchhammer, Søren

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the compression of infrared images with three codecs: JPEG2000, JPEG-XT and HEVC. Results are evaluated in terms of SNR, Mean Relative Squared Error (MRSE) and the HDR-VDP2 quality metric. JPEG2000 and HEVC perform fairy similar and better than JPEG-XT. JPEG2000 performs...

  2. Compressive CFAR radar detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Otten, M.P.G.; Rossum, W.L. van; Maleki, A.; Baraniuk, R.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we develop the first Compressive Sensing (CS) adaptive radar detector. We propose three novel architectures and demonstrate how a classical Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) detector can be combined with ℓ1-norm minimization. Using asymptotic arguments and the Complex Approximate

  3. Fingerprints in compressed strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Cording, Patrick Hagge

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we show how to construct a data structure for a string S of size N compressed into a context-free grammar of size n that supports efficient Karp–Rabin fingerprint queries to any substring of S. That is, given indices i and j, the answer to a query is the fingerprint of the substring S...

  4. Fingerprints in Compressed Strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Cording, Patrick Hagge; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2013-01-01

    The Karp-Rabin fingerprint of a string is a type of hash value that due to its strong properties has been used in many string algorithms. In this paper we show how to construct a data structure for a string S of size N compressed by a context-free grammar of size n that answers fingerprint queries...

  5. Compressed Sensing for Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jacob Nathan

    Many chemical applications, from spectroscopy to quantum chemistry, involve measuring or computing a large amount of data, and then compressing this data to retain the most chemically-relevant information. In contrast, compressed sensing is an emergent technique that makes it possible to measure or compute an amount of data that is roughly proportional to its information content. In particular, compressed sensing enables the recovery of a sparse quantity of information from significantly undersampled data by solving an ℓ 1-optimization problem. This thesis represents the application of compressed sensing to problems in chemistry. The first half of this thesis is about spectroscopy. Compressed sensing is used to accelerate the computation of vibrational and electronic spectra from real-time time-dependent density functional theory simulations. Using compressed sensing as a drop-in replacement for the discrete Fourier transform, well-resolved frequency spectra are obtained at one-fifth the typical simulation time and computational cost. The technique is generalized to multiple dimensions and applied to two-dimensional absorption spectroscopy using experimental data collected on atomic rubidium vapor. Finally, a related technique known as super-resolution is applied to open quantum systems to obtain realistic models of a protein environment, in the form of atomistic spectral densities, at lower computational cost. The second half of this thesis deals with matrices in quantum chemistry. It presents a new use of compressed sensing for more efficient matrix recovery whenever the calculation of individual matrix elements is the computational bottleneck. The technique is applied to the computation of the second-derivative Hessian matrices in electronic structure calculations to obtain the vibrational modes and frequencies of molecules. When applied to anthracene, this technique results in a threefold speed-up, with greater speed-ups possible for larger molecules. The

  6. Gmz: a Gml Compression Model for Webgis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, A.; Rajan, K. S.

    2017-09-01

    Geography markup language (GML) is an XML specification for expressing geographical features. Defined by Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), it is widely used for storage and transmission of maps over the Internet. XML schemas provide the convenience to define custom features profiles in GML for specific needs as seen in widely popular cityGML, simple features profile, coverage, etc. Simple features profile (SFP) is a simpler subset of GML profile with support for point, line and polygon geometries. SFP has been constructed to make sure it covers most commonly used GML geometries. Web Feature Service (WFS) serves query results in SFP by default. But it falls short of being an ideal choice due to its high verbosity and size-heavy nature, which provides immense scope for compression. GMZ is a lossless compression model developed to work for SFP compliant GML files. Our experiments indicate GMZ achieves reasonably good compression ratios and can be useful in WebGIS based applications.

  7. Compression selective solid-state chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Anguang

    Compression selective solid-state chemistry refers to mechanically induced selective reactions of solids under thermomechanical extreme conditions. Advanced quantum solid-state chemistry simulations, based on density functional theory with localized basis functions, were performed to provide a remarkable insight into bonding pathways of high-pressure chemical reactions in all agreement with experiments. These pathways clearly demonstrate reaction mechanisms in unprecedented structural details, showing not only the chemical identity of reactive intermediates but also how atoms move along the reaction coordinate associated with a specific vibrational mode, directed by induced chemical stress occurred during bond breaking and forming. It indicates that chemical bonds in solids can break and form precisely under compression as we wish. This can be realized through strongly coupling of mechanical work to an initiation vibrational mode when all other modes can be suppressed under compression, resulting in ultrafast reactions to take place isothermally in a few femtoseconds. Thermodynamically, such reactions correspond to an entropy minimum process on an isotherm where the compression can force thermal expansion coefficient equal to zero. Combining a significantly brief reaction process with specific mode selectivity, both statistical laws and quantum uncertainty principle can be bypassed to precisely break chemical bonds, establishing fundamental principles of compression selective solid-state chemistry. Naturally this leads to understand the ''alchemy'' to purify, grow, and perfect certain materials such as emerging novel disruptive energetics.

  8. Extreme dynamic compression with a table top laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael; Crowhurst, Jonathan; Radousky, Harry; Zaug, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    Recently, it was shown that the energy required for laser driven dynamic compression experiments varies as the third power of the compression time, where the compression time must be larger than the equilibration time in the sample. Traditional dynamic compression experiments typically have drive times greater than 10 ns, but a wide range of materials equilibrate on substantially faster time scales, which should enable such materials to be compressed on much shorter time scales. So, for materials which equilibrate on a sub-nanosecond time scale, ultrafast dynamic compression has the potential to substantially reduce the laser energy required to obtain highly compressed states of matter. This has been demonstrated for sub-Mbar pressures with <100 μJ energy laser drive pulses, where the laser drive energy per unit density change is as much as 109 smaller than longer time scale experiments. Although these results are promising, extreme pressures (up to 10 Mbar) have not yet been observed with table-top scale laser systems. Here we present results for ultrafast laser driven shock experiments using up to 500x more drive intensity than our previous work, which, by conventional scaling, should result in dynamic pressures previously only accessible to facility scale instruments. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Fast Compression and Decompression capabilities at HPCAT, APS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinogeikin, S. V.

    2016-12-01

    Materials behavior and phase transformation pathways are strongly influenced by the time dependence of the driving mechanism (compression, thermal transfer, strain, irradiation, etc). While shock compression and static compression are well established techniques available for a long time, the techniques filling the compression rate gap and studying materials behavior as a function of compression rates at intermediate rates remain scarce. Recent advances in synchrotron sources, x-ray optics, fast area detectors, and sample environment control have enabled many time-resolved experimental techniques for studying materials at extreme pressure and temperature conditions. The High Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HPCAT) at the Advanced Photon Source has made a sustained effort to develop and assemble a powerful collection of high-pressure apparatus for time-resolved research and developing techniques for collecting high-quality time-resolved x-ray scattering data at compression rates intermediate between static and shock compression experiments. In this talk we will outline recently developed capabilities at HPCAT for synthesis of metastable and amorphous materials and studying properties (EOS, lattice relaxation, etc.) and phase transition mechanisms of materials using fast unidirectional and cyclic compression-decompression with variable strain rates up to extreme compression of tens of TPa per second.

  10. The compressible adjoint equations in geodynamics: derivation and numerical assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghelichkhan, Siavash; Bunge, Hans-Peter

    2017-04-01

    The adjoint method is a powerful means to obtain gradient information in a mantle convection model relative to past flow structure. While the adjoint equations in geodynamics have been derived for the conservation equations of mantle flow in their incompressible form, the applicability of this approximation to Earth is limited. Here we introduce the compressible adjoint equations for the conservation equations in the anelastic-liquid approximation. Our derivation applies an operator formulation in Hilbert spaces, to connect to recent work in seismology (Fichtner et al. 2006) and geodynamics (Horbach et al. 2014), where the approach was used to derive the adjoint equations for the wave equation and incompressible mantle flow. We present numerical tests of the newly derived equations based on twin experiments, focusing on three simulations. A first, termed Compressible, assumes the compressible forward and adjoint equations, and represents the consistent means of including compressibility effects. A second, termed Mixed, applies the compressible forward equation, but ignores compressibility effects in the adjoint equations, where the incompressible equations are used instead. A third simulation, termed Incompressible, neglects compressibility effects entirely in the forward and adjoint equations relative to the reference twin. The compressible and mixed formulations successfully restore earlier mantle flow structure, while the incompressible formulation yields noticeable artifacts. Our results suggest the use of a compressible formulation, when applying the adjoint method to seismically derived mantle heterogeneity structure.

  11. Impact of Various Compression Ratio on the Compression Ignition Engine with Diesel and Jatropha Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaganesan, S.; Chandrasekaran, M.; Ruban, M.

    2017-03-01

    The present experimental investigation evaluates the effects of using blends of diesel fuel with 20% concentration of Methyl Ester of Jatropha biodiesel blended with various compression ratio. Both the diesel and biodiesel fuel blend was injected at 23º BTDC to the combustion chamber. The experiment was carried out with three different compression ratio. Biodiesel was extracted from Jatropha oil, 20% (B20) concentration is found to be best blend ratio from the earlier experimental study. The engine was maintained at various compression ratio i.e., 17.5, 16.5 and 15.5 respectively. The main objective is to obtain minimum specific fuel consumption, better efficiency and lesser Emission with different compression ratio. The results concluded that full load show an increase in efficiency when compared with diesel, highest efficiency is obtained with B20MEOJBA with compression ratio 17.5. It is noted that there is an increase in thermal efficiency as the blend ratio increases. Biodiesel blend has performance closer to diesel, but emission is reduced in all blends of B20MEOJBA compared to diesel. Thus this work focuses on the best compression ratio and suitability of biodiesel blends in diesel engine as an alternate fuel.

  12. Compressive Spectral Renormalization Method

    CERN Document Server

    Bayindir, Cihan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a novel numerical scheme for finding the sparse self-localized states of a nonlinear system of equations with missing spectral data is introduced. As in the Petviashivili's and the spectral renormalization method, the governing equation is transformed into Fourier domain, but the iterations are performed for far fewer number of spectral components (M) than classical versions of the these methods with higher number of spectral components (N). After the converge criteria is achieved for M components, N component signal is reconstructed from M components by using the l1 minimization technique of the compressive sampling. This method can be named as compressive spectral renormalization (CSRM) method. The main advantage of the CSRM is that, it is capable of finding the sparse self-localized states of the evolution equation(s) with many spectral data missing.

  13. STUDIES AND EVALUATION OF COMPRESSED MICROSPHERES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idris Mohamed El-Mahdi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This work was aimed at the use of dissolution testing and similarity factor to assess the level of damage taken by active drug microspheres during compression in tablet dosage form. To achieve that, combinations of suitable excipients were used to protect drug microspheres during compression. The excipients were used in the form of powders, granules or placebo pellets prepared by extrusion-spheronization technology. The excipients were evaluated alone, in combinations and post-compression into compacts.  Preliminary experiments included density, hardness, friability and disintegration on all of the selected excipients. Based on such experiments it was found that the flowability of combination powders was more acceptable than individual excipients. Two combinations of microcrystalline -starch and microcrystalline cellulose -calcium carbonate granules were selected to be compressed with active ketoprofen pellets. In all the combinations used there was a significant amount of damage to drug pellets.  The kinetics of drug release appears to follow the zero-order rate and the rate remained unchanged even when a significant degree of damage to pellets occur. It was found that a high level of excipients is required in order to prepare microspheres as a rapid disintegrating tablet. Citation DOI: 10.21502/limuj.002.01.2016  LIMUJ is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

  14. MAPS Image Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    SUMMARY MICRO-ADAPTIVE PICTURE SEQUENCING (MAPS) is a digital image data compression technique which originated at Control Data Corporation and underwent...w w Figure 1-3. Test Imagery Set 6 L.( The MAPS process is clearly sensitive to contrast but not to the Mean gray scale in the image . Thus, all images ...BUFFERED WORD TRANSFER RATES image processing Typical computa- tional functions which can be solved e DUAL 16-BIT INTERNAL DATA BUS SYSTEM with this

  15. Differential Privacy with Compression

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Shuheng; Ligett, Katrina; Wasserman, Larry

    2009-01-01

    This work studies formal utility and privacy guarantees for a simple multiplicative database transformation, where the data are compressed by a random linear or affine transformation, reducing the number of data records substantially, while preserving the number of original input variables. We provide an analysis framework inspired by a recent concept known as differential privacy (Dwork 06). Our goal is to show that, despite the general difficulty of achieving the differential privacy guaran...

  16. Compressibility of solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinet, P.; Ferrante, J.; Rose, J. H.; Smith, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    A universal form is proposed for the equation of state (EOS) of solids. Good agreement is found for a variety of test data. The form of the EOS is used to suggest a method of data analysis, which is applied to materials of geophysical interest. The isothermal bulk modulus is discussed as a function of the volume and of the pressure. The isothermal compression curves for materials of geophysical interest are examined.

  17. Compression Amplification in Hearing Aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickson, L M

    1994-11-01

    In this tutorial, the characteristics of compression amplification in analog hearing aids and the experimental results obtained with single- and multichannel compression amplification systems are reviewed. Single-channel compression systems are classified into four broad groups on the basis of their static and dynamic characteristics: compression limiters, syllabic compressors, automatic volume control (AVC) systems, and "others," those with adaptive recovery time (aRT) and dual frontend automatic gain control (AGC) (Moore, 1990; Moore & Glasberg, 1988). Multichannel compression devices have, to date, used a variety of different types of compression, with syllabic compression in each frequency channel being the most popular. Experimental evidence suggests that compression limiting is generally superior to peak clipping as a means of controlling output, except for some individuals with severe to profound hearing loss. There is some evidence that syllabic compression and AVC systems enhance speech perception in quiet compared to conventional linear amplification; however, this improvement is not consistently maintained in the presence of background noise. The majority of recent research has focused on multichannel compression, and favorable results have been obtained with some systems. Research findings about the efficacy of using compression amplification for people with hearing loss have been extremely variable, and possible reasons for this are discussed.

  18. Modelado y experimentación computacional de la etapa de compresión en motores de pistones libres//Modeling and computer experiments of the compression stage in free piston engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genovevo Morejón-Vizcaino

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available En este articulo se alcanzó la obtención de un prototipo analítico de la etapa de combustión de un motor de pistones libres para realizar experimentos virtuales con el propósito de arribar al nuevo conocimiento, necesario para desarrollar un motor de pistones libres multicilindro con una bomba volumétrica, que hagala función, del acumulador hidráulico que emplean los diseños actuales para la carrera de compresión, con la finalidad de mejorar la densidad de potencia y disminuir las exigencias al comportamiento dinámico de los agregados. El método empleado es el “Desarrollo de nuevos productos mecatrónicos”. Se dedujo elmodelo matemático para la etapa de la compresión y aplicando el método de los grafos dicromáticos se obtuvo un algoritmo y el prototipo analítico. Los resultados de los experimentos virtuales muestran diferentes restricciones en la geometría y los materiales a utilizar así como las tendencias en el comportamiento de los diferentes parámetros hidráulicos.Palabras claves: motores de pistones libres, experimentos computacionales, prototipos analíticos, modelos matemáticos, oleohidráulica._____________________________________________________________________________AbstractThe goal of the investigation is the development of a free piston engine with an auxiliary hydraulic bomb that substitutes the function of the hydraulic accumulator with the objective of to improve the density of power and to diminish the demands in the dynamic behavior of the components. The used method is the“Development of new products mecatrónicos". In the investigation to arrive to the new knowledge an analytic prototype is developed to carry out PC-experiments. The mathematical model is deduced for the stage of the compression, the algorithm and the analytic prototype was obtained. The results of theexperiments show different restrictions in the geometry and the materials to use as well as the tendencies in the behavior of the

  19. Cylindrical isentropic compression by ultrahigh magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zhuowei; Luo, Hao; Zhang, Hengdi; Zhao, Shichao; Tang, Xiaosong; Tong, Yanjin; Song, Zhenfei; Tan, Fuli; Zhao, Jianheng; Sun, Chengwei

    2014-05-01

    The cylindrical isentropic compression by ultrahigh magnetic field (MC-1) is a kind of unique high energy density technique. It has characters like ultrahigh pressure and low temperature rising, and would have widely used in areas like high pressure physics, new material synthesis and ultrahigh magnetic field physics. The Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (IFP, CAEP) has begun the experiment since 2011 and a primary experimental device had been set-up. In the experiments, a seed magnetic field of 5 Tesla were set-up first and compressed by a stainless steel liner which is driven by high explosive initiated synchronously. The internal diameter of the liner is 97 mm, and its thickness is 1.5 mm. The movement of liner was recorded optically and a typical turnaround phenomenon was observed. From the photography results the liner was compressed smoothly and evenly and its average velocity was about 5-6 km/s. In the experiment a axial magnetic field of over 1400 Tesla has been recorded. The MC-1 process was numerical simulated by 1D MHD code MC11D and the simulations are in accord with the experiments.

  20. Working Characteristics of Variable Intake Valve in Compressed Air Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qihui Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new camless compressed air engine is proposed, which can make the compressed air energy reasonably distributed. Through analysis of the camless compressed air engine, a mathematical model of the working processes was set up. Using the software MATLAB/Simulink for simulation, the pressure, temperature, and air mass of the cylinder were obtained. In order to verify the accuracy of the mathematical model, the experiments were conducted. Moreover, performance analysis was introduced to design compressed air engine. Results show that, firstly, the simulation results have good consistency with the experimental results. Secondly, under different intake pressures, the highest output power is obtained when the crank speed reaches 500 rpm, which also provides the maximum output torque. Finally, higher energy utilization efficiency can be obtained at the lower speed, intake pressure, and valve duration angle. This research can refer to the design of the camless valve of compressed air engine.

  1. Velocity and Magnetic Compressions in FEL Drivers

    CERN Document Server

    Serafini, L

    2005-01-01

    We will compare merits and issues of these two techniques suitable for increasing the peak current of high brightness electron beams. The typical range of applicability is low energy for the velocity bunching and middle to high energy for magnetic compression. Velocity bunching is free from CSR effects but requires very high RF stability (time jitters), as well as a dedicated additional focusing and great cure in the beam transport: it is very well understood theoretically and numerical simulations are pretty straightforward. Several experiments of velocity bunching have been performed in the past few years: none of them, nevertheless, used a photoinjector designed and optimized for that purpose. Magnetic compression is a much more consolidated technique: CSR effects and micro-bunch instabilities are its main drawbacks. There is a large operational experience with chicanes used as magnetic compressors and their theoretical understanding is quite deep, though numerical simulations of real devices are still cha...

  2. Compressible turbulent flows: aspects of prediction and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, R. [TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Fachgebiet Stroemungsmechanik

    2007-03-15

    Compressible turbulent flows are an important element of high-speed flight. Boundary layers developing along fuselage and wings of an aircraft and along engine compressor and turbine blades are compressible and mostly turbulent. The high-speed flow around rockets and through rocket nozzles involves compressible turbulence and flow separation. Turbulent mixing and combustion in scramjet engines is another example where compressibility dominates the flow physics. Although compressible turbulent flows have attracted researchers since the fifties of the last century, they are not completely understood. Especially interactions between compressible turbulence and combustion lead to challenging, yet unsolved problems. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) and large-eddy simulation (LES) represent modern powerful research tools which allow to mimic such flows in great detail and to analyze underlying physical mechanisms, even those which cannot be accessed by the experiment. The present lecture provides a short description of these tools and some of their numerical characteristics. It then describes DNS and LES results of fully-developed channel and pipe flow and highlights effects of compressibility on the turbulence structure. The analysis of pressure fluctuations in such flows with isothermal cooled walls leads to the conclusion that the pressure-strain correlation tensor decreases in the wall layer and that the turbulence anisotropy increases, since the mean density falls off relative to the incompressible flow case. Similar increases in turbulence anisotropy due to compressibility are observed in inert and reacting temporal mixing layers. The nature of the pressure fluctuations is however two-facetted. While inert compressible mixing layers reveal wave-propagation effects in the pressure and density fluctuations, compressible reacting mixing layers seem to generate pressure fluctuations that are controlled by the time-rate of change of heat release and mean density

  3. Mammographic compression in Asian women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Susie; Abdul Aziz, Yang Faridah; Ng, Kwan Hoong

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To investigate: (1) the variability of mammographic compression parameters amongst Asian women; and (2) the effects of reducing compression force on image quality and mean glandular dose (MGD) in Asian women based on phantom study. Methods We retrospectively collected 15818 raw digital mammograms from 3772 Asian women aged 35–80 years who underwent screening or diagnostic mammography between Jan 2012 and Dec 2014 at our center. The mammograms were processed using a volumetric breast density (VBD) measurement software (Volpara) to assess compression force, compression pressure, compressed breast thickness (CBT), breast volume, VBD and MGD against breast contact area. The effects of reducing compression force on image quality and MGD were also evaluated based on measurement obtained from 105 Asian women, as well as using the RMI156 Mammographic Accreditation Phantom and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) slabs. Results Compression force, compression pressure, CBT, breast volume, VBD and MGD correlated significantly with breast contact area (pimage quality (p>0.05). Conclusions Force-standardized protocol led to widely variable compression parameters in Asian women. Based on phantom study, it is feasible to reduce compression force up to 32.5% with minimal effects on image quality and MGD. PMID:28419125

  4. Relating the molecular structure of comb-type superplasticizers to the compression rheology of MgO suspensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Ane Mette; Flatt, Rober Johan; Bergström, Lennart

    2006-01-01

    chains. Consolidation experiments, where the volume fraction gradient of particle networks has been determined in response to a centrifugal force field, offer a simple, yet accurate, way of investigating flocculated, partly stabilized and stable suspensions under compression. The compression rheology...

  5. International magnetic pulse compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirbie, H. C.; Newton, M. A.; Siemens, P. D.

    1991-04-01

    Although pulsed-power engineering traditionally has been practiced by a fairly small, close community in the areas of defense and energy research, it is becoming more common in high-power, high-energy commercial pursuits such as material processing and lasers. This paper is a synopsis of the Feb. 12-14, 1990 workshop on magnetic switching as it applies primarily to pulse compression (power transformation). During the course of the Workshop at Granlibakken, a great deal of information was amassed and a keen insight into both the problems and opportunities as to the use of this switching approach was developed. The segmented workshop format proved ideal for identifying key aspects affecting optimum performance in a variety of applications. Individual groups of experts addressed network and system modeling, magnetic materials, power conditioning, core cooling and dielectrics, and finally circuits and application. At the end, they came together to consolidate their input and formulate the workshop's conclusions, identifying roadblocks or suggesting research projects, particularly as they apply to magnetic switching's trump card - its high-average-power-handling capability (at least on a burst-mode basis). The workshop was especially productive both in the quality and quantity of information transfer in an environment conducive to a free and open exchange of ideas. We will not delve into the organization proper of this meeting, rather we wish to commend to the interested reader this volume, which provides the definitive and most up-to-date compilation on the subject of magnetic pulse compression from underlying principles to current state of the art as well as the prognosis for the future of magnetic pulse compression as a consensus of the workshop's organizers and participants.

  6. Compressive Transient Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Qilin

    2017-04-01

    High resolution transient/3D imaging technology is of high interest in both scientific research and commercial application. Nowadays, all of the transient imaging methods suffer from low resolution or time consuming mechanical scanning. We proposed a new method based on TCSPC and Compressive Sensing to achieve a high resolution transient imaging with a several seconds capturing process. Picosecond laser sends a serious of equal interval pulse while synchronized SPAD camera\\'s detecting gate window has a precise phase delay at each cycle. After capturing enough points, we are able to make up a whole signal. By inserting a DMD device into the system, we are able to modulate all the frames of data using binary random patterns to reconstruct a super resolution transient/3D image later. Because the low fill factor of SPAD sensor will make a compressive sensing scenario ill-conditioned, We designed and fabricated a diffractive microlens array. We proposed a new CS reconstruction algorithm which is able to denoise at the same time for the measurements suffering from Poisson noise. Instead of a single SPAD senor, we chose a SPAD array because it can drastically reduce the requirement for the number of measurements and its reconstruction time. Further more, it not easy to reconstruct a high resolution image with only one single sensor while for an array, it just needs to reconstruct small patches and a few measurements. In this thesis, we evaluated the reconstruction methods using both clean measurements and the version corrupted by Poisson noise. The results show how the integration over the layers influence the image quality and our algorithm works well while the measurements suffer from non-trival Poisson noise. It\\'s a breakthrough in the areas of both transient imaging and compressive sensing.

  7. Fast Compressive Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaihua; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Ming-Hsuan

    2014-10-01

    It is a challenging task to develop effective and efficient appearance models for robust object tracking due to factors such as pose variation, illumination change, occlusion, and motion blur. Existing online tracking algorithms often update models with samples from observations in recent frames. Despite much success has been demonstrated, numerous issues remain to be addressed. First, while these adaptive appearance models are data-dependent, there does not exist sufficient amount of data for online algorithms to learn at the outset. Second, online tracking algorithms often encounter the drift problems. As a result of self-taught learning, misaligned samples are likely to be added and degrade the appearance models. In this paper, we propose a simple yet effective and efficient tracking algorithm with an appearance model based on features extracted from a multiscale image feature space with data-independent basis. The proposed appearance model employs non-adaptive random projections that preserve the structure of the image feature space of objects. A very sparse measurement matrix is constructed to efficiently extract the features for the appearance model. We compress sample images of the foreground target and the background using the same sparse measurement matrix. The tracking task is formulated as a binary classification via a naive Bayes classifier with online update in the compressed domain. A coarse-to-fine search strategy is adopted to further reduce the computational complexity in the detection procedure. The proposed compressive tracking algorithm runs in real-time and performs favorably against state-of-the-art methods on challenging sequences in terms of efficiency, accuracy and robustness.

  8. The quest for 'diagnostically lossless' medical image compression: a comparative study of objective quality metrics for compressed medical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalik-Urbaniak, Ilona; Brunet, Dominique; Wang, Jiheng; Koff, David; Smolarski-Koff, Nadine; Vrscay, Edward R.; Wallace, Bill; Wang, Zhou

    2014-03-01

    Our study, involving a collaboration with radiologists (DK,NSK) as well as a leading international developer of medical imaging software (AGFA), is primarily concerned with improved methods of assessing the diagnostic quality of compressed medical images and the investigation of compression artifacts resulting from JPEG and JPEG2000. In this work, we compare the performances of the Structural Similarity quality measure (SSIM), MSE/PSNR, compression ratio CR and JPEG quality factor Q, based on experimental data collected in two experiments involving radiologists. An ROC and Kolmogorov-Smirnov analysis indicates that compression ratio is not always a good indicator of visual quality. Moreover, SSIM demonstrates the best performance, i.e., it provides the closest match to the radiologists' assessments. We also show that a weighted Youden index1 and curve tting method can provide SSIM and MSE thresholds for acceptable compression ratios.

  9. Metal Hydride Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Terry A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Bowman, Robert [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Barton [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Anovitz, Lawrence [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jensen, Craig [Hawaii Hydrogen Carriers LLC, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Conventional hydrogen compressors often contribute over half of the cost of hydrogen stations, have poor reliability, and have insufficient flow rates for a mature FCEV market. Fatigue associated with their moving parts including cracking of diaphragms and failure of seal leads to failure in conventional compressors, which is exacerbated by the repeated starts and stops expected at fueling stations. Furthermore, the conventional lubrication of these compressors with oil is generally unacceptable at fueling stations due to potential fuel contamination. Metal hydride (MH) technology offers a very good alternative to both conventional (mechanical) and newly developed (electrochemical, ionic liquid pistons) methods of hydrogen compression. Advantages of MH compression include simplicity in design and operation, absence of moving parts, compactness, safety and reliability, and the possibility to utilize waste industrial heat to power the compressor. Beyond conventional H2 supplies of pipelines or tanker trucks, another attractive scenario is the on-site generating, pressuring and delivering pure H2 at pressure (≥ 875 bar) for refueling vehicles at electrolysis, wind, or solar generating production facilities in distributed locations that are too remote or widely distributed for cost effective bulk transport. MH hydrogen compression utilizes a reversible heat-driven interaction of a hydride-forming metal alloy with hydrogen gas to form the MH phase and is a promising process for hydrogen energy applications [1,2]. To deliver hydrogen continuously, each stage of the compressor must consist of multiple MH beds with synchronized hydrogenation & dehydrogenation cycles. Multistage pressurization allows achievement of greater compression ratios using reduced temperature swings compared to single stage compressors. The objectives of this project are to investigate and demonstrate on a laboratory scale a two-stage MH hydrogen (H2) gas compressor with a

  10. Analysis by compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meredith, David

    MEL is a geometric music encoding language designed to allow for musical objects to be encoded parsimoniously as sets of points in pitch-time space, generated by performing geometric transformations on component patterns. MEL has been implemented in Java and coupled with the SIATEC pattern discov...... discovery algorithm to allow for compact encodings to be generated automatically from in extenso note lists. The MEL-SIATEC system is founded on the belief that music analysis and music perception can be modelled as the compression of in extenso descriptions of musical objects....

  11. Compressive Fatigue in Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clorius, Christian Odin; Pedersen, Martin Bo Uhre; Hoffmeyer, Preben

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of fatigue failure in wood subjected to load cycles in compression parallel to grain is presented. Small clear specimens of spruce are taken to failure in square wave formed fatigue loading at a stress excitation level corresponding to 80% of the short term strength. Four...... frequencies ranging from 0.01 Hz to 10 Hz are used. The number of cycles to failure is found to be a poor measure of the fatigue performance of wood. Creep, maximum strain, stiffness and work are monitored throughout the fatigue tests. Accumulated creep is suggested identified with damage and a correlation...

  12. Breast compression in mammography: how much is enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulos, Ann; McLean, Donald; Rickard, Mary; Heard, Robert

    2003-06-01

    The amount of breast compression that is applied during mammography potentially influences image quality and the discomfort experienced. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between applied compression force, breast thickness, reported discomfort and image quality. Participants were women attending routine breast screening by mammography at BreastScreen New South Wales Central and Eastern Sydney. During the mammographic procedure, an 'extra' craniocaudal (CC) film was taken at a reduced level of compression ranging from 10 to 30 Newtons. Breast thickness measurements were recorded for both the normal and the extra CC film. Details of discomfort experienced, cup size, menstrual status, existing breast pain and breast problems were also recorded. Radiologists were asked to compare the image quality of the normal and manipulated film. The results indicated that 24% of women did not experience a difference in thickness when the compression was reduced. This is an important new finding because the aim of breast compression is to reduce breast thickness. If breast thickness is not reduced when compression force is applied then discomfort is increased with no benefit in image quality. This has implications for mammographic practice when determining how much breast compression is sufficient. Radiologists found a decrease in contrast resolution within the fatty area of the breast between the normal and the extra CC film, confirming a decrease in image quality due to insufficient applied compression force.

  13. Data compression for near Earth and deep space to Earth transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Daniel E.

    1991-01-01

    Key issues of data compression for near Earth and deep space to Earth transmission discussion group are briefly presented. Specific recommendations as made by the group are as follows: (1) since data compression is a cost effective way to improve communications and storage capacity, NASA should use lossless data compression wherever possible; (2) NASA should conduct experiments and studies on the value and effectiveness of lossy data compression; (3) NASA should develop and select approaches to high ratio compression of operational data such as voice and video; (4) NASA should develop data compression integrated circuits for a few key approaches identified in the preceding recommendation; (5) NASA should examine new data compression approaches such as combining source and channel encoding, where high payoff gaps are identified in currently available schemes; and (6) users and developers of data compression technologies should be in closer communication within NASA and with academia, industry, and other government agencies.

  14. Stored energy function and compressibility of compressible rubberlike materials under large strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, S. T. J.; Landel, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    By using new invariants in the theory of finite elasticity an expression is obtained for the stored energy function of slightly compressible materials in which the effects of the distortional change (change of shape) and of the volume change are clearly separated. The volume-related terms are expressed as a function of the third invariant, the classical compressibility, and an induced anisotropy of the effective compressibility which is due to the large deformations. After evaluating the terms, using data on pressure, volume, uniaxial strain, and fractional volume change vs strain data on natural rubber from the literature, it is shown that the volume change contribution to the total stress observed in a simple tensile experiment can be clearly separated from the distortional contribution, even at finite strains.

  15. Introduction to compressible fluid flow

    CERN Document Server

    Oosthuizen, Patrick H

    2013-01-01

    IntroductionThe Equations of Steady One-Dimensional Compressible FlowSome Fundamental Aspects of Compressible FlowOne-Dimensional Isentropic FlowNormal Shock WavesOblique Shock WavesExpansion Waves - Prandtl-Meyer FlowVariable Area FlowsAdiabatic Flow with FrictionFlow with Heat TransferLinearized Analysis of Two-Dimensional Compressible FlowsHypersonic and High-Temperature FlowsHigh-Temperature Gas EffectsLow-Density FlowsBibliographyAppendices

  16. Shock compression of precompressed deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael; Crowhurst, Jonathan; Goncharov, Alexander; Zaug, Joseph; Bastea, Sorin; Militzer, Burkhard

    2012-03-01

    Here we report quasi-isentropic dynamic compression and thermodynamic characterization of solid, precompressed deuterium over an ultra fast time scale (< 100 ps) and a microscopic length scale (< 1 ìm). We further report a fast transition in dynamically compressed solid deuterium that is consistent with the ramp to shock transition, with a time scale of less than 10 ps. These results suggest that high density dynamic compression of hydrogen may be possible on microscopic length scales.

  17. Abundance Estimation of Hyperspectral Data with Low Compressive Sampling Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongliang; Feng, Yan

    2017-12-01

    Hyperspectral data processing typically demands enormous computational resources in terms of storage, computation, and I/O throughputs. In this paper, a compressive sensing framework with low sampling rate is described for hyperspectral imagery. It is based on the widely used linear spectral mixture model. Abundance fractions can be calculated directly from compressively sensed data with no need to reconstruct original hyperspectral imagery. The proposed abundance estimation model is based on the sparsity of abundance fractions and an alternating direction method of multipliers is developed to solve this model. Experiments show that the proposed scheme has a high potential to unmix compressively sensed hyperspectral data with low sampling rate.

  18. Hugoniot and refractive indices of bromoform under shock compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. C. Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate physical properties of bromoform (liquid CHBr3 including compressibility and refractive index under dynamic extreme conditions of shock compression. Planar shock experiments are conducted along with high-speed laser interferometry. Our experiments and previous results establish a linear shock velocity−particle velocity relation for particle velocities below 1.77 km/s, as well as the Hugoniot and isentropic compression curves up to ∼21 GPa. Shock-state refractive indices of CHBr3 up to 2.3 GPa or ∼26% compression, as a function of density, can be described with a linear relation and follows the Gladstone-Dale relation. The velocity corrections for laser interferometry measurements at 1550 nm are also obtained.

  19. Spectroscopic insight for tablet compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakio, S; Ylinärä, H; Antikainen, O; Räikkönen, H; Yliruusi, J

    2015-02-01

    Tablet compression process has been studied over the years from various perspectives. However what exactly happens to material during compression is still unknown. In this study a novel compression die which enables real-time spectroscopic measurements during the compression of material is represented. Both near infrared and Raman spectroscope probes can be attached to the die. In this study the usage of the die is demonstrated by using Raman spectroscopy. Eicosane, d-glucose anhydrate, α-lactose monohydrate and xylitol were used in the study because their compression behavior and bonding properties during compression were assumed to be different. The intensity of the Raman signal changed during compression with all of the materials. However, the intensity changes were different within the materials. The biggest differences were within the xylitol spectra. It was noticed that some peaks disappeared with higher compression pressures indicating that the pressure affected variously on different bonds in xylitol structure. These reversible changes were supposed to relate the changes in conformation and crystal structure. As a conclusion, the die was found to be a significant addition for studying compression process in real-time. It can help to reveal Process induced transformations (PITs) occurring during powder compaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Lossless Compression of Broadcast Video

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, Bo; Eriksen, N.; Faber, E.

    1998-01-01

    We investigate several techniques for lossless and near-lossless compression of broadcast video.The emphasis is placed on the emerging international standard for compression of continous-tone still images, JPEG-LS, due to its excellent compression performance and moderatecomplexity. Except for one...... artificial sequence containing uncompressible data all the 4:2:2, 8-bit test video material easily compresses losslessly to a rate below 125 Mbit/s. At this rate, video plus overhead can be contained in a single telecom 4th order PDH channel or a single STM-1 channel. Difficult 4:2:2, 10-bit test material...

  1. Compression Frequency Choice for Compression Mass Gauge Method and Effect on Measurement Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Juan; Chen, Xiaoqian; Huang, Yiyong

    2013-12-01

    It is a difficult job to gauge the liquid fuel mass in a tank on spacecrafts under microgravity condition. Without the presence of strong buoyancy, the configuration of the liquid and gas in the tank is uncertain and more than one bubble may exist in the liquid part. All these will affect the measure accuracy of liquid mass gauge, especially for a method called Compression Mass Gauge (CMG). Four resonance resources affect the choice of compression frequency for CMG method. There are the structure resonance, liquid sloshing, transducer resonance and bubble resonance. Ground experimental apparatus are designed and built to validate the gauging method and the influence of different compression frequencies at different fill levels on the measurement accuracy. Harmonic phenomenon should be considered during filter design when processing test data. Results demonstrate the ground experiment system performances well with high accuracy and the measurement accuracy increases as the compression frequency climbs in low fill levels. But low compression frequencies should be the better choice for high fill levels. Liquid sloshing induces the measurement accuracy to degrade when the surface is excited to wave by external disturbance at the liquid natural frequency. The measurement accuracy is still acceptable at small amplitude vibration.

  2. Structure and Properties of Compressed Borate Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Bauer, U.; Behrens, H.

    While the influence of thermal history on the structure and properties of glasses has been thoroughly studied in the past century, the influence of pressure history has received considerably less attention. In this study, we investigate the pressure-induced changes in structure and properties...... in a series of borate glasses. Upon isostatic compression, NMR experiments show that the fraction of tetrahedral boron increases, leading to an overall decrease of the molar volume of the network. We correlate these structural changes with changes in elastic moduli from Brillouin scattering experiments...

  3. Adaptively Compressed Exchange Operator

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The Fock exchange operator plays a central role in modern quantum chemistry. The large computational cost associated with the Fock exchange operator hinders Hartree-Fock calculations and Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations with hybrid exchange-correlation functionals, even for systems consisting of hundreds of atoms. We develop the adaptively compressed exchange operator (ACE) formulation, which greatly reduces the computational cost associated with the Fock exchange operator without loss of accuracy. The ACE formulation does not depend on the size of the band gap, and thus can be applied to insulating, semiconducting as well as metallic systems. In an iterative framework for solving Hartree-Fock-like systems, the ACE formulation only requires moderate modification of the code, and can be potentially beneficial for all electronic structure software packages involving exchange calculations. Numerical results indicate that the ACE formulation can become advantageous even for small systems with tens...

  4. Waves and compressible flow

    CERN Document Server

    Ockendon, Hilary

    2016-01-01

    Now in its second edition, this book continues to give readers a broad mathematical basis for modelling and understanding the wide range of wave phenomena encountered in modern applications.  New and expanded material includes topics such as elastoplastic waves and waves in plasmas, as well as new exercises.  Comprehensive collections of models are used to illustrate the underpinning mathematical methodologies, which include the basic ideas of the relevant partial differential equations, characteristics, ray theory, asymptotic analysis, dispersion, shock waves, and weak solutions. Although the main focus is on compressible fluid flow, the authors show how intimately gasdynamic waves are related to wave phenomena in many other areas of physical science.   Special emphasis is placed on the development of physical intuition to supplement and reinforce analytical thinking. Each chapter includes a complete set of carefully prepared exercises, making this a suitable textbook for students in applied mathematics, ...

  5. Central cooling: compressive chillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J.E.

    1978-03-01

    Representative cost and performance data are provided in a concise, useable form for three types of compressive liquid packaged chillers: reciprocating, centrifugal, and screw. The data are represented in graphical form as well as in empirical equations. Reciprocating chillers are available from 2.5 to 240 tons with full-load COPs ranging from 2.85 to 3.87. Centrifugal chillers are available from 80 to 2,000 tons with full load COPs ranging from 4.1 to 4.9. Field-assemblied centrifugal chillers have been installed with capacities up to 10,000 tons. Screw-type chillers are available from 100 to 750 tons with full load COPs ranging from 3.3 to 4.5.

  6. Transmission of compressed video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasch, H. L.

    1990-09-01

    An overview of video coding is presented. The aim is not to give a technical summary of possible coding techniques, but to address subjects related to video compression in general and to the transmission of compressed video in more detail. Bit rate reduction is in general possible by removing redundant information; removing information the eye does not use anyway; and reducing the quality of the video. The codecs which are used for reducing the bit rate, can be divided into two groups: Constant Bit rate Codecs (CBC's), which keep the bit rate constant, but vary the video quality; and Variable Bit rate Codecs (VBC's), which keep the video quality constant by varying the bit rate. VBC's can be in general reach a higher video quality than CBC's using less bandwidth, but need a transmission system that allows the bandwidth of a connection to fluctuate in time. The current and the next generation of the PSTN does not allow this; ATM might. There are several factors which influence the quality of video: the bit error rate of the transmission channel, slip rate, packet loss rate/packet insertion rate, end-to-end delay, phase shift between voice and video, and bit rate. Based on the bit rate of the coded video, the following classification of coded video can be made: High Definition Television (HDTV); Broadcast Quality Television (BQTV); video conferencing; and video telephony. The properties of these classes are given. The video conferencing and video telephony equipment available now and in the next few years can be divided into three categories: conforming to 1984 CCITT standard for video conferencing; conforming to 1988 CCITT standard; and conforming to no standard.

  7. Effects of turbulence compressibility and unsteadiness in compression corner flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brankovic, A.; Zeman, O.

    1994-01-01

    The structure of the separated flow region over a 20 degree compression corner at a free-stream Mach number of 2.84 is investigated computationally using a Reynolds averaged Navier Stokes (R.A.N.S.) solver and kappa-epsilon model. At this Mach number and ramp angle, a steady-state recirculation region of order delta(sub o) is observed, with onset of a 'plateau' in the wall pressure distribution near the corner. At lower ramp angles, separation is negligible, while at an angle of 24 degrees, separation regions of length 2 delta(sub o) are expected. Of interest here is the response of the mathematical model to inclusion of the pressure dilatation term for turbulent kinetic energy. Compared with the experimental data of Smits and Muck (1987), steady-state computations show improvement when the pressure dilatation term is included. Unsteady computations, using both unforced and then forced inlet conditions, did not predict the oscillatory motion of the separation bubble as observed in laboratory experiments. An analysis of the separation bubble oscillation and the turbulent boundary layer (T.B.L.) frequencies for this flow suggests that the bubble oscillations are of nearly the same order as the turbulent frequencies, and therefore difficult for the model to separate and resolve.

  8. Tight bounds for top tree compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Fernstrøm, Finn; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2017-01-01

    We consider compressing labeled, ordered and rooted trees using DAG compression and top tree compression. We show that there exists a family of trees such that the size of the DAG compression is always a logarithmic factor smaller than the size of the top tree compression (even for an alphabet...

  9. Application specific compression : final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melgaard, David Kennett; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Myers, Daniel S.; Harrison, Carol D.; Lee, David S.; Lewis, Phillip J.; Carlson, Jeffrey J.

    2008-12-01

    With the continuing development of more capable data gathering sensors, comes an increased demand on the bandwidth for transmitting larger quantities of data. To help counteract that trend, a study was undertaken to determine appropriate lossy data compression strategies for minimizing their impact on target detection and characterization. The survey of current compression techniques led us to the conclusion that wavelet compression was well suited for this purpose. Wavelet analysis essentially applies a low-pass and high-pass filter to the data, converting the data into the related coefficients that maintain spatial information as well as frequency information. Wavelet compression is achieved by zeroing the coefficients that pertain to the noise in the signal, i.e. the high frequency, low amplitude portion. This approach is well suited for our goal because it reduces the noise in the signal with only minimal impact on the larger, lower frequency target signatures. The resulting coefficients can then be encoded using lossless techniques with higher compression levels because of the lower entropy and significant number of zeros. No significant signal degradation or difficulties in target characterization or detection were observed or measured when wavelet compression was applied to simulated and real data, even when over 80% of the coefficients were zeroed. While the exact level of compression will be data set dependent, for the data sets we studied, compression factors over 10 were found to be satisfactory where conventional lossless techniques achieved levels of less than 3.

  10. Recent progress in compressible turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, S.; Xia, Z.; Wang, Jianchun; Yang, Yantao

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we review some recent studies on compressible turbulence conducted by the authors’ group, which include fundamental studies on compressible isotropic turbulence (CIT) and applied studies on developing a constrained large eddy simulation (CLES) for wall-bounded turbulence. In the first

  11. Streaming Compression of Hexahedral Meshes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isenburg, M; Courbet, C

    2010-02-03

    We describe a method for streaming compression of hexahedral meshes. Given an interleaved stream of vertices and hexahedral our coder incrementally compresses the mesh in the presented order. Our coder is extremely memory efficient when the input stream documents when vertices are referenced for the last time (i.e. when it contains topological finalization tags). Our coder then continuously releases and reuses data structures that no longer contribute to compressing the remainder of the stream. This means in practice that our coder has only a small fraction of the whole mesh in memory at any time. We can therefore compress very large meshes - even meshes that do not file in memory. Compared to traditional, non-streaming approaches that load the entire mesh and globally reorder it during compression, our algorithm trades a less compact compressed representation for significant gains in speed, memory, and I/O efficiency. For example, on the 456k hexahedra 'blade' mesh, our coder is twice as fast and uses 88 times less memory (only 3.1 MB) with the compressed file increasing about 3% in size. We also present the first scheme for predictive compression of properties associated with hexahedral cells.

  12. Polymer-induced compression of biological hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sujit; Preska Steinberg, Asher; Ismagilov, Rustem

    Hydrogels - such as mucus, blood clots, and the extracellular matrix - provide critical functions in biological systems. However, little is known about how their structure is influenced by many of the polymeric materials they come into contact with regularly. Here, we focus on one critically important biological hydrogel: colonic mucus. While several biological processes are thought to potentially regulate the mucus hydrogel structure, the polymeric composition of the gut environment has been ignored. We use Flory-Huggins solution theory to characterize polymer-mucus interactions. We find that gut polymers, including those small enough to penetrate the mucus hydrogel, can in fact alter mucus structure, changing its equilibrium degree of swelling and forcing it to compress. The extent of compression increases with increasing polymer concentration and size. We use experiments on mice to verify these predictions with common dietary and therapeutic gut polymers. Our results provide a foundation for investigating similar, previously overlooked, polymer-induced effects in other biological hydrogels.

  13. Optical data compression in time stretch imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Lifan Chen

    Full Text Available Time stretch imaging offers real-time image acquisition at millions of frames per second and subnanosecond shutter speed, and has enabled detection of rare cancer cells in blood with record throughput and specificity. An unintended consequence of high throughput image acquisition is the massive amount of digital data generated by the instrument. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of real-time optical image compression applied to time stretch imaging. By exploiting the sparsity of the image, we reduce the number of samples and the amount of data generated by the time stretch camera in our proof-of-concept experiments by about three times. Optical data compression addresses the big data predicament in such systems.

  14. Detecting double compression of audio signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rui; Shi, Yun Q.; Huang, Jiwu

    2010-01-01

    MP3 is the most popular audio format nowadays in our daily life, for example music downloaded from the Internet and file saved in the digital recorder are often in MP3 format. However, low bitrate MP3s are often transcoded to high bitrate since high bitrate ones are of high commercial value. Also audio recording in digital recorder can be doctored easily by pervasive audio editing software. This paper presents two methods for the detection of double MP3 compression. The methods are essential for finding out fake-quality MP3 and audio forensics. The proposed methods use support vector machine classifiers with feature vectors formed by the distributions of the first digits of the quantized MDCT (modified discrete cosine transform) coefficients. Extensive experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods. To the best of our knowledge, this piece of work is the first one to detect double compression of audio signal.

  15. Binary Pulse Compression Techniques for MST Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodman, R. F.; Sulzer, M. P.; Farley, D. T.

    1984-01-01

    In most mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) applications pulsed radars are peak power limited and have excess average power capability. Short pulses are required for good range resolution but the problem of range biguity (signals received simultaneously from more than one altitude) sets a minimum limit on the interpulse period (IPP). Pulse compression is a echnique which allows more of the transmitter average power capacity to be used without scarificing range resolution. Binary phase coding methods for pulse compression are discussed. Many aspects of codes and decoding and their applications to MST experiments are addressed; this includes Barker codes and longer individual codes, and then complementary codes and other code sets. Software decoding, hardware decoders, and coherent integrators are also discussed.

  16. Goose`s eggshell strength at compressive loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šárka Nedomová

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the study of the goose eggs behaviour under compressive loading between two plates using testing device TIRATEST. The influences of the loading orientation as well as the effect of compressive velocity are studied. 226 eggs from Landes geese were chosen for the experiment. Eggs have been loaded between their poles and in the equator plane. Five different compressive velocities (0.0167, 0.167, 0.334, 1.67 and 5 mm.s-1 were used. The increase in rupture force with loading rate was observed for loading in all direction (along main axes. Dependence of the rupture force on loading rate was quantifies and described. The highest rupture force was obtained when the eggs were loaded along their axes of symmetry (X-axis. Compression in the equator plane (along the Z-axis required the least compressive force to break the eggshells. The eggshell strength was described by the rupture force, specific rupture deformation and by the absorbed energy. The rupture force is highly dependent on compression speeds. The dependence of the rupture force on the compression velocity can be described by a power function. The same is valid for the rate dependence of the energy absorbed by the egg up to the fracture. The rate sensitivity of the Goose's eggshells strength is significantly higher than that reported for the hen's eggs

  17. Designing for Compressive Sensing: Compressive Art, Camouflage, Fonts, and Quick Response Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    ARL-TR-8281 ● JAN 2018 US Army Research Laboratory Designing for Compressive Sensing: Compressive Art , Camouflage, Fonts, and...Compressive Sensing: Compressive Art , Camouflage, Fonts, and Quick Response Codes by Michael L Don Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Designing for Compressive Sensing: Compressive Art , Camouflage, Fonts, and Quick Response Codes 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  18. Undulation Contributions to the Area Compressibility in Lipid Bilayer Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waheed, Qaiser; Edholm, Olle

    2009-01-01

    Abstract It is here shown that there is a considerable system size-dependence in the area compressibility calculated from area fluctuations in lipid bilayers. This is caused by the contributions to the area fluctuations from undulations. This is also the case in experiments. At present, such a contribution, in most cases, is subtracted from the experimental values to obtain a true area compressibility. This should also be done with the simulation values. Here, this is done by extrapolating area compressibility versus system size, down to very small (zero) system size, where undulations no longer exist. The area compressibility moduli obtained from such simulations do not agree with experimental true area compressibility moduli as well as the uncorrected ones from contemporary or earlier simulations, but tend, instead, to be ∼50% too large. As a byproduct, the bending modulus can be calculated from the slope of the compressibility modulus versus system-size. The values obtained in this way for the bending modulus are then in good agreement with experiment. PMID:19917229

  19. Prospects for achieving high dynamic compression with low energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael; Crowhurst, Jonathan; Zaug, Joseph; Bastea, Sorin; Goncharov, Alexander

    2013-06-01

    Laser driven dynamic compression experiments may, in materials with picosecond equilibration times, be possible with orders of magnitude less drive energy than currently used. As we show, the compression energy for geometrically similar experiments varies as the third power of the time scale of compression. For materials which equilibrate and can be characterized on picosecond time scales, the compression energy can be orders of magnitude smaller than the 1-100 ns scale time scale of many current experiments. The use of substantially lower compression energy is a great practical advantage in such experiments, potentially enabling the observation of extreme states of matter with table top scale laser systems. We discuss prospects for realizing this scheme in practice. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 with Laboratory directed Research and Development funding (11ERD039), as well as being based on work supported as part of the EFree, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Grant No. DESC0001057.

  20. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E. [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  1. Measuring the compression of mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannisto, V

    2000-09-12

    Compression of mortality is measured here in four ways: 1) by standard deviation of the age at death above the mode; 2) by standard deviation of the age at death in the highest quartile; 3) by the inter-quartile range; and 4) by the shortest age interval in which a given proportion of deaths take place. The two first-mentioned are directed at old ages, while the other two measure compression over the entire age range. The fourth alternative is recommended as the most suitable for general use and offers several variations, called the C-family of compression indicators. Applied to historical and modern populations, all four measures show convincingly that the secular transition from high to low mortality has been accompanied by general and massive compression of mortality. In recent decades, however, this development has come close to stagnation even when life expectancy continues to increase. This has happened at a level where compression is still so incomplete that the shortest age interval in which 90% of deaths occur, is 35 years. It seems unrealistic to expect human mortality ever to be compressed into so narrow an age interval that the survival curve would even approximately rectangular. It is considered useful to monitor changes in the compression of mortality because the indicators describe relevant aspects of the length of life and may acquire new significance as indicators of population heterogeneity.

  2. Measuring the compression of mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Compression of mortality is measured here in four ways: (1 by standard deviation of the age at death above the mode; (2 by standard deviation of the age at death in the highest quartile; (3 by the inter-quartile range; and (4 by the shortest age interval in which a given proportion of deaths take place. The two first-mentioned are directed at old ages while the other two measure compression over the entire age range. The fourth alternative is recommended as the most suitable for general use and offers several variations, called the C-family of compression indicators. Applied to historical and modern populations, all four measures show convincingly that the secular transition from high to low mortality has been accompanied by general and massive compression of mortality. In recent decades, however, this development has come close to stagnation even when life expectancy continues to increase. This has happened at a level where compression is still so incomplete that the shortest age interval in which 90 percent of deaths occur, is more than 35 years. It seems unrealistic to expect human mortality ever to be compressed into so narrow an age interval that the survival curve would be even approximately rectangular. It is considered useful to monitor changes in the compression of mortality because the indicators describe relevant aspects of the length of life and may acquire new significance as indicators of population heterogeneity.

  3. Extreme dynamic compression with a low energy laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael R.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Zaug, Joseph M.; Radousky, Harry B.

    2017-01-01

    Here we review the scaling of pulse energy with duration for sub-ns laser-driven dynamic compression experiments, which suggests that extreme pressures (multiple Mbar) might be achieved in rapidly equilibrating materials with substantially lower energy than used in traditional experiments. For instance, conventional scaling of pressure with laser intensity indicates that pressures well into the multiple Mbar range should be accessible by compressing with a hundreds of picosecond duration drive pulse with some tens of mJ of energy - orders of magnitude less than required for conventional experiments. Via a related scaling argument, we also show that the throughput of time-resolved pulsed x-ray dynamic compression experiments (such as those performed at x-ray free electron lasers) varies as the inverse square of the time scale of the experiment. The strong variation of throughput with the scale of the experiment should be a significant consideration in the design of such experiments - to obtain high throughput, the time scale of compression should be no longer than required (via material equilibration) to achieve the desired final material state.

  4. Dynamic compressive response of bovine liver tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervin, Farhana; Chen, Weinong W; Weerasooriya, Tusit

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to experimentally determine the strain rate effects on the compressive stress-strain behavior of bovine liver tissues. Fresh liver tissues were used to make specimens for mechanical loading. Experiments at quasi-static strain rates were conducted at 0.01 and 0.1 s(-1). Intermediate-rate experiments were performed at 1, 10, and 100 s(-1). High strain rate (1000, 2000, and 3000 s(-1)) experiments were conducted using a Kolsky bar modified for soft material characterization. A hollow transmission bar with semi-conductor strain gages was used to sense the weak forces from the soft specimens. Quartz-crystal force transducers were used to monitor valid testing conditions on the tissue specimens. The experiment results show that the compressive stress-strain response of the liver tissue is non-linear and highly rate-sensitive, especially when the strain rate is in the Kolsky bar range. The tissue stiffens significantly with increasing strain rate. The responses from liver tissues along and perpendicular to the liver surface were consistent, indicating isotropic behavior. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Impedance of tissue-mimicking phantom material under compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Belmont

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The bioimpedance of tissues under compression is a field in need of study. While biological tissues can become compressed in a myriad of ways, very few experiments have been conducted to describe the relationship between the passive electrical properties of a material (impedance/admittance during mechanical deformation. Of the investigations that have been conducted, the exodus of fluid from samples under compression has been thought to be the cause of changes in impedance, though until now was not measured directly. Using a soft tissue-mimicking phantom material (tofu whose passive electrical properties are a function of the conducting fluid held within its porous structure, we have shown that the mechanical behavior of a sample under compression can be measured through bioimpedance techniques.

  6. Influence of Compacting Rate on the Properties of Compressed Earth Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humphrey Danso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Compaction of blocks contributes significantly to the strength properties of compressed earth blocks. This paper investigates the influence of compacting rates on the properties of compressed earth blocks. Experiments were conducted to determine the density, compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, and erosion properties of compressed earth blocks produced with different rates of compacting speed. The study concludes that although the low rate of compaction achieved slightly better performance characteristics, there is no statistically significant difference between the soil blocks produced with low compacting rate and high compacting rate. The study demonstrates that there is not much influence on the properties of compressed earth blocks produced with low and high compacting rates. It was further found that there are strong linear correlations between the compressive strength test and density, and density and the erosion. However, a weak linear correlation was found between tensile strength and compressive strength, and tensile strength and density.

  7. [Effects of real-time audiovisual feedback on secondary-school students' performance of chest compressions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelairas-Gómez, Cristian; Rodríguez-Núñez, Antonio; Vilas-Pintos, Elisardo; Prieto Saborit, José Antonio; Barcala-Furelos, Roberto

    2015-06-01

    To describe the quality of chest compressions performed by secondary-school students trained with a realtime audiovisual feedback system. The learners were 167 students aged 12 to 15 years who had no prior experience with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). They received an hour of instruction in CPR theory and practice and then took a 2-minute test, performing hands-only CPR on a child mannequin (Prestan Professional Child Manikin). Lights built into the mannequin gave learners feedback about how many compressions they had achieved and clicking sounds told them when compressions were deep enough. All the learners were able to maintain a steady enough rhythm of compressions and reached at least 80% of the targeted compression depth. Fewer correct compressions were done in the second minute than in the first (P=.016). Real-time audiovisual feedback helps schoolchildren aged 12 to 15 years to achieve quality chest compressions on a mannequin.

  8. Compressed imagery detection rate through map seeking circuit, and histogram of oriented gradient pattern recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newtson, Kathy A.; Creusere, Charles C.

    2017-05-01

    This research investigates the features retained after image compression for automatic pattern recognition purposes. Many raw images with vehicles in them were collected for these experiments. These raw images were significantly compressed using open-source JPEG and JPEG2000 compression algorithms. The original and compressed images are processed with a Map Seeking Circuit (MSC) pattern recognition algorithm, as well as a Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG) with Support Vector Machine (SVM) pattern recognition program. Detection rates are given for these images that demonstrates the feature extraction capabilities as well as false alarm rates when the compression was increased. JPEG2000 compression results show preservation of the features needed for automatic pattern recognition which was better than the JPEG standard image compression results.

  9. Testing panels in shear and biaxial compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neary, J. K.

    1979-01-01

    Hydraulic jacks simultaneously apply torsion, axial compression, and lateral compression to structural panels. Jacks are suitable for testing large panels used in aircraft, lightweight trucks, and buses.

  10. Mode pumping experiments on biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austin, R.H.; Erramilli, S. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Xie, A.; Schramm, A.

    1995-12-31

    We will explore several aspects of protein dynamics and energy transfer that can be explored by using the intense, picosecond, tunable mid-IR output of the FEL. In order of appearance they are: (1) Saturation recovery and inter-level coupling of the low temperature amide-I band in acetanilide. This is a continuation of earlier experiments to test soliton models in crystalline hydrogen bonded solids. In this experiment we utilize the sub-picosecond time resolution and low repetition rate of the Stanford SCLA FEL to do both T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} relaxation measurements at 1650 cm{sup -1}. (2) Probing the influence of collective dynamics in sensory rhodopsin. In this experiment we use the FIR output of the Stanford FIREFLY FEL to determine the lifetime of collective modes in the photo-active protein sensory rhodopsin, and begin experiments on the influence of collective modes on retinal reaction dynamics. (3) Probing the transition states of enzymes. This experiment, in the initial stages, attempts to use the intense IR output of the FEL to probe and influence the reaction path of a transition state analog for the protein nucleoside hydrolase. The transition state of the inosine substrate is believed to have critical modes softened by the protein so that bond-breaking paths show absorption at approximately 800 cm{sup -1}. A form of action spectrum using FEL excitation will be used to probe this state.

  11. Compressive sensing for urban radar

    CERN Document Server

    Amin, Moeness

    2014-01-01

    With the emergence of compressive sensing and sparse signal reconstruction, approaches to urban radar have shifted toward relaxed constraints on signal sampling schemes in time and space, and to effectively address logistic difficulties in data acquisition. Traditionally, these challenges have hindered high resolution imaging by restricting both bandwidth and aperture, and by imposing uniformity and bounds on sampling rates.Compressive Sensing for Urban Radar is the first book to focus on a hybrid of two key areas: compressive sensing and urban sensing. It explains how reliable imaging, tracki

  12. Ginger compress therapy for adults with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therkleson, Tessa

    2010-10-01

    This paper is a report of a study to explicate the phenomenon of ginger compresses for people with osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is claimed to be the leading cause of musculoskeletal pain and disability in Western society. Management ideally combines non-pharmacological strategies, including complementary therapies and pain-relieving medication. Ginger has been applied externally for over a thousand years in China to manage arthritis symptoms. Husserlian phenomenological methodology was used and the data were collected in 2007. Ten purposively selected adults who had suffered osteoarthritis for at least a year kept daily diaries and made drawings, and follow-up interviews and telephone conversations were conducted. Seven themes were identified in the data: (1) Meditative-like stillness and relaxation of thoughts; (2) Constant penetrating warmth throughout the body; (3) Positive change in outlook; (4) Increased energy and interest in the world; (5) Deeply relaxed state that progressed to a gradual shift in pain and increased interest in others; (6) Increased suppleness within the body and (7) More comfortable, flexible joint mobility. The essential experience of ginger compresses exposed the unique qualities of heat, stimulation, anti-inflammation and analgesia. Nurses could consider this therapy as part of a holistic treatment for people with osteoarthritis symptoms. Controlled research is needed with larger numbers of older people to explore further the effects of the ginger compress therapy. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Strength of Iron Under Dynamic Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Arianna; Bolme, Cindy; Merkel, Sebastien; Ramos, Kyle; Nagler, Bob; Galtier, Eric; Lee, Hae Ja; Granados, Eduardo; Hashim, Akel; Rittman, Dylan; Mao, Wendy

    2017-06-01

    Strength, defined as the maximum shear stress that can be sustained before plastic (ductile) flow, is a fundamental materials property that is difficult to measure directly or predict using theoretical calculations. Similarly, textures in polycrystals provide important information regarding the plastic behavior and identification of dominant twinning or slip mechanisms. Here we present experiments performed at the Matter in Extreme Conditions end-station at the Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC combining a laser-driven dynamic compression pump and X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) probe to measure the strength of iron up to 220 GPa under dynamic compression. Adopting an experimental geometry similar to that of radial diffraction, we measured diffraction at 65° to the shock propagation direction and cover 180° azimuth range in an X-ray transmission geometry. From the time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) we measure line-shifts in hcp-Fe and see the development of marked preferred orientation on compression following the principal Hugoniot. An assessment of our resolution for measuring the magnitude of deviatoric strain (Q) finds it to be 0.001. This enables the ability to resolve bulk strengths in iron as low as 1 GPa.

  14. Compression for venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, Susan; Cullum, Nicky A; Nelson, E Andrea

    2009-01-21

    Around one percent of people in industrialised countries will suffer from a leg ulcer at some time. The majority of these leg ulcers are due to problems in the veins, resulting in an accumulation of blood in the legs. Leg ulcers arising from venous problems are called venous (varicose or stasis) ulcers. The main treatment has been a firm compression garment (bandage or stocking) in order to aid venous return. There is a large number of compression garments available and it is unclear whether they are effective in treating venous ulcers and which compression garment is the most effective. To undertake a systematic review of all randomised controlled trials of the clinical effectiveness of compression bandage or stocking systems in the treatment of venous leg ulceration.Specific questions addressed by the review are:1. Does the application of compression bandages or stockings aid venous ulcer healing? 2. Which compression bandage or stocking system is the most effective? For this update we searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (14/10/08); The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 4 2008); Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to October Week 1 2008); Ovid EMBASE (1980 to 2008 Week 41) and Ovid CINAHL (1982 to October Week 1 2008). No date or language restrictions were applied. Randomised controlled trials recruiting people with venous leg ulceration that evaluated any type of compression bandage system or compression hosiery were eligible for inclusion. Comparators included no compression (e.g. primary dressing alone, non-compressive bandage) or an alternative type of compression. Trials had to report an objective measure of ulcer healing in order to be included (primary outcome for the review). Secondary outcomes of the review included ulcer recurrence, costs, quality of life, pain, adverse events and withdrawals. There was no restriction on date, language or publication status of trials. Details of eligible studies were

  15. Effect of Kollidon VA®64 particle size and morphology as directly compressible excipient on tablet compression properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, R S; Patel, C; Sevak, V; Chan, M

    2018-01-01

    The study evaluates use of Kollidon VA®64 and a combination of Kollidon VA®64 with Kollidon VA®64 Fine as excipient in direct compression process of tablets. The combination of the two grades of material is evaluated for capping, lamination and excessive friability. Inter particulate void space is higher for such excipient due to the hollow structure of the Kollidon VA®64 particles. During tablet compression air remains trapped in the blend exhibiting poor compression with compromised physical properties of the tablets. Composition of Kollidon VA®64 and Kollidon VA®64 Fine is evaluated by design of experiment (DoE). A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of two grades of Kollidon VA®64 exhibits morphological differences between coarse and fine grade. The tablet compression process is evaluated with a mix consisting of entirely Kollidon VA®64 and two mixes containing Kollidon VA®64 and Kollidon VA®64 Fine in ratio of 77:23 and 65:35. A statistical modeling on the results from the DoE trials resulted in the optimum composition for direct tablet compression as combination of Kollidon VA®64 and Kollidon VA®64 Fine in ratio of 77:23. This combination compressed with the predicted parameters based on the statistical modeling and applying main compression force between 5 and 15 kN, pre-compression force between 2 and 3 kN, feeder speed fixed at 25 rpm and compression range of 45-49 rpm produced tablets with hardness ranging between 19 and 21 kp, with no friability, capping, or lamination issue.

  16. Efficient Lossy Compression for Compressive Sensing Acquisition of Images in Compressive Sensing Imaging Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangwei Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Compressive Sensing Imaging (CSI is a new framework for image acquisition, which enables the simultaneous acquisition and compression of a scene. Since the characteristics of Compressive Sensing (CS acquisition are very different from traditional image acquisition, the general image compression solution may not work well. In this paper, we propose an efficient lossy compression solution for CS acquisition of images by considering the distinctive features of the CSI. First, we design an adaptive compressive sensing acquisition method for images according to the sampling rate, which could achieve better CS reconstruction quality for the acquired image. Second, we develop a universal quantization for the obtained CS measurements from CS acquisition without knowing any a priori information about the captured image. Finally, we apply these two methods in the CSI system for efficient lossy compression of CS acquisition. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed solution improves the rate-distortion performance by 0.4~2 dB comparing with current state-of-the-art, while maintaining a low computational complexity.

  17. Satellite image compression using wavelet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoso, Alb. Joko; Soesianto, F.; Dwiandiyanto, B. Yudi

    2010-02-01

    Image data is a combination of information and redundancies, the information is part of the data be protected because it contains the meaning and designation data. Meanwhile, the redundancies are part of data that can be reduced, compressed, or eliminated. Problems that arise are related to the nature of image data that spends a lot of memory. In this paper will compare 31 wavelet function by looking at its impact on PSNR, compression ratio, and bits per pixel (bpp) and the influence of decomposition level of PSNR and compression ratio. Based on testing performed, Haar wavelet has the advantage that is obtained PSNR is relatively higher compared with other wavelets. Compression ratio is relatively better than other types of wavelets. Bits per pixel is relatively better than other types of wavelet.

  18. Compressed sensing for distributed systems

    CERN Document Server

    Coluccia, Giulio; Magli, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a survey of the state-of-the art in the exciting and timely topic of compressed sensing for distributed systems. It has to be noted that, while compressed sensing has been studied for some time now, its distributed applications are relatively new. Remarkably, such applications are ideally suited to exploit all the benefits that compressed sensing can provide. The objective of this book is to provide the reader with a comprehensive survey of this topic, from the basic concepts to different classes of centralized and distributed reconstruction algorithms, as well as a comparison of these techniques. This book collects different contributions on these aspects. It presents the underlying theory in a complete and unified way for the first time, presenting various signal models and their use cases. It contains a theoretical part collecting latest results in rate-distortion analysis of distributed compressed sensing, as well as practical implementations of algorithms obtaining performance close to...

  19. Comparison of Artificial Compressibility Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiris, Cetin; Housman, Jeffrey; Kwak, Dochan

    2004-01-01

    Various artificial compressibility methods for calculating the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are compared. Each method is described and numerical solutions to test problems are conducted. A comparison based on convergence behavior, accuracy, and robustness is given.

  20. Compressibility effects in turbulence modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubesin, M. W.

    1982-01-01

    Numerical turbulence modeling is discussed with attention given to fluid property variations caused by compressibility in an adiabatic flow. The models are considered in terms of integral quantities expressed by ordinary differential equations and by those formulated as partial differential equations. Compressibility corrections for both integral and partial differential methods are reviewed. Eddy-viscosity models are explored for their capability to characterize the mass-weighted Reynolds stress, which can be accounted for with primitive and/or mass-weighted variables. Compressible flow simulations are currently constrained to low Re and zero mean dilation. The effects of compressibility are defined in wave number space by resolving the Fourier transforms of the velocity vectors into components which are perpendicular and parallel to the wave number vector. Statistical correlations then permit obtaining a value for each contribution.

  1. Data compression techniques applied to high resolution high frame rate video technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartz, William G.; Alexovich, Robert E.; Neustadter, Marc S.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation is presented of video data compression applied to microgravity space experiments using High Resolution High Frame Rate Video Technology (HHVT). An extensive survey of methods of video data compression, described in the open literature, was conducted. The survey examines compression methods employing digital computing. The results of the survey are presented. They include a description of each method and assessment of image degradation and video data parameters. An assessment is made of present and near term future technology for implementation of video data compression in high speed imaging system. Results of the assessment are discussed and summarized. The results of a study of a baseline HHVT video system, and approaches for implementation of video data compression, are presented. Case studies of three microgravity experiments are presented and specific compression techniques and implementations are recommended.

  2. HIGH CURRENT L-BAND LINAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. RUSSELL; B. CARLSTEN; J. GOETTEE

    2001-02-01

    The Sub-Picosecond Accelerator (SPA) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is an L-band photoinjector. Using magnetic compression, the SPA routinely compresses 8 MeV, 1 nC per bunch electron beams from an initial temporal FWHM bunch length of 20 ps to less than 1 ps. In recent plasma wakefield accelerator experiments, we have compressed a 2 nC per bunch electron beam to an approximate temporal length of 1 ps.

  3. A comprehensive strategy for the analysis of acoustic compressibility and optical deformability on single cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Tie; Bragheri, Francesca; Nava, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    We realized an integrated microfluidic chip that allows measuring both optical deformability and acoustic compressibility on single cells, by optical stretching and acoustophoresis experiments respectively. Additionally, we propose a measurement protocol that allows evaluating the experimental....... Results indicate that MDA-MB231 has both higher acoustic compressibility and higher optical deformability than MCF7, but statistical analysis shows that optical deformability and acoustic compressibility are not correlated parameters. This result suggests the possibility to use them to analyze...

  4. Study of compressed baryonic matter at FAIR: JINR participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derenovskaya, O.; Kurilkin, P.; Gusakov, Yu.; Ivanov, V.; Ladygin, V.; Ladygina, N.; Malakhov, A.; Peshekhonov, V.; Zinchenko, A.

    2017-11-01

    The scientific goal of the CBM (Compressed Baryonic Matter) experiment at FAIR (Darmstadt) is to explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter at highest baryon densities. The physics program of the CBM experiment is complimentary to the programs to be realized at MPD and BMN facilities at NICA and will start with beam derived by the SIS100 synchrotron. The results of JINR participation in the development of different sub-projects of the CBM experiment are presented.

  5. Double-compression method for biomedical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonenko, Yevhenii A.; Mustetsov, Timofey N.; Hamdi, Rami R.; Małecka-Massalska, Teresa; Orshubekov, Nurbek; DzierŻak, RóŻa; Uvaysova, Svetlana

    2017-08-01

    This paper describes a double compression method (DCM) of biomedical images. A comparison of image compression factors in size JPEG, PNG and developed DCM was carried out. The main purpose of the DCM - compression of medical images while maintaining the key points that carry diagnostic information. To estimate the minimum compression factor an analysis of the coding of random noise image is presented.

  6. On the compressive behavior of an FDM Steward Platform part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nectarios Vidakis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Acrylonitrile–butadiene–styrene (ABS is commonly used material in the fused deposition modeling (FDM process. In this work, ABS and ABS plus parts were built with different building parameters and they were tested according to the ASTM D695 standard. Compression strength results were compared to stock ABS material values. The fracture surfaces of selected specimens were examined under a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM, to determine the failure mode of the filament strands. Following this a Steward Platform part was tested under compression in a tensile testing machine. The experimental results were employed to develop a finite element model of the Steward Platform part, in order to determine the maximum force the part can withstand. The Finite Element Model results were in good agreement with the values measured in the Steward Platform part compressive tests, demonstrating that the model developed is reliable. In these experiments, it was found that ABS parts build with a larger layer thickness showed lower compressive strength, which ABS plus did not show. ABS specimens on average developed about half the compressive strength of the ABS plus specimens, while the ABS plus specimens showed lower compressive strength values than stock ABS material.

  7. Adult-like processing of time-compressed speech by newborns: A NIRS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Issard

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Humans can adapt to a wide range of variations in the speech signal, maintaining an invariant representation of the linguistic information it contains. Among them, adaptation to rapid or time-compressed speech has been well studied in adults, but the developmental origin of this capacity remains unknown. Does this ability depend on experience with speech (if yes, as heard in utero or as heard postnatally, with sounds in general or is it experience-independent? Using near-infrared spectroscopy, we show that the newborn brain can discriminate between three different compression rates: normal, i.e. 100% of the original duration, moderately compressed, i.e. 60% of original duration and highly compressed, i.e. 30% of original duration. Even more interestingly, responses to normal and moderately compressed speech are similar, showing a canonical hemodynamic response in the left temporoparietal, right frontal and right temporal cortex, while responses to highly compressed speech are inverted, showing a decrease in oxyhemoglobin concentration. These results mirror those found in adults, who readily adapt to moderately compressed, but not to highly compressed speech, showing that adaptation to time-compressed speech requires little or no experience with speech, and happens at an auditory, and not at a more abstract linguistic level.

  8. Isentropic compression studies using the NHMFL single turn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasker, Douglas G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mielke, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rickel, Dwight [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-10-19

    Magnetic isentropic compression experiments (ICE) provide the most accurate shock free compression data for materials at megabar stresses. Recent ICE experiments performed on the Sandia Z-machine (Asay, 1999) and at the Los Alamos High Explosive Pulsed Power facility (Tasker, 2006) are providing our nation with data on material properties in extreme dynamic high stress environments. The LANL National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) can offer a less complex ICE experiment at high stresses (up to {approx}1Mbar) with a high sample throughput and relatively low cost. This is not to say that the NHMFL technique will replace the other methods but rather complement them. For example, NHMFL-ICE is ideal for the development of advanced diagnostics, e.g., to detect phase changes. We will discuss the physics of the NHMFL-ICE experiments and present data from the first proof-of-principle experiments that were performed in September 2010.

  9. Building indifferentiable compression functions from the PGV compression functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gauravaram, P.; Bagheri, Nasour; Knudsen, Lars Ramkilde

    2016-01-01

    , Rogaway and Shrimpton formally proved this result in the ideal cipher model. However, in the indifferentiability security framework introduced by Maurer, Renner and Holenstein, all these 12 schemes are easily differentiable from a fixed input-length random oracle (FIL-RO) even when their underlying block...... are indifferentiable from a FIL-RO. To our knowledge, this is the first result showing that two independent block ciphers are sufficient to design indifferentiable single-block-length compression functions.......Preneel, Govaerts and Vandewalle (PGV) analysed the security of single-block-length block cipher based compression functions assuming that the underlying block cipher has no weaknesses. They showed that 12 out of 64 possible compression functions are collision and (second) preimage resistant. Black...

  10. Towards personalized compression in mammography: A comparison study between pressure- and force-standardization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groot, Jerry E. de, E-mail: jerry.degroot@sigmascreening.com [Academic Medical Center, Room L0-151, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Department of Biomedical Engineering & Physics, P.O. Box 22660, 1100 DD Amsterdam (Netherlands); Branderhorst, Woutjan, E-mail: w.branderhorst@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Biomedical Engineering & Physics, P.O. Box 22660, 1100 DD Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sigmascreening B.V., Meibergdreef 45, 1105 BA Amsterdam (Netherlands); Grimbergen, Cornelis A., E-mail: c.a.grimbergen@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Biomedical Engineering & Physics, P.O. Box 22660, 1100 DD Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sigmascreening B.V., Meibergdreef 45, 1105 BA Amsterdam (Netherlands); Heeten, Gerard J. den, E-mail: g.denheeten@lrcb.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 22660, 1100 DD Amsterdam (Netherlands); LRCB Dutch Reference Center for Screening, P.O. Box 6873, 6503 GJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Broeders, Mireille J.M., E-mail: mireille.broeders@radboudumc.nl [Radboud University Medical Center, Department for Health Evidence, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); LRCB Dutch Reference Center for Screening, P.O. Box 6873, 6503 GJ Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •In mammographic compression of the breast no quantitative standards or guidelines are available. •Women with small breasts receive higher pressures and express higher pain scores. •Compression can be personalized by applying the same pressure to all breasts. •New technology is validated which enables pressure-standardized compression. •Pain scores are reduced without affecting absorbed glandular dose or image quality. -- Abstract: Objective: To compare a conventional 14 decanewton (daN) force-standardized compression protocol with a personalized 10 kilopascal (kPa) pressure-standardized protocol. Methods: A new add-on contact area detector, which enables pressure-standardized compression, is validated in a double-blinded intra-individual comparison study. Breast screening participants (433) received one craniocaudal (CC) and one mediolateral oblique (MLO) compression for both breasts. Three of these compressions were force-standardized, and one, blinded and randomly assigned, was pressure-standardized. Participants scored their pain experience on an 11-point numerical rating scale (NRS). Three experienced breast-screening radiologists, blinded for compression protocol, indicated which images required retakes. Results: An unanticipated under-compression issue that occurred at forces below 5 daN was effectively solved with minimal extra radiographer training during the study. For pressure-standardized compressions obtained at 5 daN or more, the compressed breasts thickness increased on average 4.2% (MLO)—6.3% (CC), average pain scores were reduced by 10% (MLO)—17% (CC) and the proportion of women experiencing severe pain (NRS ≥ 7) was reduced by 27% (MLO)—32% (CC), compared with force-standardized compressions (all p-values <0.05). Average glandular dose (AGD) and proportions of retakes were similar for both protocols. Conclusion: Pressure-standardized compressions resulted in AGD values and a retake proportion similar to force

  11. 76 FR 4338 - Research and Development Strategies for Compressed & Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    ... Research and Development Strategies for Compressed & Cryo- Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshops AGENCY... hosting two days of workshops on compressed and cryo-compressed hydrogen storage in the Washington, DC... perspectives, and overviews of carbon fiber development and recent costs analyses. The cryo-compressed hydrogen...

  12. Compression and Predictive Distributions for Large Alphabets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao

    Data generated from large alphabet exist almost everywhere in our life, for example, texts, images and videos. Traditional universal compression algorithms mostly involve small alphabets and assume implicitly an asymptotic condition under which the extra bits induced in the compression process vanishes as an infinite number of data come. In this thesis, we put the main focus on compression and prediction for large alphabets with the alphabet size comparable or larger than the sample size. We first consider sequences of random variables independent and identically generated from a large alphabet. In particular, the size of the sample is allowed to be variable. A product distribution based on Poisson sampling and tiling is proposed as the coding distribution, which highly simplifies the implementation and analysis through independence. Moreover, we characterize the behavior of the coding distribution through a condition on the tail sum of the ordered counts, and apply it to sequences satisfying this condition. Further, we apply this method to envelope classes. This coding distribution provides a convenient method to approximately compute the Shtarkov's normalized maximum likelihood (NML) distribution. And the extra price paid for this convenience is small compared to the total cost. Furthermore, we find this coding distribution can also be used to calculate the NML distribution exactly. And this calculation remains simple due to the independence of the coding distribution. Further, we consider a more realistic class---the Markov class, and in particular, tree sources. A context tree based algorithm is designed to describe the dependencies among the contexts. It is a greedy algorithm which seeks for the greatest savings in codelength when constructing the tree. Compression and prediction of individual counts associated with the contexts uses the same coding distribution as in the i.i.d case. Combining these two procedures, we demonstrate a compression algorithm based

  13. An overview of semantic compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalz, Mark S.

    2010-08-01

    We live in such perceptually rich natural and manmade environments that detection and recognition of objects is mediated cerebrally by attentional filtering, in order to separate objects of interest from background clutter. In computer models of the human visual system, attentional filtering is often restricted to early processing, where areas of interest (AOIs) are delineated around anomalies of interest, then the pixels within each AOI's subtense are isolated for later processing. In contrast, the human visual system concurrently detects many targets at multiple levels (e.g., retinal center-surround filters, ganglion layer feature detectors, post-retinal spatial filtering, and cortical detection / filtering of features and objects, to name but a few processes). Intracranial attentional filtering appears to play multiple roles, including clutter filtration at all levels of processing - thus, we process individual retinal cell responses, early filtering response, and so forth, on up to the filtering of objects at high levels of semantic complexity. Computationally, image compression techniques have progressed from emphasizing pixels, to considering regions of pixels as foci of computational interest. In more recent research, object-based compression has been investigated with varying rate-distortion performance and computational efficiency. Codecs have been developed for a wide variety of applications, although the majority of compression and decompression transforms continue to concentrate on region- and pixel-based processing, in part because of computational convenience. It is interesting to note that a growing body of research has emphasized the detection and representation of small features in relationship to their surrounding environment, which has occasionally been called semantic compression. In this paper, we overview different types of semantic compression approaches, with particular interest in high-level compression algorithms. Various algorithms and

  14. Shock Compression and Release of Metal Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maines, Warren; Neel, Christopher; Chhabildas, Lalit; Borg, John; Reinhart, William

    2011-06-01

    We report of the results of uniaxial strain experiments and computations to discuss the compressed and isentropic release states of aluminum foam ~50% relative density undergoing high velocity impact at up to 10GPa. The initial geometry of the foam was obtained via computed x-ray tomography (XCT) and imported directly into the CTH hydrodynamic code. Simulations of the dynamic response of the foam are compared to experimental measurements and used to build macro scale constitutive relations. The experimental results were obtained utilizing a reverse ballistic plate reverberation technique that obtained shock compression states of the foam. In these experiments, 6061-T6 aluminum, oxygen free copper and tantalum were used as standard witness plates and were shocked by the metal foam projectile at up to 2.0 km/s. The response of the witness plates was monitored by three different velocity interferometers positioned at three different locations on the witness plate to obtain compaction and release behavior. The simulations captured the heterogeneous Hugoniot and release state of the foam extremely well. The resulting constitutive relations built from mesoscale simulations compare favorably to those built from experimental results.

  15. Dataset of long-term compressive strength of concrete with manufactured sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxin Ding

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents 186 groups compressive strength tests data of concrete with manufactured sand (MSC in different curing age and 262 groups compressive strength tests data of MSC at 28 days collected from authors’ experiments and other researches in China. Further interpretation and discussion were described in this issues.

  16. EFFECTS OF COMPRESSED AIR FOAM APPLICATION ON HEAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam THOMITZEK

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article evaluates the knowledge obtained in firefighting tests using compressed air foam system (CAFS within a confined space. Six experiments were conducted for verification during the cooling of rooms and the self-extinguishing effect. The simulation was for a fully developed fire within a room. The fuel was chosen to simulate ordinary combustible materials utilized in residential areas. Mantel thermocouples were placed in the rooms to record the temperature changes. Compressed air foam was first applied with a standard fire hose nozzle to the ceiling and then to the epicenter of fire. Fire extinguishing was initiated after reaching the desired temperature in the room. The temperature for the start of fire extinguishing matched the third phase of development of a fire. Fire extinguishing was terminated after no obvious signs of fire were shown in epicenter of fire. The outputs of the experiments were evaluated on the basis of the amount of time passed for the temperature to drop below the suggested limit. Individual experiments were also conducted with various different admixing foaming agents over different locations. In the experiments, it has been verified that the application of compressed air foam has a positive effect on room cooling. Use of a compressed air foaming agent does not allow for the development of steam that can scald firefighters and reduce visibility. Furthermore, the extinguishing agent used is more efficient utilizing less water flow out of the fire area.

  17. Summary of selected compressed air energy storage studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.; Kannberg, L.D.

    1985-01-01

    A descriptive summarily of research and development in compressed air energy storage technology is presented. Research funded primarily by the Department of Energy is described. Results of studies by other groups and experience at the Huntorf plant in West Germany are included. Feasibility studies performed by General Electric are summarized. The feasibility of air storage in dissolved salt cavities is also demonstrated. (BCS)

  18. Compressive Sensing for MIMO Radar

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Yao; Poor, H Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar systems have been shown to achieve superior resolution as compared to traditional radar systems with the same number of transmit and receive antennas. This paper considers a distributed MIMO radar scenario, in which each transmit element is a node in a wireless network, and investigates the use of compressive sampling for direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation. According to the theory of compressive sampling, a signal that is sparse in some domain can be recovered based on far fewer samples than required by the Nyquist sampling theorem. The DOA of targets form a sparse vector in the angle space, and therefore, compressive sampling can be applied for DOA estimation. The proposed approach achieves the superior resolution of MIMO radar with far fewer samples than other approaches. This is particularly useful in a distributed scenario, in which the results at each receive node need to be transmitted to a fusion center for further processing.

  19. Compressive Sensing in Communication Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fyhn, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    . The need for cheaper, smarter and more energy efficient wireless devices is greater now than ever. This thesis addresses this problem and concerns the application of the recently developed sampling theory of compressive sensing in communication systems. Compressive sensing is the merging of signal......Wireless communication is omnipresent today, but this development has led to frequency spectrum becoming a limited resource. Furthermore, wireless devices become more and more energy-limited, due to the demand for continual wireless communication of higher and higher amounts of information...... acquisition and compression. It allows for sampling a signal with a rate below the bound dictated by the celebrated Shannon-Nyquist sampling theorem. In some communication systems this necessary minimum sample rate, dictated by the Shannon-Nyquist sampling theorem, is so high it is at the limit of what...

  20. Instability of ties in compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Hansen, Thomas Cornelius

    2013-01-01

    Masonry cavity walls are loaded by wind pressure and vertical load from upper floors. These loads results in bending moments and compression forces in the ties connecting the outer and the inner wall in a cavity wall. Large cavity walls are furthermore loaded by differential movements from...... the temperature gradient between the outer and the inner wall, which results in critical increase of the bending moments in the ties. Since the ties are loaded by combined compression and moment forces, the loadbearing capacity is derived from instability equilibrium equations. Most of them are iterative, since......-connectors in cavity walls was developed. The method takes into account constraint conditions limiting the free length of the wall tie, and the instability in case of pure compression which gives an optimal load bearing capacity. The model is illustrated with examples from praxis....

  1. Compressive sensing and hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barducci, A.; Guzzi, D.; Lastri, C.; Marcoionni, P.; Nardino, V.; Pippi, I.

    2017-11-01

    Compressive sensing (sampling) is a novel technology and science domain that exploits the option to sample radiometric and spectroscopic signals at a lower sampling rate than the one dictated by the traditional theory of ideal sampling. In the paper some general concepts and characteristics regarding the use of compressive sampling in instruments devoted to Earth observation is discussed. The remotely sensed data is assumed to be constituted by sampled images collected by a passive device in the optical spectral range from the visible up to the thermal infrared, with possible spectral discrimination ability, e.g. hyperspectral imaging. According to recent investigations, compressive sensing necessarily employs a signal multiplexing architecture, which in spite of traditional expectations originates a significant SNR disadvantage.

  2. Hybrid Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation of heat transfer and ionization balance in overdense plasmas irradiated by subpicosecond pulse lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhidkov, A.; Sasaki, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    1998-11-01

    A 1D hybrid electromagnetic particle-in-cell code with new methods to include particle collisions and atomic kinetics is developed and applied to ultra-short-pulse laser plasma interaction. Using the Langevin equation to calculate the Coulomb collision term, the present code is shown to be fast and stable in calculating the particle motion in the PIC simulation. Furthermore, by noting that the scale length of the change of atomic kinetics is much longer than the Debye radius, we calculate ionization and X-ray emission on kinetics cells, which are determined by averaging plasma parameters such as the electron density and energy over number of PIC cells. The absorption of short-pulse laser by overdense plasmas is calculated in self-consistent manner, including the effect of rapid change of density and temperature caused by instantaneous heating and successive fast ionization of the target material. The calculated results agree well with those obtained from the Fokker-Planck simulation as well as experiments, for non-local heat transport in plasmas with steep temperature gradient, and for the absorption of a short laser pulse by solid density targets. These results demonstrate usefulness of the code and the computational method therein for understanding of physics of short pulse laser plasma interaction experiments, and for application to the gain calculation of short-pulse laser excited X-ray laser as well. (author)

  3. Turbulence compressibility corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, T. J.; Horstman, C. C.; Marvin, J. G.; Viegas, J. R.; Bardina, J. E.; Huang, P. G.; Kussoy, M. I.

    1994-01-01

    The basic objective of this research was to identify, develop and recommend turbulence models which could be incorporated into CFD codes used in the design of the National AeroSpace Plane vehicles. To accomplish this goal, a combined effort consisting of experimental and theoretical phases was undertaken. The experimental phase consisted of a literature survey to collect and assess a database of well documented experimental flows, with emphasis on high speed or hypersonic flows, which could be used to validate turbulence models. Since it was anticipated that this database would be incomplete and would need supplementing, additional experiments in the NASA Ames 3.5-Foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel (HWT) were also undertaken. The theoretical phase consisted of identifying promising turbulence models through applications to simple flows, and then investigating more promising models in applications to complex flows. The complex flows were selected from the database developed in the first phase of the study. For these flows it was anticipated that model performance would not be entirely satisfactory, so that model improvements or corrections would be required. The primary goals of the investigation were essentially achieved. A large database of flows was collected and assessed, a number of additional hypersonic experiments were conducted in the Ames HWT, and two turbulence models (kappa-epsilon and kappa-omega models with corrections) were determined which gave superior performance for most of the flows studied and are now recommended for NASP applications.

  4. Time resolved spectroscopy of shock compressed liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, K.; Duvall, G. E.

    1982-04-01

    An experimental procedure has been developed for using a rotating mirror camera to record time-resolved absorption spectra of liquids undergoing shock compression. Experimental records have been obtained for cells containing liquid carbon disulfide shocked, through reverberation, to peak pressures of 55, 80, 100 and 120 kbar. Experiments have been performed using both reflected and transmitted light. Time and spectral resolution were limited to approximately 30 nsec and 30 Å; spectral range was from 4000 to 2500 Å. This initial work on carbon disulfide shows it to become highly absorptive when shocked to low pressures of 8 to 14 kbar, and to progressively become a better broadband reflector as the pressure in a thin layer rings up to the final value. A decay in the reflectivity after reaching peak pressure in the 120 kbar experiment may indicate chemical decomposition. This is in accord with earlier results of S. A. Sheffield based on measurement of flow parameters.

  5. Excessive chest compression rate is associated with insufficient compression depth in prehospital cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monsieurs, Koenraad G.; De Regge, Melissa; Vansteelandt, Kristof; De Smet, Jeroen; Annaert, Emmanuel; Lemoyne, Sabine; Kalmar, Alain F.; Calle, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Background and goal of study: The relationship between chest compression rate and compression depth is unknown. In order to characterise this relationship, we performed an observational study in prehospital cardiac arrest patients. We hypothesised that faster compressions are associated with

  6. Using computer algebra to perform image compression with wavelet transform and SVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Felipe

    2014-05-01

    Computer Algebra Software, especially Maple and its Image Tools package, is used to develop image compression using the Weibull distribution, Wavelet transform application and Singular Value Decomposition (SVD). For prototyping of the image compression process, Maple packages, Linear Algebra, Array Tools and Discrete Transform are used simultaneously with Image Tools image processing package. The image compression process implies the realization of matrix computing with high dimension matrices, and Maple software develops those operations easily and efficiently. Some image compression experiments are done, and the matrix dimension for minimum information needed to store an image is shown clearly, also the matrix dimension of redundant information. Implementation of algorithms for image compression in other computer algebra systems such as Mathematica and Maxima is proposed as future investigation path. Also it is proposed the use of curvelet transform as a tool for image compression,

  7. Double HEVC Compression Detection with the Same QPs Based on the PU Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Rui-Shi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Double HEVC compression detection is of great importance in video forensics. However, effective detection algorithm based on the same Qps is rarely reported. In this paper, a novel method based on the same Qps is applied in dealing with double HEVC compression detection. Firstly, the numbers of PU blocks with the size of 4×4 in each I frame is extracted during the codec procedures when the video is compressed with the same Qps. Then, calculate the standard deviation of 4×4 PU blocks difference (SDoPU before and after the compression. Finally, select the appropriate threshold for compression testing classification according to the SDoPU statistical feature. By performing numerical experiments, We prove that the proposed algorithm is of high classification accuracy for detecting double HEVC compression.

  8. Astronomical context coder for image compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pata, Petr; Schindler, Jaromir

    2015-10-01

    Recent lossless still image compression formats are powerful tools for compression of all kind of common images (pictures, text, schemes, etc.). Generally, the performance of a compression algorithm depends on its ability to anticipate the image function of the processed image. In other words, a compression algorithm to be successful, it has to take perfectly the advantage of coded image properties. Astronomical data form a special class of images and they have, among general image properties, also some specific characteristics which are unique. If a new coder is able to correctly use the knowledge of these special properties it should lead to its superior performance on this specific class of images at least in terms of the compression ratio. In this work, the novel lossless astronomical image data compression method will be presented. The achievable compression ratio of this new coder will be compared to theoretical lossless compression limit and also to the recent compression standards of the astronomy and general multimedia.

  9. Sub-100 ps laser-driven dynamic compression of solid deuterium with a ˜40 μJ laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael R.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Bastea, Sorin; Zaug, Joseph M.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2014-07-01

    We dynamically compress solid deuterium over <100 ps from initial pressures of 22 GPa to 55 GPa, to final pressures as high as 71 GPa, with <40 μJ of pulse energy. At 25 GPa initial pressure, we measure compression wave speeds consistent with quasi-isentropic compression and a 24% increase in density. The laser drive energy per unit density change is 109 times smaller than it is for recent longer (˜30 ns) time scale compression experiments. This suggests that, for a given final density, dynamic compression of hydrogen might be achieved using orders of magnitude lower laser energy than currently used.

  10. Quality Assessment of Compressed Video for Automatic License Plate Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ukhanova, Ann; Støttrup-Andersen, Jesper; Forchhammer, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Definition of video quality requirements for video surveillance poses new questions in the area of quality assessment. This paper presents a quality assessment experiment for an automatic license plate recognition scenario. We explore the influence of the compression by H.264/AVC and H.265/HEVC...... standards on the recognition performance. We compare logarithmic and logistic functions for quality modeling. Our results show that a logistic function can better describe the dependence of recognition performance on the quality for both compression standards. We observe that automatic license plate...

  11. Compression and Reswelling of Microgel Particles after an Osmotic Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleeboom, Jelle J. F.; Voudouris, Panayiotis; Punter, Melle T. J. J. M.; Aangenendt, Frank J.; Florea, Daniel; van der Schoot, Paul; Wyss, Hans M.

    2017-09-01

    We use dedicated microfluidic devices to expose soft hydrogel particles to a rapid change in the externally applied osmotic pressure and observe a surprising, nonmonotonic response: After an initial rapid compression, the particle slowly reswells to approximately its original size. We theoretically account for this behavior, enabling us to extract important material properties from a single microfluidic experiment, including the compressive modulus, the gel permeability, and the diffusivity of the osmolyte inside the gel. We expect our approach to be relevant to applications such as controlled release, chromatography, and responsive materials.

  12. Compressing spatio-temporal trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Joachim; Katajainen, Jyrki; Merrick, Damian

    2009-01-01

    A trajectory is a sequence of locations, each associated with a timestamp, describing the movement of a point. Trajectory data is becoming increasingly available and the size of recorded trajectories is getting larger. In this paper we study the problem of compressing planar trajectories such tha...

  13. Compression of Probabilistic XML documents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, Irma

    2009-01-01

    Probabilistic XML (PXML) files resulting from data integration can become extremely large, which is undesired. For XML there are several techniques available to compress the document and since probabilistic XML is in fact (a special form of) XML, it might benefit from these methods even more. In

  14. Culture: Copying, Compression, and Conventionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamariz, Mónica; Kirby, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Through cultural transmission, repeated learning by new individuals transforms cultural information, which tends to become increasingly compressible (Kirby, Cornish, & Smith, 2008; Smith, Tamariz, & Kirby, 2013). Existing diffusion chain studies include in their design two processes that could be responsible for this tendency: learning…

  15. Temporal compressive imaging for video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qun; Zhang, Linxia; Ke, Jun

    2018-01-01

    In many situations, imagers are required to have higher imaging speed, such as gunpowder blasting analysis and observing high-speed biology phenomena. However, measuring high-speed video is a challenge to camera design, especially, in infrared spectrum. In this paper, we reconstruct a high-frame-rate video from compressive video measurements using temporal compressive imaging (TCI) with a temporal compression ratio T=8. This means that, 8 unique high-speed temporal frames will be obtained from a single compressive frame using a reconstruction algorithm. Equivalently, the video frame rates is increased by 8 times. Two methods, two-step iterative shrinkage/threshold (TwIST) algorithm and the Gaussian mixture model (GMM) method, are used for reconstruction. To reduce reconstruction time and memory usage, each frame of size 256×256 is divided into patches of size 8×8. The influence of different coded mask to reconstruction is discussed. The reconstruction qualities using TwIST and GMM are also compared.

  16. Compressibility of granulated rock salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinebaugh, R.E.

    1979-08-01

    Crushed rock salt will be used extensively at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as a material for backfilling underground openings. This document addresses one of the characteristics of crushed salt which must be known to assess the consequences of its usage, namely, compressibility.

  17. Compressive passive millimeter wave imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Liao, Shaolin; Elmer, Thomas W; Koehl, Eugene R; Heifetz, Alexander; Raptis, Apostolos C

    2015-01-27

    A compressive scanning approach for millimeter wave imaging and sensing. A Hadamard mask is positioned to receive millimeter waves from an object to be imaged. A subset of the full set of Hadamard acquisitions is sampled. The subset is used to reconstruct an image representing the object.

  18. Incremental data compression -extended abstract-

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeuring, J.T.

    1992-01-01

    Data may be compressed using textual substitution. Textual substitution identifies repeated substrings and replaces some or all substrings by pointers to another copy. We construct an incremental algorithm for a specific textual substitution method: coding a text with respect to a dictionary. With

  19. The Compression of The Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, G. J.; Russell, C. T.

    When the pressure in the solar wind suddenly increases, the Earth's magnetosphere is compressed. Examination of the rise time for this compression in Polar magnetic field data shows that it is controlled by the time for passage of the pressure front past the magnetosphere. Unlike measurements on the surface of the Earth, there are signif- icantly large regions of the magnetosphere where the magnetic field decreases when the magnetosphere is compressed. This occurs in the regions in which the increased field associated with the enhanced magnetopause currents opposes the local internal magnetic field. While the rise in field strength is generally smooth, sometimes the compression begins with a sharp jump indicating that in some regions of the magne- tosphere the velocity of the compressional front exceeds that of the local fast mode wave. Lastly, we note that the solar wind monitors used in this study do not always agree when solar wind measurements are simultaneously available. We have devel- oped an intercalibration procedure to alleviate this disagreement.

  20. Force balancing in mammographic compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branderhorst, W., E-mail: w.branderhorst@amc.nl; Groot, J. E. de; Lier, M. G. J. T. B. van; Grimbergen, C. A. [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Academic Medical Center, P.O. Box 22660, Amsterdam 1100 DD (Netherlands); Sigmascreening B.V., Meibergdreef 45, Amsterdam 1105 BA (Netherlands); Neeter, L. M. F. H.; Heeten, G. J. den [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Academic Medical Center, P.O. Box 22660, Amsterdam 1100 DD (Netherlands); Neeleman, C. [Sigmascreening B.V., Meibergdreef 45, Amsterdam 1105 BA (Netherlands)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: In mammography, the height of the image receptor is adjusted to the patient before compressing the breast. An inadequate height setting can result in an imbalance between the forces applied by the image receptor and the paddle, causing the clamped breast to be pushed up or down relative to the body during compression. This leads to unnecessary stretching of the skin and other tissues around the breast, which can make the imaging procedure more painful for the patient. The goal of this study was to implement a method to measure and minimize the force imbalance, and to assess its feasibility as an objective and reproducible method of setting the image receptor height. Methods: A trial was conducted consisting of 13 craniocaudal mammographic compressions on a silicone breast phantom, each with the image receptor positioned at a different height. The image receptor height was varied over a range of 12 cm. In each compression, the force exerted by the compression paddle was increased up to 140 N in steps of 10 N. In addition to the paddle force, the authors measured the force exerted by the image receptor and the reaction force exerted on the patient body by the ground. The trial was repeated 8 times, with the phantom remounted at a slightly different orientation and position between the trials. Results: For a given paddle force, the obtained results showed that there is always exactly one image receptor height that leads to a balance of the forces on the breast. For the breast phantom, deviating from this specific height increased the force imbalance by 9.4 ± 1.9 N/cm (6.7%) for 140 N paddle force, and by 7.1 ± 1.6 N/cm (17.8%) for 40 N paddle force. The results also show that in situations where the force exerted by the image receptor is not measured, the craniocaudal force imbalance can still be determined by positioning the patient on a weighing scale and observing the changes in displayed weight during the procedure. Conclusions: In mammographic breast

  1. Force balancing in mammographic compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branderhorst, W; de Groot, J E; Neeter, L M F H; van Lier, M G J T B; Neeleman, C; den Heeten, G J; Grimbergen, C A

    2016-01-01

    In mammography, the height of the image receptor is adjusted to the patient before compressing the breast. An inadequate height setting can result in an imbalance between the forces applied by the image receptor and the paddle, causing the clamped breast to be pushed up or down relative to the body during compression. This leads to unnecessary stretching of the skin and other tissues around the breast, which can make the imaging procedure more painful for the patient. The goal of this study was to implement a method to measure and minimize the force imbalance, and to assess its feasibility as an objective and reproducible method of setting the image receptor height. A trial was conducted consisting of 13 craniocaudal mammographic compressions on a silicone breast phantom, each with the image receptor positioned at a different height. The image receptor height was varied over a range of 12 cm. In each compression, the force exerted by the compression paddle was increased up to 140 N in steps of 10 N. In addition to the paddle force, the authors measured the force exerted by the image receptor and the reaction force exerted on the patient body by the ground. The trial was repeated 8 times, with the phantom remounted at a slightly different orientation and position between the trials. For a given paddle force, the obtained results showed that there is always exactly one image receptor height that leads to a balance of the forces on the breast. For the breast phantom, deviating from this specific height increased the force imbalance by 9.4 ± 1.9 N/cm (6.7%) for 140 N paddle force, and by 7.1 ± 1.6 N/cm (17.8%) for 40 N paddle force. The results also show that in situations where the force exerted by the image receptor is not measured, the craniocaudal force imbalance can still be determined by positioning the patient on a weighing scale and observing the changes in displayed weight during the procedure. In mammographic breast compression, even small changes in the

  2. Adaptation to time-compressed speech: phonological determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastián-Gallés, N; Dupoux, E; Costa, A; Mehler, J

    2000-05-01

    Perceptual adaptation to time-compressed speech was analyzed in two experiments. Previous research has suggested that this adaptation phenomenon is language specific and takes place at the phonological level. Moreover, it has been proposed that adaptation should only be observed for languages that are rhythmically similar. This assumption was explored by studying adaptation to different time-compressed languages in Spanish speakers. In Experiment 1, the performances of Spanish-speaking subjects who adapted to Spanish, Italian, French, English, and Japanese were compared. In Experiment 2, subjects from the same population were tested with Greek sentences compressed to two different rates. The results showed adaptation for Spanish, Italian, and Greek and no adaptation for English and Japanese, with French being an intermediate case. To account for the data, we propose that variables other than just the rhythmic properties of the languages, such as the vowel system and/or the lexical stress pattern, must be considered. The Greek data also support the view that phonological, rather than lexical, information is a determining factor in adaptation to compressed speech.

  3. Effective compression and noise reduction configurations for hearing protectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, King

    2007-02-01

    The author proposed to adopt wide dynamic range compression and adaptive multichannel modulation-based noise reduction algorithms to enhance hearing protector performance. Three experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of compression and noise reduction configurations on the amount of noise reduction, speech intelligibility, and overall preferences using existing digital hearing aids. In Experiment 1, sentence materials were recorded in speech spectrum noise and white noise after being processed by eight digital hearing aids. When the hearing aids were set to 3:1 compression, the amount of noise reduction achieved was enhanced or maintained for hearing aids with parallel configurations, but reduced for hearing aids with serial configurations. In Experiments 2 and 3, 16 normal-hearing listeners' speech intelligibility and perceived sound quality were tested when they listened to speech recorded through hearing aids with parallel and serial configurations. Regardless of the configuration, the noise reduction algorithms reduced the noise level and maintained speech intelligibility in white noise. Additionally, the listeners preferred the parallel rather than the serial configuration in 3:1 conditions and the serial configuration in 1:1 rather than 3:1 compression when the noise reduction algorithms were activated. Implications for hearing protector and hearing aid design are discussed.

  4. Shock Compression Spectroscopy of Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, James; Banishev, Alexandr; Dlott, Dana

    2017-06-01

    We have investigated CdSe quantum dots (QDs) as photoluminescent probes of shocked solids. They could be especially useful for composite materials, where the individual components could be tagged with different color QDs. The QDs are tiny (4 nm) spherical emitters, pumped by a continuous laser during shock or diamond anvil experiments up to 12 GPa. In the diamond anvil the QDs are hydrostatically compressed and the emission blueshifts with increasing pressure. By contrast, in shock experiments the QDs are embedded in a hard glass or a soft polymer matrix and subjected to uniaxial compression, which should mechanically deform them, and the emission redshifts with increasing pressure. We did hundreds of shock experiments with laser-driven flyer plates, measuring time-resolved intensities, spectral shifts and spectral widths with 1 ns time resolution. We also measured the time-dependent strain of the matrix using a fast optomechanical probe. We showed that the QD redshift can measure the strain in the glass or polymer with 1 ns time resolution. In the hard glass above 4 GPa the QDs behave oddly. When the shock arrives, the QDs redshift as the strain increases, but after about 20 ns, the redshift disappears for about 20 ns and then reappears. We think this redshift blinking behavior is related to the shear transients in the matrix, which suggests we might be able to use QDs to measure uniaxial strain and shear. This material is based on work supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency under Grant HDTRA1-12-1-0011.

  5. Compressible convection under hyper-gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, L.; Le Reun, T.; Alboussiere, T.; Bergman, M. I.; Labrosse, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    Convection plays an important role for heat transfer from the deep interior of planets and stars. In the Earth's core, it is responsible for the magnetic field. We often use the Boussinesq approximation for incompressible convection, and for compressible convection, we can use the anelastic liquid approximation. However, there is a lack of experimental results to check the validity of the anelastic approximation when the dissipation number is not negligible, because of the difficulty in obtaining an adiabatic gradient in the lab. Increasing the effective gravity and using a gas with a small specific heat capacity is a good way to observe a compressible convection, because for an ideal gas, the adiabatic gradient is g/Cp. We have carried out some experiments on convection in xenon gas in a cell in a centrifuge, which allows us to reach 10,000g, yielding a maximum of about 10 K across the height of the cell. In our experimental device, we measure a temperature with 11 platinum resistance thermal detectors, and the fluctuations of pressure. We can also acquire ultrasonic measurements through the cell. A Peltier module heats the bottom and PID control keeps the bottom temperature constant. The cell is insulated by perplex walls and the xenon gas in the cell is under pressure to increase the thermal inertia. We observe an adiabatic gradient at different effective gravities with different boundary conditions, and the fluctuations of temperature and pressure due to convection.

  6. XML data compression in web publishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Ruiheng; Hu, Wei; Tang, Zhi; Lu, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Lei

    2012-03-01

    XML is widely used in various document formats on the web. But it has caused negative impacts such as expensive document distribution time over the web, and long content jumping and rendering delay, especially on mobile devices. Hence we proposed a Schema-based efficient queryable XML compressor, called XTrim, which significantly improves compression ratio by utilizing optimized information in XML Schema while supporting efficient queries. Firstly, XTrim draws structure information from XML document and corresponding XML Schema. Then a novel technique is used to transform the XML tree-like structure into a compact indexed form to support efficient queries. At the same time, text values are obtained, and a language-based text trim method (LTT) that facilitates language-specific text compressors is adopted to reduce the size of text values in various languages. In LTT a word composition detection method is proposed to better process text in non-Latin languages. To evaluate the performance of XTrim, we have implemented a compressor and query engine prototype. Via extensive experiments, results show that XTrim outperforms XMill and existing queryable alternatives in terms of compression ratio, as well as the query efficiency. By applying XTrim to documents, the storage space can save up to 30% and the content jumping and rendering delay is reduced to less than 100ms from 4 seconds.

  7. Simultaneous boundary value and material parameter estimation using imperfect compression data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jansen van Rensburg, GJ

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available data obtained from these tests indicate non-uniform compression. In this paper, the benefits of surrogate modelling is investigated using a virtual experiment with parameterised displacement boundary condition that mimics the responses observed...

  8. Chest compression pauses during defibrillation attempts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deakin, Charles D.; Koster, Rudolph W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review This article summarizes current knowledge of the causes and consequences of interruption of chest compressions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Recent findings Pauses in chest compressions occur during analysis of the heart rhythm, delivery of ventilation, interventions such

  9. ADVANCED RECIPROCATING COMPRESSION TECHNOLOGY (ARCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danny M. Deffenbaugh; Klaus Brun; Ralph E. Harris; J. Pete Harrell; Robert J. Mckee; J. Jeffrey Moore; Steven J. Svedeman; Anthony J. Smalley; Eugene L. Broerman; Robert A Hart; Marybeth G. Nored; Ryan S. Gernentz; Shane P. Siebenaler

    2005-12-01

    The U.S. natural gas pipeline industry is facing the twin challenges of increased flexibility and capacity expansion. To meet these challenges, the industry requires improved choices in gas compression to address new construction and enhancement of the currently installed infrastructure. The current fleet of installed reciprocating compression is primarily slow-speed integral machines. Most new reciprocating compression is and will be large, high-speed separable units. The major challenges with the fleet of slow-speed integral machines are: limited flexibility and a large range in performance. In an attempt to increase flexibility, many operators are choosing to single-act cylinders, which are causing reduced reliability and integrity. While the best performing units in the fleet exhibit thermal efficiencies between 90% and 92%, the low performers are running down to 50% with the mean at about 80%. The major cause for this large disparity is due to installation losses in the pulsation control system. In the better performers, the losses are about evenly split between installation losses and valve losses. The major challenges for high-speed machines are: cylinder nozzle pulsations, mechanical vibrations due to cylinder stretch, short valve life, and low thermal performance. To shift nozzle pulsation to higher orders, nozzles are shortened, and to dampen the amplitudes, orifices are added. The shortened nozzles result in mechanical coupling with the cylinder, thereby, causing increased vibration due to the cylinder stretch mode. Valve life is even shorter than for slow speeds and can be on the order of a few months. The thermal efficiency is 10% to 15% lower than slow-speed equipment with the best performance in the 75% to 80% range. The goal of this advanced reciprocating compression program is to develop the technology for both high speed and low speed compression that will expand unit flexibility, increase thermal efficiency, and increase reliability and integrity

  10. Cascaded quadratic soliton compression at 800 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Bang, Ole; Moses, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    We study soliton compression in quadratic nonlinear materials at 800 nm, where group-velocity mismatch dominates. We develop a nonlocal theory showing that efficient compression depends strongly on characteristic nonlocal time scales related to pulse dispersion.......We study soliton compression in quadratic nonlinear materials at 800 nm, where group-velocity mismatch dominates. We develop a nonlocal theory showing that efficient compression depends strongly on characteristic nonlocal time scales related to pulse dispersion....

  11. Considerations and Algorithms for Compression of Sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Jesper

    We consider compression of unordered sets of distinct elements. After a discus- sion of the general problem, we focus on compressing sets of fixed-length bitstrings in the presence of statistical information. We survey techniques from previous work, suggesting some adjustments, and propose a novel...... compression algorithm that allows transparent incorporation of various estimates for probability distribution. Our experimental results allow the conclusion that set compression can benefit from incorporat- ing statistics, using our method or variants of previously known techniques....

  12. Spectral Compression of Intense Femtosecond Pulses by Self Phase Modulation in Silica Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Zhou, Binbin; Bache, Morten

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate spectral compression of mJ fs pulses by self phase modulation in silica glass. Spectral narrowing by factor 2.4 of near-transform-limited pulses is shown, with good agreement between experiment and numerical simulation.......We experimentally demonstrate spectral compression of mJ fs pulses by self phase modulation in silica glass. Spectral narrowing by factor 2.4 of near-transform-limited pulses is shown, with good agreement between experiment and numerical simulation....

  13. Forecast Jointed Rock Mass Compressive Strength Using a Numerical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Protosenya Anatoliy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of forecasting the strength of the jointed rock mass by numerical modeling of finite element method in ABAQUS was described. The paper presents advantages of this method to solve the problem of determining the mechanical characteristics of jointed rock mass and the basic steps of creating a numerical geomechanical model of jointed rock mass and numerical experiment. Numerical simulation was carried out with jointed rock mass in order to obtain the ratio of strain and stress while loading the numerical model, determining parameters of quantitative assessment of the impact of the discontinuities orientation on the value of the compressive strength, compressive strength anisotropy. The results of the numerical experiment are compared with the data of experimental studies investigations. Innovative materials and structures are analyzed in this paper. The results that were obtained by calculation show qualitative agreement with the results of laboratory experiments of jointed rock mass.

  14. Integer Set Compression and Statistical Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, N. Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Compression of integer sets and sequences has been extensively studied for settings where elements follow a uniform probability distribution. In addition, methods exist that exploit clustering of elements in order to achieve higher compression performance. In this work, we address the case where......, and discuss general properties and possibilities for this class of compression problem....

  15. H.264/AVC Video Compression on Smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharabayko, M. P.; Markov, N. G.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the usage of H.264/AVC video compression tools by the flagship smartphones. The results show that only a subset of tools is used, meaning that there is still a potential to achieve higher compression efficiency within the H.264/AVC standard, but the most advanced smartphones are already reaching the compression efficiency limit of H.264/AVC.

  16. Mechanical principles of compressive interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krödel, A

    1996-04-01

    A biomechanical study on cadaveric lumbar spines was performed measuring interfragmentary forces and contact areas between intercorporal bone blocks and vertebral endplates. To show the correct application of internal fixators to achieve interfragmentary compression between bone blocks and adjacent endplates. Several researchers have previously tried to compress interbody bone blocks by internal fixator systems. Knowledge of the correct way to use the internal fixator systems for this purpose has been lacking. Ten cadaveric lumbar spines were analyzed by instrumenting each motion unit with an intercorporal bone block and a dorsal transpedicular arbeitsgemeinschaft osteosynthesefragen internal fixator. Interfragmentary load and compression surface and their distribution were measured with a capacitive measuring mat. The internal fixator was loaded in compression in two different ways to determine the optimum mode of application. Simple compression of an internal fixator did not achieve sufficient interfragmentary forces and compression surfaces. Usually lordotic contouring of the instrumented spinal motion unit with a decrease in interfragmentary forces and width of compression surfaces developed. Preloading the fixator in slight kyphosis and compressing it in a second step achieved significantly improved interfragmentary forces and sufficient compression surfaces. Preloading an internal fixator in kyphosis and secondary compression is mandatory to get sufficient interfragmentary forces and compression surfaces between interbody bone blocks and adjacent vertebral endplates. The technique described provides a compressive interbody fusion and can be performed preserving the physiological shape of the spine.

  17. Optimizing the Ranchero Coaxial Flux Compression Generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasker, D.G.; Goforth, J.H.; Fowler, C.M.; Lopez, E.A.; Oona, H.; King, J.C.; Herrera, D.H.; Torres, D.T.; Reinovsky, R.E.; Martinez, E.C.; Stokes, J.L.; Tabaka, L.J.; Garcia, O.F.; Atchison, W.L.; Faehl, R.J.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Keinigs, R.K.; Miller, P.J.

    1998-10-18

    Ranchero is an explosively driven magnetic flux-compression generator that has been developed, over the last four years, as a versatile power source for high energy density physics experiments. It is coaxial, and comprises a 15 cm-diameter armature and a 30-cm stator, each aluminum. The length may be varied to suit the demands of each experiment; thus far, lengths of 0.43 m and 1.4 m have been used. The stator is filled and driven by a high performance cast explosive, and the ultimate performance of the device is limited by the smoothness of the armature expansion. The armature explosive is initiated on axis by PETN hemispheres, spaced at intervals of about 18 mm and 24.5 mm; each is simultaneously detonated by a slapper detonator system. Calculations of armature expansion predicted ripples less than 0.2 mm, and this was confirmed in early experiments. Yet, ripples approaching tens of millimeters were observed in some more recent experiments. The authors discuss the possible origins of the se large ripples, and the methods the authors have used to correct them.

  18. Effects of Nonlinear Frequency Compression on ACC Amplitude and Listener Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Benjamin James; Brown, Carolyn J

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear frequency compression is a signal processing technique used to increase the audibility of high-frequency speech sounds for hearing aid users with sloping, high-frequency hearing loss. However, excessive compression ratios may reduce spectral contrast between sounds and negatively impact speech perception. This is of particular concern in infants and young children who may not be able to provide feedback about frequency compression settings. This study explores the use of an objective cortical auditory evoked potential that is sensitive to changes in spectral contrast, the acoustic change complex (ACC), in the verification of frequency compression parameters. ACC responses were recorded from adult listeners to a spectral ripple contrast stimulus that was processed using a range of frequency compression ratios (1:1, 1.5:1, 2:1, 3:1, and 4:1). Vowel identification, consonant identification, speech recognition in noise (QuickSIN), and behavioral ripple discrimination thresholds were also measured under identical frequency compression conditions. In Experiment 1, these tasks were completed in 10 adults with normal hearing. In Experiment 2, these same tasks were repeated in 10 adults with sloping, high-frequency hearing loss. Repeated measures analysis of variance was completed for each task and each group with frequency compression ratio as the within-subjects factor. Increasing the compression ratio did not affect vowel identification for the normal hearing group but did cause a significant decrease in vowel identification for the hearing-impaired listeners. Increases in compression ratio were associated with significant decrements in ACC amplitudes, consonant identification scores, ripple discrimination thresholds, and speech perception in noise scores for both groups of listeners. The ACC response, like speech and nonspeech perceptual measures, is sensitive to frequency compression ratio. Additional study is needed to establish optimal stimulus and

  19. Strength and compressibility of returned lunar soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, W. D., III; Bromwell, L. G.; Martin, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    Two oedometer and three direct shear tests have been performed in vacuum on a 200 g sample of lunar soil from Apollo 12 (12001, 119). The compressibility data have been used to calculate bulk density and shear wave velocity versus depth on the lunar surface. The shear wave velocity was found to increase approximately with the one-fourth power of the depth, and the results suggest that the Apollo 14 Active Seismic Experiment may not have detected the Fra Mauro formation at a depth of 8.5 m, but only naturally consolidated lunar soil. The shear data indicate that the strength of the lunar soil sample is about 65% that of a ground basalt simulant at the same void ratio.

  20. In Situ Ellipsometry for Shock Compression Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, L.; Eliezer, S.; Appelbaum, G.; Nissim, N.; Perelmutter, L.; Mond, M.

    2009-12-01

    Knowledge about the optical properties of materials at high pressure and high temperature is needed for EOS research. Ellipsometry measures the change in the polarization of a probe beam reflected from a surface. From the change in polarization, the real and imaginary parts of the time dependent complex index of refraction can be extracted. From the measured optical properties, fundamental physical properties of the material, such as emissivity, phase transitions, and electrical conductivity can be extracted. A dynamic ellipsometry measurement system with nanosecond resolution was built in order to measure all four stocks parameters. Gas gun was used to accelerate the impact flyer. Our experiments concentrated on the optical properties of 1020 steel targets with impact pressure range of 40-250 kbar. Although there are intrinsic difficulties with dynamic ellipsometric measurements, distinct changes were observed for 1020 steel under shock compression larger than 130 kbar, the α→ɛ phase transition.

  1. Compressed magnetic flux amplifier with capacitive load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuetzer, O.M.

    1980-03-01

    A first-order analysis is presented for a compressed magnetic flux (CMF) current amplifier working into a load with a capacitive component. Since the purpose of the investigation was to gain a general understanding of the arrangement, a number of approximations and limitations were accepted. The inductance of the transducer varies with time; the inductance/resistance/capacitance (LRC) circuit therefore is parametric and solutions are different for the stable regime (high C), the oscillation regime (low C), and the transition case. Solutions and performance depend strongly on circuit boundary conditions, i.e., energization of the circuit by either an injected current or by an applied capacitor charge. The behavior of current and energy amplification for the various cases are discussed in detail. A number of experiments with small CMF devices showed that the first-order theory presented predicts transducer performance well in the linear regime.

  2. Holographic reconstruction by compressive sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leportier, T.; Park, M.-C.

    2017-06-01

    Techniques based on compressive sensing (CS) have been proposed recently for the optical capture of compressed holographic data. However, even though several remarkable articles have presented mathematical theories and numerical simulations, only a few experimental demonstrations have been reported. In this paper, we investigate the use of different metrics for the estimation of sparsity and show that the Gini index is the most consistent. In addition, we compare the sparsifying bases based on discrete cosine transform, Fourier transform and Fresnelets. We demonstrate that the Fresnelets basis is the best choice for the reconstruction of digital holograms by CS. Finally, we present an experimental set-up for optical acquisition of phase-shifted holograms with an imaging system based on a single-pixel sensor.

  3. Lossless Compression of Digital Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, Bo

    Presently, tree coders are the best bi-level image coders. The currentISO standard, JBIG, is a good example.By organising code length calculations properly a vast number of possible models (trees) can be investigated within reasonable time prior to generating code.A number of general-purpose coders...... are constructed by this principle. A multi-pass free tree coding scheme produces excellent compression results for all test images. A multi-pass fast free template coding scheme produces much better results than JBIG for difficult images, such as halftonings. Rissanen's algorithm `Context' is presented in a new...... version that is substantially faster than its precursorsand brings it close to the multi-pass coders in compression performance.Handprinted characters are of unequal complexity; recent work by Singer and Tishby demonstrates that utilizing the physiological process of writing one can synthesize cursive...

  4. Lossless compression of Peanoscanned images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provine, Joseph A.; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M.

    1994-04-01

    Peanoscanning was used to obtain the pixels from an image by following a scan path described by a space-filling curve, the Peano-Hilbert curve. The Peanoscanned data were then compressed without loss of information by direct Huffman, arithmetic, and Lempel-Ziv-Welch coding, as well as predictive and transform coding. In our implementation, tested on seven natural images, Peano-differential coding with an entropy coder gave the best results of reversible compression from 8 bits/pixel to about 5 bits/pixel, which was better than predictive coding of equivalent raster-scanned data. An efficient implementation of the Peanoscanning operation based on the symmetry exhibited by the Peano-Hilbert curve is also suggested.

  5. Compressing DNA sequence databases with coil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendy Michael D

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Publicly available DNA sequence databases such as GenBank are large, and are growing at an exponential rate. The sheer volume of data being dealt with presents serious storage and data communications problems. Currently, sequence data is usually kept in large "flat files," which are then compressed using standard Lempel-Ziv (gzip compression – an approach which rarely achieves good compression ratios. While much research has been done on compressing individual DNA sequences, surprisingly little has focused on the compression of entire databases of such sequences. In this study we introduce the sequence database compression software coil. Results We have designed and implemented a portable software package, coil, for compressing and decompressing DNA sequence databases based on the idea of edit-tree coding. coil is geared towards achieving high compression ratios at the expense of execution time and memory usage during compression – the compression time represents a "one-off investment" whose cost is quickly amortised if the resulting compressed file is transmitted many times. Decompression requires little memory and is extremely fast. We demonstrate a 5% improvement in compression ratio over state-of-the-art general-purpose compression tools for a large GenBank database file containing Expressed Sequence Tag (EST data. Finally, coil can efficiently encode incremental additions to a sequence database. Conclusion coil presents a compelling alternative to conventional compression of flat files for the storage and distribution of DNA sequence databases having a narrow distribution of sequence lengths, such as EST data. Increasing compression levels for databases having a wide distribution of sequence lengths is a direction for future work.

  6. 100J Pulsed Laser Shock Driver for Dynamic Compression Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Sethian, J.; Bromage, J.; Fochs, S.; Broege, D.; Zuegel, J.; Roides, R.; Cuffney, R.; Brent, G.; Zweiback, J.; Currier, Z.; D'Amico, K.; Hawreliak, J.; Zhang, J.; Rigg, P. A.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2017-06-01

    Logos Technologies and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE, University of Rochester) - in partnership with Washington State University - have designed, built and deployed a one of a kind 100J pulsed UV (351 nm) laser system to perform real-time, x-ray diffraction and imaging experiments in laser-driven compression experiments at the Dynamic Compression Sector (DCS) at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. The laser complements the other dynamic compression drivers at DCS. The laser system features beam smoothing for 2-d spatially uniform loading of samples and four, highly reproducible, temporal profiles (total pulse duration: 5-15 ns) to accommodate a wide variety of scientific needs. Other pulse shapes can be achieved as the experimental needs evolve. Timing of the laser pulse is highly precise (<200 ps) to allow accurate synchronization of the x-rays with the dynamic compression event. Details of the laser system, its operating parameters, and representative results will be presented. Work supported by DOE/NNSA.

  7. [Compression treatment for burned skin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafar, Fadhel; Lassoued, Mohamed A; Sahnoun, Mahdi; Sfar, Souad; Cheikhrouhou, Morched

    2012-02-01

    The regularity of a compressive knit is defined as its ability to perform its function in a burnt skin. This property is essential to avoid the phenomenon of rejection of the material or toxicity problems But: Make knits biocompatible with high burnet of human skin. We fabric knits of elastic material. To ensure good adhesion to the skin, we made elastic material, typically a tight loop knitted. The Length of yarn absorbed by stitch and the raw matter are changed with each sample. The physical properties of each sample are measured and compared. Surface modifications are made to these samples by impregnation of microcapsules based on jojoba oil. Knits are compressif, elastic in all directions, light, thin, comfortable, and washable for hygiene issues. In addition, the washing can find their compressive properties. The Jojoba Oil microcapsules hydrated the human burnet skin. This moisturizer is used to the firmness of the wound and it gives flexibility to the skin. Compressive Knits are biocompatible with burnet skin. The mixture of natural and synthetic fibers is irreplaceable in terms comfort and regularity.

  8. Data compression for command and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litow, Bruce

    1993-08-01

    Software, both source and executable versions, designed using LR parser generator technology offers superior data compression characteristics both with respect to the compression ratio, which is essentially optimal, and computational resources efficiency. Ten-fold compression should make possible highly sophisticated command and control systems for use during a space mission, on route and at the target. Carrying source in compressed form on manned missions will mean that significant modifications and even redesign of large systems can be accomplished. Basic aspects of this compression scheme are described in the paper.

  9. Compression for preventing recurrence of venous ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E Andrea; Bell-Syer, Sally E M

    2014-09-09

    Up to 1% of adults will have a leg ulcer at some time. The majority of leg ulcers are venous in origin and are caused by high pressure in the veins due to blockage or weakness of the valves in the veins of the leg. Prevention and treatment of venous ulcers is aimed at reducing the pressure either by removing/repairing the veins, or by applying compression bandages/stockings to reduce the pressure in the veins.The majority of venous ulcers heal with compression bandages, however ulcers frequently recur. Clinical guidelines therefore recommend that people continue to wear compression, usually in the form of hosiery (tights, stockings, socks) after their ulcer heals, to prevent recurrence. To assess the effects of compression (socks, stockings, tights, bandages) in preventing the recurrence of venous ulcers. If compression does prevent ulceration compared with no compression, then to identify whether there is evidence to recommend particular levels of compression (high, medium or low, for example), types of compression, or brands of compression to prevent ulcer recurrence after healing. For this second update we searched The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 4 September 2014) which includes the results of regular searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 8). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs)evaluating compression bandages or hosiery for preventing the recurrence of venous ulcers. Two review authors undertook data extraction and risk of bias assessment independently. Four trials (979 participants) were eligible for inclusion in this review. One trial in patients with recently healed venous ulcers (n = 153) compared recurrence rates with and without compression and found that compression significantly reduced ulcer recurrence at six months (Risk ratio (RR) 0.46, 95% CI 0.27 to 0.76).Two trials compared high-compression hosiery (equivalent to UK class 3) with

  10. Chapter 22: Compressed Air Evaluation Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benton, N.

    2014-11-01

    Compressed-air systems are used widely throughout industry for many operations, including pneumatic tools, packaging and automation equipment, conveyors, and other industrial process operations. Compressed-air systems are defined as a group of subsystems composed of air compressors, air treatment equipment, controls, piping, pneumatic tools, pneumatically powered machinery, and process applications using compressed air. A compressed-air system has three primary functional subsystems: supply, distribution, and demand. Air compressors are the primary energy consumers in a compressed-air system and are the primary focus of this protocol. The two compressed-air energy efficiency measures specifically addressed in this protocol are: high-efficiency/variable speed drive (VSD) compressor replacing modulating compressor; compressed-air leak survey and repairs. This protocol provides direction on how to reliably verify savings from these two measures using a consistent approach for each.

  11. Lithological Uncertainty Expressed by Normalized Compression Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatnieks, J.; Saks, T.; Delina, A.; Popovs, K.

    2012-04-01

    Lithological composition and structure of the Quaternary deposits is highly complex and heterogeneous in nature, especially as described in borehole log data. This work aims to develop a universal solution for quantifying uncertainty based on mutual information shared between the borehole logs. This approach presents tangible information directly useful in generalization of the geometry and lithology of the Quaternary sediments for use in regional groundwater flow models as a qualitative estimate of lithological uncertainty involving thousands of borehole logs would be humanly impossible due to the amount of raw data involved. Our aim is to improve parametrization of recharge in the Quaternary strata. This research however holds appeal for other areas of reservoir modelling, as demonstrated in the 2011 paper by Wellmann & Regenauer-Lieb. For our experiments we used extracts of the Quaternary strata from general-purpose geological borehole log database maintained by the Latvian Environment, Geology and Meteorology Centre, spanning the territory of Latvia. Lithological codes were generalised into 2 aggregation levels consisting of 5 and 20 rock types respectively. Our calculation of borehole log similarity relies on the concept of information distance proposed by Bennet et al. in 1998. This was developed into a practical data mining application by Cilibrasi in the 2007 dissertation. The resulting implementation called CompLearn utilities provide a calculation of the Normalized Compression Distance (NCD) metric. It relies on the universal data compression algorithms for estimating mutual information content in the data. This approach has proven to be universally successful for parameter free data mining in disciplines from molecular biology to network intrusion monitoring. To improve this approach for use in geology it is beneficial to apply several transformations as pre-processing steps to the borehole log data. Efficiency of text stream compressors, such as

  12. SRComp: short read sequence compression using burstsort and Elias omega coding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy John Selva

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies permit the rapid production of vast amounts of data at low cost. Economical data storage and transmission hence becomes an increasingly important challenge for NGS experiments. In this paper, we introduce a new non-reference based read sequence compression tool called SRComp. It works by first employing a fast string-sorting algorithm called burstsort to sort read sequences in lexicographical order and then Elias omega-based integer coding to encode the sorted read sequences. SRComp has been benchmarked on four large NGS datasets, where experimental results show that it can run 5-35 times faster than current state-of-the-art read sequence compression tools such as BEETL and SCALCE, while retaining comparable compression efficiency for large collections of short read sequences. SRComp is a read sequence compression tool that is particularly valuable in certain applications where compression time is of major concern.

  13. Total variation regularization via continuation to recover compressed hyperspectral images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Duncan T; Andrews, Mark

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate a low-complexity scheme for decoding compressed hyperspectral image data. We have exploited the simplicity of the subgradient method by modifying a total variation-based regularization problem to include a residual constraint, employing convex optimality conditions to provide equivalency between the original and reformed problem statements. A scheme that utilizes spectral smoothness by calculating informed starting points to improve the rate of convergence is introduced. We conduct numerical experiments, using both synthetic and real hyperspectral data, to demonstrate the effectiveness of the reconstruction algorithm and the validity of our method for exploiting spectral smoothness. Evidence from these experiments suggests that the proposed methods have the potential to improve the quality and run times of the future compressed hyperspectral image reconstructions.

  14. Numerical aspects of compressible turbulence simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honein, Albert Edward

    Nonlinear instabilities present a long standing hurdle for compact, high order, non dissipative, finite difference computation of compressible turbulence. The spectral-like accuracy of these schemes, while attractive, results in significant aliasing errors that corrupt the solution. As a result, successful simulations have been limited to moderate Reynolds numbers ( Re) and low-order or upwind schemes with inherent numerical dissipation. However, resorting to dissipative schemes in discretizing the nonlinear terms was shown to have a detrimental effect on turbulence. A recent LES approach is to abandon the subgrid model altogether and rely on the scheme dissipation to mimic the effect of small scales. A dissipative monotone integrated LES (MILES) algorithm based on a multidimensional flux-corrected transport (FCT) algorithm has been developed and tested for decaying compressible isotropic turbulence. Agreement with the benchmark experiments of Comte-Bellot and Corrsin is very sensitive to the parameters involved in the FCT algorithm, while the evolution of thermodynamic fluctuations do not compare well with direct numerical simulations. An under-resolved simulation of inviscid, compressible, isotropic turbulence at low Mach number is chosen as a severe benchmark to investigate the nonlinear stability properties of nondissipative schemes. The behavior of this benchmark is predicted by performing a fully de-aliased spectral simulation on a 32 3 grid with turbulent Mach number of Mto = 0.07. The kinetic energy and thermodynamic fluctuations are found to decay for finite Re, and remain constant at infinite Re for a long time before the occurrence of numerical shocks. Extending the proof of Kraichnan (Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 27(3), 1955), this inviscid statistical equilibrium is demonstrated to be a consequence of the discrete equivalent of the Liouville theorem of classical statistical mechanics. Several existing non-dissipative methods are

  15. Nonlinear dynamic range compression deconvolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji-Saeed, Bahareh; Sengupta, Sandip K.; Goodhue, William; Khoury, Jed; Woods, Charles L.; Kierstead, John

    2006-07-01

    We introduce a dynamic range image compression technique for nonlinear deconvolution; the impulse response of the distortion function and the noisy distorted image are jointly transformed to pump a clean reference beam in a two-beam coupling arrangement. The Fourier transform of the pumped reference beam contains the deconvolved image and its conjugate. In contrast to standard deconvolution approaches, for which noise can be a limiting factor in the performance, this approach allows the retrieval of distorted signals embedded in a very high-noise environment.

  16. Protostellar Collapse Induced by Compression

    OpenAIRE

    Hennebelle, P.; Whitworth, A. P.; Gladwin, P. P.; Andre, Ph.

    2002-01-01

    We present numerical simulations of the evolution of low-mass, isothermal, molecular cores which are subjected to an increase in external pressure $P\\xt$. If $P\\xt$ increases very slowly, the core approaches instability quite quasistatically. However, for larger (but still quite modest) $dP\\xt/dt$ a compression wave is driven into the core, thereby triggering collapse from the outside in. If collapse of a core is induced by increasing $P\\xt$, this has a number of interesting consequences. (i)...

  17. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF COMPRESSION TECHNIQUES FOR SYNTHETIC VIDEOS

    OpenAIRE

    Ayman Abdalla; Ahmad Mazhar; Mosa Salah

    2014-01-01

    We evaluate the performance of three state of the art video codecs on synthetic videos. The evaluation is based on both subjective and objective quality metrics. The subjective quality of the compressed video sequences is evaluated using the Double Stimulus Impairment Scale (DSIS) assessment metric while the Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR) is used for the objective evaluation. An extensive number of experiments are conducted to study the effect of frame rate and resolution o...

  18. The application of compressive sampling to radio astronomy I: Deconvolution

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Feng; Cornwell, Tim J.; de Hoog, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Compressive sampling is a new paradigm for sampling, based on sparseness of signals or signal representations. It is much less restrictive than Nyquist-Shannon sampling theory and thus explains and systematises the widespread experience that methods such as the H\\"ogbom CLEAN can violate the Nyquist-Shannon sampling requirements. In this paper, a CS-based deconvolution method for extended sources is introduced. This method can reconstruct both point sources and extended sources (using the iso...

  19. Phase unwinding for dictionary compression with multiple channel transmission in magnetic resonance fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattanzi, Riccardo; Zhang, Bei; Knoll, Florian; Assländer, Jakob; Cloos, Martijn A

    2017-12-24

    Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting reconstructions can become computationally intractable with multiple transmit channels, if the B 1 + phases are included in the dictionary. We describe a general method that allows to omit the transmit phases. We show that this enables straightforward implementation of dictionary compression to further reduce the problem dimensionality. We merged the raw data of each RF source into a single k-space dataset, extracted the transceiver phases from the corresponding reconstructed images and used them to unwind the phase in each time frame. All phase-unwound time frames were combined in a single set before performing SVD-based compression. We conducted synthetic, phantom and in-vivo experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of SVD-based compression in the case of two-channel transmission. Unwinding the phases before SVD-based compression yielded artifact-free parameter maps. For fully sampled acquisitions, parameters were accurate with as few as 6 compressed time frames. SVD-based compression performed well in-vivo with highly under-sampled acquisitions using 16 compressed time frames, which reduced reconstruction time from 750 to 25min. Our method reduces the dimensions of the dictionary atoms and enables to implement any fingerprint compression strategy in the case of multiple transmit channels. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Two-dimensional grid-free compressive beamforming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Chu, Zhigang; Xu, Zhongming; Ping, Guoli

    2017-08-01

    Compressive beamforming realizes the direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation and strength quantification of acoustic sources by solving an underdetermined system of equations relating microphone pressures to a source distribution via compressive sensing. The conventional method assumes DOAs of sources to lie on a grid. Its performance degrades due to basis mismatch when the assumption is not satisfied. To overcome this limitation for the measurement with plane microphone arrays, a two-dimensional grid-free compressive beamforming is developed. First, a continuum based atomic norm minimization is defined to denoise the measured pressure and thus obtain the pressure from sources. Next, a positive semidefinite programming is formulated to approximate the atomic norm minimization. Subsequently, a reasonably fast algorithm based on alternating direction method of multipliers is presented to solve the positive semidefinite programming. Finally, the matrix enhancement and matrix pencil method is introduced to process the obtained pressure and reconstruct the source distribution. Both simulations and experiments demonstrate that under certain conditions, the grid-free compressive beamforming can provide high-resolution and low-contamination imaging, allowing accurate and fast estimation of two-dimensional DOAs and quantification of source strengths, even with non-uniform arrays and noisy measurements.

  1. Thermophysical properties of multi-shock compressed dense argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Q. F., E-mail: chenqf01@gmail.com; Zheng, J.; Gu, Y. J.; Chen, Y. L.; Cai, L. C. [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, P. O. Box 919-102, Mianyang, Sichuan (China); Shen, Z. J. [Laboratory of Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, P. O. Box 8009-26, Beijing 10086 (China)

    2014-02-21

    In contrast to the single shock compression state that can be obtained directly via experimental measurements, the multi-shock compression states, however, have to be calculated with the aid of theoretical models. In order to determine experimentally the multiple shock states, a diagnostic approach with the Doppler pins system (DPS) and the pyrometer was used to probe multiple shocks in dense argon plasmas. Plasma was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The shock was produced using the flyer plate impact accelerated up to ∼6.1 km/s by a two-stage light gas gun and introduced into the plenum argon gas sample, which was pre-compressed from the environmental pressure to about 20 MPa. The time-resolved optical radiation histories were determined using a multi-wavelength channel optical transience radiance pyrometer. Simultaneously, the particle velocity profiles of the LiF window was measured with multi-DPS. The states of multi-shock compression argon plasma were determined from the measured shock velocities combining the particle velocity profiles. We performed the experiments on dense argon plasmas to determine the principal Hugonoit up to 21 GPa, the re-shock pressure up to 73 GPa, and the maximum measure pressure of the fourth shock up to 158 GPa. The results are used to validate the existing self-consistent variational theory model in the partial ionization region and create new theoretical models.

  2. Thermophysical properties of multi-shock compressed dense argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q. F.; Zheng, J.; Gu, Y. J.; Chen, Y. L.; Cai, L. C.; Shen, Z. J.

    2014-02-01

    In contrast to the single shock compression state that can be obtained directly via experimental measurements, the multi-shock compression states, however, have to be calculated with the aid of theoretical models. In order to determine experimentally the multiple shock states, a diagnostic approach with the Doppler pins system (DPS) and the pyrometer was used to probe multiple shocks in dense argon plasmas. Plasma was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The shock was produced using the flyer plate impact accelerated up to ˜6.1 km/s by a two-stage light gas gun and introduced into the plenum argon gas sample, which was pre-compressed from the environmental pressure to about 20 MPa. The time-resolved optical radiation histories were determined using a multi-wavelength channel optical transience radiance pyrometer. Simultaneously, the particle velocity profiles of the LiF window was measured with multi-DPS. The states of multi-shock compression argon plasma were determined from the measured shock velocities combining the particle velocity profiles. We performed the experiments on dense argon plasmas to determine the principal Hugonoit up to 21 GPa, the re-shock pressure up to 73 GPa, and the maximum measure pressure of the fourth shock up to 158 GPa. The results are used to validate the existing self-consistent variational theory model in the partial ionization region and create new theoretical models.

  3. Medical image compression using block-based transform coding techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Neve, Peter; Philips, Wilfried R.; Van Overloop, Jeroen; Lemahieu, Ignace L.

    1996-09-01

    The JPEG lossy compression technique in medical imagery has several disadvantages (at higher compression ratios), mainly due to block-distortion. We therefore investigated two methods, the lapped orthogonal transform (LOT) and the DCT/DST coder, for the use on medical image data. These techniques are block-based but they reduce the block- distortion by spreading it out over the entire image. These compression techniques were applied on four different types of medical images (MRI image, x-ray image, angiogram and CT- scan). They were then compared with results from JPEG and variable block size DCT coders. At a first stage, we determined the optimal block size for each image and for each technique. It was found that for a specific image, the optimal block size was independent of the different transform coders. For the x-ray image, the CT-scan and the angiogram an optimal block size of 32 by 32 was found, while for the MRI image the optimal block size was 16 by 16. Afterwards, for all images the rate-distortion curves of the different techniques were calculated, using the optimal block size. The overall conclusion from our experiments is that the LOT is the best transform among the ones being investigated for compressing medical images of many different kinds. However, JPEG should be used for very high image qualities, as it then requires almost the same bit rate as the LOT and as it requires fewer computations than the LOT technique.

  4. Shock-adiabatic to quasi-isentropic compression of warm dense helium up to 150 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J.; Chen, Q. F.; Gu, Y. J.; Li, J. T.; Li, Z. G.; Li, C. J.; Chen, Z. Y.

    2017-06-01

    particles results in the decreasing compressibility at the onset of electron excitation and ionization. In the P-ρ -T contour with the experiments and the calculations, our multiple compression states from insulating to semiconducting fluid (from transparent to opaque fluid) are illustrated. Our results give an elaborate validation of EOS models and have applications for planetary and stellar opaque atmospheres.

  5. Industrial Compressed Air System Energy Efficiency Guidebook.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1993-12-01

    Energy efficient design, operation and maintenance of compressed air systems in industrial plants can provide substantial reductions in electric power and other operational costs. This guidebook will help identify cost effective, energy efficiency opportunities in compressed air system design, re-design, operation and maintenance. The guidebook provides: (1) a broad overview of industrial compressed air systems, (2) methods for estimating compressed air consumption and projected air savings, (3) a description of applicable, generic energy conservation measures, and, (4) a review of some compressed air system demonstration projects that have taken place over the last two years. The primary audience for this guidebook includes plant maintenance supervisors, plant engineers, plant managers and others interested in energy management of industrial compressed air systems.

  6. Longwave infrared compressive hyperspectral imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, Julia R.; Kirby, Michael; Cosofret, Bogdan R.

    2015-06-01

    Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) is developing a longwave infrared (LWIR) compressive sensing hyperspectral imager (CS HSI) based on a single pixel architecture for standoff vapor phase plume detection. The sensor employs novel use of a high throughput stationary interferometer and a digital micromirror device (DMD) converted for LWIR operation in place of the traditional cooled LWIR focal plane array. The CS HSI represents a substantial cost reduction over the state of the art in LWIR HSI instruments. Radiometric improvements for using the DMD in the LWIR spectral range have been identified and implemented. In addition, CS measurement and sparsity bases specifically tailored to the CS HSI instrument and chemical plume imaging have been developed and validated using LWIR hyperspectral image streams of chemical plumes. These bases enable comparable statistics to detection based on uncompressed data. In this paper, we present a system model predicting the overall performance of the CS HSI system. Results from a breadboard build and test validating the system model are reported. In addition, the measurement and sparsity basis work demonstrating the plume detection on compressed hyperspectral images is presented.

  7. Hemifacial spasm and neurovascular compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Alex Y; Yeung, Jacky T; Gerrard, Jason L; Michaelides, Elias M; Sekula, Raymond F; Bulsara, Ketan R

    2014-01-01

    Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is characterized by involuntary unilateral contractions of the muscles innervated by the ipsilateral facial nerve, usually starting around the eyes before progressing inferiorly to the cheek, mouth, and neck. Its prevalence is 9.8 per 100,000 persons with an average age of onset of 44 years. The accepted pathophysiology of HFS suggests that it is a disease process of the nerve root entry zone of the facial nerve. HFS can be divided into two types: primary and secondary. Primary HFS is triggered by vascular compression whereas secondary HFS comprises all other causes of facial nerve damage. Clinical examination and imaging modalities such as electromyography (EMG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are useful to differentiate HFS from other facial movement disorders and for intraoperative planning. The standard medical management for HFS is botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) injections, which provides low-risk but limited symptomatic relief. The only curative treatment for HFS is microvascular decompression (MVD), a surgical intervention that provides lasting symptomatic relief by reducing compression of the facial nerve root. With a low rate of complications such as hearing loss, MVD remains the treatment of choice for HFS patients as intraoperative technique and monitoring continue to improve.

  8. Hemifacial Spasm and Neurovascular Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Y. Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemifacial spasm (HFS is characterized by involuntary unilateral contractions of the muscles innervated by the ipsilateral facial nerve, usually starting around the eyes before progressing inferiorly to the cheek, mouth, and neck. Its prevalence is 9.8 per 100,000 persons with an average age of onset of 44 years. The accepted pathophysiology of HFS suggests that it is a disease process of the nerve root entry zone of the facial nerve. HFS can be divided into two types: primary and secondary. Primary HFS is triggered by vascular compression whereas secondary HFS comprises all other causes of facial nerve damage. Clinical examination and imaging modalities such as electromyography (EMG and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI are useful to differentiate HFS from other facial movement disorders and for intraoperative planning. The standard medical management for HFS is botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT injections, which provides low-risk but limited symptomatic relief. The only curative treatment for HFS is microvascular decompression (MVD, a surgical intervention that provides lasting symptomatic relief by reducing compression of the facial nerve root. With a low rate of complications such as hearing loss, MVD remains the treatment of choice for HFS patients as intraoperative technique and monitoring continue to improve.

  9. Ultrafast observation of shock compression from greater than 10 GPa precompression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael; Crowhurst, Jonathan; Zaug, Joseph

    2010-03-01

    For decades, many compression experiments have applied either static compression in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) or dynamic compression using shock waves. Although such experiments provide a wide range of material data, information off the Hugoniot or room temperature isotherm requires more specialized techniques. Further, although ultrafast laser methods have recently been applied to acoustics in the DAC and shock waves at ambient pressure, shock waves from precompressed states have not been observed with ultrafast time resolution. Shock compression of a precompressed material enables two useful experimental strategies. First, the initial state of the material may be placed, via precompression, in the proximity of a phase transition before shock compression, enabling the observation of phase transition dynamics as the material is shock compressed through the phase transition boundary. Second, since low-density materials heat more substantially than high-density materials upon shock compression, an initial pressure may be used to modulate the degree of shock heating. Here we report the application of ultrafast shock wave methods to materials which have been precompressed in a DAC, providing material information off the standard Hugoniot.

  10. Eccentric crank variable compression ratio mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Keith Edward [Kobe, JP; Moser, William Elliott [Peoria, IL; Roozenboom, Stephan Donald [Washington, IL; Knox, Kevin Jay [Peoria, IL

    2008-05-13

    A variable compression ratio mechanism for an internal combustion engine that has an engine block and a crankshaft is disclosed. The variable compression ratio mechanism has a plurality of eccentric disks configured to support the crankshaft. Each of the plurality of eccentric disks has at least one cylindrical portion annularly surrounded by the engine block. The variable compression ratio mechanism also has at least one actuator configured to rotate the plurality of eccentric disks.

  11. Structural evolution of Y3Fe5O12 induced by shock compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimura, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Hitoshi

    2017-10-01

    Shock-recovery experiments on both powder and single-crystal samples of Y3Fe5O12 (YIG) are performed by flyer impact. The recovered samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. In previous static compression studies, a phase transition from cubic YIG to amorphous YIG has been observed under a pressure of 50 GPa at ambient temperature. During the shock compression of the powder sample, the cubic structure of YIG is transformed to yttrium iron perovskite and hematite. The Raman spectra obtained after the shock compression of single-crystal YIG are not similar to the spectrum for amorphous garnet. The peaks in the Raman spectra can be attributed to yttrium iron perovskite and hematite. The shock-induced heat contributes to the difference in phase transition compared with the results for static compression experiments.

  12. Compression of rehydratable vegetables and cereals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, E. E.

    1978-01-01

    Characteristics of freeze-dried compressed carrots, such as rehydration, volatile retention, and texture, were studied by relating histological changes to textural quality evaluation, and by determining the effects of storage temperature on freeze-dried compressed carrot bars. Results show that samples compressed with a high moisture content undergo only slight structural damage and rehydrate quickly. Cellular disruption as a result of compression at low moisture levels was the main reason for rehydration and texture differences. Products prepared from carrot cubes having 48% moisture compared favorably with a freshly cooked product in cohesiveness and elasticity, but were found slightly harder and more chewy.

  13. Compressed Sensing with Rank Deficient Dictionaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Lundgaard; Johansen, Daniel Højrup; Jørgensen, Peter Bjørn

    2012-01-01

    In compressed sensing it is generally assumed that the dictionary matrix constitutes a (possibly overcomplete) basis of the signal space. In this paper we consider dictionaries that do not span the signal space, i.e. rank deficient dictionaries. We show that in this case the signal-to-noise ratio...... (SNR) in the compressed samples can be increased by selecting the rows of the measurement matrix from the column space of the dictionary. As an example application of compressed sensing with a rank deficient dictionary, we present a case study of compressed sensing applied to the Coarse Acquisition (C...

  14. MPEG-4 video compression optimization research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xianmin

    2011-10-01

    In order to make a large amount of video data compression and effectively with limited network bandwidth to transfer smoothly, this article using the MPEG-4 compression technology to compress video stream. In the network transmission, according to the characteristics of video stream, for transmission technology to carry out full analysis and optimization, and combining current network bandwidth status and protocol, to establish one network model with transferring and playback video streaming effectively. Through a combination of these two areas, significantly improved compression and storage of video files and network transmission efficiency, increased video processing power.

  15. Research on the Compression Algorithm of the Infrared Thermal Image Sequence Based on Differential Evolution and Double Exponential Decay Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Yu Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper has proposed a new thermal wave image sequence compression algorithm by combining double exponential decay fitting model and differential evolution algorithm. This study benchmarked fitting compression results and precision of the proposed method was benchmarked to that of the traditional methods via experiment; it investigated the fitting compression performance under the long time series and improved model and validated the algorithm by practical thermal image sequence compression and reconstruction. The results show that the proposed algorithm is a fast and highly precise infrared image data processing method.

  16. Effect of compression ratio on perception of time compressed phonemically balanced words in Kannada and monosyllables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Prabhu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study attempted to study perception of time-compressed speech and the effect of compression ratio for phonemically balanced (PB word lists in Kannada and monosyllables. The test was administered on 30 normal hearing individuals at compression ratios of 40%, 50%, 60%, 70% and 80% for PB words in Kannada and monosyllables. The results of the study showed that the speech identification scores for time-compressed speech reduced with increase in compression ratio. The scores were better for monosyllables compared to PB words especially at higher compression ratios. The study provides speech identification scores at different compression ratio for PB words and monosyllables in individuals with normal hearing. The results of the study also showed that the scores did not vary across gender for all the compression ratios for both the stimuli. The same test material needs to be compared the clinical population with central auditory processing disorder for clinical validation of the present results.

  17. Less is More: Bigger Data from Compressive Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Andrew; Browning, Nigel D.

    2017-07-01

    Compressive sensing approaches are beginning to take hold in (scanning) transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) [1,2,3]. Compressive sensing is a mathematical theory about acquiring signals in a compressed form (measurements) and the probability of recovering the original signal by solving an inverse problem [4]. The inverse problem is underdetermined (more unknowns than measurements), so it is not obvious that recovery is possible. Compression is achieved by taking inner products of the signal with measurement weight vectors. Both Gaussian random weights and Bernoulli (0,1) random weights form a large class of measurement vectors for which recovery is possible. The measurements can also be designed through an optimization process. The key insight for electron microscopists is that compressive sensing can be used to increase acquisition speed and reduce dose. Building on work initially developed for optical cameras, this new paradigm will allow electron microscopists to solve more problems in the engineering and life sciences. We will be collecting orders of magnitude more data than previously possible. The reason that we will have more data is because we will have increased temporal/spatial/spectral sampling rates, and we will be able ability to interrogate larger classes of samples that were previously too beam sensitive to survive the experiment. For example consider an in-situ experiment that takes 1 minute. With traditional sensing, we might collect 5 images per second for a total of 300 images. With compressive sensing, each of those 300 images can be expanded into 10 more images, making the collection rate 50 images per second, and the decompressed data a total of 3000 images [3]. But, what are the implications, in terms of data, for this new methodology? Acquisition of compressed data will require downstream reconstruction to be useful. The reconstructed data will be much larger than traditional data, we will need space to store the reconstructions during

  18. Using Costal Chondrocytes to Engineer Articular Cartilage with Applications of Passive Axial Compression and Bioactive Stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huwe, Le W; Sullan, Gurdeep K; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2017-08-14

    Generating neocartilage with suitable mechanical integrity from a cell source that can circumvent chondrocyte scarcity is indispensable for articular cartilage regeneration strategies. Costal chondrocytes of the rib eliminate donor site morbidity in the articular joint, but it remains unclear how neocartilage formed from these cells responds to mechanical loading, especially if the intent is to use it in a load-bearing joint. In a series of three experiments, this study sought to determine efficacious parameters of passive axial compressive stimulation that would enable costal chondrocytes to synthesize mechanically robust cartilage. Experiment 1 determined a suitable time window for stimulation by its application during either the matrix synthesis phase, the maturation phase, or during both phases of the self-assembling process. The results showed that compressive stimulation at either time was effective in increasing instantaneous moduli by 92% and 87% in the synthesis and maturation phases, respectively. Compressive stimulation during both phases did not further improve properties beyond a one-time stimulation. The magnitude of passive axial compression was examined in Experiment 2 by applying 0, 3.3, 5.0, or 6.7 kPa stresses to the neocartilage. Unlike 6.7 kPa, both 3.3 and 5.0 kPa significantly increased neocartilage compressive properties by 42% and 48% over untreated controls, respectively. Experiment 3 examined how the passive axial compression regimen developed from the previous phases interacted with a bioactive regimen (transforming growth factor [TGF]-β1, chondroitinase ABC, and lysyl oxidase-like 2). Passive axial compression significantly improved the relaxation modulus compared with bioactive treatment alone. Furthermore, a combined treatment of compressive and bioactive stimulation improved the tensile properties of neocartilage 2.6-fold compared with untreated control. The ability to create robust articular cartilage from passaged costal

  19. Compression of Video-Otoscope Images for Tele-Otology: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-25

    algorithm used in image compression is the one developed by the Joint Picture Expert Group (JPEG), which has been deployed in almost all imaging ...recognised the image , nor go back to view the previous images . This was designed to minimise the affect of memory . After the assessments were tabulated...also have contributed such as the memory effect, or the experience of the assessor. V. CONCLUSION 1. Images can probably be compressed to about

  20. Dynamic compression of synthetic diamond windows (final report for LDRD project 93531).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Daniel H.,

    2008-09-01

    Diamond is an attractive dynamic compression window for many reasons: high elastic limit,large mechanical impedance, and broad transparency range. Natural diamonds, however, aretoo expensive to be used in destructive experiments. Chemical vapor deposition techniquesare now able to produce large single-crystal windows, opening up many potential dynamiccompression applications. This project studied the behavior of synthetic diamond undershock wave compression. The results suggest that synthetic diamond could be a usefulwindow in this field, though complete characterization proved elusive.3

  1. Client preferences for compression threshold in single-channel wide dynamic range compression hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, C; Dillon, H

    1999-04-01

    Compression in hearing aids can be applied with low compression ratios over a wide range of input levels, but reverts to linear amplification below the compression threshold (CT). In this study, we aimed to determine which of two CTs was preferred by subjects as they used their hearing aids in their own environments, and whether they would prefer to have no low ratio compression at all. Subjects were fitted with a multimemory hearing aid incorporating input controlled compression with a 2:1 compression ratio and output controlled compression limiting. The two memories contained identical programs except that they differed in CT. Sixteen mild to moderately sensorineurally hearing-impaired subjects compared low (approximately 40 dB SPL) and moderate (approximately 65 dB SPL) CTs over 2 mo of field trials using hand held remote controls to switch between the alternatives. In a third month's trial, the preferred option (which also included output controlled compression limiting) was compared with compression limiting alone. The higher CT was preferred by 14 of the subjects. The combination of input compression and output compression limiting was preferred to compression limiting alone by 14 of the subjects. Several real world advantages of frequency independent 2:1 compression with a CT of about 65 dB SPL were demonstrated over linear amplification. Extending the compression to much lower input levels appears to carry more disadvantages than advantages, at least for clients with mild and moderate hearing losses, when fitted with single-channel compression aids with a 2:1 compression ratio.

  2. Compressing turbulence and sudden viscous dissipation with compression-dependent ionization state

    OpenAIRE

    Davidovits, Seth; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Turbulent plasma flow, amplified by rapid 3D compression, can be suddenly dissipated under continuing compression. This effect relies on the sensitivity of the plasma viscosity to the temperature, $\\mu \\sim T^{5/2}$. The plasma viscosity is also sensitive to the plasma ionization state. We show that the sudden dissipation phenomenon may be prevented when the plasma ionization state increases during compression, and demonstrate the regime of net viscosity dependence on compression where sudden...

  3. Testing compression strength of wood logs by drilling resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalny, Gerda; Rados, Kristijan; Rauch, Hans Peter

    2017-04-01

    Soil bioengineering is a construction technique using biological components for hydraulic and civil engineering solutions, based on the application of living plants and other auxiliary materials including among others log wood. Considering the reliability of the construction it is important to know about the durability and the degradation process of the wooden logs to estimate and retain the integral performance of a soil bioengineering system. An important performance indicator is the compression strength, but this parameter is not easy to examine by non-destructive methods. The Rinntech Resistograph is an instrument to measure the drilling resistance by a 3 mm wide needle in a wooden log. It is a quasi-non-destructive method as the remaining hole has no weakening effects to the wood. This is an easy procedure but result in values, hard to interpret. To assign drilling resistance values to specific compression strengths, wooden specimens were tested in an experiment and analysed with the Resistograph. Afterwards compression tests were done at the same specimens. This should allow an easier interpretation of drilling resistance curves in future. For detailed analyses specimens were investigated by means of branch inclusions, cracks and distances between annual rings. Wood specimens are tested perpendicular to the grain. First results show a correlation between drilling resistance and compression strength by using the mean drilling resistance, average width of the annual rings and the mean range of the minima and maxima values as factors for the drilling resistance. The extended limit of proportionality, the offset yield strength and the maximum strength were taken as parameters for compression strength. Further investigations at a second point in time strengthen these results.

  4. Use beam steering dipoles to minimize aberrations associated with off-centered transit through the induction bunching module. Design an improved NDCX-I drift compression section to make best use of the new bunching module to optimize planned initial NDCX-I target experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HIFS-VNL; Seidl, Peter; Seidl, P.; Barnard, J.; Bieniosek, F.; Coleman, J.; Grote, D.; Leitner, M.; Gilson, E.; Logan, B.G.; Lund, S.; Lidia, S.; Ni, P.; Ogata, D.; Roy, P.; Waldron, W.; Welch, D.; Wooton, C.

    2008-03-28

    This milestone has been met by: (1) calculating steering solutions and implementing them in the experiment using the three pairs of crossed magnetic dipoles installed in between the matching solenoids, S1-S4. We have demonstrated the ability to center the beam position and angle to<1 mm and<1 mrad upstream of the induction bunching module (IBM) gap, compared to uncorrected beam offsets of several millimeters and milli-radians. (2) Based on LSP and analytic study, the new IBM, which has twice the volt-seconds of our first IBM, should be accompanied by a longer drift compression section in order to achieve a predicted doubling of the energy deposition on future warm-dense matter targets. This will be accomplished by constructing a longer ferro-electric plasma source. (3) Because the bunched current is a function of the longitudinal phase space and emittance of the beam entering the IBM we have characterized the longitudinal phase space with a high-resolution energy analyzer.

  5. Content-based image and video compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xun; Li, Honglin; Ahalt, Stanley C.

    2002-08-01

    The term Content-Based appears often in applications for which MPEG-7 is expected to play a significant role. MPEG-7 standardizes descriptors of multimedia content, and while compression is not the primary focus of MPEG-7, the descriptors defined by MPEG-7 can be used to reconstruct a rough representation of an original multimedia source. In contrast, current image and video compression standards such as JPEG and MPEG are not designed to encode at the very low bit-rates that could be accomplished with MPEG-7 using descriptors. In this paper we show that content-based mechanisms can be introduced into compression algorithms to improve the scalability and functionality of current compression methods such as JPEG and MPEG. This is the fundamental idea behind Content-Based Compression (CBC). Our definition of CBC is a compression method that effectively encodes a sufficient description of the content of an image or a video in order to ensure that the recipient is able to reconstruct the image or video to some degree of accuracy. The degree of accuracy can be, for example, the classification error rate of the encoded objects, since in MPEG-7 the classification error rate measures the performance of the content descriptors. We argue that the major difference between a content-based compression algorithm and conventional block-based or object-based compression algorithms is that content-based compression replaces the quantizer with a more sophisticated classifier, or with a quantizer which minimizes classification error. Compared to conventional image and video compression methods such as JPEG and MPEG, our results show that content-based compression is able to achieve more efficient image and video coding by suppressing the background while leaving the objects of interest nearly intact.

  6. Sub-100 ps laser-driven dynamic compression of solid deuterium with a ~40 μ J laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Michael R.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Bastea, Sorin; Zaug, Joseph M.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2014-07-14

    We dynamically compress solid deuterium over <100 ps from initial pressures of 22 GPa to 55 GPa, to final pressures as high as 71 GPa, with <40 μJ of pulse energy. At 25 GPa initial pressure, we measure compression wave speeds consistent with quasi-isentropic compression and a 24% increase in density. The laser drive energy per unit density change is 109 times smaller than it is for recent longer (~30 ns) time scale compression experiments. This suggests that, for a given final density, dynamic compression of hydrogen might be achieved using orders of magnitude lower laser energy than currently used.

  7. Effects of manual rib cage compressions on expiratory flow and mucus clearance during mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí, Joan Daniel; Li Bassi, Gianluigi; Rigol, Montserrat; Saucedo, Lina; Ranzani, Otavio Tavares; Esperatti, Mariano; Luque, Nestor; Ferrer, Miquel; Vilaro, Jordi; Kolobow, Theodor; Torres, Antoni

    2013-03-01

    We investigated the effects of two different types of manual rib cage compression on expiratory flow and mucus clearance during prolonged mechanical ventilation in pigs. Prospective randomized animal study. Animal research facility, University of Barcelona, Spain. Nine healthy pigs. Pigs were tracheally intubated, sedated, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated. The animals were prone on a surgical bed in the anti-Trendelenburg position. The experiments were carried out at approximately 60 and 80 hrs from the beginning of mechanical ventilation. Two types of manual rib cage compressions were tested: Hard and brief rib cage compressions synchronized with early expiratory phase (hard manual rib cage compression) and soft and gradual rib cage compressions applied during the late expiratory phase (soft manual rib cage compression). The interventions were randomly applied for 15min with a 15-min interval between treatments. Respiratory flow and mucus movement were assessed during the interventions. Respiratory mechanics and hemodynamics were assessed prior to and after the interventions. Peak expiratory flow increased to 60.1±7.1L/min in comparison to 51.2±4.6L/min without treatment (p < 0.0015) and 48.7±4.3L/min with soft manual rib cage compression (p = 0.0002). Similarly, mean expiratory flow increased to 28.4±5.2L/min during hard manual rib cage compression vs. 15.9±2.2 and 16.6±2.8L/min without treatment and soft manual rib cage compression, respectively (p = 0.0006). During hard manual rib cage compression, mucus moved toward the glottis (1.01 ± 2.37mm/min); conversely, mucus moved toward the lungs during no treatment and soft manual rib cage compression, -0.28 ± 0.61 and -0.15±0.95mm/min, respectively (p = 0.0283). Soft manual rib cage compression slightly worsened static lung elastance and cardiac output (p = 0.0391). Hard manual rib cage compression improved mucus clearance in animals positioned in the anti-Trendelenburg position. The technique

  8. Feasibility of Biosignal-guided Chest Compression During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Proof of Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundermann, Matthew L; Salcido, David D; Koller, Allison C; Menegazzi, James J

    2016-01-01

    , while two of the six animals improved their MAP biosignal to reach the MAP threshold. In the six experiments conducted, defibrillation was attempted on five animals, and two animals achieved ROSC. In this proof-of-concept study, a signal-guided chest compression device was demonstrated to be capable of responding to biosignal input and delivering chest compressions with a broad range of rates and depths. © 2015 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  9. Fragment separator momentum compression schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandura, Laura, E-mail: bandura@anl.gov [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab, Michigan State University, 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Erdelyi, Bela [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115 (United States); Hausmann, Marc [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Kubo, Toshiyuki [RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako (Japan); Nolen, Jerry [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Portillo, Mauricio [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Sherrill, Bradley M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab, Michigan State University, 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States)

    2011-07-21

    We present a scheme to use a fragment separator and profiled energy degraders to transfer longitudinal phase space into transverse phase space while maintaining achromatic beam transport. The first order beam optics theory of the method is presented and the consequent enlargement of the transverse phase space is discussed. An interesting consequence of the technique is that the first order mass resolving power of the system is determined by the first dispersive section up to the energy degrader, independent of whether or not momentum compression is used. The fragment separator at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams is a specific application of this technique and is described along with simulations by the code COSY INFINITY.

  10. Fragment separator momentum compression schemes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandura, L.; Erdelyi, B.; Hausmann, M.; Kubo, T.; Nolen, J.; Portillo, M.; Sherrill, B.M. (Physics); (MSU); (Northern Illinois Univ.); (RIKEN)

    2011-07-21

    We present a scheme to use a fragment separator and profiled energy degraders to transfer longitudinal phase space into transverse phase space while maintaining achromatic beam transport. The first order beam optics theory of the method is presented and the consequent enlargement of the transverse phase space is discussed. An interesting consequence of the technique is that the first order mass resolving power of the system is determined by the first dispersive section up to the energy degrader, independent of whether or not momentum compression is used. The fragment separator at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams is a specific application of this technique and is described along with simulations by the code COSY INFINITY.

  11. Fragment separator momentum compression schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, Laura; Erdelyi, Bela; Hausmann, Marc; Kubo, Toshiyuki; Nolen, Jerry; Portillo, Mauricio; Sherrill, Bradley M.

    2011-07-01

    We present a scheme to use a fragment separator and profiled energy degraders to transfer longitudinal phase space into transverse phase space while maintaining achromatic beam transport. The first order beam optics theory of the method is presented and the consequent enlargement of the transverse phase space is discussed. An interesting consequence of the technique is that the first order mass resolving power of the system is determined by the first dispersive section up to the energy degrader, independent of whether or not momentum compression is used. The fragment separator at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams is a specific application of this technique and is described along with simulations by the code COSY INFINITY.

  12. Moving traffic object retrieval in H.264/MPEG compressed video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xu-li; Xiao, Guang; Wang, Shuo-zhong; Zhang, Zhao-yang; An, Ping

    2006-05-01

    Moving object retrieval technique in compressed domain plays an important role in many real-time applications, e.g. Vehicle Detection and Classification. A number of retrieval techniques that operate in compressed domain have been reported in the literature. H.264/AVC is the up-to-date video-coding standard that is likely to lead to the proliferation of retrieval techniques in the compressed domain. Up to now, few literatures on H.264/AVC compressed video have been reported. Compared with the MPEG standard, H.264/AVC employs several new coding block types and different entropy coding method, which result in moving object retrieval in H.264/ AVC compressed video a new task and challenging work. In this paper, an approach to extract and retrieval moving traffic object in H.264/AVC compressed video is proposed. Our algorithm first Interpolates the sparse motion vector of p-frame that is composed of 4*4 blocks, 4*8 blocks and 8*4 blocks and so on. After forward projecting each p-frame vector to the immediate adjacent I-frame and calculating the DCT coefficients of I-frame using information of spatial intra-prediction, the method extracts moving VOPs (video object plan) using an interactive 4*4 block classification process. In Vehicle Detection application, the segmented VOP in 4*4 block-level accuracy is insufficient. Once we locate the target VOP, the actual edges of the VOP in 4*4 block accuracy can be extracted by applying Canny Edge Detection only on the moving VOP in 4*4 block accuracy. The VOP in pixel accuracy is then achieved by decompressing the DCT blocks of the VOPs. The edge-tracking algorithm is applied to find the missing edge pixels. After the segmentation process a retrieval algorithm that based on CSS (Curvature Scale Space) is used to search the interested shape of vehicle in H.264/AVC compressed video sequence. Experiments show that our algorithm can extract and retrieval moving vehicles efficiency and robustly.

  13. Development of 1D Liner Compression Code for IDL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazu, Akihisa; Slough, John; Pancotti, Anthony

    2015-11-01

    A 1D liner compression code is developed to model liner implosion dynamics in the Inductively Driven Liner Experiment (IDL) where FRC plasmoid is compressed via inductively-driven metal liners. The driver circuit, magnetic field, joule heating, and liner dynamics calculations are performed at each time step in sequence to couple these effects in the code. To obtain more realistic magnetic field results for a given drive coil geometry, 2D and 3D effects are incorporated into the 1D field calculation through use of correction factor table lookup approach. Commercial low-frequency electromagnetic fields solver, ANSYS Maxwell 3D, is used to solve the magnetic field profile for static liner condition at various liner radius in order to derive correction factors for the 1D field calculation in the code. The liner dynamics results from the code is verified to be in good agreement with the results from commercial explicit dynamics solver, ANSYS Explicit Dynamics, and previous liner experiment. The developed code is used to optimize the capacitor bank and driver coil design for better energy transfer and coupling. FRC gain calculations are also performed using the liner compression data from the code for the conceptual design of the reactor sized system for fusion energy gains.

  14. Isentropic compression of liquid metals near the melt line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seagle, Christopher; Porwitzky, Andrew

    2017-06-01

    A series of experiments designed to study the liquid metal response to isentropic compression have been conducted at Sandia's Z Pulsed Power Facility. Cerium and Tin have been shock melted by driving a quasi-ballistic flyer into the samples followed by a ramp compression wave generated by an increased driving magnetic field. The sound speed of the liquid metals has been investigated with the purpose of exploring possible solidification on ramp compression. Additional surface sensitive diagnostics have been employed to search for signatures of solidification at the window interface. Results of these experiments will be discussed in relation to the existing equation of state models and phase diagrams for these materials as well as future plans for exploring the response of liquid metals near the melt line. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. The dynamics of surge in compression systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In air-compression systems, instabilities occur during operation close to their peak pressure-rise capability. However, the peak efficiency of a compression system lies close to this region of instability. A surge is a violent mode of instability where there is total breakdown of flow in the system and pressure-rise capability is lost ...

  16. Space-Efficient Re-Pair Compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Prezza, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Re-Pair [5] is an effective grammar-based compression scheme achieving strong compression rates in practice. Let n, σ, and d be the text length, alphabet size, and dictionary size of the final grammar, respectively. In their original paper, the authors show how to compute the Re-Pair grammar...

  17. Compressed Subsequence Matching and Packed Tree Coloring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Cording, Patrick Hagge; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2017-01-01

    We present a new algorithm for subsequence matching in grammar compressed strings. Given a grammar of size n compressing a string of size N and a pattern string of size m over an alphabet of size \\(\\sigma \\), our algorithm uses \\(O(n+\\frac{n\\sigma }{w})\\) space and \\(O(n+\\frac{n\\sigma }{w}+m\\log N...

  18. Compression of Short Text on Embedded Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rein, S.; Gühmann, C.; Fitzek, Frank

    2006-01-01

    The paper details a scheme for lossless compression of a short data series larger than 50 bytes. The method uses arithmetic coding and context modelling with a low-complexity data model. A data model that takes 32 kBytes of RAM already cuts the data size in half. The compression scheme just takes...

  19. Error Resilient Video Compression Using Behavior Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taal, J.R.; Chen, Z.; He, Y.; Lagendijk, R.I.L.

    2004-01-01

    Wireless and Internet video applications are inherently subjected to bit errors and packet errors, respectively. This is especially so if constraints on the end-to-end compression and transmission latencies are imposed. Therefore, it is necessary to develop methods to optimize the video compression

  20. Relationship between the edgewise compression strength of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The compression strength of a corrugated board box is a direct measure of its stacking strength. The edgewise compression strength of corrugated board is the major contributor to the box stacking strength. This relation can be further extended to the critical strength properties of paper substrates. It was, therefore, the aim of ...

  1. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Previous analysis showed that cavity size and number on one hand and combinations thickness affect the compressive strength of hollow sandcrete blocks. Series arrangement of the cavities is common but parallel arrangement has been recommended. This research performed a comparative analysis of the compressive ...

  2. LOW-VELOCITY COMPRESSIBLE FLOW THEORY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The widespread application of incompressible flow theory dominates low-velocity fluid dynamics, virtually preventing research into compressible low-velocity flow dynamics. Yet, compressible solutions to simple and well-defined flow problems and a series of contradictions in incom...

  3. Effects Of Compressibility On Dynamic Stall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, L. W.; Fung, K.-Y.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents results of computations and measurements of compressible flow about an airfoil, angle of attack of which oscillates about static-stall angle. Study focuses on effects of compressibility on dynamic stall. Of particular interest are conditions determining onset of separation of flow, which leads to premature dynamic stall and consequent significant reduction of lift.

  4. Video Coding Technique using MPEG Compression Standards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Digital video compression technologies have become part of life, in the way visual information is created, communicated and consumed. Some application areas of video compression focused on the problem of optimizing storage space and transmission bandwidth (BW). The two dimensional discrete cosine transform (2-D ...

  5. Normalized Compression Distance of Multisets with Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Cohen (Andrew); P.M.B. Vitányi (Paul)

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractNormalized compression distance (NCD) is a parameter-free, feature-free, alignment-free, similarity measure between a pair of finite objects based on compression. However, it is not sufficient for all applications. We propose an NCD of finite nonempty multisets (a.k.a. multiples) of

  6. TEXT COMPRESSION ALGORITHMS - A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Senthil

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Data Compression may be defined as the science and art of the representation of information in a crisply condensed form. For decades, Data compression has been one of the critical enabling technologies for the ongoing digital multimedia revolution. There are a lot of data compression algorithms which are available to compress files of different formats. This paper provides a survey of different basic lossless data compression algorithms. Experimental results and comparisons of the lossless compression algorithms using Statistical compression techniques and Dictionary based compression techniques were performed on text data. Among the Statistical coding techniques, the algorithms such as Shannon-Fano Coding, Huffman coding, Adaptive Huffman coding, Run Length Encoding and Arithmetic coding are considered. Lempel Ziv scheme which is a dictionary based technique is divided into two families: one derived from LZ77 (LZ77, LZSS, LZH, LZB and LZR and the other derived from LZ78 (LZ78, LZW, LZFG, LZC and LZT. A set of interesting conclusions are derived on this basis.

  7. Moving your head reduces perisaccadic compression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matziridi, M.; Brenner, E.; Smeets, J.B.J.

    2016-01-01

    Flashes presented around the time of a saccade appear to be closer to the saccade endpoint than they really are. The resulting compression of perceived positions has been found to increase with the amplitude of the saccade. In most studies on perisaccadic compression the head is static, so the

  8. The dynamics of surge in compression systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    compression systems, instabilities occur during operation close to their peak pressure-rise capability. However, the peak efficiency of a compression system lies close to this region of instability. A surge is a violent mode of instability where there is total ...

  9. Hardware compression using common portions of data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jichuan; Viswanathan, Krishnamurthy

    2015-03-24

    Methods and devices are provided for data compression. Data compression can include receiving a plurality of data chunks, sampling at least some of the plurality of data chunks extracting a common portion from a number of the plurality of data chunks based on the sampling, and storing a remainder of the plurality of data chunks in memory.

  10. Sudden viscous dissipation of compressing turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Davidovits, S.; Fisch, N. J.

    2015-01-01

    Compression of turbulent plasma can amplify the turbulent kinetic energy, if the compression is fast compared to the viscous dissipation time of the turbulent eddies. A sudden viscous dissipation mechanism is demonstrated, whereby this amplified turbulent kinetic energy is rapidly converted into thermal energy, suggesting a new paradigm for fast ignition inertial fusion.

  11. Sudden Viscous Dissipation of Compressing Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovits, Seth; Fisch, Nathaniel J

    2016-03-11

    Compression of turbulent plasma can amplify the turbulent kinetic energy, if the compression is fast compared to the viscous dissipation time of the turbulent eddies. A sudden viscous dissipation mechanism is demonstrated, whereby this amplified turbulent kinetic energy is rapidly converted into thermal energy, suggesting a new paradigm for fast ignition inertial fusion.

  12. Effects of dynamic-range compression on temporal acuity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiinberg, Alan; Jepsen, Morten Løve; Epp, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    processing, temporal modulation transfer functions (TMTFs) and “supra-threshold” modulation-depth discrimination (MDD) thresholds were obtained in normal-hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners with and without wide-dynamic range compression (WDRC). The TMTFs were obtained using tonal carriers of 1......Some of the challenges that hearing-aid listeners experience with speech perception in complex acoustic environments may originate from limitations in the temporal processing of sounds. To systematically investigate the influence of hearing impairment and hearing-aid signal processing on temporal...... and 5 kHz and modulation frequencies from 8 to 256 Hz. MDD thresholds were obtained using a reference modulation depth of -15 dB. A compression ratio of 2:1 was chosen. The attack and release time constants were 10 and 60 ms, respectively. For both carrier frequencies the TMTF thresholds decreased...

  13. Effect of Image Linearization on Normalized Compression Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Jonathan; Wu, Jia Jie; Furst, Jacob; Rogers, John; Raicu, Daniela

    Normalized Information Distance, based on Kolmogorov complexity, is an emerging metric for image similarity. It is approximated by the Normalized Compression Distance (NCD) which generates the relative distance between two strings by using standard compression algorithms to compare linear strings of information. This relative distance quantifies the degree of similarity between the two objects. NCD has been shown to measure similarity effectively on information which is already a string: genomic string comparisons have created accurate phylogeny trees and NCD has also been used to classify music. Currently, to find a similarity measure using NCD for images, the images must first be linearized into a string, and then compared. To understand how linearization of a 2D image affects the similarity measure, we perform four types of linearization on a subset of the Corel image database and compare each for a variety of image transformations. Our experiment shows that different linearization techniques produce statistically significant differences in NCD for identical spatial transformations.

  14. Study on the Compressive Modulus of Nylon-11/Silica Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haseung Chung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the unusual characteristics regarding the mechanical properties of Nylon-11 filled with different volume fractions of silica nanoparticles by selective laser sintering (SLS from numerical simulation. The compressive modulus was predicted by two different numerical models and compared with the experimentally measured one. While the two-phase model has a limited capability in explaining the unusual behavior shown in the compressive modulus obtained by experiments with 2% volume fraction of nanoparticles, the effective interface model can simulate the unexpected characteristic of nanocomposites according to the volume fraction of nanoparticles. We can conclude that the effective interface model should be employed to predict the mechanical properties of nanocomposites for efficiency and accuracy.

  15. H3O+ tetrahedron induction in large negative linear compressibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Feng, Min; Wang, Yu-Fang; Gu, Zhi-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Despite the rarity, large negative linear compressibility (NLC) was observed in metal-organic framework material Zn(HO3PC4H8PO3H)∙2H2O (ZAG-4) in experiment. We find a unique NLC mechanism in ZAG-4 based on first-principle calculations. The key component to realize its large NLC is the deformation of H3O+ tetrahedron. With pressure increase, the oxygen apex approaches and then is inserted into the tetrahedron base (hydrogen triangle). The tetrahedron base subsequently expands, which results in the b axis expansion. After that, the oxygen apex penetrates the tetrahedron base and the b axis contracts. The negative and positive linear compressibility is well reproduced by the hexagonal model and ZAG-4 is the first MOFs evolving from non re-entrant to re-entrant hexagon framework with pressure increase. This gives a new approach to explore and design NLC materials. PMID:27184726

  16. An Algorithm of Extracting I-Frame in Compressed Video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Yaling

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The MPEG video data includes three types of frames, that is: I-frame, P-frame and B-frame. However, the I-frame records the main information of video data, the P-frame and the B-frame are just regarded as motion compensations of the I-frame. This paper presents the approach which analyzes the MPEG video stream in the compressed domain, and find out the key frame of MPEG video stream by extracting the I-frame. Experiments indicated that this method can be automatically realized in the compressed MPEG video and it will lay the foundation for the video processing in the future.

  17. Seismic Signal Compression Using Nonparametric Bayesian Dictionary Learning via Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Tian

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a seismic signal compression method based on nonparametric Bayesian dictionary learning method via clustering. The seismic data is compressed patch by patch, and the dictionary is learned online. Clustering is introduced for dictionary learning. A set of dictionaries could be generated, and each dictionary is used for one cluster’s sparse coding. In this way, the signals in one cluster could be well represented by their corresponding dictionaries. A nonparametric Bayesian dictionary learning method is used to learn the dictionaries, which naturally infers an appropriate dictionary size for each cluster. A uniform quantizer and an adaptive arithmetic coding algorithm are adopted to code the sparse coefficients. With comparisons to other state-of-the art approaches, the effectiveness of the proposed method could be validated in the experiments.

  18. Renewed experimentation with Ranchero flux compression genereators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goforth, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Herrera, Dennis H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tasker, Douglas G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Torres, David T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Atchison, W. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Colgate, S. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Griego, J. R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Guzik, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Holtkamp, D. B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Idzorek, G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kaul, A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kirkpatrick, R. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menikoff, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Meyer, R. K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oona, H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reardon, P. T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reinovsky, R. E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rousculp, C. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sgro, A. G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tabaka, L. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Watt, R. G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Riesman, D. B. [LLNL

    2010-11-08

    In the late 1990s, Los Alamos pursued a coaxial flux compression generator (FCG) concept that was described in several publications under the name 'Ranchero.' These FCGs were designed to be cost effective high current generators, and a variety of configurations were tested. The Ranchero armature is a 152 mm diameter aluminum cylinder with a 6 mm thick wall. The high explosive (HE) is detonated simultaneously on axis, and as the armature expands a factor of two, the wall thins to {approx}3 mm. At the final 300 mm diameter, the circumference is over 900 mm, and this should allow currents to be generated in the 90 MA range. No tests significantly over 50 MA have been performed but an experiment is planned. We have recently begun using Ranchero devices for a new application and we continue to improve the design. In this paper we describe recent tests of Ranchero and its subsystems. The load for our new application is an imploding aluminum liner that would deform due to the magnetic pressure applied during the initial flux loading. It will, however, implode properly when powered only during the {approx}29 {micro}s Ranchero flux compression time. This gives rise to a new system with explOSively formed fuse (EFF) opening switches and an integral closing switch that isolates the load. A capacitor bank delivers 2.8 MA to the Ranchero circuit in {approx}85 {micro}s. During this time, four parallel 63.5 mm wide EFFs, external to the coaxial system, complete the circuit. After armature motion begins, insulation which initially isolates the load is severed, connecting the load to the FCG in parallel with the EFFs. External HE charges are initiated on each of the EFFs to produce a resistance rise timed to not precede closure of the load isolation switch. The EFFs achieve significant resistance, and the flux remaining in the 191 nH generator and 3 nH transmission line is compressed to generate 30.85 MA in a {approx}12.5 nH static load. On three tests, the EFF system has

  19. Adiabatic Liquid Piston Compressed Air Energy Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Tage; Elmegaard, Brian; Pedersen, Allan Schrøder

    This project investigates the potential of a Compressed Air Energy Storage system (CAES system). CAES systems are used to store mechanical energy in the form of compressed air. The systems use electricity to drive the compressor at times of low electricity demand with the purpose of converting...... the mechanical energy into electricity at times of high electricity demand. Two such systems are currently in operation; one in Germany (Huntorf) and one in the USA (Macintosh, Alabama). In both cases, an underground cavern is used as a pressure vessel for the storage of the compressed air. Both systems...... are in the range of 100 MW electrical power output with several hours of production stored as compressed air. In this range, enormous volumes are required, which make underground caverns the only economical way to design the pressure vessel. Both systems use axial turbine compressors to compress air when charging...

  20. Interactive computer graphics applications for compressible aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    Three computer applications have been developed to solve inviscid compressible fluids problems using interactive computer graphics. The first application is a compressible flow calculator which solves for isentropic flow, normal shocks, and oblique shocks or centered expansions produced by two dimensional ramps. The second application couples the solutions generated by the first application to a more graphical presentation of the results to produce a desk top simulator of three compressible flow problems: 1) flow past a single compression ramp; 2) flow past two ramps in series; and 3) flow past two opposed ramps. The third application extends the results of the second to produce a design tool which solves for the flow through supersonic external or mixed compression inlets. The applications were originally developed to run on SGI or IBM workstations running GL graphics. They are currently being extended to solve additional types of flow problems and modified to operate on any X-based workstation.

  1. Video Coding Technique using MPEG Compression Standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Falade

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Digital video compression technologies have become part of life, in the way visual information is created, communicated and consumed. Some application areas of video compression focused on the problem of optimizing storage space and transmission bandwidth (BW. The two dimensional discrete cosine transform (2-D DCT is an integral part of video and image compression, which is used in Moving Picture Expert Group (MPEG encoding standards. Thus, several video compression algorithms had been developed to reduce the data quantity and provide the acceptable quality standard. In the proposed study, the Matlab Simulink Model (MSM has been used for video coding/compression. The approach is more modern and reduces error resilience image distortion.

  2. MRI Images Compression Using Curvelets Transforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beladgham, M.; Hacene, I. Boucli; Taleb-Ahmed, A.; Khélif, M.

    2008-06-01

    In the field of medical diagnostics, interested parties have resorted increasingly to medical imaging, it is well established that the accuracy and completeness of diagnosis are initially connected with the image quality, but the quality of the image is itself dependent on a number of factors including primarily the processing that an image must undergo to enhance its quality. We are interested in MRI medical image compression by Curvelets, of which we have proposed in this paper the compression algorithm FDCT using the wrapping method. In order to enhance the compression algorithm by FDCT, we have compared the results obtained with wavelet and Ridgelet transforms. The results are very satisfactory regarding compression ratio, and the computation time and quality of the compressed image compared to those of traditional methods.

  3. Caprock compressibility and permeability and the consequences for pressure development in CO2 storage sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbia, Ernest Ncha; Frykman, Peter; Nielsen, Carsten Møller

    2014-01-01

    . The most important property to be considered is caprock compressibility and permeability. Laboratory experiments on centimeter-scale plugs and dynamic sonic velocity data from relevant shale formations in Denmark indicate that shale compressibility is lower than often assumed for reservoir simulation...... studies. The measured compressibility for the Fjerritslev Formation is 0.5×10-5bar-1, which is an order of magnitude lower than the standard compressibility (4.5×10-5bar-1) normally used for reservoir simulation studies. The consequences of this lower compressibility are investigated in a simulation case...... fractures and faults. The caprock permeability is measured on core samples using a geotechnical method of constant rate of strain (CRS) experiments which seem to match the modeled permeability data for the Fjerritslev Formation. We found an average vertical permeability of 0.1μD for the Fjerritslev...

  4. On the reversibility of cake buildup and compression in a membrane bioreactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mads Koustrup; Keiding, Kristian; Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard

    2014-01-01

    Fouling in a membrane bioreactor was studied by describing the reversibility of fouling developing during short-term experiments. Data were fitted to a recently proposed model of the buildup and compression of fouling layers. Shear stepping experiments performed to characterize the efficiency...

  5. Experimental study on compression property of regolith analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omura, Tomomi; Nakamura, Akiko M.

    2017-12-01

    The compression property of regolith reflects the strength and porosity of the regolith layer on small bodies and their variations in the layer that largely influence the collisional and thermal evolution of the bodies. We conducted compression experiments and investigated the relationship between the porosity and the compression using fluffy granular samples. We focused on a low-pressure and high-porosity regime. We used tens of μm-sized irregular and spherical powders as analogs of porous regolith. The initial porosity of the samples ranged from 0.80 to 0.53. The uniaxial pressure applied to the samples lays in the range from 30 to 4 × 105 Pa. The porosity of the samples remained at their initial values below a threshold pressure and then decreased when the pressure exceeded the threshold. We defined this uniaxial pressure at the threshold as "yield strength". The yield strength increased as the initial porosity of a sample decreased. The yield strengths of samples consisting of irregular particles did not significantly depend on their size distributions when the samples had the same initial porosity. We compared the results of our experiments with a previously proposed theoretical model. We calculated the average interparticle force acting on contact points of constituent particles under the uniaxial pressure of yield strength using the theoretical model and compared it with theoretically estimated forces required to roll or slide the particles. The calculated interparticle force was larger than the rolling friction force and smaller than the sliding friction force. The yield strength of regolith may be constrained by these forces. Our results may be useful for planetary scientists to estimate the depth above which the porosity of a regolith layer is almost equal to that of the regolith surface and to interpret the compression property of an asteroid surface obtained by a lander.

  6. The Lateral Compressive Buckling Performance of Aluminum Honeycomb Panels for Long-Span Hollow Core Roofs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caiqi Zhao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To solve the problem of critical buckling in the structural analysis and design of the new long-span hollow core roof architecture proposed in this paper (referred to as a “honeycomb panel structural system” (HSSS, lateral compression tests and finite element analyses were employed in this study to examine the lateral compressive buckling performance of this new type of honeycomb panel with different length-to-thickness ratios. The results led to two main conclusions: (1 Under the experimental conditions that were used, honeycomb panels with the same planar dimensions but different thicknesses had the same compressive stiffness immediately before buckling, while the lateral compressive buckling load-bearing capacity initially increased rapidly with an increasing honeycomb core thickness and then approached the same limiting value; (2 The compressive stiffnesses of test pieces with the same thickness but different lengths were different, while the maximum lateral compressive buckling loads were very similar. Overall instability failure is prone to occur in long and flexible honeycomb panels. In addition, the errors between the lateral compressive buckling loads from the experiment and the finite element simulations are within 6%, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the nonlinear finite element analysis and provides a theoretical basis for future analysis and design for this new type of spatial structure.

  7. Visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and range performance with compressed motion video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijl, Piet; de Vries, Sjoerd C.

    2010-10-01

    Video of visual acuity (VA) and contrast sensitivity (CS) test charts in a complex background was recorded using a CCD color camera mounted on a computer-controlled tripod and was fed into real-time MPEG-2 compression/decompression equipment. The test charts were based on the triangle orientation discrimination (TOD) test method and contained triangle test patterns of different sizes and contrasts in four possible orientations. In a perception experiment, observers judged the orientation of the triangles in order to determine VA and CS thresholds at the 75% correct level. Three camera velocities (0, 1.0, and 2.0 deg/s, or 0, 4.1, and 8.1 pixels/frame) and four compression rates (no compression, 4 Mb/s, 2 Mb/s, and 1 Mb/s) were used. VA is shown to be rather robust to any combination of motion and compression. CS, however, dramatically decreases when motion is combined with high compression ratios. The measured thresholds were fed into the TOD target acquisition model to predict the effect of motion and compression on acquisition ranges for tactical military vehicles. The effect of compression on static performance is limited but strong with motion video. The data suggest that with the MPEG2 algorithm, the emphasis is on the preservation of image detail at the cost of contrast loss.

  8. Compressive behavior of laminated neoprene bridge bearing pads under thermal aging condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Xie; Zhang, Yannian; Shan, Chunhong

    2017-10-01

    The present study was conducted to obtain a better understanding of the variation rule of mechanical properties of laminated neoprene bridge bearing pads under thermal aging condition using compression tests. A total of 5 specimens were processed in a high-temperature chamber. After that, the specimens were tested subjected to axial load. The parameter mainly considered time of thermal aging processing for specimens. The results of compression tests show that the specimens after thermal aging processing are more probably brittle failure than the standard specimen. Moreover, the exposure of steel plate, cracks and other failure phenomena are more serious than the standard specimen. The compressive capacity, ultimate compressive strength, compressive elastic modulus of the laminated neoprene bridge bearing pads decreased dramatically with the increasing in the aging time of thermal aging processing. The attenuation trends of ultimate compressive strength, compressive elastic modulus of laminated neoprene bridge bearing pads under thermal aging condition accord with power function. The attenuation models are acquired by regressing data of experiment with the least square method. The attenuation models conform to reality well which shows that this model is applicable and has vast prospect in assessing the performance of laminated neoprene bridge bearing pads under thermal aging condition.

  9. Compressed sensing MRI exploiting complementary dual decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Suhyung; Park, Jaeseok

    2014-04-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) MRI exploits the sparsity of an image in a transform domain to reconstruct the image from incoherently under-sampled k-space data. However, it has been shown that CS suffers particularly from loss of low-contrast image features with increasing reduction factors. To retain image details in such degraded experimental conditions, in this work we introduce a novel CS reconstruction method exploiting feature-based complementary dual decomposition with joint estimation of local scale mixture (LSM) model and images. Images are decomposed into dual block sparse components: total variation for piecewise smooth parts and wavelets for residuals. The LSM model parameters of residuals in the wavelet domain are estimated and then employed as a regional constraint in spatially adaptive reconstruction of high frequency subbands to restore image details missing in piecewise smooth parts. Alternating minimization of the dual image components subject to data consistency is performed to extract image details from residuals and add them back to their complementary counterparts while the LSM model parameters and images are jointly estimated in a sequential fashion. Simulations and experiments demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed method in preserving low-contrast image features even at high reduction factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Image compression and transmission based on LAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sujuan; Li, Yufeng; Zhang, Zhijiang

    2004-11-01

    In this work an embedded system is designed which implements MPEG-2 LAN transmission of CVBS or S-video signal. The hardware consists of three parts. The first is digitization of analog inputs CVBS or S-video (Y/C) from TV or VTR sources. The second is MPEG-2 compression coding primarily performed by a MPEG-2 1chip audio/video encoder. Its output is MPEG-2 system PS/TS. The third part includes data stream packing, accessing LAN and system control based on an ARM microcontroller. It packs the encoded stream into Ethernet data frames and accesses LAN, and accepts Ethernet data packets bearing control information from the network and decodes corresponding commands to control digitization, coding, and other operations. In order to increase the network transmission rate to conform to the MEPG-2 data stream, an efficient TCP/IP network protocol stack is constructed directly from network hardware provided by the embedded system, instead of using an ordinary operating system for embedded systems. In the design of the network protocol stack to obtain a high LAN transmission rate on a low-end ARM, a special transmission channel is opened for the MPEG-2 stream. The designed system has been tested on an experimental LAN. The experiment shows a maximum LAN transmission rate up to 12.7 Mbps with good sound and image quality, and satisfactory system reliability.

  11. Critical Boundary of Cascaded Quadratic Soliton Compression in PPLN

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Hairun; Zeng, Xianglong; Zhou, Binbin; Bache, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Cascaded quadratic soliton compression in PPLN is investigated and a general critical soliton number is found as the compression boundary. An optimal-parameter diagram for compression at 1550 nm is presented.

  12. The Design of Accurate Micro-Compression Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    converged results is shown in Fig. 1(b).For simplicity, the input material property of the post is described by the Ramberg – Osgood equation [9] e ¼ r E þ...Scripta Mater 2001;44:2065. [8] Sharpe WN, Yuan B, Edwards RL. J Microelectromech S 1997;6:193. [9] Ramberg W, Osgood WR. Technical Note 902. NACA

  13. Critical Boundary of Cascaded Quadratic Soliton Compression in PPLN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Hairun; Zeng, Xianglong; Zhou, Binbin

    2012-01-01

    Cascaded quadratic soliton compression in PPLN is investigated and a general critical soliton number is found as the compression boundary. An optimal-parameter diagram for compression at 1550 nm is presented.......Cascaded quadratic soliton compression in PPLN is investigated and a general critical soliton number is found as the compression boundary. An optimal-parameter diagram for compression at 1550 nm is presented....

  14. Backpropagation Neural Network Implementation for Medical Image Compression

    OpenAIRE

    Kamil Dimililer

    2013-01-01

    Medical images require compression, before transmission or storage, due to constrained bandwidth and storage capacity. An ideal image compression system must yield high-quality compressed image with high compression ratio. In this paper, Haar wavelet transform and discrete cosine transform are considered and a neural network is trained to relate the X-ray image contents to their ideal compression method and their optimum compression ratio.

  15. Backpropagation Neural Network Implementation for Medical Image Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Dimililer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical images require compression, before transmission or storage, due to constrained bandwidth and storage capacity. An ideal image compression system must yield high-quality compressed image with high compression ratio. In this paper, Haar wavelet transform and discrete cosine transform are considered and a neural network is trained to relate the X-ray image contents to their ideal compression method and their optimum compression ratio.

  16. Study on Compression Induced Contrast in X-ray Mammograms Using Breast Mimicking Phantoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. M. Aowlad Hossain

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available X-ray mammography is commonly used to scan cancer or tumors in breast using low dose x-rays. But mammograms suffer from low contrast problem. The breast is compressed in mammography to reduce x-ray scattering effects. As tumors are stiffer than normal tissues, they undergo smaller deformation under compression. Therefore, image intensity at tumor region may change less than the background tissues. In this study, we try to find out compression induced contrast from multiple mammographic images of tumorous breast phantoms taken with different compressions. This is an extended work of our previous simulation study with experiment and more analysis. We have used FEM models for synthetic phantom and constructed a phantom using agar and n-propanol for simulation and experiment. The x-ray images of deformed phantoms have been obtained under three compression steps and a non-rigid registration technique has been applied to register these images. It is noticeably observed that the image intensity changes at tumor are less than those at surrounding which induce a detectable contrast. Addition of this compression induced contrast to the simulated and experimental images has improved their original contrast by a factor of about 1.4

  17. Cloud Optimized Image Format and Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, P.; Plesea, L.; Maurer, T.

    2015-04-01

    Cloud based image storage and processing requires revaluation of formats and processing methods. For the true value of the massive volumes of earth observation data to be realized, the image data needs to be accessible from the cloud. Traditional file formats such as TIF and NITF were developed in the hay day of the desktop and assumed fast low latency file access. Other formats such as JPEG2000 provide for streaming protocols for pixel data, but still require a server to have file access. These concepts no longer truly hold in cloud based elastic storage and computation environments. This paper will provide details of a newly evolving image storage format (MRF) and compression that is optimized for cloud environments. Although the cost of storage continues to fall for large data volumes, there is still significant value in compression. For imagery data to be used in analysis and exploit the extended dynamic range of the new sensors, lossless or controlled lossy compression is of high value. Compression decreases the data volumes stored and reduces the data transferred, but the reduced data size must be balanced with the CPU required to decompress. The paper also outlines a new compression algorithm (LERC) for imagery and elevation data that optimizes this balance. Advantages of the compression include its simple to implement algorithm that enables it to be efficiently accessed using JavaScript. Combing this new cloud based image storage format and compression will help resolve some of the challenges of big image data on the internet.

  18. GPU Lossless Hyperspectral Data Compression System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranki, Nazeeh I.; Keymeulen, Didier; Kiely, Aaron B.; Klimesh, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging systems onboard aircraft or spacecraft can acquire large amounts of data, putting a strain on limited downlink and storage resources. Onboard data compression can mitigate this problem but may require a system capable of a high throughput. In order to achieve a high throughput with a software compressor, a graphics processing unit (GPU) implementation of a compressor was developed targeting the current state-of-the-art GPUs from NVIDIA(R). The implementation is based on the fast lossless (FL) compression algorithm reported in "Fast Lossless Compression of Multispectral-Image Data" (NPO- 42517), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 8 (August 2006), page 26, which operates on hyperspectral data and achieves excellent compression performance while having low complexity. The FL compressor uses an adaptive filtering method and achieves state-of-the-art performance in both compression effectiveness and low complexity. The new Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) Standard for Lossless Multispectral & Hyperspectral image compression (CCSDS 123) is based on the FL compressor. The software makes use of the highly-parallel processing capability of GPUs to achieve a throughput at least six times higher than that of a software implementation running on a single-core CPU. This implementation provides a practical real-time solution for compression of data from airborne hyperspectral instruments.

  19. Block-Based Compressed Sensing for Neutron Radiation Image Using WDFB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An ideal compression method for neutron radiation image should have high compression ratio while keeping more details of the original image. Compressed sensing (CS, which can break through the restrictions of sampling theorem, is likely to offer an efficient compression scheme for the neutron radiation image. Combining wavelet transform with directional filter banks, a novel nonredundant multiscale geometry analysis transform named Wavelet Directional Filter Banks (WDFB is constructed and applied to represent neutron radiation image sparsely. Then, the block-based CS technique is introduced and a high performance CS scheme for neutron radiation image is proposed. By performing two-step iterative shrinkage algorithm the problem of L1 norm minimization is solved to reconstruct neutron radiation image from random measurements. The experiment results demonstrate that the scheme not only improves the quality of reconstructed image obviously but also retains more details of original image.

  20. On the compressibility effect in test particle acceleration by magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    González, C A; Mininni, P D; Matthaeus, W H

    2016-01-01

    The effect of compressibility in charged particle energization by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fields is studied in the context of test particle simulations. This problem is relevant to the solar wind and the solar corona due to the compressible nature of the flow in those astrophysical scenarios. We consider turbulent electromagnetic fields obtained from direct numerical simulations of the MHD equations with a strong background magnetic field. In order to explore the compressibilty effect over the particle dynamics we performed different numerical experiments: an incompressible case, and two weak compressible cases with Mach number M = 0.1 and M = 0.25. We analyze the behavior of protons and electrons in those turbulent fields, which are well known to form aligned current sheets in the direction of the guide magnetic field. We show that compressibility enhances the efficiency of proton acceleration, and that the energization is caused by perpendicular electric fields generated between currents sheets. On the ot...

  1. Efficiency optimisation of compressed air systems; Effizienz-Optimierung von Druckluftsystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruppelt, Erwin; Bahr, Michael [Kaeser Kompressoren GmbH, Coburg (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    Climate protection measures, increasing competition and rising energy prices are putting today's industrial business sector under considerable pressure. The need to save energy is therefore more important than ever. This is where modern compressed air technology can help in a number of ways ranging from compressed air production and treatment to compressor control and heat recovery. It is this last aspect in particular that can often pose something of a challenge however: Efficient and cost-effective heat recovery can be achieved only if the compressed air system is considered as a whole and is designed accordingly. Once in place, appropriately implemented heat recovery systems enable recyclable compressor heat to be used to reduce the burden on a company's heating system and also to enhance its efficiency. As experience shows, companies which take an integrated approach to their compressed air systems and look for synergies can usually take advantage of significant savings. (orig.)

  2. Estimation of the iron loss in deep-sea permanent magnet motors considering seawater compressive stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yongxiang; Wei, Yanyu; Zou, Jibin; Li, Jianjun; Qi, Wenjuan; Li, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Deep-sea permanent magnet motor equipped with fluid compensated pressure-tolerant system is compressed by the high pressure fluid both outside and inside. The induced stress distribution in stator core is significantly different from that in land type motor. Its effect on the magnetic properties of stator core is important for deep-sea motor designers but seldom reported. In this paper, the stress distribution in stator core, regarding the seawater compressive stress, is calculated by 2D finite element method (FEM). The effect of compressive stress on magnetic properties of electrical steel sheet, that is, permeability, BH curves, and BW curves, is also measured. Then, based on the measured magnetic properties and calculated stress distribution, the stator iron loss is estimated by stress-electromagnetics-coupling FEM. At last the estimation is verified by experiment. Both the calculated and measured results show that stator iron loss increases obviously with the seawater compressive stress.

  3. Application of Image Processing to Predict Compressive Behavior of Aluminum Foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Sanghoon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available An image processing technique was used to model the internal structure of aluminum foam in finite element analysis in order to predict the compressive behavior of the material. Finite element analysis and experimental tests were performed on aluminum foam with densities of 0.2, 0.25, and 0.3 g/cm3. It was found that although the compressive strength predicted from the finite element analysis was higher than that determined experimentally, the predicted compressive stress-strain curves exhibited a tendency similar to those determined from experiments for both densities. However, the behavior of the predicted compressive stress-strain curves was different from the experimental one as the applied strain increased. The difference between predicted and experimental stress-strain curves in a high strain range was due to contact between broken aluminum foam walls by the large deformation.

  4. Accelerated diffusion spectrum imaging in the human brain using compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Marion I; Tan, Ek T; Khare, Kedar; Sperl, Jonathan I; King, Kevin F; Tao, Xiaodong; Hardy, Christopher J; Marinelli, Luca

    2011-11-01

    We developed a novel method to accelerate diffusion spectrum imaging using compressed sensing. The method can be applied to either reduce acquisition time of diffusion spectrum imaging acquisition without losing critical information or to improve the resolution in diffusion space without increasing scan time. Unlike parallel imaging, compressed sensing can be applied to reconstruct a sub-Nyquist sampled dataset in domains other than the spatial one. Simulations of fiber crossings in 2D and 3D were performed to systematically evaluate the effect of compressed sensing reconstruction with different types of undersampling patterns (random, gaussian, Poisson disk) and different acceleration factors on radial and axial diffusion information. Experiments in brains of healthy volunteers were performed, where diffusion space was undersampled with different sampling patterns and reconstructed using compressed sensing. Essential information on diffusion properties, such as orientation distribution function, diffusion coefficient, and kurtosis is preserved up to an acceleration factor of R = 4. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Effects of boundary layer and liquid viscosity and compressible air on sloshing characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Fang Zou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, numerical investigations for tank sloshing, based on commercial CFD package FLUENT, are performed to study effects of boundary layer grid, liquid viscosity and compressible air on sloshing pressure, wave height and rising time of impact pressure. Also, sloshing experiments for liquids of different viscosity are carried out to validate the numerical results. Through comparison of numerical and experimental results, a computational model in-cluding boundary layer grid can predict the sloshing pressure more accurately. Energy dissipation due to viscous friction leads to reduction of sloshing pressure and wave elevation. Sloshing pressure is also reduced because of cushion effect of compressible air. Due to high viscosity damping effect and compressible air effect, the rising time of impact pressure becomes longer. It is also found that liquid viscosity and compressible air influence distribution of dynamic pressure along the vertical tank wall.

  6. Compressive sensing for nuclear security.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gestner, Brian Joseph

    2013-12-01

    Special nuclear material (SNM) detection has applications in nuclear material control, treaty verification, and national security. The neutron and gamma-ray radiation signature of SNMs can be indirectly observed in scintillator materials, which fluoresce when exposed to this radiation. A photomultiplier tube (PMT) coupled to the scintillator material is often used to convert this weak fluorescence to an electrical output signal. The fluorescence produced by a neutron interaction event differs from that of a gamma-ray interaction event, leading to a slightly different pulse in the PMT output signal. The ability to distinguish between these pulse types, i.e., pulse shape discrimination (PSD), has enabled applications such as neutron spectroscopy, neutron scatter cameras, and dual-mode neutron/gamma-ray imagers. In this research, we explore the use of compressive sensing to guide the development of novel mixed-signal hardware for PMT output signal acquisition. Effectively, we explore smart digitizers that extract sufficient information for PSD while requiring a considerably lower sample rate than conventional digitizers. Given that we determine the feasibility of realizing these designs in custom low-power analog integrated circuits, this research enables the incorporation of SNM detection into wireless sensor networks.

  7. Ribcage compressibility in living subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M; Hill, S; Scullin, J

    1994-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the responses of normal living subjects to the application of anteroposterior forces to the ribcage. Seventeen subjects aged between 25 and 37 years were tested during slow oscillatory loading while breath-holding at the end of a normal expiration. The mean stiffness coefficient was found to be 9.4 N mm(-1) (SD 2.9) and the mean gradient of the force-strain relation was 1888 N (SD 646). Comparison with previously published cadaver data indicates that the embalmed cadaver ribcage stiffness is in the order of three times stiffer than living subjects, while fresh cadavers showed comparable stiffness to living subjects. A number of studies have used models to predict and understand the behaviour of the thoracic spine. Validation of the behaviour of models which include the thoracic spine and ribcage depends on comparison of model response predictions with observed responses of human subjects. The present study provides data on the anteroposterior compressibility of the ribcage of living subjects which may be suitable for use in model validation studies. Copyright © 1994. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Scan image compression-encryption hardware system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourbakis, Nikolaos G.; Brause, R.; Alexopoulos, C.

    1995-04-01

    This paper deals with the hardware design of an image compression/encryption scheme called SCAN. The scheme is based on the principles and ideas reflected by the specification of the SCAN language. SCAN is a fractal based context-free language which accesses sequentially the data of a 2D array, by describing and generating a wide range (near (nxn)) of space filling curves (or SCAN patterns) from a short set of simple ones. The SCAN method uses the algorithmic description of each 2D image as SCAN patterns combinations for the compression and encryption of the image data. Note that each SCAN letter or word accesses the image data with a different order (or sequence), thus the application of a variety of SCAN words associated with the compression scheme will produce various compressed versions of the same image. The compressed versions are compared in memory size and the best of them with the smallest size in bits could be used for the image compression/encryption. Note that the encryption of the image data is a result of the great number of possible space filling curves which could be generated by SCAN. Since the software implementation of the SCAN compression/encryption scheme requires some time, the hardware design and implementation of the SCAN scheme is necessary in order to reduce the image compression/encryption time to the real-time one. The development of such an image compression encryption system will have a significant impact on the transmission and storage of images. It will be applicable in multimedia and transmission of images through communication lines.

  9. Data compression for full motion video transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Wayne A., Jr.; Sayood, Khalid

    1991-01-01

    Clearly transmission of visual information will be a major, if not dominant, factor in determining the requirements for, and assessing the performance of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) communications systems. Projected image/video requirements which are currently anticipated for SEI mission scenarios are presented. Based on this information and projected link performance figures, the image/video data compression requirements which would allow link closure are identified. Finally several approaches which could satisfy some of the compression requirements are presented and possible future approaches which show promise for more substantial compression performance improvement are discussed.

  10. Combined Sparsifying Transforms for Compressive Image Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAO, L.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a new compressive image fusion method based on combined sparsifying transforms. First, the framework of compressive image fusion is introduced briefly. Then, combined sparsifying transforms are presented to enhance the sparsity of images. Finally, a reconstruction algorithm based on the nonlinear conjugate gradient is presented to get the fused image. The simulations demonstrate that by using the combined sparsifying transforms better results can be achieved in terms of both the subjective visual effect and the objective evaluation indexes than using only a single sparsifying transform for compressive image fusion.

  11. An efficient compression scheme for bitmap indices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Kesheng; Otoo, Ekow J.; Shoshani, Arie

    2004-04-13

    When using an out-of-core indexing method to answer a query, it is generally assumed that the I/O cost dominates the overall query response time. Because of this, most research on indexing methods concentrate on reducing the sizes of indices. For bitmap indices, compression has been used for this purpose. However, in most cases, operations on these compressed bitmaps, mostly bitwise logical operations such as AND, OR, and NOT, spend more time in CPU than in I/O. To speedup these operations, a number of specialized bitmap compression schemes have been developed; the best known of which is the byte-aligned bitmap code (BBC). They are usually faster in performing logical operations than the general purpose compression schemes, but, the time spent in CPU still dominates the total query response time. To reduce the query response time, we designed a CPU-friendly scheme named the word-aligned hybrid (WAH) code. In this paper, we prove that the sizes of WAH compressed bitmap indices are about two words per row for large range of attributes. This size is smaller than typical sizes of commonly used indices, such as a B-tree. Therefore, WAH compressed indices are not only appropriate for low cardinality attributes but also for high cardinality attributes.In the worst case, the time to operate on compressed bitmaps is proportional to the total size of the bitmaps involved. The total size of the bitmaps required to answer a query on one attribute is proportional to the number of hits. These indicate that WAH compressed bitmap indices are optimal. To verify their effectiveness, we generated bitmap indices for four different datasets and measured the response time of many range queries. Tests confirm that sizes of compressed bitmap indices are indeed smaller than B-tree indices, and query processing with WAH compressed indices is much faster than with BBC compressed indices, projection indices and B-tree indices. In addition, we also verified that the average query response time

  12. Data compression for full motion video transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Wayne A., Jr.; Sayood, Khalid

    1991-01-01

    Clearly transmission of visual information will be a major, if not dominant, factor in determining the requirements for, and assessing the performance of, the SEI communications systems. Projected image/video requirements which are currently anticipated for SEI mission scenarios are presented. Based on this information and projected link performance figures, the image/video data compression requirements which would allow link closure are identified. Finally several approaches which could satisfy some of the compression requirements are presented and possible future approaches which show promise for more substantial compression performance improvement are discussed.

  13. Evolution Of Nonlinear Waves in Compressing Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P.F. Schmit, I.Y. Dodin, and N.J. Fisch

    2011-05-27

    Through particle-in-cell simulations, the evolution of nonlinear plasma waves is examined in one-dimensional collisionless plasma undergoing mechanical compression. Unlike linear waves, whose wavelength decreases proportionally to the system length L(t), nonlinear waves, such as solitary electron holes, conserve their characteristic size {Delta} during slow compression. This leads to a substantially stronger adiabatic amplification as well as rapid collisionless damping when L approaches {Delta}. On the other hand, cessation of compression halts the wave evolution, yielding a stable mode.

  14. Perceptual compressive sensing scalability in mobile video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bivolarski, Lazar

    2011-09-01

    Scalability features embedded within the video sequences allows for streaming over heterogeneous networks to a variety of end devices. Compressive sensing techniques that will allow for lowering the complexity increase the robustness of the video scalability are reviewed. Human visual system models are often used in establishing perceptual metrics that would evaluate quality of video. Combining of perceptual and compressive sensing approach outlined from recent investigations. The performance and the complexity of different scalability techniques are evaluated. Application of perceptual models to evaluation of the quality of compressive sensing scalability is considered in the near perceptually lossless case and to the appropriate coding schemes is reviewed.

  15. The contribution of a frequency-compression hearing aid to contralateral cochlear implant performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreau, Ann E; Bentler, Ruth A; Tyler, Richard S

    2013-02-01

    Frequency-lowering signal processing in hearing aids has re-emerged as an option to improve audibility of the high frequencies by expanding the input bandwidth. Few studies have investigated the usefulness of the scheme as an option for bimodal users (i.e., combined use of a cochlear implant and a contralateral hearing aid). In this study, that question was posed. The purposes of this study were (1) to determine if frequency compression was a better bimodal option than conventional amplification and (2) to determine the impact of a frequency-compression hearing aid on speech recognition abilities. There were two separate experiments in this study. The first experiment investigated the contribution of a frequency-compression hearing aid to contralateral cochlear implant (CI) performance for localization and speech perception in noise. The second experiment assessed monaural consonant and vowel perception in quiet using the frequency-compression and conventional hearing aid without the use of a contralateral CI or hearing aid. Ten subjects fitted with a cochlear implant and hearing aid participated in the first experiment. Seventeen adult subjects with a cochlear implant and hearing aid or two hearing aids participated in the second experiment. To be included, subjects had to have a history of postlingual deafness, a moderate or moderate-to-severe hearing loss, and have not worn this type of frequency-lowering hearing aid previously. In the first experiment, performance using the frequency-compression and conventional hearing aids was assessed on tests of sound localization, speech perception in a background of noise, and two self-report questionnaires. In the second experiment, consonant and vowel perception in quiet was assessed monaurally for the two conditions. In both experiments, subjects alternated daily between a frequency-compression and conventional hearing aid for 2 mo. The parameters of frequency compression were set individually for each subject, and

  16. Endoscopic optic nerve decompression for nontraumatic compressive optic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-long REN

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To describe the preliminary experience with endoscopic optic nerve decompression (EOND for nontraumatic compressive optic neuropathies (NCONs. Methods The clinical data of 10 patients, male 5 and female 5, with a mean age of 44.3±5.1 years, who underwent EOND for visual loss (n=5 or visual deterioration (n=5 due to tumor compression in General Hospital of Armed Police Forces of China in the period from April 2013 to April 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. Preoperative and 6-month-postoperative clinical and imaging data of these patients were reviewed and analyzed. Results Among 5 patients who lost light perception (including 2 patients with bilateral optic nerve compression before operation, 4 of them showed visual improvement to different degrees on the 7th day after operation (with improvement of bilateral visual acuity. The other 5 patients with visual impairment before operation recovered their visual acuity to different extent after the operation. All of the patients had no obvious post-operative complications. Conclusion EOND is a safe, effective, and minimally invasive surgical technique affording recovery of visual function to NCON patients. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.11.12

  17. Optimal piston crevice study in a rapid compression machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyong, Oku; Woolley, Robert; Blakey, Simon; Alborzi, Ehsan

    2017-09-01

    Multi-dimensional effects such as vortex generation and heat losses from the gas to the wall of the reactor chamber have been an issue to obtaining a reliable RCM data. This vortex initiates a flow in the relatively cold boundary layer, which may penetrate the core gas. This resulting non-uniformity of the core region could cause serious discrepancies and give unreliable experimental data. To achieve a homogenous temperature field, an optimised piston crevice was designed using CFD modelling (Ansys fluent). A 2-Dimensional computational moving mesh is assuming an axisymmetric symmetry. The model adopted for this calculation is the laminar flow model and the fluid used was nitrogen. To get the appropriate crevice volume suitable for the present design, an optimisation of the five different crevice volume was modelled which resulted to about 2-10% of the entire chamber volume. The use of creviced piston has shown to reduce the final compressed gas temperature and pressure in the reactor chamber. All the crevice volumes between 2-10% of the chamber volume adequately contained the roll up vortexes, but the crevice volume of 282 mm3 was chosen to be the best in addition to minimising the end gas pressure and temperature drop. The final pressure trace from experiment shows a reasonable agreement with the CFD model at compression and post compression stage.

  18. Helium penetrates into silica glass and reduces its compressibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tomoko; Funamori, Nobumasa; Yagi, Takehiko

    2011-06-14

    SiO(2) glass has a network structure with a significant amount of interstitial voids. Gas solubilities in silicates are expected to become small under high pressure due to compaction of voids. Here we show anomalous behaviour of SiO(2) glass in helium. Volume measurements clarify that SiO(2) glass is much less compressible than normal when compressed in helium, and the volume in helium at 10 GPa is close to the normal volume at 2 GPa. X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering measurements suggest that voids are prevented from contracting when compressed in helium because helium penetrates into them. The estimated helium solubility is very high and is between 1.0 and 2.3 mol per mole of SiO(2) glass at 10 GPa, which shows marked contrast with previous models. These results may have implications for discussions of the Earth's evolution as well as interpretations of various high-pressure experiments, and also lead to the creation of new materials.

  19. Effect of input compression and input frequency response on music perception in cochlear implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliwell, Emily R; Jones, Linor L; Fraser, Matthew; Lockley, Morag; Hill-Feltham, Penelope; McKay, Colette M

    2015-06-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether modifications to input compression and input frequency response characteristics can improve music-listening satisfaction in cochlear implant users. Experiment 1 compared three pre-processed versions of music and speech stimuli in a laboratory setting: original, compressed, and flattened frequency response. Music excerpts comprised three music genres (classical, country, and jazz), and a running speech excerpt was compared. Experiment 2 implemented a flattened input frequency response in the speech processor program. In a take-home trial, participants compared unaltered and flattened frequency responses. Ten and twelve adult Nucleus Freedom cochlear implant users participated in Experiments 1 and 2, respectively. Experiment 1 revealed a significant preference for music stimuli with a flattened frequency response compared to both original and compressed stimuli, whereas there was a significant preference for the original (rising) frequency response for speech stimuli. Experiment 2 revealed no significant mean preference for the flattened frequency response, with 9 of 11 subjects preferring the rising frequency response. Input compression did not alter music enjoyment. Comparison of the two experiments indicated that individual frequency response preferences may depend on the genre or familiarity, and particularly whether the music contained lyrics.

  20. Seneca Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-11-30

    This document provides specifications for the process air compressor for a compressed air storage project, requests a budgetary quote, and provides supporting information, including compressor data, site specific data, water analysis, and Seneca CAES value drivers.

  1. Method for compression of binary data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, G.J.

    1996-03-26

    The disclosed method for compression of a series of data bytes, based on LZSS-based compression methods, provides faster decompression of the stored data. The method involves the creation of a flag bit buffer in a random access memory device for temporary storage of flag bits generated during normal LZSS-based compression. The flag bit buffer stores the flag bits separately from their corresponding pointers and uncompressed data bytes until all input data has been read. Then, the flag bits are appended to the compressed output stream of data. Decompression can be performed much faster because bit manipulation is only required when reading the flag bits and not when reading uncompressed data bytes and pointers. Uncompressed data is read using byte length instructions and pointers are read using word instructions, thus reducing the time required for decompression. 5 figs.

  2. Principles of digital dynamic-range compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kates, James M

    2005-01-01

    This article provides an overview of dynamic-range compression in digital hearing aids. Digital technology is becoming increasingly common in hearing aids, particularly because of the processing flexibility it offers and the opportunity to create more-effective devices. The focus of the paper is on the algorithms used to build digital compression systems. Of the various approaches that can be used to design a digital hearing aid, this paper considers broadband compression, multi-channel filter banks, a frequency-domain compressor using the FFT, the side-branch design that separates the filtering operation from the frequency analysis, and the frequency-warped version of the side-branch approach that modifies the analysis frequency spacing to more closely match auditory perception. Examples of the compressor frequency resolution, group delay, and compression behavior are provided for the different design approaches.

  3. Compression resistance of four interocclusal recording materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeding, L C; Dixon, D L

    1992-12-01

    Elastomeric impression materials are popular for making interocclusal records to mount casts on dental articulators. The resistance of these materials to compressive forces is critical, because any deformation during the recording or mounting process could result in inaccurate articulation of casts and faulty fabrication of restorations. This investigation compared the deformation of designated thicknesses (2 mm, 5 mm, 10 mm, and 20 mm) for four elastomeric interocclusal recording materials (Blu-Mousse, Stat BR, Ramitec, and Regisil) when subjected to a 25 N compressive load. Compressive distortions of clinical significance were recorded for all of the materials with various thicknesses. The Blu-Mousse vinyl polysiloxane registration material exhibited the greatest resistance to compression for the designated thicknesses, and these resistance values were significantly lower than those of the other recording materials with thicknesses of 5, 10, and 20 mm (alpha < 0.05).

  4. Improve Compressed Air System Performance with AIRMaster+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-05-01

    AIRMaster+ provides a systematic apporach for assessing the supply-side performance of compressed air systems. Using plant-specific data, the software effectively evaluates supply-side operational costs for various equipment configurations and system pro

  5. Beneficiation of Compression Debarked Wood Chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    James A. Mattson

    1974-01-01

    Presents the results of a preliminary study of secondary beneficiation of compression debarked chips to reduce residual bark to acceptable amounts. Ballmilling is a feasible method of reducing residual bark and minimizing wood loss.

  6. Compressive multi-mode superresolution display

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Compressive displays are an emerging technology exploring the co-design of new optical device configurations and compressive computation. Previously, research has shown how to improve the dynamic range of displays and facilitate high-quality light field or glasses-free 3D image synthesis. In this paper, we introduce a new multi-mode compressive display architecture that supports switching between 3D and high dynamic range (HDR) modes as well as a new super-resolution mode. The proposed hardware consists of readily-available components and is driven by a novel splitting algorithm that computes the pixel states from a target high-resolution image. In effect, the display pixels present a compressed representation of the target image that is perceived as a single, high resolution image. © 2014 Optical Society of America.

  7. Compression therapy after ankle fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winge, R; Bayer, L; Gottlieb, H

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The main purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the effect of compression treatment on the perioperative course of ankle fractures and describe its effect on edema, pain, ankle joint mobility, wound healing complication, length of stay (LOS) and time to surgery (TTS). The aim...... undergoing surgery, testing either intermittent pneumatic compression, compression bandage and/or compression stocking and reporting its effect on edema, pain, ankle joint mobility, wound healing complication, LOS and TTS. To conclude on data a narrative synthesis was performed. RESULTS: The review included...... eight studies (451 patients). Seven studies found a significant effect on edema, two studies described a significant reduction in pain, one a positive effect on ankle movement, two a positive effect on wound healing, one a reduction in LOS and finally two studies reported reduction in TTS. A systematic...

  8. Defocus cue and saliency preserving video compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Meera Thapar; Chaudhury, Santanu; Lall, Brejesh

    2016-11-01

    There are monocular depth cues present in images or videos that aid in depth perception in two-dimensional images or videos. Our objective is to preserve the defocus depth cue present in the videos along with the salient regions during compression application. A method is provided for opportunistic bit allocation during the video compression using visual saliency information comprising both the image features, such as color and contrast, and the defocus-based depth cue. The method is divided into two steps: saliency computation followed by compression. A nonlinear method is used to combine pure and defocus saliency maps to form the final saliency map. Then quantization values are assigned on the basis of these saliency values over a frame. The experimental results show that the proposed scheme yields good results over standard H.264 compression as well as pure and defocus saliency methods.

  9. Effect of peanoscanning on image compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provine, Joseph A.; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M.

    1993-08-01

    Peanoscanning was used to obtain the pixels from an image by following a scan path described by a space-filling curve, the Peano-Hilbert curve. The Peanoscanned data were then compressed without loss of information by direct Huffman, arithmetic, and LZW coding, as well as predictive and transform coding. The results were then compared with the results obtained by compressing equivalent raster scanned data to study the effect of Peanoscanning on image compression. In our implementation, tested on seven natural images, Peano- Differential coding with an entropy coder gave the best results of reversible compression from 8 bits/pixel to about 5 bits/pixel. An efficient implementation of the Peanoscanning operation based on the symmetry exhibited by the Peano-Hilbert curve is also suggested.

  10. Flight Lossless Data Compression Electronics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed work seeks to drastically increase the capability of the lossless data compression technology embedded in the currently used flight part known as USES...

  11. Smoking and the compression of morbidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. Nusselder (Wilma); C.W.N. Looman (Caspar); P.J. Marang-van de Mheen; H. van de Mheen (Dike); J.P. Mackenbach (Johan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To examine whether eliminating smoking will lead to a reduction in the number of years lived with disability (that is, absolute compression of morbidity). DESIGN: Multistate life table calculations based on the longitudinal GLOBE study (the

  12. Evolution Strategies for Laser Pulse Compression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monmarché, Nicolas; Fanciulli, Riccardo; Willmes, Lars; Talbi, El-Ghazali; Savolainen, Janne; Collet, Pierre; Schoenauer, Marc; van der Walle, P.; Lutton, Evelyne; Back, Thomas; Herek, Jennifer Lynn

    2008-01-01

    This study describes first steps taken to bring evolutionary optimization technology from computer simulations to real world experimentation in physics laboratories. The approach taken considers a well understood Laser Pulse Compression problem accessible both to simulation and laboratory

  13. SAR Tomography Based on Block Compressive Sensing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang Aichun; Xiang Maosheng

    2016-01-01

    While the use of SAR Tomography (TomoSAR) based on Compressive Sensing (CS) makes it possible to reconstruct the height profile of an observed scene, the performance of the reconstruction decreases for a structural observed scene...

  14. Compression Behavior of High Performance Polymeric Fibers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kumar, Satish

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogen bonding has proven to be effective in improving the compressive strength of rigid-rod polymeric fibers without resulting in a decrease in tensile strength while covalent crosslinking results in brittle fibers...

  15. Optical properties of highly compressed polystyrene: An ab initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S. X.; Collins, L. A.; Colgan, J. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Kilcrease, D. P.

    2017-10-01

    Using all-electron density functional theory, we have performed an ab initio study on x-ray absorption spectra of highly compressed polystyrene (CH). We found that the K -edge shifts in strongly coupled, degenerate polystyrene cannot be explained by existing continuum-lowering models adopted in traditional plasma physics. To gain insights into the K -edge shift in warm, dense CH, we have developed a model designated as "single mixture in a box" (SMIAB), which incorporates both the lowering of the continuum and the rising of the Fermi surface resulting from high compression. This simple SMIAB model correctly predicts the K -edge shift of carbon in highly compressed CH in good agreement with results from quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) calculations. Traditional opacity models failed to give the proper K -edge shifts as the CH density increased. Based on QMD calculations, we have established a first-principles opacity table (FPOT) for CH in a wide range of densities and temperatures [ρ =0.1 -100 g /c m3 and T =2000 -1 000 000 K ]. The FPOT gives much higher Rosseland mean opacity compared to the cold-opacity-patched astrophysics opacity table for warm, dense CH and favorably compares to the newly improved Los Alamos atomic model for moderately compressed CH (ρCH≤10 g /c m3 ), but remains a factor of 2 to 3 higher at extremely high densities (ρCH≥50 g /c m3 ). We anticipate the established FPOT of CH will find important applications to reliable designs of high-energy-density experiments. Moreover, the understanding of K -edge shifting revealed in this study could provide guides for improving the traditional opacity models to properly handle the strongly coupled and degenerate conditions.

  16. Impact of Compression on the Video Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Uhrina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the impact of compression on the video quality. In the first part, a short characteristic of the most used MPEG compression standards is written. In the second part, the parameter Group of Picture (GOP with particular I, P, B frames is explained. The third part focuses on the objective metrics which were used for evaluating the video quality. In the fourth part, the measurements and the experimental results are described.

  17. Chest compression rate measurement from smartphone video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engan, Kjersti; Hinna, Thomas; Ryen, Tom; Birkenes, Tonje S; Myklebust, Helge

    2016-08-11

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a life threatening situation where the first person performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) most often is a bystander without medical training. Some existing smartphone apps can call the emergency number and provide for example global positioning system (GPS) location like Hjelp 113-GPS App by the Norwegian air ambulance. We propose to extend functionality of such apps by using the built in camera in a smartphone to capture video of the CPR performed, primarily to estimate the duration and rate of the chest compression executed, if any. All calculations are done in real time, and both the caller and the dispatcher will receive the compression rate feedback when detected. The proposed algorithm is based on finding a dynamic region of interest in the video frames, and thereafter evaluating the power spectral density by computing the fast fourier transform over sliding windows. The power of the dominating frequencies is compared to the power of the frequency area of interest. The system is tested on different persons, male and female, in different scenarios addressing target compression rates, background disturbances, compression with mouth-to-mouth ventilation, various background illuminations and phone placements. All tests were done on a recording Laerdal manikin, providing true compression rates for comparison. Overall, the algorithm is seen to be promising, and it manages a number of disturbances and light situations. For target rates at 110 cpm, as recommended during CPR, the mean error in compression rate (Standard dev. over tests in parentheses) is 3.6 (0.8) for short hair bystanders, and 8.7 (6.0) including medium and long haired bystanders. The presented method shows that it is feasible to detect the compression rate of chest compressions performed by a bystander by placing the smartphone close to the patient, and using the built-in camera combined with a video processing algorithm performed real-time on the device.

  18. Standard versus Abdominal Lifting and Compression CPR

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Sisen; Liu, Qing; Han, Shupeng; Zhang, Ziran; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Yahua; Li, Jing; Wang, Lixiang

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study compared outcomes of abdominal lifting and compression cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ALP-CPR) with standard CPR (STD-CPR). Materials and Methods. Patients with cardiac arrest seen from April to December 2014 were randomized to receive standard CPR or ALP-CPR performed with a novel abdominal lifting/compression device. The primary outcome was return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Results. Patients were randomized to receive ALP-CPR (n = 40) and STD-CPR (n = 43), and...

  19. Compressive sensing based algorithms for electronic defence

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, Amit Kumar

    2017-01-01

    This book details some of the major developments in the implementation of compressive sensing in radio applications for electronic defense and warfare communication use. It provides a comprehensive background to the subject and at the same time describes some novel algorithms. It also investigates application value and performance-related parameters of compressive sensing in scenarios such as direction finding, spectrum monitoring, detection, and classification.

  20. Digital Data Registration and Differencing Compression System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransford, Gary A. (Inventor); Cambridge, Vivien J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A process for X-ray registration and differencing results in more efficient compression. Differencing of registered modeled subject image with a modeled reference image forms a differenced image for compression with conventional compression algorithms. Obtention of a modeled reference image includes modeling a relatively unrelated standard reference image upon a three-dimensional model, which three-dimensional model is also used to model the subject image for obtaining the modeled subject image. The registration process of the modeled subject image and modeled reference image translationally correlates such modeled images for resulting correlation thereof in spatial and spectral dimensions. Prior to compression, a portion of the image falling outside a designated area of interest may be eliminated, for subsequent replenishment with a standard reference image. The compressed differenced image may be subsequently transmitted and/or stored, for subsequent decompression and addition to a standard reference image so as to form a reconstituted or approximated subject image at either a remote location and/or at a later moment in time. Overall effective compression ratios of 100:1 are possible for thoracic X-ray digital images.

  1. Efficient predictive algorithms for image compression

    CERN Document Server

    Rosário Lucas, Luís Filipe; Maciel de Faria, Sérgio Manuel; Morais Rodrigues, Nuno Miguel; Liberal Pagliari, Carla

    2017-01-01

    This book discusses efficient prediction techniques for the current state-of-the-art High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard, focusing on the compression of a wide range of video signals, such as 3D video, Light Fields and natural images. The authors begin with a review of the state-of-the-art predictive coding methods and compression technologies for both 2D and 3D multimedia contents, which provides a good starting point for new researchers in the field of image and video compression. New prediction techniques that go beyond the standardized compression technologies are then presented and discussed. In the context of 3D video, the authors describe a new predictive algorithm for the compression of depth maps, which combines intra-directional prediction, with flexible block partitioning and linear residue fitting. New approaches are described for the compression of Light Field and still images, which enforce sparsity constraints on linear models. The Locally Linear Embedding-based prediction method is in...

  2. Compressing Color Data for Voxelized Surface Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolonius, Dan; Sintorn, Erik; Kampe, Viktor; Assarsson, Ulf

    2017-08-18

    We explore the problem of decoupling color information from geometry in large scenes of voxelized surfaces and of compressing the array of colors without introducing disturbing artifacts. In this extension of our I3D paper with the same title, we first present a novel method for connecting each node in a sparse voxel DAG to its corresponding colors in a separate 1D array of colors, with very little additional information stored to the DAG. Then, we show that by mapping the 1D array of colors onto a 2D image using a space-filling curve, we can achieve high compression rates and good quality using conventional, modern, hardware-accelerated texture compression formats such as ASTC or BC7. We additionally explore whether this method can be used to compress voxel colors for off-line storage and network transmission using conventional off-line compression formats such as JPG and JPG2K. For real-time decompression, we suggest a novel variable bitrate block encoding that consistently outperforms previous work, often achieving two times the compression at equal quality.

  3. A review on compressed pattern matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surya Prakash Mishra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Compressed pattern matching (CPM refers to the task of locating all the occurrences of a pattern (or set of patterns inside the body of compressed text. In this type of matching, pattern may or may not be compressed. CPM is very useful in handling large volume of data especially over the network. It has many applications in computational biology, where it is useful in finding similar trends in DNA sequences; intrusion detection over the networks, big data analytics etc. Various solutions have been provided by researchers where pattern is matched directly over the uncompressed text. Such solution requires lot of space and consumes lot of time when handling the big data. Various researchers have proposed the efficient solutions for compression but very few exist for pattern matching over the compressed text. Considering the future trend where data size is increasing exponentially day-by-day, CPM has become a desirable task. This paper presents a critical review on the recent techniques on the compressed pattern matching. The covered techniques includes: Word based Huffman codes, Word Based Tagged Codes; Wavelet Tree Based Indexing. We have presented a comparative analysis of all the techniques mentioned above and highlighted their advantages and disadvantages.

  4. Dynamic compression nail: A preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Ajay

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interlocking nailing, which has become the method of choice for treating fractures of the femoral and tibial shafts, still lacks ability to provide the important contact-compression at the fracture. An intramedullary compression nail is described, which provides axial compression at the fracture site with tightening of the specially designed distal interlocking screw. This uses the same principle as dynamic compression plating. Methods The study included 11 femoral and tibial nailings performed for various clinical applications such as acute fractures, non-unions and malunions. Results All the fractures attained radiological union, with good skeletal continuity across the fracture, within an average time of 13 weeks in fresh fractures and 18 weeks in non-unions. Conclusions Active compression through intramedullary compression nailing has great utility for treating non-unions where it provides greater degree of impaction of its irregular ends. This may prove greatly advantageous to the fracture union through increased stability and the osteogenic potential, particularly when utilized in combination with the small diameter unreamed nails.

  5. MRC for compression of Blake Archive images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misic, Vladimir; Kraus, Kari; Eaves, Morris; Parker, Kevin J.; Buckley, Robert R.

    2002-11-01

    The William Blake Archive is part of an emerging class of electronic projects in the humanities that may be described as hypermedia archives. It provides structured access to high-quality electronic reproductions of rare and often unique primary source materials, in this case the work of poet and painter William Blake. Due to the extensive high frequency content of Blake's paintings (namely, colored engravings), they are not suitable for very efficient compression that meets both rate and distortion criteria at the same time. Resolving that problem, the authors utilized modified Mixed Raster Content (MRC) compression scheme -- originally developed for compression of compound documents -- for the compression of colored engravings. In this paper, for the first time, we have been able to demonstrate the successful use of the MRC compression approach for the compression of colored, engraved images. Additional, but not less important benefits of the MRC image representation for Blake scholars are presented: because the applied segmentation method can essentially lift the color overlay of an impression, it provides the student of Blake the unique opportunity to recreate the underlying copperplate image, model the artist's coloring process, and study them separately.

  6. Lossless compression of instrumentation data. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stearns, S.D.

    1995-11-01

    This is our final report on Sandia National Laboratories Laboratory- Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project 3517.070. Its purpose has been to investigate lossless compression of digital waveform and image data, particularly the types of instrumentation data generated and processed at Sandia Labs. The three-year project period ran from October 1992 through September 1995. This report begins with a descriptive overview of data compression, with and without loss, followed by a summary of the activities on the Sandia project, including research at several universities and the development of waveform compression software. Persons who participated in the project are also listed. The next part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles of lossless compression. Two basic compression stages, decorrelation and entropy coding, are described and discussed. An example of seismic data compression is included. Finally, there is a bibliography of published research. Taken together, the published papers contain the details of most of the work and accomplishments on the project. This final report is primarily an overview, without the technical details and results found in the publications listed in the bibliography.

  7. Coherent structures in compressible free-shear-layer flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Baty, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Engineering Sciences Center; Kennedy, C.A.; Chen, J.H. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion and Physical Sciences Center

    1997-08-01

    Large scale coherent structures are intrinsic fluid mechanical characteristics of all free-shear flows, from incompressible to compressible, and laminar to fully turbulent. These quasi-periodic fluid structures, eddies of size comparable to the thickness of the shear layer, dominate the mixing process at the free-shear interface. As a result, large scale coherent structures greatly influence the operation and efficiency of many important commercial and defense technologies. Large scale coherent structures have been studied here in a research program that combines a synergistic blend of experiment, direct numerical simulation, and analysis. This report summarizes the work completed for this Sandia Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project.

  8. Spectral compression of single-photon-level laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanhua; Xiang, Tong; Nie, Yiyou; Sang, Minghuang; Chen, Xianfeng

    2017-02-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that the bandwidth of single photons laser pulse is compressed by a factor of 58 in a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguide chip. A positively chirped single photons laser pulse and a negatively chirped classical laser pulse are employed to produce a narrowband single photon pulse with new frequency through sum-frequency generation. In our experiment, the frequency and bandwidth of single photons at 1550 nm are simultaneously converted. Our results mark a critical step towards the realization of coherent photonic interface between quantum communication at 1550 nm and quantum memory in the near-visible window.

  9. High-speed cinematography of compressible mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, R.; Loth, Eric

    1994-07-01

    Experiments are performed using high-speed film cinematography to temporally resolve compressible planar mixing layer structures using shadowgraphs and planar light sheet visualization. The technique is relatively inexpensive and allows multiple images. The time-dependent shadowgraph and Mie scattering images are documented with a rotating mirror camera operating at approximately 350 kHz. The results show the presence of large scale structures in the mixing layer which flatten as they convect downstream. Both spatial and temporal covariances have been obtained through digital image processing which yield, on average, elliptical structures with convective speeds above the isentropic prediction, and non-isotropic streamwise and transverse scalar transport fluctuations.

  10. Pump and probe measurements of shock-compressed states

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, K G; Hironaka, Y; Kondo, K

    2002-01-01

    A pump and probe technique is used for time-resolved measurements of the microstructure of condensed matter under laser shock compression. Two types of experiment (picosecond x-ray diffraction and nanosecond Raman spectroscopy) are performed. The picosecond time-resolved x-ray diffraction results for laser-shocked Si(111) give the time evolution of the strain profiles in 60 ps intervals. Nanosecond time-resolved Raman spectroscopy for laser-shocked poly-tetrafluoroethylene shows transient bond scission of the polymer chain.

  11. Pump and probe measurements of shock-compressed states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, K G [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Wakabayashi, K [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8565 (Japan); Hironaka, Y [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Kondo, K [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2002-11-11

    A pump and probe technique is used for time-resolved measurements of the microstructure of condensed matter under laser shock compression. Two types of experiment (picosecond x-ray diffraction and nanosecond Raman spectroscopy) are performed. The picosecond time-resolved x-ray diffraction results for laser-shocked Si(111) give the time evolution of the strain profiles in 60 ps intervals. Nanosecond time-resolved Raman spectroscopy for laser-shocked poly-tetrafluoroethylene shows transient bond scission of the polymer chain.

  12. Compressed Sensing with Linear Correlation Between Signal and Measurement Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arildsen, Thomas; Larsen, Torben

    2014-01-01

    reconstruction algorithms, but is not known in existing literature. The proposed technique reduces reconstruction error considerably in the case of linearly correlated measurements and noise. Numerical experiments confirm the efficacy of the technique. The technique is demonstrated with application to low......-rate quantization of compressed measurements, which is known to introduce correlated noise, and improvements in reconstruction error compared to ordinary Basis Pursuit De-Noising of up to approximately 7 dB are observed for 1 bit/sample quantization. Furthermore, the proposed method is compared to Binary Iterative...

  13. A new modified fast fractal image compression algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salarian, Mehdi; Nadernejad, Ehsan; MiarNaimi, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a new fractal image compression algorithm is proposed, in which the time of the encoding process is considerably reduced. The algorithm exploits a domain pool reduction approach, along with the use of innovative predefined values for contrast scaling factor, S, instead of searching...... it across. Only the domain blocks with entropy greater than a threshold are considered to belong to the domain pool. The algorithm has been tested for some well-known images and the results have been compared with the state-of-the-art algorithms. The experiments show that our proposed algorithm has...

  14. A dedicated compression device for high resolution X-ray tomography of compressed gas diffusion layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tötzke, C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Universität Potsdam, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Manke, I.; Banhart, J. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Gaiselmann, G.; Schmidt, V. [Universität Ulm, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Bohner, J. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Müller, B. R.; Kupsch, A.; Hentschel, M. P. [BAM Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -Prüfung, 12200 Berlin (Germany); Lehnert, W. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); RTWH Aachen University, 52062 Aachen (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    We present an experimental approach to study the three-dimensional microstructure of gas diffusion layer (GDL) materials under realistic compression conditions. A dedicated compression device was designed that allows for synchrotron-tomographic investigation of circular samples under well-defined compression conditions. The tomographic data provide the experimental basis for stochastic modeling of nonwoven GDL materials. A plain compression tool is used to study the fiber courses in the material at different compression stages. Transport relevant geometrical parameters, such as porosity, pore size, and tortuosity distributions, are exemplarily evaluated for a GDL sample in the uncompressed state and for a compression of 30 vol.%. To mimic the geometry of the flow-field, we employed a compression punch with an integrated channel-rib-profile. It turned out that the GDL material is homogeneously compressed under the ribs, however, much less compressed underneath the channel. GDL fibers extend far into the channel volume where they might interfere with the convective gas transport and the removal of liquid water from the cell.

  15. A dedicated compression device for high resolution X-ray tomography of compressed gas diffusion layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tötzke, C; Manke, I; Gaiselmann, G; Bohner, J; Müller, B R; Kupsch, A; Hentschel, M P; Schmidt, V; Banhart, J; Lehnert, W

    2015-04-01

    We present an experimental approach to study the three-dimensional microstructure of gas diffusion layer (GDL) materials under realistic compression conditions. A dedicated compression device was designed that allows for synchrotron-tomographic investigation of circular samples under well-defined compression conditions. The tomographic data provide the experimental basis for stochastic modeling of nonwoven GDL materials. A plain compression tool is used to study the fiber courses in the material at different compression stages. Transport relevant geometrical parameters, such as porosity, pore size, and tortuosity distributions, are exemplarily evaluated for a GDL sample in the uncompressed state and for a compression of 30 vol.%. To mimic the geometry of the flow-field, we employed a compression punch with an integrated channel-rib-profile. It turned out that the GDL material is homogeneously compressed under the ribs, however, much less compressed underneath the channel. GDL fibers extend far into the channel volume where they might interfere with the convective gas transport and the removal of liquid water from the cell.

  16. Soliton compression to few-cycle pulses with a high quality factor by engineering cascaded quadratic nonlinearities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Xianglong; Guo, Hairun; Zhou, Binbin

    2012-01-01

    We propose an efficient approach to improve few-cycle soliton compression with cascaded quadratic nonlinearities by using an engineered multi-section structure of the nonlinear crystal. By exploiting engineering of the cascaded quadratic nonlinearities, in each section soliton compression...... with a low effective order is realized, and high-quality few-cycle pulses with large compression factors are feasible. Each subsequent section is designed so that the compressed pulse exiting the previous section experiences an overall effective self-defocusing cubic nonlinearity corresponding to a modest...... soliton order, which is kept larger than unity to ensure further compression. This is done by increasing the cascaded quadratic nonlinearity in the new section with an engineered reduced residual phase mismatch. The low soliton orders in each section ensure excellent pulse quality and high efficiency...

  17. On the Distribution of Delamination in Composite Structures and Compressive Strength Prediction for Laminates with Embedded Delaminations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huimin, Fu; Yongbo, Zhang

    2011-06-01

    In this study, large numbers of aircraft composite structures were inspected, and the distribution of delamination sizes and though thickness positions in the composite laminates are investigated. An experiment is conducted to probe into the influence of delamination sizes and through thickness positions on the compressive strengths of laminates with single embedded circular delamination, with the most dangerous delamination sizes and positions defined from the distribution. Furthermore, a shell model is established for compressive strength prediction, with delamination propagation assessed using a mixed mode criterion. The finite element (FE) prediction comes out to be in good agreement with the experimental measurements, for the predicted compressive strengths stand within 10% error of experimental results. It was observed that the compressive strength was highly influenced by the delamination size, while the through thickness position of delamination did not have significant effect on the compressive strength.

  18. Compressed air energy storage in offshore grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, S.T.; Meibom, P. (Technical Univ. of Denmark (DTU). Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy, Roskilde (Denmark)); Crotogino, F.; Donadei, S. (KBB Underground Technologies, Hanover (Germany))

    2011-05-15

    Fluctuating renewable energy sources can be rendered more reliable by massive international grid extensions and by energy storages. The latter ones are partially discussed as offshore grids to combine the grid connection of offshore wind parks with international power trading. This paper gives a first assessment of offshore energy storage possibilities. Compressed air energy storage (CAES) is a technology that has been used successfully onshore for decades and is the most economic large-scale storage option after pumped hydro. More efficient adiabatic CAES is under development. At the same time, the oil and gas offshore industry provides enough experience to state that a CAES power plant could be installed and operated offshore even though at considerable higher costs. Suitable salt formations for the salt caverns exist in and around the North Sea and to a lower extent the Baltic Sea. Offshore energy storage can facilitate several issues in an offshore grid: firstly, it can delay or even replace the necessity for building interconnectors due to additional wind or wave power. Secondly, it can balance generation deviations due to forecast errors. Depending on market design, these have a negative effect on offshore generation or interconnector operation. Balancing forecast errors could allow operating the interconnectors in a more reliable and thus, more profitable way. If the offshore grid is considered a single price zone between countries, a storage has a lowering effect on electricity price volatility. The WILMAR planning tool is used to estimate these effects. Comparing onshore and offshore CAES, it is concluded that an an offshore adiabatic CAES can participate in several markets, but that this advantage is outweighed by an onshore unit's ability to provide spinning reserves. (Author)

  19. New thermodynamical systems. Alternative of compression-absorption; Nouveaux systemes thermodynamiques. Alternative de la compression-absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feidt, M.; Brunin, O.; Lottin, O.; Vidal, J.F. [Universite Henri Poincare Nancy, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Hivet, B. [Electricite de France, 77 - Moret sur Loing (France)

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes a 5 years joint research work carried out by Electricite de France (EdF) and the ESPE group of the LEMTA on compression-absorption heat pumps. It shows how a thermodynamical model of machinery, completed with precise exchanger-reactor models, allows to simulate and dimension (and eventually optimize) the system. A small power prototype has been tested and the first results are analyzed with the help of the models. A real scale experiment in industrial sites is expected in the future. (J.S.) 20 refs.

  20. Modeling the Speech-Reception Threshold for Amplitude-Compressed Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festen, Joost M.; van Dijkhuizen, Janette N.

    For normal-hearing listeners reduction of modulations in speech transmission yields reduced intelligibility. Modulation transfer is even a good predictor for intelligibility in many listening conditions. For hearing-impaired listeners it is often argued that the limited dynamic range of the ear and the associated loudness recruitment needs to be compensated for by a compressive mapping of the level variations within speech (syllabic compression). However, because the results of numerous experiments on syllabic compression are generally negative, it is interesting to see whether the results for hearing-impaired listeners can be accounted for by a reduced transfer of modulations. Intelligibility scores for 16 normal-hearing listeners and 16 hearing-impaired listeners were obtained for speech after syllabic compression with as parameters the number of processing channels and the compression ratio. Simple modulation transfer accounts only partly for the variability in intelligibility scores. A much better result is obtained with a phase-locked transfer of modulations, using only output modulations in quarter octaves that are in-phase with modulations of the input signal. Both for normal-hearing listeners and for hearing-impaired listeners the data of various compression conditions can be equated in terms of the phase-locked modulation transfer.

  1. 3D Polygon Mesh Compression with Multi Layer Feed Forward Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouil Piperakis

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an experiment is conducted which proves that multi layer feed forward neural networks are capable of compressing 3D polygon meshes. Our compression method not only preserves the initial accuracy of the represented object but also enhances it. The neural network employed includes the vertex coordinates, the connectivity and normal information in one compact form, converting the discrete and surface polygon representation into an analytic, solid colloquial. Furthermore, the 3D object in its compressed neural form can be directly - without decompression - used for rendering. The neural compression - representation is viable to 3D transformations without the need of any anti-aliasing techniques - transformations do not disrupt the accuracy of the geometry. Our method does not su.er any scaling problem and was tested with objects of 300 to 107 polygons - such as the David of Michelangelo - achieving in all cases an order of O(b3 less bits for the representation than any other commonly known compression method. The simplicity of our algorithm and the established mathematical background of neural networks combined with their aptness for hardware implementation can establish this method as a good solution for polygon compression and if further investigated, a novel approach for 3D collision, animation and morphing.

  2. Task-dependent visual-codebook compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Rongrong; Yao, Hongxun; Liu, Wei; Sun, Xiaoshuai; Tian, Qi

    2012-04-01

    A visual codebook serves as a fundamental component in many state-of-the-art computer vision systems. Most existing codebooks are built based on quantizing local feature descriptors extracted from training images. Subsequently, each image is represented as a high-dimensional bag-of-words histogram. Such highly redundant image description lacks efficiency in both storage and retrieval, in which only a few bins are nonzero and distributed sparsely. Furthermore, most existing codebooks are built based solely on the visual statistics of local descriptors, without considering the supervise labels coming from the subsequent recognition or classification tasks. In this paper, we propose a task-dependent codebook compression framework to handle the above two problems. First, we propose to learn a compression function to map an originally high-dimensional codebook into a compact codebook while maintaining its visual discriminability. This is achieved by a codeword sparse coding scheme with Lasso regression, which minimizes the descriptor distortions of training images after codebook compression. Second, we propose to adapt our codebook compression to the subsequent recognition or classification tasks. This is achieved by introducing a label constraint kernel (LCK) into our compression loss function. In particular, our LCK can model heterogeneous kinds of supervision, i.e., (partial) category labels, correlative semantic annotations, and image query logs. We validated our codebook compression in three computer vision tasks: 1) object recognition in PASCAL Visual Object Class 07; 2) near-duplicate image retrieval in UKBench; and 3) web image search in a collection of 0.5 million Flickr photographs. Our compressed codebook has shown superior performances over several state-of-the-art supervised and unsupervised codebooks.

  3. "Stayin' alive": a novel mental metronome to maintain compression rates in simulated cardiac arrests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, John W; Sturgell, Jeremy L; Matlock, David L; Bockewitz, Elizabeth G; Barker, Lisa T

    2012-11-01

    A novel and yet untested memory aid has anecdotally been proposed for aiding practitioners in complying with American Heart Association (AHA) cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) compression rate guidelines (at least 100 compressions per minute). This study investigates how subjects using this memory aid adhered to current CPR guidelines in the short and long term. A prospective observational study was conducted with medical providers certified in 2005 AHA guideline CPR. Subjects were randomly paired and alternated administering CPR compressions on a mannequin during a standardized cardiac arrest scenario. While performing compressions, subjects listened to a digital recording of the Bee Gees song "Stayin' Alive," and were asked to time compressions to the musical beat. After at least 5 weeks, the participants were retested without directly listening to the recorded music. Attitudinal views were gathered using a post-session questionnaire. Fifteen subjects (mean age 29.3 years, 66.7% resident physicians and 80% male) were enrolled. The mean compression rate during the primary assessment (with music) was 109.1, and during the secondary assessment (without music) the rate was 113.2. Mean CPR compression rates did not vary by training level, CPR experience, or time to secondary assessment. Subjects felt that utilizing the music improved their ability to provide CPR and they felt more confident in performing CPR. Medical providers trained to use a novel musical memory aid effectively maintained AHA guideline CPR compression rates initially and in long-term follow-up. Subjects felt that the aid improved their technical abilities and confidence in providing CPR. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Mechanical and Failure Criteria of Air-Entrained Concrete under Triaxial Compression Load after Rapid Freeze-Thaw Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-kun Cui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The experiment study on the air-entrained concrete of 100 mm cubes under triaxial compression with different intermediate stress ratio α2=σ2D : σ3D was carried out using a hydraulic-servo testing system. The influence of rapid freeze-thaw cycles and intermediate stress ratio on the triaxial compressive strength σ3D was analyzed according to the experimental results, respectively. The experimental results of air-entrained concrete obtained from the study in this paper and the triaxial compression experimental results of plain concrete got through the same triaxial-testing-system were compared and analyzed. The conclusion was that the triaxial compressive strength is greater than the biaxial and uniaxial compressive strength after the same rapid freeze-thaw cycles, and the increased percentage of triaxial compressive strength over biaxial compressive strength or uniaxial compressive strength is dependent on the middle stress. The experimental data is useful for precise analysis of concrete member or concrete structure under the action complex stress state.

  5. Taking into care metastatic medullary compressions; Prise en charge des compressions medullaires metastatiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupin, C.; Feuvret, L. [Groupe hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France)

    2010-10-15

    As between 5 and 14 per cent of patients suffering from cancer will suffer from a metastatic medullary compression which severely impacts the vital and functional prognostic, the authors proposes an overview of the different techniques used to take these compressions into care: surgery, radiotherapy and cortico-therapy. They describe their positive and negative impacts. Short communication

  6. Modeling the mechanical and compression properties of polyamide/elastane knitted fabrics used in compression sportswear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maqsood, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    A compression sportswear fabric should have excellent stretch and recovery properties in order to improve the performance of the sportsman. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of elastane linear density and loop length on the stretch, recovery, and compression properties of the

  7. Interfragmentary compression profile of 4 headless bone screws: an analysis of the compression lost on reinsertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, A W; Yew, Y T; Neo, P Y; Lau, C C; Tay, S C

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the interfragmentary compression force generated by 4 different types of headless compression screws and to examine the effects of removal and reinsertion of the screw. We chose foot bones rather than scaphoids for the model because they were larger and would enable comparison of 2 screw designs in the same bone, thereby controlling for the effect of interspecimen variability. A transverse osteotomy was made in 10 fresh-frozen cadaveric navicular bones and 10 medial cuneiforms. A load cell was used to measure compression between the 2 fragments as a screw was inserted across the fracture. Each bone was tested twice, with an Acutrak Mini (Acumed, Hillsboro, OR; n = 10) and an SBi AutoFIX screw (SBi, Morrisville, PA; n = 10) or an Extremifix (Osteomed, Addison, TX; n = 10) and a Barouk screw (Depuy, Warsaw, IN; n = 10). Compression was recorded at initial insertion and on removal and reinsertion of the screw twice to the same position. Compression was also measured after one additional full turn further than the initial position. The mean interfragmentary compression generated by the Acutrak Mini screw was greater than that of the SBi AutoFIX screw (96 N vs 22 N). There was a trend toward a greater mean compression generated by the Extremifix screw compared to the Barouk screw (85 N vs 22 N). There was a significant loss of compression upon removal and reinsertion of the screws. An additional full turn of the screw was able to re-establish a large proportion of the original compression. The compression forces achieved by headless screw systems appeared to vary according to the screw design, depth of insertion, and the quality of the bone. Substantial compression was lost if the screw was removed and replaced. Some screw designs appeared to require a greater depth of insertion to achieve effective compression, and the number of additional turns required to re-establish compression might vary according to the thread design. Surgeons should be aware of the

  8. Integer computation of lossy JPEG2000 compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balster, Eric J; Fortener, Benjamin T; Turri, William F

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, an integer-based Cohen-Daubechies-Feauvea (CDF) 9/7 wavelet transform as well as an integer quantization method used in a lossy JPEG2000 compression engine is presented. The conjunction of both an integer transform and quantization step allows for a complete integer computation of lossy JPEG2000 compression. The lossy method of compression utilizes the CDF 9/7 wavelet filter, which transforms integer input pixel values into floating-point wavelet coefficients that are then quantized back into integers and finally compressed by the embedded block coding with optimal truncation tier-1 encoder. Integer computation of JPEG2000 allows a reduction in computational complexity of the wavelet transform as well as ease of implementation in embedded systems for higher computational performance. The results of the integer computation show an equivalent rate/distortion curve to the JasPer JPEG2000 compression engine, as well as a 30% reduction in computation time of the wavelet transform and a 56% reduction in computation time of the quantization processing on an average.

  9. Iris Recognition: The Consequences of Image Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Belcher

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Iris recognition for human identification is one of the most accurate biometrics, and its employment is expanding globally. The use of portable iris systems, particularly in law enforcement applications, is growing. In many of these applications, the portable device may be required to transmit an iris image or template over a narrow-bandwidth communication channel. Typically, a full resolution image (e.g., VGA is desired to ensure sufficient pixels across the iris to be confident of accurate recognition results. To minimize the time to transmit a large amount of data over a narrow-bandwidth communication channel, image compression can be used to reduce the file size of the iris image. In other applications, such as the Registered Traveler program, an entire iris image is stored on a smart card, but only 4 kB is allowed for the iris image. For this type of application, image compression is also the solution. This paper investigates the effects of image compression on recognition system performance using a commercial version of the Daugman iris2pi algorithm along with JPEG-2000 compression, and links these to image quality. Using the ICE 2005 iris database, we find that even in the face of significant compression, recognition performance is minimally affected.

  10. Formulation development of carvedilol compression coated tablet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ritesh; Patel, Sachin; Patel, Hetal; Pandey, Sonia; Shah, Shailesh; Shah, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    The aim of present research was to produce carvedilol compression coated tablet to provide biphasic drug release. A compressed coated tablet made of a sustained release core tablet and an immediate release coat tablet. Both the core and the coat contained carvedilol. The sustained release effect was achieved with polymers (HPMC K4M and PEO WSR 205) to modulate the release of the drug. The powder blends for core and coat tablets were evaluated for angle of repose, bulk density, compressibility index, and drug content. Compressed coated tablets were evaluated for thickness, diameter, weight variation test, drug content, hardness, friability, disintegration and in vitro release studies. The powder blends showed satisfactory flow properties, compressibility, drug content and all the tablet formulations showed acceptable pharmaco-technical properties. Carvedilol contained in the fast releasing component was released within 3 min, whereas the drug in the core tablet was released at different times up to 24 h, depending on the composition of the matrix tablet. The mechanism of drug release was fickian diffusion or anomalous behavior. Batch F7, containing 10 mg PEO WSR 205 and 5 mg HPMC K4M, showed maximum similarity with theoretical profile and zero order drug release kinetic.

  11. Virtually Lossless Compression of Astrophysical Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Baronti

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe an image compression strategy potentially capable of preserving the scientific quality of astrophysical data, simultaneously allowing a consistent bandwidth reduction to be achieved. Unlike strictly lossless techniques, by which moderate compression ratios are attainable, and conventional lossy techniques, in which the mean square error of the decoded data is globally controlled by users, near-lossless methods are capable of locally constraining the maximum absolute error, based on user's requirements. An advanced lossless/near-lossless differential pulse code modulation (DPCM scheme, recently introduced by the authors and relying on a causal spatial prediction, is adjusted to the specific characteristics of astrophysical image data (high radiometric resolution, generally low noise, etc.. The background noise is preliminarily estimated to drive the quantization stage for high quality, which is the primary concern in most of astrophysical applications. Extensive experimental results of lossless, near-lossless, and lossy compression of astrophysical images acquired by the Hubble space telescope show the advantages of the proposed method compared to standard techniques like JPEG-LS and JPEG2000. Eventually, the rationale of virtually lossless compression, that is, a noise-adjusted lossles/near-lossless compression, is highlighted and found to be in accordance with concepts well established for the astronomers' community.

  12. JPEG compression history estimation for color images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelamani, Ramesh; de Queiroz, Ricardo; Fan, Zhigang; Dash, Sanjeeb; Baraniuk, Richard G

    2006-06-01

    We routinely encounter digital color images that were previously compressed using the Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) standard. En route to the image's current representation, the previous JPEG compression's various settings-termed its JPEG compression history (CH)-are often discarded after the JPEG decompression step. Given a JPEG-decompressed color image, this paper aims to estimate its lost JPEG CH. We observe that the previous JPEG compression's quantization step introduces a lattice structure in the discrete cosine transform (DCT) domain. This paper proposes two approaches that exploit this structure to solve the JPEG Compression History Estimation (CHEst) problem. First, we design a statistical dictionary-based CHEst algorithm that tests the various CHs in a dictionary and selects the maximum a posteriori estimate. Second, for cases where the DCT coefficients closely conform to a 3-D parallelepiped lattice, we design a blind lattice-based CHEst algorithm. The blind algorithm exploits the fact that the JPEG CH is encoded in the nearly orthogonal bases for the 3-D lattice and employs novel lattice algorithms and recent results on nearly orthogonal lattice bases to estimate the CH. Both algorithms provide robust JPEG CHEst performance in practice. Simulations demonstrate that JPEG CHEst can be useful in JPEG recompression; the estimated CH allows us to recompress a JPEG-decompressed image with minimal distortion (large signal-to-noise-ratio) and simultaneously achieve a small file-size.

  13. Compression evaluation of surgery video recordings retaining diagnostic credibility (compression evaluation of surgery video)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplaga, M.; Leszczuk, M. I.; Papir, Z.; Przelaskowski, A.

    2008-12-01

    Wider dissemination of medical digital video libraries is affected by two correlated factors, resource effective content compression that directly influences its diagnostic credibility. It has been proved that it is possible to meet these contradictory requirements halfway for long-lasting and low motion surgery recordings at compression ratios close to 100 (bronchoscopic procedures were a case study investigated). As the main supporting assumption, it has been accepted that the content can be compressed as far as clinicians are not able to sense a loss of video diagnostic fidelity (a visually lossless compression). Different market codecs were inspected by means of the combined subjective and objective tests toward their usability in medical video libraries. Subjective tests involved a panel of clinicians who had to classify compressed bronchoscopic video content according to its quality under the bubble sort algorithm. For objective tests, two metrics (hybrid vector measure and hosaka Plots) were calculated frame by frame and averaged over a whole sequence.

  14. Compressing turbulence and sudden viscous dissipation with compression-dependent ionization state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovits, Seth; Fisch, Nathaniel J

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent plasma flow, amplified by rapid three-dimensional compression, can be suddenly dissipated under continuing compression. This effect relies on the sensitivity of the plasma viscosity to the temperature, μ∼T^{5/2}. The plasma viscosity is also sensitive to the plasma ionization state. We show that the sudden dissipation phenomenon may be prevented when the plasma ionization state increases during compression, and we demonstrate the regime of net viscosity dependence on compression where sudden dissipation is guaranteed. Additionally, it is shown that, compared to cases with no ionization, ionization during compression is associated with larger increases in turbulent energy and can make the difference between growing and decreasing turbulent energy.

  15. Dynamic XRD, Shock and Static Compression of CaF2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Patricia; Specht, Paul; Root, Seth; Sinclair, Nicholas; Schuman, Adam; White, Melanie; Cornelius, Andrew; Smith, Jesse; Sinogeikin, Stanislav

    2017-06-01

    The high-pressure behavior of CaF2 is probed with x-ray diffraction (XRD) combined with both dynamic compression, using a two-stage light gas gun, and static compression, using diamond anvil cells. We use XRD to follow the unfolding of a shock-driven, fluorite to cotunnite phase transition, on the timescale of nanoseconds. The dynamic behavior of CaF2 under shock loading is contrasted with that under static compression. This work leverages experimental capabilities at the Advanced Photon Source: dynamic XRD and shock experiments at the Dynamic Compression Sector, as well as XRD and static compression in diamond anvil cell at the High-Pressure Collaborative Access Team. These experiments and cross-platform comparisons, open the door to an unprecedented understanding of equations of state and phase transitions at the microstructural level and at different time scales and will ultimately improve our capability to simulate the behavior of materials at extreme conditions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Fracture mechanisms of glass particles under dynamic compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parab, Niranjan D.; Guo, Zherui; Hudspeth, Matthew C.; Claus, Benjamin J.; Fezzaa, Kamel; Sun, Tao; Chen, Weinong W.

    2017-08-01

    In this study, dynamic fracture mechanisms of single and contacting spherical glass particles were observed using high speed synchrotron X-ray phase contrast imaging. A modified Kolsky bar setup was used to apply controlled dynamic compressive loading on the soda-lime glass particles. Four different configurations of particle arrangements with one, two, three, and five particles were studied. In single particle experiments, cracking initiated near the contact area between the particle and the platen, subsequently fragmenting the particle in many small sub-particles. In multi-particle experiments, a crack was observed to initiate from the point just outside the contact area between two particles. The initiated crack propagated at an angle to the horizontal loading direction, resulting in separation of a fragment. However, this fragment separation did not affect the ability of the particle to withstand further contact loading. On further compression, large number of cracks initiated in the particle with the highest number of particle-particle contacts near one of the particle-particle contacts. The initiated cracks roughly followed the lines joining the contact points. Subsequently, the initiated cracks along with the newly developed sub-cracks bifurcated rapidly as they propagated through the particle and fractured the particle explosively into many small fragments, leaving the other particles nearly intact.

  17. High precision Hugoniot measurements of D2 near maximum compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benage, John; Knudson, Marcus; Desjarlais, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The Hugoniot response of liquid deuterium has been widely studied due to its general importance and to the significant discrepancy in the inferred shock response obtained from early experiments. With improvements in dynamic compression platforms and experimental standards these results have converged and show general agreement with several equation of state (EOS) models, including quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) calculations within the Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA). This approach to modeling the EOS has also proven quite successful for other materials and is rapidly becoming a standard approach. However, small differences remain among predictions obtained using different local and semi-local density functionals; these small differences show up in the deuterium Hugoniot at ~ 30-40 GPa near the region of maximum compression. Here we present experimental results focusing on that region of the Hugoniot and take advantage of advancements in the platform and standards, resulting in data with significantly higher precision than that obtained in previous studies. These new data may prove to distinguish between the subtle differences predicted by the various density functionals. Results of these experiments will be presented along with comparison to various QMD calculations. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Effect of saccade automaticity on perisaccadic space compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele eFornaciai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Briefly presented stimuli occurring just before or during a saccadic eye movement are mislocalized, leading to a compression of visual space toward the target of the saccade. In most cases this has been measured in subjects over-trained to perform a stereotyped and unnatural task where saccades are repeatedly driven to the same location, marked by a highly salient abrupt onset. Here we asked to what extent the pattern of perisaccadic mislocalization depends on this specific context. We addressed this question by studying perisaccadic localization in a set of participants with no prior experience in eye-movement research, measuring localization performance as they practiced the saccade task. Localization was marginally affected by practice over the course of the experiment and it was indistinguishable from the performance of expert observers. The mislocalization also remained similar when the expert observers were tested in a condition leading to less stereotypical saccadic behavior – with no abrupt onset marking the saccade target location. These results indicate that perisaccadic compression is a robust behavior, insensitive to the specific paradigm used to drive saccades and to the level of practice with the saccade task.

  19. Compressive imaging based on clustering sub-dictionary learning and gradient histogram preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qinfen; Gu, Guohua; Sun, Yicheng; Sui, Xiubao

    2017-07-01

    This paper proposes a novel imaging technique which combines clustering sub-dictionary learning and gradient histogram preservation to improve the quality of compressive imaging from two aspects: edge sharpness and noise suppression. Practical experiments further demonstrate better results on practical optical imaging application in terms of weighted peak signal-to-noise ratio and measure of feature similarity index.

  20. Chloride transport under compressive load in bacteria-based self-healing concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binti Md Yunus, B.; Schlangen, E.; Jonkers, H.M.

    2015-01-01

    An experiment was carried out in this study to investigate the effect of compressive load on chloride penetration in self-healing concrete containing bacterial-based healing agent. Bacteria-based healing agent with the fraction of 2 mm – 4 mm of particles sizes were used in this contribution. ESEM