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Sample records for subpart doses caused

  1. Dose limits cause unacceptable risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, Sylvia.

    1985-01-01

    This paper on radiation dose limits for workers and the public discusses the following: Medical Research Council report; safety standards; risk assessment; deaths from cancers; biological radiation effects; UK legislation; low-level radiation; public concern; UKAEA staff survey; Ionising Radiations Regulations; United Nations Scientific Committee on Effects of Atomic Radiation; US studies on work force in nuclear establishments; problems of extrapolation; Japanese data from Hiroshima and Nagasaki; International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations; studies on uranium miners; UK Health and Safety Executive; UK National Radiological Protection Board. (U.K.)

  2. Calculation of the dose caused by internal radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    For the purposes of monitoring radiation exposure it is necessary to determine or to estimate the dose caused by both external and internal radiation. When comparing the value of exposure to the dose limits, account must be taken of the total dose incurred from different sources. This guide explains how to calculate the committed effective dose caused by internal radiation and gives the conversion factors required for the calculation. Application of the maximum values for radiation exposure is dealt with in ST guide 7.2, which also sets out the definitions of the quantities and concepts most commonly used in the monitoring of radiation exposure. The monitoring of exposure and recording of doses are dealt with in ST Guides 7.1 and 7.4.

  3. Prehospital high-dose sublingual nitroglycerin rarely causes hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemency, Brian M; Thompson, Jeffrey J; Tundo, Gina N; Lindstrom, Heather A

    2013-10-01

    High-dose intravenous nitroglycerin is a common in-hospital treatment for respiratory distress due to congestive heart failure (CHF) with hypertension. Intravenous (IV) nitroglycerin administration is impractical in the prehospital setting. In 2011, a new regional Emergency Medical Services (EMS) protocol was introduced allowing advanced providers to treat CHF with high-dose oral nitroglycerin. The protocol calls for patients to be treated with two sublingual tabs (0.8 mg) when systolic blood pressure (SBP) was >160 mm Hg, or three sublingual tabs (1.2 mg) when SBP was >200 mm Hg, every five minutes as needed. Hypothesis/Problem To assess the protocol's safety, the incidence of hypotension following prehospital administration of multiple simultaneous nitroglycerin (MSN) tabs by EMS providers was studied. This study was a retrospective cohort study of patients from a single commercial EMS agency over a 6-month period. Records from patients with at least one administration of MSN were reviewed. For each administration, the first documented vital signs pre- and post-administration were compared. Administrations were excluded if pre- or post-administration vital signs were missing. One hundred case-patients had at least one MSN administration by an advanced provider during the study period. Twenty-five case-patients were excluded due to incomplete vital signs. Seventy-five case-patients with 95 individual MSN administrations were included for analysis. There were 65 administrations of two tabs, 29 administrations of three tabs, and one administration of four tabs. The mean change in SBP following MSN was -14.7 mm Hg (SD = 30.7; range, +59 to -132). Three administrations had documented systolic hypotension in the post-administration vital signs (97/71, 78/50 and 66/47). All three patients were over 65 years old, were administered two tabs, had documented improved respiratory status, and had repeat SBP of at least 100. The incidence of hypotension following MSN

  4. Methamphetamine treatment during development attenuates the dopaminergic deficits caused by subsequent high-dose methamphetamine administration

    OpenAIRE

    McFadden, Lisa M; Hoonakker, Amanda J; Vieira-Brock, Paula L; Stout, Kristen A; Sawada, Nicole M; Ellis, Jonathan D; Allen, Scott C; Walters, Elliot T; Nielsen, Shannon M; Gibb, James W; Alburges, Mario E; Wilkins, Diana G; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2011-01-01

    Administration of high doses of methamphetamine (METH) causes persistent dopaminergic deficits in both nonhuman preclinical models and METH-dependent persons. Noteworthy, adolescent (i.e., postnatal day (PND) 40) rats are less susceptible to this damage than young adult (PND90) rats. In addition, biweekly treatment with METH, beginning at PND40 and continuing throughout development, prevents the persistent dopaminergic deficits caused by a “challenge” high-dose METH regimen when administered ...

  5. Assessment of skin dose modification caused by application of immobilizing cast in head and neck radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman; Toossi, Mohammad T.B.; Khosroabadi, Mohsen; Noghreiyan, Atefeh Vejdani; Shahidsales, Soodabeh; Tabrizi, Fatemeh Varshoee

    2014-01-01

    Skin dose assessment for radiotherapy patients is important to ensure that the dose received by skin is not excessive and does not cause skin reactions. Immobilizing casts may have a buildup effect, and can enhance the skin dose. This study has quantified changes to the surface dose as a result of head and neck immobilizing casts. Medtech and Renfu casts were stretched on the head of an Alderson Rando-Phantom. Irradiation was performed using 6 and 15 MV X-rays, and surface dose was measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters. In the case of 15MV photons, immobilizing casts had no effect on the surface dose. However, the mean surface dose increase reached up to 20 % when 6MV X-rays were applied. Radiation incidence angle, thickness, and meshed pattern of the casts affected the quantity of dose enhancement. For vertical beams, the surface dose increase was more than tangential beams, and when doses of the points under different areas of the casts were analysed separately, results showed that only doses of the points under the thick area had been changed. Doses of the points under the thin area and those within the holes were identical to the same points without immobilizing casts. Higher dose which was incurred due to application of immobilizing casts (20 %) would not affect the quality of life and treatment of patients whose head and neck are treated. Therefore, the benefits of head and neck thermoplastic casts are more than their detriments. However, producing thinner casts with larger holes may reduce the dose enhancement effect.

  6. Subacute Low Dose Nerve Agent Exposure Causes DNA Fragmentation in Guinea Pig Leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    1 SUBACUTE LOW DOSE NERVE AGENT EXPOSURE CAUSES DNA FRAGMENTATION IN GUINEA PIG LEUKOCYTES. Jitendra R. Dave1, John R. Moffett1, Sally M...DNA fragmentation in blood leukocytes from guinea pigs by ‘Comet’ assay after exposure to soman at doses ranging from 0.1LD50 to 0.4 LD50, once per...computer. Data obtained for exposure to soman demonstrated significant increases in DNA fragmentation in circulating leukocytes in CWNA treated guinea pigs as

  7. Validation of a model for calculating environmental doses caused by gamma emitters in the soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, X.; Rosell, J.R.; Dies, X.

    1991-01-01

    A model has been developed to calculate the absorbed dose rates caused by gamma emitters of both natural and artificial origin distributed in the soil. The model divides the soil into five compartments corresponding to layers situated at different depths, and assumes that the concentration of radionuclides is constant in each one of them. The calculations, following the model developed, are undertaken through a program which, based on the concentrations of the radionuclides in the different compartments, gives as a result the dose rate at a height of one metre above the ground caused by each radionuclide and the percentage this represents with respect to the total absorbed dose rate originating from this soil. The validity of the model has been checked in the case of sandy soils by comparing the exposure rates calculated for five sites with the experimental values obtained with an ionisation chamber. (author)

  8. Agricultural measures to reduce radiation doses to man caused by severe nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorp, F. van; Eleveld, R.; Frissel, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    Agricultural land and products may become contaminated after a severe nuclear accident. If radiation doses to man caused by the ingestion of contaminated agricultural products from such areas will be unacceptably high, measures to reduce this radiation dose will have to be taken. Radiation doses to man can be estimated by using models which describe quantitatively the transfer of radionuclides through the biosphere. The following processes and pathways are described in this study: accidental releases into atmospheric environments and subsequent nearby deposition; contamination of crops by direct deposition and the subsequent short term pathway (e.g. grass-cow-milk-man); contamination of soil and the subsequent long term pathway (e.g. soil-crop-man, soil-grass-cattle-milk/meat-man). Depending on the degree of contamination and on the estimated radiation doses to man, various measures are advised. (Auth.)

  9. Exposure to low-dose barium by drinking water causes hearing loss in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohgami, Nobutaka; Hori, Sohjiro; Ohgami, Kyoko; Tamura, Haruka; Tsuzuki, Toyonori; Ohnuma, Shoko; Kato, Masashi

    2012-10-01

    We continuously ingest barium as a general element by drinking water and foods in our daily life. Exposure to high-dose barium (>100mg/kg/day) has been shown to cause physiological impairments. Direct administration of barium to inner ears by vascular perfusion has been shown to cause physiological impairments in inner ears. However, the toxic influence of oral exposure to low-dose barium on hearing levels has not been clarified in vivo. We analyzed the toxic influence of oral exposure to low-dose barium on hearing levels and inner ears in mice. We orally administered barium at low doses of 0.14 and 1.4 mg/kg/day to wild-type ICR mice by drinking water. The doses are equivalent to and 10-fold higher than the limit level (0.7 mg/l) of WHO health-based guidelines for drinking water, respectively. After 2-week exposure, hearing levels were measured by auditory brain stem responses and inner ears were morphologically analyzed. After 2-month exposure, tissue distribution of barium was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Low-dose barium in drinking water caused severe hearing loss in mice. Inner ears including inner and outer hair cells, stria vascularis and spiral ganglion neurons showed severe degeneration. The Barium-administered group showed significantly higher levels of barium in inner ears than those in the control group, while barium levels in bone did not show a significant difference between the two groups. Barium levels in other tissues including the cerebrum, cerebellum, heart, liver and kidney were undetectably low in both groups. Our results demonstrate for the first time that low-dose barium administered by drinking water specifically distributes to inner ears resulting in severe ototoxicity with degeneration of inner ears in mice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Case of severe intestinal complications caused by high dose-rate intracavitary irradiation for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, Kenji; Nishikawa, Kiyoshi; Matsuki, Kazuhiko; Watanabe, Katsushi

    1987-02-01

    A 46-year-old woman with severe intestinal complication caused by high dose-rate intracavitary irradiation is reported. She received radiation treatment of stage IIb cervical cancer between July 24 and September 26, 1984: a dose of 2400 rad to a point A concurrently with 2000 rad to the parametrium following 4000 rad to the whole pelvis. Eight months later she developed diarrhea and bloody stool. Barium enema study revealed a stenosis at 20 to 25 cm from the anal ring and romanoscopy oozing coagula at the same site. On November 29, 1985 transverse colostomy was performed because of continuing bloody stool and abdominal pain. On January 30, 1986 resection of the ileum and ileostomy were done because of the ileum perforation located 26 cm apart from the ileum end. Some discussion on the causes of this complication are made, suggesting that short length of a tandem and deep location of ovoids influence its cause.

  11. High-dose Sulbactam Treatment for Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia Caused by Carbapenem-Resistant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Beom Jeong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Several antibiotics can be used to treat ventilator-associated pneumonia caused by carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii (CRAB-VAP including high-dose sulbactam. However, the effectiveness of high-dose sulbactam therapy is not well known. We report our experience with high-dose sulbactam for treatment of CRAB-VAP. Methods Medical records of patients with CRAB-VAP who were given high-dose sulbactam between May 2013 and June 2015 were reviewed. Results Fifty-eight patients with CRAB-VAP were treated with high-dose sulbactam. The mean age was 72.0 ± 15.2 years, and the acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II score was 15.1 ± 5.10 at the time of CRAB-VAP diagnosis. Early clinical improvement was observed in 65.5% of patients, and 30-day mortality was 29.3%. Early clinical failure (odds ratio [OR]: 8.720, confidence interval [CI]: 1.346-56.484; p = 0.023 and APACHE II score ≥ 14 at CRAB-VAP diagnosis (OR: 10.934, CI: 1.047-114.148; p = 0.046 were associated with 30-day mortality. Conclusions High-dose sulbactam therapy may be effective for the treatment of CRAB-VAP. However, early clinical failure was observed in 35% of patients and was associated with poor outcome.

  12. Standard dose 131I therapy for hyperthyroidism caused by autonomously functioning thyroid nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fui, S.C.N.T.; Maisey, M.N.

    1979-01-01

    Thirty-one patients with hyperthyroidism shown on scintigrams to have autonomously functioning thyroid nodules were treated with a standard dose of 15mCi of 131 I. Of thirty patients who have been followed up for at least 6 months to over 3 years, all but one patient were euthyroid after a single dose. Repeat scintigram and Thyrotropin Releasing Hormone test after therapy confirmed that twenty-five patients were cured of the disease. Only one patient developed hypothyroidism. This simplified dose regimen of radioiodine is effective in the treatment of hyperthyroidism caused by autonomously functioning nodules and is not complicated by the high incidence of hyperthyroidism that is observed following radioiodine therapy of Grave's disease. (author)

  13. Radiation retinopathy caused by low dose irradiation and antithyroid drug-induced systemic vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonoda, Koh-hei; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2005-01-01

    We report on a patient with Graves' disease with radiation retinopathy caused by low-dose irradiation and antithyroid drug-induced antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-positive vasculitis. A 38-year-old woman with Graves' disease presented with bilateral blurred vision, micro-aneurysms, telangiectasia, and macular edema. The patient was examined by ophthalmoscopy and fluorescein angiography, and radiation retinopathy was diagnosed. The patient had been treated with low-dose irradiation for her Graves' ophthalmopathy a few years earlier. She also had ANCA-positive vasculitis induced by the antithyroid drug (propylthiouracil, PTU) that had been prescribed for her at that time. Because of multiple avascular areas on both retinas, she was treated by intensive retinal photocoagulation to control progressive retinopathy. The radiation doses used to treat Graves' disease ophthalmopathy are low. Nevertheless, there is still a risk of radiation retinopathy developing in patients with PTU-induced ANCA-positive vasculitis. (author)

  14. Effects of low priming dose irradiation on cell cycle arrest of HepG2 cells caused by high dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Jingguang; Jin Xiaodong; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Li Wenjian; Wang Jufang; Guo Chuanling; Gao Qingxiang

    2005-01-01

    Human hepatoma cells hepG2 were irradiated twice by 60 Co γ-rays with a priming dose of 5 cGy and a higher dose of 3 Gy performed 4h or 8h after the low dose irradiation. Effects of the priming dose irradiation on cell cycle arrest caused by high dose were examined with flow cytometry. Cells in G 2 /M phase accumulated temporarily after the 5 cGy irradiation, and proliferation of tumor cells was promoted significantly by the low dose irradiation. After the 3 Gy irradiation, G 2 phase arrest occurred, and S phase delayed temporally. In comparison with 3 kGy irradiation only, the priming dose delivered 4h prior to the high dose irradiation facilitated accumulation of hepG2 cells in G 2 /M phase, whereas the priming dose delivered 8h prior to the high dose irradiation helped the cells to overcome G 2 arrest. It was concluded that effects of the priming dose treatment on cell cycle arrest caused by high dose irradiation were dependent on time interval between the two irradiations. (authors)

  15. Assessment of doses caused by electrons in thin layers of tissue-equivalent materials, using MCNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heide, Bernd

    2013-10-01

    Absorbed doses caused by electron irradiation were calculated with Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP) for thin layers of tissue-equivalent materials. The layers were so thin that the calculation of energy deposition was on the border of the scope of MCNP. Therefore, in this article application of three different methods of calculation of energy deposition is discussed. This was done by means of two scenarios: in the first one, electrons were emitted from the centre of a sphere of water and also recorded in that sphere; and in the second, an irradiation with the PTB Secondary Standard BSS2 was modelled, where electrons were emitted from an (90)Sr/(90)Y area source and recorded inside a cuboid phantom made of tissue-equivalent material. The speed and accuracy of the different methods were of interest. While a significant difference in accuracy was visible for one method in the first scenario, the difference in accuracy of the three methods was insignificant for the second one. Considerable differences in speed were found for both scenarios. In order to demonstrate the need for calculating the dose in thin small zones, a third scenario was constructed and simulated as well. The third scenario was nearly equal to the second one, but a pike of lead was assumed to be inside the phantom in addition. A dose enhancement (caused by the pike of lead) of ∼113 % was recorded for a thin hollow cylinder at a depth of 0.007 cm, which the basal-skin layer is referred to in particular. Dose enhancements between 68 and 88 % were found for a slab with a radius of 0.09 cm for all depths. All dose enhancements were hardly noticeable for a slab with a cross-sectional area of 1 cm(2), which is usually applied to operational radiation protection.

  16. Methamphetamine treatment during development attenuates the dopaminergic deficits caused by subsequent high-dose methamphetamine administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Lisa M; Hoonakker, Amanda J; Vieira-Brock, Paula L; Stout, Kristen A; Sawada, Nicole M; Ellis, Jonathan D; Allen, Scott C; Walters, Elliot T; Nielsen, Shannon M; Gibb, James W; Alburges, Mario E; Wilkins, Diana G; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2011-08-01

    Administration of high doses of methamphetamine (METH) causes persistent dopaminergic deficits in both nonhuman preclinical models and METH-dependent persons. Noteworthy, adolescent [i.e., postnatal day (PND) 40] rats are less susceptible to this damage than young adult (PND90) rats. In addition, biweekly treatment with METH, beginning at PND40 and continuing throughout development, prevents the persistent dopaminergic deficits caused by a "challenge" high-dose METH regimen when administered at PND90. Mechanisms underlying this "resistance" were thus investigated. Results revealed that biweekly METH treatment throughout development attenuated both the acute and persistent deficits in VMAT2 function, as well as the acute hyperthermia, caused by a challenge METH treatment. Pharmacokinetic alterations did not appear to contribute to the protection afforded by the biweekly treatment. Maintenance of METH-induced hyperthermia abolished the protection against both the acute and persistent VMAT2-associated deficits suggesting that alterations in thermoregulation were caused by exposure of rats to METH during development. These findings suggest METH during development prevents METH-induced hyperthermia and the consequent METH-related neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Radiation doses and cause-specific mortality among workers at a nuclear materials fabrication plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Checkoway, H.; Pearce, N.; Crawford-Brown, D.J.; Cragle, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    A historical cohort mortality study was conducted among 6781 white male employees from a nuclear weapons materials fabrication plant for the years 1947-1979. Exposures of greatest concern are alpha and gamma radiation emanating primarily from insoluble uranium compounds. Among monitored workers, the mean cumulative alpha radiation dose to the lung was 8.21 rem, and the mean cumulative external whole body penetrating dose from gamma radiation was 0.96 rem. Relative to US white males, the cohort experienced mortality deficits from all causes combined, cardiovascular diseases, and from most site-specific cancers. Mortality excesses of lung and brain and central nervous system cancers were seen from comparisons with national and state rates. Dose-response trends were detected for lung cancer mortality with respect to cumulative alpha and gamma radiation, with the most pronounced trend occurring for gamma radiation among workers who received greater than or equal to 5 rem of alpha radiation. These trends diminished in magnitude when a 10-year latency assumption was applied. Under a zero-year latency assumption, the rate ratio for lung cancer mortality associated with joint exposure of greater than or equal to 5 versus less than 1 rem of both types of radiation is 4.60 (95% confidence limits (CL) 0.91, 23.35), while the corresponding result, assuming a 10-year latency, is 3.05 (95% CL 0.37, 24.83). While these rate ratios, which are based on three and one death, respectively, lack statistical precision, the observed dose-response trends indicate potential carcinogenic effects to the lung of relatively low-dose radiation. There are no dose-response trends for mortality from brain and central nervous system cancers

  18. High Dose Ascorbate Causes Both Genotoxic and Metabolic Stress in Glioma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Maria Leticia; Carson, Georgia M.; McConnell, Melanie J.; Herst, Patries M.

    2017-01-01

    We have previously shown that exposure to high dose ascorbate causes double stranded breaks (DSBs) and a build-up in S-phase in glioblastoma (GBM) cell lines. Here we investigated whether or not this was due to genotoxic stress as well as metabolic stress generated by exposure to high dose ascorbate, radiation, ascorbate plus radiation and H2O2 in established and primary GBM cell lines. Genotoxic stress was measured as phosphorylation of the variant histone protein, H2AX, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8OH-dG) positive cells and cells with comet tails. Metabolic stress was measured as a decrease in NADH flux, mitochondrial membrane potential (by CMXRos), ATP levels (by ATP luminescence) and mitochondrial superoxide production (by mitoSOX). High dose ascorbate, ascorbate plus radiation, and H2O2 treatments induced both genotoxic and metabolic stress. Exposure to high dose ascorbate blocked DNA synthesis in both DNA damaged and undamaged cell of ascorbate sensitive GBM cell lines. H2O2 treatment blocked DNA synthesis in all cell lines with and without DNA damage. DNA synthesis arrest in cells with damaged DNA is likely due to both genotoxic and metabolic stress. However, arrest in DNA synthesis in cells with undamaged DNA is likely due to oxidative damage to components of the mitochondrial energy metabolism pathway. PMID:28737676

  19. The daily radon dose in body organs caused by drinking milk and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansoureh Mansour Bahmani; Mohammad Reza Rezaie; Elham Rezvan Nejad; Hassan Reza Dehghan

    2014-01-01

    Milk is considered as the richest nutrition, being used by people. When drinking milk or water the radon gas will transfer from air to them rapidly. Since milk is majorly composed of water, probably radon existence in livestock consumable water could be the main cause of its presence in milk. Different portion of milk changed by radon gamma ray and consumption of radon included water or milk has its effects on the human body. For investigation the effect of radon in water or milk on human organs, this study has been done in two phases with MCNPX software. In the first phase, the dose rate of absorbed gamma ray by different portion of milk which is indoctrinated by 1 Bq/m 3 of radon during a day is calculated. Moreover, the effects shown by milk and its components in radon gamma spectrum, which is demonstrator of milk absorption spectrum, are also surveyed. In the second phase as well, according to the human body phantom, the absorbed gamma dose caused by daily consumption of indoctrinated water or milk with 1 Bq/m 3 radon is calculated. The production rate of free radicals in milk and its different components are derived according to escape data of MCNPX code. (author)

  20. The public committed effective dose caused by consumption of foods and foodstuffs in Ninh Thuan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Trong Ngo; Nguyen Thanh Binh; Le Nhu Sieu; Truong Y; Nguyen Van Phuc; Nguyen Thi Linh; Nguyen Dinh Tung

    2014-01-01

    Based on the data set about radionuclides concentration in foods and foodstuffs obtained from the implementation of the National Projects on “Investigation on radionuclides and toxic elements concentration in the main kinds of foods and foodstuffs of Vietnam” and “Assessment of Marine Environmental Radioactivity Status for two selected sites of Nuclear Power Plant in the near future at Ninh Thuan Province”, a calculation software of the International Commission for Radiological Protection (ICRP), the public committed effective doses (for adult only) caused by consumption of main foods & foodstuffs in the studied experimental region were estimated. In general, the committed effective doses for adult public caused by the daily intake of radionuclides of U, 232 Th, 210 Pb, 210 Po, 226 Ra, 40 K, 90 Sr, 137 Cs and 239,240 Pu are: 7.9x10 -5 , 4.1x10 -6 , 1.1x10 -2 , 1.7x10 -1 , 1.4x10 -3 , 1.2x10 -1 , 2.32x10 -4 , 1.9x10 -4 , 2.7x10 -9 (mSv/year), respectively, and the contribution of U, Th series, 40 K and artificial radionuclides are 61.3%, 38.6% and 0.1%, respectively. (author)

  1. Dose variations caused by setup errors in intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy: A PRESAGE study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, Kieyin; Gagliardi, Frank; Alqathami, Mamdooh; Ackerly, Trevor; Geso, Moshi

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) requires tight margins around the tumor, thus producing a steep dose gradient between the tumor and the surrounding healthy tissue. Any setup errors might become clinically significant. To date, no study has been performed to evaluate the dosimetric variations caused by setup errors with a 3-dimensional dosimeter, the PRESAGE. This research aimed to evaluate the potential effect that setup errors have on the dose distribution of intracranial SRT. Computed tomography (CT) simulation of a CIRS radiosurgery head phantom was performed with 1.25-mm slice thickness. An ideal treatment plan was generated using Brainlab iPlan. A PRESAGE was made for every treatment with and without errors. A prescan using the optical CT scanner was carried out. Before treatment, the phantom was imaged using Brainlab ExacTrac. Actual radiotherapy treatments with and without errors were carried out with the Novalis treatment machine. Postscan was performed with an optical CT scanner to analyze the dose irradiation. The dose variation between treatments with and without errors was determined using a 3-dimensional gamma analysis. Errors are clinically insignificant when the passing ratio of the gamma analysis is 95% and above. Errors were clinically significant when the setup errors exceeded a 0.7-mm translation and a 0.5° rotation. The results showed that a 3-mm translation shift in the superior-inferior (SI), right-left (RL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions and 2° couch rotation produced a passing ratio of 53.1%. Translational and rotational errors of 1.5 mm and 1°, respectively, generated a passing ratio of 62.2%. Translation shift of 0.7 mm in the directions of SI, RL, and AP and a 0.5° couch rotation produced a passing ratio of 96.2%. Preventing the occurrences of setup errors in intracranial SRT treatment is extremely important as errors greater than 0.7 mm and 0.5° alter the dose distribution. The geometrical displacements affect dose delivery

  2. High doses of salicylate causes prepulse facilitation of onset-gap induced acoustic startle response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Doolittle, Lauren; Flowers, Elizabeth; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Qiuju

    2014-01-01

    Prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle reflex (PPI), a well-established method for evaluating sensorimotor gating function, has been used to detect tinnitus in animal models. Reduced gap induced PPI (gap-PPI) was considered as a sign of tinnitus. The silent gap used in the test contains both onset and offset signals. Tinnitus may affect these cues differently. In this experiment, we studied the effects of a high dose of salicylate (250 mg/kg, i.p.), an inducer of reversible tinnitus and sensorineural hearing loss, on gap-PPI induced by three different gaps: an onset-gap with 0.1 ms onset and 25 ms offset time, an offset-gap with 25 ms onset and 0.1 ms offset time, and an onset-offset-gap with 0.1 ms onset and offset time. We found that the onset-gaps induced smaller inhibitions than the offset-gaps before salicylate treatment. The offset-gap induced PPI was significantly reduced 1-3h after salicylate treatment. However, the onset-gap caused a facilitation of startle response. These results suggest that salicylate induced reduction of gap-PPI was not only caused by the decrease of offset-gap induced PPI, but also by the facilitation induced by the onset-gap. Since the onset-gap induced PPI is caused by neural offset response, our results suggest that salicylate may cause a facilitation of neural response to an offset acoustical signal. Treatment of vigabatrin (60 mg/kg/day, 14 days), which elevates the GABA level in the brain, blocked the offset-gap induced PPI and onset-gap induced facilitation caused by salicylate. These results suggest that enhancing GABAergic activities can alleviate salicylate induced tinnitus. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Psilocybin dose-dependently causes delayed, transient headaches in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew W; Sewell, R Andrew; Griffiths, Roland R

    2012-06-01

    Psilocybin is a well-characterized classic hallucinogen (psychedelic) with a long history of religious use by indigenous cultures, and nonmedical use in modern societies. Although psilocybin is structurally related to migraine medications, and case studies suggest that psilocybin may be efficacious in treatment of cluster headache, little is known about the relationship between psilocybin and headache. This double-blind study examined a broad range of psilocybin doses (0, 5, 10, 20, and 30 mg/70 kg) on headache in 18 healthy participants. Psilocybin frequently caused headache, the incidence, duration, and severity of which increased in a dose-dependent manner. All headaches had delayed onset, were transient, and lasted no more than a day after psilocybin administration. Possible mechanisms for these observations are discussed, and include induction of delayed headache through nitric oxide release. These data suggest that headache is an adverse event to be expected with the nonmedical use of psilocybin-containing mushrooms as well as the administration of psilocybin in human research. Headaches were neither severe nor disabling, and should not present a barrier to future psilocybin research. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Leukoencephalopathy in childhood hematopoietic neoplasm caused by moderate-dose methotrexate and prophylactic cranial radiotherapy -- an MR analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Ko; Takahashi, Shoki; Sato, Atsushi; Imaizumi, Masue; Higano, Shuichi; Sakamoto, Kiyohiko; Asakawa, Hiroshi; Tada, Keiya

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The main purpose of this study was to determine influential factors related to minor leukoencephalopathy (LEP) caused by moderate-dose methotrexate (MTX) and prophylactic cranial radiotherapy (CRT) in childhood hematopoietic malignancies. We also compared the incidence of LEP following this treatment to that reported in the literature following treatment with high-dose MTX alone. Methods and Materials: Thirty-eight pediatric patients of hematopoietic malignancies (37 acute lymphoblastic leukemias, 1 non-Hodgkin lymphoma) who were given CRT (18-24 Gy) as well as prophylactic intrathecal and per os MTX were studied for leukoencephalopathy by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. All the patients were free from grave neuropsychiatric disturbances. The data were examined to elucidate the influential ones of five factors (patients' age, doses of intrathecal and per os MTX, dose of CRT, interval between treatment, and MR study) to develop LEP using multiple regression analysis. To compare the effect of moderate-dose MTX and prophylactic CRT on LEP to that of high-dose MTX alone, we conducted literature review. Results: Seven out of 38 patients (18%) developed LEP. From multiple regression analysis and partial correlation coefficients, the age and CRT dose seemed influential in the subsequent development of LEP. The incidence of LEP following treatment with moderate-dose MTX and prophylactic CRT appears to be less than that reported in the literature following treatment with intravenous high-dose MTX. However, even moderate-dose MTX in combination with CRT can result in a significant incidence of MR-detectable LEP, particularly in children 6 years of age or younger receiving 24 Gy. Conclusion: Leukoencephalopathy was caused by moderate-dose MTX and prophylactic CRT in pediatric patients, probably less frequently than by high-dose MTX treatment alone. The influential factors were patient's age and CRT dose

  5. Root cause analysis of the radiation workers (radiography) in excess doses of NBD (case study: PT. XYZ)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arifin M Wibowo; Fajariadi; Aditia Anamta

    2013-01-01

    Negligence and non-compliance is the main factor of causing an incident in radiography. It shown as the result of TLD evaluation of PT. XYZ workers exceeding the dose limit (NBD). Root cause analysis stage begin in collecting data such as license, workers permit, dose, and incident sequence report. Causal chart is a tool to identification root cause to make easier of the analysis. Results of collecting data are to be clarified in BAPETEN investigation and then there are some a recommendation to facility. (author)

  6. Evaluating correlation between geometrical relationship and dose difference caused by respiratory motion using statistical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Dong Seok; Kim, Dong Su; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Kyeong Hyeon; Yoon, Do Kun; Suh, Tae Suk [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Seong Hee [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Min Seok [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Yu Yoon [Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Three-dimensional dose (3D dose) can consider coverage of moving target, however it is difficult to provide dosimetric effect which occurs by respiratory motions. Four-dimensional dose (4D dose) which uses deformable image registration (DIR) algorithm from four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images can consider dosimetric effect by respiratory motions. The dose difference between 3D dose and 4D dose can be varied according to the geometrical relationship between a planning target volume (PTV) and an organ at risk (OAR). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the correlation between the overlap volume histogram (OVH), which quantitatively shows the geometrical relationship between the PTV and OAR, and the dose differences. In conclusion, no significant statistical correlation was found between the OVH and dose differences. However, it was confirmed that a higher difference between the 3D and 4D doses could occur in cases that have smaller OVH value. No significant statistical correlation was found between the OVH and dose differences. However, it was confirmed that a higher difference between the 3D and 4D doses could occur in cases that have smaller OVH value.

  7. Survival, causes of death, and estimated tissue doses in a group of human beings injected with plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowland, R.E.; Durbin, P.W.

    1975-01-01

    To determine the relationship between urinary excretion and plutonium body content, 18 persons of short life expectancy were injected with plutonium between 1945 and 1947. Seventeen of these 18 individuals have been identified; eight were found to have survived for at least eight years and four are still alive today (1975). The causes of death of 13 of these individuals have been determined from death certificates; none appear to be related to the administered plutonium. Doses to the liver and to the cells on the surface of bone have been calculated for these plutonium cases. The liver doses do not appear to be high enough to be carcinogenic, but comparison of the bone-surface doses with radium doses that have induced bone tumors indicates that six of these cases have received doses high enough to be considered carcinogenic. However, no bone tumors have yet appeared. (auth)

  8. Dose deviations caused by positional inaccuracy of multileaf collimator in intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.C.; Chui, C.S.; Tsai, H.Y.; Chen, C.H.; Tsai, L.F.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Multileaf collimator (MLC) is currently a widely used system in the delivery of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The accuracy of the multileaf position plays an important role in the final outcome of the radiation treatment. According to ICRU recommendation, a dose inaccuracy over than 5% of prescribed dose affects treatment results. In order to quantify the influence of leaf positional errors on dose distribution, we set different MLC positional inaccuracy from 0 to 6 mm for step-and-shoot IMRT in clinical cases. Two-dimensional dose distributions of radiotherapy plans with different leaf displacements generated with a commercial treatment planning system. And verification films were used to measure two-dimensional dose distributions. Then a computerized dose comparison system will be introduced to analyze the dose deviations. Materials/methods: We assumed MLC positional inaccuracy from 0 to 6 mm for step-and-shoot IMRT in clinical cases by simulating the different leaf displacements with a commercial treatment planning system. Then we transferred the treatment plans with different leaf offset that may be happened in clinical situation to linear accelerator. Verification films (Kodat EDR2) were well positioned within solid water phantoms to be irradiated by the simulated plans. The films were scanned to display two-dimensional dose distributions. Finally, we compared with the dose distributions with MLC positional inaccuracy by a two-dimensional dose comparison software to analyze the deviations in Gamma indexes and normalized agreement test (NAT) values. Results: In general, the data show that larger leaf positional error induces larger dose error. More fields used for treatment generate lesser errors. Besides, leaf position relative to a field influences the degree of dose error. A leaf lying close to the border of a field leads to a more significant dose deviation than a leaf in the center. Algorithms for intensity modulation also affect

  9. Investigation of Anisotropy Caused by Cylinder Applicator on Dose Distribution around Cs-137 Brachytherapy Source using MCNP4C Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Sina

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Brachytherapy is a type of radiotherapy in which radioactive sources are used in proximity of tumors normally for treatment of malignancies in the head, prostate and cervix. Materials and Methods: The Cs-137 Selectron source is a low-dose-rate (LDR brachytherapy source used in a remote afterloading system for treatment of different cancers. This system uses active and inactive spherical sources of 2.5 mm diameter, which can be used in different configurations inside the applicator to obtain different dose distributions. In this study, first the dose distribution at different distances from the source was obtained around a single pellet inside the applicator in a water phantom using the MCNP4C Monte Carlo code. The simulations were then repeated for six active pellets in the applicator and for six point sources.  Results: The anisotropy of dose distribution due to the presence of the applicator was obtained by division of dose at each distance and angle to the dose at the same distance and angle of 90 degrees. According to the results, the doses decreased towards the applicator tips. For example, for points at the distances of 5 and 7 cm from the source and angle of 165 degrees, such discrepancies reached 5.8% and 5.1%, respectively.  By increasing the number of pellets to six, these values reached 30% for the angle of 5 degrees. Discussion and Conclusion: The results indicate that the presence of the applicator causes a significant dose decrease at the tip of the applicator compared with the dose in the transverse plane. However, the treatment planning systems consider an isotropic dose distribution around the source and this causes significant errors in treatment planning, which are not negligible, especially for a large number of sources inside the applicator.

  10. Low doses of ionizing radiation to mammalian cells may rather control than cause DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L.E.; Sondhaus, C.A.; Altman, K.I.

    1998-01-01

    This report examines the origin of tissue effects that may follow from different cellular responses to low-dose irradiation, using published data. Two principal categories of cellular responses are considered. One response category relates to the probability of radiation-induced DNA damage. The other category consists of low-dose induced metabolic changes that induce mechanisms of DNA damage mitigation, which do not operate at high levels of exposure. Modeled in this way, tissue is treated as a complex adaptive system. The interaction of the various cellular responses results in a net tissue dose-effect relation that is likely to deviate from linearity in the low-dose region. This suggests that the LNT hypothesis should be reexamined. This paper aims at demonstrating tissue effects as an expression of cellular responses, both damaging and defensive, in relation to the energy deposited in cell mass, by use of microdosimetric concepts

  11. Low doses of ionizing radiation to mammalian cells may rather control than cause DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinendegen, L.E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Medical Dept.; Bond, V.P. [Washington State Univ., Richland, WA (United States); Sondhaus, C.A. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Radiology and Radiation Control Office; Altman, K.I. [Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics

    1998-12-31

    This report examines the origin of tissue effects that may follow from different cellular responses to low-dose irradiation, using published data. Two principal categories of cellular responses are considered. One response category relates to the probability of radiation-induced DNA damage. The other category consists of low-dose induced metabolic changes that induce mechanisms of DNA damage mitigation, which do not operate at high levels of exposure. Modeled in this way, tissue is treated as a complex adaptive system. The interaction of the various cellular responses results in a net tissue dose-effect relation that is likely to deviate from linearity in the low-dose region. This suggests that the LNT hypothesis should be reexamined. This paper aims at demonstrating tissue effects as an expression of cellular responses, both damaging and defensive, in relation to the energy deposited in cell mass, by use of microdosimetric concepts.

  12. Meat Intake and the Dose of Vitamin B – Nicotinamide: Cause of the Causes of Disease Transitions, Health Divides, and Health Futures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa J Hill

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Meat and vitamin B 3 – nicotinamide – intake was high during hunter-gatherer times. Intake then fell and variances increased during and after the Neolithic agricultural revolution. Health, height, and IQ deteriorated. Low dietary doses are buffered by ‘welcoming’ gut symbionts and tuberculosis that can supply nicotinamide, but this co-evolved homeostatic metagenomic strategy risks dysbioses and impaired resistance to pathogens. Vitamin B 3 deficiency may now be common among the poor billions on a low-meat diet. Disease transitions to non-communicable inflammatory disorders (but longer lives may be driven by positive ‘meat transitions’. High doses of nicotinamide lead to reduced regulatory T cells and immune intolerance. Loss of no longer needed symbiotic ‘old friends’ compounds immunological over-reactivity to cause allergic and auto-immune diseases. Inhibition of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide consumers and loss of methyl groups or production of toxins may cause cancers, metabolic toxicity, or neurodegeneration. An optimal dosage of vitamin B 3 could lead to better health, but such a preventive approach needs more equitable meat distribution. Some people may require personalised doses depending on genetic make-up or, temporarily, when under stress.

  13. Low-dose radiation employed in diagnostic imaging causes genetic effects in cultured cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponzinibbio, Maria V.; Peral-Garcia, Pilar; Seoane, Analia; Crudeli, Cintia

    2010-01-01

    Background: Exposure to environmental, diagnostic, and occupational sources of radiation frequently involves low doses. Although these doses have no immediately noticeable impact on human health there is great interest in their long-term biological effects. Purpose: To assess immediate and time-delayed DNA damage in two cell lines exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation by using the comet assay and micronucleus test, and to compare these two techniques in the analysis of low-dose induced genotoxicity. Material and Methods: CHO and MRC-5 cells were exposed to 50 milliSievert (mSv) of ionizing radiation and assayed immediately after irradiation and at 16 or 12 passages post-irradiation, respectively. Comet assay and micronucleus test were employed. Results: The comet assay values observed in 50 mSv-treated cells were significantly higher than in the control group for both sample times and cell lines (P < 0.001). Micronuclei frequencies were higher in treated cells than in the control group (P < 0.01, CHO cells passage 16; P < 0.05, MRC-5 cells immediately after exposure; P < 0.01 MRC-5 cells passage 12). Correlation analysis between the two techniques was statistically significant (correlation coefficient 0.82, P < 0.05 and correlation coefficient 0.86, P < 0.05 for CHO and MRC-5 cells, respectively). Cells scored at passages 12 or 16 showed more damage than those scored immediately after exposure in both cell lines (no statistically significant differences). Conclusion: Cytomolecular and cytogenetic damage was observed in cells exposed to very low doses of X-rays and their progeny. A single low dose of ionizing radiation was sufficient to induce such response, indicating that mammalian cells are exquisitely sensitive to it. Comet and micronucleus assays are sensitive enough to assess this damage, although the former seems to be more efficient

  14. Image quality and dose differences caused by vendor-specific image processing of neonatal radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensakovic, William F.; O'Dell, M.C.; Letter, Haley; Kohler, Nathan; Rop, Baiywo; Cook, Jane; Logsdon, Gregory; Varich, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Image processing plays an important role in optimizing image quality and radiation dose in projection radiography. Unfortunately commercial algorithms are black boxes that are often left at or near vendor default settings rather than being optimized. We hypothesize that different commercial image-processing systems, when left at or near default settings, create significant differences in image quality. We further hypothesize that image-quality differences can be exploited to produce images of equivalent quality but lower radiation dose. We used a portable radiography system to acquire images on a neonatal chest phantom and recorded the entrance surface air kerma (ESAK). We applied two image-processing systems (Optima XR220amx, by GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI; and MUSICA"2 by Agfa HealthCare, Mortsel, Belgium) to the images. Seven observers (attending pediatric radiologists and radiology residents) independently assessed image quality using two methods: rating and matching. Image-quality ratings were independently assessed by each observer on a 10-point scale. Matching consisted of each observer matching GE-processed images and Agfa-processed images with equivalent image quality. A total of 210 rating tasks and 42 matching tasks were performed and effective dose was estimated. Median Agfa-processed image-quality ratings were higher than GE-processed ratings. Non-diagnostic ratings were seen over a wider range of doses for GE-processed images than for Agfa-processed images. During matching tasks, observers matched image quality between GE-processed images and Agfa-processed images acquired at a lower effective dose (11 ± 9 μSv; P < 0.0001). Image-processing methods significantly impact perceived image quality. These image-quality differences can be exploited to alter protocols and produce images of equivalent image quality but lower doses. Those purchasing projection radiography systems or third-party image-processing software should be aware that image processing

  15. Image quality and dose differences caused by vendor-specific image processing of neonatal radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sensakovic, William F.; O' Dell, M.C.; Letter, Haley; Kohler, Nathan; Rop, Baiywo; Cook, Jane; Logsdon, Gregory; Varich, Laura [Florida Hospital, Imaging Administration, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Image processing plays an important role in optimizing image quality and radiation dose in projection radiography. Unfortunately commercial algorithms are black boxes that are often left at or near vendor default settings rather than being optimized. We hypothesize that different commercial image-processing systems, when left at or near default settings, create significant differences in image quality. We further hypothesize that image-quality differences can be exploited to produce images of equivalent quality but lower radiation dose. We used a portable radiography system to acquire images on a neonatal chest phantom and recorded the entrance surface air kerma (ESAK). We applied two image-processing systems (Optima XR220amx, by GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI; and MUSICA{sup 2} by Agfa HealthCare, Mortsel, Belgium) to the images. Seven observers (attending pediatric radiologists and radiology residents) independently assessed image quality using two methods: rating and matching. Image-quality ratings were independently assessed by each observer on a 10-point scale. Matching consisted of each observer matching GE-processed images and Agfa-processed images with equivalent image quality. A total of 210 rating tasks and 42 matching tasks were performed and effective dose was estimated. Median Agfa-processed image-quality ratings were higher than GE-processed ratings. Non-diagnostic ratings were seen over a wider range of doses for GE-processed images than for Agfa-processed images. During matching tasks, observers matched image quality between GE-processed images and Agfa-processed images acquired at a lower effective dose (11 ± 9 μSv; P < 0.0001). Image-processing methods significantly impact perceived image quality. These image-quality differences can be exploited to alter protocols and produce images of equivalent image quality but lower doses. Those purchasing projection radiography systems or third-party image-processing software should be aware that image

  16. Low-dose radiation employed in diagnostic imaging causes genetic effects in cultured cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponzinibbio, Maria V.; Peral-Garcia, Pilar; Seoane, Analia (Inst. de Genetica Veterinaria, Univ. Nacional de La Plata CONICET, La Plata (Argentina)), e-mail: aseoane@fcv.unlp.edu.ar; Crudeli, Cintia (Agencia Nacional de Promocion Cientifica y Tecnologica, La Plata (Argentina))

    2010-11-15

    Background: Exposure to environmental, diagnostic, and occupational sources of radiation frequently involves low doses. Although these doses have no immediately noticeable impact on human health there is great interest in their long-term biological effects. Purpose: To assess immediate and time-delayed DNA damage in two cell lines exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation by using the comet assay and micronucleus test, and to compare these two techniques in the analysis of low-dose induced genotoxicity. Material and Methods: CHO and MRC-5 cells were exposed to 50 milliSievert (mSv) of ionizing radiation and assayed immediately after irradiation and at 16 or 12 passages post-irradiation, respectively. Comet assay and micronucleus test were employed. Results: The comet assay values observed in 50 mSv-treated cells were significantly higher than in the control group for both sample times and cell lines (P < 0.001). Micronuclei frequencies were higher in treated cells than in the control group (P < 0.01, CHO cells passage 16; P < 0.05, MRC-5 cells immediately after exposure; P < 0.01 MRC-5 cells passage 12). Correlation analysis between the two techniques was statistically significant (correlation coefficient 0.82, P < 0.05 and correlation coefficient 0.86, P < 0.05 for CHO and MRC-5 cells, respectively). Cells scored at passages 12 or 16 showed more damage than those scored immediately after exposure in both cell lines (no statistically significant differences). Conclusion: Cytomolecular and cytogenetic damage was observed in cells exposed to very low doses of X-rays and their progeny. A single low dose of ionizing radiation was sufficient to induce such response, indicating that mammalian cells are exquisitely sensitive to it. Comet and micronucleus assays are sensitive enough to assess this damage, although the former seems to be more efficient

  17. Estimation of internal exposure dose caused by 3H releasted at QNPP base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Meiyan; Ma Yongfu; Ni Shiying; Zhang Xinyu

    2010-01-01

    QNPP III is the first heavy water reactors nuclear power plant in China, with its 1, 2 units generating electricity in November 2002 and June 2003, respectively. This paper, based on the monitoring data of tritium concentration in environmental samples at Xiajiawan, Yangliucun, Qinlian, Qinshanzheng and Wuyuanzheng (sampling points) in the external environment around QNPP Base, in combination with the study on living and eating habits of residents around QNPP Base, presents estimated annual tritium intake of air, drinking water and food for residents (not including the organic combination tritium). In accordance with the new dose coefficient at different ages recommended by ICRP 72 Publication, it is calculated that the tritium annual intake by various approaches for infants, children and adults (at the Xiajiawan resident point) are 5.75, 9.59, 15.7 kBq/a, respectively; the annual committed effective dose are 0.33, 0.18, 0.23 μSv/a respectively. The infant group would receive the largest committed effective dose from tritium, 0.33/μSv/a, but this is only less than 1% of the effective target dose (0.05 mSv). In all, the tritium impact on surrounding areas of QNPP Phase III is very small under the normal and safe operation of HWR. (authors)

  18. Image quality and dose differences caused by vendor-specific image processing of neonatal radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensakovic, William F; O'Dell, M Cody; Letter, Haley; Kohler, Nathan; Rop, Baiywo; Cook, Jane; Logsdon, Gregory; Varich, Laura

    2016-10-01

    Image processing plays an important role in optimizing image quality and radiation dose in projection radiography. Unfortunately commercial algorithms are black boxes that are often left at or near vendor default settings rather than being optimized. We hypothesize that different commercial image-processing systems, when left at or near default settings, create significant differences in image quality. We further hypothesize that image-quality differences can be exploited to produce images of equivalent quality but lower radiation dose. We used a portable radiography system to acquire images on a neonatal chest phantom and recorded the entrance surface air kerma (ESAK). We applied two image-processing systems (Optima XR220amx, by GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI; and MUSICA(2) by Agfa HealthCare, Mortsel, Belgium) to the images. Seven observers (attending pediatric radiologists and radiology residents) independently assessed image quality using two methods: rating and matching. Image-quality ratings were independently assessed by each observer on a 10-point scale. Matching consisted of each observer matching GE-processed images and Agfa-processed images with equivalent image quality. A total of 210 rating tasks and 42 matching tasks were performed and effective dose was estimated. Median Agfa-processed image-quality ratings were higher than GE-processed ratings. Non-diagnostic ratings were seen over a wider range of doses for GE-processed images than for Agfa-processed images. During matching tasks, observers matched image quality between GE-processed images and Agfa-processed images acquired at a lower effective dose (11 ± 9 μSv; P < 0.0001). Image-processing methods significantly impact perceived image quality. These image-quality differences can be exploited to alter protocols and produce images of equivalent image quality but lower doses. Those purchasing projection radiography systems or third-party image-processing software should be aware that image

  19. A case of gait disturbance caused by low-dose gabapentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanao-Kanda, Megumi; Kanda, Hirotsugu; Takahata, Osamu; Kunisawa, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Gabapentin, an anticonvulsant agent, is now often used for the treatment of neuropathic pain all over the world. It is unclear whether the combined use of gabapentin, sodium valproate, and flunitrazepam results in enhancement of the side effect, a gait disturbance. A 60-year-old man was taking oral sodium valproate for symptomatic epilepsy after a brain contusion and flunitrazepam to relieve insomnia. Oral gabapentin therapy was started for suspected neuropathic pain. Although the initial dose of oral gabapentin (200 mg) relieved the pain, the lower extremities became weak, resulting in a gait disturbance. The therapy was restarted with a halved dose, and this resolved the gait disturbance and relieved the pain. PMID:27354808

  20. A case of gait disturbance caused by low-dose gabapentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanao-Kanda M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Megumi Kanao-Kanda, Hirotsugu Kanda, Osamu Takahata, Takayuki Kunisawa Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, Asahikawa, Hokkaido, Japan Abstract: Gabapentin, an anticonvulsant agent, is now often used for the treatment of neuropathic pain all over the world. It is unclear whether the combined use of gabapentin, sodium valproate, and flunitrazepam results in enhancement of the side effect, a gait disturbance. A 60-year-old man was taking oral sodium valproate for symptomatic epilepsy after a brain contusion and flunitrazepam to relieve insomnia. Oral gabapentin therapy was started for suspected neuropathic pain. Although the initial dose of oral gabapentin (200 mg relieved the pain, the lower extremities became weak, resulting in a gait disturbance. The therapy was restarted with a halved dose, and this resolved the gait disturbance and relieved the pain. Keywords: gabapentin, gait disturbance, side effect, neuropathic pain

  1. Cumulative radiation dose caused by radiologic studies in critically ill trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Patrick K; Gracias, Vicente H; Maidment, Andrew D A; O'Shea, Michael; Reilly, Patrick M; Schwab, C William

    2004-09-01

    Critically ill trauma patients undergo many radiologic studies, but the cumulative radiation dose is unknown. The purpose of this study was to estimate the cumulative effective dose (CED) of radiation resulting from radiologic studies in critically ill trauma patients. The study group was composed of trauma patients at an urban Level I trauma center with surgical intensive care unit length of stay (LOS) greater than 30 days. The radiology records were reviewed. A typical effective dose per study for each type of plain film radiograph, computed tomographic scan, fluoroscopic study, and nuclear medicine study was used to calculate CED. Forty-six patients met criteria. The mean surgical intensive care unit and hospital LOS were 42.7 +/- 14.0 and 59.5 +/- 28.5 days, respectively. The mean Injury Severity Score was 32.2 +/- 15.0. The mean number of studies per patient was 70.1 +/- 29.0 plain film radiographs, 7.8 +/- 4.1 computed tomographic scans, 2.5 +/- 2.6 fluoroscopic studies, and 0.065 +/- 0.33 nuclear medicine study. The mean CED was 106 +/- 59 mSv per patient (range, 11-289 mSv; median, 104 mSv). Among age, mechanism, Injury Severity Score, and LOS, there was no statistically significant predictor of high CED. The mean CED in the study group was 30 times higher than the average yearly radiation dose from all sources for individuals in the United States. The theoretical additional morbidity attributable to radiologic studies was 0.78%. From a radiobiologic perspective, risk-to-benefit ratios of radiologic studies are favorable, given the importance of medical information obtained. Current practice patterns regarding use of radiologic studies appear to be acceptable.

  2. Causes of genome instability: the effect of low dose chemical exposures in modern society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langie, Sabine A.S.; Koppen, Gudrun; Desaulniers, Daniel; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Azqueta, Amaya; Bisson, William H.; Brown, Dustin; Brunborg, Gunnar; Charles, Amelia K.; Chen, Tao; Colacci, Annamaria; Darroudi, Firouz; Forte, Stefano; Gonzalez, Laetitia; Hamid, Roslida A.; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Leyns, Luc; Lopez de Cerain Salsamendi, Adela; Memeo, Lorenzo; Mondello, Chiara; Mothersill, Carmel; Olsen, Ann-Karin; Pavanello, Sofia; Raju, Jayadev; Rojas, Emilio; Roy, Rabindra; Ryan, Elizabeth; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Salem, Hosni K.; Scovassi, Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Van Schooten, Frederik J.; Valverde, Mahara; Woodrick, Jordan; Zhang, Luoping; van Larebeke, Nik; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Collins, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Genome instability is a prerequisite for the development of cancer. It occurs when genome maintenance systems fail to safeguard the genome’s integrity, whether as a consequence of inherited defects or induced via exposure to environmental agents (chemicals, biological agents and radiation). Thus, genome instability can be defined as an enhanced tendency for the genome to acquire mutations; ranging from changes to the nucleotide sequence to chromosomal gain, rearrangements or loss. This review raises the hypothesis that in addition to known human carcinogens, exposure to low dose of other chemicals present in our modern society could contribute to carcinogenesis by indirectly affecting genome stability. The selected chemicals with their mechanisms of action proposed to indirectly contribute to genome instability are: heavy metals (DNA repair, epigenetic modification, DNA damage signaling, telomere length), acrylamide (DNA repair, chromosome segregation), bisphenol A (epigenetic modification, DNA damage signaling, mitochondrial function, chromosome segregation), benomyl (chromosome segregation), quinones (epigenetic modification) and nano-sized particles (epigenetic pathways, mitochondrial function, chromosome segregation, telomere length). The purpose of this review is to describe the crucial aspects of genome instability, to outline the ways in which environmental chemicals can affect this cancer hallmark and to identify candidate chemicals for further study. The overall aim is to make scientists aware of the increasing need to unravel the underlying mechanisms via which chemicals at low doses can induce genome instability and thus promote carcinogenesis. PMID:26106144

  3. Coffee consumption and mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crippa, Alessio; Discacciati, Andrea; Larsson, Susanna C; Wolk, Alicja; Orsini, Nicola

    2014-10-15

    Several studies have analyzed the relationship between coffee consumption and mortality, but the shape of the association remains unclear. We conducted a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies to examine the dose-response associations between coffee consumption and mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and all cancers. Pertinent studies, published between 1966 and 2013, were identified by searching PubMed and by reviewing the reference lists of the selected articles. Prospective studies in which investigators reported relative risks of mortality from all causes, CVD, and all cancers for 3 or more categories of coffee consumption were eligible. Results from individual studies were pooled using a random-effects model. Twenty-one prospective studies, with 121,915 deaths and 997,464 participants, met the inclusion criteria. There was strong evidence of nonlinear associations between coffee consumption and mortality for all causes and CVD (P for nonlinearity Coffee consumption was not associated with cancer mortality. Findings from this meta-analysis indicate that coffee consumption is inversely associated with all-cause and CVD mortality. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Histopathological changes in the kidney of experimental animals caused by lethal doses of thallium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danilewicz, M; Danilewicz, M; Kurnatowski, A

    1979-01-01

    The experiment was carried out on 65 white male Wistar rats and 65 white male Swiss mice poisoned with thallium sulfate in doses 30 to 40 mg/kg body weight. The animals were sacrificed in the 4, 8, 24, 48th hours of experiment and their kidneys were submitted to light and an electron microscopic examination. With the light microscope necrosis of epithelium of Henle loops, hydropic degeneration, swelling and focal necrosis of epithelium of proximal convoluted tubules, and stromal oedema were seen. An electron microscopic study pointed out swelling and degenerative changes in the mitochondria, loss of microvilli in many cells, dilatation of endoplasmic reticulum and decrease of electron density of basement membranes. Urea level in blood serum and protein level in urine increased.

  5. Osteomalacia and Fanconi's syndrome caused by long-term low-dose adefovir dipivoxil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B-F; Wang, Y; Wang, B-Y; Sun, F-R; Zhang, D; Chen, Y-S

    2015-06-01

    Adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) is recommended for patients infected with lamivudine-refractory hepatitis B virus (HBV). We report a case of low-dose ADV-induced hypophosphatemic osteomalacia that initially presented as diffuse musculoskeletal pain. A 59-year-old Chinese man reported an 18-month history of severe chest wall pain and multiple bone pain during the previous 4 months with no antecedent trauma. There was no clinical evidence of an infectious, inflammatory or malignant process. Medical history showed that the patient had a history of chronic hepatitis B infection, and receiving lamivudine at a daily dose of 100 mg for 70 months. Lamivudine was changed to adefovir (10 mg/day) for the past 42 months. His serum inorganic phosphorus concentration was significantly low (0·4 mmol/l; 0·81-1·5 mmol/L), and the result of a urine routine test was abnormal. Combined with unbearable bone pain, spontaneous fractures, changes in laboratory markers and the result of ECT and other radiographic findings, the diagnosis of Fanconi's syndrome with osteomalacia was established. Dramatic clinical, laboratory and imaging improvement was observed after ADV discontinuation. This case indicates that Fanconi's syndrome with osteomalacia can be acquired by a chronic hepatitis B patient taking ADV at a conventional dosage of 10 mg/day. Therefore, patients with HBV treated with long-term ADV should be regularly monitored for renal function, serum calcium and serum phosphate. Urine testing for ion concentration should also be undertaken. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Low-dose exposure to Veratrum album in children causes mild effects--a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauber-Lüthy, Christine; Halbsguth, Ulrike; Kupferschmidt, Hugo; König, Naoko; Mégevand, Chloé; Zihlmann, Karin; Ceschi, Alessandro

    2010-03-01

    White or false hellebore (Veratrum album) has a toxicological relevance because of the potential for misidentification of this plant as yellow gentian (Gentiana lutea). We report a retrospective case series of 11 children (8-12 years) with accidental intake of V. album at a youth camp where they had collected herbs for preparing fresh herb tea. Two children (18%) remained asymptomatic. Nine (82%) developed mild gastrointestinal symptoms, six (55%) presented neurological symptoms, and three (27%) showed bradycardia. All children recovered completely within 10 h of ingestion. The plant was identified at the emergency department; however, detection of veratridine and cevadine by means of high-performance liquid chromatography-Mass spectrometry from the blood of the child with the most severe symptoms was negative (limit 0.01 ng/mL). Veratrum species contain more than 200 different alkaloids, which are the principal toxins and are responsible for most clinical symptoms. There are likely multiple mechanisms of toxicity and some of them are only partially understood. The opening of voltage-gated sodium channels is probably one of the most relevant pathophysiological mechanisms. Veratrum album intoxication in children demonstrated the same clinical course as observed in adults. Accidental ingestion of a low dose of the plant had a favorable outcome with supportive care.

  7. Causes of Mortality After Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy and Androgen Deprivation for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tendulkar, Rahul D.; Hunter, Grant K.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Ciezki, Jay P.; Abdel-Wahab, May; Stephenson, Andrew J.; Klein, Eric A.; Mahadevan, Arul; Kupelian, Patrick A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Men with high-risk prostate cancer have other competing causes of mortality; however, current risk stratification schema do not account for comorbidities. We aim to identify the causes of death and factors predictive for mortality in this population. Methods and Materials: A total of 660 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated with definitive high-dose external beam radiation therapy (≥74 Gy) and androgen deprivation (AD) between 1996 and 2009 at a single institution. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was conducted to determine factors predictive of survival. Results: The median radiation dose was 78 Gy, median duration of AD was 6 months, and median follow-up was 74 months. The 10-year overall survival (OS) was 60.6%. Prostate cancer was the leading single cause of death, with 10-year mortality of 14.1% (95% CI 10.7-17.6), compared with other cancers (8.4%, 95% CI 5.7-11.1), cardiovascular disease (7.3%, 95% CI 4.7-9.9), and all other causes (10.4%, 95% CI 7.2-13.6). On multivariate analysis, older age (HR 1.55, P=.002) and Charlson comorbidity index score (CS) ≥1 (HR 2.20, P<.0001) were significant factors predictive of OS, whereas Gleason score, T stage, prostate-specific antigen, duration of AD, radiation dose, smoking history, and body mass index were not. Men younger than 70 years of age with CS = 0 were more likely to die of prostate cancer than any other cause, whereas older men or those with CS ≥1 more commonly suffered non-prostate cancer death. The cumulative incidences of prostate cancer-specific mortality were similar regardless of age or comorbidities (P=.60). Conclusions: Men with high-risk prostate cancer are more likely to die of causes other than prostate cancer, except for the subgroup of men younger than 70 years of age without comorbidities. Only older age and presence of comorbidities significantly predicted for OS, whereas prostate cancer- and treatment-related factors did not

  8. Low doses of ivermectin cause sensory and locomotor disorders in dung beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdú, José R.; Cortez, Vieyle; Ortiz, Antonio J.; González-Rodríguez, Estela; Martinez-Pinna, Juan; Lumaret, Jean-Pierre; Lobo, Jorge M.; Numa, Catherine; Sánchez-Piñero, Francisco

    2015-09-01

    Ivermectin is a veterinary pharmaceutical generally used to control the ecto- and endoparasites of livestock, but its use has resulted in adverse effects on coprophilous insects, causing population decline and biodiversity loss. There is currently no information regarding the direct effects of ivermectin on dung beetle physiology and behaviour. Here, based on electroantennography and spontaneous muscle force tests, we show sub-lethal disorders caused by ivermectin in sensory and locomotor systems of Scarabaeus cicatricosus, a key dung beetle species in Mediterranean ecosystems. Our findings show that ivermectin decreases the olfactory and locomotor capacity of dung beetles, preventing them from performing basic biological activities. These effects are observed at concentrations lower than those usually measured in the dung of treated livestock. Taking into account that ivermectin acts on both glutamate-gated and GABA-gated chloride ion channels of nerve and muscle cells, we predict that ivermectin’s effects at the physiological level could influence many members of the dung pat community. The results indicate that the decline of dung beetle populations could be related to the harmful effects of chemical contamination in the dung.

  9. Simulation of the occupational radiation dose caused by contamination of primary circuit media in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artmann, Andreas; Bruhn, Gerd; Schneider, Sebastian [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Koeln (Germany); Strub, Erik [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Abt. Nuklearchemie

    2016-11-15

    The occupational radiation exposure of workers in NPPs during overall maintenance and refueling inspections and decommissioning is determined by numerous parameters. Radiation exposure caused by contamination of components may be minimised by the chemical operation mode and by applying systematic decontamination techniques. Data on occupational exposure in German NPPs as well as information about the radionuclide concentration in the coolant are available. The generic 3D model of the primary circuit presented is based on the analysis of technical documentation of German PWRs. Tasks are modeled as a combination of retention times at related local positions in the surroundings of work areas. The generic model allows the calculation of the resulting occupational doses generated by definable jobs and tasks. The KWU/Siemens- PWR generations are characterised by nuclide vectors, the thickness of shielding, and the material composition of components. It was possible to show that for a pre-Konvoi plant, the calculated occupational dose caused by a specific working task is close to measurements.

  10. Simulation of the occupational radiation dose caused by contamination of primary circuit media in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artmann, Andreas; Bruhn, Gerd; Schneider, Sebastian; Strub, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The occupational radiation exposure of workers in NPPs during overall maintenance and refueling inspections and decommissioning is determined by numerous parameters. Radiation exposure caused by contamination of components may be minimised by the chemical operation mode and by applying systematic decontamination techniques. Data on occupational exposure in German NPPs as well as information about the radionuclide concentration in the coolant are available. The generic 3D model of the primary circuit presented is based on the analysis of technical documentation of German PWRs. Tasks are modeled as a combination of retention times at related local positions in the surroundings of work areas. The generic model allows the calculation of the resulting occupational doses generated by definable jobs and tasks. The KWU/Siemens- PWR generations are characterised by nuclide vectors, the thickness of shielding, and the material composition of components. It was possible to show that for a pre-Konvoi plant, the calculated occupational dose caused by a specific working task is close to measurements.

  11. Sodium bicarbonate causes dose-dependent increases in cerebral blood flow in infants and children with single ventricle physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Erin M.; Naim, Maryam Y.; Lynch, Jennifer M.; Goff, Donna A.; Schwab, Peter J.; Diaz, Laura K.; Nicolson, Susan C.; Montenegro, Lisa M.; Lavin, Natasha A.; Durduran, Turgut; Spray, Thomas L.; Gaynor, J. William; Putt, Mary E.; Yodh, A.G.; Fogel, Mark A.; Licht, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) is a common treatment for metabolic acidemia, however little definitive information exists regarding its treatment efficacy and cerebral hemodynamic effects. This pilot observational study quantifies relative changes in cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and oxy and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations (ΔHbO2 and ΔHb) due to bolus administration of NaHCO3 in patients with mild base deficits. Methods Infants and children with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) were recruited prior to cardiac surgery. NaHCO3 was given as needed for treatment of base deficit. Diffuse optical spectroscopies were employed for 15 minutes post-injection to non-invasively monitor ΔHb, ΔHbO2 and rCBF relative to baseline prior to NaHCO3 administration. Results Twenty-two anesthetized and mechanically ventilated HLHS patients (1 day to 4 years old) received a median (interquartile range) dose of 1.1 (0.8, 1.8) mEq/kg NaHCO3 administered intravenously over 10–20 seconds to treat a base deficit of −4 (−6, −3) mEq/l. NaHCO3 caused significant dose-dependent increases in rCBF, however population averaged ΔHb or Δ4HbO2 compared to controls were not significant. Conclusions Dose-dependent increases in cerebral blood flow (CBF) caused by bolus NaHCO3 are an important consideration in vulnerable populations wherein risk of rapid CBF fluctuations does not outweigh the benefit of treating a base deficit. PMID:23403802

  12. Effect of low dose pre-irradiation on DNA damage and genetic material damage caused by high dosage of cyclophosphamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hongsheng; Zhu Jingjuan; Shang Qingjun; Wang Zhuomin; Cui Fuxian

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of low dose γ-rays pre-irradiation on the induction of DNA damage and genetic material damage in peripheral lymphocytes by high dosage of cyclophosphamide (CTX). Methods: Male Kunming strain mice were randomly divided into five groups: control group, sham-irradiated group, low dose irradiated group(LDR group), cyclophosphamide chemotherapy group(CTX group) and low dose irradiation combined with chemotherapy group(LDR + CTX group). After being feeded for one week, all the mice were implanted subcutaneously with S180 cells in the left groin (control group excluded). On days 8 and 11, groups of LDR and LDR + CTX were administered with 75 mGy of whole-body irradiation, 30 h later groups CTX and LDR + CTX were injected intraperitoneally 3.0 mg cyclophosphamide. All the mice were sacrificed on day 13. DNA damage of the peripheral lymphocytes was analyzed using single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE). Genetic material damage was analyzed using micronucleus frequency(MNF) of polychromatoerythrocytes(PCE) in bone marrow. Results: (1) Compared with control group and sham-irradiated group, the DNA damage of peripheral lymphocytes in CTX group were increased significantly (P 0.05). Conclusions: (1) High- dosage of CTX chemotherapy can cause DNA damage in peripheral lymphocytes. 75 mGy y-irradiation before chemotherapy may have certain protective effect on DNA damage. (2) CTX has potent mutagenic effect, giving remarkable rise to MNF of PCE. 75 mGy γ-ray pre-irradiation has not obvious protection against genetic toxicity of high-dose CTX chemotherapy. (authors)

  13. Low-dose strontium stimulates osteogenesis but high-dose doses cause apoptosis in human adipose-derived stem cells via regulation of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aimaiti, Abudousaimi; Maimaitiyiming, Asihaerjiang; Boyong, Xu; Aji, Kaisaier; Li, Cao; Cui, Lei

    2017-12-19

    Strontium is a widely used anti-osteoporotic agent due to its dual effects on inhibiting bone resorption and stimulating bone formation. Thus, we studied the dose response of strontium on osteo-inductive efficiency in human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs). Qualitative alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining, quantitative ALP activity, Alizarin Red staining, real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot were used to investigate the in vitro effects of a range of strontium concentrations on hASC osteogenesis and associated signaling pathways. In vitro work revealed that strontium (25-500 μM) promoted osteogenic differentiation of hASCs according to ALP activity, extracellular calcium deposition, and expression of osteogenic genes such as runt-related transcription factor 2, ALP, collagen-1, and osteocalcin. However, osteogenic differentiation of hASCs was significantly inhibited with higher doses of strontium (1000-3000 μM). These latter doses of strontium promoted apoptosis, and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 signaling was increased and accompanied by the downregulation of Bcl-2 and increased phosphorylation of BAX. The inhibition of ERK1/2 decreased apoptosis in hASCs. Lower concentrations of strontium facilitate osteogenic differentiation of hASCs up to a point; higher doses cause apoptosis of hASCs, with activation of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway contributing to this process.

  14. A single subconvulsant dose of domoic acid at mid-gestation does not cause temporal lobe epilepsy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demars, Fanny; Clark, Kristen; Wyeth, Megan S; Abrams, Emily; Buckmaster, Paul S

    2018-05-01

    Harmful blooms of domoic acid (DA)-producing algae are a problem in oceans worldwide. DA is a potent glutamate receptor agonist that can cause status epilepticus and in survivors, temporal lobe epilepsy. In mice, one-time low-dose in utero exposure to DA was reported to cause hippocampal damage and epileptiform activity, leading to the hypothesis that unrecognized exposure to DA from contaminated seafood in pregnant women can damage the fetal hippocampus and initiate temporal lobe epileptogenesis. However, development of epilepsy (i.e., spontaneous recurrent seizures) has not been tested. In the present study, long-term seizure monitoring and histology was used to test for temporal lobe epilepsy following prenatal exposure to DA. In Experiment One, the previous study's in utero DA treatment protocol was replicated, including use of the CD-1 mouse strain. Afterward, mice were video-monitored for convulsive seizures from 2 to 6 months old. None of the CD-1 mice treated in utero with vehicle or DA was observed to experience spontaneous convulsive seizures. After seizure monitoring, mice were evaluated for pathological evidence of temporal lobe epilepsy. None of the mice treated in utero with DA displayed the hilar neuron loss that occurs in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and in the mouse pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy. In Experiment Two, a higher dose of DA was administered to pregnant FVB mice. FVB mice were tested as a potentially more sensitive strain, because they have a lower seizure threshold, and some females spontaneously develop epilepsy. Female offspring were monitored with continuous video and telemetric bilateral hippocampal local field potential recording at 1-11 months old. A similar proportion of vehicle- and DA-treated female FVB mice spontaneously developed epilepsy, beginning in the fourth month of life. Average seizure frequency and duration were similar in both groups. Seizure frequency was lower than that of positive

  15. Ovarian function after autologous bone marrow transplantation in childhood: high-dose busulfan is a major cause of ovarian failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teinturier, C; Hartmann, O; Valteau-Couanet, D; Benhamou, E; Bougneres, P F

    1998-11-01

    We studied pubertal status and ovarian function in 21 girls aged 11-21 years who had earlier received 1.2-13 years (median 7 years) high-dose chemotherapy and autologous BMT without TBI for malignant tumors. Ten of them were given busulfan (600 mg/m2) and melphalan (140 mg/m2) with or without cyclophosphamide (3.6 g/m2). Eleven others did not receive busulfan. Twelve girls (57%) had clinical and hormonal evidence of ovarian failure. Among nine others who had completed normal puberty, six had normal gonadotropin levels, one had elevated gonadotropin levels and two had gonadotropin levels at the upper limit of normal. The 10 girls who received busulfan all developed severe and persistent ovarian failure. High-dose busulfan is therefore a major cause of ovarian failure even when given in the prepubertal period. These findings emphasize the need for long-term endocrine follow-up of these patients in order to initiate estrogen replacement therapy.

  16. 10 CFR 63.303 - Implementation of Subpart L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Implementation of Subpart L. 63.303 Section 63.303 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC... Implementation of Subpart L. (a) Compliance is based upon the arithmetic mean of the projected doses from DOE's...

  17. LDR brachytherapy: can low dose rate hypersensitivity from the "inverse" dose rate effect cause excessive cell killing to peripherial connective tissues and organs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, B E; Lucas, A C

    2009-02-01

    Examined here are the possible effects of the "inverse" dose rate effect (IDRE) on low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy. The hyper-radiosensitivity and induced radioresistance (HRS/IRR) effect benefits cell killing in radiotherapy, and IDRE and HRS/IRR seem to be generated from the same radioprotective mechanisms. We have computed the IDRE excess cell killing experienced in LDR brachytherapy using permanent seed implants. We conclude, firstly, that IDRE is a dose rate-dependent manifestation of HRS/IRR. Secondly, the presence of HRS/IRR or IDRE in a cell species or tissue must be determined by direct dose-response measurements. Thirdly, a reasonable estimate is that 50-80% of human adjoining connective and organ tissues experience IDRE from permanent implanted LDR brachytherapy. If IDRE occurs for tissues at point A for cervical cancer, the excess cell killing will be about a factor of 3.5-4.0 if the initial dose rate is 50-70 cGy h(-1). It is greater for adjacent tissues at lower dose rates and higher for lower initial dose rates at point A. Finally, higher post-treatment complications are observed in LDR brachytherapy, often for unknown reasons. Some of these are probably a result of IDRE excess cell killing. Measurements of IDRE need be performed for connective and adjacent organ tissues, i.e. bladder, rectum, urinary tract and small bowels. The measured dose rate-dependent dose responses should extended to tissues and organs remain above IDRE thresholds).

  18. Osteoporosis markers on low-dose lung cancer screening chest computed tomography scans predict all-cause mortality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckens, C.F. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Radiology Department, Utrecht (Netherlands); University Medical Center Utrecht, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands); Graaf, Y. van der [University Medical Center Utrecht, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands); Verkooijen, H.M.; Mali, W.P.; Jong, P.A. de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Radiology Department, Utrecht (Netherlands); Isgum, I.; Mol, C.P. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands); Verhaar, H.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Vliegenthart, R.; Oudkerk, M. [Medical Center Groningen, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Aalst, C.M. van; Koning, H.J. de [Erasmus MC Rotterdam, Department of Public Health, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-01-15

    Further survival benefits may be gained from low-dose chest computed tomography (CT) by assessing vertebral fractures and bone density. We sought to assess the association between CT-measured vertebral fractures and bone density with all-cause mortality in lung cancer screening participants. Following a case-cohort design, lung cancer screening trial participants (N = 3,673) who died (N = 196) during a median follow-up of 6 years (inter-quartile range: 5.7-6.3) were identified and added to a random sample of N = 383 from the trial. We assessed vertebral fractures using Genant and acute;s semiquantative method on sagittal reconstructions and measured bone density (Hounsfield Units (HU)) in vertebrae. Cox proportional hazards modelling was used to determine if vertebral fractures or bone density were independently predictive of mortality. The prevalence of vertebral fractures was 35 % (95 % confidence interval 30-40 %) among survivors and 51 % (44-58 %) amongst cases. After adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, pack years smoked, coronary and aortic calcium volume and pulmonary emphysema, the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for vertebral fracture was 2.04 (1.43-2.92). For each 10 HU decline in trabecular bone density, the adjusted HR was 1.08 (1.02-1.15). Vertebral fractures and bone density are independently associated with all-cause mortality. (orig.)

  19. Osteoporosis markers on low-dose lung cancer screening chest computed tomography scans predict all-cause mortality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckens, C.F.; Graaf, Y. van der; Verkooijen, H.M.; Mali, W.P.; Jong, P.A. de; Isgum, I.; Mol, C.P.; Verhaar, H.J.; Vliegenthart, R.; Oudkerk, M.; Aalst, C.M. van; Koning, H.J. de

    2015-01-01

    Further survival benefits may be gained from low-dose chest computed tomography (CT) by assessing vertebral fractures and bone density. We sought to assess the association between CT-measured vertebral fractures and bone density with all-cause mortality in lung cancer screening participants. Following a case-cohort design, lung cancer screening trial participants (N = 3,673) who died (N = 196) during a median follow-up of 6 years (inter-quartile range: 5.7-6.3) were identified and added to a random sample of N = 383 from the trial. We assessed vertebral fractures using Genant and acute;s semiquantative method on sagittal reconstructions and measured bone density (Hounsfield Units (HU)) in vertebrae. Cox proportional hazards modelling was used to determine if vertebral fractures or bone density were independently predictive of mortality. The prevalence of vertebral fractures was 35 % (95 % confidence interval 30-40 %) among survivors and 51 % (44-58 %) amongst cases. After adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, pack years smoked, coronary and aortic calcium volume and pulmonary emphysema, the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for vertebral fracture was 2.04 (1.43-2.92). For each 10 HU decline in trabecular bone density, the adjusted HR was 1.08 (1.02-1.15). Vertebral fractures and bone density are independently associated with all-cause mortality. (orig.)

  20. ESTE AI (Annual Impacts) - the program for calculation of radiation doses caused by effluents in routine releases to the atmosphere and to the hydrosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carny, P.; Suchon, D.; Smejkalova, E.; Fabova, V.

    2009-01-01

    ESTE AI is a program for calculation of radiation doses caused by effluents in routine releases to the atmosphere and to the hydrosphere. Doses to the members of critical groups of inhabitants in the vicinity of NPP are calculated and as a result, critical group is determined. The program enables to calculate collective doses as well. Collective doses to the inhabitants living in the vicinity of the NPP are calculated. ESTE AI calculates doses to the whole population of Slovakia from the effluents of the specific plant. In this calculation, global nuclides are included and assumed, as well. The program enables to calculate and to document beyond-border radiological impacts of effluents caused by routine operation of NPP. ESTE AI was approved by the 'Public Health Authority of the Slovak Republic' and is used as legal instrument by Slovenske elektrarne a.s., NPP Bohunice. (authors)

  1. ESTE AI (Annual Impacts) - the program for calculation of radiation doses caused by effluents in routine releases to the atmosphere and to the hydrosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carny, P.; Suchon, D.; Smejkalova, E.; Fabova, V.

    2008-01-01

    ESTE AI is a program for calculation of radiation doses caused by effluents in routine releases to the atmosphere and to the hydrosphere. Doses to the members of critical groups of inhabitants in the vicinity of NPP are calculated and as a result, critical group is determined. The program enables to calculate collective doses as well. Collective doses to the inhabitants living in the vicinity of the NPP are calculated. ESTE AI calculates doses to the whole population of Slovakia from the effluents of the specific plant. In this calculation, global nuclides are included and assumed, as well. The program enables to calculate and to document beyond-border radiological impacts of effluents caused by routine operation of NPP. ESTE AI was approved by the 'Public Health Authority of the Slovak Republic' and is used as legal instrument by Slovenske elektrarne a.s., NPP Bohunice. (authors)

  2. Does Cervical Interlaminar Epidural Steroid Injection with Low-Dose Lidocaine Cause Objective Upper Extremity Weakness? A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Zachary L; Nelson, Ariana; Kendall, Mark C; McCarthy, Robert J; Nagpal, Geeta; Walega, David R

    2017-12-01

    Low-dose local anesthetic is often used in cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injections (CIESI), yet its effect on upper extremity strength has not been studied. The presence of consequent weakness has potential implications for postprocedure safety. This study aimed to determine whether low-dose lidocaine in a C7-T1 CIESI causes objective weakness. Prospective case series. Academic pain center. Adults, cervical radicular pain. Participants underwent CIESI with 1 mL of 1% lidocaine (3 mL total injectate). Elbow flexion (EF), wrist extension (WE), elbow extension (EE), and handgrip strength were measured by dynamometry at baseline, 15 minutes, and 30 minutes postinjection. Changes in strength from baseline and the proportion of participants with a minimum perceptible change in EF, WE, EE, and handgrip strength (≥20%) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Twenty-seven participants were included. At 15 and 30 minutes postinjection, there was no within-participant difference in EF, WE, EE, and handgrip strength from baseline overall. Nonetheless, five (19%, 95% CI = 4-33) of the participants demonstrated a 20% or greater strength decrease in at least one myotomal distribution. A 20% or greater decrease in strength was present in left EF 4% (95% CI = 0-11%), right EF 7% (95% CI = 0-17%), left WE 4% (95% CI = 0-11%), and right WE 7% (95% CI = 0-17%). The present data suggest that CIESI with an injectate volume of 3 mL that includes 1 mL of 1% lidocaine may result in objective upper extremity weakness that is above the minimum threshold of perception in a subset of patients. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  3. How much radiation dose, to whom? Long-term storage, surveillance, retrieval and long processes cause additional dose to employees; Wie viel Strahlendosis fuer wen? Lange Lagerung, Offenhaltung und ein langer Entsorgungsprozess bedeuten zusaetzliche Dosis fuer Beschaeftigte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walther, Clemens [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiooekologie und Strahlenschutz; Riemann, Moritz [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Philosophie und Ethik der Umwelt

    2017-09-01

    In the case of final nuclear waste disposal there are concurrent interests with respect to radiation protection: The realization of a disposal option with minimum required follow-up care needs time causing additional radiation exposure for the employees, also the option of long-term storage, surveillance and retrieval possibilities cause additional dose to employees. The contribution discusses possible consideration of requests for the different options.

  4. Dose-response relationship of physical activity to premature and total all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality in walkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T Williams

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To assess the dose-response relationships between cause-specific mortality and exercise energy expenditure in a prospective epidemiological cohort of walkers. METHODS: The sample consisted of the 8,436 male and 33,586 female participants of the National Walkers' Health Study. Walking energy expenditure was calculated in metabolic equivalents (METs, 1 MET = 3.5 ml O2/kg/min, which were used to divide the cohort into four exercise categories: category 1 (≤ 1.07 MET-hours/d, category 2 (1.07 to 1.8 MET-hours/d, category 3 (1.8 to 3.6 MET-hours/d, and category 4 (≥ 3.6 MET-hours/d. Competing risk regression analyses were use to calculate the risk of mortality for categories 2, 3 and 4 relative to category 1. RESULTS: 22.9% of the subjects were in category 1, 16.1% in category 2, 33.3% in category 3, and 27.7% in category 4. There were 2,448 deaths during the 9.6 average years of follow-up. Total mortality was 11.2% lower in category 2 (P = 0.04, 32.4% lower in category 3 (P<10(-12 and 32.9% lower in category 4 (P = 10(-11 than in category 1. For underlying causes of death, the respective risk reductions for categories 2, 3 and 4 were 23.6% (P = 0.008, 35.2% (P<10(-5, and 34.9% (P = 0.0001 for cardiovascular disease mortality; 27.8% (P = 0.18, 20.6% (P = 0.07, and 31.4% (P = 0.009 for ischemic heart disease mortality; and 39.4% (P = 0.18, 63.8% (P = 0.005, and 90.6% (P = 0.002 for diabetes mortality when compared to category 1. For all related mortality (i.e., underlying and contributing causes of death combined, the respective risk reductions for categories 2, 3 and 4 were 18.7% (P = 0.22, 42.5% (P = 0.001, and 57.5% (P = 0.0001 for heart failure; 9.4% (P = 0.56, 44.3% (P = 0.0004, and 33.5% (P = 0.02 for hypertensive diseases; 11.5% (P = 0.38, 41.0% (P<10(-4, and 35.5% (P = 0.001 for dysrhythmias: and 23.2% (P = 0.13, 45.8% (P = 0.0002, and 41.1% (P

  5. Electron dose distributions caused by the contact-type metallic eye shield: Studies using Monte Carlo and pencil beam algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sei-Kwon; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Hwang, Taejin; Park, Soah; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Han, Tae Jin; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Me-Yeon; Kim, Kyoung Ju; Bae, Hoonsik

    2015-01-01

    A metallic contact eye shield has sometimes been used for eyelid treatment, but dose distribution has never been reported for a patient case. This study aimed to show the shield-incorporated CT-based dose distribution using the Pinnacle system and Monte Carlo (MC) calculation for 3 patient cases. For the artifact-free CT scan, an acrylic shield machined as the same size as that of the tungsten shield was used. For the MC calculation, BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc were used for the 6-MeV electron beam of the Varian 21EX, in which information for the tungsten, stainless steel, and aluminum material for the eye shield was used. The same plan was generated on the Pinnacle system and both were compared. The use of the acrylic shield produced clear CT images, enabling delineation of the regions of interest, and yielded CT-based dose calculation for the metallic shield. Both the MC and the Pinnacle systems showed a similar dose distribution downstream of the eye shield, reflecting the blocking effect of the metallic eye shield. The major difference between the MC and the Pinnacle results was the target eyelid dose upstream of the shield such that the Pinnacle system underestimated the dose by 19 to 28% and 11 to 18% for the maximum and the mean doses, respectively. The pattern of dose difference between the MC and the Pinnacle systems was similar to that in the previous phantom study. In conclusion, the metallic eye shield was successfully incorporated into the CT-based planning, and the accurate dose calculation requires MC simulation. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Electron dose distributions caused by the contact-type metallic eye shield: Studies using Monte Carlo and pencil beam algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sei-Kwon; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Hwang, Taejin; Park, Soah; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Jin Han, Tae; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Me-Yeon; Ju Kim, Kyoung, E-mail: kjkim@hallym.or.kr; Bae, Hoonsik

    2015-10-01

    A metallic contact eye shield has sometimes been used for eyelid treatment, but dose distribution has never been reported for a patient case. This study aimed to show the shield-incorporated CT-based dose distribution using the Pinnacle system and Monte Carlo (MC) calculation for 3 patient cases. For the artifact-free CT scan, an acrylic shield machined as the same size as that of the tungsten shield was used. For the MC calculation, BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc were used for the 6-MeV electron beam of the Varian 21EX, in which information for the tungsten, stainless steel, and aluminum material for the eye shield was used. The same plan was generated on the Pinnacle system and both were compared. The use of the acrylic shield produced clear CT images, enabling delineation of the regions of interest, and yielded CT-based dose calculation for the metallic shield. Both the MC and the Pinnacle systems showed a similar dose distribution downstream of the eye shield, reflecting the blocking effect of the metallic eye shield. The major difference between the MC and the Pinnacle results was the target eyelid dose upstream of the shield such that the Pinnacle system underestimated the dose by 19 to 28% and 11 to 18% for the maximum and the mean doses, respectively. The pattern of dose difference between the MC and the Pinnacle systems was similar to that in the previous phantom study. In conclusion, the metallic eye shield was successfully incorporated into the CT-based planning, and the accurate dose calculation requires MC simulation.

  7. Dexmedetomidine reduces pain associated with rocuronium injection without causing a decrease in BIS values: a dose-response study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Jin; Baek, Jungwon; Lee, Jaemin

    2014-09-01

    To examine whether dexmedetomidine reduces the injection pain of propofol and rocuronium and to investigate whether the decrease in injection pain is associated with the known sedative action of dexmedetomidine. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical comparison study. Patients undergoing general anesthesia with intubation received 40 mg of 1% lidocaine (lidocaine group; n = 28), 0.25 μg/kg of dexmedetomidine (low-dose group; n = 27), 0.5 μg/kg of dexmedetomidine (subclinical dose group; n = 28), 1.0 μg/kg of dexmedetomidine (clinical dose group, n = 27), or normal saline (saline group; n = 28) before anesthetic induction. Pain associated with propofol and rocuronium injection was assessed using a 10-point verbal analog scale (VAS) and a 4-point withdrawal movement scale, respectively. The BIS value was measured 60 seconds after administration of the study drug, and at the time of rocuronium injection and intubation. The overall incidence of withdrawal movements due to rocuronium decreased significantly as the dose of dexmedetomidine increased (92.8%, 85.2%, 78.6%, and 51.9% in the saline, low-dose, subclinical dose, and clinical dose groups, respectively; P = 0.001). There was no significant difference in BIS values among the groups 60 seconds after study drug administration or at the time of rocuronium injection. Dexmedetomidine reduced pain associated with rocuronium injection in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was not associated with the decrease in BIS value. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. High efficacy and safety from high dose 131I for the treatment of hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease (GD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juri, A.; Pitoia, Fabian; El Tamer, Elias; Lopaczek, N.; Mana, D.; Niepomniszcze, Hugo

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Radioiodine (RAI) 131 I has became a widely used therapy for patients with hyperthyroidism due to GD. It is controversial which the dose to apply in such patients is. Administration of low doses of 131 I, oriented to decrease the incidence of hypothyroidism, may delay or fail to cure the hyperthyroidism. Objective: We designed this study to compare the frequencies of cure and persistence/recidive (P/R) of the hyperthyroidism using 2 different fixed dose protocols, also to evaluate the presence of complications after such doses. Subjects and Methods: Seventy six patients who received 131 I therapy for GD between 1997 and 2004 were evaluated. All of them had received initial treatment with methimazole, relapsing the hyperthyroidism after drug withdrawal. Patients were divided into 2 groups considering the RAI dose administered. Group 1 (n=32): 300 μCi/g retained at 24 h; and Group 2 (n=44): 100 μCi/g retained at 24 h. Both groups were comparable when age, gender and thyroid weight were considered. Results: The frequency of cure was 87.5% (28/32) in Group 1 vs. 45.5% (20/44) in Group 2 (p<0.0003). Hypothyroidism was observed in 96.5% (27/28) of cured patients in Group 1 vs. 85% (17/20) of cured patients in Group 2 (p=NS). P/R was observed in 28 patients. Twenty five of them received a new RAI dose (3 in Group 1 and 22 in Group 2) and two had received a third dose. After this procedure 87.5 % became hypothyroid within one year of follow up. No adverse events were observed in these patients, except for hypothyroidism. Conclusion: High dose RAI therapy in GD resulted in earlier and better rates for the control of thyrotoxicosis. Rates of hypothyroidism were similar in both groups, with the difference that those subjects, who originally received a low dose of RAI, were creeping in a winding path, rendering a poor quality of life, and finally arriving at the same hypothyroid state than the others. Therefore, we recommend high RAI doses for the

  9. Adaptive Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Automated Daily Plan Reoptimization Prevents Dose Delivery Degradation Caused by Anatomy Deformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leinders, Suzanne M. [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Méndez Romero, Alejandra [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Schaart, Dennis [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Seppenwoolde, Yvette, E-mail: y.seppenwoolde@erasmusmc.nl [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Heijmen, Ben J.M. [Erasmus Medical Center-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate how dose distributions for liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) can be improved by using automated, daily plan reoptimization to account for anatomy deformations, compared with setup corrections only. Methods and Materials: For 12 tumors, 3 strategies for dose delivery were simulated. In the first strategy, computed tomography scans made before each treatment fraction were used only for patient repositioning before dose delivery for correction of detected tumor setup errors. In adaptive second and third strategies, in addition to the isocenter shift, intensity modulated radiation therapy beam profiles were reoptimized or both intensity profiles and beam orientations were reoptimized, respectively. All optimizations were performed with a recently published algorithm for automated, multicriteria optimization of both beam profiles and beam angles. Results: In 6 of 12 cases, violations of organs at risk (ie, heart, stomach, kidney) constraints of 1 to 6 Gy in single fractions occurred in cases of tumor repositioning only. By using the adaptive strategies, these could be avoided (<1 Gy). For 1 case, this needed adaptation by slightly underdosing the planning target volume. For 2 cases with restricted tumor dose in the planning phase to avoid organ-at-risk constraint violations, fraction doses could be increased by 1 and 2 Gy because of more favorable anatomy. Daily reoptimization of both beam profiles and beam angles (third strategy) performed slightly better than reoptimization of profiles only, but the latter required only a few minutes of computation time, whereas full reoptimization took several hours. Conclusions: This simulation study demonstrated that replanning based on daily acquired computed tomography scans can improve liver stereotactic body radiation therapy dose delivery.

  10. Determination of radiation doses caused by release into the atmosphere by nuclear power plants, based on measurement of emission and immission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekler, B.; Deme, S.

    2006-01-01

    The radiation impact of nuclear facilities, and the nuclear power plants as well, can be determined by using two methods. The first one calculates the dose of critical group of population based on the release, meteorological and hydrological parameters. The second method gives an estimate of the additional dose caused by the nuclear facility from the radiological measurements in the environment. This article compares this two methods for the release in the atmosphere, and gives an estimate of the relative error. The comparison can be applied for cases when the atmospheric pollution is released from a point type source, so for the conventional power plants as well. (author)

  11. AXAOTHER XL -- A spreadsheet for determining doses for incidents caused by tornadoes or high-velocity straight winds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpkins, A.A.

    1996-09-01

    AXAOTHER XL is an Excel Spreadsheet used to determine dose to the maximally exposed offsite individual during high-velocity straight winds or tornado conditions. Both individual and population doses may be considered. Potential exposure pathways are inhalation and plume shine. For high-velocity straight winds the spreadsheet has the capability to determine the downwind relative air concentration, however for the tornado conditions, the user must enter the relative air concentration. Theoretical models are discussed and hand calculations are performed to ensure proper application of methodologies. A section has also been included that contains user instructions for the spreadsheet

  12. Ablative doses of radioiodine show a high efficacy and safety in the treatment of hyperthyroidism caused by Graves diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juri, A.; Pitoia, Fabian; Lopaczek, N.; Mana, D.; Niepomniscze, Hugo; El Tamer, Elias A.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this work is to compare the frequency of healing and persistence/relapse of hyperthyroidism using two protocols of different 131 I doses in patients with Graves diseases, and to evaluate the presence of adverse effects observed in the patients after each of the protocols. (author) [es

  13. Distribution of natural radioactivity in agriculture through fertilizers, and an estimate of the external gonad dose caused

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moere, H.

    1978-01-01

    The content of the radionucleids 226-Ra, 232-Th, and 40-K has been analyzed in a number of phosphate fertilizers, representative for the market. From these concentrations, a rough estimate is made of the gonad dose rates for different groups of the population. It is concluded that the radiation hazards connected to the use of such fertilizers are small. (L.E.)

  14. Determination of dose enhancement caused by gold-nanoparticles irradiated with proton, X-rays (kV and MV) and electron beams, using alanine/EPR dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Clare L.; Ackerly, Trevor; Best, Stephen P.; Gagliardi, Frank; Kie, Katahira; Little, Peter J.; McCorkell, Giulia; Sale, Charlotte A.; Tsunei, Yusuke; Tominaga, Takahiro; Volaric, Sioe See; Geso, Moshi

    2015-01-01

    The main aims of this research was to employ alanine doped with gold-nanoparticles “AuNPs” to determine the levels of dose enhancement caused by these particles when irradiated with proton beams, low and high energy X-rays and electrons. DL-alanine was impregnated with 5 nm gold-nanoparticles (3% by weight) and added as a uniform layer within a wax pellet of dimensions 10 × 5 × 5 mm. Control pellets, containing DL-Alanine were also produced, and placed within a phantom, and exposed to various types of radiations: low energy (kV ranges) X-rays were obtained from a superficial machine, high energy (MV) X-rays and electrons derived from a linear accelerator, and protons were produced by the Hyogo Ion Beam Centre in Japan. Nominal doses received ranged from 2 to 20 Gy (within clinical range). The Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectra of the irradiated samples were recorded on a BRUKER Elexsys 9.5 MHz. The dose enhancement caused by gold nanoparticles for 80 kV x-rays was found to be more than 60% at about 5 Gy. Smaller dose enhancements (under the same measurement conditions) were observed for megavoltage x-ray beams (up to 10%). Dose enhancement caused by charged particles indicated minimal values for 6 MeV electrons (approximately 5%) whilst less than that is obtained with protons of 150 MeV. The proton results validate the latest simulation results based on Monte Carlo calculations but the dose enhancement is significantly less than that reported in cell and animal model systems, (about 20%). We attribute this difference to the fact that alanine only measures the levels of free radicals generated by the inclusion of nanoparticles and not the redox type radicals (such as reactive oxygen species) generated from aqueous media in cells. Dose enhancement caused by 5 nm gold-nanoparticles with radiotherapy type proton beams has been found to be less than 5% as determined when using alanine/wax as both a phantom and dosimeter. This agrees well

  15. Use of low-dose UV-C irradiation to control powdery mildew caused by Podosphaera aphanis on strawberry plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powdery mildew of strawberry plants, caused by Podoshaera aphanis, can cause severe losses by reducing fruit yield, quality and predisposing fruit to other diseases. Fungicides have been routinely used to control this disease. However, limitations mainly related to their effectiveness, re-entry pe...

  16. Perinatal exposure to low-dose BDE-47, an emergent environmental contaminant, causes hyperactivity in rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvorov, Alexander; Girard, Sylvie; Lachapelle, Sophie; Abdelouahab, Nadia; Sebire, Guillaume; Takser, Larissa

    2009-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) are a group of environmental contaminants increasing in North America. Few data are available on neurobehavioral effects at low-dose exposure. Our goal in the present study was to evaluate whether low-dose BDE-47, which is the most abundant PBDE in human samples, affects the neurobehavioral development of rats. Dams were exposed to vehicle or low-dose BDE-47 (0.002, 0.02 and 0.2 mg/kg body weight) each 5 days from gestational day 15 to postnatal day (PND) 20 by intravenous injections. Spontaneous locomotor activity of pups was assessed using the open field test on PND 15, 20 and 25. Sensorimotor coordination was assessed using a RotaRod on PND 30. Exposure to BDE-47 increased locomotor activity of pups. Developmental landmarks and sensorimotor coordination were not influenced by exposure to BDE-47. BDE-47 content in adipose tissue of exposed rats was similar to that known for human populations. These results indicate neurodevelopmental disruption induced in rats by BDE-47 at levels found in the human population.

  17. Chitin Oligosaccharide (COS Reduces Antibiotics Dose and Prevents Antibiotics-Caused Side Effects in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS Patients with Spinal Fusion Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Qu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are always considered for surgical site infection (SSI in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS surgery. However, the use of antibiotics often causes the antibiotic resistance of pathogens and side effects. Thus, it is necessary to explore natural products as drug candidates. Chitin Oligosaccharide (COS has anti-inflammation and anti-bacteria functions. The effects of COS on surgical infection in AIS surgery were investigated. A total of 312 AIS patients were evenly and randomly assigned into control group (CG, each patient took one-gram alternative Azithromycin/Erythromycin/Cloxacillin/Aztreonam/Ceftazidime or combined daily, experiment group (EG, each patient took 20 mg COS and half-dose antibiotics daily, and placebo group (PG, each patient took 20 mg placebo and half-dose antibiotics daily. The average follow-up was one month, and infection severity and side effects were analyzed. The effects of COS on isolated pathogens were analyzed. SSI rates were 2%, 3% and 8% for spine wounds and 1%, 2% and 7% for iliac wound in CG, EG and PG (p < 0.05, respectively. COS reduces the side effects caused by antibiotics (p < 0.05. COS improved biochemical indexes and reduced the levels of interleukin (IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF alpha. COS reduced the antibiotics dose and antibiotics-caused side effects in AIS patients with spinal fusion surgery by improving antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. COS should be developed as potential adjuvant for antibiotics therapies.

  18. Influence of photon beam energy on the dose enhancement factor caused by gold and silver nanoparticles: An experimental approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidelli, Eder José, E-mail: ederguidelli@pg.ffclrp.usp.br; Baffa, Oswaldo [Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Noble metal nanoparticles have found several medical applications in the areas of radiation detection; x-ray contrast agents and cancer radiation therapy. Based on computational methods, many papers have reported the nanoparticle effect on the dose deposition in the surrounding medium. Here the authors report experimental results on how silver and gold nanoparticles affect the dose deposition in alanine dosimeters containing several concentrations of silver and gold nanoparticles, for five different beam energies, using electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR). Methods: The authors produced alanine dosimeters containing several mass percentage of silver and gold nanoparticles. Nanoparticle sizes were measured by dynamic light scattering and by transmission electron microscopy. The authors determined the dose enhancement factor (DEF) theoretically, using a widely accepted method, and experimentally, using ESR spectroscopy. Results: The DEF is governed by nanoparticle concentration, size, and position in the alanine matrix. Samples containing gold nanoparticles afford a DEF higher than 1.0, because gold nanoparticle size is homogeneous for all gold concentrations utilized. For samples containing silver particles, the silver mass percentage governs the nanoparticles size, which, in turns, modifies nanoparticle position in the alanine dosimeters. In this sense, DEF decreases for dosimeters containing large and segregated particles. The influence of nanoparticle size-position is more noticeable for dosimeters irradiated with higher beam energies, and dosimeters containing large and segregated particles become less sensitive than pure alanine (DEF < 1). Conclusions: ESR dosimetry gives the DEF in a medium containing metal nanoparticles, although particle concentration, size, and position are closely related in the system. Because this is also the case as in many real systems of materials containing inorganic nanoparticles, ESR is a valuable tool for

  19. Influence of photon beam energy on the dose enhancement factor caused by gold and silver nanoparticles: An experimental approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidelli, Eder José; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Noble metal nanoparticles have found several medical applications in the areas of radiation detection; x-ray contrast agents and cancer radiation therapy. Based on computational methods, many papers have reported the nanoparticle effect on the dose deposition in the surrounding medium. Here the authors report experimental results on how silver and gold nanoparticles affect the dose deposition in alanine dosimeters containing several concentrations of silver and gold nanoparticles, for five different beam energies, using electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR). Methods: The authors produced alanine dosimeters containing several mass percentage of silver and gold nanoparticles. Nanoparticle sizes were measured by dynamic light scattering and by transmission electron microscopy. The authors determined the dose enhancement factor (DEF) theoretically, using a widely accepted method, and experimentally, using ESR spectroscopy. Results: The DEF is governed by nanoparticle concentration, size, and position in the alanine matrix. Samples containing gold nanoparticles afford a DEF higher than 1.0, because gold nanoparticle size is homogeneous for all gold concentrations utilized. For samples containing silver particles, the silver mass percentage governs the nanoparticles size, which, in turns, modifies nanoparticle position in the alanine dosimeters. In this sense, DEF decreases for dosimeters containing large and segregated particles. The influence of nanoparticle size-position is more noticeable for dosimeters irradiated with higher beam energies, and dosimeters containing large and segregated particles become less sensitive than pure alanine (DEF < 1). Conclusions: ESR dosimetry gives the DEF in a medium containing metal nanoparticles, although particle concentration, size, and position are closely related in the system. Because this is also the case as in many real systems of materials containing inorganic nanoparticles, ESR is a valuable tool for

  20. Recommended values for the distribution coefficient (Kd) to be used in dose assessments for decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-09-24

    ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. The site contains two reactor Containment Buildings, a Fuel Building, an Auxiliary Building, and a Turbine Building that may be contaminated. The current decommissioning plan involves removing all above grade structures to a depth of 3 feet below grade. The remaining underground structures will be backfilled. The remaining underground structures will contain low amounts of residual licensed radioactive material. An important component of the decommissioning process is the demonstration that any remaining activity will not cause a hypothetical individual to receive a dose in excess of 25 mrem/y as specified in 10CFR20 SubpartE.

  1. Recommended values for the distribution coefficient (Kd) to be used in dose assessments for decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan T.

    2014-06-09

    ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. The site contains two reactor Containment Buildings, a Fuel Building, an Auxiliary Building, and a Turbine Building that may be contaminated. The current decommissioning plan involves removing all above grade structures to a depth of 3 feet below grade. The remaining underground structures will be backfilled. The remaining underground structures will contain low amounts of residual licensed radioactive material. An important component of the decommissioning process is the demonstration that any remaining activity will not cause a hypothetical individual to receive a dose in excess of 25 mrem/y as specified in 10CFR20 SubpartE.

  2. Comparative study on hematopoietic damage of mice caused by high-dose of gamma-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Hongying; Wang Yueying; Li Deguan; Wang Xiaochun; Zhang Heng; Lu Lu; Chang Jianhui; Du Liqing; Wang Yan; Men Aimin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of high-dose of gamma-ray irradiation on hematopoiesis injury and recovery of IRM-2 and C57BL/6 J mouse. Methods: The experiment was designed to study the effects of radiation (4 Gy) on spleen index, CFU-S and DNA damage on the 9 th day of IRM-2 and ICR mice and the effects of radiation (6 Gy) on WBC change and its absolute value on the 45 th days of IRM-2 and C57BL/6 J mice. Results: The IRM-2 mouse spleen index, CFU-S and DNA were higher than ICR mouse on the 9 th days, and there were significant difference in CFU-S and DNA (P<0.01). The IRM-2 mouse WBC, RMC, HGB and HCT were higher than C57BL/6 J mouse on the 45 th days, and there were significant difference (P<0.01). Conclusion: IRM-2 mouse hematopoiesis resumes quicker than C57BL/6 J and ICR do after high-dose of gamma-ray irradiation. (authors)

  3. Perinatal exposure to low-dose imidacloprid causes ADHD-like symptoms: Evidences from an invertebrate model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seoyoung; Lee, Hee-Seok; Park, Yooheon

    2017-12-01

    The fundamental diagnoses of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism consists of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity, which lead to abnormal social interactions and repetitive and restricted behavior. Several food contaminants are suspected of being a possible contributing factor to the present-day increase in diseases, such as obesity and ADHD, and pesticides are also considered as a contributor to the increased prevalence of ADHD. Imidacloprid is a neonicotinoid insecticide with lower toxicity to mammals. Based on recent reports on neurobehavioral studies using an invertebrate model system, we have assessed ADHD-related impairments to test the effects of low-dose exposure to imidacloprid in Drosophila melanogaster through behavior assays, such as abnormal social interaction, repetitive behaviors, and significant deficiency in locomotion in an open field arena, a decision-making process. Drosophila stocks were treated with imidacloprid at the level of 200 pM. Social interaction among the flies was disturbed by imidacloprid. Travelled distance and velocity was also increased by the treatment. The difference in velocity between the treatment group and the control group was significant, revealing that imidacloprid-exposed flies moved faster and longer than control flies. This study illustrated the behavioral deficiency in Drosophila due to the low-dose imidacloprid exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Change of Cr atoms distribution in Fe85Cr15 alloy caused by 250 keV He+ ion irradiation to different doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubiel, S.M.; Żukrowski, J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Effect of He-ion irradiation dose on Fe 85 Cr 15 alloy. • Irradiation-induced clustering of Cr atoms. • Irradiation-caused reorientation of the surface magnetization vector. • Irradiation-caused increase of Fe-site spin-density. - Abstract: Redistribution of Cr atoms in a Fe 85 Cr 15 alloy caused by its irradiation with 250 keV He + ions to different doses, D = 8 ⋅ 10 16 , 16 ⋅ 10 16 and 48 ⋅ 10 16 ions/cm 2 was investigated by means of conversion electrons Mössbauer spectroscopy. The redistribution was expressed in terms of the Warren–Cowley short-range order parameters α 1 , α 2 and α 12 pertaining to the first (1NN), second (2NN) and both i.e. 1NN + 2NN shells, respectively. Clear evidence was found, both for non-irradiated and irradiated samples that the actual distribution of Cr atoms is characteristic of the shell, and for a given shell it depends on the irradiation dose. In particular, α 1 is positive, hence indicates an under population of Cr atoms in 1NN with respect to the random case, α 2 is negative, giving evidence thereby that 2NN is overpopulated by Cr atoms, and α 12 is weakly positive. Under the applied irradiation the number of Cr atoms in both neighbor shells decreased signifying thereby a clustering of Cr atoms. The underlying decrease of Cr concentration within the 1NN–2NN volume around the probe Fe atoms was estimated at 1.5 at.% ranging between 2.1 for the lowest and 0.8 at.% for the highest dose

  5. Subpart DD Training Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  6. Subpart AA Training Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  7. Subpart W Training Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  8. A nested case-control approach to interactions between radiation dose and other factors as causes of cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Land, Charles E [Department of Epidemiology, Radiation Epidemiology Branch, US National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1992-04-01

    Often a nested case-control study is the most practicable approach to estimating the interaction of two cancer risk factors in a large cohort. If one of the factors has already been evaluated for the entire cohort, however, more information is already available about its relationship to risk than could be obtained from a nested study. A modified case-control approach is proposed, in which information about the second, unknown factor is sought for cases and controls matched on the first factor. The approach requires, for interaction models other than the multiplicative, a nonstandard analytical approach incorporating cohort-based information about the first factor. The problem is discussed in the context of breast cancer risk in a defined cohort of female Japanese atomic bomb survivors, in relation to radiation dose and reproductive history. (author)

  9. Exposure to low dose benzo[a]pyrene during early life stages causes symptoms similar to cardiac hypertrophy in adult zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lixing; Gao, Dongxu; Zhang, Youyu; Wang, Chonggang; Zuo, Zhenghong

    2014-07-15

    Growing evidence indicates that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) can lead to cardiac hypertrophy and recent research indicates that exposure to low dose crude oil during early embryonic development may lead to impacts on heart health at later life stages. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether exposure during early life stages to low dose benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), as a high-ring PAH, would lead to cardiac hypertrophy at later life stages. Zebrafish were exposed to low dose BaP until 96 hpf, then transferred to clean water and maintained for a year before histological and molecular biological analysis. Our results showed that exposure to low level BaP during early life stages increased heart weight to body weight ratios and deposited collagen in the heart of adult zebrafish. ANP, BNP and c-Myc were also induced in the heart of adult zebrafish by BaP. These results proved that low level BaP exposure during early life stages caused symptoms similar to cardiac hypertrophy in adult zebrafish. Our results displayed an elevated expression of CdC42, RhoA, p-ERK1, 2 and Rac1. Therefore, the mechanism of the cardiac hypertrophy caused by BaP exposure during early life stages may be through inducing the expression of CdC42, RhoA and Rac1, together with activating ERK1, 2. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Chitin Oligosaccharide (COS) Reduces Antibiotics Dose and Prevents Antibiotics-Caused Side Effects in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) Patients with Spinal Fusion Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yang; Xu, Jinyu; Zhou, Haohan; Dong, Rongpeng; Kang, Mingyang; Zhao, Jianwu

    2017-03-14

    Antibiotics are always considered for surgical site infection (SSI) in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) surgery. However, the use of antibiotics often causes the antibiotic resistance of pathogens and side effects. Thus, it is necessary to explore natural products as drug candidates. Chitin Oligosaccharide (COS) has anti-inflammation and anti-bacteria functions. The effects of COS on surgical infection in AIS surgery were investigated. A total of 312 AIS patients were evenly and randomly assigned into control group (CG, each patient took one-gram alternative Azithromycin/Erythromycin/Cloxacillin/Aztreonam/Ceftazidime or combined daily), experiment group (EG, each patient took 20 mg COS and half-dose antibiotics daily), and placebo group (PG, each patient took 20 mg placebo and half-dose antibiotics daily). The average follow-up was one month, and infection severity and side effects were analyzed. The effects of COS on isolated pathogens were analyzed. SSI rates were 2%, 3% and 8% for spine wounds and 1%, 2% and 7% for iliac wound in CG, EG and PG ( p antibiotics ( p antibiotics dose and antibiotics-caused side effects in AIS patients with spinal fusion surgery by improving antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. COS should be developed as potential adjuvant for antibiotics therapies.

  11. Intraperitoneal administration of high doses of polyethylene glycol (PEG) causes hepatic subcapsular necrosis and low-grade peritonitis with a rise in hepatic biomarkers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, Giovanni; Starkey Lewis, Phil J.; Palmer, Luke; Hetzel, Udo; Goldring, Christopher E.; Park, B. Kevin; Kipar, Anja; Williams, Dominic P.

    2013-01-01

    Polyethylene glycols (PEGs) are commonly employed as excipients in preclinical studies and in vitro experiments to dissolve poorly hydrosoluble drugs. Their use is generally considered safe in both animals and humans; however, limited data is available concerning the safety of PEGs when administered parenterally. The results of our investigation demonstrate that PEG-400 can have an irritant effect on serosal surfaces and causes subcapsular hepatocellular necrosis in mice when administered intraperitoneally at a high dose (4 mL/kg). Accordingly, levels of serum biomarkers of liver injury need to be carefully interpreted in studies where PEG is administered intraperitoneally and always in association with the results of the histological assessment

  12. Analysis of Gamma Dose Rate Caused by Corrosion Products inside the Containment Building of Yonngwang Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3 During Shutdown Period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Wi Ho; Kim, Jae Cheon; Kim, Soon Young; Kim, Jong Kyung [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Occupational radiation exposure(ORE) of nuclear power plant(NPP) workers mainly occurs during the shutdown period. Major radioactive sources are the corrosion products released from the reactor coolant system(RCS). The corrosion products consist of circulating crud and deposited crud. Major radioactive corrosion products, {sup 58}Co and {sup 60}Co, are known to contribute approximately more than 70% of the total ORE. In this study, the corrosion products regarding cobalt were evaluated during the shutdown period, and gamma dose rates caused by them were calculated at the main working area inside the containment building of the Yonggwang NPP Unit 3.

  13. Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy Rosai-Dorfman's disease as cause of isolated hilar lymphadenopathy and complete remission after high dose steroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Jahdali, Hamdan H.; Al-Shirawi, Nehad N.; Bamefleh, Hana S.; Yamani, Nizar M.

    2008-01-01

    Rosai-Dorfman's Disease, also known as sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy SHML, is a rare histiocytic proliferative disorder and a distinct clinic-pathological feature of unknown origin. Painless cervical lymphadenopathy is the most common clinical presentation. Different treatment modalities have been tried with variable responses, however, there is no consensus on the best modality of treatment. Here, we present a case report of SHML causing isolated hilar lymphadenopathy with complete remission for more than 6 years, after a short course of high dose steroid dexamethasone 20 mg daily for 3 days. (author)

  14. Text mining-based in silico drug discovery in oral mucositis caused by high-dose cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Jon; Shah, Nirav; Noll, Braxton; Stevens, Craig B; Lawler, Marshall; Mougeot, Farah B; Mougeot, Jean-Luc C

    2018-08-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a major dose-limiting side effect of chemotherapy and radiation used in cancer treatment. Due to the complex nature of OM, currently available drug-based treatments are of limited efficacy. Our objectives were (i) to determine genes and molecular pathways associated with OM and wound healing using computational tools and publicly available data and (ii) to identify drugs formulated for topical use targeting the relevant OM molecular pathways. OM and wound healing-associated genes were determined by text mining, and the intersection of the two gene sets was selected for gene ontology analysis using the GeneCodis program. Protein interaction network analysis was performed using STRING-db. Enriched gene sets belonging to the identified pathways were queried against the Drug-Gene Interaction database to find drug candidates for topical use in OM. Our analysis identified 447 genes common to both the "OM" and "wound healing" text mining concepts. Gene enrichment analysis yielded 20 genes representing six pathways and targetable by a total of 32 drugs which could possibly be formulated for topical application. A manual search on ClinicalTrials.gov confirmed no relevant pathway/drug candidate had been overlooked. Twenty-five of the 32 drugs can directly affect the PTGS2 (COX-2) pathway, the pathway that has been targeted in previous clinical trials with limited success. Drug discovery using in silico text mining and pathway analysis tools can facilitate the identification of existing drugs that have the potential of topical administration to improve OM treatment.

  15. Coffee consumption and risk of all-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality in smokers and non-smokers: a dose-response meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosso, Giuseppe; Micek, Agnieszka; Godos, Justyna; Sciacca, Salvatore; Pajak, Andrzej; Martínez-González, Miguel A.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Galvano, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Coffee consumption has been associated with several benefits toward human health. However, its association with mortality risk has yielded contrasting results, including a non-linear relation to all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality and no association with cancer mortality. As smoking habits may affect the association between coffee and health outcomes, the aim of the present study was to update the latest dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies on the association between coffee consumption and mortality risk and conduct stratified analyses by smoking status and other potential confounders. A systematic search was conducted in electronic databases to identify relevant studies, risk estimates were retrieved from the studies, and dose-response analysis was modeled by using restricted cubic splines. A total of 31 studies comprising 1610,543 individuals and 183,991 cases of all-cause, 34,574 of CVD, and 40,991 of cancer deaths were selected. Analysis showed decreased all-cause [relative risk (RR) = 0.86, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 0.82, 0.89)] and CVD mortality risk (RR = 0.85, 95 % CI = 0.77, 0.93) for consumption of up to 4 cups/day of coffee, while higher intakes were associated with no further lower risk. When analyses were restricted only to non-smokers, a linear decreased risk of all-cause (RR = 0.94, 95 % CI = 0.93, 0.96), CVD (RR = 0.94, 95 % CI = 0.91, 0.97), and cancer mortality (RR = 0.98, 95 % CI = 0.96, 1.00) for 1 cup/day increase was found. The search for other potential confounders, including dose-response analyses in subgroups by gender, geographical area, year of publication, and type of coffee, showed no relevant differences between strata. In conclusion, coffee consumption is associated with decreased risk of mortality from all-cause, CVD, and cancer; however, smoking modifies the observed risk when studying the role of coffee on human health.

  16. Coffee consumption and risk of all-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality in smokers and non-smokers: a dose-response meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosso, Giuseppe; Micek, Agnieszka; Godos, Justyna; Sciacca, Salvatore; Pajak, Andrzej; Martínez-González, Miguel A; Giovannucci, Edward L; Galvano, Fabio

    2016-12-01

    Coffee consumption has been associated with several benefits toward human health. However, its association with mortality risk has yielded contrasting results, including a non-linear relation to all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality and no association with cancer mortality. As smoking habits may affect the association between coffee and health outcomes, the aim of the present study was to update the latest dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies on the association between coffee consumption and mortality risk and conduct stratified analyses by smoking status and other potential confounders. A systematic search was conducted in electronic databases to identify relevant studies, risk estimates were retrieved from the studies, and dose-response analysis was modeled by using restricted cubic splines. A total of 31 studies comprising 1610,543 individuals and 183,991 cases of all-cause, 34,574 of CVD, and 40,991 of cancer deaths were selected. Analysis showed decreased all-cause [relative risk (RR) = 0.86, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 0.82, 0.89)] and CVD mortality risk (RR = 0.85, 95 % CI = 0.77, 0.93) for consumption of up to 4 cups/day of coffee, while higher intakes were associated with no further lower risk. When analyses were restricted only to non-smokers, a linear decreased risk of all-cause (RR = 0.94, 95 % CI = 0.93, 0.96), CVD (RR = 0.94, 95 % CI = 0.91, 0.97), and cancer mortality (RR = 0.98, 95 % CI = 0.96, 1.00) for 1 cup/day increase was found. The search for other potential confounders, including dose-response analyses in subgroups by gender, geographical area, year of publication, and type of coffee, showed no relevant differences between strata. In conclusion, coffee consumption is associated with decreased risk of mortality from all-cause, CVD, and cancer; however, smoking modifies the observed risk when studying the role of coffee on human health.

  17. Meta-analysis: low-dose intake of vitamin E combined with other vitamins or minerals may decrease all-cause mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shan; Pan, Zhenyu; Li, Hui; Li, Fenglan; Song, Yanyan; Qiu, Yu

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that vitamin E alone or combined with other vitamins or minerals can prevent oxidative stress and slow oxidative injury-related diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. A comprehensive search of PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library was performed. Relative risk was used as an effect measure to compare the intervention and control groups. A total of 33 trials were included in the meta-analysis. Neither vitamin E intake alone (RR=1.01; 95% CI, 0.97 to 1.04; p=0.77) nor vitamin E intake combined with other agents (RR=0.97; 95% CI, 0.89 to 1.06; p=0.55) was correlated with all-cause mortality. Subgroup analyses revealed that low-dose vitamin E supplementation combined with other agents is associated with a statistically significant reduction in all-cause mortality (RR=0.92; 95% CI, 0.86 to 0.98; p=0.01), and vitamin E intake combined with other agents is associated with a statistically significant reduction in mortality rates among individuals without probable or confirmed diseases (RR=0.92; 95% CI, 0.86 to 0.99; p=0.02). Neither vitamin E intake alone nor combined with other agents is associated with a reduction in all-cause mortality. But a low dose (vitamin E combined with other agents is correlated with a reduction in all-cause mortality, and vitamin E intake combined with other agents is correlated with a reduction in the mortality rate among individuals without probable or confirmed diseases.

  18. Developmental disorders of the brain can be caused by PCBs; low doses of hydroxy-PCBs disrupt thyroid hormone-dependent dendrite formation from Purkinje neurons in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, Y; Kimura-Kuroda, J [Tokyo Metropol. Inst. for Neuroscience, Tokyo (Japan); Nagata, I [CREST/ JST, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    Exposure to some environmental chemicals during the perinatal period causes developmental disorders of the brain. Cognitive impairment and hyperactivity in infants were reported in Taiwan, known as Yu-cheng incidents caused by the accidental contamination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Together with recent experimental data, Kuroda proposes a hypothesis that spatio-temporal disruptions of developing neuronal circuits by PCB exposure can cause the comobidity of learning disorders (LD), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autsm with the co-exposure to other environmental chemicals. PCBs and hydroxylated PCBs (OH-PCBs) have similar chemical structures to thyroid hormones (TH), thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). TH deficiency in the perinatal period causes cretinism children with severe cognitive and mental retardation. In primate model, Rice demonstrates that postnatal exposure to PCBs can dramatically influence later behavioral function. Epidemiological studies also indicate the possible developmental neurotoxicity of PCBs accumulated in human bodies. However, the precise underlying mechanisms and which types of PCB or OH-PCB with such effects have yet to be elucidated. It is important to establish a simple, reproducible, and sensitive in vitro assay for determining the effects of PCBs and OH-PCBs on the development of the central nervous system. Recently Iwasaki et al. established a reporter assay system and disclosed that low doses of PCBs potentially interfere TH-dependent gene expressions. This is the first demonstration that PCBs and OH-PCBs directly affect TH-receptor (TR)-mediated gene expressions crucial to the brain development, through unique mechanism. We also have demonstrated TH-dependent development of Purkinje neurons in vitro using a serum-free chemically defined medium. The degree of dendritic development of Purkinje cells is TH dose-dependent and exhibits high sensitivity in the pM order. Therefore, in the present study

  19. Daytime Napping and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and All-Cause Mortality: A Prospective Study and Dose-Response Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Tomohide; Hara, Kazuo; Shojima, Nobuhiro; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    To summarize evidence about the association between daytime napping and the risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality, and to quantify the potential dose-response relation. Meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. Electronic databases were searched for articles published up to December 2014 using the terms nap, cardiovascular disease, and all-cause mortality. We selected well-adjusted prospective cohort studies reporting risk estimates for cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality related to napping. Eleven prospective cohort studies were identified with 151,588 participants (1,625,012 person-years) and a mean follow-up period of 11 years (60% women, 5,276 cardiovascular events, and 18,966 all-cause deaths). Pooled analysis showed that a long daytime nap (≥ 60 min/day) was associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease (rate ratio [RR]: 1.82 [1.22-2.71], P = 0.003, I(2) = 37%) compared with not napping. All-cause mortality was associated with napping for ≥ 60 min/day (RR: 1.27 [1.11-1.45], P napping. In contrast, napping for nap time and cardiovascular disease (P for nonlinearity = 0.01). The RR initially decreased from 0 to 30 min/day. Then it increased slightly until about 45 min/day, followed by a sharp increase at longer nap times. There was also a positive linear relation between nap time and all-cause mortality (P for non-linearity = 0.97). Nap time and cardiovascular disease may be associated via a J-curve relation. Further studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of a short nap. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  20. Dose-response association of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity with cardiovascular biomarkers and all-cause mortality: Considerations by individual sports, exercise and recreational physical activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loprinzi, Paul D

    2015-12-01

    Previous research demonstrates that moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) is associated with reduced all-cause mortality risk. Our understanding of whether individual physical activities are associated with all-cause mortality is less understood. Data from the 1999-2006 NHANES were employed, with follow-up through 2011. 48 different individual physical activities (e.g., swimming, running, bicycling) were assessed, and total MVPA MET-min-month was calculated based on their responses to these 48 individual physical activities. Greater engagement in MVPA was associated with more favorable cardiovascular biomarkers, particularly for men. Even after adjustment for total MVPA, different individual physical activities were associated with cardiovascular biomarkers across gender. When compared to those not meeting guidelines (0-1999 MVPA MET-min-month), a dose-response association between MVPA and mortality was observed, with those engaging in 5 times the guideline level having the lowest risk of all-cause mortality (45% reduced risk). There was no evidence of a harmful effect of very high MVPA (e.g., 20,000+ MVPA MET-min-month). Engaging in MVPA even below the minimum recommendation was associated with survival benefits, and the greatest survival effects occurred at a dose of approximately 5 times the minimum recommendation. Although very high levels (e.g., 10 times the minimum recommendation) of self-reported MVPA did not demonstrate the greatest survival effects, high levels of physical activity did not appear to have harmful effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Jj of... - General Provisions Applicability to Subpart JJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Subpart JJ 1 Table 1 to Subpart JJ of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY.... JJ, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart JJ of Part 63—General Provisions Applicability to Subpart JJ Reference Applies to subpart JJ Comment 63.1(a) Yes 63.1(b)(1) No Subpart JJ specifies applicability. 63.1(b)(2) Yes...

  2. A single low dose of Fe ions can cause long-term biological responses in NL20 human bronchial epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Qianlin; Wang, Jingdong; Cao, Jianping; Yang, Hongying [Medical College of Soochow University/Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, School of Radiation Medicine and Protection, Suzhou, Jiangsu (China); Liu, Wei [Soochow University, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Second Affiliated Hospital, Suzhou, Jiangsu (China)

    2018-03-15

    Space radiation cancer risk may be a potential obstacle for long-duration spaceflight. Among all types of cancer space radiation may induce, lung cancer has been estimated to be the largest potential risk. Although previous animal study has shown that Fe ions, the most important contributor to the total dose equivalent of space radiation, induced a higher incidence of lung tumorigenesis per dose than X-rays, the underlying mechanisms at cellular level remained unclear. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated long-term biological changes in NL20 human bronchial epithelial cells after exposure to Fe ion or X-ray irradiation. We found that compared with sham control, the progeny of NL20 cells irradiated with 0.1 Gy of Fe ions showed slightly increased micronucleus formation, significantly decreased cell proliferation, disturbed cell cycle distribution, and obviously elevated intracellular ROS levels accompanied by reduced SOD1 and SOD2 expression, but the progeny of NL20 cells irradiated with 0.9 Gy of X-rays did not show any significant changes. More importantly, Fe ion exposure caused much greater soft-agar colony formation than X-rays did in the progeny of irradiated NL20 cells, clearly suggesting higher cell transformation potential of Fe ions compared with X-rays. These data may shed the light on the potential lung tumorigenesis risk from Fe ion exposure. In addition, ATM inhibition by Ku55933 reversed some of the changes in the progeny of Fe ion-irradiated cells but not others such as soft-agar colony formation, suggesting complex processes from DNA damage to carcinogenesis. These data indicate that even a single low dose of Fe ions can induce long-term biological responses such as cell transformation, etc., suggesting unignorable health risk from space radiation to astronauts. (orig.)

  3. Milk and dairy consumption and risk of cardiovascular diseases and all-cause mortality: dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing; Astrup, Arne; Lovegrove, Julie A; Gijsbers, Lieke; Givens, David I; Soedamah-Muthu, Sabita S

    2017-04-01

    With a growing number of prospective cohort studies, an updated dose-response meta-analysis of milk and dairy products with all-cause mortality, coronary heart disease (CHD) or cardiovascular disease (CVD) have been conducted. PubMed, Embase and Scopus were searched for articles published up to September 2016. Random-effect meta-analyses with summarised dose-response data were performed for total (high-fat/low-fat) dairy, milk, fermented dairy, cheese and yogurt. Non-linear associations were investigated using the spine models and heterogeneity by subgroup analyses. A total of 29 cohort studies were available for meta-analysis, with 938,465 participants and 93,158 mortality, 28,419 CHD and 25,416 CVD cases. No associations were found for total (high-fat/low-fat) dairy, and milk with the health outcomes of mortality, CHD or CVD. Inverse associations were found between total fermented dairy (included sour milk products, cheese or yogurt; per 20 g/day) with mortality (RR 0.98, 95% CI 0.97-0.99; I 2  = 94.4%) and CVD risk (RR 0.98, 95% CI 0.97-0.99; I 2  = 87.5%). Further analyses of individual fermented dairy of cheese and yogurt showed cheese to have a 2% lower risk of CVD (RR 0.98, 95% CI 0.95-1.00; I 2  = 82.6%) per 10 g/day, but not yogurt. All of these marginally inverse associations of totally fermented dairy and cheese were attenuated in sensitivity analyses by removing one large Swedish study. This meta-analysis combining data from 29 prospective cohort studies demonstrated neutral associations between dairy products and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. For future studies it is important to investigate in more detail how dairy products can be replaced by other foods.

  4. Systematic review and meta-analysis of reduction in all-cause mortality from walking and cycling and shape of dose response relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Paul; Kahlmeier, Sonja; Götschi, Thomas; Orsini, Nicola; Richards, Justin; Roberts, Nia; Scarborough, Peter; Foster, Charlie

    2014-10-24

    Walking and cycling have shown beneficial effects on population risk of all-cause mortality (ACM). This paper aims to review the evidence and quantify these effects, adjusted for other physical activity (PA). We conducted a systematic review to identify relevant studies. Searches were conducted in November 2013 using the following health databases of publications: Embase (OvidSP); Medline (OvidSP); Web of Knowledge; CINAHL; SCOPUS; SPORTDiscus. We also searched reference lists of relevant texts and reviews. Eligible studies were prospective cohort design and reporting walking or cycling exposure and mortality as an outcome. Only cohorts of individuals healthy at baseline were considered eligible. Extracted data included study population and location, sample size, population characteristics (age and sex), follow-up in years, walking or cycling exposure, mortality outcome, and adjustment for other co-variables. We used random-effects meta-analyses to investigate the beneficial effects of regular walking and cycling. Walking (18 results from 14 studies) and cycling (8 results from 7 studies) were shown to reduce the risk of all-cause mortality, adjusted for other PA. For a standardised dose of 11.25 MET.hours per week (or 675 MET.minutes per week), the reduction in risk for ACM was 11% (95% CI = 4 to 17%) for walking and 10% (95% CI = 6 to 13%) for cycling. The estimates for walking are based on 280,000 participants and 2.6 million person-years and for cycling they are based on 187,000 individuals and 2.1 million person-years. The shape of the dose-response relationship was modelled through meta-analysis of pooled relative risks within three exposure intervals. The dose-response analysis showed that walking or cycling had the greatest effect on risk for ACM in the first (lowest) exposure interval. The analysis shows that walking and cycling have population-level health benefits even after adjustment for other PA. Public health approaches would have the biggest impact

  5. A kinematic-based methodology for radiological protection: Runoff analysis to calculate the effective dose for internal exposure caused by ingestion of radioactive isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Syota; Yamada, Tadashi; Yamada, Tomohito J.

    2014-05-01

    We aim to propose a kinematic-based methodology similar with runoff analysis for readily understandable radiological protection. A merit of this methodology is to produce sufficiently accurate effective doses by basic analysis. The great earthquake attacked the north-east area in Japan on March 11, 2011. The system of electrical facilities to control Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant was completely destroyed by the following tsunamis. From the damaged reactor containment vessels, an amount of radioactive isotopes had leaked and been diffused in the vicinity of the plant. Radiological internal exposure caused by ingestion of food containing radioactive isotopes has become an issue of great interest to the public, and has caused excessive anxiety because of a deficiency of fundamental knowledge concerning radioactivity. Concentrations of radioactivity in the human body and internal exposure have been studied extensively. Previous radiologic studies, for example, studies by International Commission on Radiological Protection(ICRP), employ a large-scale computational simulation including actual mechanism of metabolism in the human body. While computational simulation is a standard method for calculating exposure doses among radiology specialists, these methods, although exact, are too difficult for non-specialists to grasp the whole image owing to the sophistication. In this study, the human body is treated as a vessel. The number of radioactive atoms in the human body can be described by an equation of continuity, which is the only governing equation. Half-life, the period of time required for the amount of a substance decreases by half, is only parameter to calculate the number of radioactive isotopes in the human body. Half-life depends only on the kinds of nuclides, there are no arbitrary parameters. It is known that the number of radioactive isotopes decrease exponentially by radioactive decay (physical outflow). It is also known that radioactive isotopes

  6. Sodium orthovanadate associated with pharmacological doses of ascorbate causes an increased generation of ROS in tumor cells that inhibits proliferation and triggers apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Günther, T-hat nia Mara Fischer; Kviecinski, Maicon Roberto; Baron, Carla Cristine; Felipe, Karina Bettega; Farias, Mirelle Sifroni; Ourique da Silva, Fabiana; Bücker, Nádia Cristina Falcão [Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis (Brazil); Pich, Claus Tröger [Campus de Araranguá, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Araranguá (Brazil); Ferreira, Eduardo Antonio [Universidade de Brasília, Faculdade de Ceilândia, DF (Brazil); Filho, Danilo Wilhelm [Departamento de Ecologia e Zoologia, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis (Brazil); Verrax, Julien; Calderon, Pedro Buc [Toxicology and Cancer Biology Research Group, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Pedrosa, Rozangela Curi, E-mail: rozangelapedrosa@gmail.com [Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis (Brazil)

    2013-01-18

    Graphical abstract: -- Abstract: Pharmacological doses of ascorbate were evaluated for its ability to potentiate the toxicity of sodium orthovanadate (Na{sub 3}VO{sub 4}) in tumor cells. Cytotoxicity, inhibition of cell proliferation, generation of ROS and DNA fragmentation were assessed in T24 cells. Na{sub 3}VO{sub 4} was cytotoxic against T24 cells (EC{sub 50} = 5.8 μM at 24 h), but in the presence of ascorbate (100 μM) the EC{sub 50} fell to 3.3 μM. Na{sub 3}VO{sub 4} plus ascorbate caused a strong inhibition of cell proliferation (up to 20%) and increased the generation of ROS (4-fold). Na{sub 3}VO{sub 4} did not directly cleave plasmid DNA, at this aspect no synergism was found occurring between Na{sub 3}VO{sub 4} and ascorbate once the resulting action of the combination was no greater than that of both substances administered separately. Cells from Ehrlich ascites carcinoma-bearing mice were used to determine the activity of antioxidant enzymes, the extent of the oxidative damage and the type of cell death. Na{sub 3}VO{sub 4} alone, or combined with ascorbate, increased catalase activity, but only Na{sub 3}VO{sub 4} plus ascorbate increased superoxide dismutase activity (up to 4-fold). Oxidative damage on proteins and lipids was higher due to the treatment done with Na{sub 3}VO{sub 4} plus ascorbate (2–3-fold). Ascorbate potentiated apoptosis in tumor cells from mice treated with Na{sub 3}VO{sub 4}. The results indicate that pharmacological doses of ascorbate enhance the generation of ROS induced by Na{sub 3}VO{sub 4} in tumor cells causing inhibition of proliferation and apoptosis. Apoptosis induced by orthovanadate and ascorbate is closer related to inhibition on Bcl-xL and activation of Bax. Our data apparently rule out a mechanism of cell demise p53-dependent or related to Cdk2 impairment.

  7. The influence of detoxification agents on the intensity of side effects caused by medium-high doses of methotrexate in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šumar Jovana S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective The treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL in Serbia is conducted according to protocol ALL IC BMF-2009. The therapy includes the application of cytostatic drugs methotrexate and 6-mercaptopurine, and drug detoxifying Calcium Folinate. At the moment, 80% of affected children could be cured with current treatment, but resistance to the therapy and its toxic effects remain serious clinical problems. The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of detoxification agents (Calcium Folinate, silymarin and ursodeoxycholic acid on the side effects of methotrexate, applied in this protocol. Methods A modified acute toxicity form (GPOH was used for side effects monitoring. The research included children with either standard or intermediate risk ALL in the consolidation therapy phase, who were hospitalised at the Institute for Child and Youth Health Care of Vojvodina in Novi Sad during the period from July 2010 to February 2011. Results The most frequent side effect after 40 applications of methotrexate in ten children was bone marrow depression. Methotrexate caused: leukopenia in 10 patients, thrombocytopenia in 5 patients; after the use of folic acid, platelet count grew in 8 patients, leukocyte in 2 patients. Less frequent side effects: an increase serum transaminase activity, the state of fever, bronchopneumonia, diarrhoea with mild cramps and hypercalcaemia. Conclusion The application of Calcium Folinate, silymarin and ursodeoxycholic acid prevented the occurrence of severe adverse effects caused by medium-high doses of methotrexate. Observed adverse effects were of mild to moderate intensity, reversible and did not significantly disturb the quality of life in treated patients.

  8. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart N of... - General Provisions Applicability to Subpart N

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Subpart N 1 Table 1 to Subpart N of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Electroplating and Chromium Anodizing Tanks Pt. 63, Subpt. N, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart N of Part 63—General Provisions Applicability to Subpart N General provisionsreference Applies to subpart N Comment 63.1(a)(1) Yes...

  9. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart W of... - General Provisions Applicability to Subpart W

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Subpart W 1 Table 1 to Subpart W of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Polyamides Production Pt. 63, Subpt. W, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart W of Part 63—General Provisions Applicability to Subpart W Reference Applies to subpart W BLR WSR WSR alternative standard, and BLR equipment...

  10. Chronic exposure to low environmental concentrations and legal aquaculture doses of antibiotics cause systemic adverse effects in Nile tilapia and provoke differential human health risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbu, Samwel M; Zhou, Li; Sun, Sheng-Xiang; Zhang, Mei-Ling; Du, Zhen-Yu

    2018-06-01

    Antibiotics used globally to treat human and animal diseases exist ubiquitously in the environment at low doses because of misuse, overdose and poor absorption after ingestion, coupled with their high-water solubility and degradation resistance. However, the systemic chronic effects of exposure to low environmental concentrations of antibiotics (LECAs) and legal aquaculture doses of antibiotics (LADAs) in fish and their human health risk are currently unknown. To investigate the in vivo chronic effects of exposure to LECAs and LADAs using oxytetracycline (OTC) and sulfamethoxazole (SMZ) in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and their human health risk. Twenty O. niloticus weighing 27.73 ± 0.81 g were exposed to water containing LECAs (OTC at 420 ng/L and SMZ at 260 ng/L) and diets supplemented with LADAs (OTC 80 mg/kg/day and SMZ 100 mg/kg/day) for twelve weeks. General physiological functions, metabolic activities, intestinal and hepatic health were systemically evaluated. The possible human health risks of the consumption of the experimental Nile tilapia fillets in adults and children were assessed by using risk quotient. After exposure, we observed retarded growth performance accompanied by reduced nutrients digestibility, feed efficiency, organ indices, and lipid body composition in treated fish. Antibiotics distorted intestinal morphological features subsequently induced microbiota dysbiosis and suppressed intestinal tight junction proteins. Exposure of fish to LECAs and LADAs induced oxidative stress, suppressed innate immunity, stimulated inflammatory and detoxification responses, concomitantly inhibited antioxidant capacity and caused lipid peroxidation in intestine and liver organs. Both LECAs and LADAs enhanced gluconeogenesis, inhibited lipogenesis and fatty acid beta oxidation in intestine and liver organs. The exposure of fish to LECAs and LADAs induced anaerobic glycolytic pathway and affected intestinal fat catabolism in intestine

  11. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Aa of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants From Phosphoric Acid Manufacturing Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. AA, App. A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA 40 CFR...

  12. Does high-dose metformin cause lactic acidosis in type 2 diabetic patients after CABG surgery? A double blind randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Ghafari

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Metformin is a dimethyl biguanide oral anti-hyperglycemic agent. Lactic acidosis due to metformin is a fatal metabolic condition that limits its use in patients in poor clinical condition, consequently reducing the number of patients who benefit from this medication. In a double blind randomized clinical trial, we investigated 200 type 2 diabetic patients after coronary artery bypass surgery in the open heart ICU of the Mazandaran Heart Center, and randomly assigned them to equal intervention and control groups. The intervention group received regular insulin infusion along with 2 metformin 500 mg tablets every twelve hours, while the control group received only intravenous insulin with 2 placebo tablets every twelve hours. Lactate level, pH, base excess, blood glucose and serum creatinine were measured over five 12 h periods, with data averaged for each period. The primary outcome in this study was high lactate levels. Comparison between the 2 groups was made by independent Student’s t-test. To compare changes in multiple measures in each group and analysis of group interaction, a repeated measurement ANOVA test was used. There was no significant difference between the 2 groups regarding pH, base excess, or bicarbonate intake (P>0.05. No patient showed lactic acidosis in either group. Lactate levels were 23.0 vs 23.4 in the insulin-metformin and insulin only groups when the study was started, respectively. At the end of the study, those levels were 18.7 vs 18.9, respectively. In addition, the ANOVA repeated measurement test did not show a significant difference in terms of changes in the amount of lactate level between the 2 groups during the five measurement tests of the study period (P>0.05. High-dose metformin (1,000 mg twice daily with insulin does not cause lactic acidosis in type 2 diabetic patients after coronary artery

  13. 32 CFR 842.55 - Scope of this subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Scope of this subpart. 842.55 Section 842.55 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE CLAIMS AND LITIGATION... property damage, personal injury, or death caused by military and civilian members of the US Armed Forces...

  14. Atrazine Does Not Induce Pica Behavior at Doses that Increase Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Activation and Cause Conditioned Taste Avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous work has shown that a single oral administration of atrazine (ATR), a chlorotriazine herbicide, induces dose-dependent increases in plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), serum corticosterone (CORT) and progesterone. The mechanism for these effects is unknown. To tes...

  15. National Contingency Plan Subpart J

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subpart J of the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) directs EPA to prepare a schedule of dispersants, other chemicals, and oil spill mitigating devices and substances that may be used to remove or control oil discharges.

  16. Single Low Dose Primaquine (0.25 mg/kg Does Not Cause Clinically Significant Haemolysis in G6PD Deficient Subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germana Bancone

    Full Text Available Primaquine is the only drug consistently effective against mature gametocytes of Plasmodium falciparum. The transmission blocking dose of primaquine previously recommended was 0.75 mg/kg (adult dose 45 mg but its deployment was limited because of concerns over haemolytic effects in patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency. G6PD deficiency is an inherited X-linked enzymatic defect that affects an estimated 400 million people around the world with high frequencies (15-20% in populations living in malarious areas. To reduce transmission in low transmission settings and facilitate elimination of P. falciparum, the World Health Organization now recommends adding a single dose of 0.25 mg/kg (adult dose 15 mg to Artemisinin-based Combination Therapies (ACTs without G6PD testing. Direct evidence of the safety of this low dose is lacking. Adverse events and haemoglobin variations after this treatment were assessed in both G6PD normal and deficient subjects in the context of targeted malaria elimination in a malaria endemic area on the North-Western Myanmar-Thailand border where prevalence of G6PD deficiency (Mahidol variant approximates 15%.The tolerability and safety of primaquine (single dose 0.25 mg base/kg combined with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PPQ given three times at monthly intervals was assessed in 819 subjects. Haemoglobin concentrations were estimated over the six months preceding the ACT + primaquine rounds of mass drug administration. G6PD deficiency was assessed with a phenotypic test and genotyping was performed in male subjects with deficient phenotypes and in all females. Fractional haemoglobin changes in relation to G6PD phenotype and genotype and primaquine round were assessed using linear mixed-effects models. No adverse events related to primaquine were reported during the trial. Mean fractional haemoglobin changes after each primaquine treatment in G6PD deficient subjects (-5.0%, -4.2% and -4

  17. High-dose methylprednisolone pulse therapy for treatment of refractory intestinal involvement caused by Henoch-Schönlein purpura: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun Sik; Chung, Hee Sup; Kang, Ki-Soo; Han, Kyoung Hee

    2015-03-24

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura is an immunoglobulin A-mediated, small vascular inflammatory disease that can be associated with palpable purpura, arthralgia, abdominal pain, or nephritis. The presence of purpura facilitates the diagnosis of Henoch-Schönlein purpura at the onset of associated symptoms, whereas the absence of purpura makes the diagnosis challenging. It is important to diagnose Henoch-Schönlein purpura with delayed-onset skin purpura to avoid unnecessary surgery for acute abdomen. Most cases of Henoch-Schönlein purpura with severe abdominal pain are treated with low-dose steroids and intravenous immunoglobulin. A 15-year-old Korean girl complained of severe abdominal pain and delayed-onset purpura on admission. Henoch-Schönlein purpura was diagnosed based on endoscopic findings of hemorrhagic duodenitis and duodenal vasculitis and abdominal computed tomography findings of edematous bowels. Two common initial treatments, a low-dose steroid and intravenous immunoglobulin, were administered, but there was no improvement for 1 month. Subsequently, we used high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy (30 mg/kg/day, with a maximum of 1g/day), which dramatically alleviated her abdominal symptoms. High-dose intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy can be used as the ultimate treatment for delayed-onset Henoch-Schönlein purpura with severe abdominal pain when symptoms do not improve after low-dose steroid and intravenous immunoglobulin treatments.

  18. Measurement of gamma-dose caused by built in coal slags with elevated 226Ra concentration, and the modelling of shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemeth, Cs.; Somlai, J.; Nenyei, A.; Skrinyar, M.; Kanyar, B.; Nemeth, P.; Hoffer, K.

    2000-01-01

    Slags, derived from coal mined in the neighbourhood of the town Tatabanya in Hungary, have been used as filling and insulating material for buildings of houses, block of flats, schools and kindergartens. The slag samples come from here have elevated concentrations of 226 Ra (range of 850 - 2400 Bq x kg -1 ). Therefore, the external gamma dose rates at 1 m height were about four times higher than the world average. It has been found, based on the modelling, that the dose rate could be decreased with 70 - 80% using an appropriate thickness of concrete or barite-concrete layers. (author)

  19. 40 CFR Table 17 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Applicability of General Provisions to This Subpart XXXX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... This Subpart XXXX 17 Table 17 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Manufacturing Pt. 63, Subpt. XXXX, Table 17 Table 17 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions to This Subpart XXXX As stated in § 63.6013, you must comply with the applicable General...

  20. Three-dimensional analysis of the respiratory interplay effect in helical tomotherapy: Baseline variations cause the greater part of dose inhomogeneities seen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor, G Samuel J; Harden, Susan V; Thomas, Simon J

    2014-03-01

    Dose differences from those planned can occur due to the respiratory interplay effect on helical tomotherapy. The authors present a technique to calculate single-fraction doses in three-dimensions resulting from craniocaudal motion applied to a patient CT set. The technique is applied to phantom and patient plans using patient respiratory traces. An additional purpose of the work is to determine the contribution toward the interplay effect of different components of the respiratory trace. MATLAB code used to calculate doses to a CT dataset from a helical tomotherapy plan has been modified to permit craniocaudal motion and improved temporal resolution. Real patient traces from seven patients were applied to ten phantom plans of differing field width, modulation factor, pitch and fraction dose, and simulations made with peak-to-peak amplitudes ranging from 0 to 2.5 cm. PTV voxels near the superior or inferior limits of the PTV are excluded from the analysis. The maximum dose discrepancy compared with the static case recorded along with the proportion of voxels receiving more than 10% and 20% different from prescription dose. The analysis was repeated with the baseline variation of the respiratory trace removed, leaving the cyclic component of motion only. Radiochromic film was used on one plan-trace combination and compared with the software simulation. For one case, filtered traces were generated and used in simulations which consisted only of frequencies near to particular characteristic frequencies of the treatment delivery. Intraslice standard deviation of dose differences was used to identify potential MLC interplay, which was confirmed using nonmodulated simulations. Software calculations were also conducted for four realistic patient plans and modeling movement of a patient CT set with amplitudes informed by the observed motion of the GTV on 4DCT. The maximum magnitude of dose difference to a PTV voxel due to the interplay effect within a particular plan

  1. Residual γH2AX foci induced by low dose x-ray radiation in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells do not cause accelerated senescence in the progeny of irradiated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovalova, Margarita; Astrelina, Тatiana A; Grekhova, Anna; Vorobyeva, Natalia; Tsvetkova, Anastasia; Blokhina, Taisia; Nikitina, Victoria; Suchkova, Yulia; Usupzhanova, Daria; Brunchukov, Vitalyi; Kobzeva, Irina; Karaseva, Тatiana; Ozerov, Ivan V; Samoylov, Aleksandr; Bushmanov, Andrey; Leonov, Sergey; Izumchenko, Evgeny; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Klokov, Dmitry; Osipov, Andreyan N

    2017-11-21

    Mechanisms underlying the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation (IR) exposure (10-100 mGy) remain unknown. Here we present a comparative study of early (less than 24h) and delayed (up to 11 post-irradiation passages) radiation effects caused by low (80 mGy) vs intermediate (1000 mGy) dose X-ray exposure in cultured human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We show that γН2АХ foci induced by an intermediate dose returned back to the control value by 24 h post-irradiation. In contrast, low-dose irradiation resulted in residual γН2АХ foci still present at 24 h. Notably, these low dose induced residual γН2АХ foci were not co-localized with рАТМ foci and were observed predominantly in the proliferating Кi67 positive (Кi67+) cells. The number of γН2АХ foci and the fraction of nonproliferating (Кi67-) and senescent (SA-β-gal+) cells measured at passage 11 were increased in cultures exposed to an intermediate dose compared to unirradiated controls. These delayed effects were not seen in the progeny of cells that were irradiated with low-dose X-rays, although such exposure resulted in residual γН2АХ foci in directly irradiated cells. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that the low-dose IR induced residual γH2AХ foci do not play a role in delayed irradiation consequences, associated with cellular senescence in cultured MSCs.

  2. The additional dose to radiosensitive organs caused by using under-collimated X-ray beams in neonatal intensive care radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datz, H.; Ben-Shlomo, A.; Margaliot, M.; Bader, D.; Sadetzki, S.; Juster-Reicher, A.; Marks, K.; Smolkin, T.; Zangen, S.

    2008-01-01

    Radiographic technique and exposure parameters were recorded in five Israeli Neonatal Intensive Care Units for chest, abdomen and both chest and abdomen X-ray examinations. Equivalent dose and effective dose values were calculated according to actual examination field size borders and proper technique field size recommendations using PCXMC, a PC-based Monte Carlo program. Exposure of larger than required body areas resulted in an increase of the organ doses by factors of up to 162 (testes), 162 (thyroid) and 8 (thyroid) for chest, abdomen and both chest and abdomen examinations, respectively. These exposures increased the average effective dose by factors of 2.0, 1.9 and 1.3 for the chest, abdomen and both chest and abdomen examinations, respectively. Differences in exposure parameters were found between the different neonatal intensive care units - tube voltage, current-time product and focal to skin distance differences up to 13, 44 and 22%, respectively. Reduction of at least 50% of neonate exposure is feasible and can be implemented using existing methodology without any additional costs. (authors)

  3. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart R of... - General Provisions Applicability to Subpart R

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Subpart R 1 Table 1 to Subpart R of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Pipeline Breakout Stations) Pt. 63, Subpt. R, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart R of Part 63—General Provisions Applicability to Subpart R Reference Applies to subpart R Comment 63.1(a)(1) Yes 63.1(a)(2) Yes 63.1(a)(3) Yes...

  4. The IRSN publishes an assessment of doses received in Japan by external irradiation due to radioactive deposits caused by the Fukushima-Daiichi power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This document first describes how dry and wet radioactive deposits are formed. It also indicates their main components: iodine 131 and 132, caesium 134, 136 and 137, tellurium 132, and barium 140. It describes the different exposure ways due to radioactive deposits in the environment. A map indicates dose level assessments few tens of kilometres around the Fukushima power plant. A brief comment of this map is proposed

  5. Long term low dose rate irradiation causes recovery from type II diabetes and suppression of aging in type II diabetes-prone mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namura, T.; Oda, T.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of low dose rate gamma irradiation on model C57BL/KsJ-db/db mice with Type II diabetes mellitus was investigated. These mice develop Type II diabetes by 10 weeks of age, due to obesity, and are characterized by hyperinsulinemia. A group of 12 female 10-week old mice were irradiated at 0.65 mGy/hr in the low dose rate irradiation facility in the Low Dose Radiation Research Center. The urine glucose levels of all of the mice were strongly positive at the beginning of the irradiation. In the irradiated group, a decrease in the glucose level was observed in three mice, one in the 35th week, another in the 52nd week and the third in the 80th week. No recovery from the diabetes was observed in the 12 mice of non-irradiated control group. There was no systematic change of body weight or consumption of food and drinking water between the irradiated group and the non-irradiated group or between the recovered mice and the non-recovered mice. Survival was better in the irradiated group. The surviving fraction at the age of 90 weeks was 75 % in the irradiated group but only 40 % in the non-irradiated. A marked difference was also observed in the appearance of the coat hair, skin and tail. The irradiated group was in much better condition. Mortality was delayed and the healthy appearance was prolonged in the irradiated mice by about 20-30 weeks compared with the control mice. These results suggest that the low dose irradiation modified the condition of the diabetic mice, leading not only to recovery from diabetes, but also to suppression of the aging process

  6. Low-dose irradiation to head, neck, or chest during infancy as a possible cause of thyroid carcinoma in teen-agers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Akira; Fukuda, Katsuhiro; Noguchi, Shiro; Hirohata, Tomio.

    1987-01-01

    A matched case-control study was performed to identify the etiologic factors for thyroid carcinoma in teen-agers. Twenty-seven cases and 69 controls were investigated to assess the significance of various maternal and subject factors. Irradiation during infancy was the only factor which showed a statistically significant association with the incidence of thyroid cancer in teen-agers (summary χ 2 = 8.040; d.f. = 1; P < 0.005). The estimated dose ranged from 0.2 to 40 rads on the head, neck, or chest during infancy. (author)

  7. Empty virions in AAV8 vector preparations reduce transduction efficiency and may cause total viral particle dose-limiting side effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Empty virions are inadvertent by-products of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV packaging process, resulting in vector lots with mixtures of full and empty virions at variable ratios. Impact of empty virions on the efficiency and side effects of rAAV transduction has not been well characterized. Here, we generated partially and completely empty AAV8 virions, fully packaged rAAV8 lots, and mixtures of empty and fully packaged virions with variable ratios of empty virions. The aforementioned dosing formulations of rAAV8 expressing either cellular (EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein or nuclear-targeted (n LacZ or secreted (human α1-antitrypsin (hA1AT reporter genes were intravenously injected into two different mouse strains, followed by analyses of transgene expressions and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT levels at different time points. We found that addition of empty particles to the fixed doses of rAAV8 preparations repressed liver transduction up to 64% (serum hA1AT and 44% (nLacZ in C57BL/6 mice, respectively. The similar trend in inhibiting EGFP expression together with concurrent elevations of serum ALT levels were observed in the BALB/c mice, indicating that empty particles may also exacerbate side effects of rAAV8 EGFP transduction. Our results suggest that removal of empty particles from rAAV preparations may improve efficacy and safety of AAV in clinical applications.

  8. From personnel dose to personal dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefert, M.; Raffnsoe, R.C.; Tuyn, J.W.N.; Wittekind, D.

    1985-01-01

    From following the development of personnel doses at CERN over the past six years it has become evident that work in areas of induced radioactivity is the principal cause of exposure. The results of photon dose measurements free-in-air and around a phantom are presented and discussed in the light of new quantities in individual monitoring. The importance of these results, with respect to the practical situation, is discussed and the problem of phantom size is mentioned. Finally, the results of dose measurements in the phantom are presented, since such information is important in cases where it becomes necessary to transform personnel doses into personal doses. (author)

  9. Administration of high doses of copper to capuchin monkeys does not cause liver damage but induces transcriptional activation of hepatic proliferative responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Magdalena; Núñez, Héctor; Pavez, Leonardo; Arredondo, Miguel; Méndez, Marco; Cisternas, Felipe; Pizarro, Fernando; Sierralta, Walter; Uauy, Ricardo; González, Mauricio

    2012-02-01

    Liver cells respond to copper loading upregulating protective mechanisms. However, to date, except for liver content, there are no good indicators that identify individuals with excess liver copper. We hypothesized that administering high doses of copper to young (5.5 mg Cu · kg⁻¹ . d⁻¹) and adult (7.5 mg Cu · kg⁻¹ . d⁻¹) capuchin monkeys would induce detectable liver damage. Study groups included adult monkeys (2 females, 2 males) 3-3.5 y old at enrollment treated with copper for 36 mo (ACu); age-matched controls (1 female, 3 males) that did not receive additional copper (AC); young monkeys (2 female, 2 males) treated from birth with copper for 36 mo (YCu); and young age-matched controls (2 female, 2 males) that did not receive additional copper (YC). We periodically assessed clinical, blood biochemical, and liver histological indicators and at 36 mo the hepatic mRNA abundance of MT2a, APP, DMT1, CTR1, HGF, TGFβ, and NFκΒ only in adult monkeys. After 36 mo, the liver copper concentration was 4-5 times greater in treated monkeys relative to controls. All monkeys remained healthy with normal routine serum biochemical indices and there was no evidence of liver tissue damage. Relative mRNA abundance of HGF, TGFβ and NFκB was significantly greater in ACu than in AC monkeys. In conclusion, capuchin monkeys exposed to copper at doses up to 50 times the current upper level enhanced expression of genes related to inflammation and injury without clinical, blood biochemical, or histological evidence of liver damage.

  10. Structural changes caused by radiation-induced reduction and radiolysis: the effect of X-ray absorbed dose in a fungal multicopper oxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De la Mora, Eugenio; Lovett, Janet E.; Blanford, Christopher F.; Garman, Elspeth F.; Valderrama, Brenda; Rudino-Pinera, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-induced reduction, radiolysis of copper sites and the effect of pH value together with the concomitant geometrical distortions of the active centres were analysed in several fungal (C. gallica) laccase structures collected at cryotemperature. This study emphasizes the importance of careful interpretation when the crystallographic structure of a metalloprotein is described. X-ray radiation induces two main effects at metal centres contained in protein crystals: radiation-induced reduction and radiolysis and a resulting decrease in metal occupancy. In blue multicopper oxidases (BMCOs), the geometry of the active centres and the metal-to-ligand distances change depending on the oxidation states of the Cu atoms, suggesting that these alterations are catalytically relevant to the binding, activation and reduction of O 2 . In this work, the X-ray-determined three-dimensional structure of laccase from the basidiomycete Coriolopsis gallica (Cg L), a high catalytic potential BMCO, is described. By combining spectroscopic techniques (UV–Vis, EPR and XAS) and X-ray crystallography, structural changes at and around the active copper centres were related to pH and absorbed X-ray dose (energy deposited per unit mass). Depletion of two of the four active Cu atoms as well as low occupancies of the remaining Cu atoms, together with different conformations of the metal centres, were observed at both acidic pH and high absorbed dose, correlating with more reduced states of the active coppers. These observations provide additional evidence to support the role of flexibility of copper sites during O 2 reduction. This study supports previous observations indicating that interpretations regarding redox state and metal coordination need to take radiation effects explicitly into account

  11. HbA1c and Risks of All-Cause and Cause-Specific Death in Subjects without Known Diabetes: A Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Guo-Chao; Ye, Ming-Xin; Cheng, Jia-Hao; Zhao, Yong; Gong, Jian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Whether HbA1c levels are associated with mortality in subjects without known diabetes remains controversial. Moreover, the shape of the dose–response relationship on this topic is unclear. Therefore, a dose–response meta-analysis was conducted. PubMed and EMBASE were searched. Summary hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using a random-effects model. Twelve studies were included. The summary HR per 1% increase in HbA1c level was 1.03 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.01–1.04] for all-cause mortality, 1.05 [95% CI = 1.02–1.07) for cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, and 1.02 (95% CI = 0.99–1.07) for cancer mortality. After excluding subjects with undiagnosed diabetes, the aforementioned associations remained significant for CVD mortality only. After further excluding subjects with prediabetes, all aforementioned associations presented non-significance. Evidence of a non-linear association between HbA1c and mortality from all causes, CVD and cancer was found (all Pnon-linearity HbA1c less than around 5.7%, and rose steeply thereafter. In conclusion, higher HbA1c level is associated with increased mortality from all causes and CVD among subjects without known diabetes. However, this association is driven by those with undiagnosed diabetes or prediabetes. The results regarding cancer mortality should be treated with caution due to limited studies. PMID:27045572

  12. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Hhhhhh... - Applicability of General Provisions to Subpart HHHHHH of Part 63

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Subpart HHHHHH of Part 63 1 Table 1 to Subpart HHHHHH of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... 1 to Subpart HHHHHH of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions to Subpart HHHHHH of Part 63 Citation Subject Applicable to subpart HHHHHH Explanation § 63.1(a)(1)-(12) General Applicability Yes § 63...

  13. 48 CFR 239.7100 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... OF DEFENSE SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING ACQUISITION OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Security and Privacy for Computer Systems 239.7100 Scope of subpart. This subpart includes information assurance and... protection of privacy of individuals (see FAR Subpart 24.1). ...

  14. Comparison of the dose results in whole body and thyroid caused by 131 I using the software AIDE, DOSINT and ACCUSCAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintero P, E.; Alfaro L, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Due to the sharp incorporation of 3.7 MBq of 131 I via oral for a patient, with the purpose of obtaining a thyroid gamma gram, it makes later a pursuit on to carry out the calculation of effective dose committed using the software AIDE, DOSINT and Accuscan that possesses the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) and to compare the results of these. For this study it was carried out a pursuit of the biokinetic behavior of the radioisotope in the patient's body, measuring the activity with a whole-body counter of vertical sweeping, Canberra, model Accuscan Canberra trademark. The calibration of the system it was carried out using a RMC-II Canberra trademark phantom. The patient was accounted to different intervals of time starting from April 5 up to June 30, 2005. The Accuscan II program Canberra trademark, it was acquired with the whole-body system in 1992 by the ININ. The DOSINT program was elaborated by the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards of Mexico and proportionate to the ININ in 2000. So much the DOSINT program as the Accuscan are based on the ICRP-26/30. The AIDE program was provided by the IAEA through the project IAEA-ARCAL-RLA/9/049-LXXVII - Harmonization of procedures of internal dosimetry in 2005. This program is based on the ICRP-78. The present activity in the urine was measured later starting from the third day of the incorporation of 131 I to different intervals of time until the 87 th day. The measurements were carried out using a gamma spectrometer with a Ge Hp detector and beryllium window, with 27.4% of relative efficiency and graduate armor-plating. The calibration of the system it was carried out using a multi nuclides pattern packed in Marinelli geometry of 0.5 L, prepared by the Laboratory of Radioactive Patterns (LPR) of the INlN starting from a certified solution. (Author)

  15. High doses of ethylenediurea (EDU) as soil drenches did not increase leaf N content or cause phytotoxicity in willow grown in fertile soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agathokleous, Evgenios; Paoletti, Elena; Manning, William J; Kitao, Mitsutoshi; Saitanis, Costas J; Koike, Takayoshi

    2018-01-01

    Ground-level ozone (O 3 ) levels are nowadays elevated in wide regions of the Earth, causing significant effects on plants that finally lead to suppressed productivity and yield losses. Ethylenediurea (EDU) is a chemical compound which is widely used in research projects as phytoprotectant against O 3 injury. The EDU mode of action remains still unclear, while there are indications that EDU may contribute to plants with nitrogen (N) when the soil is poor in N and the plants have relatively small leaf area. To reveal whether the N content of EDU acts as a fertilizer to plants when the soil is not poor in N and the plants have relatively large total plant leaf area, willow plants (Salix sachalinensis Fr. Schm) were exposed to low ambient O 3 levels and treated ten times (9-day interval) with 200mL soil drench containing 0, 800 or 1600mg EDU L -1 . Fertilizer was added to a nutrient-poor soil, and the plants had an average plant leaf area of 9.1m 2 at the beginning of EDU treatments. Indications for EDU-induced hormesis in maximum electron transport rate (J max ) and ratio of intercellular to ambient CO 2 concentration (C i :C a ) were observed at the end of the experiment. No other EDU-induced effects on leaf greenness and N content, maximum quantum yield of photosystem II (F v /F m ), gas exchange, growth and matter production suggest that EDU did not act as N fertilizer and did not cause toxicity under these experimental conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Dd of... - Applicability of Paragraphs in Subpart A of This Part 63-General Provisions to Subpart DD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... A of This Part 63-General Provisions to Subpart DD 2 Table 2 to Subpart DD of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants from Off-Site Waste and Recovery Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. DD, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart DD of Part 63—Applicability of Paragraphs in Subpart A of This Part 63—General Provisions to...

  17. 10 CFR 2.1200 - Scope of subpart L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Scope of subpart L. 2.1200 Section 2.1200 Energy NUCLEAR... Hearing Procedures for NRC Adjudications § 2.1200 Scope of subpart L. The provisions of this subpart... and request the application of Subpart L procedures, and proceedings for the direct or indirect...

  18. Comparison of the treatment efficacy between tigecycline plus high-dose cefoperazone-sulbactam and tigecycline monotherapy against ventilator-associated pneumonia caused by extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Youfa; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Lei; Zhang, Dailong; Fu, Lunjiao; Xue, Xiaoyan

    2018-03-01

    The present study examined the effect of high-dose cefoperazone-sulbactam combined with tigecycline against ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) caused by extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii(XDR-AB). 42 patients with VAP due to XDR-AB infection were randomized into two groups: the TIG group (received tigecycline injection) and the TIG+CFS group (received tigecycline and cefoperazone-sulbactam (1 : 1) injection). Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used for genotyping the isolated XDR-AB. The microdilution method was used to test the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of cefoperazone-sulbactam or tigecycline in vitro and the combined effect was determined with the checkerboard method. The total combined effectiveness rate (including all patients who demonstrated an improved condition) was significantly higher in the TIG+CFS group (85.7%) compared with the TIG group (47.6%) (p = 0.010). No significant differences were noted with regard to the adverse reactions between the two groups. The 42 isolated XDR-AB strains were classified into four types. The MIC of the two drugs in combination was significantly lower than that of each drug used alone (p < 0.05). High dose of cefoperazone-sulbactam can improve the antimicrobial activity of tigecycline against XDR-AB.
.

  19. Tank exhaust comparison with 40 CFR 61.93, Subpart H, and other referenced guidelines for Tank Farms National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant (NESHAP) designated stacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachand, D.D.; Crummel, G.M.

    1994-07-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated National Emission Standards other than Radon from US Department of Energy (DOE) Facilities (40 CFR 61, Subpart H) on December 15, 1989. The regulations specify procedures, equipment, and test methods that.are to be used to measure radionuclide emissions from exhaust stacks that are designated as National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant (NESHAP) stacks. Designated NESHAP stacks are those that have the potential to cause any member of the public to receive an effective dose equivalent (EDE) greater than or equal to 0.1 mrem/year, assuming all emission controls were removed. Tank Farms currently has 33 exhaust stacks, 15 of which are designated NESHAP stacks. This document assesses the compliance status of the monitoring and sampling systems for the designated NESHAP stacks

  20. Tank exhaust comparison with 40 CFR 61.93, Subpart H, and other referenced guidelines for Tank Farms National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant (NESHAP) designated stacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachand, D.D.; Crummel, G.M.

    1994-07-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated National Emission Standards other than Radon from US Department of Energy (DOE) Facilities (40 CFR 61, Subpart H) on December 15, 1989. The regulations specify procedures, equipment, and test methods that.are to be used to measure radionuclide emissions from exhaust stacks that are designated as National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant (NESHAP) stacks. Designated NESHAP stacks are those that have the potential to cause any member of the public to receive an effective dose equivalent (EDE) greater than or equal to 0.1 mrem/year, assuming all emission controls were removed. Tank Farms currently has 33 exhaust stacks, 15 of which are designated NESHAP stacks. This document assesses the compliance status of the monitoring and sampling systems for the designated NESHAP stacks.

  1. SM22α-induced activation of p16INK4a/retinoblastoma pathway promotes cellular senescence caused by a subclinical dose of γ-radiation and doxorubicin in HepG2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Rim; Lee, Hee Min; Lee, So Yong; Kim, Eun Jin; Kim, Kug Chan; Paik, Sang Gi; Cho, Eun Wie; Kim, In Gyu

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → SM22α overexpression in HepG2 cells leads cells to a growth arrest state, and the treatment of a subclinical dose of γ-radiation or doxorubicin promotes cellular senescence. → SM22α overexpression elevates p16 INK4a followed by pRB activation, but there are no effects on p53/p21 WAF1/Cip1 pathway. → SM22α-induced MT-1G activates p16 INK4a /pRB pathway, which promotes cellular senescence by damaging agents. -- Abstract: Smooth muscle protein 22-alpha (SM22α) is known as a transformation- and shape change-sensitive actin cross-linking protein found in smooth muscle tissue and fibroblasts; however, its functional role remains uncertain. We reported previously that SM22α overexpression confers resistance against anti-cancer drugs or radiation via induction of metallothionein (MT) isozymes in HepG2 cells. In this study, we demonstrate that SM22α overexpression leads cells to a growth arrest state and promotes cellular senescence caused by treatment with a subclinical dose of γ-radiation (0.05 and 0.1 Gy) or doxorubicin (0.01 and 0.05 μg/ml), compared to control cells. Senescence growth arrest is known to be controlled by p53 phosphorylation/p21 WAF1/Cip1 induction or p16 INK4a /retinoblastoma protein (pRB) activation. SM22α overexpression in HepG2 cells elevated p16 INK4a followed by pRB activation, but did not activate the p53/p21 WAF1/Cip1 pathway. Moreover, MT-1G, which is induced by SM22α overexpression, was involved in the activation of the p16 INK4a /pRB pathway, which led to a growth arrest state and promoted cellular senescence caused by damaging agents. Our findings provide the first demonstration that SM22α modulates cellular senescence caused by damaging agents via regulation of the p16 INK4a /pRB pathway in HepG2 cells and that these effects of SM22α are partially mediated by MT-1G.

  2. SM22{alpha}-induced activation of p16{sup INK4a}/retinoblastoma pathway promotes cellular senescence caused by a subclinical dose of {gamma}-radiation and doxorubicin in HepG2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Rim; Lee, Hee Min; Lee, So Yong; Kim, Eun Jin; Kim, Kug Chan [Department of Radiation Biology, Environmental Radiation Research Group, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Paik, Sang Gi [Department of Biology, School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Eun Wie, E-mail: ewcho@kribb.re.kr [Daejeon-KRIBB-FHCRC Cooperation Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, In Gyu, E-mail: igkim@kaeri.re.kr [Department of Radiation Biology, Environmental Radiation Research Group, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-10

    Research highlights: {yields} SM22{alpha} overexpression in HepG2 cells leads cells to a growth arrest state, and the treatment of a subclinical dose of {gamma}-radiation or doxorubicin promotes cellular senescence. {yields} SM22{alpha} overexpression elevates p16{sup INK4a} followed by pRB activation, but there are no effects on p53/p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} pathway. {yields} SM22{alpha}-induced MT-1G activates p16{sup INK4a}/pRB pathway, which promotes cellular senescence by damaging agents. -- Abstract: Smooth muscle protein 22-alpha (SM22{alpha}) is known as a transformation- and shape change-sensitive actin cross-linking protein found in smooth muscle tissue and fibroblasts; however, its functional role remains uncertain. We reported previously that SM22{alpha} overexpression confers resistance against anti-cancer drugs or radiation via induction of metallothionein (MT) isozymes in HepG2 cells. In this study, we demonstrate that SM22{alpha} overexpression leads cells to a growth arrest state and promotes cellular senescence caused by treatment with a subclinical dose of {gamma}-radiation (0.05 and 0.1 Gy) or doxorubicin (0.01 and 0.05 {mu}g/ml), compared to control cells. Senescence growth arrest is known to be controlled by p53 phosphorylation/p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} induction or p16{sup INK4a}/retinoblastoma protein (pRB) activation. SM22{alpha} overexpression in HepG2 cells elevated p16{sup INK4a} followed by pRB activation, but did not activate the p53/p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} pathway. Moreover, MT-1G, which is induced by SM22{alpha} overexpression, was involved in the activation of the p16{sup INK4a}/pRB pathway, which led to a growth arrest state and promoted cellular senescence caused by damaging agents. Our findings provide the first demonstration that SM22{alpha} modulates cellular senescence caused by damaging agents via regulation of the p16{sup INK4a}/pRB pathway in HepG2 cells and that these effects of SM22{alpha} are partially mediated by MT-1G.

  3. Impact of chemotherapy relative dose intensity on cause-specific and overall survival for stage I-III breast cancer: ER+/PR+, HER2- vs. triple-negative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Yu, Qingzhao; Wu, Xiao-Cheng; Hsieh, Mei-Chin; Loch, Michelle; Chen, Vivien W; Fontham, Elizabeth; Ferguson, Tekeda

    2018-05-01

    To investigate the impact of chemotherapy relative dose intensity (RDI) on cause-specific and overall survival for stage I-III breast cancer: estrogen receptor or progesterone receptor positive, human epidermal-growth factor receptor negative (ER+/PR+ and HER2-) vs. triple-negative (TNBC) and to identify the optimal RDI cut-off points in these two patient populations. Data were collected by the Louisiana Tumor Registry for two CDC-funded projects. Women diagnosed with stage I-III ER+/PR+, HER2- breast cancer, or TNBC in 2011 with complete information on RDI were included. Five RDI cut-off points (95, 90, 85, 80, and 75%) were evaluated on cause-specific and overall survival, adjusting for multiple demographic variables, tumor characteristics, comorbidity, use of granulocyte-growth factor/cytokines, chemotherapy delay, chemotherapy regimens, and use of hormone therapy. Cox proportional hazards models and Kaplan-Meier survival curves were estimated and adjusted by stabilized inverse probability treatment weighting (IPTW) of propensity score. Of 494 ER+/PR+, HER2- patients and 180 TNBC patients, RDI PR+, HER2- patients, 85% was the only cut-off point at which the low RDI was significantly associated with worse overall survival (HR = 1.93; 95% CI 1.09-3.40). Among TNBC patients, 75% was the cut-off point at which the high RDI was associated with better cause-specific (HR = 2.64; 95% CI 1.09, 6.38) and overall survival (HR = 2.39; 95% CI 1.04-5.51). Higher RDI of chemotherapy is associated with better survival for ER+/PR+, HER2- patients and TNBC patients. To optimize survival benefits, RDI should be maintained ≥ 85% in ER+/PR+, HER2- patients, and ≥ 75% in TNBC patients.

  4. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Xx of... - Requirements of 40 CFR Part 61, Subpart FF, Not Included in the Requirements for This Subpart and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Subpart XX of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. XX, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart XX of Part 63—Requirements of 40 CFR Part 61...

  5. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Q of... - References to subpart Q of Part 1926

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Concrete and Masonry Construction Pt. 1926, Subpt. Q, App. A Appendix A to Subpart Q of Part 1926—References to subpart.... • Accident Prevention Manual for Industrial Operations; Eighth Edition; National Safety Council. • Building...

  6. 18 CFR Appendix B to Subpart H of... - Appendix B to Subpart H of Part 35

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Appendix B to Subpart H of Part 35 B Appendix B to Subpart H of Part 35 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL... SCHEDULES AND TARIFFS Wholesale Sales of Electric Energy, Capacity and Ancillary Services at Market-Based...

  7. 18 CFR Appendix A to Subpart H of... - Appendix A to Subpart H of Part 35

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Appendix A to Subpart H of Part 35 A Appendix A to Subpart H of Part 35 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL... SCHEDULES AND TARIFFS Wholesale Sales of Electric Energy, Capacity and Ancillary Services at Market-Based...

  8. 14 CFR 1204.400 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Business Policy § 1204.400 Scope of subpart. This subpart establishes NASA's small business policy and outlines the delegation of authority in implementing this policy as required by Federal law. ...

  9. 48 CFR 7.400 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ACQUISITION PLANNING Equipment Lease or Purchase 7.400 Scope of subpart. This subpart provides guidance pertaining to the decision to acquire equipment by lease or purchase. It applies to both the initial...

  10. 45 CFR 63.16 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PLANNING AND EVALUATION Financial Provisions § 63.16 Scope of subpart. This subpart sets forth supplemental financial provisions which apply to all grants awarded by...

  11. 48 CFR 750.7100 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... MANAGEMENT EXTRAORDINARY CONTRACTUAL ACTIONS Extraordinary Contractual Actions To Protect Foreign Policy Interests of the United States 750.7100 Scope of subpart. This subpart sets forth the standards and the...

  12. 48 CFR 4.500 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... MATTERS Electronic Commerce in Contracting 4.500 Scope of subpart. This subpart provides policy and procedures for the establishment and use of electronic commerce in Federal acquisition as required by Section...

  13. 10 CFR 2.1000 - Scope of subpart J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Scope of subpart J. 2.1000 Section 2.1000 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION RULES OF PRACTICE FOR DOMESTIC LICENSING PROCEEDINGS AND ISSUANCE OF ORDERS Procedures... Geologic Repository § 2.1000 Scope of subpart J. The rules in this subpart, together with the rules in...

  14. 48 CFR 504.500 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scope of subpart. 504.500 Section 504.500 Federal Acquisition Regulations System GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Electronic Commerce in Contracting 504.500 Scope of subpart. This subpart provides policy and procedure for use of GSA's Electronic...

  15. 12 CFR 516.100 - What does this subpart do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What does this subpart do? 516.100 Section 516.100 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY APPLICATION PROCESSING PROCEDURES Comment Procedures § 516.100 What does this subpart do? This subpart contains the procedures...

  16. 12 CFR 516.160 - What does this subpart do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What does this subpart do? 516.160 Section 516.160 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY APPLICATION PROCESSING PROCEDURES Meeting Procedures § 516.160 What does this subpart do? This subpart contains meeting procedures...

  17. 41 CFR 101-39.4900 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-INTERAGENCY FLEET MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS 39.49-Forms § 101-39.4900 Scope of subpart. This subpart provides the... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Scope of subpart. 101-39.4900 Section 101-39.4900 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management...

  18. 29 CFR 1926.155 - Definitions applicable to this subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Definitions applicable to this subpart. 1926.155 Section... § 1926.155 Definitions applicable to this subpart. (a) Approved, for the purpose of this subpart, means... any of the following hydrocarbons, or mixtures of them, such as propane, propylene, butane (normal...

  19. 33 CFR 148.300 - What does this subpart concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What does this subpart concern... (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: GENERAL Licenses § 148.300 What does this subpart concern? This subpart concerns the license for a deepwater port and the procedures for transferring, amending...

  20. 10 CFR 63.302 - Definitions for Subpart L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions for Subpart L. 63.302 Section 63.302 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC... Definitions for Subpart L. All definitions in subpart K of this part, and the following: Accessible...

  1. Dose limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitoussi, L.

    1987-12-01

    The dose limit is defined to be the level of harmfulness which must not be exceeded, so that an activity can be exercised in a regular manner without running a risk unacceptable to man and the society. The paper examines the effects of radiation categorised into stochastic and non-stochastic. Dose limits for workers and the public are discussed

  2. Leptin Intake at Physiological Doses Throughout Lactation in Male Wistar Rats Normalizes the Decreased Density of Tyrosine Hydroxylase-Immunoreactive Fibers in the Stomach Caused by Mild Gestational Calorie Restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nara Szostaczuk

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gestational under nutrition in rats has been shown to decrease expression of sympathetic innervation markers in peripheral tissues of offspring, including the stomach. This has been linked to lower gastric secretion and decreased circulating levels of ghrelin. Considering the critical role of leptin intake during lactation in preventing obesity and reversing adverse developmental programming effects, we aimed to find out whether leptin supplementation may reverse the above mentioned alterations caused by mild gestational calorie restriction.Methods: Three groups of male rats were studied at a juvenile age (25 days old and during adulthood (3 and 6 months old: the offspring of ad libitum fed dams (controls, the offspring of dams that were diet restricted (20% from days 1 to 12 of gestation (CR, and CR rats supplemented with a daily oral dose of leptin (equivalent to 5 times the average amount they could receive each day from maternal milk throughout lactation (CR-Leptin. The density of TyrOH-immunoreactive (TyrOH+ fibers and the levels of Tyrosine hydroxylase (TyrOH—used as potential markers of functional sympathetic innervation—were measured in stomach. Plasma leptin and ghrelin levels were also determined.Results: Twenty five-day-old CR rats, but not CR-Leptin rats, displayed lower density of TyrOH+ fibers (−46% and TyrOH levels (−47% in stomach compared to controls. Alterations in CR animals were mitigated at 6 months of age, and differences were not significant. Adult CR-Leptin animals showed higher plasma ghrelin levels than CR animals, particularly at 3 months (+16%, and a lower leptin/ghrelin ratio (−28 and −37% at 3 and 6 months, respectively.Conclusion: Leptin intake during lactation is able to reverse the alterations in the density of TyrOH+ fibers in the stomach and normalize the increased leptin/ghrelin ratio linked to a mild gestational calorie restriction in rats, supporting the relevance of leptin as an

  3. Cancer-causing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, R.L.; Holland, J.M.; Storer, J.B.

    1977-01-01

    Radiation causes cancer. That simple fact was known by the early 1900s. Further, radiation can induce cancer in almost any tissue in animals and humans. But the cancer-causing dose may vary by 20-fold for different tissues in animals. Such variation is also seen in people who are exposed, typically, to low radiation doses. Hence, the minimum dose that causes human cancer is not known. Thus, the crucial question becomes what factors, including amount of exposure, trigger cancer. Radiation is divided into two types, ionizing and nonionizing. Of the two, ionizing radiation involves higher energies. Thus by ejecting electrons from molecules, charged particles called ion pairs are formed. They are short-lived, and often break down to form highly reactive free radicals, which are molecular fragments containing unpaired electrons. Nonionizing radiation, which involves ultraviolet light and micro- and radiowaves, causes molecular excitations such as vibrations and electron movement, but produces no ions. And though ultraviolet light causes skin cancer, ionizing radiation is, by far, the more potent carcinogen

  4. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Wwwww of... - Applicability of General Provisions to Subpart WWWWW

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... operating permits for purposes of being subject to this subpart. § 63.1(c)(3)-(4) [Reserved] § 63.1(c)(5) Subject to notification requirements No § 63.1(d) [Reserved] § 63.1(e) Emission limitation by permit Yes... requirements Yes § 63.6(b)(6) [Reserved] § 63.6(c)(1) Compliance dates for existing sources Yes Subpart WWWWW...

  5. 30 CFR 206.100 - What is the purpose of this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for the lessee's oil by applying the rules in this subpart to your disposition of the lessee's oil. (c... in this subpart to the lessee's disposition of its oil. (d) If the regulations in this subpart are... MANAGEMENT PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Oil § 206.100 What is the purpose of this subpart? (a) This subpart...

  6. Controllable dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez R, J.T.; Anaya M, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    With the purpose of eliminating the controversy about the lineal hypothesis without threshold which found the systems of dose limitation of the recommendations of ICRP 26 and 60, at the end of last decade R. Clarke president of the ICRP proposed the concept of Controllable Dose: as the dose or dose sum that an individual receives from a particular source which can be reasonably controllable by means of any means; said concept proposes a change in the philosophy of the radiological protection of its concern by social approaches to an individual focus. In this work a panorama of the foundations is presented, convenient and inconveniences that this proposal has loosened in the international community of the radiological protection, with the purpose of to familiarize to our Mexican community in radiological protection with these new concepts. (Author)

  7. Diffuse and fugitive emission dose assessment on the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W.E.; Schmidt, J.W.; Gleckler, B.P.; Rhoads, K.

    1995-01-01

    On February 3, 1993, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL), received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Division of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. The Compliance Order requires RL to (1) evaluate all radionuclide emission points at the Hanford Site to determine which are subject to continuous emission measurement requirements in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61, Subpart H, and (2) continuously measure radionuclide emissions in accordance with 40 CFR 61.93. The Information Request requires RL to provide a written Compliance Plan to meet the requirements of the Compliance Order. The RL Compliance Plan included as one of its milestones the requirement to develop a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA). An FFCA was negotiated between RL and the EPA, Region 10, and was entered into on February 7, 1994. One of the milestones was to provide EPA, Region 10, with a copy of the Federal Clean Air Act Title V operating air permit application and Air Emission Inventory (AEI) concurrent with its submission to the Washington State Department of Ecology. The AEI will include an assessment of the diffuse and fugitive emissions from the Hanford Site. This assessment does not identify any diffuse or fugitive emission source that would cause an effective dose equivalent greater than 0.1 mrem/yr

  8. 29 CFR Appendix B to Subpart B of... - Reprint of U.S. Coast Guard Regulations Referenced in Subpart B, for Determination of Coast Guard...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Subpart B, for Determination of Coast Guard Authorized Persons B Appendix B to Subpart B of Part 1915... Enclosed Spaces and Other Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment Pt. 1915, Subpt. B, App. B Appendix B to Subpart B of Part 1915—Reprint of U.S. Coast Guard Regulations Referenced in Subpart B, for...

  9. 10 CFR 2.700 - Scope of subpart G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Scope of subpart G. 2.700 Section 2.700 Energy NUCLEAR... Formal Adjudications § 2.700 Scope of subpart G. The provisions of this subpart apply to and supplement... authorization for high-level radioactive waste repository noticed under §§ 2.101(f)(8) or 2.105(a)(5...

  10. 40 CFR 63.5780 - What is the purpose of this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production What This Subpart Covers... for hazardous air pollutants (NESHAP) for reinforced plastic composites production. This subpart also...

  11. 40 CFR 63.8266 - What definitions apply to this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... data acquisition and availability requirements of this subpart, used to sample, condition (if... operating limit) or work practice standard in this subpart during startup, shutdown, or malfunction...

  12. Dose and dose rate monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakova, O.; Ryba, J.; Slezak, V.; Svobodova, B.; Viererbl, L.

    1984-10-01

    The methods are discussea of measuring dose rate or dose using a scintillation counte. A plastic scintillator based on polystyrene with PBD and POPOP activators and coated with ZnS(Ag) was chosen for the projected monitor. The scintillators were cylindrical and spherical in shape and of different sizes; black polypropylene tubes were chosen as the best case for the probs. For the counter with different plastic scintillators, the statistical error 2σ for natural background was determined. For determining the suitable thickness of the ZnS(Ag) layer the energy dependence of the counter was measured. Radioisotopes 137 Cs, 241 Am and 109 Cd were chosen as radiation sources. The best suited ZnS(Ag) thickness was found to be 0.5 μm. Experiments were carried out to determine the directional dependence of the detector response and the signal to noise ratio. The temperature dependence of the detector response and its compensation were studied, as were the time stability and fatigue manifestations of the photomultiplier. The design of a laboratory prototype of a dose rate and dose monitor is described. Block diagrams are given of the various functional parts of the instrument. The designed instrument is easiiy portable, battery powered, measures dose rates from natural background in the range of five orders, i.e., 10 -2 to 10 3 nGy/s, and allows to determine a dose of up to 10 mGy. Accouracy of measurement in the energy range of 50 keV to 1 MeV is better than +-20%. (E.S.)

  13. Retrospective Evaluation Reveals That Long-term Androgen Deprivation Therapy Improves Cause-Specific and Overall Survival in the Setting of Dose-Escalated Radiation for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Felix Y.; Blas, Kevin; Olson, Karin; Stenmark, Matthew; Sandler, Howard; Hamstra, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and duration for high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated RT (minimum 75 Gy) with or without ADT was performed. The relationship between ADT use and duration with biochemical failure (BF), metastatic failure (MF), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), non-prostate cancer death (NPCD), and overall survival (OS) was assessed as a function of pretreatment characteristics, comorbid medical illness, and treatment using Fine and Gray's cumulative incidence methodology. Results: The median follow-up time was 64 months. In men with National Comprehensive Cancer Network defined high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated RT, on univariate analysis, both metastasis (P<.0001; hazard ratio 0.34; 95% confidence interval 0.18-0.67; cumulative incidence at 60 months 13% vs 35%) and PCSM (P=.015; hazard ratio 0.41; 95% confidence interval 0.2-1.0; cumulative incidence at 60 months 6% vs 11%) were improved with the use of ADT. On multivariate analysis for all high-risk patients, Gleason score was the strongest negative prognostic factor, and long-term ADT (LTAD) improved MF (P=.002), PCSM (P=.034), and OS (P=.001). In men with prostate cancer and Gleason scores 8 to 10, on multivariate analysis after adjustment for other risk features, there was a duration-dependent improvement in BF, metastasis, PCSM, and OS, all favoring LTAD in comparison with STAD or RT alone. Conclusion: For men with high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated EBRT, this retrospective study suggests that the combination of LTAD and RT provided a significant improvement in clinical outcome, which was especially true for those with Gleason scores of 8 to 10

  14. A dose rate causes no fluctuating asymmetry indexes changes in silver birch (Betula pendula (L.) Roth.) leaves and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) needles in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashparova, Elena; Levchuk, Sviatoslav; Morozova, Valeriia; Kashparov, Valery

    2018-06-04

    The assessment of the fluctuating asymmetry based on measurement of the parameters of left and right parts of silver birch (Betula pendula (L.) Roth.) leaves and relative sizes of pairs of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) needles from the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ) was carried out. Twelve samples of both birch leaves and pairs of needles were collected from 10 trees at 5 sites in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and also at one control site located outside the ChEZ. Values of gamma dose rate in the air varied between the sites from 0.1 to 40 μGy h -1 . Activity concentrations of 90 Sr and 137 Cs in the birch leaves varied over the range of 0.9÷2460 kBq kg -1 and 0.1÷339 kBq·kg -1 (DW), respectively. In addition to the above, in the Scots pine needles, these ranges were 0.7 ÷1970 kBq kg -1 f for 90 Sr and 0.1÷78 kBq kg -1 (DW) for 137 Cs. From the values of the radionuclides activity concentrations in the plants, the internal dose rate is estimated to be in the range of 0.1 ÷ 274 μGy h -1 . The main sources of the internal dose rate were radiation of 90 Sr and 90 Y. Indices of fluctuating asymmetry of silver birch leaves and Scots pine needles varied over the range of 0.048 ± 0.007 ÷ 0.060 ± 0.009 and 0.014 ± 0.002 ÷ 0.018 ± 0.002, respectively, and did not statistically differ for all experimental sites. The indices also did not depend on the external or internal dose rate of ionizing radiation for plants. The above findings seem to be consistent with other research effort in terms of understanding the response of organisms to chronic pollutant exposure and the long-term effects of large scale nuclear accidents. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dose-response testing with nickel sulphate using the TRUE test in nickel-sensitive individuals. Multiple nickel sulphate patch-test reactions do not cause an 'angry back'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Lidén, C; Hansen, J

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to employ the TRUE test assay to confirm the presence or absence of the 'angry back' phenomenon, i.e. that a strong positive patch-test reaction heightens adjacent patch-test response. In addition, we wished to establish the dose-response relationship for nickel sulphate...... back' phenomenon was not apparent in this study, as the spill-over effect was not statistically significant. Strong reactions to high concentrations of nickel sulphate did not enhance the response to adjacent lower concentrations of nickel sulphate....

  16. Dose rate constants for new dose quantities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschurlovits, M.; Daverda, G.; Leitner, A.

    1992-01-01

    Conceptual changes and new quantities made is necessary to reassess dose rate quantities. Calculations of the dose rate constant were done for air kerma, ambient dose equivalent and directional dose equivalent. The number of radionuclides is more than 200. The threshold energy is selected as 20 keV for the dose equivalent constants. The dose rate constant for the photon equivalent dose as used mainly in German speaking countries as a temporary quantity is also included. (Author)

  17. 31 CFR 363.9 - What does this subpart cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What does this subpart cover? 363.9 Section 363.9 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL... cover? This subpart provides general rules governing securities held within the TreasuryDirect ® system...

  18. 25 CFR 900.110 - What does this subpart cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... management, and the actual construction of the building or facility in accordance with the construction... construction management services as defined in § 900.113 may be included in a construction contract under this... Construction § 900.110 What does this subpart cover? (a) This subpart establishes requirements for issuing...

  19. 20 CFR 408.1000 - What is this subpart about?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is this subpart about? 408.1000 Section 408.1000 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II... Determinations § 408.1000 What is this subpart about? (a) Explanation of the administrative review process. This...

  20. 40 CFR 60.1000 - What does this subpart do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What does this subpart do? 60.1000 Section 60.1000 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Modification or Reconstruction is Commenced After June 6, 2001 Introduction § 60.1000 What does this subpart do...

  1. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Nnnnnn... - HAP Emissions Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false HAP Emissions Sources 1 Table 1 to Subpart NNNNNN of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR...: Chromium Compounds Pt. 63, Subpt. NNNNNN, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart NNNNNN of Part 63—HAP Emissions...

  2. 7 CFR Exhibit A to Subpart Jj of... - Agreement Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Agreement Form A Exhibit A to Subpart JJ of Part 2045...) ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS GENERAL Rural Development-Utilization of Gratuitous Services Pt. 2045, Subpt. JJ, Exh. A Exhibit A to Subpart JJ of Part 2045—Agreement Form for utilization of employees of (official...

  3. 27 CFR 73.10 - What does subpart B cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...? 73.10 Section 73.10 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES AND PRACTICES ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES; ELECTRONIC SUBMISSION OF FORMS Electronic Signatures § 73.10 What does subpart B cover? This subpart provides the...

  4. 27 CFR 73.30 - What does subpart C cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...? 73.30 Section 73.30 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES AND PRACTICES ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES; ELECTRONIC SUBMISSION OF FORMS Electronic Filing of Documents with TTB § 73.30 What does subpart C cover? This subpart...

  5. 7 CFR Exhibit A to Subpart B of... - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false [Reserved] A Exhibit A to Subpart B of Part 1900 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS... REGULATIONS GENERAL Adverse Decisions and Administrative Appeals Exhibit A to Subpart B of Part 1900 [Reserved] ...

  6. 22 CFR 226.80 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION OF ASSISTANCE AWARDS TO U.S. NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS Additional Provisions For Awards to Commercial Organizations § 226.80 Scope of subpart. This subpart contains additional provisions that apply to awards to commercial organizations. These provisions...

  7. 40 CFR 86.1405 - Introduction; structure of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-Duty Trucks; Certification Short Test Procedures § 86.1405 Introduction; structure of subpart. (a) This... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Introduction; structure of subpart. 86.1405 Section 86.1405 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...

  8. 16 CFR Figure 2 to Subpart A of... - Test Frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Test Frame 2 Figure 2 to Subpart A of Part 1201 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS... Subpart A of Part 1201—Test Frame EC03OC91.005 ...

  9. 31 CFR Appendix A to Subpart C of... - Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Examples A Appendix A to Subpart C of... A to Subpart C of Part 29—Examples This appendix contains sample calculations of Federal Benefit Payments in a variety of situations. Optional Retirement Examples Example 1: No Unused Sick Leave A. In...

  10. 40 CFR Table 3 of Subpart Bbbbbbb... - Test Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test Methods 3 Table 3 of Subpart... 3 Table 3 of Subpart BBBBBBB of Part 63—Test Methods For * * * You must use * * * 1. Selecting the sampling locations a and the number of traverse points EPA test method 1 or 1A in appendix A to part 60. 2...

  11. 40 CFR Table 3 of Subpart Aaaaaaa... - Test Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test Methods 3 Table 3 of Subpart..., Subpt. AAAAAAA, Table 3 Table 3 of Subpart AAAAAAA of Part 63—Test Methods For * * * You must use * * * 1. Selecting the sampling locations a and the number of traverse points EPA test method 1 or 1A in...

  12. 28 CFR 32.31 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Scope of subpart. 32.31 Section 32.31 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICERS' DEATH, DISABILITY, AND EDUCATIONAL ASSISTANCE BENEFIT CLAIMS Educational Assistance Benefit Claims § 32.31 Scope of subpart. Consistent with...

  13. 40 CFR Table 11 to Subpart Sssss... - Applicability of General Provisions to Subpart SSSSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...)-(3) Alternative Standard Procedures for getting an alternative standard. Yes. § 63.6(h)(1)-(9... subpart SSSSS § 63.1 Applicability Yes. § 63.2 Definitions Yes. § 63.3 Units and Abbreviations Yes. § 63.4 Prohibited Activities Compliance date; circumvention, severability Yes. § 63.5 Construction/Reconstruction...

  14. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Ppppp of... - Applicability of General Provisions to Subpart PPPPP

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., inspection Yes. § 63.6(g)(1)-(3) Alternative Standard Procedures for getting an alternative standard Yes... Applies to subpart PPPPP § 63.1(a)(1) Applicability General applicability of the General Provisions Yes. Additional terms defined in § 63.9375. § 63.1(a)(2)-(4) Applicability Applicability of source categories Yes...

  15. 40 CFR Table 9 to Subpart U of... - Routine Reports Required by This Subpart

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...)(ii) Requests for Approval of a Nominal Control Efficiency for Use in Emissions Averaging Initial... determination. a There may be two versions of this report due at different times; one for equipment subject to § 63.502 and one for other emission points subject to this subpart. b There will be two versions of...

  16. 30 CFR Appendix II to Subpart D of... - Appendix II to Subpart D of Part 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Machines Assembled With Certified or Explosion-Proof Components, Field Modifications of Approved Machines, and Permits To Use Experimental Equipment Pt. 18, Subpt. D, App. II Appendix II to Subpart D of...

  17. Single Intravenous Dose of Oritavancin for Treatment of Acute Skin and Skin Structure Infections Caused by Gram-Positive Bacteria: Summary of Safety Analysis from the Phase 3 SOLO Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, G Ralph; Loutit, Jeffery; Moeck, Greg; Wikler, Matthew; Dudley, Michael N; O'Riordan, William

    2018-04-01

    Oritavancin is a lipoglycopeptide with bactericidal activity against Gram-positive organisms. Its rapid concentration-dependent bactericidal activity and long elimination half-life allow single-dose treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). SOLO I and SOLO II were randomized, double-blind studies evaluating the efficacy and safety of a single 1,200-mg intravenous (i.v.) dose of oritavancin versus twice-daily i.v. vancomycin for 7 to 10 days in ABSSSI patients. Safety data from both studies were pooled for safety analysis. The database comprised pooled safety data for 976 oritavancin-treated patients and 983 vancomycin-treated patients. The incidences of adverse events, serious adverse events, and discontinuations due to adverse events were similar for oritavancin (55.3, 5.8, and 3.7%, respectively) and vancomycin (56.9, 5.9, and 4.2%, respectively). The median time to onset (3.8 days versus 3.1 days, respectively) and the duration (3.0 days for both groups) of adverse events were also similar between the two groups. The most frequently reported events were nausea, headache, and vomiting. Greater than 90% of all events were mild or moderate in severity. There were slightly more infections and infestations, abscesses or cellulitis, and hepatic and cardiac adverse events in the oritavancin group; however, more than 80% of these events were mild or moderate. Subgroup analyses did not identify clinically meaningful differences in the incidence of adverse events attributed to oritavancin. A single 1,200-mg dose of oritavancin was well tolerated and had a safety profile similar to that of twice-daily vancomycin. The long elimination half-life of oritavancin compared to that of vancomycin did not result in a clinically meaningful delay to the onset or prolongation of adverse events. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01252719 and NCT01252732.). Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. Gonadal dose in routine diagnostic examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, J.; Koen, J.A.; Akkermans, J.A.

    1974-01-01

    Gonadal doses caused by stray radiation produced during radiodiagnostic investigations were measured with thermoluminescent dosemeters in various hospitals in the Netherlands. Significantly different gonadal doses were measured depending upon the hospital where the investigations were carried out. The mean dose of an examination type in one country can only be determined with any accuracy if measurements in a large number of hospitals are performed

  19. 2 CFR 801.1105 - Cause for a limited denial of participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cause for a limited denial of participation. 801.1105 Section 801.1105 Grants and Agreements Federal Agency Regulations for Grants and Agreements... (Department of Veterans Affairs Optional Subpart for OMB Guidance at 2 CFR Part 180). § 801.1105 Cause for a...

  20. 40 CFR 60.4305 - Does this subpart apply to my stationary combustion turbine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... turbine. Any additional heat input to associated heat recovery steam generators (HRSG) or duct burners... subpart are exempt from the requirements of subpart GG of this part. Heat recovery steam generators and duct burners regulated under this subpart are exempted from the requirements of subparts Da, Db, and Dc...

  1. Absorbed dose by a CMOS in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borja H, C. G.; Valero L, C. Y.; Guzman G, K. A.; Banuelos F, A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R.; Paredes G, L. C.

    2011-10-01

    Absorbed dose by a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuit as part of a pacemaker, has been estimated using Monte Carlo calculations. For a cancer patient who is a pacemaker carrier, scattered radiation could damage pacemaker CMOS circuits affecting patient's health. Absorbed dose in CMOS circuit due to scattered photons is too small and therefore is not the cause of failures in pacemakers, but neutron calculations shown an absorbed dose that could cause damage in CMOS due to neutron-hydrogen interactions. (Author)

  2. The IRSN publishes an assessment of doses received in Japan by external irradiation due to radioactive deposits caused by the Fukushima-Daiichi power plant accident; L'IRSN publie une estimation des doses recues au Japon par irradiation externe due aux depots radioactifs provoques par l'accident de la centrale de Fukushima-Daiichi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    This document first describes how dry and wet radioactive deposits are formed. It also indicates their main components: iodine 131 and 132, caesium 134, 136 and 137, tellurium 132, and barium 140. It describes the different exposure ways due to radioactive deposits in the environment. A map indicates dose level assessments few tens of kilometres around the Fukushima power plant. A brief comment of this map is proposed

  3. Are low radiation doses Dangerous?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Lima, O.; Cornejo, N.

    1996-01-01

    In the last few years the answers to this questions has been affirmative as well as negative from a radiation protection point of view low doses of ionizing radiation potentially constitute an agent causing stochasting effects. A lineal relation without threshold is assumed between dose and probability of occurrence of these effects . Arguments against the danger of probability of occurrence of these effects. Arguments again the danger of low dose radiation are reflected in concepts such as Hormesis and adaptive response, which are phenomena that being studied at present

  4. 40 CFR 33.301 - What does this subpart require?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY PROGRAMS Good Faith Efforts § 33.301 What does this subpart require? A recipient, including one... good faith efforts whenever procuring construction, equipment, services and supplies under an EPA...

  5. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart S of... - Decompression Tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Underground Construction, Caissons, Cofferdams and Compressed Air Pt. 1926, Subpt. S, App. A Appendix A to Subpart S of Part 1926...

  6. 48 CFR 1819.7301 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...&D, thereby increasing competition, productivity and economic growth. Federal agencies participating... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Programs 1819.7301 Scope of subpart. The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR...

  7. 20 CFR 1001.100 - Purpose and scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... system established pursuant to the Wagner-Peyser Act, as amended. (b) This subpart describes the roles... performance standards for determining compliance of State agencies in carrying out the provisions of 38 U.S.C...

  8. 48 CFR 22.300 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... contracts that may require or involve laborers or mechanics. In this subpart, the term laborers or mechanics... perform services in connection with dredging or rock excavation in rivers or harbors, but does not include...

  9. Dose from drinking water Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekelaeinen, Ilona; Salonen, Laina; Huikuri, Pia; Arvela, Hannu

    1999-01-01

    The dose from drinking water originates almost totally from naturally occurring radionuclides in the uranium-238 series, the most important nuclide being radon-222. Second comes lead-210, and third polonium-210. The mean age-group-weighted dose received by ingestion of drinking water is 0.14 mSv per year. More than half of the total cumulative dose of 750 manSv is received by the users of private wells, forming 13% of the population. The most exposed group comprises the users of wells drilled in bedrock, who receive 320 manSv while comprising only 4% of the population. The calculated number of annual cancer incidences due to drinking water is very sensitive to the dose-conversion factors of ingested radon used, as well as to the estimated lung cancer incidences caused by radon released from water into indoor air. (au)

  10. Dose assessment from potential radionuclide emissions from stacks on the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W.E.; Barnett, J.M.

    1995-04-01

    On February 3, 1993, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL), received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Division of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. The Compliance Order required RL to (1) evaluate all radionuclide emission points at the Hanford Site to determine which points are subject to the continuous emission sampling requirements of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61 (40 CFR 61), Subpart H, and (2) continuously sample radionuclide emissions in accordance with requirements in 40 CFR 61.93. The Information Request required RL to provide a written Compliance Plan to meet the requirements of the Compliance Order. A Compliance Plan was submitted to EPA, Region 10, on April 30, 1993. The Compliance Plan specified that a dose assessment would be performed for 84 Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) stacks registered with the Washington State Department of Health on the Hanford Site. Any stack identified in the assessment as having potential emissions to cause an effective dose equivalent (EDE) to a maximum exposed individual (MEI) greater than 0.1 mrem y -1 must have a compliant sampling system. In addition, a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) was signed on. February 7, 1994. The FFCA required that all unregistered stacks on the Hanford Site be assessed. This requirement increased the number of stacks to be assessed to 123 stacks. Six methods for performing the assessments are described. An initial assessment using only the HEPA filtration factor for back calculations identified 32 stacks that would have emissions which would cause an EDE to the MEI greater than 0.1 mrem y -1 . When the other methods were applied the number was reduced to 20 stacks. The paper discusses reasons for these overestimates

  11. Potential radionuclide emissions from stacks on the Hanford site, Part 1: Dose assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, W.E.; Barnett, J.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    On February 3, 1993, the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Division of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10. The Compliance Order requires RL to evaluate all radionuclide emission points at the Hanford Site to determine which are subject to continuous emission monitoring requirements in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, and to continuously monitor radionuclide emissions in accordance with requirements in 40 CFR 61.93. The Information Request required RL to provide a written Compliance Plan to meet the requirements of the Compliance Order. A Compliance Plan was submitted to EPA, Region 10, on April 30, 1993. The Compliance Plan specified that a dose assessment would be performed for 84 Westinghouse Hanford Company stacks registered with the Washington State Department of Health on the Hanford Site. Stacks that have the potential emissions to cause an effective dose equivalent to a maximum exposed individual greater than 0.1 mrem/y must be monitored continuously for radionuclide emissions. Five methods were approved by EPA, Region 10 for performing the assessments: Release Fractions from Appendix D of 40 CFR 61, Back Calculations Using A HEPA Filtration Factor, Nondestructive Assay of HEPA Filters, A Spill Release Fraction, and Upstream of HEPA Filter Air Concentrations. The first two methods were extremely conservative for estimating releases. The third method, which used a state-of-the-art portable gamma spectrometer, yielded surprising results from the distribution of radionuclides on the HEPA filters. All five methods are described. Assessments using a HEPA Filtration Factor for back calculations identified 32 stacks that would have emissions that would cause an EDE to the MEI greater than 0.1 mrem y{sup {minus}1}. The number was reduced to 15 stacks when the other methods were applied. The paper discusses reasons for the overestimates.

  12. 25 CFR 1000.350 - What is the purpose of this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... EDUCATION ACT Trust Evaluation Review § 1000.350 What is the purpose of this subpart? This subpart describes how the trust responsibility of the United States is legally maintained through a system of trust...

  13. 40 CFR 267.170 - Does this subpart apply to me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PERMIT Use and Management of Containers § 267.170 Does this subpart apply to me? This subpart applies to you if you own or operate a facility that treats or stores hazardous waste in containers under a 40...

  14. 40 CFR 266.210 - What definitions apply to this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., Transportation and Disposal. Terms § 266.210 What definitions apply to this subpart? This subpart uses the... waste in accordance with 40 CFR 261.3, “Definition of Hazardous Waste.” Land Disposal Restriction (LDR...

  15. 2 CFR 182.110 - What do subparts A through F of this part do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS Reserved GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Purpose and Coverage § 182.110 What do subparts A through F of this part do? Subparts A through F...

  16. 20 CFR 655.300 - Purpose and scope of subparts D and E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Aliens as Registered Nurses § 655.300 Purpose and scope of subparts D and E. (a) Purpose. The Immigration... crisis. Subpart D of this part sets forth the procedure by which health care facilities seeking to use...

  17. When is a dose not a dose?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, V.P.

    1991-01-01

    Although an enormous amount of progress has been made in the fields of radiation protection and risk assessment, a number of significant problems remain. The one problem which transcends all the rest, and which has been subject to considerable misunderstanding, involves what has come to be known as the 'linear non-threshold hypothesis', or 'linear hypothesis'. Particularly troublesome has been the interpretation that any amount of radiation can cause an increase in the excess incidence of cancer. The linear hypothesis has dominated radiation protection philosophy for more than three decades, with enormous financial, societal and political impacts and has engendered an almost morbid fear of low-level exposure to ionizing radiation in large segments of the population. This document presents a different interpretation of the linear hypothesis. The basis for this view lies in the evolution of dose-response functions, particularly with respect to their use initially in the context of early acute effects, and then for the late effects, carcinogenesis and mutagenesis. 11 refs., 4 figs

  18. Health effect of low dose/low dose rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    The clarified and non-clarified scientific knowledge is discussed to consider the cause of confusion of explanation of the title subject. The low dose is defined roughly lower than 200 mGy and low dose rate, 0.05 mGy/min. The health effect is evaluated from 2 aspects of clinical symptom/radiation hazard protection. In the clinical aspect, the effect is classified in physical (early and late) and genetic ones, and is classified in stochastic (no threshold value, TV) and deterministic (with TV) ones from the radioprotection aspect. Although the absence of TV in the carcinogenic and genetic effects has not been proved, ICRP employs the stochastic standpoint from the safety aspect for radioprotection. The lowest human TV known now is 100 mGy, meaning that human deterministic effect would not be generated below this dose. Genetic deterministic effect can be observable only in animal experiments. These facts suggest that the practical risk of exposure to <100 mGy in human is the carcinogenesis. The relationship between carcinogenic risk in A-bomb survivors and their exposed dose are found fitted to the linear no TV model, but the epidemiologic data, because of restriction of subject number analyzed, do not always mean that the model is applicable even below the dose <100 mGy. This would be one of confusing causes in explanation: no carcinogenic risk at <100 mGy or risk linear to dose even at <100 mGy, neither of which is scientifically conclusive at present. Also mentioned is the scarce risk of cancer in residents living in the high background radiation regions in the world in comparison with that in the A-bomb survivors exposed to the chronic or acute low dose/dose rate. Molecular events are explained for the low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair, gene mutation and chromosome aberration, hypothesis of carcinogenesis by mutation, and non-targeting effect of radiation (bystander effect and gene instability). Further researches to elucidate the low dose

  19. Salivary gland doses from dental radiographic exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, Masaharu; Kato, Kazuo; Wada, Takuro; Antoku, Shigetoshi; Russell, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    Salivary gland doses incurred during dental radiography were measured by phantom dosimetry, and these dose data and data obtained during a two-week survey of Hiroshima and Nagasaki dental hospitals and clinics were used to estimate the respective doses to members of the populations of the two cities. The results obtained were used to supplement previously determined doses to the thyroid gland, lens, and pituitary gland from dental radiography. No significant differences in doses were observed by age, sex or city. Doses to the salivary glands during dental radiography are probably not sufficiently large to cause bias in assessments of atomic bomb survivors for late radiation effects. However, the steadily increasing use of dental radiography underscores the need for continued monitoring of dental radiography doses in the interests of these assessments. (author)

  20. 29 CFR 776.0 - Subpart limited to individual employee coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the Act on the traditional basis of engagement by individual employees “in commerce or in the... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Subpart limited to individual employee coverage. 776.0... § 776.0 Subpart limited to individual employee coverage. This subpart, which was adopted before the...

  1. 30 CFR 285.1000 - What activities does this subpart regulate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What activities does this subpart regulate? 285.1000 Section 285.1000 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Activities § 285.1000 What activities does this subpart regulate? (a) This subpart provides the general...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix: Table 1 to... - List of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP) for Subpart HHH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true List of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP) for Subpart HHH Table Appendix: Table 1 to Subpart HHH of Part 63 Protection of Environment... HHH of Part 63—List of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP) for Subpart HHH CAS Number a Chemical name 75070...

  3. 10 CFR 2.1400 - Purpose and scope of subpart N.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose and scope of subpart N. 2.1400 Section 2.1400... ORDERS Expedited Proceedings with Oral Hearings § 2.1400 Purpose and scope of subpart N. The purpose of... parties otherwise agree and request the application of subpart N procedures, and proceedings for the...

  4. 40 CFR 63.1080 - What is the purpose of this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the purpose of this subpart... Waste Operations Introduction § 63.1080 What is the purpose of this subpart? This subpart establishes requirements for controlling emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAP) from heat exchange systems and waste...

  5. 49 CFR 195.551 - What do the regulations in this subpart cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What do the regulations in this subpart cover? 195... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.551 What do the regulations in this subpart cover? This subpart prescribes minimum requirements for protecting steel pipelines...

  6. 77 FR 12528 - Amendments to Commission's Rules of Practice and Procedure-Subparts E and L

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... (Proceedings; Pleadings; Motions; Replies) and Subpart L (Depositions, Written Interrogatories, and Discovery... rules, the Commission proposes to amend Subpart E (Proceedings; Pleadings; Motions; Replies) and Subpart... considering adoption of these federal rules, due regard should be given to the differences in the nature of...

  7. 41 CFR 101-27.500 - Scope and applicability of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

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    ... MANAGEMENT 27.5-Return of GSA Stock Items § 101-27.500 Scope and applicability of subpart. This subpart sets... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Scope and applicability of subpart. 101-27.500 Section 101-27.500 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property...

  8. 17 CFR Table IV to Subpart E of... - Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Inflation Adjustments IV Table IV to Subpart E of Part 201 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Table IV to Subpart E of Part 201—Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments Table IV to Subpart E U.S. Code citation Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustments Civil monetary penalty description Year...

  9. 40 CFR 63.5110 - What special definitions are used in this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... not limited to bags, pouches, labels, liners and wraps utilizing paper, plastic, film, aluminum foil... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true What special definitions are used in... Subpart Covers § 63.5110 What special definitions are used in this subpart? All terms used in this subpart...

  10. 43 CFR 44.10 - What is the purpose of this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What is the purpose of this subpart? 44.10 Section 44.10 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS General Information § 44.10 What is the purpose of this subpart? This subpart sets forth...

  11. 40 CFR 63.6175 - What definitions apply to this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... from the distillation of petroleum with a boiling point of approximately 150 to 360 degrees Celsius... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true What definitions apply to this subpart... Requirements and Information § 63.6175 What definitions apply to this subpart? Terms used in this subpart are...

  12. 41 CFR Appendix A to Subpart B of... - 3-Key Points and Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Principles A Appendix A to Subpart B of Part 102 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property.... B, App. A Appendix A to Subpart B of Part 102-3—Key Points and Principles This appendix provides... principles that may be applied to situations not covered elsewhere in this subpart. The guidance follows: Key...

  13. 41 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - 3-Key Points and Principles

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    2010-07-01

    ... Principles A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 102 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property..., Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 102-3—Key Points and Principles This appendix provides... principles that may be applied to situations not covered elsewhere in this subpart. The guidance follows: Key...

  14. 77 FR 52341 - Information Collection Activity: Subpart C, Pollution Prevention and Control; Submitted for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-29

    ...-0001; OMB Number 1014-NEW] Information Collection Activity: Subpart C, Pollution Prevention and Control... the regulations under Subpart C, Pollution Prevention and Control. This notice also provides the... information. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: 30 CFR 250, Subpart C, Pollution Prevention and Control. OMB...

  15. 40 CFR 35.4015 - Do certain words in this subpart have specific meaning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Do certain words in this subpart have....4015 Do certain words in this subpart have specific meaning? Yes, some words in this subpart have specific meanings that are described in§ 35.4270, Definitions. The first time these words are used they are...

  16. Dose sculpting with generalized equivalent uniform dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Qiuwen; Djajaputra, David; Liu, Helen H.; Dong Lei; Mohan, Radhe; Wu, Yan

    2005-01-01

    With intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), a variety of user-defined dose distribution can be produced using inverse planning. The generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) has been used in IMRT optimization as an alternative objective function to the conventional dose-volume-based criteria. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of gEUD optimization to fine tune the dose distributions of IMRT plans. We analyzed the effect of gEUD-based optimization parameters on plan quality. The objective was to determine whether dose distribution to selected structures could be improved using gEUD optimization without adversely altering the doses delivered to other structures, as in sculpting. We hypothesized that by carefully defining gEUD parameters (EUD 0 and n) based on the current dose distributions, the optimization system could be instructed to search for alternative solutions in the neighborhood, and we could maintain the dose distributions for structures already satisfactory and improve dose for structures that need enhancement. We started with an already acceptable IMRT plan optimized with any objective function. The dose distribution was analyzed first. For structures that dose should not be changed, a higher value of n was used and EUD 0 was set slightly higher/lower than the EUD value at the current dose distribution for critical structures/targets. For structures that needed improvement in dose, a higher to medium value of n was used, and EUD 0 was set to the EUD value or slightly lower/higher for the critical structure/target at the current dose distribution. We evaluated this method in one clinical case each of head and neck, lung and prostate cancer. Dose volume histograms, isodose distributions, and relevant tolerance doses for critical structures were used for the assessment. We found that by adjusting gEUD optimization parameters, the dose distribution could be improved with only a few iterations. A larger value of n could lead to

  17. Repair and dose-response at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totter, J.R.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1977-04-01

    The DNA of each individual is subject to formation of some 2-4 x 10 14 ion pairs during the first 30 years of life from background radiation. If a single hit is sufficient to cause cancer, as is implicit in the linear, no-threshold theories, it is unclear why all individuals do not succumb to cancer, unless repair mechanisms operate to remove the damage. We describe a simple model in which the exposed population displays a distribution of repair thresholds. The dose-response at low dose is shown to depend on the shape of the threshold distribution at low thresholds. If the probability of zero threshold is zero, the response at low dose is quadratic. The model is used to resolve a longstanding discrepancy between observed incidence of leukemia at Nagasaki and the predictions of the usual linear hypothesis

  18. Pocket total dose meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Endres, G.W.R.

    1984-10-01

    Laboratory measurements have demonstrated that it is possible to simultaneously measure absorbed dose and dose equivalent using a single tissue equivalent proportional counter. Small, pocket sized instruments are being developed to determine dose equivalent as the worker is exposed to mixed field radiation. This paper describes the electronic circuitry and computer algorithms used to determine dose equivalent in these devices

  19. On dose distribution comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Steve B; Sharp, Greg C; Neicu, Toni; Berbeco, Ross I; Flampouri, Stella; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    In radiotherapy practice, one often needs to compare two dose distributions. Especially with the wide clinical implementation of intensity-modulated radiation therapy, software tools for quantitative dose (or fluence) distribution comparison are required for patient-specific quality assurance. Dose distribution comparison is not a trivial task since it has to be performed in both dose and spatial domains in order to be clinically relevant. Each of the existing comparison methods has its own strengths and weaknesses and there is room for improvement. In this work, we developed a general framework for comparing dose distributions. Using a new concept called maximum allowed dose difference (MADD), the comparison in both dose and spatial domains can be performed entirely in the dose domain. Formulae for calculating MADD values for various comparison methods, such as composite analysis and gamma index, have been derived. For convenience in clinical practice, a new measure called normalized dose difference (NDD) has also been proposed, which is the dose difference at a point scaled by the ratio of MADD to the predetermined dose acceptance tolerance. Unlike the simple dose difference test, NDD works in both low and high dose gradient regions because it considers both dose and spatial acceptance tolerances through MADD. The new method has been applied to a test case and a clinical example. It was found that the new method combines the merits of the existing methods (accurate, simple, clinically intuitive and insensitive to dose grid size) and can easily be implemented into any dose/intensity comparison tool

  20. 40 CFR 63.2831 - Where can I find definitions of key words used in this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... words used in this subpart? 63.2831 Section 63.2831 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Vegetable Oil Production What This Subpart Covers § 63.2831 Where can I find definitions of key words used in this subpart? You can find definitions of key words used in this subpart in § 63.2872. ...

  1. 23 CFR Appendix A to Subpart D of... - Sample Show Cause Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... female representation at each level of each trade and a list of minority employees. You are specifically... unacceptable level of minority and female employment in your operations, particularly in the semiskilled and skilled categories of employees. The Department of Labor regulations (41 CFR 60) implementing Executive...

  2. Absorbed dose by a CMOS in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borja H, C. G.; Valero L, C. Y.; Guzman G, K. A.; Banuelos F, A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Paredes G, L. C., E-mail: candy_borja@hotmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-10-15

    Absorbed dose by a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuit as part of a pacemaker, has been estimated using Monte Carlo calculations. For a cancer patient who is a pacemaker carrier, scattered radiation could damage pacemaker CMOS circuits affecting patient's health. Absorbed dose in CMOS circuit due to scattered photons is too small and therefore is not the cause of failures in pacemakers, but neutron calculations shown an absorbed dose that could cause damage in CMOS due to neutron-hydrogen interactions. (Author)

  3. SPE dose prediction using locally weighted regression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hines, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.; Nichols, T. F.

    2005-01-01

    When astronauts are outside earth's protective magnetosphere, they are subject to large radiation doses resulting from solar particle events (SPEs). The total dose received from a major SPE in deep space could cause severe radiation poisoning. The dose is usually received over a 20-40 h time interval but the event's effects may be mitigated with an early warning system. This paper presents a method to predict the total dose early in the event. It uses a locally weighted regression model, which is easier to train and provides predictions as accurate as neural network models previously used. (authors)

  4. SPE dose prediction using locally weighted regression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hines, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.; Nichols, T. F.

    2005-01-01

    When astronauts are outside Earth's protective magnetosphere, they are subject to large radiation doses resulting from solar particle events. The total dose received from a major solar particle event in deep space could cause severe radiation poisoning. The dose is usually received over a 20-40 h time interval but the event's effects may be reduced with an early warning system. This paper presents a method to predict the total dose early in the event. It uses a locally weighted regression model, which is easier to train, and provides predictions as accurate as the neural network models that were used previously. (authors)

  5. Severidade da mela da soja causada por Rhizoctonia solani AG-1 IA em função de doses de potássio Severity of hte foliar blight of the soylean caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG-1 IA infunction of doses of potassium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Basseto

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available O fungo Rhizoctonia solani pertencente ao grupo de anastomose 1 IA (AG-1 IA é um dos patógenos mais importantes afetando a cultura da soja no Brasil. Este fungo causa queima da folha e/ou mela em soja, para a qual medidas de manejo cultural são consideradas alternativas importantes para controle antes do estabelecimento da doença. Há evidências de que a adubação potássica diminui substancialmente a severidade dos sintomas de várias doenças da soja como a queima foliar (Cercospora kikuchii, a seca da haste e da vagem (Phomopsis phaseoli var. sojae e o cancro da haste (Diaporthe phaseolorum f. sp. meridionalis. Apesar das evidências do efeito do potássio no controle de várias doenças da soja, não há informação na literatura sobre o efeito desse nutriente no controle da mela. A hipótese testada foi que a mela da soja pode ser controlada através de incrementos na adubação potássica. De maneira geral, concluiu-se que, sob condições de casa de vegetação, o incremento de K no solo não resultou no controle da mela da soja. É necessário, entretanto, confirmar esta observação conduzindo-se experimentos sob condições de campo, podendo-se incluir a avaliação do efeito da doença sob aspectos da produção.The fungus Rhizoctonia solani, belonging to anastomosis group 1IA (AG-1 IA is one of the most important pathogens affecting soybean in Brazil. This fungus causes aerial or foliar blight of soybean, and cultural measures are thought as important choices for the control before the establishment of the disease. Based on evidences that potassium amendments can substantially reduce the severity of several soybean diseases such as Cercospora leaf blight (Cercospora kikuchii, pod and stem blight (Phomopsis phaseoli var. sojae and stem canker (Diaporthe phaseolorum f. sp. meridionalis. Despite all evidence, there is no information in the literature about the effect of potassium controlling the soybean foliar blight. The

  6. Estimation of radiation risks at low dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    The report presents a review of the effects caused by radiation in low doses, or at low dose rates. For the inheritable (or ''genetic''), as well as for the cancer producing effects of radiation, present evidence is consistent with: (a) a non-linear relationship between the frequency of at least some forms of these effects, with comparing frequencies caused by doses many times those received annually from natural sources, with those caused by lower doses; (b) a probably linear relationship, however, between dose and frequency of effects for dose rates in the region of that received from natural sources, or at several times this rate; (c) no evidence to indicate the existence of a threshold dose below which such effects are not produced, and a strong inference from the mode of action of radiation on cells at low dose rates that no such thresholds are likely to apply to the detrimental, cancer-producing or inheritable, effects resulting from unrepaired damage to single cells. 19 refs

  7. Radiation Dose Measurement Using Chemical Dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Min Sun; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Yu Ri; Han, Bum Soo

    2010-01-01

    The radiation dose can be estimated in various ways. Dose estimates can be obtained by either experiment or theoretical analysis. In experiments, radiation impact is assessed by measuring any change caused by energy deposition to the exposed matter, in terms of energy state (physical change), chemical production (chemical change) or biological abnormality (biological change). The chemical dosimetry is based on the implication that the energy deposited to the matter can be inferred from the consequential change in chemical production. The chemical dosimetry usually works on the sample that is an aqueous solution, a biological matter, or an organic substance. In this study, we estimated absorbed doses by quantitating chemical changes in matter caused by radiation exposure. Two different chemical dosimeters, Fricke and ECB (Ethanol-Chlorobenzene) dosimeter, were compared in several features including efficacy as dose indicator and effective dose range

  8. Compliance with public dose limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, G.C.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation, in various forms, is ubiquitous in the environment. Natural background radiation leads to an average radiation exposure for the general population of about 2 mSv per year. The mining and milling of radioactive ores - uranium and mineral sands - may cause a small increase in radiation exposure for some members of the public. Because any such increment in exposure is small compared with a natural exposure that is variable and difficult to quantify accurately, it is not easy to determine what proportion of the total dose received by a member of the public can be attributed to mining and milling activities. Consequently, because public dose limits apply and to those doses caused by human activity, such as mining and milling, the task of demonstrating compliance can be hampered by uncertainty. Some strategies for handling this situation are discussed. While the discussion concentrates on public dose limits, much of it may also be applicable, or adaptable, to occupational exposure. 4 refs., 2 figs

  9. Treatment of the pain caused by cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Masao

    1979-01-01

    Relief of pain caused by cancerous invasion is one of the most important role of radiotherapy. Telecobalt has improved the palliative effects for cancer pain, because of its sufficient depth dose. Supervoltage x-ray generated from Linac has expanded indications of treatment for cancer pain by the shortening of treatment time due to high dose rate. Intraoperative electron beam therapy is useful in the case of carcinoma of the pancreas suffering severe pain. Fast neutron therapy is clearly more effective than supervoltage x-ray for pain caused by the invasion of radioresistant cancer. Pelvic angiography is useful for diagnosis of pain focus caused by illiac lymph node metastasis. (author)

  10. When is a dose not a dose?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Patrick

    1992-01-01

    There is confusion over radiation dose limits between the International Commission on Radiological Protection, the National Radiological Protection Board and the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF), reports a Friends of the Earth's radiation campaigner. MAFF is suggesting the inadequate ICRP public dose limit does not apply to public exposures which arise from environmental contamination from past radioactive discharges. (author)

  11. Dose from radiological examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Keiko; Uji, Teruyuki; Sakuyama, Keiko; Fujikawa, Mitsuhiro; Fujii, Masamichi

    1976-01-01

    Relatively high gonad doses, several hundred to one thousand mR, have been observed in case of pelvis, hip-joint, coccyx, lower abdomen and lumber examination. Dose to the ovary is especially high in barium enema and I.V.P. examinations. About 12 per cent of the 4-ray examination are high-dose. The gonad dose is relatively high in examination of abdomen and lower extremities, in infants. The dose to the eyes is especially high, 1.0 to 2.5R per exposure, in temporal bone and nasal sinuses tomography. X-ray doses have been compared with dose limits recommended by ICRP and with the gonad dose from natural radiations. The gonad dose in lumbar examination, barium enema, I.V.P. etc. is as high as the maximum permissible dose per year recommended by ICRP. Several devices have been made for dose reduction in the daily examinations: (1) separating the radiation field from the gonad by one centimeter decreases the gonad dose about one-half. (2) using sensitive screens and films. In pelvimetry and in infant hip-joint examination, the most sensitive screen and film are used. In the I.V.P. examination of adult, use of MS screen in place of FS screen decreases the dose to one-third, in combination with careful setting of radiation field, (3) use of grid increases the dose about 50 percent and the lead rubber protection (0.1mm lead equivalent) decreases the gonad dose to one-thirtieth in the spinal column examination of infant, (4) A lead protector, 1mm thickness and 2.5cm in diameter, on the eyes decreases the dose to about one-eighth in the face and nead examinations. These simple and effective methods for dose reduction. Should be carried out in as many examinations as possible in addition to observing dose limits recommended by ICRP. (Evans, J.)

  12. 14 CFR 1261.601 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... amended (26 U.S.C. 1 et seq.), the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 301 et seq.), or the tariff laws of the... claims to the General Accounting Office. This subpart does not preclude an employee from requesting... questioning the amount or validity of a debt by submitting a subsequent claim to the General Accounting Office...

  13. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart B of... - Commentary

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    ..., domestic or foreign, including foreign central banks as specified in paragraph (b)(1) of this section... under subpart B because they are not an instruction to a Federal Reserve Bank to pay money. (3) This... account will create an overdraft in the sender's account. The Board and the Federal Reserve Banks have...

  14. 10 CFR Appendix C to Subpart B of... - Compliance Certification

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    ... Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies (EE-2J), Forrestal Building, 1000... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance Certification C Appendix C to Subpart B of Part 431 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL...

  15. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Vvvvvv... - Partially Soluble HAP

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    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Partially Soluble HAP 7 Table 7 to... Pt. 63, Subpt. VVVVVV, Table 7 Table 7 to Subpart VVVVVV of Part 63—Partially Soluble HAP As required... partially soluble HAP listed in the following table. Partially soluble HAP name CAS No. 1. 1,1,1...

  16. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Ggg of... - Soluble HAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Soluble HAP 3 Table 3 to Subpart GGG of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... HAP Compound 1,1-Dimethylhydrazine. 1,4-Dioxane. Acetonitrile. Acetophenone. Diethyl sulfate. Dimethyl...

  17. 7 CFR 3016.2 - Scope of subpart.

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    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Scope of subpart. 3016.2 Section 3016.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS TO STATE AND LOCAL...

  18. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart X of... - Ladders

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    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ladders A Appendix A to Subpart X of Part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... designed and built in accordance with the applicable national consensus standards, as set forth below, will...

  19. 48 CFR 51.200 - Scope of subpart.

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    ... Section 51.200 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT USE OF GOVERNMENT SOURCES BY CONTRACTORS Contractor Use of Interagency Fleet Management System (IFMS... of interagency fleet management system (IFMS) vehicles and related services. In this subpart, the...

  20. 41 CFR 101-26.300 - Scope of subpart.

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    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Scope of subpart. 101-26.300 Section 101-26.300 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 26-PROCUREMENT SOURCES AND...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart C of... - References

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) AMBIENT AIR MONITORING REFERENCE AND EQUIVALENT METHODS Procedures for Determining Comparability Between Candidate Methods and Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, App. A Appendix A to Subpart C of Part 53... 3005, Milwaukee, WI 53202 (http://qualitypress.asq.org). (2) Quality Assurance Guidance Document 2.12...

  2. 7 CFR Appendix to Subpart F of... - Unknown Title

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    2010-01-01

    ... and Human Nutrition Research and Extension Program. 7 U.S.C. 3171 et seq. 30. Animal Health and... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appendix to Subpart F of Part 15a Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING OR BENEFITTING FROM...

  3. 29 CFR 570.32 - Effect of subpart C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS CHILD LABOR... (Child Labor Reg. 3) § 570.32 Effect of subpart C. Link to an amendment published at 75 FR 28448, May 20... conditions specified in § 570.35 shall not be deemed to be oppressive child labor within the meaning of the...

  4. 41 CFR 115-1.100 - Scope of subpart.

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    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Scope of subpart. 115-1.100 Section 115-1.100 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 1-INTRODUCTION 1.1-Regulation System § 115-1.100 Scope...

  5. 41 CFR 101-1.100 - Scope of subpart.

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    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Scope of subpart. 101-1.100 Section 101-1.100 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS GENERAL 1-INTRODUCTION 1.1-Regulation System § 101-1.100...

  6. 41 CFR 105-1.100 - Scope of subpart.

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    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Scope of subpart. 105-1.100 Section 105-1.100 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION 1-INTRODUCTION 1.1-Regulations System § 105-1.100...

  7. 41 CFR 128-1.100 - Scope of subpart.

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    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Scope of subpart. 128-1.100 Section 128-1.100 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 1-INTRODUCTION 1.1-Regulation System § 128-1.100 Scope of...

  8. 41 CFR 101-1.4900 - Scope of subpart.

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    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Scope of subpart. 101-1.4900 Section 101-1.4900 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS GENERAL 1-INTRODUCTION 1.49-Illustrations of Forms...

  9. 7 CFR 1215.10 - Part and subpart.

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    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... CONSUMER INFORMATION Popcorn Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Definitions § 1215.10 Part and subpart. Part means the Popcorn Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order and all rules...

  10. 13 CFR 120.1700 - Definitions used in subpart J.

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    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions used in subpart J. 120.1700 Section 120.1700 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Establishment of SBA Secondary Market Guarantee Program for First Lien Position 504 Loan Pools § 120.1700...

  11. 17 CFR Appendix B to Subpart A of... - Sample Clauses

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    2010-04-01

    ... Information Pt. 248, Subpt. A, App. B Appendix B to Subpart A of Part 248—Sample Clauses Link to an amendment..., such as “call the following toll-free number: (insert number)”]. A-7—Confidentiality and Security (All...

  12. 40 CFR 141.622 - Subpart V monitoring plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... procedures; and (iv) Monitoring plans for any other systems in the combined distribution system if the State... current distribution system locations with expected high TTHM or HAA5 levels. The State may also require modifications in your monitoring plan. If you are a subpart H system serving > 3,300 people, you must submit a...

  13. 48 CFR 1426.7000 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... policies and procedures for implementation of Section 7(b) of the Indian Self-Determination and Education... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scope of subpart. 1426.7000 Section 1426.7000 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOCIOECONOMIC...

  14. 48 CFR 225.7300 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... military sales (FMS) under the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. Chapter 39). Section 22 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2762) authorizes DoD to enter into contracts for resale to foreign countries or international organizations. (b) This subpart does not apply to— (1) FMS made from inventories...

  15. 41 CFR 109-1.5300 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS GENERAL 1-INTRODUCTION 1... identification, accounting, control, and disposal policy guidance for the following categories of high risk... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Scope of subpart. 109-1...

  16. 45 CFR 90.11 - Purpose of this subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purpose of this subpart. 90.11 Section 90.11 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE What is Age Discrimination...

  17. 20 CFR 408.301 - What is this subpart about?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is this subpart about? 408.301 Section 408.301 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II..., where and when it must be signed and filed, the period of time it is in effect, and how it may be...

  18. 48 CFR 22.1400 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scope of subpart. 22.1400 Section 22.1400 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT ACQUISITIONS Employment of Workers with Disabilities 22...

  19. 31 CFR 203.14 - Scope of the subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Scope of the subpart. 203.14 Section 203.14 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE PAYMENT OF FEDERAL TAXES AND THE TREASURY...

  20. 31 CFR 203.9 - Scope of the subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Scope of the subpart. 203.9 Section 203.9 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE PAYMENT OF FEDERAL TAXES AND THE TREASURY TAX AND...

  1. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español Do Allergies Cause Asthma? KidsHealth / For Parents / Do Allergies Cause Asthma? Print ... son la causa del asma? Do Allergies Cause Asthma? Allergies don't cause asthma. But kids who ...

  2. A novel dose uncertainty model and its application for dose verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Hosang; Chung Heetaek; Liu Chihray; Palta, Jatinder; Suh, Tae-Suk; Kim, Siyong

    2005-01-01

    Based on statistical approach, a novel dose uncertainty model was introduced considering both nonspatial and spatial dose deviations. Non-space-oriented uncertainty is mainly caused by dosimetric uncertainties, and space-oriented dose uncertainty is the uncertainty caused by all spatial displacements. Assuming these two parts are independent, dose difference between measurement and calculation is a linear combination of nonspatial and spatial dose uncertainties. Two assumptions were made: (1) the relative standard deviation of nonspatial dose uncertainty is inversely proportional to the dose standard deviation σ, and (2) the spatial dose uncertainty is proportional to the gradient of dose. The total dose uncertainty is a quadratic sum of the nonspatial and spatial uncertainties. The uncertainty model provides the tolerance dose bound for comparison between calculation and measurement. In the statistical uncertainty model based on a Gaussian distribution, a confidence level of 3σ theoretically confines 99.74% of measurements within the bound. By setting the confidence limit, the tolerance bound for dose comparison can be made analogous to that of existing dose comparison methods (e.g., a composite distribution analysis, a γ test, a χ evaluation, and a normalized agreement test method). However, the model considers the inherent dose uncertainty characteristics of the test points by taking into account the space-specific history of dose accumulation, while the previous methods apply a single tolerance criterion to the points, although dose uncertainty at each point is significantly different from others. Three types of one-dimensional test dose distributions (a single large field, a composite flat field made by two identical beams, and three-beam intensity-modulated fields) were made to verify the robustness of the model. For each test distribution, the dose bound predicted by the uncertainty model was compared with simulated measurements. The simulated

  3. Absorbed dose thresholds and absorbed dose rate limitations for studies of electron radiation effects on polyetherimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Gray, Stephanie L.; Collins, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The threshold values of total absorbed dose for causing changes in tensile properties of a polyetherimide film and the limitations of the absorbed dose rate for accelerated-exposure evaluation of the effects of electron radiation in geosynchronous orbit were studied. Total absorbed doses from 1 kGy to 100 MGy and absorbed dose rates from 0.01 MGy/hr to 100 MGy/hr were investigated, where 1 Gy equals 100 rads. Total doses less than 2.5 MGy did not significantly change the tensile properties of the film whereas doses higher than 2.5 MGy significantly reduced elongation-to-failure. There was no measurable effect of the dose rate on the tensile properties for accelerated electron exposures.

  4. Insignificant levels of dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.A.M.; McLean, A.S.

    1977-01-01

    The procedures recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for making decisions concerning controllable sources of radiation exposure of the public include 'justification' and 'optimisation'. The tool recommended by the ICRP for reaching these decisions is collective dose or dose commitment supplemented by consideration of doses to individuals. In both these considerations the practical problem arises of whether very small doses to large numbers of people should contribute to the final decision-making process. It may be that at levels of dose which are small increments on natural background, the relationship between dose and effect is linear even though the slope may be close to zero. If so, collective dose is a meaningful concept and the calculation of total detriment for the purpose of justification could legitimately include all doses. In the calculation of collective doses for the purpose of optimisation, which involves decisions on how much money or resource should be allocated to dose reduction, it is necessary to appraise radiation detriment realistically. At low levels of dose to the individual such as those small by comparison with variations in natural background within the UK, the risk to the individual is such that his well-being will not be significantly changed by the presence or absence of the radiation dose. These small doses, which are well below the point at which an individual attaches significance, should not carry a societal significance. Societal acceptance of risk is analysed with a view to assessing a level of possible risk, and hence dose, below which resources should not in general be diverted to secure further reduction. A formulation for collective dose commitment is proposed incorporating a cut-off to exclude insignificant doses. The implications of this formulation in practical situations are discussed

  5. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Dd of... - List of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP) for Subpart DD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false List of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP... Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP) for Subpart DD CAS No. a Chemical name fm 305 75-07-0 Acetaldehyde 1.000 75... mixtures of compounds. b. Denotes a HAP that hydrolyzes quickly in water, but the hydrolysis products are...

  6. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Vvv of... - Applicability of 40 CFR Part 63 General Provisions to Subpart VVV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Publicly Owned... Postmark explanation. § 63.1(a)(12)-(14) Yes Time period changes. Regulation conflict. Force and effect of... State options regarding title V permit. Unless required by the State, area sources subject to subpart...

  7. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Pppp of... - Applicability of General Provisions to Subpart PPPP of Part 63

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of Plastic Parts and Products Pt. 63, Subpt. PPPP, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart PPPP of Part 63...) Data Reduction No Sections 63.4567 and 63.4568 specify monitoring data reduction. § 63.9(a)-(d...

  8. Total dose meter development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brackenbush, L.W.

    1986-09-01

    This report describes an alarming ''pocket'' monitor/dosimeter, based on a tissue-equivalent proportional counter, that measure both neutron and gamma dose and determines dose equivalent for the mixed radiation field. This report details the operation of the device and provides information on: the necessity for a device to measure dose equivalent in mixed radiation fields; the mathematical theory required to determine dose equivalent from tissue equivalent proportional; the detailed electronic circuits required; the algorithms required in the microprocessor used to calculate dose equivalent; the features of the instrument; program accomplishments and future plans

  9. Dose reader CD-02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakowiuk, A.; Kaluska, I.; Machaj, B.

    2005-01-01

    Dose Reader CD-02 is designed for measurement of dose from a long narrow band of dosimetric foil used for check up and control of electron beam dose during sterilization of materials and products on conveyor belt. Irradiated foil after processing (heating) is inserted into foil driving (moving) system and when the foil is moved across focused light beam the absorbed dose is measured and displayed at the same time at computer monitor (in form of a diagram). The absorbed dose is measured on the principle of light attenuation at selected light wavelength (foil absorbance is measured). (author)

  10. Dose conversion factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1992-01-01

    The following is discussed in this report: concepts and quantities used in calculating radiation dose from internal and external exposure. Tabulations of dose conversion factor for internal and external exposure to radionuclides. Dose conversion factors give dose per unit intake (internal) or dose per unit concentration in environment (external). Intakes of radionuclides for internal exposure and concentrations of radionuclides in environment for external exposure are assumed to be known. Intakes and concentrations are obtained, e.g., from analyses of environmental transport and exposure pathways. differences between dosimetry methods for radionuclides and hazardous chemicals are highlighted

  11. Dose optimization in computed tomography: ICRP 87

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The doses given in the use of computed tomography scans are studied, aiming to calibrate the limits of irradiation in patients who need these tests. Furthermore, a good value of computed tomography should be guaranteed by physicians and radiologists for people not being irradiated unfairly, reducing doses and unnecessary tests. A critical evaluation by an ethics committee is suggested for cases where the test is performed for medical research without a cause [es

  12. The reconstruction of thyroid dose following Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanenko, V.; Kondrashov, A.; Yaskova, E.; Petin, D.; Skvortsov, V.; Parshkov, E.; Gavrilin, Yu.; Khrousch, V.; Shinkarev, S.; Makarenkova, I.; Volkov, V.; Zvonova, I.; Bratilova, A.; Kaidanovsky, J.; Minenko, V.; Drozdovich, V.; Ulanovsky, A.; Korneev, S.; Heinemann, K.; Pomplun, E.; Hille, R.; Bailiff, A.

    1996-01-01

    The report presents the overview of several approaches in working out the methods of thyroid internal dose reconstruction following Chernobyl. One of these approaches was developed (IBPh, Moscow; MRRC, Obninsk; IRM, Minsk) using the correlations between the mean dose calculation based on I 131 thyroid content measurements and Cs 137 contamination of territories. The available data on I 131 soil contamination were taken into account. The lack of data on I 131 soil contamination was supposed to be compensated by I 129 measurements in soil samples from contaminated territories. The semiempiric model was developed for dose reconstruction. The comparison of the results obtained by semiempiric model and empirical values are presented. The estimated values of average dose according semiempiric model were used for individual dose reconstruction. The IRH (St.-Petersburg) has developed the following method for individual dose reconstruction: correlation between the total I 131 radioiodine incorporation in thyroid and whole body Cs 137 content during first months after accident. The individual dose reconstruction is also mentioned to be performed using the data on individual milk consumption during first weeks after accident. For evaluation of average doses it is suggested to use the linear correlation: thyroid dose values based on radioiodine thyroid measurements vs Cs 137 contamination, air kerma rate, mean I 131 concentration in the milk. The method for retrospective reconstruction of thyroid dose caused by short-living iodine nuclides released after the Chernobyl accident has been developed by Research Centre, Juelich, Germany. It is based on the constant ratio that these nuclides have with the long-living I 129 . The contamination of soil samples by this nuclide can be used to assess thyroid doses. First results of I 129 contamination values and derived thyroid doses are to be presented

  13. Enjebi Island dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Phillips, W.A.

    1987-07-01

    We have updeated the radiological dose assessment for Enjebi Island at Enewetak Atoll using data derived from analysis of food crops grown on Enjebi. This is a much more precise assessment of potential doses to people resettling Enjebi Island than the 1980 assessment in which there were no data available from food crops on Enjebi. Details of the methods and data used to evaluate each exposure pathway are presented. The terrestrial food chain is the most significant potential exposure pathway and 137 Cs is the radionuclide responsible for most of the estimated dose over the next 50 y. The doses are calculated assuming a resettlement date of 1990. The average wholebody maximum annual estimated dose equivalent derived using our diet model is 166 mremy;the effective dose equivalent is 169 mremy. The estimated 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral whole-body dose equivalents are 3.5 rem, 5.1 rem, and 6.2 rem, respectively. Bone-marrow dose equivalents are only slightly higher than the whole-body estimates in each case. The bone-surface cells (endosteal cells) receive the highest dose, but they are a less sensitive cell population and are less sensitive to fatal cancer induction than whole body and bone marrow. The effective dose equivalents for 30, 50, and 70 y are 3.6 rem, 5.3 rem, and 6.6 rem, respectively. 79 refs., 17 figs., 24 tabs

  14. Dose assessment in radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donkor, S.

    2013-04-01

    The applications of ionizing radiation bring many benefits to humankind, ranging from power generation to uses in medicine, industry and agriculture. Facilities that use radiation source require special care in the design and operation of equipment to prevent radiation injury to workers or to the public. Despite considerable development of radiation safety, radiation accidents do happen. The purpose of this study is therefore to discuss how to assess doses to people who will be exposed to a range of internal and external radiation sources in the event of radiological accidents. This will go a long way to complement their medical assessment thereby helping to plan their treatment. Three radiological accidents were reviewed to learn about the causes of those accidents and the recommendations that were put in place to prevent recurrence of such accidents. Various types of dose assessment methods were discussed.(au)

  15. What Causes SIDS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Environment Look Like? How Can Caregivers Create a Safe Sleep Environment? Babies Need Tummy ... exactly what causes SIDS at this time. Scientists and health care providers are working very hard to find the cause or causes ...

  16. Effects of small doses of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, R.

    1998-01-01

    Uncertainty remains about the quantitative effects of doses of ionising radiation less than 0.2 Sv. Estimates of hereditary effects, based on the atomic bomb survivors, suggest that the mutation doubling dose is about 2 Sv for acute low LET radiation, but the confidence limits are wide. The idea that paternal gonadal irradiation might explain the Seascale cluster of childhood leukaemia has been disproved. Fetal irradiation may lead to a reduction in IQ and an increase in seizures in childhood proportional to dose. Estimates that doses to a whole population cause a risk of cancer proportional to dose, with 0.1 Sv given acutely causing a risk of 1%, will need to be modified as more information is obtained, but the idea that there is a threshold for risk above this level is not supported by observations on the irradiated fetus or the effect of fallout. The idea, based on ecological observations, that small doses protect against the development of cancer is refuted by the effect of radon in houses. New observations on the atomic bomb survivors have raised afresh the possibility that small doses may also have other somatic effects. (author)

  17. Urban contamination and dose model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, E.; Barry, P.J.

    1995-10-01

    Nuclear power reactors and other nuclear facilities are being built near or even within urban centres. Accidental releases of radionuclides to the atmosphere in built-up areas result in radiological exposure pathways that differ from those caused by releases in rural environments. Other than inhalation, exposure pathways involve external radiation from the plume while it passes and from radioactivity deposited onto the many and varied surfaces after it has passed. Radiation fields inside buildings are attenuated but many people are potentially exposed so while individual doses may be relatively low, population integrated doses may be high enough to cause concern. It is important, therefore, to assess the potential exposures and to estimate the cost-effectiveness of dose reduction measures in urban environments. This report describes a model developed to carry out such assessments. The model draws heavily on experience gained in European cities after their contamination fallout from the Chernobyl accident. Input is time integrated concentrations of specific radionuclides in urban air, obtained either by direct measurement or by prediction using an atmospheric dispersion model. The code includes default values for site specific variables and transfer parameters but the user is invited if desired to enter other values from the keyboard. Output is the time integrated dose rates for individuals selected because of the characteristic living, working and recreational habits. An accompanying manual documents the technical background on which the model is based and leads a first-time suer through various steps and operations encountered while the model is running. (author). 60 refs., 10 tabs., 1 fig

  18. Estimation of population dose from all sources in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusama, Tomoko; Nakagawa, Takeo; Kai, Michiaki; Yoshizawa, Yasuo

    1988-01-01

    The purposes of estimation of population doses are to understand the per-caput doses of the public member from each artificial radiation source and to determine the proportion contributed of the doses from each individual source to the total irradiated population. We divided the population doses into two categories: individual-related and source-related population doses. The individual-related population dose is estimated based on the maximum assumption for use in allocation of the dose limits for members of the public. The source-related population dose is estimated both to justify the sources and practices and to optimize radiation protection. The source-related population dose, therefore, should be estimated as realistically as possible. We investigated all sources that caused exposure to the population in Japan from the above points of view

  19. Dose measurements in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainberger, F.; Kallinger, W.

    1977-01-01

    Dose measurements at the mamma during mammography were carried out in the form of direct measurement with thermoluminescent dosimetry. Measurement was done for the in- and outcoming doses at the mamma, the dose exposure of the sternal region and the scattered rays above the symphysis, the latter as parameter for the genetic radiation exposure. As expected, the dose of the smooth radiation used for mammography showed a strong decrease at the outcome point in comparison with the income point. Surprisingly high was the scattered radiation in the sternal region. A corresponding protection by lead plates could be taken into consideration. Extremely low is the scattered radiation above the symphysis. Even measurements with the very sensitive calcium fluoride dosimeters did not reveal any practically important dose in the symphysis region. Most measurement values remained below the determinable dose of 0.3mR. Some maximal values varied in the range of 3-1 mR. (orig.) [de

  20. Registration of radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-02-01

    In Finland the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) is maintaining the register (called Dose Register) of the radiation exposure of occupationally exposed workers in order to ensure compliance with the principles of optimisation and individual protection. The guide contains a description of the Dose Register and specifies the responsibilities of the party running a radiation practice to report the relevant information to the Dose Register

  1. Paediatric dose display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, D.W.; Derges, S.; Hesslewood, S.

    1984-01-01

    A compact, inexpensive unit, based on an 8085 microprocessor, has been designed for calculating doses of intravenous radioactive injections for children. It has been used successfully for over a year. The dose is calculated from the body surface area and the result displayed in MBq. The operator can obtain the required dose on a twelve character alphanumeric display by entering the age of the patient and the adult dose using a hexadecimal keyboard. Circuit description, memory map and input/output, and firmware are dealt with. (U.K.)

  2. An environmental dose experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Luis

    2017-11-01

    Several radiation sources worldwide contribute to the delivered dose to the human population. This radiation also acts as a natural background when detecting radiation, for instance from radioactive sources. In this work a medium-sized plastic scintillation detector is used to evaluate the dose delivered by natural radiation sources. Calibration of the detector involved the use of radioactive sources and Monte Carlo simulation of the energy deposition per disintegration. A measurement of the annual dose due to background radiation to the body was then estimated. A dose value compatible with the value reported by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation was obtained.

  3. An environmental dose experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peralta, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Several radiation sources worldwide contribute to the delivered dose to the human population. This radiation also acts as a natural background when detecting radiation, for instance from radioactive sources. In this work a medium-sized plastic scintillation detector is used to evaluate the dose delivered by natural radiation sources. Calibration of the detector involved the use of radioactive sources and Monte Carlo simulation of the energy deposition per disintegration. A measurement of the annual dose due to background radiation to the body was then estimated. A dose value compatible with the value reported by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation was obtained. (paper)

  4. Doses from portable gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linauskas, S.H.

    1988-08-01

    Field studies to measure actual radiation exposures of operators of commercial moisture-density gauges were undertaken in several regions of Canada. Newly developed bubble detector dosimeter technology and conventional dosimetry such as thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), integrating electronic dosimeters (DRDs), and CR-39 neutron track-etch detectors were used to estimate the doses received by 23 moisture-density gauge operators and maintenance staff. These radiation dose estimates were supported by mapping radiation fields and accounting for the time an operator was near a gauge. Major findings indicate that gauge maintenance and servicing workers were more likely than gauge operators to receive exposures above the level of 5 mSv, and that neutron doses were roughly the same as gamma doses. Gauge operators receive approximately 75% of their dose when transporting and carrying the gauge. Dose to their hands is similar to the dose to their trunks, but the dose to their feet area is 6 to 30 times higher. Gamma radiation is the primary source of radiation contributing to operator dose

  5. Radiation dose in vertebroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehdizade, A.; Lovblad, K.O.; Wilhelm, K.E.; Somon, T.; Wetzel, S.G.; Kelekis, A.D.; Yilmaz, H.; Abdo, G.; Martin, J.B.; Viera, J.M.; Ruefenacht, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    We wished to measure the absorbed radiation dose during fluoroscopically controlled vertebroplasty and to assess the possibility of deterministic radiation effects to the operator. The dose was measured in 11 consecutive procedures using thermoluminescent ring dosimeters on the hand of the operator and electronic dosimeters inside and outside of the operator's lead apron. We found doses of 0.022-3.256 mGy outside and 0.01-0.47 mGy inside the lead apron. Doses on the hand were higher, 0.5-8.5 mGy. This preliminary study indicates greater exposure to the operator's hands than expected from traditional apron measurements. (orig.)

  6. 25 CFR Appendix B to Subpart C - Population Adjustment Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Population Adjustment Factor B Appendix B to Subpart C...—Population Adjustment Factor 1. The Population Adjustment Factor allows for participation in the IRR Program... Distribution factor* Number of tribes** Funding amount per tribe Less than 25 1 N1 MBA*** × 1 25-100 3.5 N2 MBA...

  7. Influence of Genotype on Warfarin Maintenance Dose Predictions Produced Using a Bayesian Dose Individualization Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffian, Shamin M; Duffull, Stephen B; Roberts, Rebecca L; Tait, Robert C; Black, Leanne; Lund, Kirstin A; Thomson, Alison H; Wright, Daniel F B

    2016-12-01

    A previously established Bayesian dosing tool for warfarin was found to produce biased maintenance dose predictions. In this study, we aimed (1) to determine whether the biased warfarin dose predictions previously observed could be replicated in a new cohort of patients from 2 different clinical settings, (2) to explore the influence of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 genotype on predictive performance of the Bayesian dosing tool, and (3) to determine whether the previous population used to develop the kinetic-pharmacodynamic model underpinning the Bayesian dosing tool was sufficiently different from the test (posterior) population to account for the biased dose predictions. The warfarin maintenance doses for 140 patients were predicted using the dosing tool and compared with the observed maintenance dose. The impact of genotype was assessed by predicting maintenance doses with prior parameter values known to be altered by genetic variability (eg, EC50 for VKORC1 genotype). The prior population was evaluated by fitting the published kinetic-pharmacodynamic model, which underpins the Bayesian tool, to the observed data using NONMEM and comparing the model parameter estimates with published values. The Bayesian tool produced positively biased dose predictions in the new cohort of patients (mean prediction error [95% confidence interval]; 0.32 mg/d [0.14-0.5]). The bias was only observed in patients requiring ≥7 mg/d. The direction and magnitude of the observed bias was not influenced by genotype. The prior model provided a good fit to our data, which suggests that the bias was not caused by different prior and posterior populations. Maintenance doses for patients requiring ≥7 mg/d were overpredicted. The bias was not due to the influence of genotype nor was it related to differences between the prior and posterior populations. There is a need for a more mechanistic model that captures warfarin dose-response relationship at higher warfarin doses.

  8. Effective dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyskens, C.J.; Passchier, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    The effective dose equivalent is a quantity which is used in the daily practice of radiation protection as well as in the radiation hygienic rules as measure for the health risks. In this contribution it is worked out upon which assumptions this quantity is based and in which cases the effective dose equivalent can be used more or less well. (H.W.)

  9. Doses from radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzel, H-G.; Harrison, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Practical implementation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection’s (ICRP) system of protection requires the availability of appropriate methods and data. The work of Committee 2 is concerned with the development of reference data and methods for the assessment of internal and external radiation exposure of workers and members of the public. This involves the development of reference biokinetic and dosimetric models, reference anatomical models of the human body, and reference anatomical and physiological data. Following ICRP’s 2007 Recommendations, Committee 2 has focused on the provision of new reference dose coefficients for external and internal exposure. As well as specifying changes to the radiation and tissue weighting factors used in the calculation of protection quantities, the 2007 Recommendations introduced the use of reference anatomical phantoms based on medical imaging data, requiring explicit sex averaging of male and female organ-equivalent doses in the calculation of effective dose. In preparation for the calculation of new dose coefficients, Committee 2 and its task groups have provided updated nuclear decay data (ICRP Publication 107) and adult reference computational phantoms (ICRP Publication 110). New dose coefficients for external exposures of workers are complete (ICRP Publication 116), and work is in progress on a series of reports on internal dose coefficients to workers from inhaled and ingested radionuclides. Reference phantoms for children will also be provided and used in the calculation of dose coefficients for public exposures. Committee 2 also has task groups on exposures to radiation in space and on the use of effective dose.

  10. Gonad dose in cineurethrocystography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardran, G.M.; Dixon-Brown, A.; Fursdon, P.S.

    1978-01-01

    The technical factors used for cineurethrocystography for the true lateral projection in females are given. The mid-line radiation dose has been measured with LiF TLD inserted into the vagina in 19 examinations. The average dose recorded was 148 mrad, the range being 50 to 306 mrad, the average number of cine frames exposed was 96. Data obtained using a Rando phantom indicated that the average ovary dose would be 30% greater than the mid-line dose since the near ovary receives a higher dose than the more distant one. The technique used for men is also given, the average gonad dose in six men being 123 mrad, range 56 to 243 mrad when simple lead foil gonad protection was used; the average number of cine frames was 107. The dose in one man without gonad protection was 1575 mrad for 112 cine frames. The results for both sexes compare favourably with those of others reported in the literature and with gonad doses recorded in typical IVP examinations. (author)

  11. Internal dose estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrenn, M.E.

    1977-01-01

    Internal doses, the procedures for making them and their significance has been reviewed. Effects of uranium, radium, lead-210, polonium-210, thorium in man are analysed based on data from tables and plots. Dosimetry of some ingested nuclides and inhalation dose due to radon-222, radon-220 and their daugther products are discussed [pt

  12. Volume 1: Calculating potential to emit releases and doses for FEMP's and NOCs; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HILL, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide Hanford Site facilities a handbook for estimating potential emissions and the subsequent offsite doses. General guidelines and information are provided to assist personnel in estimating emissions for use with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility effluent monitoring plans (FEMPs) and regulatory notices of construction (NOCs), per 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 61, Subpart H, and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247 requirements. This document replaces Unit Dose Calculation Methods and Summary of Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan Determinations (WHC-EP-0498). Meteorological data from 1983 through 1996, 13-year data set, was used to develop the unit dose factors provided by this document, with the exception of two meteorological stations. Meteorological stations 23 and 24, located at Gable Mountain and the 100-F Area, only have data from 1986 through 1996, 10-year data set. The scope of this document includes the following: Estimating emissions and resulting effective dose equivalents (EDE) to a facility's nearest offsite receptor (NOR) for use with NOCs under 40 CFR Part 61, Subpart H, requirements Estimating emissions and resulting EDEs to a facility's or emission unit's NOR for use with NOCs under the WAC Chapter 246-247 requirements Estimating emissions and resulting EDEs to a facility's or emission unit's NOR for use with FEMPs and FEMP determinations under DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 requirements

  13. Occupational dose constraint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilbron Filho, Paulo Fernando Lavalle; Xavier, Ana Maria

    2005-01-01

    The revision process of the international radiological protection regulations has resulted in the adoption of new concepts, such as practice, intervention, avoidable and restriction of dose (dose constraint). The latter deserving of special mention since it may involve reducing a priori of the dose limits established both for the public and to individuals occupationally exposed, values that can be further reduced, depending on the application of the principle of optimization. This article aims to present, with clarity, from the criteria adopted to define dose constraint values to the public, a methodology to establish the dose constraint values for occupationally exposed individuals, as well as an example of the application of this methodology to the practice of industrial radiography

  14. Research on low radiation doses - A better understanding of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Radiation doses below 100 mSv are called low doses. Epidemiological research on the health hazards of low doses are difficult to do because numerous pathologies, particularly cancer, appear lifelong for genetical or environmental causes without any link with irradiation and it is very difficult to identify the real cause of a cancer. Another concern is that the impact on human health is weak and are observed only after a long period after irradiation. These features make epidemiological studies cumbersome to implement since they require vast cohorts and a very long-term follow-up. The extrapolation of the effects of higher doses to the domain of low doses does not meet reality and it is why the European Union takes part into the financing of such research. In order to gain efficiency, scientists work together through various European networks among them: HLEG (High Level Expert Group On European Low Dose Risk Research) or MELODI (Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative). Several programs are underway or have been recently launched: -) the impact of Cesium contamination on children's health (Epice program), -) the study of the impact of medical imaging on children, -) the study of the health of children living near nuclear facilities, -) the relationship between radon and lung cancer, -) the effect of occupational low radiation doses, -) the effect of uranium dissolved in water on living organisms (Envirhom program). (A.C.)

  15. Ionization chamber for high dose measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues Junior, Ary de Araujo

    2005-01-01

    irradiator and at an industrial irradiation plant in static position, using different absorbing materials. A good linearity of the detector was found between the dose and the accumulated charge, independently of the different dose rates caused by absorbing materials. The uncertainties for all curves were less than 5%, which is recommended for a dosimetric system routine. The developed ionization chamber showed to be suitable as a dosimeter on line, independently of the spectrum degradation caused by the absorption of the 60 Co photons in the material under dynamic irradiation. (author)

  16. The Dose Response Relationship for Radiation Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Eric

    2008-03-01

    Recent surveys show that the collective population radiation dose from medical procedures in the U.S. has increased by 750% in the past two decades. It would be impossible to imagine the practice of medicine today without diagnostic and therapeutic radiology, but nevertheless the widespread and rapidly increasing use of a modality which is a known human carcinogen is a cause for concern. To assess the magnitude of the problem it is necessary to establish the shape of the dose response relationship for radiation carcinogenesis. Information on radiation carcinogenesis comes from the A-bomb survivors, from occupationally exposed individuals and from radiotherapy patients. The A-bomb survivor data indicates a linear relationship between dose and the risk of solid cancers up to a dose of about 2.5 Sv. The lowest dose at which there is a significant excess cancer risk is debatable, but it would appear to be between 40 and 100 mSv. Data from the occupation exposure of nuclear workers shows an excess cancer risk at an average dose of 19.4 mSv. At the other end of the dose scale, data on second cancers in radiotherapy patients indicates that cancer risk does not continue to rise as a linear function of dose, but tends towards a plateau of 40 to 60 Gy, delivered in a fractionated regime. These data can be used to estimate the impact of diagnostic radiology at the low dose end of the dose response relationship, and the impact of new radiotherapy modalities at the high end of the dose response relationship. In the case of diagnostic radiology about 90% of the collective population dose comes from procedures (principally CT scans) which involve doses at which there is credible evidence of an excess cancer incidence. While the risk to the individual is small and justified in a symptomatic patient, the same is not true of some screening procedures is asymptomatic individuals, and in any case the huge number of procedures must add up to a potential public health problem. In the

  17. Dose response relationship at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schull, W.J.

    1992-01-01

    The data that have accrued in Hiroshima and Nagasaki on the effects of ionizing radiation on the developing human brain are reviewed. Effects considered are severe mental retardation, lowered IQ scores, decline in school performance, seizures, other neuropsychological effects, and small head size. All these factors may be related to radiation doses received by the mother during pregnancy. (L.L.) 3 figs., tab., 7 refs

  18. Dose escalation using conformal high-dose-rate brachytherapy improves outcome in unfavorable prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alvaro A; Gustafson, Gary; Gonzalez, José; Armour, Elwood; Mitchell, Chris; Edmundson, Gregory; Spencer, William; Stromberg, Jannifer; Huang, Raywin; Vicini, Frank

    2002-06-01

    To overcome radioresistance for patients with unfavorable prostate cancer, a prospective trial of pelvic external beam irradiation (EBRT) interdigitated with dose-escalating conformal high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy was performed. Between November 1991 and August 2000, 207 patients were treated with 46 Gy pelvic EBRT and increasing HDR brachytherapy boost doses (5.50-11.5 Gy/fraction) during 5 weeks. The eligibility criteria were pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level >or=10.0 ng/mL, Gleason score >or=7, or clinical Stage T2b or higher. Patients were divided into 2 dose levels, low-dose biologically effective dose 93 Gy (149 patients). No patient received hormones. We used the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition for biochemical failure. The median age was 69 years. The mean follow-up for the group was 4.4 years, and for the low and high-dose levels, it was 7.0 and 3.4 years, respectively. The actuarial 5-year biochemical control rate was 74%, and the overall, cause-specific, and disease-free survival rate was 92%, 98%, and 68%, respectively. The 5-year biochemical control rate for the low-dose group was 52%; the rate for the high-dose group was 87% (p failure. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 gastrointestinal/genitourinary complications ranged from 0.5% to 9%. The actuarial 5-year impotency rate was 51%. Pelvic EBRT interdigitated with transrectal ultrasound-guided real-time conformal HDR prostate brachytherapy boost is both a precise dose delivery system and a very effective treatment for unfavorable prostate cancer. We demonstrated an incremental beneficial effect on biochemical control and cause-specific survival with higher doses. These results, coupled with the low risk of complications, the advantage of not being radioactive after implantation, and the real-time interactive planning, define a new standard for treatment.

  19. 25 CFR 900.114 - Why is there a separate subpart in these regulations for construction contracts and grants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT Construction § 900.114 Why is there a separate subpart in these regulations for construction contracts and grants? There is a separate subpart because the... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Why is there a separate subpart in these regulations for...

  20. 40 CFR 63.1176 - Where can I find definitions of key words used in this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... words used in this subpart? 63.1176 Section 63.1176 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Production § 63.1176 Where can I find definitions of key words used in this subpart? The definitions of key words used in this subpart are in the Clean Air Act (Act), in § 63.2 of the general provisions in...

  1. 40 CFR Table C-1 to Subpart C of... - Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specification C Table C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53 Protection of... Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Table C-1 Table C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Concentration Ranges..., June 22, 2010, table C-1 to subpart C was revised, effective Aug. 23, 2010. For the convenience of the...

  2. Topics on study of low dose-effect relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takeshi; Ohyama, Harumi

    1999-01-01

    It is not exceptional but usually observed that a dose-effect relationship in biosystem is not linear. Sometimes, the low dose-effect relationship appears entirely contrary to the expectation from high dose-effect. This is called a 'hormesis' phenomena. A high dose irradiation inflicts certainly an injury on biosystem. No matter how low the dose may be, an irradiation might inflict some injury on biosystem according to Linear Non-Threshold hypothesis(LNT). On the contrary to the expectation, a low dose irradiation stimulates immune system, and promotes cell proliferation. This is called 'radiation hormesis'. The studies of the radiation hormesis are made on from four points of view as follows: (1) radiation adaptive response, (2) revitalization caused by a low dose stimulation, (3) a low dose response unexpected from the LNT hypothesis, (4) negation of the LNT hypothesis. The various empirical proofs of radiation hormesis are introduced in the report. (M . Suetake)

  3. Synchronized dynamic dose reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litzenberg, Dale W.; Hadley, Scott W.; Tyagi, Neelam; Balter, James M.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2007-01-01

    Variations in target volume position between and during treatment fractions can lead to measurable differences in the dose distribution delivered to each patient. Current methods to estimate the ongoing cumulative delivered dose distribution make idealized assumptions about individual patient motion based on average motions observed in a population of patients. In the delivery of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a multi-leaf collimator (MLC), errors are introduced in both the implementation and delivery processes. In addition, target motion and MLC motion can lead to dosimetric errors from interplay effects. All of these effects may be of clinical importance. Here we present a method to compute delivered dose distributions for each treatment beam and fraction, which explicitly incorporates synchronized real-time patient motion data and real-time fluence and machine configuration data. This synchronized dynamic dose reconstruction method properly accounts for the two primary classes of errors that arise from delivering IMRT with an MLC: (a) Interplay errors between target volume motion and MLC motion, and (b) Implementation errors, such as dropped segments, dose over/under shoot, faulty leaf motors, tongue-and-groove effect, rounded leaf ends, and communications delays. These reconstructed dose fractions can then be combined to produce high-quality determinations of the dose distribution actually received to date, from which individualized adaptive treatment strategies can be determined

  4. 40 CFR 763.120 - What is the purpose of this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Asbestos Standards of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). This subpart applies the OSHA Asbestos Standards in 29 CFR 1910.1001 and 29 CFR 1926.1101 to these employees. ... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT ASBESTOS Asbestos Worker Protection § 763.120 What is the purpose of this subpart...

  5. 10 CFR Appendix A to Subpart U of... - Sampling Plan for Enforcement Testing of Electric Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sampling Plan for Enforcement Testing of Electric Motors A Appendix A to Subpart U of Part 431 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY... to Subpart U of Part 431—Sampling Plan for Enforcement Testing of Electric Motors Step 1. The first...

  6. 24 CFR 55.11 - Applicability of subpart C decision making process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applicability of subpart C decision making process. 55.11 Section 55.11 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT Application of Executive Order on Floodplain Management § 55.11 Applicability of subpart C...

  7. 7 CFR Exhibit C to Subpart B of... - Cooperative Agreement (Example)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Cooperative Agreement (Example) C Exhibit C to Subpart B of Part 1955 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING... Exhibit C to Subpart B of Part 1955—Cooperative Agreement (Example) Editorial Note: Exhibit C is not...

  8. 47 CFR Figure 3 to Subpart N of... - Example of Ideal EPIRB Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Example of Ideal EPIRB Spectrum 3 Figure 3 to Subpart N of Part 2 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND... Position Indicating Radiobeacons (EPIRBs) Pt. 2, Subpt. N, Fig. 3 Figure 3 to Subpart N of Part 2—Example...

  9. 40 CFR Table 9 to Subpart Ggg of... - Default Biorates for Soluble HAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Biorates for Soluble HAP 9 Table 9 to Subpart GGG of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Subpart GGG of Part 63—Default Biorates for Soluble HAP Compound name Biorate (K1),L/g MLVSS-hr...

  10. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Uuu of... - Metal HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Metal HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units 1 Table 1 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Table 1 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Metal HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in...

  11. 40 CFR Table 15 to Subpart Uuu of... - Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units 15 Table 15 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., Table 15 Table 15 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units As...

  12. 40 CFR Table 22 to Subpart Uuu of... - Inorganic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Inorganic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units 22 Table 22 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., Table 22 Table 22 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Inorganic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units...

  13. 40 CFR Table 29 to Subpart Uuu of... - HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units 29 Table 29 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... to Subpart UUU of Part 63—HAP Emission Limits for Sulfur Recovery Units As stated in § 63.1568(a)(1...

  14. 40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart Uuu of... - Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units 8 Table 8 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., Table 8 Table 8 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units As...

  15. 31 CFR Appendix J to Subpart C of... - Office of the Comptroller of the Currency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Office of the Comptroller of the Currency J Appendix J to Subpart C of Part 1 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS Privacy Act Pt. 1, Subpt. C, App. J Appendix J to Subpart C of Part 1—Office...

  16. 31 CFR Appendix J to Subpart A of... - Office of the Comptroller of the Currency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Office of the Comptroller of the Currency J Appendix J to Subpart A of Part 1 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS Freedom of Information Act Pt. 1, Subpt. A, App. J Appendix J to Subpart A...

  17. 29 CFR Appendix B to Subpart L of... - National Consensus Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National Consensus Standards B Appendix B to Subpart L of... Appendix B to Subpart L of Part 1910—National Consensus Standards The following table contains a cross-reference listing of those current national consensus standards which contains information and guidelines...

  18. 14 CFR Appendix H to Part 36 - Noise Requirements For Helicopters Under Subpart H

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Subpart H H Appendix H to Part 36 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT NOISE STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT TYPE AND AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATION Pt. 36, App. H Appendix H to Part 36—Noise Requirements For Helicopters Under Subpart H part a—reference conditions Sec. H36...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart E of... - Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Auditing A Appendix A to Subpart E of Part 1068 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Auditing Pt. 1068, Subpt. E, App. A Appendix A to Subpart E of Part 1068—Plans for Selective Enforcement Auditing The following tables describe sampling plans for selective enforcement audits, as described in...

  20. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Jj of... - Summary of Emission Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to Subpart JJ of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Wood Furniture Manufacturing Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. JJ, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart JJ of Part 63—Summary of Emission Limits Emission point Existing source New...

  1. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Jj of... - VHAP of Potential Concern

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Subpart JJ of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...) National Emission Standards for Wood Furniture Manufacturing Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. JJ, Table 6 Table 6 to Subpart JJ of Part 63—VHAP of Potential Concern CAS No. Chemical name EPA de minimis, tons/yr...

  2. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Jj of... - List of Volatile Hazardous Air Pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false List of Volatile Hazardous Air Pollutants 2 Table 2 to Subpart JJ of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY.... JJ, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart JJ of Part 63—List of Volatile Hazardous Air Pollutants Chemical name...

  3. 40 CFR 63.7491 - Are any boilers or process heaters not subject to this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Are any boilers or process heaters not..., and Institutional Boilers and Process Heaters What This Subpart Covers § 63.7491 Are any boilers or process heaters not subject to this subpart? The types of boilers and process heaters listed in paragraphs...

  4. 5 CFR 1201.121 - Scope of jurisdiction; application of subparts B, F, and H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... agency actions against administrative law judges, decided under this subpart. Subpart H of this part also... stays of certain personnel actions, proposed agency actions against administrative law judges, and... with Special Counsel complaints and stay requests, and agency actions against administrative law judges...

  5. 46 CFR 1.03-10 - Definition of terms used in this subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Definition of terms used in this subpart. (a) The term recognized classification society means the American Bureau of Shipping or other classification society recognized by the Commandant. (b) The term new vessel... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Definition of terms used in this subpart. 1.03-10...

  6. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Subpart A of... - Flooring Radiant Tester Schematic Side Elevation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flooring Radiant Tester Schematic Side Elevation 3 Figure 3 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION.... 1209, Subpt. A, Fig. 3 Figure 3 to Subpart A of Part 1209—Flooring Radiant Tester Schematic Side...

  7. 31 CFR Appendix B to Subpart I of... - Recertification Regarding Correspodent Accounts for Foreign Banks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Correspodent Accounts for Foreign Banks B Appendix B to Subpart I of Part 103 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance FINANCIAL RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING OF CURRENCY AND FOREIGN TRANSACTIONS Anti-Money Laundering Programs Pt. 103, Subpt. I, App. B Appendix B to Subpart I of Part 103...

  8. 31 CFR Appendix A to Subpart I of... - Certification Regarding Correspondent Accounts for Foreign Banks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Accounts for Foreign Banks A Appendix A to Subpart I of Part 103 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance FINANCIAL RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING OF CURRENCY AND FOREIGN TRANSACTIONS Anti-Money Laundering Programs Pt. 103, Subpt. I, App. A Appendix A to Subpart I of Part 103...

  9. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Federal Home Loan Banks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Federal Home Loan Banks A Appendix A to Subpart... Board Pt. 905, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 905—Federal Home Loan Banks Federal Home Loan Bank District 1 (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont) Federal...

  10. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Xx of... - Hazardous Air Pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hazardous Air Pollutants 1 Table 1 to Subpart XX of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. XX, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart XX of Part 63—Hazardous Air Pollutants Hazardous air...

  11. 21 CFR 1.362 - What records are excluded from this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What records are excluded from this subpart? 1.362 Section 1.362 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... Requirements § 1.362 What records are excluded from this subpart? The establishment and maintenance of records...

  12. 40 CFR Table A-1 to Subpart A of... - Global Warming Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Global Warming Potentials A Table A-1 to Subpart A of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING General Provision Pt. 98, Subpt. A, Table A-1 Table A-1 to Subpart A of Part 98—Global Warming...

  13. 45 CFR 260.51 - What definitions apply to this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... of Domestic Violence? § 260.51 What definitions apply to this subpart? Family Violence Option (or FVO... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What definitions apply to this subpart? 260.51 Section 260.51 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE...

  14. 40 CFR 63.1561 - Am I subject to this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units What This Subpart Covers § 63.1561 Am I subject to this subpart... reforming an intermediate petroleum stream, or recovering a by-product(s) from the intermediate petroleum...

  15. 15 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G of... - Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Boundary Coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Sanctuary Boundary Coordinates A Appendix A to Subpart G of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY PROGRAM REGULATIONS Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. G, App. A Appendix A to Subpart G of Part 922...

  16. 15 CFR Appendix C to Subpart M of... - Dredged Material Disposal Sites Within the Sanctuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the Sanctuary C Appendix C to Subpart M of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to... COMMERCE OCEAN AND COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY PROGRAM REGULATIONS Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. M, App. C Appendix C to Subpart M of Part 922—Dredged Material...

  17. 15 CFR Appendix A to Subpart N of... - Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary Boundary Coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Sanctuary Boundary Coordinates A Appendix A to Subpart N of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY PROGRAM REGULATIONS Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. N, App. A Appendix A to Subpart N of Part 922...

  18. 15 CFR Appendix A to Subpart L of... - Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary Boundary Coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Sanctuary Boundary Coordinates A Appendix A to Subpart L of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY PROGRAM REGULATIONS Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. L, App. A Appendix A to Subpart L of Part...

  19. 15 CFR Appendix A to Subpart O of... - Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary Boundary Coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Sanctuary Boundary Coordinates A Appendix A to Subpart O of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY PROGRAM REGULATIONS Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. O, App. A Appendix A to Subpart O of Part 922...

  20. 40 CFR 60.2020 - What combustion units are exempt from this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What combustion units are exempt from..., 2001 Applicability § 60.2020 What combustion units are exempt from this subpart? This subpart exempts... byproduct streams/residues containing catalyst metals which are reclaimed and reused as catalysts or used to...

  1. 40 CFR 63.11398 - What definitions apply to this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... comonomers are suspended in water in the presence of a catalyst where they polymerize under agitation. Solid... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What definitions apply to this subpart... Production Area Sources Other Requirements and Information § 63.11398 What definitions apply to this subpart...

  2. 40 CFR 63.1562 - What parts of my plant are covered by this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true What parts of my plant are covered by... What parts of my plant are covered by this subpart? (a) This subpart applies to each new, reconstructed...-regenerative, cyclic, or continuous processes) that are associated with regeneration of the catalyst used in...

  3. 17 CFR Table III to Subpart E of... - Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments III Table III to Subpart E of Part 201 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES..., Table III Table III to Subpart E of Part 201—Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments U.S. Code...

  4. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Emission Limits for Tire Production Affected Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Emission Limits for Tire Production Affected Sources 1 Table 1 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION.... 63, Subpt. XXXX, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63—Emission Limits for Tire Production...

  5. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Emission Limits for Puncture Sealant Application Affected Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Emission Limits for Puncture Sealant Application Affected Sources 3 Table 3 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Manufacturing Pt. 63, Subpt. XXXX, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63—Emission Limits for Puncture...

  6. 40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Initial Compliance With the Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Initial Compliance With the Emission 8 Table 8 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED.... XXXX, Table 8 Table 8 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63—Initial Compliance With the Emission As stated in § 63...

  7. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Emission Limits for Tire Cord Production Affected Sources 2 Table 2 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Manufacturing Pt. 63, Subpt. XXXX, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63—Emission Limits for Tire Cord...

  8. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Operating Limits for Puncture Sealant Application Control Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Operating Limits for Puncture Sealant Application Control Devices 4 Table 4 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Manufacturing Pt. 63, Subpt. XXXX, Table 4 Table 4 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63—Operating Limits for Puncture...

  9. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Requirements for Performance Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Requirements for Performance Tests 5 Table 5 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED.... XXXX, Table 5 Table 5 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63—Requirements for Performance Tests As stated in § 63...

  10. 40 CFR Table 15 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Requirements for Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Subpart XXXX of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Rubber Tire Manufacturing Pt. 63, Subpt. XXXX, Table 15 Table 15 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63—Requirements for Reports As stated in § 63.6010, you must submit each report that...

  11. 40 CFR Table 16 to Subpart Xxxx of... - Selected Hazardous Air Pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Selected Hazardous Air Pollutants 16 Table 16 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED.... XXXX, Table 16 Table 16 to Subpart XXXX of Part 63—Selected Hazardous Air Pollutants You must use the...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix E to Subpart A of... - Article 5 Parties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Article 5 Parties E Appendix E to Subpart A of Part 82 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Appendix E to Subpart A of Part 82—Article 5 Parties Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Angola, Antigua...

  13. 40 CFR 725.305 - Persons who may apply under this subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... a result of the test marketing. A person may apply under this subpart for the following test... for Test Marketing § 725.305 Persons who may apply under this subpart. A person identified in this section may apply for a test marketing exemption. EPA may grant the exemption if the person demonstrates...

  14. 40 CFR 63.4181 - What definitions apply to this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... may be required to meet the data acquisition and availability requirements of this subpart used to... subpart during startup, shutdown, or malfunction regardless of whether or not such failure is permitted by.... Responsible official means responsible official as defined in 40 CFR 70.2. Startup, initial means the first...

  15. 40 CFR 63.4371 - What definitions apply to this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... meet the data acquisition and availability requirements of this subpart, used to sample, condition (if... limit, or operating limit, or work practice standard in this subpart during startup, shutdown, or... substrate. Startup, initial means the first time equipment is brought online in a facility. Surface...

  16. 40 CFR 63.3310 - What definitions are used in this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., bags, pouches, labels, liners and wraps utilizing paper, plastic, film, aluminum foil, metalized or... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true What definitions are used in this... Covers § 63.3310 What definitions are used in this subpart? All terms used in this subpart that are not...

  17. 40 CFR 60.4315 - What pollutants are regulated by this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What pollutants are regulated by this subpart? 60.4315 Section 60.4315 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... pollutants regulated by this subpart are nitrogen oxide (NOX) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). ...

  18. 41 CFR Appendix A to Subpart D of... - 3-Key Points and Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Principles A Appendix A to Subpart D of Part 102 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... Subpart D of Part 102-3—Key Points and Principles This appendix provides additional guidance in the form of answers to frequently asked questions and identifies key points and principles that may be applied...

  19. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart W to... - Figures W-14 through W-28

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Figures W-14 through W-28 A Appendix A to Subpart W to part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION...; Overhead Protection Pt. 1926, Subpt. W, App. A Appendix A to Subpart W to part 1926—Figures W-14 through W...

  20. 40 CFR 26.201 - To what does this subpart apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false To what does this subpart apply? 26.201 Section 26.201 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN... Subjects who are Children or Pregnant or Nursing Women § 26.201 To what does this subpart apply? (a) This...

  1. 40 CFR 26.1201 - To what does this subpart apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false To what does this subpart apply? 26.1201 Section 26.1201 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PROTECTION OF... Human Subjects who are Children or Pregnant or Nursing Women § 26.1201 To what does this subpart apply...

  2. 40 CFR 26.1101 - To what does this subpart apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false To what does this subpart apply? 26.1101 Section 26.1101 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PROTECTION OF... Intentional Exposure of Non-pregnant, Non-nursing Adults § 26.1101 To what does this subpart apply? (a) Except...

  3. 40 CFR Table A-2 to Subpart A of... - Units of Measure Conversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Units of Measure Conversions A Table A-2 to Subpart A of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... A-2 to Subpart A of Part 98—Units of Measure Conversions To convert from To Multiply by Kilograms...

  4. 20 CFR 603.3 - What is the purpose and scope of this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 3304(a)(16), Federal Unemployment Tax Act (FUTA). This subpart also establishes uniform minimum requirements for the payment of costs, safeguards, and data-sharing agreements when UC information is disclosed, and for conformity and substantial compliance with this proposed rule. This subpart applies to States...

  5. Saving doses by outage planning strategy and architectural arrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlstroem, B.

    1993-01-01

    All radiation doses come out as a result of dose rate and exposure time, and the main part of the occupational exposure is caused during outages. While every reasonable attempt should be made to lower the dose rates, the other factor, the exposure time, may not be forgotten. The paper presents possible ways of saving man-hours in the controlled zone by outage planning strategy. And every saved man-hour means a saved radiation dose. At Loviisa NPS also some special architectural arrangements contribute to shortening the outage time, thus saving doses

  6. What Causes Cushing's Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print What causes Cushing syndrome? Cushing syndrome can develop for two reasons: Medication ... uhs ), thyroid, or thymus How Tumors Can Cause Cushing Syndrome Normally, the pituitary gland in the brain controls ...

  7. What Causes COPD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: The Challenge of COPD What Causes COPD? Past Issues / Fall 2014 Table of Contents Long- ... and the airways usually is the cause of COPD. In the United States, the most common irritant ...

  8. Compliance program for 40 CFR 61, Subpart H at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNamara, E.A.

    1997-01-01

    Effective on March 15, 1990, the Environmental Protection Agency established regulations controlling the emission of radionuclides to the air from Department of Energy facilities to limit the dose to the public to 10 mrem/yr. These regulations are detailed in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, open-quotes National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon from Department of Energy Facilitiesclose quotes. Part of these regulations require the operation of sampling systems on stacks meeting certain requirements. Although Los Alamos National Laboratory has a long history of stack sampling, the systems in place at the time the regulation became effective did not meet the specific design requirements of the new regulation. In addition, certain specific program elements did not exist or were not adequately documented. The Los Alamos National Laboratory has undertaken a major effort to upgrade its compliance program to meet the requirements of USEPA. This effort involved: developing new and technically superior sampling methods and obtaining approval from the Environmental Protection Agency for their use; negotiating specific methodologies with the Environmental Protection Agency to implement certain requirements of the regulation: implementing a complete, quality assured, compliance program; and upgrading sampling systems. After several years of effort, Los Alamos National Laboratory now meets all requirements of the USEPA

  9. Low doses effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.

    1997-01-01

    In this article is asked the question about a possible carcinogens effect of low dose irradiation. With epidemiological data, knowledge about the carcinogenesis, the professor Tubiana explains that in spite of experiments made on thousand or hundred of thousands animals it has not been possible to bring to the fore a carcinogens effect for low doses and then it is not reasonable to believe and let the population believe that low dose irradiation could lead to an increase of neoplasms and from this point of view any hardening of radiation protection standards could in fact, increase anguish about ionizing radiations. (N.C.)

  10. Dose assessment for brachytherapy with Henschke applicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Pei-Chieh; Chao, Tsi-Chian; Tung, Chuan-Jong; Wu, Ching-Jung; Lee, Chung-Chi

    2011-01-01

    Dose perturbation caused by the Henschke applicator is a major concern for the brachytherapy planning system (BPS) in recent years. To investigate dose impact owing to neglect of the metal shielding effect, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, BPS calculation, and film measurement have been performed for dose assessment in a water phantom. Additionally, a cylindrical air cavity representing the rectum was added into the MC simulation to study its effect on dose distribution. Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) was used in this study to simulate the dose distribution using a mesh tally. This Monte Carlo simulation has been validated using the TG-43 data in a previous report. For the measurement, the Henschke applicator was placed in a specially-designed phantom, and Gafchromic films were inserted in the center plane for 2D dose assessment. Isodose distributions with and without the Henschke applicator by the MC simulation show significant deviation from those by the BPS. For MC simulation, the isodose curves shrank more significantly when the metal applicator was applied. For the impact of the added air cavity, the results indicate that it is hard to distinguish between with and without the cavity. Thus, the rectum cavity has little impact on the dose distribution around the Henschke applicator.

  11. Doses from radioactive methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phipps, A.W.; Kendall, G.M.; Fell, T.P.; Harrison, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    A possible radiation hazard arises from exposure to methane labelled with either a 3 H or a 14 C nuclide. This radioactive methane could be released from a variety of sources, e.g. land burial sites containing radioactive waste. Standard assumptions adopted for vapours would not apply to an inert alkane like methane. This paper discusses mechanisms by which radioactive methane would irradiate tissues and provides estimates of doses. Data on skin thickness and metabolism of methane are discussed with reference to these mechanisms. It is found that doses are dominated by dose from the small fraction of methane which is inhaled and metabolised. This component of dose has been calculated under rather conservative assumptions. (author)

  12. Controllable dose; Dosis controlable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez R, J T; Anaya M, R A [ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    With the purpose of eliminating the controversy about the lineal hypothesis without threshold which found the systems of dose limitation of the recommendations of ICRP 26 and 60, at the end of last decade R. Clarke president of the ICRP proposed the concept of Controllable Dose: as the dose or dose sum that an individual receives from a particular source which can be reasonably controllable by means of any means; said concept proposes a change in the philosophy of the radiological protection of its concern by social approaches to an individual focus. In this work a panorama of the foundations is presented, convenient and inconveniences that this proposal has loosened in the international community of the radiological protection, with the purpose of to familiarize to our Mexican community in radiological protection with these new concepts. (Author)

  13. Acetaminophen dosing for children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your child, call your provider. Proper Dosing of Suppositories If your child is vomiting or will not take oral medicine, you can use suppositories. Suppositories are placed in the anus to deliver ...

  14. Radiation dose electrophysiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Armas, J.; Rodriguez, A.; Catalan, A.; Hernandez Armas, O.; Luque Japon, L.; Moral, S.; Barroso, L.; Rfuez-Hdez, R.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper has been to measure and analyse some of the parameters which are directly related with the doses given to patients in two electrophysiology procedures: diagnosis and ablation with radiofrequency. 16 patients were considered in this study. 13 them had an ablation with radiofrequency at the Unit of Electrophysiology at the University Hospital of the Canaries, La Laguna., Tenerife. The results of skin doses, in the ablation cases, were higher than 2 Gy (threshold of some deterministic effects). The average value was 1.1 Gy. The personal doses, measured under the lead apron, for physician and nurses were 4 and 3 micro Sievert. These results emphasised the necessity of radiation protection measures in order to reduce, ad much as possible, the doses to patients. (Author)

  15. Dose in conventional radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acuna D, E.; Padilla R, Z. P.; Escareno J, E.; Vega C, H. R.

    2011-10-01

    It has been pointed out that medical exposures are the most significant sources of exposure to ionizing radiation for the general population. Inside the medical exposures the most important is the X-ray use for diagnosis, which is by far the largest contribution to the average dose received by the population. From all studies performed in radiology the chest radiography is the most abundant. In an X-ray machine, voltage and current are combined to obtain a good image and a reduce dose, however due to the workload in a radiology service individual dose is not monitored. In order to evaluate the dose due to chest radiography in this work a plate phantom was built according to the ISO recommendations using methylmethacrylate walls and water. The phantom was used in the Imaging department of the Zacatecas General Hospital as a radiology patient asking for a chest study; using thermoluminescent dosimeters, TLD 100 the kerma at the surface entrance was determined. (Author)

  16. Maximum permissible dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    This chapter presents a historic overview of the establishment of radiation guidelines by various national and international agencies. The use of maximum permissible dose and maximum permissible body burden limits to derive working standards is discussed

  17. Irradiation dose of cosmonauts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makra, Zs.

    1978-01-01

    The results obtained by determining the irradiation dose during the spaceflights of Apollo as well as the Sojouz-3 and Sojouz-9 spacecrafts have been compared in the form of tables. In case of Apollo astronauts the irradiation dose was determined by two methods and its sources were also pointed out, in tables. During Sojouz spacetravels the cosmonauts were exposed to a negligible dose. In spite of this fact the radiation danger is considerable. The small irradiation doses noticed so far are due to the fact that during the spaceflights there was no big proturberance. However, during the future long-range spacetravels a better radiation shielding than the one used up to now will be necessary. (P.J.)

  18. Ibuprofen dosing for children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000772.htm Ibuprofen dosing for children To use the sharing features ... much of this medicine can be harmful. How Ibuprofen can Help Your Child Ibuprofen is a type ...

  19. Effects of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, B.

    2001-01-01

    Actually, even though it is comfortable for the risk management, the hypothesis of the dose-effect relationship linearity is not confirmed for any model. In particular, in the area of low dose rate delivered by low let emitters. this hypothesis is debated at the light of recent observations, notably these ones relative to the mechanisms leading to genetic instability and induction eventuality of DNA repair. The problem of strong let emitters is still to solve. (N.C.)

  20. Gonadal doses from radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, S.B.; Morris, N.D.

    1980-06-01

    The method of calculation of gonadal doses arising from different radiotherapeutic procedures is described. The measurement of scatter factors to the gonads from superficial and deep therapy is detailed and the analytic fits to the experimental data, as a function of field position, field size and beam energy are given. The data used to calculate the gonadal doses from treatments using linear accelerators, teletherapy and sealed sources are described and the analytic fits to the data given

  1. Radiation doses to children with shunt-treated hydrocephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmedal, Lise J. [Helse Fonna, Department of Radiology, Stord Hospital, Stord (Norway); Friberg, Eva G.; Boerretzen, Ingelin; Olerud, Hilde [The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Oesteraas (Norway); Laegreid, Liv [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Bergen (Norway); Rosendahl, Karen [University of Bergen, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology Section, Bergen (Norway); Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-12-15

    Children with shunt-treated hydrocephalus are still followed routinely with frequent head CT scans. To estimate the effective dose, brain and lens doses from these examinations during childhood, and to assess dose variation per examination. All children born between 1983 and 1995 and treated for hydrocephalus between 1983 and 2002 were included. We retrospectively registered the number of examinations and the applied scan parameters. The effective dose was calculated using mean conversion factors from the CT dose index measured free in air, while doses to the lens and brain were estimated using tabulated CT dose index values measured in a head phantom. A total of 687 CT examinations were performed in 67 children. The mean effective dose, lens dose and brain dose to children over 6 months of age were 1.2 mSv, 52 mGy and 33 mGy, respectively, and the corresponding doses to younger children were 3.2 mSv, 60 mGy and 48 mGy. The effective dose per CT examination varied by a factor of 64. None of the children was exposed to doses known to cause deterministic effects. However, since the threshold for radiation-induced damage is not known with certainty, alternative modalities such as US and MRI should be used whenever possible. (orig.)

  2. Application of a Novel Dose-Uncertainty Model for Dose-Uncertainty Analysis in Prostate Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Hosang; Palta, Jatinder R.; Kim, You-Hyun; Kim, Siyong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze dose uncertainty using a previously published dose-uncertainty model, and to assess potential dosimetric risks existing in prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: The dose-uncertainty model provides a three-dimensional (3D) dose-uncertainty distribution in a given confidence level. For 8 retrospectively selected patients, dose-uncertainty maps were constructed using the dose-uncertainty model at the 95% CL. In addition to uncertainties inherent to the radiation treatment planning system, four scenarios of spatial errors were considered: machine only (S1), S1 + intrafraction, S1 + interfraction, and S1 + both intrafraction and interfraction errors. To evaluate the potential risks of the IMRT plans, three dose-uncertainty-based plan evaluation tools were introduced: confidence-weighted dose-volume histogram, confidence-weighted dose distribution, and dose-uncertainty-volume histogram. Results: Dose uncertainty caused by interfraction setup error was more significant than that of intrafraction motion error. The maximum dose uncertainty (95% confidence) of the clinical target volume (CTV) was smaller than 5% of the prescribed dose in all but two cases (13.9% and 10.2%). The dose uncertainty for 95% of the CTV volume ranged from 1.3% to 2.9% of the prescribed dose. Conclusions: The dose uncertainty in prostate IMRT could be evaluated using the dose-uncertainty model. Prostate IMRT plans satisfying the same plan objectives could generate a significantly different dose uncertainty because a complex interplay of many uncertainty sources. The uncertainty-based plan evaluation contributes to generating reliable and error-resistant treatment plans.

  3. Dose escalation using conformal high-dose-rate brachytherapy improves outcome in unfavorable prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Alvaro A.; Gustafson, Gary; Gonzalez, Jose; Armour, Elwood; Mitchell, Chris; Edmundson, Gregory; Spencer, William; Stromberg, Jannifer; Huang, Raywin; Vicini, Frank

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To overcome radioresistance for patients with unfavorable prostate cancer, a prospective trial of pelvic external beam irradiation (EBRT) interdigitated with dose-escalating conformal high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy was performed. Methods and Materials: Between November 1991 and August 2000, 207 patients were treated with 46 Gy pelvic EBRT and increasing HDR brachytherapy boost doses (5.50-11.5 Gy/fraction) during 5 weeks. The eligibility criteria were pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level ≥10.0 ng/mL, Gleason score ≥7, or clinical Stage T2b or higher. Patients were divided into 2 dose levels, low-dose biologically effective dose 93 Gy (149 patients). No patient received hormones. We used the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition for biochemical failure. Results: The median age was 69 years. The mean follow-up for the group was 4.4 years, and for the low and high-dose levels, it was 7.0 and 3.4 years, respectively. The actuarial 5-year biochemical control rate was 74%, and the overall, cause-specific, and disease-free survival rate was 92%, 98%, and 68%, respectively. The 5-year biochemical control rate for the low-dose group was 52%; the rate for the high-dose group was 87% (p<0.001). Improvement occurred in the cause-specific survival in favor of the brachytherapy high-dose level (p=0.014). On multivariate analysis, a low-dose level, higher Gleason score, and higher nadir value were associated with increased biochemical failure. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 gastrointestinal/genitourinary complications ranged from 0.5% to 9%. The actuarial 5-year impotency rate was 51%. Conclusion: Pelvic EBRT interdigitated with transrectal ultrasound-guided real-time conformal HDR prostate brachytherapy boost is both a precise dose delivery system and a very effective treatment for unfavorable prostate cancer. We demonstrated an incremental beneficial effect on biochemical control and cause

  4. Brachytherapy dose measurements in heterogeneous tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiva F, G.; Luvizotto, J.; Salles C, T.; Guimaraes A, P. C.; Dalledone S, P. de T.; Yoriyaz, H.; Rubo, R.

    2014-08-01

    Recently, Beau lieu et al. published an article providing guidance for Model-Based Dose Calculation Algorithms (MBDCAs), where tissue heterogeneity considerations are addressed. It is well-known that T G-43 formalism which considers only water medium is limited and significant dose differences have been found comparing both methodologies. The aim of the present work is to experimentally quantify dose values in heterogeneous medium using different dose measurement methods and techniques and compare them with those obtained with Monte Carlo simulations. Experiments have been performed using a Nucletron micro Selectron-Hdr Ir-192 brachytherapy source and a heterogeneous phantom composed by PMMA and different tissue equivalent cylinders like bone, lungs and muscle. Several dose measurements were obtained using tissue equivalent materials with height 1.8 cm and 4.3 cm positioned between the radiation source and the detectors. Radiochromic films, TLDs and MOSFET S have been used for the dose measurements. Film dosimetry has been performed using two methodologies: a) linearization for dose-response curve based on calibration curves to create a functional form that linearize s the dose response and b) 177 multichannel analysis dosimetry where the multiple color channels are analyzed allowing to address not only disturbances in the measurements caused by thickness variation in the film layer, but also, separate other external influences in the film response. All experiments have been simulated using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo radiation transport code. Comparison of experimental results are in good agreement with calculated dose values with differences less than 6% for almost all cases. (Author)

  5. Scatter Dose in Patients in Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, W. F. O.

    2003-01-01

    Patients undergoing radiation therapy are often treated with high energy radiation (bremsstrahlung) which causes scatter doses in the patients from various sources as photon scatter coming from collimator, gantry, patient, patient table or room (walls, floor, air) or particle doses resulting from gamma-particle reactions in the atomic nucleus if the photon energies are above 8 MeV. In the last years new treatment techniques like IMRT (esp the step-and-shoot- or the MIMIC-techniques) have increased interest in these topics again. In the lecture an overview about recent measurements on scatter doses resulting from gantry, table and room shall be given. Scatter doses resulting from the volume treated in the patient to other critical parts of the body like eyes, ovarii etc. have been measured in two diploma works in our institute and are compared with a program (PERIDOSE; van der Giessen, Netherlands) to estimate them. In some cases these scatter doses have led to changes of treatment modalities. Also an overview and estimation of doses resulting from photon-particle interactions is given according to a publication from Gudowska et al.(Gudowska I, Brahme A, Andreo P, Gudowski W, Kierkegaard J. Calculation of absorbed dose and biological effectiveness from photonuclear reactions in a bremsstrahlung beam of end point 50 MeV. Phys Med Biol 1999; 44(9):2099-2125.). Energy dose has been calculated with Monte Carlo-methods and is compared with analytical methods for 50 MV bremsstrahlung. From these data biologically effective doses from particles in different depths of the body can be estimated also for energies used in normal radiotherapy. (author)

  6. Brachytherapy dose measurements in heterogeneous tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva F, G.; Luvizotto, J.; Salles C, T.; Guimaraes A, P. C.; Dalledone S, P. de T.; Yoriyaz, H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rubo, R., E-mail: gabrielpaivafonseca@gmail.com [Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05403-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Recently, Beau lieu et al. published an article providing guidance for Model-Based Dose Calculation Algorithms (MBDCAs), where tissue heterogeneity considerations are addressed. It is well-known that T G-43 formalism which considers only water medium is limited and significant dose differences have been found comparing both methodologies. The aim of the present work is to experimentally quantify dose values in heterogeneous medium using different dose measurement methods and techniques and compare them with those obtained with Monte Carlo simulations. Experiments have been performed using a Nucletron micro Selectron-Hdr Ir-192 brachytherapy source and a heterogeneous phantom composed by PMMA and different tissue equivalent cylinders like bone, lungs and muscle. Several dose measurements were obtained using tissue equivalent materials with height 1.8 cm and 4.3 cm positioned between the radiation source and the detectors. Radiochromic films, TLDs and MOSFET S have been used for the dose measurements. Film dosimetry has been performed using two methodologies: a) linearization for dose-response curve based on calibration curves to create a functional form that linearize s the dose response and b) 177 multichannel analysis dosimetry where the multiple color channels are analyzed allowing to address not only disturbances in the measurements caused by thickness variation in the film layer, but also, separate other external influences in the film response. All experiments have been simulated using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo radiation transport code. Comparison of experimental results are in good agreement with calculated dose values with differences less than 6% for almost all cases. (Author)

  7. The Cause of Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Einstein said that gravity is an acceleration like any other acceleration. But gravity causes relativistic effects at non-relativistic speeds; so gravity could have relativistic origins. And since the strong force is thought to cause most of mass, and mass is proportional to gravity; the strong force is therefore also proportional to gravity. The strong force could thus cause relativistic increases of mass through the creation of virtual gluons; along with a comparable contraction of space ar...

  8. Modeling Multiple Causes of Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, T D

    1999-01-24

    multiple causes of carcinogenesis and shifts the risk-assessment logic to considerations of "what dose does?" in contrast to the current process of the substance-specific question of "what dose is?" Whether reactive oxygen is the proximate or contributing cause of disease or simply a better estimate of biologically effective dose, it has enormous advantages for improved risk- and policy-based decisions. Various estimates of immune system modulation will be given based on radiobiology.

  9. Physiological and immunological changes following exposure to low versus high-dose ionizing irradiation; comparative analysis with dose rate and cumulative dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heesun, Kim; Heewon, Jang; Soungyeon, Song; Shinhye, Oh; Cukcheul, Shin; Meeseon, Jeong; Chasoon, Kim; Kwnaghee, Yang; Seonyoung, Nam; Jiyoung, Kim; Youngwoo, Jin; Changyoung, Cha

    2008-01-01

    Full text: While high-dose of ionizing radiation is generally harmful and causes damage to living organisms some reports suggest low-dose of radiation may not be as damaging as previously thought. Despite increasing evidence regarding the protective effect of low-dose radiation, no studies have directly compared the exact dose-response pattern by high- and low-dose of radiation exposed at high-and low-dose rate. This study aims to explore the cellular and molecular changes in mice exposed to low- and high-dose of radiation exposed at low- and high-dose rate. When C57BL/6 mice (Female, 6 weeks) were exposed at high-dose rate, 0.8 Gy/min, no significant change on the level of WBC, RBC, or platelets was observed up to total dose of 0.5 Gy. However, 2 Gy of radiation caused dramatic reduction in the level of white blood cells (WBC) and platelets. This reduction was accompanied by increased DNA damage in hematopoietic environments. The reduction of WBC was mainly due to the reduction in the number of CD4+ T cells and CD19+ B cells. CD8+ T cells and NK cells appeared to be relatively resistant to high-dose of radiation. This change was also accompanied by the reduction of T- and B- progenitor cells in the bone marrow. In contrast, no significant changes of the number of CD4+ T, CD8+ T, NK, and B cells were observed in the spleen of mice exposed at low-dose-rate (0.7 m Gy/h or 3.95 mGy/h) for up to 2 Gy, suggesting that low-dose radiation does not alter cellular distribution in the spleen. Nevertheless, mice exposed to low-dose radiation exhibited elevation of VEGF, MCP-1, IL-4, Leptin, IL-3, and Tpo in the peripheral blood and slight increases in MIP-2, RANTES, and IL-2 in the spleen. This suggests that chronic γ-radiation can stimulate immune function without causing damage to the immune components of the body. Taken together, these data indicate hormesis of low-dose radiation, which could be attributed to the stimulation of immune function. Dose rate rather than total

  10. Acute renal failure in high dose carboplatin chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenkel, J.; Kool, G.; de Kraker, J.

    1995-01-01

    Carboplatin has been reported to cause acute renal failure when administered in high doses to adult patients. We report a 4 1/2-year-old girl who was treated with high-dose carboplatin for metastatic parameningeal embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. Acute renal failure developed followed by a slow partial

  11. Natural radiation dose to Gammarus from Hudson river

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschoa, A.S.; Wrenn, M.E.; Eisenbud, M.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate the natural radiation dose rate to whole body and components of the Gammarus species, a zooplankton which occurs in the Hudson River among other places, and to compare the results with the upper limits of dose rates from man-made sources. The alpha dose rates to the exoskeleton and soft tissues are about 10 times the average alpha dose rate to the whole body, assuming uniform distribution of 226 Ra. The natural alpha radiation dose rate to Gammarus represents only about 5% of the total natural dose to the organism, i.e., 492 mrad/yr. The external dose rate due to 40 K, 238 U plus daughters and 232 Th plus daughters accumulated in the sediments comprise 91% of that total natural dose rate, the remaining percentage being due to natural internal beta emitters and cosmic radiation. Man-made sources can cause an external dose rate up to 224 mrad/yr, which comprises roughly 1/3 of the total dose rate (up to 716 mrad/yr; natural plus man-made) to the Gammarus of Hudson River in front of Indian Point Nuclear Power Station. However, in terms of dose-equivalent the natural sources of radiation would contribute more than 75% of the total dose to Gammarus

  12. Program for rapid dose assessment in criticality accident, RADAPAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki

    2006-09-01

    In a criticality accident, a person near fissile material can receive extremely high dose which can cause acute health effect. For such a case, medical treatment should be carried out for the exposed person, according to severity of the exposure. Then, radiation dose should be rapidly assessed soon after an outbreak of an accident. Dose assessment based upon the quantity of induced 24 Na in human body through neutron exposure is expected as one of useful dosimetry techniques in a criticality accident. A dose assessment program, called RADAPAS (RApid Dose Assessment Program from Activated Sodium in Criticality Accidents), was therefore developed to assess rapidly radiation dose to exposed persons from activity of induced 24 Na. RADAPAS consists of two parts; one is a database part and the other is a part for execution of dose calculation. The database contains data compendiums of energy spectra and dose conversion coefficients from specific activity of 24 Na induced in human body, which had been derived in a previous analysis using Monte Carlo calculation code. Information for criticality configuration or characteristics of radiation in the accident field is to be interactively given with interface displays in the dose calculation. RADAPAS can rapidly derive radiation dose to the exposed person from the given information and measured 24 Na specific activity by using the conversion coefficient in database. This report describes data for dose conversions and dose calculation in RADAPAS and explains how to use the program. (author)

  13. Radiographic film: surface dose extrapolation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, T.; Yu, P.K.N.; Butson, M.J.; Cancer Services, Wollongong, NSW; Currie, M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Assessment of surface dose delivered from radiotherapy x-ray beams for optimal results should be performed both inside and outside the prescribed treatment fields An extrapolation technique can be used with radiographic film to perform surface dose assessment for open field high energy x-ray beams. This can produce an accurate 2 dimensional map of surface dose if required. Results have shown that surface % dose can be estimated within ±3% of parallel plate ionisation chamber results with radiographic film using a series of film layers to produce an extrapolated result. Extrapolated percentage dose assessment for 10cm, 20cmand 30cm square fields was estimated to be 15% ± 2%, 29% ± 3% and 38% ± 3% at the central axis and relatively uniform across the treatment field. Corresponding parallel plate ionisation chamber measurement are 16%, 27% and 37% respectively. Surface doses are also measured outside the treatment field which are mainly due to scattered electron contamination. To achieve this result, film calibration curves must be irradiated to similar x-ray field sizes as the experimental film to minimize quantitative variations in film optical density caused by varying x-ray spectrum with field size. Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  14. Surface dose extrapolation measurements with radiographic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butson, Martin J; Cheung Tsang; Yu, Peter K N; Currie, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Assessment of surface dose delivered from radiotherapy x-ray beams for optimal results should be performed both inside and outside the prescribed treatment fields. An extrapolation technique can be used with radiographic film to perform surface dose assessment for open field high energy x-ray beams. This can produce an accurate two-dimensional map of surface dose if required. Results have shown that the surface percentage dose can be estimated within ±3% of parallel plate ionization chamber results with radiographic film using a series of film layers to produce an extrapolated result. Extrapolated percentage dose assessment for 10 cm, 20 cm and 30 cm square fields was estimated to be 15% ± 2%, 29% ± 3% and 38% ± 3% at the central axis and relatively uniform across the treatment field. The corresponding parallel plate ionization chamber measurements are 16%, 27% and 37%, respectively. Surface doses are also measured outside the treatment field which are mainly due to scattered electron contamination. To achieve this result, film calibration curves must be irradiated to similar x-ray field sizes as the experimental film to minimize quantitative variations in film optical density caused by varying x-ray spectrum with field size. (note)

  15. Gonad doses in biliary tract examinations (cholecystography)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radtke, I [Staedtisches Klinikum Berlin-Buch (German Democratic Republic). Roentgendiagnostisches Zentrum; Angerstein, W [Forschungsinstitut fuer Tuberkulose und Lungenkrankheiten, Berlin (German Democratic Republic); Koenig, W; Menzel, B [Staatliches Amt fuer Atomsicherheit und Strahlenschutz, Berlin (German Democratic Republic)

    1979-02-01

    622 single measurements of gonad doses were performed during cholecystography in patients of either sex (intravaginally in women). In oral cholecystography on an average 13 mR were revealed for men and 149 mR for women, resp. According to a minimum, medium, or maximum extent of examination, in intravenous cholecystography the data for men were 11, 17, and 24 mR, while the corresponding data for women were 93, 185, and 278 mR. Based on about 400,000 cholegraphic examinations per year in the GDR the contribution to the total gonad dose caused by radiological examinations is 6-8%.

  16. Gonad doses in biliary tract examinations (cholecystography)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radtke, I.; Koenig, W.; Menzel, B.

    1979-01-01

    622 single measurements of gonad doses were performed during cholecystography in patients of either sex (intravaginally in women). In oral cholecystography on an average 13 mR were revealed for men and 149 mR for women, resp. According to a minimum, medium, or maximum extent of examination, in intravenous cholecystography the data for men were 11, 17, and 24 mR, while the corresponding data for women were 93, 185, and 278 mR. Based on about 400,000 cholegraphic examinations per year in the GDR the contribution to the total gonad dose caused by radiological examinations is 6-8%. (author)

  17. Wireless monitoring system for personal dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Hironobu; Kawamura, Takeshi; Inoue, Takayuki

    2000-01-01

    Fuji Electric has developed a system for the higher radiation controlled area in nuclear power plants, in which exposure dose data measured on the wearer's chest, hands, and legs are transferred by wireless to the data control equipment so that the exposure dose can be controlled in real time. The system using a specified low-power radio wave causes no interference to the other types of dosimeters. The data control equipment automatically saves data received from the dosimeters and also has functions of calibration of dosimeters and maintenance of the wireless system. This paper describes the wireless monitoring system that consists of chest and parts dosimeters and data control equipment. (author)

  18. Assessment of internal doses

    CERN Document Server

    Rahola, T; Falk, R; Isaksson, M; Skuterud, L

    2002-01-01

    There is a definite need for training in dose calculation. Our first course was successful and was followed by a second, both courses were fully booked. An example of new tools for software products for bioassay analysis and internal dose assessment is the Integrated Modules for Bioassay Analysis (IMBA) were demonstrated at the second course. This suite of quality assured code modules have been adopted in the UK as the standard for regulatory assessment purposes. The intercomparison measurements are an important part of the Quality Assurance work. In what is known as the sup O utside workers ' directive it is stated that the internal dose measurements shall be included in the European Unions supervision system for radiation protection. The emergency preparedness regarding internal contamination was much improved by the training with and calibration of handheld instruments from participants' laboratories. More improvement will be gained with the handbook giving practical instructions on what to do in case of e...

  19. Mean inactivation dose (D)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, S.; Ng, T.C.; Raudkivi, U.; Meaney, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    By predicting treatment outcome to radiotherapy from in vitro radiobiological parameters, not only individual patient treatments can be tailored, but also new promising treatment protocols can be tried in patients in whom unfavorable outcome is predicted. In this respect, choosing the right parameter can be very important. Unlike D 0 and N which provide information of the distal part of the survival curve, mean inactivation dose (D) estimates overall radiosensitivity. However, the parameters reflecting the response at the clinically relevant low-dose region are neglected in the literature. In a literature survey of 98 papers in which survival curves or D 0 /N were used, only in 2 D was used. In 21 papers the D 0 /n values were important in drawing conclusions. By calculating D in 3 of these 21 papers, we show that the conclusion drawn may be altered with the use of D. The importance of ''low-dose-region-parameters'' is reviewed. (orig.)

  20. What causes education?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldgaard, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    Why do universities not give priority to education? The article suggests a formal answer on the basis of Lacan’s four discourses. Why education? Why do we learn? Is it caused by a natural curiosity or is it caused by anxiety? Is it at all possible to control the influence that we undoubtedly have...

  1. What Causes Bad Breath?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español What Causes Bad Breath? KidsHealth / For Teens / What Causes Bad Breath? Print en español ¿Qué es lo que provoca el mal aliento? Bad breath, or halitosis , can be a major problem, ...

  2. CAUSES OF OCCUPATIONAL INJURIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KINGMA, J

    1994-01-01

    The causes of occupational injuries (N = 2,365) were investigated. Accidents with machinery and hand tools were the two main causes (49.9%). 89% of the patients with occupational injuries were male. The highest risk group were in the age category of 19 years or less (51.9%). This age group also

  3. Dose Reduction Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-01-01

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program

  4. CT dose management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zasheva, Ts.; Georgiev, E.; Kirova, G.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: In recent decades Computed Tomography established itself as one of the most common study with a very wide range of applications and techniques of scanning. Best diagnostic value of the method resist to the risks of ionizing radiation, as statistics show that CT is one of the main sources of continuously increasing dose to the population. What you will learn: The physical parameters of the X-ray tube and the principles of image reconstruction; The relationship between variables parameters and the received dose; The ratio between the force and voltage of the current to the image quality, Influence of the used contrast medium to the physical properties of the image, The ratio of patient BMI to image processing, Effective use of knowledge for the optimal CT protocol. Discussions: The goal to reduce the dose received by the patient during a CT scan while keeping the diagnostic quality of the image puts to the test as handset X-ray producers and technicians who need to master the technique of study protocol forming as well as to balance the harm - benefit ratio. Among the most popular techniques are these of dose modulation, low-dose computed tomography at the expense of a reduction of the current or voltage intensity, and control of the number of post-processing algorithms for the image reconstruction. Conclusion: The training of radiologists and X-ray technicians plays a major role in optimizing of technical parameters in view of the reduction of the dose for the patient, while maintaining the diagnostic quality of the image

  5. Dose Reduction Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-05-16

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program.

  6. Radioactive cloud dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Healy, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Radiological dosage principles, as well as methods for calculating external and internal dose rates, following dispersion and deposition of radioactive materials in the atmosphere are described. Emphasis has been placed on analytical solutions that are appropriate for hand calculations. In addition, the methods for calculating dose rates from ingestion are discussed. A brief description of several computer programs are included for information on radionuclides. There has been no attempt to be comprehensive, and only a sampling of programs has been selected to illustrate the variety available

  7. Patient doses in interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera, F.; Ojeda, C.; Ruiz-Cruces, R.; Francisco Diaz, J.; Sanchez, A.; Tort, I.

    2001-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the first cause of death in Spain. The most usual procedures in interventional cardiology are coronariography and PTCA. The first is a diagnostic technique, and the second one is interventional. Our goal has been to study procedures made during the first six months in the Interventional Cardiology Unit of the Juan Ramon Jimenez Hospital (Huelva-Spain), taking into account radiation protection issues. We have studied 178 patients; 145 of them underwent coronariography, and 33 of the patients had PTCA too. Every case was analyzed taking into account technical and dosimetric parameters. We show parameters values gathered: Diagnostic techniques (valvular and non-valvular patients), and interventional techniques (coronariography and PTCA in different or in the same intervention). Higher doses were obtained with valvular patients, although the number of frames was similar. Attending to therapeutic procedures, the highest values were gotten with the 'double' interventions. Interventional procedures exceed in 60% doses gotten in diagnostic studies: this is because of the number of series and number of frames per series. Similar values obtained by other authors have been gotten. (author)

  8. Application of maximum values for radiation exposure and principles for the calculation of radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-08-01

    The guide presents the definitions of equivalent dose and effective dose, the principles for calculating these doses, and instructions for applying their maximum values. The limits (Annual Limit on Intake and Derived Air Concentration) derived from dose limits are also presented for the purpose of monitoring exposure to internal radiation. The calculation of radiation doses caused to a patient from medical research and treatment involving exposure to ionizing radiation is beyond the scope of this ST Guide

  9. Fertilizer micro-dosing

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Localized application of small quantities of fertilizer (micro-dosing), combined with improved planting pits for rainwater harvesting, has generated greater profits and food security for women farmers in the Sahel. • Women are 25% more likely to use combined applications, and have expanded areas of food crops (cowpea,.

  10. Weldon Spring dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, H.W.; Hill, G.S.; Perdue, P.T.

    1978-09-01

    In response to a request by the Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) Office of the Department of Energy (DOE) for assistance to the Department of the Army (DA) on the decommissioning of the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant, the Health and Safety Research Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) performed limited dose assessment calculations for that site. Based upon radiological measurements from a number of soil samples analyzed by ORNL and from previously acquired radiological data for the Weldon Spring site, source terms were derived to calculate radiation doses for three specific site scenarios. These three hypothetical scenarios are: a wildlife refuge for hunting, fishing, and general outdoor recreation; a school with 40 hr per week occupancy by students and a custodian; and a truck farm producing fruits, vegetables, meat, and dairy products which may be consumed on site. Radiation doses are reported for each of these scenarios both for measured uranium daughter equilibrium ratios and for assumed secular equilibrium. Doses are lower for the nonequilibrium case

  11. Low dose epidemiologic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    In this chapter the BEIR committee has reviewed low-dose irradiation studies since the BEIR III report. They have considered the carcinogenic effectiveness of low-LET in populations exposed to radiation from a number of different sources: diagnostic radiography; fallout from nuclear weapons testing; nuclear installations; radiation in the workplace and high levels of natural background radiation

  12. Radiation doses to Finns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantalainen, L.

    1996-01-01

    The estimated annual radiation doses to Finns have been reduced in the recent years without any change in the actual radiation environment. This is because the radiation types have been changed. The risk factors will probably be changed again in the future, because recent studies show discrepancies in the neutron dosimetry concerning the city of Hiroshima. Neutron dosimetry discrepancy has been found between the predicted and estimated neutron radiation. The prediction of neutron radiation is calculated by Monte Carlo simulations, which have also been used when designing recommendations for the limits of radiation doses (ICRP60). Estimation of the neutron radiation is made on the basis of measured neutron activation of materials in the city. The estimated neutron dose beyond 1 km is two to ten, or more, times as high as the predicted dose. This discrepancy is important, because the most relevant distances with respect to radiation risk evaluation are between 1 and 2 km. Because of this discrepancy, the present radiation risk factors for gamma and neutron radiation, which rely on the Monte Carlo calculations, are false, too. The recommendations of ICRP60 have been adopted in a few countries, including Finland, and they affect the planned common limits of the EU. It is questionable whether happiness is increased by adopting false limits, even if they are common. (orig.) (2 figs., 1 tab.)

  13. Dose Reduction Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Waggoner, L O

    2000-01-01

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the sm...

  14. Dose tracking and dose auditing in a comprehensive computed tomography dose-reduction program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Phuong-Anh; Little, Brent P

    2014-08-01

    Implementation of a comprehensive computed tomography (CT) radiation dose-reduction program is a complex undertaking, requiring an assessment of baseline doses, an understanding of dose-saving techniques, and an ongoing appraisal of results. We describe the role of dose tracking in planning and executing a dose-reduction program and discuss the use of the American College of Radiology CT Dose Index Registry at our institution. We review the basics of dose-related CT scan parameters, the components of the dose report, and the dose-reduction techniques, showing how an understanding of each technique is important in effective auditing of "outlier" doses identified by dose tracking. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Dose specification for radiation therapy: dose to water or dose to medium?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C-M; Li Jinsheng

    2011-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method enables accurate dose calculation for radiation therapy treatment planning and has been implemented in some commercial treatment planning systems. Unlike conventional dose calculation algorithms that provide patient dose information in terms of dose to water with variable electron density, the Monte Carlo method calculates the energy deposition in different media and expresses dose to a medium. This paper discusses the differences in dose calculated using water with different electron densities and that calculated for different biological media and the clinical issues on dose specification including dose prescription and plan evaluation using dose to water and dose to medium. We will demonstrate that conventional photon dose calculation algorithms compute doses similar to those simulated by Monte Carlo using water with different electron densities, which are close (<4% differences) to doses to media but significantly different (up to 11%) from doses to water converted from doses to media following American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 105 recommendations. Our results suggest that for consistency with previous radiation therapy experience Monte Carlo photon algorithms report dose to medium for radiotherapy dose prescription, treatment plan evaluation and treatment outcome analysis.

  16. Childhood Obesity Causes & Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Local Programs Related Topics Diabetes Nutrition Childhood Obesity Causes & Consequences Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... determine how a community is designed. Consequences of Obesity More Immediate Health Risks Obesity during childhood can ...

  17. What Causes a Toothache?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... See a Dentist? What is Dental Amalgam (Silver Filling)? Temporomandibular Joint Disorder Men: Looking for a Better ... sinus or ear infections and tension in the facial muscles can cause discomfort that resembles a toothache, ...

  18. Causes of Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and often disabling disease of the central nervous system. > Muscular dystrophy MD is characterized by the degeneration of skeletal muscles. > Neurofibromatosis Progressive disorder of the nervous system that causes tumors on the nerves. > Post-polio ...

  19. What causes IBD?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. What causes IBD? An overly aggressive cell-mediated immune response to luminal commensal bacteria in genetically susceptible individuals. Sartor, Gastroenterology 2004.

  20. Determination of sterilizing dose of lincocine drug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adawi, M.A.; Shamma, M.; Al-Mousa, A.

    1998-01-01

    There are too many antibiotics that have been studied on their dry solid state to determine their safe sterilizing dose by decreasing their bio burden in order to reach the sterility assurance level (SAL) needed. The sterilizing radiating dose of lincocine was determined according to information about their bio burden and radiating sensitivity at the sterility assurance level 10-6. The study of bio burden has shown that the contamination was fungal (Pemicillium sp.) and by applying the same tests to the raw materials of lincocine it came out that the cause of contamination was bad storage and that the radiating dose required to decrease the bio burden was 5.5 kGy. (author)

  1. Simulation of computed tomography dose based on voxel phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunyu; Lv, Xiangbo; Li, Zhaojun

    2017-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is one of the preferred and the most valuable imaging tool used in diagnostic radiology, which provides a high-quality cross-sectional image of the body. It still causes higher doses of radiation to patients comparing to the other radiological procedures. The Monte-Carlo method is appropriate for estimation of the radiation dose during the CT examinations. The simulation of the Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) phantom was developed in this paper. Under a similar conditions used in physical measurements, dose profiles were calculated and compared against the measured values that were reported. The results demonstrate a good agreement between the calculated and the measured doses. From different CT exam simulations using the voxel phantom, the highest absorbed dose was recorded for the lung, the brain, the bone surface. A comparison between the different scan type shows that the effective dose for a chest scan is the highest one, whereas the effective dose values during abdomen and pelvis scan are very close, respectively. The lowest effective dose resulted from the head scan. Although, the dose in CT is related to various parameters, such as the tube current, exposure time, beam energy, slice thickness and patient size, this study demonstrates that the MC simulation is a useful tool to accurately estimate the dose delivered to any specific organs for patients undergoing the CT exams and can be also a valuable technique for the design and the optimization of the CT x-ray source.

  2. Tumor significant dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supe, S.J.; Nagalaxmi, K.V.; Meenakshi, L.

    1983-01-01

    In the practice of radiotherapy, various concepts like NSD, CRE, TDF, and BIR are being used to evaluate the biological effectiveness of the treatment schedules on the normal tissues. This has been accepted as the tolerance of the normal tissue is the limiting factor in the treatment of cancers. At present when various schedules are tried, attention is therefore paid to the biological damage of the normal tissues only and it is expected that the damage to the cancerous tissues would be extensive enough to control the cancer. Attempt is made in the present work to evaluate the concent of tumor significant dose (TSD) which will represent the damage to the cancerous tissue. Strandquist in the analysis of a large number of cases of squamous cell carcinoma found that for the 5 fraction/week treatment, the total dose required to bring about the same damage for the cancerous tissue is proportional to T/sup -0.22/, where T is the overall time over which the dose is delivered. Using this finding the TSD was defined as DxN/sup -p/xT/sup -q/, where D is the total dose, N the number of fractions, T the overall time p and q are the exponents to be suitably chosen. The values of p and q are adjusted such that p+q< or =0.24, and p varies from 0.0 to 0.24 and q varies from 0.0 to 0.22. Cases of cancer of cervix uteri treated between 1978 and 1980 in the V. N. Cancer Centre, Kuppuswamy Naidu Memorial Hospital, Coimbatore, India were analyzed on the basis of these formulations. These data, coupled with the clinical experience, were used for choice of a formula for the TSD. Further, the dose schedules used in the British Institute of Radiology fraction- ation studies were also used to propose that the tumor significant dose is represented by DxN/sup -0.18/xT/sup -0.06/

  3. Three model systems measure oxidation/nitration damage caused ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    caused by peroxynitrite ... (OONO–) or its carbon dioxide derivatives cause oxidation/nitration and hence mutation to various body poly- mers e.g. .... The work described in this paper is quite brief due to ex- ... exact way to balance the dose of antioxidants in mixtures ... tralizing conditions the half-life of OONO– is less than.

  4. [Evaluation of Organ Dose Estimation from Indices of CT Dose Using Dose Index Registry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriuchijima, Akiko; Fukushima, Yasuhiro; Ogura, Akio

    Direct measurement of each patient organ dose from computed tomography (CT) is not possible. Most methods to estimate patient organ dose is using Monte Carlo simulation with dedicated software. However, dedicated software is too expensive for small scale hospitals. Not every hospital can estimate organ dose with dedicated software. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the simple method of organ dose estimation using some common indices of CT dose. The Monte Carlo simulation software Radimetrics (Bayer) was used for calculating organ dose and analysis relationship between indices of CT dose and organ dose. Multidetector CT scanners were compared with those from two manufactures (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare; SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare). Using stored patient data from Radimetrics, the relationships between indices of CT dose and organ dose were indicated as each formula for estimating organ dose. The accuracy of estimation method of organ dose was compared with the results of Monte Carlo simulation using the Bland-Altman plots. In the results, SSDE was the feasible index for estimation organ dose in almost organs because it reflected each patient size. The differences of organ dose between estimation and simulation were within 23%. In conclusion, our estimation method of organ dose using indices of CT dose is convenient for clinical with accuracy.

  5. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, J.H.; Rusek, A.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C.; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X.S.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  6. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, J H; Sanzari, J; Avery, S; Sayers, C; Krigsfeld, G; Nuth, M; Wan, X S; Rusek, A; Kennedy, A R

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  7. 13 CFR 101.401 - What programs and activities of SBA are subject to this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATION Intergovernmental Partnership § 101.401 What programs and activities of SBA are subject to this subpart? SBA publishes in the Federal Register a list of programs and activities subject...

  8. 13 CFR 101.400 - What is the purpose of this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What is the purpose of this subpart? 101.400 Section 101.400 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION... at law. ...

  9. Subpart W: National Emission Standards for Radon Emissions From Operating Mill Tailings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subpart W limits the radon-222 emissions rate from uranium tailings piles to 20 picocuries per square meter per second and requires that new tailings impoundments meet certain work practice standards.

  10. 40 CFR 63.1560 - What is the purpose of this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic... from petroleum refineries. This subpart also establishes requirements to demonstrate initial and continuous compliance with the emission limitations and work practice standards. ...

  11. 40 CFR 63.3004 - What definitions apply to this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... limit, or operating limit, or work practice standard in this subpart during startup, shutdown, or... the amount of finished product needed to cover an area 10 feet by 10 feet (100 square feet) of...

  12. 7 CFR Exhibit F to Subpart I of... - Site Option Loan to Technical Assistance Grantees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE... decision reviewed following the procedure established in subpart B of part 1900 of this chapter. (2) Review...

  13. 16 CFR Figure 5 to Subpart A of... - Zero Reference Point Related to Detecting Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Plane 5 Figure 5 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INTERIM SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard Pt... Plane EC03OC91.035 ...

  14. 49 CFR 192.1003 - What do the regulations in this subpart cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Gas...? General. This subpart prescribes minimum requirements for an IM program for any gas distribution pipeline...

  15. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Ggg of... - Partially Soluble HAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Standards for Pharmaceuticals Production Pt. 63, Subpt. GGG, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart GGG of Part 63... Epichlorohydrin 1,3-Dichloropropene Ethyl acrylate 2,4,5-Trichlorophenol Ethylbenzene 2-Butanone (mek) Ethylene...

  16. 46 CFR Exhibit No. 3 to Subpart E... - Petition for Leave To Intervene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... PROVISIONS RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Proceedings; Pleadings; Motions; Replies Pt. 502, Subpt. E, Exh. 3...., as in Exhibit No. 1 to this subpart, and nature and principal place of business]. II. [Here set out...

  17. 40 CFR 63.4781 - What definitions apply to this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... acquisition and availability requirements of this subpart used to sample, condition (if applicable), analyze... minimis manner. Responsible official means responsible official as defined in 40 CFR 70.2. Startup...

  18. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Ddddd of... - Fuel Analysis Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Institutional Boilers and Process Heaters Pt. 63, Subpt. DDDDD, Table 6 Table 6 to Subpart DDDDD of Part 63—Fuel... of pounds of pollutant per MMBtu of heat content. 3. Hydrogen Chloride * * * a. Collect fuel samples...

  19. 40 CFR Table 2b to Subpart E of... - Reactivity Factors for Aliphatic Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures 2B Table 2B to Subpart E of Part 59 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures Bin Averageboiling point * (degrees F) Criteria Reactivityfactor 1 80-205 Alkanes... + Dry Point) / 2 (b) Aromatic Hydrocarbon Solvents ...

  20. 40 CFR 141.571 - What records does subpart T require my system to keep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... records does subpart T require my system to keep? Your system must keep several types of records based on... Benchmarking(§§ 141.540-141.544) Benchmark (including raw data and analysis) Indefinitely. ...

  1. Radiation-dose consequences of acid rain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, S.C.; Sheppard, M.I.; Mitchell, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Acid rain causes accelerated mobilization of many materials in soils. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides, especially Ra and Cs, are among these materials. Generally, a decrease in soil pH by 1 unit will cause increases in mobility and plant uptake by factors of 2 to 7. Several simulation models were tested with most emphasis on an atmospherically driven soil model that predicts water and nuclide flow through a soil profile. We modelled a typical, acid rain sensitive soil using meterological data from Geraldton, Ontario. The results, within the range of effects on the soil expected from acidification, showed direct proportionality between the mobility of the nuclides and dose. Based on the literature available, a decrease in pH of 1 unit may increase the mobility of Ra and Cs by a factor or 2 or more. This will lead to increases in plant uptake and ultimate dose to man of about the same extent

  2. Occupational dose assessment and national dose registry system in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafari-Zadeh, M.; Nazeri, F.; Hosseini-Pooya, S. M.; Taheri, M.; Gheshlaghi, F.; Kardan, M. R.; Babakhani, A.; Rastkhah, N.; Yousefi-Nejad, F.; Darabi, M.; Oruji, T.; Gholamali-Zadeh, Z.; Karimi-Diba, J.; Kazemi-Movahed, A. A.; Dashti-Pour, M. R.; Enferadi, A.; Jahanbakhshian, M. H.; Sadegh-Khani, M. R.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents status of external and internal dose assessment of workers and introducing the structure of National Dose Registry System of Iran (NDRSI). As well as types of individual dosemeters in use, techniques for internal dose assessment are presented. Results obtained from the International Atomic Energy Agency intercomparison programme on measurement of personal dose equivalent H p (10) and consistency of the measured doses with the delivered doses are shown. Also, implementation of dosimetry standards, establishment of quality management system, authorisation and approval procedure of dosimetry service providers are discussed. (authors)

  3. Radiation doses and risks from internal emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, John; Day, Philip

    2008-01-01

    This review updates material prepared for the UK Government Committee Examining Radiation Risks from Internal Emitters (CERRIE) and also refers to the new recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and other recent developments. Two conclusions from CERRIE were that ICRP should clarify and elaborate its advice on the use of its dose quantities, equivalent and effective dose, and that more attention should be paid to uncertainties in dose and risk estimates and their implications. The new ICRP recommendations provide explanations of the calculation and intended purpose of the protection quantities, but further advice on their use would be helpful. The new recommendations refer to the importance of understanding uncertainties in estimates of dose and risk, although methods for doing this are not suggested. Dose coefficients (Sv per Bq intake) for the inhalation or ingestion of radionuclides are published as reference values without uncertainty. The primary purpose of equivalent and effective dose is to enable the summation of doses from different radionuclides and from external sources for comparison with dose limits, constraints and reference levels that relate to stochastic risks of whole-body radiation exposure. Doses are calculated using defined biokinetic and dosimetric models, including reference anatomical data for the organs and tissues of the human body. Radiation weighting factors are used to adjust for the different effectiveness of different radiation types, per unit absorbed dose (Gy), in causing stochastic effects at low doses and dose rates. Tissue weighting factors are used to take account of the contribution of individual organs and tissues to overall detriment from cancer and hereditary effects, providing a simple set of rounded values chosen on the basis of age- and sex-averaged values of relative detriment. While the definition of absorbed dose has the scientific rigour required of a basic physical quantity

  4. Doses from radiation exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Practical implementation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection's (ICRP) system of protection requires the availability of appropriate methods and data. The work of Committee 2 is concerned with the development of reference data and methods for the assessment of internal and external radiation exposure of workers and members of the public. This involves the development of reference biokinetic and dosimetric models, reference anatomical models of the human body, and reference anatomical and physiological data. Following ICRP's 2007 Recommendations, Committee 2 has focused on the provision of new reference dose coefficients for external and internal exposure. As well as specifying changes to the radiation and tissue weighting factors used in the calculation of protection quantities, the 2007 Recommendations introduced the use of reference anatomical phantoms based on medical imaging data, requiring explicit sex averaging of male and female organ-equivalent doses in the calculation of effecti...

  5. Radiation dose rate meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronenberg, S.; Siebentritt, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    A combined dose rate meter and charger unit therefor which does not require the use of batteries but on the other hand produces a charging potential by means of a piezoelectric cylinder which is struck by a manually triggered hammer mechanism. A tubular type electrometer is mounted in a portable housing which additionally includes a geiger-muller (Gm) counter tube and electronic circuitry coupled to the electrometer for providing multi-mode operation. In one mode of operation, an rc circuit of predetermined time constant is connected to a storage capacitor which serves as a timed power source for the gm tube, providing a measurement in terms of dose rate which is indicated by the electrometer. In another mode, the electrometer indicates individual counts

  6. Small dose... big poison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braitberg, George; Oakley, Ed

    2010-11-01

    It is not possible to identify all toxic substances in a single journal article. However, there are some exposures that in small doses are potentially fatal. Many of these exposures are particularly toxic to children. Using data from poison control centres, it is possible to recognise this group of exposures. This article provides information to assist the general practitioner to identify potential toxic substance exposures in children. In this article the authors report the signs and symptoms of toxic exposures and identify the time of onset. Where clear recommendations on the period of observation and known fatal dose are available, these are provided. We do not discuss management or disposition, and advise readers to contact the Poison Information Service or a toxicologist for this advice.

  7. 31 CFR Appendix K to Subpart C of... - Federal Law Enforcement Training Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal Law Enforcement Training Center K Appendix K to Subpart C of Part 1 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS Privacy Act Pt. 1, Subpt. C, App. K Appendix K to Subpart C of Part 1—Federal Law Enforcement Training Center 1. In...

  8. 31 CFR Appendix K to Subpart A of... - Federal Law Enforcement Training Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal Law Enforcement Training Center K Appendix K to Subpart A of Part 1 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS Freedom of Information Act Pt. 1, Subpt. A, App. K Appendix K to Subpart A of Part 1—Federal Law Enforcement Training...

  9. Radiation dose measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1960-01-01

    About 200 scientists from 28 countries and 5 international organizations met at a symposium on radiation dosimetry held by the International Atomic Energy Agency in June 1960. The aim of the symposium was not so much the description of a large number of measuring instruments as a discussion of the methods used, with special emphasis on those problems which had become important in the context of recent developments, such as the measurement of mixed or very large doses

  10. Low dose epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirmarche, M.; Hubert, P.

    1992-01-01

    Actually, epidemiological studies have to establish if the assessment of cancer risk can be verified at low chronic radiation doses. The population surveillance must be very long, the side effects and cancers of such radiation appearing much later. In France, this epidemiological study on nuclear workers have been decided recently. Before describing the experiment and french projects in epidemiology of nuclear workers, the authors present the main english and american studies

  11. Two factors influencing dose reconstruction in low dose range: the variability of BKG intensity on one individual and water content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Tengda; Zhang, Wenyi; Zhao, Zhixin; Zhang, Haiying; Ruan, Shuzhou; Jiao, Ling

    2016-01-01

    A fast and accurate retrospective dosimetry method for the triage is very important in radiation accidents. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) fingernail dosimetry is a promising way to estimate radiation dose. This article presents two factors influencing dose reconstruction in low dose range: the variability of background signal (BKG) intensity on one individual and water content. Comparing the EPR spectrum of dried and humidified fingernail samples, it is necessary to add a procedure of dehydration before EPR measurements, so as to eliminate the deviation caused by water content. Besides, the BKGs of different fingers' nails are not the same as researchers thought previously, and the difference between maximum and minimum BKG intensities of one individual can reach 55.89 %. Meanwhile, the variability of the BKG intensity among individuals is large enough to impact precise dose reconstruction. Water within fingernails and instability of BKG are two reasons that cause the inaccuracy of radiation dose reconstruction in low-dosage level. (authors)

  12. Microdosimetric approach for lung dose assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, W.; Steinhausler, F.; Pohl, E.; Bernroider, G.

    1980-01-01

    In the macroscopic region the term ''organ dose'' is related to an uniform energy deposition within a homogeneous biological target. Considering the lung, inhaled radioactive nuclides, however, show a significant non-uniform distribution pattern throughout the respiratory tract. For the calculation of deposition and clearance of inhaled alpha-emitting radionuclides within different regions of this organ, a detailed compartment model, based on the Weibel model A was developed. Since biological effects (e.g. lung cancer initiation) are primarily caused at the cellular level, the interaction of alpha particles with different types of cells of the lung tissue was studied. The basic approach is to superimpose alpha particle tracks on magnified images of randomly selected tissue slices, simulating alpha emitting sources. Particle tracks are generated by means of a specially developed computer program and used as input data for an on-line electronic image analyzer (Quantimet-720). Using adaptive pattern recognition methods the different cells in the lung tissue can be identified and their distribution within the whole organ determined. This microdosimetric method is applied to soluble radon decay products as well as to insoluble, highly localized, plutonium particles. For a defined microdistribution of alpha emitters, the resulting dose, integrated over all cellular dose values, is compared to the compartmental doses of the ICRP lung model. Furthermore this methodology is also applicable to other organs and tissues of the human body for dose calculations in practical health physics. (author)

  13. Analysis of T101 outage radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhonghua

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Collective radiation dose during outage is about 80% of annual collective radiation dose at nuclear power plants (NPPs). T 101 Outage is the first four-year outage of Unit 1 at Tianwan Nuclear Power Station (TNPS) and thorough overhaul was undergone for the 105-day's duration. Therefore, T 101 Outage has significant reference meaning to reducing collective radiation dose at TNPS. This paper collects the radiation dose statistics during T 101 Outage and analyses the radiation dose distribution according to tasks, work kinds and varying trend of the collective radiation dose etc., comparing with other similar PWRs in the world. Based on the analysis this paper attempts to find out the major factors in collective radiation dose during T 101 Outage. The major positive factor is low radiation level at workplace, which profits from low content of Co in reactor construction materials, optimised high-temperature p H value of the primary circuit coolant within the tight range and reactor operation without trips within the first fuel cycle. One of the most negative factors is long outage duration and many person-hours spent in the radiological controlled zone, caused by too many tasks and inefficient work. So besides keeping good performance of reducing radioactive sources, it should be focused on how to improve implementation of work management including work selection, planning and scheduling, work preparation, work implementation, work assessment and feedback, which can lead to reduced numbers of workers needed to perform a task, of person-hours spent in the radiological controlled zone. Moreover, this leads to reduce occupational exposures in an ALARA fashion. (author)

  14. Time-dose modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kian Ang, K.

    1987-01-01

    Changes in fractionation schedule can be made by various approaches. However, from the first principle, it is anticipated that strategies of hyperfractionation and/or accelerated fractionation offer the most promised in improving the therapeutic ratio. Hyperfractionation is defined as a treatment schedule in which a large number of significantly reduced dose fractions (--1.2 Gy/fraction) is used to give a greater total dose in a conventional overall time period. The results of the pilot studies testing the efficacy of hyperfractionation have been encouraging. The most valid clinical trial of pure hyperfractionation, however, is that conducted by the EORTC. This study compared 70 Gy in 35 fractions or 80.5 Gy in 70 fractions over 7 weeks in the treatment of patients with oropharyngeal carcinomas. The local tumor control was significantly improved in the hyperfractionated arm without increasing the morbidity. Accelerated fractionation is defined as a schedule in which the overall time of treatment is reduced without significant changes in the total dose and fraction size. The strategy has been used to treat patients with malignant gliomas, melanomas and Head and Neck cancers. The data in Head and Neck Cancers seem to be promising

  15. Dose calculation for electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Hideo

    1995-01-01

    The joint working group of ICRP/ICRU is advancing the works of reviewing the ICRP publication 51 by investigating the data related to radiation protection. In order to introduce the 1990 recommendation, it has been demanded to carry out calculation for neutrons, photons and electrons. As for electrons, EURADOS WG4 (Numerical Dosimetry) rearranged the data to be calculated at the meeting held in PTB Braunschweig in June, 1992, and the question and request were presented by Dr. J.L. Chartier, the responsible person, to the researchers who are likely to undertake electron transport Monte Carlo calculation. The author also has carried out the requested calculation as it was the good chance to do the mutual comparison among various computation codes regarding electron transport calculation. The content that the WG requested to calculate was the absorbed dose at depth d mm when parallel electron beam enters at angle α into flat plate phantoms of PMMA, water and ICRU4-element tissue, which were placed in vacuum. The calculation was carried out by the versatile electron-photon shower computation Monte Carlo code, EGS4. As the results, depth dose curves and the dependence of absorbed dose on electron energy, incident angle and material are reported. The subjects to be investigated are pointed out. (K.I.)

  16. Dose reduction in evacuation proctography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hare, C.; Halligan, S.; Bartram, C.I.; Gupta, R.; Walker, A.E.; Renfrew, I.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this study was to reduce the patient radiation dose from evacuation proctography. Ninety-eight consecutive adult patients referred for proctography to investigate difficult rectal evacuation were studied using a digital imaging system with either a standard digital program for barium examinations, a reduced dose digital program (both with and without additional copper filtration), or Video fluoroscopy. Dose-area products were recorded for each examination and the groups were compared. All four protocols produced technically acceptable examinations. The low-dose program with copper filtration (median dose 382 cGy cm 2 ) and Video fluoroscopy (median dose 705 cGy cm 2 ) were associated with significantly less dose than other groups (p < 0.0001). Patient dose during evacuation proctography can be reduced significantly without compromising the diagnostic quality of the examination. A digital program with added copper filtration conveyed the lowest dose. (orig.)

  17. Optimized dose distribution of a high dose rate vaginal cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zuofeng; Liu, Chihray; Palta, Jatinder R.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To present a comparison of optimized dose distributions for a set of high-dose-rate (HDR) vaginal cylinders calculated by a commercial treatment-planning system with benchmark calculations using Monte-Carlo-calculated dosimetry data. Methods and Materials: Optimized dose distributions using both an isotropic and an anisotropic dose calculation model were obtained for a set of HDR vaginal cylinders. Mathematical optimization techniques available in the computer treatment-planning system were used to calculate dwell times and positions. These dose distributions were compared with benchmark calculations with TG43 formalism and using Monte-Carlo-calculated data. The same dwell times and positions were used for a quantitative comparison of dose calculated with three dose models. Results: The isotropic dose calculation model can result in discrepancies as high as 50%. The anisotropic dose calculation model compared better with benchmark calculations. The differences were more significant at the apex of the vaginal cylinder, which is typically used as the prescription point. Conclusion: Dose calculation models available in a computer treatment-planning system must be evaluated carefully to ensure their correct application. It should also be noted that when optimized dose distribution at a distance from the cylinder surface is calculated using an accurate dose calculation model, the vaginal mucosa dose becomes significantly higher, and therefore should be carefully monitored

  18. Vulvovaginitis: causes and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, A M; Hart, C A

    1992-01-01

    Over a period of 33 months in a paediatric accident and emergency department, the clinical pattern and possible causes of vulvovaginitis were studied prospectively in 200 girls presenting with genital discharge, irritation, pain, or redness. The major causes were poor hygiene and threadworms. The suspicion of sexual abuse arose in a few girls but no organisms of sexually transmitted disease were found. Urinary symptoms were common but only 20 patients had a significant bacteriuria and 40 had sterile pyuria. Specific skin problems occurred in 28 cases. Simple measures to improve hygiene and treatment of threadworms gave effective relief. Genital irritation caused urinary symptoms with no clinical evidence of infection, and it is advised that antibiotic treatment should await urine culture. Specific skin problems require help from a dermatologist. The possibility of sexual abuse must be considered especially if the vulvovaginitis is persistent or recurrent after adequate treatment. PMID:1580682

  19. Tumour induction by small doses of ionised radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putten, L.M. van

    1980-01-01

    The effect of low doses of ionised radiation on tumour induction in animals is discussed. It is hypothesised that high doses of radiation can strongly advance tumour induction from the combination of a stimulated cell growth, as a reaction to massive cell killing, and damage to DNA in the cell nuclei. This effect has a limit below which the radiation dose causes a non-significant amount of dead cells. However in animals where through other reasons, a chronic growth stimulation already exists, only one effect, the damage of DNA, is necessary to induce tumours. A linear dose effect without a threshold level applies in these cases. Applying this hypothesis to man indicates that calculating low dose effects by linear extrapolation of high dose effects is nothing more than a reasonable approximation. (C.F.)

  20. Effects of low dose mitomycin C on experimental tumor radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jianzheng; Liang Shuo; Qu Yaqin; Pu Chunji; Zhang Haiying; Wu Zhenfeng; Wang Xianli

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the possibility of low dose mitomycin C(MMC) as an adjunct therapy for radiotherapy. Methods: Change in tumor size tumor-bearing mice was measured. Radioimmunoassay was used to determine immune function of mice. Results: Low dose Mac's pretreatment reduced tumor size more markedly than did radiotherapy only. The immune function in mice given with low dose MMC 12h before radiotherapy was obviously higher than that in mice subjected to radiotherapy only (P<0.05), and was close to that in the tumor-bearing mice before radiotherapy. Conclusion: Low dose MMC could improve the radiotherapy effect. Pretreatment with low dose MMC could obviously improve the immune suppression state in mice caused by radiotherapy. The mechanism of its improvement of radiotherapeutic effect by low dose of MMC might be due to its enhancement of immune function and induction of adaptive response in tumor-bearing mice

  1. Measurement of gamma radiation doses in nuclear power plant environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochvar, I.A.; Keirim-Markus, I.B.; Sergeeva, N.A.

    1976-01-01

    Considered are the problems of measuring gamma radiation dose values and the dose distribution in the nuclear power plant area with the aim of estimating the extent of their effect on the population. Presented are the dosimeters applied, their distribution throughout the controlled area, time of measurement. The distribution of gamma radiation doses over the controlled area and the dose alteration with the increase of the distance from the release source are shown. The results of measurements are investigated. The conclusion is made that operating nuclear power plants do not cause any increase in the gamma radiation dose over the area. Recommendations for clarifying the techniques for using dose-meters and decreasing measurement errors are given [ru

  2. Inactive Doses and Protein Concentration of Gamma Irradiated Yersinia Enterocolitica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irawan Sugoro; Sandra Hermanto

    2009-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is one of bacteria which cause coliform mastitis in dairy cows. The bacteria could be inactivated by gamma irradiation as inactivated vaccine candidate. The experiment has been conducted to determine the inactive doses and the protein concentration of Yersinia enterocolitica Y3 which has been irradiated by gamma rays. The cells cultures were irradiated by gamma rays with doses of 0, 100, 200, 400, 600, 800, 1.000 and 1.500 Gy (doses rate was 1089,59 Gy/hours). The inactive dose was determined by the drop test method and the protein concentration of cells were determined by Lowry method. The results showed that the inactive doses occurred on 800 – 1500 Gy. The different irradiation doses of cell cultures showed the effect of gamma irradiation on the protein concentration that was random and has a significant effect on the protein concentration. (author)

  3. Absorbed dose from traversing spherically symmetric, Gaussian radioactive clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.M.; Poston, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    If a large radioactive cloud is produced, sampling may require that an airplane traverse the cloud. A method to predict the absorbed dose to the aircrew from penetrating the radioactive cloud is needed. Dose rates throughout spherically symmetric Gaussian clouds of various sizes, and the absorbed doses from traversing the clouds, were calculated. Cloud size is a dominant parameter causing dose to vary by orders of magnitude for a given dose rate measured at some distance. A method to determine cloud size, based on dose rate readings at two or more distances from the cloud center, was developed. This method, however, failed to resolve the smallest cloud sizes from measurements made at 1,000 m to 2,000 m from the cloud center

  4. In vitro and in vivo effects of low dose HTO contamination modulated by dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petcu, I.; Savu, D.; Moisoi, N.; Koeteles, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    The experiment performed in vitro intended to examine whether an adaptive response could be elicited on lymphocytes by low-level contamination of whole blood with tritiated water and if the modification of the dose rate has any influence on it. Lymphocytes pre-exposed to 3 HOH (0.2 - 6.6 MBq/ml) and subsequently irradiated with I Gy γ-rays showed micronuclei frequency significantly lower (40% - 45%) than the expected member (sum of the yields induced by 3 HOH and γ-rays separately). The degree of the radioresistance induced by HTO pre-treatments became higher with decreasing dose-rate for a rather similar total adapting dose. In vivo, the aim of the study was to investigate if different dose rates are inducing modulation of the lipid peroxidation level and of the thymidine uptake in different tissues of animals contaminated by HTO ingestion. The total doses varied between 5 and 20 cGy and were delivered as chronic (100 days) or acute contamination (5 days). It was observed that only doses about 20 cGy caused a dose-rate dependent increase of the lipid peroxidation level in the tissues of small intestine, kidney and spleen. Both chronic and acute contamination did produce reduced incorporation of thymidine in the cells of bone marrow. The most effective decrease of thymidine uptake was induced by the acute contamination in the lower dose domain (approx. 5 cGy). Our hypothesis is that in this dose domain the modification of thymidine uptake could be due to changes at the level of membrane transport. (author)

  5. VirtualDose: a software for reporting organ doses from CT for adult and pediatric patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Aiping; Gao, Yiming; Liu, Haikuan; Caracappa, Peter F.; Long, Daniel J.; Bolch, Wesley E.; Liu, Bob; Xu, X. George

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of VirtualDose—a software for reporting organ doses for adult and pediatric patients who undergo x-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations. The software is based on a comprehensive database of organ doses derived from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations involving a library of 25 anatomically realistic phantoms that represent patients of different ages, body sizes, body masses, and pregnant stages. Models of GE Lightspeed Pro 16 and Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 scanners were carefully validated for use in MC dose calculations. The software framework is designed with the ‘software as a service (SaaS)’ delivery concept under which multiple clients can access the web-based interface simultaneously from any computer without having to install software locally. The RESTful web service API also allows a third-party picture archiving and communication system software package to seamlessly integrate with VirtualDose’s functions. Software testing showed that VirtualDose was compatible with numerous operating systems including Windows, Linux, Apple OS X, and mobile and portable devices. The organ doses from VirtualDose were compared against those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT—two dosimetry tools that were based on the stylized pediatric and adult patient models that were known to be anatomically simple. The organ doses reported by VirtualDose differed from those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT by as much as 300% in some of the patient models. These results confirm the conclusion from past studies that differences in anatomical realism offered by stylized and voxel phantoms have caused significant discrepancies in CT dose estimations.

  6. VirtualDose: a software for reporting organ doses from CT for adult and pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Aiping; Gao, Yiming; Liu, Haikuan; Caracappa, Peter F; Xu, X George; Long, Daniel J; Bolch, Wesley E; Liu, Bob

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of VirtualDose—a software for reporting organ doses for adult and pediatric patients who undergo x-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations. The software is based on a comprehensive database of organ doses derived from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations involving a library of 25 anatomically realistic phantoms that represent patients of different ages, body sizes, body masses, and pregnant stages. Models of GE Lightspeed Pro 16 and Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 scanners were carefully validated for use in MC dose calculations. The software framework is designed with the ‘software as a service (SaaS)’ delivery concept under which multiple clients can access the web-based interface simultaneously from any computer without having to install software locally. The RESTful web service API also allows a third-party picture archiving and communication system software package to seamlessly integrate with VirtualDose’s functions. Software testing showed that VirtualDose was compatible with numerous operating systems including Windows, Linux, Apple OS X, and mobile and portable devices. The organ doses from VirtualDose were compared against those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT—two dosimetry tools that were based on the stylized pediatric and adult patient models that were known to be anatomically simple. The organ doses reported by VirtualDose differed from those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT by as much as 300% in some of the patient models. These results confirm the conclusion from past studies that differences in anatomical realism offered by stylized and voxel phantoms have caused significant discrepancies in CT dose estimations. (paper)

  7. Respiratory dose analysis for components of ambient particulate matter#

    Science.gov (United States)

    Particulate matter (PM) in the atmosphere is a complex mixture of particles with different sizes and chemical compositions. Although PM is known to cause health hazard, specific attributes of PM that may cause health effects are somewhat ambiguous. The dose of each specific compo...

  8. Absorbed doses behind bones with MR image-based dose calculations for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Juha; Kapanen, Mika; Keyrilainen, Jani; Seppala, Tiina; Tuomikoski, Laura; Tenhunen, Mikko

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images are used increasingly in external radiotherapy target delineation because of their superior soft tissue contrast compared to computed tomography (CT) images. Nevertheless, radiotherapy treatment planning has traditionally been based on the use of CT images, due to the restrictive features of MR images such as lack of electron density information. This research aimed to measure absorbed radiation doses in material behind different bone parts, and to evaluate dose calculation errors in two pseudo-CT images; first, by assuming a single electron density value for the bones, and second, by converting the electron density values inside bones from T(1)∕T(2)∗-weighted MR image intensity values. A dedicated phantom was constructed using fresh deer bones and gelatine. The effect of different bone parts to the absorbed dose behind them was investigated with a single open field at 6 and 15 MV, and measuring clinically detectable dose deviations by an ionization chamber matrix. Dose calculation deviations in a conversion-based pseudo-CT image and in a bulk density pseudo-CT image, where the relative electron density to water for the bones was set as 1.3, were quantified by comparing the calculation results with those obtained in a standard CT image by superposition and Monte Carlo algorithms. The calculations revealed that the applied bulk density pseudo-CT image causes deviations up to 2.7% (6 MV) and 2.0% (15 MV) to the dose behind the examined bones. The corresponding values in the conversion-based pseudo-CT image were 1.3% (6 MV) and 1.0% (15 MV). The examinations illustrated that the representation of the heterogeneous femoral bone (cortex denser compared to core) by using a bulk density for the whole bone causes dose deviations up to 2% both behind the bone edge and the middle part of the bone (diameter bones). This study indicates that the decrease in absorbed dose is not dependent on the bone diameter with all types of bones. Thus

  9. Dose gradient curve: A new tool for evaluating dose gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, KiHoon; Choi, Young Eun

    2018-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy, which delivers an ablative high radiation dose to a target volume for maximum local tumor control, requires a rapid dose fall-off outside the target volume to prevent extensive damage to nearby normal tissue. Currently, there is no tool to comprehensively evaluate the dose gradient near the target volume. We propose the dose gradient curve (DGC) as a new tool to evaluate the quality of a treatment plan with respect to the dose fall-off characteristics. The average distance between two isodose surfaces was represented by the dose gradient index (DGI) estimated by a simple equation using the volume and surface area of isodose levels. The surface area was calculated by mesh generation and surface triangulation. The DGC was defined as a plot of the DGI of each dose interval as a function of the dose. Two types of DGCs, differential and cumulative, were generated. The performance of the DGC was evaluated using stereotactic radiosurgery plans for virtual targets. Over the range of dose distributions, the dose gradient of each dose interval was well-characterized by the DGC in an easily understandable graph format. Significant changes in the DGC were observed reflecting the differences in planning situations and various prescription doses. The DGC is a rational method for visualizing the dose gradient as the average distance between two isodose surfaces; the shorter the distance, the steeper the dose gradient. By combining the DGC with the dose-volume histogram (DVH) in a single plot, the DGC can be utilized to evaluate not only the dose gradient but also the target coverage in routine clinical practice.

  10. Landslides - Cause and effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radbruch-Hall, D. H.; Varnes, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    Landslides can cause seismic disturbances; landslides can also result from seismic disturbances, and earthquake-induced slides have caused loss of life in many countries. Slides can cause disastrous flooding, particularly when landslide dams across streams are breached, and flooding may trigger slides. Slope movement in general is a major process of the geologic environment that places constraints on engineering development. In order to understand and foresee both the causes and effects of slope movement, studies must be made on a regional scale, at individual sites, and in the laboratory. Areal studies - some embracing entire countries - have shown that certain geologic conditions on slopes facilitate landsliding; these conditions include intensely sheared rocks; poorly consolidated, fine-grained clastic rocks; hard fractured rocks underlain by less resistant rocks; or loose accumulations of fine-grained surface debris. Field investigations as well as mathematical- and physical-model studies are increasing our understanding of the mechanism of slope movement in fractured rock, and assist in arriving at practical solutions to landslide problems related to all kinds of land development for human use. Progressive failure of slopes has been studied in both soil and rock mechanics. New procedures have been developed to evaluate earthquake response of embankments and slopes. The finite element method of analysis is being extensively used in the calculation of slope stability in rock broken by joints, faults, and other discontinuities. ?? 1976 International Association of Engineering Geology.

  11. Leading Causes of Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have cataracts. They are the leading cause of blindness in the world. By age 80, more than half of all people in the United States either will have a cataract or have had cataract surgery. Common symptoms are: Blurry vision Colors that seem faded Glare Not being able to ...

  12. Aliteracy : causes and solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielen, Thijs Martinus Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The reading motivation of the majority of students declines in the upper half of primary school, which implies a risk for aliteracy: Students can read but, due to lack of practice, their skills remain underdeveloped (Chapter 2). In this thesis we have explored causes and solutions for this important

  13. Does intuition cause cooperation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.P.J.L. Verkoeijen (Peter); S. Bouwmeester (Samantha)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractRecently, researchers claimed that people are intuitively inclined to cooperate with reflection causing them to behave selfishly. Empirical support for this claim came from experiments using a 4-player public goods game with a marginal return of 0.5 showing that people contributed more

  14. Infestation caused by acanthocephala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Crotti

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available An on-line case of infestation caused by M. moniliformis is descripted. This rodents’ worm, belonging to acanthocephala, can be rarely responsible of human intestinal pathology. The case is the pretext for a brief revision on this parasitosis. So, biological, epidemiological, clinical and diagnostical findings are reported.

  15. Fighting a lost cause

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mario Haaf

    2015-01-01

    This essay claims that the declared war on drugs has failed, it has caused more harm than good, and that a new approach is necessary. The focus of analysis lays especially on the implemented drug policies of Mexico and the United States. The goal is to point out the flaws of the current policy based

  16. Determination of organ doses and effective doses in radiooncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, J.; Martinez, A.E.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Purpose: With an increasing chance of success in radiooncology, it is necessary to estimate the risk from radiation scatter to areas outside the target volume. The cancer risk from a radiation treatment can be estimated from the organ doses, allowing a somewhat limited effective dose to be estimated and compared. Material and Methods: The doses of the radiation-sensitive organs outside the target volume can be estimated with the aid of the PC program PERIDOSE developed by van der Giessen. The effective doses are determined according to the concept of ICRP, whereby the target volume and the associated organs related to it are not taken into consideration. Results: Organ doses outside the target volume are generally < 1% of the dose in the target volume. In some cases, however, they can be as high as 3%. The effective doses during radiotherapy are between 60 and 900 mSv, depending upon the specific target volume, the applied treatment technique, and the given dose in the ICRU point. Conclusion: For the estimation of the radiation risk, organ doses in radiooncology can be calculated with the aid of the PC program PERIDOSE. While evaluating the radiation risk after ICRP, for the calculation of the effective dose, the advanced age of many patients has to be considered to prevent that, e.g., the high gonad doses do not overestimate the effective dose. (orig.)

  17. Biochemical and cellular mechanisms of low-dose effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L.E.; Booz, J.; Muehlensiepen, H.

    1988-01-01

    The question of health effects from small radiation doses remains open. Individual cells, when being hit by single elemental doses - in low-dose irradiation - react acutely and temporarily by altering control of enzyme activity, as is demonstrated for the case of thymidine kinase. This response is not constant in that it provides a temporary protection of enzyme activity against a second irradiation, by a mechanism likely to be via improved detoxification of intracellular radicals. It must be considered that in the low-dose region radiation may also exert protection against other challenges involving radicals, causing a net beneficial effect by temporarily shielding the hit cell against radicals produced by metabolism. Since molecular alterations leading to late effects are considered a consequence of the initial cellular response, late effects from small radiation doses do not necessarily adhere to a linear dose-effect relationship. The reality of the linear relationship between the risk of late effects from high doses to small doses is an assumption, for setting dose limits, but it must not be taken for predicting health detriment from low doses. (author)

  18. Osteoradionecrosis: Causes and prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) is one of the most serious complications arising from head and neck radiation therapy. Current research has shown that ORN represents nonhealing, dead bone and is not a state of infection. ORN is the result of functional and structural bony changes that may not be expressed for months or years. ORN may occur spontaneously or in response to wounding. Predisposing factors include absorbed radiation dose, fractionation, delivery modality, and dental status. Timing of dental extractions and other factors have also been shown to affect incidence. ORN may be reduced through early intraoral evaluation, treatment, and adequate healing time prior to beginning RT. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy has been beneficial in the prevention and treatment of ORN. It is of paramount importance for the medical community to recognize the factors that may reduce ORN incidence, endorse oral care protocols, and acknowledge the value of HBO therapy in the prevention and treatment of this disease. 60 references

  19. SU-F-P-19: Fetal Dose Estimate for a High-Dose Fluoroscopy Guided Intervention Using Modern Data Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moirano, J [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: An accurate dose estimate is necessary for effective patient management after a fetal exposure. In the case of a high-dose exposure, it is critical to use all resources available in order to make the most accurate assessment of the fetal dose. This work will demonstrate a methodology for accurate fetal dose estimation using tools that have recently become available in many clinics, and show examples of best practices for collecting data and performing the fetal dose calculation. Methods: A fetal dose estimate calculation was performed using modern data collection tools to determine parameters for the calculation. The reference point air kerma as displayed by the fluoroscopic system was checked for accuracy. A cumulative dose incidence map and DICOM header mining were used to determine the displayed reference point air kerma. Corrections for attenuation caused by the patient table and pad were measured and applied in order to determine the peak skin dose. The position and depth of the fetus was determined by ultrasound imaging and consultation with a radiologist. The data collected was used to determine a normalized uterus dose from Monte Carlo simulation data. Fetal dose values from this process were compared to other accepted calculation methods. Results: An accurate high-dose fetal dose estimate was made. Comparison to accepted legacy methods were were within 35% of estimated values. Conclusion: Modern data collection and reporting methods ease the process for estimation of fetal dose from interventional fluoroscopy exposures. Many aspects of the calculation can now be quantified rather than estimated, which should allow for a more accurate estimation of fetal dose.

  20. Intercomparison On Depth Dose Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohmah, N; Akhadi, M

    1996-01-01

    Intercomparation on personal dose evaluation system has been carried out between CSRSR-NAEA of Indonesia toward Standard Laboratory of JAERI (Japan) and ARL (Australia). The intercomparison was in 10 amm depth dose measurement , Hp (10), from the intercomparison result could be stated that personal depth dose measurement conducted by CSRSR was sufficiently good. Deviation of dose measurement result using personal dosemeter of TLD BG-1 type which were used by CSRSR in the intercomparison and routine photon personal dose monitoring was still in internationally agreed limit. Maximum deviation of reported doses by CSRSR compared to delivered doses for dosemeter irradiation by JAERI was -10.0 percent and by ARL was +29 percent. Maximum deviation permitted in personal dose monitoring is ± 50 percent