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Sample records for subpart doses caused

  1. Inadequate doses of hemodialysis. Predisposing factors, causes and prevention

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    Pehuén Fernández

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Patients receiving sub-optimal dose of hemodialysis have increased morbidity and mortality. The objectives of this study were to identify predisposing factors and causes of inadequate dialysis, and to design a practical algorithm for the management of these patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted. Ninety patients in chronic hemodialysis at Hospital Privado Universitario de Córdoba were included, during September 2015. Twenty two received sub-optimal dose of hemodialysis. Those with urea distribution volume (V greater than 40 l (72 kg body weight approximately are 11 times more likely (OR = 11.6; CI 95% = 3.2 to 51.7, p < 0.0001 to receive an inadequate dose of hemodialysis, than those with a smaller V. This situation is more frequent in men (OR = 3.5; 95% CI 1.01-15.8; p = 0.0292. V greater than 40 l was the only independent predictor of sub-dialysis in the multivariate analysis (OR = 10.3; 95% CI 2.8-37; p < 0.0004. The main cause of suboptimal dialysis was receiving a lower blood flow (Qb than the prescribed (336.4 ± 45.8 ml/min vs. 402.3 ± 28.8 ml/min respectively, p < 0.0001 (n = 18. Other causes were identified: shorter duration of the session (n = 2, vascular access recirculation (n = 1, and error in the samples (n = 1. In conclusion, the only independent predisposing factor found in this study for sub-optimal dialysis is V greater than 40 l. The main cause was receiving a slower Qb than prescribed. From these findings, an algorithm for the management of these patients was developed

  2. Methamphetamine treatment during development attenuates the dopaminergic deficits caused by subsequent high-dose methamphetamine administration

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    McFadden, Lisa M.; Hoonakker, Amanda J.; Vieira-Brock, Paula L.; Stout, Kristen A.; Sawada, Nicole M; Ellis, Jonathan D; Allen, Scott C.; Walters, Elliot T.; Nielsen, Shannon M.; Gibb, James W.; Alburges, Mario E.; Wilkins, Diana G.; Hanson, Glen R.; Fleckenstein, Annette E.

    2011-01-01

    Administration of high doses of methamphetamine (METH) causes persistent dopaminergic deficits in both nonhuman preclinical models and METH-dependent persons. Noteworthy, adolescent (i.e., postnatal day (PND) 40) rats are less susceptible to this damage than young adult (PND90) rats. In addition, biweekly treatment with METH, beginning at PND40 and continuing throughout development, prevents the persistent dopaminergic deficits caused by a “challenge” high-dose METH regimen when administered ...

  3. Enhanced epidermal dose caused by localized electron contamination from lead cutouts used in kilovoltage radiotherapy

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    Lye, J. E.; Butler, D. J.; Webb, D. V. [Australian Radiation and Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, Yallambie, Melbourne 3085 (Australia)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: To investigate and quantify electron contamination from the lead cutouts used in kilovoltage x-ray radiotherapy. Methods: The lead cutouts were modeled with the Monte Carlo EGSnrc user codes DOSXYZnrc and DOSRZnrc for x-ray beams ranging from 50 to 300 kV{sub p}. The results from the model were confirmed with Gafchromic film measurements. The model and measurements investigated the dose distribution with and without gladwrap shielding under the lead, and dose distributions with round, square, and serrated edge cutouts. Results: Large dose enhancement near the edges of the lead was observed due to electron contamination. At the epidermal/dermal border, there is double the dose at the edge of the lead compared to the central dose due to electron contamination for a 150 kV{sub p} beam and three times the dose for a 300 kV{sub p} beam. gladwrap shielding effectively removes the contaminant dose enhancement using ten and four layers for 300 and 150 kV{sub p} beams, respectively. Conclusions: The contaminant dose enhancement is undesirable as it could cause unnecessary erythema and hyperpigmentation at the border of the treated and untreated skin and lead to a poorer cosmetic outcome. The contamination is easily removed by gladwrap shielding placed under or around the lead cutout.

  4. Exposure to low-dose barium by drinking water causes hearing loss in mice.

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    Ohgami, Nobutaka; Hori, Sohjiro; Ohgami, Kyoko; Tamura, Haruka; Tsuzuki, Toyonori; Ohnuma, Shoko; Kato, Masashi

    2012-10-01

    We continuously ingest barium as a general element by drinking water and foods in our daily life. Exposure to high-dose barium (>100mg/kg/day) has been shown to cause physiological impairments. Direct administration of barium to inner ears by vascular perfusion has been shown to cause physiological impairments in inner ears. However, the toxic influence of oral exposure to low-dose barium on hearing levels has not been clarified in vivo. We analyzed the toxic influence of oral exposure to low-dose barium on hearing levels and inner ears in mice. We orally administered barium at low doses of 0.14 and 1.4 mg/kg/day to wild-type ICR mice by drinking water. The doses are equivalent to and 10-fold higher than the limit level (0.7 mg/l) of WHO health-based guidelines for drinking water, respectively. After 2-week exposure, hearing levels were measured by auditory brain stem responses and inner ears were morphologically analyzed. After 2-month exposure, tissue distribution of barium was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Low-dose barium in drinking water caused severe hearing loss in mice. Inner ears including inner and outer hair cells, stria vascularis and spiral ganglion neurons showed severe degeneration. The Barium-administered group showed significantly higher levels of barium in inner ears than those in the control group, while barium levels in bone did not show a significant difference between the two groups. Barium levels in other tissues including the cerebrum, cerebellum, heart, liver and kidney were undetectably low in both groups. Our results demonstrate for the first time that low-dose barium administered by drinking water specifically distributes to inner ears resulting in severe ototoxicity with degeneration of inner ears in mice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. High-dose Sulbactam Treatment for Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia Caused by Carbapenem-Resistant

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    In Beom Jeong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Several antibiotics can be used to treat ventilator-associated pneumonia caused by carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii (CRAB-VAP including high-dose sulbactam. However, the effectiveness of high-dose sulbactam therapy is not well known. We report our experience with high-dose sulbactam for treatment of CRAB-VAP. Methods Medical records of patients with CRAB-VAP who were given high-dose sulbactam between May 2013 and June 2015 were reviewed. Results Fifty-eight patients with CRAB-VAP were treated with high-dose sulbactam. The mean age was 72.0 ± 15.2 years, and the acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II score was 15.1 ± 5.10 at the time of CRAB-VAP diagnosis. Early clinical improvement was observed in 65.5% of patients, and 30-day mortality was 29.3%. Early clinical failure (odds ratio [OR]: 8.720, confidence interval [CI]: 1.346-56.484; p = 0.023 and APACHE II score ≥ 14 at CRAB-VAP diagnosis (OR: 10.934, CI: 1.047-114.148; p = 0.046 were associated with 30-day mortality. Conclusions High-dose sulbactam therapy may be effective for the treatment of CRAB-VAP. However, early clinical failure was observed in 35% of patients and was associated with poor outcome.

  6. Comparison of Data on Mutation Frequencies of Mice Caused by Radiation with Low Dose Model

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    Manabe, Yuichiro; Bando, Masako

    2013-09-01

    We propose low dose (LD) model, the extension of LDM model which was proposed in the previous paper [Y. Manabe et al.: J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 81 (2012) 104004] to estimate biological damage caused by irradiation. LD model takes account of cell death effect in addition to the proliferation, apoptosis, repair which were included in LDM model. As a typical example of estimation, we apply LD model to the experiment of mutation frequency on the responses induced by the exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. The most famous and extensive experiments are those summarized by Russell and Kelly [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 79 (1982) 539], which are known as ``mega-mouse project''. This provides us with important information of the frequencies of transmitted specific-locus mutations induced in mouse spermatogonia stem-cells. It is found that the numerical results of the mutation frequency of mice are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data: the LD model reproduces the total dose and dose rate dependence of data reasonably. In order to see such dose-rate dependence more explicitly, we introduce the dose-rate effectiveness factor (DREF). This represents a sort of dose rate dependent effect, which are to be competitive with proliferation effect of broken cells induced by irradiation.

  7. Assessment of doses caused by electrons in thin layers of tissue-equivalent materials, using MCNP.

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    Heide, Bernd

    2013-10-01

    Absorbed doses caused by electron irradiation were calculated with Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP) for thin layers of tissue-equivalent materials. The layers were so thin that the calculation of energy deposition was on the border of the scope of MCNP. Therefore, in this article application of three different methods of calculation of energy deposition is discussed. This was done by means of two scenarios: in the first one, electrons were emitted from the centre of a sphere of water and also recorded in that sphere; and in the second, an irradiation with the PTB Secondary Standard BSS2 was modelled, where electrons were emitted from an (90)Sr/(90)Y area source and recorded inside a cuboid phantom made of tissue-equivalent material. The speed and accuracy of the different methods were of interest. While a significant difference in accuracy was visible for one method in the first scenario, the difference in accuracy of the three methods was insignificant for the second one. Considerable differences in speed were found for both scenarios. In order to demonstrate the need for calculating the dose in thin small zones, a third scenario was constructed and simulated as well. The third scenario was nearly equal to the second one, but a pike of lead was assumed to be inside the phantom in addition. A dose enhancement (caused by the pike of lead) of ∼113 % was recorded for a thin hollow cylinder at a depth of 0.007 cm, which the basal-skin layer is referred to in particular. Dose enhancements between 68 and 88 % were found for a slab with a radius of 0.09 cm for all depths. All dose enhancements were hardly noticeable for a slab with a cross-sectional area of 1 cm(2), which is usually applied to operational radiation protection.

  8. Mitochondrial proteomic alterations caused by long-term low-dose copper exposure in mouse cortex.

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    Lin, Xuemei; Wei, Gang; Huang, Zhijun; Qu, Zhongsen; Huang, Xinfeng; Xu, Hua; Liu, Jianjun; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Yang, Xifei

    2016-11-30

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in neurotoxicity caused by exposure of various chemicals such as copper. However, the effects of long-term low-dose copper exposure on mitochondrial proteome remain unclear. In this study, we found the treatment of copper (0.13ppm copper sulfate in drinking water) for 12 months caused abnormal expression of a total of 13 mitochondrial proteins (7 up-regulated and 6 down-regulated) as revealed by two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry in mouse cortex. Protein functional analysis revealed that these differentially expressed proteins mainly included apoptosis-associated proteins, axon guidance-associated proteins, axonogenesis-associated proteins and mitochondrial respiratory chain complex. Among these differentially expressed mitochondrial proteins, GRP75 (75kDa glucose-regulated protein) and GRP78 (78kDa glucose-regulated protein) were found to be significantly down-regulated as confirmed by Western-blot analysis. The down-regulation of GRP75 was shown to promote apoptosis. The down-regulation of GRP78/BiP could up-regulate endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress mediators and thus cause apoptosis. Our study suggested that these differentially expressed mitochondrial proteins such as GRP75 and GRP78 could be involved in neurotoxicity caused by long-term low-dose copper exposure and serve as potential molecular targets for the treatment of copper neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Methamphetamine treatment during development attenuates the dopaminergic deficits caused by subsequent high-dose methamphetamine administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Lisa M; Hoonakker, Amanda J; Vieira-Brock, Paula L; Stout, Kristen A; Sawada, Nicole M; Ellis, Jonathan D; Allen, Scott C; Walters, Elliot T; Nielsen, Shannon M; Gibb, James W; Alburges, Mario E; Wilkins, Diana G; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2011-08-01

    Administration of high doses of methamphetamine (METH) causes persistent dopaminergic deficits in both nonhuman preclinical models and METH-dependent persons. Noteworthy, adolescent [i.e., postnatal day (PND) 40] rats are less susceptible to this damage than young adult (PND90) rats. In addition, biweekly treatment with METH, beginning at PND40 and continuing throughout development, prevents the persistent dopaminergic deficits caused by a "challenge" high-dose METH regimen when administered at PND90. Mechanisms underlying this "resistance" were thus investigated. Results revealed that biweekly METH treatment throughout development attenuated both the acute and persistent deficits in VMAT2 function, as well as the acute hyperthermia, caused by a challenge METH treatment. Pharmacokinetic alterations did not appear to contribute to the protection afforded by the biweekly treatment. Maintenance of METH-induced hyperthermia abolished the protection against both the acute and persistent VMAT2-associated deficits suggesting that alterations in thermoregulation were caused by exposure of rats to METH during development. These findings suggest METH during development prevents METH-induced hyperthermia and the consequent METH-related neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Dose variations caused by setup errors in intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy: A PRESAGE study

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    Teng, Kieyin [School of Medical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia); Gagliardi, Frank [School of Medical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia); William Buckland Radiotherapy Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Alqathami, Mamdooh [School of Medical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia); Ackerly, Trevor [William Buckland Radiotherapy Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Geso, Moshi, E-mail: moshi.geso@rmit.edu.au [School of Medical Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia)

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) requires tight margins around the tumor, thus producing a steep dose gradient between the tumor and the surrounding healthy tissue. Any setup errors might become clinically significant. To date, no study has been performed to evaluate the dosimetric variations caused by setup errors with a 3-dimensional dosimeter, the PRESAGE. This research aimed to evaluate the potential effect that setup errors have on the dose distribution of intracranial SRT. Computed tomography (CT) simulation of a CIRS radiosurgery head phantom was performed with 1.25-mm slice thickness. An ideal treatment plan was generated using Brainlab iPlan. A PRESAGE was made for every treatment with and without errors. A prescan using the optical CT scanner was carried out. Before treatment, the phantom was imaged using Brainlab ExacTrac. Actual radiotherapy treatments with and without errors were carried out with the Novalis treatment machine. Postscan was performed with an optical CT scanner to analyze the dose irradiation. The dose variation between treatments with and without errors was determined using a 3-dimensional gamma analysis. Errors are clinically insignificant when the passing ratio of the gamma analysis is 95% and above. Errors were clinically significant when the setup errors exceeded a 0.7-mm translation and a 0.5° rotation. The results showed that a 3-mm translation shift in the superior-inferior (SI), right-left (RL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions and 2° couch rotation produced a passing ratio of 53.1%. Translational and rotational errors of 1.5 mm and 1°, respectively, generated a passing ratio of 62.2%. Translation shift of 0.7 mm in the directions of SI, RL, and AP and a 0.5° couch rotation produced a passing ratio of 96.2%. Preventing the occurrences of setup errors in intracranial SRT treatment is extremely important as errors greater than 0.7 mm and 0.5° alter the dose distribution. The geometrical displacements affect dose delivery

  11. Dose variations caused by setup errors in intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy: a PRESAGE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Kieyin; Gagliardi, Frank; Alqathami, Mamdooh; Ackerly, Trevor; Geso, Moshi

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) requires tight margins around the tumor, thus producing a steep dose gradient between the tumor and the surrounding healthy tissue. Any setup errors might become clinically significant. To date, no study has been performed to evaluate the dosimetric variations caused by setup errors with a 3-dimensional dosimeter, the PRESAGE. This research aimed to evaluate the potential effect that setup errors have on the dose distribution of intracranial SRT. Computed tomography (CT) simulation of a CIRS radiosurgery head phantom was performed with 1.25-mm slice thickness. An ideal treatment plan was generated using Brainlab iPlan. A PRESAGE was made for every treatment with and without errors. A prescan using the optical CT scanner was carried out. Before treatment, the phantom was imaged using Brainlab ExacTrac. Actual radiotherapy treatments with and without errors were carried out with the Novalis treatment machine. Postscan was performed with an optical CT scanner to analyze the dose irradiation. The dose variation between treatments with and without errors was determined using a 3-dimensional gamma analysis. Errors are clinically insignificant when the passing ratio of the gamma analysis is 95% and above. Errors were clinically significant when the setup errors exceeded a 0.7-mm translation and a 0.5° rotation. The results showed that a 3-mm translation shift in the superior-inferior (SI), right-left (RL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions and 2° couch rotation produced a passing ratio of 53.1%. Translational and rotational errors of 1.5mm and 1°, respectively, generated a passing ratio of 62.2%. Translation shift of 0.7mm in the directions of SI, RL, and AP and a 0.5° couch rotation produced a passing ratio of 96.2%. Preventing the occurrences of setup errors in intracranial SRT treatment is extremely important as errors greater than 0.7mm and 0.5° alter the dose distribution. The geometrical displacements affect dose delivery to

  12. Selective learning impairment of delayed reinforcement autoshaped behavior caused by low doses of trimethyltin.

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    Cohen, C A; Messing, R B; Sparber, S B

    1987-01-01

    The organometal neurotoxin trimethyltin (TMT), induces impaired learning and memory for various tasks. However, administration is also associated with other "non-specific" behavioral changes which may be responsible for effects on conditioned behaviors. To determine if TMT treatment causes a specific learning impairment, three experiments were done using variations of a delay of reinforcement autoshaping task in which rats learn to associate the presentation and retraction of a lever with the delivery of a food pellet reinforcer. No significant effects of TMT treatment were found with a short (4 s) delay of reinforcement, indicating that rats were motivated and had the sensorimotor capacity for learning. When the delay was increased to 6 s, 3.0 or 6.0 mg TMT/kg produced dose-related reductions in behaviors directed towards the lever. Performance of a group given 7.5 mg TMT/kg, while still impaired relative to controls, appeared to be better than the performance of groups given lower doses. This paradoxical effect was investigated with a latent inhibition paradigm, in which rats were pre-exposed to the Skinner boxes for several sessions without delivery of food reinforcement. Control rats showed retardation of autoshaping when food reinforcement was subsequently introduced. Rats given 7.5 mg TMT/kg exhibited elevated levels of lever responding during pre-exposure and autoshaping sessions. The results indicate that 7.5 mg TMT/kg produces learning impairments which are confounded by hyperreactivity to the environment and an inability to suppress behavior toward irrelevant stimuli. In contrast, low doses of TMT cause learning impairments which are not confounded by hyperreactivity, and may prove to be useful models for studying specific associational dysfunctions.

  13. Psilocybin dose-dependently causes delayed, transient headaches in healthy volunteers.

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    Johnson, Matthew W; Sewell, R Andrew; Griffiths, Roland R

    2012-06-01

    Psilocybin is a well-characterized classic hallucinogen (psychedelic) with a long history of religious use by indigenous cultures, and nonmedical use in modern societies. Although psilocybin is structurally related to migraine medications, and case studies suggest that psilocybin may be efficacious in treatment of cluster headache, little is known about the relationship between psilocybin and headache. This double-blind study examined a broad range of psilocybin doses (0, 5, 10, 20, and 30 mg/70 kg) on headache in 18 healthy participants. Psilocybin frequently caused headache, the incidence, duration, and severity of which increased in a dose-dependent manner. All headaches had delayed onset, were transient, and lasted no more than a day after psilocybin administration. Possible mechanisms for these observations are discussed, and include induction of delayed headache through nitric oxide release. These data suggest that headache is an adverse event to be expected with the nonmedical use of psilocybin-containing mushrooms as well as the administration of psilocybin in human research. Headaches were neither severe nor disabling, and should not present a barrier to future psilocybin research. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ambient and Dosed Exposure to Quaternary Ammonium Disinfectants Causes Neural Tube Defects in Rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrubec, Terry C; Melin, Vanessa E; Shea, Caroline S; Ferguson, Elizabeth E; Garofola, Craig; Repine, Claire M; Chapman, Tyler W; Patel, Hiral R; Razvi, Reza M; Sugrue, Jesse E; Potineni, Haritha; Magnin-Bissel, Geraldine; Hunt, Patricia A

    2017-08-15

    Quaternary ammonium compounds are a large class of chemicals used for their antimicrobial and antistatic properties. Two common quaternary ammonium compounds, alkyldimethylbenzyl ammonium chloride (ADBAC) and didecyldimethyl ammonium chloride (DDAC), are combined in common cleaners and disinfectants. Introduction of a cleaner containing ADBAC+DDAC in the vivarium caused neural tube defects (NTDs) in mice and rats. To further evaluate this finding, male and female mice were dosed in the feed at 60 or 120 mg/kg/day, or by oral gavage at 7.5, 15, or 30 mg/kg ADBAC+DDAC. Mice also received ambient exposure to ADBAC+DDAC from the disinfectant used in the mouse room. Embryos were evaluated on gestational day 10 for NTDs, and fetuses were evaluated on gestational day 18 for gross and skeletal malformations. We found increased NTDs with exposure to ADBAC+DDAC in both rats and mice. The NTDs persisted for two generations after cessation of exposure. Notably, male exposure alone was sufficient to cause NTDs. Equally significant, ambient exposure from disinfectant use in the vivarium, influenced the levels of NTDs to a greater extent than oral dosing. No gross or significant axial skeletal malformations were observed in late gestation fetuses. Placental abnormalities and late gestation fetal deaths were increased at 120 mg/kg/day, which might explain the lack of malformations observed in late gestation fetuses. These results demonstrate that ADBAC+DDAC in combination are teratogenic to rodents. Given the increased use of these disinfectants, further evaluation of their safety in humans and their contribution to health and disease is essential. Birth Defects Research 109:1166-1178, 2017. © 2017 The Authors. Birth Defects Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 The Authors. Birth Defects Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Repeated Low-Dose Influenza Virus Infection Causes Severe Disease in Mice: a Model for Vaccine Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yufeng; Wang, Xiang; Zhang, Hongbo; Tang, Xinying; Li, Min; Yao, Jufang; Jin, Xia; Ertl, Hildegund C J; Zhou, Dongming

    2015-08-01

    Influenza infection causes severe disease and death in humans. In traditional vaccine research and development, a single high-dose virus challenge of animals is used to evaluate vaccine efficacy. This type of challenge model may have limitations. In the present study, we developed a novel challenge model by infecting mice repeatedly in short intervals with low doses of influenza A virus. Our results show that compared to a single high-dose infection, mice that received repeated low-dose challenges showed earlier morbidity and mortality and more severe disease. They developed higher vial loads, more severe lung pathology, and greater inflammatory responses and generated only limited influenza A virus-specific B and T cell responses. A commercial trivalent influenza vaccine protected mice against a single high and lethal dose of influenza A virus but was ineffective against repeated low-dose virus challenges. Overall, our data show that the repeated low-dose influenza A virus infection mouse model is more stringent and may thus be more suitable to select for highly efficacious influenza vaccines. Influenza epidemics and pandemics pose serious threats to public health. Animal models are crucial for evaluating the efficacy of influenza vaccines. Traditional models based on a single high-dose virus challenge may have limitations. Here, we describe a new mouse model based on repeated low-dose influenza A virus challenges given within a short period. Repeated low-dose challenges caused more severe disease in mice, associated with higher viral loads and increased lung inflammation and reduced influenza A virus-specific B and T cell responses. A commercial influenza vaccine that was shown to protect mice from high-dose challenge was ineffective against repeated low-dose challenges. Overall, our results show that the low-dose repeated-challenge model is more stringent and may therefore be better suited for preclinical vaccine efficacy studies. Copyright © 2015, American

  16. Evaluating correlation between geometrical relationship and dose difference caused by respiratory motion using statistical analysis

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    Shin, Dong Seok; Kim, Dong Su; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Kyeong Hyeon; Yoon, Do Kun; Suh, Tae Suk [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Seong Hee [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Min Seok [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Yu Yoon [Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Three-dimensional dose (3D dose) can consider coverage of moving target, however it is difficult to provide dosimetric effect which occurs by respiratory motions. Four-dimensional dose (4D dose) which uses deformable image registration (DIR) algorithm from four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images can consider dosimetric effect by respiratory motions. The dose difference between 3D dose and 4D dose can be varied according to the geometrical relationship between a planning target volume (PTV) and an organ at risk (OAR). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the correlation between the overlap volume histogram (OVH), which quantitatively shows the geometrical relationship between the PTV and OAR, and the dose differences. In conclusion, no significant statistical correlation was found between the OVH and dose differences. However, it was confirmed that a higher difference between the 3D and 4D doses could occur in cases that have smaller OVH value. No significant statistical correlation was found between the OVH and dose differences. However, it was confirmed that a higher difference between the 3D and 4D doses could occur in cases that have smaller OVH value.

  17. Low Dose Radiation Hypersensitivity is Caused by p53-dependent Apoptosis

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    Enns, L; Bogen, K; Wizniak, J; Murtha, A; Weinfeld, M

    2004-04-08

    Exposure to environmental radiation and the application of new clinical modalities, such as radioimmunotherapy, have heightened the need to understand cellular responses to low dose and low-dose rate ionizing radiation. Many tumor cell lines have been observed to exhibit a hypersensitivity to radiation doses below 50 cGy, which manifests as a significant deviation from the clonogenic survival response predicted by a linear-quadratic fit to higher doses. However, the underlying processes for this phenomenon remain unclear. Using a gel microdrop/flow cytometry assay to monitor single cell proliferation at early times post irradiation, we examined the response of human A549 lung carcinoma, T98G glioma and MCF7 breast carcinoma cell lines exposed to gamma radiation doses from 0 to 200 cGy delivered at 0.18 and 22 cGy/min. The A549 and T98G cells, but not MCF7 cells, showed the marked hypersensitivity at doses <50 cGy. To further characterize the low-dose hypersensitivity, we examined the influence of low-dose radiation on cell cycle status and apoptosis by assays for active caspase-3 and phosphatidylserine translocation (annexin-V binding). We observed that caspase-3 activation and annexin-V binding mirrored the proliferation curves for the cell lines. Furthermore, the low-dose hypersensitivity and annexin-V binding to irradiated A549 and T98G cells were eliminated by treating the cells with pifithrin, an inhibitor of p53. When p53-inactive cell lines (2800T skin fibroblasts and HCT116 colorectal carcinoma cells) were examined for similar patterns, we found that there was no HRS and apoptosis was not detectable by annexin-V or caspase-3 assays. Our data therefore suggest that low-dose hypersensitivity is associated with p53-dependent apoptosis.

  18. Osteoporosis markers on low-dose lung cancer screening chest computed tomography scans predict all-cause mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buckens, C. F.; van der Graaf, Y.; Verkooijen, H. M.; Mali, W. P.; Isgum, I.; Mol, C. P.; Verhaar, H. J.; Vliegenthart, R.; Oudkerk, M.; van Aalst, C. M.; de Koning, H. J.; de Jong, P.A.

    Objectives Further survival benefits may be gained from low-dose chest computed tomography (CT) by assessing vertebral fractures and bone density. We sought to assess the association between CT-measured vertebral fractures and bone density with all-cause mortality in lung cancer screening

  19. Low doses of ionizing radiation to mammalian cells may rather control than cause DNA damage

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    Feinendegen, L.E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Medical Dept.; Bond, V.P. [Washington State Univ., Richland, WA (United States); Sondhaus, C.A. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Radiology and Radiation Control Office; Altman, K.I. [Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics

    1998-12-31

    This report examines the origin of tissue effects that may follow from different cellular responses to low-dose irradiation, using published data. Two principal categories of cellular responses are considered. One response category relates to the probability of radiation-induced DNA damage. The other category consists of low-dose induced metabolic changes that induce mechanisms of DNA damage mitigation, which do not operate at high levels of exposure. Modeled in this way, tissue is treated as a complex adaptive system. The interaction of the various cellular responses results in a net tissue dose-effect relation that is likely to deviate from linearity in the low-dose region. This suggests that the LNT hypothesis should be reexamined. This paper aims at demonstrating tissue effects as an expression of cellular responses, both damaging and defensive, in relation to the energy deposited in cell mass, by use of microdosimetric concepts.

  20. Appropriate antivenom doses for six types of envenomations caused by snakes in taiwan

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    C Chieh-Fan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Six of the 15 species of venomous snakes found in Taiwan are responsible for most of the clinically significant envenomations in the country. These species are: Trimeresurus mucrosquamatus, Trimeresurus stejnegeri, Naja atra, Bungarus multicinctus, Deinagkistrodon acutus and Daboia russelii siamensis, which together can be subdivided into three groups based on their venom effects. Primary treatment consists of rapid administration of appropriate antivenoms. The present study aimed to identify a proper dose of antivenom for each snake group as well as to describe hemorrhagic, neurotoxic, and mixed effects of their venoms. A retrospective chart review identified 72 snakebite cases referred to an emergency department. Data on epidemiology, examination findings, snake identification, treatment, antivenom dose and complications were collected. After excluding 14 patients, data from 58 victims were analyzed. Most studied cases were male (86%. Significantly higher doses of antivenom were administered against neurotoxic envenomations (mean dose: three vials compared with the other two (p < 0.05. Moreover, patients affected by neurotoxic bites were more likely to develop blurred vision and other complications (p < 0.05. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that neurotoxic envenomation was a risk factor for complications (OR: 8.84, 95% CI: 1.06-73.73. Neurotoxic envenomations and complication occurrence were positively correlated with antivenom dosage. In conclusion, patients affected by neurotoxic envenomations received higher doses of antivenom than others whereas incidence of complications was associated with higher antivenom doses.

  1. Site-specific range uncertainties caused by dose calculation algorithms for proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuemann, J.; Dowdell, S.; Grassberger, C.; Min, C. H.; Paganetti, H.

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the possibility of introducing site-specific range margins to replace current generic margins in proton therapy. Further, the goal was to study the potential of reducing margins with current analytical dose calculations methods. For this purpose we investigate the impact of complex patient geometries on the capability of analytical dose calculation algorithms to accurately predict the range of proton fields. Dose distributions predicted by an analytical pencil-beam algorithm were compared with those obtained using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations (TOPAS). A total of 508 passively scattered treatment fields were analyzed for seven disease sites (liver, prostate, breast, medulloblastoma-spine, medulloblastoma-whole brain, lung and head and neck). Voxel-by-voxel comparisons were performed on two-dimensional distal dose surfaces calculated by pencil-beam and MC algorithms to obtain the average range differences and root mean square deviation for each field for the distal position of the 90% dose level (R90) and the 50% dose level (R50). The average dose degradation of the distal falloff region, defined as the distance between the distal position of the 80% and 20% dose levels (R80-R20), was also analyzed. All ranges were calculated in water-equivalent distances. Considering total range uncertainties and uncertainties from dose calculation alone, we were able to deduce site-specific estimations. For liver, prostate and whole brain fields our results demonstrate that a reduction of currently used uncertainty margins is feasible even without introducing MC dose calculations. We recommend range margins of 2.8% + 1.2 mm for liver and prostate treatments and 3.1% + 1.2 mm for whole brain treatments, respectively. On the other hand, current margins seem to be insufficient for some breast, lung and head and neck patients, at least if used generically. If no case specific adjustments are applied, a generic margin of 6.3% + 1.2 mm would be

  2. Combined exposure to low doses of pesticides causes decreased birth weights in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hass, Ulla; Christiansen, Sofie; Petersen, Marta Axelstad

    2017-01-01

    Decreased birth weight is a common effect of many pesticides in reproductive toxicity studies, but there are no empirical data on how pesticides act in combination on this endpoint. We hypothesized that a mixture of six pesticides (cyromazine, MCPB, pirimicarb, quinoclamine, thiram, and ziram......) would decrease birth weight, and that these mixture effects could be predicted by the Dose Addition model. Data for the predictions were obtained from the Draft Assessment Reports of the individual pesticides. A mixture of equi-effective doses of these pesticides was tested in two studies in Wistar rats......, showing mixture effects in good agreement with the additivity predictions. Significantly lower birth weights were observed when compounds were present at individual doses below their no-observed adverse effect levels (NOAELs). These results emphasize the need for cumulative risk assessment of pesticides...

  3. Combined exposure to low doses of pesticides causes decreased birth weights in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, Ulla; Christiansen, Sofie; Axelstad, Marta; Scholze, Martin; Boberg, Julie

    2017-09-01

    Decreased birth weight is a common effect of many pesticides in reproductive toxicity studies, but there are no empirical data on how pesticides act in combination on this endpoint. We hypothesized that a mixture of six pesticides (cyromazine, MCPB, pirimicarb, quinoclamine, thiram, and ziram) would decrease birth weight, and that these mixture effects could be predicted by the Dose Addition model. Data for the predictions were obtained from the Draft Assessment Reports of the individual pesticides. A mixture of equi-effective doses of these pesticides was tested in two studies in Wistar rats, showing mixture effects in good agreement with the additivity predictions. Significantly lower birth weights were observed when compounds were present at individual doses below their no-observed adverse effect levels (NOAELs). These results emphasize the need for cumulative risk assessment of pesticides to avoid potentially serious impact of mixed exposure on prenatal development and pregnancy in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Image quality and dose differences caused by vendor-specific image processing of neonatal radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sensakovic, William F.; O' Dell, M.C.; Letter, Haley; Kohler, Nathan; Rop, Baiywo; Cook, Jane; Logsdon, Gregory; Varich, Laura [Florida Hospital, Imaging Administration, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Image processing plays an important role in optimizing image quality and radiation dose in projection radiography. Unfortunately commercial algorithms are black boxes that are often left at or near vendor default settings rather than being optimized. We hypothesize that different commercial image-processing systems, when left at or near default settings, create significant differences in image quality. We further hypothesize that image-quality differences can be exploited to produce images of equivalent quality but lower radiation dose. We used a portable radiography system to acquire images on a neonatal chest phantom and recorded the entrance surface air kerma (ESAK). We applied two image-processing systems (Optima XR220amx, by GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI; and MUSICA{sup 2} by Agfa HealthCare, Mortsel, Belgium) to the images. Seven observers (attending pediatric radiologists and radiology residents) independently assessed image quality using two methods: rating and matching. Image-quality ratings were independently assessed by each observer on a 10-point scale. Matching consisted of each observer matching GE-processed images and Agfa-processed images with equivalent image quality. A total of 210 rating tasks and 42 matching tasks were performed and effective dose was estimated. Median Agfa-processed image-quality ratings were higher than GE-processed ratings. Non-diagnostic ratings were seen over a wider range of doses for GE-processed images than for Agfa-processed images. During matching tasks, observers matched image quality between GE-processed images and Agfa-processed images acquired at a lower effective dose (11 ± 9 μSv; P < 0.0001). Image-processing methods significantly impact perceived image quality. These image-quality differences can be exploited to alter protocols and produce images of equivalent image quality but lower doses. Those purchasing projection radiography systems or third-party image-processing software should be aware that image

  5. Low-dose radiation employed in diagnostic imaging causes genetic effects in cultured cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponzinibbio, Maria V.; Peral-Garcia, Pilar; Seoane, Analia (Inst. de Genetica Veterinaria, Univ. Nacional de La Plata CONICET, La Plata (Argentina)), e-mail: aseoane@fcv.unlp.edu.ar; Crudeli, Cintia (Agencia Nacional de Promocion Cientifica y Tecnologica, La Plata (Argentina))

    2010-11-15

    Background: Exposure to environmental, diagnostic, and occupational sources of radiation frequently involves low doses. Although these doses have no immediately noticeable impact on human health there is great interest in their long-term biological effects. Purpose: To assess immediate and time-delayed DNA damage in two cell lines exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation by using the comet assay and micronucleus test, and to compare these two techniques in the analysis of low-dose induced genotoxicity. Material and Methods: CHO and MRC-5 cells were exposed to 50 milliSievert (mSv) of ionizing radiation and assayed immediately after irradiation and at 16 or 12 passages post-irradiation, respectively. Comet assay and micronucleus test were employed. Results: The comet assay values observed in 50 mSv-treated cells were significantly higher than in the control group for both sample times and cell lines (P < 0.001). Micronuclei frequencies were higher in treated cells than in the control group (P < 0.01, CHO cells passage 16; P < 0.05, MRC-5 cells immediately after exposure; P < 0.01 MRC-5 cells passage 12). Correlation analysis between the two techniques was statistically significant (correlation coefficient 0.82, P < 0.05 and correlation coefficient 0.86, P < 0.05 for CHO and MRC-5 cells, respectively). Cells scored at passages 12 or 16 showed more damage than those scored immediately after exposure in both cell lines (no statistically significant differences). Conclusion: Cytomolecular and cytogenetic damage was observed in cells exposed to very low doses of X-rays and their progeny. A single low dose of ionizing radiation was sufficient to induce such response, indicating that mammalian cells are exquisitely sensitive to it. Comet and micronucleus assays are sensitive enough to assess this damage, although the former seems to be more efficient

  6. Image quality and dose differences caused by vendor-specific image processing of neonatal radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensakovic, William F; O'Dell, M Cody; Letter, Haley; Kohler, Nathan; Rop, Baiywo; Cook, Jane; Logsdon, Gregory; Varich, Laura

    2016-10-01

    Image processing plays an important role in optimizing image quality and radiation dose in projection radiography. Unfortunately commercial algorithms are black boxes that are often left at or near vendor default settings rather than being optimized. We hypothesize that different commercial image-processing systems, when left at or near default settings, create significant differences in image quality. We further hypothesize that image-quality differences can be exploited to produce images of equivalent quality but lower radiation dose. We used a portable radiography system to acquire images on a neonatal chest phantom and recorded the entrance surface air kerma (ESAK). We applied two image-processing systems (Optima XR220amx, by GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI; and MUSICA(2) by Agfa HealthCare, Mortsel, Belgium) to the images. Seven observers (attending pediatric radiologists and radiology residents) independently assessed image quality using two methods: rating and matching. Image-quality ratings were independently assessed by each observer on a 10-point scale. Matching consisted of each observer matching GE-processed images and Agfa-processed images with equivalent image quality. A total of 210 rating tasks and 42 matching tasks were performed and effective dose was estimated. Median Agfa-processed image-quality ratings were higher than GE-processed ratings. Non-diagnostic ratings were seen over a wider range of doses for GE-processed images than for Agfa-processed images. During matching tasks, observers matched image quality between GE-processed images and Agfa-processed images acquired at a lower effective dose (11 ± 9 μSv; P Image-processing methods significantly impact perceived image quality. These image-quality differences can be exploited to alter protocols and produce images of equivalent image quality but lower doses. Those purchasing projection radiography systems or third-party image-processing software should be aware that image processing can

  7. Effect of infectious dose and season on development of hemorrhagic pneumonia in mink caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, Charlotte Mark; Chriél, Mariann; Jensen, Trine Hammer

    2013-01-01

    Hemorrhagic pneumonia is an acute and fatal disease of farmed mink caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The pathogenesis of this disease has not yet been resolved. Mink are the only animals known to be susceptible to acute, contagious, and fatal lung infections caused by P. aeruginosa. The purpose...... of this study was to investigate the correlation between dose-response and season of infection and to clarify whether Danish mink are carriers of P. aeruginosa on their nasal mucosa during the season for hemorrhagic pneumonia. To elucidate the pathogenesis of the disease, an infectious dose-response trial...... was carried out on adult mink and mink kits, both in the season for hemorrhagic pneumonia (November) as well as out of season (July). It proved difficult to infect mink via the intra-nasal route. Only 4 out of 60 infected mink developed clinical disease and were euthanized, all of them in November...

  8. A Case of Teicoplanin-Induced Pancytopenia Caused by Excessive Dosing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hye Min; Choi, Moon Hee; Yang, Yoo Whooi

    2016-01-01

    Teicoplanin is reported to be as effective as vancomycin but with minimal side effects. We report a case of teicoplanin-induced pancytopenia, which has not been demonstrated previously. A 44-year-old man with tetraplegia was treated with a diagnosis of urinary tract infection and pneumonia, and a high-dose of teicoplanin (400 mg every 12 hours) was administered for 4 days inadvertently. Although the infection rapidly improved, the patient developed pancytopenia by the fourth day of teicoplanin therapy, which was improved after reducing the dose of teicoplanin (200 mg/d). Our patient represents a probable case of teicoplanin-induced pancytopenia with adverse drug reaction probability score of 6.

  9. A case of gait disturbance caused by low-dose gabapentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanao-Kanda M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Megumi Kanao-Kanda, Hirotsugu Kanda, Osamu Takahata, Takayuki Kunisawa Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, Asahikawa, Hokkaido, Japan Abstract: Gabapentin, an anticonvulsant agent, is now often used for the treatment of neuropathic pain all over the world. It is unclear whether the combined use of gabapentin, sodium valproate, and flunitrazepam results in enhancement of the side effect, a gait disturbance. A 60-year-old man was taking oral sodium valproate for symptomatic epilepsy after a brain contusion and flunitrazepam to relieve insomnia. Oral gabapentin therapy was started for suspected neuropathic pain. Although the initial dose of oral gabapentin (200 mg relieved the pain, the lower extremities became weak, resulting in a gait disturbance. The therapy was restarted with a halved dose, and this resolved the gait disturbance and relieved the pain. Keywords: gabapentin, gait disturbance, side effect, neuropathic pain

  10. Cumulative radiation dose caused by radiologic studies in critically ill trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Patrick K; Gracias, Vicente H; Maidment, Andrew D A; O'Shea, Michael; Reilly, Patrick M; Schwab, C William

    2004-09-01

    Critically ill trauma patients undergo many radiologic studies, but the cumulative radiation dose is unknown. The purpose of this study was to estimate the cumulative effective dose (CED) of radiation resulting from radiologic studies in critically ill trauma patients. The study group was composed of trauma patients at an urban Level I trauma center with surgical intensive care unit length of stay (LOS) greater than 30 days. The radiology records were reviewed. A typical effective dose per study for each type of plain film radiograph, computed tomographic scan, fluoroscopic study, and nuclear medicine study was used to calculate CED. Forty-six patients met criteria. The mean surgical intensive care unit and hospital LOS were 42.7 +/- 14.0 and 59.5 +/- 28.5 days, respectively. The mean Injury Severity Score was 32.2 +/- 15.0. The mean number of studies per patient was 70.1 +/- 29.0 plain film radiographs, 7.8 +/- 4.1 computed tomographic scans, 2.5 +/- 2.6 fluoroscopic studies, and 0.065 +/- 0.33 nuclear medicine study. The mean CED was 106 +/- 59 mSv per patient (range, 11-289 mSv; median, 104 mSv). Among age, mechanism, Injury Severity Score, and LOS, there was no statistically significant predictor of high CED. The mean CED in the study group was 30 times higher than the average yearly radiation dose from all sources for individuals in the United States. The theoretical additional morbidity attributable to radiologic studies was 0.78%. From a radiobiologic perspective, risk-to-benefit ratios of radiologic studies are favorable, given the importance of medical information obtained. Current practice patterns regarding use of radiologic studies appear to be acceptable.

  11. Toxoplasma gondii infection causes structural changes in the jejunum of rats infected with different inoculum doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicentino-Vieira, Suellen Laís; Góis, Marcelo Biondaro; Trevizan, Aline Rosa; de Lima, Lainy Leiny; Leatte, Elen Paula; Nogueira de Melo, Gessilda de Alcântara; Garcia, João Luiz; Araújo, Eduardo José de Almeida; Sant'Ana, Débora de Mello Gonçales

    2017-12-15

    To evaluate the mucosal tunic and submucosal plexus of the jejunum of rats infected with different inoculum doses of Toxoplasma gondii. Rats were infected with different inoculum doses (50, 500, 1000 and 5000 oocysts) of the T. gondii for 30days, while a control group (CG) received saline solution. Blood and feces were collected before euthanasia for analysis of blood and fecal leukocytes (LEs). Histological analysis of the mucosa, submucosa, villi, crypts and enterocytes were performed. Goblet cells, intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and Paneth cells were quantified. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess enteroendocrine serotonergic (5HT-IR) cells, proliferative cells (PCNA + ) and mast cells. Whole mounts were obtained to determine the total submucosal neurons by Giemsa staining and metabolically active neurons (NADH-d + ), nitrergic neurons (NADPH-d + ) and glial cells (S100). An increase in blood LEs was observed 30days post-infection (dpi). Fecal LEs were more abundant in the feces in all infected groups at 21 dpi when compared to the CG. The number of IELs, sulfomucin-producing goblet cells, Paneth cells, PCNA + cells and mast cells increased, whereas the number of 5HT-IR cells decreased. The jejunal architecture was altered, with atrophy of the mucosa, submucosa, villi and crypts. The number of total submucosal neurons decreased, but the NADPH-d + subpopulation increased. The results show how chronic toxoplasmic infection affects the tissue and cellular composition of the rat jejunum. These structural changes tend to intensify with the inoculum dose, demonstrating the importance of the parasitic load on intestinal alterations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Low Doses of Oxygen Ion Irradiation Cause Acute Damage to Hematopoietic Cells in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhui Chang

    Full Text Available One of the major health risks to astronauts is radiation on long-duration space missions. Space radiation from sun and galactic cosmic rays consists primarily of 85% protons, 14% helium nuclei and 1% high-energy high-charge (HZE particles, such as oxygen (16O, carbon, silicon, and iron ions. HZE particles exhibit dense linear tracks of ionization associated with clustered DNA damage and often high relative biological effectiveness (RBE. Therefore, new knowledge of risks from HZE particle exposures must be obtained. In the present study, we investigated the acute effects of low doses of 16O irradiation on the hematopoietic system. Specifically, we exposed C57BL/6J mice to 0.1, 0.25 and 1.0 Gy whole body 16O (600 MeV/n irradiation and examined the effects on peripheral blood (PB cells, and bone marrow (BM hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs at two weeks after the exposure. The results showed that the numbers of white blood cells, lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils and platelets were significantly decreased in PB after exposure to 1.0 Gy, but not to 0.1 or 0.25 Gy. However, both the frequency and number of HPCs and HSCs were reduced in a radiation dose-dependent manner in comparison to un-irradiated controls. Furthermore, HPCs and HSCs from irradiated mice exhibited a significant reduction in clonogenic function determined by the colony-forming and cobblestone area-forming cell assays. These acute adverse effects of 16O irradiation on HSCs coincided with an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, enhanced cell cycle entry of quiescent HSCs, and increased DNA damage. However, none of the 16O exposures induced apoptosis in HSCs. These data suggest that exposure to low doses of 16O irradiation induces acute BM injury in a dose-dependent manner primarily via increasing ROS production, cell cycling, and DNA damage in HSCs. This finding may aid in developing novel strategies in the protection of the

  13. Coffee consumption and mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crippa, Alessio; Discacciati, Andrea; Larsson, Susanna C; Wolk, Alicja; Orsini, Nicola

    2014-10-15

    Several studies have analyzed the relationship between coffee consumption and mortality, but the shape of the association remains unclear. We conducted a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies to examine the dose-response associations between coffee consumption and mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and all cancers. Pertinent studies, published between 1966 and 2013, were identified by searching PubMed and by reviewing the reference lists of the selected articles. Prospective studies in which investigators reported relative risks of mortality from all causes, CVD, and all cancers for 3 or more categories of coffee consumption were eligible. Results from individual studies were pooled using a random-effects model. Twenty-one prospective studies, with 121,915 deaths and 997,464 participants, met the inclusion criteria. There was strong evidence of nonlinear associations between coffee consumption and mortality for all causes and CVD (P for nonlinearity Coffee consumption was not associated with cancer mortality. Findings from this meta-analysis indicate that coffee consumption is inversely associated with all-cause and CVD mortality. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Severe dose inaccuracies caused by an oxygen-antioxidant imbalance in normoxic polymer gel dosimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedaghat, Mahbod; Bujold, Rachel; Lepage, Martin

    2011-02-01

    Two oxygen scavengers have been successfully tested to produce normoxic polymer gel dosimeters under normal atmospheric conditions. The first is ascorbic acid and the second is a chloride (also sulfate) salt of tetrakis (hydroxymethyl) phosphonium. These antioxidants, added to the dosimeter during gel preparation, chemically remove dissolved oxygen that otherwise inhibits propagation of the polymerization reaction during irradiation of the dosimeter. These gel dosimeters are radiosensitive after manufacture under normoxic conditions. However, we show herein that the accuracy of the dosimetric measurement is compromised due to chemical reactions of the antioxidant with radicals. In addition, we provide evidence that both antioxidant and oxygen act as radical scavengers that affect the amount of polymer formed in the gel dosimeter. This can result in important dose inaccuracies in both methacrylic acid-based and acrylamide-based normoxic dosimeter gels.

  15. Severe dose inaccuracies caused by an oxygen-antioxidant imbalance in normoxic polymer gel dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedaghat, Mahbod; Lepage, Martin [Departement de medecine nucleaire et de radiobiologie, Centre d' imagerie moleculaire de Sherbrooke, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC (Canada); Bujold, Rachel, E-mail: martin.lepage@usherbrooke.ca [Service de radio-oncologie, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC (Canada)

    2011-02-07

    Two oxygen scavengers have been successfully tested to produce normoxic polymer gel dosimeters under normal atmospheric conditions. The first is ascorbic acid and the second is a chloride (also sulfate) salt of tetrakis (hydroxymethyl) phosphonium. These antioxidants, added to the dosimeter during gel preparation, chemically remove dissolved oxygen that otherwise inhibits propagation of the polymerization reaction during irradiation of the dosimeter. These gel dosimeters are radiosensitive after manufacture under normoxic conditions. However, we show herein that the accuracy of the dosimetric measurement is compromised due to chemical reactions of the antioxidant with radicals. In addition, we provide evidence that both antioxidant and oxygen act as radical scavengers that affect the amount of polymer formed in the gel dosimeter. This can result in important dose inaccuracies in both methacrylic acid-based and acrylamide-based normoxic dosimeter gels.

  16. Causes of Mortality After Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy and Androgen Deprivation for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tendulkar, Rahul D., E-mail: tendulr@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Hunter, Grant K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Intermountain Healthcare, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Reddy, Chandana A.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Ciezki, Jay P.; Abdel-Wahab, May [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Stephenson, Andrew J.; Klein, Eric A. [Department of Urology, Glickman Urological Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Mahadevan, Arul [Seacoast Cancer Center New Hampshire, Dover, New Hampshire (United States); Kupelian, Patrick A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles Health System, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: Men with high-risk prostate cancer have other competing causes of mortality; however, current risk stratification schema do not account for comorbidities. We aim to identify the causes of death and factors predictive for mortality in this population. Methods and Materials: A total of 660 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated with definitive high-dose external beam radiation therapy (≥74 Gy) and androgen deprivation (AD) between 1996 and 2009 at a single institution. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was conducted to determine factors predictive of survival. Results: The median radiation dose was 78 Gy, median duration of AD was 6 months, and median follow-up was 74 months. The 10-year overall survival (OS) was 60.6%. Prostate cancer was the leading single cause of death, with 10-year mortality of 14.1% (95% CI 10.7-17.6), compared with other cancers (8.4%, 95% CI 5.7-11.1), cardiovascular disease (7.3%, 95% CI 4.7-9.9), and all other causes (10.4%, 95% CI 7.2-13.6). On multivariate analysis, older age (HR 1.55, P=.002) and Charlson comorbidity index score (CS) ≥1 (HR 2.20, P<.0001) were significant factors predictive of OS, whereas Gleason score, T stage, prostate-specific antigen, duration of AD, radiation dose, smoking history, and body mass index were not. Men younger than 70 years of age with CS = 0 were more likely to die of prostate cancer than any other cause, whereas older men or those with CS ≥1 more commonly suffered non-prostate cancer death. The cumulative incidences of prostate cancer-specific mortality were similar regardless of age or comorbidities (P=.60). Conclusions: Men with high-risk prostate cancer are more likely to die of causes other than prostate cancer, except for the subgroup of men younger than 70 years of age without comorbidities. Only older age and presence of comorbidities significantly predicted for OS, whereas prostate cancer- and treatment-related factors did not.

  17. Low doses of ivermectin cause sensory and locomotor disorders in dung beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdú, José R.; Cortez, Vieyle; Ortiz, Antonio J.; González-Rodríguez, Estela; Martinez-Pinna, Juan; Lumaret, Jean-Pierre; Lobo, Jorge M.; Numa, Catherine; Sánchez-Piñero, Francisco

    2015-09-01

    Ivermectin is a veterinary pharmaceutical generally used to control the ecto- and endoparasites of livestock, but its use has resulted in adverse effects on coprophilous insects, causing population decline and biodiversity loss. There is currently no information regarding the direct effects of ivermectin on dung beetle physiology and behaviour. Here, based on electroantennography and spontaneous muscle force tests, we show sub-lethal disorders caused by ivermectin in sensory and locomotor systems of Scarabaeus cicatricosus, a key dung beetle species in Mediterranean ecosystems. Our findings show that ivermectin decreases the olfactory and locomotor capacity of dung beetles, preventing them from performing basic biological activities. These effects are observed at concentrations lower than those usually measured in the dung of treated livestock. Taking into account that ivermectin acts on both glutamate-gated and GABA-gated chloride ion channels of nerve and muscle cells, we predict that ivermectin’s effects at the physiological level could influence many members of the dung pat community. The results indicate that the decline of dung beetle populations could be related to the harmful effects of chemical contamination in the dung.

  18. Effects of low dose pre-irradiation on hepatic damage and genetic material damage caused by cyclophosphamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, H-S; Song, A-Q; Liu, N; Wang, H

    2014-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CTX) can attack tumour cells, but can also damage the other cells and microstructures of an organism at different levels, such as haematopoietic cells, liver cells, peripheral lymphocyte DNA, and genetic materials. Low dose radiation (LDR) can induce general adaptation reaction. In this study, we explore the effects of low dose radiation on hepatic damage and genetic material damage caused by CTX. Mice were implanted subcutaneously with S180 cells in the left groin (control group excluded). On days 8 and 11, mice of the LDR and LDR+CTX groups were given 75 mGy of whole-body γ-irradiation; whereas mice of the CTX and LDR+CTX groups were injected intraperitoneally with 3.0 mg of CTX. All mice were sacrificed on day 13. DNA damage of the peripheral lymphocytes, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity, total protein (TP), albumin (ALB) of the plasma, malonyl-dialdheyde (MDA) content, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) activity of the hepatic homogenate, and micronucleus frequency (MNF) of polychromatoerythrocytes in the bone marrow were analysed. The control group had the lowest MDA content and the highest SOD and GSH-PX activity, whereas the CTX group had the highest MDA content and the lowest SOD and GSH-PX activity. Compared with the CTX group, the MDA content decreased significantly (p 0.05). Pre-chemotherapeutic LDR can induce the activities of anti-oxidative enzymes and promote the elimination of free radicles to alleviate the damaging effects of oxidative stress to hepatic tissue caused by high-dose CTX. At the same time, LDR has no obvious effect on the ALT activity of plasma, but may have protective effect on the protein synthesis function of the liver. High-dose CTX chemotherapy can cause DNA damage of peripheral lymphocytes; however, LDR before chemotherapy may have certain protective effect on DNA damage. Moreover, CTX has potent mutagenic effect; however, LDR may have no protective effect against the genetic

  19. Osteoporosis markers on low-dose lung cancer screening chest computed tomography scans predict all-cause mortality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckens, C.F. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Radiology Department, Utrecht (Netherlands); University Medical Center Utrecht, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands); Graaf, Y. van der [University Medical Center Utrecht, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands); Verkooijen, H.M.; Mali, W.P.; Jong, P.A. de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Radiology Department, Utrecht (Netherlands); Isgum, I.; Mol, C.P. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands); Verhaar, H.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Vliegenthart, R.; Oudkerk, M. [Medical Center Groningen, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Aalst, C.M. van; Koning, H.J. de [Erasmus MC Rotterdam, Department of Public Health, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-01-15

    Further survival benefits may be gained from low-dose chest computed tomography (CT) by assessing vertebral fractures and bone density. We sought to assess the association between CT-measured vertebral fractures and bone density with all-cause mortality in lung cancer screening participants. Following a case-cohort design, lung cancer screening trial participants (N = 3,673) who died (N = 196) during a median follow-up of 6 years (inter-quartile range: 5.7-6.3) were identified and added to a random sample of N = 383 from the trial. We assessed vertebral fractures using Genant and acute;s semiquantative method on sagittal reconstructions and measured bone density (Hounsfield Units (HU)) in vertebrae. Cox proportional hazards modelling was used to determine if vertebral fractures or bone density were independently predictive of mortality. The prevalence of vertebral fractures was 35 % (95 % confidence interval 30-40 %) among survivors and 51 % (44-58 %) amongst cases. After adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, pack years smoked, coronary and aortic calcium volume and pulmonary emphysema, the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for vertebral fracture was 2.04 (1.43-2.92). For each 10 HU decline in trabecular bone density, the adjusted HR was 1.08 (1.02-1.15). Vertebral fractures and bone density are independently associated with all-cause mortality. (orig.)

  20. 10 CFR 63.303 - Implementation of Subpart L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Implementation of Subpart L. 63.303 Section 63.303 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC... Implementation of Subpart L. (a) Compliance is based upon the arithmetic mean of the projected doses from DOE's...

  1. Osteoporosis markers on low-dose lung cancer screening chest computed tomography scans predict all-cause mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckens, C F; van der Graaf, Y; Verkooijen, H M; Mali, W P; Isgum, I; Mol, C P; Verhaar, H J; Vliegenthart, R; Oudkerk, M; van Aalst, C M; de Koning, H J; de Jong, P A

    2015-01-01

    Further survival benefits may be gained from low-dose chest computed tomography (CT) by assessing vertebral fractures and bone density. We sought to assess the association between CT-measured vertebral fractures and bone density with all-cause mortality in lung cancer screening participants. Following a case-cohort design, lung cancer screening trial participants (N = 3,673) who died (N = 196) during a median follow-up of 6 years (inter-quartile range: 5.7-6.3) were identified and added to a random sample of N = 383 from the trial. We assessed vertebral fractures using Genant's semiquantative method on sagittal reconstructions and measured bone density (Hounsfield Units (HU)) in vertebrae. Cox proportional hazards modelling was used to determine if vertebral fractures or bone density were independently predictive of mortality. The prevalence of vertebral fractures was 35% (95% confidence interval 30-40%) among survivors and 51% (44-58%) amongst cases. After adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, pack years smoked, coronary and aortic calcium volume and pulmonary emphysema, the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for vertebral fracture was 2.04 (1.43-2.92). For each 10 HU decline in trabecular bone density, the adjusted HR was 1.08 (1.02-1.15). Vertebral fractures and bone density are independently associated with all-cause mortality. • Lung cancer screening chest computed tomography contains additional, potentially useful information. • Vertebral fractures and bone density are independently predictive of mortality. • This finding has implications for screening and management decisions.

  2. How much radiation dose, to whom? Long-term storage, surveillance, retrieval and long processes cause additional dose to employees; Wie viel Strahlendosis fuer wen? Lange Lagerung, Offenhaltung und ein langer Entsorgungsprozess bedeuten zusaetzliche Dosis fuer Beschaeftigte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walther, Clemens [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiooekologie und Strahlenschutz; Riemann, Moritz [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Philosophie und Ethik der Umwelt

    2017-09-01

    In the case of final nuclear waste disposal there are concurrent interests with respect to radiation protection: The realization of a disposal option with minimum required follow-up care needs time causing additional radiation exposure for the employees, also the option of long-term storage, surveillance and retrieval possibilities cause additional dose to employees. The contribution discusses possible consideration of requests for the different options.

  3. Massive reduction of tumour load and normalisation of hyperprolactinaemia after high dose cabergoline in metastasised prolactinoma causing thoracic syringomyelia

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Uum, S H M; van Alfen, N; Wesseling, P; van Lindert, E; Pieters, G; Nooijen, P; Hermus, A

    2004-01-01

    On administration of high dose cabergoline, 0.5 mg twice a day orally, the plasma prolactin levels decreased within one month and then normalised within 26 months. Tumour load reduced considerably but unfortunately, her signs and symptoms did not improve. This case illustrates that a high dose dopamine agonist might be an important therapeutic option in patients with a metastasised prolactinoma. PMID:15377706

  4. Dose-response relationship of physical activity to premature and total all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality in walkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T Williams

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To assess the dose-response relationships between cause-specific mortality and exercise energy expenditure in a prospective epidemiological cohort of walkers. METHODS: The sample consisted of the 8,436 male and 33,586 female participants of the National Walkers' Health Study. Walking energy expenditure was calculated in metabolic equivalents (METs, 1 MET = 3.5 ml O2/kg/min, which were used to divide the cohort into four exercise categories: category 1 (≤ 1.07 MET-hours/d, category 2 (1.07 to 1.8 MET-hours/d, category 3 (1.8 to 3.6 MET-hours/d, and category 4 (≥ 3.6 MET-hours/d. Competing risk regression analyses were use to calculate the risk of mortality for categories 2, 3 and 4 relative to category 1. RESULTS: 22.9% of the subjects were in category 1, 16.1% in category 2, 33.3% in category 3, and 27.7% in category 4. There were 2,448 deaths during the 9.6 average years of follow-up. Total mortality was 11.2% lower in category 2 (P = 0.04, 32.4% lower in category 3 (P<10(-12 and 32.9% lower in category 4 (P = 10(-11 than in category 1. For underlying causes of death, the respective risk reductions for categories 2, 3 and 4 were 23.6% (P = 0.008, 35.2% (P<10(-5, and 34.9% (P = 0.0001 for cardiovascular disease mortality; 27.8% (P = 0.18, 20.6% (P = 0.07, and 31.4% (P = 0.009 for ischemic heart disease mortality; and 39.4% (P = 0.18, 63.8% (P = 0.005, and 90.6% (P = 0.002 for diabetes mortality when compared to category 1. For all related mortality (i.e., underlying and contributing causes of death combined, the respective risk reductions for categories 2, 3 and 4 were 18.7% (P = 0.22, 42.5% (P = 0.001, and 57.5% (P = 0.0001 for heart failure; 9.4% (P = 0.56, 44.3% (P = 0.0004, and 33.5% (P = 0.02 for hypertensive diseases; 11.5% (P = 0.38, 41.0% (P<10(-4, and 35.5% (P = 0.001 for dysrhythmias: and 23.2% (P = 0.13, 45.8% (P = 0.0002, and 41.1% (P

  5. An evaluation of surface-dose increase caused by the thermoplastic shell in head and neck radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Shin-ichi; Hayama, Kazuhide; Toyama, Michio; Ninomiya, Shuichi; Eguchi, Toru; Takase, Hiroshi; Maeda, Kadzuo (Nippon Dental Univ., Niigata (Japan) Faculty of Dentistry (Niigata))

    1992-10-01

    Some kinds of the thermoplastic shells have been developed to improve the reproducibility of patient immobilization in head and neck radiotherapy treatment. Due to a build-up layer of high energy photons, the consideration of the surface-dose under the shell is important in radiotherapy treatment planning. This paper presents the precise evaluation of the surface-dose affected by the shell. The therapy machine used was 2.8 MV linac X-ray. The shell used was mesh sheet type thermoplastic shell. The TPR (tissue peak ratio) in the build-up layer was measured in various irradiation fields under the conditions with or without a wedge filter. The coefficients m' and K's of the power function of the build-up region were obtained from the relation between TPR and the irradiation fields. As a result, the coefficients were approximately intermediate values between cobalt-60 [gamma]-ray and 4.3 MV X-ray. When a wedge filter was used, the coefficients shifted toward those of higher energy. Before obtaining the dose distribution under the thermoplastic shell, film response was tested under the conditions of various irradiation fields and use of a wedge filter. The results showed that the film response was constant enough for dosimetry in the build-up region. Digital surface-absorbed dose distribution images under the shell were obtained using the microphotometer-microcomputer system. The digital image demonstrated a meshy dose pattern under the shell. In the area of a higher absorbed dose, the dose increases were in the range of 40-50%. The differences depended on not only the irradiation field and presence of a wedge-filter, but especially on the extent of expansion of the thermoplastic material in making the shell mask. (author).

  6. The incidence and predictors of overall adverse effects caused by low dose amiodarone in real-world clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Seo, Jae-Bin; Chung, Woo-Young; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Myung-A; Zo, Joo-Hee

    2014-09-01

    Most current knowledge regarding amiodarone toxicity derives from clinical trials. This study was performed to investigate the incidence and risk factors of overall adverse effects of amiodarone in real-world practice using a large sample size. Between January 1, 2000 and March 10, 2012, a total of 930 consecutive patients who had been treated with amiodarone for arrhythmia were reviewed retrospectively. An amiodarone-associated adverse event was considered in cases of discontinuation or drug dose reduction due to an unexpected clinical response. The mean daily dose of amiodarone was 227 ± 126 mg, and the mean duration was 490 ± 812 days. During the mean follow-up duration of 982 ± 1,137 days, a total of 154 patients (16.6%) experienced adverse effects related to amiodarone, the most common being bradycardia or conduction disturbance (9.5%). Major organ toxicities in the thyroid (2.5%), liver (2.2%), eyes (0.6%), and lungs (0.3%) were rare. All patients recovered fully without complications after amiodarone discontinuation or dose reduction. The only independent predictor of adverse effects was the duration of amiodarone treatment (odds ratio, 1.21; 95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 1.41; p = 0.016, per year). Low-dose amiodarone is well tolerated in a real-world clinical population. Further studies with a prospective design are needed to confirm this finding.

  7. Effects of a Single Dose of Parecoxib on Inflammatory Response and Ischemic Tubular Injury Caused by Hemorrhagic Shock in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Takaku

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Parecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, is used to improve analgesia in postoperative procedures. Here we evaluated whether pretreatment with a single dose of parecoxib affects the function, cell injury, and inflammatory response of the kidney of rats subjected to acute hemorrhage. Inflammatory response was determined according to serum and renal tissue cytokine levels (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α. Forty-four adult Wistar rats anesthetized with sevoflurane were randomized into four groups: placebo/no hemorrhage (Plc/NH; parecoxib/no hemorrhage (Pcx/NH; placebo/hemorrhage (Plc/H; and parecoxib/hemorrhage (Pcx/H. Pcx groups received a single dose of intravenous parecoxib while Plc groups received a single dose of placebo (isotonic saline. Animals in hemorrhage groups underwent bleeding of 30% of blood volume. Renal function and renal histology were then evaluated. Plc/H showed the highest serum levels of cytokines, suggesting that pretreatment with parecoxib reduced the inflammatory response in rats subjected to hemorrhage. No difference in tissue cytokine levels between groups was observed. Plc/H showed higher percentage of tubular dilation and degeneration, indicating that parecoxib inhibited tubular injury resulting from renal hypoperfusion. Our findings indicate that pretreatment with a single dose of parecoxib reduced the inflammatory response and tubular renal injury without altering renal function in rats undergoing acute hemorrhage.

  8. Relation between intracavernosal dose of prostaglandin Pge 1 and mean duration of erection in men with different underlying causes of erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratus, Dejan; Hlebic, Gregor; Hajdinjak, Tine

    2007-02-01

    To analyze differences in effect of intracavernosally applied alprostadil (prostaglandin PGE 1) on men with different underlying causes of erectile dysfunction. Forty eight men with erectile dysfunction lasting for at least six months were stratified according to the etiology of erectile dysfunction into one of 4 groups comprising 12 patients. The groups were the following: psychogenic, arteriogenic, veno-occlusive, and neurological erectile dysfunction group. All men filled out International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF)-5 questionnaire, which is a 5-question version of International Index of Erectile Function Questionnaire, underwent clinical examination including neurological assessment, were tested for nocturnal penile tumescence, and had Doppler color sonography of penile arteries. Intracavernosal alprostadil was then applied to the patients, starting with a 5 mug dose and then increased in 5 microg increments until the final dose of 20 microg was reached. We measured the time from the moment of application until the start of erection and time of erection duration. For statistical analysis, non-parametric Friedman test for significant differences between repeated measurements in small groups and Wilcoxon test for differences between doses were used. Significant relation was found between the applied dose of intracavernosal alprostadil and the duration of erection in all 4 groups of men with erectile dysfunction. In patients with arteriogenic erectile dysfunction, mean (+/-standard deviation) duration of erection for consecutive doses of alprostadil 5 microg, 10 microg, 15 microg, and 20 microg were 40.0+/-20.6, 54.6+/-23.6, 65.0+/-29.6, and 82.1+/-35.4 minutes, respectively, with significant increase for each dose. In patients with veno-occlusive dysfunction, mean durations of erection significantly increased from 8.2+/-7.8 minutes at 10 microg to 17.3+/-9.5 minutes at 20 microg. In patients with neurogenic erectile dysfunction, mean durations of erection

  9. Dose-response analysis indicating time-dependent neurotoxicity caused by organic and inorganic mercury-Implications for toxic effects in the developing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletz, Julia; Sánchez-Bayo, Francisco; Tennekes, Henk A

    2016-03-10

    A latency period preceding neurotoxicity is a common characteristic in the dose-response relationship induced by organic mercury. Latency periods have typically been observed with genotoxicants in carcinogenesis, with cancer being manifested a long time after the initiating event. These observations indicate that even a very small dose may cause extensive adverse effects later in life, so the toxicity of the genotoxic compound is dose and time-dependent. In children, methylmercury exposure during pregnancy (in utero) has been associated with delays in reaching developmental milestones (e.g., age at first walking) and decreases in intelligence, increasing in severity with increasing exposure. Ethylmercury exposure from thimerosal in some vaccines has been associated, in some studies, with autism and other neurological disorders in children. In this paper, we have examined whether dose-response data from in vitro and in vivo organic mercury toxicity studies fit the Druckrey-Küpfmüller equation c·t(n)=constant (c=exposure concentration, t=latency period), first established for genotoxic carcinogens, and whether or not irreversible effects are enhanced by time of exposure (n≥1), or else toxic effects are dose-dependent while time has only minor influence on the adverse outcome (nmercury induced neurotoxic effects. This amounts to a paradigm shift in chemical risk assessment of mercurial compounds and highlights that it is vital to perform toxicity testing geared to investigate time-dependent effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Use of low-dose UV-C irradiation to control powdery mildew caused by Podosphaera aphanis on strawberry plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powdery mildew of strawberry plants, caused by Podoshaera aphanis, can cause severe losses by reducing fruit yield, quality and predisposing fruit to other diseases. Fungicides have been routinely used to control this disease. However, limitations mainly related to their effectiveness, re-entry pe...

  11. Low-dose testosterone alleviates vascular damage caused by castration in male rats in puberty via modulation of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Liu, Ge-Li; Wei, Ying; Jiang, Li-Hong; Bao, Peng-Li; Yang, Qing-Yan

    2016-09-01

    increases in the mRNA levels of NF‑κB, TNF‑α and PI3K, compared with the low dose group. Castration induced marked disorders of glucolipid metabolism and vascular injuries in the pubescent male rats. Low‑dose testosterone treatment was found to ameliorate the vascular damage caused by castration via the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

  12. Chitin Oligosaccharide (COS Reduces Antibiotics Dose and Prevents Antibiotics-Caused Side Effects in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS Patients with Spinal Fusion Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Qu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are always considered for surgical site infection (SSI in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS surgery. However, the use of antibiotics often causes the antibiotic resistance of pathogens and side effects. Thus, it is necessary to explore natural products as drug candidates. Chitin Oligosaccharide (COS has anti-inflammation and anti-bacteria functions. The effects of COS on surgical infection in AIS surgery were investigated. A total of 312 AIS patients were evenly and randomly assigned into control group (CG, each patient took one-gram alternative Azithromycin/Erythromycin/Cloxacillin/Aztreonam/Ceftazidime or combined daily, experiment group (EG, each patient took 20 mg COS and half-dose antibiotics daily, and placebo group (PG, each patient took 20 mg placebo and half-dose antibiotics daily. The average follow-up was one month, and infection severity and side effects were analyzed. The effects of COS on isolated pathogens were analyzed. SSI rates were 2%, 3% and 8% for spine wounds and 1%, 2% and 7% for iliac wound in CG, EG and PG (p < 0.05, respectively. COS reduces the side effects caused by antibiotics (p < 0.05. COS improved biochemical indexes and reduced the levels of interleukin (IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF alpha. COS reduced the antibiotics dose and antibiotics-caused side effects in AIS patients with spinal fusion surgery by improving antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. COS should be developed as potential adjuvant for antibiotics therapies.

  13. Influence of photon beam energy on the dose enhancement factor caused by gold and silver nanoparticles: An experimental approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidelli, Eder José, E-mail: ederguidelli@pg.ffclrp.usp.br; Baffa, Oswaldo [Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Noble metal nanoparticles have found several medical applications in the areas of radiation detection; x-ray contrast agents and cancer radiation therapy. Based on computational methods, many papers have reported the nanoparticle effect on the dose deposition in the surrounding medium. Here the authors report experimental results on how silver and gold nanoparticles affect the dose deposition in alanine dosimeters containing several concentrations of silver and gold nanoparticles, for five different beam energies, using electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR). Methods: The authors produced alanine dosimeters containing several mass percentage of silver and gold nanoparticles. Nanoparticle sizes were measured by dynamic light scattering and by transmission electron microscopy. The authors determined the dose enhancement factor (DEF) theoretically, using a widely accepted method, and experimentally, using ESR spectroscopy. Results: The DEF is governed by nanoparticle concentration, size, and position in the alanine matrix. Samples containing gold nanoparticles afford a DEF higher than 1.0, because gold nanoparticle size is homogeneous for all gold concentrations utilized. For samples containing silver particles, the silver mass percentage governs the nanoparticles size, which, in turns, modifies nanoparticle position in the alanine dosimeters. In this sense, DEF decreases for dosimeters containing large and segregated particles. The influence of nanoparticle size-position is more noticeable for dosimeters irradiated with higher beam energies, and dosimeters containing large and segregated particles become less sensitive than pure alanine (DEF < 1). Conclusions: ESR dosimetry gives the DEF in a medium containing metal nanoparticles, although particle concentration, size, and position are closely related in the system. Because this is also the case as in many real systems of materials containing inorganic nanoparticles, ESR is a valuable tool for

  14. Exposure to Low Dose of Cinnabar (a Naturally Occurring Mercuric Sulfide (HgS Caused Neurotoxicological Effects in Offspring Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Fa Huang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cinnabar, a naturally occurring mercuric sulfide (HgS, has long been used in Chinese mineral medicine for more than 2000 years. Although mercury is well-known for its toxicity, whether cinnabar induces neurotoxicity, especially in infants and children, is unknown. The purpose of this study was to explore the neurotoxic effects of low-dose of cinnabar (10 mg/kg/day on developing mice. The results revealed neurobehavioral defects in F1-C-Cin group, which were associated with Hg accumulation, increased NOx levels in whole blood, and Na+/K+-ATPase activities in brain tissues. F1- and F2-Cin-V groups were found to increase brain Hg contents and prominent neurobehavioral defects compared with F1-C-V group, suggesting that the fetal brain was more susceptible to irreversible effects for cinnabar-induced damage. Moreover, F1- and F2-Cin-Cin groups had severely neurobehavioral dysfunctions, closely correlated with the further alteration of NOx levels and Na+/K+-ATPase activities than F1- and F2-C-Cin groups. Effects in F2-Cin-Cin group were more significant than those in F1-Cin-Cin group. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that exposure to low-dose of cinnabar during the perinatal and developmental stages results in irreversible and severe injuries of the neurotoxicity in offspring, and NOx and Na+/K+-ATPase activities may exist potential and useful biomarkers for neurotoxicity-induced by low-doses of mercuric compounds.

  15. Acute administration of tramadol and tapentadol at effective analgesic and maximum tolerated doses causes hepato- and nephrotoxic effects in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Joana; Faria, Juliana; Leal, Sandra; Afonso, Luís Pedro; Lobo, João; Queirós, Odília; Moreira, Roxana; Carvalho, Félix; Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge

    2017-08-15

    Tramadol and tapentadol are two atypical synthetic opioid analgesics, with monoamine reuptake inhibition properties. Mainly aimed at the treatment of moderate to severe pain, these drugs are extensively prescribed for multiple clinical applications. Along with the increase in their use, there has been an increment in their abuse, and consequently in the reported number of adverse reactions and intoxications. However, little is known about their mechanisms of toxicity. In this study, we have analyzed the in vivo toxicological effects in liver and kidney resulting from an acute exposure of a rodent animal model to both opioids. Male Wistar rats were intraperitoneally administered with 10, 25 and 50mg/kg tramadol and tapentadol, corresponding to a low, effective analgesic dose, an intermediate dose and the maximum recommended daily dose, respectively, for 24h. Toxicological effects were assessed in terms of oxidative stress, biochemical and metabolic parameters and histopathology, using serum and urine samples, liver and kidney homogenates and tissue specimens. The acute exposure to tapentadol caused a dose-dependent increase in protein oxidation in liver and kidney. Additionally, exposure to both opioids led to hepatic commitment, as shown by increased serum lipid levels, decreased urea concentration, increased alanine aminotransferase and decreased butyrylcholinesterase activities. It also led to renal impairment, as reflected by proteinuria and decreased glomerular filtration rate. Histopathological findings included sinusoidal dilatation, microsteatosis, vacuolization, cell infiltrates and cell degeneration, indicating metabolic changes, inflammation and cell damage. In conclusion, a single effective analgesic dose or the maximum recommended daily dose of both opioids leads to hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity, with tapentadol inducing comparatively more toxicity. Whether these effects reflect risks during the therapeutic use or human overdoses requires focused

  16. Perinatal exposure to low-dose imidacloprid causes ADHD-like symptoms: Evidences from an invertebrate model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seoyoung; Lee, Hee-Seok; Park, Yooheon

    2017-12-01

    The fundamental diagnoses of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism consists of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity, which lead to abnormal social interactions and repetitive and restricted behavior. Several food contaminants are suspected of being a possible contributing factor to the present-day increase in diseases, such as obesity and ADHD, and pesticides are also considered as a contributor to the increased prevalence of ADHD. Imidacloprid is a neonicotinoid insecticide with lower toxicity to mammals. Based on recent reports on neurobehavioral studies using an invertebrate model system, we have assessed ADHD-related impairments to test the effects of low-dose exposure to imidacloprid in Drosophila melanogaster through behavior assays, such as abnormal social interaction, repetitive behaviors, and significant deficiency in locomotion in an open field arena, a decision-making process. Drosophila stocks were treated with imidacloprid at the level of 200 pM. Social interaction among the flies was disturbed by imidacloprid. Travelled distance and velocity was also increased by the treatment. The difference in velocity between the treatment group and the control group was significant, revealing that imidacloprid-exposed flies moved faster and longer than control flies. This study illustrated the behavioral deficiency in Drosophila due to the low-dose imidacloprid exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Recommended values for the distribution coefficient (Kd) to be used in dose assessments for decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-09-24

    ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. The site contains two reactor Containment Buildings, a Fuel Building, an Auxiliary Building, and a Turbine Building that may be contaminated. The current decommissioning plan involves removing all above grade structures to a depth of 3 feet below grade. The remaining underground structures will be backfilled. The remaining underground structures will contain low amounts of residual licensed radioactive material. An important component of the decommissioning process is the demonstration that any remaining activity will not cause a hypothetical individual to receive a dose in excess of 25 mrem/y as specified in 10CFR20 SubpartE.

  18. Recommended values for the distribution coefficient (Kd) to be used in dose assessments for decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan T.

    2014-06-09

    ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. The site contains two reactor Containment Buildings, a Fuel Building, an Auxiliary Building, and a Turbine Building that may be contaminated. The current decommissioning plan involves removing all above grade structures to a depth of 3 feet below grade. The remaining underground structures will be backfilled. The remaining underground structures will contain low amounts of residual licensed radioactive material. An important component of the decommissioning process is the demonstration that any remaining activity will not cause a hypothetical individual to receive a dose in excess of 25 mrem/y as specified in 10CFR20 SubpartE.

  19. Chitin Oligosaccharide (COS) Reduces Antibiotics Dose and Prevents Antibiotics-Caused Side Effects in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) Patients with Spinal Fusion Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yang; Xu, Jinyu; Zhou, Haohan; Dong, Rongpeng; Kang, Mingyang; Zhao, Jianwu

    2017-03-14

    Antibiotics are always considered for surgical site infection (SSI) in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) surgery. However, the use of antibiotics often causes the antibiotic resistance of pathogens and side effects. Thus, it is necessary to explore natural products as drug candidates. Chitin Oligosaccharide (COS) has anti-inflammation and anti-bacteria functions. The effects of COS on surgical infection in AIS surgery were investigated. A total of 312 AIS patients were evenly and randomly assigned into control group (CG, each patient took one-gram alternative Azithromycin/Erythromycin/Cloxacillin/Aztreonam/Ceftazidime or combined daily), experiment group (EG, each patient took 20 mg COS and half-dose antibiotics daily), and placebo group (PG, each patient took 20 mg placebo and half-dose antibiotics daily). The average follow-up was one month, and infection severity and side effects were analyzed. The effects of COS on isolated pathogens were analyzed. SSI rates were 2%, 3% and 8% for spine wounds and 1%, 2% and 7% for iliac wound in CG, EG and PG (p antibiotics (p antibiotics dose and antibiotics-caused side effects in AIS patients with spinal fusion surgery by improving antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. COS should be developed as potential adjuvant for antibiotics therapies.

  20. Regadenoson, a selective A2A adenosine receptor agonist, causes dose-dependent increases in coronary blood flow velocity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieu, Hsiao D; Shryock, John C; von Mering, Gregory O; Gordi, Toufigh; Blackburn, Brent; Olmsted, Ann W; Belardinelli, Luiz; Kerensky, Richard A

    2007-07-01

    Regadenoson is a selective A2A adenosine receptor agonist and vasodilator used to increase the heterogeneity of distribution of coronary blood flow during myocardial perfusion imaging. This study characterized the dose dependence of regadenoson-induced coronary hyperemia. An open-label, dose-escalation study of regadenoson (10-500 microg, rapid intravenous bolus) was performed in 34 subjects; in 4 additional subjects, the effect of aminophylline to reverse the response to regadenoson was determined. Intracoronary peak blood flow velocity in either the left anterior descending or left circumflex artery was measured by continuous Doppler signal recording, heart rate, central aortic blood pressure, and adverse effects were recorded. Regadenoson increased peak blood flow velocity by up to 3.4-fold in a dose-dependent manner. The mean duration of the increase in flow velocity of 2.5-fold or greater caused by 400 to 500 microg of regadenoson was 2.3 to 2.4 minutes. Regadenoson (400-500 microg) increased heart rate by up to 21 +/- 6 beats/min and decreased systolic blood pressure (-5 +/- 8 mm Hg to -24 +/- 16 mm Hg) and diastolic blood pressure (-8 +/- 4 mm Hg to -15 +/- 14 mm Hg). Aminophylline (100 mg) attenuated the increase in peak flow velocity but not tachycardia caused by 400 microg of regadenoson. The results of this study demonstrate the utility of regadenoson as a coronary vasodilator for myocardial perfusion imaging.

  1. NOTE: The method of intercepts in parameter space for the analysis of local minima caused by dose-volume constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuan; Jeraj, Robert; Mackie, Thomas R.

    2003-06-01

    The local minima problem in radiotherapy optimization has been a concern for both researchers and physicians. In this work, local minima induced by dose-volume histogram (DVH) constraints are discussed. The non-convex property of the feasible set formed by DVH constraints is discussed in beam weight space. An intuitive explanation of the origin of this type of local minima is given by a two-beam model setup. Some interesting properties and insights about the DVH-induced local minima are found. Based on this, a heuristic non-random initial guess sampling method is proposed and applied to a clinical nasopharyngeal case, where some significantly different local minima are located.

  2. Dose-dependent association between muscle-strengthening activities and all-cause mortality: Prospective cohort study among a national sample of adults in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankel, Scott J; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Loprinzi, Paul D

    2016-11-01

    We have a limited understanding of the association between behavioural participation in muscle-strengthening activities (MSA) and all-cause mortality. To determine the effect of MSA on all-cause mortality, and examine a potential dose-response relationship between the frequency with which MSA are performed and the incidence of all-cause mortality. Individuals (8772 adults aged≥20years) from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey were evaluated for baseline characteristics, then followed for an average of 6.7years. MSA were assessed at baseline as the number of self-reported sessions completed within the past 30days. Analyses were performed in 2015. Only 18.6% of individuals met MSA guidelines (2-3 MSA sessions/week) at baseline, while those performing any form of MSA had a 23% reduced risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.77; 95% confidence interval: 0.60-0.98; P=0.04). Additionally, we created a five-category variable to determine whether a dose-response relationship existed between MSA and premature mortality; only individuals performing 8-14 sessions over a 30-day period (current MSA guidelines) had a reduced risk of all-cause mortality (HR: 0.70; P=0.02). Results were similar for CVD-specific mortality. The national recommendations that 2-3 MSA sessions be performed per week appear to be most effective at reducing the risk of premature all-cause mortality; however, despite these recommendations, the majority of the adult population in the USA still fails to perform any MSA. Future studies should determine strategies for increasing adherence to these established guidelines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Text mining-based in silico drug discovery in oral mucositis caused by high-dose cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Jon; Shah, Nirav; Noll, Braxton; Stevens, Craig B; Lawler, Marshall; Mougeot, Farah B; Mougeot, Jean-Luc C

    2018-02-23

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a major dose-limiting side effect of chemotherapy and radiation used in cancer treatment. Due to the complex nature of OM, currently available drug-based treatments are of limited efficacy. Our objectives were (i) to determine genes and molecular pathways associated with OM and wound healing using computational tools and publicly available data and (ii) to identify drugs formulated for topical use targeting the relevant OM molecular pathways. OM and wound healing-associated genes were determined by text mining, and the intersection of the two gene sets was selected for gene ontology analysis using the GeneCodis program. Protein interaction network analysis was performed using STRING-db. Enriched gene sets belonging to the identified pathways were queried against the Drug-Gene Interaction database to find drug candidates for topical use in OM. Our analysis identified 447 genes common to both the "OM" and "wound healing" text mining concepts. Gene enrichment analysis yielded 20 genes representing six pathways and targetable by a total of 32 drugs which could possibly be formulated for topical application. A manual search on ClinicalTrials.gov confirmed no relevant pathway/drug candidate had been overlooked. Twenty-five of the 32 drugs can directly affect the PTGS2 (COX-2) pathway, the pathway that has been targeted in previous clinical trials with limited success. Drug discovery using in silico text mining and pathway analysis tools can facilitate the identification of existing drugs that have the potential of topical administration to improve OM treatment.

  4. Low-dose paroxetine exposure causes lifetime declines in male mouse body weight, reproduction and competitive ability as measured by the novel organismal performance assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaukler, Shannon M; Ruff, James S; Galland, Tessa; Kandaris, Kirstie A; Underwood, Tristan K; Liu, Nicole M; Young, Elizabeth L; Morrison, Linda C; Yost, Garold S; Potts, Wayne K

    2015-01-01

    Paroxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) that is currently available on the market and is suspected of causing congenital malformations in babies born to mothers who take the drug during the first trimester of pregnancy. We utilized organismal performance assays (OPAs), a novel toxicity assessment method, to assess the safety of paroxetine during pregnancy in a rodent model. OPAs utilize genetically diverse wild mice (Mus musculus) to evaluate competitive performance between experimental and control animals as they compete among each other for limited resources in semi-natural enclosures. Performance measures included reproductive success, male competitive ability and survivorship. Paroxetine-exposed males weighed 13% less, had 44% fewer offspring, dominated 53% fewer territories and experienced a 2.5-fold increased trend in mortality, when compared with controls. Paroxetine-exposed females had 65% fewer offspring early in the study, but rebounded at later time points, presumably, because they were no longer exposed to paroxetine. In cages, paroxetine-exposed breeders took 2.3 times longer to produce their first litter and pups of both sexes experienced reduced weight when compared with controls. Low-dose paroxetine-induced health declines detected in this study that were undetected in preclinical trials with doses 2.5-8 times higher than human therapeutic doses. These data indicate that OPAs detect phenotypic adversity and provide unique information that could be useful towards safety testing during pharmaceutical development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Developmental disorders of the brain can be caused by PCBs; low doses of hydroxy-PCBs disrupt thyroid hormone-dependent dendrite formation from Purkinje neurons in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, Y.; Kimura-Kuroda, J. [Tokyo Metropol. Inst. for Neuroscience, Tokyo (Japan); Nagata, I. [CREST/ JST, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    Exposure to some environmental chemicals during the perinatal period causes developmental disorders of the brain. Cognitive impairment and hyperactivity in infants were reported in Taiwan, known as Yu-cheng incidents caused by the accidental contamination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Together with recent experimental data, Kuroda proposes a hypothesis that spatio-temporal disruptions of developing neuronal circuits by PCB exposure can cause the comobidity of learning disorders (LD), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autsm with the co-exposure to other environmental chemicals. PCBs and hydroxylated PCBs (OH-PCBs) have similar chemical structures to thyroid hormones (TH), thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). TH deficiency in the perinatal period causes cretinism children with severe cognitive and mental retardation. In primate model, Rice demonstrates that postnatal exposure to PCBs can dramatically influence later behavioral function. Epidemiological studies also indicate the possible developmental neurotoxicity of PCBs accumulated in human bodies. However, the precise underlying mechanisms and which types of PCB or OH-PCB with such effects have yet to be elucidated. It is important to establish a simple, reproducible, and sensitive in vitro assay for determining the effects of PCBs and OH-PCBs on the development of the central nervous system. Recently Iwasaki et al. established a reporter assay system and disclosed that low doses of PCBs potentially interfere TH-dependent gene expressions. This is the first demonstration that PCBs and OH-PCBs directly affect TH-receptor (TR)-mediated gene expressions crucial to the brain development, through unique mechanism. We also have demonstrated TH-dependent development of Purkinje neurons in vitro using a serum-free chemically defined medium. The degree of dendritic development of Purkinje cells is TH dose-dependent and exhibits high sensitivity in the pM order. Therefore, in the present study

  6. Meta-analysis: low-dose intake of vitamin E combined with other vitamins or minerals may decrease all-cause mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shan; Pan, Zhenyu; Li, Hui; Li, Fenglan; Song, Yanyan; Qiu, Yu

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that vitamin E alone or combined with other vitamins or minerals can prevent oxidative stress and slow oxidative injury-related diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. A comprehensive search of PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library was performed. Relative risk was used as an effect measure to compare the intervention and control groups. A total of 33 trials were included in the meta-analysis. Neither vitamin E intake alone (RR=1.01; 95% CI, 0.97 to 1.04; p=0.77) nor vitamin E intake combined with other agents (RR=0.97; 95% CI, 0.89 to 1.06; p=0.55) was correlated with all-cause mortality. Subgroup analyses revealed that low-dose vitamin E supplementation combined with other agents is associated with a statistically significant reduction in all-cause mortality (RR=0.92; 95% CI, 0.86 to 0.98; p=0.01), and vitamin E intake combined with other agents is associated with a statistically significant reduction in mortality rates among individuals without probable or confirmed diseases (RR=0.92; 95% CI, 0.86 to 0.99; p=0.02). Neither vitamin E intake alone nor combined with other agents is associated with a reduction in all-cause mortality. But a low dose (vitamin E combined with other agents is correlated with a reduction in all-cause mortality, and vitamin E intake combined with other agents is correlated with a reduction in the mortality rate among individuals without probable or confirmed diseases.

  7. 40 CFR Table 15 to Subpart Wwww of... - Applicability of General Provisions (Subpart A) to Subpart WWWW of Part 63

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (Subpart A) to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 15 Table 15 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment...: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 15 Table 15 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (Subpart A) to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 As specified in § 63.5925, the parts...

  8. Subpart AA Training Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  9. Subpart HH Training Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  10. Subpart W Training Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  11. Subpart DD Training Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has produced the following training presentation(s) for reporters subject to this subpart. Generally, these presentations explain the rule or show how to use the reporting system e-GGRT to submit annual GHG reports to EPA.

  12. Daytime Napping and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and All-Cause Mortality: A Prospective Study and Dose-Response Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Tomohide; Hara, Kazuo; Shojima, Nobuhiro; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    To summarize evidence about the association between daytime napping and the risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality, and to quantify the potential dose-response relation. Meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. Electronic databases were searched for articles published up to December 2014 using the terms nap, cardiovascular disease, and all-cause mortality. We selected well-adjusted prospective cohort studies reporting risk estimates for cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality related to napping. Eleven prospective cohort studies were identified with 151,588 participants (1,625,012 person-years) and a mean follow-up period of 11 years (60% women, 5,276 cardiovascular events, and 18,966 all-cause deaths). Pooled analysis showed that a long daytime nap (≥ 60 min/day) was associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease (rate ratio [RR]: 1.82 [1.22-2.71], P = 0.003, I(2) = 37%) compared with not napping. All-cause mortality was associated with napping for ≥ 60 min/day (RR: 1.27 [1.11-1.45], P napping. In contrast, napping for nap time and cardiovascular disease (P for nonlinearity = 0.01). The RR initially decreased from 0 to 30 min/day. Then it increased slightly until about 45 min/day, followed by a sharp increase at longer nap times. There was also a positive linear relation between nap time and all-cause mortality (P for non-linearity = 0.97). Nap time and cardiovascular disease may be associated via a J-curve relation. Further studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of a short nap. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  13. SU-E-J-205: Dose Distribution Differences Caused by System Related Geometric Distortion in MRI-Guided Radiation Treatment System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J; Yang, J; Wen, Z [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Marshall, S [Monaco, Elekta AB, Tampa, FL (Monaco); Court, L; Ibbott, G [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI has superb soft tissue contrast but is also known for geometric distortions. The concerns and uncertainty about MRI’s geometric distortion have contributed to the hesitation of using only MRI for simulation in radiation therapy. There are two major categories of geometric distortion in MRI; system related and patient related. In this presentation, we studied the impact of system-related geometric distortion on dose distribution in a digital body phantom under an MR-Linac environment. Methods: Residual geometric distortion (after built-in geometric correction) was modeled based on phantom measurements of the system-related geometric distortions of a MRI scanner of a combined MR guided Radiation Therapy (MRgRT) system. A digital oval shaped phantom (40×25 cm) as well as one ellipsoid shaped tumor volume was created to simulate a simplified human body. The simulated tumor volume was positioned at several locations between the isocenter and the body surface. CT numbers in HUs that approximate soft tissue and tumor were assigned to the respective regions in the digital phantom. To study the effect of geometric distortion caused by system imperfections, an IMRT plan was optimized with the distorted image set with the B field. Dose distributions were re-calculated on the undistorted image set with the B field (as in MR-Linac). Results: The maximum discrepancies in both body contour and tumor boundary was less than 2 mm, which leads to small dose distribution change. For the target in the center, coverage was reduced from 98.8% (with distortion) to 98.2%; for the other peripheral target coverage was reduced from 98.4% to 95.9%. Conclusion: System related geometric distortions over the 40×25 area were within 2mm and the resulted dosimetric effects were minor for the two tumor locations in the phantom. Patient study will be needed for further investigation. The authors received a corporate research grant from Elekta.

  14. A kinematic-based methodology for radiological protection: Runoff analysis to calculate the effective dose for internal exposure caused by ingestion of radioactive isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Syota; Yamada, Tadashi; Yamada, Tomohito J.

    2014-05-01

    We aim to propose a kinematic-based methodology similar with runoff analysis for readily understandable radiological protection. A merit of this methodology is to produce sufficiently accurate effective doses by basic analysis. The great earthquake attacked the north-east area in Japan on March 11, 2011. The system of electrical facilities to control Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant was completely destroyed by the following tsunamis. From the damaged reactor containment vessels, an amount of radioactive isotopes had leaked and been diffused in the vicinity of the plant. Radiological internal exposure caused by ingestion of food containing radioactive isotopes has become an issue of great interest to the public, and has caused excessive anxiety because of a deficiency of fundamental knowledge concerning radioactivity. Concentrations of radioactivity in the human body and internal exposure have been studied extensively. Previous radiologic studies, for example, studies by International Commission on Radiological Protection(ICRP), employ a large-scale computational simulation including actual mechanism of metabolism in the human body. While computational simulation is a standard method for calculating exposure doses among radiology specialists, these methods, although exact, are too difficult for non-specialists to grasp the whole image owing to the sophistication. In this study, the human body is treated as a vessel. The number of radioactive atoms in the human body can be described by an equation of continuity, which is the only governing equation. Half-life, the period of time required for the amount of a substance decreases by half, is only parameter to calculate the number of radioactive isotopes in the human body. Half-life depends only on the kinds of nuclides, there are no arbitrary parameters. It is known that the number of radioactive isotopes decrease exponentially by radioactive decay (physical outflow). It is also known that radioactive isotopes

  15. Antioxidant effects of melatonin and coenzyme Q10 on oxidative damage caused by single-dose ochratoxin A in rat kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenilmez, Aydin; Isikli, Burhanettin; Aral, Erinc; Degirmenci, Irfan; Sutken, Emine; Baycu, Cengiz

    2010-10-31

    In the study, the effects of relatively high single-dose of Ochratoxin A (OTA) and the antioxidant effects of Melatonin (Mel) and Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) on OTA-induced oxidative damages in rats were investigated. A total of 28 male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups of 7 rats each: Control, OTA, Mel+OTA and CoQ10+OTA groups. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in the plasma and glutathione (GSH) levels in whole blood were measured; kidneys (for histological inspection and for apoptosis detection by TUNEL method) and bone marrow samples (for chromosome aberration and mitotic index) were taken. The rats in the OTA group showed limited degeneration of tubular cells. In some tubules karyomegaly, desquamated cells and vacuolization were observed by light microscopy. Mel and CoQ10 treatment significantly reduced the severity of the lesions. MDA levels of the OTA group were significantly higher than the control, OTA+Mel and OTA+CoQ10 groups, while GSH levels were significantly lower than the control, OTA+Mel and OTA+CoQ10 groups. Higher incidences of apoptotic bodies were observed in the kidneys of the OTA group although OTA administration did not significantly change the incidence of apoptotic bodies when compared to the control and antioxidant administrated groups. Although the percentage of the mitotic index was lowest in the OTA group, no statistical difference was found among the groups. Additionally, OTA had no numerical and structural significant effects on chromosomes. It was observed that single-dose OTA administration caused oxidative damages in rat kidney and Mel or CoQ10 treatment appeared to ameliorate the OTA-induced tissue injuries.

  16. Sodium orthovanadate associated with pharmacological doses of ascorbate causes an increased generation of ROS in tumor cells that inhibits proliferation and triggers apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Günther, T-hat nia Mara Fischer; Kviecinski, Maicon Roberto; Baron, Carla Cristine; Felipe, Karina Bettega; Farias, Mirelle Sifroni; Ourique da Silva, Fabiana; Bücker, Nádia Cristina Falcão [Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis (Brazil); Pich, Claus Tröger [Campus de Araranguá, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Araranguá (Brazil); Ferreira, Eduardo Antonio [Universidade de Brasília, Faculdade de Ceilândia, DF (Brazil); Filho, Danilo Wilhelm [Departamento de Ecologia e Zoologia, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis (Brazil); Verrax, Julien; Calderon, Pedro Buc [Toxicology and Cancer Biology Research Group, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Pedrosa, Rozangela Curi, E-mail: rozangelapedrosa@gmail.com [Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis (Brazil)

    2013-01-18

    Graphical abstract: -- Abstract: Pharmacological doses of ascorbate were evaluated for its ability to potentiate the toxicity of sodium orthovanadate (Na{sub 3}VO{sub 4}) in tumor cells. Cytotoxicity, inhibition of cell proliferation, generation of ROS and DNA fragmentation were assessed in T24 cells. Na{sub 3}VO{sub 4} was cytotoxic against T24 cells (EC{sub 50} = 5.8 μM at 24 h), but in the presence of ascorbate (100 μM) the EC{sub 50} fell to 3.3 μM. Na{sub 3}VO{sub 4} plus ascorbate caused a strong inhibition of cell proliferation (up to 20%) and increased the generation of ROS (4-fold). Na{sub 3}VO{sub 4} did not directly cleave plasmid DNA, at this aspect no synergism was found occurring between Na{sub 3}VO{sub 4} and ascorbate once the resulting action of the combination was no greater than that of both substances administered separately. Cells from Ehrlich ascites carcinoma-bearing mice were used to determine the activity of antioxidant enzymes, the extent of the oxidative damage and the type of cell death. Na{sub 3}VO{sub 4} alone, or combined with ascorbate, increased catalase activity, but only Na{sub 3}VO{sub 4} plus ascorbate increased superoxide dismutase activity (up to 4-fold). Oxidative damage on proteins and lipids was higher due to the treatment done with Na{sub 3}VO{sub 4} plus ascorbate (2–3-fold). Ascorbate potentiated apoptosis in tumor cells from mice treated with Na{sub 3}VO{sub 4}. The results indicate that pharmacological doses of ascorbate enhance the generation of ROS induced by Na{sub 3}VO{sub 4} in tumor cells causing inhibition of proliferation and apoptosis. Apoptosis induced by orthovanadate and ascorbate is closer related to inhibition on Bcl-xL and activation of Bax. Our data apparently rule out a mechanism of cell demise p53-dependent or related to Cdk2 impairment.

  17. The influence of detoxification agents on the intensity of side effects caused by medium-high doses of methotrexate in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šumar Jovana S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective The treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL in Serbia is conducted according to protocol ALL IC BMF-2009. The therapy includes the application of cytostatic drugs methotrexate and 6-mercaptopurine, and drug detoxifying Calcium Folinate. At the moment, 80% of affected children could be cured with current treatment, but resistance to the therapy and its toxic effects remain serious clinical problems. The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of detoxification agents (Calcium Folinate, silymarin and ursodeoxycholic acid on the side effects of methotrexate, applied in this protocol. Methods A modified acute toxicity form (GPOH was used for side effects monitoring. The research included children with either standard or intermediate risk ALL in the consolidation therapy phase, who were hospitalised at the Institute for Child and Youth Health Care of Vojvodina in Novi Sad during the period from July 2010 to February 2011. Results The most frequent side effect after 40 applications of methotrexate in ten children was bone marrow depression. Methotrexate caused: leukopenia in 10 patients, thrombocytopenia in 5 patients; after the use of folic acid, platelet count grew in 8 patients, leukocyte in 2 patients. Less frequent side effects: an increase serum transaminase activity, the state of fever, bronchopneumonia, diarrhoea with mild cramps and hypercalcaemia. Conclusion The application of Calcium Folinate, silymarin and ursodeoxycholic acid prevented the occurrence of severe adverse effects caused by medium-high doses of methotrexate. Observed adverse effects were of mild to moderate intensity, reversible and did not significantly disturb the quality of life in treated patients.

  18. Residual γH2AX foci induced by low dose x-ray radiation in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells do not cause accelerated senescence in the progeny of irradiated cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pustovalova, Margarita; Astrelina, Тatiana A.; Grekhova, Anna; Vorobyeva, Natalia; Tsvetkova, Anastasia; Blokhina, Taisia; Nikitina, Victoria; Suchkova, Yulia; Usupzhanova, Daria; Brunchukov, Vitalyi; Kobzeva, Irina; Karaseva, Тatiana; Ozerov, Ivan V.; Samoylov, Aleksandr; Bushmanov, Andrey

    2017-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation (IR) exposure (10-100 mGy) remain unknown. Here we present a comparative study of early (less than 24h) and delayed (up to 11 post-irradiation passages) radiation effects caused by low (80 mGy) vs intermediate (1000 mGy) dose X-ray exposure in cultured human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We show that γН2АХ foci induced by an intermediate dose returned back to the control value by 24 h post-irradiation. In contrast, ...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Bb of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart BB

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart BB A Appendix A to Subpart BB of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants From Phosphate Fertilizers Production Plants Pt. 63, Subpart BB, App. A Appendix A to Subpart BB of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart...

  20. Does high-dose metformin cause lactic acidosis in type 2 diabetic patients after CABG surgery? A double blind randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Ghafari

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Metformin is a dimethyl biguanide oral anti-hyperglycemic agent. Lactic acidosis due to metformin is a fatal metabolic condition that limits its use in patients in poor clinical condition, consequently reducing the number of patients who benefit from this medication. In a double blind randomized clinical trial, we investigated 200 type 2 diabetic patients after coronary artery bypass surgery in the open heart ICU of the Mazandaran Heart Center, and randomly assigned them to equal intervention and control groups. The intervention group received regular insulin infusion along with 2 metformin 500 mg tablets every twelve hours, while the control group received only intravenous insulin with 2 placebo tablets every twelve hours. Lactate level, pH, base excess, blood glucose and serum creatinine were measured over five 12 h periods, with data averaged for each period. The primary outcome in this study was high lactate levels. Comparison between the 2 groups was made by independent Student’s t-test. To compare changes in multiple measures in each group and analysis of group interaction, a repeated measurement ANOVA test was used. There was no significant difference between the 2 groups regarding pH, base excess, or bicarbonate intake (P>0.05. No patient showed lactic acidosis in either group. Lactate levels were 23.0 vs 23.4 in the insulin-metformin and insulin only groups when the study was started, respectively. At the end of the study, those levels were 18.7 vs 18.9, respectively. In addition, the ANOVA repeated measurement test did not show a significant difference in terms of changes in the amount of lactate level between the 2 groups during the five measurement tests of the study period (P>0.05. High-dose metformin (1,000 mg twice daily with insulin does not cause lactic acidosis in type 2 diabetic patients after coronary artery

  1. Dietary magnesium intake and the risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and all-cause mortality: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xuexian; Wang, Kai; Han, Dan; He, Xuyan; Wei, Jiayu; Zhao, Lu; Imam, Mustapha Umar; Ping, Zhiguang; Li, Yusheng; Xu, Yuming; Min, Junxia; Wang, Fudi

    2016-12-08

    Although studies have examined the association between dietary magnesium intake and health outcome, the results are inconclusive. Here, we conducted a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies in order to investigate the correlation between magnesium intake and the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), type 2 diabetes (T2D), and all-cause mortality. PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science were searched for articles that contained risk estimates for the outcomes of interest and were published through May 31, 2016. The pooled results were analyzed using a random-effects model. Forty prospective cohort studies totaling more than 1 million participants were included in the analysis. During the follow-up periods (ranging from 4 to 30 years), 7678 cases of CVD, 6845 cases of coronary heart disease (CHD), 701 cases of heart failure, 14,755 cases of stroke, 26,299 cases of T2D, and 10,983 deaths were reported. No significant association was observed between increasing dietary magnesium intake (per 100 mg/day increment) and the risk of total CVD (RR: 0.99; 95% CI, 0.88-1.10) or CHD (RR: 0.92; 95% CI, 0.85-1.01). However, the same incremental increase in magnesium intake was associated with a 22% reduction in the risk of heart failure (RR: 0.78; 95% CI, 0.69-0.89) and a 7% reduction in the risk of stroke (RR: 0.93; 95% CI, 0.89-0.97). Moreover, the summary relative risks of T2D and mortality per 100 mg/day increment in magnesium intake were 0.81 (95% CI, 0.77-0.86) and 0.90 (95% CI, 0.81-0.99), respectively. Increasing dietary magnesium intake is associated with a reduced risk of stroke, heart failure, diabetes, and all-cause mortality, but not CHD or total CVD. These findings support the notion that increasing dietary magnesium might provide health benefits.

  2. SU-E-T-502: Dose Perturbation Effects Near Implant Surfaces Caused by Secondary Electron Transport in Photon-Beam Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chofor, N; Poppe, B; Harder, D

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the dose perturbation effects at interfaces between water and a Titanium implant, attributable to secondary electron transport across the interface, during high energy photon radiotherapy. While dose enhancement is characteristic for the proximal interface of a high-atomic number implant, the dose perturbation at the distal interface varies from reduction to enhancement, requiring proper computation of secondary electron transport effects. The backward and forward perturbation factors pb and pf will be calculated. Using DOSRZnrc, depth dose curves were computed in a water phantom using photon spectra of nominal energies 4, 6, 10, 15, 24 MV for conditions (i) homogeneous water without any insert, (ii) alternatively with Titanium inserts of thicknesses 3 and 5 cm placed at 10 cm water depth. Backscatter factor pb was computed as the ratio of the dose with implant against that without implant, whereas pf was calculated by first accounting for photon attenuation in the implant and then taking the ratio of the dose with implant against that without implant. At the front interface, pb is independent of the material thickness and varies slightly with beam energy and incident angle. On consideration of photon attenuation in the implant, pf was also found to be independent on material thickness, but strongly varying with energy, including change of sign. For 4-24 MV photon beams the maximum spread of the dose perturbation effect remains within only a few millimeters from the interface, with pb values ranging from 1.18-1.22, while factor pf ranges from 0.9-1.21 at normal incidence, indicating the extent to which planning systems may over- or underestimate the doses near implant interfaces. At inclined beam incidence the dose perturbation effects even increase, and for instance pb (1.24-1.25) and pf (0.85-1.32) were determined for 6 MV and 24 MV beams at 45° incidence. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  3. Atrazine Does Not Induce Pica Behavior at Doses that Increase Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Activation and Cause Conditioned Taste Avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous work has shown that a single oral administration of atrazine (ATR), a chlorotriazine herbicide, induces dose-dependent increases in plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), serum corticosterone (CORT) and progesterone. The mechanism for these effects is unknown. To tes...

  4. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart W of... - General Provisions Applicability to Subpart W

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Subpart W 1 Table 1 to Subpart W of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Polyamides Production Pt. 63, Subpt. W, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart W of Part 63—General Provisions Applicability to Subpart W Reference Applies to subpart W BLR WSR WSR alternative standard, and BLR equipment...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Aa of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants From Phosphoric Acid Manufacturing Plants Pt. 63, Subpt. AA, App. A Appendix A to Subpart AA of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart AA 40 CFR...

  6. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Ddd of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart DDD of Part 63

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart DDD of Part 63 1 Table 1 to Subpart DDD of Part 63 Protection... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Mineral Wool Production Pt. 63, Subpt. DDD, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart DDD of Part 63—Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart DDD of Part 63...

  7. Residual γH2AX foci induced by low dose x-ray radiation in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells do not cause accelerated senescence in the progeny of irradiated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovalova, Margarita; Astrelina, Тatiana A; Grekhova, Anna; Vorobyeva, Natalia; Tsvetkova, Anastasia; Blokhina, Taisia; Nikitina, Victoria; Suchkova, Yulia; Usupzhanova, Daria; Brunchukov, Vitalyi; Kobzeva, Irina; Karaseva, Тatiana; Ozerov, Ivan V; Samoylov, Aleksandr; Bushmanov, Andrey; Leonov, Sergey; Izumchenko, Evgeny; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Klokov, Dmitry; Osipov, Andreyan N

    2017-11-21

    Mechanisms underlying the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation (IR) exposure (10-100 mGy) remain unknown. Here we present a comparative study of early (less than 24h) and delayed (up to 11 post-irradiation passages) radiation effects caused by low (80 mGy) vs intermediate (1000 mGy) dose X-ray exposure in cultured human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We show that γН2АХ foci induced by an intermediate dose returned back to the control value by 24 h post-irradiation. In contrast, low-dose irradiation resulted in residual γН2АХ foci still present at 24 h. Notably, these low dose induced residual γН2АХ foci were not co-localized with рАТМ foci and were observed predominantly in the proliferating Кi67 positive (Кi67+) cells. The number of γН2АХ foci and the fraction of nonproliferating (Кi67-) and senescent (SA-β-gal+) cells measured at passage 11 were increased in cultures exposed to an intermediate dose compared to unirradiated controls. These delayed effects were not seen in the progeny of cells that were irradiated with low-dose X-rays, although such exposure resulted in residual γН2АХ foci in directly irradiated cells. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that the low-dose IR induced residual γH2AХ foci do not play a role in delayed irradiation consequences, associated with cellular senescence in cultured MSCs.

  8. The influence of the patient's posture on organ and tissue absorbed doses caused by radiodiagnostic examinations; Influencia da postura do paciente na dose absorvida em orgaos e tecidos causada por exames radiologicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassola, Vagner F.; Kramer, Richard; Khoury, Helen J.; Lira, Carlos A.B.O., E-mail: vagner.cassola@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    Due to the gravitational force, organ positions and subcutaneous fat distribution change when a standing person lies down on her/his back, which is called 'supine posture'. Both postures, standing and supine, are very common in X-ray diagnosis, however, phantoms used for the simulation of patients for organ and tissue absorbed dose assessments normally represent humans either in standing or in supine posture. Consequently, the exposure scenario simulated sometimes does not match the real X-ray examination with respect to the patient's posture. Using standing and supine versions of mesh-based female and male adult phantoms, this study investigates the 'posture-effect' on organ and tissue absorbed doses for radiographs of the pelvis and the lumbar spine in order to find out if the errors from simulating the false posture are significant. (author)

  9. Coronary artery calcium can predict all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events on low-dose CT screening for lung cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, P.C.; Gondrie, M.J.; Graaf, Y. van der; Koning, H.J. de; Isgum, I.; Ginneken, B. van; Mali, W.P.Th.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Performing coronary artery calcium (CAC) screening as part of low-dose CT lung cancer screening has been proposed as an efficient strategy to detect people with high cardiovascular risk and improve outcomes of primary prevention. This study aims to investigate whether CAC measured on

  10. Coronary artery calcium can predict all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events on low-dose ct screening for lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.C. Jacobs (Peter); M.J. Gondrie (Martijn); Y. van der Graaf (Yolanda); H.J. de Koning (Harry); I. Isgum (Ivana); B.T.J. van Ginneken (Berbke); W.P. Mali (Willem)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE. Performing coronary artery calcium (CAC) screening as part of low-dose CT lung cancer screening has been proposed as an efficient strategy to detect people with high cardiovascular risk and improve outcomes of primary prevention. This study aims to investigate whether CAC

  11. ATRAZINE DOES NOT INDUCE GASTROINTESTINAL DISCOMFORT (PICA) IN RATS AT DOSES THAT INCREASE HPA-AXIS ACTIVATION AND CAUSE CONDITIONED TASTE AVERSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous work has shown that a single oral administration of atrazine (ATR), a chlorotriazine herbicide, induces dose-dependent increases in plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and serum corticosterone (CORT), with a NOEL equal to 5mg/kg. The mechanism for these effects ...

  12. ATRAZINE DOES NOT INDUCE GASTROINTESTINAL DISCOMFORT (PICA) IN RATS AT DOSES THAT INCREASE ACTH ANDCORTICOSTERONE RELEASE AND CAUSE CONDITIONED TASTE AVERSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous work has shown that a single oral administration of atrazine (ATR), a chlorotriazine herbicide, induces dose-dependent increases in plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and serum corticosterone (CORT), with a LOEL of 12.5mg/kg. The mechanism for these effects is unk...

  13. Finger Injection with High-Dose (1:1,000) Epinephrine: Does it Cause Finger Necrosis and Should it be Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzcharles-Bowe, Colleen; Denkler, Keith

    2006-01-01

    Objectives Accidental finger injections with high-dose (1:1,000) epinephrine is a new and increasing phenomenon. The purpose of this study is to document the incidence of finger necrosis and the treatment for this type of injury. The necessity or type of treatment required for this type of injury has not been established. Methods The literature was reviewed from 1900 to 2005 by hand and by Internet to document all cases of high-dose (1:1,000) finger epinephrine injection. In addition, the authors added five additional cases. Results There are a total of 59 reported cases of finger injections with high-dose epinephrine, of which, 32 cases were untreated. There were no instances of necrosis or skin loss, but neuropraxia lasting as long as 10 weeks and reperfusion pain were carefully documented. Treatment was not uniform for those who received it, but phentolamine was the most commonly used agent. Conclusions There is not one case of finger necrosis in all of the 59 reported cases of finger injections with 1:1,000 epinephrine in the world literature. The necessity or type of treatment of high-dose epinephrine injection injuries remains conjecture, but phentolamine is the most commonly used agent in the reported cases, and the rationale and evidence for its use are discussed PMID:18780041

  14. A computer simulated phantom study of tomotherapy dose optimization based on probability density functions (PDF) and potential errors caused by low reproducibility of PDF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Ke; Cai, Jing; Brookeman, James; Molloy, Janelle; Christopher, John; Read, Paul

    2006-09-01

    Lung tumor motion trajectories measured by four-dimensional CT or dynamic MRI can be converted to a probability density function (PDF), which describes the probability of the tumor at a certain position, for PDF based treatment planning. Using this method in simulated sequential tomotherapy, we study the dose reduction of normal tissues and more important, the effect of PDF reproducibility on the accuracy of dosimetry. For these purposes, realistic PDFs were obtained from two dynamic MRI scans of a healthy volunteer within a 2 week interval. The first PDF was accumulated from a 300 s scan and the second PDF was calculated from variable scan times from 5 s (one breathing cycle) to 300 s. Optimized beam fluences based on the second PDF were delivered to the hypothetical gross target volume (GTV) of a lung phantom that moved following the first PDF The reproducibility between two PDFs varied from low (78%) to high (94.8%) when the second scan time increased from 5 s to 300 s. When a highly reproducible PDF was used in optimization, the dose coverage of GTV was maintained; phantom lung receiving 10%-20% prescription dose was reduced by 40%-50% and the mean phantom lung dose was reduced by 9.6%. However, optimization based on PDF with low reproducibility resulted in a 50% underdosed GTV. The dosimetric error increased nearly exponentially as the PDF error increased. Therefore, although the dose of the tumor surrounding tissue can be theoretically reduced by PDF based treatment planning, the reliability and applicability of this method highly depend on if a reproducible PDF exists and is measurable. By correlating the dosimetric error and PDF error together, a useful guideline for PDF data acquisition and patient qualification for PDF based planning can be derived.

  15. Low doses of oxygen ion irradiation cause long-term damage to bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Wang

    Full Text Available During deep space missions, astronauts will be exposed to low doses of charged particle irradiation. The long-term health effects of these exposures are largely unknown. We previously showed that low doses of oxygen ion (16O irradiation induced acute damage to the hematopoietic system, including hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells in a mouse model. However, the chronic effects of low dose 16O irradiation remain undefined. In the current study, we investigated the long-term effects of low dose 16O irradiation on the mouse hematopoietic system. Male C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 0.05 Gy, 0.1 Gy, 0.25 Gy and 1.0 Gy whole body 16O (600 MeV/n irradiation. The effects of 16O irradiation on bone marrow (BM hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs were examined three months after the exposure. The results showed that the frequencies and numbers of BM HPCs and HSCs were significantly reduced in 0.1 Gy, 0.25 Gy and 1.0 Gy irradiated mice compared to 0.05 Gy irradiated and non-irradiated mice. Exposure of mice to low dose 16O irradiation also significantly reduced the clongenic function of BM HPCs determined by the colony-forming unit assay. The functional defect of irradiated HSCs was detected by cobblestone area-forming cell assay after exposure of mice to 0.1 Gy, 0.25 Gy and 1.0 Gy of 16O irradiation, while it was not seen at three months after 0.5 Gy and 1.0 Gy of γ-ray irradiation. These adverse effects of 16O irradiation on HSCs coincided with an increased intracellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. However, there were comparable levels of cellular apoptosis and DNA damage between irradiated and non-irradiated HPCs and HSCs. These data suggest that exposure to low doses of 16O irradiation induces long-term hematopoietic injury, primarily via increased ROS production in HSCs.

  16. National Contingency Plan Subpart J

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subpart J of the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) directs EPA to prepare a schedule of dispersants, other chemicals, and oil spill mitigating devices and substances that may be used to remove or control oil discharges.

  17. The Estimated Annual Effective Dose Caused By Radon and Thoron Gases in the Vicinity of Active Faults in the North East of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asghar Mowlavi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Active faults are actually the most important factor in the entry of radon and thoron to the surface of Earth. The location of residential areas on these faults is one of the main reasons for increasing the concentration of these radioactive gases in them. Materials and Methods: By using RTM1688, the concentration of Radon and Thoron was measured in 200 houses in rural residential areas placed on the active faults in Northern Khorasan in the north-east of Iran. Results: Radon measurements range was registered from 12Bqm-3 and 188 Bqm-3 with an average of 75.43 Bqm-3. The highest annual effective dose in samples was 5.45 mSv and the lowest was 0.35 mSv with an average of 2.187mSv. The range of Thoron was registered between 0.0 Bqm-3 and 840Bqm-3 with an average of 325.48 Bqm-3. The highest annual effective dose in samples was 21.17 mSv and the lowest was 0 mSv with an average of 8.20 mSv. Conclusion: The results show that in close areas to active faults of north-east of Iran the concentration of Thoron and Radon is two to three times more than the safe level. It was found that 20 percent of residential areas are subject to annual effective dose greater than the limit for radon and 54 percent for Thoron. The high concentration of Thoron and Radon in these areas show that the active faults play the main role of producing of these gases which may increase of lung diseases.

  18. 40 CFR Table 9 to Subpart Jjj of... - Routine Reports Required by This Subpart

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Routine Reports Required by This Subpart 9 Table 9 to Subpart JJJ of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY.... 63, Subpt. JJJ, Table 9 Table 9 to Subpart JJJ of Part 63—Routine Reports Required by This Subpart...

  19. Low-dose energetic protons induce adaptive and bystander effects that protect human cells against DNA damage caused by a subsequent exposure to energetic iron ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonanno, Manuela; De Toledo, Sonia M; Howell, Roger W; Azzam, Edouard I

    2015-05-01

    During interplanetary missions, astronauts are exposed to mixed types of ionizing radiation. The low 'flux' of the high atomic number and high energy (HZE) radiations relative to the higher 'flux' of low linear energy transfer (LET) protons makes it highly probable that for any given cell in the body, proton events will precede any HZE event. Whereas progress has been made in our understanding of the biological effects of low-LET protons and high-LET HZE particles, the interplay between the biochemical processes modulated by these radiations is unclear. Here we show that exposure of normal human fibroblasts to a low mean absorbed dose of 20 cGy of 0.05 or 1-GeV protons (LET ∼ 1.25 or 0.2 keV/μm, respectively) protects the irradiated cells (P proton-irradiated cells were co-cultured were also significantly protected from the DNA-damaging effects of the challenge dose. The mitigating effect persisted for at least 24 h. These results highlight the interactions of biological effects due to direct cellular traversal by radiation with those due to bystander effects in cell populations exposed to mixed radiation fields. They show that protective adaptive responses can spread from cells targeted by low-LET space radiation to bystander cells in their vicinity. The findings are relevant to understanding the health hazards of space travel. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  20. Low doses of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin increase transforming growth factor {beta} and cause myocardial fibrosis in marmosets (Callithrix jacchus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riecke, K.; Grimm, D.; Kossmehl, P.; Paul, M.; Stahlmann, R. [Inst. of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Benjamin Franklin Medical Center, Freie Univ. Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Shakibaei, M.; Schulze-Tanzil, G. [Inst. of Anatomy, Benjamin Franklin Medical Center, Freie Univ. Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2002-06-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested an association between exposure to dioxins and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, cardiotoxic effects of low doses of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in animals have not been reported so far. We studied the hearts of male marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) after treatment with single subcutaneous doses of 1, 10 or 100 ng TCDD/kg body weight or vehicle (toluene/DMSO 1+2 v/v, 100 {mu}l/kg body weight). The animals were killed 2 or 4 weeks after treatment. Tissue samples of left ventricular myocardium were stained with picrosirius red and examined histologically along with quantitative image analysis. Extracellular matrix proteins were additionally analysed by western blotting. Monkeys showed no overt signs of toxicity nor did their relative heart weights differ significantly depending on treatment. Histology revealed an increase of picrosirius red-positive area above control values in 2 of 4 (1 ng TCDD/kg body weight), 6 of 12 (10 ng/kg) and 6 of 10 (100 ng/kg) marmosets. Western blotting confirmed these histological findings showing an increase of collagen, fibronectin and laminin in the hearts of TCDD-treated animals. Western blotting additionally showed an increased concentration of transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) as well as TGF-{beta} receptor type I which could be a functional link to the effects on extracellular matrix. Our findings might explain the association of TCDD exposure with increased cardiovascular mortality observed in epidemiological studies and should stimulate further research on the role of changes in the extracellular matrix in the toxic effects of dioxins and related substances on other organs. (orig.)

  1. Structural changes caused by radiation-induced reduction and radiolysis: the effect of X-ray absorbed dose in a fungal multicopper oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De la Mora, Eugenio [Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Avenida Universidad 2001, Cuernavaca, Morelos 62210 (Mexico); Lovett, Janet E. [University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QR (United Kingdom); University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3RE (United Kingdom); EaStCHEM School of Chemistry, Joseph Black Building, The King’s Buildings, Edinburgh EH9 3JJ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Blanford, Christopher F. [University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QR (United Kingdom); Manchester Interdisciplinary Biocentre, 131 Princess Street, Manchester M1 7DN (United Kingdom); Garman, Elspeth F. [University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU (United Kingdom); Valderrama, Brenda; Rudino-Pinera, Enrique, E-mail: rudino@ibt.unam.mx [Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Avenida Universidad 2001, Cuernavaca, Morelos 62210 (Mexico)

    2012-05-01

    Radiation-induced reduction, radiolysis of copper sites and the effect of pH value together with the concomitant geometrical distortions of the active centres were analysed in several fungal (C. gallica) laccase structures collected at cryotemperature. This study emphasizes the importance of careful interpretation when the crystallographic structure of a metalloprotein is described. X-ray radiation induces two main effects at metal centres contained in protein crystals: radiation-induced reduction and radiolysis and a resulting decrease in metal occupancy. In blue multicopper oxidases (BMCOs), the geometry of the active centres and the metal-to-ligand distances change depending on the oxidation states of the Cu atoms, suggesting that these alterations are catalytically relevant to the binding, activation and reduction of O{sub 2}. In this work, the X-ray-determined three-dimensional structure of laccase from the basidiomycete Coriolopsis gallica (Cg L), a high catalytic potential BMCO, is described. By combining spectroscopic techniques (UV–Vis, EPR and XAS) and X-ray crystallography, structural changes at and around the active copper centres were related to pH and absorbed X-ray dose (energy deposited per unit mass). Depletion of two of the four active Cu atoms as well as low occupancies of the remaining Cu atoms, together with different conformations of the metal centres, were observed at both acidic pH and high absorbed dose, correlating with more reduced states of the active coppers. These observations provide additional evidence to support the role of flexibility of copper sites during O{sub 2} reduction. This study supports previous observations indicating that interpretations regarding redox state and metal coordination need to take radiation effects explicitly into account.

  2. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Gg of... - General Provisions Applicability to Subpart GG

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Subpart GG 1 Table 1 to Subpart GG of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY..., Subpt. GG, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart GG of Part 63—General Provisions Applicability to Subpart GG Reference Applies to affected sources in subpart GG Comment 63.1(a)(1) Yes 63.1(a)(2) Yes 63.1(a)(3) Yes 63...

  3. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Eee of... - General Provisions Applicable to Subpart EEE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Subpart EEE 1 Table 1 to Subpart EEE of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY..., Subpt. EEE, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart EEE of Part 63—General Provisions Applicable to Subpart EEE Reference Applies to subpart EEE Explanation 63.1 Yes. 63.2 Yes. 63.3 Yes. 63.4 Yes. 63.5 Yes. 63.6(a), (b...

  4. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart R of... - General Provisions Applicability to Subpart R

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Subpart R 1 Table 1 to Subpart R of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Pipeline Breakout Stations) Pt. 63, Subpt. R, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart R of Part 63—General Provisions Applicability to Subpart R Reference Applies to subpart R Comment 63.1(a)(1) Yes 63.1(a)(2) Yes 63.1(a)(3) Yes...

  5. Dosing of adult pigeons with as little as one #9 lead pellet caused severe δ-ALAD depression, suggesting potential adverse effects in wild populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holladay, Jeremy P; Nisanian, Mandy; Williams, Susan; Tuckfield, R Cary; Kerr, Richard; Jarrett, Timothy; Tannenbaum, Lawrence; Holladay, Steven D; Sharma, Ajay; Gogal, Robert M

    2012-11-01

    Avian wildlife species commonly ingest lead (Pb) spent shot or bullet fragments as grit or mistakenly as food. In previous studies in our laboratory and others, the toxicity varied based on the diet as well as type and quantity of Pb ingested. In the current study, domestic pigeons were gavaged with 1, 2, or 3 Pb pellets and then followed with weekly radiographs and blood physiologic endpoints for 28 days. Pellet retention decreased by roughly 50 % per week as pellets were either absorbed or excreted, except for week 4 where pellet number no longer was diminished. Size of retained pellets visually decreased over retention time. Birds dosed with a single #9 pellet showed mean blood Pb levels over 80 times higher than those of the controls, verifying Pb pellet absorption from the gut. A single Pb pellet also reduced plasma δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (δ-ALAD) activity by over 80 % compared to controls, suggesting the potential for population injury in Pb pellet-exposed pigeons.

  6. Potential Offsite Radiological Doses Estimated for the Proposed Divine Strake Experiment, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ron Warren

    2006-12-01

    An assessment of the potential radiation dose that residents offsite of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) might receive from the proposed Divine Strake experiment was made to determine compliance with Subpart H of Part 61 of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities. The Divine Strake experiment, proposed by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, consists of a detonation of 700 tons of heavy ammonium nitrate fuel oil-emulsion above the U16b Tunnel complex in Area 16 of the NTS. Both natural radionuclides suspended, and historic fallout radionuclides resuspended from the detonation, have potential to be transported outside the NTS boundary by wind. They may, therefore, contribute radiological dose to the public. Subpart H states ''Emissions of radionuclides to the ambient air from Department of Energy facilities shall not exceed those amounts that would cause any member of the public to receive in any year an effective dose equivalent of 10 mrem/yr'' (Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 61.92) where mrem/yr is millirem per year. Furthermore, application for U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approval of construction of a new source or modification of an existing source is required if the effective dose equivalent, caused by all emissions from the new construction or modification, is greater than or equal to 0.1 mrem/yr (40 CFR 61.96). In accordance with Section 61.93, a dose assessment was conducted with the computer model CAP88-PC, Version 3.0. In addition to this model, a dose assessment was also conducted by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This modeling was conducted to obtain dose estimates from a model designed for acute releases and which addresses terrain effects and uses meteorology from multiple locations. Potential radiation dose to a

  7. High doses of ethylenediurea (EDU) as soil drenches did not increase leaf N content or cause phytotoxicity in willow grown in fertile soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agathokleous, Evgenios; Paoletti, Elena; Manning, William J; Kitao, Mitsutoshi; Saitanis, Costas J; Koike, Takayoshi

    2018-01-01

    Ground-level ozone (O3) levels are nowadays elevated in wide regions of the Earth, causing significant effects on plants that finally lead to suppressed productivity and yield losses. Ethylenediurea (EDU) is a chemical compound which is widely used in research projects as phytoprotectant against O3 injury. The EDU mode of action remains still unclear, while there are indications that EDU may contribute to plants with nitrogen (N) when the soil is poor in N and the plants have relatively small leaf area. To reveal whether the N content of EDU acts as a fertilizer to plants when the soil is not poor in N and the plants have relatively large total plant leaf area, willow plants (Salix sachalinensis Fr. Schm) were exposed to low ambient O3 levels and treated ten times (9-day interval) with 200mL soil drench containing 0, 800 or 1600mg EDU L(-1). Fertilizer was added to a nutrient-poor soil, and the plants had an average plant leaf area of 9.1m(2) at the beginning of EDU treatments. Indications for EDU-induced hormesis in maximum electron transport rate (Jmax) and ratio of intercellular to ambient CO2 concentration (Ci:Ca) were observed at the end of the experiment. No other EDU-induced effects on leaf greenness and N content, maximum quantum yield of photosystem II (Fv/Fm), gas exchange, growth and matter production suggest that EDU did not act as N fertilizer and did not cause toxicity under these experimental conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Necrotizing pneumonia and acute purulent pericarditis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 19A in a healthy 4-year-old girl after one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shay; Tsai, Jeng-Dau; Tsao, Ten-Fu; Liao, Pei-Fen; Sheu, Ji-Nan

    2016-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of infectious diseases in children that may lead to life-threatening complications. Acute purulent pericarditis is an uncommon complication of S. pneumoniae in the antibiotic era. A healthy 4-year-old girl was admitted with pneumonia and pleural effusion. She had received one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine at 2 years of age. She rapidly developed necrotizing pneumonia, complicated by bronchopleural fistula presenting as subcutaneous emphysema and pneumothorax and acute purulent pericarditis. S. pneumoniae serotype 19A was subsequently identified from blood, empyema and pericardial fluid cultures. After appropriate antibiotic therapy and a right lower lobectomy, her condition stabilized and she promptly recovered. This case highlights two rare potential clinical complications of pneumococcal disease in a child: necrotizing pneumonia and acute purulent pericarditis. This is the first report of a child who received just one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine at 2 years of age, as per the United States' Advisory Committee on Immunization Practice's recommendations, but who still developed severe invasive pneumococcal disease with life-threatening complications caused by S. pneumoniae serotype 19A.

  9. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Jjj of... - Applicability of general provisions to subpart JJJ affected sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... subpart JJJ affected sources 1 Table 1 to Subpart JJJ of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Polymers and Resins Pt. 63, Subpt. JJJ, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart JJJ of Part 63—Applicability of general provisions to subpart JJJ affected sources Reference Applies toSubpart JJJ Explanation § 63.1(a)(1) Yes § 63...

  10. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Mmmmm of... - Applicability of General Provisions to Subpart MMMMM

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Polyurethane Foam Fabrication Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. MMMMM, Table 7 Table 7 to Subpart MMMMM of Part 63...) Compliance with opacity/visible emission standards No Subpart MMMMM does not specify opacity or visible.... § 63.8(a)(4) Monitoring with flares No Subpart MMMMM does not refer directly or indirectly to § 63.11...

  11. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Dd of... - Applicability of Paragraphs in Subpart A of This Part 63-General Provisions to Subpart DD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... A of This Part 63-General Provisions to Subpart DD 2 Table 2 to Subpart DD of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants from Off-Site Waste and Recovery Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. DD, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart DD of Part 63—Applicability of Paragraphs in Subpart A of This Part 63—General Provisions to...

  12. Overweight, obesity and risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xue-ming; Liu, Yu-jian; Zhan, Jian; He, Qi-qiang

    2015-01-01

    Overweight and obese individuals with type 2 diabetes are recommended to lose weight, but the associations between excess body weight and all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes remain controversial. Therefore, we performed a dose-response meta-analysis to investigate this association. We searched PubMed and Embase through 19th October 2014 and examined the references of retrieved articles to identify relevant prospective cohort studies. A random-effect model was used to calculate the summary risk estimates. Nine studies including 13 cohorts with 161,984 participants were identified. The relative risks (RRs) of all-cause mortality in overweight and obese patients with type 2 diabetes were 0.81 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.74-0.90) and 0.72 (95% CI 0.63-0.81) respectively, compared with the normal or non-overweight patients. Furthermore, a 5 kg/m(2) increase in body mass index was associated with a significantly reduced risk of all-cause mortality by 5% (RR 0.95, 95% CI 0.93-0.97). However, no significant association was found between obese and/or overweight and the risk of cardiovascular mortality in type 2 diabetic patients (RR 0.89; 95% CI 0.66-1.20 for overweight and RR 0.77; 95% CI 0.54-1.10 for obesity, respectively). The findings from the present meta-analysis indicate that excess body weight may be a protective factor for all-cause mortality among patients with type 2 diabetes.

  13. SM22{alpha}-induced activation of p16{sup INK4a}/retinoblastoma pathway promotes cellular senescence caused by a subclinical dose of {gamma}-radiation and doxorubicin in HepG2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Rim; Lee, Hee Min; Lee, So Yong; Kim, Eun Jin; Kim, Kug Chan [Department of Radiation Biology, Environmental Radiation Research Group, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Paik, Sang Gi [Department of Biology, School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Eun Wie, E-mail: ewcho@kribb.re.kr [Daejeon-KRIBB-FHCRC Cooperation Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, In Gyu, E-mail: igkim@kaeri.re.kr [Department of Radiation Biology, Environmental Radiation Research Group, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-10

    Research highlights: {yields} SM22{alpha} overexpression in HepG2 cells leads cells to a growth arrest state, and the treatment of a subclinical dose of {gamma}-radiation or doxorubicin promotes cellular senescence. {yields} SM22{alpha} overexpression elevates p16{sup INK4a} followed by pRB activation, but there are no effects on p53/p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} pathway. {yields} SM22{alpha}-induced MT-1G activates p16{sup INK4a}/pRB pathway, which promotes cellular senescence by damaging agents. -- Abstract: Smooth muscle protein 22-alpha (SM22{alpha}) is known as a transformation- and shape change-sensitive actin cross-linking protein found in smooth muscle tissue and fibroblasts; however, its functional role remains uncertain. We reported previously that SM22{alpha} overexpression confers resistance against anti-cancer drugs or radiation via induction of metallothionein (MT) isozymes in HepG2 cells. In this study, we demonstrate that SM22{alpha} overexpression leads cells to a growth arrest state and promotes cellular senescence caused by treatment with a subclinical dose of {gamma}-radiation (0.05 and 0.1 Gy) or doxorubicin (0.01 and 0.05 {mu}g/ml), compared to control cells. Senescence growth arrest is known to be controlled by p53 phosphorylation/p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} induction or p16{sup INK4a}/retinoblastoma protein (pRB) activation. SM22{alpha} overexpression in HepG2 cells elevated p16{sup INK4a} followed by pRB activation, but did not activate the p53/p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} pathway. Moreover, MT-1G, which is induced by SM22{alpha} overexpression, was involved in the activation of the p16{sup INK4a}/pRB pathway, which led to a growth arrest state and promoted cellular senescence caused by damaging agents. Our findings provide the first demonstration that SM22{alpha} modulates cellular senescence caused by damaging agents via regulation of the p16{sup INK4a}/pRB pathway in HepG2 cells and that these effects of SM22{alpha} are partially mediated by MT-1G.

  14. 25 CFR 161.702 - Who will enforce this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who will enforce this subpart? 161.702 Section 161.702... GRAZING PERMITS Trespass § 161.702 Who will enforce this subpart? (a) BIA enforces the provisions of this subpart. If the Navajo Nation adopts the provisions of this subpart, the Navajo Nation will have...

  15. 10 CFR 2.1200 - Scope of subpart L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Scope of subpart L. 2.1200 Section 2.1200 Energy NUCLEAR... Hearing Procedures for NRC Adjudications § 2.1200 Scope of subpart L. The provisions of this subpart... and request the application of Subpart L procedures, and proceedings for the direct or indirect...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix to Subpart Hh of... - Tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tables Appendix to Subpart HH of Part..., Subpt. HH, App. Appendix to Subpart HH of Part 63—Tables Table 1 to Subpart HH of Part 63—List of Hazardous Air Pollutants for Subpart HH CAS Number a Chemical name 75070 Acetaldehyde 71432 Benzene...

  17. 10 CFR 2.1103 - Scope of subpart K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Scope of subpart K. 2.1103 Section 2.1103 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION RULES OF PRACTICE FOR DOMESTIC LICENSING PROCEEDINGS AND ISSUANCE OF ORDERS Hybrid... § 2.1103 Scope of subpart K. The provisions of this subpart, together with subpart C and applicable...

  18. Tank exhaust comparison with 40 CFR 61.93, Subpart H, and other referenced guidelines for Tank Farms National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant (NESHAP) designated stacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachand, D.D.; Crummel, G.M.

    1994-07-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated National Emission Standards other than Radon from US Department of Energy (DOE) Facilities (40 CFR 61, Subpart H) on December 15, 1989. The regulations specify procedures, equipment, and test methods that.are to be used to measure radionuclide emissions from exhaust stacks that are designated as National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant (NESHAP) stacks. Designated NESHAP stacks are those that have the potential to cause any member of the public to receive an effective dose equivalent (EDE) greater than or equal to 0.1 mrem/year, assuming all emission controls were removed. Tank Farms currently has 33 exhaust stacks, 15 of which are designated NESHAP stacks. This document assesses the compliance status of the monitoring and sampling systems for the designated NESHAP stacks.

  19. BMI and all cause mortality: systematic review and non-linear dose-response meta-analysis of 230 cohort studies with 3.74 million deaths among 30.3 million participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aune, Dagfinn; Sen, Abhijit; Prasad, Manya; Norat, Teresa; Janszky, Imre; Tonstad, Serena; Romundstad, Pål; Vatten, Lars J

    2016-05-04

    To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies of body mass index (BMI) and the risk of all cause mortality, and to clarify the shape and the nadir of the dose-response curve, and the influence on the results of confounding from smoking, weight loss associated with disease, and preclinical disease. PubMed and Embase databases searched up to 23 September 2015. Cohort studies that reported adjusted risk estimates for at least three categories of BMI in relation to all cause mortality. Summary relative risks were calculated with random effects models. Non-linear associations were explored with fractional polynomial models. 230 cohort studies (207 publications) were included. The analysis of never smokers included 53 cohort studies (44 risk estimates) with >738 144 deaths and >9 976 077 participants. The analysis of all participants included 228 cohort studies (198 risk estimates) with >3 744 722 deaths among 30 233 329 participants. The summary relative risk for a 5 unit increment in BMI was 1.18 (95% confidence interval 1.15 to 1.21; I(2)=95%, n=44) among never smokers, 1.21 (1.18 to 1.25; I(2)=93%, n=25) among healthy never smokers, 1.27 (1.21 to 1.33; I(2)=89%, n=11) among healthy never smokers with exclusion of early follow-up, and 1.05 (1.04 to 1.07; I(2)=97%, n=198) among all participants. There was a J shaped dose-response relation in never smokers (Pnon-linearity studies of never smokers with ≥20 years' follow-up. In contrast there was a U shaped association between BMI and mortality in analyses with a greater potential for bias including all participants, current, former, or ever smokers, and in studies with a short duration of follow-up (<5 years or <10 years), or with moderate study quality scores. Overweight and obesity is associated with increased risk of all cause mortality and the nadir of the curve was observed at BMI 23-24 among never smokers, 22-23 among healthy never smokers, and 20-22 with longer durations of

  20. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Dd of... - List of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP) for Subpart DD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) for Subpart DD 1 Table 1 to Subpart DD of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Waste and Recovery Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. DD, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart DD of Part 63—List of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP) for Subpart DD CAS No. a Chemical name fm 305 75-07-0 Acetaldehyde 1.000 75...

  1. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Oooooo... - Applicability of General Provisions to Subpart OOOOOO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Polyurethane Foam Production and Fabrication Area Sources Pt. 63, Subpt. OOOOOO, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart... plan. § 63.6 (f)-(g) Yes § 63.6(h) No Subpart OOOOOO does not require opacity and visible emissions...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix I to Subpart B of... - Appendix I to Subpart B of Part 205

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Appendix I to Subpart B of Part 205 I Appendix I to Subpart B of Part 205 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Medium and Heavy Trucks Pt...

  3. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 327

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 327 A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 327 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND... one year; • Minimum and maximum downgrade probability cutoff values, based on data from June 30, 2008...

  4. 14 CFR 1204.400 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Business Policy § 1204.400 Scope of subpart. This subpart establishes NASA's small business policy and outlines the delegation of authority in implementing this policy as required by Federal law. ...

  5. 45 CFR 605.31 - Application of this subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Preschool, Elementary, and Secondary Education § 605.31 Application of this subpart. Subpart D applies to preschool, elementary, secondary, and adult education programs or activities that receive or benefit from...

  6. 19 CFR 206.21 - Applicability of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... RELIEF ACTIONS Investigations Relating to a Surge in Imports From a NAFTA Country § 206.21 Applicability of subpart. This subpart C applies specifically to investigations under section 312(c) of the NAFTA...

  7. 48 CFR 239.7100 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... OF DEFENSE SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING ACQUISITION OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Security and Privacy for Computer Systems 239.7100 Scope of subpart. This subpart includes information assurance and Privacy Act considerations. Information assurance requirements are in addition to provisions concerning...

  8. 34 CFR 104.51 - Application of this subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE Health, Welfare, and Social Services § 104.51 Application of this subpart. Subpart F applies to health, welfare, and other social service programs or activities that receive Federal financial...

  9. 48 CFR 4.1300 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scope of subpart. 4.1300 Section 4.1300 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Personal Identity Verification 4.1300 Scope of subpart. This subpart provides policy and...

  10. 48 CFR 4.500 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scope of subpart. 4.500 Section 4.500 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Electronic Commerce in Contracting 4.500 Scope of subpart. This subpart provides policy and procedures for the establishment and use of...

  11. 48 CFR 504.500 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scope of subpart. 504.500 Section 504.500 Federal Acquisition Regulations System GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Electronic Commerce in Contracting 504.500 Scope of subpart. This subpart provides policy and procedure for use of GSA's Electronic...

  12. 29 CFR 96.51 - Purpose and scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Purpose and scope of subpart. 96.51 Section 96.51 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDIT REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS, CONTRACTS, AND OTHER AGREEMENTS Audit Resolution § 96.51 Purpose and scope of subpart. This subpart prescribes standards for resolution of audit...

  13. 45 CFR 605.51 - Application of this subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., Welfare, and Social Services § 605.51 Application of this subpart. Subpart F applies to health, welfare... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application of this subpart. 605.51 Section 605.51 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix - Tables to Subpart B of Part 88

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tables to Subpart B of Part 88 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CLEAN-FUEL VEHICLES California Pilot Test Program State opt-in for the California Pilot Test Program. Pt. 88, Subpart B, Tables Tables to Subpart B of Part 88...

  15. 40 CFR 262.108 - When will this subpart expire?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When will this subpart expire? 262.108 Section 262.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES...-Laboratory Environmental Management Standard § 262.108 When will this subpart expire? This subpart will...

  16. 34 CFR 104.31 - Application of this subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE Preschool, Elementary, and Secondary Education § 104.31 Application of this subpart. Subpart D applies to preschool, elementary, secondary, and adult education programs or activities that receive... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Application of this subpart. 104.31 Section 104.31...

  17. 10 CFR 2.1000 - Scope of subpart J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Scope of subpart J. 2.1000 Section 2.1000 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION RULES OF PRACTICE FOR DOMESTIC LICENSING PROCEEDINGS AND ISSUANCE OF ORDERS Procedures... Geologic Repository § 2.1000 Scope of subpart J. The rules in this subpart, together with the rules in...

  18. 13 CFR 120.1700 - Definitions used in subpart J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions used in subpart J. 120... Definitions used in subpart J. 504 financing. The loans made to a small business to fund a Project under the... eligibility requirements as set forth in § 120.1704 of this subpart J and has been pooled. Pool Loan...

  19. 41 CFR 101-39.4900 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-INTERAGENCY FLEET MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS 39.49-Forms § 101-39.4900 Scope of subpart. This subpart provides the... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Scope of subpart. 101-39.4900 Section 101-39.4900 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management...

  20. 40 CFR Table 6 of Subpart Bbbbbbb... - General Provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Maintenance Yes. § 63.8(c)(1)(i) CMS maintenance Yes. § 63.8(c)(1)(ii) Spare Parts for CMS Malfunction Yes... Subpart BBBBBBB of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR..., Table 6 Table 6 of Subpart BBBBBBB of Part 63—General Provisions Citation Subject Applies to subpart...

  1. 13 CFR 120.1800 - Definitions used in subpart K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions used in subpart K. 120... Loan Program) § 120.1800 Definitions used in subpart K. (a) Administrator. The Administrator of the U.S... Secondary Market Broker-Dealer defined in Section 120.1810 of Subpart K and pursuant to Section 509 of the...

  2. 45 CFR 84.51 - Application of this subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Social Services § 84.51 Application of this subpart. Subpart F applies to health, welfare, and other... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application of this subpart. 84.51 Section 84.51 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE...

  3. Utirik Atoll Dose Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Bogen, K.T

    1999-10-06

    radionuclides. However, we continually see {sup 137}Cs in the groundwater at all contaminated atolls; the turnover time of the groundwater is about 5 y. The {sup 137}Cs can only get to the groundwater by leaching through the soil column when a portion of the soluble fraction of {sup 137}Cs inventory in the soil is transported to the groundwater when rainfall is heavy enough to cause recharge of the aquifer. This process is causing a loss of {sup 137}Cs out of the root zone of the plants that provides an environmental loss constant ({lambda}{sub env}) in addition to radiological decay {lambda}{sub rad}. Consequently, there is an effective rate of loss, {lambda}{sub eff} = {lambda}{sub rad} + {lambda}{sub env} that is the sum of the radiological and environmental-loss decay constants. We have had, and continue to have, a vigorous program to determine the rate of the environmental loss process. What we do know at this time is that the loss of {sup 137}Cs over time is greater than the estimate based on radiological decay only, and that the actual dose received by the Utirik people over 30-, 50-, or 70-y will be less than those presented in this report.

  4. Comparing coronary artery calcium and thoracic aorta calcium for prediction of all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events on low-dose non-gated computed tomography in a high-risk population of heavy smokers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Peter C.; Prokop, Mathias; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Gondrie, Martijn J.; Janssen, Kristel J.; de Koning, Harry J.; Isgum, Ivana; van Klaveren, Rob J.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; van Ginneken, Bram; Mali, Willem P.

    Background: Coronary artery calcium (CAC) and thoracic aorta calcium (TAC) can be detected simultaneously on low-dose, non-gated computed tomography (CT) scans. CAC has been shown to predict cardiovascular (CVD) and coronary (CHD) events. A comparable association between TAC and CVD events has yet

  5. Retrospective Evaluation Reveals That Long-term Androgen Deprivation Therapy Improves Cause-Specific and Overall Survival in the Setting of Dose-Escalated Radiation for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Felix Y., E-mail: ffeng@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Blas, Kevin; Olson, Karin; Stenmark, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and duration for high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated RT (minimum 75 Gy) with or without ADT was performed. The relationship between ADT use and duration with biochemical failure (BF), metastatic failure (MF), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), non-prostate cancer death (NPCD), and overall survival (OS) was assessed as a function of pretreatment characteristics, comorbid medical illness, and treatment using Fine and Gray's cumulative incidence methodology. Results: The median follow-up time was 64 months. In men with National Comprehensive Cancer Network defined high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated RT, on univariate analysis, both metastasis (P<.0001; hazard ratio 0.34; 95% confidence interval 0.18-0.67; cumulative incidence at 60 months 13% vs 35%) and PCSM (P=.015; hazard ratio 0.41; 95% confidence interval 0.2-1.0; cumulative incidence at 60 months 6% vs 11%) were improved with the use of ADT. On multivariate analysis for all high-risk patients, Gleason score was the strongest negative prognostic factor, and long-term ADT (LTAD) improved MF (P=.002), PCSM (P=.034), and OS (P=.001). In men with prostate cancer and Gleason scores 8 to 10, on multivariate analysis after adjustment for other risk features, there was a duration-dependent improvement in BF, metastasis, PCSM, and OS, all favoring LTAD in comparison with STAD or RT alone. Conclusion: For men with high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated EBRT, this retrospective study suggests that the combination of LTAD and RT provided a significant improvement in clinical outcome, which was especially true for those with Gleason scores of 8 to 10.

  6. 29 CFR Appendix B to Subpart B of... - Reprint of U.S. Coast Guard Regulations Referenced in Subpart B, for Determination of Coast Guard...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Subpart B, for Determination of Coast Guard Authorized Persons B Appendix B to Subpart B of Part 1915... Enclosed Spaces and Other Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment Pt. 1915, Subpt. B, App. B Appendix B to Subpart B of Part 1915—Reprint of U.S. Coast Guard Regulations Referenced in Subpart B, for...

  7. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart III of... - Applicability of General Provisions (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A) to Subpart III

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production Pt. 63, Subpt. III, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart III of Part 63... malfunction plan. § 63.6 (f)-(g) YES § 63.6(h) NO Subpart III does not require opacity and visible emission...

  8. 12 CFR Appendixes A-H to Subpart A... - Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 A Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS PROMPT CORRECTIVE ACTION Net Worth Classification Pt. 702, Apps. Appendixes A-H to Subpart A of Part 702 ER01OC03.056...

  9. Infusão intravenosa de vasopressina causa efeitos cardiovasculares adversos dose-dependentes em cães anestesiados Infusión intravenosa de vasopresina causa efectos cardiovasculares adversos dependientes de la dosis en canes anestesiados Vasopressin intravenous infusion causes dose dependent adverse cardiovascular effects in anesthetized dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Cláudio Martins

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: A arginina-vasopressina (AVP tem sido amplamente utilizada no tratamento do choque vasodilatador. Entretanto, há muitas questões relativas ao seu uso clínico, especialmente em altas doses, pois sua utilização pode estar associada a efeitos cardíacos adversos. OBJETIVO: Investigar os efeitos cardiovasculares da AVP em infusão IV contínua nos parâmetros hemodinâmicos em cães. MÉTODOS: Dezesseis cães saudáveis sem raça definida, anestesiados com pentobarbital, receberam um cateter intravascular e foram aleatoriamente designados para dois grupos: controle (solução salina - placebo; n=8 e AVP (n=8. O grupo do estudo recebeu infusão de AVP por três períodos consecutivos de 10 minutos a doses logaritmicamente progressivas (0,01; 0,1 e 1,0 U/kg/min, a intervalos de 20 minutos. A frequência cardíaca (HR e as pressões intravasculares foram continuamente registradas. O debito cardíaco foi medido através do método de termodiluição. RESULTADOS: Nenhum efeito hemodinâmico significante foi observado durante a infusão de 0,01 U/kg/min de AVP, mas com as doses mais altas, de 0,1 e 1,0U/kg/min, houve um aumento progressivo na pressão arterial média (PAM e índice de resistência vascular sistêmica (IRVS, com significante diminuição na frequência cardíaca (FC e índice cardíaco (IC. Com a dose de 1,0 U/kg/min, também foi observado um aumento significante no índice de resistência vascular pulmonar (IRVP, principalmente devido à diminuição no IC. CONCLUSÃO: A AVP em doses entre 0,1 e 1,0 U/kg/min resultou em significantes aumentos na PAM e no IRVS, com efeitos inotrópicos e cronotrópicos negativos em animais saudáveis. Embora essas doses sejam de 10 a 1.000 vezes maiores do que as rotineiramente utilizadas no tratamento do choque vasodilatador, nossos dados confirmam que a AVP deveria ser usada cuidadosamente e sob rígida monitoração hemodinâmica na prática clínica, especialmente se doses maiores do

  10. Minimal Erythema Dose (MED) testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, Carolyn J; Chandler, Rachel; Kloss, Jacqueline D; Benson, Amy; Rooney, Deborah; Munshi, Teja; Darlow, Susan D; Perlis, Clifford; Manne, Sharon L; Oslin, David W

    2013-05-28

    Ultraviolet radiation (UV) therapy is sometimes used as a treatment for various common skin conditions, including psoriasis, acne, and eczema. The dosage of UV light is prescribed according to an individual's skin sensitivity. Thus, to establish the proper dosage of UV light to administer to a patient, the patient is sometimes screened to determine a minimal erythema dose (MED), which is the amount of UV radiation that will produce minimal erythema (sunburn or redness caused by engorgement of capillaries) of an individual's skin within a few hours following exposure. This article describes how to conduct minimal erythema dose (MED) testing. There is currently no easy way to determine an appropriate UV dose for clinical or research purposes without conducting formal MED testing, requiring observation hours after testing, or informal trial and error testing with the risks of under- or over-dosing. However, some alternative methods are discussed.

  11. 31 CFR 203.18 - Scope of the subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... TAX AND LOAN PROGRAM Investment Program and Collateral Security Requirements for TT&L Depositaries § 203.18 Scope of the subpart. This subpart governs the operation of the investment program, including the rules that TT&L depositaries must follow in crediting and debiting TIP main account balances, SDI...

  12. 5 CFR Appendix A-1 to Subpart I... - Windchill Chart

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Windchill Chart A Appendix A-1 to Subpart I of Part 550 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY... A-1 to Subpart I of Part 550—Windchill Chart EC01SE91.002 windchill chart in non-metric units...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix - Tables to Subpart C of Part 88

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tables to Subpart C of Part 88 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CLEAN-FUEL VEHICLES Clean-Fuel Fleet Program Incentives for the purchase of Inherently Low-Emission Vehicles. Pt. 88, Subpt. C, Tables Tables to Subpart C of Par...

  14. 49 CFR Appendix - Figures to Subpart C of Part 587

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Figures to Subpart C of Part 587 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) DEFORMABLE BARRIERS Offset Deformable Barrier Mounting. Pt. 587, Subpt. C, Figs. Figures to Subpart C of...

  15. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart H of... - Batch Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Batch Processes 1 Table 1 to Subpart H... Subpart H of Part 63—Batch Processes Monitoring Frequency for Equipment Other than Connectors Operating time (% of year) Equivalent continuous process monitoring frequency time in use Monthly Quarterly...

  16. 42 CFR 412.300 - Scope of subpart and definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scope of subpart and definition. 412.300 Section 412.300 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... System for Inpatient Hospital Capital Costs General Provisions § 412.300 Scope of subpart and definition...

  17. 48 CFR 47.300 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 47.300 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.300 Scope of subpart. (a) This subpart prescribes policies and procedures for the application of transportation and traffic management considerations in the...

  18. 36 CFR 1275.40 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 1275.40 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NIXON... THE NIXON ADMINISTRATION Access by the Public § 1275.40 Scope of subpart. This subpart sets forth policies and procedures concerning public access to the Presidential historical materials of Richard M...

  19. 27 CFR 73.10 - What does subpart B cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...? 73.10 Section 73.10 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES AND PRACTICES ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES; ELECTRONIC SUBMISSION OF FORMS Electronic Signatures § 73.10 What does subpart B cover? This subpart provides the...

  20. 27 CFR 73.30 - What does subpart C cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...? 73.30 Section 73.30 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES AND PRACTICES ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES; ELECTRONIC SUBMISSION OF FORMS Electronic Filing of Documents with TTB § 73.30 What does subpart C cover? This subpart...

  1. 48 CFR 26.400 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scope of subpart. 26.400 Section 26.400 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS OTHER SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS Food Donations to Nonprofit Organizations 26.400 Scope of subpart. This section implements the Federal Food...

  2. 40 CFR 86.1405 - Introduction; structure of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled Otto-Cycle Light-Duty Vehicles and New Gasoline-Fueled Otto-Cycle Light-Duty Trucks; Certification Short Test Procedures § 86.1405 Introduction; structure of subpart. (a) This subpart describes equipment and the procedures required to perform the CST on gasoline-fueled Otto-cycle...

  3. 40 CFR 725.350 - Procedural requirements for this subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedural requirements for this subpart. 725.350 Section 725.350 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... for Test Marketing § 725.350 Procedural requirements for this subpart. General requirements for all...

  4. 16 CFR Figures 3 and 4 to Subpart... - Test Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Test Specimens 3 Figures 3 and 4 to Subpart... REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR ARCHITECTURAL GLAZING MATERIALS The Standard Pt. 1201, Subpt. A, Figs. 3, 4 Figures 3 and 4 to Subpart A of Part 1201—Test Specimens EC03OC91.006 ...

  5. 45 CFR 84.31 - Application of this subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Preschool, Elementary, and Secondary Education § 84.31 Application of this subpart. Subpart D applies to preschool, elementary, secondary, and adult education programs or activities that receive Federal financial assistance...

  6. 32 CFR Attachment D to Subpart B... - Decision Tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Decision Tables D Attachment D to Subpart B of Part 147 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY... Investigative Standards Pt. 147, Subpt. B, Att. D Attachment D to Subpart B of Part 147—Decision Tables Table 1...

  7. 10 CFR 63.203 - Implementation of Subpart K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Implementation of Subpart K. 63.203 Section 63.203 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC... Implementation of Subpart K. DOE must demonstrate that normal operations at the Yucca Mountain site will and do...

  8. 10 CFR 63.202 - Definitions for Subpart K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions for Subpart K. 63.202 Section 63.202 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC... Definitions for Subpart K. General environment means everywhere outside the Yucca Mountain site, the Nellis...

  9. 25 CFR 900.110 - What does this subpart cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... management, and the actual construction of the building or facility in accordance with the construction... construction management services as defined in § 900.113 may be included in a construction contract under this... Construction § 900.110 What does this subpart cover? (a) This subpart establishes requirements for issuing...

  10. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Ggg of... - Soluble HAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Soluble HAP 3 Table 3 to Subpart GGG of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... for Pharmaceuticals Production Pt. 63, Subpt. GGG, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart GGG of Part 63—Soluble...

  11. Jaundice causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is a yellow color in the skin, mucus membranes, or eyes. The yellow color comes from bilirubin, a byproduct of old red blood cells. Jaundice is a sign of other diseases. This article discusses the possible causes of jaundice in children ...

  12. 43 CFR Appendix B to Subpart A of... - Appendix B to Subpart A of Part 17

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Race, Color, or National Origin Pt. 17, Subpt. A, App. B Appendix B to Subpart A of Part 17 The following statutes authorize Federal financial assistance limited to individuals of a particular race, color.... Adult Vocational Training Act (70 Stat. 986, 25 U.S.C. 309). 3. Vocational and Trade School Act (48 Stat...

  13. 13 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 113

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Program Small Business Act, sec. 8(d) and Pub. L. 95-507. Technology Assistance Program Small Business Act... 113 A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 113 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION... Authority Financial Programs Regular business loans Small Business Act, sec. 7(a). Handicapped assistance...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 750

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 750 To assist in reading the regulations set forth above, this appendix sets forth the principal stages through which rules promulgated under section 6 of TSCA will pass... time that a typical rulemaking is likely to require to reach and complete each stage of these...

  15. 43 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 17

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Race, Color, or National Origin Pt. 17, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 17 Federal....C. 387). III. Mineral Resources. Grants and loans of Federal funds. 1. Control of Coal Mine Fires... filling of voids in abandoned coal mines, reclamation of surface mine areas, and extinguishing mine fires...

  16. 40 CFR 63.5490 - What parts of my plant does this subpart cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... subpart cover? 63.5490 Section 63.5490 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... This Subpart Covers § 63.5490 What parts of my plant does this subpart cover? (a) This subpart applies... Processes source category is each cellulose food casing, rayon, cellulosic sponge, or cellophane operation...

  17. Dose assessment from potential radionuclide emissions from stacks on the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, W.E.; Barnett, J.M.

    1995-04-01

    On February 3, 1993, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL), received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Division of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. The Compliance Order required RL to (1) evaluate all radionuclide emission points at the Hanford Site to determine which points are subject to the continuous emission sampling requirements of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61 (40 CFR 61), Subpart H, and (2) continuously sample radionuclide emissions in accordance with requirements in 40 CFR 61.93. The Information Request required RL to provide a written Compliance Plan to meet the requirements of the Compliance Order. A Compliance Plan was submitted to EPA, Region 10, on April 30, 1993. The Compliance Plan specified that a dose assessment would be performed for 84 Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) stacks registered with the Washington State Department of Health on the Hanford Site. Any stack identified in the assessment as having potential emissions to cause an effective dose equivalent (EDE) to a maximum exposed individual (MEI) greater than 0.1 mrem y{sup {minus}1} must have a compliant sampling system. In addition, a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) was signed on. February 7, 1994. The FFCA required that all unregistered stacks on the Hanford Site be assessed. This requirement increased the number of stacks to be assessed to 123 stacks. Six methods for performing the assessments are described. An initial assessment using only the HEPA filtration factor for back calculations identified 32 stacks that would have emissions which would cause an EDE to the MEI greater than 0.1 mrem y{sup {minus}1}. When the other methods were applied the number was reduced to 20 stacks. The paper discusses reasons for these overestimates.

  18. Absorbed dose by a CMOS in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borja H, C. G.; Valero L, C. Y.; Guzman G, K. A.; Banuelos F, A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Paredes G, L. C., E-mail: candy_borja@hotmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-10-15

    Absorbed dose by a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuit as part of a pacemaker, has been estimated using Monte Carlo calculations. For a cancer patient who is a pacemaker carrier, scattered radiation could damage pacemaker CMOS circuits affecting patient's health. Absorbed dose in CMOS circuit due to scattered photons is too small and therefore is not the cause of failures in pacemakers, but neutron calculations shown an absorbed dose that could cause damage in CMOS due to neutron-hydrogen interactions. (Author)

  19. 21 CFR 500.80 - Scope of this subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the act for risks other than cancer. (d) This subpart does not apply to essential nutrients. [52 FR... prohibits the use in food-producing animals of any compound found to induce cancer when ingested by people...

  20. 48 CFR 1509.500 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 1509.500 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Organizational Conflicts of Interests 1509.500 Scope of subpart. This... conflicts of interest. EPA's policy is to avoid, neutralize, or mitigate organizational conflicts of...

  1. 40 CFR 63.5495 - When do I have to comply with this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Subpart Covers § 63.5495 When do I have to comply with this subpart? (a) If you have a new or... sponge, cellophane, and cellulose ether operations must comply with the emission limits, operating limits...

  2. 31 CFR 205.32 - What Federal assistance programs are subject to this subpart B?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE RULES... to this subpart B? This subpart B applies to all Federal assistance programs listed in the Catalog of...

  3. An environmental dose experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Luis

    2017-11-01

    Several radiation sources worldwide contribute to the delivered dose to the human population. This radiation also acts as a natural background when detecting radiation, for instance from radioactive sources. In this work a medium-sized plastic scintillation detector is used to evaluate the dose delivered by natural radiation sources. Calibration of the detector involved the use of radioactive sources and Monte Carlo simulation of the energy deposition per disintegration. A measurement of the annual dose due to background radiation to the body was then estimated. A dose value compatible with the value reported by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation was obtained.

  4. Variation in lunar neutron dose estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaba, Tony C; Blattnig, Steve R; Clowdsley, Martha S

    2011-12-01

    The radiation environment on the Moon includes albedo neutrons produced by primary particles interacting with the lunar surface. In this work, HZETRN2010 is used to calculate the albedo neutron contribution to effective dose as a function of shielding thickness for four different space radiation environments and to determine to what extent various factors affect such estimates. First, albedo neutron spectra computed with HZETRN2010 are compared to Monte Carlo results in various radiation environments. Next, the impact of lunar regolith composition on the albedo neutron spectrum is examined, and the variation on effective dose caused by neutron fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients is studied. A methodology for computing effective dose in detailed human phantoms using HZETRN2010 is also discussed and compared. Finally, the combined variation caused by environmental models, shielding materials, shielding thickness, regolith composition and conversion coefficients on the albedo neutron contribution to effective dose is determined. It is shown that a single percentage number for characterizing the albedo neutron contribution to effective dose can be misleading. In general, the albedo neutron contribution to effective dose is found to vary between 1-32%, with the environmental model, shielding material and shielding thickness being the driving factors that determine the exact contribution. It is also shown that polyethylene or other hydrogen-rich materials may be used to mitigate the albedo neutron exposure.

  5. 40 CFR 63.11459 - What definitions apply to this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What definitions apply to this subpart... Other Requirements and Information § 63.11459 What definitions apply to this subpart? Terms used in this... is not considered to be a raw material for the purposes of this subpart. Electrostatic precipitator...

  6. 17 CFR Table IV to Subpart E of... - Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Inflation Adjustments IV Table IV to Subpart E of Part 201 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Table IV to Subpart E of Part 201—Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments Table IV to Subpart E U.S. Code citation Civil monetary penalty inflation adjustments Civil monetary penalty description Year...

  7. 34 CFR 86.400 - What is the scope of this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the scope of this subpart? 86.400 Section 86.400 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION Appeal Procedures § 86.400 What is the scope of this subpart? (a) The procedures in this subpart are the...

  8. 40 CFR 63.2981 - Does this subpart apply to me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Does this subpart apply to me? 63.2981 Section 63.2981 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... § 63.2981 Does this subpart apply to me? You must comply with this subpart if you meet the criteria in...

  9. 40 CFR 63.5090 - Does this subpart apply to me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Does this subpart apply to me? 63.5090 Section 63.5090 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Does this subpart apply to me? (a) The provisions of this subpart apply to each facility that is a...

  10. 40 CFR 267.110 - Does this subpart apply to me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Does this subpart apply to me? 267.110 Section 267.110 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES... PERMIT Closure § 267.110 Does this subpart apply to me? This subpart applies to you if you own or operate...

  11. 40 CFR 267.190 - Does this subpart apply to me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Does this subpart apply to me? 267.190 Section 267.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES... PERMIT Tank Systems § 267.190 Does this subpart apply to me? This subpart applies to you if you own or...

  12. 40 CFR 267.10 - Does this subpart apply to me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Does this subpart apply to me? 267.10 Section 267.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES... PERMIT General Facility Standards § 267.10 Does this subpart apply to me? This subpart applies to you if...

  13. 40 CFR 63.5683 - Does this subpart apply to me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Does this subpart apply to me? 63.5683 Section 63.5683 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... subpart apply to me? (a) This subpart applies to you if you meet both of the criteria listed in paragraphs...

  14. 40 CFR 267.30 - Does this subpart apply to me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Does this subpart apply to me? 267.30 Section 267.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES... PERMIT Preparedness and Prevention § 267.30 Does this subpart apply to me? This subpart applies to you if...

  15. 40 CFR 267.1100 - Does this subpart apply to me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Does this subpart apply to me? 267.1100 Section 267.1100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID... STANDARDIZED PERMIT Containment buildings § 267.1100 Does this subpart apply to me? This subpart applies to you...

  16. 40 CFR 267.170 - Does this subpart apply to me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Does this subpart apply to me? 267.170 Section 267.170 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES... PERMIT Use and Management of Containers § 267.170 Does this subpart apply to me? This subpart applies to...

  17. 40 CFR 267.50 - Does this subpart apply to me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Does this subpart apply to me? 267.50 Section 267.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES... PERMIT Contingency Plan and Emergency Procedures § 267.50 Does this subpart apply to me? This subpart...

  18. 40 CFR 63.3290 - Does this subpart apply to me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Does this subpart apply to me? 63.3290 Section 63.3290 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... this subpart apply to me? The provisions of this subpart apply to each new and existing facility that...

  19. 40 CFR 144.81 - Does this subpart apply to me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Does this subpart apply to me? 144.81 Section 144.81 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Wells § 144.81 Does this subpart apply to me? This subpart applies to you if you own or operate a Class...

  20. 40 CFR 267.70 - Does this subpart apply to me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Does this subpart apply to me? 267.70 Section 267.70 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES... PERMIT Recordkeeping, Reporting, and Notifying § 267.70 Does this subpart apply to me? This subpart...

  1. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart D of... - Concentration for Group Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Concentration for Group Determination... Table 1 to Subpart D of Part 65—Concentration for Group Determination Referencing subpart Concentration... of TOC. Subpart G of Part 63 50 ppmv of HAP 2. 1 The 50 ppm HAP concentration cutoff only applies to...

  2. 40 CFR 63.481 - Compliance dates and relationship of this subpart to existing applicable rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... with § 63.104 (e.g., subpart JJJ of this part). (2) After the applicable compliance date specified in.... (ii) A subpart of this part which requires compliance with §§ 63.132 through 63.147 (e.g., subpart JJJ...

  3. 21 CFR 111.95 - Under this subpart E, what records must you make and keep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... information, will ensure that a product specification that is exempted under § 111.75(d) is met without...) You must make and keep records required under this subpart E in accordance with subpart P of this part. (b) Under this subpart E, you must make and keep the following records: (1) The specifications...

  4. SU-E-T-280: Reconstructed Rectal Wall Dose Map-Based Verification of Rectal Dose Sparing Effect According to Rectum Definition Methods and Dose Perturbation by Air Cavity in Endo-Rectal Balloon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J [Dept. of Pediatrics, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, H [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J [Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, S; Lee, M; Suh, T [Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, B [Dept. of Bio-Convergence Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Sun Medical Center, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric effect and discrepancy according to the rectum definition methods and dose perturbation by air cavity in an endo-rectal balloon (ERB) were verified using rectal-wall (Rwall) dose maps considering systematic errors in dose optimization and calculation accuracy in intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) for prostate cancer patients. Methods: When the inflated ERB having average diameter of 4.5 cm and air volume of 100 cc is used for patient, Rwall doses were predicted by pencil-beam convolution (PBC), anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA), and AcurosXB (AXB) with material assignment function. The errors of dose optimization and calculation by separating air cavity from the whole rectum (Rwhole) were verified with measured rectal doses. The Rwall doses affected by the dose perturbation of air cavity were evaluated using a featured rectal phantom allowing insert of rolled-up gafchromic films and glass rod detectors placed along the rectum perimeter. Inner and outer Rwall doses were verified with reconstructed predicted rectal wall dose maps. Dose errors and extent at dose levels were evaluated with estimated rectal toxicity. Results: While AXB showed insignificant difference of target dose coverage, Rwall doses underestimated by up to 20% in dose optimization for the Rwhole than Rwall at all dose range except for the maximum dose. As dose optimization for Rwall was applied, the Rwall doses presented dose error less than 3% between dose calculation algorithm except for overestimation of maximum rectal dose up to 5% in PBC. Dose optimization for Rwhole caused dose difference of Rwall especially at intermediate doses. Conclusion: Dose optimization for Rwall could be suggested for more accurate prediction of rectal wall dose prediction and dose perturbation effect by air cavity in IMRT for prostate cancer. This research was supported by the Leading Foreign Research Institute Recruitment Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea

  5. Influence of Genotype on Warfarin Maintenance Dose Predictions Produced Using a Bayesian Dose Individualization Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffian, Shamin M; Duffull, Stephen B; Roberts, Rebecca L; Tait, Robert C; Black, Leanne; Lund, Kirstin A; Thomson, Alison H; Wright, Daniel F B

    2016-12-01

    A previously established Bayesian dosing tool for warfarin was found to produce biased maintenance dose predictions. In this study, we aimed (1) to determine whether the biased warfarin dose predictions previously observed could be replicated in a new cohort of patients from 2 different clinical settings, (2) to explore the influence of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 genotype on predictive performance of the Bayesian dosing tool, and (3) to determine whether the previous population used to develop the kinetic-pharmacodynamic model underpinning the Bayesian dosing tool was sufficiently different from the test (posterior) population to account for the biased dose predictions. The warfarin maintenance doses for 140 patients were predicted using the dosing tool and compared with the observed maintenance dose. The impact of genotype was assessed by predicting maintenance doses with prior parameter values known to be altered by genetic variability (eg, EC50 for VKORC1 genotype). The prior population was evaluated by fitting the published kinetic-pharmacodynamic model, which underpins the Bayesian tool, to the observed data using NONMEM and comparing the model parameter estimates with published values. The Bayesian tool produced positively biased dose predictions in the new cohort of patients (mean prediction error [95% confidence interval]; 0.32 mg/d [0.14-0.5]). The bias was only observed in patients requiring ≥7 mg/d. The direction and magnitude of the observed bias was not influenced by genotype. The prior model provided a good fit to our data, which suggests that the bias was not caused by different prior and posterior populations. Maintenance doses for patients requiring ≥7 mg/d were overpredicted. The bias was not due to the influence of genotype nor was it related to differences between the prior and posterior populations. There is a need for a more mechanistic model that captures warfarin dose-response relationship at higher warfarin doses.

  6. Fertilizer micro-dosing

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    millet, sorghum) under micro-dosing and water harvesting. • Farmers' access to fertilizer has been improved by an innovative 'warrantage' credit scheme, that has enabled over 1,000 farmers (30% women), to purchase and use more fertilizer on food crops. Fertilizer micro-dosing: a profitable innovation for. Sahelian women.

  7. Clozapine dose for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Selvizhi; Völlm, Birgit A; Huband, Nick

    2017-06-14

    Schizophrenia and related disorders such as schizophreniform and schizoaffective disorder are serious mental illnesses characterised by profound disruptions in thinking and speech, emotional processes, behaviour and sense of self. Clozapine is useful in the treatment of schizophrenia and related disorders, particularly when other antipsychotic medications have failed. It improves positive symptoms (such as delusions and hallucinations) and negative symptoms (such as withdrawal and poverty of speech). However, it is unclear what dose of clozapine is most effective with the least side effects. To compare the efficacy and tolerability of clozapine at different doses and to identify the optimal dose of clozapine in the treatment of schizophrenia, schizophreniform and schizoaffective disorders. We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's Study-Based Register of Trials (August 2011 and 8 December 2016). All relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs), irrespective of blinding status or language, that compared the effects of clozapine at different doses in people with schizophrenia and related disorders, diagnosed by any criteria. We independently inspected citations from the searches, identified relevant abstracts, obtained full articles of relevant abstracts, and classified trials as included or excluded. We included trials that met our inclusion criteria and reported useable data. For dichotomous data, we calculated the relative risk (RR) and the 95% confidence interval (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random-effects model. For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD) again based on a random-effects model. We assessed risk of bias for included studies and created 'Summary of findings' tables using GRADE. We identified five studies that could be included. Each compared the effects of clozapine at very low dose (up to 149 mg/day), low dose (150 mg/day to 300 mg/day) and standard dose (301 mg/day to 600 mg/day). Four of the five included

  8. Controllable dose; Dosis controlable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez R, J.T.; Anaya M, R.A. [ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: jtar@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    With the purpose of eliminating the controversy about the lineal hypothesis without threshold which found the systems of dose limitation of the recommendations of ICRP 26 and 60, at the end of last decade R. Clarke president of the ICRP proposed the concept of Controllable Dose: as the dose or dose sum that an individual receives from a particular source which can be reasonably controllable by means of any means; said concept proposes a change in the philosophy of the radiological protection of its concern by social approaches to an individual focus. In this work a panorama of the foundations is presented, convenient and inconveniences that this proposal has loosened in the international community of the radiological protection, with the purpose of to familiarize to our Mexican community in radiological protection with these new concepts. (Author)

  9. Acetaminophen dosing for children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000783.htm Acetaminophen dosing for children To use the sharing features ... much of this medicine can be harmful. How Acetaminophen Can Help Your Child Acetaminophen is used to ...

  10. Volume 1: Calculating potential to emit releases and doses for FEMP's and NOCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HILL, J.S.

    1999-07-27

    The purpose of this document is to provide Hanford Site facilities a handbook for estimating potential emissions and the subsequent offsite doses. General guidelines and information are provided to assist personnel in estimating emissions for use with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility effluent monitoring plans (FEMPs) and regulatory notices of construction (NOCs), per 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 61, Subpart H, and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247 requirements. This document replaces Unit Dose Calculation Methods and Summary of Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan Determinations (WHC-EP-0498). Meteorological data from 1983 through 1996, 13-year data set, was used to develop the unit dose factors provided by this document, with the exception of two meteorological stations. Meteorological stations 23 and 24, located at Gable Mountain and the 100-F Area, only have data from 1986 through 1996, 10-year data set. The scope of this document includes the following: Estimating emissions and resulting effective dose equivalents (EDE) to a facility's nearest offsite receptor (NOR) for use with NOCs under 40 CFR Part 61, Subpart H, requirements Estimating emissions and resulting EDEs to a facility's or emission unit's NOR for use with NOCs under the WAC Chapter 246-247 requirements Estimating emissions and resulting EDEs to a facility's or emission unit's NOR for use with FEMPs and FEMP determinations under DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 requirements.

  11. 48 CFR 227.7200 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... OF DEFENSE GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Rights in Computer Software and Computer Software Documentation 227.7200 Scope of subpart. This subpart— (a) Prescribes policies and procedures for the acquisition of computer software and computer software documentation, and the...

  12. 10 CFR Appendix C to Subpart B of... - Compliance Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies (EE-2J), Forrestal Building, 1000... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance Certification C Appendix C to Subpart B of Part 431 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL...

  13. 29 CFR 96.31 - Purpose and scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Purpose and scope of subpart. 96.31 Section 96.31 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDIT REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS, CONTRACTS, AND OTHER AGREEMENTS Audits of... requirement for audits of recipients, subrecipients, contractors, and subcontractors that receive funds from...

  14. 29 CFR 96.61 - Purpose and scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Purpose and scope of subpart. 96.61 Section 96.61 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDIT REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS, CONTRACTS, AND OTHER AGREEMENTS Appeals... audit resolution as a result of audits. (b) Subrecipients and subcontractors shall have only such appeal...

  15. 29 CFR 96.11 - Purpose and scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Purpose and scope of subpart. 96.11 Section 96.11 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDIT REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS, CONTRACTS, AND OTHER AGREEMENTS Audits of...-133, “Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit Organizations,” which was issued pursuant to...

  16. 42 CFR Appendix - Tables to Subpart H of Part 84

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tables to Subpart H of Part 84 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus Gas tightness test; minimum requirements. Pt. 84,...

  17. 49 CFR Appendix - Figures to Subpart P of Part 572

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Figures to Subpart P of Part 572 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 3-year-Old Child Crash Test Dummy, Alpha Version Test conditions and...

  18. 49 CFR Appendix - Figures to Subpart I of Part 572

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Figures to Subpart I of Part 572 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 6-Year-Old Child Performance test conditions. Pt. 572, Subpt. I, Figs....

  19. 49 CFR Appendix - Figures to Subpart S of Part 572

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Figures to Subpart S of Part 572 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy Test conditions and...

  20. 49 CFR Appendix - Figures to Subpart O of Part 572

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Figures to Subpart O of Part 572 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Test Dummy, Alpha Version Test conditions...

  1. 33 CFR Appendix - Figures to Subpart H of Part 183

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Figures to Subpart H of Part 183 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Flotation Requirements for Outboard Boats Rated for Engines of 2 Horsepower or Less Tests Level flotation test...

  2. 49 CFR Appendix - Part 238, Subpart C, Figure 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Part 238, Subpart C, Figure 1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PASSENGER EQUIPMENT SAFETY STANDARDS Specific Requirements for Tier I Passenger Equipment Automated monitoring. Pt. 238, Subpt, C, Fig....

  3. 42 CFR Appendix - Tables to Subpart I of Part 84

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tables to Subpart I of Part 84 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks Canister bench tests; minimum requirements. Pt. 84, Subpt. I, Tables Tables...

  4. 42 CFR Appendix - Tables to Subpart L of Part 84

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tables to Subpart L of Part 84 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators Bench tests; gas and vapor tests; minimum requirements;...

  5. 49 CFR Appendix - Figures to Subpart N of Part 572

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Figures to Subpart N of Part 572 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Six-year-old Child Test Dummy, Beta Version Test conditions and...

  6. 7 CFR Appendix - Exhibits to Subpart E of Part 1951

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Exhibits to Subpart E of Part 1951 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) SERVICING AND...

  7. 49 CFR Appendix - Figures to Subpart R of Part 572

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Figures to Subpart R of Part 572 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES CRABI 12-Month-Old Infant, Alpha Version Test conditions and instrumentation...

  8. 24 CFR 146.11 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Scope of subpart. 146.11 Section 146.11 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR EQUAL OPPORTUNITY, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT EMPLOYMENT AND...

  9. 10 CFR 63.302 - Definitions for Subpart L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions for Subpart L. 63.302 Section 63.302 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC... hydraulic conductivity, gradient, and the screened interval. Yucca Mountain disposal system means the...

  10. 48 CFR 1819.7301 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Programs 1819.7301 Scope of subpart. The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Programs were established and issued under the authority...

  11. 26 CFR 1.952-1 - Subpart F income defined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... States by that corporation, shall not be excluded from subpart F income under section 952(b) and this... paragraph (b)(1))(viii) of § 1.956-2, an item of income derived by a controlled foreign corporation from..., 1962, plus (b) The sum of such corporation's deficits in earnings and profits for taxable years...

  12. 38 CFR 36.4300 - Applicability of this subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) LOAN GUARANTY Guaranty or Insurance of Loans to Veterans With Electronic Reporting § 36.4300... segment on or after the date that VA issues a Federal Register notice making this subpart applicable to that segment. This includes loans entitled to an automatic guaranty, or otherwise guaranteed or insured...

  13. 20 CFR 410.401 - Scope of subpart D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Total Disability or Death Due to Pneumoconiosis § 410.401 Scope of subpart... of his death, or whether his death was due to pneumoconiosis. (b) Pneumoconiosis defined... basis for application of the statutory presumption of disability or death due to pneumoconiosis under...

  14. 41 CFR 101-30.300 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Scope of subpart. 101-30.300 Section 101-30.300 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 30-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30...

  15. 42 CFR Appendix - Tables to Subpart KK of Part 84

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tables to Subpart KK of Part 84 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH...; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks Dust, fume, and...

  16. 7 CFR Exhibit B to Subpart B of... - Servicing Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Servicing Company B Exhibit B to Subpart B of Part 1806 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL... of Part 1806—Servicing Company The servicing company office to be contacted for information relative...

  17. 20 CFR Appendixes to Subpart C of... - Note

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Computing Primary Insurance Amounts Pt. 404, Subpt. C, Apps., Nt. Appendixes to Subpart C of Part 404—Note The following appendices contain data that are needed in computing primary insurance amounts. Appendix...

  18. 41 CFR 101-26.300 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Scope of subpart. 101-26.300 Section 101-26.300 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 26-PROCUREMENT SOURCES AND...

  19. 7 CFR 1219.18 - Part and subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Part and subpart. 1219.18 Section 1219.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HASS AVOCADO PROMOTION, RESEARCH...

  20. 33 CFR 157.08 - Applicability of subpart B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... OIL IN BULK Design, Equipment, and Installation § 157.08 Applicability of subpart B. Note: An “oil... retains oily mixtures on board and discharges them to a reception facility. (f) Sections 157.11 (a... cohesive and adhesive characteristics, that inhibit effective product/water separation and monitoring. (g...

  1. 7 CFR 1540.40 - Applicability of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture under section 204(e) of the Andean Trade Preference Act, title II of Public Law 102-182, 105 Stat... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Applicability of subpart. 1540.40 Section 1540.40 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOREIGN AGRICULTURAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT...

  2. 41 CFR 101-28.300 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Scope of subpart. 101-28.300 Section 101-28.300 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 28-STORAGE AND DISTRIBUTION...

  3. 30 CFR 206.170 - What does this subpart contain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Federal leases. (b) If the specific provisions of any Federal statute, treaty, negotiated agreement... are inconsistent with any regulation in this subpart, then the Federal statute, treaty, negotiated... calculate the value of production for royalty purposes under methods other than those the regulations in...

  4. 34 CFR 682.103 - Applicability of subparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability of subparts. 682.103 Section 682.103 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOAN (FFEL) PROGRAM Purpose and Scope § 682.103...

  5. 48 CFR 51.200 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 51.200 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT USE OF GOVERNMENT SOURCES BY CONTRACTORS Contractor Use of Interagency Fleet Management System (IFMS... of interagency fleet management system (IFMS) vehicles and related services. In this subpart, the...

  6. 5 CFR 178.201 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Scope of subpart. 178.201 Section 178.201 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PROCEDURES FOR SETTLING CLAIMS... of the Federal land banks, Federal intermediate credit banks, or regional banks for cooperatives (see...

  7. 41 CFR 101-1.100 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Scope of subpart. 101-1.100 Section 101-1.100 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS GENERAL 1-INTRODUCTION 1.1-Regulation System § 101-1.100...

  8. 41 CFR 101-1.4900 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Scope of subpart. 101-1.4900 Section 101-1.4900 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS GENERAL 1-INTRODUCTION 1.49-Illustrations of Forms...

  9. 31 CFR 203.14 - Scope of the subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Scope of the subpart. 203.14 Section 203.14 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE PAYMENT OF FEDERAL TAXES AND THE TREASURY...

  10. 31 CFR 203.9 - Scope of the subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Scope of the subpart. 203.9 Section 203.9 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE PAYMENT OF FEDERAL TAXES AND THE TREASURY TAX AND...

  11. 48 CFR 1503.600-70 - Scope of subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-70 Section 1503.600-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Contracts with Government Employees or... FAR subpart 3.6 and sets forth EPA policy and procedures for identifying and dealing with conflicts of...

  12. 40 CFR 33.301 - What does this subpart require?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What does this subpart require? 33.301 Section 33.301 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE PARTICIPATION BY DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS ENTERPRISES IN UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  13. 40 CFR 33.201 - What does this subpart require?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What does this subpart require? 33.201 Section 33.201 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE PARTICIPATION BY DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS ENTERPRISES IN UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  14. 40 CFR 33.401 - What does this subpart require?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What does this subpart require? 33.401 Section 33.401 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE PARTICIPATION BY DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS ENTERPRISES IN UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  15. 75 FR 20085 - Subpart B-Advanced Biofuel Payment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... Rural Business-Cooperative Service 7 CFR Part 4288 RIN 0570-AA75 Subpart B--Advanced Biofuel Payment... biofuels to support existing advanced biofuel production and to encourage new production of advanced biofuels. The Agency would enter into contracts with advanced biofuel producers to pay such producers for...

  16. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Vvvvvv... - Partially Soluble HAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Partially Soluble HAP 7 Table 7 to... Pt. 63, Subpt. VVVVVV, Table 7 Table 7 to Subpart VVVVVV of Part 63—Partially Soluble HAP As required... partially soluble HAP listed in the following table. Partially soluble HAP name CAS No. 1. 1,1,1...

  17. Brachytherapy dose measurements in heterogeneous tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva F, G.; Luvizotto, J.; Salles C, T.; Guimaraes A, P. C.; Dalledone S, P. de T.; Yoriyaz, H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rubo, R., E-mail: gabrielpaivafonseca@gmail.com [Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05403-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Recently, Beau lieu et al. published an article providing guidance for Model-Based Dose Calculation Algorithms (MBDCAs), where tissue heterogeneity considerations are addressed. It is well-known that T G-43 formalism which considers only water medium is limited and significant dose differences have been found comparing both methodologies. The aim of the present work is to experimentally quantify dose values in heterogeneous medium using different dose measurement methods and techniques and compare them with those obtained with Monte Carlo simulations. Experiments have been performed using a Nucletron micro Selectron-Hdr Ir-192 brachytherapy source and a heterogeneous phantom composed by PMMA and different tissue equivalent cylinders like bone, lungs and muscle. Several dose measurements were obtained using tissue equivalent materials with height 1.8 cm and 4.3 cm positioned between the radiation source and the detectors. Radiochromic films, TLDs and MOSFET S have been used for the dose measurements. Film dosimetry has been performed using two methodologies: a) linearization for dose-response curve based on calibration curves to create a functional form that linearize s the dose response and b) 177 multichannel analysis dosimetry where the multiple color channels are analyzed allowing to address not only disturbances in the measurements caused by thickness variation in the film layer, but also, separate other external influences in the film response. All experiments have been simulated using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo radiation transport code. Comparison of experimental results are in good agreement with calculated dose values with differences less than 6% for almost all cases. (Author)

  18. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Voice in Health Care Decisions Do Allergies Cause Asthma? KidsHealth > For Parents > Do Allergies Cause Asthma? Print ... son la causa del asma? Do Allergies Cause Asthma? Allergies don't cause asthma. But kids who ...

  19. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Ttttt of... - Applicability of General Provisions to Subpart TTTTT of Part 63

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Primary Magnesium Refining Pt. 63, Subpt. TTTTT, Table 5 Table 5 to Subpart TTTTT of Part 63—Applicability...

  20. Argatroban dosing in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elagizi, Stephanie; Davis, Kyle

    2018-01-09

    Obesity is associated with significant alterations in pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. The use of weight based anticoagulants such as argatroban may put obese patients at an increased risk of hemorrhagic events. The purpose of this study was to evaluate argatroban dosing requirements in obese vs non-obese patients. This single-center, retrospective cohort study included patients ≥18 years with suspected HIT, treated with argatroban for ≥12 h. Patients were stratified by body mass index (BMI) into obese (BMI > 30 kg/m2) and non-obese (BMI ≤ 30 kg/m2) groups. The primary outcome was the median maintenance dose required to achieve two consecutive therapeutic activated partial thromboplastin times. A total of 121 patients were included. The median BMI in the obese vs non-obese groups was 35.8 vs 24.05 kg/m2 (p < .0001). Although statistically significant, there was no clinically significant difference in median maintenance argatroban dose in obese versus non-obese patients (1 vs 1 μg/kg/min; p = .01). In-hospital major bleeding and in-hospital thrombosis also did not differ between the two groups. Obese patients require similar median argatroban maintenance doses when compared to non-obese patients. Based on these results argatroban should be dosed using actual body weight regardless of BMI. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Pathogenic effects of low dose irradiation: dose-effect relationships; Effets pathogenes d'un faible debit de dose: la relation ''dose-effet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, R. [Academie des Technologies, 91 - Saint Michel sur Orge (France)

    2002-10-01

    There is no evidence of pathogenic effects in human groups exposed to less than 100 mSv at low dose-rate. The attributed effects are therefore the result of extrapolations from higher doses. The validity of such extrapolations is discussed from the point of view of epidemiology as well as cellular and molecular biology. The Chernobyl accident resulted in large excess of thyroid cancers in children; it also raised the point that some actual sanitary effects among distressed populations might be a direct consequence of low doses. Studies under the control of UN have not confirmed this point identifying no dose-effect relationship and 'severe socio-economic and psychological pressures... poverty, poor diet and living conditions, and lifestyle factors' as the main cause for depressed health. Some hypothesis are considered for explaining the dose-dependence and high prevalence of non-cancer causes of death among human groups exposed to more than 300 mSv. (author)

  2. 5 CFR Appendix C to Subpart D of... - Application of Subpart D, Part 900, to Programs Receiving Federal Financial Assistance of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Application of Subpart D, Part 900, to Programs Receiving Federal Financial Assistance of the Office of Personnel Management C Appendix C to Subpart D of Part 900 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) INTERGOVERNMENTAL...

  3. Assessment of internal doses

    CERN Document Server

    Rahola, T; Falk, R; Isaksson, M; Skuterud, L

    2002-01-01

    There is a definite need for training in dose calculation. Our first course was successful and was followed by a second, both courses were fully booked. An example of new tools for software products for bioassay analysis and internal dose assessment is the Integrated Modules for Bioassay Analysis (IMBA) were demonstrated at the second course. This suite of quality assured code modules have been adopted in the UK as the standard for regulatory assessment purposes. The intercomparison measurements are an important part of the Quality Assurance work. In what is known as the sup O utside workers ' directive it is stated that the internal dose measurements shall be included in the European Unions supervision system for radiation protection. The emergency preparedness regarding internal contamination was much improved by the training with and calibration of handheld instruments from participants' laboratories. More improvement will be gained with the handbook giving practical instructions on what to do in case of e...

  4. In Vivo Mutagenic Effect of Very Low Dose Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Pamela J.; Day, Tanya K.; Swinburne, Sarah J.; Lane, Joanne M.; Morley, Alexander A.; Hooker, Antony M.; Bhat, Madhava

    2006-01-01

    Almost all of our knowledge about the mutational effect of radiation has come from high dose studies which are generally not relevant to public exposure. The pKZ1 mouse recombination mutagenesis assay enables study of the mutational effect of very low doses of low LET radiation (μGy to cGy range) in a whole animal model. The mutational end-point studied is chromosomal inversion which is a common mutation in cancer. We have observed 1) a non-linear dose response of induced inversions in pKZ1 mice exposed to a wide dose range of low LET radiation, 2) the ability of low priming doses to cause an adaptive response to subsequent higher test doses and 3) the effect of genetic susceptibility where animals that are heterozygous for the Ataxia Telangiectasia gene (Atm) exhibit different responses to low dose radiation compared to their normal litter-mates. PMID:18648587

  5. Radiation Leukemogenesis at Low Dose Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weil, Michael; Ullrich, Robert

    2013-09-25

    The major goals of this program were to study the efficacy of low dose rate radiation exposures for the induction of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and to characterize the leukemias that are caused by radiation exposures at low dose rate. An irradiator facility was designed and constructed that allows large numbers of mice to be irradiated at low dose rates for protracted periods (up to their life span). To the best of our knowledge this facility is unique in the US and it was subsequently used to study radioprotectors being developed for radiological defense (PLoS One. 7(3), e33044, 2012) and is currently being used to study the role of genetic background in susceptibility to radiation-induced lung cancer. One result of the irradiation was expected; low dose rate exposures are ineffective in inducing AML. However, another result was completely unexpected; the irradiated mice had a very high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), approximately 50%. It was unexpected because acute exposures are ineffective in increasing HCC incidence above background. This is a potential important finding for setting exposure limits because it supports the concept of an 'inverse dose rate effect' for some tumor types. That is, for the development of some tumor types low dose rate exposures carry greater risks than acute exposures.

  6. Acute renal failure in high dose carboplatin chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenkel, J.; Kool, G.; de Kraker, J.

    1995-01-01

    Carboplatin has been reported to cause acute renal failure when administered in high doses to adult patients. We report a 4 1/2-year-old girl who was treated with high-dose carboplatin for metastatic parameningeal embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. Acute renal failure developed followed by a slow partial

  7. Basics of Monte-Carlo Simulation: Focusing on Dose-to-medium and Dose-to-water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadano, Kiichi; Isobe, Tomonori; Sato, Eisuke; Takei, Hideyuki; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Mori, Yutaro; Tomita, Tetsuya; Sakae, Takeji

    2016-01-01

    Treatment planning systems with highly accurate dose calculation algorithms such as Monte-Carlo method and linear Boltzmann transport equation are becoming popular thanks to a development of the computer technology. These algorithms use new concepts, dose-to-medium and dose-to-water. However, introducing these concepts can cause confusion in clinical sites. Basic knowledges about Monte-Carlo simulation and other corresponding algorithms were explained in this article such as the principles, the parameters and words of caution.

  8. Irreversible encephalopathy after treatment with high-dose intravenous metronidazole.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothoff, M.V.R.; Hofmeijer, J.; Sikma, M.A.; Meulenbelt, J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Encephalopathy associated with metronidazole is rare and, in most cases, reversible following discontinuation. OBJECTIVE: We describe a case of fatal encephalopathy after treatment with high-dose intravenous metronidazole and the potential causes of the irreversibility. CASE SUMMARY: A

  9. Irreversible Encephalopathy After Treatment With High-Dose Intravenous Metronidazole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothoff, Miriam V. R.; Hofmeijer, Jannette; Sikma, Maaike A.; Meulenbelt, Jan

    Background: Encephalopathy associated with metronidazole is rare and, in most cases, reversible following discontinuation. Objective: We describe a case of fatal encephalopathy after treatment with high-dose intravenous metronidazole and the potential causes of the irreversibility. Case summary: A

  10. Doses of Tktazzus Tbxoid '

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary. Famnde O], Familusi ]B. Post—neonatal Tetanus in Nigeria: A Need for Booster. Doses of Tetanus Toxoid. 1V1_'gen'an journal ofPaediatn'cs 2001; 28:35. Eighty-two (87 per cent) of the 94- cases of post-neonatal tetanus patients seen in the department of paediatrics,. University College Hospital, Ibadan, over an ...

  11. Ibuprofen dosing for children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000772.htm Ibuprofen dosing for children To use the sharing features on this page, ... much of this medicine can be harmful. How Ibuprofen can Help Your Child Ibuprofen is a type of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory ...

  12. Biological dose estimation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to this effect was found in at least 3 cases using biological dosimetric criteria, proving the ... The classification system described by Savage3 was used to determine the ... TABLE I. DISTANCE FROM RADIATION SOURCE, DETAILS OF CYTOGENETIC ANALYSIS AND BIOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL. DOSE ESTIMATIONS.

  13. Dose Reduction Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Waggoner, L O

    2000-01-01

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the sm...

  14. Dose specification for radiation therapy: dose to water or dose to medium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, C.-M.; Li, Jinsheng

    2011-05-01

    The Monte Carlo method enables accurate dose calculation for radiation therapy treatment planning and has been implemented in some commercial treatment planning systems. Unlike conventional dose calculation algorithms that provide patient dose information in terms of dose to water with variable electron density, the Monte Carlo method calculates the energy deposition in different media and expresses dose to a medium. This paper discusses the differences in dose calculated using water with different electron densities and that calculated for different biological media and the clinical issues on dose specification including dose prescription and plan evaluation using dose to water and dose to medium. We will demonstrate that conventional photon dose calculation algorithms compute doses similar to those simulated by Monte Carlo using water with different electron densities, which are close (doses to media but significantly different (up to 11%) from doses to water converted from doses to media following American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 105 recommendations. Our results suggest that for consistency with previous radiation therapy experience Monte Carlo photon algorithms report dose to medium for radiotherapy dose prescription, treatment plan evaluation and treatment outcome analysis.

  15. Survey on immunotherapy practice patterns: dose, dose adjustments, and duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larenas-Linnemann, Désirée E S; Gupta, Payel; Mithani, Sima; Ponda, Punita

    2012-05-01

    Practical issues dealing with the administration of allergen immunotherapy (AIT) by European and US allergists are not well known. Several concerns are only partially covered by guidelines. To survey AIT practice patterns among worldwide members of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI). A web-based survey was conducted among AAAAI members on dosing, dose adjustment after missed doses, and duration of AIT. A total of 1,201 replies (24.7% response rate of which 10% of responses were from non-US and non-Canada members). A total of 57% to 65% of the US-Canadian dosing falls within the recommended Practice Parameter ranges (9.4%-19% too low). Dose adjustment after missed doses is based on time elapsed since the last administered dose by 77% of US-Canadian and 58% of non-US-Canadian allergists. Doses are reduced when a patient comes in more than 14 days for 5 weeks after the last administration and initial dosing restarted after more than 30 days for 12 weeks since last administration during the build-up or maintenance stage. After missing 1 to 3 doses, the dosing schedules were mostly followed (build-up phase: repeat last dose, reduce by 1 dose, reduce by 2doses; maintenance phase: reduce by 1 dose, reduce by 2 doses, reduce by 3 doses). AIT is prescribed for a median of 3 years by non-US-Canadian allergists but for a median of 5 years by 75% of US-Canadian allergists. Main reasons for continuing beyond 5 years were "after stopping, symptoms reappeared" or "patient afraid to relapse." Many patients receive less than recommended doses. Two areas in which to plan further research are establishment of an optimal dose-adjustment plan for missed applications and exploration of the maximum appropriate duration of immunotherapy. Copyright © 2012 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 30 CFR 206.360 - What records must I keep to support my calculations of royalty or fees under this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... subpart? If you determine royalties or direct use fees for your geothermal resource under this subpart... MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS REVENUE MANAGEMENT PRODUCT VALUATION Geothermal...

  17. What Causes Cardiogenic Shock?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Shock Cardiogenic Shock Causes Immediate Causes Cardiogenic shock occurs if the ... is cardiogenic shock. Tests and Procedures To Diagnose Shock and Its Underlying Causes Blood Pressure Test Medical ...

  18. Entrance surface dose according to dose calculation: Head and wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Ho Jin [Dept. Radiology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jae Bok; Song, Jong Nam; Choi, Nam Gil [Dept. of Radiological Science, Dongshin University, Naju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    This study were compared with the direct measurement and indirect dose methods through various dose calculation in head and wrist. And, the modified equation was proposed considering equipment type, setting conditions, tube voltage, inherent filter, added filter and its accompanied back scatter factor. As a result, it decreased the error of the direct measurement than the existing dose calculation. Accordingly, diagnostic radiography patient dose comparison would become easier and radiographic exposure control and evaluation will become more efficient. The study findings are expected to be useful in patients' effective dose rate evaluation and dose reduction.

  19. Monte Carlo dose calculations for high-dose-rate brachytherapy using GPU-accelerated processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Z; Zhang, M; Hrycushko, B; Albuquerque, K; Jiang, S B; Jia, X

    2016-01-01

    Current clinical brachytherapy dose calculations are typically based on the Association of American Physicists in Medicine Task Group report 43 (TG-43) guidelines, which approximate patient geometry as an infinitely large water phantom. This ignores patient and applicator geometries and heterogeneities, causing dosimetric errors. Although Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation is commonly recognized as the most accurate method, its associated long computational time is a major bottleneck for routine clinical applications. This article presents our recent developments of a fast MC dose calculation package for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, gBMC, built on a graphics processing unit (GPU) platform. gBMC-simulated photon transport in voxelized geometry with physics in (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy energy range considered. A phase-space file was used as a source model. GPU-based parallel computation was used to simultaneously transport multiple photons, one on a GPU thread. We validated gBMC by comparing the dose calculation results in water with that computed TG-43. We also studied heterogeneous phantom cases and a patient case and compared gBMC results with Acuros BV results. Radial dose function in water calculated by gBMC showed GPU-based MC dose calculation package, gBMC, for HDR brachytherapy make it attractive for clinical applications. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Quartz red TL SAR equivalent dose overestimation for Chinese loess

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lai, Z.P.; Murray, A.S.; Bailey, R.M.

    2006-01-01

    For the red TL of quartz extracted from Chinese loess, the single-aliquot regenerative-dose (SAR) procedure overestimates the known laboratory doses in dose recovery test. The overestimation is the result of the first heating during the measurement of natural TL signal causing a sensitivity...... reduction, which is not corrected for using a SAR protocol. The SARA procedure was used to measure the sensitivity change. Using this as a correction factor is tested by comparison with the quartz optically stimulated luminiscence (OSL) equivalent dose. SARA is also employed to determine the residual level...

  1. Doses from radiation exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Practical implementation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection's (ICRP) system of protection requires the availability of appropriate methods and data. The work of Committee 2 is concerned with the development of reference data and methods for the assessment of internal and external radiation exposure of workers and members of the public. This involves the development of reference biokinetic and dosimetric models, reference anatomical models of the human body, and reference anatomical and physiological data. Following ICRP's 2007 Recommendations, Committee 2 has focused on the provision of new reference dose coefficients for external and internal exposure. As well as specifying changes to the radiation and tissue weighting factors used in the calculation of protection quantities, the 2007 Recommendations introduced the use of reference anatomical phantoms based on medical imaging data, requiring explicit sex averaging of male and female organ-equivalent doses in the calculation of effecti...

  2. Small dose... big poison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braitberg, George; Oakley, Ed

    2010-11-01

    It is not possible to identify all toxic substances in a single journal article. However, there are some exposures that in small doses are potentially fatal. Many of these exposures are particularly toxic to children. Using data from poison control centres, it is possible to recognise this group of exposures. This article provides information to assist the general practitioner to identify potential toxic substance exposures in children. In this article the authors report the signs and symptoms of toxic exposures and identify the time of onset. Where clear recommendations on the period of observation and known fatal dose are available, these are provided. We do not discuss management or disposition, and advise readers to contact the Poison Information Service or a toxicologist for this advice.

  3. First dose in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard Christensen, Mette Marie

    2011-01-01

    Du er blevet ansat som læge i et lægemiddelfirma med ansvar for planlægning og sikkerhed i fase 1 forsøg. Firmaet har udviklet tre dopamin D2-receptor antagonister til behandling af skizofreni. Lægemidlerne har undergået et omfattende farmakologisk, toksikologisk og farmaceutisk afprøvningsprogra...... fase 1 forsøg alias »First dose in man«....

  4. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Wwww of... - Basic Requirements for Performance Tests, Performance Evaluations, and Design Evaluations for New...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Devices 6 Table 6 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 6 Table 6 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Basic Requirements for Performance...

  5. 40 CFR Table 11 to Subpart Wwww of... - Data Requirements for New and Existing Continuous Lamination and Continuous Casting Lines...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Limit on an Averaging Basis 11 Table 11 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment...: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 11 Table 11 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63...

  6. CT Radiation Dose Management: A Comprehensive Optimization Process for Improving Patient Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parakh, Anushri; Kortesniemi, Mika; Schindera, Sebastian T

    2016-09-01

    Rising concerns of radiation exposure from computed tomography have caused various advances in dose reduction technologies. While proper justification and optimization of scans has been the main focus to address increasing doses, the value of dose management has been largely overlooked. The purpose of this article is to explain the importance of dose management, provide an overview of the available options for dose tracking, and discuss the importance of a dedicated dose team. The authors also describe how a digital radiation tracking software can be used for analyzing the big data on doses for auditing patient safety, scanner utilization, and productivity, all of which have enormous personal and institutional implications. (©) RSNA, 2016.

  7. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Rrrrr of... - Applicability of General Provisions to Subpart RRRRR of Part 63

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) requirements in § 63.8(c)(5) and (6) apply only to COMS for dry electrostatic precipitators. § 63.8(a)(4... for dry electrostatic precipitators. § 63.10(a), (b)(1)-(2)(xii), (b)(2)(xiv), (b)(3), (c)(1)-(6), (c... dry electrostatic precipitators. § 63.10(b)(2)(xiii) CMS Records for RATA Alternative No Subpart RRRRR...

  8. Low-dose Radiation Exposure and Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2012-01-01

    Absorption of energy from ionizing radiation by the genetic material in the cell leads to damage to DNA, which in turn leads to cell death, chromosome aberrations and gene mutations. While early or deterministic effects result from organ and tissue damage caused by cell killing, latter two are considered to be involved in the initial events that lead to the development of cancer. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the dose-2013;response relationships for cancer induction and quantitati...

  9. Patient-specific dose calculation methods for high-dose-rate iridium-192 brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Emily S.

    In high-dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy, the radiation dose received by the patient is calculated according to the AAPM Task Group 43 (TG-43) formalism. This table-based dose superposition method uses dosimetry parameters derived with the radioactive 192Ir source centered in a water phantom. It neglects the dose perturbations caused by inhomogeneities, such as the patient anatomy, applicators, shielding, and radiographic contrast solution. In this work, we evaluated the dosimetric characteristics of a shielded rectal applicator with an endocavitary balloon injected with contrast solution. The dose distributions around this applicator were calculated by the GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) code and measured by ionization chamber and GAFCHROMIC EBT film. A patient-specific dose calculation study was then carried out for 40 rectal treatment plans. The PTRAN_CT MC code was used to calculate the dose based on computed tomography (CT) images. This study involved the development of BrachyGUI, an integrated treatment planning tool that can process DICOM-RT data and create PTRAN_CT input initialization files. BrachyGUI also comes with dose calculation and evaluation capabilities. We proposed a novel scatter correction method to account for the reduction in backscatter radiation near tissue-air interfaces. The first step requires calculating the doses contributed by primary and scattered photons separately, assuming a full scatter environment. The scatter dose in the patient is subsequently adjusted using a factor derived by MC calculations, which depends on the distances between the point of interest, the 192Ir source, and the body contour. The method was validated for multicatheter breast brachytherapy, in which the target and skin doses for 18 patient plans agreed with PTRAN_CT calculations better than 1%. Finally, we developed a CT-based analytical dose calculation method. It corrects for the photon attenuation and scatter based upon the radiological paths determined by ray tracing

  10. VirtualDose: a software for reporting organ doses from CT for adult and pediatric patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Aiping; Gao, Yiming; Liu, Haikuan; Caracappa, Peter F.; Long, Daniel J.; Bolch, Wesley E.; Liu, Bob; Xu, X. George

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of VirtualDose—a software for reporting organ doses for adult and pediatric patients who undergo x-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations. The software is based on a comprehensive database of organ doses derived from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations involving a library of 25 anatomically realistic phantoms that represent patients of different ages, body sizes, body masses, and pregnant stages. Models of GE Lightspeed Pro 16 and Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 scanners were carefully validated for use in MC dose calculations. The software framework is designed with the ‘software as a service (SaaS)’ delivery concept under which multiple clients can access the web-based interface simultaneously from any computer without having to install software locally. The RESTful web service API also allows a third-party picture archiving and communication system software package to seamlessly integrate with VirtualDose’s functions. Software testing showed that VirtualDose was compatible with numerous operating systems including Windows, Linux, Apple OS X, and mobile and portable devices. The organ doses from VirtualDose were compared against those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT—two dosimetry tools that were based on the stylized pediatric and adult patient models that were known to be anatomically simple. The organ doses reported by VirtualDose differed from those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT by as much as 300% in some of the patient models. These results confirm the conclusion from past studies that differences in anatomical realism offered by stylized and voxel phantoms have caused significant discrepancies in CT dose estimations.

  11. Transit dose calculation in high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transit doses around a high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy source were calculated using Sievert Integral at positions where the moving source was located exactly between two adjacent dwell positions. The correspond-ing transit dose rates were obtained by using energy absorption coefficients. Discrete step sizes of 0.25 ...

  12. 7 CFR Exhibit B to Subpart K of... - Administrative Instructions for State Offices Regarding Their Responsibilities in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Program B Exhibit B to Subpart K of Part 1944 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... and Supervisory Assistance Grants Pt. 1944, Subpt. K, Exh. B Exhibit B to Subpart K of Part 1944.... Subpart K of part 1944 of this chapter. B. The State Office should inform all potential applicants, at the...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix to Subpart Eee of... - Quality Assurance Procedures for Continuous Emissions Monitors Used for Hazardous Waste Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Continuous Emissions Monitors Used for Hazardous Waste Combustors Appendix to Subpart EEE of Part 63... Hazardous Air Pollutants from Hazardous Waste Combustors Pt. 63, Subpt. EEE, App. Appendix to Subpart EEE of... under this subpart EEE of part 63. Owners and operators must meet these minimum requirements and are...

  14. Ambient dose equivalents in TGFs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celestin, Sebastien; Pincon, Jean-Louis; Trompier, Francois

    2017-04-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bursts of high-energy photons originating from the Earth's atmosphere in association with thunderstorm activity [e.g., Briggs et al., JGR, 118, 3805, 2013]. TGFs are associated with initial propagation stages of intracloud lightning, which represent the most frequent type of lightning discharges [e.g., Cummer et al., GRL, 42, 7792, 2015, and references therein]. TGFs are known to be produced inside common thunderclouds [e.g., Splitt et al., JGR, 115, A00E38, 2010] typically at altitudes ranging from 10 to 14 km [e.g., Cummer et al., GRL, 41, 8586, 2014]. The global TGF occurrence rate is estimated to be 400,000 per year concerning TGFs detectable by Fermi-GBM (Gamma ray Burst Monitor) [Briggs et al., 2013], but detailed analysis of satellite measurements [Østgaard et al., JGR, 117, A03327, 2012] and theoretical studies [Celestin et al., JGR, 120, 10712, 2015] suggest that it cannot be excluded that TGFs represent a part of a regular process taking place during the propagation of lightning discharges. It is important to assess the risk induced by TGFs for airline passengers and crews on board aircraft approaching thunderstorms. Dwyer et al. [JGR, 115, D09206, 2010] have estimated that if an aircraft were to find itself in the source electron beam giving rise to a TGF, passengers and crews might receive effective radiation doses above the regulatory limit depending on the beam diameter. Moreover, Tavani et al. [Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 13, 1127, 2013] concluded that TGF-associated neutrons produced by photonuclear reactions would cause serious hazard on the aircraft avionics. In this work, we will present detailed simulation-based estimations of effective doses received by humans that would be irradiated by TGFs for various production altitudes and distances from the TGF source.

  15. Peritoneal Dialysis Dose and Adequacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Peritoneal Dialysis Peritoneal Dialysis: Dose & Adequacy Peritoneal Dialysis: Dose & Adequacy When kidneys fail, waste products such ... absorbed from the abdominal cavity. Types of Peritoneal Dialysis The two types of peritoneal dialysis differ mainly ...

  16. 40 CFR 63.8784 - What parts of my plant does this subpart cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What parts of my plant does this... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Flexible Polyurethane Foam Fabrication Operations What This Subpart Covers § 63.8784 What parts of my plant does this subpart cover? (a...

  17. 7 CFR Appendix A to Subpart E of... - Hazard Potential Classification for Civil Works Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Subpart E of Part 1724—Hazard Potential Classification for Civil Works Projects The source for this... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazard Potential Classification for Civil Works Projects A Appendix A to Subpart E of Part 1724 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture...

  18. 40 CFR Table 14 to Subpart Wwww of... - Requirements for Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 14 Table 14 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Requirements for Reports As required in § 63.5910(a), (b), (g...

  19. 40 CFR Table 13 to Subpart Wwww of... - Applicability and Timing of Notifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Applicability and Timing of Notifications 13 Table 13 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 13 Table 13 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Applicability and Timing of...

  20. 40 CFR Table 9 to Subpart Wwww of... - Initial Compliance With Work Practice Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Initial Compliance With Work Practice Standards 9 Table 9 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 9 Table 9 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Initial Compliance With Work...

  1. 40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart Wwww of... - Initial Compliance With Organic HAP Emissions Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Initial Compliance With Organic HAP Emissions Limits 8 Table 8 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 8 Table 8 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Initial Compliance With...

  2. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Wwww of... - Work Practice Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 4 Table 4 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Work Practice Standards As specified in § 63.5805, you must...

  3. 40 CFR 63.1562 - What parts of my plant are covered by this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true What parts of my plant are covered by... What parts of my plant are covered by this subpart? (a) This subpart applies to each new, reconstructed... regeneration of the catalyst used in the unit (i.e., the catalyst regeneration flue gas vent). (2) The process...

  4. 30 CFR 206.350 - What is the purpose of this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT PRODUCT VALUATION Geothermal Resources § 206.350 What is the purpose of this subpart? (a) This subpart applies to all geothermal resources produced from Federal geothermal leases issued pursuant to the... definitions apply: (1) “Settlement agreement” means a settlement agreement between the United States and a...

  5. 37 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G to... - Sample Sequence Listing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample Sequence Listing A Appendix A to Subpart G to Part 1 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK... Disclosures Pt. 1, Subpt. G, App. A Appendix A to Subpart G to Part 1—Sample Sequence Listing ER01JN98.006...

  6. 29 CFR Appendix B to Subpart T to... - Guidelines for Scientific Diving

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Guidelines for Scientific Diving B Appendix B to Subpart T... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Commercial Diving Operations Pt. 1910, Subpt. T, App. B Appendix B to Subpart T to Part 1910—Guidelines for Scientific Diving This...

  7. 29 CFR Appendix B to Subpart Y of... - Guidelines for Scientific Diving

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Guidelines for Scientific Diving B Appendix B to Subpart Y... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Pt. 1926, Subpt. Y, App. B Appendix B to Subpart Y of Part 1926—Guidelines for Scientific Diving Note: The...

  8. 40 CFR 63.5790 - What parts of my plant does this subpart cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... subpart applies to each new or existing affected source at reinforced plastic composites production... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true What parts of my plant does this subpart cover? 63.5790 Section 63.5790 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix B to Subpart Nnn... - Free Formaldehyde Analysis of Insulation Resins by Hydroxylamine Hydrochloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Insulation Resins by Hydroxylamine Hydrochloride B Appendix B to Subpart NNN of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants for Wool Fiberglass Manufacturing Pt. 63, Subpt. NNN, App. B Appendix B to Subpart NNN of Part 63—Free Formaldehyde Analysis of Insulation Resins by Hydroxylamine Hydrochloride 1. Scope This method was...

  10. 46 CFR Appendix F to Subpart C to... - Sample Worker Certification Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sample Worker Certification Form F Appendix F to Subpart C to Part 197 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene Pt. 197, Subpt. C, App. F Appendix F to Subpart C...

  11. 7 CFR Appendix F to Subpart B of... - Form of Supplemental Mortgage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Form of Supplemental Mortgage F Appendix F to Subpart B of Part 1744 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES... Subpart B of Part 1744—Form of Supplemental Mortgage Er09au01.032 Er09au01.033 Er09au01.034 ...

  12. 21 CFR 111.103 - What are the requirements under this subpart F for written procedures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... System: Requirements for Quality Control § 111.103 What are the requirements under this subpart F for... quality control operations, including written procedures for conducting a material review and making a... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the requirements under this subpart F for...

  13. 31 CFR Appendix K to Subpart A of... - Federal Law Enforcement Training Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal Law Enforcement Training Center K Appendix K to Subpart A of Part 1 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS Freedom of Information Act Pt. 1, Subpt. A, App. K Appendix K to Subpart A...

  14. 47 CFR 73.7000 - Definition of terms (as used in subpart K only).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Definition of terms (as used in subpart K only). 73.7000 Section 73.7000 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST... Channels § 73.7000 Definition of terms (as used in subpart K only). Attributable interest. An interest of...

  15. 31 CFR Appendix K to Subpart C of... - Federal Law Enforcement Training Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal Law Enforcement Training Center K Appendix K to Subpart C of Part 1 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS Privacy Act Pt. 1, Subpt. C, App. K Appendix K to Subpart C of Part 1...

  16. 40 CFR 63.9882 - What parts of my plant does this subpart cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Primary Magnesium Refining What This Subpart Covers § 63.9882 What parts of my plant does this subpart cover? (a) The...

  17. 46 CFR Exhibit No. 1 to Subpart B... - Notice of Appearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notice of Appearance No. Exhibit No. 1 to Subpart B of... AND PROCEDURE Appearance and Practice Before the Commission Pt. 502, Subpt. B, Exh. 1 Exhibit No. 1 to Subpart B of Part 502—Notice of Appearance Federal Maritime Commission Docket No. _____: Please enter my...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix E to Subpart A of... - Article 5 Parties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Article 5 Parties E Appendix E to Subpart A of Part 82 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Appendix E to Subpart A of Part 82—Article 5 Parties Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Angola, Antigua...

  19. 40 CFR Table 15 to Subpart Uuu of... - Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Catalytic Reforming Units 15 Table 15 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 15 Table 15 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units As...

  20. 40 CFR Table 22 to Subpart Uuu of... - Inorganic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Catalytic Reforming Units 22 Table 22 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 22 Table 22 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Inorganic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units...

  1. 17 CFR Table 1 to Subpart E of... - Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments 1 Table 1 to Subpart E of Part 201 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Table 1 to Subpart E of Part 201—Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments U.S. code citation Civil...

  2. 17 CFR Table III to Subpart E of... - Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments III Table III to Subpart E of Part 201 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES..., Table III Table III to Subpart E of Part 201—Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments U.S. Code...

  3. 17 CFR Table II to Subpart E of... - Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments II Table II to Subpart E of Part 201 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Table II to Subpart E of Part 201—Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments U.S. Code citation Civil...

  4. 30 CFR 206.100 - What is the purpose of this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Oil § 206.100 What is the purpose of this subpart? (a) This subpart applies to all oil produced from Federal oil and gas leases onshore and on the Outer Continental Shelf..., you as a designee must determine and report royalty value for the lessee's oil by applying the rules...

  5. 34 CFR 86.402 - Who may be a party in a hearing under this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who may be a party in a hearing under this subpart? 86.402 Section 86.402 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION Appeal Procedures § 86.402 Who may be a party in a hearing under this subpart? (a) Only the...

  6. 16 CFR Figure 2 to Subpart A of... - Cyclone Receiver Weldment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cyclone Receiver Weldment 2 Figure 2 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT... to Subpart A of Part 1209—Cyclone Receiver Weldment EC03OC91.032 ...

  7. 40 CFR Table 10 to Subpart G of... - Wastewater-Compliance Options for Wastewater Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wastewater-Compliance Options for Wastewater Tanks 10 Table 10 to Subpart G of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Wastewater Pt. 63, Subpt. G, Table 10 Table 10 to Subpart G of Part 63—Wastewater—Compliance Options for...

  8. 15 CFR Appendix V to Subpart P of... - Sanctuary Preservation Areas Boundary Coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sanctuary Preservation Areas Boundary Coordinates V Appendix V to Subpart P of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce... National Marine Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. P, App. V Appendix V to Subpart P of Part 922—Sanctuary...

  9. 40 CFR 63.11158 - What definitions apply to this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Sources Other Requirements and Information § 63.11158 What definitions apply to this subpart? Terms used in this subpart are defined in the CAA, in 40 CFR 63.2, and in this section as follows: Anode copper means copper that is cast into anodes and refined in an electrolytic process to produce high purity...

  10. 40 CFR 63.11412 - What definitions apply to this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...: Chromium Compounds Other Requirements and Information § 63.11412 What definitions apply to this subpart? Terms used in this subpart are defined in the CAA, in 40 CFR 63.2, and in this section as follows: Bag... matter (dust loadings) in the exhaust of a baghouse to detect bag leaks and other upset conditions. A bag...

  11. 2 CFR 1532.1105 - Does this subpart apply to me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Does this subpart apply to me? 1532.1105 Section 1532.1105 Grants and Agreements Federal Agency Regulations for Grants and Agreements ENVIRONMENTAL... the Clean Air Act and Clean Water Act § 1532.1105 Does this subpart apply to me? (a) Portions of this...

  12. 40 CFR 763.121 - Does this subpart apply to me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Does this subpart apply to me? 763.121 Section 763.121 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT ASBESTOS Asbestos Worker Protection § 763.121 Does this subpart apply to me? If you are a...

  13. 40 CFR 63.11556 - What definitions apply to this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., Copper, and Other Nonferrous Foundries Other Requirements and Information § 63.11556 What definitions apply to this subpart? Terms used in this subpart are defined in the Clean Air Act, in § 63.2, and in... of these metals in the elemental form. Annual copper and other nonferrous foundry metal melt capacity...

  14. 47 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Locations Where GMRS Is Regulated by the FCC A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 95 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) Pt. 95, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part...

  15. 40 CFR Figure F-1 to Subpart F of... - Designation Testing Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Designation Testing Checklist F Figure F-1 to Subpart F of Part 53 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Figure F-1 to Subpart F of Part 53—Designation Testing Checklist DESIGNATION TESTING CHECKLIST FOR CLASS...

  16. 40 CFR Table A-2 to Subpart A of... - Units of Measure Conversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Units of Measure Conversions A Table A-2 to Subpart A of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... A-2 to Subpart A of Part 98—Units of Measure Conversions To convert from To Multiply by Kilograms...

  17. 49 CFR Schedule A to Subpart B of... - Class I Participating Carriers' Revenue Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class I Participating Carriers' Revenue Data A Schedule A to Subpart B of Part 1139 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... REVENUE PROCEEDINGS Intercity Bus Industry Pt. 1139, Subpt. B, Sch. A Schedule A to Subpart B of Part 1139...

  18. 45 CFR 260.71 - What definitions apply to this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What definitions apply to this subpart? 260.71... GENERAL TEMPORARY ASSISTANCE FOR NEEDY FAMILIES (TANF) PROVISIONS What Special Provisions Apply to States that Were Operating Programs Under Approved Waivers? § 260.71 What definitions apply to this subpart...

  19. 45 CFR 260.51 - What definitions apply to this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What definitions apply to this subpart? 260.51... GENERAL TEMPORARY ASSISTANCE FOR NEEDY FAMILIES (TANF) PROVISIONS What Special Provisions Apply to Victims of Domestic Violence? § 260.51 What definitions apply to this subpart? Family Violence Option (or FVO...

  20. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Subpart A of... - Flooring Radiant Tester Schematic Side Elevation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flooring Radiant Tester Schematic Side Elevation 3 Figure 3 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION.... 1209, Subpt. A, Fig. 3 Figure 3 to Subpart A of Part 1209—Flooring Radiant Tester Schematic Side...

  1. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart W to... - Figures W-14 through W-28

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Figures W-14 through W-28 A Appendix A to Subpart W to part 1926 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION...; Overhead Protection Pt. 1926, Subpt. W, App. A Appendix A to Subpart W to part 1926—Figures W-14 through W...

  2. 33 CFR 96.210 - Who does this subpart apply to?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... VESSEL OPERATING REGULATIONS RULES FOR THE SAFE OPERATION OF VESSELS AND SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Company and Vessel Safety Management Systems § 96.210 Who does this subpart apply to? (a) This subpart... foreign voyage that are— (i) A vessel transporting more than 12 passengers; or (ii) A tanker, a bulk...

  3. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Federal Home Loan Banks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Federal Home Loan Banks A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 905 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD... Board Pt. 905, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 905—Federal Home Loan Banks Federal Home...

  4. 20 CFR 655.100 - Scope and purpose of subpart B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... EMPLOYMENT OF FOREIGN WORKERS IN THE UNITED STATES Labor Certification Process for Temporary Agricultural Employment in the United States (H-2A Workers) § 655.100 Scope and purpose of subpart B. This subpart sets... import nonimmigrant foreign workers (H-2A workers); and (b) Whether the employment of H-2A workers will...

  5. 20 CFR 655.1290 - Purpose and scope of subpart B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... EMPLOYMENT OF FOREIGN WORKERS IN THE UNITED STATES Labor Certification Process for Temporary Agricultural Employment in the United States (H-2A Workers) § 655.1290 Purpose and scope of subpart B. This subpart sets... agricultural employment for which an employer desires to import nonimmigrant foreign workers (H-2A workers...

  6. 40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart Uuu of... - Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Catalytic Cracking Units 8 Table 8 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 8 Table 8 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units As...

  7. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Uuu of... - Metal HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Cracking Units 1 Table 1 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Metal HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in...

  8. 40 CFR Table A-1 to Subpart A of... - Global Warming Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Global Warming Potentials A Table A-1 to Subpart A of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... A-1 to Subpart A of Part 98—Global Warming Potentials Name CAS No. Chemical formula Global warming...

  9. 40 CFR 725.305 - Persons who may apply under this subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Persons who may apply under this subpart. 725.305 Section 725.305 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... for Test Marketing § 725.305 Persons who may apply under this subpart. A person identified in this...

  10. 26 CFR 1.668(b)-2 - Illustration of the provisions of subpart D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Illustration of the provisions of subpart D. 1.668(b)-2 Section 1.668(b)-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.668(b)-2 Illustration of the provisions of subpart D...

  11. 45 CFR 260.50 - What is the purpose of this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... of Domestic Violence? § 260.50 What is the purpose of this subpart? Under section 402(a)(7) of the... domestic violence and to waive program requirements for such individuals. This subpart explains how... (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  12. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Jjj of... - Group 1 Storage Vessels at Existing Affected Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Group 1 Storage Vessels at Existing Affected Sources 2 Table 2 to Subpart JJJ of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... and Resins Pt. 63, Subpt. JJJ, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart JJJ of Part 63—Group 1 Storage Vessels at...

  13. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Jjj of... - Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 6 Table 6 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of Environment... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Pt. 62, Subpt. JJJ, Table 6 Table 6 to Subpart JJJ...

  14. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Jjj of... - Group 1 Storage Vessels at New Affected Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Group 1 Storage Vessels at New Affected Sources 4 Table 4 to Subpart JJJ of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY.... 63, Subpt. JJJ, Table 4 Table 4 to Subpart JJJ of Part 63—Group 1 Storage Vessels at New Affected...

  15. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Jjj of... - Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a 7 Table 7 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Pt. 62, Subpt. JJJ, Table 7 Table 7 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62...

  16. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Jjj of... - Generic Compliance Schedules and Increments of Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Generic Compliance Schedules and Increments of Progress 1 Table 1 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... or Before August 30, 1999 Pt. 62, Subpt. JJJ, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62—Generic...

  17. 40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart Jjj of... - Requirements for Stack Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for Stack Tests 8 Table 8 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR..., 1999 Pt. 62, Subpt. JJJ, Table 8 Table 8 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62—Requirements for Stack Tests...

  18. 12 CFR 225.173 - How are investments in private equity funds treated under this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false How are investments in private equity funds... (REGULATION Y) Regulations Merchant Banking Investments § 225.173 How are investments in private equity funds treated under this subpart? (a) What is a private equity fund? For purposes of this subpart, a “private...

  19. 40 CFR Tables 14-14b to Subpart G... - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 14 Tables 14-14b to Subpart G of Part... for Organic Hazardous Air Pollutants From the Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry for Process Vents, Storage Vessels, Transfer Operations, and Wastewater Tables 14-14b to Subpart G of Part 63 ...

  20. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIi of... - Certification Requirements for Stationary Fire Pump Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Stationary Fire Pump Engines 3 Table 3 to Subpart IIII of Part 60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL.... IIII, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart IIII of Part 60—Certification Requirements for Stationary Fire Pump Engines Engine power Starting model year engine manufacturers must certify new stationary fire pump...

  1. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart IIIi of... - Emission Standards for Stationary Fire Pump Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Pump Engines 4 Table 4 to Subpart IIII of Part 60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION..., Table 4 Table 4 to Subpart IIII of Part 60—Emission Standards for Stationary Fire Pump Engines Maximum... fire pump stationary CI ICE in this engine power category with a rated speed of greater than 2,650...

  2. 40 CFR Table 9 to Subpart Ggg of... - Default Biorates for Soluble HAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Biorates for Soluble HAP 9 Table 9 to Subpart GGG of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Subpart GGG of Part 63—Default Biorates for Soluble HAP Compound name Biorate (K1),L/g MLVSS-hr...

  3. 40 CFR 227.2 - Materials which satisfy the environmental impact criteria of subpart B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... environmental impact criteria of subpart B. 227.2 Section 227.2 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING CRITERIA FOR THE EVALUATION OF PERMIT APPLICATIONS FOR OCEAN DUMPING OF MATERIALS General § 227.2 Materials which satisfy the environmental impact criteria of subpart...

  4. 20 CFR 1001.101 - Definitions of terms used in subpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Definitions of terms used in subpart. Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET) shall... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definitions of terms used in subpart. 1001.101 Section 1001.101 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR VETERANS' EMPLOYMENT...

  5. 21 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - List of Applicable Laws, Regulations, and Administrative Provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Administrative Provisions A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 26 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Good Manufacturing Practices Pt. 26, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 26—List of... authorization and supervision of medicinal products for human and veterinary use and establishing a European...

  6. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M. (comps.)

    1992-10-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP) provides technical direction. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates):Source Terms, Environmental Transport, Environmental Monitoring Data, Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture, and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  7. Dose determination in high dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houdek, P V; Schwade, J G; Wu, X; Pisciotta, V; Fiedler, J A; Serago, C F; Markoe, A M; Abitbol, A A; Lewin, A A; Braunschweiger, P G

    1992-01-01

    Although high dose-rate brachytherapy with a single, rapidly moving radiation source is becoming a common treatment modality, a suitable formalism for determination of the dose delivered by a moving radiation source has not yet been developed. At present, brachytherapy software simulates high dose-rate treatments using only a series of stationary sources, and consequently fails to account for the dose component delivered while the source is in motion. We now describe a practical model for determination of the true, total dose administered. The algorithm calculates both the dose delivered while the source is in motion within and outside of the implanted volume (dynamic component), and the dose delivered while the source is stationary at a series of fixed dwell points. It is shown that the dynamic dose element cannot be ignored because it always increases the dose at the prescription points and, in addition, distorts the dose distribution within and outside of the irradiated volume. Failure to account for the dynamic dose component results in dosimetric errors that range from significant (> 10%) to negligible (source activity, and source speed as defined by the implant geometry.

  8. Causes of High Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Causes of High Cholesterol Updated:Nov 16,2017 If you have high ... for a heart or stroke event? Find out . Cholesterol • Home • About Cholesterol • HDL, LDL, and Triglycerides • Causes ...

  9. What Causes Polycythemia Vera?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Polycythemia Vera? Primary Polycythemia Polycythemia vera (PV) also is known as primary ... may play a role in causing PV. Secondary Polycythemia Another type of polycythemia, called secondary polycythemia, isn' ...

  10. What Causes Cushing's Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print What causes Cushing syndrome? Cushing syndrome can develop for two reasons: ... uhs ), thyroid, or thymus How Tumors Can Cause Cushing Syndrome Normally, the pituitary gland in the brain ...

  11. What Causes COPD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: The Challenge of COPD What Causes COPD? Past Issues / Fall 2014 Table of Contents Long- ... and the airways usually is the cause of COPD. In the United States, the most common irritant ...

  12. What Causes Rett Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print What causes Rett syndrome? Most cases of Rett syndrome are caused by ... as bad for development as too little. Is Rett syndrome passed from one generation to the next? In ...

  13. What Causes Lactose Intolerance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find a Study Resources and Publications What causes lactose intolerance? Skip sharing on social media links Share ... lactase in the body is the cause of lactose intolerance. The names for the three types of ...

  14. Solute clearance in CRRT: prescribed dose versus actual delivered dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyndon, William D; Wille, Keith M; Tolwani, Ashita J

    2012-03-01

    Substantial efforts have been made toward defining the dose threshold of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) associated with improved survival in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. Published studies have used prescribed effluent rates, expressed as total effluent volume (TEV) per weight and unit time (mL/kg/h), as a surrogate for dose. The purpose of this study was to compare differences in CRRT dose based on prescribed effluent rate, measured TEV and direct measurement of urea and creatinine clearance. We analyzed data that had been prospectively collected on 200 patients enrolled in a randomized trial comparing survival with a prescribed effluent rate of 20 mL/kg/h (standard dose) to 35 mL/kg/h (high dose) using pre-dilution continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF). Filters were changed every 72 h. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (SCr), effluent urea nitrogen (EUN) and effluent creatinine (ECr) were collected daily. Actual delivered dose was calculated as: (EUN/BUN)*TEV for urea and (ECr/SCr)*TEV for creatinine. Data were available for 165 patients. In both groups, prescribed dose differed significantly from the measured TEV dose (P < 0.001). In the standard dose group, there was no difference between the measured TEV dose and actual delivered urea and creatinine clearances. However, in the high-dose group, measured TEV dose differed significantly from delivered urea clearance by 7.1% (P < 0.001) and creatinine clearance by 13.9% (P < 0.001). Dose based on prescribed effluent rate or measured TEV is a poor substitute for actual CVVHDF creatinine and urea clearance.

  15. Personalized exercise dose prescription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubin Maslov, Petra; Schulman, Alexa; Lavie, Carl J; Narula, Jagat

    2017-12-28

    Physical activity (PA) is associated with increased longevity and decreased risk of cardiovascular disease, however, the majority of the general population is still sedentary. In order to maximize the health benefits of PA, health care practitioners should be familiarized with the appropriate dose of exercise for each healthy individual, depending on their habitual PA and relative fitness. The aim of this review is to quantitatively describe the lowest and the highest level of exercise that has health benefits, and what should hypothetically be considered 'the sweet spot'. Analysis of the current literature allows us to develop personalized 'exercise prescription' for healthy individuals. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author(s) 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. High-dose versus low-dose oxytocin for augmentation of delayed labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Sara; Tokumasu, Hironobu; Dowswell, Therese; Pledge, Debbie; Mori, Rintaro

    2013-07-13

    A major cause of failure to achieve spontaneous vaginal birth is delay in labour due to presumed inefficient uterine action. Oxytocin is given to increase contractions and high-dose regimens may potentially increase the number of spontaneous vaginal births, but as oxytocin can cause hyperstimulation of the uterus, there is a possibility of increased adverse events. To compare starting dose and increment dose of oxytocin for augmentation for women delayed in labour to determine whether augmentation by high-dose regimens of oxytocin improves labour outcomes and to examine the effect on both maternal/neonatal outcomes and women's birth experiences. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 May 2013) and reference lists of retrieved studies. We included all randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials for women in delayed labour requiring augmentation by oxytocin comparing high-dose regimens (defined as starting dose and increment of equal to or more than 4 mU per minute) with low-dose regimens (defined as starting dose and an increment of less than 4 mU per minute). Increase interval: between 15 and 40 minutes. The separation of low- and high-dose regimens is based on an arbitrary decision. Four review authors undertook assessment of trial eligibility, risk of bias, and data extraction independently. We included four studies involving 644 pregnant women. Three studies were randomised controlled trials and one trial was a quasi-randomised study. A higher dose of oxytocin was associated with a significant reduction in length of labour reported from one trial (mean difference (MD) -3.50 hours; 95% confidence interval (CI) -6.38 to -0.62; one trial, 40 women). There was a decrease in the rate of caesarean section (risk ratio (RR) 0.62; 95% CI 0.44 to 0.86 four trials, 644 women) and an increase in the rate of spontaneous vaginal birth in the high-dose group (RR 1.35; 95% CI 1.13 to 1.62, three trials, 444 women), although for both

  17. Antimicrobial dosing in acute renal replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fissell, William H

    2013-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common problem in hospitalized patients and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Two large trials showed no benefit from increased doses of renal replacement therapy (RRT) despite previous clinical data suggesting that increased clearance from RRT has beneficial effects. Since infection is the leading cause of death in AKI, my group and others hypothesized that increased RRT antibiotic clearance might create a competing morbidity. The data from my group, as well as those of other groups, show that many patients are underdosed when routine "1 size fits all" antibiotic dosing is used in patients with AKI receiving continuous RRT (CRRT). Here, concepts of drug distribution and clearance in AKI are briefly discussed and then 1 antibiotic (piperacillin) is discussed in depth to illustrate the challenges in applying the medical literature to clinical practice. The fact that published data on drug dosing in AKI and dialysis reflect the evolution of practice patterns and often do not apply to present prescribing habits is also discussed. A more general approach to drug dosing facilitates situation-specific prescribing by the nephrologist and critical care specialist. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Modeling Multiple Causes of Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, T D

    1999-01-24

    multiple causes of carcinogenesis and shifts the risk-assessment logic to considerations of "what dose does?" in contrast to the current process of the substance-specific question of "what dose is?" Whether reactive oxygen is the proximate or contributing cause of disease or simply a better estimate of biologically effective dose, it has enormous advantages for improved risk- and policy-based decisions. Various estimates of immune system modulation will be given based on radiobiology.

  19. Causes and effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, Carol L; Feldman, Mark A; DaSilva, Alison T

    2003-07-01

    Most companies make charitable donations, but few approach their contributions with an eye toward enhancing their brands. Those that do take such an approach commit talent and know-how, not just dollars, to a pressing but carefully chosen social need and then tell the world about the cause and their service to it. Through the association, both the business and the cause benefit in ways they could not otherwise. Organizations such as Avon, ConAgra Foods, and Chevrolet have recognized that a sustained cause-branding program can improve their reputations, boost their employees' morale, strengthen relations with business partners, and drive sales. And the targeted causes receive far more money than they could have from direct corporate gifts alone. The authors examine these best practices and offer four principles for building successful cause-branding programs. First, they say, a company should select a cause that advances its corporate goals. That is, unless the competitive logic for supporting the cause is clear, a company shouldn't even consider putting its finite resources behind it. Second, a business should commit to a cause before picking its charitable partners. Otherwise, a cause-branding program may become too dependent on its partners. Third, a company should put all its assets to work, especially its employees. It should leverage the professional skills of its workers as well as its other assets such as distribution networks. And fourth, a company should promote its philanthropic initiatives through every possible channel. In addition to using the media, it should communicate its efforts through the Web, annual reports, direct mail, and so on. Cause branding is a way to turn the obligations of corporate citizenship into a valuable asset. When the cause is well chosen, the commitment genuine, and the program well executed, the cause helps the company, and the company helps the cause.

  20. Radiation dose assessments for materials with elevated natural radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markkanen, M.

    1995-11-01

    The report provides practical information needed for evaluating the radiation dose to the general public and workers caused by materials containing elevated levels of natural radionuclides. The report presents criteria, exposure scenarios and calculations used to assess dose with respect to the safety requirements set for construction materials in accordance with the Finnish Radiation Act. A method for calculating external gamma exposure from building materials is presented in detail. The results for most typical cases are given as specific dose rates in table form to enable doses to be assessed without computer calculation. A number of such dose assessments is presented, as is the corresponding computer code. Practical investigation levels for the radioactivity of materials are defined. (23 refs.).

  1. Total Ionizing Dose Effects on High Resolution (12-/14-bit) Analog-to-Digital Converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. I.; Rax, B. G.; Johnson, A. H.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports total dose radiation test results for high resolution 12-/14-bit A/D converters. Small changes in internal components can cause these devices to fail their specifications at relatively low total dose levels. Degradation of signal-to-noise ratio becomes increasingly importamt for high accuracy converters. Rebound effects in the thick-oxide MOS devices causes these responses to be different at low and high dose rates, which is a major concern for space applications.

  2. Experimental evaluation of neutron dose in radiotherapy patients: Which dose?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero-Expósito, M., E-mail: mariateresa.romero@uab.cat; Domingo, C.; Ortega-Gelabert, O.; Gallego, S. [Grup de Recerca en Radiacions Ionizants (GRRI), Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra 08193 (Spain); Sánchez-Doblado, F. [Departamento de Fisiología Médica y Biofísica, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla 41009 (Spain); Servicio de Radiofísica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla 41009 (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The evaluation of peripheral dose has become a relevant issue recently, in particular, the contribution of secondary neutrons. However, after the revision of the Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, there has been a lack of experimental procedure for its evaluation. Specifically, the problem comes from the replacement of organ dose equivalent by the organ-equivalent dose, being the latter “immeasurable” by definition. Therefore, dose equivalent has to be still used although it needs the calculation of the radiation quality factor Q, which depends on the unrestricted linear energy transfer, for the specific neutron irradiation conditions. On the other hand, equivalent dose is computed through the radiation weighting factor w{sub R}, which can be easily calculated using the continuous function provided by the recommendations. The aim of the paper is to compare the dose equivalent evaluated following the definition, that is, using Q, with the values obtained by replacing the quality factor with w{sub R}. Methods: Dose equivalents were estimated in selected points inside a phantom. Two types of medical environments were chosen for the irradiations: a photon- and a proton-therapy facility. For the estimation of dose equivalent, a poly-allyl-diglicol-carbonate-based neutron dosimeter was used for neutron fluence measurements and, additionally, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to obtain the energy spectrum of the fluence in each point. Results: The main contribution to dose equivalent comes from neutrons with energy higher than 0.1 MeV, even when they represent the smallest contribution in fluence. For this range of energy, the radiation quality factor and the radiation weighting factor are approximately equal. Then, dose equivalents evaluated using both factors are compatible, with differences below 12%. Conclusions: Quality factor can be replaced by the radiation weighting factor in the evaluation of dose

  3. Derivation of mean dose tolerances for new fractionation schemes and treatment modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkó, Zoltán; Bortfeld, Thomas R; Hong, Theodore S; Wolfgang, John; Unkelbach, Jan

    2017-11-03

    Avoiding toxicities in radiotherapy requires the knowledge of tolerable organ doses. For new, experimental fractionation schemes (e.g. hypofractionation) these are typically derived from traditional schedules using the Biologically Effective Dose (BED) model. In this report we investigate the difficulties of establishing mean dose tolerances that arise since the mean BED depends on the entire spatial dose distribution, rather than on the dose level alone. Methods: A formula has been derived to establish mean physical dose constraints such that they are mean BED equivalent to a reference treatment scheme. This formula constitutes a modified BED equation where the influence of the spatial dose distribution is summarized in a single parameter, the dose shape factor. To quantify effects we analyzed 24 liver cancer patients for whom both proton and photon IMRT treatment plans were available. Results: The results show that the standard BED equation - neglecting the spatial dose distribution - can overestimate mean dose tolerances for hypofractionated treatments by up to 20%. The shape difference between photon and proton dose distributions can cause 30-40% differences in mean physical dose for plans having identical mean BEDs. Converting hypofractionated, 5/15-fraction proton doses to mean BED equivalent photon doses in traditional 35-fraction regimens resulted in up to 10 Gy higher doses than applying the standard BED formula. Conclusions: The dose shape effect should be accounted for to avoid overestimation of mean dose tolerances, particularly when estimating constraints for hypofractionated regimens. Additionally, tolerances established for one treatment modality cannot necessarily be applied to other modalities with drastically different dose distributions, such as proton therapy. Last, protons may only allow marginal (5-10%) dose escalation if a fraction-size adjusted organ mean dose is constraining instead of a physical dose. © 2017 Institute of Physics

  4. Organ Doses and Effective Doses in Pediatric Radiography: Patient-Dose Survey in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiljunen, T.; Tietaevaeinen, A.; Parviainen, T.; Viitala, A.; Kortesniemi, M. (Radiation Practices Regulation, Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland))

    2009-01-15

    Background: Use of the effective dose in diagnostic radiology permits the radiation exposure of diverse diagnostic procedures to be quantified. Fundamental knowledge of patient doses enhances the implementation of the 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA) principle. Purpose: To provide comparative information on pediatric examination protocols and patient doses in skull, sinus, chest, abdominal, and pelvic radiography examinations. Material and Methods: 24 Finnish hospitals were asked to register pediatric examination data, including patient information and examination parameters and specifications. The total number of examinations in the study was 1916 (1426 chest, 228 sinus, 96 abdominal, 94 skull, and 72 pelvic examinations). Entrance surface dose (ESD) and dose-area products (DAP) were calculated retrospectively or DAP meters were used. Organ doses and effective doses were determined using a Monte Carlo program (PCXMC). Results: There was considerable variation in examination protocols between different hospitals, indicating large variations in patient doses. Mean effective doses of different age groups ranged from 5 muSv to 14 muSv in skull and sinus examinations, from 25 muSv to 483 muSv in abdominal examinations, and from 6 muSv to 48 muSv in chest examinations. Conclusion: In chest and sinus examinations, the amount of data was extensive, allowing national pediatric diagnostic reference levels to be defined. Parameter selection in pediatric examination protocols should be harmonized in order to reduce patient doses and improve optimization

  5. Chloroquine is grossly under dosed in young children with malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ursing, Johan; Eksborg, Staffan; Rombo, Lars

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Plasmodium falciparum malaria is treated with 25 mg/kg of chloroquine (CQ) irrespective of age. Theoretically, CQ should be dosed according to body surface area (BSA). The effect of dosing CQ according to BSA has not been determined but doubling the dose per kg doubled the efficacy...... of CQ in children aged causing genes typical for Africa. The study aim was to determine the effect of age on CQ concentrations. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Day 7 whole blood CQ concentrations were determined in 150 and 302 children treated with 25...

  6. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H. (comps.)

    1992-06-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories under contract with the Centers for Disease Control. The independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP) provides technical direction. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demography, food consumption, and agriculture; environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  7. REMEDIATION FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Arakali; E. Faillace

    2004-02-27

    The purpose of this design calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel in the Remediation Facility performing operations to receive, prepare, open, repair, recover, disposition, and correct off-normal and non-standard conditions with casks, canisters, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies, and waste packages (WP). The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers both collective doses and individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation. The results of this calculation will be used to support the design of the Remediation Facility and provide occupational dose estimates for the License Application.

  8. Antibiotic dosing for multidrug-resistant pathogen pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Aziz, Mohd H; Lipman, Jeffrey; Roberts, Jason A

    2017-04-01

    Nosocomial pneumonia caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens is increasing in the ICU, and these infections are negatively associated with patient outcomes. Optimization of antibiotic dosing has been suggested as a key intervention to improve clinical outcomes in patients with nosocomial pneumonia. This review describes the recent pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic data relevant to antibiotic dosing for nosocomial pneumonia caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens. Optimal antibiotic treatment is challenging in critically ill patients with nosocomial pneumonia; most dosing guidelines do not consider the altered physiology and illness severity associated with severe lung infections. Antibiotic dosing can be guided by plasma drug concentrations, which do not reflect the concentrations at the site of infection. The application of aggressive dosing regimens, in accordance to the antibiotic's pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic characteristics, may be required to ensure rapid and effective drug exposure in infected lung tissues. Conventional antibiotic dosing increases the likelihood of therapeutic failure in critically ill patients with nosocomial pneumonia. Alternative dosing strategies, which exploit the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties of an antibiotic, should be strongly considered to ensure optimal antibiotic exposure and better therapeutic outcomes in these patients.

  9. Injury of the blood-testies barrier after low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Young Hoon; Bae Min Ji; Lee, Chang Geun; Yang, Kwang Mo; Jur, Kyu; Kim, Jong Sun [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    The systemic effect of radiation increases in proportionally with the dose and dose rate. Little is known concerning the relationships between harmful effects and accumulated dose, which is derived from continuous low-dose rate radiation exposure. Recent our studies show that low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure (3.49 mGy/h) causes adverse effects in the testis at a dose of 2 Gy (6 mGy/h). However, the mechanism of the low-dose-rate 2 Gy irradiation induced testicular injury remains unclear. The present results indicate that low-dose rate chronic radiation might affect the BTB permeability, possibly by decreasing levels of ZO-1, Occludin-1, and NPC-2. Furthermore, our results suggest that there is a risk of male infertility through BTB impairment even with low-dose-rate radiation if exposure is continuous.

  10. Do dose area product meter measurements reflect radiation doses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    between radiation doses absorbed by health care workers and dose area product meter (DAP) measurements at Universitas Hospital, Bloemfontein. The DAP is an instrument which accurately measures the radiation emitted from the source. The study included the interventional radiolo- gists, radiographers and nurses ...

  11. What causes education?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldgaard, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    Why do universities not give priority to education? The article suggests a formal answer on the basis of Lacan’s four discourses. Why education? Why do we learn? Is it caused by a natural curiosity or is it caused by anxiety? Is it at all possible to control the influence that we undoubtedly have...

  12. What Causes Heart Block?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... defects. Acquired heart block is more common than congenital heart block. Damage to the heart muscle or its electrical system causes acquired heart block. Diseases, surgery, or medicines can cause this damage. The three types of heart block are first degree, second degree, ...

  13. A dose error evaluation study for 4D dose calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milz, Stefan; Wilkens, Jan J.; Ullrich, Wolfgang

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that respiration induced motion is not negligible for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy. The intrafractional breathing induced motion influences the delivered dose distribution on the underlying patient geometry such as the lung or the abdomen. If a static geometry is used, a planning process for these indications does not represent the entire dynamic process. The quality of a full 4D dose calculation approach depends on the dose coordinate transformation process between deformable geometries. This article provides an evaluation study that introduces an advanced method to verify the quality of numerical dose transformation generated by four different algorithms. The used transformation metric value is based on the deviation of the dose mass histogram (DMH) and the mean dose throughout dose transformation. The study compares the results of four algorithms. In general, two elementary approaches are used: dose mapping and energy transformation. Dose interpolation (DIM) and an advanced concept, so called divergent dose mapping model (dDMM), are used for dose mapping. The algorithms are compared to the basic energy transformation model (bETM) and the energy mass congruent mapping (EMCM). For evaluation 900 small sample regions of interest (ROI) are generated inside an exemplary lung geometry (4DCT). A homogeneous fluence distribution is assumed for dose calculation inside the ROIs. The dose transformations are performed with the four different algorithms. The study investigates the DMH-metric and the mean dose metric for different scenarios (voxel sizes: 8 mm, 4 mm, 2 mm, 1 mm 9 different breathing phases). dDMM achieves the best transformation accuracy in all measured test cases with 3-5% lower errors than the other models. The results of dDMM are reasonable and most efficient in this study, although the model is simple and easy to implement. The EMCM model also achieved suitable results, but the approach requires a more complex

  14. The chondrotoxicity of single-dose corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoo, Jason L; Danial, Christina M; Braun, Hillary J; Pouliot, Michael A; Kim, Hyeon Joo

    2012-09-01

    Corticosteroids are commonly injected into the joint space. However, studies have not examined the chondrotoxicity of one-time injection doses. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of dexamethasone sodium phosphate (Decadron), methylprednisolone acetate (Depo-Medrol), betamethasone sodium phosphate and betamethasone acetate (Celestone Soluspan), and triamcinolone acetonide (Kenalog) on human chondrocyte viability in vitro. Single-injection doses of each of the corticosteroids were separately delivered to human chondrocytes for their respective average duration of action and compared to controls using a bioreactor containing a continuous infusion pump constructed to mimic joint fluid metabolism. A 14-day time-controlled trial was also performed. A live/dead reduced biohazard viability/cytotoxicity assay was used to quantify chondrocyte viability. Over their average duration of action, betamethasone sodium phosphate/acetate solution and triamcinolone acetonide caused significant decreases in chondrocyte viability compared to control media (19.8 ± 2.9% vs. 5.2 ± 2.1%, P = 0.0025 and 10.2 ± 1.3% vs. 4.8 ± 0.9%, P = 0.0049, respectively). In the 14-day trial, only betamethasone sodium phosphate/acetate solution caused a significant decrease in chondrocyte viability compared to control media (21.5% vs. 4.6%, P < 0.001). A single-injection dose of betamethasone sodium phosphate and betamethasone acetate solution illustrated consistent and significant chondrotoxicity using a physiologically relevant in vitro model and should be used with caution. Given the observed chondrotoxicity of triamcinolone acetonide in a single trial, there may be some evidence that this medication is chondrotoxic. However, at 14 days, betamethasone sodium phosphate and betamethasone acetate was the only condition that caused significant cell death.

  15. Irrigation in dose assessments models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, Ulla; Barkefors, Catarina [Studsvik RadWaste AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2004-05-01

    SKB has carried out several safety analyses for repositories for radioactive waste, one of which was SR 97, a multi-site study concerned with a future deep bedrock repository for high-level waste. In case of future releases due to unforeseen failure of the protective multiple barrier system, radionuclides may be transported with groundwater and may reach the biosphere. Assessments of doses have to be carried out with a long-term perspective. Specific models are therefore employed to estimate consequences to man. It has been determined that the main pathway for nuclides from groundwater or surface water to soil is via irrigation. Irrigation may cause contamination of crops directly by e.g. interception or rain-splash, and indirectly via root-uptake from contaminated soil. The exposed people are in many safety assessments assumed to be self-sufficient, i.e. their food is produced locally where the concentration of radionuclides may be the highest. Irrigation therefore plays an important role when estimating consequences. The present study is therefore concerned with a more extensive analysis of the role of irrigation for possible future doses to people living in the area surrounding a repository. Current irrigation practices in Sweden are summarised, showing that vegetables and potatoes are the most common crops for irrigation. In general, however, irrigation is not so common in Sweden. The irrigation model used in the latest assessments is described. A sensitivity analysis is performed showing that, as expected, interception of irrigation water and retention on vegetation surfaces are important parameters. The parameters used to describe this are discussed. A summary is also given how irrigation is proposed to be handled in the international BIOMASS (BIOsphere Modelling and ASSessment) project and in models like TAME and BIOTRAC. Similarities and differences are pointed out. Some numerical results are presented showing that surface contamination in general gives the

  16. Topics on study of low dose-effect relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Takeshi [Toho Univ., School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ohyama, Harumi

    1999-09-01

    It is not exceptional but usually observed that a dose-effect relationship in biosystem is not linear. Sometimes, the low dose-effect relationship appears entirely contrary to the expectation from high dose-effect. This is called a 'hormesis' phenomena. A high dose irradiation inflicts certainly an injury on biosystem. No matter how low the dose may be, an irradiation might inflict some injury on biosystem according to Linear Non-Threshold hypothesis(LNT). On the contrary to the expectation, a low dose irradiation stimulates immune system, and promotes cell proliferation. This is called 'radiation hormesis'. The studies of the radiation hormesis are made on from four points of view as follows: (1) radiation adaptive response, (2) revitalization caused by a low dose stimulation, (3) a low dose response unexpected from the LNT hypothesis, (4) negation of the LNT hypothesis. The various empirical proofs of radiation hormesis are introduced in the report. (M . Suetake)

  17. Response of mouse oral mucosa to repeated doses of bleomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörr, W; Hönig, M

    1994-09-01

    Bleomycin (BLM) applied at systemically tolerable doses induces denudation of tongue mucosa in the C3H-Neuherberg mouse strain. The dose-incidence curve after single injections has a sigmoid shape with an ED50 of 17.5 mg/kg. In contrast, the dose-response curves to repeated (two, five and 10) drug injections follow triphasic shapes and show dose-effect inversions. The effect initially increases with dose to a maximum of 70-100% at 2 x 7, 5 x 2, and 10 x 0.9 mg/kg. A marked decrease in response is observed at higher doses with a nadir of 10-30% after 2 x 11 mg/kg, 5 x 4 to 5 x 5 mg/kg and 10 x 2 mg/kg, followed by a second rise when dose is further increased. These clinical results were confirmed in a histological study. Variation of the time interval between two drug injections caused marked fluctuations in the treatment efficacy. A clear increase in drug response was induced by splitting total drug doses of 6, 14 or 22 mg/kg, the maximum effect (100%) was seen at intervals of 2 h, 0.5-1 h and 0.25 h between two injections of 3, 7 or 11 mg/kg, respectively. At longer intervals of up to 6 h, a dose-dependent decrease in drug efficacy resulted in an inverse dose-effect. Original tissue tolerance to BLM was restored only in the 2 x 3 mg/kg arm but was still elevated in the other arms after 96 h. The results can be plausibly explained by the dose-dependent induction of detoxifying processes.

  18. EPA's Benchmark Dose Modeling Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA developed the Benchmark Dose Software (BMDS) as a tool to help Agency risk assessors facilitate applying benchmark dose (BMD) method’s to EPA’s human health risk assessment (HHRA) documents. The application of BMD methods overcomes many well know limitations ...

  19. Dose calculation of anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, Bo; Klumpen, Heinz-Josef; Gurney, Howard

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anticancer drugs are characterized by a narrow therapeutic window and significant inter-patient variability in therapeutic and toxic effects. Current body surface area (BSA)-based dosing fails to standardize systemic anticancer drug exposure and other alternative dosing strategies also

  20. Evolution of radon dose evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujimoto Kenzo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The historical change of radon dose evaluation is reviewed based on the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR reports. Since 1955, radon has been recognized as one of the important sources of exposure of the general public. However, it was not really understood that radon is the largest dose contributor until 1977 when a new concept of effective dose equivalent was introduced by International Commission on Radiological Protection. In 1982, the dose concept was also adapted by UNSCEAR and evaluated per caput dose from natural radiation. Many researches have been carried out since then. However, lots of questions have remained open in radon problems, such as the radiation weighting factor of 20 for alpha rays and the large discrepancy of risk estimation among dosimetric and epidemiological approaches.

  1. 13 CFR 101.400 - What is the purpose of this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What is the purpose of this subpart? 101.400 Section 101.400 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION... at law. ...

  2. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Ttttt of... - Toxic Equivalency Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Subpart TTTTT of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Primary Magnesium Refining Pt. 63...

  3. 40 CFR 63.9881 - Am I subject to this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 63.9881 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Primary Magnesium Refining What This Subpart...

  4. 40 CFR Table 1 of Subpart Aaaaaaa... - Emission Limits for Asphalt Processing (Refining) Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (Refining) Operations 1 Table 1 of Subpart AAAAAAA of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for...

  5. 40 CFR Table 2b to Subpart E of... - Reactivity Factors for Aliphatic Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures 2B Table 2B to Subpart E of Part 59 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures Bin Averageboiling point * (degrees F) Criteria Reactivityfactor 1 80-205 Alkanes... + Dry Point) / 2 (b) Aromatic Hydrocarbon Solvents ...

  6. 40 CFR 63.5485 - Am I subject to this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Cellulose Products Manufacturing What This Subpart Covers § 63..., cellulosic sponge, and cellophane operations, as defined in § 63.5610. The Cellulose Ethers Production source...

  7. 40 CFR 141.605 - Subpart V compliance monitoring location recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... residence time compliance monitoring location (maximum residence time compliance monitoring location for... location. (7) Existing subpart L average residence time compliance monitoring location (maximum residence... (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Initial Distribution...

  8. 40 CFR 63.4181 - What definitions apply to this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... similar small products); (2) Refrigerators, freezers, and refrigerated cabinets and cases; (3) Laundry... chillers means, for the purposes of this subpart, equipment designed to produce chilled water for use in...

  9. 40 CFR 63.8830 - What definitions apply to this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... this subpart during startup, shutdown, or malfunction, regardless of whether or not such failure is... (appendix A to 40 CFR part 63) or another approved alternative. Loop slitter means a machine used to create...

  10. 40 CFR 63.11167 - What definitions apply to this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... limitation or work practice standard in this subpart during startup, shutdown, or malfunction, regardless of...) of the sulfur contained in the charge. Sintering machine means any furnace in which calcines are...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Restatement of Torts Section 757, Comment b

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROFESSIONALS Trade Secrecy Claims Pt. 350, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 350—Restatement of..., communicate it to employees involved in its use. He may likewise communicate it to others pledged to secrecy...

  12. 40 CFR 63.212 - What parts of my facility does this subpart cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Polyvinyl Chloride and Copolymers...) The affected source subject to this subpart is the collection of all equipment and activities in vinyl...

  13. What Causes Respiratory Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Respiratory Failure Respiratory Failure What Is Respiratory (RES-pih-rah-tor- ... injure your lungs. Normal Lungs and Conditions Causing Respiratory Failure Figure A shows the location of the ...

  14. What causes bone loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of bone loss. For men, a drop in testosterone as they age can cause bone loss. Your ... Wisse, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology & Nutrition, University of Washington School of Medicine, ...

  15. Dandruff: Symptoms and Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... during the summer. A type of dandruff called cradle cap can affect babies. This disorder, which causes a ... infancy. Although it can be alarming for parents, cradle cap isn't dangerous and usually clears up on ...

  16. EAMJ March -Causes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    iMac User

    2008-03-01

    Mar 1, 2008 ... emotions; determination, control and environment manipulation (1). Given this ... assist in managing long-term effects of the injuries. Understanding the .... In Ireland, falls (15%) and sports (15%) were the leading causes, while ...

  17. Causes of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for fighting infection, attacks and destroys the insulin -producing beta cells of the pancreas . Scientists think type ... of diabetes—is caused by several factors, including lifestyle factors and genes. Overweight, obesity, and physical inactivity ...

  18. What Causes Heart Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Heart Failure Heart Failure Also known as Congestive heart failure What ... diseases for many years that led to heart failure. Heart failure is a leading cause of hospital stays ...

  19. What Causes SIDS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Look Like? How Can Caregivers Create a Safe Sleep Environment? Babies Need Tummy Time! FAQs Myths and Facts Printer-Friendly Email Page Skip sharing on social media links What Causes SIDS? Page Content We don’ ...

  20. Dyslexia: Causes, Symptoms, Definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Albert J.

    1986-01-01

    The article reviews proposed causes and observable symptoms that characterize dyslexia, concluding that individualized analysis and specialized treatments are required and that, until an operational definition can be agreed upon, use of the label "dyslexia" is counterproductive. (DB)

  1. Causes of Child Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Erhan Deveci

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Child abuse is an important public health problem that is present almost in every society and environment at different level and intensities. For implementation of child abuse protection measures it is necessary to investigate its causes. In this review, causes of child abuse was attempted to investigate with respects to the society and institution, family and individual and child related factors. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2003; 12(4.000: 396-405

  2. Comparison of two dosing schedules for subcutaneous injections of low-dose anti-CD20 veltuzumab in relapsed immune thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebman, Howard A; Saleh, Mansoor N; Bussel, James B; Negrea, O George; Horne, Heather; Wegener, William A; Goldenberg, David M

    2016-11-01

    We compared two dosing schedules for subcutaneous injections of a low-dose humanized anti-CD20 antibody, veltuzumab, in immune thrombocytopenia. Fifty adults with primary immune thrombocytopenia, in whom one or more lines of standard therapy had failed and who had a platelet count <30×10(9)/L but no major bleeding, initially received escalating 80, 160, or 320 mg doses of subcutaneous veltuzumab administered twice, 2 weeks apart; the last group received once-weekly doses of 320 mg for 4 weeks. In all dose groups, injection reactions were transient and mild to moderate; there were no other safety issues. Forty-seven response-evaluable patients had 23 (49%) objective responses (platelet counts ≥30×10(9)/L and ≥2 × baseline) including 15 (32%) complete responses (platelets ≥100×10(9)/L). Responses (including complete responses) and bleeding reduction occurred in all dose groups and were not dose-dependent. In contrast, response duration increased progressively with total dose, reaching a median of 2.7 years with the four once-weekly 320-mg doses. Among nine responders retreated at relapse, three at higher dose levels responded again, including one patient who was retreated four times. In all dose groups, B-cell depletion occurred after the first dose until recovery starting 12 to 16 weeks after treatment. Veltuzumab serum levels increased with dose group according to total dose administered, but terminal half-life and clearance were comparable. Human anti-veltuzumab antibody titers developed without apparent dose dependence in nine patients, of whom six responded including five who had complete responses. Subcutaneous veltuzumab was convenient, well-tolerated, and active, without causing significant safety concerns. Platelet responses and bleeding reduction occurred in all dose groups, and response durability appeared to improve with higher doses. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00547066. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  3. Radiation dose estimates for radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stabin, M.G.; Stubbs, J.B.; Toohey, R.E. [Oak Ridge Inst. of Science and Education, TN (United States). Radiation Internal Dose Information Center

    1996-04-01

    Tables of radiation dose estimates based on the Cristy-Eckerman adult male phantom are provided for a number of radiopharmaceuticals commonly used in nuclear medicine. Radiation dose estimates are listed for all major source organs, and several other organs of interest. The dose estimates were calculated using the MIRD Technique as implemented in the MIRDOSE3 computer code, developed by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Radiation Internal Dose Information Center. In this code, residence times for source organs are used with decay data from the MIRD Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes to produce estimates of radiation dose to organs of standardized phantoms representing individuals of different ages. The adult male phantom of the Cristy-Eckerman phantom series is different from the MIRD 5, or Reference Man phantom in several aspects, the most important of which is the difference in the masses and absorbed fractions for the active (red) marrow. The absorbed fractions for flow energy photons striking the marrow are also different. Other minor differences exist, but are not likely to significantly affect dose estimates calculated with the two phantoms. Assumptions which support each of the dose estimates appears at the bottom of the table of estimates for a given radiopharmaceutical. In most cases, the model kinetics or organ residence times are explicitly given. The results presented here can easily be extended to include other radiopharmaceuticals or phantoms.

  4. Superficial dose evaluation of four dose calculation algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ying; Yang, Xiaoyu; Yang, Zhen; Qiu, Xiaoping; Lv, Zhiping; Lei, Mingjun; Liu, Gui; Zhang, Zijian; Hu, Yongmei

    2017-08-01

    Accurate superficial dose calculation is of major importance because of the skin toxicity in radiotherapy, especially within the initial 2 mm depth being considered more clinically relevant. The aim of this study is to evaluate superficial dose calculation accuracy of four commonly used algorithms in commercially available treatment planning systems (TPS) by Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and film measurements. The superficial dose in a simple geometrical phantom with size of 30 cm×30 cm×30 cm was calculated by PBC (Pencil Beam Convolution), AAA (Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm), AXB (Acuros XB) in Eclipse system and CCC (Collapsed Cone Convolution) in Raystation system under the conditions of source to surface distance (SSD) of 100 cm and field size (FS) of 10×10 cm2. EGSnrc (BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc) program was performed to simulate the central axis dose distribution of Varian Trilogy accelerator, combined with measurements of superficial dose distribution by an extrapolation method of multilayer radiochromic films, to estimate the dose calculation accuracy of four algorithms in the superficial region which was recommended in detail by the ICRU (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement) and the ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection). In superficial region, good agreement was achieved between MC simulation and film extrapolation method, with the mean differences less than 1%, 2% and 5% for 0°, 30° and 60°, respectively. The relative skin dose errors were 0.84%, 1.88% and 3.90%; the mean dose discrepancies (0°, 30° and 60°) between each of four algorithms and MC simulation were (2.41±1.55%, 3.11±2.40%, and 1.53±1.05%), (3.09±3.00%, 3.10±3.01%, and 3.77±3.59%), (3.16±1.50%, 8.70±2.84%, and 18.20±4.10%) and (14.45±4.66%, 10.74±4.54%, and 3.34±3.26%) for AXB, CCC, AAA and PBC respectively. Monte Carlo simulation verified the feasibility of the superficial dose measurements by multilayer Gafchromic films. And the rank

  5. Effects of low doses; Effet des faibles doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guen, B. [Electricite de France (EDF-LAM-SCAST), 93 - Saint-Denis (France)

    2001-07-01

    Actually, even though it is comfortable for the risk management, the hypothesis of the dose-effect relationship linearity is not confirmed for any model. In particular, in the area of low dose rate delivered by low let emitters. this hypothesis is debated at the light of recent observations, notably these ones relative to the mechanisms leading to genetic instability and induction eventuality of DNA repair. The problem of strong let emitters is still to solve. (N.C.)

  6. Nuclear reaction secondary particle dose distributions and dose enhancement by boron neutron capture in proton beam therapy evaluated using the LAHET code system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laky, Peter Gyula

    The objective of this study was to use the LAHET Code System (LCS), which has recently been used in shielding calculations for proton therapy, to model the proton, neutron and photon dose and equivalent dose distributions created in tissue during proton beam cancer therapy. Proton beams used for therapy have shown distinct advantages over other therapeutic radiation treatments due to the rapid distal dose falloff in the region of the Bragg Peak. Nuclear reactions caused by the primary proton beam in beam modifying devices and patient tissues create secondary particles which contribute to the dose received by the patient inside and outside of the targeted region. The spatial distribution of the dose created by these secondary particles is an important consideration in the choice of beam modification methods and treatment volume planning, since a goal of radiation therapy is to minimize dose to normal tissue while maximizing dose to the tumor. The photon dose was found to be negligible in all target regions. The neutron dose and dose equivalent were found to be negligible in the tissue volume targeted for proton beam therapy, but contributed a majority of the dose outside of the treatment volume. Finally, LAHET was used to evaluate the utility of exploiting the secondary neutrons for supplemental boron neutron capture therapy during proton beam therapy. These results indicate that the additional useful dose due to BNCT is negligible.

  7. Effects of monthly dose and regular dosing of intravenous active vitamin D use on mortality among patients undergoing hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Peter, Wendy L; Li, Shuling; Liu, Jiannong; Gilbertson, David T; Arneson, Thomas J; Collins, Allan J

    2009-02-01

    To determine if apparent protective mortality benefits of intravenous active vitamin D in patients undergoing hemodialysis extend across all groups defined by dialysis duration; if higher monthly dose and dosing regularity are associated with reduced mortality; and if intravenous active vitamin D use is associated with reduced cardiovascular, infectious, and cancer-related mortality. Retrospective cohort study. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services End-Stage Renal Disease database. A total of 193,830 patients undergoing hemodialysis during 1999-2000, of whom 94,208 (48.6%) were taking intravenous active vitamin D in the baseline period. Time-varying Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the effects of monthly vitamin D dose and dosing regularity over 3-month intervals on risk of all-cause and cause-specific death, by dialysis duration groups (or=5 yrs from dialysis initiation). Models were adjusted for baseline characteristics, time-varying hospital days, monthly epoetin alfa dose, mean hemoglobin level, and urea reduction ratio in the 3-month intervals. Maximum follow-up time was 5.25 years. Adjusted all-cause mortality risk was reduced 7-17% among patients receiving vitamin D each month of the 3-month interval, with the highest reduction among patients with shorter dialysis duration. However, regular vitamin D dosing did not show consistent benefit across dialysis duration groups for cardiovascular, infectious, cancer, or other (all deaths not attributable to cardiovascular disease, infection, or cancer) mortality. Mortality benefits of intravenous vitamin D cannot be easily explained by currently proposed biologic mechanisms. Randomized controlled trials are needed to show definitively whether intravenous vitamin D can reduce all-cause and cause-specific mortality in patients undergoing dialysis compared with placebo.

  8. Nominal Performance Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Wasiolek

    2000-12-21

    The purpose of this report was to document the process leading to development of the Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) for the postclosure nominal performance of the potential repository at Yucca Mountain. BDCF calculations concerned twenty-four radionuclides. This selection included sixteen radionuclides that may be significant nominal performance dose contributors during the compliance period of up to 10,000 years, five additional radionuclides of importance for up to 1 million years postclosure, and three relatively short-lived radionuclides important for the human intrusion scenario. Consideration of radionuclide buildup in soil caused by previous irrigation with contaminated groundwater was taken into account in the BDCF development. The effect of climate evolution, from the current arid conditions to a wetter and cooler climate, on the BDCF values was evaluated. The analysis included consideration of different exposure pathway's contribution to the BDCFs. Calculations of nominal performance BDCFs used the GENII-S computer code in a series of probabilistic realizations to propagate the uncertainties of input parameters into the output. BDCFs for the nominal performance, when combined with the concentrations of radionuclides in groundwater allow calculation of potential radiation doses to the receptor of interest. Calculated estimates of radionuclide concentration in groundwater result from the saturated zone modeling. The integration of the biosphere modeling results (BDCFs) with the outcomes of the other component models is accomplished in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) to calculate doses to the receptor of interest from radionuclides postulated to be released to the environment from the potential repository at Yucca Mountain.

  9. Online Radiation Dose Measurement System for ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Mandić, I; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Particle detectors and readout electronics in the high energy physics experiment ATLAS at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN operate in radiation field containing photons, charged particles and neutrons. The particles in the radiation field originate from proton-proton interactions as well as from interactions of these particles with material in the experimental apparatus. In the innermost parts of ATLAS detector components will be exposed to ionizing doses exceeding 100 kGy. Energetic hadrons will also cause displacement damage in silicon equivalent to fluences of several times 10e14 1 MeV-neutrons per cm2. Such radiation doses can have severe influence on the performance of detectors. It is therefore very important to continuously monitor the accumulated doses to understand the detector performance and to correctly predict the lifetime of radiation sensitive components. Measurements of doses are important also to verify the simulations and represent a crucial input into the models used for predicting future ...

  10. Low dose ionizing radiation induced acoustic neuroma: A putative link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin A Borkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although exposure to high dose ionizing radiation (following therapeutic radiotherapy has been incriminated in the pathogenesis of many brain tumors, exposure to chronic low dose ionizing radiation has not yet been shown to be associated with tumorigenesis. The authors report a case of a 50-year-old atomic reactor scientist who received a cumulative dose of 78.9 mSv over a 10-year period and was detected to have an acoustic neuroma another 15 years later. Although there is no proof that exposure to ionizing radiation was the cause for the development of the acoustic neuroma, this case highlights the need for extended follow-up periods following exposure to low dose ionizing radiation.

  11. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H. (comps.)

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon and Washington, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on human (dose estimates): Source Terms; Environmental Transport; Environmental Monitoring Data; Demographics, Agriculture, Food Habits and; Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  12. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMakin, A.H.; Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M. (comps.)

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demography, food consumption, and agriculture, and environmental pathways and dose estimates. Progress is discussed.

  13. High dose irradiation with hyperfractionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asakura, Hideo; Kurashima, Shoji; Hasegawa, Maki; Akiyama, Kazuo (Sagamihara National Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan))

    1990-10-01

    From March 1988 to January 1990, 12 patients including 7 primary lung cancers, 2 lung metastases of colorectal cancer, and each 1 gall bladder cancer, ovarian cancer, and spinal cord metastasis of prostatic cancer, received {sup 60}Co-irradiation with high dose by hyperfractionation. This hyperfractionation consisted of 1.2 Gy per fraction, twice a day with 6 hour interval, and 5 days (10 fractions) a week. The total dose administered was 81.6{approx}100 Gy. The acute reaction of skin, lung, and intestines was tolerable, and it seemed that the late damage of normal tissues was slighter and the treatment result was favorable in comparison with the conventional fractionation, but this estimation was not definite because of short observation period. It was discussed that further reduction of dose per fraction (1 Gy or below) and more increased total dose (100 Gy or more) would be promising in hyperfractionation. (author).

  14. Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

    2003-06-27

    applications of NEOTRANS2, indicate that nonlinear threshold-type, dose-response relationships for excess stochastic effects (problematic nonlethal mutations, neoplastic transformation) should be expected after exposure to low linear energy transfer (LET) gamma rays or gamma rays in combination with high-LET alpha radiation. Similar thresholds are expected for low-dose-rate low-LET beta irradiation. We attribute the thresholds to low-dose, low-LET radiation induced protection against spontaneous mutations and neoplastic transformations. The protection is presumed mainly to involve selective elimination of problematic cells via apoptosis. Low-dose, low-LET radiation is presumed to trigger wide-area cell signaling, which in turn leads to problematic bystander cells (e.g., mutants, neoplastically transformed cells) selectively undergoing apoptosis. Thus, this protective bystander effect leads to selective elimination of problematic cells (a tissue cleansing process in vivo). However, this protective bystander effects is a different process from low-dose stimulation of the immune system. Low-dose, low-LET radiation stimulation of the immune system may explain why thresholds for inducing excess cancer appear much larger (possibly more than 100-fold larger) than thresholds for inducing excess mutations and neoplastic transformations, when the dose rate is low. For ionizing radiation, the current risk assessment paradigm is such that the relative risk (RR) is always ¡Ý 1, no matter how small the dose. Our research results indicate that for low-dose or low-dose-rate, low-LET irradiation, RR < 1 may be more the rule than the exception. Directly tied to the current RR paradigm are the billion-dollar cleanup costs for radionuclide-contaminated DOE sites. Our research results suggest that continued use of the current RR paradigm for which RR ¡Ý 1 could cause more harm than benefit to society (e.g., by spreading unwarranted fear about phantom excess risks associated with low-dose low

  15. The LNT-controversy and the concept of "controllable dose".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellerer, A M; Nekolla, E A

    2000-10-01

    There is no firm scientific information on the potential health effects, such as increased cancer rates, due to low doses of ionizing radiation. In view of this uncertainty ICRP has adopted as a prudent default option the linear no-threshold (LNT) assumption and has used it to derive nominal risk coefficients. Subsequent steps, such as the comparison of putative fatality rates in radiation workers with observed accident rates in other professions, have given the risk estimates a false appearance of scientific fact. This has encouraged meaningless computations of radiation-induced fatalities in large populations and has caused a trend to measure dose limits for the public not against the magnitude of the natural radiation exposure and its geographic variations, but against the numerical risk estimates. In reaction to this development, opposing claims are being made of a threshold in dose for deleterious health effects in humans. In view of the growing polarization, ICRP is now exploring a new concept "controllable dose" that aims to abandon the quantity collective dose, emphasizing, instead, individual dose and, in particular, the control of the maximum individual dose from single sources. Essential features of the new proposal are here examined, and it is concluded that the control of individual dose will still have to be accompanied by the avoidance of unnecessary exposures of large populations, even if their magnitude lies below that acceptable to the individual. If a reasonable cut-off at trivial doses is made, the collective dose can remain useful. Misapplications of collective dose are not the deeper cause of the current controversy; the actual root is the misrepresentation of the LNT-assumption as a scientific fact and the amplification of this confusion by loose terminology. If over-interpretation and distortion are avoided, the current system of radiation protection is workable and essentially sound, and there is no need for a fruitless LNT-controversy. The

  16. The dose makes the medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, Walter E

    2006-06-01

    Dose and time considerations in the development and use of a drug are important for assessing actions and side effects, as well as predictions of safety and toxicity. This article deals with epistemological aspects of dose selection by probing into the linguistic and cultural roots for the measure of medicine mediated by the medical doctor. Because toxicity is related to dose, historic and recent views suggest that less can be more. At low, medium and high dose levels, effects can differ not only quantitatively but also qualitatively. Dose-related target activation and recognition of enantiodromic thresholds between beneficial and toxic effects require elucidation of underlying events. Such studies, including hormesis and microdosing, call for extended ADME procedures with high-resolution methods in addition to the current low-resolution approaches. Improved information of drug logistics and target pharmacokinetics enables effective drug selection, dose determination and prediction. It also allows considerations of systems biology [i.e. integral (gestalt) pharmacology] exemplified by the drug homunculus, as in the case of vitamin D, that might lead to new paradigms and drug design.

  17. BENCHMARK DOSE TECHNICAL GUIDANCE DOCUMENT ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA conducts risk assessments for an array of health effects that may result from exposure to environmental agents, and that require an analysis of the relationship between exposure and health-related outcomes. The dose-response assessment is essentially a two-step process, the first being the definition of a point of departure (POD), and the second extrapolation from the POD to low environmentally-relevant exposure levels. The benchmark dose (BMD) approach provides a more quantitative alternative to the first step in the dose-response assessment than the current NOAEL/LOAEL process for noncancer health effects, and is similar to that for determining the POD proposed for cancer endpoints. As the Agency moves toward harmonization of approaches for human health risk assessment, the dichotomy between cancer and noncancer health effects is being replaced by consideration of mode of action and whether the effects of concern are likely to be linear or nonlinear at low doses. Thus, the purpose of this project is to provide guidance for the Agency and the outside community on the application of the BMD approach in determining the POD for all types of health effects data, whether a linear or nonlinear low dose extrapolation is used. A guidance document is being developed under the auspices of EPA's Risk Assessment Forum. The purpose of this project is to provide guidance for the Agency and the outside community on the application of the benchmark dose (BMD) appr

  18. Weldon Spring historical dose estimate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meshkov, N.; Benioff, P.; Wang, J.; Yuan, Y.

    1986-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine the estimated radiation doses that individuals in five nearby population groups and the general population in the surrounding area may have received as a consequence of activities at a uranium processing plant in Weldon Spring, Missouri. The study is retrospective and encompasses plant operations (1957-1966), cleanup (1967-1969), and maintenance (1969-1982). The dose estimates for members of the nearby population groups are as follows. Of the three periods considered, the largest doses to the general population in the surrounding area would have occurred during the plant operations period (1957-1966). Dose estimates for the cleanup (1967-1969) and maintenance (1969-1982) periods are negligible in comparison. Based on the monitoring data, if there was a person residing continually in a dwelling 1.2 km (0.75 mi) north of the plant, this person is estimated to have received an average of about 96 mrem/yr (ranging from 50 to 160 mrem/yr) above background during plant operations, whereas the dose to a nearby resident during later years is estimated to have been about 0.4 mrem/yr during cleanup and about 0.2 mrem/yr during the maintenance period. These values may be compared with the background dose in Missouri of 120 mrem/yr.

  19. Does intuition cause cooperation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.P.J.L. Verkoeijen (Peter); S. Bouwmeester (Samantha)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractRecently, researchers claimed that people are intuitively inclined to cooperate with reflection causing them to behave selfishly. Empirical support for this claim came from experiments using a 4-player public goods game with a marginal return of 0.5 showing that people contributed more

  20. Landslides - Cause and effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radbruch-Hall, D. H.; Varnes, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    Landslides can cause seismic disturbances; landslides can also result from seismic disturbances, and earthquake-induced slides have caused loss of life in many countries. Slides can cause disastrous flooding, particularly when landslide dams across streams are breached, and flooding may trigger slides. Slope movement in general is a major process of the geologic environment that places constraints on engineering development. In order to understand and foresee both the causes and effects of slope movement, studies must be made on a regional scale, at individual sites, and in the laboratory. Areal studies - some embracing entire countries - have shown that certain geologic conditions on slopes facilitate landsliding; these conditions include intensely sheared rocks; poorly consolidated, fine-grained clastic rocks; hard fractured rocks underlain by less resistant rocks; or loose accumulations of fine-grained surface debris. Field investigations as well as mathematical- and physical-model studies are increasing our understanding of the mechanism of slope movement in fractured rock, and assist in arriving at practical solutions to landslide problems related to all kinds of land development for human use. Progressive failure of slopes has been studied in both soil and rock mechanics. New procedures have been developed to evaluate earthquake response of embankments and slopes. The finite element method of analysis is being extensively used in the calculation of slope stability in rock broken by joints, faults, and other discontinuities. ?? 1976 International Association of Engineering Geology.

  1. [What causes English sweats?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimar, Yossi

    2004-09-01

    English sweating disease also known as Sudor Anglicus is one of the least familiar epidemics of the Middle Ages, striking England 5 times during the 15th and 16th centuries before fading. This article will discuss the knowledge available to us about this fascinating epidemic, its characteristics and causes.

  2. Tagged vulture causes concerns

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-09-15

    Sep 15, 2008 ... student from the Department of Ecology,. Evolution and. Behaviour at the. Tagged vulture causes concerns. Hebrew University of Jerusalem, working under Professor Ran Nathan and studying the movement and ... in a proliferation of feral dogs, wolves and particularly Golden Jackals (which are extremely ...

  3. EAMJ March -Causes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    iMac User

    2008-03-01

    Mar 1, 2008 ... Ireland and Qatar (4,5). However, Larsen et al in a study in The Netherlands and Denmark described the peak of injury to be in teenagers (6). These were largely due to recreational causes. This difference could be attributed to presence of less work place- related injuries which usually occur among older.

  4. Darwin's Sacred Cause

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    of scholarly specialists and been appropriated by money makers. One could not help thinking about this as, in the autumn of 2008, the publisher began hyping Darwin's Sacred Cause as ‘one of the major contributions to the worldwide Darwin anniversary celebrations in 2009' Udgivelsesdato: February...

  5. Aliteracy : causes and solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielen, Thijs Martinus Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The reading motivation of the majority of students declines in the upper half of primary school, which implies a risk for aliteracy: Students can read but, due to lack of practice, their skills remain underdeveloped (Chapter 2). In this thesis we have explored causes and solutions for this important

  6. Tracing Actual Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-08

    drunken pilot, a system failure, or a maintenance lapse?”. This kind of deter- mination is of interest in many fields, ranging from philoso- phy to law...describe the vocabulary with which we express causative and caused events. A primitive event is an assertion of the form X = x, where X ∈ V and x ∈ R(X). An

  7. What Causes Rainbows?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, John

    2004-01-01

    If one looks at a rain cloud with the Sun behind one's back, the sunlight and water drops may interact just right, revealing the familiar arc of red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet. Many of people have been pleasantly surprised to see a rainbow in the sky, but probably have not considered why they occur. Rainbows are caused by…

  8. Unusual cause of Coma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Confusion and reduced levels of consciousness are a common cause of admission to medical wards ... of 50% glucose. She regained consciousness, but remained confused and uncommunicative. ... The main features on examination were: puffy face; slow and slurred speech; no axillary hair; supine pulse rate ...

  9. Teacher Dismissal for Cause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Brad; Schumacher, Gary; Hammonds, Craig

    2013-01-01

    This case presents a discussion of events that led to the dismissal of a teacher for cause. A first year high school principal is confronted with teacher behavior that creates a dangerous situation for students. The decision process to determine the appropriate organizational response involves a number of individuals and systems. The…

  10. What Causes Hemophilia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... methods of screening and treating donated blood, the risk of getting an infectious disease from human clotting factors is very small. ... that cause HIV/AIDS and hepatitis. However, the risk of getting an infectious disease from human clotting factors is very small ...

  11. Fighting a lost cause

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mario Haaf

    2015-01-01

    This essay claims that the declared war on drugs has failed, it has caused more harm than good, and that a new approach is necessary. The focus of analysis lays especially on the implemented drug policies of Mexico and the United States. The goal is to point out the flaws of the current policy based

  12. SU-D-204-02: BED Consistent Extrapolation of Mean Dose Tolerances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perko, Z; Bortfeld, T; Hong, T; Wolfgang, J; Unkelbach, J [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The safe use of radiotherapy requires the knowledge of tolerable organ doses. For experimental fractionation schemes (e.g. hypofractionation) these are typically extrapolated from traditional fractionation schedules using the Biologically Effective Dose (BED) model. This work demonstrates that using the mean dose in the standard BED equation may overestimate tolerances, potentially leading to unsafe treatments. Instead, extrapolation of mean dose tolerances should take the spatial dose distribution into account. Methods: A formula has been derived to extrapolate mean physical dose constraints such that they are mean BED equivalent. This formula constitutes a modified BED equation where the influence of the spatial dose distribution is summarized in a single parameter, the dose shape factor. To quantify effects we analyzed 14 liver cancer patients previously treated with proton therapy in 5 or 15 fractions, for whom also photon IMRT plans were available. Results: Our work has two main implications. First, in typical clinical plans the dose distribution can have significant effects. When mean dose tolerances are extrapolated from standard fractionation towards hypofractionation they can be overestimated by 10–15%. Second, the shape difference between photon and proton dose distributions can cause 30–40% differences in mean physical dose for plans having the same mean BED. The combined effect when extrapolating proton doses to mean BED equivalent photon doses in traditional 35 fraction regimens resulted in up to 7–8 Gy higher doses than when applying the standard BED formula. This can potentially lead to unsafe treatments (in 1 of the 14 analyzed plans the liver mean dose was above its 32 Gy tolerance). Conclusion: The shape effect should be accounted for to avoid unsafe overestimation of mean dose tolerances, particularly when estimating constraints for hypofractionated regimens. In addition, tolerances established for a given treatment modality cannot

  13. Isobio software: biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram from physical dose conversion using linear-quadratic-linear model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tanwiwat Jaikuna; Phatchareewan Khadsiri; Nisa Chawapun; Suwit Saekho; Ekkasit Tharavichitkul

    2017-01-01

      Purpose: To develop an in-house software program that is able to calculate and generate the biological dose distribution and biological dose volume histogram by physical dose conversion using the linear-quadratic-linear (LQL) model...

  14. Haematological evaluation of Wistar rats exposed to chronic doses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cadmium and mercury present in the environment, cause blood disorders. This study was conducted to evaluate the influence of cadmium, mercury and their combination on hematological parameters of Wistar rats. For this purpose, two different doses of each metal and their combination were administered orally for 28 ...

  15. Image quality and radiation dose in cardiac imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Joris David

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is a major cause of death accounting for 8% of all deaths in the Netherlands. This disease can be detected in an early stage by cardiac imaging. However, this detection comes at the price of a relatively high radiation dose which is potentially harmful for the patient.

  16. Dose assessments for SFR 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, Ulla (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)); Avila, Rodolfo; Ekstroem, Per-Anders; Cruz, Idalmis de la (Facilia AB, Bromma (Sweden))

    2008-06-15

    Following a review by the Swedish regulatory authorities of the safety analysis of the SFR 1 disposal facility for low and intermediate level waste, SKB has prepared an updated safety analysis, SAR-08. This report presents estimations of annual doses to the most exposed groups from potential radionuclide releases from the SFR 1 repository for a number of calculation cases, selected using a systematic approach for identifying relevant scenarios for the safety analysis. The dose estimates can be used for demonstrating that the long term safety of the repository is in compliance with the regulatory requirements. In particular, the mean values of the annual doses can be used to estimate the expected risks to the most exposed individuals, which can then be compared with the regulatory risk criteria for human health. The conversion from doses to risks is performed in the main report. For one scenario however, where the effects of an earthquake taking place close to the repository are analysed, risk calculations are presented in this report. In addition, prediction of concentrations of radionuclides in environmental media, such as water and soil, are compared with concentration limits suggested by the Erica-project as a base for estimating potential effects on the environment. The assessment of the impact on non-human biota showed that the potential impact is negligible. Committed collective dose for an integration period of 10,000 years for releases occurring during the first thousand years after closure are also calculated. The collective dose commitment was estimated to be 8 manSv. The dose calculations were carried out for a period of 100,000 years, which was sufficient to observe peak doses in all scenarios considered. Releases to the landscape and to a well were considered. The peaks of the mean annual doses from releases to the landscape are associated with C-14 releases to a future lake around year 5,000 AD. In the case of releases to a well, the peak annual doses

  17. Dose-dependent headache response and dilatation of limb and extracranial arteries after three doses of 5-isosorbide-mononitrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Nielsen, T H; Garre, K

    1992-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the ability of different doses of isosorbide-5-mononitrate (5-ISMN) to cause dilatation of medium sized and small arteries, and to examine the intensity and duration of any headache produced. Ten healthy volunteers each received 3 doses of 5-ISMN...... and placebo on separate days. The diameters of the radial and superficial temporal arteries were repeatedly measured with high frequency ultrasound and pain was scored using a 10 point verbal scale. A clear dose-relationship was found for plasma concentrations and headache, and for changes in the diameter...... of the temporal artery, but not for the radial artery. It is concluded that headache after 5-ISMN is caused by arterial dilatation or by mechanisms responsible for the arterial dilatation. Ultrasound monitoring of arterial diameters is an important and sensitive tool in the evaluation of nitrates and other...

  18. Comparison of the dose results in whole body and thyroid caused by {sup 131} I using the software AIDE, DOSINT and ACCUSCAN; Comparacion de los resultados de dosis en cuerpo entero y tiroides causada por {sup 131} I utilizando los softwares AIDE, DOSINT y ACCUSCAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintero P, E.; Alfaro L, M.M. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: eqp@nuclear.inin.mx

    2006-07-01

    Due to the sharp incorporation of 3.7 MBq of {sup 131} I via oral for a patient, with the purpose of obtaining a thyroid gamma gram, it makes later a pursuit on to carry out the calculation of effective dose committed using the software AIDE, DOSINT and Accuscan that possesses the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) and to compare the results of these. For this study it was carried out a pursuit of the biokinetic behavior of the radioisotope in the patient's body, measuring the activity with a whole-body counter of vertical sweeping, Canberra, model Accuscan Canberra trademark. The calibration of the system it was carried out using a RMC-II Canberra trademark phantom. The patient was accounted to different intervals of time starting from April 5 up to June 30, 2005. The Accuscan II program Canberra trademark, it was acquired with the whole-body system in 1992 by the ININ. The DOSINT program was elaborated by the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards of Mexico and proportionate to the ININ in 2000. So much the DOSINT program as the Accuscan are based on the ICRP-26/30. The AIDE program was provided by the IAEA through the project IAEA-ARCAL-RLA/9/049-LXXVII - Harmonization of procedures of internal dosimetry in 2005. This program is based on the ICRP-78. The present activity in the urine was measured later starting from the third day of the incorporation of {sup 131} I to different intervals of time until the 87 th day. The measurements were carried out using a gamma spectrometer with a Ge Hp detector and beryllium window, with 27.4% of relative efficiency and graduate armor-plating. The calibration of the system it was carried out using a multi nuclides pattern packed in Marinelli geometry of 0.5 L, prepared by the Laboratory of Radioactive Patterns (LPR) of the INlN starting from a certified solution. (Author)

  19. Multiple indicators, multiple causes measurement error models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekwe, Carmen D; Carter, Randy L; Cullings, Harry M; Carroll, Raymond J

    2014-11-10

    Multiple indicators, multiple causes (MIMIC) models are often employed by researchers studying the effects of an unobservable latent variable on a set of outcomes, when causes of the latent variable are observed. There are times, however, when the causes of the latent variable are not observed because measurements of the causal variable are contaminated by measurement error. The objectives of this paper are as follows: (i) to develop a novel model by extending the classical linear MIMIC model to allow both Berkson and classical measurement errors, defining the MIMIC measurement error (MIMIC ME) model; (ii) to develop likelihood-based estimation methods for the MIMIC ME model; and (iii) to apply the newly defined MIMIC ME model to atomic bomb survivor data to study the impact of dyslipidemia and radiation dose on the physical manifestations of dyslipidemia. As a by-product of our work, we also obtain a data-driven estimate of the variance of the classical measurement error associated with an estimate of the amount of radiation dose received by atomic bomb survivors at the time of their exposure. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Radiation dose monitoring in the clinical routine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guberina, Nika [UK Essen (Germany). Radiology

    2017-04-15

    Here we describe the first clinical experiences regarding the use of an automated radiation dose management software to monitor the radiation dose of patients during routine examinations. Many software solutions for monitoring radiation dose have emerged in the last decade. The continuous progress in radiological techniques, new scan features, scanner generations and protocols are the primary challenge for radiation dose monitoring software systems. To simulate valid dose calculations, radiation dose monitoring systems have to follow current trends and stay constantly up-to-date. The dose management software is connected to all devices at our institute and conducts automatic data acquisition and radiation dose calculation. The system incorporates 18 virtual phantoms based on the Cristy phantom family, estimating doses in newborns to adults. Dose calculation relies on a Monte Carlo simulation engine. Our first practical experiences demonstrate that the software is capable of dose estimation in the clinical routine. Its implementation and use have some limitations that can be overcome. The software is promising and allows assessment of radiation doses, like organ and effective doses according to ICRP 60 and ICRP 103, patient radiation dose history and cumulative radiation doses. Furthermore, we are able to determine local diagnostic reference doses. The radiation dose monitoring software systems can facilitate networking between hospitals and radiological departments, thus refining radiation doses and implementing reference doses at substantially lower levels.

  1. 40 CFR Table 10 to Subpart Wwww of... - Data Requirements for New and Existing Continuous Lamination Lines and Continuous Casting Lines...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Line Basis 10 Table 10 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 10 Table 10 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Data Requirements for...

  2. 40 CFR Table 12 to Subpart Wwww of... - Data Requirements for New and Existing Continuous Lamination Lines and Continuous Casting Lines...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... on a Per Line Basis 12 Table 12 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 12 Table 12 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Data...

  3. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Wwww of... - Organic HAP Emissions Limits for Existing Open Molding Sources, New Open Molding Sources Emitting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Table 3 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Organic HAP Emissions Limits for...

  4. 40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart Jjj of... - Operating Parameters for Which Levels Are Required To Be Established for Continuous and Batch...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 8 Table 8 to Subpart JJJ of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY.... 63, Subpt. JJJ, Table 8 Table 8 to Subpart JJJ of Part 63—Operating Parameters for Which Levels Are...

  5. 7 CFR Exhibit B-3 to Subpart B of... - Letter for Notifying Applicants, Lender, Holders and Borrowers of Adverse Decisions Where the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Farmer Program Primary Loan Servicing Actions) B Exhibit B-3 to Subpart B of Part 1900 Agriculture... GENERAL Adverse Decisions and Administrative Appeals Pt. 1900, Subpt. B, Exh. B-3 Exhibit B-3 to Subpart B...

  6. Analysis of patient CT dose data using virtualdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Richard

    -Expo for organ dose difference versus age, male phantoms show percent difference of -19 % to 25 % for various organs minus bone surface and breast tissues results. Finally, for organ dose difference across all software for average adult phantom the results range from -45 % to 6 % in the comparison of ImPACT CT to VirtualDose and -27 % to 66 % for the comparison of CT-Expo to VirtualDose. In the comparison for increased BMI (done only in VirtualDose), results show that with all other parameters fixed, the organ dose goes down as BMI increases, which is due to the increase in adipose tissue and bulk of the patient model. The range of results when comparing all the three softwares have a wide range, in some cases greater than 150 %, it is evident that using a different anatomical basis for the human phantom and the theoretical basis for the dose estimation will cause fluctuation in the results. Therefore, choosing the software with the most accurate human phantom will provide a closer range to the true dose to the organ.

  7. Fluzone High-Dose Seasonal Influenza Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Variant Pandemic Other Fluzone High-Dose Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Questions & Answers Language: English (US) Español Recommend on ... flu season. What is Fluzone High-Dose influenza vaccine? Fluzone High-Dose is an influenza vaccine, manufactured ...

  8. Radiological dose assessment for vault storage concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, R.F.

    1997-02-25

    This radiological dose assessment presents neutron and photon dose rates in support of project W-460. Dose rates are provided for a single 3013 container, the ``infloor`` storage vault concept, and the ``cubicle`` storage vault concept.

  9. Labor Informality: General Causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Sandoval Betancour

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the main causes of labor informality in order to verify the validity of classical theories that explain unemployment in market economies and its relationship to informality. Methodologically, the project was based, in the empirical part, on international statistics, comparing the evolution of labor market structure in a combined sample of highly industrialized countries and other less industrialized ones. Empirical evidence supports the conclusion that the classical economic theory of Marxist origin is inefficient to explain the causes of unemployment in contemporary market economies, as well as it fails to satisfactorily explain informality. On the contrary, we conclude that the theory in question is more relevant to explain informality in centrally planned economies where this phenomenon has been present even more significantly than in free market economies.

  10. Hacking for a cause

    OpenAIRE

    Still, Brian

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the concept of hacktivism, which is hacking for a political or social cause on the Internet. Generally hackers, even those hacking government–sponsored sites, have been negatively stereotyped as malicious thrill seekers or, worse yet, cyberterrorists. But increasingly there are more politically motivated hackers distancing themselves from cyberterrorism by engaging in hacktivism that is intent more upon disruption than disobedience. Certain hacktivists, in fact, have creat...

  11. What causes violent crime?

    OpenAIRE

    Loayza, Norman

    1998-01-01

    This study uses a new data set of crime ratesfor a large sample of countriesfor the period 1970- 1994, based on information from the United Nations World Crime Surveys, to ana/yze the determinants ofnational homicide and robbery rates. A simple model of the incentives to commit crimes is proposed, which explicit/y considers possible causes of the persistence of crime over time (criminal inertia). Several econometric mode/s are estimated, attempting to capture the . determinonts...

  12. Causes autocracy in Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Kopylov, Alexei; Kopylova, Elena

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyzes the causes of the existing Russian autocratic management system. The analysis is based on a Marxist materialist conception of history, expressed postulates “politics is the concentrated expression of economics” and “social existence determines the consciousness of men”. The social existence of stable autocratic form of government in modern Russia is due corresponding to this form of government economic base.

  13. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Wwwwww... - Table 1 to Subpart WWWWWW of Part 63. Applicability of General Provisions to Plating and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... Applicability of General Provisions to Plating and Polishing Area Sources 1 Table 1 to Subpart WWWWWW of Part 63. Applicability of General Provisions to Plating and Polishing Area Sources Protection of Environment... Pollutants: Area Source Standards for Plating and Polishing Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWWWW, Table 1 Table 1...

  14. AGING FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.L. Thacker

    2005-03-24

    The purpose of this calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel working in the Aging Facility performing operations to transfer aging casks to the aging pads for thermal and logistical management, stage empty aging casks, and retrieve aging casks from the aging pads for further processing in other site facilities. Doses received by workers due to aging cask surveillance and maintenance operations are also included. The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers both collective doses and individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation from normal operation. There are no Category 1 event sequences associated with the Aging Facility (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167268], Section 7.2.1). The results of this calculation will be used to support the design of the Aging Facility and to provide occupational dose estimates for the License Application. The calculations contained in this document were developed by Environmental and Nuclear Engineering of the Design and Engineering Organization and are intended solely for the use of the Design and Engineering Organization in its work regarding facility operation. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering should be consulted before use of the calculations for purposes other than those stated herein or use by individuals other than authorized personnel in Environmental and Nuclear Engineering.

  15. Efficacy and safety of single and double doses of ivermectin versus 7-day high dose albendazole for chronic strongyloidiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yupin Suputtamongkol

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloidiasis, caused by an intestinal helminth Strongyloides stercoralis, is common throughout the tropics. It remains an important health problem due to autoinfection, which may result in hyperinfection and disseminated infection in immunosuppressed patients, especially patients receiving chemotherapy or corticosteroid treatment. Ivermectin and albendazole are effective against strongyloidiasis. However, the efficacy and the most effective dosing regimen are to be determined.A prospective, randomized, open study was conducted in which a 7-day course of oral albendazole 800 mg daily was compared with a single dose (200 microgram/kilogram body weight, or double doses, given 2 weeks apart, of ivermectin in Thai patients with chronic strongyloidiasis. Patients were followed-up with 2 weeks after initiation of treatment, then 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 9 months, and 1 year after treatment. Combination of direct microscopic examination of fecal smear, formol-ether concentration method, and modified Koga agar plate culture were used to detect strongyloides larvae in two consecutive fecal samples in each follow-up visit. The primary endpoint was clearance of strongyloides larvae from feces after treatment and at one year follow-up.Ninety patients were included in the analysis (30, 31 and 29 patients in albendazole, single dose, and double doses ivermectin group, respectively. All except one patient in this study had at least one concomitant disease. Diabetes mellitus, systemic lupus erythrematosus, nephrotic syndrome, hematologic malignancy, solid tumor and human immunodeficiency virus infection were common concomitant diseases in these patients. The median (range duration of follow-up were 19 (2-76 weeks in albendazole group, 39 (2-74 weeks in single dose ivermectin group, and 26 (2-74 weeks in double doses ivermectin group. Parasitological cure rate were 63.3%, 96.8% and 93.1% in albendazole, single dose oral ivermectin, and double doses of

  16. Monte Carlo study of radiation dose enhancement by gadolinium in megavoltage and high dose rate radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel G Zhang

    Full Text Available MRI is often used in tumor localization for radiotherapy treatment planning, with gadolinium (Gd-containing materials often introduced as a contrast agent. Motexafin gadolinium is a novel radiosensitizer currently being studied in clinical trials. The nanoparticle technologies can target tumors with high concentration of high-Z materials. This Monte Carlo study is the first detailed quantitative investigation of high-Z material Gd-induced dose enhancement in megavoltage external beam photon therapy. BEAMnrc, a radiotherapy Monte Carlo simulation package, was used to calculate dose enhancement as a function of Gd concentration. Published phase space files for the TrueBeam flattening filter free (FFF and conventional flattened 6MV photon beams were used. High dose rate (HDR brachytherapy with Ir-192 source was also investigated as a reference. The energy spectra difference caused a dose enhancement difference between the two beams. Since the Ir-192 photons have lower energy yet, the photoelectric effect in the presence of Gd leads to even higher dose enhancement in HDR. At depth of 1.8 cm, the percent mean dose enhancement for the FFF beam was 0.38±0.12, 1.39±0.21, 2.51±0.34, 3.59±0.26, and 4.59±0.34 for Gd concentrations of 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg/mL, respectively. The corresponding values for the flattened beam were 0.09±0.14, 0.50±0.28, 1.19±0.29, 1.68±0.39, and 2.34±0.24. For Ir-192 with direct contact, the enhanced were 0.50±0.14, 2.79±0.17, 5.49±0.12, 8.19±0.14, and 10.80±0.13. Gd-containing materials used in MRI as contrast agents can also potentially serve as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy. This study demonstrates that Gd can be used to enhance radiation dose in target volumes not only in HDR brachytherapy, but also in 6 MV FFF external beam radiotherapy, but higher than the currently used clinical concentration (>5 mg/mL would be needed.

  17. Monte Carlo study of radiation dose enhancement by gadolinium in megavoltage and high dose rate radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Daniel G; Feygelman, Vladimir; Moros, Eduardo G; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey G

    2014-01-01

    MRI is often used in tumor localization for radiotherapy treatment planning, with gadolinium (Gd)-containing materials often introduced as a contrast agent. Motexafin gadolinium is a novel radiosensitizer currently being studied in clinical trials. The nanoparticle technologies can target tumors with high concentration of high-Z materials. This Monte Carlo study is the first detailed quantitative investigation of high-Z material Gd-induced dose enhancement in megavoltage external beam photon therapy. BEAMnrc, a radiotherapy Monte Carlo simulation package, was used to calculate dose enhancement as a function of Gd concentration. Published phase space files for the TrueBeam flattening filter free (FFF) and conventional flattened 6MV photon beams were used. High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with Ir-192 source was also investigated as a reference. The energy spectra difference caused a dose enhancement difference between the two beams. Since the Ir-192 photons have lower energy yet, the photoelectric effect in the presence of Gd leads to even higher dose enhancement in HDR. At depth of 1.8 cm, the percent mean dose enhancement for the FFF beam was 0.38±0.12, 1.39±0.21, 2.51±0.34, 3.59±0.26, and 4.59±0.34 for Gd concentrations of 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg/mL, respectively. The corresponding values for the flattened beam were 0.09±0.14, 0.50±0.28, 1.19±0.29, 1.68±0.39, and 2.34±0.24. For Ir-192 with direct contact, the enhanced were 0.50±0.14, 2.79±0.17, 5.49±0.12, 8.19±0.14, and 10.80±0.13. Gd-containing materials used in MRI as contrast agents can also potentially serve as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy. This study demonstrates that Gd can be used to enhance radiation dose in target volumes not only in HDR brachytherapy, but also in 6 MV FFF external beam radiotherapy, but higher than the currently used clinical concentration (>5 mg/mL) would be needed.

  18. Root cause analysis of prescription opioid overdoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzyniak, Kelly M; Sabo, Alex; McDonald, Ann; Trudeau, Jeremiah J; Poulose, Mon; Brown, Mary; Katz, Nathaniel P

    2015-01-01

    Overdoses (ODs) of prescription opioids (RxOs) have become a major public health issue in the United States. To determine the root causes of accidental prescription opioid overdoses (RxO-OD). The authors conducted a root cause analysis using the Antecedent Target-Measurement method, interviewing three types of key informants: survivors of RxO-ODs, family members, and clinical experts. Ten survivors, five family members, and three experts were interviewed. Proximal causes of RxO-ODs described by survivors and family members were recent RxO dose escalation (n = 9), polysubstance use (n = 5), and polypharmacy use (n = 3). Proximal causes were elicited by the following six antecedent causes: wanting to feel good/high (n = 9), perceived tolerance to RxO (n = 6), didn't know/believe it was dangerous (n = 5), wanting to reduce psychosocial pain (n = 5), wanting to reduce physical pain (n = 4), and wanting to avoid discomfort due to withdrawal symptoms (n = 4). RxOs involved in the OD were either prescribed by a doctor (n = 7), purchased from a dealer (n = 6), given/purchased from family/friends (n = 3), or stolen from family (n = 1). Psychosocial stressors (n = 9), chronic recurrent depression (n = 3), and chronic substance abuse/addiction (n = 4) were also distal and proximal causes of OD. Experts cited similar causes but added prescriberrelated causes (eg, inadequate training) and healthcare system and culture. Patients at risk for OD can be identified and ODs potentially prevented. Opportunities for intervention include routine screening of patients using RxOs for psychosocial distress and coping, flagging of high-risk patients, care pathways for high-risk patients, clinician and patient training on OD prevention, and developing abuse-deterrent formulations of RxOs.

  19. 40 CFR 63.1947 - When do I have to comply with this subpart if I own or operate a bioreactor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... subpart if I own or operate a bioreactor? 63.1947 Section 63.1947 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... or operate a bioreactor? You must comply with this subpart by the dates specified in § 63.1945(a) or (b) of this subpart. If you own or operate a bioreactor located at a landfill that is not permanently...

  20. The Effect of High Dose Radioiodine Therapy on Formation of Radiation Retinopathy During Thyroid Cancer Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Tülay Kaçar Güvel; Sezer Özkan; Müge Öner Tamam

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Non-thyroidal complication of high-dose radioiodine therapy for thyroid carcinoma might cause salivary and lacrimal gland dysfunction, which may be transient or permanent in a dose-dependent manner. However, radiation retinopathy complicating 131I therapy, has not been previously well characterized. The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent of retinal damage among patients who had received high doses of radioiodine treatment. Methods: Forty eyes of 20 patients (3 male, 17 fe...

  1. On line high dose static position monitoring by ionization chamber detector for industrial gamma irradiators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Ary A. [Universidade Estadual de Londrina-Depto de Fisica, Rodovia Celso Garcia Cid, km 38, 086051-990 Londrina (Brazil); Vieira, Jose M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares-IPEN/CNEN-SP, Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242-Cidade Universitaria, 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Hamada, Margarida M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares-IPEN/CNEN-SP, Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242-Cidade Universitaria, 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)], E-mail: mmhamada@ipen.br

    2010-04-15

    A 1 cm{sup 3} cylindrical ionization chamber was developed to measure high doses on line during the sample irradiation in static position, in a {sup 60}Co industrial plant. The developed ionization chamber showed to be suitable for use as a dosimeter on line. A good linearity of the detector was found between the dose and the accumulated charge, independently of the different dose rates caused by absorbing materials.

  2. New observations on chronic intoxication by very small doses of sodium fluosilicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristiani, H.; Chausse, P.

    1927-01-01

    It was determined that daily doses of approximately 0.1 of the lethal dose of sodium fluoride produced a fluoric cachexia in guinea pigs which caused the death of the animals in 2 or 3 months. Animals which were given 0.02 of the lethal dose of sodium fluoride were apparently in good health for a period of 10 months. However, after two or three years cachexia was likely to appear.

  3. Radiation-induced heart disease: review of experimental data on dose response and pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz-Hector, S. (Institut fuer Strahlenbiologie, Neuherberg (Germany))

    1992-02-01

    Clinical and experimental heart irradiation can cause a variety of sequelae. A single dose of {>=} 15 Gy leads to a reversible exudative pericarditis, occurring in dogs, rabbits or rats at around 100 days. Its time-course is very similar in all species investigated, but there are considerable species and strain differences in severity and incidence. After longer, dose-dependent latency times chronic congestive myocardial failure develops. The paper reviews experimental data concerning dose response and pathogenesis. (author).

  4. Ischemia causes muscle fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ischemia, which reduces oxygenation in the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle, causes a reduction in muscle force production. In eight subjects, muscle oxygenation (TO2) of the right ECR was measured noninvasively and continuously using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while muscle twitch force was elicited by transcutaneous electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 0.1 ms). Baseline measurements of blood volume, muscle oxygenation and twitch force were recorded continuously, then a tourniquet on the upper arm was inflated to one of five different pressure levels: 20, 40, 60 mm Hg (randomized order) and diastolic (69 +/- 9.8 mm Hg) and systolic (106 +/- 12.8 mm Hg) blood pressures. Each pressure level was maintained for 3-5 min, and was followed by a recovery period sufficient to allow measurements to return to baseline. For each respective tourniquet pressure level, mean TO2 decreased from resting baseline (100% TO2) to 99 +/- 1.2% (SEM), 96 +/- 1.9%, 93 +/- 2.8%, 90 +/- 2.5%, and 86 +/- 2.7%, and mean twitch force decreased from resting baseline (100% force) to 99 +/- 0.7% (SEM), 96 +/- 2.7%, 93 +/- 3.1%, 88 +/- 3.2%, and 86 +/- 2.6%. Muscle oxygenation and twitch force at 60 mm Hg tourniquet compression and above were significantly lower (P muscle oxygenation (r = 0.78, P muscle oxygenation causes decreased muscle force production in the forearm extensor muscle. Thus, ischemia associated with a modest decline in TO2 causes muscle fatigue.

  5. Do dose area product meter measurements reflect radiation doses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    accurately measures the radiation emitted from the source. The study included the interventional radiolo ... mined as most sensitive to radiation. The use of a thyroid guard also decreases the effective dose by approx- ... al radiation is necessary. Thermo- luminescent dosimetry is used to measure radiation and the apparatus.

  6. Penicillium species causing onychomycosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramani R

    1994-04-01

    Full Text Available Onychomycosis caused by mould infection is rare. A 40 year old male patient presented with dystrophic finger nails and multiple, erythematous lesions with slightly raised borders and scaling all over the body. The patient was a known diabetic. He did not respond to griseofulvin. Samples from nails and skin scales were cultured. From the nails, Penicillium species and from the skin scales. Trichophyton rubrum were isolated. Ketoconazole therapy (200 mg twice daily x 4 mths led to complete cure with negative cultures and normalization of nails.

  7. Hypocalcaemia: Causes, diagnostics and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypocalcaemia is a state with total calcium serum level below 2.25 mM/l. From the total serum calcium content, 50% is free and ionized, 40% is protein-bound and 10% is bound for organic anions. The most frequent causes of hypocalcaemia are iatrogenic hypoparathyroidism, magnesium deficit, disorders of vitamin D metabolism and chronic renal failure. Iatrogenic hypoparathyroidism is associated with low serum ionized calcium and low serum parathormone levels. There are two important clinical signs of hypocalcemia: Chvostek's sign (twitches of upper lip after percussion on facial nerve over mandible and Trousseau's sign (carpal spasm after increasing pressure in blood pressure cuff placed about the upper arm for 20 milimeters above systolic pressure for 3-5 minutes. The following lab analyses should be performed when hypocalcaemia is an option: serum levels of creatinine, calcium, magnesium, 25 - hydroxyvitamin, parathormone, potassium, sodium, chloride and bicarbonates. If hypocalcaemia is mild, it could be treated with oral calcium preparations, usually calcium carbonate, in a dose of 1 to 2 grams of elemental calcium daily. In more severe hypocalcaemia intravenous calcium-gluconate or calcium-chloride should be administered, as 10% solutions. These parenteral preparations of calcium should be diluted prior to the intravenous administration, and the administration should be longer than 20 minutes in order to avoid adverse effects on heart. If administration of calcium does not correct hypocalcaemia, oral vitamin D should be also prescribed. If this does not regulate calcaemia, from 0.25 to 1 micrograms of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (clacitriol daily should be prescribed. Calcium serum levels should be kept within the lower part of normal serum concentration range.

  8. Performance standard for dose Calibrator

    CERN Document Server

    Darmawati, S

    2002-01-01

    Dose calibrator is an instrument used in hospitals to determine the activity of radionuclide for nuclear medicine purposes. International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) has published IEC 1303:1994 standard that can be used as guidance to test the performance of the instrument. This paper briefly describes content of the document,as well as explains the assessment that had been carried out to test the instrument accuracy in Indonesia through intercomparison measurement.Its is suggested that hospitals acquire a medical physicist to perform the test for its dose calibrator. The need for performance standard in the form of Indonesia Standard is also touched.

  9. Routine High Dose Excretory Urography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronner, Arthur T.; Arkoff, Robert S.; Burhenne, H. Joachim

    1967-01-01

    Radiologic evaluation of 316 excretory urograms utilizing a single 50 ml injection of a 50 to 60 per cent tri-iodinated contrast medium indicated that these studies are of better quality than those previously obtained with the injection of 30 ml. The low incidence of side effects coincides with recent reports in the literature that this dosage level is safe. High dose intravenous drip infusion pyelography was necessary only in selected cases. High dose excretory urography is recommended for routine use. ImagesFigure 1A, 1BFigure 2. PMID:6045483

  10. Confectionery-based dose forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangso, Kristian J; Ho, Quy Phuong; Boyd, Ben J

    2015-01-01

    Conventional dosage forms such as tablets, capsules and syrups are prescribed in the normal course of practice. However, concerns about patient preferences and market demands have given rise to the exploration of novel unconventional dosage forms. Among these, confectionery-based dose forms have strong potential to overcome compliance problems. This report will review the availability of these unconventional dose forms used in treating the oral cavity and for systemic drug delivery, with a focus on medicated chewing gums, medicated lollipops, and oral bioadhesive devices. The aim is to stimulate increased interest in the opportunities for innovative new products that are available to formulators in this field, particularly for atypical patient populations.

  11. 7 CFR Exhibit A to Subpart A of... - Memorandum of Understanding Between Commodity Credit Corporation and Farmers Home Administration...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Corporation and Farmers Home Administration or its successor agency under Public Law 103-354 A Exhibit A to Subpart A of Part 1962 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING... Liquidation of Chattel Security Pt. 1962, Subpt. A, Exh. A Exhibit A to Subpart A of Part 1962—Memorandum of...

  12. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Ppp of... - Process Vents From Batch Unit Operations-Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and Reporting Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Subpart PPP of Part 63—Process Vents From Batch Unit Operations—Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and Reporting... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Process Vents From Batch Unit Operations-Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and Reporting Requirements 5 Table 5 to Subpart PPP of Part 63...

  13. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Ppp of... - Process Vents From Continuous Unit Operations-Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and Reporting Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Subpart PPP of Part 63—Process Vents From Continuous Unit Operations—Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Process Vents From Continuous Unit Operations-Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and Reporting Requirements 6 Table 6 to Subpart PPP of Part 63...

  14. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Ppp of... - Process Vents From Continuous Unit Operations-Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and Reporting Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Subpart PPP of Part 63—Process Vents From Continuous Unit Operations—Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Process Vents From Continuous Unit Operations-Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and Reporting Requirements 7 Table 7 to Subpart PPP of Part 63...

  15. 10 CFR Appendix U to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Ceiling Fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of Ceiling Fans U Appendix U to Subpart B of Part 430 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION... Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Ceiling Fans 1. Scope. This appendix covers the test requirements used to measure the energy performance of ceiling fans. 2...

  16. 75 FR 40849 - Implementation of Question 10 of 25 CFR Part 170, Subpart C, Indian Reservation Roads Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-14

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Implementation of Question 10 of 25 CFR Part 170, Subpart C, Indian Reservation... change in how BIA and the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) will implement Question 10 of 25 CFR Part 170, Subpart C. Question 10 determines the percentages that certain transportation facilities...

  17. 40 CFR Table F-1 to Subpart F of... - Performance Specifications for PM2.5 Class II Equivalent Samplers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Performance Specifications for PM2.5 Class II Equivalent Samplers F Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 53 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., Subpt. F, Table F-1 Table F-1 to Subpart F of Part 53—Performance Specifications for PM2.5 Class II...

  18. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Tttt of... - Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits for Determining the Allowable HAP Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Leather Finishing HAP Emission Limits for Determining the Allowable HAP Loss 2 Table 2 to Subpart TTTT of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Leather Finishing Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. TTTT, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart TTTT of Part 63—Leather...

  19. 40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart Ggg of... - Fraction Measured (Fm) for HAP Compounds in Wastewater Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Fraction Measured (Fm) for HAP Compounds in Wastewater Streams 8 Table 8 to Subpart GGG of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL.... GGG, Table 8 Table 8 to Subpart GGG of Part 63—Fraction Measured (Fm) for HAP Compounds in Wastewater...

  20. 20 CFR Appendix V to Subpart C of... - Computing the Special Minimum Primary Insurance Amount and Related Maximum Family Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Computing the Special Minimum Primary Insurance Amount and Related Maximum Family Benefits V Appendix V to Subpart C of Part 404 Employees...- ) Computing Primary Insurance Amounts Pt. 404, Subpt. C, App. V Appendix V to Subpart C of Part 404—Computing...