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Sample records for suboxic bottom water

  1. Understanding why the volume of suboxic waters does not increase over centuries of global warming in an Earth System Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gnanadesikan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Global warming is expected to reduce oxygen solubility and vertical exchange in the ocean, changes which would be expected to result in an increase in the volume of hypoxic waters. A simulation made with a full Earth System model with dynamical atmosphere, ocean, sea ice and biogeochemical cycling (the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory's Earth System Model 2.1 shows that this holds true if the condition for hypoxia is set relatively high. However, the volume of the most hypoxic (i.e., suboxic waters does not increase under global warming, as these waters actually become more oxygenated. We show that the rise in dissolved oxygen in the tropical Pacific is associated with a drop in ventilation time. A term-by-term analysis within the least oxygenated waters shows an increased supply of dissolved oxygen due to lateral diffusion compensating an increase in remineralization within these highly hypoxic waters. This lateral diffusive flux is the result of an increase of ventilation along the Chilean coast, as a drying of the region under global warming opens up a region of wintertime convection in our model. The results highlight the potential sensitivity of suboxic waters to changes in subtropical ventilation as well as the importance of constraining lateral eddy transport of dissolved oxygen in such waters.

  2. Nitrogen and oxygen isotopic composition of N sub(2)O from suboxic waters of the eastern tropical North Pacific and the Arabian Sea - measurement by continuous-flow isotope-ratio monitoring

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Yoshinari, T.; Altabet, M.A.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Codispoti, L.; Jayakumar, D.A.; Kuhland, M.; Devol, A.

    . Our observations include determinations across the oxic/suboxic boundaries that occur in the water columns of the ETNP and Arabian Sea. In these suboxic waters, the values of delta sup(15)N and delta sup(18)O increased linearly with one another...

  3. Putative ammonia-oxidizing Crenarchaeota in suboxic waters of the Black Sea: a basin-wide ecological study using 16S ribosomal and functional genes and membrane lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolen, Marco J L; Abbas, Ben; van Bleijswijk, Judith; Hopmans, Ellen C; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Wakeham, Stuart G; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S

    2007-04-01

    Within the upper 400 m at western, central and eastern stations in the world's largest stratified basin, the Black Sea, we studied the qualitative and quantitative distribution of putative nitrifying Archaea based on their genetic markers (16S rDNA, amoA encoding for the alpha-subunit of archaeal ammonia monooxygenase), and crenarchaeol, the specific glycerol diphytanyl glycerol tetraether of pelagic Crenarchaeota within the Group I.1a. Marine Crenarchaeota were the most abundant Archaea (up to 98% of the total archaeal 16S rDNA copies) in the suboxic layers with oxygen levels as low as 1 microM including layers where previously anammox bacteria were described. Different marine crenarchaeotal phylotypes (both 16S rDNA and amoA) were found at the upper part of the suboxic zone as compared with the base of the suboxic zone and the upper 15-30 m of the anoxic waters with prevailing sulfide concentrations of up to 30 microM. Crenarchaeol concentrations were higher in the sulfidic chemocline as compared with the suboxic zone. These results indicate an abundance of putative nitrifying Archaea at very low oxygen levels within the Black Sea and might form an important source of nitrite for the anammox reaction.

  4. An evaluation of physical and biogeochemical processes regulating perennial suboxic conditions in the water column of the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, V.V.S.S.

    ., J. W. Elkins, T. Yoshinari, G. E. Friederich, C. M. Saka- moto, and T. T. Packard, On the nitrous oxide flux from productive regions that contain low oxygen waters, in Oceanography of the Indian Ocean, edited by B. N. Desai, pp. 271–284, Oxford...

  5. Understanding why the volume of suboxic waters does not increase over centuries of global warming in an Earth System Model

    OpenAIRE

    A. Gnanadesikan; J. P. Dunne; J. John

    2012-01-01

    Global warming is expected to reduce oxygen solubility and vertical exchange in the ocean, changes which would be expected to result in an increase in the volume of hypoxic waters. A simulation made with a full Earth System model with dynamical atmosphere, ocean, sea ice and biogeochemical cycling (the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory's Earth System Model 2.1) shows that this holds true if the condition for hypoxia is set relatively high. However, the volume of the most hypoxic (i.e., su...

  6. Bottom Backscattering Strengths Measured in Shallow and Deep Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-18

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/7160--17-9701 Bottom Backscattering Strengths Measured in Shallow and Deep Water January...LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Bottom Backscattering Strengths Measured in Shallow and Deep Water Roger C. Gauss,1 Edward L. Kunz,1 Joseph M. Fialkowski...2 3 B2001 (SHALLOW WATER − NEW JERSEY SHELF) .............................. 4

  7. Varying bottom water oxygenation during deposition of organic-rich, bioclastic carbonates on a southern Tethys ramp (lower-middle Eocene, Tunisia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez Berrocoso, A.; Bodin, S.; Wood, J.

    2012-04-01

    Redox-sensitive and sulphide-forming metals are variably enriched in the bioclastic carbonates of the lower-middle Eocene Bou Dabbous Formation (BDFm) of north-central Tunisia. The occurrence of trace metal enrichment in sediments that contain benthic fossils is a long standing sedimentary anomaly with respect to the level of bottom water oxygenation during deposition. In the BDFm, varying levels of oxygen depletion, suggested by varying trace metal enrichment, further compounds this question. An integrated sedimentological, paleontological and geochemical study of the BDFm is underway in order to address as to what controls the magnitude and physical extend of this oxygen depletion. Up to 4 lithofacies are distinguished in the seven sections studied. Common characteristics in all of them include alternating, massive limestones and marly limestones with abundant planktonic foraminifera and common to rare phosphatic grains and disseminated pyrite. The main difference among lithofacies is the amount of benthic fossils (e.g., echinoids, bivalves, foraminifera), being higher in lithofacies 1 and 2 and lower in lithofacies 3 and 4. Lithofacies 4 is characterised by laminated fabrics with mm-thick, phosphatic laminae alternating with thicker, black bands. All lithofacies were deposited in the distal part of a ramp, with the less bioclastic lithofacies 3 and 4 representing the most distal deposits. However, a fraction of the benthic bioclasts in all lithofacies represents in situ fossil remains. Coupled with the presence of in situ benthic fossils, clear enrichment of Cr, U and V in lithofacies 2, 3 and 4 of six sections studied indicate suboxic bottom waters during their deposition. Consistent with some dissolved oxygen in bottom waters allowing seafloor colonisation by benthic organisms, these lithofacies are only moderately enriched in Mo (up to 9 ppm) and suggests a steep redox boundary close below the sediment/water interface, where anoxia could have fully developed

  8. Meiofauna metabolism in suboxic sediments: currently overestimated.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Braeckman

    Full Text Available Oxygen is recognized as a structuring factor of metazoan communities in marine sediments. The importance of oxygen as a controlling factor on meiofauna (32 µm-1 mm in size respiration rates is however less clear. Typically, respiration rates are measured under oxic conditions, after which these rates are used in food web studies to quantify the role of meiofauna in sediment carbon turnover. Sediment oxygen concentration ([O(2] is generally far from saturated, implying that (1 current estimates of the role of meiofauna in carbon cycling may be biased and (2 meiofaunal organisms need strategies to survive in oxygen-stressed environments. Two main survival strategies are often hypothesized: 1 frequent migration to oxic layers and 2 morphological adaptation. To evaluate these hypotheses, we (1 used a model of oxygen turnover in the meiofauna body as a function of ambient [O(2], and (2 performed respiration measurements at a range of [O(2] conditions. The oxygen turnover model predicts a tight coupling between ambient [O(2] and meiofauna body [O(2] with oxygen within the body being consumed in seconds. This fast turnover favors long and slender organisms in sediments with low ambient [O(2] but even then frequent migration between suboxic and oxic layers is for most organisms not a viable strategy to alleviate oxygen limitation. Respiration rates of all measured meiofauna organisms slowed down in response to decreasing ambient [O(2], with Nematoda displaying the highest metabolic sensitivity for declining [O(2] followed by Foraminifera and juvenile Gastropoda. Ostracoda showed a behavioral stress response when ambient [O(2] reached a critical level. Reduced respiration at low ambient [O(2] implies that meiofauna in natural, i.e. suboxic, sediments must have a lower metabolism than inferred from earlier respiration rates conducted under oxic conditions. The implications of these findings are discussed for the contribution of meiofauna to carbon

  9. Seasonal, sub-seasonal and spatial fluctuations in oxygen-depleted bottom waters in an embayment of an eastern boundary upwelling system: St Helena Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, G. C.; Probyn, T. A.

    2015-08-01

    The considerable impact of oxygen deficient waters on marine resources in St Helena Bay has generated interest in exploring the vulnerability of South Africa's largest and most productive bay to further deoxygenation in response to climate change. Seasonal, sub-seasonal and spatial fluctuations in bottom dissolved oxygen (DO) are examined in St Helena Bay to facilitate better interpretation of historical data. DO measurements in relation to physical, chemical and biological variables were made between November 2013 and November 2014. Alongshore bay characteristics were assessed through comparison of variables along the 50 m depth contour. A mean coefficient of variation of 0.35 provided a measure of the relative variability of near-bottom DO concentrations along this contour. Across-shelf transects captured the seasonal development of hypoxia in relation to the distribution of phytoplankton biomass. DO was lowest in autumn in the south of the bay prior to winter ventilation of the bottom waters. Exceptional dinoflagellate blooms forming extensive subsurface thin layers preceded the autumn DO minima. The development of hypoxia at inner and central stations prior to expansion beyond the boundaries of the bay provided evidence of local drawdown. Coincident with the seasonal decline of DO within the bay was an increase in macronutrient concentrations which tended to mirror DO concentrations. Indication of denitrification in the suboxic waters in the south of the bay was provided through evidence of a nitrate deficit in autumn supported by elevated nitrite concentrations. Superimposed on the seasonal decline of DO concentrations in the bottom waters were sub-seasonal events of hypoxia and anoxia linked to episodic deposition of organic matter as indicated by increases in bottom Chl a concentrations.

  10. Bottom Sediment Chemistry, Nutrient Balance, and Water Birds in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water bird characteristics, nutrient loadings, and the levels of bottom sediment silicon oxide (SiO2), aluminium oxide (Al2O3), ferric oxide (Fe2O3), calcium oxide (CaO), copper (Cu), phosphorus (P) and organic carbon (C) was studied in eight high altitude (2040-2640m) small shallow (0.065-0.249 km2; 0.9-3.1 m) ...

  11. An Analysis Model for Water Cone Subsidence in Bottom Water Drive Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianjun; Xu, Hui; Wu, Shucheng; Yang, Chao; Kong, lingxiao; Zeng, Baoquan; Xu, Haixia; Qu, Tailai

    2017-12-01

    Water coning in bottom water drive reservoirs, which will result in earlier water breakthrough, rapid increase in water cut and low recovery level, has drawn tremendous attention in petroleum engineering field. As one simple and effective method to inhibit bottom water coning, shut-in coning control is usually preferred in oilfield to control the water cone and furthermore to enhance economic performance. However, most of the water coning researchers just have been done on investigation of the coning behavior as it grows up, the reported studies for water cone subsidence are very scarce. The goal of this work is to present an analytical model for water cone subsidence to analyze the subsidence of water cone when the well shut in. Based on Dupuit critical oil production rate formula, an analytical model is developed to estimate the initial water cone shape at the point of critical drawdown. Then, with the initial water cone shape equation, we propose an analysis model for water cone subsidence in bottom water reservoir reservoirs. Model analysis and several sensitivity studies are conducted. This work presents accurate and fast analytical model to perform the water cone subsidence in bottom water drive reservoirs. To consider the recent interests in development of bottom drive reservoirs, our approach provides a promising technique for better understanding the subsidence of water cone.

  12. Spatial and temporal variability of the Black Sea suboxic zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Brian T.; Luther, George W.; Konovalov, Sergey K.; Friederich, Gernot E.; Trouwborst, Robert E.; Romanov, Alexander S.

    2006-08-01

    We coupled an in situ electrochemical analyzer to a CTD to conduct high-resolution, real-time profiling of redox species across the oxic-anoxic transition zone of the Black Sea water column. Voltammetry was performed using gold-amalgam working electrodes to measure simultaneously soluble oxygen and sulfur species (H 2S/HS -, Sx2-, S 8) at a resolution of greater than one measurement per meter. In situ data agreed with measurements made in an on-deck voltammetry flow cell coupled to a pump profiling system, and from water samples collected with conventional CTD rosette bottle casts. In situ voltammetric analyses provided rapid redox information, thus enabling more accurate targeting of specific geochemical features by the CTD rosette package. We observed much less lateral oxygen injection from the Bosphorus in 2003 (less than 95 km from Bosphorus) than in 2001 (up to 150 km). This difference can be attributed to variability in physical processes including seasonal temperature and wind variations between winter conditions (2003) and early summer conditions (2001). Furthermore, suboxic zone thickness varied basin-wide, exhibiting changes in the depth of oxygen extinction (minimum detection limit=3 μM) and sulfide onset (minimum detection limit=30 nM). The density surface for oxygen extinction was more variable than the density for the onset of sulfide. Vertical shifts in oxygen extinction and sulfide onset also were observed at the western central gyre station for seven profiles measured over 21 days in 2003.

  13. Sinking of less dense water in the bottom Ekman layer formed by a coastal downwelling current over a sloping bottom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkin, D. N.; Zatsepin, A. G.; Podymov, O. I.; Ostrovskii, A. G.

    2017-07-01

    Laboratory experiments on the dynamics of a downwelling coastal current over a sloping bottom were conducted in a tank on a rotating platform. The current was generated by a source of stable water flow of the same density (barotropic case) or of lesser density (baroclinic case) compared with the surrounding water in the tank. It was found that even in the case of the baroclinic current, a less dense water downflow in the bottom Ekman layer was formed under certain conditions. At some moment, this downflow undergoes convective instability. Taking into account the results of the experiment, the parameters of the bottom Ekman layer on the continental shelf/slope of the Black Sea were preliminarily estimated and the possible sinking depth of less dense water was calculated.

  14. Preliminary water quality assessment of Spunky Bottoms restored wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Guang; Eilts, Kristen; Kelley, Timothy R; Webb, James W

    2009-02-15

    The approximately 1200-acre "Spunky Bottoms" wetland in Southern Illinois has been undergoing restoration to conditions prior to levying of the Illinois River and draining of adjacent floodplain for intensive agriculture (circa 1900). As part of a long-term water quality impact assessment of this restoration project, baseline water quality monitoring was conducted soon after restoration began. During this baseline/preliminary assessment, water samples were taken every 2-4 weeks from 10 sampling wells and seven surface water sites throughout the wetlands area for a period of 18 months. Measured parameters include nutrients (nitrate (NO3-) and phosphate (PO4(3-)), cations and anions (SO4(2-), Cl-, Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+) commonly found in surface and well water, trace metals (Al, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, Zn), total dissolved solids (TDS), pH, and trace organics (triazine herbicides and their metabolites). In general, highest concentrations of ions were found in the southwest and northeast perimeter of the wetland area for both surface and ground water samples. Primarily low concentrations of heavy metals and organic compounds were found throughout the wetland sampling area. Distribution of NO3--N suggests that this restored wetland, even at its infant age, may still contribute to biogeochemical (particularly N) element cycling. Continued monitoring and further research is necessary to determine long-term specific contribution of restored wetland to biogeochemical cycles.

  15. Lime application methods, water and bottom soil acidity in fresh water fish ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Queiroz Julio Ferraz de

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Although some methods for determining lime requirement of pond soils are available and commonly used, there is still no consensus on whether it is more effective to apply liming materials to the bottoms of empty ponds or to wait and apply them over the water surface after ponds are filled. There is also little information on how deep lime reacts in pond sediment over time, and whether the depth of reaction is different when liming materials are applied to the water or to the soil. Therefore, three techniques for treating fish ponds with agricultural limestone were evaluated in ponds with clayey soils at a commercial fish farm. Amounts of agricultural limestone equal to the lime requirement of bottom soils were applied to each of three ponds by: direct application over the pond water surface; spread uniformly over the bottom of the empty pond; spread uniformly over the bottom of the empty pond followed by tilling of the bottom. Effectiveness of agricultural limestone applications did not differ among treatment methods. Agricultural limestone also reacted quickly to increase total alkalinity and total hardness of pond water to acceptable concentrations within 2 weeks after application. The reaction of lime to increase soil pH was essentially complete after one to two months, and lime had no effect below a soil depth of 8 cm. Tilling of pond bottoms to incorporate liming materials is unnecessary, and tilling consumes time and is an expensive practice; filled ponds can be limed effectively.

  16. The influence of suboxic diagenesis on Mn-Fe nodules from the CCFZ in the Pacific Ocean: new answers to old questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegorzewski, Anna; Kuhn, Thomas; Lückge, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Polymetallic nodules occuring between the Clarion and Clipperton Fracture Zone (CCFZ) in the equatorial Pacific are of high economic interest due to high content of metals such as Ni, Cu, Co, Mo, Li, Te and high field strength elements (REY, Ti, Hf, Nb, Ta, Zr). These Mn-Fe oxy-hydroxide precipitations consist of a complex texture of irregular, concentrically banded zones of nm to µm thick layers of different genesis. We carried out chemical and mineralogical analyses of individual layers and distribution of their metals (e.g., Ni and Cu) in order to decipher the environmental conditions of nodule formation. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measurements of the youngest outermost layers (1-3nm) which precipitated around the nodules (surface, which was in contact with near-bottom water; bottom side, which was in contact with sediment pore water; rim which show the interface between sediment and water) represent low Mn/Fe ratios (1.4-2.8), low Ni+Cu contents (0.3 to 1.9 wt%) but higher Co content (0.3-1.4 wt%) on all sides of the nodules. These results are typical for hydrogenetic grow processes under oxic conditions. Oxygen concentration measurements of ocean bottom water and pore water (within the sediments) proved that the nodules are currently growing completely under oxic conditions. Individual layers within the nodules reveal a high chemical heterogeneity. These layers are characterized by highly variable Mn/Fe ratios (3-300) with high variations of Ni+Cu content (1-5.5 wt%) and low Co contents (ventilation or even suboxic bottom waters and/or increasing bioproductivity in surface waters during glacial periods in the central Pacific Ocean initiating diagenetic growth of nodules with high Mn-Fe fractionation.

  17. Water Breakthrough Shape Description of Horizontal Wells in Bottom-Water Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijun Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal wells have been applied in bottom-water reservoir since their advantages were found on distribution of linear dropdown near wellbore, higher critical production, and more OOIP (original oil in place controlled. In the paper, one 3D visible physical model of horizontal physical model is designed and built to simulate the water cresting process during the horizontal well producing and find water breakthrough point in homogenous and heterogeneous reservoir with bottom water. Water cresting shape and water cut of horizontal well in between homogenous and heterogeneous reservoir are compared on the base of experiment’s result. The water cresting pattern of horizontal well in homogeneous reservoir can be summarized as “central breakthrough, lateral expansion, thorough flooding, and then flank uplifting.” Furthermore, a simple analysis model of horizontal well in bottom water reservoir is established and water breakthrough point is analyzed. It can be drawn from the analysis result that whether or not to consider the top and bottom border, breakthrough would be located in the middle of horizontal segment with equal flow velocity distribution.

  18. Modelling air―water flows in bottom outlets of dams

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ting

    2014-01-01

    If air is entrained in a bottom outlet of a dam in an uncontrolled way, the resulting air pockets may cause problems such as blowback, blowout and loss of discharge capacity. In order to provide guidance for bottom outlet design and operation, this study examines how governing parameters affect air entrainment, air-pocket transport and de-aeration and the surrounding flow structure in pipe flows. Both experimental and numerical approaches are used. Air can be entrained into the bottom outlet ...

  19. A Study on the Environmental Standard of Sediment on the Bottom of the Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Hee; Yoo, Hye Jin [Korea Environment Institute, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-12-01

    Sediment on the bottom of the water has been considered one of the water pollutants in the environmental management of Korea so treated as a management on pollutants, as you can see the examples in the dragging operation in the polluted sea area. To healthily maintain and conserve the water ecosystem including bottom living things in the water, sediment on the bottom of the water should be recognized as the independent medium, which should maintain the certain quality like the water, the atmosphere, and soil, rather than the source of water pollution. Such recognition means that the management of sediment on the bottom of the water should change the fragmentary goal, centered the post management focusing on the water management, to the ecosystematic goal including the bottom living things. In a point of the view, this study has a great significance to suggest not only the final goal for the management of sediment on the bottom of the water but also the necessity of developing the environmental standard of the sediment on the bottom of the water, which is a standard of the management or judgment in the actual managing the sediment on the bottom of the water - an estimation on the pollution of sediment, a removal of the polluted sediment, a purification of sediment, and an abandonment of the dragged sediment -, and the development measures. Considering the situation that even the basic scheme related to the management of sediment is not prepared in the Government level, the concept of the environmental standard of sediment, the foreign example of the environmental standard of sediment, the current state of the domestic sediment pollution, and the development scheme of the environmental standard in this study must be the important foundation to establish the management system of sediment in the Government level. 121 refs., 10 figs., 45 tabs.

  20. BOEM Seismic Water Bottom Anomalies - Gulf of Mexico - Gulf of Mexico NAD27

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — Since 1998, geoscientists at the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) have identified and mapped over 31,000 water bottom (seafloor) acoustic amplitude anomalies...

  1. Bottom depth and type for shallow waters: Hyperspectral observations from a blimp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, ZhongPing; Carder, K.; Steward, R. [Univ. of South Florida, St. Petersburg, FL (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    In a study of a blimp transect over Tampa Bay (Florida), hyperspectral upwelling radiance over the sand and seagrass bottoms was measured. These measurements were converted to hyperspectral remote-sensing reflectances. Using a shallow-water remote-sensing-reflectance model, in-water optical properties, bottom depths and bottom albedos were derived analytically and simultaneously by an optimization procedure. In the process, curvatures of sand and seagrass albedos were used. Also used was a model of absorption spectrum of phytoplankton pigments. The derived bottom depths were compared with bathymetry charts and found to agree well. This study suggests that a low-flying blimp is a useful platform for the study and mapping of coastal water environments. The optical model as well as the data-reduction procedure used are practical for the retrieval of shallow water optical properties.

  2. Effect of anaerobic conditions in bottom waters on the occurrence of red tides at omura bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, K; Iizuka, S

    1975-01-01

    The field observation that the occurrence of red tides at Omura Bay may have a close connection with the development of anoxic conditions in bottom waters was tested by bioassays of seawater collected during summer 1971. The stimulating effect of anaerobically-decomposed products of bottom mud on the growth of Gymnodinium type-'65 was examined. The results suggest that the development of oxygen deficiency in the bottom waters of Omura Bay makes the environment favourable for the growth of red tide organisms, both by the supply of inorganic nutrients and of some unidentified stimulants.

  3. Characterization of bottom-sediment, water, and elutriate chemistry at selected stations at Reelfoot Lake, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broshears, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    To better-understand and predict the potential effect of dredging on water quality at Reelfoot Lake, chemical analyses were conducted on samples of lake water, bottom sediment, and elutriate water. Chemical analyses were conducted on samples of lake water, bottom sediment, and elutriate water collected at five stations in the lake during November 1988. Lake water was of the calcium magnesium bicarbonate type with an average dissolved-solids concentration of 120 milligrams per liter. Trace constituents were present in bottom sediments at concentrations representative of their average relative abundance in the earth?s crust. Elutriate waters prepared by mixing bottom sediment and lake water had suspended-solids concentrations as high as 2,000 milligrams per liter which exerted significant oxygen demand Trace constituents in the unfiltered elutriate waters were elevated with respect to lake water; elevated concentrations were attributable to the increased suspended-solids concentrations. Concentrations of total-recoverable copper, lead., and zinc in many elutriate waters exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s water-quality criteria for the protection of freshwater aquatic life. The toxicity of elutriate waters, as measured by a 48-hour bioassay with Ceriodaphnia dubia, was low.

  4. Submarine Slope Failure Primed and Triggered by Bottom Water Warming in Oceanic Hydrate-Bearing Deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Hyuk Kwon

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Many submarine slope failures in hydrate-bearing sedimentary deposits might be directly triggered, or at least primed, by gas hydrate dissociation. It has been reported that during the past 55 years (1955–2010 the 0–2000 m layer of oceans worldwide has been warmed by 0.09 °C because of global warming. This raises the following scientific concern: if warming of the bottom water of deep oceans continues, it would dissociate natural gas hydrates and could eventually trigger massive slope failures. The present study explored the submarine slope instability of oceanic gas hydrate-bearing deposits subjected to bottom water warming. One-dimensional coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical (T-H-M finite difference analyses were performed to capture the underlying physical processes initiated by bottom water warming, which includes thermal conduction through sediments, thermal dissociation of gas hydrates, excess pore pressure generation, pressure diffusion, and hydrate dissociation against depressurization. The temperature rise at the seafloor due to bottom water warming is found to create an excess pore pressure that is sufficiently large to reduce the stability of a slope in some cases. Parametric study results suggest that a slope becomes more susceptible to failure with increases in thermal diffusivity and hydrate saturation and decreases in pressure diffusivity, gas saturation, and water depth. Bottom water warming can be further explored to gain a better understanding of the past methane hydrate destabilization events on Earth, assuming that more reliable geological data is available.

  5. Range-Dependent Acoustic Propagation in Shallow Water with Elastic Bottom Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    water and sediments at the ocean bottom. The attenuation in near-bottom ocean sediments may be very high. It may be high enough that perturbation...for oceanic T-wave generation," Frank et al., has been published. This article documents the incorporation of seismic -like sources into the PE...contribution to this were supported by this grant. Finally the paper “Traveling wave modal attenuation and interaction with a transversely isotropic

  6. Balance-characteristic scheme as applied to the shallow water equations over a rough bottom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goloviznin, V. M.; Isakov, V. A.

    2017-07-01

    The CABARET scheme is used for the numerical solution of the one-dimensional shallow water equations over a rough bottom. The scheme involves conservative and flux variables, whose values at a new time level are calculated by applying the characteristic properties of the shallow water equations. The scheme is verified using a series of test and model problems.

  7. Benthic microbial production of oxygen supersaturates the bottom water of a stratified hypersaline lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, C M

    1995-03-01

    Lake Hayward is a hypersaline lake that stratifies seasonally and maintains oxygen supersaturation in its bottom water for about 6 months each year. This phenomenon was found to be the result of photosynthesis by the benthic microbial communities, composed primarily of the cyanobacteria Cyanothece spp., Spirulina sp., and Oscillatoria sp. When these communities were present and the lake was stratified, the bottom water was supersaturated with oxygen (up to 370%). During illumination, the benthic microbial communities rapidly developed very high concentrations (e.g., >500 μM) of oxygen, which then diffused into the overlying water. However, while the overlying water became supersaturated, the concentration in the water was lower than in the benthic microbial communities because (1) transport across the sediment-water interface was limited by diffusion, and (2) turbulence rapidly mixed the oxygen throughout the much larger volume of the bottom water (approximately 1.5 m deep). Thus, import of oxygen by the benthic microbial communities at night proceeded more slowly than daytime export, allowing supersaturation of the bottom water to develop.

  8. Southern Ocean ventilation and bottom water formation driven by Weddell Sea polynyas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheinlaender, Jonathan; Nisancioglu, Kerim; Smedsrud, Lars Henrik

    2017-04-01

    A distinct feature of the last glacial period, are the abrupt temperature fluctuations in Greenland associated with Dansgaard-Oeschger events and a similar but opposite response in Antarctica. The prevailing hypothesis behind this inter-hemispheric coupling, points to changes in deep water formation as the main driver, thus highlighting the pivotal role of the high latitude oceans in global climate. Bottom water formation through open-ocean deep convection in an Antarctic polynya, a large open water area inside the winter sea ice cover, provide a potential mechanism to trigger such changes in ocean circulation. In this study, an ocean-sea ice only version of the Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM) is explored and shows strong open-ocean deep convection associated with large polynyas in the Weddell Sea. This provides us with an opportunity to test (1) how internal ocean dynamics can trigger abrupt changes in sea-ice cover and (2) how these polynyas affect the overturning circulation through changes in bottom water formation. During the 1,000 year long free-running simulation two polynyas are observed. We show, that the polynya is caused by subsurface warming leading to a gradual weakening of the surface stratification which destabilizes the whole water column and eventually triggers deep convective overturning. This mixes up relatively warm deep water causing extensive melt of sea ice in the Weddell Sea, while cold and fresh surface water sinks to the bottom. Consequently, the polynya leads to extensive bottom water formation and increase in the northward flow of Antarctic Bottom Water, while the southward flow of North Atlantic Deep Water is reduced. Finally, our results suggest that a decrease in the temperature of warm deep water in the Weddell Sea leads to cessation of open-ocean deep convection. This raises the question if open-ocean deep convection associated with polynyas in the Southern Ocean could be a realistic feature in a cold, glacial climate.

  9. Relaxing the formation of hypoxic bottom water with sediment microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touch, Narong; Hibino, Tadashi; Morimoto, Yuki; Kinjo, Nobutaka

    2017-12-01

    The method of improving bottom water environment using industrial wastes to suppress diffusion substances from bottom sediment has recently captured the attention of many researchers. In this study, wastewater discharge-derived sediment was used to examine an alternative approach involving the use of sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) in relaxing the formation of hypoxic bottom water, and removing reduced substances from sediment. Concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) and other ions were measured in overlying water and sediment pore water with and without the application of SMFCs. The results suggest that SMFCs can markedly reduce hydrogen sulfide and manganese ion concentrations in overlying water, and decrease the depletions of redox potential and DO concentration. In addition, SMFCs can dissolve ferric compounds in the sediment and thereby release the ferric ion available to fix phosphate in the sediment. Our results indicate that SMFCs can be used as an alternative method to relax the formation of hypoxic bottom water and to remove reduced substances from the sediment, thus improving the quality of both water and sediment environments.

  10. Nitrogen cycling in the suboxic waters of the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Devol, A.H.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Codispoti, L.A.

    -1-4020-4262-1 (HB) ISBN-10 1-40204297-3 (e-book) ISBN-1 3 978-1 -4020-4297-3 (e-book) Published by Springer, P.O. Box 17,3300 AA Dordrecht, The Netherlands. www. springer. corn Printed on acid-free paper All Rights Reserved O 2006 Springer No part.... INTRODUCTION Nitrogen has long been long recognized as a major nutrient limiting primary carbon fixation in vast areas of the world's oceans 114, 32,351. Furthermore, through its control of marine primary production, it has been suggested that changes...

  11. Wave-induced bottom shear stress estimation in shallow water exemplified by using deep water wind statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dag Myrhaug

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides a simple and analytical method which can be used to give estimates of the wave-induced bottom shear stress for very rough beds and mud beds in shallow water based on wind statistics in deep water. This is exemplified by using long-term wind statistics from the northern North Sea, and by providing examples representing realistic field conditions. Based on, for example, global wind statistics, the present results can be used to make estimates of the bottom shear stress in shallow water.

  12. Shallow water bathymetry correction using sea bottom classification with multispectral satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazama, Yoriko; Yamamoto, Tomonori

    2017-10-01

    Bathymetry at shallow water especially shallower than 15m is an important area for environmental monitoring and national defense. Because the depth of shallow water is changeable by the sediment deposition and the ocean waves, the periodic monitoring at shoe area is needed. Utilization of satellite images are well matched for widely and repeatedly monitoring at sea area. Sea bottom terrain model using by remote sensing data have been developed and these methods based on the radiative transfer model of the sun irradiance which is affected by the atmosphere, water, and sea bottom. We adopted that general method of the sea depth extraction to the satellite imagery, WorldView-2; which has very fine spatial resolution (50cm/pix) and eight bands at visible to near-infrared wavelengths. From high-spatial resolution satellite images, there is possibility to know the coral reefs and the rock area's detail terrain model which offers important information for the amphibious landing. In addition, the WorldView-2 satellite sensor has the band at near the ultraviolet wavelength that is transmitted through the water. On the other hand, the previous study showed that the estimation error by the satellite imagery was related to the sea bottom materials such as sand, coral reef, sea alga, and rocks. Therefore, in this study, we focused on sea bottom materials, and tried to improve the depth estimation accuracy. First, we classified the sea bottom materials by the SVM method, which used the depth data acquired by multi-beam sonar as supervised data. Then correction values in the depth estimation equation were calculated applying the classification results. As a result, the classification accuracy of sea bottom materials was 93%, and the depth estimation error using the correction by the classification result was within 1.2m.

  13. Deep and bottom water characteristics in the Owen Fracture Zone, Western Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.; Kureishy, T.W.

    Hydro chemical studies at a station (10 degrees 34.l'N,56 degrees 31,7'E) in the Owen Fracture zone reveal an active movement of bottom water as approx 75 m thick, cold, low-salinity layer. Silicate profile exhibits a broad maximum coinciding with a...

  14. Transport of Antarctic bottom water through the Kane Gap, tropical NE Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morozov, E.G.; Tarakanov, R.Y.; van Haren, H.

    2013-01-01

    We study low-frequency properties of the Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) flow through the Kane Gap (9° N) in the Atlantic Ocean. The measurements in the Kane Gap include five visits with CTD (Conductivity-Temperature-Depth) sections in 2009–2012 and a year-long record of currents on a mooring using

  15. Chemical quality of water and bottom sediment, Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge, Lahontan Valley, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thodal, Carl E.

    2017-12-28

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service collected data on water and bottom-sediment chemistry to be used to evaluate a new water rights acquisition program designed to enhance wetland habitat in Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge and in Lahontan Valley, Churchill County, Nevada. The area supports habitat critical to the feeding and resting of migratory birds travelling the Pacific Flyway. Information about how water rights acquisitions may affect the quality of water delivered to the wetlands is needed by stakeholders and Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge managers in order to evaluate the effectiveness of this approach to wetlands management. A network of six sites on waterways that deliver the majority of water to Refuge wetlands was established to monitor the quality of streamflow and bottom sediment. Each site was visited every 4 to 6 weeks and selected water-quality field parameters were measured when flowing water was present. Water samples were collected at varying frequencies and analyzed for major ions, silica, and organic carbon, and for selected species of nitrogen and phosphorus, trace elements, pharmaceuticals, and other trace organic compounds. Bottom-sediment samples were collected for analysis of selected trace elements.Dissolved-solids concentrations exceeded the recommended criterion for protection of aquatic life (500 milligrams per liter) in 33 of 62 filtered water samples. The maximum arsenic criterion (340 micrograms per liter) was exceeded twice and the continuous criterion was exceeded seven times. Criteria protecting aquatic life from continuous exposure to aluminum, cadmium, lead, and mercury (87, 0.72, 2.5, and 0.77 micrograms per liter, respectively) were exceeded only once in filtered samples (27, 40, 32, and 36 samples, respectively). Mercury was the only trace element analyzed in bottom-sediment samples to exceed the published probable effect concentration (1,060 micrograms per kilogram).

  16. A comparative study of intensive Litopenaeus vannamei culture on four bottom substrates without water change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Hongwei; Zhang, Li; Gao, Lei; Su, Yuepeng; Bao, Weiyang; Ma, Shen

    2014-08-01

    The effect of four bottom substrates, oyster shell powder (OP), sugarcane bagasse (SB), a mixture of OP and SB (OS) and fresh soil (FS), on the water quality and bacterial and zooplankton density of intensive shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei) culture tanks without water change and the growth performance of cultured shrimp were compared in this study. At the end of a 110 days culturing trial, the total ammonium-N (TAN) of the water on SB and the nitrite nitrogen (NO2-N) on OS was significantly lower than that on the other substrates ( Pvannamei without water change than OP and FS. To our knowledge, this study presents the first evidence regarding the effect of different bottom substrates on intensive shrimp culture.

  17. Pumping bottom water to prevent Korean red tide damage caused by Cochlodinium polykrikoides Margalef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eun Seob; Moon, Seong Yong; Shu, Young Sang; Hwang, Jae Dong; Youn, Seok Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Cochlodinium polykrikoides Margalef produces annual massive blooms in Korean coastal waters which cause great damage to aquaculture and fisheries. Although various methods have been developed to remove the red tide of C. polykrikoides, release of yellow loess has been regarded as the most desirable technique for mitigation for over 10 years. Each August, strong irradiation generates water column stratification separating warm surface from colder bottom waters. Water from a distance of 0 (St. 1), 5 (St. 2), 10 (St. 3), and 15 m (St. 4) was pumped by running a pump for 0, 10, 30 and 90 min and characterized water temperature, salinity collected, suspended solids, Chl-a, and phytoplankton including C. polykrikoides. After running for 30 min, was temperature and salinity in surface water was similar to those of bottom water, and water column stratification completely reversed after 90 min. Likewise, suspended solids, Chl-a, and total phytoplankton cell density decreased after 30 min, but C. polykrikoides did not show strong removal because of low cell density during sampling. However, the number of C. polykrikoides was significantly diluted (80%) after 90 min. These results suggested that pumping device was as an environmentally-friendly method convenient to be install in fish cages and effective to remove C. polykrikoides stratified water column conditions.

  18. Valorization of MSWI bottom ash for biogas desulfurization: Influence of biogas water content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontseré Obis, Marta; Germain, Patrick; Troesch, Olivier; Spillemaecker, Michel; Benbelkacem, Hassen

    2017-02-01

    In this study an alternative valorization of Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) Bottom Ash (BA) for H2S elimination from landfill biogas was evaluated. Emphasis was given to the influence of water content in biogas on H2S removal efficiency by BA. A small-scale pilot was developed and implemented in a landfill site located in France. A new biogas analyzer was used and allowed real-time continuous measurement of CH4, CO2, O2, H2S and H2O in raw and treated biogas. The H2S removal efficiency of bottom ash was evaluated for different inlet biogas humidities: from 4 to 24gwater/m3. The biogas water content was found to greatly affect bottom ash efficiency regarding H2S removal. With humid inlet biogas the H2S removal was almost 3 times higher than with a dry inlet biogas. Best removal capacity obtained was 56gH2S/kgdryBA. A humid inlet biogas allows to conserve the bottom ash moisture content for a maximum H2S retention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Topological helical edge states in water waves over a topographical bottom

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Shi qiao

    2017-11-27

    We present the discovery of topologically protected helical edge states in water wave systems, which are realized in water wave propagating over a topographical bottom whose height is modulated periodically in a two-dimensional triangular pattern. We develop an effective Hamiltonian to characterize the dispersion relation and use spin Chern numbers to classify the topology. Through full wave simulations we unambiguously demonstrate the robustness of the helical edge states which are immune to defects and disorders so that the backscattering loss is significantly reduced. A spin splitter is designed for water wave systems, where helical edge states with different spin orientations are spatially separated with each other, and potential applications are discussed.

  20. Impact of sea-ice formation on the properties of Antarctic bottom water

    OpenAIRE

    Goosse, H.; Campin, J. M.; T. Fichefet; Deleersnijder, E.

    1997-01-01

    It is generally accepted that fresh-water fluxes due to ice accretion or melting profoundly influence the formation of Antarctic bottom water (AABW). This is investigated by means of a global, three-dimensional ice-ocean model. Two model runs were conducted. At the high southern latitudes, the control experiment exhibits positive (i.e. towards the ocean) fresh-water fluxes over the deep ocean, and large negative fluxes over the Antarctic continental shelf, because of the intense ice-productio...

  1. Distribution of hydrocarbons in water and bottom sediments of the Northern and Middle Caspian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemirovskaya, I. A.; Lisitzin, A. P.; Ostrovskaya, E. V.

    2017-07-01

    A study of two classes of hydrocarbons (HCs)—aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic—in suspended matter of the surface waters and bottom sediments of the Northern and Middle Caspian Sea (R/V Nikifor Shurekov, October 2015) is described. It has been determined that oil pollution transported by river runoff and fluid streams flowing from sedimentary formations in the northeastern part are the main sources of hydrocarbons in the river-sea boundaries of the Volga, Terek, and Sulak rivers.

  2. MODIS-derived spatiotemporal water clarity patterns in optically shallow FloridaKeys waters: A new approach to remove bottom contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retrievals of water quality parameters from satellite measurements over optically shallow waters have been problematic due to bottom contamination of the signals. As a result, large errors are associated with derived water column properties. These deficiencies greatly reduce the ...

  3. Abundance of macrozoobenthos in relation to bottom soil textural types and water depth In aquaculture ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Nupur

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The present experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of bottom soil textural classes and different water depths on abundance of macrozoobenthos in aquaculture ponds. Three treatments, i.e., ponds bottom with sandy loam (T1, with loam (TS2 and with clay loam (T3 were considered in this experiment. Samples were collected from three different depths (60.96 cm, 106.68 cm and 152.40 cm with three replications. The ranges of water quality parameters were suitable for the growth of macrozoobenthos during the experimental period. Similarly, chemical properties of soil were also within suitable ranges and every parameter showed comparatively higher ranges in T2. Eight genera were recorded belonging to major groups of Chironomidae, Oligochaeta, Mollusca and Ceratoponogonidae. The highest population densities of Oligochaeta (1200±4.25 per m2, Chironomidae (1422±4.88 per m2, Ceratopogonidae (399±1.56 per m2 and Mollusca (977±2.24 per m2 were found in T2. The population densities of macrozoobenthos showed fortnightly variations in all the treatments. Among the three depths, significantly highest densities of macrozoobenthos were recorded in 106.68 cm in every treatment. The mean abundance of macrozoobenthos was significantly highest in T2. The present study indicates that loamy soil pond bottom along with water depth 106.68 cm is suitable for the growth and production of macrozoobenthos in aquaculture ponds.

  4. Effects of bottom water dissolved oxygen variability on copper and lead fractionation in the sediments across the oxygen minimum zone, western continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, P.; Chakraborty, S.; Jayachandran, S.; Madan, R.; Sarkar, Arindam; Linsy, P.; Nath, B.N.

    .e., stability increased) with the decreasing dissolved oxygen concentrations of the bottom water. Decreasing bottom-water oxygen concentration increased Cu association with sedimentary organic matter. However, Pb association with Fe/Mn-oxyhydroxide phases...

  5. Numerical analyses of soft bottom invertebrates to diagnose the pollution in tropical coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkantra, Sadanand N; Rodrigues, Nimi R

    2004-01-01

    Soft bottom benthic organisms especially polychaetes are known to adapt as r or k selected strategies to different gradients of pollution. This will result in changes of benthic community structure from that of normal structure. There are a number of techniques to assess the impact of pollution on benthic community structure. Hence, to test this hypotheses some of the univariate and multivariate techniques were applied to soft bottom macro-invertebrates data of coastal waters of Mangalore, central west coast of India, a hot-spot area. Univariate techniques such as Pearson Rosenberg Model (PRM), abundance biomass comparison curve (ABC), geometrical class distribution, dominance-diversity curve, benthic community structure indices and multivariate techniques such as cluster classification, multidimensional scaling (MDS) and principal component analysis (PCA) were used to discriminate and diagnose the disturbance among the sites. Effectiveness and applicability of some of the above techniques are highlighted and discussed with the present set of data for environmental impact assessment studies.

  6. The nepheloid bottom layer and water masses at the shelf break of the western Ross Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capello, Marco; Budillon, Giorgio; Cutroneo, Laura; Tucci, Sergio

    2009-06-01

    In the austral summers of 2000/2001 and 2002/2003 the Italian CLIMA Project carried out two oceanographic cruises along the northwestern margin of the Ross Sea, where the Antarctic Bottom Water forms. Here there is an interaction between the water masses on the sea floor of the outer shelf and slope with a consequent evolution of benthic nepheloid layers and an increase in total particulate matter. We observed three different situations: (a) the presence of triads (bottom structures characterized by a concomitant jump in turbidity, temperature, and salinity data) and high re-suspension phenomena related to the presence of the Circumpolar Deep Water and its mixing with cold, salty shelf waters associated with gravity currents; (b) the absence of triads with high re-suspension, implying that when the gravity currents are no longer active the benthic nepheloid layer may persist until the suspended particles settle to the sea floor, suggesting that the turbidity data can be used to study recent gravity current events; and (c) the absence of turbidity and sediment re-suspension phenomena supports the theory that a steady situation had been re-established and the current interaction no longer occurred or had finished sometime before.

  7. Influence of Ross Sea Bottom Water changes on the warming and freshening of the Antarctic Bottom Water in the Australian-Antarctic Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Shimada

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Changes to the properties of Antarctic Bottom Water in the Australian-Antarctic Basin (AA-AABW between the 1990s and 2000s are documented using data from the WOCE Hydrographic Program (WHP and repeated hydrographic surveys. Strong cooling and freshening are observed on isopycnal layers denser than γn = 28.30 kg m−3. Changes in the average salinity and potential temperature below this isopycnal correspond to a basin-wide warming of 1300 ± 200 GW and freshening of 24 ± 3 Gt year−1. Recent changes to dense shelf water in the source regions in the Ross Sea and George V Land can explain the freshening of AA-AABW but not its extensive warming. An alternative mechanism for this warming is a decrease in the supply of AABW from the Ross Sea (RSBW. Hydrographic profiles between the western Ross Sea and George V Land (171–158° E were analyzed with a simple advective-diffusive model to assess the causes of the observed changes. The model suggests that the warming of RSBW observed between the 1970s and 2000s can be explained by a 21 ± 23% reduction in RSBW transport and the enhancement of the vertical diffusion of heat resulting from a 30 ± 7% weakening of the abyssal stratification. The documented freshening of Ross Sea dense shelf water leads to a reduction in both salinity and density stratification. Therefore the direct freshening of RSBW at its source also produces an indirect warming of the RSBW. A simple box model suggests that the changes in RSBW properties and volume transport (a decrease of 6.7% is assumed between the year 1995 and 2005 can explain 51 ± 6% of the warming and 84 ± 10% of the freshening observed in AA-AABW.

  8. Coral by-catch in shrimp bottom trawl surveys in West Greenland waters (2010 – 2012)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensbye, Helle; Arboe, Nanette Hammeken

    There have been zoological expeditions in Greenland waters since the 19th century documenting the sea life, including cold water corals. Coral trees (vernacular name for Paragorgia arborea) are mentioned as early as 1741 in the first natural history book about Greenland (Egede 1741). Due...... to the many expeditions and opportunistic collections by Greenlandic fisheries surveys, the species composition of West Greenlandic corals is fairly well known (Tendal and Heiner 2002), although observations of species new to Greenland are still being made (Jørgensen et al. 2013, Tendal et al. 2013......). The earlier collections of corals were not systematic and distribution patterns are poorly understood. Thus, more recently the Greenland Institute of Natural Resources started to collect cold water corals in a more systematic way to document the occurrence of corals in the bottom trawls made for the annual...

  9. Numerical Simulation Study on Steam-Assisted Gravity Drainage Performance in a Heavy Oil Reservoir with a Bottom Water Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ni

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the Pikes Peak oil field near Lloydminster, Canada, a significant amount of heavy oil reserves is located in reservoirs with a bottom water zone. The properties of the bottom water zone and the operation parameters significantly affect oil production performance via the steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD process. Thus, in order to develop this type of heavy oil resource, a full understanding of the effects of these properties is necessary. In this study, the numerical simulation approach was applied to study the effects of properties in the bottom water zone in the SAGD process, such as the initial gas oil ratio, the thickness of the reservoir, and oil saturation of the bottom water zone. In addition, some operation parameters were studied including the injection pressure, the SAGD well pair location, and five different well patterns: (1 two corner wells, (2 triple wells, (3 downhole water sink well, (4 vertical injectors with a horizontal producer, and (5 fishbone well. The numerical simulation results suggest that the properties of the bottom water zone affect production performance extremely. First, both positive and negative effects were observed when solution gas exists in the heavy oil. Second, a logarithmical relationship was investigated between the bottom water production ratio and the thickness of the bottom water zone. Third, a non-linear relation was obtained between the oil recovery factor and oil saturation in the bottom water zone, and a peak oil recovery was achieved at the oil saturation rate of 30% in the bottom water zone. Furthermore, the operation parameters affected the heavy oil production performance. Comparison of the well patterns showed that the two corner wells and the triple wells patterns obtained the highest oil recovery factors of 74.71% and 77.19%, respectively, which are almost twice the oil recovery factors gained in the conventional SAGD process (47.84%. This indicates that the optimized SAGD process

  10. Property changes of deep and bottom waters in the Western Tropical Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrford, Josefine; Brandt, Peter; Zenk, Walter

    2017-06-01

    The flow of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) and Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) contributes to the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. Changes in the associated water mass formation might impact the deep ocean's capacity to take up anthropogenic CO2 while a warming of the deep ocean significantly contributes to global sea level rise. Here we compile historic and recent shipboard measurements of hydrography and velocity to provide a comprehensive view of water mass distribution, pathways, along-path transformation and long-term temperature changes of NADW and AABW in the western South and Equatorial Atlantic. We confirm previous results which show that the northwest corner of the Brazil Basin represents a splitting point for the southward/northward flow of NADW/AABW. The available measurements sample water mass transformation along the two major routes for deep and bottom waters in the tropical to South Atlantic - along the deep western boundary and eastward, parallel to the equator - as well as the hot-spots of extensive mixing. We find lower NADW and lighter AABW to form a highly interactive transition layer in the northern Brazil Basin. The AABW north of 5°S is relatively homogeneous with only lighter AABW being able to pass through the Equatorial Channel (EQCH) into the North Atlantic. Spanning a period of 26 years, our data also allow an estimation of long-term temperature trends in abyssal waters. We find a warming of 2.5±0.7•10-3 °C yr-1 of the waters in the northern Brazil Basin at temperatures colder than 0.6 °C throughout the period 1989-2014 and can relate this warming to a thinning of the dense AABW layer. Whereas isopycnal heave is the dominant effect which defines the vertical distribution of temperature trends on isobars, we also find temperature changes on isopycnals in the lower NADW and AABW layers. There temperatures on isopycnals exhibit decadal variations with warming in the 1990s and cooling in the 2000s - the contributions to the

  11. Acoustic water bottom investigation with a remotely operated watercraft survey system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Shintaro; Tabusa, Tomonori; Iwasaki, Shunsuke; Hiramatsu, Masahiro

    2017-12-01

    This paper describes a remotely operated investigation system developed by combining a modern leisure-use fish finder and an unmanned watercraft to survey water bottom topography and other data related to bottom materials. Current leisure-use fish finders have strong depth sounding capabilities and can provide precise sonar images and bathymetric information. Because these sonar instruments are lightweight and small, they can be used on unmanned small watercraft. With the developed system, an operator can direct the heading of an unmanned watercraft and monitor a PC display showing real-time positioning information through the use of onboard equipment and long-distance communication devices. Here, we explain how the system was developed and demonstrate the use of the system in an area of submerged woods in a lake. The system is low cost, easy to use, and mobile. It should be useful in surveying areas that have heretofore been hard to investigate, including remote, small, and shallow lakes, for example, volcanic and glacial lakes.

  12. Trends in summer bottom-water temperatures on the northern Gulf of Mexico continental shelf from 1985 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, R Eugene; Rabalais, Nancy N; Justić, Dubravko

    2017-01-01

    We quantified trends in the 1985 to 2015 summer bottom-water temperature on the northern Gulf of Mexico (nGOM) continental shelf for data collected at 88 stations with depths ranging from 3 to 63 m. The analysis was supplemented with monthly data collected from 1963 to 1965 in the same area. The seasonal summer peak in average bottom-water temperature varied concurrently with air temperature, but with a 2- to 5-month lag. The summer bottom-water temperature declined gradually with depth from 30 oC at stations closest to the shore, to 20 oC at the offshore edge of the study area, and increased an average 0.051 oC y-1 between1963 and 2015. The bottom-water warming in summer for all stations was 1.9 times faster compared to the rise in local summer air temperatures, and 6.4 times faster than the concurrent increase in annual global ocean sea surface temperatures. The annual rise in average summer bottom-water temperatures on the subtropical nGOM continental shelf is comparable to the few published temperature trend estimates from colder environments. These recent changes in the heat storage on the nGOM continental shelf will affect oxygen and carbon cycling, spatial distribution of fish and shrimp, and overall species diversity.

  13. Trends in summer bottom-water temperatures on the northern Gulf of Mexico continental shelf from 1985 to 2015.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Eugene Turner

    Full Text Available We quantified trends in the 1985 to 2015 summer bottom-water temperature on the northern Gulf of Mexico (nGOM continental shelf for data collected at 88 stations with depths ranging from 3 to 63 m. The analysis was supplemented with monthly data collected from 1963 to 1965 in the same area. The seasonal summer peak in average bottom-water temperature varied concurrently with air temperature, but with a 2- to 5-month lag. The summer bottom-water temperature declined gradually with depth from 30 oC at stations closest to the shore, to 20 oC at the offshore edge of the study area, and increased an average 0.051 oC y-1 between1963 and 2015. The bottom-water warming in summer for all stations was 1.9 times faster compared to the rise in local summer air temperatures, and 6.4 times faster than the concurrent increase in annual global ocean sea surface temperatures. The annual rise in average summer bottom-water temperatures on the subtropical nGOM continental shelf is comparable to the few published temperature trend estimates from colder environments. These recent changes in the heat storage on the nGOM continental shelf will affect oxygen and carbon cycling, spatial distribution of fish and shrimp, and overall species diversity.

  14. Importance of bottom-up approach in water management - sustainable development of catchment areas in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavic, M.; Cosic-Flajsig, G.; Petricec, M.; Blazevic, Z.

    2012-04-01

    Association for preservation of Croatian waters and sea SLAP is a non-governmental organization (NGO) that gathers more than 150 scientist, hydrologist and civil engineers. SLAP has been established in 2006 and since then had organized many conferences and participated in projects dealing with water management. We have started our work developing plans to secure water supply to the 22 (21) villages in the rural parts of Dubrovnik (Pozega) area and trough the years we have accumulated knowledge and experience in dealing with stakeholders in hydrology and water management. Within this paper we will present importance of bottom-up approach to the stakeholders in water management in Croatia on two case studies: (1) Management of River Trebizat catchment area - irrigation of the Imotsko-Bekijsko rural parts; (2) Development of multipurpose water reservoirs at the River Orljava catchment area. Both projects were designed in the mid and late 1980's but due to the war were forgotten and on halt. River Trebizat meanders between Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina and acquires joint management by both countries. In 2010 and 2011 SLAP has organized conferences in both countries gathering all the relevant stakeholders from representatives of local and state governments, water management companies and development agencies to the scientist and interested NGO's. The conferences gave firm scientific background of the topic including presentation of all previous studies and measurements as well as model results but presented in manner appropriate to the stakeholders. The main result of the conference was contribution to the development of joint cross-border project sent to the EU Pre-Accession funds in December 2011 with the aim to strengthen capacities of both countries and prepare larger project dealing with management of the whole Trebizat catchment area to EU structural funds once Croatia enters EU in 2013. Similar approach was taken for the Orljava catchment in the northern

  15. ESTIMATION OF MODERN CONDITION OF POLLUTION DEGREE OF WATER AND BOTTOM SEDIMENT OF THE SOUTHERN PART OF THE AGRAKHAN BAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Gadzhiev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the data obtained in the course of field research in the southern part of theAgrakhan Bay. As a result of research, conducted full hydrochemical analysis of water samples taken at nine stations. An estimate is given of the degree of pollution of water and bottom sediments of the oil products , phenols and heavy metals.

  16. Chemical evidence of the changes of the Antarctic Bottom Water ventilation in the western Ross Sea between 1997 and 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivaro, Paola; Massolo, Serena; Bergamasco, Andrea; Castagno, Pasquale; Budillon, Giorgio

    2010-05-01

    Data from three Italian CLIMA project cruises between 1997 and 2003 were used to obtain sections of the hydrographic and chemical properties of the main water masses across the shelf break off Cape Adare (western Ross Sea, Antarctica). Dissolved oxygen, nitrate and phosphate data were combined on the basis of the Redfield ratio to obtain the quasi-conservative tracers NO (9[NO 3]+[O 2]), PO (135[PO 4]+[O 2]) and phosphate star PO4* ( PO4*=[PO 4]+[O 2]/175-1.95). In 1997 and 2003 the presence of the High Salinity Shelf Water at the bottom depth near the sill was traced by both physical and chemical measurements. In 2001 the Modified Shelf Water, characterized by warmer temperature and by a lower dissolved oxygen content than High Salinity Shelf Water, was observed at the shelf edge. The distribution of the chemical tracers together with the hydrographic observations showed recently formed Antarctic Bottom Water on the continental slope during all of the cruises. These observations were confirmed by the extended optimum multiparameter analysis. The calculated thickness of the new Antarctic Bottom Water, as well as the tracer content, were variable in time and in space. The estimated volume of the new Antarctic Bottom Water and the export of dissolved oxygen and nutrient associated with the overflowing water were different over the examined period. In particular, a lower (˜55%) export was evidenced in 2001 compared to 1997.

  17. Bottom water oxygenation changes in the northern Okinawa Trough since the last 88ka: Controlled by local hydrology and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jianjun; Shi, Xuefa; Zhu, Aimei; Bai, Yazhi; Selvaraj, Kandasamy

    2014-05-01

    Dissolved oxygen content in oceanic bottom water is closely related to the surface organic carbon export and subsurface water stratification, regulating the biogeochemical cycles of some key nutrients and trace elements in intermediate and deep water columns. Further, the rate of organic carbon flux to sediments and bottom water oxygen concentration together determine the intensity of reducing conditions in sediments. In this study, we obtain high-resolution geochemical elements (TOC, TN, TS, CaCO3, Cd, U, Mn and Mo) in a radiocarbon (14C) and δ18O dated, sediment core CSH1 collected from the northern Okinawa Trough to reconstruct the history of bottom water redox conditions over 88 ka. Our data revealed the presence of hypoxic bottom water in the northern Okinawa Trough during late MIS5a-early MIS4, Last Glacial Maximum, and the early Last Deglacial intervals. During the Holocene and the early MIS5a, the dissolved oxygen content in bottom water has increased with decreasing water stratification, which was probably caused by the increased upwelling from the bottom in tandem with the climbing of Kuroshio Current and subdued freshwater effect in the northern Okinawa Trough. The reasons that caused the change of dissolved oxygen content in bottom water in the northern Okinawa Trough varied during different periods. The main factors are related to sea level, strengths of East Asian monsoon and the Kuroshio Current, and the shift of Westerly Jet Axis. The semi-closed topography in the northern Okinawa Trough provides a space framework for the presence of anoxia, while the sea level together with the Kuroshio Current, the East Asian monsoon and the Westerly Jet Axis seems to affect the strength of water stratification and the nutrient supply; thereby, regulating the dissolved oxygen exchange between surface and bottom waters. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China(Grant No.:40906035,40710069004) and by basic scientific fund for

  18. Concepts for a bottom-mounted buoyant, stab-in cold water pipe for the OTEC program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pompa, J.A.; Key, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    A conceptual design for a bottom-mounted, stab-in cold water pipe (CWP) for OTEC is presented. The design concepts used are based on experience gained in the design of marine risers for offshore petroleum production. After a detailed description of the system envisioned and the installation scenario, the status of the major components in the system is discussed relative to the present state of the art in the oil industry. From preliminary structural analyses and cost projections, a comparison is then drawn between the bottom-mounted pipe and free-hanging CWP designs. The comparison shows the bottom-mounted concept to be technically and economically sound, utilizing present oil industry design practices. Finally, recommendations are made for further work to integrate the bottom-mounted CWP concept into the OTEC program.

  19. Ground-Water Flow, 2004-07, and Water Quality, 1992-2007, in McBaine Bottoms, Columbia, Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brenda Joyce; Richards, Joseph M.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of Columbia, Missouri, and the Missouri Department of Conservation, collected ground-water quality data, surface-water quality data, and water-level data in McBaine Bottoms, southwest of Columbia. McBaine Bottoms, adjacent to the Missouri River, is the location of the municipal-supply well field for the city of Columbia, the city of Columbia wastewater-treatment wetlands, and the Missouri Department of Conservation Eagle Bluffs Conservation Area. This report describes the ground-water flow and water quality of McBaine Bottoms and provides information to better understand the interaction between treated effluent from the wetlands used on the Eagle Bluffs Conservation Area and the water in the alluvial aquifer that is pumped from the city of Columbia municipal-supply well field. Changes in major chemical constituent concentrations have been detected at several sampling sites between pre- and post-effluent application data. Analysis of post-effluent data indicates substantial changes in calcium, potassium, sodium, chloride, and sulfate concentrations in ground water. These changes became apparent shortly after the beginning of the operation of the wastewater-treatment wetland in 1994 and the formation of the Eagle Bluffs Conservation Area, which uses the treated effluent as a water source for the management of migratory water fowl. The changes have continued throughout the 15 years of sample collection. The concentrations of these major chemical constituents are on the mixing continuum between pre-effluent ground water as one end member and the treated wastewater effluent as the other end member. For monitoring wells that had changes in major chemical constituent concentrations, the relative percentage of treated effluent in the ground water, assuming chloride is conservative, ranged from 6 to 88 percent. Twenty-two monitoring wells throughout McBaine Bottoms have been affected by effluent based on chloride

  20. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages and bottom water evolution off the Portuguese margin since the Middle Pleistocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qimei; Li, Baohua; Kim, Jin-Kyoung

    2017-03-01

    The upper 250 meter-long sediment core of Site U1391 (1085 m water depth) retrieved from the Portuguese margin in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean was adopted for the benthic foraminiferal analyses to disclose the variations in Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW) intensity over the last 0.9 Ma. Benthic foraminifera are abundant at this site and mainly composed of the hyaline forms (80%, such as Cibicidoides/Cibicides spp., Globobulimina spp., Bulimina spp., Uvigerina spp., Melonis spp., Sphaeroidina bulloides, Hoeglundina elegans, Gyroidinoides spp., Lenticulina spp. and Planulina ariminensis), while the agglutinated and porcelaneous forms have only 5% and 14.1% on average, respectively. Down-core variations of the benthic foraminifera show glacial-interglacial contrasts, especially those of Lenticulina spp. and Planulina ariminensis, which is also supported by the benthic foraminiferal cluster analysis. During the interglacial periods, the fauna are dominated by Sphaeroidina bulloides, Lenticulina spp., Planulina ariminensis, Dentalina spp., Cibicidoides robertsonianus and the agglutinated forms, while by Cibicidoides pachyderma, Praeglobobulimina ovata, Praeglobobulimina pupoides, Bulimina mexicana, Uvigerina mediterranea, Bolivinita quadrilatera and mililoids during the glacial periods. Benthic foraminiferal faunal data at Site U1391 was detailed analyzed to disclose the bottom water property over the last 0.9 Ma. Variations of the character species or assemblages, such as Planulina ariminensis, and the ;elevated epibenthos; group suggest that the MOW intensity has typical glacial-interglacial cycles, strengthening during the interglacial periods and weakening during the glacial periods, and reaches its peak at MIS 11. The strongest MOW intensity during MIS 11 confirms the climatic influence of waving sea level on the MOW current by its + 20 m high-stand above the present sea level. The agglutinated benthic foraminifera have a significantly positive correlation with

  1. The occurrence of heavy metals and metal-resistant bacteria in water and bottom sediments of the Straszyn reservoir (Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulbat Eliza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the distribution of selected heavy metals and metal–resistant bacteria in water and bottom sediments of the surface drinking water reservoir for Gdańsk. The following sequence of metals in regard to metal concentration in sediments can be written down: Zn > Pb > Cu > Cd. The evaluation of metals accumulation was performed using the Müller index, to indicate the bottom sediment's contamination and geochemical classification of sediment quality according to Polish standards. The Müller geochemical index was changing in a wide range: < 1–4.1. Although the maximum value of Müller's geochemical index determined for copper indicates that the sediment is ‘strongly contaminated’, in general the analysed bottom sediments were classified as the I and II category according to Polish geochemical standards. From the microbiological side a significant part of heterotrophic bacteria isolated from the bottom sediment and surface water (raw and treated water showed a resistance to 0.2 mM and 2 mM concentrations of zinc, copper and lead. The highest percentages of metal–resistant bacteria were recorded in the sediments of the reservoir (60%–88%. The share of metal–resistant strains in the raw water was significantly lower (34%–61%. The results indicate also that water treatment processes may contribute to the selection of resistant strains.

  2. The occurrence of heavy metals and metal-resistant bacteria in water and bottom sediments of the Straszyn reservoir (Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulbat, Eliza; Sokołowska, Aleksandra

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the distribution of selected heavy metals and metal-resistant bacteria in water and bottom sediments of the surface drinking water reservoir for Gdańsk. The following sequence of metals in regard to metal concentration in sediments can be written down: Zn > Pb > Cu > Cd. The evaluation of metals accumulation was performed using the Müller index, to indicate the bottom sediment's contamination and geochemical classification of sediment quality according to Polish standards. The Müller geochemical index was changing in a wide range: sediment is `strongly contaminated', in general the analysed bottom sediments were classified as the I and II category according to Polish geochemical standards. From the microbiological side a significant part of heterotrophic bacteria isolated from the bottom sediment and surface water (raw and treated water) showed a resistance to 0.2 mM and 2 mM concentrations of zinc, copper and lead. The highest percentages of metal-resistant bacteria were recorded in the sediments of the reservoir (60%-88%). The share of metal-resistant strains in the raw water was significantly lower (34%-61%). The results indicate also that water treatment processes may contribute to the selection of resistant strains.

  3. A new method to assess long term small sea-bottom vertical displacement in shallow water from bottom pressure sensor: the case of Campi Flegrei, Southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malservisi, R.; Chierici, F.; Iannaccone, G.; Guardato, S.; Pignagnoli, L.; Locritani, M.; Embriaco, D.; Donnarumma, G. P.; Rodgers, M.; Beranzoli, L.

    2016-12-01

    We present a new methodology aimed at assessing long term small vertical seafloor deformation in shallow water environments by using Bottom Pressure Recorder (BPR) measurements jointly with ancillary sea level, water column and barometric data. These measurements are presently acquired only in areas where the amount of vertical deformation is large and in deep water environment, where the noise induced by the sea state and other near surface disturbances is low. We applied the method to the data acquired in 2011 by a BPR deployed at about 96 m depth in the marine sector of the Campi Flegrei Caldera, during a quasi-symmetric seafloor uplift episode of a few centimeters amplitude. The method provides an estimation of the vertical uplift of the caldera of 2.5 +/- 1.3 cm achieving an unprecedented level of precision in the measurement of the seafloor vertical deformation in shallow water. We reached this result by taking into account the contribution of the BPR instrumental drift and the contribution of the sea water density variations, which can affect the measurement on the order of tens of centimeters. The estimation of the vertical deformation obtained in this way compares favorably with data acquired by a land based GPS station, which is located at the same distance from the area of maximum deformation as the BPR

  4. Fern spore longevity in saline water: can sea bottom sediments maintain a viable spore bank?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Arjen de Groot

    Full Text Available Freshwater and marine sediments often harbor reservoirs of plant diaspores, from which germination and establishment may occur whenever the sediment falls dry. Therewith, they form valuable records of historical inter- and intraspecific diversity, and are increasingly exploited to facilitate diversity establishment in new or restored nature areas. Yet, while ferns may constitute a considerable part of a vegetation's diversity and sediments are known to contain fern spores, little is known about their longevity, which may suffer from inundation and--in sea bottoms--salt stress. We tested the potential of ferns to establish from a sea or lake bottom, using experimental studies on spore survival and gametophyte formation, as well as a spore bank analysis on sediments from a former Dutch inland sea. Our experimental results revealed clear differences among species. For Asplenium scolopendrium and Gymnocarpium dryopteris, spore germination was not affected by inundated storage alone, but decreased with rising salt concentrations. In contrast, for Asplenium trichomanes subsp. quadrivalens germination decreased following inundation, but not in response to salt. Germination rates decreased with time of storage in saline water. Smaller and less viable gametophytes were produced when saline storage lasted for a year. Effects on germination and gametophyte development clearly differed among genotypes of A. scolopendrium. Spore bank analyses detected no viable spores in marine sediment layers. Only two very small gametophytes (identified as Thelypteris palustris via DNA barcoding emerged from freshwater sediments. Both died before maturation. We conclude that marine, and likely even freshwater sediments, will generally be of little value for long-term storage of fern diversity. The development of any fern vegetation on a former sea floor will depend heavily on the deposition of spores onto the drained land by natural or artificial means of dispersal.

  5. Fern spore longevity in saline water: can sea bottom sediments maintain a viable spore bank?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, G Arjen; During, Heinjo

    2013-01-01

    Freshwater and marine sediments often harbor reservoirs of plant diaspores, from which germination and establishment may occur whenever the sediment falls dry. Therewith, they form valuable records of historical inter- and intraspecific diversity, and are increasingly exploited to facilitate diversity establishment in new or restored nature areas. Yet, while ferns may constitute a considerable part of a vegetation's diversity and sediments are known to contain fern spores, little is known about their longevity, which may suffer from inundation and--in sea bottoms--salt stress. We tested the potential of ferns to establish from a sea or lake bottom, using experimental studies on spore survival and gametophyte formation, as well as a spore bank analysis on sediments from a former Dutch inland sea. Our experimental results revealed clear differences among species. For Asplenium scolopendrium and Gymnocarpium dryopteris, spore germination was not affected by inundated storage alone, but decreased with rising salt concentrations. In contrast, for Asplenium trichomanes subsp. quadrivalens germination decreased following inundation, but not in response to salt. Germination rates decreased with time of storage in saline water. Smaller and less viable gametophytes were produced when saline storage lasted for a year. Effects on germination and gametophyte development clearly differed among genotypes of A. scolopendrium. Spore bank analyses detected no viable spores in marine sediment layers. Only two very small gametophytes (identified as Thelypteris palustris via DNA barcoding) emerged from freshwater sediments. Both died before maturation. We conclude that marine, and likely even freshwater sediments, will generally be of little value for long-term storage of fern diversity. The development of any fern vegetation on a former sea floor will depend heavily on the deposition of spores onto the drained land by natural or artificial means of dispersal.

  6. Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.; GADGIL, ASHOK J.; ADDY, SUSAN E.A.; KOWOLIK, KRISTIN

    2010-06-01

    We describe laboratory and field results of a novel arsenic removal adsorbent called 'Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash' (ARUBA). ARUBA is prepared by coating particles of coal bottom ash, a waste material from coal fired power plants, with iron (hydr)oxide. The coating process is simple and conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Material costs for ARUBA are estimated to be low (~;;$0.08 per kg) and arsenic remediation with ARUBA has the potential to be affordable to resource-constrained communities. ARUBA is used for removing arsenic via a dispersal-and-removal process, and we envision that ARUBA would be used in community-scale water treatment centers. We show that ARUBA is able to reduce arsenic concentrations in contaminated Bangladesh groundwater to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. Using the Langmuir isotherm (R2 = 0.77) ARUBA's adsorption capacity in treating real groundwater is 2.6x10-6 mol/g (0.20 mg/g). Time-to-90percent (defined as the time interval for ARUBA to remove 90percent of the total amount of arsenic that is removed at equilibrium) is less than one hour. Reaction rates (pseudo-second-order kinetic model, R2>_ 0.99) increase from 2.4x105 to 7.2x105 g mol-1 min-1 as the groundwater arsenic concentration decreases from 560 to 170 ppb. We show that ARUBA's arsenic adsorption density (AAD), defined as the milligrams of arsenic removed at equilibrium per gram of ARUBA added, is linearly dependent on the initial arsenic concentration of the groundwater sample, for initial arsenic concentrations of up to 1600 ppb and an ARUBA dose of 4.0 g/L. This makes it easy to determine the amount of ARUBA required to treat a groundwater source when its arsenic concentration is known and less than 1600 ppb. Storing contaminated groundwater for two to three days before treatment is seen to significantly increase ARUBA's AAD. ARUBA can be separated from treated water by coagulation and clarification, which is expected to

  7. Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Johanna L; Gadgil, Ashok J; Addy, Susan E A; Kowolik, Kristin

    2010-09-01

    We describe laboratory and field results of a novel arsenic removal adsorbent called 'Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash' (ARUBA). ARUBA is prepared by coating particles of coal bottom ash, a waste material from coal fired power plants, with iron (hydr)oxide. The coating process is simple and conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Material costs for ARUBA are estimated to be low (approximately $0.08 per kg) and arsenic remediation with ARUBA has the potential to be affordable to resource-constrained communities. ARUBA is used for removing arsenic via a dispersal-and-removal process, and we envision that ARUBA would be used in community-scale water treatment centers. We show that ARUBA is able to reduce arsenic concentrations in contaminated Bangladesh groundwater to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. Using the Langmuir isotherm (R(2) = 0.77) ARUBA's adsorption capacity in treating real groundwater is 2.6 x 10(- 6)mol/g (0.20 mg/g). Time-to-90% (defined as the time interval for ARUBA to remove 90% of the total amount of arsenic that is removed at equilibrium) is less than 1 hour. Reaction rates (pseudo-second-order kinetic model, R(2) > or = 0.99) increase from 2.4 x 10(5) to 7.2 x 10(5) g mol(- 1)min(- 1) as the groundwater arsenic concentration decreases from 560 to 170 ppb. We show that ARUBA's arsenic adsorption density (AAD), defined as the milligrams of arsenic removed at equilibrium per gram of ARUBA added, is linearly dependent on the initial arsenic concentration of the groundwater sample, for initial arsenic concentrations of up to 1600 ppb and an ARUBA dose of 4.0 g/L. This makes it easy to determine the amount of ARUBA required to treat a groundwater source when its arsenic concentration is known and less than 1600 ppb. Storing contaminated groundwater for two to three days before treatment is seen to significantly increase ARUBA's AAD. ARUBA can be separated from treated water by coagulation and clarification, which is expected to

  8. Nitrogen isotopic studies in the suboxic Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A; Yoshinari, T.; Brandes, J.A; Devol, A; Jayakumar, D.A; Narvekar, P.V.; Altabet, M.A; Codispoti, L.A.

    sub(2) and oxygen (O sub(2)), respectively] have been made in water column at several locations in the Arabian Sea, a region with one of the thickest and most intense O sub(2) minima observed in the open ocean. Microbially-mediated reduction of NO sub...

  9. Coupling of North Pacific Productivity, Beringian Precipitation, and Antarctic Bottom Water Formation: an Atmospheric Link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caissie, B.; Wilkie, K. M. K.

    2016-12-01

    Changes in primary productivity in the North Pacific occur on a variety of timescales from seasonal to orbital. A prime indicator of this productivity is expressed as laminated intervals deposited simultaneously in intermediate-depth waters across the North Pacific and its marginal seas at Glacial Terminations. Debate continues regarding the mechanism that triggered this anoxia in the North Pacific. Some argue for a change in intermediate water ventilation, and others for simply an increase in primary productivity. While little evidence has been found for a change in ventilation of intermediate waters, primary productivity increased dramatically at Terminations. However, the cause of this primary productivity is currently unknown. Some have suggested increasing aeolian iron deposition, increasing nutrient input due to rising sea level, or changes in stratification. Here we show that although there is no change in intermediate water ventilation during laminated intervals, there is a significant change in the rate of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) Formation. We use new diatom records from the Bering Sea and previously published sediment records from the South Pacific and Lake El'gygytgyn, Russia to show that AABW formation is coupled with primary productivity in the North Pacific and terrestrial precipitation in Beringia. During three interglacials (MIS 1, MIS 5, and MIS 11), primary productivity, driven by increased upwelling, is high when AABW formation is high. This increased upwelling in turn increases the open water area of the Bering Sea, pushes sea ice farther north and increases moisture supply to the Beringian continent. At peak interglacials, productivity in the North Pacific and Beringian temperatures decrease simultaneously with a decrease in AABW formation. We attribute these changes to large-scale atmospheric climate modes linking changes in the strength and position of the Aleutian Low to upwelling of nutrient-rich waters in the North Pacific and Bering

  10. BOTTOM SEDIMENTS IN DELTAIC SHALLOW-WATER AREAS – ARE THEY SOILS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna N. Tkachenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on long-term research of aquatic landscapes in the VolgaRiver delta which was held in 2010–2012 and included investigation and sampling of bottom sediments in deltaic lagoons, fresh-water bays, small channels, oxbow lakes, and part of the deltaic near-shore zone. Contrasting hydrological regime and suspended matter deposition together with huge amount of water plants in the river delta provide for the formation of different types of subaquatic soils. The purpose of this research is to reveal the properties of the subaquatic soils in the Volga River deltaic area and to propose pedogenetic approaches to the diagnostic of aquazems as soil types. It is suggested to name the horizons in aquazems in the same way as in terrestrial soils in the recent Russian soil classification system, and apply symbols starting with the combination of caps – AQ (for “aquatic”. The aquazems’ horizons are identified and their general properties are described. Most typical of aquazems is the aquagley (AQG horizon; it is dove grey, homogeneous in color and permeated by clay. The upper part is usually enriched in organic matter and may be qualified for aquahumus (AQA or  aquapeat (AQT horizons. In case of active hydrodynamic regime and/or strong mixing phenomena, the oxidized (AQOX or aqox horizon, or property could be formed. It is yellowish-grey, thin, and depleted of organic matter. The main types of aquzems specified by forming agents and combinations of horizons are described.

  11. Nitrogen isotopic studies in the suboxic Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, S. W. A.; Yoshinari, T.; Brandes, J. A.; Devol, A. H.; Jayakumar, D. A.; Narvekar, P. V.; Altabet, M. A.; Codispoti, L. A.

    1998-12-01

    Measurements of15N/14N in dissolved molecular nitrogen (N2), nitrate (NO{3/-}) and nitrous oxide (N2O) and18O/16O in N2O [expressed as δ15N and δ18O, relative to atmospheric N2 and oxygen (O2), respectively] have been made in water column at several locations in the Arabian Sea, a region with one of the thickest and most intense O2 minima observed in the open ocean. Microbially-mediated reduction of NO{3/-} to N2 (denitrification) in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) appears to greatly affect the natural isotopic abundances. The δ15N of NO{3/-} increases from 6‰ in deep waters (2500 m) to 15‰ within the core of the denitrifying layer (250-350 m); the δ15N of N2 concurrently decreases from 0.6‰ to 0.20‰ Values of the isotopic fractionation factor (ɛ) during denitrification estimated using simple advection-reaction and diffusion-reaction models are 22‰ and 25‰, respectively. A strong decrease in δ15N of NO{3/-} is observed from ˜ 200m (> 11‰) to 80m (˜ 6‰); this is attributed to the input of isotopically light nitrogen through nitrogen fixation. Isotopic analysis of N2O reveals extremely large enrichments of both15N and18O within the OMZ, presumably due to the preferential reduction of lighter N2O to N2. However, isotopically light N2O is observed to accumulate in high concentrations above the OMZ indicating that the N2O emitted to the atmosphere from this region cannot be very heavy. The isotope data from the intense upwelling zone off the southwest coast of India, where some of the highest concentrations of N2O ever found at the sea surface are observed, show moderate depletion of15N, but slight enrichment of18O relative to air. These results suggest that the ocean-atmosphere exchange cannot counter inputs of heavier isotopes (particularly18O) associated with the stratospheric back flux, as proposed by previous workers. This calls for additional sources and/or sinks of N2O in the atmosphere. Also, the N2O isotope data cannot be explained by

  12. Field screening of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the Yuma Valley, Arizona, 1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadayon, Saeid; King, K.A.; Andrews, Brenda; Roberts, William

    1997-01-01

    Because of concerns expressed by the U.S. Congress and the environmental community, the Department of the Interior began a program in late 1985 to identify the nature and extent of water-quality problems induced by irrigation that might exist in the western States. Surface water, bottom sediment, and biota were collected from March through September 1995 along the lower Colorado River and in agricultural drains at nine sites in the Yuma Valley, Arizona, and analyzed for selected inorganic and organic constituents. Analyses of water, bottom sediment, and biota were completed to determine if irrigation return flow has caused, or has the potential to cause, harmful effects on human health, fish, and wildlife in the study area. Concentrations of dissolved solids in surface-water samples collected in March generally did not vary substantially from surface-water samples collected in June. Concentrations of dissolved solids ranged from 712 to 3,000 milligrams per liter and exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency secondary maximum contaminant level of 500 milligrams per liter for drinking water. Concentrations of chloride in 9 of 18 water samples and concentrations of sulfate in 16 of 18 water samples exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency secondary maximum contaminant level of 250 milligrams per liter for drinking water. Calcium and sodium were the dominant cations, and chloride and sulfate were the dominant anions. The maximum selenium concentration of 8 micrograms per liter exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency aquatic-life chronic criterion of 5 micrograms per liter. Concentrations of lead in 7 of 18 water samples and concentrations of mercury in 4 of 18 water samples exceeded the aquatic-life cronic criteria of 3.2 and 0.012 micrograms per liter, respectively. Concentrations of antimony, beryllium, cadmium, and silver in the water samples were below analytical reporting limits. Arsenic was detected in 3 of 9 bottom-sediment samples

  13. Environmental complexity of a port: Evidence from circulation of the water masses, and composition and contamination of bottom sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutroneo, L; Carbone, C; Consani, S; Vagge, G; Canepa, G; Capello, M

    2017-06-15

    Ports are complex environments due to their complicated geometry (quays, channels, and piers), the presence of human activities (vessel traffic, shipyards, industries, and discharges), and natural factors (stream and torrent inputs, sea action, and currents). Taking these factors into consideration, we have examined the marine environment of a port from the point of view of the circulation of the water masses, hydrological characteristics, distribution of the sediment grain-size, mineralogical characteristics, and metal concentrations of the bottom sediments. Our results show that, in the case of the Port of Genoa (north-western Italy), the impact of human activities (such as a coal power-plant, oil depots, shipyards, dredging of the bottom sediments, etc.), natural processes (such as currents, fresh water and sediment inputs from the torrents), and the morphology of the basin, are important factors in the sediment, water, and metal distributions that have given rise to a complex environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Detection of reactive oxygen species supplied into the water bottom by atmospheric non-thermal plasma jet using iodine-starch reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Toshiyuki; Eto, Wataru; Hamada, Masaki; Wakabayashi, Yasutaka; Abe, Yasufumi; Kihara, Keisuke

    2015-08-01

    The supply of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to a target through liquid by plasma jet should be clarified. In this study, a non-thermal plasma jet was irradiated onto the water surface in atmospheric air, and the ROS reaching the water bottom were detected using a gel reagent with iodine-starch reactions. As a result, two-dimensional ROS distributions were visually obtained at the bottom, and the relative ROS concentration was obtained by absorbance measurement. Oxygen addition to helium led to a higher ROS supply into the bottom than helium plasma jet and ozone exposure. A doughnut-shaped ROS distribution was clearly observed at the bottom under certain conditions. The ROS concentration at the bottom significantly depended on irradiation distance and water layer thickness. It is observed from the results obtained using a liquid reagent that the plasma-jet-induced flow and the mixing effect play an important role in ROS supply into the bottom.

  15. Suboxic deep seawater in the late Paleoproterozoic: Evidence from hematitic chert and iron formation related to seafloor-hydrothermal sulfide deposits, central Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, J.F.; Grenne, Tor; Bekker, A.; Rouxel, O.J.; Lindberg, P.A.

    2007-01-01

    A current model for the evolution of Proterozoic deep seawater composition involves a change from anoxic sulfide-free to sulfidic conditions 1.8??Ga. In an earlier model the deep ocean became oxic at that time. Both models are based on the secular distribution of banded iron formation (BIF) in shallow marine sequences. We here present a new model based on rare earth elements, especially redox-sensitive Ce, in hydrothermal silica-iron oxide sediments from deeper-water, open-marine settings related to volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits. In contrast to Archean, Paleozoic, and modern hydrothermal iron oxide sediments, 1.74 to 1.71??Ga hematitic chert (jasper) and iron formation in central Arizona, USA, show moderate positive to small negative Ce anomalies, suggesting that the redox state of the deep ocean then was at a transitional, suboxic state with low concentrations of dissolved O2 but no H2S. The presence of jasper and/or iron formation related to VMS deposits in other volcanosedimentary sequences ca. 1.79-1.69??Ga, 1.40??Ga, and 1.24??Ga also reflects oxygenated and not sulfidic deep ocean waters during these time periods. Suboxic conditions in the deep ocean are consistent with the lack of shallow-marine BIF ??? 1.8 to 0.8??Ga, and likely limited nutrient concentrations in seawater and, consequently, may have constrained biological evolution. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Numerical analyses of soft bottom macroinvertebrates to diagnose the pollution in tropical coastal waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Harkantra, S.N.; Rodrigues, N.R.

    NUMERICAL ANALYSESOF SOFT BOTTOM MACROINVERTEBRATESTO DIAGNOSE THE POLLUTIONIN TROPICAL COASTALWATERS SADANAND N. HARKANTRA ∗ and NIMI R. RODRIGUES Biological Oceanography Division, National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa, India ( ∗ author... wastes, numerical analyses, pollution 1. Introduction Soft bottom macro-invertebrates are widely used in monitoring the effects of mar- ine pollution, as they are mostly sessile, relatively larger in size, have a longer life span, and also due...

  17. A new mini box corer for sampling muddy bottoms in antarctic shallow waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alejandro Echeverría

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A new Mini Box Corer (MBC-GEAMB was developed for bottom sampling in Antarctic shallow waters down to 100 m depth from a small vessel. It consists of a detachable stainless steel box with a total sampling area of 0.0625 m², and a closing arm with a detachable blade without an external frame. MBC allowed stratified bottom sampling and good quality samples comparable to those obtained through diving. A comparison between the MBC-GEAMB and a 0.056 m²van Veen grab (VV was undertaken for the benthic macrofaunal composition in Admiralty Bay, King George Island (Antarctica. MBC and VV samples were taken from three depths (20, 30 and 60m in two sites. Total densities sampled with the MBC were up to 10 times higher than those obtained with van Veen grab. VV samples might lead to faunistic abundance underestimation compared to the MBC samples. Besides, MBC showed a higher performance on discriminating different sites as regards total macrofaunal density. It is suggested that MBC could be employed as an efficient remote sampling device for shallow-waters where direct sampling by SCUBA was not advisable.Um novo Mini Box Corer (MBC-GEAMB foi desenvolvido para amostragens de fundo em águas rasas antárticas até 100 metros de profundidade, a partir de embarcações pequenas. Consiste em uma caixa de aço inox destacável com uma área total de amostragem de 0,0625 m², e um braço de fechamento com uma lâmina destacável, sem um suporte externo. MBC permite a amostragem estratificada do sedimento de fundo com amostras de qualidade comparáveis àquelas obtidas através de mergulho autônomo. Uma comparação entre o MBC-GEAMB e um van Veen de área 0,056 m²(VV foi realizada utilizando a composição da macrofauna bentônica na Baía do Almirantado, (Ilha Rei George, Antarctica. Amostragens com MBC e VV foram realizadas em três profundidades (20, 30 e 60m em dois locais. As densidades totais obtidas com o MBC foram até 10 vezes maiores que as obtidas

  18. Millennial-scale changes of surface and bottom water conditions in the northwestern Pacific during the last deglaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunghan; Khim, Boo-Keun; Ikehara, Ken; Itaki, Takuya; Shibahara, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Masanobu

    2017-07-01

    Changes in water column conditions in the northwestern Pacific during the last 23 ka were reconstructed using geochemical and isotope proxies and redox elemental compositions along with published data (alkenone sea surface temperature (SST) and benthic foraminiferal fauna) at core GH02-1030. Surface water primary productivity in terms of biogenic opal and TOC contents, which mainly represented export production of diatom, was closely related to alkenone (spring-summer) SST and the development of spring-summer mixed layer depth. The different variation patterns of nitrate and silicic acid utilization, estimated by bulk δ15N and δ30Sidiatom values, respectively, are most likely due to the water column denitrification influence on bulk δ15N. Dysoxic bottom water conditions occurred during the Bølling-Allerød (BA) and the Pre-Boreal (PB), which was evident by laminated sediments, abundant dysoxic benthic foraminifers, and increased redox elemental compositions. Although surface water productivity increased during the BA and PB, dysoxic bottom water conditions were caused by a combination of enhanced surface water productivity and reduced ventilation of North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW) in response to meltwater input from the high latitude areas. Based on records of core GH02-1030 and other cores in the northwestern Pacific, the Okhotsk Sea, and the Bering Sea, which are all proximal to the modern NPIW source region, dissolved oxygen concentrations of bottom water were more depleted during the BA than PB. Such difference was attributed to more sluggish NPIW ventilation due to more meltwater input during the BA than the PB. The opening or closure of the Bering Strait is critical to the direction of meltwater transport to the northwestern Pacific.

  19. The footprint of bottom trawling in European waters: distribution, intensity, and seabed integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eigaard, Ole Ritzau; Bastardie, Francois; Hinzen, N.T.

    2017-01-01

    Mapping trawling pressure on the benthic habitats is needed as background to support an ecosystem approach to fisheries management. The extent and intensity of bottom trawling on the European continental shelf (0-1000 m) was analysed from logbook statistics and vessel monitoring system data for 2...

  20. Bottom-up control of water hyacinth weevil populations: Do the plants regulate the insects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    A key measure of dietary sufficiency relates to an insect’s reproductive ability so oögenesis, a nutrient-limited process, can be subject to bottom-up regulation. We hypothesized that aquatic nutrient flux seasonally affects ovarian development thereby controlling population growth of two specialis...

  1. A Determination of an Abrupt Motion of the Sea Bottom by Using Snapshot Data of Water Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Jang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an inverse problem and its solution procedure, which are aimed at identifying a sudden underwater movement of the sea bottom. The identification is mathematically shown to work with a known snapshot data of generated water wave configurations. It is also proved that the problem has a unique solution. However, the inverse problem is involved in an integral equation of the first kind, resulting in an ill-posed problem in the sense of stability. That is, the problem lacks solution stability properties. To overcome the difficulty of solution instability, in this paper, a stabilization technique, called regularization, is incorporated in the present solution procedure for the identification of the sea bottom movement. A numerical experiment is presented to demonstrate that the proposed (numerical solution procedure operates.

  2. Bottom head to shell junction assembly for a boiling water nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fife, Alex Blair; Ballas, Gary J.

    1998-01-01

    A bottom head to shell junction assembly which, in one embodiment, includes an annular forging having an integrally formed pump deck and shroud support is described. In the one embodiment, the annular forging also includes a top, cylindrical shaped end configured to be welded to one end of the pressure vessel cylindrical shell and a bottom, conical shaped end configured to be welded to the disk shaped bottom head. Reactor internal pump nozzles also are integrally formed in the annular forging. The nozzles do not include any internal or external projections. Stubs are formed in each nozzle opening to facilitate welding a pump housing to the forging. Also, an upper portion of each nozzle opening is configured to receive a portion of a diffuser coupled to a pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening. Diffuser openings are formed in the integral pump deck to provide additional support for the pump impellers. The diffuser opening is sized so that a pump impeller can extend at least partially therethrough. The pump impeller is connected to the pump shaft which extends through the nozzle opening.

  3. Distribution of shallow water soft and hard bottom seabeds in the Isla del Coco National Park, Pacific Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A. Sibaja-Cordero

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Geographic Information Systems (GIS applications used in marine habitats are powerful tools for management and monitoring of marine reserves and resources. Here, we present a series of maps of the soft and hard substrates in the shallow waters (>80 m depth of Parque Nacional Isla del Coco (PNIC= Isla del Coco National Park. We use bathymetry data and field data as input for a GIS, GAM, and kriging methods to generate a series of maps that describe the bottom characteristics. Eight types of bottom were found in the PNIC by composition and grain size. The shore of the island and islets consisted of rocky formations (mainly basalts, with coral reefs in the subtidal of some areas. Rhodolith beds had a dispersing distribution. The bottom on the southern and southwestern region is hard substrate, while sediments cover the northern and northeastern zones. Slightly gravelly sand dominated the bays, while gravelly sand (with more coarse grains was frequent offshore. The inner areas of Chatham and Wafer bays have mud and organic matter. The sediments in the area are mostly carbonates, except in Bahía Yglesias where clastic sediments (from the erosion of basalts are presented. The information generated in this study could be a valuable input for future monitoring in the PNIC.

  4. The role of Argopecten purpuratus shells structuring the soft bottom community in shallow waters of southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomovasky, Betina J.; Gamero, Patricia A.; Romero, Leonardo; Firstater, Fausto N.; Gamarra Salazar, Alex; Hidalgo, Fernando; Tarazona, Juan; Iribarne, Oscar O.

    2015-12-01

    Accumulation of Argopecten purpuratus shells often occurs after El Niño events in shallow waters of Independencia Bay (14°17‧S-76°10‧W; Pisco, Peru). Here we experimentally investigate the effects of their shell accumulation on macrobenthos assemblages in soft bottom, shallow areas of the bay. A field experiment (from May 2006 to May 2007), including four treatments with different coverage levels of empty shells of A. purpuratus, were randomly arranged in: (1) areas devoid of shells ("Empty" treatment: experimental control), (2) 50% of the plot area covered with shells haphazardly distributed over the bottom ("medium" treatment), (3) 100% of the plot area covered with shells, forming a 10 cm valve layer ("full" treatment) and (4) "natural control". We found a total of 124 taxa throughout the experiment. Polychaetes, crustaceans and mollusks were the most abundant groups in "natural controls", dominated by the gastropod Nassarius gayi and the polychaetes Prionospio peruana, Platynereis bicanaliculata and Mediomastus branchiferus. The abundance of individuals (N) and the species richness (S) were higher in the "medium" treatment, but only in one month under positive sea bottom thermal anomalies. Similarity analysis (Bray-Curtis) showed that "natural control", "empty" and "full" treatments were more similar among them than the "medium" treatment. Multidimensional analysis showed no clear species association among treatments and a higher grouping among the samplings of Jun-06, Aug-06 and Nov-06. Our results also showed that the commercial crab Romaleon polyodon and the polyplacophora Tonicia elegans were positively affected by shell accumulations ("medium" treatment), while the limpet Fissurella crassa was negatively affected. Our study shows that directly by changing habitat structure or indirectly by changing sediment characteristics, the addition of scallop shells to the soft bottom can modify the macrobenthic assemblage; however, the seasonal oceanographic

  5. The oxygen content of ocean bottom waters, the burial efficiency of organic carbon, and the regulation of atmospheric oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, J. N.; Holland, H. D.

    1991-01-01

    Data for the burial efficiency of organic carbon with marine sediments have been compiled for 69 locations. The burial efficiency as here defined is the ratio of the quantity of organic carbon which is ultimately buried to that which reaches the sediment-water interface. As noted previously, the sedimentation rate exerts a dominant influence on the burial efficiency. The logarithm of the burial efficiency is linearly related to the logarithm of the sedimentation rate at low sedimentation rates. At high sedimentation rates the burial efficiency can exceed 50% and becomes nearly independent of the sedimentation rate. The residual of the burial efficiency after the effect of the sedimentation rate has been subtracted is a weak function of the O2 concentration in bottom waters. The scatter is sufficiently large, so that the effect of the O2 concentration in bottom waters on the burial efficiency of organic matter could be either negligible or a minor but significant part of the mechanism that controls the level of O2 in the atmosphere.

  6. Global view of sea-ice production in polynyas and its linkage to dense/bottom water formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Kay I.; Nihashi, Sohey; Iwamoto, Katsushi

    2016-12-01

    Global overturning circulation is driven by density differences. Saline water rejected during sea-ice formation in polynyas is the main source of dense water, and thus sea-ice production is a key factor in the overturning circulation. Due to difficulties associated with in situ observation, sea-ice production and its interannual variability have not been well understood until recently. Methods to estimate sea-ice production on large scales have been developed using heat flux calculations based on satellite microwave radiometer data. Using these methods, we present the mapping of sea-ice production with the same definition and scale globally, and review the polynya ice production and its relationship with dense/bottom water. The mapping demonstrates that ice production rate is high in Antarctic coastal polynyas, in contrast to Arctic coastal polynyas. This is consistent with the formation of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW), the densest water mass which occupies the abyssal layer of the global ocean. The Ross Ice Shelf polynya has by far the highest ice production in the Southern Hemisphere. The Cape Darnley polynya (65°E-69°E) is found to be the second highest production area and recent observations revealed that this is the missing (fourth) source of AABW. In the region off the Mertz Glacier Tongue (MGT), the third source of AABW, sea-ice production decreased by as much as 40 %, due to the MGT calving in early 2010, resulting in a significant decrease in AABW production. The Okhotsk Northwestern polynya exhibits the highest ice production in the Northern Hemisphere, and the resultant dense water formation leads to overturning in the North Pacific, extending to the intermediate layer. Estimates of its ice production show a significant decrease over the past 30-50 years, likely causing the weakening of the North Pacific overturning. These regions demonstrate the strong linkage between variabilities of sea-ice production and bottom/intermediate water formation. The

  7. Hydrogeology and chemical quality of water and bottom sediment at three stormwater detention ponds, Pinellas County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Mario; Hutchinson, C.B.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation of three detention ponds in Pinellas County, Florida indicated little potential for chemical contamination of surficial-aquifer ground water; however, concentrations of contami- nants in some sediments are sufficient to indicate possible hazardous levels of bioconcentration in benthic organisms. The general direction of ground- water movement at three pond sites indicates that the ponds are ground-water discharge points. Shallow ground water tends to move laterally toward these ponds, which have surface outflow, instead of from the ponds into the aquifer. Surface-water and pond-sediment samples from a 1-year-old pond were collected and analyzed for inorganic constituents and organic compounds. The concentrations were either near or below analytical detection limits. Surface-water and pond-sediment samples from the other two ponds, 20- and 30-years old, respectively, also were analyzed for inorganic constituents and organic compounds. The water quality of these older ponds was not significantly different from that of the 1-year-old pond. However, bottom sediments in the 20- and 30-year-old ponds contained 16 and 23 organic compounds, respectively. None of the organic compounds were in sufficient concentrations to cause concern about their chronic effects on aquatic life. Concentrations of dichlordiphenyl-trichlorethane, dieldrin, and heptachlor were above the hazardous level with respect to bioconcentration in the food chain.

  8. Contrasting fates of organic matter in locations having different organic matter inputs and bottom water O2 concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai-Thi, Ngoc-Nu; St-Onge, Guillaume; Tremblay, Luc

    2017-11-01

    The goals of this work were to study sedimentary organic matter (OM) composition and transformation since the end of the last deglaciation and to evaluate the influence of contrasting depositional conditions on these parameters. One station was located in the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (LSLE) where the current bottom waters are hypoxic and receive terrigenous and marine OM. The other station, located in the Gulf of St. Lawrence (GSL), has more oxygenated bottom waters and almost only marine OM inputs. Analyses included enantiomers of amino acids (L and D-AA) and muramic acid that provide different markers of OM alteration state and reactivity and of bacterial contribution to OM composition and diagenesis. The markers clearly indicated the increase in OM alteration state with depth in the sediments of the LSLE and the GSL. The steady decrease in AA yields with depth confirmed the preferential degradation of AA compared to the rest of the OM. The OM in the surface sediment of the LSLE was less altered than that of the GSL and was enriched in bacterial biomass as indicated by much higher muramic acid yields. Results indicated that an important degradation of particulate organic matter occurs in the water column in the GSL, while it takes place mostly in the sediments in the LSLE. The presence of heterogeneous OM and hypoxic conditions in the LSLE likely reduce OM degradation rate in its deep water layer. However, the zone near the water-sediment interface is responsible for large variations in AA composition at both locations. A relatively new redox index, based on AA composition, was tested and appeared robust. This study highlights the importance of ambient conditions in determining the fate of OM and in the biogeochemical cycles of vital elements.

  9. Microbial stratification in low pH oxic and suboxic macroscopic growths along an acid mine drainage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Méndez-García, Celia; Mesa, Victoria; Sprenger, Richard Remko

    2014-01-01

    and N, H2, Fe, aromatic amino acids, sphingolipid and peptidoglycan metabolism. Our study is the first to highlight profound taxonomic and functional shifts in single AMD formations, as well as new microbial species and the importance of H2 in acidic suboxic macroscopic growths.The ISME Journal advance...

  10. A Synoptic View of the Ventilation and Circulation of Antarctic Bottom Water from Chlorofluorocarbons and Natural Tracers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purkey, Sarah G; Smethie, William M; Gebbie, Geoffrey; Gordon, Arnold L; Sonnerup, Rolf E; Warner, Mark J; Bullister, John L

    2017-09-06

    Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) is the coldest, densest, most prolific water mass in the global ocean. AABW forms at several distinct regions along the Antarctic coast and feeds into the bottom limb of the meridional overturning circulation, filling most of the global deep ocean. AABW has warmed, freshened, and declined in volume around the globe in recent decades, which has implications for the global heat and sea level rise budgets. Over the past three decades, the use of tracers, especially time-varying tracers such as chlorofluorocarbons, has been essential to our understanding of the formation, circulation, and variability of AABW. Here, we review three decades of temperature, salinity, and tracer data and analysis that have led to our current knowledge of AABW and how the southern component of deep-ocean ventilation is changing with time. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Marine Science Volume 10 is January 3, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  11. Development of a GPS buoy system for monitoring tsunami, sea waves, ocean bottom crustal deformation and atmospheric water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Teruyuki; Terada, Yukihiro; Nagai, Toshihiko; Koshimura, Shun'ichi

    2010-05-01

    bottom positions with a few centimeters in accuracy. The system is now operational for more than ten sites along the Japanese coasts. Currently, however, the measurements are not continuous but have been done once to several times a year using a boat. If a GPS and acoustic system is placed on a buoy, ocean bottom position could be monitored in near real-time and continuous manner. This will allow us to monitor more detailed and short term crustal deformations at the sea bottom. Another application plan is for an atmospheric research. Previous researchers have shown that GPS is capable of measuring atmospheric water vapor through estimating tropospheric zenith delay measurements of GPS at the sea surface. Information of water vapor content and its temporal variation over sea surface will much contribute to weather forecast on land which has mostly been conducted only by land observations. Considering that the atmospheric mass moves from west to east in general in and around Japanese islands, information of water vapor together with other atmospheric data from an array of GPS buoy placed in the west of Japanese Islands, will much improve weather forecast. We try to examine if this is also feasible. As a conclusion of a series of GPS buoy experiments, we could assert that GPS buoy system will be a powerful tool to monitor ocean surface and much contribute to provide safe and secure life of people.

  12. Effects of transient bottom water currents and oxygen concentrations on benthic exchange rates as assessed by eddy correlation measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtappels, Moritz; Glud, Ronnie N.; Doris, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    Eddy correlation (EC) measurements in the benthic boundary layer (BBL) allow estimating benthic O2 uptake from a point distant to the sediment surface. This noninvasive approach has clear advantages as it does not disturb natural hydrodynamic conditions, integrates the flux over a large foot...... in the bottom water are in steady state, which is seldom the case in highly dynamic environments like coastal waters. Therefore, it is of great importance to estimate the error introduced by nonsteady state conditions. We investigated two cases of transient conditions. First, the case of transient O2...... concentrations was examined using the theory of shear flow dispersion. A theoretical relationship between the change of O2 concentrations and the induced vertical O2 flux is introduced and applied to field measurements showing that changes of 5–10 μM O2 h−1 result in transient EC-fluxes of 6–12 mmol O2 m−2 d−1...

  13. Bottom attenuation estimation using sound intensity fluctuations due to mode coupling by nonlinear internal waves in shallow water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorev, Valery A; Katsnelson, Boris G; Lynch, James F

    2016-11-01

    Analyses of fluctuations of low frequency signals (300 ± 30 Hz) propagating in shallow water in the presence of nonlinear internal waves (NIWs) in the Shallow Water 2006 experiment are carried out. Signals were received by a vertical line array at a distance of ∼20 km from the source. A NIW train was moving totally inside of the acoustic track, and the angle between the wave front of the NIW and the acoustic track in the horizontal plane was ∼10°. It is shown that the spectrum of the sound intensity fluctuations contains peaks corresponding to the coupling of pairs of propagating modes. Analysis of spectra at different hydrophone depths, and also summed over depth allows the authors to estimate attenuation in the bottom sediments.

  14. Pressure field induced in the water column by acoustic-gravity waves generated from sea bottom motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Tiago C. A.; Kadri, Usama

    2016-10-01

    An uplift of the ocean bottom caused by a submarine earthquake can trigger acoustic-gravity waves that travel at near the speed of sound in water and thus may act as early tsunami precursors. We study the spatiotemporal evolution of the pressure field induced by acoustic-gravity modes during submarine earthquakes, analytically. We show that these modes may all induce comparable temporal variations in pressure at different water depths in regions far from the epicenter, though the pressure field depends on the presence of a leading acoustic-gravity wave mode. Practically, this can assist in the implementation of an early tsunami detection system by identifying the pressure and frequency ranges of measurement equipment and appropriate installation locations.

  15. Summer Bottom Trawl Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sampling the coastal waters of the Gulf of Maine using the Northeast Fishery Science Center standardized bottom trawl has been problematic due to large areas of hard...

  16. Integrated Water Resources Management, institutions and livelihoods under stress: bottom-up perspectives from Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mabiza, C.C.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of people in Limpopo river basin depend on rainfed agriculture. Unfortunately the Limpopo is water scarce, and parts of the basin such as the Mzingwane catchment are under stress in terms of agro-ecological and socio-politico-economic conditions. Integrated Water Resources Management

  17. Integrated Water Resources Management, institutions and livelihoods under stress : Bottom-up perspectives from Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mabiza, C.C.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of people in Limpopo river basin depend on rainfed agriculture. Unfortunately the Limpopo is water scarce, and parts of the basin such as the Mzingwane catchment are under stress in terms of agro-ecological and socio-politico-economic conditions. Integrated Water Resources Management

  18. A bottom-landing water sampling system for the benthic boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, A. J.; Barrett, C. D.

    A novel water sampling device which enables vertical profiles of water samples to be obtained within the benthic boundary layer in shelf sea waters is described. A maximum of ten samples spread over 2 m immediately above the seabed can be obtained on each deployment. The design of the sample bottles minimizes disturbances to particle aggregates and positive displacement sampling ensures that the samples are representative of the environment. Suspended-solids profiles sampled in the benthic boundary layer over 15-hour period at a station in the English Channel are presented to demonstrate the utility of the system.

  19. Automatic non-destructive three-dimensional acoustic coring system for in situ detection of aquatic plant root under the water bottom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsunori Mizuno

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Digging is necessary to detect plant roots under the water bottom. However, such detection is affected by the transparency of water and the working skills of divers, usually requires considerable time for high-resolution sampling, and always damages the survey site. We developed a new automatic non-destructive acoustic measurement system that visualizes the space under the water bottom, and tested the system in the in situ detection of natural plant roots. The system mainly comprises a two-dimensional waterproof stage controlling unit and acoustic measurement unit. The stage unit was electrically controlled through a notebook personal computer, and the space under the water bottom was scanned in a two-dimensional plane with the stage unit moving in steps of 0.01 m (±0.0001 m. We confirmed a natural plant root with diameter of 0.025–0.030 m in the reconstructed three-dimensional acoustic image. The plant root was at a depth of about 0.54 m and the propagation speed of the wave between the bottom surface and plant root was estimated to be 1574 m/s. This measurement system for plant root detection will be useful for the non-destructive assessment of the status of the space under the water bottom.

  20. Sedimentary phosphorus dynamics and the evolution of bottom-water hypoxia: A coupled benthic­pelagic model of a coastal system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reed, D.C.; Slomp, C.P.; Gustafsson, B.G.

    2011-01-01

    The present study examines oxygen and phosphorus dynamics at a seasonally hypoxic site in the Arkona basin of the Baltic Sea. A coupled benthic–pelagic reactive-transport model is used to describe the evolution of bottom-water solute concentrations, as well as pore-water and sediment profiles.

  1. Town Lake bottom sediments : a chronicle of water quality changes in Austin, Texas, 1960-98

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Metre, Peter C.; Mahler, B.J.

    1999-01-01

    Town Lake, the last in the chain of Highland Lakes on the Colorado River, runs through the center of Austin, Texas. On any given day, grebes and coots dot the water, rowers skim alongside, and the sparkle of the sun on the water can be admired from the adjacent hike and bike path and from the windows of nearby office buildings. During the summer months, crowds gather along the shores of Town Lake to watch as many as 1 million Mexican Free-Tail bats emerge from under the Congress Avenue bridge. But below the lazily moving azure water lies a bed of sediment about 1 meter (m) thick?sediment that has been deposited gradually since the reservoir was formed in 1959 and that has been recording changes in water quality since that time. What can this sediment tell us about the history of water quality in the Colorado River? And what does it say about the effects of the rapid urbanization of Austin and the future health of our environment?

  2. Pairing top-down and bottom-up approaches to analyze catchment scale management of water quality and quantity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovette, J. P.; Duncan, J. M.; Band, L. E.

    2016-12-01

    Watershed management requires information on the hydrologic impacts of local to regional land use, land cover and infrastructure conditions. Management of runoff volumes, storm flows, and water quality can benefit from large scale, "top-down" screening tools, using readily available information, as well as more detailed, "bottom-up" process-based models that explicitly track local runoff production and routing from sources to receiving water bodies. Regional scale data, available nationwide through the NHD+, and top-down models based on aggregated catchment information provide useful tools for estimating regional patterns of peak flows, volumes and nutrient loads at the catchment level. Management impacts can be estimated with these models, but have limited ability to resolve impacts beyond simple changes to land cover proportions. Alternatively, distributed process-based models provide more flexibility in modeling management impacts by resolving spatial patterns of nutrient source, runoff generation, and uptake. This bottom-up approach can incorporate explicit patterns of land cover, drainage connectivity, and vegetation extent, but are typically applied over smaller areas. Here, we first model peak flood flows and nitrogen loads across North Carolina's 70,000 NHD+ catchments using USGS regional streamflow regression equations and the SPARROW model. We also estimate management impact by altering aggregated sources in each of these models. To address the missing spatial implications of the top-down approach, we further explore the demand for riparian buffers as a management strategy, simulating the accumulation of nutrient sources along flow paths and the potential mitigation of these sources through forested buffers. We use the Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation System (RHESSys) to model changes across several basins in North Carolina's Piedmont and Blue Ridge regions, ranging in size from 15 - 1,130 km2. The two approaches provide a complementary set of tools

  3. Constraints in using Cerium-animaly of bulk sediments as an indicator of paleo bottom water redox environment: A case study from the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Pearce, N.J.G.; Mislankar, P.G.

    condition. Thus, the negative Ce-anomaly observed between 4 and 5 m core depth does not represent a suboxic/anoxic environment, but is more likely due to the retention of a negative Ce-anomaly caused by authigenic phosphate and authigenic Fe-rich smectite...

  4. A bottom-up approach of stochastic demand allocation in water quality modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blokker, E.J.M.; Vreeburg, J.H.G.; Beverloo, H.; Klein Arfman, M.; Van Dijk, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    An “all pipes” hydraulic model of a drinking water distribution system was constructed with two types of demand allocations. One is constructed with the conventional top-down approach, i.e. a demand multiplier pattern from the booster station is allocated to all demand nodes with a correction factor

  5. A bottom-up approach of stochastic demand allocation in water quality modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blokker, E.J.M.; Vreeburg, J.H.G.; Beverloo, H.; Klein Arfman, M.; Van Dijk, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    An “all pipes” hydraulic model of a DMA-sized drinking water distribution system was onstructed with two types of demand allocations. One is constructed with the conventional op-down approach, i.e. a demand multiplier pattern from the booster station is llocated to all demand nodes with a correction

  6. Development process for integrated water resources management plan under a bottom-up participation perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kittiwet Kuntiyawichai

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the development process for the integrated water resources management and development plan of Maha Sarakham Province by considering the priority and urgency of water problem issues. Gathering feedback from stakeholders and prioritizing water management and development projects are also taken into consideration. In view of integrated plans, the project is classified into short-, medium- and long-term plans with the project duration of 2 years, 3 years and 5 years, respectively. In this case, the plans can be categorized into proposed provincial and local plans. Firstly, the comprehensive provincial plans can be divided into 2 groups, i.e. district plans with the total number of 532 plans, which comprise of 505 projects for coping with drought and 27 projects for flood mitigation, and provincial plans from 13 agencies with the amount of 513 projects, which include 396 projects and 117 projects for dealing with drought and flood, respectively. Secondly, there are 4,099 of local plans to be put in place, in which 3,973 projects and 126 projects are proposed to handle drought and flood problems, respectively. From the analysis, it is found that if all planned drought relief projects are implemented, the water demand for domestic and agricultural needs could be covered by 96% and 51%, respectively. In case of the entire proposed flood alleviation projects are executed, 29% of the total flood prone areas can be effectively protected.

  7. Presence of selected chemicals of emerging concern in water and bottom sediment from the St. Louis River, St. Louis Bay, and Superior Bay, Minnesota and Wisconsin, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Victoria G.; Lee, Kathy E.; Kieta, Kristen A.; Elliott, Sarah M.

    2012-01-01

    The St. Louis Bay of Lake Superior receives substantial urban runoff, wastewater treatment plant effluent, and industrial effluent. In 1987, the International Joint Commission designated the St. Louis Bay portion of the lower St. Louis River as one of the Great Lakes Areas of Concern. Concerns exist about the potential effects of chemicals of emerging concern on aquatic biota because many of these chemicals, including endocrine active chemicals, have been shown to affect the endocrine systems of fish. To determine the occurrence of chemicals of emerging concern in the St. Louis River, the St. Louis Bay, and Superior Bay, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources collected water and bottom-sediment samples from 40 sites from August through October 2010. The objectives of this study were to (1) identify the extent to which chemicals of emerging concern, including pharmaceuticals, hormones, and other organic chemicals, occur in the St. Louis River, St. Louis Bay, and Superior Bay, and (2) identify the extent to which the chemicals may have accumulated in bottom sediment of the study area. Samples were analyzed for selected wastewater indicators, hormones, sterols, bisphenol A, and human-health pharmaceuticals. During this study, 33 of 89 chemicals of emerging concern were detected among all water samples collected and 56 of 104 chemicals of emerging concern were detected in bottom-sediment samples. The chemical N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET) was the most commonly detected chemical in water samples and 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene was the most commonly detected chemical in bottom-sediment samples. In general, chemicals of emerging concern were detected at a higher frequency in bottom-sediment samples than in water samples. Estrone (a steroid hormone) and hexahydrohexamethyl cyclopentabensopyran (a synthetic fragrance) were the most commonly detected endocrine active chemicals in

  8. Tracking Bottom Waters in the Southern Adriatic Sea Applying Seismic Oceanography Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-05

    profile so the weak thermohaline reflections can be visualized 3. The Adriatic context The general circulation of the Adriatic Sea is characterized by...Reflectivity Thermohaline structures Southern Adriatic Sea ABSTRACT We present the first results from the seismic oceanography (SO) cruise ADRIASE1SMIC...where we successfully imaged thermohaline fine structures in the shallow water environment (50-150 m) of the southern Adriatic Sea during March

  9. Forcing of a bottom-mounted circular cylinder by steep regular water waves at finite depth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Bo Terp; Bredmose, Henrik; Bingham, Harry B.

    2014-01-01

    with the experimental data was found. Time-domain computations of the normalized inline force history on the cylinder were analysed as a function of dimensionless wave height, water depth and wavelength. Here the dependence on depth was weak, while an increase in wavelength or wave height both lead to the formation......-harmonic force, a good agreement with the perturbation theories of Faltinsen, Newman & Vinje (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 289, 1995, pp. 179–198) and Malenica & Molin (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 302, 1995, pp. 203–229) was found. It was shown that the third-harmonic forces were estimated well by a Morison force formulation...

  10. Ground-water, surface-water, and bottom-sediment contamination in the O-field area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, and the possible effects of selected remedial actions on ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Lorah, Michelle M.; Oliveros, James P.

    1995-01-01

    Disposal of munitions and chemical-warfare substances has introduced inorganic and organic contaminants to the ground water, surface water, and bottom sediment at O-Field, in the Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Contaminants include chloride, arsenic, transition metals, chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic compounds, and organosulfur and organophosphorus compounds. The hydrologic effects of several remedial actions were estimated by use of a ground-water-flow model. The remedial actions examined were an impermeable covering, encapsulation, subsurface barriers, a ground-water drain, pumping of wells to manage water levels or to remove contaminated ground water for treatment, and no action.

  11. Fe-Binding Dissolved Organic Ligands in the Oxic and Suboxic Waters of the Black Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerringa, L.J.A.; Rijkenberg, M.J.A.; Bown, J.; Margolin, A.R.; Laan, P.; De Baar, H.J.W.

    2016-01-01

    In the oxygen-rich layer of the Black Sea, above the permanent halocline, the Fe and nitrate concentrations are low where fluorescence is relatively high, indicating uptake by phytoplankton. In this study we used ligand exchange adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE-aCSV), using

  12. DRIVERS OF THE DYNAMICS OF DIAZOTROPHS AND DENITRIFIERS IN NORTH SEA BOTTOM WATERS AND SEDIMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas eStal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The fixation of dinitrogen (N2 and denitrification are two opposite processes in the nitrogen cycle. The former transfers atmospheric dinitrogen gas into bound nitrogen in the biosphere, while the latter returns this bound nitrogen back to atmospheric dinitrogen. It is unclear whether or not these processes are intimately connected in any microbial ecosystem or that they are spatially and/or temporally separated. Here, we measured seafloor nitrogen fixation and denitrification as well as pelagic nitrogen fixation by using the stable isotope technique. Alongside, we measured the diversity, abundance, and activity of nitrogen-fixing and denitrifying microorganisms at three stations in the southern North Sea. Nitrogen fixation ranged from undetectable to 2.4 nmol N L-1 d-1 and from undetectable to 8.2 nmol N g-1 d-1 in the water column and seafloor, respectively. The highest rates were measured in August at Doggersbank, both for the water column and for the seafloor. Denitrification ranged from 1.7 to 208.8 µmol m-2 d-1 and the highest rates were measured in May at the Oyster Grounds. DNA sequence analysis showed sequences of nifH, a structural gene for nitrogenase, related to sequences from anaerobic sulfur/iron reducers and sulfate reducers. Sequences of the structural gene for nitrite reductase, nirS, were related to environmental clones from marine sediments. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR data revealed the highest abundance of nifH and nirS genes at the Oyster Grounds. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR data revealed the highest nifH expression at Doggersbank and the highest nirS expression at the Oyster Grounds. The distribution of the diazotrophic and denitrifying communities seems to be subject to different selecting factors, leading to spatial and temporal separation of nitrogen fixation and denitrification. These selecting factors include temperature, organic matter availability, and

  13. THE INFLUENCE OF GYPSUM TREATMENT ON PHOSPHORUS RETENTION IN BOTTOM SEDIMENTS AND ON THE WATER OF MAN-MADE LAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilianna Bartoszek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a research covering the stability of phosphorus retention in the bottom sediments, resulting from application of gypsum in anoxic conditions and in slightly acidic environment (pH~5 of solutions. The present work also contains an analysis of possible effects of gypsum application for water from the reservoir, on the basis of selected parameters of overlying water. Undisturbed deposit cores extracted from two research stations on the Solina Reservoir have been a subject to a 10-weeks long exposure in determinate conditions, after application of gypsum. The conducted research indicated that retention capacities of deposits, which become increased after the use of gypsum, will decrease over time (e.g. after winter period. Application of gypsum led to a quite significant increase in concentrations of calcium in solutions. Intense release of iron from the sediments into the solutions and decrease in SO42- content, during the said 10-week exposure in anoxic conditions, indicates the use of iron (III and sulphates as electron acceptors in process of oxidization of an organic substance.

  14. The Deposition and Accumulation of Microplastics in Marine Sediments and Bottom Water from the Irish Continental Shelf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jake; Lusher, Amy; Thompson, Richard C; Morley, Audrey

    2017-09-07

    Microplastics are widely dispersed throughout the marine environment. An understanding of the distribution and accumulation of this form of pollution is crucial for gauging environmental risk. Presented here is the first record of plastic contamination, in the 5 mm-250 μm size range, of Irish continental shelf sediments. Sixty-two microplastics were recovered from 10 of 11 stations using box cores. 97% of recovered microplastics were found to reside shallower than 2.5 cm sediment depth, with the area of highest microplastic concentration being the water-sediment interface and top 0.5 cm of sediments (66%). Microplastics were not found deeper than 3.5 ± 0.5 cm. These findings demonstrate that microplastic contamination is ubiquitous within superficial sediments and bottom water along the western Irish continental shelf. Results highlight that cores need to be at least 4-5 cm deep to quantify the standing stock of microplastics within marine sediments. All recovered microplastics were classified as secondary microplastics as they appear to be remnants of larger items; fibres being the principal form of microplastic pollution (85%), followed by broken fragments (15%). The range of polymer types, colours and physical forms recovered suggests a variety of sources. Further research is needed to understand the mechanisms influencing microplastic transport, deposition, resuspension and subsequent interactions with biota.

  15. A Bottom-up Vulnerability Analysis of Water Systems with Decentralized Decision Making and Demographic Shifts- the Case of Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachaut, T.; Yoon, J.; Klassert, C. J. A.; Talozi, S.; Mustafa, D.; Knox, S.; Selby, P. D.; Haddad, Y.; Gorelick, S.; Tilmant, A.

    2016-12-01

    Probabilistic approaches to uncertainty in water systems management can face challenges of several types: non stationary climate, sudden shocks such as conflict-driven migrations, or the internal complexity and dynamics of large systems. There has been a rising trend in the development of bottom-up methods that place focus on the decision side instead of probability distributions and climate scenarios. These approaches are based on defining acceptability thresholds for the decision makers and considering the entire range of possibilities over which such thresholds are crossed. We aim at improving the knowledge on the applicability and relevance of this approach by enlarging its scope beyond climate uncertainty and single decision makers; thus including demographic shifts, internal system dynamics, and multiple stakeholders at different scales. This vulnerability analysis is part of the Jordan Water Project and makes use of an ambitious multi-agent model developed by its teams with the extensive cooperation of the Ministry of Water and Irrigation of Jordan. The case of Jordan is a relevant example for migration spikes, rapid social changes, resource depletion and climate change impacts. The multi-agent modeling framework used provides a consistent structure to assess the vulnerability of complex water resources systems with distributed acceptability thresholds and stakeholder interaction. A proof of concept and preliminary results are presented for a non-probabilistic vulnerability analysis that involves different types of stakeholders, uncertainties other than climatic and the integration of threshold-based indicators. For each stakeholder (agent) a vulnerability matrix is constructed over a multi-dimensional domain, which includes various hydrologic and/or demographic variables.

  16. Dense water cascading, bottom currents and sediment wave formation at the exit of the Bari canyon (Southern Adriatic Sea, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langone, Leonardo; Miserocchi, Stefano; Boldrin, Alfredo; Turchetto, Margherita; Foglini, Federica; Trincardi, Fabio

    2010-05-01

    The dense water forming in the North Adriatic (NAdDW) spreading southward along the Italian continental shelf, sinks in the Southern Adriatic basin through particular cascading events. Such events are seasonal, occurring specially in April, with variable intensity. These phenomena control the water mass mixing, the deep ocean ventilation, the behaviour of deep ecosystems, the formation of complex erosive and depositional bedforms and the abyssal export and burial of nutrients and carbon. Because of the NadDW formation is linked to climate factors (frequency, duration and size of Bura winds), the temporal variations of the NadDW dispersion into the Southern Adriatic allow to make inferences of the impact of recent climate changes on the ecosystems of the deep Mediterranean Sea. Previous research projects (EuroStrataform, HERMES) acquired a large data set of bathymetric, side-scan sonar (TOBI) and Chirp sonar profiles, which were used to build detailed morpho-bathymetric maps of the Southern Adriatic margin. There, the seabed is extremely complex, characterized by a large variety of bedforms (sediment waves, erosive scours, longitudinal furrows and giant comet marks). A branch of the cascading NAdDW is confined and accelerated through the Bari canyon where it produces a strong current capable of reaching down-slope velocities greater than 60 cm s-1 near the bottom at ~600 m of water depth, eroding the canyon thalweg and entraining large amounts of fine-grained sediment. At the exit of the canyon, in water depth greater than 800 m, the current becomes less confined, spreads laterally and generates an 80-km2-wide field of mud waves; these bedforms migrate up current and show amplitudes up to 50 m and wavelengths of about 1 km. Cruise IMPACT-09 of RV Urania was carried out in the Southern Adriatic Sea from 17-30 March 2009 with main scope of studying the impact of NadDW cascading events on the deep ecosystems of the Southern Adriatic. Experiments planned in the cruise

  17. Distribution of dissolved and labile particulate trace metals in the overlying bottom water in the Vistula River plume (southern Baltic Sea)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sokolowski, A.; Wolowicz, M.; Hummel, H.

    2001-01-01

    Overlying bottom water samples were collected in the Vistula River plume, southern Baltic Sea, (Poland) and analysed for dissolved and labile particulate (1 M HCl extractable) Cu, Pb, Zn, Mn, Fe and Ni, hydrological parameters being measured simultaneously. Particulate organic matter (POM),

  18. Decline of deep and bottom water ventilation and slowing down of anthropogenic carbon storage in the Weddell Sea, 1984-2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huhn, Oliver; Rhein, Monika; Hoppema, Mario; van Heuven, Steven

    We use a 27 year long time series of repeated transient tracer observations to investigate the evolution of the ventilation time scales and the related content of anthropogenic carbon (C-ant) in deep and bottom water in the Weddell Sea. This time series consists of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)

  19. Reconnaissance investigation of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in and near Stillwater Wildlife Management Area, Churchill County, Nevada, 1986-87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, R.J.; Hallock, R.J.; Rowe, T.G.; Lico, M.S.; Burge, H.L.; Thompson, S.P.

    1990-01-01

    A reconnaissance was initiated in 1986 to determine whether the quality of irrigation-drainage water in and near the Stillwater Wildlife Management Area, Nevada, has caused or has potential to cause harmful effects on human health, fish, wildlife, or other beneficial uses of water. Samples of surface and groundwater, bottom sediment, and biota were collected from sites upstream and downstream from the Fallon agricultural area in the Carson Desert, and analyzed for potentially toxic trace elements. Other analysis included radioactive substances, major dissolved constituents, and nutrients in water, and pesticide residues in bottom sediment and biota. In areas affected by irrigation drainage, the following constituents were found to commonly exceed baseline concentrations or recommended criteria for protection of aquatic life or propagation of wildlife: In water, arsenic, boron, dissolved solids, molybdenum, sodium, and un-ionized ammonia; in bottom sediments, arsenic, lithium, mercury, molybdenum, and selenium; and in biota, arsenic, boron, chromium, copper, mercury, selenium, and zinc. In some wetlands, selenium and mercury appeared to be biomagnified, and arsenic bioaccumulated. Pesticides contamination in bottom sediments and biota was insignificant. Adverse biological effects observed during this reconnaissance included gradual vegetative changes and species loss, fish die-offs, waterfowl disease epidemics, and persistent and unexplained deaths of migratory birds. (USGS)

  20. Phytoplankton reduction in near-bottom water caused by filter-feeding Nereis diversicolor - Implications for worm growth and population grazing impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Poul Scheel; Riisgård, H. U.; Poulsen, L.

    1996-01-01

    Studies of vertical profiles of phytoplankton in the field combined with laboratory experiments demonstrated that reduction in phytoplankton concentrations in the near-bottom water layer, 5 to 10 cm in thickness on calm days, may play a significant role for the filter-feeding polychaete Nereis...

  1. Seasonal variation of CaCO3 saturation state in bottom water of a biological hotspot in the Chukchi Sea, Arctic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yamamoto-Kawai

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of calcium carbonate saturation state (Ω was observed in the Chukchi Sea in autumn 2012 and early summer 2013. Ω in bottom water ranged from 0.3 to 2.0 for aragonite and from 0.5 to 3.2 for calcite in 2012. In 2013, Ω in bottom water was 1.1–2.8 for aragonite and 1.7–4.4 for calcite. Aragonite and calcite undersaturation was found in high productivity regions in autumn 2012 but not in early summer 2013. Comparison with other parameters has indicated that biological processes – respiration and photosynthesis – are major factors controlling the regional and temporal variability of Ω. From these ship-based observations, we have obtained empirical equations to reconstruct Ω from temperature, salinity and apparent oxygen utilization. Using 2-year-round mooring data and these equations, we have reconstructed seasonal variation of Ω in bottom water in Hope Valley, a biological hotspot in the southern Chukchi Sea. Estimated Ω was high in spring and early summer, decreased in later summer, and remained relatively low in winter. Calculations indicated a possibility that bottom water could have been undersaturated for aragonite on an intermittent basis even in the pre-industrial period, and that anthropogenic CO2 has extended the period of aragonite undersaturation to more than 2-fold longer by now.

  2. Better well control through safe drilling margin identification, influx analysis and direct bottom hole pressure control method for deep water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veeningen, Daan [National Oilwell Varco IntelliServ (NOV), Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Currently, well control events are almost exclusively detected by using surface measurements. Measuring a volume increase in the 'closed loop' mud circulation system; a standpipe pressure decrease; or changes in a variety of drilling parameters provide indicators of a kick. Especially in deep water, where the riser comprises a substantial section of the well bore, early kick detection is paramount for limiting the severity of a well bore influx and improve the ability to regain well control. While downhole data is presently available from downhole tools nearby the bit, available data rates are sparse as mud pulse telemetry bandwidth is limited and well bore measurements compete with transmission of other subsurface data. Further, data transfer is one-directional, latency is significant and conditions along the string are unknown. High-bandwidth downhole data transmission system, via a wired or networked drill string system, has the unique capability to acquire real-time pressure and temperature measurement at a number of locations along the drill string. This system provides high-resolution downhole data available at very high speed, eliminating latency and restrictions that typically limit the availability of downhole data. The paper describes well control opportunities for deep water operations through the use of downhole data independent from surface measurements. First, the networked drill string provides efficient ways to identify pore pressure, fracture gradient, and true mud weight that comprise the safe drilling margin. Second, the independent measurement capability provides early kick detection and improved ability to analyze an influx even with a heterogeneous mud column through distributed along-string annular pressure measurements. Third, a methodology is proposed for a direct measurement method using downhole real-time pressure for maintaining constant bottom hole pressure during well kills in deep water. (author)

  3. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: the potential impact on microphytoplankton of bottom water discharge at subsurface in the Caribbean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, Mélanie; Boye, Marie; Garçon, Véronique; L'Helguen, Stéphane; Donval, Anne; De la Broise, Denis

    2015-04-01

    Part of the solar energy can be harvested and used in different processes. Taking advantage of the natural temperature gradient between the surface and deep ocean, the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) process fulfills this goal. The IMPALA project (Impacts of artificial upwelling on microplankton) aims to study the potential environmental impacts of releasing, below the surface, deep seawater flowing out of a scheduled OTEC pilot plant offshore the Martinique Island in the Caribbean Sea. Biogeochemical processes involved in the artificial upwelling generated by the use of an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plant were studied in this poor nutrient environment. The biogeochemical and physical ecosystem structure and functioning on the OTEC site were described and deep seawater discharge using in situ microcosm experiments was carried out off Martinique. Surface seawater was collected in ultra-clean conditions at two depths (corresponding to the maximum of chlorophyll a concentration and bottom of nutricline) and mixed in different proportions with deep seawater (2% and 10%). Pigments determination, picophytoplankton abundance, macro-nutrients (silicates, nitrates, and phosphates), particular organic carbon and nitrogen concentrations and primary production were documented to assess the variability between the natural environment and within the microcosms. The latter were immersed for 6 days on a 250 meters mooring. Variations observed in microcosms experiments and in the surrounding waters were compared in order to evaluate the natural variability of the phytoplankton assemblage and the potential shifts induced by deep water supply. Results obtained during two fields campaigns conducted off Martinique at the onset of the dry (November-December 2013) and wet seasons (June 2014), respectively, will be presented and discussed. Incubating mixtures of subsurface and deep waters at two ratios and at two depths, allows evaluating the potential impact of a deep

  4. Investigating the Sources of Decadal-Scale Property Changes in Antarctic Bottom Water in the Southeast Indian Ocean (80-90°E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, K.; Macdonald, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    A recognizable warming and freshening of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) throughout much of the Southern Ocean is one of the major findings of the international long-line hydrographic programs of 1990's and the 2000's. A recent GO-SHIP repeat of the I08S line in the southeast Indian Ocean in 2016 found continued, but weaker, AABW warming and significantly strong freshening in the Antarctic-Australian Basin (A-AB). It has been proposed that the 2010 B9b iceberg calving along the Adélie Land Coast may be linked to the sharp increase in A-AB AABW freshening. The present study seeks to affirm or challenge this hypothesis through a quantitative investigation into the origins of A-AB (i.e. I08S) bottom water. The investigation takes the form of an Extended Optimum MultiParameter mixing analysis (eOMP) to determine a) the contribution of individual formation regions to the bottom water seen at I08S, and b) how these contributions may have changed over the twenty years since the first occupation of the line. The initial investigation that used mean source water properties found Adélie Bottom Water (ADLBW) to be the dominant source of AABW in the A-AB. However, by calculating source water properties from times preceding the occupations of the I08S line (1994, 2007, 2016), it was determined that in both 1994 and 2007, Ross Sea Bottom Water (RSBW) was the dominant source of AABW (approx. 61 & 75 %, respectively) in the A-AB. This dominance shifted in 2016, to ADLBW composing approximately 44% of AABW. This result suggests that it is feasible that the B9b calving that impacted ADLBW in the formation region is, at least, partially responsible for the changes seen at I08S. Nevertheless, given that there are significant contributions from both RSBW and Weddell Sea Bottom Water, it seems unlikely that this single alteration of ADLBW is the sole driver of the observed freshening. Further investigation seeks to determine the sensitivity of the solution to particular source water

  5. Field screening of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in and near Walker River Indian Reservation, Nevada 1994-95

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thodal, Carl E.; Tuttle, Peter L.

    1996-01-01

    A study was begun in 1994 to determine whether the quality of irrigation drainage from the Walker River Indian Reservation, Nevada, has caused or has potential to cause harmful effects on human health or on fish and wildlife, or may adversely affect the suitability of the Walker River for other beneficial uses. Samples of water, bottom sediment, and biota were collected during June-August 1994 (during a drought year) from sites upstream from and on the Walker River Indian Reservation for analyses of trace elements. Other analyses included physical characteristics, major dissolved constituents, selected species of water-soluble nitrogen and phosphorus, and selected pesticides in bottom sediment. Water samples were collected again from four sites on the Reservation in August 1995 (during a wetterthan- average year) to provide data for comparing extreme climatic conditions. Water samples collected from the Walker River Indian Reservation in 1994 equaled or exceeded the Nevada water-quality standard or level of concern for at least one of the following: water temperature, pH, dissolved solids, unionized ammonia, phosphate, arsenic, boron, chromium, lead, and molybdenum; in 1995, only a single sample from one site exceeded a Nevada water-quality standard for molybdenum. Levels of concern for trace elements in bottom sediment collected in 1994 were equaled or exceeded for arsenic, iron, manganese, and zinc. Concentrations of organochiorine pesticide residues in bottom sediment were below analytical reporting limits. Levels of concern for trace-elements in samples of biota were equaled or exceeded for arsenic, boron, copper, and mercury. Results of toxicity testing indicate that only water samples from Walker Lake caused a toxic response in test bacteria. Arsenic and boron concentrations in water, bottom sediment, and biological tissue exceeded levels of concern throughout the Walker River Basin, but most commonly in the lower Walker River Basin. Mercury also was elevated

  6. Distribution of shallow water soft and hard bottom seabeds in the Isla del Coco National Park, Pacific Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A. Sibaja-Cordero

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Geographic Information Systems (GIS applications used in marine habitats are powerful tools for management and monitoring of marine reserves and resources. Here, we present a series of maps of the soft and hard substrates in the shallow waters (>80 m depth of Parque Nacional Isla del Coco (PNIC= Isla del Coco National Park. We use bathymetry data and field data as input for a GIS, GAM, and kriging methods to generate a series of maps that describe the bottom characteristics. Eight types of bottom were found in the PNIC by composition and grain size. The shore of the island and islets consisted of rocky formations (mainly basalts, with coral reefs in the subtidal of some areas. Rhodolith beds had a dispersing distribution. The bottom on the southern and southwestern region is hard substrate, while sediments cover the northern and northeastern zones. Slightly gravelly sand dominated the bays, while gravelly sand (with more coarse grains was frequent offshore. The inner areas of Chatham and Wafer bays have mud and organic matter. The sediments in the area are mostly carbonates, except in Bahía Yglesias where clastic sediments (from the erosion of basalts are presented. The information generated in this study could be a valuable input for future monitoring in the PNIC.La aplicación de Sistemas de Información Geográfica (SIG, en los hábitats marinos es muy importante para la gestión y control de las reservas y recursos marinos. Aquí se presentan una serie de mapas de los sustratos sedimentarios y duros en las aguas poco profundas (> 80 m de profundidad del Parque Nacional Isla del Coco (PNIC. Utilizamos datos de batimetría y datos de campo como entrada para un SIG, GAM, y los métodos de “kriging” para generar una serie de mapas que describen las características del fondo. ocho tipos de fondo marino se encuentran en el PNIC. La orilla de la isla y los islotes consistía de formaciones rocosas (principalmente basaltos, con arrecifes de

  7. Occurence of antibiotic compounds found in the water column and bottom sediments from a stream receiving two waste water treatment plant effluents in northern New Jersey, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibs, Jacob; Heckathorn, Heather A.; Meyer, Michael T.; Klapinski, Frank R.; Alebus, Marzooq; Lippincott, Robert

    2013-01-01

    An urban watershed in northern New Jersey was studied to determine the presence of four classes of antibiotic compounds (macrolides, fluoroquinolones, sulfonamides, and tetracyclines) and six degradates in the water column and bottom sediments upstream and downstream from the discharges of two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and a drinking-water intake (DWI). Many antibiotic compounds in the four classes not removed by conventional WWTPs enter receiving waters and partition to stream sediments. Samples were collected at nine sampling locations on 2 days in September 2008. Two of the nine sampling locations were background sites upstream from two WWTP discharges on Hohokus Brook. Another background site was located upstream from a DWI on the Saddle River above the confluence with Hohokus Brook. Because there is a weir downstream of the confluence of Hohokus Brook and Saddle River, the DWI receives water from Hohokus Brook at low stream flows. Eight antibiotic compounds (azithromycin (maximum concentration 0.24 μg/L), ciprofloxacin (0.08 μg/L), enrofloxacin (0.015 μg/L), erythromycin (0.024 μg/L), ofloxacin (0.92 μg/L), sulfamethazine (0.018 μg/L), sulfamethoxazole (0.25 μg/L), and trimethoprim (0.14 μg/L)) and a degradate (erythromycin-H2O (0.84 μg/L)) were detected in the water samples from the sites downstream from the WWTP discharges. The concentrations of six of the eight detected compounds and the detected degradate compound decreased with increasing distance downstream from the WWTP discharges. Azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, and trimethoprim were detected in stream-bottom sediments. The concentrations of three of the four compounds detected in sediments were highest at a sampling site located downstream from the WWTP discharges. Trimethoprim was detected in the sediments from a background site. Pseudo-partition coefficients normalized for streambed sediment organic carbon concentration were calculated for azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and

  8. Cascading of high salinity bottom waters from the Arabian/Persian Gulf to the northern Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Georgy; Wobus, Fred; Solovyev, Vladimir; Francis, Xavier; Hyder, Patrick; Chen, Feng; Asif, Muhammad

    2017-04-01

    Cascading (aka shelf convection) is a specific type of buoyancy driven current in which dense water is formed over the continental shelf and then descends down the slope to a greater depth. The cascades of dense water down continental slopes provide a mechanism for shelf-ocean exchange in many parts of the world's oceans (Shapiro et al, 2003). Dense water is formed on the shelf by a number of processes, with high evaporation, limited river discharge and low precipitation being the major processes in warm climates (Ivanov et al, 2004). The formation and outflow of high salinity waters in the near-bottom layer of the Arabian/Persian Gulf is an example of dense water cascading (Bower et al 2000). Despite of its importance for the self-cleaning and the state of the marine ecosystem in the Arabian/Persian Gulf, the properties of the outflow have so far mainly been analysed using climatologically averaged data or observations of a limited set of parameters (mainly temperature), see (Bower et al 2000). In this paper we study the dynamics of the flow using a comprehensive set of observational data (temperature, salinity velocity and turbidity profiles) obtained during the GRASP (Gulf Reconnaissance And Selective Profiling) observational campaign in the Gulf of Oman, which are complemented by the results of numerical modelling of the area using a number of 3D ocean models, and some ARGO T/S profiles. The GRASP measurements were carried out using an Aqualog climbing moored profiler, which was equipped with a Seabird CTD sensor, a Nortek Aquadopp current meter and a Seapoint turbidity meter. The Ocean circulation models used in the study include PGM4 and IND12 (UK Met Office); and AS20 and AG60 (University of Plymouth). All models are based on NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean) codebase with a resolution from 9 km down to 1.8 km. The models were calibrated and validated against ARGO float profiles in the area. The study revealed the mesoscale and sub

  9. Increased water salinity applied to tomato plants accelerates the development of the leaf miner Tuta absoluta through bottom-up effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Peng; Wang, Zhi-jian; Lavoir, Anne-Violette; Michel, Thomas; Seassau, Aurélie; Zheng, Wen-yan; Niu, Chang-ying; Desneux, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Variation in resource inputs to plants may trigger bottom-up effects on herbivorous insects. We examined the effects of water input: optimal water vs. limited water; water salinity: with vs. without addition of 100 mM NaCl; and their interactions on tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum), and consequently, the bottom-up effects on the tomato leaf miner, Tuta absoluta (Meytick) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae). Plant growth was significantly impeded by limited water input and NaCl addition. In terms of leaf chemical defense, the production of tomatidine significantly increased with limited water and NaCl addition, and a similar but non-significant trend was observed for the other glycoalkaloids. Tuta absoluta survival did not vary with the water and salinity treatments, but the treatment “optimal water-high salinity” increased the development rate without lowering pupal mass. Our results suggest that caution should be used in the IPM program against T. absoluta when irrigating tomato crops with saline water. PMID:27619473

  10. Nitrogen and water inputs to tomato plant do not trigger bottom-up effects on a leafminer parasitoid through host and non-host exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yong-Cheng; Han, Peng; Niu, Chang-Ying; Zappalà, Lucia; Amiens-Desneux, Edwige; Bearez, Philippe; Lavoir, Anne-Violette; Biondi, Antonio; Desneux, Nicolas

    2017-10-02

    Bottom-up and top-down forces are major components of biological control against pests in an agro-ecosystem. Understanding the multi-trophic interactions between plants and secondary consumers would help optimize pest control strategies. We manipulated nitrogen and/or water inputs to tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum) to test whether these manipulations could trigger bottom-up effects on the parasitoid Necremnus tutae via host (Tuta absoluta) and/or non-host (Bemisia tabaci) exposures, and compared the control efficacy of N. tutae on T. absoluta in the presence and absence of B. tabaci. The results showed no cascading effects of plant nitrogen and/or water inputs on N. tutae via either host or non-host exposure. The bottom-up force was mitigated by chewing or sap-feeding insect consumers at the second energy level. By contrast, the top-down force on T. absoluta from parasitoids was enhanced by an additionally provided non-host, which could produce alternative food sources extending N. tutae longevity and enhancing the fitness of its offspring. Our results provided evidence for the combination of bottom-up and top-down approaches in tomato integrated pest management programs. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Triple bottom line assessment of raw water treatment: methodology and application to a case study in the municipality of Oppegård in south-eastern Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, G; Azrague, Kamal; Bell, Stig; Eikebrokk, Bjørnar

    2015-01-01

    There could be several options a water treatment plant (WTP) can select from, if an improvement in treated water quality (WQ) is desired. This paper outlines a methodology to test a variety of approaches to accomplish pre-set goals as regards WQ, while adopting a triple bottom line approach. This approach, in a nutshell, takes into consideration economic, environmental and social aspects in decision-making. The methodology has been applied to the Stangasen WTP in the town of Oppegård in south-eastern Norway. Among the seven alternative approaches compared were the use, as coagulant, of five different dosages of granulated aluminium sulphate, liquid aluminium sulphate (48%) and liquid ferric chloride (40%). Using the set of weighting factors obtained from experts, it was determined that increasing the dosage of granulated aluminium sulphate by 20% over the current one would be the most sustainable option from a triple bottom line point of view.

  12. Variability in inorganic As, Sb and Tl species concentrations in waters and bottom sediments of the Kłodnica River (Poland).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Rajmund; Szopa, Sebastian

    2017-08-24

    The study describes the application of new methodologies for the simultaneous determination of As(III)/As(V), Sb(III)/Sb(V) and Tl(I)/Tl(III) ions in waters and bottom sediments of the Kłodnica River (Poland) with the hyphenated technique of high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) . Time and spatial correlations were determined in the changes of total and speciation concentrations of the above-mentioned analytes in Kłodnica river in 2012. The developed methodologies demonstrate high selectivity and limits of quantification at the level of 0.009-0.120 µg/L. Their repeatability, precision and recovery are appropriate for trace analyses of environmental samples. Time and spatial correlations, and concentrations of inorganic As, Sb and Tl ions demonstrated high variability both in water and bottom sediments.

  13. Diurnal behavior of the carbon dioxide flux and change in the isotopic ratio δ13C in surface and near-bottom water in littoral of Lake Baikal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, Mikhail V.; Domysheva, Valentina M.; Padalko, Natalia L.; Chernikov, Eugenii V.; Prazdnichnykh, Maxim I.; Tumakov, Alexander G.; Pestunov, Dmitrii A.

    2014-11-01

    Lake Baikal is one of the unique natural environments in Siberia which, to a large extent, affects the state of the nature in this region. The processes of gas exchange in the "water-atmosphere" system have been studied in Lake Baikal since 2002. The main purpose of the integrated investigations of exchange of carbon-containing gases in the water-atmosphere system in Lake Baikal is to study the contribution of physical, chemical, and biological components of the process and their interrelation with the intensity and rhythms of the fluxes. In 2013, the integrated measurements in the littoral area of Baikal were complemented with studies of the diurnal dynamics of isotopic ratio δ 13C in the surface and near-bottom water, which were not yet performed in Baikal before. In this work, we analyze first results of the joint analysis of RO2 fluxes in the "atmosphere - water surface" system and δ 13C, obtained in August 2013 in the littoral area of South Baikal. It is shown that d13C markedly increases in the surface waters at daylight time. In nighttime period, there takes place a reverse process, when δ 13C of the surface water approaches δ 13C, which is recorded for near-bottom water.

  14. Water-wave diffraction and radiation by multiple three-dimensional bodies over a mild-slope bottom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruiz, Pau Mercadé; Ferri, Francesco; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2017-01-01

    Highlights •A tool to model wave diffraction and radiation in mild-slope bottoms is proposed. •The tool combines a mild-slope equation model with diffraction transfer matrices. •The tool predictions are verified against analytical solutions for two test problems.......Highlights •A tool to model wave diffraction and radiation in mild-slope bottoms is proposed. •The tool combines a mild-slope equation model with diffraction transfer matrices. •The tool predictions are verified against analytical solutions for two test problems....

  15. Assessing the quality of bottom water temperatures from the Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM) in the Northwest Atlantic Shelf region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bai; Tanaka, Kisei R.; Chen, Yong; Brady, Damian C.; Thomas, Andrew C.

    2017-09-01

    The Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM) is an advanced coastal circulation model widely utilized for its ability to simulate spatially and temporally evolving three-dimensional geophysical conditions of complex and dynamic coastal regions. While a body of literature evaluates model skill in surface fields, independent studies validating model skill in bottom fields over large spatial and temporal scales are scarce because these fields cannot be remotely sensed. In this study, an evaluation of FVCOM skill in modeling bottom water temperature was conducted by comparison to hourly in situ observed bottom temperatures recorded by the Environmental Monitors on Lobster Traps (eMOLT), a program that attached thermistors to commercial lobster traps from 2001 to 2013. Over 2 × 106 pairs of FVCOM-eMOLT records were evaluated by a series of statistical measures to quantify accuracy and precision of the modeled data across the Northwest Atlantic Shelf region. The overall comparison between modeled and observed data indicates reliable skill of FVCOM (r2 = 0.72; root mean squared error = 2.28 °C). Seasonally, the average absolute errors show higher model skill in spring, fall and winter than summer. We speculate that this is due to the increased difficulty of modeling high frequency variability in the exact position of the thermocline and frontal zones. The spatial patterns of the residuals suggest that there is improved similarity between modeled and observed data at higher latitudes. We speculate that this is due to increased tidal mixing at higher latitudes in our study area that reduces stratification in winter, allowing improved model accuracy. Modeled bottom water temperatures around Cape Cod, the continental shelf edges, and at one location at the entrance to Penobscot Bay were characterized by relatively high errors. Constraints for future uses of FVCOM bottom water temperature are provided based on the uncertainties in temporal-spatial patterns. This study is

  16. The Nd isotopic composition of Adélie Coast Bottom Water - insights from GIPY6 cruise along 140°E

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Flierdt, T.; Lambelet, M.; Butler, E. C. V.; Bowie, A. R.; Rintoul, S. R.; Watson, R. J.; Remenyi, T.; Lannuzel, D.

    2014-12-01

    Cold and dense Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) is an important component of the global overturning circulation. The majority of AABW forms in three discrete locations around the Antarctic continent, the Weddell Sea (Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean), the Ross Sea (Pacific sector), and the Adélie Depression (~142-145°E, ~66-67°S; Indian sector). Adélie Land Bottom Water (ALBW) is formed as dense shelf waters beneath coastal polynyas, and periodically overspills and is exported to the abyssal ocean. Previous work suggested that this particular water mass not only carries characteristic hydrographic properties, but that it may also carry a distinct radiogenic isotope composition, which would allow tracing local bottom water formation back in time.We here present new results for the Nd isotope composition and concentration of seawater collected during the GIPY6 voyage from Tasmania (Australia) to the Adélie Depression (Antarctica) (SR3 CASO-GEOTRACES transect; March-April 2008). A total of four seawater profiles were sampled at four depths each across the Southern Ocean (48 to 65.5°S) along the 140°E meridian. Seawater was filtered and acidified aboard the Aurora Australis, and analysed back in the home laboratory using pre-concentration on C18 cartridges, 2 stage ion chromatography and NdO+ analysis by TIMS. Results confirm a rather homogenous isotopic composition of Circumpolar Deep Waters (eNd = -8.2 to -9.0), but a distinct isotopic fingerprint of ALBW (eNd = -9.3 to -10.5). ALBW contributes up to 2 Sverdrup of AABW annually, and cold temperatures and relatively high oxygen and CFC-rich contents of this water mass correlate with rather negative Nd isotopic compositions. Absolute values are more than two epsilon units lower than the ones observed in Ross Sea bottom water, supporting the idea that the proximity of the old Adélie craton facilitates the formation of a particularly unradiogenic variety of AABW.

  17. Living (Rose Bengal stained) benthic foraminiferal faunas along a strong bottom-water oxygen gradient on the Indian margin (Arabian Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulle, C.; Mojtahid, M.; Gooday, A. J.; Jorissen, F. J.; Kitazato, H.

    2015-02-01

    Rose Bengal stained foraminiferal assemblages were analysed along a five-station bathymetric transect across the core and the lower part of the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) on the Indian margin of the Arabian Sea. Sediment cores were collected using the manned submersible Shinkai 6500 during RV Yokosuka cruise YK08-11 in the post-monsoon season (October 2008) at water depths ranging from 535 to 2000 m, along a gradient from almost anoxic to well-oxygenated (0.3 to 108 μM) bottom waters. Stained foraminiferal densities were very high in the OMZ core (535 m) and decreased with depth. The faunas were dominated (40-80%) by non-calcareous taxa at all stations. These were mainly species of Reophax and Lagenammina but also included delicate monothalamous taxa (organic-walled "allogromiids", agglutinated saccamminids, psammosphaerids and tubular forms). These new data from the Indian margin are compared to previous studies from the Murray Ridge, the Pakistan margin and the Oman margin. The fact that similar species were found at sites with comparable bottom-water oxygen concentrations but with very different surface water productivity suggests that, within the strongly developed Arabian Sea OMZ, bottom-water oxygen concentration, and not the organic flux to the sea floor, is the main factor controlling the species composition of the foraminiferal communities. Several foraminiferal species (e.g. Praeglobobulimina sp. 1, Ammodiscus sp. 1, Bolivina aff. dilatata) were confined to the core of the OMZ and are presently known only from the Arabian Sea. Because of their association with extremely low-oxygen concentration, these species may prove to be good indicators of past OMZ variability in the Arabian Sea.

  18. Living (Rose-Bengal-stained) benthic foraminiferal faunas along a strong bottom-water oxygen gradient on the Indian margin (Arabian Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulle, C.; Mojtahid, M.; Gooday, A. J.; Jorissen, F. J.; Kitazato, H.

    2015-08-01

    Rose-Bengal-stained foraminiferal assemblages (> 150 μm) were analysed along a five-station bathymetric transect across the core and the lower part of the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) on the Indian margin of the Arabian Sea. Sediment cores were collected using the manned submersible Shinkai 6500 during the RV Yokosuka cruise YK08-11 in the post-monsoon season (October 2008) at water depths ranging from 535 to 2000 m, along a gradient from almost anoxic to well-oxygenated (0.3 to 108 μM) bottom waters. Stained benthic foraminifera were investigated from two different size fractions (150-300 μm and > 300 μm). Stained foraminiferal densities were very high in the core of the OMZ (at 535 and 649 m) and decreased at deeper sites. The faunas (> 150 μm) were dominated (40-80 %) by non-calcareous taxa at all stations. These were mainly species of Reophax and Lagenammina but also included delicate monothalamous taxa (organic-walled "allogromiids", agglutinated saccamminids, psammosphaerids and tubular forms). These new data from the Indian margin are compared to previous studies from the Murray Ridge, the Pakistan margin and the Oman margin. The fact that similar species were found at sites with comparable bottom-water oxygen concentrations but with very different surface water productivity suggests that, within the strongly developed Arabian Sea OMZ, bottom-water oxygen concentration, and not the organic flux to the sea floor, is the main factor controlling the species composition of the foraminiferal communities. Several foraminiferal species (e.g. Praeglobobulimina sp. 1, Ammodiscus sp. 1, Bolivina aff. dilatata) were confined to the core of the OMZ. These species are presently known only from the Arabian Sea. Because of their association with extremely low oxygen concentrations, these species may be good markers for very low oxygen concentrations, and could be used to reconstruct past OMZ variability in the Arabian Sea.

  19. Effects of bottom water oxygen concentrations on mercury distribution and speciation in sediments below the oxygen minimum zone of the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, P.; Mason, R.P.; Jayachandran, S.; Vudamala, K.; Armoury, K.; Sarkar, Arindam; Chakraborty, S.; Bardhan, P.; Naik, R.

    and introduced into the machine. Controlled heating stages are applied to dry and then thermally decompose the sample. The decomposition products are then carried through a catalyst bed with a continuous flow of oxygen (99.9% pure). The interfering decomposed... stations in Hollweg et al. (2009) had a ratio that was 5-10 times lower than that of the Chesapeake Bay. The results in this study may be attributed to strong complexation reaction of Hg with Corg under suboxic conditions which probably prevented Me...

  20. The impact of fish predation on shallow soft bottoms in brackish waters (SW Finland); an experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, J.; Bonsdorff, E.

    The impact of fish predation on shallow soft bottoms was studied by field and laboratory experiments. The field manipulations (caging experiments) were carried out in 2 shallow (1.5 m) bays in the northern Baltic Sea. An a priori hypothesis that fish do not structure macrozoobenthic communities in shallow soft-bottom areas was tested. Short-term aquarium experiments clearly showed that perch ( Perca fluviatilis L.), roach ( Rutilus rutilus L.) and ruffe ( Acerina cernua (L.)) are all effective predators on benthic macroinvertebrates ( Corophium volutator) Pallas and Nereis diversicolor O.F. Müller) under laboratory conditions. Thus fish can be considered a potential structuring force on benthic communities in shallow soft-bottom areas. Caging experiments of one to two month's duration (partial and total exclosure of fish and enclosure with perch) induced only minor changes in the benthic community. These results support the a priori hypothesis. One of our main conclusions is, however, that fish predation and other biotic interactions (competition, disturbance, etc.) together with abiotic factors play some role in the structuring processes. Multilevel testing is needed in studies on biotic interactions in the marine environment. Results from a specific environment should not automatically be applied to other kinds of habitats.

  1. Brine network structural metamorphosis and sea ice bottom layer permeability change induced by sea water penetration under a surface pressure field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudier, E. J.

    2013-12-01

    Sea ice presents two roughness scales: one in the millimetre range and the other up to several meters due to ridging. The larger roughness elements are the result of compression and sheer, causing ice blocks to pile up and down at the line of contact between converging ice floes. In terms of boundary limit dynamic, they create obstacles that induce, in their wake, a pressure gradient at the ice water interface. Sea ice is a porous medium and as such, is permeable when subject to pressure gradients. Models have shown that, at spring, when ice permeability increases, sea water can be forced through the ice water interface into the bottom ice layer while brine is pumped out of it under obstacle induced pressure gradients. These results suggest that ice ocean heat budgets have to include a porous flow component and its associated latent heat import/export caused by through volume melting/thawing inside the bottom ice layer subject to sea water infiltration. With the initiation of a melt/thaw dynamic within the porous bottom ice layer, the porous network restructures. Our research show an enlargement of the larger brine channels while smaller ones close due ice growth. Similarly, ice volume of smaller cross size tend to disappear while larger ones evolve slowly. As heat fluxes due to latent heat exchanges become several orders of magnitude larger than any other exterior forcing, such as radiation, heat budgets within ice individual volumes balance fluxes in and out caused by melting/thaw on channel walls. Our simulations were run from an early spring C shape temperature profile to an isothermal state showing that structural change becomes significant only after the temperature profile becomes positive upward.

  2. Seasonality of bottom water temperature in the northern North Sea reconstructed from the oxygen isotope composition of the bivalve Arctica islandica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimova, Tamara; Andersson, Carin; Bonitz, Fabian

    2017-04-01

    The seasonality of temperature changes is an important characteristic of climate. However, observational data for the ocean are only available for the last 150 year from a limited number of locations. Prior to 18th century information is only available from proxy reconstructions. The vast majority of such reconstructions depend on land-based archives, primarily from dendrochronology. Established marine proxy records for the ocean, especially at high latitudes, are both sparsely distributed and poorly resolved in time. Therefore, the identification and development of proxies for studying key ocean processes at sub-annual resolution that can extend the marine instrumental record is a clear priority in marine climate science. In this study, we have developed a record of early Holocene seasonal variability of bottom water temperature from the Viking Bank in the northern most North Sea. This area is of a particular interest since the hydrography is controlled by the inflow of Atlantic water. The reconstruction is based on the oxygen isotope composition of the growth increments in two sub-fossil shells of Arctica islandica (Bivalvia), dated to 9600-9335 cal. yr BP. By combining radiocarbon dating and sclerochronological techniques a floating chronology spanning over 200 years was constructed. Using the chronology as an age model, oxygen isotope measurements from 2 shells were combined into a 22-years long record. The results from this oxygen isotope record are compared with stable oxygen isotope profiles from modern shells to estimate changes in the mean state and seasonality between present and early Holocene. Shell-derived oxygen isotope values together with ice-volume corrected oxygen isotope values for the seawater were used to calculate bottom-water temperatures on a sub-annual time-scale. Preliminary results of the reconstructed early Holocene bottom water temperature indicate higher seasonality and lower minimum temperature compared to the present.

  3. Reconnaissance investigation of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the Dolores Project area, southwestern Colorado and southeastern Utah, 1990-91

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, D.L.; Krueger, R.P.; Osmundson, B.C.; Jensen, E.G.

    1995-01-01

    Water, bottom-sediment, and biota samples were collected in 1990-91 to identify water-quality problems associated with irrigation drainage in the Dolores Project area. Concentrations of cadmium, mercury, and selenium in some water samples exceeded aquatic-life criteria. Selenium was associated with irrigaton drainage from the Dolores Project, but other trace elements may be transported into the area in the irrigation water supply. Selenium concentrations exceeded the chronic aquatic-life criterion in water samples from lower McElmo Creek and Navajo Wash, which drain the Montezuma Valley, from newly irrigated areas, and from the Mancos River. The maximum selenium con- centration in water was 88 micrograms per liter from Navajo Wash. Concentrations of herbicides in water were less than concentrations harmful to aquatic life. Selenium concentrations in four bottom-sediment samples exceeded the baseline concentrations for soils in the Western United States. The largest selenium concentrations in biota were in samples from Navajo Wash, from newly irrigated areas north of the Montezuma Valley, and from the Mancos River basin. Selenium concentrations in aquatic-invertebrate samples from the newly irrigated areas exceeded a guideline for food items consumed by fish and wildlife. Selenium concen- trations in whole-body suckers were larger in the San Juan River downstream from the Dolores Project than upstream from the project at Four Corners. Selenium concentrations in fathead minnow samples from two sites were at adverse-effect levels. Mercury concentrations in warm-water game fish in reservoirs in the study area may be of concern to human health. Some concentrations of other trace elements exceeded background concentrations, but the concentrations were not toxicologically significant or the toxicologic significance is not known.

  4. BOTTOM DEPOSITS OF STRATIFIED, SEEPAGE, URBAN LAKE (ON EXAMPLE OF TYRSKO LAKE, POLAND AS A FACTOR POTENTIALLY SHAPING LAKE WATER QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Augustyniak

    2017-09-01

    The obtained results revealed, that bottom sediment of Tyrsko Lake can be classified as mixed, silica-organic type, with quite high content of iron (over 4% Fe in d.w.. The total phosphorus content was ca. 3.5 mg P g-1 d.w. on average. Phosphorus in bottom sediment was bound mainly with organic matter (NaOH-nrP fraction, which had over 50% share in TP. Easy mobile fractions (NH4-Cl-P and BD-P together included ca 5% to 7 % TP only. The obtained results show, that bottom sediment of Tyrsko Lake can bind phosphorus quite effectively. Calculated internal mineral phosphorus loading during summer stagnation period was 10.9 kg P and it was lower that the assessed annual external phosphorus load (22.6 kg P y-1. The assessed annual phosphorus loading from both sources still was lower than critical load according to Vollenweider criteria. But due to the fact that internal loading phenomenon is occurring in the lake it should be taken into consideration that the lake water quality can deteriorate gradually during the longer time perspective. These findings should be taken into consideration in the future if the potential protection and restoration procedures will be developed.

  5. THE INFLUENCE OF SEA-LEVEL CHANGES ON SEA-BOTTOM MORPHOLOGY OF SINGKAWANG WATERS WEST KALIMANTAN BASED ON ANALYSES OF BATHYMETRIC AND SEISMIC DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hananto Kurnio

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the history of Quaternary geology, global climate changes influenced worldwide sea-level variations. On this study, these phenomena are tried to be assessed through sea-bottom morphology changes using bathymetric and seismic strata box data obtained during field survey in Singkawang Waters, West Kalimantan. Sea-level changes in this area are referred to global variations that had been studied by many researchers. Maximal depth attained during bathymetry mapping was -52 meters which take place as a depression between Lemukutan and Penata Besar Islands. General depths are - 30 m; thus, morphology reconstruction was done for sea-level positions - 10 m, - 20 m, and - 30 m from mean sea level. At the study area, sea-level dropped more than -30 m was only occurred in sea bottom morphology of isolated depressions. These isolated depressions are assumed as paleo-lakes which occurred throughout Sunda Land by some authors. The study also shows that sea-level history in Singkawang’s area span from approximately 10,000 years ago or Holocene time to Recent. During low sea-levels, the sea-bottom morphology was characterized by more extension of Singkawang land, formations of narrow straits between islands and developments of paleo-lakes assumed as fresh water lakes in the past. These events, based on Voris’s Diagram, occurred about 10,200 up to 8,300 years ago. On the other hand, marine clays appeared on coastal area of Singkawang. These might be evidence of sea-level rise in this area. About + 5m sea-level rise flooded this area approximately 4,200 years ago. Influences of sea-level changes to subbottom geological conditions were also assessed. The assessment was carried out by analyzing shallow seismic reflection records by using strata box. The records demonstrated that subsurface geology were characterized by truncation reflector configurations interpreted as fluvial environments.

  6. Reconnaissance investigation of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the American Falls Reservoir area, Idaho, 1988-89

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Walton H.; Mullins, William H.

    1990-01-01

    Increased concern about the quality of irrigation drainage and its potential effects on human health, fish, and wildlife prompted the Department of the Interior to begin a program during late 1985 to identify irrigation-induced water-quality problems that might exist in the Western States. During `988, the Task Group on Irrigation Drainage selected the American Falls Reservoir area, Idaho, for study to determine whether potentially toxic concentrations of trace elements or organochlorine compounds existed in water, bottom sediment, and biota. The 91-square mile American Falls Reservoir has a total capacity of 1.7 million acre-feet and is used primarily for irrigation-water supply and power generation. Irrigated land upstream from the reservoir totals about 550,000 acres. Total water inflow to the reservoir is about 5.8 million acre-feet per year, of which about 63 percent is from surface-water runoff, 33 percent is from ground-water discharge, and about 4 percent is from ungaged tributaries, canals, ditches, sloughs, and precipitation. Ground-water discharge to the reservoir originates, in part, from irrigation of land upstream from and adjacent to the reservoir. The 1988 water year was a drought year, and water discharge was about 34 percent less than during 1939-88. Water samples were collected during the post-irrigation (October 1987) and irrigation (July 1988) seasons and were analyzed for major ions and trace elements. Bottom-sediment samples were collected during the irrigation season and were analyzed for trace elements and organochlorine compounds. Biota samples were collected during May, June, July, and August 1988 and were analyzed for trace elements and organochlorine compounds. Dissolved-solids concentrations in water ranged from 216 to 561 milligrams per liter. The similarity of dissolved-solids concentrations between the irrigation and post-irrigation seasons can be attributed to the large volume of ground-water discharge in the study area. Most trace

  7. Bottom RedOx Model (BROM v.1.1): a coupled benthic-pelagic model for simulation of water and sediment biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushev, Evgeniy V.; Protsenko, Elizaveta A.; Bruggeman, Jorn; Wallhead, Philip; Pakhomova, Svetlana V.; Yakubov, Shamil Kh.; Bellerby, Richard G. J.; Couture, Raoul-Marie

    2017-02-01

    Interactions between seawater and benthic systems play an important role in global biogeochemical cycling. Benthic fluxes of some chemical elements (e.g., C, N, P, O, Si, Fe, Mn, S) alter the redox state and marine carbonate system (i.e., pH and carbonate saturation state), which in turn modulate the functioning of benthic and pelagic ecosystems. The redox state of the near-bottom layer in many regions can change with time, responding to the supply of organic matter, physical regime, and coastal discharge. We developed a model (BROM) to represent key biogeochemical processes in the water and sediments and to simulate changes occurring in the bottom boundary layer. BROM consists of a transport module (BROM-transport) and several biogeochemical modules that are fully compatible with the Framework for the Aquatic Biogeochemical Models, allowing independent coupling to hydrophysical models in 1-D, 2-D, or 3-D. We demonstrate that BROM is capable of simulating the seasonality in production and mineralization of organic matter as well as the mixing that leads to variations in redox conditions. BROM can be used for analyzing and interpreting data on sediment-water exchange, and for simulating the consequences of forcings such as climate change, external nutrient loading, ocean acidification, carbon storage leakage, and point-source metal pollution.

  8. WAVECALC: an Excel-VBA spreadsheet to model the characteristics of fully developed waves and their influence on bottom sediments in different water depths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Jacobus P.; Demirbilek, Zeki; Brodalka, Marysia; Flemming, Burghard W.

    2010-10-01

    The generation and growth of waves in deep water is controlled by winds blowing over the sea surface. In fully developed sea states, where winds and waves are in equilibrium, wave parameters may be calculated directly from the wind velocity. We provide an Excel spreadsheet to compute the wave period, length, height and celerity, as well as horizontal and vertical particle velocities for any water depth, bottom slope, and distance below the reference water level. The wave profile and propagation can also be visualized for any water depth, modeling the sea surface change from sinusoidal to trochoidal and finally cnoidal profiles into shallow water. Bedload entrainment is estimated under both the wave crest and the trough, using the horizontal water particle velocity at the top of the boundary layer. The calculations are programmed in an Excel file called WAVECALC, which is available online to authorized users. Although many of the recently published formulas are based on theoretical arguments, the values agree well with several existing theories and limited field and laboratory observations. WAVECALC is a user-friendly program intended for sedimentologists, coastal engineers and oceanographers, as well as marine ecologists and biologists. It provides a rapid means to calculate many wave characteristics required in coastal and shallow marine studies, and can also serve as an educational tool.

  9. Final Scientific/Technical Report: Characterizing the Response of the Cascadia Margin Gas Hydrate Reservoir to Bottom Water Warming Along the Upper Continental Slope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, Evan A. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Johnson, H. Paul [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Salmi, Marie [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Whorley, Theresa [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2017-11-10

    The objective of this project is to understand the response of the WA margin gas hydrate system to contemporary warming of bottom water along the upper continental slope. Through pre-cruise analysis and modeling of archive and recent geophysical and oceanographic data, we (1) inventoried bottom simulating reflectors along the WA margin and defined the upper limit of gas hydrate stability, (2) refined margin-wide estimates of heat flow and geothermal gradients, (3) characterized decadal scale temporal variations of bottom water temperatures at the upper continental slope of the Washington margin, and (4) used numerical simulations to provide quantitative estimates of how the shallow boundary of methane hydrate stability responds to modern environmental change. These pre-cruise results provided the context for a systematic geophysical and geochemical survey of methane seepage along the upper continental slope from 48° to 46°N during a 10-day field program on the R/V Thompson from October 10-19, 2014. This systematic inventory of methane emissions along this climate-sensitive margin corridor and comprehensive sediment and water column sampling program provided data and samples for Phase 3 of this project that focused on determining fluid and methane sources (deep-source vs. shallow; microbial, thermogenic, gas hydrate dissociation) within the sediment, and how they relate to contemporary intermediate water warming. During the 2014 research expedition, we sampled nine seep sites between ~470 and 520 m water depth, within the zone of predicted methane hydrate retreat over the past 40 years. We imaged 22 bubble plumes with heights commonly rising to ~300 meters below sea level with one reaching near the sea surface. We collected 22 gravity cores and 20 CTD/hydrocasts from the 9 seeps and at background locations (no acoustic evidence of seepage) within the depth interval of predicted downslope retreat of the methane hydrate stability zone. Approximately 300 pore water

  10. Run-up of long ocean waves in shallow water on the flat and non-reflecting bottom profiles taking into account wave breaking effects, hypothetical cases and the possible consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodin, Artem; Pelinovsky, Efim; Rodina, Natalia

    2017-04-01

    The analysis and comparison of the results of numerical experiments on the long waves run-up on a coast with a variety of bottom profiles in the framework of the nonlinear theory of shallow water have been performed in this work. Two types of one-dimensional problems are solved: in the first case the bottom profile is represented as a flat slope; in the second - the so-called non-reflecting profile. In both cases the run-up area in deep water is conjugated with a flat bottom, and on the beach - with a vertical wall. It is shown that for small amplitude waves the amplification of the incident wave's amplitude is higher on non-reflecting bottom profile, rather than on a flat bottom profile. With the increasing of the incident wave's amplitude, wave breaking near the coast occurs earlier on non-reflecting bottom profile, and therefore the amplitude decreases faster than on a plane beach. The behavior of breaking waves approaching and running-up the wall on non-reflecting and flat bottom profiles is demonstrated. The research was supported within the framework of the grant of the President of Russian Federation for state support of young Russian scientists (MK-1127.2017.5).

  11. Reconnaissance investigation of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the Kendrick Reclamation Project Area, Wyoming, 1986-87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, D.A.; Jones, W.E.; Morton, A.G.

    1988-01-01

    A reconnaissance investigation of the Kendrick Reclamation Project in central Wyoming was conducted during 1986-87 to determine if irrigation drainage has caused or has the potential to cause harmful effects on human health, fish, and wildlife, or other water uses. The investigation of the Kendrick Reclamation Project is one of nine similar investigations being conducted in the western conterminous United States as part of the Department of the Interior 's Irrigation Drainage Program. Samples of surface water were collected at 10 sites and ground water at 5 sites. Surface-water analyses included trace elements, radiochemicals, and pesticides. Concentrations in the water generally were less than national standards for public water supplies, with the exception of selenium. The median concentration of dissolved selenium was 7.5 microgm/L in 24 samples of surface and groundwater. Of the 11 samples that contained dissolved- selenium concentrations greater than the national standard for public water supplies of 10 microgm/L, 10 of the samples were collected at sites on streams that are not used for public water supplies; the eleventh sample was collected from a shallow well. Dissolved-selenium concentrations ranged from less than 1 to 300 microgm/L. Concentrations of dissolved selenium in the North Platte River, which supplies drinking water for several municipalities, ranged from less than 1 to 4 microgm/L. The dissolved-selenium concentration and selenium discharge in the North Platte River increased in the downstream direction. The four principal tributaries that receive drainage from the Kendrick Reclamation Project contributed substantially to the increase in selenium concentration and discharge in the North Platte River. Bottom-sediment samples from the North Platte River contained selenium contents of 1.2 microgm/g or less. (Author 's abstract)

  12. Fulvic acid-like organic compounds control nucleation of marine calcite under suboxic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neuweiler, F.; D'Orazio, M.; Immenhauser, A.M.; Geipel, G.; Heise, K.H.; Cocozza, C.; Miano, T.M.

    2003-01-01

    Intracrystalline organic compounds, enclosed within in situprecipitated marine microcrystalline calcite (automicrite), might represent either an inclusion or the catalyst of such precipitation. We use evidence from a Lower Cretaceous deep-water carbonate mound to show (1) the original source, (2)

  13. Reconnaissance investigation of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the middle Green River basin, Utah, 1986-87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, D.W.; Waddell, Bruce; Miller, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    Reconnaissance of wildlife areas in the middle Green River basin of Utah was conducted during 1986 and 1987 to determine whether irrigation drainage has caused, or has the potential to cause significant harmful effects on human health, fish, and wildlife, or may adversely affect the suitability of water for beneficial uses. Studies at Stewart Lake Waterfowl Management Area and Ouray National Wildlife Refuge indicated that concentrations of boron, selenium, and zinc in water, bottom sediment, and biological tissue were sufficiently large to be harmful to fish and wildlife, and to adversely affect beneficial uses of water. Selenium is the principal element of concern in both areas. Concentrations of dissolved selenium in irrigation drain water entering Stewart Lake Waterfowl Management Area ranged from 14-140 micrograms/L (ug/L) and consistently exceeded Utah standards for wildlife protection in water in two of the four drains. Concentrations of boron and zinc exceeded Utah standards only occasionally in the drain waters. Concentrations of total selenium in sediments collected where the drains discharge into the lake were 10-85 ug/gm. Liver tissue collected from American coots at Stewart Lake Waterfowl Management Area contained concentrations of selenium from 4.9-26 ug/gm (dry weight), and whole body samples of carp contained as much as 31 ug/gm (dry weight). Concentrations of selenium in Potamogeton and blue-green algae ranged from 2.1-27 ug/gm. Concentrations of boron, selenium, and zinc were also measured in water from Ouray National Wildlife Refuge. Liver tissue of American coots from the North Roadside Pond, which receives irrigation tailwater, contained a geometric-mean concentration of selenium of 32 ug/gm (dry weight). Five water-bird eggs collected from the North and South Roadside Ponds contained selenium concentrations of 63-120 ug/gm (dry weight). (Lantz-PTT)

  14. Assessment of Near-Bottom Water Quality of Southwestern Coast of Sarawak, Borneo, Malaysia: A Multivariate Statistical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Lin Soo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study on Sarawak coastal water quality is scarce, not to mention the application of the multivariate statistical approach to investigate the spatial variation of water quality and to identify the pollution source in Sarawak coastal water. Hence, the present study aimed to evaluate the spatial variation of water quality along the coastline of the southwestern region of Sarawak using multivariate statistical techniques. Seventeen physicochemical parameters were measured at 11 stations along the coastline with approximately 225 km length. The coastal water quality showed spatial heterogeneity where the cluster analysis grouped the 11 stations into four different clusters. Deterioration in coastal water quality has been observed in different regions of Sarawak corresponding to land use patterns in the region. Nevertheless, nitrate-nitrogen exceeded the guideline value at all sampling stations along the coastline. The principal component analysis (PCA has determined a reduced number of five principal components that explained 89.0% of the data set variance. The first PC indicated that the nutrients were the dominant polluting factors, which is attributed to the domestic, agricultural, and aquaculture activities, followed by the suspended solids in the second PC which are related to the logging activities.

  15. Occurrence and partitioning of antibiotic compounds found in the water column and bottom sediments from a stream receiving two wastewater treatment plant effluents in Northern New Jersey, 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibs, Jacob, E-mail: jgibs@usgs.gov [U.S. Geological Survey, 810 Bear Tavern Road, West Trenton, NJ 08628 (United States); Heckathorn, Heather A. [U.S. Geological Survey, 810 Bear Tavern Road, West Trenton, NJ 08628 (United States); Meyer, Michael T. [U.S. Geological Survey, 4821 Quail Crest Place, Lawrence, KS 66049 (United States); Klapinski, Frank R.; Alebus, Marzooq; Lippincott, Robert L. [New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, PO Box 413, Trenton, NJ 08625 (United States)

    2013-08-01

    An urban watershed in northern New Jersey was studied to determine the presence of four classes of antibiotic compounds (macrolides, fluoroquinolones, sulfonamides, and tetracyclines) and six degradates in the water column and bottom sediments upstream and downstream from the discharges of two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and a drinking-water intake (DWI). Many antibiotic compounds in the four classes not removed by conventional WWTPs enter receiving waters and partition to stream sediments. Samples were collected at nine sampling locations on 2 days in September 2008. Two of the nine sampling locations were background sites upstream from two WWTP discharges on Hohokus Brook. Another background site was located upstream from a DWI on the Saddle River above the confluence with Hohokus Brook. Because there is a weir downstream of the confluence of Hohokus Brook and Saddle River, the DWI receives water from Hohokus Brook at low stream flows. Eight antibiotic compounds (azithromycin (maximum concentration 0.24 μg/L), ciprofloxacin (0.08 μg/L), enrofloxacin (0.015 μg/L), erythromycin (0.024 μg/L), ofloxacin (0.92 μg/L), sulfamethazine (0.018 μg/L), sulfamethoxazole (0.25 μg/L), and trimethoprim (0.14 μg/L)) and a degradate (erythromycin–H{sub 2}O (0.84 μg/L)) were detected in the water samples from the sites downstream from the WWTP discharges. The concentrations of six of the eight detected compounds and the detected degradate compound decreased with increasing distance downstream from the WWTP discharges. Azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, and trimethoprim were detected in stream-bottom sediments. The concentrations of three of the four compounds detected in sediments were highest at a sampling site located downstream from the WWTP discharges. Trimethoprim was detected in the sediments from a background site. Pseudo-partition coefficients normalized for streambed sediment organic carbon concentration were calculated for azithromycin

  16. Deep water bottom current evolution in the northern South China Sea during the last 150 kyr: Evidence from sedimentary sortable silt and magnetic fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Niu; Yang, Xiaoqiang; Peng, Jie; Zhou, Qixian; Su, Zhihua

    2017-04-01

    Deep water bottom current (DWBC) plays a central role in global climate. Relative to the Atlantic, the evolution of Pacific deepwater circulation is still unclear. Luzon Strait with a sill depth of about 2600 m serves as the only important deep connection between the South China Sea (SCS) and the Pacific, providing a unique opportunity to monitor the western Pacific deep water circulation. We present a magnetic and grain size analysis of two sediment cores (PC111 and PC83) located in Xisha Trough, northern SCS in order to reconstruct past changes of DWBC during the last 150 kyrs. Variations in the mean size of sortable silt and the magnetic grain size was interpreted to indicate past changes of DWBC, which suggest abrupt, millennial-scale increasing DWBC strength corresponding to Heinrich Stadials (HS1, HS2, HS3, HS4. HS5, HS6, HS7, HS8, HS9, HS10, HS11) for past 150 kyr, times of weak North Atlantic Deep Water formation. The direction of DWBC reconstructed from the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) is mostly N-S direction in core PC111 from 30 to 0 ka and NW-SE direction in core PC83 from 50 to 0 ka, which are parallel to the local topography. The good relationship between DWBC strength and the relative positive value of the planktonic foraminifera δ18O suggests the evolution of DWBC in northern SCS, sourced probably from North Pacific Deep Water, closely linking to the global climate.

  17. Type II preliminary pilot-plant evaluation of a coal-liquefaction residue - water slurry using vaccum-tower bottoms from the H-Coal liquefaction process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, C.M.; Robin, A.M.

    1982-09-01

    About 6.7 tons of vacuum tower bottoms (residue) which were obtained during the liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 coal from the H-Coal liquefaction process pilot plant at Catlettsburg, Kentucky were successfully gasified at Texaco's Montebello Research Laboratory. The single 9.5-hour run with H-Coal liquefaction residue-water slurry was completed at 750 to 760 psig gasifier pressure. The run consisted of two test periods, each at a different gasifier temperature. Over 99.6 percent conversion of carbon in the feed to syngas was achieved yielding 32.9 to 33.7 standard cubic feet of dry syngas per pound of residue charged. The oxygen requirement was about 1.0 pound of oxygen per pound of residue. The dry syngas contained 78.5 to 79.7 (vol.) percent carbon monoxide plus hydrogen.

  18. Comparative metagenomics of bathypelagic plankton and bottom sediment from the Sea of Marmara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaiser, Achim; Zivanovic, Yvan; Moreira, David; López-García, Purificación

    2011-02-01

    To extend comparative metagenomic analyses of the deep-sea, we produced metagenomic data by direct 454 pyrosequencing from bathypelagic plankton (1000  m depth) and bottom sediment of the Sea of Marmara, the gateway between the Eastern Mediterranean and the Black Seas. Data from small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene libraries and direct pyrosequencing of the same samples indicated that Gamma- and Alpha-proteobacteria, followed by Bacteroidetes, dominated the bacterial fraction in Marmara deep-sea plankton, whereas Planctomycetes, Delta- and Gamma-proteobacteria were the most abundant groups in high bacterial-diversity sediment. Group I Crenarchaeota/Thaumarchaeota dominated the archaeal plankton fraction, although group II and III Euryarchaeota were also present. Eukaryotes were highly diverse in SSU rRNA gene libraries, with group I (Duboscquellida) and II (Syndiniales) alveolates and Radiozoa dominating plankton, and Opisthokonta and Alveolates, sediment. However, eukaryotic sequences were scarce in pyrosequence data. Archaeal amo genes were abundant in plankton, suggesting that Marmara planktonic Thaumarchaeota are ammonia oxidizers. Genes involved in sulfate reduction, carbon monoxide oxidation, anammox and sulfatases were over-represented in sediment. Genome recruitment analyses showed that Alteromonas macleodii 'surface ecotype', Pelagibacter ubique and Nitrosopumilus maritimus were highly represented in 1000  m-deep plankton. A comparative analysis of Marmara metagenomes with ALOHA deep-sea and surface plankton, whale carcasses, Peru subsurface sediment and soil metagenomes clustered deep-sea Marmara plankton with deep-ALOHA plankton and whale carcasses, likely because of the suboxic conditions in the deep Marmara water column. The Marmara sediment clustered with the soil metagenome, highlighting the common ecological role of both types of microbial communities in the degradation of organic matter and the completion of biogeochemical cycles.

  19. Detection of low bottom water oxygen concentrations in the North Sea; implications for monitoring and assessment of ecosystem health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greenwood, N.; Parker, E.R.; Fernand, L.; Sivyer, D.B.; Weston, K.; Painting, S.J.; Kröger, S.; Forster, R.M.; Lees, H.E.; Mills, D.K.; Laane, R.W.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents new results from high temporal resolution observations over two years (2007 and 2008) from instrumented moorings deployed in the central North Sea, at the Oyster Grounds and on the northern slope of Dogger Bank (North Dogger). The water column was stratified in the summer at both

  20. Isothiazolone Volatility Study of a Water Bottom from Fuel Treated with Kathon(trade name) FP1.5 Biocide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-01

    pas clans l’espace habitable au-dessus du fond de cale, pour donner des constituants toxiques qui pourraient alors 8tre inhales par les personnes...accumulation and elimination of isothiazolone compounds in rats and fish, as well as in river waters, sludge, plants and soil. Dissipation studies in Delaware

  1. Food Waste to Energy: How Six Water Resource Recovery Facilities are Boosting Biogas Production and the Bottom Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water Resource Recovery Facilities (WRRFs) with anaerobic digestion have been harnessing biogas for heat and power since at least the 1920’s. A few are approaching “energy neutrality” and some are becoming “energy positive” through a combination of energy efficiency measures and...

  2. Formation of anoxia and denitrification in the bottom waters of a tropical estuary, southwest coast of India.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Martin, G.D.; Muraleedharan, K.R.; Vijay, J.G.; Rejomon, G.; Madhu, N.V.; Shivaprasad, A.; Haridevi, C.K.; Nair, M.; Balachandran, K.K.; Revichandran, C.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Chandramohanakumar, N.

    and makes the CBW system highly productive. Intrusion of AS waters seems to be stronger towards the upstream end (approx. 15 km), than had been previously reported, as a consequence of the lowering of river discharges and deepening of channels in the estuary...

  3. Water and Bottom Properties of a Coastal Environment Derived from Hyperion Data Measured from the EO-1 Spacecraft Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-26

    areas have suffered shoreline erosions, declines in aquatic species, losses in seagrass beds, and bleaching of coral reefs [e.g., 20080211243 C,2007...obtain reliable water-leaving radiance (L.). Unfortunately the radiometric accuracy of L, is only about ±5% for Hyperion [8], which may cause ...models. The Hyperion sensor, however, has a radiometric accuracy of only ±5% in the measured L, [8). Such an uncertainty in L, may cause a 50% error in L

  4. Improvement of the free-surface tension model in shallow water basin by using in-situ bottom-friction measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseenko, Elena; Kuznetsov, Konstantin; Roux, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    Wind stress on the free surface is the main driving force behind the circulation of the upper part of the ocean, which in hydrodynamic models are usually defined in terms of the coefficient of surface tension (Zhang et al., 2009, Davies et al., 2003). Moreover, wave motion impacts local currents and changes sea level, impacts the transport and the stratification of the entire water column. Influence of surface waves at the bottom currents is particularly pronounced in the shallow coastal systems. However, existing methods of parameterization of the surface tension have significant limits, especially in strong wind waves (Young et al., 2001, Jones et al., 2004) due to the difficulties of measuring the characteristics of surface waves in stormy conditions. Thus, the formula for calculating the coefficient of surface tension in our day is the actual problem in modeling fluid dynamics, particularly in the context of strong surface waves. In the hydrodynamic models usually a coefficient of surface tension is calculated once at the beginning of computation as a constant that depends on the averaged wind waves characteristic. Usually cases of strongly nonlinear wind waves are not taken into account, what significantly reduces the accuracy of the calculation of the flow structures and further calculation of the other processes in water basins, such as the spread of suspended matter and pollutants. Thus, wave motion influencing the pressure on the free surface and at the bottom must be considered in hydrodynamic models particularly in shallow coastal systems. A method of reconstruction of a free-surface drag coefficient based on the measured in-situ bottom pressure fluctuations is developed and applied in a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model MARS3D, developed by the French laboratory of IFREMER (IFREMER - French Research Institute for Marine Dynamics). MARS3D solves the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible fluid in the Boussinesq approximation and with the

  5. Nitrogen and water availability to tomato plants triggers bottom-up effects on the leafminer Tuta absoluta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Peng; Lavoir, Anne-Violette; Le Bot, Jacques; Amiens-Desneux, Edwige; Desneux, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effects of various levels of nitrogen inputs (optimal, insufficient and excessive) and water inputs (optimal, low drought and high drought) to tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum) on survival and development of an invasive tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta (Meytick) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae). Plant growth i.e. plant height and the number of nodes declined under insufficient or excessive nitrogen treatment. Compared to optimal N, insufficient N treatment decreased leaf N content and increased the carbon/nitrogen ratio (C/N) whereas an excess of N had no effect on both leaf N content and leaf C/N ratio. Sub-optimal nitrogen supplies, water treatments and their interactions, significantly reduced the leafminer survival rate and slowed down its development. Together with the findings from three recent companion studies, we assumed that a combination of changes in nutritional value and chemical defense could explain these observed effects. Furthermore, our findings supported both the “Plant vigor hypothesis” and the “Nitrogen limitation hypothesis”. PMID:24675796

  6. Governing for Integrated Water and Flood Risk Management: Comparing Top-Down and Bottom-Up Approaches in Spain and California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Serra-Llobet

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Flood risk management in the context of Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM is becoming widely accepted as an approach to improving resilience in light of increasing flood risks due to climate change and other factors. This paper contributes to a better understanding of the governance arrangements needed for effectively implement integrated approaches to managing flood risk. We compare how IWRM and flood risk management have been operationalized within “top-down” and “bottom-up” governance arrangements in the European Union and the United States. We focus in particular on two case study regions, the Catalan coastal region in Spain and the San Francisco Bay Area in California, which have strong similarities in economy, climate, and environmental values, but different institutional settings. Our findings contribute empirical evidence of the need for a balance between “top-down” and “bottom-up” approaches. While the San Francisco Bay Area’s strongly collaborative and participatory approach has generated new connections among flood managers and other stakeholders, the lack of a central entity with the capacity and mandate for on-going coordination and region-wide risk assessments appears to constrain its ability to support integrated and adaptive management. The European Union’s top-down approach and the presence of a central authority at the river basin scale have led to a consolidated regional plan in Catalonia encompassing all phases of flood risk management, but the degree of engagement and opportunities for knowledge-sharing among participants may be more limited.

  7. Axisymmetric flow in a cylindrical tank over a rotating bottom. Part II. Deformation of the water surface and experimental verification of the theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iga, Keita; Yokota, Sho; Watanabe, Shunichi; Ikeda, Takashi; Niino, Hiroshi; Misawa, Nobuhiko

    2017-12-01

    The theory of axisymmetric flow in a cylindrical container with a rotating bottom, as described in Part I, is validated against the results of previous and our own laboratory experiments. First, deformation of the water surface is derived using the velocity distribution of the axisymmetric flow obtained by the theory. The form of the water surface is classified into three regimes, and the rotation rates of the transitions between these regimes are determined. The parameters predicted from this theory are compared with the results measured in laboratory experiments and also with data from previous experimental studies. The theory predicts the experimental data well, but a slight difference was found in the narrow region close to the side wall. Corrections estimated by considering the fluid behavior around the side wall boundary layer successfully explain most of the discrepancies. This theory appears to predict the results of the laboratory experiments very well, much better than a theory using an assumption of quadratic drag as a model of turbulent boundary layers.

  8. Comparing bottom-up and top-down approaches at the landscape scale, including agricultural activities and water systems, at the Roskilde Fjord, Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lequy, Emeline; Ibrom, Andreas; Ambus, Per; Massad, Raia-Silvia; Markager, Stiig; Asmala, Eero; Garnier, Josette; Gabrielle, Benoit; Loubet, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    The greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) mainly originates in direct emissions from agricultural soils due to microbial reactions stimulated by the use of nitrogen fertilisers. Indirect N2O emissions from water systems due to nitrogen leaching and deposition from crop fields range between 26 and 37% of direct agricultural emissions, indicating their potential importance and uncertainty (Reay et al. 2012). The study presented here couples a top-down approach with eddy covariance (EC) and a bottom-up approach using different models and measurements. A QCL sensor at 96-m height on a tall tower measures the emissions of N2O from 1100 ha of crop fields and from the south part of the Roskilde fjord, in a 5-km radius area around the tall tower at Roskilde, Denmark. The bottom-up approach includes ecosystem modelling with CERES-EGC for the crops and PaSIM for the grasslands, and the N2O fluxes from the Roskilde fjord are derived from N2O sea water concentration measurements. EC measurements are now available from July to December 2014, and indicate a magnitude of the emissions from the crop fields around 0.2 mg N2O-N m-2 day-1 (range -9 to 5) which is consistent with the CERES-EGC simulations and calculations using IPCC emission factors. N2O fluxes from the Roskilde fjord in May and July indicated quite constant N2O concentrations around 0.1 µg N L-1 despite variations of nitrate and ammonium in the fjord. The calculated fluxes from these concentrations and the tall tower measurements consistently ranged between -7 and 6 mg N2O-N m-2 day-1. The study site also contains a waste water treatment plant, whose direct emissions will be measured in early 2015 using a dynamic plume tracer dispersion method (Mønster et al. 2014). A refined source attribution methodology together with more measurements and simulations of the N2O fluxes from the different land uses in this study site will provide a clearer view of the dynamics and budgets of N2O at the regional scale. The

  9. Concentration maxima of volatile organic iodine compounds in the bottom layer water and the cold, dense water over the Chukchi Sea in the western Arctic Ocean: a possibility of production related to degradation of organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooki, A.; Kawasaki, S.; Kuma, K.; Nishino, S.; Kikuchi, T.

    2015-07-01

    We conducted a shipboard observation over the Chukchi Sea and the Canada Basin in the western Arctic Ocean in September and October 2012 to obtain vertical distributions of four volatile organic iodine compounds (VOIs) in seawater. VOIs are believed to play a role in ozone destruction in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. The VOIs observed in this study were iodomethane (CH3I), iodoethane (C2H5I), diiodomethane (CH2I2) and chloroiodomethane (CH2ClI). Maximum concentrations of the four VOIs were found in the bottom layer water over the Chukchi Sea shelf, in which layer the maximum concentration of ammonium (NH4+) also occurred. A significant correlation was observed between C2H5I and NH4+ (correlate coefficient R = 0.93) and between CH3I and NH4+ (R = 0.77), suggesting production of these VOIs increased with degradation of organic matter. Over the northern Chukchi Sea shelf-slope area, concentration maxima of CH2I2, CH2ClI, and CH3I were found in the subsurface cold, dense water (CDW). A large nitrogen deficit (N-deficit = NH4+ + NO3- + NO2- - 16PO43-) simultaneously occurred in this water, suggesting production of the three VOIs in the sediment or the bottom layer water over the shelf, probably in association with degradation of organic matter. We conclude that VOI production over the Chukchi Sea shelf can be largely attributed to the degradation of organic matter that is produced in the highly productive shelf water. High concentrations of CH2ClI were also found in the Alaskan Coastal Water (ACW) from the Bering Strait to the surface of the northern Chukchi slope. The VOIs that originated at the Chukchi Sea shelf are expected to be laterally transported to the Arctic Ocean Basin though the subsurface CDW and the surface ACW.

  10. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: The Potential Impact of Bottom Water Discharge at Subsurface on Microphytoplankton in the Caribbean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Broise, D.; Giraud, M.; Garcon, V.; Boye, M.

    2016-02-01

    Mélanie Giraud1,2,3, Véronique Garçon3, Marie Boye11LEMAR - UMR 6539 Plouzané France, 2France Energies Marines Brest France, 3LEGOS/CNRS Toulouse -France Part of the solar energy can be harvested and used in different processes. Taking advantage of the natural temperature gradient between the surface and deep ocean, the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) process fulfills this goal. The IMPALA project (Impacts of artificial upwelling on microplankton) aims to study the potential environmental impacts of releasing, below the surface, deep seawater flowing out of a scheduled OTEC pilot plant offshore the Martinique Island in the Caribbean Sea. The OTEC installed off the Caribbean coast of Martinique is expected to pump approximately 100 000 m3/h of deep seawater for its functioning. The resulting impact of this cold nutrient-rich deep seawater discharge on the phytoplankton community of the nutrient depleted surface water is not fully understood. Therefore, a study was initiated before the installation of the pilot plant. The vertical and horizontal seawater plume dispersion of the deep seawater upwelling was described using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). Field data allowed describing the expected chemical characteristics of the resulting mixed seawaters. The potential impact on the phytoplankton community was evaluated by in situ microcosm experiments. Two deep seawater ratio (2% and 10%) and two incubation depths (deep chlorophyll maximum and euphotic layer deep limit) were tested, showing a larger impact at the deep chlorophyll maximum and for the higher deep seawater concentration (10%). The microcosm enrichment by 10% of deep seawater induced a significant shift in the phytoplankton assemblage, supporting diatoms development, whereas the enrichment by 2% of deep seawater only showed a small shift in phytoplankton population. Experimental and modelling results were combined in order to identify the deep seawater discharge depth exhibiting the

  11. Landfilling: Bottom Lining and Leachate Collection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Manfredi, Simone; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    from entering the groundwater or surface water. The bottom lining system should cover the full footprint area of the landfill, including both the relatively flat bottom and the sideslopes in the case of an excavated configuration. This prevents the lateral migration of leachate from within the landfill......The critical element of a landfill, which is essential for the protection of the environment in general, and prevention of contamination of the underlying soils and groundwater in particular, is the bottom lining system. The major focus of the bottom lining system development is to prevent leachate......, as well as the migration of landfill gas, preventing contact between gas and groundwater. The bottom lining system is composed of a relatively impermeable liner or lining system. This very low hydraulic conductivity system controls the movement of the leachate out of the landfill. The bottom lining system...

  12. Variability of the intensity of the Tsushima Warm Current and bottom water ventilation in western North Pacific marginal seas during the Pleistocene: Preliminary results from IODP Expedition 346 (Sites U1427 and U1428) based on ostracod assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Zarikian, Carlos A.; Bassetti, Maria-Angela; Toucanne, Samuel; Sagawa, Takuya; Holbourn, Ann; Yasuhara, Moriaki; Tada, Ryuji; Murray, Richard W.

    2015-04-01

    IODP Expedition 346 drilled Sites U1427 and U1428 in ideal locations to monitor changes in (i) the intensity of the influx of the Tsushima Warm Current (TWC), and (ii) the intermediate bottom water ventilation from a few hundred thousand years to over a million years in the western North Pacific marginal seas. Site U1427 is located at 330 m water depth in the marginal sea bordered by the Eurasian continent, the Korean peninsula and the Japanese Islands. This semi-enclosed marginal sea has an average water depth of 1350 m and is connected with other marginal seas in the region by shallow, narrow straits. Site U1428 is located at 724 m in the East China Sea and this region is more influenced by continental freshwater runoff derived from the Yangtze River. Both sites are in the path of the TWC, a branch of the Kuroshio Current, the only warm current flowing into the marginal sea west of Japan. The TWC carries both water originating from the subtropical North Pacific and fresher runoff water derived from East China Sea continental shelf. The northerly flow of the TWC through the shallow Tsushima Strait is ultimately controlled by relative sea level variations over time. The Japan Sea Intermediate Water (JSIW), found below the TWC between 200 and 400-500 m water depth, corresponds to a vertical salinity minimum, and has relatively high oxygen concentration related to the deep-water convection in winter and linked to fresh water supply during winter monsoon intervals. Recent observations point to variations in the intensity of deep and intermediate water currents during glacials and interglacials, and millennial scale climate cycles, but the mechanisms of such variations are not fully known. Here we present preliminary results based on microfossil faunal (ostracods) and sedimentological (sortable silt) proxies that show variability in the intensity of bottom water circulation and environmental conditions during the Pleistocene. Ostracods (benthic microcrustaceans known

  13. Tsunami Energy, Ocean-Bottom Pressure, and Hydrodynamic Force from Stochastic Bottom Displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Khaled T.; Omar, M. A.; Allam, Allam A.

    2017-03-01

    Tsunami generation and propagation due to a randomly fluctuating of submarine earthquake modeled by vertical time-dependent of a stochastic bottom displacement are investigated. The increase in oscillations and amplitude in the free surface elevation are controlled by the noise intensity parameter of the stochastic bottom displacement. Evolution of kinetic and potential energy of the resulting waves by the stochastic bottom displacement is examined. Exchange between potential and kinetic energy was achieved in the propagation process. The dynamic ocean-bottom pressure during tsunami generation is investigated. As the vertical displacement of the stochastic bottom increases, the peak amplitude of the ocean-bottom pressure increases through the dynamic effect. Time series of the maximum tsunami wave amplitude, kinetic and potential energy, wave and ocean-bottom pressure gauges and the hydrodynamic force caused by the stochastic source model under the effect of the water depth of the ocean are investigated.

  14. The potential of sedimentary foraminiferal rare earth element patterns to trace water masses in the past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Anne H.; Hathorne, Ed C.; Schijf, Johan; Plancherel, Yves; Böning, Philipp; Frank, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Dissolved rare earth element (REE) concentration data from intermediate and deep seawater form an array characterized by higher middle-REE enrichments (MREE/MREE*) in the North Atlantic and a progressive increase in heavy-to-light REE ratios (HREE/LREE) as water masses age. The REEs in foraminifera are fractionated toward higher MREE/MREE* and lower HREE/LREE relative to seawater. Calculations based on a scavenging model show that the REE patterns in uncleaned core-top foraminifera resemble those adsorbed onto calcite, particulate organic material, and hydrous ferric oxides but the full extent of the REE fractionation measured in foraminifera was not reproduced by the model. However, differences in the HREE/LREE and MREE/MREE* ratios and the cerium anomaly between ocean basins are preserved and are in agreement with the seawater REE distribution. Under oxic conditions, the HREE/LREE and MREE/MREE* compositions of uncleaned foraminifera at the sediment/seawater boundary are preserved during burial but the cerium anomaly is sensitive to burial depth. In suboxic sedimentary environments, all uncleaned foraminiferal REE concentrations are elevated relative to core-top values indicating addition of REEs from pore waters. The HREE/LREE ratio is highest when sedimentation rates were greatest and when high Fe/Ca ratios in the uncleaned foraminifera indicate that Fe was mobile. In sediments that have not experienced suboxic conditions during burial, uncleaned foraminifera preserve the seawater signal taken up at the sediment/seawater interface and are therefore suggested to be a suitable archive of changes in the REE signal of past bottom waters.

  15. Review article: the false-bottom ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, D. V.; Jouzel, J.; Nizovtseva, I.; Ryashko, L. B.

    2013-11-01

    Nansen from his observations in the Beaufort Sea published in 1897 noted that heat transfer from the fresh water (with a~temperature of 0 °C) to the arctic salt water (with a temperature of -1.6 °C) is the only source of ice accretion during the polar summer. This transfer mechanism, unusual at first sight, is responsible for the initiation and evolution of a false bottom ice, changing ice properties to a great extent and affecting various processes while interacting with the ocean and the atmosphere. The processes of false bottom ice growth from below (i.e. from the ocean to the atmosphere) become of prime importance in the era of global warming and climate change. In this review, we summarize the theoretical approaches, field and laboratory observations, conducted during more than 100 yr, in order to address the problem of false bottoms to a broad community of readers. We also discuss the recent modeling advances to which we have contributed. A "false bottom" is a thin layer of ice which forms in summer underneath the floe, where fresh water lies between the salt water and the ice. Such false bottoms represent the only significant source of ice growth in the Arctic during the spring-summer period. Their evolution influences the mass balance of the Arctic sea-ice cover, which is recognized as an indicator of climate change. However, the quantity, aerial extent and other properties of false bottoms are difficult to measure because coring under the surface melt ponds leads to direct mixing of surface and under-ice water. This explains why their aerial extent and overall volume is still not known despite the fact that the upper limit of the present-day estimate of the false bottom ice coverage is approximately half of the sea ice surface. The growth of false bottoms also leads to other important consequences for various physical, chemical and biological processes associated with their dynamics.

  16. Winter Bottom Trawl Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The standardized NEFSC Winter Bottom Trawl Survey was initiated in 1992 and covered offshore areas from the Mid-Atlantic to Georges Bank. Inshore strata were covered...

  17. Fall Bottom Trawl Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The standardized NEFSC Fall Bottom Trawl Survey was initiated in 1963 and covered an area from Hudson Canyon, NY to Nova Scotia, Canada. Throughout the years,...

  18. The Bottom Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, John H; Lentz, Steven J

    2018-01-03

    The oceanic bottom boundary layer extracts energy and momentum from the overlying flow, mediates the fate of near-bottom substances, and generates bedforms that retard the flow and affect benthic processes. The bottom boundary layer is forced by winds, waves, tides, and buoyancy and is influenced by surface waves, internal waves, and stratification by heat, salt, and suspended sediments. This review focuses on the coastal ocean. The main points are that (a) classical turbulence concepts and modern turbulence parameterizations provide accurate representations of the structure and turbulent fluxes under conditions in which the underlying assumptions hold, (b) modern sensors and analyses enable high-quality direct or near-direct measurements of the turbulent fluxes and dissipation rates, and (c) the remaining challenges include the interaction of waves and currents with the erodible seabed, the impact of layer-scale two- and three-dimensional instabilities, and the role of the bottom boundary layer in shelf-slope exchange.

  19. Spring Bottom Trawl Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The standardized NEFSC Spring Bottom Trawl Survey was initiated in 1968 and covered an area from Cape Hatteras, NC, to Nova Scotia, Canada, at depths >27m....

  20. CALCULATION AND ANALYSIS OF THE EXPECTED IMPACT OF THE HYDROTECHNICAL CONSTRUCTION ON THE ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITION IN THE WATER AREA AND BOTTOM TOPOGRAPHY IN CASE OF THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE APPROACH CHANNEL TO THE SABETTA PORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vvedensky Alexei Rostislavovich

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of changes in the ecological situation and bottom topography in the Ob Bay, which may be caused by the construction of the approach channel to the port of Sabetta, was carried out with the help of the developed complex of numerical models. Particular attention was paid to the study of the displacement of the boundaries of the saline water expansion and the sediment accumulation in the channel area. It is established that the possible influence of the approach channel on the hydrologic-hydrochemical characteristics is less than their natural interannual and seasonal variability in the investigated water area. The change in the bottom topography after the construction of the approach channel does not entail a significant change in the regime of hydrologic-hydrochemical parameters of the Ob Bay and, consequently, should not affect the biocenosis. The calculated changes in the bottom topography in the approach channel area will not exceed 2 % of the depth per year and will not become a significant obstacle to the reliable and uninterrupted operation of the Sabetta port.

  1. Bottom-linked innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Catharina Juul

    2018-01-01

    Employee-driven innovation is gaining ground as a strategy for developing sustainable organisations in the public and private sector. This type of innovation is characterised by active employee participation, and the bottom-up perspective is often emphasised. This article explores an issue that has...... hitherto been paid little explicit attention, namely collaboration between middle managers and employees in innovation processes. In contrast to most studies, middle managers and employees are here both subjects of explicit investigation. The collaboration processes explored in this article are termed...... ‘bottom-linked innovation’. The empirical analysis is based on an in-depth qualitative study of bottom-linked innovation in a public frontline institution in Denmark. By combining research on employee-driven innovation and middle management, the article offers new insights into such collaborative...

  2. Detailed study of selenium and selected constituents in water, bottom sediment, soil, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the San Juan River area, New Mexico, 1991-95

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Carole L.; Wilson, R.M.; Lusk, J.D.; Bristol, R.S.; Shineman, A.R.

    1998-01-01

    In response to increasing concern about the quality of irrigation drainage and its potential effects on fish, wildlife, and human health, the U.S. Department of the Interior began the National Irrigation Water Quality Program (NIWQP) to investigate these concerns at irrigation projects sponsored by the Department. The San Juan River in northwestern New Mexico was one of the areas designated for study. Study teams composed of scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Bureau of Reclamation, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs collected water, bottom-sediment, soil, and biological samples at 61 sites in the San Juan River area during 1993-94. Supplemental data collection conducted during 1991-95 by the Bureau of Indian Affairs and its contractor extended the time period and sampling sites available for analysis. Analytical chemistry performed on samples indicated that most potentially toxic elements other than selenium generally were not high enough to be of concern to fish, wildlife, and human health. Element concentrations in some water, bottom-sediment, soil, and biological samples exceeded applicable standards and criteria suggested by researchers in current literature. Selenium concentrations in water samples from 28 sites in the study area exceeded the 2-microgram-per-liter wildlife-habitat standard. Vanadium concentrations in water exceeded the 100-microgram-per-liter standard for livestock-drinking water at one site. In biota, selenium and aluminum concentrations regularly equaled or exceeded avian dietary threshold concentrations. In bottom sediment and soil, element concentrations above the upper limit of the baseline range for western soils were: selenium, 24 exceedances; lead, 2 exceedances; molybdenum, 2 exceedances; strontium, 4 exceedances; and zinc, 4 exceedances. Concentrations of total selenium in bottom-sediment and soil samples were significantly greater for Cretaceous than for non-Cretaceous soil types in the

  3. Monitoring of metals in Tilapia nilotica tissues, bottom sediments ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tilapia (Tilapia nilotica), bottom sediments and water were collected from Nworie River and Oguta Lake. The muscle, liver and gills of the fish as well as the bottom sediments and water were analysed for Al, Cr, Cd, Pb, As, Zn, Mn, Co, Se, Cu, Ni and Fe using atomic absorption spectrophotometer to highlight the importance ...

  4. Kinetics of Ce and Nd scavenging in Black Sea waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijf, Johan; Baar, Hein J.W. de; Millero, Frank J.

    1994-01-01

    Mixing experiments were performed during Leg 5 of the 1988 Black Sea Expedition in order to learn more about the mechanism and kinetics of rare earth element (REE) scavenging at the oxic-anoxic interface of anoxic basins and, more specifically, in the suboxic zone of the Black Sea. Water from the

  5. Investigation of the tritium content in surface water, bottom sediments (zoobenthos), macrophytes, and fish in the mid-stream region of the Yenisei River (Siberia, Russia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondareva, Lydia; Schultz, Michael K

    2015-11-01

    The potential sources of tritium input to the Yenisei River ecosystem are derived from local operations of nuclear facilities of the Mining and Chemical Combine operated by the state-owned Rosatom corporation and from sources derived from global weapons testing fallout and nuclear power. The background tritium concentrations in zoobenthos, bottom sediments, relevant commercial fish species, and widespread endogenous aquatic plants have been obtained for the first time in this region. Our results demonstrate that the major input term of tritium to this region of the Yenisei is derived from nearby mining operations of Rosatom, with tritium concentrations in aquatic plants marginally exceeding the observed background values obtained from upstream control sample collection sites.

  6. Nitrate removal in shallow, open-water treatment wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, Justin T; Jones, Zackary L; Sharp, Jonathan O; Sedlak, David L

    2014-10-07

    The diffuse biomat formed on the bottom of shallow, open-water unit process wetland cells contains suboxic zones that provide conditions conducive to NO3(-) removal via microbial denitrification, as well as anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox). To assess these processes, nitrogen cycling was evaluated over a 3-year period in a pilot-scale wetland cell receiving nitrified municipal wastewater effluent. NO3(-) removal varied seasonally, with approximately two-thirds of the NO3(-) entering the cell removed on an annual basis. Microcosm studies indicated that NO3(-) removal was mainly attributable to denitrification within the diffuse biomat (i.e., 80 ± 20%), with accretion of assimilated nitrogen accounting for less than 3% of the NO3(-) removed. The importance of denitrification to NO3(-) removal was supported by the presence of denitrifying genes (nirS and nirK) within the biomat. While modest when compared to the presence of denitrifying genes, a higher abundance of the anammox-specific gene hydrazine synthase (hzs) at the biomat bottom than at the biomat surface, the simultaneous presence of NH4(+) and NO3(-) within the biomat, and NH4(+) removal coupled to NO2(-) and NO3(-) removal in microcosm studies, suggested that anammox may have been responsible for some NO3(-) removal, following reduction of NO3(-) to NO2(-) within the biomat. The annual temperature-corrected areal first-order NO3(-) removal rate (k20 = 59.4 ± 6.2 m yr(-1)) was higher than values reported for more than 75% of vegetated wetlands that treated water in which NO3(-) was the primary nitrogen species (e.g., nitrified secondary wastewater effluent and agricultural runoff). The inclusion of open-water cells, originally designed for the removal of trace organic contaminants and pathogens, in unit-process wetlands may enhance NO3(-) removal as compared to existing vegetated wetland systems.

  7. Freshwater balance and the sources of deep and bottom waters in the Arctic Ocean inferred from the distribution of H218O

    OpenAIRE

    Bauch, Dorothea; Schlosser, Peter; Fairbanks, Richard G.

    1995-01-01

    Data from sections across the Eurasian Basin of the Arctic Ocean occupied in 1987 and 1991 are used to derive information on the freshwater balance of the Arctic Ocean and on sources of the deep waters of the Nansen, Amundsen and Makarov basins. Using salinity, H218O, and mass balances we estimate the river-runoff and the sea-ice melt water fractions contained in the upper waters of the Arctic Ocean and infer pathways of the river-runoff signal from the shelf seas across the central Arctic Oc...

  8. Detailed study of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the Klamath Basin, California and Oregon, 1990-92

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dileanis, P.D.; Schwarzbach, S.E.; Bennett, Jewel

    1996-01-01

    The effect of irrigation drainage on the water quality and wildlife of the Klamath Basin in California and Oregon was evaluated during 1990-92 as part of the National Irrigation Water Quality Program of the U.S. Department of the Interior. The study focused on land serviced by the Bureau of Reclamation Klamath Project, which supplies irrigation water to agricultural land in the Klamath Basin and the Lost River Basin. The Tule Lake and Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuges, managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, are in the study area. These refuges provide critical resting and breeding habitat for waterfowl on the Pacific flyway and are dependent on irrigation drainwater from upstream agriculture for most of their water supply. Water-quality characteristics throughout the study area were typical of highly eutrophic systems during the summer months of 1991 and 1992. Dissolved-oxygen concentrations and pH tended to fluctuate each day in response to diurnal patterns of photosynthesis, and frequently exceeded criteria for protection of aquatic organisms. Nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations were generally at or above threshold levels characteristic of eutrophic lakes and streams. At most sites the bulk of dissolved nitrogen was organically bound. Elevated ammonia concentrations were common in the study area, especially down- stream of drain inputs. High pH of water increased the toxicity of ammonia, and concentrations exceeded criteria at sites upstream and downstream of irrigated land. Concentrations of ammonia in samples from small drains on the Tule Lake refuge leaseland were higher than those measured in the larger, integrating drains at primary monitoring sites. The mean ammonia concentration in leaseland drains [1.21 milligrams per liter (mg/L)] was significantly higher than the mean concentration in canals delivering water to the leaseland fields (0.065 mg/L) and higher than concentrations reported to be lethal to Daphnia magna (median lethal

  9. Detailed study of selenium and other constituents in water, bottom sediment, soil, alfalfa, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the Uncompahgre Project area and in the Grand Valley, west-central Colorado, 1991-93

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, D.L.; Wright, W.G.; Stewart, K.C.; Osmundson, B.C.; Krueger, R.P.; Crabtree, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    transport to streams and irrigation drains that are tributary to the Gunnison, Uncompahgre, and Colorado Rivers. Selenium concentrations in about 64\\x11percent of water samples collected from the lower Gunnison River and about 50 percent of samples from the Colorado River near the Colorado-Utah State line exceeded the U.S.\\x11Environmental Protection Agency criterion of 5\\x11micrograms per liter for protection of aquatic life. Almost all selenium concentrations in samples collected during the nonirrigation season from Mancos Shale areas exceeded the aquatic-life criterion. The maximum selenium concentrations in surface-water samples were 600\\x11micrograms per liter in the Uncompahgre Project area and 380\\x11micrograms per liter in the Grand Valley. Irrigation drainage from the Uncompahgre Project and the Grand Valley might account for as much as 75 percent of the selenium load in the Colorado River near the Colorado-Utah State line. The primary source areas of selenium were the eastern side of the Uncompahgre Project and the western one-half of the Grand Valley, where there is extensive irrigation on soils derived from Mancos Shale. The largest mean selenium loads from tributary drainages were 14.0 pounds per day from Loutsenhizer Arroyo in the Uncompahgre Project and 12.8 pounds per day from Reed Wash in the Grand Valley. Positive correlations between selenium loads and dissolved-solids loads could indicate that salinity-control projects designed to decrease dissolved-solids loads also could decrease selenium loads from the irrigated areas. Selenium concentrations in irrigation drainage in the Grand Valley were much higher than concentrations predicted by simple evaporative concentration of irrigation source water. Selenium probably is removed from pond water by chemical and biological processes and incorporated into bottom sediment. The maximum selenium concentration in bottom sediment was 47 micrograms per gram from a pond on the eastern side of the

  10. Chemicals of emerging concern in water and bottom sediment in the Great Lakes Basin, 2012: collection methods, analytical methods, quality assurance, and study data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kathy E.; Langer, Susan K.; Menheer, Michael A.; Hansen, Donald S.; Foreman, William T.; Furlong, Edward T.; Jorgenson, Zachary G.; Choy, Steven J.; Moore, Jeremy N.; Banda, JoAnn; Gefell, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    In synoptic surveys of surface-water quality across the United States, a large group of organic chemicals associated with agricultural, household, and industrial waste have been detected. These chemicals are referred to collectively as chemicals of emerging concern (CECs) and include prescription drugs and antibiotics, over-the-counter medications, reproductive hormones, personal-care products, detergent metabolites, and flame retardants.

  11. Bottom hole blowout preventer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lineham, D.H.

    1991-04-24

    An automatically controlled ball-valve type bottom-hole blowout preventer is provided for use in drilling oil or gas wells. The blowout preventer of the invention operates under normal drilling conditions in a fully open position with an unrestricted bore. This condition is maintained by a combination of spring and mud flow pressure acting against the upper surfaces of the valve. In the event of a well kick or blowout, pressures from gas or fluid volumes acting against the lower surfaces of the valve force it into the fully closed position. A system of ports and check valves within the blowout preventer forces hydraulic fluid from one chamber to another. The metering effect of these ports determines the rate of closure of the valve, thereby allowing normal running and pulling of the drill string or tubing, without interference to pipe fill-up or drainage, from valve closure. The blowout preventer is placed in a subassembly that is an integral part of the drill string and can be incorporated in a string in any location. 3 figs.

  12. Bottom water hydrodynamic provinces and transport patterns of the northern South China Sea: Evidence from grain size of the terrigenous sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yi; Chen, Zhong; Li, Liang; Liu, Jianguo; Li, Gang; Zheng, Xufeng; Wang, Shuhong; Mo, Aibin

    2017-05-01

    Sediment transport in the source-to-sink systems of the northern South China Sea (SCS) has been of increasing interest during the past few decades. However, the mechanisms for sediment redistribution remain unclear. Sources and transport patterns in the northern SCS were investigated in this study based on grain size analyses of 205 surface sediment samples. Detailed characterizations of hydrodynamic conditions and sediment transport have been made using the log-ratio method to partition grain size components of surface sediments in the northern SCS. Results reveal that sediment dispersal patterns in the region generally contain traction, saltation, graded and uniform suspension modes. Based on the spatial distribution characteristics, the study area can be classified into three hydrodynamic provinces. Province A contains high traction concentrations that are exposed to the longshore current and topographic features, which are distributed in the Taiwan Shoal, Dongsha Islands and extends from the Pearl River estuary to the southeast of Hainan Island. Province B is characterized by higher values of saltation and graded suspension, which are widespread along the northern slope of the SCS, and its formation is interpreted as the result of interactions between down- and along-slope processes. Province C reaches its greatest concentration in the abyssal areas, particularly in the vicinity of Luzon Island, which settles only under calm conditions. Combined with previous data concerning magnetic susceptibility distributions of surface sediments from the northern SCS, the sediment transport route near the mainland is traced. Furthermore, based on distribution pattern of sortable silts and hydrodynamic provenance of the terrigenous sediments, the sediment transport route in the deep water region of the northern SCS is outlined. It flows along marginal channels which cut across the continental slope along isobaths. Taken together, the combination of grain-size components and

  13. A trawl-resistant ocean bottom seismometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, A. H.; Gassier, D.; Webb, S. C.; Koczynski, T.; Oletu, V.; Gaherty, J. B.; Tolstoy, M.

    2010-12-01

    Long-term ocean-bottom seismometer (OBS) deployments are difficult on continental shelves and other shallow regions because of the hazard from bottom trawling. Seafloor instruments can be damaged, destroyed, or prematurely released by a trawl net that is weighted with rollers and dragged across the seafloor. Bottom trawling is extensive in many areas and past instrument losses have led the U. S. OBS Instrument Pool (OBSIP) to avoid long-duration deployments in water depths shallower than 1000 m. This restriction is particularly limiting for passive-source seismic studies at active continental margins. We report on the development and testing of a new trawl-resistant OBS. The seismometer and datalogger are protected within a heavy (450 kg) eight-sided steel shield that has a low, smooth profile (2 m basal diameter and a central peak height of 50 cm) and is designed to resist and deflect bottom-trawling equipment. The sides of the shield are closed in order to protect the seismometer from seafloor currents that can cause tilt-related low-frequency seismic noise. Shield-generated noise (from mechanical resonance or from interaction with seafloor currents) is reduced by decoupling the sensor from the shield and by maximizing the distance between the seismometer and the shield’s bottom rim. The heavy weight and low profile of the instrument preclude the use of dropweights for deployment and recovery. The OBS is instead lowered to the seafloor and recovered by attaching a lifting line using a remotely-operated vehicle. Twenty trawl-resistant OBSs, equipped with Trillium Compact seismometers and absolute pressure gauges, are being constructed and will be deployed as a component of the NSF Cascadia Initiative in the summer of 2011.

  14. CHARACTERISTICS OF SLUDGE BOTTOM MESH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Szydłowski

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the study was to assess the selected heavy metals pollution of bottom sediments of small water bodies of different catchment management. Two ponds located in Mostkowo village were chosen for investigation. The first small water reservoir is surrounded by the cereal fields, cultivated without the use of organic and mineral fertilizers (NPK. The second reservoir is located in a park near rural buildings. Sediment samples were collected by the usage of KC Denmark sediments core probe. Samples were taken from 4 layers of sediment, from depth: 0–5, 5–10, 10–20 and 20–30 cm. Sampling was made once during the winter period (2014 year when ice occurred on the surface of small water bodies, from three points. The material was prepared for further analysis according to procedures used in soil science. The content of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry by usage of ASA ICE 3000 Thermo Scientific after prior digestion in the mixture (5: 1 of concentrated acids (HNO3 and HClO4. Higher pH values ​​were characteristic for sediments of pond located in a park than in pond located within the agricultural fields. In both small water bodies the highest heavy metal concentrations occurred in the deepest points of the research. In the sediments of the pond located within crop fields the highest concentration of cadmium, copper, lead and zinc were observed in a layer of 0–5 cm, wherein the nickel and chromium in a layer of 20–30 cm. In the sediments of the pond, located in the park the highest values ​​occurred at the deepest sampling point in the layer taken form 10–20 cm. Sediments from second reservoir were characterized by the largest average concentrations of heavy metals, except the lead content in sediment form the layer of 10–20 cm. According to the geochemical evaluation of sediments proposed by Bojakowska and Sokołowska [1998], the majority of samples belongs to Ist

  15. Nanoelectronics from the bottom up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Lieber, Charles M

    2007-11-01

    Electronics obtained through the bottom-up approach of molecular-level control of material composition and structure may lead to devices and fabrication strategies not possible with top-down methods. This review presents a brief summary of bottom-up and hybrid bottom-up/top-down strategies for nanoelectronics with an emphasis on memories based on the crossbar motif. First, we will discuss representative electromechanical and resistance-change memory devices based on carbon nanotube and core-shell nanowire structures, respectively. These device structures show robust switching, promising performance metrics and the potential for terabit-scale density. Second, we will review architectures being developed for circuit-level integration, hybrid crossbar/CMOS circuits and array-based systems, including experimental demonstrations of key concepts such lithography-independent, chemically coded stochastic demultipluxers. Finally, bottom-up fabrication approaches, including the opportunity for assembly of three-dimensional, vertically integrated multifunctional circuits, will be critically discussed.

  16. Reconnaissance investigation of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the Vermejo Project area and the Maxwell National Wildlife Refuge, Colfax County, northeastern New Mexico, 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolino, J.R.; Garrabrant, L.A.; Wilson, Mark; Lusk, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    Based on findings of limited studies during 1989-92, a reconnaissance investigation was conducted in 1993 to assess the effects of the Vermejo Irrigation Project on water quality in the area of the project, including the Maxwell National Wildlife Refuge. This project was part of a U.S. Department of the Interior National Irrigation Water-Quality Program to determine whether irrigation drainage has caused or has the potential to cause significant harmful effects on human health, fish, and wildlife and whether irrigation drainage may adversely affect the suitability of water for other beneficial uses. For this study, samples of water, sediment, and biota were collected from 16 sites in and around the Vermejo Irrigation Project prior to, during the latter part of, and after the 1993 irrigation season (April, August-September, and November, respectively). No inorganic constituents exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking-water standards. The State of New Mexico standard of 750 micrograms per liter for boron in irrigation water was exceeded at three sites (five samples), though none exceeded the livestock water standard of 5,000 micrograms per liter. Selenium concentrations exceeded the State of New Mexico chronic standard of 2 micrograms per liter for wildlife and fisheries water in at least eight samples from five sites. Bottom-sediment samples were collected and analyzed for trace elements and compared to concentrations of trace elements in soils of the Western United States. Concentrations of three trace elements at eight sites exceeded the upper values of the expected 95-percent ranges for Western U.S. soils. These included molybdenum at one site, selenium at seven sites, and uranium at four sites. Cadmium and copper concentrations exceeded the National Contaminant Biomonitoring Program 85th percentile in fish from six sites. Average concentrations of selenium in adult brine flies (33.7 mg/g dry weight) were elevated above concentrations in other

  17. Unique 'man-made' object: reservoirs B10 and B11 of Techa cascade and means for in-situ measurement of its contamination - Water, soil, bottom sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Oleg; Potapov, Victor; Stepanov, Vyacheslav; Smirnov, Sergey; Volkovich, Anatoly [National Research Centre - Kurchatov Institute, 1 Kurchatov Sq., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    Contamination of natural objects - alarm fallout zones and flood plains near production sites (the result of technological accidents and resource extraction) occupy large areas. Large area and volume of pollution, moderate activity facilities (at low and medium-level rad-wastes) to make such objects specific types of radioactive waste. These objects exist for a long time, now they are characterized by a bound state of nuclides with the matrix. There are no cost-effective ways to remove these rad-wastes, the only solution for the rehabilitation of such areas is their isolation and regular monitoring through direct and indirect measurements. The task of mapping and subsequent monitoring of pollution is very complex. Most of the complexity of the laboratory measurement techniques, as well as high levels of contamination (to 10{sup 9} Bk/m{sup 2}) for radionuclides Cs-137 and Sr-90 require for mapping pollution field physical methods of measurement of the specific activity of radionuclides directly on the ground. The set of instruments for in-situ contamination measurements: a portable spectrometric collimated detector, collimated borehole spectrometric detector, underwater spectrometric detector, spectrometer for field measurements of the specific activity of Sr-90, connected to a portable MCA. The complex was used in Bryansk region, on the Techa river and Yenisei river. We present measurements of contamination in and around the reservoir No. 10 of Techa cascade containing a huge amount of radioactive waste. Measurements are performed in the framework of international expeditions in 2008, 2011 and 2012. To develop plans and programs for the rehabilitation of non-standard large-size objects containing radioactive waste precise and detailed measurement data are necessary and very often there is not enough of such data. Measurements of contaminated water, soil and bottom sediments in area of water reservoirs of Techa cascade have shown that unique system of detectors and

  18. Revisiting the round bottom flask rainbow experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmke, Markus; Selmke, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    A popular demonstration experiment in optics uses a round-bottom flask filled with water to project a circular rainbow on a screen with a hole through which the flask is illuminated. We show how the vessel's wall shifts the first- and second-order bows towards each other and consequently reduces the width of Alexander's dark band. We address the challenge this introduces in observing Alexander's dark band, and explain the importance of a sufficient distance between the flask and the screen. The wall-effect also introduces a splitting of the bows that can easily be misinterpreted.

  19. Grounding experiments on soft bottoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sterndorff, M.J.; Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1996-01-01

    To verify a theoretical analysis procedure for calculation of the hull girder response of ships running aground, a series of large-scale ship grounding experiments was performed on an artificial island made of engineered fill. The tests were conducted by running a condemned fishing vessel up...... for grounding on soft bottoms....

  20. Culture from the Bottom Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Dwight; Sohn, Jija

    2013-01-01

    The culture concept has been severely criticized for its top-down nature in TESOL, leading arguably to its falling out of favor in the field. But what of the fact that people do "live culturally" (Ingold, 1994)? This article describes a case study of culture from the bottom up--culture as understood and enacted by its individual users.…

  1. Bottom Production, Spectroscopy and Lifetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Argiro, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution, I give a brief overview of the latest results related to the production, spectroscopy and lifetimes of bottom and charm hadrons. Several interesting experimental results were presented in this field in 2012. The focus will be on the findings of experiments performed at hadron colliders, since the LHC is taking up most of the stage this year, with a brief mention about electron-proton collider results.

  2. Chemical speciation of vanadium in coal bottom Ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydin, Firat; Aydin, Isil; Hamamci, Candan [Science Faculty, Chemistry Department, Dicle University, Diyarbakir (Turkey); Saydut, Abdurrahman [Engineering Faculty, Mining Engineering Department, Dicle University, Diyarbakir (Turkey); Gunduz, Beniz [Science Faculty, Chemistry Department, Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey)

    2012-04-15

    Chemical speciation of vanadium is important to understand the true nature of this element in the environment as well as its biochemical pathways. Sample pretreatment, preparation, and chemical speciation methods were applied for vanadium in coal bottom ash here. Two-stage microwave acid digestion was used to preparation of samples. Determination of vanadium was performed using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Speciation of vanadium was carried out using a seven-step sequential extraction procedure of the coal bottom ash each releasing species of vanadium: Water soluble, exchangeable, carbonate, reducible, oxidizable, sulfide, and residual fractions. Total vanadium concentration in the coal bottom ash is 701 mg kg{sup -1} d.w. The most abundant form of vanadium in coal bottom ash is residual fraction of vanadium (196 mg kg{sup -1} d.w.). Relative abundances of the remaining vanadium fractions in coal bottom ash are as follows: Reducible (176 mg kg{sup -1} d.w.) > sulfide (176 mg kg{sup -1} d.w.) > carbonate (85 mg kg{sup -1} d.w.) > oxidizable (50 mg kg{sup -1} d.w.) > water soluble (10.6 mg kg{sup -1} d.w.) > exchangeable (9.0 mg kg{sup -1} d.w.). (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Compositions of foraminifera-rich turbidite sediments from the Shenhu area on the northern slope of the South China Sea: Implication for the presence of deep water bottom currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Niu; Feng, Dong; Chen, Linying; Wang, Hongbin; Chen, Duofu

    2017-05-01

    The sediments in gravity core DH-1, collected from Shenhu area on the northern slope of the South China Sea, are composed of two dark grey clay silt layers (A1 and A3) and two foraminifera-rich layers (A2 and A4) (A1 is the top layer and A4 is the bottom layer). Major and trace metal contents, along with grain size and mineralogic data suggest that these silt layers represent background hemipelagic sedimentation. Unlike silt layers, the intervening foraminifera-rich layerA4 exhibits a fining-upward trend, is distal turbidite. Grain size CM diagram and the sharp contacts between the foraminifera-rich layer A2 and the upper and lower layers suggest layer A2 is the result of depositional interaction between turbidite and bottom currents. AMS 14C dating of planktonic foraminifera indicate the age of the turbidite in A2 is between15.3 ka and 22.6 ka. We hypothesize that turbidite formation in this period was related to the increase supply of terrigenous matter since the Last Glacial Maximum. The rapid deposition of each turbidite led to reduced rates of oxygen diffusion into the sediment, allowing anoxic conditions develop in sediments and fostering U enrichment (>3.1 μg/g) in foraminifera-rich layer A4b. In contrast, decrease concentration of U and U/Mo ratios in foraminifera-rich layerA2, which is possibly due to U remobilization as a consequence of downward penetration of the oxidation front from the oxygen rich bottom currents. These new data suggest that authigenic U was quite sensitive to the inflow of bottom currents, and U/Mo ratios may indicate the depositional environmental change in relation to the bottom current action on the turbidite.

  4. Nutrient loading and metabolism in hard-bottom littoral mesocosms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersting, K.; Lindblad, C.

    2001-01-01

    In eight hard-bottom tidal littoral mesocosms oxygen concentrations and temperature were measured every 30 s and registered as 15 min-averages. The mesocosms were fed with water from the Oslofjord (residence time about 2 h) and the measurements were also performed in the inflow. In addition,

  5. Drag reduction of a miniature boat with superhydrophobic grille bottom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. Jiang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Water strider can slide on water surface with a very small drag force using its long superhydrophobic legs. Inspired by the water strider legs, we report here a novel design of superhydrophobic grille structure for drag reduction. A miniature boat covered with a superhydrophobic grille at the bottom is fabricated and compared with a normal boat with flat bottom in the same size, and a significant drag reduction is obtained by the former. Experiments also reveal that the grille structure exhibits a remarkable loading capacity supplied by the water surface tension. It is found that the optimal design of such a miniature boat with a considerable loading capacity and a small drag can be realized through controlling the length and the spacing of the grilles. This study shows a new idea to reduce the fluid drag in microfluidics, micro electromechanical system and other engineering areas.

  6. Development of Crashworthy Bottom and Side Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naar, H.; Kujala, P.; Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    2002-01-01

    structures. The first structure is a conventional double bottom. In the second structure (presently protected through a patent) the bottom plating is stiffened with hat-profiles instead of bulb profiles. In the third structure the outer shell is an all-steel sandwich panel. In the fourth structure the bottom...

  7. Peat accumulation in kettle holes: bottom up or top down?

    OpenAIRE

    G. Gaudig; Couwenberg, J; Joosten, H.

    2006-01-01

    Rapid peat formation in kettle hole-shaped basins may take place either a) by peat forming downwards (top down) from a floating mat under stable water level conditions (terrestrialisation), or b) by peat forming upwards (bottom up) as humus colloids seal off the basin, causing the water level to rise progressively (“kettle hole mire mechanism”). The latter mechanism has hardly been considered in the international literature. The floating-mat mechanism must lead to concave peat isochrones thro...

  8. OIL DECONTAMINATION OF BOTTOM SEDIMENTS EXPERIMENTAL WORK RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lushnikov Sergey V.

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of experimental work during 2004-2005 on oil decontamination of bottom sediments of Lake Schuchye, situated in the Komi Republic (Northern Russia. The cause of thecontamination were huge oil spills occurred after a series of accidental ruptures on the Harjaga-Usinsk and Vozej-Usinsk oil-pipe lines in 1994. Flotation technology was used for the cleaning of bottom sediments.157 tons of crude oil were removed during the course of 2-year experimental work from an area of 4,1 ha.The content of aliphatic and alicyclic oil hydrocarbons was reduced from 53,3 g/kg to 2,2 g/kg, on average.Hydrobiological investigations revealed that bottom sediments started to be inhabited by benthos organisms, dominantly Oligochaeta. Besides Oligochaeta, Chironomidae maggots and Bivalvia were detected. Theappearance of Macrozoobenthos organisms can serve as a bioindicator of water quality.

  9. Perspectives on Geoacoustic Inversion of Ocean Bottom Reflectivity Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ross Chapman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on acoustic reflectivity of the ocean bottom, and describes inversion of reflection data from an experiment designed to study the physical properties and structure of the ocean bottom. The formalism of Bayesian inference is reviewed briefly to establish an understanding of the approach for inversion that is in widespread use. A Bayesian inversion of ocean bottom reflection coefficient versus angle data to estimate geoacoustic model parameters of young oceanic crust is presented. The data were obtained in an experiment to study the variation of sound speed in crustal basalt with age of the crust at deep water sites in the Pacific Ocean where the sediment deposits overlying the basalt are very thin. The inversion results show that sound speed of both compressional and shear waves is increasing with crustal age over the track of the experiment where age increased from 40 to 70 million years.

  10. Bottom Reflectance in Ocean Color Satellite Remote Sensing for Coral Reef Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Reichstetter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Most ocean color algorithms are designed for optically deep waters, where the seafloor has little or no effect on remote sensing reflectance. This can lead to inaccurate retrievals of inherent optical properties (IOPs in optically shallow water environments. Here, we investigate in situ hyperspectral bottom reflectance signatures and their separability for coral reef waters, when observed at the spectral resolutions of MODIS and SeaWiFS sensors. We use radiative transfer modeling to calculate the effects of bottom reflectance on the remote sensing reflectance signal, and assess detectability and discrimination of common coral reef bottom classes by clustering modeled remote sensing reflectance signals. We assess 8280 scenarios, including four IOPs, 23 depths and 45 bottom classes at MODIS and SeaWiFS bands. Our results show: (i no significant contamination (Rrscorr < 0.0005 of bottom reflectance on the spectrally-averaged remote sensing reflectance signal at depths >17 m for MODIS and >19 m for SeaWiFS for the brightest spectral reflectance substrate (light sand in clear reef waters; and (ii bottom cover classes can be combined into two distinct groups, “light” and “dark”, based on the modeled surface reflectance signals. This study establishes that it is possible to efficiently improve parameterization of bottom reflectance and water-column IOP retrievals in shallow water ocean color models for coral reef environments.

  11. Significance of archaeal nitrification in hypoxic waters of the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, C.; Vandieken, V.; Thamdrup, B.; Jürgens, K.

    2012-04-01

    Marine oxygen deficient areas are sites of important microbially mediated transformations within the nitrogen cycle. In the Baltic Sea, suboxic waters (oxygen below 5 μmol L-1) are considered to be a major nitrification zone within the water column. Recent evidence indicates that Archaea and not Bacteria are here the major ammonium oxidizers. In a Baltic Sea pelagic redoxcline, the crenarchaeotal subcluster GD2 which is related to the first cultivated ammonia-oxidizing crenarchaeote Candidatus Nitrosopumilus maritimus occurs in high abundance. However, little is known about its function and importance for the nitrogen and carbon cycles in oxygen minimum zones of the Baltic Sea. To approach this question, we sampled pelagic redoxclines in the Baltic Sea and determined the rates of nitrification and light-independent, inorganic carbon fixation via 15N and 14C isotope incubations, and quantified the abundance of putative ammonia-oxidizing Crenarchaeota by catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH). Nitrification was detectable throughout the suboxic zone with maxima of 122-131 nmol L-1 d-1 in layers with 1.8-7.1 μmol oxygen L-1 and ammonium below 0.2 μmol L-1. However, a nitrification potential was detected even in the upper anoxic, sulfidic zone. Crenarchaeotal abundance correlated strongly with nitrification rates and accounted for up to 24% of total prokaryotic cells. In contrast, the CO2 fixation in the suboxic zone was with 1.6-19.6 nmol L-1 d-1 rather low when compared to the subjacent anoxic, sulfidic waters. Our study indicates that ammonia oxidation in the suboxic zone of the Baltic Sea is mainly driven by Crenarchaeota. Their occurrence also in the anoxic, sulfidic water masses and the maintained nitrification potential point to special adaptations in this habitat with a potentially reduced sensitivity against hydrogen sulfide.

  12. Bottom friction. A practical approach to modelling coastal oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolanos, Rodolfo; Jensen, Palle; Kofoed-Hansen, Henrik; Tornsfeldt Sørensen, Jacob

    2017-04-01

    Coastal processes imply the interaction of the atmosphere, the sea, the coastline and the bottom. The spatial gradients in this area are normally large, induced by orographic and bathymetric features. Although nowadays it is possible to obtain high-resolution bathymetry, the details of the seabed, e.g. sediment type, presence of biological material and living organisms are not available. Additionally, these properties as well as bathymetry can also be highly dynamic. These bottom characteristics are very important to describe the boundary layer of currents and waves and control to a large degree the dissipation of flows. The bottom friction is thus typically a calibration parameter in numerical modelling of coastal processes. In this work, we assess this process and put it into context of other physical processes uncertainties influencing wind-waves and currents in the coastal areas. A case study in the North Sea is used, particularly the west coast of Denmark, where water depth of less than 30 m cover a wide fringe along the coast, where several offshore wind farm developments are being carried out. We use the hydrodynamic model MIKE 21 HD and the spectral wave model MIKE 21 SW to simulate atmosphere and tidal induced flows and the wind wave generation and propagation. Both models represent state of the art and have been developed for flexible meshes, ideal for coastal oceanography as they can better represent coastlines and allow a variable spatial resolution within the domain. Sensitivity tests to bottom friction formulations are carried out into context of other processes (e.g. model forcing uncertainties, wind and wave interactions, wind drag coefficient). Additionally, a map of varying bottom properties is generated based on a literature survey to explore the impact of the spatial variability. Assessment of different approaches is made in order to establish a best practice regarding bottom friction and coastal oceanographic modelling. Its contribution is also

  13. Application of solidified sea bottom sediments into environmental bioremediation materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed H.A. Dabwan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Since dredged sea bottom sediments normally give off a horrible smell, the limitation of disposal places has become a serious problem in Japan. Hence, development of an alternative system to readily treat dredged sea bottom sediments is therefore needed. The development of “value-added” reused products from these sediments offers particular benefits both in terms of resource recovery and protection of the environment. We developed an in situ solidification system for the treatment of sea bottom sediments, the “Hi-Biah-System (HBS”. Firstly, this review deals with solidified sea bottom sediments for the construction of an artificial tidal flat in Ago Bay, Japan. The environmental conditions (pH, oxidation–reduction potential (ORP, acid volatile sulphide (AVS, loss on ignition (LOI, water content (WC, chemical oxygen demand (COD, total organic carbon (TOC, total nitrogen (T-N, chlorophyll a and particle size were then monitored in the constructed tidal flat. The number of benthos individuals and growth of short-necked clams (Ruditapes philippinarum in the artificial tidal flat were also evaluated. The environmental conditions, number of benthos individuals and growth of short-necked clams in the artificial tidal flat were shown to be similar to those observed in a natural tidal flat. Next, the potential use of solidified sea bottom sediments as soil parent material in the germination/growth of seagrass is presented. The soil parent material consisting of solidified sediments obtained using HBS plus soil conditioner and hardener seems to be effective for the germination of Zostera marina. The best growth after six months was observed in plants grown in soil parent material consisting of a mixture of solidified sediments and the sand by weight ration 70:30. The present study may suggest the possible application of solidified sea bottom sediments into growth of other plants.

  14. Bottom Slamming on Heaving Point Absorber Wave Energy Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Griet; Vantorre, Marc; Frigaard, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Oscillating point absorber buoys may rise out of the water and be subjected to bottom slamming upon re-entering the water. Numerical simulations are performed to estimate the power absorption, the impact velocities and the corresponding slamming forces for various slamming constraints. Three buoy...... shapes are considered: a hemisphere and two conical shapes with deadrise angles of 30 and 45, with a waterline diameter of 5 m. The simulations indicate that the risk of rising out of the water is largely dependent on the buoy draft and sea state. Although associated with power losses, emergence...

  15. Coal liquefaction with subsequent bottoms pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walchuk, George P.

    1978-01-01

    In a coal liquefaction process wherein heavy bottoms produced in a liquefaction zone are upgraded by coking or a similar pyrolysis step, pyrolysis liquids boiling in excess of about 1000.degree. F. are further reacted with molecular hydrogen in a reaction zone external of the liquefaction zone, the resulting effluent is fractionated to produce one or more distillate fractions and a bottoms fraction, a portion of this bottoms fraction is recycled to the reaction zone, and the remaining portion of the bottoms fraction is recycled to the pyrolysis step.

  16. Development of hot water utilizing power plants in fiscal 1999. Development of binary cycle power plant (Development of system to detect well bottom information when geothermal hot water is excavated); 1999 nendo nessui riyo hatsuden plant nado kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Binary cycle hatsuden plant no kaihatsu (chinetsusei kussakuji kotei joho kenchi system no kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Developmental research has been performed on the MWD system to identify on the real time basis the information about well bottom when geothermal hot water is excavated (azimuth, inclination, pressure and temperature). This paper summarizes the achievements in fiscal 1999. In the developmental research on the detection device, attempts were made in improving the zonde, and enhancing its heat resisting performance. In addition, data were acquired on electronics parts as a result of the heat resistance identifying test. For the on-the-ground devices, improvement was made to add the experiment analyzing program with a program to remove the downhole motor pressure noise. The pressure noise during excavation in the actual wells was collected. In the analyzing system, use of PC, improvement, and operation check were performed on the well trace projecting and indicating system. Operation of the well trace estimating system was checked by using the actual data in order to prepare the operation manual. With regard to the well evaluation supporting system, improvement, operation check and that by using the actual data were executed on the PC version temperature analyzing system. Performance of the zonde was verified by the actual geothermal well test. (NEDO)

  17. Flowable Backfill Materials from Bottom Ash for Underground Pipeline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Joong Lee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between strength and strain in manufacturing controlled low strength materials to recycle incineration bottom ash. Laboratory tests for controlled low strength materials with bottom ash and recycled in-situ soil have been carried out. The optimum mixing ratios were 25%–45% of in-situ soil, 30% of bottom ash, 10%–20% of fly ash, 0%–3% of crumb rubber, 3% of cement, and 22% of water. Each mixture satisfied the standard specifications: a minimum 20 cm of flowability and 127 kPa of unconfined compressive strength. The average secant modulus (E50 was (0.07–0.08 qu. The ranges of the internal friction angle and cohesion for mixtures were 36.5°–46.6° and 49.1–180 kPa, respectively. The pH of all of the mixtures was over 12, which is strongly alkaline. Small-scale chamber tests for controlled low strength materials with bottom ash and recycled in-situ soil have been carried out. Vertical deflection of 0.88–2.41 mm and horizontal deflection of 0.83–3.72 mm were measured during backfilling. The vertical and horizontal deflections of controlled low strength materials were smaller than that of sand backfill.

  18. Wet physical separation of MSWI bottom ash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muchova, L.

    2010-01-01

    Bottom ash (BA) from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) has high potential for the recovery of valuable secondary materials. For example, the MSWI bottom ash produced by the incinerator at Amsterdam contains materials such as non-ferrous metals (2.3%), ferrous metals (8-13%), gold (0.4 ppm),

  19. Wet physical separation of MSWI bottom ash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Breugel, K.; Muchova, L.

    Bottom ash (BA) from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) has high potential for the recovery of valuable secondary materials. For example, the MSWI bottom ash produced by the incinerator at Amsterdam contains materials such as non-ferrous metals (2.3%), ferrous metals (8-13%), gold (0.4 ppm),

  20. A ocean bottom vector magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaomei; Teng, Yuntian; Wang, Chen; Ma, Jiemei

    2017-04-01

    The new development instrument with a compact spherical coil system and Overhauser magnetometer for measuring the total strength of the magnetic field and the vectors of strength, Delta inclination - Delta declination, meanwhile we also use a triaxial fluxgate instrument of the traditional instrument for geomagnetic vector filed measurement. The advantages of this method are be calibrated by each other and get good performances with automatic operation, good stability and high resolution. Firstly, a brief description of the instrument measurement principles and the key technologies are given. The instrument used a spherical coil system with 34 coils to product the homogeneous volume inside the coils which is large enough to accommodate the sensor of Overhauser total field sensor; the rest of the footlocker-sized ocean-bottom vector magnetometer consists of equipment to run the sensors and records its data (batteries and a data logger), weight to sink it to the sea floor, a remote-controlled acoustic release and flotation to bring the instrument back to the surface. Finally, the accuracy of the instrument was tested in the Geomagnetic station, and the measurement accuracies of total strength and components were better than 0.2nT and 1nT respectively. The figure 1 shows the development instrument structure. it includes six thick glass spheres which protect the sensor, data logger and batteries from the pressures of the deep sea, meanwhile they also provide recycling positive buoyancy; To cushion the glass, the spheres then go inside yellow plastic "hardhats". The triaxial fluxgate is inside No.1 glass spheres, data logger and batteries are inside No.2 glass spheres, the new vector sensor is inside No.3 glass spheres, acoustic communication unit is inside No.4 glass spheres, No.5 and No.6 glass spheres are empty which only provide recycling positive buoyancy. The figure 2 shows the development instrument Physical photo.

  1. Distribution of Polychaeta in soft-bottoms of a Galician Ria (NW Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Cacabelos

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Macrobenthic polychaete distributions were studied along the soft-bottoms of the Ensenada de San Simón (Galicia, NW Spain. Results suggest that the distribution and abundance of polychaetes in the inlet were highly dependent on depth, sediment characteristics (grain size, organic matter and calcium carbonate content and bottom water temperature. In the inner area of the inlet, intertidal bottoms colonised by the seagrasses Zostera marina and Z. noltii were dominated by spionids and capitellids, and showed low species number and diversity. Shallow muddy bottoms of central areas were mostly dominated by ampharetids, terebellids and cirratullids. These families along with paraonids, maldanids and syllids were the most abundant families in the deeper subtidal muddy bottoms at the mouth of the inlet. These sediments also showed the highest number of species, diversity and density of individuals.

  2. On the near-bottom variability in the northwestern Weddell Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, M.; Hellmer, H. H.; Absy, J. M.

    The thermohaline data from the first Brazilian hydrographic cruise to the northwestern Weddell Sea (AR XVIII) revealed significant near-bottom changes in water-column properties over seasonal and interannual time scales. Favorable ice conditions in 2000 allowed a dense station coverage of the area including the main pathways for Weddell Sea deep and bottom waters. The new results are compared with the data from the 1998 German cruise ANT XV/4 and other historical data. A warming of the bottom layer was discovered that was more attributable to short-term seasonal or interannual fluctuations in the formation of cold bottom water than to a long-term trend. There was both consistency and variation between and within seasons. Invariant bottom-water characteristics were observed in different seasons (summer/winter), and variable bottom-water characteristics were observed in the same season (summer) at the same locations. This reduces the possibility of a dominant seasonal effect. Instead, we propose that the intermittent behavior of small cold-water sources along the Weddell Sea's periphery causes the variability measured in the deep northwestern Weddell Sea. The observed variability has consequences for the water-mass export across the South Scotia Ridge, as the absence of the fresher/lighter Weddell Sea Bottom Water south of South Orkney Plateau during AR XVIII might be linked to a reduced ventilation of the deep Scotia Sea. The results of this study show the need for ongoing efforts for establishing a long-term monitoring of this region with global importance.

  3. Pipeline bottoming cycle study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of applying bottoming cycles to the prime movers that drive the compressors of natural gas pipelines was studied. These bottoming cycles convert some of the waste heat from the exhaust gas of the prime movers into shaft power and conserve gas. Three typical compressor station sites were selected, each on a different pipeline. Although the prime movers were different, they were similar enough in exhaust gas flow rate and temperature that a single bottoming cycle system could be designed, with some modifications, for all three sites. Preliminary design included selection of the bottoming cycle working fluid, optimization of the cycle, and design of the components, such as turbine, vapor generator and condensers. Installation drawings were made and hardware and installation costs were estimated. The results of the economic assessment of retrofitting bottoming cycle systems on the three selected sites indicated that profitability was strongly dependent upon the site-specific installation costs, how the energy was used and the yearly utilization of the apparatus. The study indicated that the bottoming cycles are a competitive investment alternative for certain applications for the pipeline industry. Bottoming cycles are technically feasible. It was concluded that proper design and operating practices would reduce the environmental and safety hazards to acceptable levels. The amount of gas that could be saved through the year 2000 by the adoption of bottoming cycles for two different supply projections was estimated as from 0.296 trillion ft/sup 3/ for a low supply projection to 0.734 trillion ft/sup 3/ for a high supply projection. The potential market for bottoming cycle equipment for the two supply projections varied from 170 to 500 units of varying size. Finally, a demonstration program plan was developed.

  4. Workability and strength of lignite bottom ash geopolymer mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathonsaowaphak, Apha; Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Pimraksa, Kedsarin

    2009-08-30

    In this paper, the waste lignite bottom ash from power station was used as a source material for making geopolymer. Sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) were used as liquid for the mixture and heat curing was used to activate the geopolymerization. The fineness of bottom ash, the liquid alkaline/ash ratio, the sodium silicate/NaOH ratio and the NaOH concentration were studied. The effects of the additions of water, NaOH and napthalene-based superplasticizer on the workability and strength of the geopolymer mortar were also studied. Relatively high strength geopolymer mortars of 24.0-58.0 MPa were obtained with the use of ground bottom ash with 3% retained on sieve no. 325 and mean particle size of 15.7 microm, using liquid alkaline/ash ratios of 0.429-0.709, the sodium silicate/NaOH ratios of 0.67-1.5 and 7.5-12.5M NaOH. The incorporation of water improved the workability of geopolymer mortar more effectively than the use of napthalene-based superplasticizer with similar slight reduction in strengths. The addition of NaOH solution slightly improves the workability of the mix while maintaining the strength of the geopolymer mortars.

  5. Bottom-mounted water level recorder data in the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Inner Shelf Transport and Recycling (ISHTAR) project from 05 July 1985 to 09 October 1988 (NODC Accession 0000349)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Depth, pressure, and water temperature data were collected at fixed platforms in the Gulf of Alaska from July 5, 1985 to October 9, 1988. These data were submitted...

  6. Radiative transfer theory applied to ocean bottom modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijano, Jorge E; Zurk, Lisa M

    2009-10-01

    Research on the propagation of acoustic waves in the ocean bottom sediment is of interest for active sonar applications such as target detection and remote sensing. The interaction of acoustic energy with the sea floor sublayers is usually modeled with techniques based on the full solution of the wave equation, which sometimes leads to mathematically intractable problems. An alternative way to model wave propagation in layered media containing random scatterers is the radiative transfer (RT) formulation, which is a well established technique in the electromagnetics community and is based on the principle of conservation of energy. In this paper, the RT equation is used to model the backscattering of acoustic energy from a layered elastic bottom sediment containing distributions of independent scatterers due to a constant single frequency excitation in the water column. It is shown that the RT formulation provides insight into the physical phenomena of scattering and conversion of energy between waves of different polarizations.

  7. Microplastics in Baltic bottom sediments: Quantification procedures and first results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobkov, M; Esiukova, E

    2017-01-30

    Microplastics in the marine environment are known as a global ecological problem but there are still no standardized analysis procedures for their quantification. The first breakthrough in this direction was the NOAA Laboratory Methods for quantifying synthetic particles in water and sediments, but fibers numbers have been found to be underestimated with this approach. We propose modifications for these methods that will allow us to analyze microplastics in bottom sediments, including small fibers. Addition of an internal standard to sediment samples and occasional empty runs are advised for analysis quality control. The microplastics extraction efficiency using the proposed modifications is 92±7%. Distribution of microplastics in bottom sediments of the Russian part of the Baltic Sea is presented. Microplastic particles were found in all of the samples with an average concentration of 34±10 items/kg DW and have the same order of magnitude as neighbor studies reported. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The analysis of bottom forming process for hybrid heating device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bałon, Paweł; Świątoniowski, Andrzej; Kiełbasa, Bartłomiej

    2017-10-01

    In this paper the authors present an unusual method for bottom forming applicable for various industrial purposes including the manufacture of water heaters or pressure equipment. This method allows for the fabrication of the bottom of a given piece of stainless steel into a pre-determined shape conforming to the DIN standard which determines the most advantageous dimensions for the bottom cross section in terms of working pressure loading. The authors checked the validity of the method in a numerical and experimental way generating a tool designed to produce bottoms of specified geometry. Many problems are encountered during the design and production of parts, especially excessive sheet wrinkling over a large area of the part. The experiment showed that a lack of experience and numerical analysis in the design of such elements would result in the production of highly wrinkled parts. This defect would render the parts impossible to assemble with the cylindrical part. Many tool shops employ a method for drawing elements with a spherical surface which involves additional spinning, stamping, and grading operations, which greatly increases the cost of parts production. The authors present and compare two forming methods for spherical and parabolic objects, and experimentally confirm the validity of the sheet reversing method with adequate pressure force. The applied method produces parts in one drawing operation and in a following operation that is based on laser or water cutting to obtain a round blank. This reduces the costs of tooling manufacturing by requiring just one tool which can be placed on any hydraulic press with a minimum force of 2 000 kN.

  9. Wave-structure interaction for long wave models with a freely moving bottom

    OpenAIRE

    Benyo, Krisztian

    2017-01-01

    43 pages; In this paper we address a particular fluid-solid interaction problem in which the solid object is lying at the bottom of a layer of fluid and moves under the forces created by waves travelling on the surface of this layer. More precisely, we consider the water waves problem in a fluid of fixed depth with a flat bottom topography and with an object lying on the bottom, allowed to move horizontally under the pressure forces created by the waves. After establishing the physical settin...

  10. Bottom Scour Observed Under Hurricane Ivan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Teague, William J; Jarosz, Eva; Keen, Timothy R; Wang, David W; Hulbert, Mark S

    2006-01-01

    Observations that extensive bottom scour along the outer continental shelf under Hurricane Ivan resulted in the displacement of more than 100 million cubic meters of sediment from a 35x15 km region...

  11. Detailed study of irrigation drainage in and near wildlife management areas, west-central Nevada, 1987-90; Part C, Summary of irrigation-drainage effects on water quality, bottom sediment, and biota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Ray J.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents a summary of the detailed scientific study of Stillwater Wildlife Management Area and other nearby wetlands in west-central Nevada during 1987-90. The work was funded by the National Irrigation Water Quality Program of the U.S. Department of the Interior with the overall objectives of determining (1) the extent, magnitude, and effects of selected water-quality constituents associated with irrigation drainage on fish, wildlife, and human health, and (2) the sources and exposure pathways that cause contamination where adverse effects are documented. Much of the information in this report was summarized from two previously published interpretive reports that were completed to fulfill study objectives. Where applicable, data for the study area from other published sources also were utilized. The results of these studies indicate that the aquatic biota in natural wetlands of the Carson Desert are adversely affected by hydrological and geochemical sources and processes in the Newlands Irrigation Project area. Reactions between water and naturally occurring minerals in the shallow alluvial aquifer increase concentrations of potentially toxic constituents in ground water that eventually enters the wetlands. Once in the wetlands, these constituents are furhter concentrated by evaporation and transpiration. Water from some agricultural drains that enter Stillwater WMA was acutely toxic to aquatic organisms. The drains in the agricultural areas, which eventually discharge to the wetlands, were also implicated as sites of uptake of selenium and mercury by aquatic organisms.

  12. Anthropopression markers in lake bottom sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadolna, Anna; Nowicka, Barbara

    2014-05-01

    Lakes are vulnerable to various types of anthropogenic disturbances. Responses of lake ecosystems to environmental stressors are varied and depend not only on the type of a factor but also on the lake natural resistance to degradation. Within the EULAKES project an evaluation of anthropogenic stress extent in a flow-through, postglacial, ribbon lake (Lake Charzykowskie) was carried out. It was assumed, that this impact manifests unevenly, depending on a type and degree of the pressure on the shore zones, water quality of tributaries, lake basin shape and dynamics of a water movement. It was stated, that anthropogenic markers are substances accumulated in bottom sediments as a result of allochthonous substances inflow from the catchment and atmosphere. Along the selected transects 105 samples from the top layer of sediments (about 20 cm) was collected representing the contemporary accumulation (about 15 years). The content of selected chemical elements and compounds was examined, including nutrients (TN and TP), heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, lead, chromium, nickel, copper, zinc, mercury, iron, and manganese) and pesticides (DDT, DDD, DDE, DMDT , γ-HCH). The research was conducted in the deepest points of each lake basin and along the research transects - while choosing the spots, the increased intensity of anthropogenic impact (ports, roads with heavy traffic, wastewater discharge zones, built-up areas) was taken into consideration. The river outlets to the lake, where there are ecotonal zones between limnic and fluvial environment, were also taken into account. Analysis of the markers distribution was carried out against the diversity of chemical characteristics of limnic sediments. Ribbon shape of the lake basin and the dominant wind direction provide an opportunity of easy water mixing to a considerable depth. Intensive waving processes cause removal of the matter from the littoral zone towards lake hollows (separated by the underwater tresholds), where the

  13. The GITEWS ocean bottom sensor packages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Boebel

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The German-Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS aims at reducing the risks posed by events such as the 26 December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. To minimize the lead time for tsunami alerts, to avoid false alarms, and to accurately predict tsunami wave heights, real-time observations of ocean bottom pressure from the deep ocean are required. As part of the GITEWS infrastructure, the parallel development of two ocean bottom sensor packages, PACT (Pressure based Acoustically Coupled Tsunameter and OBU (Ocean Bottom Unit, was initiated. The sensor package requirements included bidirectional acoustic links between the bottom sensor packages and the hosting surface buoys, which are moored nearby. Furthermore, compatibility between these sensor systems and the overall GITEWS data-flow structure and command hierarchy was mandatory. While PACT aims at providing highly reliable, long term bottom pressure data only, OBU is based on ocean bottom seismometers to concurrently record sea-floor motion, necessitating highest data rates. This paper presents the technical design of PACT, OBU and the HydroAcoustic Modem (HAM.node which is used by both systems, along with first results from instrument deployments off Indonesia.

  14. Tachibana Bay Electric Power Plant. Design and construction of pipe-laying works on the sea bottom for the industrial water; Tachibanawan hatsudensho. Kogyo yosui kaitei haikan koji no sekkei to seko

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiono, A.; Tanaka, K. [Shikoku Electric Power Co., Inc., Takamatsu (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    At Kokatsu Island in the Bay of Tachibana, Anan City, Tokushima Prefecture, Tachibana Bay coal burning thermal electric power plants are now under construction. This is a joint venture of Shikoku electric Power Company and Dengen-kaihatsu (Power Resources Development Co.) with the objective of securing power supply in and after the year of 2000. The former plans one 700,000kW generator and the latter plans two 1.05 million kW generators totalling 2.8 million kW in terms of plant capacity. As for the above plants, the industrial water of 14,000m{sup 3} per day is required for various equipment including exhaust gas desulfurizers, etc. and the receiving and sending point of this industrial water is located at Ohgata Area, the northern opposite coast of this island. It is necessary to lay water pipes in the sea area from the above point up to Kokatsu Island, but this sea area lies within the important harbor designated for lanes and anchorages of vessels, hence traffic of vessels is heavy and restrictive conditions are many. Having studied various construction methods, the chain cutter simultaneous laying and burying method has been adopted. Three large calibre submarine water conveyance pipes, each of which is 250mm in inner diameter and about 2km long, have been built and the works have been completed at the end of June, 1997. 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Bottom Topographic Changes of Poyang Lake During Past Decade Using Multi-temporal Satellite Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.

    2015-12-01

    Poyang Lake, as a well-known international wetland in the Ramsar Convention List, is the largest freshwater lake in China. It plays crucial ecological role in flood storage and biological diversity. Poyang Lake is facing increasingly serious water crises, including seasonal dry-up, decreased wetland area, and water resource shortage, all of which are closely related to progressive bottom topographic changes over recent years. Time-series of bottom topography would contribute to our understanding of the lake's evolution during the past several decades. However, commonly used methods for mapping bottom topography fail to frequently update quality bathymetric data for Poyang Lake restricted by weather and accessibility. These deficiencies have limited our ability to characterize the bottom topographic changes and understanding lake erosion or deposition trend. To fill the gap, we construct a decadal bottom topography of Poyang Lake with a total of 146 time series medium resolution satellite images based on the Waterline Method. It was found that Poyang Lake has eroded with a rate of -14.4 cm/ yr from 2000 to 2010. The erosion trend was attributed to the impacts of human activities, especially the operation of the Three Gorge Dams, sand excavation, and the implementation of water conservancy project. A decadal quantitative understanding bottom topography of Poyang Lake might provide a foundation to model the lake evolutionary processes and assist both researchers and local policymakers in ecological management, wetland protection and lake navigation safety.

  16. Color Fringes Bordering Black Stripes at the Bottom of a Swimming Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster, Gonzalo; Rojas, Roberto; Slüsarenko, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    We have observed a nice example of chromatic dispersion due to refraction in water, in the form of color fringes bordering the black stripes that exist at the bottom of a swimming pool. Here we give a qualitative description of the phenomenon, explaining the role of the black stripes and the dispersive index of refraction of water.

  17. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... www.girlshealth.gov/ Home Nutrition Nutrition basics Water Water Did you know that water makes up more ... to drink more water Other drinks How much water do you need? top Water is very important, ...

  18. Sediment transport in the presence of large reef bottom roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Andrew W. M.; Lowe, Ryan J.; Ghisalberti, Marco; Storlazzi, Curt; Symonds, Graham; Roelvink, Dano

    2017-02-01

    The presence of large bottom roughness, such as that formed by benthic organisms on coral reef flats, has important implications for the size, concentration, and transport of suspended sediment in coastal environments. A 3 week field study was conducted in approximately 1.5 m water depth on the reef flat at Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia, to quantify the cross-reef hydrodynamics and suspended sediment dynamics over the large bottom roughness (˜20-40 cm) at the site. A logarithmic mean current profile consistently developed above the height of the roughness; however, the flow was substantially reduced below the height of the roughness (canopy region). Shear velocities inferred from the logarithmic profile and Reynolds stresses measured at the top of the roughness, which are traditionally used in predictive sediment transport formulations, were similar but much larger than that required to suspend the relatively coarse sediment present at the bed. Importantly, these stresses did not represent the stresses imparted on the sediment measured in suspension and are therefore not relevant to the description of suspended sediment transport in systems with large bottom roughness. Estimates of the bed shear stresses that accounted for the reduced near-bed flow in the presence of large roughness vastly improved the relationship between the predicted and observed grain sizes that were in suspension. Thus, the impact of roughness, not only on the overlying flow but also on bed stresses, must be accounted for to accurately estimate suspended sediment transport in regions with large bottom roughness, a common feature of many shallow coastal ecosystems.

  19. Sediment transport in the presence of large reef bottom roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Andrew; Lowe, Ryan J.; Ghisalberti, Marco; Storlazzi, Curt; Symonds, Graham; Roelvink, Dano

    2017-01-01

    The presence of large bottom roughness, such as that formed by benthic organisms on coral reef flats, has important implications for the size, concentration, and transport of suspended sediment in coastal environments. A 3 week field study was conducted in approximately 1.5 m water depth on the reef flat at Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia, to quantify the cross-reef hydrodynamics and suspended sediment dynamics over the large bottom roughness (∼20–40 cm) at the site. A logarithmic mean current profile consistently developed above the height of the roughness; however, the flow was substantially reduced below the height of the roughness (canopy region). Shear velocities inferred from the logarithmic profile and Reynolds stresses measured at the top of the roughness, which are traditionally used in predictive sediment transport formulations, were similar but much larger than that required to suspend the relatively coarse sediment present at the bed. Importantly, these stresses did not represent the stresses imparted on the sediment measured in suspension and are therefore not relevant to the description of suspended sediment transport in systems with large bottom roughness. Estimates of the bed shear stresses that accounted for the reduced near-bed flow in the presence of large roughness vastly improved the relationship between the predicted and observed grain sizes that were in suspension. Thus, the impact of roughness, not only on the overlying flow but also on bed stresses, must be accounted for to accurately estimate suspended sediment transport in regions with large bottom roughness, a common feature of many shallow coastal ecosystems.

  20. Developing the new method measuring thickness and quality of bottom sediments in using ultrasonic wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Tomonari; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Hozumi, Naohiro

    2017-07-01

    Measuring the quality and thickness of bottom sediment that it causes some environmental problem, the shortage of water storage volume and anaerobic zone in the bottom of reservoirs, takes huge costs and long time. The purpose of our research is to develop a new method to measure the thickness and size characteristics of bottom sediment using ultrasonic waves that allow obtaining the quality of it indirectly. This new method applies the echo characteristic of bottom sediment in each particle size using the higher frequency than another method, which uses for measuring geological layer at seabed survey. In this research, we attempted to estimate the particle size of bottom sediment by ultrasonic waves irradiating from two different directions such as horizontal and vertical direction, and compare these experiments. We use sediment that we sampled from the lake bottom classified by particle size. At first, we acquired the results that show a relation between particle size and intensity; the obtained echo intensities, which were observed with oscilloscope, were changed depending on the particle sizes. In addition, peaks, which were obtained by power spectrum analysis, appeared on the same frequency band even though the different particle size. However the relation between the experiments of horizontal and vertical direction is not clear. This research indicated the possibility of estimating the characteristics of each particle size in bottom sediment by ultrasonic waves.

  1. Coal Bottom Ash for Portland Cement Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Argiz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of industrialization growth, the amount of coal power plant wastes has increased very rapidly. Particularly, the disposal of coal bottom ash (CBA is becoming an increasing concern for many countries because of the increasing volume generated, the costs of operating landfill sites, and its potential hazardous effects. Therefore, new applications of coal bottom ash (CBA have become an interesting alternative to disposal. For instance, it could be used as a Portland cement constituent leading to more sustainable cement production by lowering energy consumption and raw material extracted from quarries. Coal fly and bottom ashes are formed together in the same boiler; however, the size and shape of these ashes are very different, and hence their effect on the chemical composition as well as on the mineralogical phases must be studied. Coal bottom ash was ground. Later, both ashes were compared from a physical, mechanical, and chemical point of view to evaluate the potential use of coal bottom ash as a new Portland cement constituent. Both ashes, produced by the same electrical power plant, generally present similar chemical composition and compressive strength and contribute to the refill of mortar capillary pores with the reaction products leading to a redistribution of the pore size.

  2. Bottom-sediment chemistry in Devil's Lake, northeast North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komor, S.C.

    1994-01-01

    Devils Lake is a 200 km2 terminal lake that contains sodium sulfate type water. Dissolved solids concentrations range from about 3,500 mg/L to 10,000 mg/L depending on location To investigate geochemical processes in the bottom sediments of Devils Lake, sediment cores were collected at two sites in the western half of the lake during a period of bottom water oxygen depletion. The upper 10 cm of the sediments consist of about 60 weight percent silicates (quartz, feldspar, and clays) 35 weight percent carbonates and 5 weight percent organic material. At depths between 1 and 3 cm in the sediments bacterial sulfate reduction and associated degradation of organic material cause minima in sulfate concentrations and δ13C values of dissolved inorganic carbon and maxima in alkalinity, ammonia, phosphate, and sulfide concentrations and δ34S values of dissolved sulfate. Downward increases of sodium, magnesium, potassium, and calcium concentrations result from upward diffusion of ions from saline pore water and dissolving sulfate minerals below 30 cm depth in the sediments.

  3. Accurate ocean bottom seismometer positioning method inspired by multilateration technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benazzouz, Omar; Pinheiro, Luis M.; Matias, Luis M. A.; Afilhado, Alexandra; Herold, Daniel; Haines, Seth S.

    2018-01-01

    The positioning of ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) is a key step in the processing flow of OBS data, especially in the case of self popup types of OBS instruments. The use of first arrivals from airgun shots, rather than relying on the acoustic transponders mounted in the OBS, is becoming a trend and generally leads to more accurate positioning due to the statistics from a large number of shots. In this paper, a linearization of the OBS positioning problem via the multilateration technique is discussed. The discussed linear solution solves jointly for the average water layer velocity and the OBS position using only shot locations and first arrival times as input data.

  4. Wet physical separation of MSWI bottom ash

    OpenAIRE

    Muchova, L.

    2010-01-01

    Bottom ash (BA) from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) has high potential for the recovery of valuable secondary materials. For example, the MSWI bottom ash produced by the incinerator at Amsterdam contains materials such as non-ferrous metals (2.3%), ferrous metals (8-13%), gold (0.4 ppm), silver (10 ppm), stainless steel (0.1%) and minerals that can be converted into building products such as aggregates utilized for concrete, asphalt, etc. Since the composition of BA varies from cou...

  5. Calculating wave-generated bottom orbital velocities from surface-wave parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiberg, P.L.; Sherwood, C.R.

    2008-01-01

    Near-bed wave orbital velocities and shear stresses are important parameters in many sediment-transport and hydrodynamic models of the coastal ocean, estuaries, and lakes. Simple methods for estimating bottom orbital velocities from surface-wave statistics such as significant wave height and peak period often are inaccurate except in very shallow water. This paper briefly reviews approaches for estimating wave-generated bottom orbital velocities from near-bed velocity data, surface-wave spectra, and surface-wave parameters; MATLAB code for each approach is provided. Aspects of this problem have been discussed elsewhere. We add to this work by providing a method for using a general form of the parametric surface-wave spectrum to estimate bottom orbital velocity from significant wave height and peak period, investigating effects of spectral shape on bottom orbital velocity, comparing methods for calculating bottom orbital velocity against values determined from near-bed velocity measurements at two sites on the US east and west coasts, and considering the optimal representation of bottom orbital velocity for calculations of near-bed processes. Bottom orbital velocities calculated using near-bed velocity data, measured wave spectra, and parametric spectra for a site on the northern California shelf and one in the mid-Atlantic Bight compare quite well and are relatively insensitive to spectral shape except when bimodal waves are present with maximum energy at the higher-frequency peak. These conditions, which are most likely to occur at times when bottom orbital velocities are small, can be identified with our method as cases where the measured wave statistics are inconsistent with Donelan's modified form of the Joint North Sea Wave Project (JONSWAP) spectrum. We define the 'effective' forcing for wave-driven, near-bed processes as the product of the magnitude of forcing times its probability of occurrence, and conclude that different bottom orbital velocity statistics

  6. 49 CFR 178.811 - Bottom lift test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bottom lift test. 178.811 Section 178.811... Testing of IBCs § 178.811 Bottom lift test. (a) General. The bottom lift test must be conducted for the... bottom lift test. The IBC must be loaded to 1.25 times its maximum permissible gross mass, the load being...

  7. 49 CFR 178.970 - Bottom lift test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bottom lift test. 178.970 Section 178.970... Testing of Large Packagings § 178.970 Bottom lift test. (a) General. The bottom lift test must be...) Special preparation for the bottom lift test. The Large Packaging must be loaded to 1.25 times its maximum...

  8. Bottom fauna of the Malacca Strait

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parulekar, A.H.; Ansari, Z.A.

    Bottom fauna of Malacca Strait (connecting the Indian Ocean with Pacific) in the depth range of 80 to 1350 m, is dominated by meiofauna which exceeds macrofauna by 12.5 times in weight and by more than 780 times in population density. Standing crop...

  9. Police reform from the bottom up

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The title of this volume, Police reform from the bottom up, is bound to create expectations amongst those concerned with the challenges confronting institutional change in public police agencies. It is an interest shared by police scholars and practitioners across the usual North-South divide. Few police agencies today can ...

  10. Coil in bottom part of splitter magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1976-01-01

    Radiation-resistant coil being bedded into the bottom part of a splitter magnet. This very particular magnet split the beam into 3 branches, for 3 target stations in the West-Area. See Annual Report 1975, p.176, Figs.14 and 15.

  11. Spectroscopy and decays of charm and bottom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, J.N.

    1997-10-01

    After a brief review of the quark model, we discuss our present knowledge of the spectroscopy of charm and bottom mesons and baryons. We go on to review the lifetimes, semileptonic, and purely leptonic decays of these particles. We conclude with a brief discussion B and D mixing and rare decays.

  12. Bottomonia: open bottom strong decays and spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santopinto E.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We present our results for the bottomonium spectrum with self energy corrections. The bare masses used in the calculation are computed within Godfrey and Isgur’s relativized quark model. We also discuss our results for the open bottom strong decay widths of higher bottomonia in the 3P0 pair-creation model.

  13. There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 9. There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom. Richard P Feynman. Classics Volume 16 Issue 9 September 2011 pp 890-905. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/016/09/0890-0905 ...

  14. "Triple-bottom-line" assessment of urban stormwater projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A C; Fletcher, T D

    2006-01-01

    New guidelines have been developed and trialled in Australia to assist urban stormwater managers to assess options for projects that aim to improve urban waterway health. These guidelines help users to examine the financial, ecological and social dimensions of projects (i.e., the so-called "triple-bottom-line"). Features of the assessment process described in the guidelines include use of multi criteria analysis, input from technical experts as well as non-technical stakeholders, and provision of three alternative levels of assessment to suit stormwater managers with differing needs and resources. This paper firstly provides a background to the new guidelines and triple-bottom-line assessment. The assessment methodology promoted in the new guidelines is then briefly summarised. This methodology is compared and contrasted with European guidelines from the "SWARD" project that have been primarily developed for assessing the relative sustainability of options involving urban water supply and sewerage assets. Finally, the paper discusses how assessment methodologies that evaluate the financial, ecological and social dimensions of projects can, under some circumstances, be used to evaluate the relative progress of options for urban water management on a journey towards the widely pursued, but vaguely defined goal of "sustainable development".

  15. Cathodic protection for the bottoms of above ground storage tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohr, John P. [Tyco Adhesives, Norwood, MA (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Impressed Current Cathodic Protection has been used for many years to protect the external bottoms of above ground storage tanks. The use of a vertical deep ground bed often treated several bare steel tank bottoms by broadcasting current over a wide area. Environmental concerns and, in some countries, government regulations, have introduced the use of dielectric secondary containment liners. The dielectric liner does not allow the protective cathodic protection current to pass and causes corrosion to continue on the newly placed tank bottom. In existing tank bottoms where inadequate protection has been provided, leaks can develop. In one method of remediation, an old bottom is covered with sand and a double bottom is welded above the leaking bottom. The new bottom is welded very close to the old bottom, thus shielding the traditional cathodic protection from protecting the new bottom. These double bottoms often employ the use of dielectric liner as well. Both the liner and the double bottom often minimize the distance from the external tank bottom. The minimized space between the liner, or double bottom, and the bottom to be protected places a challenge in providing current distribution in cathodic protection systems. This study examines the practical concerns for application of impressed current cathodic protection and the types of anode materials used in these specific applications. One unique approach for an economical treatment using a conductive polymer cathodic protection method is presented. (author)

  16. Ocean Bottom Seismometers technology: current state and future outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilinskiy, Dmitry; Ganzha, Oleg

    2016-04-01

    The beginning of 2000s was marked by a significant progress in the development and use of self-pop-up sea-bottom seismic recorders (Ocean Bottom Seismometers). In Russia it was a novel solution developed by the Russian Academy of Sciences Experimental Design Bureau of Oceanological Engineering. This recorder and its clones have been widely used not only for the Earth crust studies, but also for investigations of sub-basalt structures and gas hydrate exploration. And what has happened over the last 10 years? Let us look closely at the second generation of ocean bottom stations developed by Geonodal Solutions (GNS) as an illustration of the next step forward in the sea-bottom acquisition technology. First of all, hardware components have changed dramatically. The electronic components became much smaller, accordingly, the power consumption and electronic self-noise were dropped down significantly. This enabled development of compact station 330 mm in diameter instead of previous 450mm. The weight fell by half, while the autonomy increased up to 90 days due to both decreased energy consumption and increased capacity of the batteries. The dynamic range of recorded seismic data has expended as a result of decreased set noise and the application of 24-bit A/D converters. The instruments dimensions have been reduced, power consumption decreased, clock accuracy was significantly improved. At the same time, development of advanced time reference algorithms enabled to retain instrument accuracy around 1 ms during all the autonomous recording period. The high-speed wireless data transfer technology offered a chance to develop "maintenance-free" station throughout its operation time. The station can be re-used at the different sea bottom locations without unsealing of the deep-water container for data download, battery re-charge, clock synchronization. This noticeably reduces the labor efforts of the personnel working with the stations. This is critically important in field

  17. Bottom friction and wave-induced roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepesqueur, J.; Ardhuin, F.; Bennis, A.-C.

    2012-04-01

    The parameterization of the interaction of waves with a sandy bottom including ripple generation and relict ripple roughness (Ardhuin et al. 2003) using the sub-grid roughness algorithm by Tolman (1995) has been implemented in the WAVEWATCH III model and generalized to take into account the variability of the bottom nature, including rock and cohesive sediments. The model is applied with a triangle-based mesh to both the U.S. East-Coast and the French Atlantic to North Sea coasts. The hindcast wave heights over the North Carolina continental shelf during the SHOaling Waves EXperiment reproduce the results of Ardhuin et al. (2003). The new application in the English Channel and Southern North see shows a general better result that with the JONSWAP parameterization. In particular the use of realistic roughness is important with gravel in the central Channel and sand or sand/silt mixtures in the southern North Sea.

  18. Stabilization of bottom sediments from Rzeszowski Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koś Karolina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of stabilization of bottom sediments from Rzeszowski Reservoir. Based on the geotechnical characteristics of the tested sediments it was stated they do not fulfill all the criteria set for soils in earth embankments. Therefore, an attempt to improve their parameters was made by using two additives – cement and lime. An unconfined compressive strength, shear strength, bearing ratio and pH reaction were determined on samples after different time of curing. Based on the carried out tests it was stated that the obtained values of unconfined compressive strength of sediments stabilized with cement were relatively low and they did not fulfill the requirements set by the Polish standard, which concerns materials in road engineering. In case of lime stabilization it was stated that the tested sediments with 6% addition of the additive can be used for the bottom layers of the improved road base.

  19. Constructing bottom barriers with met grouting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibazaki, M.; Yoshida, H. [Chemical Grouting Company, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    Installing a bottom barrier using conventional high pressure jetting technology and ensuring barrier continuity is challenging. This paper describes technology that has been developed and demonstrated for the emplacement of bottom barriers using pressures and flow rates above the conventional high pressure jetting parameters. The innovation capable of creating an improved body exceeding 5 meters in diameter has resulted in the satisfying connection and adherence between the treated columns. Besides, the interfaces among the improved bodies obtain the same strength and permeability lower than 1 x 10{sup -7} cm/sec as body itself. A wide variety of the thickness and the diameter of the improved mass optimizes the application, and the method is nearing completion. The paper explains an aspect and briefs case histories.

  20. Development of Bottom Oil Recovery Systems. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    important to have a backup unit with the same capabilities. • The heading sensor is essential for effective ROV operation. • The tending vessel can...debris/bottom type/weather effects 5. Logistics a. Equipment requirements b. Equipment availability c. Backup equipment/spares availability d...Southeast Florida Mystery Spill SE Florida HFO X 2001 T/V Baltic Carrier Baltic Sea, Denmark Intermediate fuel oil (IFO) 380 X 2002 T/V Prestige

  1. Wave trapping by dual porous barriers near a wall in the presence of bottom undulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaligatla, R. B.; Manisha; Sahoo, T.

    2017-09-01

    Trapping of oblique surface gravity waves by dual porous barriers near a wall is studied in the presence of step type varying bottom bed that is connected on both sides by water of uniform depths. The porous barriers are assumed to be fixed at a certain distance in front of a vertical rigid wall. Using linear water wave theory and Darcy's law for flow past porous structure, the physical problem is converted into a boundary value problem. Using eigenfunction expansion in the uniform bottom bed region and modified mild-slope equation in the varying bottom bed region, the mathematical problem is handled for solution. Moreover, certain jump conditions are used to account for mass conservation at slope discontinuities in the bottom bed profile. To understand the effect of dual porous barriers in creating tranquility zone and minimum load on the sea wall, reflection coefficient, wave forces acting on the barrier and the wall, and surface wave elevation are computed and analyzed for different values of depth ratio, porous-effect parameter, incident wave angle, gap between the barriers and wall and slope length of undulated bottom. The study reveals that with moderate porosity and suitable gap between barriers and sea wall, using dual barriers an effective wave trapping system can be developed which will exert less wave force on the barriers and the rigid wall. The proposed wave trapping system is likely to be of immense help for protecting various facilities/ infrastructures in coastal environment.

  2. Investigating bottom-up auditory attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Merve Kaya

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Bottom-up attention is a sensory-driven selection mechanism that directs perception towards a subset of the stimulus that is considered salient, or attention-grabbing. Most studies of bottom-up auditory attention have adapted frameworks similar to visual attention models whereby local or global contrast is a central concept in defining salient elements in a scene. In the current study, we take a more fundamental approach to modeling auditory attention; providing the first examination of the space of auditory saliency spanning pitch, intensity and timbre; and shedding light on complex interactions among these features. Informed by psychoacoustic results, we develop a computational model of auditory saliency implementing a novel attentional framework, guided by processes hypothesized to take place in the auditory pathway. In particular, the model tests the hypothesis that perception tracks the evolution of sound events in a multidimensional feature space, and flags any deviation from background statistics as salient. Predictions from the model corroborate the relationship between bottom-up auditory attention and statistical inference, and argues for a potential role of predictive coding as mechanism for saliency detection in acoustic scenes.

  3. Landlabs: An Integrated Approach to Creating Agricultural Enterprises that Meet the Triple Bottom Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Nicholas; Schulte, Lisa A.; Williams, Carol; Mulla, David; Pitt, David; Slotterback, Carissa Schively; Jackson, Randall; Landis, Douglas; Dale, Bruce; Becker, Dennis; Rickenbach, Mark; Helmers, Matt; Bringi, Bobby

    2013-01-01

    Global demand is increasing for food, feed, and fiber; for additional agricultural outputs, such as biofuels; and for ecosystem services, such as clean water and outdoor recreation. In response, new agricultural enterprises are needed that produce more outputs from existing lands while meeting the "triple bottom line" of high performance…

  4. A dataset from bottom trawl survey around Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-tsao Shao

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Bottom trawl fishery is one of the most important coastal fisheries in Taiwan both in production and economic values. However, its annual production started to decline due to overfishing since the 1980s. Its bycatch problem also damages the fishery resource seriously. Thus, the government banned the bottom fishery within 3 nautical miles along the shoreline in 1989. To evaluate the effectiveness of this policy, a four year survey was conducted from 2000–2003, in the waters around Taiwan and Penghu (Pescadore Islands, one region each year respectively. All fish specimens collected from trawling were brought back to lab for identification, individual number count and body weight measurement. These raw data have been integrated and established in Taiwan Fish Database (http://fishdb.sinica.edu.tw. They have also been published through TaiBIF (http://taibif.tw, FishBase and GBIF (website see below. This dataset contains 631 fish species and 3,529 records, making it the most complete demersal fish fauna and their temporal and spatial distributional data on the soft marine habitat in Taiwan.

  5. Ground Water Redox Zonation near La Pine, Oregon: Relation to River Position within the Aquifer-Riparian Zone Continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, Stephen R.; Morgan, David S.; Orzol, Leonard L.; Polette, Danial J.

    2007-01-01

    Increasing residential development since in the 1960s has lead to increases in nitrate concentrations in shallow ground water in parts of the 247 square mile study area near La Pine, Oregon. Denitrification is the dominant nitrate-removal process that occurs in suboxic ground water, and suboxic ground water serves as a barrier to transport of most nitrate in the aquifer. Oxic ground water, on the other hand, represents a potential pathway for nitrate transport from terrestrial recharge areas to the Deschutes and Little Deschutes Rivers. The effects of present and potential future discharge of ground-water nitrate into the nitrogen-limited Deschutes and Little Deschutes Rivers are not known. However, additions of nitrogen to nitrogen-limited rivers can lead to increases in primary productivity which, in turn, can increase the magnitudes of dissolved oxygen and pH swings in river water. An understanding of the distribution of oxic ground water in the near-river environment could facilitate understanding the vulnerability of these rivers and could be a useful tool for management of these rivers. In this study, transects of temporary wells were installed in sub-river sediments beneath the Deschutes and Little Deschutes Rivers near La Pine to characterize near-river reduction/oxidation (redox) conditions near the ends of ground-water flow paths. Samples from transects installed near the center of the riparian zone or flood plain were consistently suboxic. Where transects were near edges of riparian zones, most ground-water samples also were suboxic. Oxic ground water (other than hyporheic water) was uncommon, and was only detected near the outside edge of some meander bends. This pattern of occurrence likely reflects geochemical controls throughout the aquifer as well as geochemical processes in the microbiologically active riparian zone near the end of ground-water flow paths. Younger, typically less reduced ground water generally enters near-river environments through

  6. 46 CFR 173.058 - Double bottom requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.058 Double bottom requirements. Each new sailing school vessel... service must comply with the double bottom requirements in §§ 171.105 through 171.109, inclusive, of this...

  7. Bottom Trawl Survey Protocol Development (HB0706, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Cruise objectives include: 1) Investigate performance characteristics of new research bottom trawl; 2) Develop standard operating procedures for the NEFSC Bottom...

  8. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... environment and your health: Green living Sun Water Health effects of water pollution How to protect yourself from water pollution Air Chemicals Noise Quizzes Links to more information girlshealth glossary girlshealth. ...

  9. Quality assurance of MSWI bottom ash. Environmental properties; Kvalitetssaekring av slaggrus. Miljoemaessiga egenskaper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flyhammar, Peter [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Engineering Geology

    2006-04-15

    In Sweden, several hundred tonnes of MSWI bottom ash are generated annually at 29 incineration plants for municipal solid waste. So far bottom ash has mainly been disposed in to landfills or used as cover material in landfills or in other construction works at landfills. A few applications of bottom ash in construction works outside landfills have been reported. A large problem for the market of bottom ash and other secondary materials outside Swedish waste treatment plants is the lack of roles and regulations for a non-polluting use. During 2002 Hartlen and Groenholm presented a proposal to a system to assure the quality of bottom ash after homogenization and stabilization. They notice that the leaching of salts and metals to ground water constitutes the largest risk for the environment during use of bottom ash. Therefore, a quality assurance of environmental properties should be based on leaching tests. The aim of this project was to study how the control of environmental properties of bottom ash (at first hand leaching properties) earlier described in e.g. a product information sheet should be worked out. The starting-point has been a control system for bottom ash developed by Sysav. Different leaching tests illustrate however different aspects of the environmental properties, e.g. short-term and long-term leaching. Limit and target values for different variables could affect both the possibilities to use bottom ash as well as the sampling from storage heaps. We have chosen to investigate pH, availability and leached amount and the connection between these variables. the possibilities to use pH or the availability to assess both short-term and longterm leaching properties. how the number of subsamples that should be collected from a storage heap is affected by different control variables and quality requirements. how bottom ash is stabilized by today's storage technology and how the technology could be improved. Our sample test of bottom ash from Swedish

  10. A small ocean bottom electromagnetometer and ocean bottom electrometer system with an arm-folding mechanism (Technical Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasaya, Takafumi; Goto, Tada-nori

    2009-02-01

    Natural magnetic fields are attenuated by electrically conductive water. For that reason, marine magnetotelluric surveys have collected data at long periods (1000-100 000s). The mantle structure has been the main target of seafloor magnetotelluric measurements. To ascertain crustal structure, however, electromagnetic data at shorter periods are important, e.g. in investigations of megathrust earthquake zones, or in natural resource surveys. To investigate of the former, for example, electromagnetic data for periods of less than 1000s are necessary. Because no suitable ocean bottom electromagnetometer (OBEM) has been available, we have developed a small OBEM and ocean bottom electrometer (OBE) system with a high sample rate, which has an arm-folding mechanism to facilitate assembly and recovering operations. For magnetic observation, we used a fluxgate sensor. Field observations were undertaken to evaluate the field performance of our instruments. All instruments were recovered and their electromagnetic data were obtained. Results of the first experiment show that our system functioned well throughout operations and observations. Results of other field experiments off Tottori support the claim that the electromagnetic data obtained using the new OBEM and OBE system are of sufficient quality for the survey target. These results suggest that this device removes all instrumental obstacles to measurement of electromagnetic fields on the seafloor.

  11. Mathematical model of device for slurry concentration and desludging in near-bottom zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkin, P. V.; Trufanova, I. S.

    2017-10-01

    There are many systems for extracting minerals from the bottom of water bodies, but none of them meets the requirements, so the actual task is to create technical means that provide the best performance and environmental safety. Increase the efficiency of the hydromechanical mining method is possible due to the maximum concentration and desludging of the slurry in the near-bottom zone, which allows reducing the energy and material consumption of hydrotransport of minerals. To achieve this goal, it is proposed to use a perforated section adjacent to the power unit, with a transverse cross section that reduces in its length in the direction of flow, in the pressure pulp pipeline system.

  12. Bottom-up grammar analysis : a functional formulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeuring, J.T.; Swierstra, D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses bottom-up grammar analysis problems such as te EMPTY problem and the FIRST problem. It defines a general class of bottom-up grammar analysis problems, and from this definition it derives a functional program for performing bottom-up grammar analysis. The derivation is purely

  13. Scaled blast loading simulations on different vehicle bottom geometries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verreault, J.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.; Weerheijm, J.

    2016-01-01

    The development of new bottom concepts for military vehicles against mine blast threats involves the consideration of two main aspects: the bottom geometry and the material used. In order to reduce costs, experimental testing of new vehicle bottom concepts often requires small-scale setups together

  14. Mixing and bottom friction: parametrization and application to the surf zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennis, A.-C.; Dumas, F.; Ardhuin, F.; Blanke, B.; Lepesqueur, J.

    2012-04-01

    Wave breaking has been observed to impact the bottom boundary layer in surf zones, with potential impacts on bottom friction. Observations in the inner surf zone have also shown a tendency to an underestimation of the wave-induced set-up when using usual model parameterizations. The present study investigates the possible impact of wave breaking on bottom friction and set-up using a recently proposed parameterization of the wave-induced turbulent kinetic energy in the vertical mixing parameterization of the wave-averaged flow. This parametrization proposed by Mellor (2002) allows us to take account the oscillations of the bottom boundary layer with the wave phases thanks to some additional turbulent source terms. First, the behavior of this parameterization, is investigated by comparing phase-resolving and phase-averaged solutions. The hydrodynamical model MARS (Lazure et Dumas, 2008) is used for this, using a modified k-epsilon model to take account the Mellor (2002) parametrization. It is shown that the phase averaged solution strongly overestimates the turbulent kinetic energy, which is similar to the situation of the air flow over waves (Miles 1996). The waves inhibits the turbulence and the wave-averaged parametrization is not able to reproduce correctly this phenomenom. Cases with wave breaking at the surface are simulated in order to study the influence of surface wave breaking on the bottom boundary layer. This parametrization is applied in the surf zone for two differents cases, one for a planar beach and one other for a barred beach with rip currents. The coupled model MARS-WAVEWATCH III is used for this (Bennis et al, 2011) and for a realistic planar beach, the mixing parameterization has only a limited impact on the bottom friction and the wave set-up, unless the bottom roughness is greatly enhanced in very shallow water, or for a spatially varying roughness. The use of the mixing parametrization requires an adjustement of the bottom roughness to fit

  15. Long surface wave dynamics along a convex bottom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didenkulova, Ira; Pelinovsky, Efim; Soomere, Tarmo

    2009-07-01

    Long linear wave transformation in a basin of varying depth is studied for a case of a convex bottom profile h(x) ˜ x4/3. This bottom geometry provides the "nonreflecting" wave propagation at least in the framework of the one-dimensional shallow water equation. In this case, shoaling effects are very strong and wave reflection occurs in the immediate vicinity of the shoreline. The existence of traveling wave solutions (which propagate without reflection) in this geometry is established through construction of a 1:1 transformation of the general 1-D wave equation to the analogous wave equation with constant coefficients. The general solution of the Cauchy problem consists of two traveling waves propagating in opposite directions and allows a detailed description of the wavefield (vertical displacement and depth-averaged flow). It is found that generally a zone of weak current is formed between these two waves. Waves are reflected from the coastline so that their profile is inverted with respect to the calm water surface. Long-wave runup on a beach with this profile is studied for the sine pulse, Korteweg-de Vries soliton, and N wave. It is shown that in certain cases the runup height along the convex profile is considerably larger than for beaches with a linear slope. The analysis of wave reflection from the border of a shallow coastal area of constant depth and a section with the convex profile shows that a transmitted wave always has a sign-variable shape. Results of the wave transformation above the convex beach and beaches following a general power law are compared. This simplified model demonstrates the potential importance of the tsunami wave transformation along convex beaches.

  16. Water Flow Experiments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is a simple exercise in elementary fluid dynamics for the undergraduate and the secondary school level. Here, we explore the flow of water through an orifice at the bottom of a cylindri- cal bottle/tank, first through a tube attached to the bottom of the bottle/tank and then without the tube. The experiment is easy to perform.

  17. ZINC AND LEAD IN BOTTOM SEDIMENTS AND AQUATIC PLANTS IN RIVER NAREW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Skorbiłowicz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic ecosystems are a valuable part of natural environment. The increasing level of pollution in waters transforming biocoenoses and other adverse effects of the impact of toxic substances have contributed to the development of biological monitoring. The aim of the study was to determine the changes in contents of zinc and lead in bottom sediments and roots of aquatic plants: Phragmites australis and Acorus calamus in the river Narew. There were 14 points on the river, from where samples of bottom sediments and plant material were collected. The contents of lead and zinc were determined by means of flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry using Varian device. It was proven that bottom sediments were characterized by low contents of zinc and lead except from two sampling points: in Bondary and Narew. Achieved results of analyzes of plant material showed a slight exceeding in the case of lead. Spatial distribution of zinc and lead contents in examined roots of plants coincided with their contents in bottom sediments, which was also confirmed by statistical analysis. It was proven that aquatic plants had greater tendency for accumulation of metals than bottom sediments.

  18. Copper speciation in municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash leachates; Kopparformer i lakvatten fraan energiaskor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Susanna; Gustafsson, Jon Petter [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden); Schaik, Joris van; Berggren Kleja, Dan [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Hees, Patrick van [Oerebro Univ. (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    The formation of copper (Cu) complexes with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in bottom ash from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) may increase the total amount of Cu released but at the same time reduce its toxicity. In this study, DOC in a MSWI bottom ash leachate was characterized and the Cu-binding properties of different DOC fractions in the ash leachate and in a soil solution were studied. This knowledge may be used for improved environmental assessment of MSWI bottom ash in engineering applications. The Cu{sup 2+} activity at different pH values was measured potentiometrically using a Cu-ion selective electrode (Cu-ISE). Experimental copper complexation results were compared to speciation calculations made in Visual MINTEQ with the NICA-Donnan model and the Stockholm Humic Model (SHM). The MSWI bottom ash leachate contained a larger proportion of hydrophilic organic carbon than the investigated soil solution and other natural waters. The hydrophilic fraction of both samples showed Cu{sup 2+} binding properties similar to that of the bulk, cation-exchanged, leachate. For the ash leachate, the pH dependence of the Cu activity was not correctly captured by neither the SHM nor the NICA-Donnan model, but for the soil solution the model predictions of Cu speciation were in good agreement with the obtained results. The complex formation properties of the ash DOC appears to be less pH-dependent than what is assumed for DOC in natural waters. Hence, models calibrated for natural DOC may give inconsistent simulations of Cu-DOC complexation in MSWI bottom ash leachate. A Biotic Ligand Model for Daphnia Magna was used to provide an estimate of the copper concentrations at LC50 for a simulated bottom ash leachate. It was concluded that the Cu concentrations in certain bottom ash leachates are high enough to pose an ecotoxicological risk; however, after dilution and soil sorption, the risks for neighboring water bodies are most likely negligible. Three processes were

  19. Heavy exotic molecules with charm and bottom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yizhuang; Zahed, Ismail

    2016-11-01

    We revisit the formation of pion-mediated heavy-light exotic molecules with both charm and bottom and their chiral partners under the general strictures of both heavy-quark and chiral symmetry. The chiral exotic partners with good parity formed using the (0+ ,1+) multiplet are about twice more bound than their primary exotic partners formed using the (0- ,1-) multiplet. The chiral couplings across the multiplets (0± ,1±) cause the chiral exotic partners to unbind, and the primary exotic molecules to be about twice more bound, for J ≤ 1. Our multi-channel coupling results show that only the charm isosinglet exotic molecules with JPC =1++ bind, which we identify as the reported neutral X (3872). Also, the bottom isotriplet exotic with JPC =1+- binds, which we identify as a mixture of the reported charged exotics Zb+ (10610) and Zb+ (10650). The bound isosinglet with JPC =1++ is suggested as a possible neutral Xb (10532) not yet reported.

  20. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Luna Bergere; Baldwin, Helene L.

    1962-01-01

    What do you use water for?If someone asked you this question you would probably think right away of water for drinking. Then you would think of water for bathing, brushing teeth, flushing the toilet. Your list would get longer as you thought of water for cooking, washing the dishes, running the garbage grinder. Water for lawn watering, for play pools, for swimming pools, for washing the car and the dog. Water for washing machines and for air conditioning. You can hardly do without water for fun and pleasure—water for swimming, boating, fishing, water-skiing, and skin diving. In school or the public library, you need water to wash your hands, or to have a drink. If your home or school bursts into flames, quantities of water are needed to put it out.In fact, life to Americans is unthinkable without large supplies of fresh, clean water. If you give the matter a little thought, you will realize that people in many countries, even in our own, may suffer from disease and dirt simply because their homes are not equipped with running water. Imagine your own town if for some reason - an explosion, perhaps - water service were cut off for a week or several weeks. You would have to drive or walk to a neighboring town and bring water back in pails. Certainly if people had to carry water themselves they might not be inclined to bathe very often; washing clothes would be a real chore.Nothing can live without water. The earth is covered by water over three-fourths of its surface - water as a liquid in rivers, lakes and oceans, and water as ice and snow on the tops of high mountains and in the polar regions. Only one-quarter of our bodies is bone and muscle; the other three-fourths is made of water. We need water to live, and so do plants and animals. People and animals can live a long time without food, but without water they die in a few days. Without water, everything would die, and the world would turn into a huge desert.

  1. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the tap as described). 3. In all situations, drink or cook only with water that comes out of the tap cold. Water that comes out of the tap warm or hot can contain much higher levels of lead. Boiling ...

  2. Migration of nitrate, nitrite, and ammonia through the municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash layer in the simulated landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Chen, Luxi; Zhu, Huayue; Shen, Dongsheng; Qiu, Zhanhong

    2017-04-01

    Simulated landfill was operated for 508 days to investigate the effect of municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash layer on the migration of nitrate, nitrite, and ammonia when it was used as the intermediate layer in the landfill. The result suggested that the MSWI bottom ash layer could capture the nitrate, nitrite, and ammonia from the leachate. The adsorption of the nitrate, nitrite, and ammonia on the MSWI bottom ash layer was saturated at the days 396, 34, and 97, respectively. Afterwards, the nitrogen species were desorbed from the MSWI bottom ash layer. Finally, the adsorption and desorption could reach the equilibrium. The amounts of adsorbed nitrate and nitrite on the MSWI bottom ash layer were 1685.09 and 7.48 mg, respectively, and the amount of the adsorbed and transformed ammonia was 13,773.19 mg, which was much higher than the desorbed. The water leaching test and synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) results showed that the leachable nitrate, nitrite, and ammonia in the MSWI bottom ash were greatly increased after the landfill operation, suggesting that the adsorbed nitrogen could be finally leached out. Besides, the results also showed that MSWI bottom ash layer could affect the release of nitrate and ammonia at the initial stage of the landfill. However, it had little effect on the release of nitrite.

  3. The benefits of bottom-up design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcfarland, Gregory

    1986-01-01

    An inconsistency is examined in generic top-down design methods and standards employed in the implementation of reliable software. Many design approaches adopt top-down ordering when defining the structure, interfaces, and processing of a system. However, strict adherence to a top-down sequencing does not permit accurate description of a system's error handling functions. The design of the system response to errors is becoming critical as the reliability requirements of systems increase. How top-down methods such as object oriented design and structured design do not adequately address the issues of error handling is described, and it is suggested using a bottom-up substep within these methods to eliminate the problem.

  4. Control Properties of Bottom Fired Marine Boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solberg, Brian; Andersen, Palle; Karstensen, Claus M. S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses on model analysis of a dynamic model of a bottom fired one-pass smoke tube boiler. Linearised versions of the model are analysed to determine how gain, time constants and right half plane zeros (caused by the shrink-and-swell phenomenon) depend on the steam flow load. Furthermore...... the interactions in the system are inspected to analyse potential benefit from using a multivariable control strategy in favour of the current strategy based on single loop theory. An analysis of the nonlinear model is carried out to further determine the nonlinear characteristics of the boiler system...... and to verify whether nonlinear control is needed. Finally a controller based on single loop theory is used to analyse if input constraints become active when rejecting transient behaviour from the disturbance steam flow. The model analysis shows large variations in system gains at steady state as function...

  5. Control Properties of Bottom Fired Marine Boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solberg, Brian; Andersen, Palle; Karstensen, Claus M. S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper focuses on model analysis of a dynamic model of a bottom fired one-pass smoke tube boiler. Linearized versions of the model are analyzed and show large variations in system gains at steady state as function of load whereas gain variations near the desired bandwidth are small. An analysis...... of the potential benefit from using a multivariable control strategy in favor of the current strategy based on single loop theory is carried out and proves that the interactions in the system are not negligible and a subsequent controller design should take this into account. A design using dynamical decoupling...... showed substantial improvement compared to a decentralized scheme based on sequential loop closing. Similar or better result is expected to be obtainable using a full Multiple input Multiple output scheme. Furthermore closed loop simulations, applying a linear controller to the nonlinear plant model...

  6. Impacts of offshore wind energy turbines on marine bottom fauna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, A. [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar- and Marine Research, Bremerhaven (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The foundations of offshore wind energy farms will cause alterations to the natural marine habitat of the North and Baltic Seas. The seabed in the proposed areas for offshore windfarms is mainly characterised by soft sediments ranging from medium sands to silt. The underwater structures themselves not only provide empty space for the settlement of hardbottom epifauna, which do not naturally occur in these areas, but they also alter the surrounding natural habitat. In the absence of actual wind farms in German waters, the research platform FINO 1 was used in the project BeoFINO to study biologic processes around the underwater structure leading to alterations of the natural bottom fauna. Shortly after installation, the surface was colonised by an epifauna consisting of few species, but reaching a high biomass. Mytilus edulis dominated in the upper depth zone, while lower reaches were dominated by the Amphipod Jassa spp. and Anthozoans (mainly Metridium senile). Changed current conditions around the structure lead to erosion and altered sediment composition with thick layers of empty shells on the surface. Natural soft bottom fauna is strongly reduced in the vicinity of the platform, while predators and scavengers profit from the additional food source provided by material falling from the platform. The export of lighter material like faeces is predicted to spread over larger areas. Dense aggregations of pelagic fish were observed around the platform, while some demersal species also live in niches of the structure. All results are combined in mathematical models in order to compare different locations and to calculate scenarios for wind farm effects in various habitats. (orig.)

  7. Deep Water Survey Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The deep water biodiversity surveys explore and describe the biodiversity of the bathy- and bentho-pelagic nekton using Midwater and bottom trawls centered in the...

  8. Hydrogeologic framework bottom elevations and thicknesses of Permian, Upper Pennsylvanian, Lower Pennsylvanian, and Mississippian units in the Appalachian Plateaus Physiographic Province

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — As part of the U.S. Geological Survey Water Availability and Use Science Program study of Appalachian Plateaus aquifers, bottom elevations and thicknesses were...

  9. Peat accumulation in kettle holes: bottom up or top down?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gaudig

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid peat formation in kettle hole-shaped basins may take place either a by peat forming downwards (top down from a floating mat under stable water level conditions (terrestrialisation, or b by peat forming upwards (bottom up as humus colloids seal off the basin, causing the water level to rise progressively (“kettle hole mire mechanism”. The latter mechanism has hardly been considered in the international literature. The floating-mat mechanism must lead to concave peat isochrones throughout the basin, whereas the kettle hole mire mechanism will yield surface-parallel isochrones. Peat isochrones were studied in three mires occupying kettle hole-shaped basins in north-eastern Germany by comparing pollen samples from the mineral soil–peat interface at different distances from the centre of each mire with the pollen assemblage profile of a central peat core. All three mires appeared to have largely surface-parallel isochrones and must have developed by the kettle hole mire mechanism. In one mire, this mechanism alternated and took place in combination with terrestrialisation following karst subsidence. The fact that evidence of the kettle hole mire mechanism was found at all of the sites investigated indicates that it may be a common peat forming mechanism in kettle hole-shaped basins worldwide.

  10. Bottom-up grammar analysis : a functional formulation

    OpenAIRE

    Jeuring, J.T.; Swierstra, D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses bottom-up grammar analysis problems such as te EMPTY problem and the FIRST problem. It defines a general class of bottom-up grammar analysis problems, and from this definition it derives a functional program for performing bottom-up grammar analysis. The derivation is purely calculational, using theorems from lattice therory, the Bird-Meertens calculus, and laws for list-comprehensions. Sufficient conditions guaranteeing the existence of a solution emerge as a byproduct o...

  11. Stability of leadership in bottom-up hierarchical organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Galam, Serge

    2007-01-01

    The stability of a leadership against a growing internal opposition is studied in bottom-up hierarchical organizations. Using a very simple model with bottom-up majority rule voting, the dynamics of power distribution at the various hierarchical levels is calculated within a probabilistic framework. Given a leadership at the top, the opposition weight from the hierarchy bottom is shown to fall off quickly while climbing up the hierarchy. It reaches zero after only a few hierarchical levels. I...

  12. Measurements of Direct CP Violating Asymmetries in Charmless Decays of Strange Bottom Mesons and Bottom Baryons

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K.R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Brigliadori, L.; Brisuda, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Bucciantonio, M.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H.S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y.C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J.P.; Chung, W.H.; Chung, Y.S.; Ciobanu, C.I.; Ciocci, M.A.; Clark, A.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M.E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C.A.; Cox, D.J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; De Cecco, S.; De Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d'Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J.R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H.C.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M.J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J.C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J.E.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzalez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A.T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R.C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S.R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J.Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R.F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R.E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E.J.; Jha, M.K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K.K.; Jun, S.Y.; Junk, T.R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P.E.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D.H.; Kim, H.S.; Kim, H.W.; Kim, J.E.; Kim, M.J.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, S.H.; Kim, Y.K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D.J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A.V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A.T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R.L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H.S.; Lee, J.S.; Lee, S.W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J.D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D.O.; Liu, C.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Lockyer, N.S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martinez, M.; Martinez-Ballarin, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M.E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K.S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moon, C.S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M.S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S.H.; Oh, Y.D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Griso, S.Pagan; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A.A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D.E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T.J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.; Prokoshin, F.; Pronko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Rao, K.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rubbo, F.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W.K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E.E.; Schmidt, M.P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S.Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P.F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sissakian, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J.R.; Snider, F.D.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Squillacioti, P.; Stancari, M.; Stanitzki, M.; Denis, R.St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G.L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P.K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G.A.; Thomson, E.; Ttito-Guzman, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tu, Y.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Varganov, A.; Vazquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vizan, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R.L.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S.M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wester, W.C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A.B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Wick, F.; Williams, H.H.; Wilson, J.S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B.L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, T.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Y.C.; Yao, W.M.; Yeh, G.P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G.B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S.S.; Yun, J.C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2011-01-01

    We report measurements of direct CP-violating asymmetries in charmless decays of neutral bottom hadrons to pairs of charged hadrons with the upgraded Collider Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. Using a data sample corresponding to 1 fb-1 of integrated luminosity, we obtain the first measurements of direct CP violation in bottom strange mesons, A_CP(BsKpi) = +0.39 +- 0.15 stat +- 0.08 syst, and bottom baryons, A_CP(Lb->ppi) = +0.03 +- 0.17 stat +- 0.05 syst and A_CP(Lb->pK) = +0.37 +- 0.17 +- 0.03 syst. In addition, we measure CP violation in Bd-->Kpi decays with 3.5sigma significance, A_CP(B->Kpi) = -0.086 +- 0.023 stat +- 0.009 syst, in agreement with the current world average. Measurements of branching fractions of Bs-->K+K- and B0-->pi+pi- decays are also updated.

  13. Aquatic Habitat Bottom Classification Using ADCP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Description of physical aquatic habitat often includes data describing distributions of water depth, velocity and bed material type. Water depth and velocity in streams deeper than about 1 m may be continuously mapped using an acoustic Doppler current profiler from a moving boat. Herein we examine...

  14. Drag-based 'hovering' in ducks: the hydrodynamics and energetic cost of bottom feeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gal Ribak

    Full Text Available Diving ducks use their webbed feet to provide the propulsive force that moves them underwater. To hold position near the bottom while feeding, ducks paddle constantly to resist the buoyant force of the body. Using video sequences from two orthogonal cameras we reconstructed the 3-dimensional motion of the feet through water and estimated the forces involved with a quasi-steady blade-element model. We found that during station holding, near the bottom, ducks use drag based propulsion with the webbed area of the foot moving perpendicular to the trajectory of the foot. The body was pitched at 76+/-3.47 degrees below the horizon and the propulsive force was directed 26+/-1.9 degrees ventral to the body so that 98% of the propulsive force in the sagittal plane of the duck worked to oppose buoyancy. The mechanical work done by moving both feet through a paddling cycle was 1.1+/-0.2 J which was equivalent to an energy expenditure of 3.7+/-0.5 W to hold position while feeding at 1.5 m depth. We conclude that in shallow water the high energetic cost of feeding in ducks is due to the need to paddle constantly against buoyancy even after reaching the bottom. The mechanical energy spent on holding position near the bottom, while feeding, is approximately 2 fold higher than previous estimates that were made for similar bottom depths but based on the presumed motion of the body instead of motion of the feet.

  15. Sinterability study of ceramic bodies made from a mixture of mineral coal bottom ash and soda-lime glass cullet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanova, Daniela L; Bergmann, Carlos P

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the sinterability to improve the technical properties of ceramic bodies made from coal bottom ash and soda-lime glass cullet. Different mixtures of bottom ash and glass cullet were formulated. The amount of bottom ash was 100, 70, 50 and 30 wt.%. The particle size distribution was the same for all formulations. The mixture containing 50 wt.% bottom ash also had its particle size distribution changed. Samples were formed by dry pressing and then fired at 950, 1050 and 1150 degrees C. Samples were evaluated for linear shrinkage, water absorption, flexural mechanical resistance, scanning electronic microscopy, pyroplastic deformation and thermodilatometric analysis. The higher firing temperature led to a decrease in water absorption and increased linear shrinkage, mechanical resistance and pyroplastic deformation. This effect was also observed for addition of glass up to 50 wt.%. The effect of smaller particles of bottom ash was more significant for linear shrinkage and mechanical resistance of ceramic bodies fired at 1150 degrees C. The use of a finer powder contributed to increase these properties. The influence of finer particles on water absorption and mechanical resistance of ceramic bodies fired at 950 and 1050 degrees C was not significant.

  16. Scour and Burial of Bottom Mines: a Primer for Fleet Use

    OpenAIRE

    Inman, Douglas L.; Jenkins, Scott A.

    2002-01-01

    This primer is for fleet use as a means of rapid access to information on scour, burial, and re-exposure of bottom mines placed in nearshore waters. The format is easily adapted to a computer slide show where sequential illustrations such as progressive mine scour and burial could be in animated form. The illustrations detail mechanisms and burial rates characteristic of coastal and sediment type. The primer also addresses the ranges of uncertainty in mine burial estimates by showing burial d...

  17. How Service Innovation Boosts Bottom Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Legrand

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the national quest for ground-breaking R&D discoveries and inventions, service innovation is frequently ignored at considerable cost to an organization’s bottom line and a nation’s productivity. For the fact is that innovation applied systematically to all activities outside of R&D can make the difference between uninspiring results and substantial growth in every sector. Many countries, in particular in Europe, have recognized the importance of service innovation and are devoting considerable resources to research, the capture of best practices, and the measurement of progress and success. Given the physiognomy of the modern economy, it does not make sense for leaders in the Canadian public sector to devote all available innovation investment dollars to science and technology R&D. This article explores why service innovation is not yet a priority on the innovation agenda in Canada and why we should correct the dangerous misconception that there is just one “innovation gap” that needs to be addressed. It provides practical recommendations that public and private sector leaders can use to take advantage of this under-valued, high-potential innovation opportunity and calls for the creation of a national service innovation resource to support enterprises of all sizes as a means to improve Canadian productivity.

  18. Bottoms Up. [report on the Defense Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaacs, J.

    1993-11-01

    The [open quotes]Bottoms Up Review[close quotes] was the Pentagon's ongoing reevaluation of the dangers faced by the United States and the forces needed to deal with those dangers. Its purpose was [open quotes]to define the strategy, force structure, modernization programs, industrial base, and infrastucture needed to meet new dangers and seize new opportunities.[close quotes] The report was released in early September. Washington's reaction to the review (generally silence) and the review's major shortcomings are discussed is this article. The central shortfall of the review is the disconnection between the latest military plan and the security threats faced by the United States. As an example of the disconnection, the Pentagon's fiscal 1994 budget request allots less than one percent of the $263 billion budget request to destroy nuclear weapons in the former Soviet Union, to fund peacekeeping operations, to support economic conversion, and to counter proliferation, although these problems are among those slated as among the most important when listed in the review.

  19. Water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available , and of the remaining 2,5 percent, some 70 percent is frozen in the polar caps and around 30 percent is present as soil moisture or in underground aquifers. Less than 1 percent is thus accessible for direct use by humans, animals and plants. Consequently... be serviced with harvested water and/or grey water. Conserve and reuse cooling tower water by using efficient systems and strategies. Avoid ?once-through systems? commonly used for evaporation coolers, ice makers, hydraulic equipment, and air compressors...

  20. Contribution of food availability to the more rapid growth of the scallop, Euvola ziczac (Pteroida, Pectinidae in bottom than in suspended culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Hunauld

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a 5-month experiment at Turpialito in the Golfo de Cariaco, Venezuela, to examine whether the previously reported more rapid growth of scallop Euvola ziczac in bottom compared to suspended culture can be attributed to more abundant or higher quality food resources near the sediment/water interface. The various body components (shell, muscle, digestive gland, gonad and remaining tissues increased in size at a much greater rate for scallops maintained on the bottom, in partly buried cages at 5 m in depth, than in cages suspended at the same depth in the water column. Furthermore, survival was greater on the bottom. Food abundance and quality were examined by analyzing the seston collected in sediment traps at the sediment/water interface in the vicinity of the bottom cages and next to the suspended cages. Phytoplankton abundance (chlorophyll a and the proportion of various fatty acids in the lipid fraction of the seston were similar on the bottom and in suspension. However, sestonic protein, lipid and carbohydrate levels, and the estimated energetic content of the seston, were higher on the bottom than in suspension, and probably contributed to the greater growth on the bottom. As the increase in the energetic content of the seston on the bottom compared to in suspension was less than the increase in growth (biomass on the bottom compared to in suspension, and the evidence showed in previous studies above the negative influence of fouling and wave action in suspended culture, we conclude that the more rapid growth of Euvola ziczac in bottom than suspended culture is principally due to stress relative to suspended culture system. Rev. Biol. Trop. 53(3-4: 455-461. Epub 2005 Oct 3.

  1. Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Sanmuga Priya

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Phytoremediation through aquatic macrophytes treatment system (AMATS for the removal of pollutants and contaminants from various natural sources is a well established environmental protection technique. Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes, a worst invasive aquatic weed has been utilised for various research activities over the last few decades. The biosorption capacity of the water hyacinth in minimising various contaminants present in the industrial wastewater is well studied. The present review quotes the literatures related to the biosorption capacity of the water hyacinth in reducing the concentration of dyestuffs, heavy metals and minimising certain other physiochemical parameters like TSS (total suspended solids, TDS (total dissolved solids, COD (chemical oxygen demand and BOD (biological oxygen demand in textile wastewater. Sorption kinetics through various models, factors influencing the biosorption capacity, and role of physical and chemical modifications in the water hyacinth are also discussed.

  2. Internal wave-turbulence pressure above sloping sea bottoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haren, H.

    2011-01-01

    An accurate bottom pressure sensor has been moored at different sites varying from a shallow sea strait via open ocean guyots to a 1900 m deep Gulf of Mexico. All sites show more or less sloping bottom topography. Focusing on frequencies (sigma) higher than tidal, the pressure records are remarkably

  3. Vector-like bottom quarks in composite Higgs models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillioz, M.; Grober, R.; Kapuvari, A.

    2014-01-01

    of heavy bottom partners. We show that they can have a significant impact on electroweak precision observables and the current Higgs results if there is a sizeable mixing with the bottom quark. We explicitly check that the constraints from the measurement of the CKM matrix element V-tb are fulfilled...

  4. Use of Unprocessed Coal Bottom Ash as Partial Fine Aggregate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... obtained from FUEL thermal power station and had a loss of ignition of 11%. Experiments were conducted by replacing fine aggregate with bottom ash by weight in varying percentages (20%, 30%, 40%, 60%, and 80% respectively). The results showed that an increase in bottom ash content causes workability and plastic ...

  5. Use of Unprocessed Coal Bottom Ash as Partial Fine Aggregate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012r

    This paper investigates the use of unprocessed coal bottom ash as fine aggregate replacement in structural concrete in an attempt to contribute to a sound management of coal ash on the island of Mauritius. The coal bottom ash was obtained from FUEL thermal power station and had a loss of ignition of 11%. Experiments ...

  6. Bottom-up attention orienting in young children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amso, Dima; Haas, Sara; Tenenbaum, Elena; Markant, Julie; Sheinkopf, Stephen J

    2014-03-01

    We examined the impact of simultaneous bottom-up visual influences and meaningful social stimuli on attention orienting in young children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Relative to typically-developing age and sex matched participants, children with ASDs were more influenced by bottom-up visual scene information regardless of whether social stimuli and bottom-up scene properties were congruent or competing. This initial reliance on bottom-up strategies correlated with severity of social impairment as well as receptive language impairments. These data provide support for the idea that there is enhanced reliance on bottom-up attention strategies in ASDs, and that this may have a negative impact on social and language development.

  7. Bottom-feeding for blockbuster businesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, David; Tomlinson, Doug; Scott, Larry

    2003-03-01

    Marketing experts tell companies to analyze their customer portfolios and weed out buyer segments that don't generate attractive returns. Loyalty experts stress the need to aim retention programs at "good" customers--profitable ones- and encourage the "bad" ones to buy from competitors. And customer-relationship-management software provides ever more sophisticated ways to identify and eliminate poorly performing customers. On the surface, the movement to banish unprofitable customers seems reasonable. But writing off a customer relationship simply because it is currently unprofitable is at best rash and at worst counterproductive. Executives shouldn't be asking themselves, How can we shun unprofitable customers? They need to ask, How can we make money off the customers that everyone else is shunning? When you look at apparently unattractive segments through this lens, you often see opportunities to serve those segments in ways that fundamentally change customer economics. Consider Paychex, a payroll-processing company that built a nearly billion-dollar business by serving small companies. Established players had ignored these customers on the assumption that small companies couldn't afford the service. When founder Tom Golisano couldn't convince his bosses at Electronic Accounting Systems that they were missing a major opportunity, he started a company that now serves 390,000 U.S. customers, each employing around 14 people. In this article, the authors look closely at bottom-feeders--companies that assessed the needs of supposedly unattractive customers and redesigned their business models to turn a profit by fulfilling those needs. And they offer lessons other executives can use to do the same.

  8. Preliminary results for oil on the bottom detection technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, K.A. [United States Coast Guard, Groton, CT (United States). Research and Development Center

    2008-07-01

    This paper addressed the challenge of finding and recovering spills of submerged oil using current methods that often prove to be inadequate. The United States Coast Guard has launched a multi-year project to develop a complete approach for spills of submerged oils. This paper described the preliminary assessment of using sonar, laser fluorometry, real-time mass spectrometry and in-situ fluorometry to locate submerged oil. Specifications for the various techniques were also described. The authors noted that the sensors should provide enough information so that decision-makers could determine if an amount of oil sufficient to merit recovering could be identified. The systems chosen for testing for this paper were the RESON multi-beam sonar system; the Science Laser Line Scan System (LLSS) adapted for fluorescence and developed by Applications International Corporation (SAIC); fluorescence polarization developed by EIC Laboratories; and in-situ mass spectrometry and in-situ fluorometry developed by Wood Hole Oceanographic Institute (WHOI). Each of these technologies represented an improvement over the existing ad-hoc methods. Although they have not been tested in harsh environments, they may be useful immediately in some situations to increase reliability of oil detection at the bottom of, or in the water column. 16 refs., 1 tab., 20 figs.

  9. Eddy current testing system for bottom mounted instrumentation welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Noriyasu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The capability of eddy current testing (ECT for the bottom mounted instrumentation (BMI weld area of reactor vessel in a pressurized water reactor was demonstrated by the developed ECT system and procedure. It is difficult to position and move the probe on the BMI weld area because the area has complexly curved surfaces. The space coordinates and the normal vectors at the scanning points were calculated as the scanning trajectory of probe based on the measured results of surface shape on the BMI mock-up. The multi-axis robot was used to move the probe on the mock-up. Each motion-axis position of the robot corresponding to each scanning point was calculated by the inverse kinematic algorithm. In the mock-up test, the probe was properly contacted with most of the weld surfaces. The artificial stress corrosion cracking of approximately 6 mm in length and the electrical-discharge machining slit of 0.5 mm in length, 1 mm in depth and 0.2 mm in width given on the weld surface were detected. From the probe output voltage, it was estimated that the average probe tilt angle on the surface under scanning was 2.6°.

  10. The Effect of Different Ratio Bottom Ash and Fly Ash Geopolymer Brick on Mechanical Properties for Non-loading Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardiah Deraman Laila

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the finding of strength and water absorption of geopolymer bricks using bottom ash and fly ash as a geopolymer raw material for non-loading application with minimum strength. The study has been conducted to produce bottom ash and fly ash geopolymer bricks by varying the ratio of fly ash-to-bottom ash, solid-to-liquid and sodium silicate (Na2SiO3-to-sodium hydroxide (NaOH in the mixing process. The compressive strength range between 3.8-4.5 MPa was obtained due to the minimum strength of non-loading application with 70°C curing temperature within 24 hours at 7 days of ageing. The optimum ratio selected of bottom ash-to-fly ash, solid-to-liquid and Na2SiO3-to-NaOH are 1:2, 2.0 and 4.0 respectively. The water absorption result is closely related to the amount of bottom ash used in the mix design.

  11. Lost in translation? Multi-metric macrobenthos indicators and bottom trawling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gislason, Henrik; Bastardie, Francois; Dinesen, Grete E.

    2017-01-01

    The member states of the European Union use multi-metric macrobenthos indicators to monitor the ecological status of their marine waters in relation to the Water Framework and Marine Strategy Framework Directives. The indicators translate the general descriptors of ecological quality...... trawling. We use linear mixed effects models to analyze how bottom trawling intensity affects the indicators used in the Danish (Danish Quality Index, DKI) and Swedish (Benthic Quality Index, BQI) environmental monitoring programs in the Kattegat, the sea area between Sweden and Denmark. Using year...

  12. Properties and Leachability of Self-Compacting Concrete Incorporated with Fly Ash and Bottom Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Aeslina Abdul; Ikhmal Haqeem Hassan, Mohd; Jamaluddin, Norwati; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al

    2016-06-01

    The process of combustion in coal-fired power plant generates ashes, namely fly ash and bottom ash. Besides, coal ash produced from coal combustion contains heavy metals within their compositions. These metals are toxic to the environment as well as to human health. Fortunately, treatment methods are available for these ashes, and the use of fly ash and bottom ash in the concrete mix is one of the few. Therefore, an experimental program was carried out to study the properties and determine the leachability of selfcompacting concrete incorporated with fly ash and bottom ash. For experimental study, self-compacting concrete was produced with fly ash as a replacement for Ordinary Portland Cement and bottom ash as a replacement for sand with the ratios of 10%, 20%, and 30% respectively. The fresh properties tests conducted were slump flow, t500, sieve segregation and J-ring. Meanwhile for the hardened properties, density, compressive strength and water absorption test were performed. The samples were then crushed to be extracted using Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure and heavy metals content within the samples were identified accordingly using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. The results demonstrated that both fresh and hardened properties were qualified to categorize as self-compacting concrete. Improvements in compressive strength were observed, and densities for all the samples were identified as a normal weight concrete with ranges between 2000 kg/m3 to 2600 kg/m3. Other than that, it was found that incorporation up to 30% of the ashes was safe as the leached heavy metals concentration did not exceed the regulatory levels, except for arsenic. In conclusion, this study will serve as a reference which suggests that fly ash and bottom ash are widely applicable in concrete technology, and its incorporation in self-compacting concrete constitutes a potential means of adding value to appropriate mix and design.

  13. Measurements of Direct CP Violating Asymmetries in Charmless Decays of Strange Bottom Mesons and Bottom Baryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-03-01

    We report measurements of direct CP-violating asymmetries in charmless decays of neutral bottom hadrons to pairs of charged hadrons with the upgraded Collider Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. Using a data sample corresponding to 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, we obtain the first measurements of direct CP violation in bottom strange mesons, A{sub CP}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = +0.39 {+-} 0.15 (stat) {+-} 0.08 (syst), and botton baryons, A{sub CP}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} p{pi}{sup -}) = + 0.03 {+-} 0.17 (stat) {+-} 0.05 (syst) and A{sub CP} ({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} pK{sup -}) = +0.37 {+-} 0.17 (stat) {+-} 0.03 (syst). In addition, they measure CP violation in B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays with 3.5{sigma} significance, A{sub CP} (B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = -0.086 {+-} 0.023 (stat) {+-} 0.009 (syst), in agreement with the current world average. Measurements of branching fractions of B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays are also updated.

  14. Growth and Development of Four Oaks Through Age 10 Planted at Five Spacings in a Minor Stream Bottom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey E. Kennedy; Roger M. Krinard; Bryce E. Schlaegel

    1987-01-01

    The growth and development of four species of oak, planted at five spacings in a minor stream bottom in southeast Arkansas, illustrate differences among ,species and by spacing. Spacing and species affected all tree size and biomass variables except survival. Water oak developed most rapidly, while swamp chestnut oak developed most slowly. Ten year results show that...

  15. AABW-transport variation and its effect on internal wave motions between top and bottom of the Puerto Rico Trench

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haren, H.

    2017-01-01

    Slow subinertial variations in Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) are investigated interacting with internal waves and associated turbulent mixing in the Puerto Rico Trench (PRT), northwest Atlantic. Just below the PRT's top at 5,500 m, a deep-sea mooring was deployed for 14 months. Around 6,100 m, the

  16. Horns Rev offshore wind farm. Introducing hard bottom substrate sea bottom and marine biology. Data report 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonhard, S.B.; Pedersen, John

    2002-08-15

    The Ministry of Environment and Energy requested ELSAM and ELTRA to establish an offshore wind farm with an output of 150 MW in the waters of Horns Rev, approximately 15 km off Blaevandshuk, which is the most westerly point of Denmark. The first phase of construction of the wind farm have started in spring 2002. Before the construction activities take place, a baseline description of the benthos has been conducted as a part of an environmental monitoring programme for the introduction of hard bottom substrates in the North Sea. The establishment of a monitoring programme is required according to some environmental guidelines for offshore wind farms prepared by the Danish Energy Agency. The monitoring programme established for the benthic infauna was performed in spring 2001. In addition to a proposed fish investigation programme concerning the stomach contents of fish a comparative programme on benthos was established as part of the monitoring programme. The benthos sampling in connection with the fish programme was conducted in autumn 2001. This benthic survey includes sampling in a proposed reference area for the fish surveys north east of the wind farm. This report presents the data of the baseline environmental survey of the seabed in the wind farm site and in the proposed reference site and a brief description of the weather conditions at the time of sampling. (au)

  17. Abundance of plankton population densities in relation to bottom soil textural types in aquaculture ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Siddika

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Plankton is an important food item of fishes and indicator for the productivity of a water body. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of bottom soil textural conditions on abundance of plankton in aquaculture pond. The experiment was carried out using three treatments, i.e., ponds bottom with sandy loam (T1, with loam (T2 and with clay loam (T3. The ranges of water quality parameters analyzed were suitable for the growth of plankton during the experimental period. Similarly, chemical properties of soil were also within suitable ranges and every parameter showed higher ranges in T2. A total 20 genera of phytoplankton were recorded belonged to Chlorophyceae (7, Cyanophyceae (5, Bacillariophyceae (5, Euglenophyceae (2 and Dinophyceae (1. On the other hand, total 13 genera of zooplankton were recorded belonged to Crustacea (7 and Rotifera (6. The highest ranges of phytoplankton and zooplankton densities were found in T2 where low to medium-type bloom was observed during the study period. Consequently, the mean abundance of plankton (phytoplankton and zooplankton density was significantly highest in T2. The highest abundance of plankton in the T2 indicated that pond bottom with loamy soil is suitable for the growth and production of plankton in aquaculture ponds.

  18. Bottom-up Initiatives for Photovoltaic: Incentives and Barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Reinsberger

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available When facing the challenge of restructuring the energy system, bottom-up initiatives can aid the diffusion of decentralized and clean energy technologies. We focused here on a bottom-up initiative of citizen-funded and citizen-operated photovoltaic power plants. The project follows a case study-based approach and examines two different community initiatives. The aim is to investigate the potential incentives and barriers relating to participation or non-participation in predefined community PV projects. Qualitative, as well as quantitative empirical research was used to examine the key factors in the further development of bottom-up initiatives as contributors to a general energy transition.

  19. The Behavior of Multiple Acoustic Waves in the Lakes Bottom Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylov, P.; Nourgaliev, D. K.; Yasonov, P.

    2016-12-01

    Seismic studies are used for various tasks, such as the study of the bottom sediments properties, finding sunken objects, reconstruction the reservoir history, etc. Multiple acoustic waves are an enormous obstacle in obtaining full seismic record. Multiples from the bottom of a body of water (the surface of the base of water and the rock or sediment beneath it) and the air-water surface are common in lake seismic data. Multiple reflections on the seismic cross-sections are usually located on the double distance from the air/water surface. However, sometime multiple reflections from liquid deposits cannot be generated or they reflected from the deeper horizons. It is observed the phenomenon of changes in reflectance of the water/weakly consolidated sediments acoustic boundary under the influence of the acoustic wave. This phenomenon lies in the fact that after the first acoustic impact and reflection of acoustic wave for some time the reflectance of this boundary remains close to 0. This event on a cross-section can explain by the short-term changes in the properties of bottom sediments under the influence of shock? acoustic wave, with a further reduction of these properties to the next wave generation (generation period of 2 seconds). Perhaps in these deposits occurs thixotropic process. The paper presents the seismic acoustic cross-sections of Lake Balkhash (Kazakhstan), Turgoyak (Russia). The work was carried out according to the Russia Government's Program of Competitive Growth of Kazan Federal University, supported by the grant provided to the Kazan State University for performing the state program in the field of scientific research, and partially supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic research (grants ð 14-05-00785, 16-35-00452).

  20. A non-destructive non-contact method of the sea-bottom structure investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Chupin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a nondestructive noncontact method for investigating the sea-bottom structure using hydroacoustic and laser radiation. A practical implementation of this method is also presented. The research complex incorporates a state-of-the-art low-frequency hydroacoustic radiating system and a system of coastal laser strainmeters arranged in the specially selected sea waters and coastal grounds. The hydroacoustic radiators are used to generate a seismic signal. Seismic superficial waves are recorded by the coastal laser strainmeters. Optical parts of the strainmeters are constructed as the unequal-path Michelson interferometer where the frequency-stable helium-neon lasers serve as emission sources. A preliminary model of the sea-bottom testing ground has been developed by application of geologic-geophysical procedures. The model-based analysis of the timing data of the recorded seismic waves was carried out. The prospectivity of the used method was proved.

  1. Hamiltonian models for the propagation of irrotational surface gravity waves over a variable bottom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compelli, A; Ivanov, R; Todorov, M

    2018-01-28

    A single incompressible, inviscid, irrotational fluid medium bounded by a free surface and varying bottom is considered. The Hamiltonian of the system is expressed in terms of the so-called Dirichlet-Neumann operators. The equations for the surface waves are presented in Hamiltonian form. Specific scaling of the variables is selected which leads to approximations of Boussinesq and Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) types, taking into account the effect of the slowly varying bottom. The arising KdV equation with variable coefficients is studied numerically when the initial condition is in the form of the one-soliton solution for the initial depth.This article is part of the theme issue 'Nonlinear water waves'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  2. Assessing and mitigating of bottom trawling. Final BENTHIS project Report (Benthic Ecosystem Fisheries Impact Study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijnsdorp, Adriaan D; Eigaard, Ole Ritzau; Kenny, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    (high impact). Additional fishing in these core grounds have only a small impact. In the peripheral areas where fishing intensity is low, additional fishing will have a much larger impact. Hence, shifting trawling activities from the core fishing grounds to the peripheral areas will increase the overall...... to reduce the bycatch and bottom contact in the beam trawl fishery for brown shrimps. Sea trials to replace bottom trawls with pots were inconclusive. Results suggest that creels may offer an alternative for small Nephrops fishers in the Kattegat. In waters off Greece, the catch rates were very low. Sea...... studies carried out in BENTHIS revealed the critical success factors for implementing technological innovations to mitigate trawling impact. While economic investment theory predict that economic profitability should lead to investment in innovative gears, it appeared that many other factors play a role...

  3. Greenlandic Waste Incineration Fly And Bottom Ash As Secondary Resource In Mortar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Jensen, Pernille Erland

    2016-01-01

    , the effects on compressive strengths of mortars by substituting cement or sand by raw, washed and electrodialytically treated fly ash or bottom ash were investigated. Parts of the experimental fly ash had been pre-treated by either washing with distilled water or electro-dialytically treated to remove salts...... and by the latter method, also heavy metals. Mortar samples were cast where cement (5%–20%) or sand (5%–10%) was replaced with fly ash or bottom ash, together with references without replacements. The compressive strengths were measured after 7, 14, 28 and 42 days. Replacing cement by fly ash resulted in lower...... and cement with fly ash. Based on the compressive strength tests, it is found that using Greenlandic incineration ashes in mortar as 5% cement replacement could consume all ash instead of disposals, and could thus turn the ashes into a local resource and simultaneously reduce the import of cement....

  4. NEFSC 2002 Spring Bottom Trawl Survey (AL0204, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  5. NEFSC 1998 Fall Bottom Trawl Survey (AL9811, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  6. Monitoring changes in stream bottom sediments and benthic invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The study was conducted to determine whether the analysis of stream bottom sediments could be used to assess sediment pollution generated by highway construction. Most of the work completed to date has involved testing and refining methods for the co...

  7. Gulf of Maine Cooperative Bottom Longline Survey Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This database is for a bottom longline (fixed gear) survey executed in the western and central Gulf of Maine targeting complex rocky habitats. The survey is operated...

  8. SIMULATION OF ANALYTICAL TRANSIENT WAVE DUE TO DOWNWARD BOTTOM THRUST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugih Sudharma Tjandra

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Generation process is an important part of understanding waves, especially tsunami. Large earthquake under the sea is one major cause of tsunamis. The sea surface deforms as a response from the sea bottom motion caused by the earthquake. Analytical description of surface wave generated by bottom motion can be obtained from the linearized dispersive model. For a bottom motion in the form of a downward motion, the result is expressed in terms of improper integral. Here, we focus on analyzing the convergence of this integral, and then the improper integral is approximated into a finite integral so that the integral can be evaluated numerically. Further, we simulate free surface elevation for three different type of bottom motions, classified as impulsive, intermediate, and slow  movements. We demonstrate that the wave propagating to the right, with a depression as the leading wave, followed with subsequent wave crests. This phenomena is often observed in most tsunami events.

  9. NEFSC 2009 Fall Bottom Trawl Survey (HB0905, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  10. NEFSC 2009 Spring Bottom Trawl Survey (HB0901, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  11. NEFSC 2011 Spring Bottom Trawl Survey (HB1102, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  12. Gear Selectivity of a Longfin Squid Bottom Trawl

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Loligo pealeii (longfin inshore squid) co-occurs with Atlantic butterfish (Peprilus triacanthus) throughout the year and discarding in the L. pealeii bottom trawl...

  13. NEFSC 2003 Fall Bottom Trawl Survey (AL0305, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  14. NMFS Bottom Longline Analytical Dataset Provided to NRDA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Southeast Fisheries Science Center Mississippi Laboratories has conducted standardized bottom longline surveys in the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic since...

  15. NEFSC 2007 Bottom Trawl Survey Calibration (HB0710, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  16. NEFSC 2014 Fall Bottom Trawl Survey (HB1405, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  17. NEFSC 1999 Fall Bottom Trawl Survey (AL9911, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  18. NEFSC 2001 Fall Bottom Trawl Survey (AL0110, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  19. NEFSC 2000 Fall Bottom Trawl Survey (Al0006, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  20. Bottom flange reinforcement in NU I-girders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    "The 1996 edition of AASHTO Standard Specifications for Highway Bridges stated that nominal confinement reinforcement be placed to enclose prestressing steel in the bottom flange of bridge girders from girder ends to at least a distance eq changed th...

  1. NEFSC 2004 Fall Bottom Trawl Survey (AL0409, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  2. NEFSC 2007 Bottom Trawl Survey Calibration (HB0711, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  3. NEFSC 2013 Spring Bottom Trawl Survey (HB1301, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  4. NEFSC 2015 Spring Bottom Trawl Survey (HB1501, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  5. NEFSC 2008 Fall Bottom Trawl Survey (AL0803, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  6. NEFSC 2010 Spring Bottom Trawl Survey (HB1002, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  7. NEFSC 2000 Fall Bottom Trawl Survey (AL0007, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  8. NEFSC 2004 Winter Bottom Trawl Survey (AL0401, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  9. NEFSC 2012 Fall Bottom Trawl Survey (HB1206, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  10. NEFSC 2008 Fall Bottom Trawl Survey (HB0807, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  11. NEFSC 2002 Fall Bottom Trawl Survey (AL0210, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  12. NEFSC 2013 Fall Bottom Trawl Survey (HB1304, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  13. NEFSC 2015 Fall Bottom Trawl Survey (HB1506, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  14. NEFSC 2012 Spring Bottom Trawl Survey (HB1201, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  15. NEFSC 2011 Fall Bottom Trawl Survey (HB1105, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  16. NEFSC 2002 Winter Bottom Trawl Survey (AL0203, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  17. Pretreatment and utilization of waste incineration bottom ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    , however, have had a strong emphasis on lab experiments with little focus on full scale bottom ash upgrading methods. The introduction of regulatory limit values restricting leaching from utilized bottom ashes, has created a need for a better understanding of how lab scale experiences can be utilized....../aging, washing with and without additives, organic matter, sampling techniques, utilization options, and assessment tools. This paper provides an overview of these projects. The main results and experiences are discussed and evaluated with respect to bottom ash upgrading and utilization. Based on this discussion......Within recent years, researchers and authorities have had increasing focus on leaching properties from waste incineration bottom ashes. Researchers have investigated processes such as those related to carbonation, weathering, metal complexation, and leaching control. Most of these investigations...

  18. NEFSC 2005 Winter Bottom Trawl Survey (AL0502, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  19. NEFSC 2004 Spring Bottom Trawl Survey (AL0403, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  20. NEFSC 2005 Fall Bottom Trawl Survey (AL0508, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  1. NEFSC 2005 Fall Bottom Trawl Survey (AL0509, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  2. NEFSC 2014 Spring Bottom Trawl Survey (HB1401, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  3. NEFSC 2008 Spring Bottom Trawl Survey (AL0801, EK500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  4. NEFSC 2008 Spring Bottom Trawl Survey (HB0802, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC bottom trawl survey is a fisheries independent, multi-species survey that provides the primary scientific data for fisheries assessments in the U.S....

  5. A Stakeholder Approach to Triple Bottom Line Accounting: Nigerian Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Okenwa Cy Ogbodo

    2015-01-01

    The broad objective of this study is to determine whether triple bottom line reports has been able to deliver stakeholders with the needed satisfaction when compared to conventional financial reports. To achieve the above objective three research questions were raised, to address the issue of triple bottom line report and stakeholder satisfaction. From these hypotheses were formulated. The descriptive method of research design was employed to generate the required data. The population of were...

  6. Features of distribution and quality of organic matter in the bottom sediments of the Great Peter Bay (Sea of Japan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterova, Olga; Tregubova, Valentina; Semal, Victoria; Vasenev, Ivan

    2017-04-01

    The nature and distribution of organic carbon in marine waters depends on: 1) biological productivity and revenue of the autochthonous organic matter to the bottom; 2) sediment grain-size composition and conditions of dumping, which in turn depends of hydrothermic regime, topography, speed River mist and received major erosion products; 3) living conditions of the benthos (the quantity consumed of OM, gas regime of habitats, physiological capacity of heterotrophs). Autochthonous OM of phytoplankton plays a dominant role in the processes of formation of humus in aquatic conditions. Bottom sediments at different distance from the shoreline to depths from 0.5 up to 480 m of the Sea of Japan, which are formed in various conditions of facies, were selected as the objects of study. There is no clear relationships to the amount of organic matter in bottom sediments on the characteristics of the distribution and nature of living matter in the oceans and seas. This is because the process of sedimentation and fossilization of organic matter on the seabed and the ocean floor depends on many factors (currents, depth). Humus of studied bottom sediments in composition can be attributed mainly to the humic type. Nonhydrolyzing rest is 70-90%. This is characteristic of bottom sediments formed in facial types of small bays, internal coastal shelf bights and the underwater slope. At a fraction of the carbon of humic acids in organic matter, ranging from 4 to 80% of the amount of humic and fulvic acids. Fulvic acids content is much less. This is due to more favourable conservation situation of humic acids in precipitation with high content of organic matter, whereas fulvic acids in aquatic environments are more labile and almost not dumped. Despite the fact humic acids are not the most stable component (s), however, with increased content of humic acids, the mobility of organic matter and removing it from the bottom sediments are reduced. Internal shelf facies of the Great Peter Bay

  7. Chimeric types of chromosome X in bottom-fermenting yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, T; Izumikawa, M; Tadami, H

    2009-10-01

    To determine the structure of the chimeric chromosome X of bottom-fermenting yeasts. Eight cosmid clones carrying DNA from chromosome X of bottom-fermenting yeasts were selected by end-sequencing. Four of the cosmid clones had Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SC)-type and Saccharomyces bayanus (SB)-type chimeric ends, two had SC-type ends and two had SB-type ends. Sequencing revealed that the bottom-fermenting yeast strains in this study had four types of chromosome X: SC-SC, SC-SB, SB-SC and SB-SB. The translocation site in the chimeric chromosome is conserved among bottom-fermenting yeast strains, and was created by homologous recombination within a region of high sequence identity between the SC-type sequence and the SB-type sequence. Existing bottom-fermenting yeast strains share a common ancestor in which the chimeric chromosome X was generated. The knowledge gained in this study sheds light on the evolution of bottom-fermenting yeasts.

  8. Assessing benthic ecological impacts of bottom aquaculture using macrofaunal assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Fan, Ying; Yan, Cunjun; Gao, Chunzi; Xu, Zhaodong; Liu, Xiaoshou

    2017-01-15

    Bottom aquaculture of bivalves is a high-yield culture method, which is increasingly adopted by shellfish farmers worldwide. However, the effects of bottom aquaculture on benthic ecosystems are not well-known. Manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum), is a widely distributed bottom aquaculture mollusk species. To assess the ecological impacts of Manila clam bottom aquaculture, clams and other macrofaunal assemblages were investigated during four cruises (July and November 2011, February and May 2012) at six sampling sites in Jiaozhou Bay, China. Correlation analysis showed that macrofaunal assemblages had significant negative correlations with the abundance of Manila clams. However, according to the results of several biotic indices, a low disturbance was detected by Manila clam bottom aquaculture. In conclusion, AMBI (AZTI'S Marine Biotic Index) and M-AMBI (Multivariate AZTI Marine Biotic Index) indices are more suitable for assessing ecological quality than polychaete/amphipod ratios when the disturbance is slight, such as at a bivalve bottom aquaculture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. 2010 Hudson River Shallow Water Sediment Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Hudson River Shallow Water Mapping project characterizes the bottom of the Hudson River Estuary in shallow water (<3 m). The characterization includes...

  10. 2010 Hudson River Shallow Water Sediment Grabs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Hudson River Shallow Water Mapping project characterizes the bottom of the Hudson River Estuary in shallow water (<3 m). The characterization includes...

  11. Implementation of the new hydrographic technologies for bottom topography and seafloor gas venting investigations in the russian northern seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koloskov, Evgenii

    2017-04-01

    The report examines modern hydrographic technologies for the Russian northern seas investigations. The new hydro acoustics methods for seabed study are discussed. It presents stages of seafloor relief studies in the Russian Arctic seas since the 1950s and the obtained results. At the beginning of the 21st century an entirely new phase of bathymetric investigations began with the use of Multibeam Echosounders (MB) and modern hydrographic software. The software tools to process and analyze the bathymetry, and more recently to characterize the seabed from the backscatter, are available in a majority of modern sonar systems. Besides the bathymetry and sonar data, modern MB can produce water column images. These hydrographic technologies provide the possibility to achieve a high level of the seafloor topography. The latest generation of hydrographic MB now has the ability to provide the water column images along with the seafloor. The gas seeps from multibeam water column data can be distantly discerned against the seabed relief background with the aid of the Fledermause software package ("FMMidwater" module). The ability to integrate the water column data with the seafoor and other information,in an integrated geospatial and temporal environment, enhanced the analysis and interpretation of the data which is essential for marine geological research and investigations. The modern hydrographic equipment presents the ability to integrate the MB digital relief models (DTM) and sub bottom profiler data. This provide the possibility to obtain not only the detailed seabed topography, but also the additional information concerning the structure of under bottom soil layers and presence of the endogenous objects in near bottom environment. The importance of the hydrographic software tools needed to process and analyze the bathymetry and water column data are emphasized. The practical importance of the water column and bottom profiler data processing for the submarine gas

  12. BARC (bottom anti-reflective coating) for immersion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroi, Yoshiomi; Kishioka, Takahiro; Sakamoto, Rikimaru; Maruyama, Daisuke; Ohashi, Takuya; Ishida, Tomohisa; Kimura, Shigeo; Sakaida, Yasushi; Watanabe, Hisayuki

    2007-03-01

    193nm immersion Lithography will be installed at 45nm and beyond. For severe CD control, BARC (Bottom Antireflective Coating) has been used and this material must be used for immersion lithography. So far, we have developed several BARCs with various advantages (fast etch rate, broad resist compatibility, high adhesion, conformal...etc). Especially in an immersion process, development of BARC has to satisfy for the optical control and defectivity. The reflectivity control at Hyper NA is not same as the lower NA, because optical pass length in the BARC is not the same between low NA and High NA. In order to achieve enough etch selectivity to the substrate, hard mask materials are necessary. These under layers have absorption at 193nm. As a result of simulation, target optical parameters of next BARC should be low k value (k = ~0.25) for multi BARC stack. On the other hand, the defect issue must be decreased in the immersion process. However, the generation of many kinds of defects is suspected in the immersion process (water mark, blob defect, sublimation defect...etc). Regarding the BARC, there are also several specific defects in this process. Especially, after edge bead rinse, film peeling at edge area is one of the concerns. We researched the root cause of edge peeling and a solution for this defect. In this paper, we will discuss the detail of our BARC approach for litho performance, optical parameter, leaching, sublimation, edge peel defects and etch selectivity, and introduce new BARC for 193nm immersion lithography.

  13. Bottom fauna of small acid forest lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mossberg, P.; Nyberg, P.

    1979-01-01

    The structure of the benthic community was studied in seven small (1.6-11.5 ha) acid (pH-mean: 4.2-5.0) forest lakes. All of these lakes can be considered to be practically empty of fish at the time of sampling. There was a clear tendency for the number of taxa to decrease with increasing acidity. Only one species of each of the orders Hirudinea, Ephemeroptera and Mollusca was found. The benthic community of the lakes was dominated by the order Diptera (e.g. Chaoboridae and Chironomidae). The species composition of the benthos in the lakes studied was very much the same as is found in humic waters, but in the most acid lakes the greater part of the chironomid fauna consisted of Chironomus sp. Probable as a result of the very slight or nonexistent fish predation, certain groups of animals (e.g. Odonata, Heteroptera and Chaoboridae) occurred in unusual abundance.

  14. Acidic and alkaline bottom ash and composted manure blends as a soil amendment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtar, S; Sadaka, S S; Kenimer, A L; Rahman, S; Mathis, J G

    2008-09-01

    Potential water quality impacts associated with using bottom ash (BA) and composted dairy manure (CM) as a soil amendment were evaluated in this study. Two column studies were conducted to evaluate three blends of acidic BA and CM (BA:CM, v/v) namely, B1ac (95:5), B2ac (90:10), and B3ac (80:20) and three blends of alkaline BA and CM (BA:CM, v/v), namely, B1al (95:5), B2al (90:10), and B3al (80:20) under constant head water table conditions. Samples from standing water (top) and leachate (bottom) were collected at weekly intervals until day 49 to evaluate the effects of different blend ratios and elapsed time on standing water and leachate chemical and physical properties. A higher CM content in both acidic and alkaline blends resulted in higher leachate concentrations for solids and nutrients tested in this study. Alkaline blends had higher standing water and leachate nutrients concentration compared to acidic blends. After day 28, standing water total dissolved solids (TDS) concentrations for all acidic blends was below the USEPA drinking water standard however, TDS value for alkaline blend was always below the standard. Similar trends were also observed for NO3-N and phosphorus (P) concentrations for both blends. Based on these findings, it was concluded that acidic and alkaline blends B1ac, B1al, B2ac and B2al may be considered as a soil amendment material.

  15. Foamed bitumen stabilization of MSWI bottom ash; Skumbitumenstabilisering av bottenaska fraan avfallsfoerbraenning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendz, David [Swedish Geotechnical Inst., Linkoeping (Sweden); Jacobsson, Torbjoern [Swedish National Road and Transport Research Inst., Linkoeping (Sweden); Svensson, Mikael; Flyhammar, Peter [Lund Inst. of Technology (Sweden). Dept. of Water Resources Engineering

    2006-04-15

    Foamed bitumen is a mixture of bitumen, water and air. Bitumen that is heated to 175 deg C expands about 10-30 times compared to its original volume when injecting small amounts of water and air under high pressure. By exposing a granulate material to foamed bitumen the particles will be covered with a bitumen film. This will give the particles hydrophobic properties, as well as a smaller specific surface. At the same time the mechanical properties of the material are expected to improve due to the cohesive properties of the bitumen covered particles. The treatment can be made both offsite and in situ. The objective of this project was to investigate the possibility to treat municipal solid waste bottom ash with foamed bitumen to achieve improved leaching and mechanical properties. The following leaching tests have been performed on the original bottom ash and two foamed bitumen treated ashes with 2 and 4.5 % bitumen, respectively: one-stage batch test (EN 12457-4), pH-static test (prEN 14997), column test (prEN 14405) and monolithic leaching test (NEN 7345). In addition, the specific surface and intra-particle porosity were determined by BET N2 adsorption experiments on selected fractions of bottom ash. The results showed that the specific surface decreased with more than 50 % and manifested itself in a lower buffer capacity at both low and high pH. For most elements no significant difference in leaching behavior where found when comparing the results from the leaching tests for the three materials at their own pH. This is thought to be due to that sufficient specific area available for leaching exists to reach equilibrium despite the foam bitumen treatment. The results from the one-stage batch test show a minor reduction in leaching for Cl{sup -}, S, SO{sub 4}{sup -2}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, Sb, and Ca for the foamed bitumen treated ashes. The results from the column test of the foamed bitumen stabilized ashes showed an increased leaching of some elements, especially

  16. Ocean Bottom Seismometer: Design and Test of a Measurement System for Marine Seismology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Cadena

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Ocean Bottom Seismometer (OBS is a key instrument for the geophysical study of sea sub-bottom layers. At present, more reliable autonomous instruments capable of recording underwater for long periods of time and therefore handling large data storage are needed. This paper presents a new Ocean Bottom Seismometer designed to be used in long duration seismic surveys. Power consumption and noise level of the acquisition system are the key points to optimize the autonomy and the data quality. To achieve our goals, a new low power data logger with high resolution and Signal–to-Noise Ratio (SNR based on Compact Flash memory card is designed to enable continuous data acquisition. The equipment represents the achievement of joint work from different scientific and technological disciplines as electronics, mechanics, acoustics, communications, information technology, marine geophysics, etc. This easy to handle and sophisticated equipment allows the recording of useful controlled source and passive seismic data, as well as other time varying data, with multiple applications in marine environment research. We have been working on a series of prototypes for ten years to improve many of the aspects that make the equipment easy to handle and useful to work in deep-water areas. Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS have received growing attention from the geoscience community during the last forty years. OBS sensors recording motion of the ocean floor hold key information in order to study offshore seismicity and to explore the Earth’s crust. In a seismic survey, a series of OBSs are placed on the seabed of the area under study, where they record either natural seismic activity or acoustic signals generated by compressed air-guns on the ocean surface. The resulting data sets are subsequently used to model both the earthquake locations and the crustal structure.

  17. Ocean bottom seismometer: design and test of a measurement system for marine seismology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mànuel, Antoni; Roset, Xavier; Del Rio, Joaquin; Toma, Daniel Mihai; Carreras, Normandino; Panahi, Shahram Shariat; Garcia-Benadí, A; Owen, Tim; Cadena, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The Ocean Bottom Seismometer (OBS) is a key instrument for the geophysical study of sea sub-bottom layers. At present, more reliable autonomous instruments capable of recording underwater for long periods of time and therefore handling large data storage are needed. This paper presents a new Ocean Bottom Seismometer designed to be used in long duration seismic surveys. Power consumption and noise level of the acquisition system are the key points to optimize the autonomy and the data quality. To achieve our goals, a new low power data logger with high resolution and Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) based on Compact Flash memory card is designed to enable continuous data acquisition. The equipment represents the achievement of joint work from different scientific and technological disciplines as electronics, mechanics, acoustics, communications, information technology, marine geophysics, etc. This easy to handle and sophisticated equipment allows the recording of useful controlled source and passive seismic data, as well as other time varying data, with multiple applications in marine environment research. We have been working on a series of prototypes for ten years to improve many of the aspects that make the equipment easy to handle and useful to work in deep-water areas. Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) have received growing attention from the geoscience community during the last forty years. OBS sensors recording motion of the ocean floor hold key information in order to study offshore seismicity and to explore the Earth's crust. In a seismic survey, a series of OBSs are placed on the seabed of the area under study, where they record either natural seismic activity or acoustic signals generated by compressed air-guns on the ocean surface. The resulting data sets are subsequently used to model both the earthquake locations and the crustal structure.

  18. Mechanisms of bottom boundary fluxes in a numerical model of the Shetland shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Arjav; Toumi, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    Across-slope bottom boundary layer (BBL) fluxes on the shelf-edge connect this region to deeper waters. Two proposed ways in which across-slope BBL fluxes can occur, in regions that have a slope current aligned to the bathymetry, are the frictional veering of bottom currents termed the `Ekman drain' and through local wind-forced downwelling (wind-driven surface Ekman flow with an associated bottom flow). We investigate the variability, magnitude and spatial scale of BBL fluxes on the Shetland shelf, which has a prominent slope current, using a high-resolution (˜2 km) configuration of the MITgcm model. Fluxes are analysed in the BBL at the shelf break near the 200 m isobath and are found to have a seasonal variability with high/low volume transport in winter/summer respectively. By using a multivariate regression approach, we find that the locally wind-driven Ekman transport plays no explicit role in explaining daily bottom fluxes. We can better explain the variability of the across-slope BBL flux as a linear function of the speed and across-slope component of the interior flow, corresponding to an Ekman plus mean-flow flux. We estimate that the mean-flow is a greater contributor than the Ekman flux to the BBL flux. The spatial heterogeneity of the BBL fluxes can be attributed to the mean-flow, which has a much shorter decorrelation length compared to the Ekman flux. We conclude that both the speed and direction of the interior current determines the daily BBL flux. The wind does not explicitly contribute through local downwelling, but may influence the interior current and therefore implicitly the BBL fluxes on longer timescales.

  19. Characterizing wave- and current- induced bottom shear stress: U.S. middle Atlantic continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalyander, P. Soupy; Butman, Bradford; Sherwood, Christopher R.; Signell, Richard P.; Wilkin, John L.

    2013-01-01

    Waves and currents create bottom shear stress, a force at the seabed that influences sediment texture distribution, micro-topography, habitat, and anthropogenic use. This paper presents a methodology for assessing the magnitude, variability, and driving mechanisms of bottom stress and resultant sediment mobility on regional scales using numerical model output. The analysis was applied to the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB), off the U.S. East Coast, and identified a tidally-dominated shallow region with relatively high stress southeast of Massachusetts over Nantucket Shoals, where sediment mobility thresholds are exceeded over 50% of the time; a coastal band extending offshore to about 30 m water depth dominated by waves, where mobility occurs more than 20% of the time; and a quiescent low stress region southeast of Long Island, approximately coincident with an area of fine-grained sediments called the “Mud Patch”. The regional high in stress and mobility over Nantucket Shoals supports the hypothesis that fine grain sediment winnowed away in this region maintains the Mud Patch to the southwest. The analysis identified waves as the driving mechanism for stress throughout most of the MAB, excluding Nantucket Shoals and sheltered coastal bays where tides dominate; however, the relative dominance of low-frequency events varied regionally, and increased southward toward Cape Hatteras. The correlation between wave stress and local wind stress was lowest in the central MAB, indicating a relatively high contribution of swell to bottom stress in this area, rather than locally generated waves. Accurate prediction of the wave energy spectrum was critical to produce good estimates of bottom shear stress, which was sensitive to energy in the long period waves.

  20. Transfer of radionuclides from high polluted bottom sediments to marine organisms through benthic food chain in post Fukushima period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezhenar, Roman; Jung, Kyung Tae; Maderich, Vladimir; Willemsen, Stefan; de With, Govert; Qiao, Fangli

    2015-04-01

    A catastrophic earthquake and tsunami occurred on March 11, 2011 and severely damaged the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) that resulted in an uncontrolled release of radioactivity into air and ocean. Around 80% of the radioactivity released due to the FDNPP accident in March-April 2011 was either directly discharged into the ocean or deposited onto the ocean surface from the atmosphere. A large amount of long-lived radionuclides (mainly Cs-137) were released into the environment. The concentration of radionuclides in the ocean reached a maximum in mid-April of 2011, and then gradually decreased. From 2011 the concentration of Cs-137 in water essentially fell except the area around the FDNPP where leaks of contaminated water are continued. However, in the bottom sediment high concentrations of Cs-137 were found in the first months after the accident and slowly decreased with time. Therefore, it should be expected that a time delay is found of sediment-bound radionuclides in marine organisms. For the modeling of radionuclide transfer from highly polluted bottom sediments to marine organisms the dynamical food chain model BURN-POSEIDON (Heling et al, 2002; Maderich et al., 2014) was extended. In this model marine organisms are grouped into a limited number of classes based on their trophic level and type of species. These include: phytoplankton, zooplankton, fishes (two types: piscivorous and non-piscivorous), crustaceans, and molluscs for pelagic food chain and bottom sediment invertebrates, demersal fishes and bottom predators for benthic food chain and whole water column predators feeding by pelagial and benthic fishes. Bottom invertebrates consume organic parts of bottom sediments with adsorbed radionuclides which then migrate through the food chain. All organisms take radionuclides directly from water as well as via food. In fishes where radioactivity is not homogeneously distributed over all tissues of the organism, it is assumed that radionuclide

  1. Variación espacial y temporal de las masas de agua, nutrientes y sedimentación de la materia orgánica e inorgánica en la bahía Mejillones del sur (23° S, Chile Spatial and temporal variability of water masses, nutrients and sedimentation of organic and inorganic matter, in Mejillones del sur bay (23° S, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAURICIO CERDA

    2010-01-01

    temporal variability of physical-chemical properties and sedimentation rates of particulate matter of the water column at a fixed station set within Bahía de Mejillones del Sur, during the austral summer of 2003-2004. The water column was generally characterized by warmer oxygen-rich surface waters, marked stratification gradients between about 10 to 20 m depths and by colder, denser and sub-oxic upwelling waters from 30 m depths to the bottom throughout studied period. The bay was governed by three different water masses: the Surface Sub-Tropical Waters (SSTW, Sub-Antarctic Waters (SAAW and the Equatorial Sub-Surface Waters (ESSW. The surface waters exhibited a clear alternation between weak and short (three to eight days upwelling events and longer (29 days periods of stratification. During the weak upwelling events and at the onset of the stratification periods, sub-oxic to micro-oxic conditions prevailed with elevated nutrient concentrations at the 10 to 15 m depth layer. The variability of oxygen saturation levéis and of the dissolved inorganic nutrients nitrogen (N, phosphorus (P and silicic acid (Si, as well as the behavior of the N:P and Si:NID ratios, indicated the important combined effects of internal recycling of the organic matter in the surface water column and of the contribution of allochthonous nutrients from upwelled bottom waters. The fortnightly variability of the total flux of particulate material collected in sediment traps in the bay suggest that material deposition from the water column is governed by the alternation of upwelling and stratification events. In addition, the sediment traps registered nitrogen impoverishment with increasing depths, suggesting that remineralisation processes affected the settling of particles and the denitrification of the oxydo-reducting deeper waters of the bay.

  2. Sedimentation and polar order of active bottom-heavy particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Katrin; Hahn, Aljoscha M; Stark, Holger

    2013-04-01

    Self-propelled particles in an external gravitational field have been shown to display both an increased sedimentation length and polar order even without particle interactions. Here, we investigate self-propelled particles which additionally are bottom-heavy, that is they feel a torque aligning them to swim against the gravitational field. For bottom-heavy particles the gravitational field has the two opposite effects of i) sedimentation and ii) upward alignment of the particles' swimming direction. We perform a multipole expansion of the one-particle distribution of non-interacting particles with respect to orientation and derive expressions for sedimentation length and mean particle orientation which we check against Brownian Dynamics simulations. For large strength of gravity or small particle speeds and aligning torque, we observe sedimentation with increased sedimentation length compared with passive colloids but also active colloids without bottom-heaviness. Increasing, for example, swimming speed the sedimentation profile is inverted and the particles swim towards the top wall of the enclosing box. We find maximal orientational order at intermediate swimming speeds for both cases of particles with bottom-heaviness and those without. Ordering unsurprisingly is increased for the bottom-heavy particles, but this difference disappears at higher levels of activity and for very high activities ordering goes to zero in both cases.

  3. On a Bottom-Up Approach to Scientific Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiang

    2014-03-01

    Two popular models of scientific discovery, abduction and the inference to the best explanation (IBE), presuppose that the reason for accepting a hypothetical explanation A comes from the epistemic and/or explanatory force manifested in the fact that observed fact C is an inferred consequence of A. However, not all discoveries take this top-down procedure from A to C, in which the result of discovery A implies the observed fact C. I contend that discovery can be modeled as a bottom-up procedure based on inductive and analogical rules that lead us to infer from C to A. I take the theory of Dignaga, an Indian medieval logician, as a model of this bottom-up approach. My argument has three panels: 1) this bottom-up approach applies to both commonsense and scientific discovery without the assumption that C has to be an inferred consequence of A; 2) this bottom-up approach helps us get around problems that crop up in applying abduction and/or IBE, which means that scientific discovery need not to be modeled exclusively by top-down approaches; and 3) the existence of the bottom-up approach requires a pluralist attitude towards modeling of scientific discovery.

  4. Response of ocean bottom dwellers exposed to underwater shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, S. H. R.; Kaiho, Kunio; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The paper reports results of experiments to estimate the mortality of ocean bottom dwellers, ostracoda, against underwater shock wave exposures. This study is motivated to verify the possible survival of ocean bottom dwellers, foraminifera, from the devastating underwater shock waves induced mass extinction of marine creatures which took place at giant asteroid impact events. Ocean bottom dwellers under study were ostracoda, the replacement of foraminifera, we readily sampled from ocean bottoms. An analogue experiment was performed on a laboratory scale to estimate the domain and boundary of over-pressures at which marine creatures' mortality occurs. Ostracods were exposed to underwater shock waves generated by the explosion of 100mg PETN pellets in a chamber at shock over-pressures ranging up to 44MPa. Pressure histories were measured simultaneously on 113 samples. We found that bottom dwellers were distinctively killed against overpressures of 12MPa and this value is much higher than the usual shock over-pressure threshold value for marine-creatures having lungs and balloons.

  5. Oil and gas platforms with steam bottoming cycles: System integration and thermoenvironomic evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Tuong-Van; Tock, Laurence; Breuhaus, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The integration of steam bottoming cycles on oil and gas platforms is currently regarded as the most promising option for improving the performance of these energy-intensive systems. In this paper, a North Sea platform is taken as case study, and a systematic analysis of its energy requirements...... water from the processing plant reveals to be more profitable than using seawater, as the additional pumping power outweighs the benefit of using a cooling medium at a temperature of about 8 °C lower. This study highlights thereby the importance of analysing energy savings and recovery options...

  6. Occurance of geophilic of keratinophilic fungi in bottom sediments of lakes of various trophicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Korniłłowicz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The present investigations proved that colonization of bottom sediments with geophilie kerationophilic fungi in lakes of different trophicity was conditioned by the organic matter content. There was a relationship between occurrence of microorganisms and the basin management method. The greatest concentration of keratinophilic fungi where species typical of sewages polluted with them dominated was found in sediments of a basin used for recreation. In sediments of a lake located in the agricultural region there was a domination of species charakteristic of pure water in respect to sanitary regulations.

  7. Extreme bottom velocities induced by wind wave and currents in the Gulf of Gdańsk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieślikiewicz, Witold; Dudkowska, Aleksandra; Gic-Grusza, Gabriela; Jędrasik, Jan

    2017-11-01

    The principal goal of this study is to get some preliminary insights about the intensity of water movement generated by wind waves, and due to the currents in the bottom waters of Gulf of Gdańsk, during severe storms. The Gulf of Gdańsk is located in the southern Baltic Sea. This paper presents the results of analysis of wave and current-induced velocities during extreme wind conditions, which are determined based on long-term historical records. The bottom velocity fields originated from wind wave and wind currents, during analysed extreme wind events, are computed independently of each other. The long-term wind wave parameters for the Baltic Sea region are derived from the 44-year hindcast wave database generated in the framework of the project HIPOCAS funded by the European Union. The output from the numerical wave model WAM provides the boundary conditions for the model SWAN operating in high-resolution grid covering the area of the Gulf of Gdańsk. Wind current velocities are calculated with the M3D hydrodynamic model developed in the Institute of Oceanography of the University of Gdańsk based on the POM model. The three dimensional current fields together with trajectories of particle tracers spreading out of bottom boundary layer are modelled, and the calculated fields of bottom velocities are presented in the form of 2D maps. During northerly winds, causing in the Gulf of Gdańsk extreme waves and most significant wind-driven circulation, the wave-induced bottom velocities are greater than velocities due to currents. The current velocities in the bottom layer appeared to be smaller by an order of magnitude than the wave-induced bottom orbital velocities. Namely, during most severe northerly storms analysed, current bottom velocities ranged about 0.1-0.15 m/s, while the root mean square of wave-induced near-seabed velocities reached maximum values of up to 1.4 m/s in the southern part of Gulf of Gdańsk.

  8. Bursting Events in Pressure Flushing with Expanding Bottom Outlet Channel within Dam Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    soheila Tofighi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Currently, large dams in the world, due to the high amount of sediments in the reservoir, especially around the intake, have operational problems. One of the solutions for this problem is pressure flushing. In this type of flushing, a mixture of water and sediment is removed from bottom outlets form dam reservoir and a funnel shaped crater is created in the vicinity of the outlet opening. In laboratory experiments carried out in this study, pressure flushing with the expansion of bottom outlet within the reservoir and its statistical analysis of bursting events were investigated. The structure of the turbulent flow is not fully understood due to their complexity and random nature. Klein et al. Introduced the turbulence bursting in this kind of flow and Nezo and Nakagora suggested that the events resulting from turbulence bursting has a significant effect of transferring the sediment particles. Materials and Methods: For the purposes of this study, the experiments were conducted with a physical model with 7m length, 1.4m width, and 1.5m height, consisting of three parts namely the inlet of the model, the main reservoir, and settling basin. The main reservoir of the model was 5m long and the sediments were placed within this part of the model. The sediment particles were non-cohesive silica with uniform size and with median diameter (d50 1.15mm and geometrics standard deviation (σg 1.37. Experiments carried out with different discharges and water depths above the bottom outlet in different expansion size of outlet channel in constant sediment level of 20cm above the center of the outlet channel. The model was slowly filled with water until the water surface elevation reached to a desired level. The bottom outlet was manually opened, after a while sedimentwere discharged with the water flow in very high concentrations through the outlet channel (sudden discharge and a funnel shaped crater was formed in front of it. After the run of

  9. The influence of triple bottom line on international operations management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Sperotto Flores

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper takes a triple bottom line perspective to analyze how the international operations literature integrates economic, social, and environmental issues. Additionally, it shows the main drivers of and barriers to the adoption of triple bottom line practices by companies in an international context. We conducted a literature review in English language journals which publish research of production and operations management and sustainability, resulting in a final sample of 29 papers. Results show that social and legal pressure for companies to adopt a responsible behavior prompts an isomorphic process that leads them to conduct their operations on behalf of triple bottom line goals. Behavioral differences between spin-offs in various countries caused institutions to create mechanisms that can press and change private standards through regulation and enforcement. There is room for progress in studies that seek to analyze the company’s relationships in its international experience and its multi-institutional relations.

  10. A plea for Global Health Action bottom-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Laaser

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This opinion piece focuses on global health action by hands-on bottom-up practice: Initiation of an organizational framework and securing financial efficiency are – however - essential, both clearly a domain of well trained public health professionals. Examples of action are cited in the four main areas of global threats: planetary climate change, global divides and inequity, global insecurity and violent conflicts, global instability and financial crises. In conclusion a stable health systems policy framework would greatly enhance success. However, such organisational framework dries out if not linked to public debates channelling fresh thoughts and controversial proposals: the structural stabilisation is essential but has to serve not to dominate bottom-up activities. In other words a horizontal management is required, a balanced equilibrium between bottom-up initiative and top-down support. Last not least rewarding voluntary and charity work by public acknowledgement is essential.

  11. Bottom-linked innovation: Collaboration between middle managers and employees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Catharina Juul

    2018-01-01

    Employee-driven innovation is gaining ground as a strategy for developing sustainable organisations in the public and private sector. This type of innovation is characterised by active employee participation, and the bottom-up perspective is often emphasised. This article explores an issue that has...... hitherto been paid little explicit attention, namely collaboration between middle managers and employees in innovation processes. In contrast to most studies, middle managers and employees are here both subjects of explicit investigation. The collaboration processes explored in this article are termed...... ‘bottom-linked innovation’. The empirical analysis is based on an in-depth qualitative study of bottom-linked innovation in a public frontline institution in Denmark. By combining research on employee-driven innovation and middle management, the article offers new insights into such collaborative...

  12. Bottom quark contribution to spin-dependent dark matter detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinmian Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a previously overlooked bottom quark contribution to the spin-dependent cross section for Dark Matter (DM scattering from the nucleon. While the mechanism is relevant to any supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model, for illustrative purposes we explore the consequences within the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM. We study two cases, namely those where the DM is predominantly Gaugino or Higgsino. In both cases, there is a substantial, viable region in parameter space (mb˜−mχ≲O(100 GeV in which the bottom contribution becomes important. We show that a relatively large contribution from the bottom quark is consistent with constraints from spin-independent DM searches, as well as some incidental model dependent constraints.

  13. Getting to the bottom of L2 listening instruction: Making a case for bottom-up activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Siegel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues for the incorporation of bottom-up activities for English as a foreign language (EFL listening. It discusses theoretical concepts and pedagogic options for addressing bottom-up aural processing in the EFL classroom as well as how and why teachers may wish to include such activities in lessons. This discussion is augmented by a small-scale classroom-based research project that investigated six activities targeting learners’ bottom-up listening abilities. Learners studying at the lower-intermediate level of a compulsory EFL university course were divided into a treatment group (n = 21 and a contrast group (n = 32. Each group listened to the same audio material and completed listening activities from an assigned textbook. The treatment group also engaged in a set of six bottom-up listening activities using the same material. This quasi-experimental study used dictation and listening proficiency tests before and after the course. Between-group comparisons of t-test results of dictation and listening proficiency tests indicated that improvements for the treatment group were probably due to the BU intervention. In addition, results from a posttreatment survey suggested that learners value explicit bottom-up listening instruction.

  14. Thickness optimization of the flow plate of bottom end piece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jeong Sik; Lee, Jae Kyung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-05-01

    High burnup fuel assembly has been the worldwide trends in nuclear fuel design. The burnup increase will result in more axial irradiation growth of fuel rod and consequently it requires more space between top and bottom nozzles to accommodate the increased axial growth of the fuel rod. In order to get more axial space between top and bottom nozzles, thickness optimization of the flow plate for the Korean fuel assembly (KOFA) as well as DRBEP-DG based on stress criterion was performed by way of finite element code `ANSYS`. 12 tabs., 92 figs., 9 refs. (Author) .new.

  15. Bottom-up synthetic biology: engineering in a tinkerer's world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwille, Petra

    2011-09-02

    How synthetic can "synthetic biology" be? A literal interpretation of the name of this new life science discipline invokes expectations of the systematic construction of biological systems with cells being built module by module--from the bottom up. But can this possibly be achieved, taking into account the enormous complexity and redundancy of living systems, which distinguish them quite remarkably from design features that characterize human inventions? There are several recent developments in biology, in tight conjunction with quantitative disciplines, that may bring this literal perspective into the realm of the possible. However, such bottom-up engineering requires tools that were originally designed by nature's greatest tinkerer: evolution.

  16. Modeling of melt-coolant mixing by bottom injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazachkov, I.V.; Paladino, D.; Sehgal, B.R. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Div. of Nuclear Power Safety, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-07-01

    In this paper, the flow characteristics during the coolant injection, with submerged nozzles, at the bottom of a molten pool are studied. The flow pattern developed by the rising coolant is considered for the case of complete coolant vaporization, and the pool-coolant phase distributions are assessed by a modeling approach delivered from literature for a heterogeneous turbulent jet. To calculate the basic characteristics of such flow, integral relationships are proposed for the two-phase boundary layer. The results of numerical computations and approximate solution are compared with the experimental data obtained in the low temperature experiments, conducted in the DECOBI (debris coolability by bottom injection) facility. (authors)

  17. Bottom-up silicon nanowire-based thermoelectric microgenerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila, D.; Huber, R.; Hierold, C.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, bottom-up intrinsic crystalline Si nanowire arrays in combination with top-down microfabrication techniques and a vertical device architecture have been proposed to develop an all-silicon nanostructured thermoelectric generator. To fabricate this device, a suitable vertical integration of Si NWs on patterned microstructures, which define the thermoelectric legs of the generator, has been achieved by bonding top and bottom silicon structures through nanowires. The process has been proven to be a feasible approach that employs a regrowth process of the nanowires for bonding purposes.

  18. 30 Gbps bottom-emitting 1060 nm VCSEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatarczak, Anna; Zheng, Y.; Rodes, G. A.

    2014-01-01

    1060 nm VCSEL-based data transmission over 50 m OM3 MMF at 30 Gbit/s is experimentally demonstrated. A highly-strained bottom-emitting QW VCSEL with p-type modulation doping is used with 3.77 mA bias and 0.55 V data amplitude.......1060 nm VCSEL-based data transmission over 50 m OM3 MMF at 30 Gbit/s is experimentally demonstrated. A highly-strained bottom-emitting QW VCSEL with p-type modulation doping is used with 3.77 mA bias and 0.55 V data amplitude....

  19. Dynamics of a Convex Bit Rolling Over Curvilinear Well Bottom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulyayev, V. I.; Lugovoi, P. Z.; Shevchuk, L. V.

    2017-10-01

    The problem of the dynamical bending of a drill string rotating in a deep borehole with self-excitation of whirling oscillations of the bit on the well bottom is stated. A mathematical model describing the rolling of a spherical bit over an ellipsoidal bottom is developed. The whirling modes of the bit in fixed and rotating frames of reference are plotted. It is shown that the calculated trajectories of the bit can be spirals that unwind (unstable mode) or wind (stable mode). They are characterized by high accelerations and, therefore, are dangerous for the system.

  20. Does Plant Cultivar Difference Modify the Bottom-Up Effects of Resource Limitation on Plant-Insect Herbivore Interactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Peng; Desneux, Nicolas; Michel, Thomas; Le Bot, Jacques; Seassau, Aurelie; Wajnberg, Eric; Amiens-Desneux, Edwige; Lavoir, Anne-Violette

    2016-12-01

    Variation in resource input to plants triggers bottom-up effects on plant-insect herbivore interactions. However, variation in plant intrinsic traits in response to resource availability may modify the bottom-up effects. Furthermore, the consequences also may depend on the feeding strategy of insect herbivores belonging to different feeding guilds. We evaluated the performance of two insect herbivores from distinct feeding guilds, the leaf miner Tuta absoluta and the phloem feeder Bemisia tabaci. We offered the insects two tomato cultivars growing under optimal nitrogen input vs. nitrogen limitation, or under optimal water input vs. water limitation. We found that: (i) the two cultivars differed in their responses to nitrogen and water limitation by regulating primary (leaf-gas exchange related parameters, leaf nitrogen content, and leaf C/N ratio) and secondary metabolism (main defensive compounds: glycoalkaloids); (ii) for both plant cultivars, nitrogen or water limitation significantly affected T. absoluta survival and development, while B. tabaci survival was affected only by nitrogen limitation; and surprisingly (iii) plant cultivar differences did not modify the negative bottom-up effects of resource limitation on the two insect herbivores. In conclusion, the negative effects of resource limitation cascaded up to insect herbivores even though plant cultivars exhibited various adaptive traits to resource limitation.

  1. Statistical Estimates of Lidar Signals Reflected from the Ocean Bottom, Using a Lidar Equipped with a Photodetector Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisenko, A. A.; Potekaev, A. I.; Shamanaev, V. S.

    2017-10-01

    With the aim of obtaining preliminary estimates, the Monte Carlo method has been used to solve the nonstationary equation of laser sensing of an optically dense, complex, multicomponent aqueous medium by a monostatic lidar equipped with a photodetector array mounted on board an aircraft. The influence of the air-water interface, the contribution of multiple scattering of radiation by the water column, and reflection of the signal from the bottom are all taken into account. Estimates of the dependence of the power of the lidar signal recorded from the surface and the bottom have been obtained for different optical characteristics of the medium and brightness of the solar illumination. The field of view of the photodetector array is translated along the direction of flight of the aircraft with relatively low velocity. A combined image of the investigated space is obtained by joining together the sequentially taken rectangular images. Here, each pixel of the frame images distance and the sum of all these pixels gives a three-dimensional image of the ocean surface and bottom. Results of statistical simulation show that a lidar system for sensing the ocean water column using a detector array can be realized on a level that can justly be termed state-of-the-art. Under favorable conditions, it is possible to sense water depths up to 44 m.

  2. Sieving of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ash; Siktning av askor fraan avfallsfoerbraenning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todorovic, Jelena

    2010-07-01

    Waste-to-Energy is steadily increasing in Sweden and more than 46 % of municipal solid waste (MSW) is being incinerated. Solid residues from MSW incineration (MSWI) mainly constitute of bottom ash and air pollution control (APC) residues. Bottom ashes from MSWI amounted to 0.7 millions of tons and APC residues to 0.2 millions of tons in 2008. Bottom ashes from MSWI contain pollutants like metals (e.g. Pb, Zn, Cu), metalloids (e.g. As, Se), elements forming oxyanions (e.g. Sb, Cr, Mo) and easily soluble salts like chlorides and sulphates. These constituents can leach out polluting the environment if ash comes in contact with water. Treatment methods for decreasing the amount of pollutants in ashes or their mobility are therefore needed. Sieving was investigated as a separate or a complementary treatment method for MSWI ashes. Hypothesis was that the large share of pollutant concentrations could be removed from the ashes through separation of the finest fractions. The rest is less harmful to the environment, more acceptable as secondary construction material or less costly to landfill. Investigation included three MSWI ashes, namely bottom ash from Boraas Energy och Miljoe's plant with fluid bad, boiler ash from the same plant and bottom ash from Renova's stocker grate type plant. Ashes were sieved in 2-4 size fractions. Total content of pollutants and their leachability (batch leaching test, L/S=10 l/kg) was assessed for each of the fractions. Leaching results were compared to limit values stipulated by Swedish Environmental Protection Agency for acceptance of waste at landfills as wells as to recommendations for reuse of waste as a construction material. Results from bottom ash from the stocker grate type incinerator and from the boiler ash confirm the hypothesis that pollutants leach out in higher concentrations from the finer fractions. A large amount of pollutant could be removed from the ashes through sieving, but the goal to produce a fraction that

  3. The distribution of heavy metals content in the bottom deposits of the trans-border Uzh river system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Bilkey

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics and peculiarities of the heavy metals (Cu, Pb, Zn, As, V, Cr, Ni migration were established in the system of the river Uzh bottom deposits. An excess in maximum permissible concentration among such elements as Zn, V, As, and Cu was detected in surface waters. We may connect the elevated level of Cu and Zn with natural (metals appearing in ground water run-off, ablation from iron ore, the reaction of interstitial water, anthropogenic (sewage disposals from communal households and manufacturing plants, agricultural run-offs, and hydrochemical (pH of water medium, methylation of non-organic metal compounds, metals release from the organic compounds composition, ingress from bottom deposits factors. The high concentrations of vanadium in water as well as in bottom deposits are most probably induced by the leaching of elements from the regional volcanic rocks. The plumbum content did not exceed the higher-than-normal rates; however, significant element accumulation was detected in bottom deposits outside the city of Uzhgorod which may be the result of ecotoxicant ingress along with land runoff from the riverside highways laid parallel to the water course. In comparison with background measures, the highest chromium and nickel concentrations were detected near the streamlet Domoradzh and, therefore, it is assumed that the industrial wastewaters serve here as a source of heavy metals. The reservoir in the lowland is above all enriched by arsenic. Areas under agricultural use are significantly concentrated in lowlands. Runoffs from these areas are the main source of the ore supply. However, the impact of municipal domestic waste water which contains arsenic-containing detergents should not be excluded. Moreover, we found a relationship between the relief heterogeneity of the study area and distribution of heavy metals in the hydro-ecosystem. The accomplished comparative analysis of the territories under study indicates the significant

  4. Water Pollution, Causes and Cures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manufacturing Chemists Association, Washington, DC.

    This commentary on sources of water pollution and water pollution treatment systems is accompanied by graphic illustrations. Sources of pollution such as lake bottom vegetation, synthetic organic pollutants, heat pollution, radioactive substance pollution, and human and industrial waste products are discussed. Several types of water purification…

  5. Nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharbaugh, John E.

    1987-01-01

    An improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction has a reactor core and a generally cylindrical reactor vessel for holding a large pool of low pressure liquid metal coolant and housing the core within the pool. The reactor vessel has an open top end, a closed flat bottom end wall and a continuous cylindrical closed side wall interconnecting the top end and bottom end wall. The reactor also has a generally cylindrical concrete containment structure surrounding the reactor vessel and being formed by a cylindrical side wall spaced outwardly from the reactor vessel side wall and a flat base mat spaced below the reactor vessel bottom end wall. A central support pedestal is anchored to the containment structure base mat and extends upwardly therefrom to the reactor vessel and upwardly therefrom to the reactor core so as to support the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and the lower end of the reactor core in spaced apart relationship above the containment structure base mat. Also, an annular reinforced support structure is disposed in the reactor vessel on the bottom end wall thereof and extends about the lower end of the core so as to support the periphery thereof. In addition, an annular support ring having a plurality of inward radially extending linear members is disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end of the reactor vessel wall and is connected to and supports the reactor vessel at its bottom end on the containment structure base mat so as to allow the reactor vessel to expand radially but substantially prevent any lateral motions that might be imposed by the occurrence of a seismic event. The reactor construction also includes a bed of insulating material in sand-like granular form, preferably being high density magnesium oxide particles, disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and uniformly supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall on the containment

  6. Working Paper 5: Beyond Collier's Bottom Billion | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-12-16

    Dec 16, 2010 ... The Bottom Billion by Paul Collier has raised a lot of attention in the world of development. The heart of the narrative presented in the book is that a group of almost 60 countries, with a population of about a billion people, are caught in four main traps. Their prospects for escaping the traps are poor, and they ...

  7. Detection of Higgs bosons decaying to bottom quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilman, F.J.; Price, L.E.

    1986-11-01

    Several developments affecting the possibility of Higgs detection are discussed. These include the level of certainty about the t quark mass, Monte Carlo programs to generate both signal and background events, and separation and/or enhancement of heavy quark jets from jets due to light quarks or gluons, and the possibility that the neutral Higgs decay into bottom quarks might be the decay mode of choice for detecting the intermediate mass Higgs. Possible means of detection of an intermediate mass Higgs at the SSC, particularly if a prominent decay mode is to bottom quarks, are examined, using the PYTHIA Monte Carlo program to generate both signal and background events. For the signal, events were generated in which Higgs bosons are created in proton-proton collisions, with the Higgs decaying into bottom quarks. The presence of W or Z bosons, created in the same proton-proton collision, is used to enhance the likelihood of Higgs production and to reduce the potentially enormous background. It is found that the Higgs decay to bottom quarks, if important, would be more favorable for detection of the Higgs than decay to top quarks was found to be because of the smaller background. 3 refs., 4 figs. (LEW)

  8. Planning from the bottom up : Democratic decentralisation in action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pal, A.

    2010-01-01

    This research highlights the gap between the official rhetoric and the political reality of democratic decentralisation and bottom-up planning using an indepth study of the metropolitan planning process in Kolkata, India. The key question that I address here is: how do elected officials at different

  9. 49 CFR 179.200-17 - Bottom outlets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... bottom of the tank or mounted on a pad or nozzle with a tongue and groove or male and female flange... tank or mounted with a tongue and groove or male and female flange attachment on a pad attached to the... and the valve body of exterior valves, must be of cast, fabricated, or forged metal. If welded to tank...

  10. Bottom Raking Damage to High-Speed Craft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of the raking damage to high speed craft (HSC) and conventional ships. The analysis is based on a detailed theoretical model for the raking resistance of an assembled ship bottom structure and on the idea that the impact conditions for various ship types have...

  11. Microfinance for the Urban Bottom of the Pyramid Segment in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although mainstream research on investing in the Bottom of the Pyramid (BOP) segment focus heavily on investors' expected returns, there is less focus on the fast increasing gaps on the role of financial training in academic literature. In addition, there is a lack of deliberate focus on the wellbeing and success of targeted ...

  12. The Bottom Line: Industry and the Environment in South Africa ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    All economic activity depends on the environment. This simple fact has spurred the international community into giving more and more attention to the environment in general and the environmental performance of industry in particular. The Bottom Line is a major new contribution to the debates on industry and the ...

  13. 49 CFR 179.220-18 - Bottom outlets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.220-18 Bottom outlets. (a) The... or stem projection below the “V” groove or its equivalent. The valve and seat must be readily...

  14. MSWI Bottom Ash Characterization and Resource Recovery Potential Assessment.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šyc, Michal; Kameníková, Petra; Krausová, Aneta; Zach, Boleslav; Pohořelý, Michael; Svoboda, Karel; Punčochář, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 36 (2015), s. 79-84 ISSN 1640-4902 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TE02000236 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : MSWI * bottom ash * metal recovery Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  15. The Bottom Line: Industry and the Environment in South Africa ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    It explores, for instance, the relationship between legislation and new investments, the environmental costs of electricity supply, the role of trade unions in environmental management, and the environmental management of small and medium-sized enterprises. The Bottom Line is a product of 3 years of research conducted ...

  16. Optics, Acoustics and Stress in a Nearshore Bottom Nepheloid Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-12

    APPROACH The approach was to obtain measurements that permitted comparisons of temporal evolution of bottom stress, suspended particle size, and...observations of floe settiing velocities in Glacier Bay, Alaska, Marine Geology, 145: 85-94. Hill, P. S., D. G. Bowers and K. M. Braithwaite, 2013. The

  17. Theoretical and numerical analysis of the influence of the bottom ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bottom friction modelling is an important step in river flow computation with 1D or 2D solvers. It is usually performed using energy slope based formulations established for uniform flow conditions, or using a turbulent regime based approach relying on turbulence analysis. However, these formulations are often applied under ...

  18. Fostering Rural Social Organizations: A Bottom-Up Paradigm In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper therefore examines rural social organizations in bottom-up paradigm in sustainable rural transformation in Nigeria. In an attempt to justify the continued involvement of rural social organizations in rural transformation, the paper takes an overview on the short and long term strategies adopted so far by rural social ...

  19. PENGGUNAAN SANDWICH PLATE SYSTEM (SPS PADA KONSTRUKSI INNER BOTTOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Baidowi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Perkembangan teknologi yang semakin maju memberikan alternatif-alternatif dalam memperbaiki berbagai bentuk sistem, termasuk di dalamnya konstruksi struktur kapal. Latar belakang dari penelitian ini adalah pada permasalahan kebutuhan material ringan pada kapal, kecepatan proses produksi, penyederhanaan konstruksi dan biaya perawatan kapal yang rendah. Penggunaan material ringan Sandwich Plate System (SPS menjadi salah satu jawaban dari permasalahan-permasalahan tersebut, penggunaan SPS dapat menyederhanakan bentuk dari konstruksi kapal dengan menghilangkan penegar inner bottom longitudinal dan mampu mengurangi Light Weight Tonnase (LWT. Artikel ini membahas perbandingan pola distribusi tegangan dan deformasi pada konstruksi bottom yang menggunakan SPS dan baja AH36, selain dari itu juga mengetahui seberapa besar pengurangan LWT yang dihasilkan untuk meningkatkan Payload kapal. Analisa dilakukan dengan simulasi numerik berdasarkan FEM pada konstruksi inner bottom dengan pembebanan muatan. Dari hasil simulasi didapatkan besar tegangan maksimal untuk material baja AH36 sebesar 226 Mpa dengan menggunakan penegar, sedangkan konstuksi dengan material SPS tegangan maksimal yang dihasilkan sebesar 221 Mpa tanpa penggunaan penegar, dengan deformasi maksimal untuk AH36 dan SPS yaitu 77 mm yang terjadi pada bagian tengah blok konstruksi inner bottom. Dengan hilangnya penegar berat konstruksi berkurang sebesar 13,05% dari penggunaan material baja AH36 sehingga memberikan peningkatan payload sebesar 13,05%. Simulasi penelitian dilakukan pada kapal Bulk Carrier (BC.

  20. Theoretical and numerical analysis of the influence of the bottom ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-02-01

    Feb 1, 2010 ... Bottom friction modelling is an important step in river flow computation with 1D or 2D solvers. It is usually performed using energy slope based formulations established for uniform flow conditions, or using a turbulent regime based approach relying on turbulence analysis. However, these formulations are ...

  1. Aquifer-scale controls on the distribution of nitrate and ammonium in ground water near La Pine, Oregon, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, S.R.; Böhlke, J.K.; Duff, J.H.; Morgan, D.S.; Weick, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Geochemical and isotopic tools were applied at aquifer, transect, and subtransect scales to provide a framework for understanding sources, transport, and fate of dissolved inorganic N in a sandy aquifer near La Pine, Oregon. NO3 is a common contaminant in shallow ground water in this area, whereas high concentrations of NH4-N (up to 39 mg/L) are present in deep ground water. N concentrations, N/Cl ratios, tracer-based apparent ground-water ages, N isotope data, and hydraulic gradients indicate that septic tank effluent is the primary source of NO3. N isotope data, N/Cl and N/C relations, 3H data, and hydraulic considerations point to a natural, sedimentary organic matter source for the high concentrations of NH4, and are inconsistent with an origin as septic tank N. Low recharge rates and flow velocities have largely restricted anthropogenic NO3 to isolated plumes within several meters of the water table. A variety of geochemical and isotopic data indicate that denitrification also affects NO3 gradients in the aquifer. Ground water in the La Pine aquifer evolves from oxic to increasingly reduced conditions. Suboxic conditions are achieved after about 15-30 y of transport below the water table. NO3 is denitrified near the oxic/suboxic boundary. Denitrification in the La Pine aquifer is characterized well at the aquifer scale with a redox boundary approach that inherently captures spatial variability in the distribution of electron donors. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Ecology of Caribbean sponges: are top-down or bottom-up processes more important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, Michael P; Slattery, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Benthic-pelagic coupling and the role of bottom-up versus top-down processes are recognized as having a major impact on the structure of marine communities. While the roles of bottom-up processes are better appreciated they are still viewed as principally affecting the outcome of top-down processes. Sponges on coral reefs are important members of the benthic community and provide a critically important functional linkage between water-column productivity and the benthos. As active suspension feeders sponges utilize the abundant autotrophic and heterotrophic picoplankton in the water column. As a result sponges across the Caribbean basin exhibit a consistent and significant pattern of greater biomass, tube extension rate, and species numbers with increasing depth. Likewise, the abundance of their food supply also increases along a depth gradient. Using experimental manipulations it has recently been reported that predation is the primary determinant of sponge community structure. Here we provide data showing that the size and growth of the sponge Callyspongia vaginalis are significantly affected by food availability. Sponges increased in size and tube extension rate with increasing depth down to 46 m, while simultaneously exposed to the full range of potential spongivores at all depths. Additionally, we point out important flaws in the experimental design used to demonstrate the role of predation and suggest that a resolution of this important question will require well-controlled, multi-factorial experiments to examine the independent and interactive effects of predation and food abundance on the ecology of sponges.

  3. Top-Down Beta Enhances Bottom-Up Gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Craig G; Thompson, William H; Bosman, Conrado A; Fries, Pascal

    2017-07-12

    Several recent studies have demonstrated that the bottom-up signaling of a visual stimulus is subserved by interareal gamma-band synchronization, whereas top-down influences are mediated by alpha-beta band synchronization. These processes may implement top-down control of stimulus processing if top-down and bottom-up mediating rhythms are coupled via cross-frequency interaction. To test this possibility, we investigated Granger-causal influences among awake macaque primary visual area V1, higher visual area V4, and parietal control area 7a during attentional task performance. Top-down 7a-to-V1 beta-band influences enhanced visually driven V1-to-V4 gamma-band influences. This enhancement was spatially specific and largest when beta-band activity preceded gamma-band activity by ∼0.1 s, suggesting a causal effect of top-down processes on bottom-up processes. We propose that this cross-frequency interaction mechanistically subserves the attentional control of stimulus selection.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Contemporary research indicates that the alpha-beta frequency band underlies top-down control, whereas the gamma-band mediates bottom-up stimulus processing. This arrangement inspires an attractive hypothesis, which posits that top-down beta-band influences directly modulate bottom-up gamma band influences via cross-frequency interaction. We evaluate this hypothesis determining that beta-band top-down influences from parietal area 7a to visual area V1 are correlated with bottom-up gamma frequency influences from V1 to area V4, in a spatially specific manner, and that this correlation is maximal when top-down activity precedes bottom-up activity. These results show that for top-down processes such as spatial attention, elevated top-down beta-band influences directly enhance feedforward stimulus-induced gamma-band processing, leading to enhancement of the selected stimulus. Copyright © 2017 Richter, Thompson et al.

  4. Hydrocarbons in the suspended matter and the bottom sediments in different regions of the Black Sea Russian sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Nemirovskaya

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Content and composition of hydrocarbons (mainly the aliphatic ones in the suspended matter and the bottom sediments in the Gelendzhik Bay, the Big Sochi water area, the Feodosiya Bay and the Black Sea central part are defined and compared with the total organic carbon and chlorophyll a contents. It is shown that the aliphatic hydrocarbon concentrations exceeding the background ones are found only in the coastal zone. Advancing to the pelagic zone is accompanied by sharp decrease of their concentrations. Petroleum and pyrogenic hydrocarbons are mainly manifested in the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons composition. Influence of construction of the Olympic facilities upon distribution of hydrocarbons in the Big Sochi water area was of short duration, and already by 2015 the aliphatic hydrocarbons concentration decreased, on the average, up to 24 µg/l in the surface waters, and up to 18 µg/g – in the bottom sediments. Accumulation of hydrocarbons took place in bottom sediments, where their concentrations exceeded the background ones in terms of dry weight. In the Gelendzhik Bay, their content reached 252 μg/g, and in the composition of organic carbon (Corg > 1 %, which may indicate the contamination of sediments with oil products. In the Feodosiya Bay their part in the composition of Corg did not exceed 0.73 % and was 0.35 % on average. Natural alkanes dominated in the composition of aliphatic hydrocarbons. The bottom sediments are characterized by the predominance of odd high-molecular terrigenous alkanes. The content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the studied sediments was rather low: up to 31 ng/g in the Gelendzhik Bay, up to 348 ng/g in the Feodosiya Bay. These concentrations according to the EPA classification are considered background, or minor petroleum hydrocarbons increase the level of aliphatic hydrocarbons in water and sediments, thus creating a modern hydrocarbon background.

  5. Contourite drift off Madeira Island (Northeast Atlantic) and implications to Cenozoic bottom-current circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, Cristina; Hernández-Molina, F. Javier; Madureira, Pedro; Quartau, Rui; Magalhães, Vitor; Carrara, Gabriela; Santos de Campos, Aldino; Brandão, Filipe; Tomás Vázquez, Juan; Somoza, Luis

    2017-04-01

    During the last decades several works have been carried out on the morphosedimentary processes driven by bottom-currents in several continental margins and abyssal plains worldwide. However these processes still remain poorly understood on deep-water settings and particularly around oceanic islands. This study is focused on the offshore of Madeira Island (Portugal), which is located in the Northeast Atlantic at about 700 km west of NW Africa. The interpretation of a newly acquired dataset, composed of multibeam bathymetry, Parasound echosounder profiles and multichannel seismic reflection profiles, allowed to identify a giant (about 385 km long and over than 175 km wide) plastered contourite drift, called the "Madeira Drift", developing along the lower slope of the Madeira plateau. It formed on top of a major erosional unconformity that truncates the underlying pelagic deposits, which drape over faulted blocks of Cretaceous oceanic crust. The Madeira Drift is composed of three main regional seismic units showing a predominant aggradational stacking pattern, without evidence of major lateral migration thought time. Its internal configuration indicates that it was build-up by a northwards flowing deep bottom current. These characteristics suggests that an almost persistent and stable water mass has been responsible for its edification trough time. While the precise age of this contourite drift is undetermined, some chronostratigraphic constraints can be determined based upon published works regarding seafloor magnetic anomalies (e.g. Bird et al., 2007), DSDP Site 136drilling data (Hayes et al., 1978). Attending to this, we propose that the possible onset of Madeira Drift must have occurred after Late Cretaceous, within the tertiary period, and quite probably in the Late Eocene / Eocene-Oligocene transition. Based on them is commonly accepted that an enhanced proto-Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) started to circulate at that time we considered this water mass as the

  6. A simple method to model the reduced environment of lake bottom sapropel formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskova, Olga L.; Strakhovenko, Vera D.; Ermolaeva, Nadezhda I.; Zarubina, Eugene Yu.; Ovdina, Ekaterina A.

    2017-07-01

    The Kambala and Barchin brackish lakes (Baraba steppe, southern West Siberia) contain an organic-rich sapropel layer that was formed in oxygen-depleted waters. We measured the bulk sediment elemental composition, the water chemistry and determined the mineralogical composition and predominant biota species (Diatoms and Cyanobacteria in phytoplankton community respectively) in the lakes. The result indicates that the first lake has a siliceous type of sapropel and the second a carbonaceous one. A computer thermodynamic model was developed for chemical interaction in water-bottom sediment systems of the Kambala and Barchin Lakes. The surface sodium bicarbonate waters are supersaturated with respect to calcite, magnesite (or low Mg-calcite), quartz and chlorite with minor strontianite, apatite and goethite (pH 8.9-9.3, Eh 0.3 V). Nevertheless, it is shown that during sapropel deposition, deep silt waters should be anoxic (Ehcomponent CH2O has been used to create an anoxic environment suitable for pyrite formation due to the biotic community impact and abiotic reduction. Thermodynamic calculation has shown that silt water is not necessarily euxinic (anoxic and sulfidic). Depending on Eh, sulfate sulfur can dominate in solution, causing the formation of gypsum together with pyrite. An attempt was made to find a reason for solution supersaturation with respect to Ca and Mg ions due to their complexation with humic acids.

  7. Composition and distribution of subtidal and intertidal crustacean assemblages in soft-bottoms of the Ria de Vigo (NW Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Cacabelos

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The intertidal and subtidal soft-bottoms of the inner area of the Ria de Vigo (NW Spain were sampled in November and December 1999, and spatial distribution of crustacean species was examined. Environmental variables from water and sediment were measured at each sampling site. Amphipods and myocopids were the numerically dominant orders (49.9 and 26.9% dominance, amphipods accounting for more than 54% of identified taxa. The highest crustacean densities occurred with 55-41 species and 5953.6-4346.4 ind. m–2 in external areas, where the diversity index reached the maximum values. Multivariate techniques revealed that distribution of crustaceans in the inlet was highly dependent on depth. Ordination analysis determined three major assemblages: Intertidal bottoms colonized by seagrasses and subjected to strong variations of salinity were dominated by the amphipod Melita palmata, harpacticoids and the isopod Idotea baltica (Group A. The amphipod Corophium cf. runcicorne and the cumacean Iphinoe tenella predominated in the muddy bottoms of central areas (Group B. These species were also present in the deep muddy bottoms of the mouth of the inlet, with high carbonate and gravel contents, and with the myocopids and the amphipod Microdeutopus cf. armatus displaying maximum dominances (Group C.

  8. Moon phase effects and timing of emerging macrobenthic assemblages in a sheltered soft-bottom sublittoral habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Aldo S.; Gómez, Gonzalo E.; Santoro, Pablo A.; Malebran, Maritza; Cortés, Cynthia; Riascos, José M.

    2014-02-01

    Several species of benthic macro and meio-invertebrates actively emerge from the seabed to the water column during the night. Such diel vertical migrations have important consequences for benthic-pelagic coupling, dispersal, connectivity and recovery after disturbance of benthic assemblages. However, this process has never been studied in the coast of the Humboldt Current ecosystem. Herein we examined the relationship between the emerging assemblage and moon phases (and co-variables) and the timing of emergence during the day/night cycle, in a sublittoral soft-bottom habitat. Sampling using emergence traps was conducted at 7 m depth in the zone of Bolsico, a sheltered cove with low bottom hydrodynamics in northern Chile. Multivariable analysis showed that changes in the dissimilarity of the emerging assemblage were related to each moon phase. The percentage of moon illumination, bottom illumination and tide amplitude explained most of the variation of the emerging assemblage. Species showed differential responses to each moon phase; some were abundant at intermediate phases (e.g., harpacticoids), or peaked at full moon (e.g. ostracods) and others such as mysids emerged in equal abundances at all moon phases. The timing of assemblage emergence followed a consecutive sequence through the night/day period. Most of the studies dealing with the emergence processes have described species-specific responses. Our research shows that the examination at assemblage level may reveal new and distinct patterns of emergence in sublittoral soft-bottom habitats.

  9. Use of bottom ash from olive pomace combustion in the production of eco-friendly fired clay bricks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliche-Quesada, D; Leite-Costa, J

    2016-02-01

    Olive pomace bottom ash was used to replace different amounts (10-50wt%) of clay in brick manufacturing. The aim of this study is both studying bricks properties and showing a new way of olive pomace bottom ash recycling. Properties of waste bricks were compared to conventional products following standard procedures in order to determine the maximum waste percentage. The amount of olive pomace bottom ash is limited to 20wt%, obtaining bricks with superior engineering properties when 10wt% of waste is added. Adding higher amount of waste (30-50wt%) resulted in bricks with water absorption and compressive strength values on the edge of meeting those established by standards. Therefore, the addition of 10 and 20wt% of olive pomace bottom ash produced bricks with a bulk density of 1635 and 1527kg/m(3) and a compressive strength of 33.9MPa and 14.2MPa, respectively. Fired bricks fulfil standards requirements for clay masonry units, offering, at the same time, better thermal insulation of buildings due to a reduction in thermal conductivity of 14.4% and 16.8% respectively, compared to control bricks (only clay). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Hydrography and bottom boundary layer dynamics: Influence on inner shelf sediment mobility, Long Bay, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, L.A.; Leonard, L.A.; Snedden, G.A.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the hydrography and bottom boundary-layer dynamics of two typical storm events affecting coastal North Carolina (NC); a hurricane and the passages of two small consecutive extratropical storms during November 2005. Two upward-looking 1200-kHz Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) were deployed on the inner shelf in northern Long Bay, NC at water depths of less than 15 m. Both instruments profiled the overlying water column in 0.35 in bins beginning at a height of 1.35 in above the bottom (mab). Simultaneous measurements of wind speed and direction, wave and current parameters, and acoustic backscatter were coupled with output from a bottom boundary layer (bbl) model to describe the hydrography and boundary layer conditions during each event. The bbl model also was used to quantify sediment transport in the boundary layer during each storm. Both study sites exhibited similar temporal variations in wave and current magnitude, however, wave heights during the November event were higher than waves associated with the hurricane. Near-bottom mean and subtidal currents, however, were of greater magnitude during the hurricane. Peak depth-integrated suspended sediment transport during the November event exceeded transport associated with the hurricane by 25-70%. Substantial spatial variations in sediment transport existed throughout both events. During both events, along-shelf sediment transport exceeded across-shelf transport and was related to the magnitude and direction of subtidal currents. Given the variations in sediment type across the bay, complex shoreline configuration, and local bathymetry, the sediment transport rates reported here are very site specific. However, the general hydrography associated with the two storms is representative of conditions across northern Long Bay. Since the beaches in the study area undergo frequent renourishment to counter the effects of beach erosion, the results of this study also are relevant to coastal

  11. Extraction of crustal deformations and oceanic fluctuations from ocean bottom pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyoshi, Keisuke; Nagano, Akira; Hasegawa, Takuya; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Kido, Motoyuki; Igarashi, Toshihiro; Uchida, Naoki; Iinuma, Takeshi; Yamashita, Yusuke

    2017-04-01

    It has been well known that megathrust earthquakes such as the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake (Mw 9.1) and the 2011 the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake (Mw 9.0) had devastated the coastal areas in the western of Indonesia and in the north-eastern of Japan, respectively. To mitigate the disaster of those forthcoming megathrust earthquakes along Nankai Trough, the Japanese government has established seafloor networks of cable-linked observatories around Japan: DONET (Dense Oceanfloor Network system for Earthquakes and Tsunamis along the Nankai Trough) and S-net (Seafloor Observation Network for Earthquakes and Tsunamis along the Japan Trench). The advantage of the cable-linked network is to monitor the propagation process of tsunami and seismic waves as well as seismic activity in real time. DONET contains pressure gauges as well as seismometers, which are expected to detect crustal deformations driven by peeling off subduction plate coupling process. From our simulation results, leveling changes are different sense among the DONET points even in the same science node. On the other hand, oceanic fluctuations such as melting ice masses through the global warming have so large scale as to cause ocean bottom pressure change coherently for all of DONET points especially in the same node. This difference suggests the possibility of extracting crustal deformations component from ocean bottom pressure data by differential of stacking data. However, this operation cannot be applied to local-scale fluctuations related to ocean mesoscale eddies and current fluctuations, which affect ocean bottom pressure through water density changes in the water column (from the sea surface to the bottom). Therefore, we need integral analysis by combining seismology, ocean physics and tsunami engineering so as to decompose into crustal deformation, oceanic fluctuations and instrumental drift, which will bring about high precision data enough to find geophysical phenomena. In this study

  12. Fluorescence and DOC contents of pore waters from coastal and deep-sea sediments in the Gulf of Biscay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra, M.M.D. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis-SC (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Donard, O.F.X. [Pau Univ. (France). Lab. de Chimie Bio-Inorganique et Environnement; Etcheber, H. [Universite de Bordeaux I, Talence (France). Dept. de Geologie et Oceanographie; Soriano-Sierra, E.J. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis-SC (Brazil). Nucleo de Estudos do Mar; Ewald, M. [Universite de Bordeaux I, Talence (France). Lab. de Physico Toxico-Chimie des Systemes Naturels

    2001-07-01

    Fluorescence of waters from the Gulf of Biscay was investigated. Pore waters fluoresced more intensely and exhibited red-shifted spectra relative to overlying seawaters. Also, a blue-shift was observed going from coastal to open sea sites. Results indicate that continental inputs of fluorescent material reach the sea bed at all sites studied. Organic matter (OM) modifications within sediments were also observed. In the uppermost layer (6 cm), fluorescence intensity and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations decrease, followed by a red-shift in emission spectra with increasing depth. This may reflect the increase in OM molar mass due to humification. The reverse of these trends in the deepest sub-oxic sediments might be related to the degradation of OM released from the solid phase, resulting in dissolved fluorescent material with a relative paucity of oxygen-containing functional groups. A very good correlation of DOC with fluorescence was observed in all cores. (author)

  13. Tides and mixing in the northwestern East China Sea, Part II: Near-bottom turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozovatsky, Iossif; Liu, Zhiyu; Wei, Hao; Fernando, H. J. S.

    2008-02-01

    The dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy ɛ and friction velocity u* was studied in reversing and rotating tidal flows in the East China Sea near the northeastern coast of China using ADV and ADCP measurements. The highest near-bottom dissipation rate on a shallow (19 m depth) shelf ɛ nb˜5×10 -5 W/kg was associated with the stronger flooding current of the reversing tide and the lowest ɛ nb˜10 -7 W/kg with the weaker ebb current. The log-layer (ADCP-based) and the skin-layer (ADV-based) near-bottom estimates of friction velocities, u*(log) and u*(cor), showed close correspondence for the reversing tidal flow, but when the tidal vector rotated over a sloping bottom u*(log) was approximately two times larger than u*(cor). The inapplicability of the Prandtl-Karman log-layer scaling for energetic rotating flow is considered as the major source for this discrepancy. The classical wall-layer parameterization ɛ=c0u*3/κζ with c0=1 was found to hold well for the reversing tide, but for rotating flow c0=1.5. The scaling for the dissipation rate, ɛ=cetr3/2/L, used in the turbulent kinetic energy ( e tr) balance equation requires c ɛ=0.06 for the reversing tide, but c ɛ=0.09 for the rotating flow, where the turbulent scale L tr= κζ and ζ is the distance from the seafloor. Significant departure from the wall layer parameterization was noted when advection of warm water affected the testing site at a sloping shelf (38 m depth), possibly causing convective mixing in addition to boundary-induced turbulence.

  14. Cochlear implant/Deaf World dispute: different bottom elephants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsoulin, T P

    2001-11-01

    To examine the controversy between the proponents of cochlear implantation in children and the Deaf World opponents with the hope of offering a method for decreasing the acrimony of opposing positions. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING (METHODS): The opposing arguments will be presented from a review of pertinent literature. The systemic philosophic process of bottom elephant analysis will be elucidated. Contrasting models of power will be described. The application of the bottom elephant analysis of each group's position plus a paradigm shift in the utilization of power offers possibilities for the implementation of mutually respectful dialogue that does not undermine each group's stature. Philosophic analysis and paradigm shift could lead to improvement in the interaction of cochlear implant proponents and Deaf World opponents.

  15. Measurement of bottom quark production in two photon collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Saremi, Sepehr

    2001-01-01

    The cross section for bottom quark production in two-photon collisions, sigma( e+e- → e+e- bb¯X), is measured for the first time. The measurement is performed with the L3 detector at the Large Electron Positron (LEP) collider at the European Center for Nuclear and Particle Physics (CERN). The data corresponds to 410 pb-1 taken at center-of-mass energies from 189 GeV to 202 GeV. Hadrons containing a bottom quark are identified by detecting electrons or muons from their semi-leptonic decays. The measured cross section is in excess of the Next to Leading Order QCD prediction by a factor of three.

  16. Enhanced E-bed bottoms upgrading using latest catalytic technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toshima, H.; Mayo, S.; Sedlacek, Z.; Hughes, T.; De Wind, M. [Albermarle Corp., Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-07-01

    The profitability of refineries depends on heavy oil upgrading in terms of price, conversion, yields and quality of the product. The Ebullated-bed process represents a solution for the effective primary upgrading of heavy oils. Since the 1970s, Albemarle has commercialized several E-bed catalysts to upgrade the bottoms in low sediment and high hydrogenation operations. Although an E-bed is used to maximize the conversion of vacuum residuum (VR), it is often limited by fouling caused by sediment in the product. In order to reduce sedimentation in the product, Albemarle developed an improved E-bed catalytic technology by characterizing the asphaltenes and sediments in order to better understand the oil chemistry and compatibility. The most recent development involves the patented catalyst-staging technology and the improved single catalyst application. Both achieve very low sediment or higher hydrodesulphurization (HDS) and Conradson carbon (CCR) removal for improved bottom upgrading. tabs., figs.

  17. Combining bottom-up and top-down

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehringer, Christoph [Department of Economics, University of Oldenburg, Oldenburg (Germany); Centre for European Economic Research (ZEW), Mannheim (Germany); Rutherford, Thomas F. [Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2008-03-15

    We motivate the formulation of market equilibrium as a mixed complementarity problem which explicitly represents weak inequalities and complementarity between decision variables and equilibrium conditions. The complementarity format permits an energy-economy model to combine technological detail of a bottom-up energy system with a second-best characterization of the over-all economy. Our primary objective is pedagogic. We first lay out the complementarity features of economic equilibrium and demonstrate how we can integrate bottom-up activity analysis into a top-down representation of the broader economy. We then provide a stylized numerical example of an integrated model - within both static and dynamic settings. Finally, we present illustrative applications to three themes figuring prominently on the energy policy agenda of many industrialized countries: nuclear phase-out, green quotas, and environmental tax reforms. (author)

  18. Importance of Nonperturbative QCD Parameters for Bottom Mesons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Upadhyay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of nonperturbative quantum chromodynamics (QCD parameters is discussed in context to the predicting power for bottom meson masses and isospin splitting. In the framework of heavy quark effective theory, the work presented here focuses on the different allowed values of the two nonperturbative QCD parameters used in heavy quark effective theory formula, and using the best fitted parameter, masses of the excited bottom meson states in jp=1/2+ doublet in strange and nonstrange sectors are calculated here. The calculated masses are found to be matching well with experiments and other phenomenological models. The mass splitting and hyperfine splitting have also been analyzed for both strange and nonstrange heavy mesons with respect to spin and flavor symmetries.

  19. The Bottom Line : Industry and the Environment in South Africa ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    On y explore, par exemple, le lien entre la législation et les nouveaux investissements, les coûts environnementaux de l'approvisionnement en électricité, le rôle des syndicats dans la gestion de l'environnement, ainsi que la gestion environnementale des petites et moyennes entreprises. The Bottom Line est le fruit de trois ...

  20. CLASSICS There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    copy of every book in our library by striking off a copy from the master plate in a few hours and mailing it in an envelope no bigger or heavier than any other ordinary air mail letter. Now, the name of this talk is “There is Plenty of Room at the Bottom” – not just “There is Room at the Bottom.” What I have demonstrated is that ...

  1. Succeeding at the Bottom-of-the-Pyramid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boxenbaum, Eva; Olsen, Mette

    initiative to build a social impact venture at the interface of a multi-national corporation and a hybrid organization that is operating on the Bottom-of-the-Pyramid market. Our study identifies how corporate social entrepreneurs dynamically use framing and organizational anchoring strategies to build...... internal support and external legitimacy for a radically new social venture initiative. Our findings point to the challenges, opportunities, and strategies associated with straddling global events and internal corporate priorities when engaging in corporate social entrepreneurship....

  2. QCD predictions for charm and bottom quark production at RHIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciari, Matteo; Nason, Paolo; Vogt, Ramona

    2005-09-16

    We make up-to-date QCD predictions for open charm and bottom production at RHIC in nucleon-nucleon collisions at square root of S=200 GeV. We also calculate the electron spectrum resulting from heavy flavor decays to allow direct comparison to the data. A rigorous benchmark, including the theoretical uncertainties, is established against which nuclear collision data can be compared to obtain evidence for nuclear effects.

  3. QCD Predictions for Charm and Bottom Production at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cacciari, Matteo; Nason, Paolo; Vogt, Ramona

    2005-09-01

    We make up-to-date QCD predictions for open charm and bottom production at RHIC in nucleon-nucleon collisions at {radical}S = 200 GeV. We also calculate the electron spectrum resulting from heavy flavor decays to allow direct comparison to the data. A rigorous benchmark, including the theoretical uncertainties, is established against which nuclear collision data can be compared to obtain evidence for nuclear effects.

  4. Ecological-geochemical characteristics of bottom sediments of Sophiivske reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Тетяна Миколаївна Альохіна

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Results of the investigation of the chemical composition of the bottom sediments Sophiivske reservoir located on the Ingul River was presented in this article. The most significant factor of differential sedimentation chemical compounds can be facies factor that reflects the impact of geomorphic parameters and hydrological characteristics of the reservoir. There are a change of environment sedimentogenesis from oxidative to reductive on sites near reservoir dam.

  5. Decision Support to Sustainable Management of Bottom Trawl Fleet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Bitunjac

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A decision support concept (DSC for sustainable management of the bottom trawl fleet was created in line with ecosystem-based management. It is based on principles that integrate ecological, social and techno-economic aspects of trawl fisheries in a multicriteria analysis approach. For the sake of greater transparency and improved stakeholder participation, elements of the proposed multicriteria models were discussed, generated and evaluated in collaboration with designated experts from four stakeholder groups: fishers, environmentally focused non-governmental organizations, fisheries scientists and government representatives. The proposed DSC management could facilitate management and assist decision makers in adequately using data and scientific advice to shape management strategies and related policies for the bottom trawl fleet. It may also assist in finding compromise solutions based on deliverables from the multicriteria analysis, while taking stakeholder requirements into account by using the multicriteria Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP and Preference Ranking Organization Method for Enrichment Evaluations (PROMETHEE methods. The final decision is then based on a vast amount of knowledge and relevant information collected from different sources. The proposed DSC represents a novel approach to fishery fleet management and assists in systematizing management processes and instruments to make it operational at the strategic level. The method was applied to the Adriatic bottom trawl fishery, and the obtained results confirmed its managerial potential in the strategic decision-making process, aimed at improving conventional management, while considering the specific requirements of an ecosystem-based approach and ensuring stakeholder participation.

  6. Spectra of charmed and bottom baryons with hyperfine interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-Yang; Qi, Jing-Juan; Guo, Xin-Heng; Wei, Ke-Wei

    2017-09-01

    Up to now, the excited charmed and bottom baryon states have still not been well studied experimentally or theoretically. In this paper, we predict the mass of , the only L = 0 baryon state which has not been observed, to be 6069.2 MeV. The spectra of charmed and bottom baryons with the orbital angular momentum L = 1 are studied in two popular constituent quark models, the Goldstone boson exchange (GBE) model and the one gluon exchange (OGE) hyperfine interaction model. Inserting the latest experimental data from the “Review of Particle Physics", we find that in the GBE model, there exist some multiplets (Σc(b), and Ωc(b)) in which the total spin of the three quarks in their lowest energy states is 3/2, but in the OGE model there is no such phenomenon. This is the most important difference between the GBE and OGE models. These results can be tested in the near future. We suggest more efforts to study the excited charmed and bottom baryons both theoretically and experimentally, not only for the abundance of baryon spectra, but also for determining which hyperfine interaction model best describes nature. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175020, 11575023, U1204115)

  7. Bottom-type scattering layers and equatorial spread F

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Chau

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Jicamarca radar observations of bottom-type coherent scattering layers in the post-sunset bottomside F-region ionosphere are presented and analyzed. The morphology of the primary waves seen in radar images of the layers supports the hypothesis of kudeki+bhattacharyya-1999 that wind-driven gradient drift instabilities are operating. In one layer event when topside spread F did not occur, irregularities were distributed uniformly in space throughout the layers. In another event when topside spread F did eventually occur, the irregularities within the pre-existing bottom-type layers were horizontally clustered, with clusters separated by about 30km. The same horizontal periodicity was evident in the radar plumes and large-scale irregularities that emerged later in the event. We surmise that horizontal periodicity in bottom-type layer irregularity distribution is indicative of large-scale horizontal waves in the bottomside F-region that may serve as seed waves for large-scale Rayleigh Taylor instabilities. Key words. Ionosphere (equatorial ionosphere; ionospheric irregularties; plasma waves and instabilities

  8. Characteristics of nearshore waters in Binge Bay, Karwar

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Zingde, M.D.; Singbal, S.Y.S.

    Environmental parameters to delineate characteristics of nearshore waters were studied over one year in Binge Bay. Existence of low temperature, high saline, low dissolved oxygen and high nutrient water during August-October at the bottom...

  9. Analysis of the Causes of Cracks in the Bottom Floor of the Underground Garage of the Hefei Government Affairs Center by using 3D Finite-Element Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHU Lei

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional finite-element software program is used in this study to analyze the causes of cracks in an underground garage. Numerous cracks, serious and regular alike, can be found in the underground garage of the Hefei Government Affairs Center. These cracks are mainly located around the central part of the bottom floor within a 44.6– 57.8 m radius. To explore the causes of the cracks, two attempts are made. On one hand, on-site crack detection and underground water monitoring are conducted. On the other hand, the finite-element software program ANSYS is adopted to establish a finite-element model for the floor–foundation and connecting beam–foundation soil systems of the underground garage. Furthermore, the influences of the underground foundation, underground water level, soil expansion, and Poisson ratio on the bottom floor are calculated and analyzed. On the basis of the calculation and monitoring results, the following conclusion can be made: underground water is the main cause of the bottom floor cracks because underground water exerts a pushing force from the bottom and causes the expansibility of expansive soil. The study aims to provide a theoretical basis for the treatment of cracking in the Hefei Government Affairs Center, and offer a reference for the design, construction, and maintenance of similar projects.

  10. Promoting Sanitation Markets at the Bottom of the Pyramid in Peru : A Win-Win Scenario for Government, the Private Sector, and Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Baskovich, Malva Rosa

    2010-01-01

    Launched in 2007, the Creating Sanitation Markets (CSM) initiative is a multi stakeholder effort led by the World Bank's water and sanitation program to explore new alternatives for increasing access to quality household sanitation in Peru. The approach is premised on a market-based system for sanitation at the bottom of the pyramid, introducing a new paradigm for local sustainable develop...

  11. Role of Effective Density in improving the accuracy of bottom pressure based sea level measurements - A case study from Gulf of Guinea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; Mehra, P.; Desai, R.G.P.; Dotse, J.; Odametey, J.T.; Nkebi, E.K.; Vijaykumar, K.; Prabhudesai, S.P.

    Seasonal observations of a set of bottom pressures and concurrent tide-staff measurements from Takoradi harbour located in the Gulf of Guinea indicated that the effective depth-mean density value, rho sub(eff) of this clear water body is less than...

  12. New fired bricks based on municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taurino, R; Karamanova, E; Barbieri, L; Atanasova-Vladimirova, S; Andreola, F; Karamanov, A

    2017-10-01

    The main objective of this work was to study the sintering process and technological properties of new fired bricks based on high amount of post-treated municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash and refractory clay. In addition, the effect of the minor addition of flux (Na2CO3) or reinforce (corundum) was also highlighted. Several methods were used to study the effect of compositions variations on the sintering process, structure and the mechanical characteristics of the test briquettes. Differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA) and dilatometry techniques were applied to study the thermal behaviour while scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and high-temperature X-ray diffraction were used to elucidate the structure and the phase composition. The mechanical characteristics were estimated by micro-indentation, strength and various physical tests (porosity, linear shrinkage and water absorption, etc). The results highlight the possibility to use very high amount of municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ashes in the production of new fired bricks with good performances at all levels. It is also shown that the addition of additives managed the final properties, affecting the crystal phase formation, porosity and greatly the strength of the samples.

  13. Interaction of two rivulets on the bottom side of an inclined plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slesareva Ekaterina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow of rivulets and droplets over the bottom side of inclined hydrophobic surface was studied in this work. Interacting of two nearby draining rivulets is investigated. Distilled water was used as the working liquid. The experiments were carried out on the bottom side of a smooth plate with the width of 440 mm and length of 1400 mm. The angle of plate surface deviation from the vertical was 14°. The switching centre consisted of two nozzles with diameter of 0.8 mm. Tubes placed perpendicularly plate surfaces on distance of 10 mm from each other. The experiments were carried out at the flow rates from 0.1 to 1.0 ml/s, and flow rate supported constant. The flow patterns were recorded video with the speed of 1200 fps. It was shown at a constant liquid flow rate at the nozzle exit the direction of and shape of the rivulet depend on maldistribution of the liquid flow rate along the rivulet. It is shown, that the regime of flow rivulet can be changed by interacting with another rivulet. Change regime of flow of rivulet occurs according to the laws defining character of a current of a liquid in rivulet.

  14. Pacific deep circulation and ventilation controlled by tidal mixing away from the sea bottom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Akira; Niwa, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Vertical mixing in the ocean is a key driver of the global ocean thermohaline circulation, one of the most important factors controlling past and future climate change. Prior observational and theoretical studies have focused on intense tidal mixing near the sea bottom (near-field mixing). However, ocean general circulation models that employ a parameterization of near-field mixing significantly underestimate the strength of the Pacific thermohaline circulation. Here we demonstrate that tidally induced mixing away from the sea bottom (far-field mixing) is essential in controlling the Pacific thermohaline circulation. Via the addition of far-field mixing to a widely used tidal parameterization, we successfully simulate the Pacific thermohaline circulation. We also propose that far-field mixing is indispensable for explaining the presence of the world ocean's oldest water in the eastern North Pacific Ocean. Our findings suggest that far-field mixing controls ventilation of the deep Pacific Ocean, a process important for ocean carbon and biogeochemical cycles.

  15. Formation of cement mortar with incineration municipal solid waste bottom ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Ng Hooi; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri; Hussin, Kamarudin; Jin, Tan Soo

    2017-04-01

    Product of incineration municipal solid waste bottom ash was substitute to Portland cement in construction industry. This study investigated the changes of bottom ash in Portland cement by chemical and mineralogical testing. Various substitution of bottom ash (10%, 20%, 30%, and 40%) to Portland cement was investigated. The main purpose was to clarify the mechanisms behind the formation of the cement mortar with bottom ash particles. The result indicated that the chemical and mineralogical of the cement mortar incorporating bottom ash was not significantly changed with the substitution of 10-40% bottom ash. However, the use of bottom ash minimizes the main composition of cement mortar. Overall, it was found that there is significant potential to increase the utilization of bottom ash.

  16. Spatial and temporal variations of trace metals in bottom sediments of Peter the Great Bay, the Sea of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkalin, A V; Presley, B J; Boothe, P N

    1996-01-01

    New data on trace metal distribution in bottom sediments of Peter the Great Bay (the Sea of Japan) are presented. Much higher concentrations were detected near the most likely anthropogenic sources of trace metal inputs (waste water discharges from Vladivostok and Nakhodka, and the Vladivostok coastal landfill). Sediments in these contaminated areas were up to 700 ppm in Zn, 530 ppm in Pb, 7 ppm in Cd and 3 ppm in Hg. River runoff is of minor importance as a metal source in the investigated areas. The spatial distribution of trace metals outside the areas directly influenced by sewage discharges is regulated by natural processes such as sediment sorting by grain size. Based on radiometric dating of sediment cores, increases in the trace metal content of bottom sediments near Vladivostok begun in approximately 1945.

  17. Experimental study of properties of heavy concrete with bottom ash from power stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondar Victor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the influence of cement quantity, plasticizing additives and compaction time on the strength and water consumption of concrete during its manufacturing using bottom ash from a thermal power station. The study was carried out using three factorial experiments. Variables varied on three levels. The obtained pattern functions characterize a relationship between strength, water consumption and variable factors. These factors include cement quantity, plasticize additives and compaction time. Compilation of Pareto effect charts allowed estimation of the significance of function indexes. Analysis of surface pattern function has revealed the optimal correlation between additive quantity and compaction time, cement quantity and additive quantity, cement quantity and compaction time. Compression strength of concrete was taken as the pattern in the pattern function. When analyzing the pattern function with water consumption as a pattern, optimal correlations between additive quantity and compaction time, cement quantity and additive quantity, cement quantity and compaction time were revealed. Application of STATISTICA 12 software has specified values of factors when the maximum strength is achieved. Correlations of components which have an impact on water consumption have been determined. The conclusions contain the quantitative findings of the study.

  18. Investigation of nonlinear 2D bottom transportation dynamics in coastal zone on optimal curvilinear boundary adaptive grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhinov Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the practically important tasks of hydrophysics for sea coastal systems is the problem of modeling and forecasting bottom sediment transportation. A number of problems connected to ship safety traffic, water medium condition near the coastal line etc. depends on forecasting bottom deposit transportation under natural and technogenic influences. Coastal systems are characterized by a complicated form of coastline - the presence of long, narrow and curvilinear peninsulas and bays. Water currents and waves near the beach are strongly depend on complicated coastal line and in turn, exert on the bottom sediment transportation near the shore. The use of rectangular grids in the construction of discrete models leads to significant errors in both the specification of boundary conditions and in the modeling of hydrophysical processes in the coastal zone. In this paper, we consider the construction of a finite-element approximation of the initial-boundary value problem for the spatially two-dimensional linearized equation of sediment transportation using optimal boundary-adaptive grid. First, the linearization of a spatially two-dimensional nonlinear parabolic equation on the time grid is performed-when the coefficients of the equation that are nonlinearly dependent on the bottom relief function are set on the previous time layer, and the corresponding initial conditions are used on the first time layer. The algorithm for constructing the grid is based on the procedure for minimizing the generalized Dirichlet functional. On the constructed grid, finite element approximation using bilinear basis functions is performed, which completes the construction of a discrete model for the given problem. The using of curvilinear boundary adaptive grids leads to decreasing of total grid number in 5-20 times and respectively the total modeling time and/or it allows to improve modeling accuracy.

  19. Monitoring of test roads with MSWI bottom ash in the sub-base. Measurements with falling weight deflectometer on test structures in Malmoe and Umeaa. Analyses of ground water and leachate along test structures in Umeaa; Uppfoeljning av slaggrusprovvaegar. Fallviktsmaetning paa provstraeckor paa Toerringevaegen i Malmoe och Daavamyran i Umeaa. Grundvatten- och lakvattenanalyser paa provstraeckor vid Daavamyran i Umeaa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arm, Maria; Larsson, Lennart; Tiberg, Charlotta; Lind, Bo; Arvidslund, Ola

    2008-12-15

    A number of test roads and test areas with processed municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash, here called MSWI gravel, have been built in Sweden during the last 10-15 years. The main purpose of the projects reported here was to take advantage of the existing test roads to increase the knowledge of the long-term strength and environmental impact of MSWI gravel, when it is used as a road material. Two test roads with MSWI gravel in the sub-base were monitored through falling weight deflectometer (FWD) measurements and, for one of the roads, by means of sampling and analyses of groundwater and leachate within and along the road. The first road, constructed in 1998, is named Toerringevaegen and is situated outside Malmoe in the south of Sweden. The second road, Daava test road, was constructed in 2001 and is situated outside Umeaa in the north of Sweden. The roads were monitored regarding strength from 2004 to 2008 and Daava test road was also monitored regarding environmental impact from 2006 to 2008. For both roads, comparison was made over time and between the test sections with MSWI gravel and reference sections with crushed rock. Comparison was also made with results from previous studies on these test roads, resulting in a uniquely long monitoring period. The results from Toerringevaegen show that the road section with MSWI gravel in the sub-base retains its strength after several years. The three measurements performed at the Daava road revealed an initially decreasing strength and then a stabilisation. As in previous studies, the strength of the MSWI gravel was found to be about 70% of that of the crushed rock, which has to be taken into account in the design phase. It was concluded that regarding the strength properties MSWI gravel is suitable as sub-base material if the road is properly designed. It can also be used as a filling material, in embankments and as a capping layer. This confirms the conclusions from previous studies. The results from the

  20. 77 FR 17410 - Bottom Mount Combination Refrigerator-Freezers From the Republic of Korea: Final Affirmative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-26

    ... combination refrigerator-freezers, namely: (1) Any assembled cabinets designed for use in bottom mount... external doors designed for use in bottom mount combination refrigerator-freezers that incorporate, at a... assembled external drawers designed for use in bottom mount combination refrigerator-freezers that...

  1. 76 FR 55044 - Bottom Mount Combination Refrigerator-Freezers From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Negative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-06

    ..., namely: (1) Any assembled cabinets designed for use in bottom mount combination refrigerator-freezers... designed for use in bottom mount combination refrigerator-freezers that incorporate, at a minimum: (a) an... International Trade Administration Bottom Mount Combination Refrigerator-Freezers From the Republic of Korea...

  2. 76 FR 23298 - Bottom Mount Combination Refrigerator-Freezers From the Republic of Korea: Initiation of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-26

    ... in bottom mount combination refrigerator-freezers, namely: (1) Any assembled cabinets designed for...; (2) any assembled external doors designed for use in bottom mount combination refrigerator-freezers... International Trade Administration Bottom Mount Combination Refrigerator-Freezers From the Republic of Korea...

  3. Balancing Priorities and Measuring Success: A Triple Bottom Line Framework for International School Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, James

    2009-01-01

    Drawing upon a multiple bottom line concept, which was originally developed for the business world, this article proposes a triple bottom line framework for analyzing and assessing the performance of international schools. The author contends that international schools can be broken down into three bottom lines: one "financial," one "academic" and…

  4. 40 CFR 63.170 - Standards: Surge control vessels and bottoms receivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards: Surge control vessels and... Standards: Surge control vessels and bottoms receivers. Each surge control vessel or bottoms receiver that... surge control vessel or bottoms receiver back to the process or to a control device that complies with...

  5. Plasmonic nanoparticles for a bottom-up approach to fabricate optical metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dintinger, José; Scharf, Toralf

    2012-03-01

    We investigate experimentally metallic nanoparticle composites fabricated by bottom-up techniques as potential candidates for optical metamaterials. Depending on the plasmonic resonances sustained by individual NPs and their nanoscale organization into larger meta-atoms, various properties might emerge. Here, the focus of our contribution is on the fabrication and optical characterization of silver NP clusters with a spherical shape. We start with the characterisation of the "bulk" dielectric constants of silver NP inks by spectroscopic ellipsometry for different nanoparticle densities (i.e from strongly diluted dispersions to solid randomly packed films). The inks are then used to prepare spherical nanoparticle clusters by an oil-in water emulsion technique. The study of their optical properties demonstrates their ability to support Mie resonances in the visible. These resonances are associated with the excitation of a magnetic dipole, which constitutes a prerequisite to the realization of metamaterials with negative permeability.

  6. Bottom-up Synthesis of Porous NiMo Alloy for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailong Hu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bottom-up synthesis of porous NiMo alloy reduced by NiMoO4 nanofibers was systematically investigated to fabricate non-noble metal porous electrodes for hydrogen production. The different annealing temperatures of NiMoO4 nanofibers under hydrogen atmosphere reveal that the 950 °C annealing temperature is key for producing bicontinuous porous NiMo alloy without oxide phases. The porous NiMo alloy acts as a cathode in electrical water splitting, which demonstrates not only almost identical catalytic activity with commercial Pt/C in 1.0 M KOH solution, but also superb stability for 12 days at an electrode potential of −200 mV vs. reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE.

  7. Air bottoming cycle, an alternative to combined cycles. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaikko, J. [Royal Inst. of Techn., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Energy Technology

    2001-10-01

    In this work, the idea of Air Bottoming Cycle (ABC) has been studied. The objectives for the work have been to establish an understanding of the concept for power and heat generation as well as to find - if possible - feasible concepts for future use in the Swedish energy system. Combined cycle in power generation is an established technology. In the conventional combined cycle, a gas turbine works as a topping cycle together with the steam (Rankine) bottoming cycle. In the ABC the steam bottoming cycle is replaced with a gas turbine (Brayton) bottoming cycle having air as a working fluid. The two gas turbines are thermally connected over a gas-to-gas heat exchanger. This concept promises savings in weight and cost, as well as operating benefits, compared to the Rankine bottoming technology. The ABC has been modelled using a heat balance program, and a parametric study for the concept optimisation as well as for off-design analysis has been performed. Performance of the ABC has been compared to other, established technologies. A preliminary economic evaluation has been made. As a result of the study, it is clarified that the Rankine bottoming cycle with steam remains superior to the ABC as regards electrical efficiency in the medium and large power scale. For small-scale applications (<10 MW{sub e}) where the thermodynamic advantage of the Rankine cycle is not dominating any longer and its economy is burdened by the heavy investment structure, the ABC becomes the better alternative for energy utilisation. A preliminary economic evaluation shows that (at energy prices autumn 2000) the ABC is at the same level as the comparable small-scale cogeneration installations. Due to high power-to-heat ratio however, higher electricity prices will favour the ABC. One interesting feature of the ABC is that about 50% of the dissipated low-value heat from the cycle is carried by clean (sterile) air at the temperature around 200 deg C. This air can be utilised for space heating or

  8. Air bottoming cycle, an alternative to combined cycles. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaikko, J. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Energy Technology

    2002-02-01

    In this work, the idea of Air Bottoming Cycle (ABC) has been studied. The objectives for the work have been to establish an understanding of the concept for power and heat generation as well as to find - if possible - feasible concepts for future use in the Swedish energy system. Combined cycle in power generation is an established technology. In the conventional combined cycle, a gas turbine works as a topping cycle together with the steam (Rankine) bottoming cycle. In the ABC the steam bottoming cycle is replaced with a gas turbine (Brayton) bottoming cycle having air as a working fluid. The two gas turbines are thermally connected over a gas-to-gas heat exchanger. This concept promises savings in weight and cost, as well as operating benefits, compared to the Rankine bottoming technology. The ABC has been modelled using a heat balance program, and a parametric study for the concept optimisation as well as for off-design analysis has been performed. Performance of the ABC has been compared to other, established technologies. A preliminary economic evaluation has been made. As a result of the study, it is clarified that the Rankine bottoming cycle with steam remains superior to the ABC as regards electrical efficiency in the medium and large power scale. For small-scale applications (<10 MW{sub e}) where the thermodynamic advantage of the Rankine cycle is not dominating any longer and its economy is burdened by the heavy investment structure, the ABC becomes the better alternative for energy utilisation. A preliminary economic evaluation shows that (at energy prices autumn 2000) the ABC is at the same level as the comparable small-scale cogeneration installations. Due to high power-to-heat ratio however, higher electricity prices will favour the ABC. One interesting feature of the ABC is that about 50% of the dissipated low-value heat from the cycle is carried by clean (sterile) air at the temperature around 200 deg C. This air can be utilised for space heating or

  9. Ecology of Caribbean sponges: are top-down or bottom-up processes more important?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Lesser

    Full Text Available Benthic-pelagic coupling and the role of bottom-up versus top-down processes are recognized as having a major impact on the structure of marine communities. While the roles of bottom-up processes are better appreciated they are still viewed as principally affecting the outcome of top-down processes. Sponges on coral reefs are important members of the benthic community and provide a critically important functional linkage between water-column productivity and the benthos. As active suspension feeders sponges utilize the abundant autotrophic and heterotrophic picoplankton in the water column. As a result sponges across the Caribbean basin exhibit a consistent and significant pattern of greater biomass, tube extension rate, and species numbers with increasing depth. Likewise, the abundance of their food supply also increases along a depth gradient. Using experimental manipulations it has recently been reported that predation is the primary determinant of sponge community structure. Here we provide data showing that the size and growth of the sponge Callyspongia vaginalis are significantly affected by food availability. Sponges increased in size and tube extension rate with increasing depth down to 46 m, while simultaneously exposed to the full range of potential spongivores at all depths. Additionally, we point out important flaws in the experimental design used to demonstrate the role of predation and suggest that a resolution of this important question will require well-controlled, multi-factorial experiments to examine the independent and interactive effects of predation and food abundance on the ecology of sponges.

  10. Higgs Searches with Bottom Quarks and Invisible Particles

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2077110

    An essential search to answer the question of whether the newly discovered boson of mass 125 GeV at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the standard model Higgs boson ($H$) is the search for decay of the boson into a pair of bottom quarks ($b {\\overline{b}}$), as this is theoretically the dominant decay channel of a low-mass Higgs boson. For best signal-to-background sensitivity, the associated production of the Higgs boson with a vector boson ($V$ = $W$ or $Z$) is used. The search is carried out in six channels based on the decay of the vector boson: $W(\\mu\

  11. Top down, bottom up structured programming and program structuring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, M.; Zeldin, S.

    1972-01-01

    New design and programming techniques for shuttle software. Based on previous Apollo experience, recommendations are made to apply top-down structured programming techniques to shuttle software. New software verification techniques for large software systems are recommended. HAL, the higher order language selected for the shuttle flight code, is discussed and found to be adequate for implementing these techniques. Recommendations are made to apply the workable combination of top-down, bottom-up methods in the management of shuttle software. Program structuring is discussed relevant to both programming and management techniques.

  12. English L2 reading getting to the bottom

    CERN Document Server

    Birch, Barbara M

    2014-01-01

    English L2 Reading, Third Edition offers teachers research-based insights into bottom-up skills in reading English as a second language and a solid foundation on which to build reading instruction. Core linguistic and psycholinguistic concepts are presented within the context of their application to teaching. The goal is to balance or supplement (not replace) top-down approaches and methodologies with effective low-level options for teaching English reading. The text's pedagogical features- Questions, Study Guide Questions. Discussion Questions, Spotlight on Teaching sections- engage readers o

  13. Bottom-up effects on attention capture and choice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peschel, Anne; Orquin, Jacob Lund; Mueller Loose, Simone

    of different product categories. Surface size and visual saliency of a product label were manipulated to determine bottom-up effects on attention and choice. Results show a strong and significant increase in attention in terms of fixation likelihood towards product labels which are larger and more visually...... the information available to form a decision. Does changing one visual cue in the stimulus set affect attention towards this cue and what does that mean for the choice outcome? To address this, we conducted a combined eye tracking and choice experiment in a consumer choice setting with visual shelf simulations...

  14. Community N and O isotope fractionation by sulfide-dependent denitrification and anammox in a stratified lacustrine water column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenk, Christine B.; Zopfi, Jakob; Blees, Jan; Veronesi, Mauro; Niemann, Helge; Lehmann, Moritz F.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the community nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O) isotope effects of fixed N loss in the northern basin of Lake Lugano, where sulfide-dependent denitrification and anammox are the main drivers of suboxic N2 production. A decrease in nitrate (NO3-) concentration toward the redox transition zone (RTZ) at mid-water depth was paralleled by an increase in δ15N and δ18O from approximately 5‰ to >20‰ and from 0‰ to >10‰, respectively. Ammonium (NH4+) concentrations were highest in the near-bottom water and decreased toward the RTZ concomitant with an increase in δ15N-NH4+ from ∼7‰ to >15‰. A diffusion-reaction model yielded N and O isotope enrichment factors that are significantly smaller than isotope effects reported previously for microbial NO3- reduction and NH4+ oxidation (15εNO3 ≈ 10‰, 18εNO3 ≈ 7‰, and 15εNH4 ≈ 10-12‰). For the Lake Lugano north basin, we constrain the apparent under-expression of the N isotope effects to: (1) environmental conditions (e.g., substrate limitation, low cell specific N transformation rates), or (2) low process-specific (chemolithotrophic denitrification and anammox) isotope fractionation. Our results have confirmed the robust nature of the co-linearity between N and O isotope enrichment during microbial denitrification beyond its organotrophic mode. However, the ratio of 18O to 15N enrichment (18εNO3:15εNO3) associated with NO3- reduction in the RTZ was ∼0.89, which is lower than observed in marine environments and in most culture experiments. We propose that chemolithotrophic NO3- reduction in the Lake Lugano north basin was partly catalyzed by the periplasmic dissimilatory nitrate reductase (Nap) (rather than the membrane-bound dissimilatory Nar), which is known to express comparably low 18εNO3:15εNO3 ratios in the ambient NO3- pool. However, NO2- re-oxidation, e.g., during anammox or microaerobic nitrification, could have contributed to the lowered 18O to 15N enrichment ratios. Although

  15. Trophic cascades of bottom-up and top-down forcing on nutrients and plankton in the Kattegat, evaluated by modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marcell Elo; Maar, Marie; Larsen, Janus

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the relative importance of bottom-up and top-down forcing on trophic cascades in the pelagic food-web and the implications for water quality indicators (summer phytoplankton biomass and winter nutrients) in relation to management. The 3D ecological model...... ERGOM was validated and applied in a local set-up of the Kattegat, Denmark, using the off-line Flexsem framework. The model scenarios were conducted by changing the forcing by ±20% of nutrient inputs (bottom-up) and mesozooplankton mortality (top-down), and both types of forcing combined. The model...... results showed that cascading effects operated differently depending on the forcing type. In the single-forcing bottom-up scenarios, the cascade directions were in the same direction as the forcing. For scenarios involving top-down, there was a skipped-level-transmission in the trophic responses...

  16. Search for scalar top and scalar bottom quarks at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Elfgren, E.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hauschildt, J.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Horvath, D.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kramer, T.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Krop, D.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Rick, H.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vachon, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2002-01-01

    Searches for a scalar top quark and a scalar bottom quark have been performed using a data sample of 438 pb-1 at centre-of-mass energies of sqrt(s) = 192 - 209 GeV collected with the OPAL detector at LEP. No evidence for a signal was found. The 95% confidence level lower limit on the scalar top quark mass is 97.6 GeV if the mixing angle between the supersymmetric partners of the left- and right-handed states of the top quark is zero. When the scalar top quark decouples from the Z0 boson, the lower limit is 95.7 GeV. These limits were obtained assuming that the scalar top quark decays into a charm quark and the lightest neutralino, and that the mass difference between the scalar top quark and the lightest neutralino is larger than 10 GeV. The complementary decay mode of the scalar top quark decaying into a bottom quark, a charged lepton and a scalar neutrino has also been studied. The lower limit on the scalar top quark mass is 93.0 GeV for this decay mode, if the mass difference between the scalar top quark a...

  17. Precise Comparisons of Bottom-Pressure and Altimetric Ocean Tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    A new set of pelagic tide determinations is constructed from seafloor pressure measurements obtained at 151 sites in the deep ocean. To maximize precision of estimated tides, only stations with long time series are used; median time series length is 567 days. Geographical coverage is considerably improved by use of the international tsunami network, but coverage in the Indian Ocean and South Pacific is still weak. As a tool for assessing global ocean tide models, the data set is considerably more reliable than older data sets : the root-mean-square difference with a recent altimetric tide model is approximately 5 mm for the M2 constituent. Precision is sufficiently high to allow secondary effects in altimetric and bottom-pressure tide differences to be studied. The atmospheric tide in bottom pressure is clearly detected at the S1, S2, and T2 frequencies. The altimetric tide model is improved if satellite altimetry is corrected for crustal loading by the atmospheric tide. Models of the solid body tide can also be constrained. The free corenutation effect in the K1 Love number is easily detected, but the overall estimates are not as accurate as a recent determination with very long baseline interferometry.

  18. ICT-ENABLED BOTTOM-UP ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burak Pak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at discussing the potentials of bottom-up design practices in relation to the latest developments in Information and Communication Technologies (ICT by making an in-depth review of inaugural cases. The first part of the study involves a literature study and the elaboration of basic strategies from the case study. The second part reframes the existing ICT tools and strategies and elaborates on their potentials to support the modes of participation performed in these cases. As a result, by distilling the created knowledge, the study reveals the potentials of novel modes of ICT-enabled design participation which exploit a set of collective action tools to support sustainable ways of self-organization and bottom-up design. The final part explains the relevance of these with solid examples and presents a hypothetical case for future implementation. The paper concludes with a brief reflection on the implications of the findings for the future of architectural design education.

  19. Close-range sensors for small unmanned bottom vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Charles L.

    1999-07-01

    The Surf Zone Reconnaissance Project is developing sensor for small, autonomous, Underwater Bottom-crawling Vehicles (UBVs) for detection and classification of images and obstacles on the ocean bottom in depths between 0 and 20 feet. The challenge is to exploit many target features by using a suite of small, inexpensive, and low-power sensors. The goal is to enable the UBVs to detect and classify objects on the sea floor autonomously. A unique aspect of the project is that sensing can occur at very short ranges. The goal for detection range is two to four meters, and classification may involve direct contact between the sensor and the target. The techniques under development include mechanical impulse response, surface profiling, magnetic anomaly sensing, pulse-induction sensing, shape tracing, and imaging. Initial studies have confirmed the usefulness of several of these techniques. Specific behaviors, termed microbehaviors, are being developed to support each sensor by exploiting the vehicle's mobility. Project plans for FY99 and FY00 include construction of a prototype sensor suite and collection of a signature database. The database will be used to develop fusion, detection, and classification algorithms that will be demonstrated over the next four years for the Office of Naval Research.

  20. Close-range sensors for small unmanned bottom vehicles: update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Charles L.

    2000-07-01

    The Surf Zone Reconnaissance Project is developing sensors for small, autonomous, Underwater Bottom-crawling Vehicles. The objective is to enable small, crawling robots to autonomously detect and classify mines and obstacles on the ocean bottom in depths between 0 and 10 feet. We have identified a promising set of techniques that will exploit the electromagnetic, shape, texture, image, and vibratory- modal features of this images. During FY99 and FY00 we have worked toward refining these techniques. Signature data sets have been collected for a standard target set to facilitate the development of sensor fusion and target detection and classification algorithms. Specific behaviors, termed microbehaviors, are developed to utilize the robot's mobility to position and operate the sensors. A first generation, close-range sensor suite, composed of 5 sensors, will be completed and tested on a crawling platform in FY00, and will be further refined and demonstrated in FY01 as part of the Mine Countermeasures 6.3 core program sponsored by the Office of Naval Research.

  1. Hunting for exotic doubly hidden-charm/bottom tetraquark states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We develop a moment QCD sum rule method augmented by fundamental inequalities to study the existence of exotic doubly hidden-charm/bottom tetraquark states made of four heavy quarks. Using the compact diquark–antidiquark configuration, we calculate the mass spectra of these tetraquark states. There are 18 hidden-charm ccc¯c¯ tetraquark currents with JPC=0++, 0−+, 0−−, 1++, 1+−, 1−+, 1−−, and 2++. We use them to perform QCD sum rule analyses, and the obtained masses are all higher than the spontaneous dissociation thresholds of two charmonium mesons, which are thus their dominant decay modes. The masses of the corresponding hidden-bottom bbb¯b¯ tetraquarks are all below or very close to the thresholds of the ϒ(1Sϒ(1S and ηb(1Sηb(1S, except one current of JPC=0++. Hence, we suggest to search for the doubly hidden-charm states in the J/ψJ/ψ and ηc(1Sηc(1S channels.

  2. Evidence for acoustic communication among bottom foraging humpback whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Susan E; Cusano, Dana A; Stimpert, Alison K; Weinrich, Mason T; Friedlaender, Ari S; Wiley, David N

    2014-12-16

    Humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae), a mysticete with a cosmopolitan distribution, demonstrate marked behavioural plasticity. Recent studies show evidence of social learning in the transmission of specific population level traits ranging from complex singing to stereotyped prey capturing behaviour. Humpback whales have been observed to employ group foraging techniques, however details on how individuals coordinate behaviour in these groups is challenging to obtain. This study investigates the role of a novel broadband patterned pulsed sound produced by humpback whales engaged in bottom-feeding behaviours, referred to here as a 'paired burst' sound. Data collected from 56 archival acoustic tag deployments were investigated to determine the functional significance of these signals. Paired burst sound production was associated exclusively with bottom feeding under low-light conditions, predominantly with evidence of associated conspecifics nearby suggesting that the sound likely serves either as a communicative signal to conspecifics, a signal to affect prey behaviour, or possibly both. This study provides additional evidence for individual variation and phenotypic plasticity of foraging behaviours in humpback whales and provides important evidence for the use of acoustic signals among foraging individuals in this species.

  3. Thermal remote sensing of estuarine spatial dynamics: Effects of bottom-generated vertical mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmorino, G. O.; Smith, G. B.

    2008-07-01

    In a recent paper, Hedger, R.D., Malthus, T.J., Folkard, A.M., Atkinson, P.M. [2007. Spatial dynamics of estuarine water surface temperature from airborne remote sensing. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science 71, 608-615] demonstrate that airborne thermal remote sensing shows great potential for monitoring estuarine dynamics and surface currents. One aspect needing further attention is the impact of bottom-generated vertical mixing as this can create both stationary thermal features as well as thermal patterns that advect with the flow. This dual effect is illustrated using airborne infrared imagery of a mixing front having an embedded pattern of thermal boils. The boils are several meters in diameter (in water less than 4 m deep) and are ˜0.2 °C cooler than the ambient water surface. Time sequential imagery that captures the movement of individual boils as well as their growth rate can be used to deduce both the near-surface current and the intensity of turbulent mixing.

  4. Ultrasonic oil recovery and salt removal from refinery tank bottom sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guangji; Li, Jianbing; Thring, Ronald W; Arocena, Joselito

    2014-01-01

    The oil recovery and salt removal effects of ultrasonic irradiation on oil refinery tank bottom sludge were investigated, together with those of direct heating. Ultrasonic power, treatment duration, sludge-to-water ratio, and initial sludge-water slurry temperature were examined for their impacts on sludge treatment. It was found that the increased initial slurry temperature could enhance the ultrasonic irradiation performance, especially at lower ultrasonic power level (i.e., 21 W), but the application of higher-power ultrasound could rapidly increase the bulk temperature of slurry. Ultrasonic irradiation had a better oil recovery and salt removal performance than direct heating treatment. More than 60% of PHCs in the sludge was recovered at an ultrasonic power of 75 W, a treatment duration of 6 min, an initial slurry temperature of 25°C, and a sludge-to-water ratio of 1:4, while salt content in the recovered oil was reduced to refinery feedstock oil. In general, ultrasonic irradiation could be an effective method in terms of oil recovery and salt removal from refinery oily sludge, but the separated wastewater still contains relatively high concentrations of PHCs and salt which requires proper treatment.

  5. Ecological and Economic Prerequisites for the Extraction of Solid Minerals from the Bottom of the Arctic Seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myaskov Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The world ocean has huge reserves of minerals that are contained directly in the water, as well as on the surface of its bottom and in its subsoils. The deposits of solid minerals on the surface of the bottom of the World Ocean are considered the most promising for industrial extraction. The deposits of ferromanganese nodules, cobalt-manganese crusts and polymetallic sulphides are considered as an object of extracting more often than others. There are the largest deposits of ferromanganese nodules in the central and southern parts of the Pacific Ocean, in the central part of the Indian Ocean, and in the seas of the Arctic Ocean near Russia. The deposits of ferromanganese nodules are a serious alternative to deposits of manganese ore on land. However, there are many factors influencing the efficiency of the development of ferromanganese deposits, the most significant are: the content of the useful component in the ore, the depth of the bottom and the distance from the seaports. It is also necessary to take into account the possible environmental consequences of underwater mining.

  6. Axisymmetric flow in a cylindrical tank over a rotating bottom. Part I. Analysis of boundary layers and vertical circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iga, Keita

    2017-12-01

    Axisymmetric flow in a cylindrical tank over a rotating bottom is investigated and its approximate solution with an analytic expression is obtained. The interior region, comprising the majority of the fluid, consists of two sub-regions. It is easily shown that a rigid-body rotational flow with the same rotation rate as that of the bottom is formed in the inner interior and that a potential flow with constant angular momentum occurs in the outer interior sub-region. However, the radius that divides these two sub-regions has not been determined. To determine this radius, the structures of the boundary layers are investigated in detail. These boundary layers surround the interior regions, and include the boundaries between the interior region and the side wall of the tank, between the interior and the bottom, and between the inner and outer interior sub-regions. By connecting the flows in the boundary layers, the vertical circulation as a whole is established, and consequently the radius dividing the two interior sub-regions is successfully determined as a function of the aspect ratio of the water layer region. This axisymmetric flow will be utilized as the basic state for investigating theoretically various non-axisymmetric phenomena observed in laboratory experiments.

  7. Sea bottom gravity survey of Osaka bay and its study; Osakawan kaitei juryoku chosa to sono kosatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komazawa, M. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan); Ota, Y.; Shibuya, S.; Kumai, M.; Murakami, M. [Japex Geoscience Institute, Inc., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    This paper reports a sea bottom gravity survey conducted with an objective to identify deep underground structure in the vicinity of the epicenter of the Hyogoken-Nanbu Earthquake. The surveyed areas are the whole Osaka Bay area north of the north latitude of 34 degrees and 20 minutes, and the eastern part of the Sea of Harima east of the east longitude of 134 degrees and 40 minutes, excluding the areas difficult of performing measurements. A square lattice with sides each about 2 km was arranged with 408 measurement points. The measurement was carried out by using an observation vessel mounted with a sea bottom gravimeter made by LaCoste and Romberg Corporation, which was lowered down to the sea bottom at the measurement points. Errors in positions and water depths at the gravity measuring points were suppressed to less than 0.002 minutes and 0.1 m, respectively. The measurement data were given necessary corrections by using a unified method applicable also to land areas, and a Bouguer anomaly chart was prepared. Based on the chart, this paper summarizes features in the Bouguer anomaly in the surveyed areas (such as the low-gravity anomaly band extending the central part of the Osaka bay from north-east to south-west, and the gradient structure existing on the Awaji island side). 6 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Ecological and Economic Prerequisites for the Extraction of Solid Minerals from the Bottom of the Arctic Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myaskov, Alexander; Gonchar, Alexander

    2017-11-01

    The world ocean has huge reserves of minerals that are contained directly in the water, as well as on the surface of its bottom and in its subsoils. The deposits of solid minerals on the surface of the bottom of the World Ocean are considered the most promising for industrial extraction. The deposits of ferromanganese nodules, cobalt-manganese crusts and polymetallic sulphides are considered as an object of extracting more often than others. There are the largest deposits of ferromanganese nodules in the central and southern parts of the Pacific Ocean, in the central part of the Indian Ocean, and in the seas of the Arctic Ocean near Russia. The deposits of ferromanganese nodules are a serious alternative to deposits of manganese ore on land. However, there are many factors influencing the efficiency of the development of ferromanganese deposits, the most significant are: the content of the useful component in the ore, the depth of the bottom and the distance from the seaports. It is also necessary to take into account the possible environmental consequences of underwater mining.

  9. Ocean Bottom Deformation Due To Present-Day Mass Redistribution and Its Impact on Sea Level Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederikse, Thomas; Riva, Riccardo E. M.; King, Matt A.

    2017-12-01

    Present-day mass redistribution increases the total ocean mass and, on average, causes the ocean bottom to subside elastically. Therefore, barystatic sea level rise is larger than the resulting global mean geocentric sea level rise, observed by satellite altimetry and GPS-corrected tide gauges. We use realistic estimates of mass redistribution from ice mass loss and land water storage to quantify the resulting ocean bottom deformation and its effect on global and regional ocean volume change estimates. Over 1993-2014, the resulting globally averaged geocentric sea level change is 8% smaller than the barystatic contribution. Over the altimetry domain, the difference is about 5%, and due to this effect, barystatic sea level rise will be underestimated by more than 0.1 mm/yr over 1993-2014. Regional differences are often larger: up to 1 mm/yr over the Arctic Ocean and 0.4 mm/yr in the South Pacific. Ocean bottom deformation should be considered when regional sea level changes are observed in a geocentric reference frame.

  10. Bottom shear stress and salinity distribution in a windy Mediterranean lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseenko, Elena; Roux, Bernard; Kuznetsov, Konstantin

    2017-04-01

    This work concerns the wind influence on bottom shear stress and salinity levels in a Mediterranean semi-enclosed coastal lagoon (Etang de Berre), with respect to a replanting program of Zostera noltii. The MARS3D numerical model is used to analyze the 3D current, salinity and temperature distribution induced by three meteorological, oceanic and anthropogenic forcings in this lagoon. The numerical model has been carefully validated by comparison with daily observations of the vertical salinity and temperature profiles at three mooring stations, for one year. Then, two modelling scenarios are considered. The first scenario (scen.#1), starting with an homogeneous salinity of S=20 PSU and without wind forcing, studies a stratification process under the influence of a periodic seawater inflow and a strong freshwater inflow from an hydropower plant (250 m3/s). Then, in the second scenario (scen.#2), we study how a strong wind of 80 km/h can mix the haline stratification obtained at the end of scen.#1. The most interesting results concern four nearshore replanting areas ; two are situated on the eastern side of EB and two on the western side. The results of scen.#2 show that all these areas are subject to a downwind coastal jet. Concerning bottom salinity, the destratification process is very beneficial; it always remains greater than 12 PSU for a N-NW wind of 80 km/h and a hydropower runoff of 250 m3/s. Special attention is devoted to the bottom shear stress (BSS) for different values of the bottom roughness parameter (for gravels, sands and silts), and to the bottom salinity. BSS presents a maximum near the shoreline and decreases along transects perpendicular to the shoreline. There exists a zone, parallel to the shoreline, where BSS presents a minimum (close to zero). When comparing the BSS value at the four replanting areas with the critical value, BSScr, at which the sediment mobility would occur, we see that for the smaller roughness values (ranging from z0=3.5 e

  11. ASSESSMENT OF THE CHEMICAL POLLUTION OF THE SOIL, GROUND AND BOTTOM SEDIMENTS AT KLEN GOLD AND SILVER DEPOSIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryukhan' Fedor Fedorovich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Currently, prospecting and design-related works are performed prior to the upcoming launch of mining operations at Klen gold and silver deposit in Chukot Autonomous District. The anthropogenic impact of the geological exploration in this intact territory has been produced since 1984. A considerable amount of borehole drilling, prospecting, road building, and temporary housing development has been performed. The engineering research, including ecological surveys, has been completed to assess the ecological impact of upcoming exploratory and mining operations at the deposit. Assessment of the geochemical condition of the landscape constituents, including the soil, ground and bottom sediments is of special importance in terms of their engineering protection and rational management of the natural environment. The above assessments were based on the field sampling made by «Sibgeoconsulting», CJSC (Krasnoyarsk and the laboratory research made by accredited laboratories of Federal State Unitary Geological Enterprise «Urangeolograzvedka» (Irkutsk and «Krasnoyarskgeologiya» (Krasnoyarsk. The analysis of the chemical pollution of soils, ground and bottom sediments is based on the examination of 30 samples. Peculiarities of the chemical composition of samples extracted at the deposit were identified. It has been discovered that pH values of the soil vary from 5.1 to 7.3. The concentration of metal in bottom sediments exceeds its concentration in the soil by far. Almost all irregular features of the sample water in the whole territory of the deposit are caused by the anthropogenic impact. In general, the metal content in soils, ground and bottom sediments within the territory of the deposit is slightly different from the regular clarke.

  12. Oceanic density fronts steering bottom-current induced sedimentation deduced from a 50 ka contourite-drift record and numerical modeling (off NW Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanebuth, Till J. J.; Zhang, Wenyan; Hofmann, Antonia L.; Löwemark, Ludvig A.; Schwenk, Tilmann

    2015-03-01

    How the various bottom-near hydrographic and sedimentary processes control the formation of contourite drifts, i.e. of bottom-current related confined deep-sea depocenters, usually remains widely speculative. This study uses a transect of six sediment cores and a sediment echosounder profile across a whole contourite system off NW Spain to address the sediment dynamics responsible for the depositional pattern. This "mounded patch"-type contourite drift (18 km long, 20 km wide) with a 150-m deep channel (moat) has formed around an 800-m high structural obstacle. Deposition on the contourite drift in the past was characterized by alternating calm and high-energy bottom-flow conditions. Calm conditions (Last Glacial period: 27-17 cal ka BP; late Holocene times: water masses (Labrador Sea Water, Mediterranean Outflow Water) provide a powerful mechanism for contouritic deposition, rather than the core of a water mass itself. These gravity-driven density fronts lead to local re-suspension of sands stored inside the drift's moat and to subsequent upward transport towards the drift's crest. Here, the oceanic density fronts produce additional km-scale eddies. These migrating eddies provide an efficient mechanism for further widespread sediment re-distribution. In comparison with paleoceanographic reconstructions, a downward migration or expansion of the Mediterranean Outflow Water by about 300 m led most probably to such temporary contouritic sand deposition. We finally propose a conceptual model to explain how seafloor obstacles redirect and perturbate bottom currents. This model proposes not only a sharp contact between two water masses but also the transition zone between those as an important high-energy regime, offering oceanic density fronts a travel medium. These fronts are strong enough to distribute fine sands across highly pronounced seabed topography. On the respective time scale, the moat itself seems to act as the main source for those sands, making a remote

  13. Monitoring of metals in Tilapia nilotica tissues, bottom sediments ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EKEANYANWU RC

    waters and some are essential to living organisms, yet they may become highly toxic when present in high ... Water is essential to all living organisms and in all aspects of human life. Unfortunately, the availability and quality of ...... Res, 5(1): 166 – 172. WPCL (2004). Land Based Water Quality Classification. Official Journal,.

  14. Abundance and size patterns of echinoderms in coastal soft-bottoms at Deception Island (South Shetland Islands, Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo-Preckler, Carlos; Tuya, Fernando; Avila, Conxita

    2017-04-01

    Deception Island is an active volcano in Antarctic waters under high sedimentation regimes, which may affect the abundance and structure of soft-bottom assemblages. During the summer of 2012-2013, a survey of the shallow water soft-bottom assemblages of Deception Island was carried out to examine patterns of abundance and size structure of the three dominant echinoderms (Ophionotus victoriae, Sterechinus neumayeri and Odontaster validus) at 8 locations encompassing a gradient in proximity from the open ocean, including two depths (5 vs. 15 m) per location. Abundance patterns of the three species varied with depth; organisms were typically more abundant at 15 relative to 5 m depth. Our results partially supported the hypothesis that echinoderms from locations adjacent to the open ocean present larger abundances. Body sizes varied significantly among locations and depths for the three species and some places presented a density-size pattern. High sedimentation rates, combined with low ice-related disturbance, may be the reason behind the large abundances of echinoderms found in this waters.

  15. Examination of the possibilities of the application of waste materials (gypsum, fly ash and bottom ash in construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trifunović Prvoslav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibilities of the application of waste gypsum (citrogypsum, nitrogyosum and sulphogypsum, fly ash and bottom ash in construction: for production of gypsum binders (a-calcium sulphate hemihydrate, b-calcium sulphata hemihydrate and b-anhydrite, for obtaining construction products (bricks and blocks and as component materials for road layers were presented in this work. Also, the possibilities of the application of sulphogypsum (or FGD gypsum for solidification and stabilization of fly ash were presented. The obtained results could have great importance in both ecological and economic views (elimination of important pollutants of water, air and soil, replacement of natural by waste materials, reduction of waste disposal cost.

  16. The geochemical characteristics of the bottom sediment in the pockmark area of the eastern part of the Gulf of Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanova Varvara

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available It is the first time pockmark-like structures have been detected in the south-eastern part of the Gulf of Finland with the help of a side-scan sonar and a profile recorder. The analysis of the distribution of microcomponents in the bottom sediment indicates that the pockmark area is located in the geochemical barrier border zone where the reducing medium of the incoming mineralized solution meets the highly oxidizing sea water medium. The hydrodynamic and geochemical processes in the pockmark zone create focal areas of anomalous microenvironment and affect the composition and development of benthos.

  17. Effects of patch size and position above the substratum during early succession of subtidal soft-bottom communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Aldo S.; Thiel, Martin; Oliva, Marcelo E.; Riascos, José M.

    2012-12-01

    Early macrobenthos succession in small, disturbed patches on subtidal soft bottoms is facilitated by the arrival of post-larval colonizers, in particular by active and passive dispersers along the seafloor or through the water column. Using a field experiment at two contrasting sites (protected vs. exposed to wave action), we evaluated the role of (a) active and passive dispersal through the water column and (b) the influence of small-scale spatial variability during succession of subtidal macrobenthic communities in northern Chile. Containers of two sizes (surface area: small—0.12 m2 and large—0.28 m2) at two positions above the natural substratum (height: low—3 cm and high—26 cm) were filled with defaunated sediment, installed at two sandy sublittoral sites (7-9 m water depth) and sampled after 7, 15, 30, 60 and 90 days, together with the natural bottom sediment. The experiment took place during austral fall (from late March to early July 2010), when both larval and post-larval stages are abundant. At the exposed site, early succession was driven by similar proportions of active and passive dispersers. A sequence from early, late and reference communities was also evident, but container position and size affected the proportional abundance of dispersal types. At the protected site, the successional process started with abundant colonization of active dispersers, but toward the end of the experiment, the proportion of swimmer/crawlers increased, thus resembling the dispersal types found in the natural community. At this site, the position above the sediment affected the proportional abundance of dispersal types, but patch size had no effect. This study highlights that macrobenthic post-larvae can reach at least 26 cm high above the bottom (actively or passively, depending on site exposure), thus playing an important role during early succession of sublittoral soft bottoms. The active or passive use of the sediment-water interphase may also play an

  18. Quality criteria for bottom ashes for civil construction. Part II Technical characteristics of bottom ashes; Kvalitetskriterier foer bottenaskor till vaegoch anlaeggningsbyggnad. Etapp II Bottenaskors tekniska egenskaper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahr, Bo von; Loorents, Karl-Johan; Ekvall, Annika; Arvidsson, Haakan [SP Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden)

    2006-01-15

    This report is the presentation of the second of two stages. This stage deals mainly with the testing of three different types of ashes and the evaluation and suitability of the chosen test methods. The project only relates to the technical aspects of ashes. The report is written in such a way that both ash owners (e.g. Energy companies) and those who build roads and constructions will find it meaningful. All test methods that are used for traditional materials (gravel and crushed rock) is not fitting for ashes. New test methods for some properties that will be tested must therefore be presented, tested practically and evaluated. The project encompasses both road and construction building but has a focus on road construction since there the highest and comprising demands are defined. Three bottom ashes of different types have been studied regarding some tenfold mechanical/physical parameters, essential for the functionality of the ash as a construction material. An important conclusion is that ash is from a functionality and characterisation point of view, an undefined concept that encloses materials with widely different properties. Despite that only three ashes have been looked into the range of results are varying large for some properties. This is especially true for the loose bulk density, water absorption and grain size distribution. It is also clear that some of the standard test methods for aggregates need to be exchanged by other methods, which are more adapted to alternative materials. One such example is water absorption, a property that further influences frost resistance, frost heave and such. All the proposed test methods that been used in the project is considered fitting for its purpose. The test methods can be divided into two categories the ones that yield easy assessable results and those that yield results hard to appraise. To the first group belong grain size distribution, loose bulk density, thermal conductivity, permeability and frost heave

  19. Excited state mass spectra and Regge trajectories of bottom baryons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Kaushal; Shah, Zalak; Rai, Ajay Kumar; C. Vinodkumar, P.

    2017-09-01

    We present the mass spectra of radial and orbital excited states of singly heavy bottom baryons; Σb+, Σb-, Ξb-, Ξb0, Λb0 and Ωb-. The QCD motivated hypercentral quark model is employed for the three body description of baryons and the form of confinement potential is hyper Coulomb plus linear. The first order correction to the confinement potential is also incorporated in this work. The semi-electronic decay of Ωb and Ξb are calculated using the spectroscopic parameters of the baryons. The computed results are compared with other theoretical predictions as well as with the available experimental observations. The Regge trajectories are plotted in (n ,M2) plane.

  20. Distribution and transport of tritium in the Peach Bottom HTGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wichner, R.P.; Dyer, F.F.

    1979-08-01

    This report completes the first phase of a two-phase effort to describe and understand tritium production and movement in an operating high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) system. The principal objective of phase 1 is to report the findings on tritium concentrations in core components acquired during the Peach Bottom Surveillance Program, which dealt with fission product migration in general, and a follow-on task devoted specifically to tritium. Administrative procedures are being developed for the second phase of the work to be performed in the Federal Republic of Germany under the auspices of the international umbrella agreement on gas-cooled reactor (GCR) development. In this effort, computer model predictions of tritium transport in the reactor system will be compared with observed concentration levels.