WorldWideScience

Sample records for suboptimal growth temperatures

  1. Influence of sub-optimal temperature on tomato growth and yield : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeg, van der A.; Heuvelink, E.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of temperature on growth, development and yield of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) are reviewed with special emphasis on cultivar differences. The focus is on sub-optimal temperatures, above the level where chilling injury occurs. Temperature has a large effect on all aspects of

  2. A non-destructive selection method for faster growth at suboptimal temperature in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drijfhout, E.; Oeveren, J.C. van; Jansen, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    A non-destructive method has been developed to select common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) plants whose growth is less effected at a suboptimal temperature. Shoot weight was determined at a suboptimal (14°C) and optimal temperature (20°C), 38 days after sowing and accessions identified with a

  3. A dietary dairy/yeast prebiotic and flaxseed oil enhance growth, hematological and immunological parameters in channel catfish at a suboptimal temperature (15°C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M; Lochmann, R; Phillips, H; Sink, T D

    2015-07-01

    Channel catfish raised in the southern United States require two growing seasons to reach market size. Growing seasons are separated by a cool period of about 3 months when feed intake and growth are greatly reduced. A cool-weather feeding strategy to improve feed intake, growth or health of catfish might improve survival and reduce the time needed to achieve market size. We conducted a feeding trial with channel catfish at a suboptimal temperature (15°C) to determine the effects of supplementing diets with either a dairy/yeast prebiotic or flaxseed oil (high in 18:3n-3) compared with a control with soybean oil (high in 18:2n-6). The trial was conducted in recirculating systems with 1140-l tanks containing 100 fish each (mean initial weight 61.4 g±0.43 s.e.m.). A 28%-protein basal diet was supplemented with 20 g/kg cellulose and 20 g/kg soybean oil (SBO, control), 20 g/kg cellulose and 20 g/kg flaxseed oil (FLAX) or 20 g/kg of a dairy/yeast prebiotic and 20 g/kg soybean oil (PREB). Fish were fed once daily to satiation and weighed every 3 weeks to track growth. Hematology, non-specific immune responses, proximate and fatty acid composition of muscle were determined to assess diet effects. Catfish-fed FLAX or PREB had higher weight gain, feed consumption and lysozyme activity than fish fed SBO. Total n-3 fatty acids in muscle were higher in fish fed SBO or FLAX than those fed PREB. Total n-6 long-chain polyunsaturated acids were higher in muscle of fish fed PREB than those fed SBO. Fatty acids in the PREB and SBO diets were similar, so the PREB appeared to increase elongation and desaturation of n-6 fatty acids in muscle. Flaxseed oil and the dairy/yeast prebiotic both have potential to increase catfish performance at a low temperature.

  4. [Effects of chlorophyllin-iron on osmotic adjustment and activities of antioxidantive enzymes in cucumber seedlings under suboptimal temperature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Wang, Xiu-feng; Zhang, Fan-yang; Wei, Min; Shi, Qing-hua; Yang, Feng-juan; Li, Yan

    2014-12-01

    Cucumber cultivar 'Jinyan 4' was subjected to suboptimal temperature treatment of 18/12 degrees C (day/night) in the growth chambers. A solution culture experiment was conducted to study the effect of exogenously spraying 5 mg x L(-1) chlorophyllin-iron solution on plant growth, the content of proline, soluble sugar, MDA and activity of peroxidase in the leaves of cucumber seedling under suboptimal temperature. Application of chlorophyllin-iron showed prominent effects on mitigating the stress of suboptimal temperature on growth of the cucumber seedlings, significantly increasing the plant height, leaf area, shoot dry mass, the contents of soluble sugar and proline and the activities of SOD, POD, CAT and APX. Exogenously spraying chlorophyllin-iron could promote the accumulation of proline and soluble sugar, raise the activities of antioxidant enzymes, decrease the membrane lipid peroxidation and improve the adaptability of cucumber seedlings under suboptimal temperature.

  5. COMPARISON OF MAIZE INBRED LINES DIFFERING IN LOW-TEMPERATURE TOLERANCE - EFFECT OF ACCLIMATION AT SUBOPTIMAL TEMPERATURE ON CHLOROPLAST FUNCTIONING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VERHEUL, MJ; VANHASSEL, PR; STAMP, P

    Acclimation to optimal or suboptimal temperature may influence photosynthetic properties of different maize genotypes in distinct ways. In this study, leaf growth and chloroplast functioning of the second leaves of Penjalinan, an inbred line used in warm tropical regions (CS) and Z7, an inbred line

  6. Genotypic Variation in the Response to Suboptimal Temperature at Different Plant Densities in Cut Chrysanthemum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeg, van der A.; Carvalho, S.M.P.; Heuvelink, E.

    2009-01-01

    Energy efficiency of greenhouse cut chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat.) may be increased by breeding. In addition to breeding for cultivars with a shorter reaction time at suboptimal temperatures, an alternative approach would be to develop cultivars that are heavier at suboptimal

  7. Variation between cut chrysanthemum cultivars in response to suboptimal temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeg, van der A.; Kularathne, R.J.K.N.; Carvalho, S.M.P.; Heuvelink, E.

    2007-01-01

    To breed for more energy-efficient cut chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat.) cultivars it is important to know the variation of the temperature response existing in modern cultivars. In a greenhouse experiment with 25 chrysanthemum cultivars, a significant variation was observed in

  8. Phosphorus acquisition by barley (Hordeum vulgare L. at suboptimal soil temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari Ylivainio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We studied the effects of soil temperature (8 ºC and 15 ºC on barley growth, barley phosphorus (P uptake and soil P solubility. Barley was grown in a pot experiment in two soils with different P fertilization histories for 22 years. The availability of P was estimated by using 33P-labeled fertilizer and calculating L-values. After cultivation for 22 years at ambient soil temperature without P fertilization (-P, soil L-value had decreased compared to soil that received annual P fertilization (P+. Low soil temperature further reduced the L-values, more in the -P soil than in the +P soil. Our results demonstrated that P fertilization can only partially ameliorate poor growth at low soil temperatures. Thus, applying ample fertilization to compensate for poor growth at low soil temperatures would increase the P content and solubility in the soil, but plant uptake would remain inhibited by cold.

  9. The influence of temperature on growth and development of chrysanthemum cultivars: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeg, van der A.; Heuvelink, E.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of temperature, especially in the sub-optimal temperature range, on growth and development of chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflorum syn. Chrysanthemum morifolium) are reviewed with special emphasis on cultivar differences. The developmental aspects analysed in this paper are leaf

  10. Rootstock Sub-Optimal Temperature Tolerance Determines Transcriptomic Responses after Long-Term Root Cooling in Rootstocks and Scions of Grafted Tomato Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Georgia Ntatsi; Dimitrios Savvas; Vassilis Papasotiropoulos; Anastasios Katsileros; Zrenner, Rita M.; Hincha, Dirk K.; Ellen Zuther; Dietmar Schwarz

    2017-01-01

    Grafting of elite cultivars onto tolerant rootstocks is an advanced strategy to increase tomato tolerance to sub-optimal temperature. However, a detailed understanding of adaptive mechanisms to sub-optimal temperature in rootstocks and scions of grafting combinations on a physiological and molecular level is lacking. Here, the commercial cultivar Kommeet was grafted either onto ‘Moneymaker’ (sensitive) or onto the line accession LA 1777 of Solanum habrochaites (tolerant). Grafted plants were ...

  11. Cold temperature preference in bacterially infected Drosophila melanogaster improves survival but is remarkably suboptimal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorka, Kenneth M; Kutch, Ian C; Collins, Louisa; Musto, Edward

    Altering one's temperature preference (e.g. behavioral fever or behavioral chill) is a common immune defense among ectotherms that is likely to be evolutionarily conserved. However, the temperature chosen by an infected host may not be optimal for pathogen defense, causing preference to be inefficient. Here we examined the efficiency of temperature preference in Drosophila melanogaster infected with an LD50 of the gram negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To this end, we estimated the host's uninfected and infected temperature preferences as well as their optimal survival temperature. We found that flies decreased their preference from 26.3°C to 25.2°C when infected, and this preference was stable over 48h. Furthermore, the decrease in temperature preference was associated with an increased chance of surviving the infection. Nevertheless, the infected temperature preference did not coincide with the optimum temperature for infection survival, which lies at or below 21.4°C. These data suggest that the behavioral response to P. aeruginosa infection is considerably inefficient, and the mechanisms that may account for this pattern are discussed. Future studies of infected temperature preferences should document its efficiency, as this understudied aspect of behavioral immunity can provide important insight into preference evolution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Rootstock Sub-Optimal Temperature Tolerance Determines Transcriptomic Responses after Long-Term Root Cooling in Rootstocks and Scions of Grafted Tomato Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntatsi, Georgia; Savvas, Dimitrios; Papasotiropoulos, Vassilis; Katsileros, Anastasios; Zrenner, Rita M; Hincha, Dirk K; Zuther, Ellen; Schwarz, Dietmar

    2017-01-01

    Grafting of elite cultivars onto tolerant rootstocks is an advanced strategy to increase tomato tolerance to sub-optimal temperature. However, a detailed understanding of adaptive mechanisms to sub-optimal temperature in rootstocks and scions of grafting combinations on a physiological and molecular level is lacking. Here, the commercial cultivar Kommeet was grafted either onto 'Moneymaker' (sensitive) or onto the line accession LA 1777 of Solanum habrochaites (tolerant). Grafted plants were grown in NFT-system at either optimal (25°C) or sub-optimal (15°C) temperatures in the root environment with optimal air temperature (25°C) for 22 days. Grafting onto the differently tolerant rootstocks caused differences in shoot fresh and dry weight, total leaf area and dry matter content of roots, in stomatal conductance and intercellular CO2 and guaiacol peroxidase activity but not in net photosynthesis, sugar, starch and amino acid content, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzyme activity. In leaves, comparative transcriptome analysis identified 361 differentially expressed genes (DEG) responding to sub-optimal root temperature when 'Kommeet' was grafted onto the sensitive but no when grafted onto the tolerant rootstock. 1509 and 2036 DEG responding to sub-optimal temperature were identified in LA 1777 and 'Moneymaker' rootstocks, respectively. In tolerant rootstocks down-regulated genes were enriched in main stress-responsive functional categories and up-regulated genes in cellulose synthesis suggesting that cellulose synthesis may be one of the main adaptation mechanisms to long-term sub-optimal temperature. Down-regulated genes of the sensitive rootstock showed a similar response, but functional categories of up-regulated genes pointed to induced stress responses. Rootstocks of the sensitive cultivar Moneymaker showed in addition an enrichment of up-regulated genes in the functional categories fatty acid desaturation, phenylpropanoids, biotic stress, cytochrome P

  13. Rootstock Sub-Optimal Temperature Tolerance Determines Transcriptomic Responses after Long-Term Root Cooling in Rootstocks and Scions of Grafted Tomato Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Ntatsi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Grafting of elite cultivars onto tolerant rootstocks is an advanced strategy to increase tomato tolerance to sub-optimal temperature. However, a detailed understanding of adaptive mechanisms to sub-optimal temperature in rootstocks and scions of grafting combinations on a physiological and molecular level is lacking. Here, the commercial cultivar Kommeet was grafted either onto ‘Moneymaker’ (sensitive or onto the line accession LA 1777 of Solanum habrochaites (tolerant. Grafted plants were grown in NFT-system at either optimal (25°C or sub-optimal (15°C temperatures in the root environment with optimal air temperature (25°C for 22 days. Grafting onto the differently tolerant rootstocks caused differences in shoot fresh and dry weight, total leaf area and dry matter content of roots, in stomatal conductance and intercellular CO2 and guaiacol peroxidase activity but not in net photosynthesis, sugar, starch and amino acid content, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzyme activity. In leaves, comparative transcriptome analysis identified 361 differentially expressed genes (DEG responding to sub-optimal root temperature when ‘Kommeet’ was grafted onto the sensitive but no when grafted onto the tolerant rootstock. 1509 and 2036 DEG responding to sub-optimal temperature were identified in LA 1777 and ‘Moneymaker’ rootstocks, respectively. In tolerant rootstocks down-regulated genes were enriched in main stress-responsive functional categories and up-regulated genes in cellulose synthesis suggesting that cellulose synthesis may be one of the main adaptation mechanisms to long-term sub-optimal temperature. Down-regulated genes of the sensitive rootstock showed a similar response, but functional categories of up-regulated genes pointed to induced stress responses. Rootstocks of the sensitive cultivar Moneymaker showed in addition an enrichment of up-regulated genes in the functional categories fatty acid desaturation, phenylpropanoids

  14. Effects of feeding frequency on apparent energy and nutrient digestibility/availability of channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, reared at optimal and suboptimal temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examined the effects of feeding frequency (daily versus every other day [EOD]) on nutrient digestibility/availability of channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, reared at optimal (30 C) and suboptimal (24 C) temperatures. A 28% protein practical diet was used as the test diet, and chromic o...

  15. Using a population growth model to simulate response of Plodia interpunctella Hübner to temperature and diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Response to temperature and diet are major factors in the potential population growth of Plodia interpunctella Hübner, a damaging pest of many stored products. A population growth model was used to simulate population development on an optimal wheat-based diet and a sub-optimal diet of raisins at 20...

  16. Growth of Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL-B523 in an alkaline medium: suboptimal pH growth inhibition of a lactic acid bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Barry F; Fogler, H Scott

    2005-01-05

    Bacterial profile modification (BPM), a form of tertiary oil recovery, diverts water from the water-flooded high-permeability zone into the oil-bearing low-permeability zone. During field use, exopolymer-producing bacteria plug the high-permeability zone only in the immediate vicinity of the injection point (the near-well bore region). For effective BPM the plug must penetrate far into the formation. Slowing the specific growth rate, lengthening the lag phase, and slowing the polymerization rate are techniques that can prolong the onset of biopolymer gelation and extend the depth of the biological plug. In batch experiments, the growth of Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL-B523 was inhibited by the synergistic effects of high substrate loading and an alkaline pH. Exponential growth was delayed up to 190 h. It was observed that cell division was significantly retarded until the medium pH, reduced by the acid byproducts of fermentation, reached a critical value of 6.79 +/- 0.06. A mathematical model was developed to describe the relationship between specific growth rate, lag time, and medium pH. (c) 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Temperature and growth - the pacific razor clam

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Quantitative relations between growth parameters of the cod (Gadus morhua L.) and mean annual sea surface temperature at various localities have been described by...

  18. Concepts on Low Temperature Mechanical Grain Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharon, John Anthony [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Metallurgy and Materials Joining Dept.; Boyce, Brad Lee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Metallurgy and Materials Joining Dept.

    2013-11-01

    In metals, as grain size is reduced below 100nm, conventional dislocation plasticity is suppressed resulting in improvements in strength, hardness, and wears resistance. Existing and emerging components use fine grained metals for these beneficial attributes. However, these benefits can be lost in service if the grains undergo growth during the component’s lifespan. While grain growth is traditionally viewed as a purely thermal process that requires elevated temperature exposure, recent evidence shows that some metals, especially those with nanocrystalline grain structure, can undergo grain growth even at room temperature or below due to mechanical loading. This report has been assembled to survey the key concepts regarding how mechanical loads can drive grain coarsening at room temperature and below. Topics outlined include the atomic level mechanisms that facilitate grain growth, grain boundary mobility, and the impact of boundary structure, loading scheme, and temperature.

  19. Evidence for Divergent Evolution of Growth Temperature Preference in Sympatric Saccharomyces Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Paula; Valério, Elisabete; Correia, Cláudia; de Almeida, João M. G. C. F.; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2011-01-01

    The genus Saccharomyces currently includes eight species in addition to the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, most of which can be consistently isolated from tree bark and soil. We recently found sympatric pairs of Saccharomyces species, composed of one cryotolerant and one thermotolerant species in oak bark samples of various geographic origins. In order to contribute to explain the occurrence in sympatry of Saccharomyces species, we screened Saccharomyces genomic data for protein divergence that might be correlated to distinct growth temperature preferences of the species, using the dN/dS ratio as a measure of protein evolution rates and pair-wise species comparisons. In addition to proteins previously implicated in growth at suboptimal temperatures, we found that glycolytic enzymes were among the proteins exhibiting higher than expected divergence when one cryotolerant and one thermotolerant species are compared. By measuring glycolytic fluxes and glycolytic enzymatic activities in different species and at different temperatures, we subsequently show that the unusual divergence of glycolytic genes may be related to divergent evolution of the glycolytic pathway aligning its performance to the growth temperature profiles of the different species. In general, our results support the view that growth temperature preference is a trait that may have undergone divergent selection in the course of ecological speciation in Saccharomyces. PMID:21674061

  20. The effect of sub-optimal temperature on specific sulfidogenic activity of mesophilic SRB in an H-2-fed membrane bioreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nevatalo, L.M.; Bijmans, M.F.M.; Lens, P.N.L.; Kaksonen, A.H.; Puhakka, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    The sulfidogenic activity of two mesophilic sulfate reducing enrichment cultures was studied in H-2-fed membrane bioreactors. The two enrichment cultures had different origins; one of them was a mesophilic and the other a psychrotolerant mesophilic culture. The operational temperatures of the

  1. Factors associated with ultrasound-aided detection of suboptimal fetal growth in a malaria-endemic area in Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Holger Werner; Ome-Kaius, Maria; Karl, Stephan; Singirok, Dupain; Siba, Peter; Walker, Jane; Wangnapi, Regina Alice; Mueller, Ivo; Rogerson, Stephen John

    2015-04-03

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is associated with increased infant mortality rates and ill-health in adulthood. Evaluation of fetal growth requires ultrasound. As a result, ultrasound-assisted evaluations of causes of FGR in malaria-endemic developing countries are rare. We aimed to determine factors associated with indicators of abnormal fetal growth in rural lowland Papua New Guinea (PNG). Weights and growth of 671 ultrasound-dated singleton pregnancies (malaria on several occasions. FGR was suspected upon detection of an estimated fetal weight or birthweight malaria infection detected in peripheral blood. A low MUAC (adjusted risk ratio [aRR] 1.51, 95% CI 1.29, 1.76, P body mass index was associated with low fetal weight gain (aRR 2.10, 95% CI 1.62, 2.71, P Malaria infection was associated with SGA on crude but not adjusted analyses (aRR 1.13, 95% CI 0.95, 1.34, P = 0.172). Macronutrient undernutrition and anaemia increased the risk of FGR. Antenatal nutritional interventions and malaria prevention could improve fetal growth in PNG.

  2. Biofilm growth on polyvinylchloride surface incubated in suboptimal microbial warm water and effect of sanitizers on biofilm removal post biofilm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    An in vitro experiment was conducted to understand the nature of biofilm growth on polyvinyl chloride (PVC) surface when exposed to sub optimal quality microbial water (> 4 log10 cfu/ml) obtained from poultry drinking water source mimicking water in waterlines during the first week of poultry broodi...

  3. Experimental Horizontal Gene Transfer of Methylamine Dehydrogenase Mimics Prevalent Exchange in Nature and Overcomes the Methylamine Growth Constraints Posed by the Sub-Optimal N-Methylglutamate Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipti D. Nayak

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Methylamine plays an important role in the global carbon and nitrogen budget; microorganisms that grow on reduced single carbon compounds, methylotrophs, serve as a major biological sink for methylamine in aerobic environments. Two non-orthologous, functionally degenerate routes for methylamine oxidation have been studied in methylotrophic Proteobacteria: Methylamine dehydrogenase and the N-methylglutamate pathway. Recent work suggests the N-methylglutamate (NMG pathway may be more common in nature than the well-studied methylamine dehydrogenase (MaDH, encoded by the mau gene cluster. However, the distribution of these pathways across methylotrophs has never been analyzed. Furthermore, even though horizontal gene transfer (HGT is commonly invoked as a means to transfer these pathways between strains, the physiological barriers to doing so have not been investigated. We found that the NMG pathway is both more abundant and more universally distributed across methylotrophic Proteobacteria compared to MaDH, which displays a patchy distribution and has clearly been transmitted by HGT even amongst very closely related strains. This trend was especially prominent in well-characterized strains of the Methylobacterium extroquens species, which also display significant phenotypic variability during methylamine growth. Strains like Methylobacterium extorquens PA1 that only encode the NMG pathway grew on methylamine at least five-fold slower than strains like Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 that also possess the mau gene cluster. By mimicking a HGT event through the introduction of the M. extorquens AM1 mau gene cluster into the PA1 genome, the resulting strain instantaneously achieved a 4.5-fold increase in growth rate on methylamine and a 11-fold increase in fitness on methylamine, which even surpassed the fitness of M. extorquens AM1. In contrast, when three replicate populations of wild type M. extorquens PA1 were evolved on methylamine as the sole

  4. Effect of Temperature and Relative Humidity on the Growth of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of temperature and relative humidity on the growth of Helminthosporium fulvum were investigated. Various temperature regimes of 10oC, 15oC, 20oC, 25oC, 30oC, 35oC and 40¢ªC were used to determine the temperature effect on the growth of H. fulvum. Maximum growth of H. fulvum was obtained at 25¢ªC ...

  5. Effect of Temperature and Relative Humidity on the Growth of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: The effects of temperature and relative humidity on the growth of Helminthosporium fulvum were investigated. Various temperature regimes of 10oC, 15oC, 20oC, 25oC, 30oC, 35oC and 40˚C were used to determine the temperature effect on the growth of H. fulvum. Maximum growth of H. fulvum was obtained ...

  6. Definition study for temperature control in advanced protein crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyce, Thomas A.; Rosenberger, Franz; Sowers, Jennifer W.; Monaco, Lisa A.

    1990-01-01

    Some of the technical requirements for an expedient application of temperature control to advanced protein crystal growth activities are defined. Lysozome was used to study the effects of temperature ramping and temperature gradients for nucleation/dissolution and consecutive growth of sizable crystals and, to determine a prototype temperature program. The solubility study was conducted using equine serum albumin (ESA) which is an extremely stable, clinically important protein due to its capability to bind and transport many different small ions and molecules.

  7. Environmental temperature impact on bone and cartilage growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrat, Maria A

    2014-04-01

    Environmental temperature can have a surprising impact on extremity growth in homeotherms, but the underlying mechanisms have remained elusive for over a century. Limbs of animals raised at warm ambient temperature are significantly and permanently longer than those of littermates housed at cooler temperature. These remarkably consistent lab results closely resemble the ecogeographical tenet described by Allen's "extremity size rule," that appendage length correlates with temperature and latitude. This phenotypic growth plasticity could have adaptive significance for thermal physiology. Shortened extremities help retain body heat in cold environments by decreasing surface area for potential heat loss. Homeotherms have evolved complex mechanisms to maintain tightly regulated internal temperatures in challenging environments, including "facultative extremity heterothermy" in which limb temperatures can parallel ambient. Environmental modulation of tissue temperature can have direct and immediate consequences on cell proliferation, metabolism, matrix production, and mineralization in cartilage. Temperature can also indirectly influence cartilage growth by modulating circulating levels and delivery routes of essential hormones and paracrine regulators. Using an integrated approach, this article synthesizes classic studies with new data that shed light on the basis and significance of this enigmatic growth phenomenon and its relevance for treating human bone elongation disorders. Discussion centers on the vasculature as a gateway to understanding the complex interconnection between direct (local) and indirect (systemic) mechanisms of temperature-enhanced bone lengthening. Recent advances in imaging modalities that enable the dynamic study of cartilage growth plates in vivo will be key to elucidating fundamental physiological mechanisms of long bone growth regulation. © 2014 American Physiological Society.

  8. Suboptimal care in stillbirths - a retrospective audit study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saastad, Eli; Vangen, Siri; Frøen, J Frederik

    2007-01-01

    Stillbirth rates have decreased radically over the last decades. One reason for this is improved perinatal care. The aim of this study was to explore whether sub-optimal factors in stillbirths were more frequent among non-western than western women. Population-based perinatal audit of 356 stillbirths after gestational week 23, in 2 Norwegian counties during 1998-2003 (4.2 per 1,000 deliveries); of these 31% were born to non-western women. By audit, the stillbirths were attributed to optimal or sub-optimal care factors. Multivariate methods were used to analyse the data. Sub-optimal factors were identified in 37% of the deaths. When compared to western women, non-western women had an increased risk of stillbirth (OR: 2.2; 95% CI: 1.3-3.8), and an increased risk of sub-optimal care (OR: 2.4; 95% CI: 1.5-3.9). More often, non-western women received sub-optimal obstetric care (plabour progression. A common failure in antenatal care for both groups was unidentified or inadequate management of intrauterine growth restriction or decreased fetal movements. Non-western women were less prone to attend the program for antenatal care or to take the consequences of recommendations from health professionals. Inadequate communication was documented in 47% of non-western mothers; an interpreter was used in 29% of these cases. Non-western women constituted a risk group for sub-optimal care factors in stillbirths. Possibilities for improvements include a reduction of language barriers, better identification and management of growth restriction for both origin groups, and adequate intervention in complicated vaginal births; with increased vigilance towards non-western women.

  9. Competitive interactions modify the temperature dependence of damselfly growth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson-Ortman, Viktor; Stoks, Robby; Johansson, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Individual growth rates and survival are major determinants of individual fitness, population size structure, and community dynamics. The relationships between growth rate, survival, and temperature may thus be important for predicting biological responses to climate change. Although it is well known that growth rates and survival are affected by competition and predation in addition to temperature, the combined effect of these factors on growth rates, survival, and size structure has rarely been investigated simultaneously in the same ecological system. To address this question, we conducted experiments on the larvae of two species of damselflies and determined the temperature dependence of growth rate, survival, and cohort size structure under three scenarios of increasing ecological complexity: no competition, intraspecific competition, and interspecific competition. In one species, the relationship between growth rate and temperature became steeper in the presence of competitors, whereas that of survival remained unchanged. In the other species, the relationship between growth rate and temperature was unaffected by competitive interactions, but survival was greatly reduced at high temperatures in the presence of interspecific competitors. The combined effect of competitive interactions and temperature on cohort size structure differed from the effects of these factors in isolation. Together, these findings suggest that it will be challenging to scale up information from single-species laboratory studies to the population and community level.

  10. Influence of water activity and temperature on growth and mycotoxin production by Alternaria alternata on irradiated soya beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviedo, Maria Silvina; Ramirez, Maria Laura; Barros, Germán Gustavo; Chulze, Sofia Noemi

    2011-09-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of water activity (a(w)) (0.99-0.90), temperature (15, 25 and 30°C) and their interactions on growth and alternariol (AOH) and alternariol monomethyl ether (AME) production by Alternaria alternata on irradiated soya beans. Maximum growth rates were obtained at 0.980 a(w) and 25°C. Minimum a(w) level for growth was dependent on temperature. Both strains were able to grow at the lowest a(w) assayed (0.90). Maximum amount of AOH was produced at 0.98 a(w) but at different temperatures, 15 and 25°C, for the strains RC 21 and RC 39 respectively. Maximum AME production was obtained at 0.98 a(w) and 30°C for both strains. The concentration range of both toxins varied considerably depending on a(w) and temperature interactions. The two metabolites were produced over the temperature range 15 to 30°C and a(w) range 0.99 to 0.96. The limiting a(w) for detectable mycotoxin production is slightly greater than that for growth. Two-dimensional profiles of a(w)× temperature were developed from these data to identify areas where conditions indicate a significant risk from AOH and AME accumulation on soya bean. Knowledge of AOH and AME production under marginal or sub-optimal temperature and a(w) conditions for growth can be important since improper storage conditions accompanied by elevated temperature and moisture content in the grain can favour further mycotoxin production and lead to reduction in grain quality. This could present a hazard if the grain is used for human consumption or animal feedstuff. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Root temperature and growth of young tomato plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harssema, H.

    1978-01-01

    During recent years sophisticated techniques are applied in the glasshouse industry for the control of the glasshouse climate. Along with that development, extensive research programs were carried out to establish optimum conditions for growth. Air temperature, radiation, CO

  12. A shooting approach to suboptimal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, David G.; Sheen, Jyh-Jong

    1991-01-01

    The shooting method is used to solve the suboptimal control problem where the control history is assumed to be piecewise linear. Suboptimal solutions can be obtained without difficulty and can lead to accurate approximate controls and good starting multipliers for the regular shooting method by increasing the number of nodes. Optimal planar launch trajectories are presented for the advanced launch system.

  13. Higher temperature variability reduces temperature sensitivity of vegetation growth in Northern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiuchen; Liu, Hongyan; Li, Xiaoyan; Piao, Shilong; Ciais, Philippe; Guo, Weichao; Yin, Yi; Poulter, Ben; Peng, Changhui; Viovy, Nicolas; Vuichard, Nicolas; Wang, Pei; Huang, Yongmei

    2017-06-01

    Interannual air temperature variability has changed over some regions in Northern Hemisphere (NH), accompanying with climate warming. However, whether and to what extent it regulates the interannual sensitivity of vegetation growth to temperature variability (i.e., interannual temperature sensitivity)—one central issue in understanding and predicting the responses of vegetation growth to changing climate—still remains poorly quantified and understood. Here we quantify the relationships between the interannual temperature sensitivity of mean growing-season (April-October) normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and ecosystem model simulations of gross primary productivity (GPP), and variability in mean growing-season temperature for forest, shrub, and grass over NH. We find that higher interannual variability in mean growing-season temperature leads to consistent decrease in interannual temperature sensitivity of mean growing-season NDVI among all vegetation types but not in model simulations of GPP. Drier condition associates with 130 ± 150% further decrease in interannual temperature sensitivity of mean growing-season NDVI by temperature variability in forest and shrub. These results illustrate that varying temperature variability can significantly regulate the interannual temperature sensitivity of vegetation growth over NH, interacted with drought variability and nonlinear responses of photosynthesis to temperature. Our findings call for an improved characterization of the nonlinear effects of temperature variability on vegetation growth within global ecosystem models.

  14. Photoreactivation of Escherichia coli is impaired at high growth temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Tian, Changqing; Lu, Xiaohua; Ling, Liefeng; Lv, Jun; Wu, Mingcai; Zhu, Guoping

    2015-06-01

    Photolyase repairs UV-induced lesions in DNA using light energy, which is the principle of photoreactivation. Active photolyase contains the two-electron-reduced flavin cofactor. We observed that photoreactivation of Escherichia coli was impaired at growth temperatures ⩾37°C, and growth in this temperature range also resulted in decreased photolyase protein levels in the cells. However, the levels of phr transcripts (encoding photolyase) were almost unchanged at the various growth temperatures. A lacZ-reporter under transcriptional control of the phr promoter showed no temperature-dependent expression. However, a translational reporter consisting of the photolyase N-terminal α/β domain-LacZ fusion protein exhibited lower β-galactosidase activity at high growth temperatures (37-42°C). These results indicated that the change in photolyase levels at different growth temperatures is post-transcriptional in nature. Limited proteolysis identified several susceptible cleavage sites in E. coli photolyase. In vitro differential scanning calorimetry and activity assays revealed that denaturation of active photolyase occurs at temperatures ⩾37°C, while apo-photolyase unfolds at temperatures ⩾25°C. Evidence from temperature-shift experiments also implies that active photolyase is protected from thermal unfolding and proteolysis in vivo, even at 42°C. These results suggest that thermal unfolding and proteolysis of newly synthesized apo-photolyase, but not active photolyase, is responsible for the impaired photoreactivation at high growth temperatures (37-42°C). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Growth temperature and plant age influence on nutritional quality of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As a leafy vegetable, Amaranthus can be harvested at different stages of plant growth, ranging from young seedlings to the late juvenile stage, but data on the changes in leaf nutritional value with plant age are scanty. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of growth temperature on Amaranthus leaf yield and ...

  16. The stimulating impact of elevated temperatures on growth and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pot studies conducted at 22-300°C temperature conditions were considered as control. During summer at 35-450°C, various growth parameters significantly increased in comparison to the 7-150°C temperature regime in winter. Different biochemical constituents were also higher in the leaves during summer than in winter ...

  17. Low temperature CVD growth of ultrathin carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Wu, Peng; Gan, Wei; Habib, Muhammad; Xu, Weiyu; Fang, Qi; Song, Li

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate the low temperature, large area growth of ultrathin carbon films by chemical vapor deposition under atmospheric pressure on various substrates. In particularly, uniform and continuous carbon films with the thickness of 2-5 nm were successfully grown at a temperature as low as 500 oC on copper foils, as well as glass substrates coated with a 100 nm thick copper layer. The characterizations revealed that the low-temperature-grown carbon films consist on few short, curved graphene layers and thin amorphous carbon films. Particularly, the low-temperature grown samples exhibited over 90% transmittance at a wavelength range of 400-750 nm and comparable sheet resistance in contrast with the 1000oC-grown one. This low-temperature growth method may offer a facile way to directly prepare visible ultrathin carbon films on various substrate surfaces that are compatible with temperatures (500-600oC) used in several device processing technologies.

  18. Temperatures and the growth and development of maize and rice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sánchez, Berta; Rasmussen, Anton; Porter, John Roy

    2014-01-01

    crops for the key physiological processes such as leaf initiation, shoot growth and root growth and for the most susceptible phenological phases such as sowing to emergence, anthesis and grain filling. Our summary shows that cardinal temperatures are conservative between studies and are seemingly well...... defined in all three crops. Anthesis and ripening are the most sensitive temperature stages in rice as well as in wheat and maize. We call for further experimental studies of the effects of transgressing threshold temperatures so such responses can be included into crop impact and adaptation models....

  19. Effect of temperature on microbial growth rate-mathematical analysis: the Arrhenius and Eyring-Polanyi connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lihan; Hwang, Andy; Phillips, John

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a mathematical model for evaluating the effect of temperature on the rate of microbial growth. The new mathematical model is derived by combination and modification of the Arrhenius equation and the Eyring-Polanyi transition theory. The new model, suitable for both suboptimal and the entire growth temperature ranges, was validated using a collection of 23 selected temperature-growth rate curves belonging to 5 groups of microorganisms, including Pseudomonas spp., Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., Clostridium perfringens, and Escherichia coli, from the published literature. The curve fitting is accomplished by nonlinear regression using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The resulting estimated growth rate (μ) values are highly correlated to the data collected from the literature (R(2) = 0.985, slope = 1.0, intercept = 0.0). The bias factor (B(f) ) of the new model is very close to 1.0, while the accuracy factor (A(f) ) ranges from 1.0 to 1.22 for most data sets. The new model is compared favorably with the Ratkowsky square root model and the Eyring equation. Even with more parameters, the Akaike information criterion, Bayesian information criterion, and mean square errors of the new model are not statistically different from the square root model and the Eyring equation, suggesting that the model can be used to describe the inherent relationship between temperature and microbial growth rates. The results of this work show that the new growth rate model is suitable for describing the effect of temperature on microbial growth rate. Practical Application:  Temperature is one of the most significant factors affecting the growth of microorganisms in foods. This study attempts to develop and validate a mathematical model to describe the temperature dependence of microbial growth rate. The findings show that the new model is accurate and can be used to describe the effect of temperature on microbial growth rate in foods

  20. Growth of ZnO nanostructures on Au-coated Si: Influence of growth temperature on growth mechanism and morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Rajendra; McGlynn, E.; Biswas, M.

    2008-01-01

    ZnO nanostructures were grown on Au-catalyzed Si silicon substrates using vapor phase transport at growth temperatures from 800 to 1150 degrees C. The sample location ensured a low Zn vapor supersaturation during growth. Nanostructures grown at 800 and 850 degrees C showed a faceted rodlike...... growth tended to dominate resulting in the formation of a porous, nanostructured morphology. In all cases growth was seen only on the Au-coated region. Our results show that the majority of the nanostructures grow via a vapor-solid mechanism at low growth temperatures with no evidence of Au nanoparticles...

  1. Winter temperatures limit population growth rate of a migratory songbird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, Bradley K; Wheelwright, Nathaniel T; Newman, Amy E; Schaub, Michael; Norris, D Ryan

    2017-03-20

    Understanding the factors that limit and regulate wildlife populations requires insight into demographic and environmental processes acting throughout the annual cycle. Here, we combine multi-year tracking data of individual birds with a 26-year demographic study of a migratory songbird to evaluate the relative effects of density and weather at the breeding and wintering grounds on population growth rate. Our results reveal clear support for opposing forces of winter temperature and breeding density driving population dynamics. Above-average temperatures at the wintering grounds lead to higher population growth, primarily through their strong positive effects on survival. However, population growth is regulated over the long term by strong negative effects of breeding density on both fecundity and adult male survival. Such knowledge of how year-round factors influence population growth, and the demographic mechanisms through which they act, will vastly improve our ability to predict species responses to environmental change and develop effective conservation strategies for migratory animals.

  2. Growth and survival at chiller temperatures of Arcobacter butzleri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldgaard, Jette; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Ingmer, Hanne

    2009-01-01

    . butzleri ATCC 49616 and newly isolated A. butzleri strains under conditions likely to prevail in the slaughterhouse environment using a chicken meat juice medium (CMJ). CMJ supported growth of A. butzleri at 15 degrees C, the recognised minimal growth temperature of this organism, and at 10 degrees C. At 5...... degrees C. Given the ability to survive, multiply and form biofilm under chilled conditions A. butzleri appears well suited for establishment in food processing and slaughterhouse environments....

  3. Effect of increasing growth temperature on yeast fermentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of increasing growth temperature on yeast fermentation was studied at approximately 5 oC intervals over a range of 18 – 37 oC, using one strain each of ale, lager and wine yeast. The ale and wine yeasts grew at all the temperatures tested, but lager yeast failed to grow at 37 oC. All these strains gave lower ...

  4. Void growth and coalescence in metals deformed at elevated temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klöcker, H.; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2000-01-01

    For metals deformed at elevated temperatures the growth of voids to coalescence is studied numerically. The voids are assumed to be present from the beginning of deformation, and the rate of deformation considered is so high that void growth is dominated by power law creep of the material, without...... voids. The focus of the study is on various relatively high stress triaxialties. In order to represent the results in terms of a porous ductile material model a set of constitutive relations are used, which have been proposed for void growth in a material undergoing power law creep....

  5. GENOTYPIC VARIATION IN CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE PARAMETERS, PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND GROWTH OF TOMATO GROWN AT LOW-TEMPERATURE AND LOW IRRADIANCE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JANSSEN, LHJ; VANOEVEREN, JC; VANHASSELT, PR; KUIPER, PJC

    1995-01-01

    The genetic variation in low temperature sensitivity of eight tomato genotypes grown at suboptimal temperature (19 degrees C) and at low irradiance (140 mu mol m(-2) s(-1)) was assessed at the plant, chloroplast and thylakoid membrane levels. Temperature effects on the thylakoid membrane were

  6. Explaining growth variation over large spatial scales: Effects of temperature and food on walleye growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosgaard, Thomas; Venturelli, Paul; Lester, Nigel P.

    2012-01-01

    for among-lake variation in growth (e.g., food and temperature) has proved very difficult. Here, we use length at age and temperature data from hundreds of water bodies between 44⁰N to 53⁰N latitude to explain variation in immature growth of walleye (Sander vitreus), one of the most economically valuable...... the variation is productivity and a negative relationship indicates density-dependence. We found that variation in walleye growth among water bodies is largely explained by food productivity - not density-dependence. These results suggest that we can’t detect density-dependence among lakes when density......Most fishes exhibit strong spatial variation in growth. Because fish growth and production are tightly linked, quantifying and explaining variation in growth can mean the difference between successful management and unforeseen collapse. However, disentangling the factors that are responsible...

  7. [Temperature range for growth of the Antarctic microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanovaskaia, V A; Tashirev, A B; Gladka, G B; Tashireva, A A

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of a temperature range for growth of microorganisms isolated at various temperatures (1-5 degrees C or 30 degrees C) from biotopes of the Antarctic region (soil, grass Deschampcia antarctica, grass Colobanthus, a green moss, crustose black lichens and encrustation biofilm on vertical rocks) is made. From 40 to 70% of the investigated Antarctic microorganisms, irrespective of temperature conditions of their isolation, were capable of growing in a wide temperature range (from 1 degrees C to 30 degrees C), i.e. they are psychrotolerant. In selective conditions (1 degrees C or 5 degrees C) the psychrophilic Antarctic bacteria and yeast are isolated which grew in the range from 1 degrees C to 20 degrees C and did not grow at 30 degrees C. At the same time, among the Antarctic microorganisms isolated in nonselective conditions (at 30 degrees C), almost 50% are capable of growing at the lowest temperature (5 degrees C), and a smaller number of strains--at 1 degrees C. However with a decrease of cultivation temperature the growth lag-phase of the Antarctic bacteria increased. Thus the level of the final biomass of the investigated strains did not depend on cultivation temperature. When comparing the temperature range of growth of the mesophilic Antarctic bacteria and collection strains of the same species isolated more than 10 years ago from the region with a temperate climate, the psychrotolerant forms were also revealed among the latter. So, it is shown that the investigated Antarctic bacteria can exist in the temperature range characteristic of terrestrial biotopes of the Antarctic Region (from 1 degrees C to 10 degrees C).

  8. Effect of stress-induced grain growth during room temperature ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Effect of stress-induced grain growth during room temperature tensile deformation on ductility in nanocrystalline metals. WEICHANG XU, PINQIANG DAI* and XIAOLEI WU. †. College of Materials Science and Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350108, China. †. State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute ...

  9. Influence of temperature, light and plant growth regulators on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of temperature, light and different concentrations of plant growth regulators on germination of Piper nigrum L. seeds was studied under controlled environmental conditions. Black pepper seeds were placed in. Petri dishes with filtration papers and the germination and radical development followed during eighteen ...

  10. Effect of temperature, light intensity and growth regulators on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ansellia africana (Orchidaceae) is an important endangered medicinal plant species of South Africa which has been heavily exploited in recent years. Experiments were conducted in growth rooms at different temperatures (16, 26, 36°C) and in a nursery at different light intensities induced by shade cloth densities (200, 400, ...

  11. Temperature impacts on economic growth warrant stringent mitigation policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Frances C.; Diaz, Delavane B.

    2015-02-01

    Integrated assessment models compare the costs of greenhouse gas mitigation with damages from climate change to evaluate the social welfare implications of climate policy proposals and inform optimal emissions reduction trajectories. However, these models have been criticized for lacking a strong empirical basis for their damage functions, which do little to alter assumptions of sustained gross domestic product (GDP) growth, even under extreme temperature scenarios. We implement empirical estimates of temperature effects on GDP growth rates in the DICE model through two pathways, total factor productivity growth and capital depreciation. This damage specification, even under optimistic adaptation assumptions, substantially slows GDP growth in poor regions but has more modest effects in rich countries. Optimal climate policy in this model stabilizes global temperature change below 2 °C by eliminating emissions in the near future and implies a social cost of carbon several times larger than previous estimates. A sensitivity analysis shows that the magnitude of climate change impacts on economic growth, the rate of adaptation, and the dynamic interaction between damages and GDP are three critical uncertainties requiring further research. In particular, optimal mitigation rates are much lower if countries become less sensitive to climate change impacts as they develop, making this a major source of uncertainty and an important subject for future research.

  12. A Key Marine Diazotroph in a Changing Ocean: The Interacting Effects of Temperature, CO2 and Light on the Growth of Trichodesmium erythraeum IMS101.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias G Boatman

    Full Text Available Trichodesmium is a globally important marine diazotroph that accounts for approximately 60 - 80% of marine biological N2 fixation and as such plays a key role in marine N and C cycles. We undertook a comprehensive assessment of how the growth rate of Trichodesmium erythraeum IMS101 was directly affected by the combined interactions of temperature, pCO2 and light intensity. Our key findings were: low pCO2 affected the lower temperature tolerance limit (Tmin but had no effect on the optimum temperature (Topt at which growth was maximal or the maximum temperature tolerance limit (Tmax; low pCO2 had a greater effect on the thermal niche width than low-light; the effect of pCO2 on growth rate was more pronounced at suboptimal temperatures than at supraoptimal temperatures; temperature and light had a stronger effect on the photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm than did CO2; and at Topt, the maximum growth rate increased with increasing CO2, but the initial slope of the growth-irradiance curve was not affected by CO2. In the context of environmental change, our results suggest that the (i nutrient replete growth rate of Trichodesmium IMS101 would have been severely limited by low pCO2 at the last glacial maximum (LGM, (ii future increases in pCO2 will increase growth rates in areas where temperature ranges between Tmin to Topt, but will have negligible effect at temperatures between Topt and Tmax, (iii areal increase of warm surface waters (> 18°C has allowed the geographic range to increase significantly from the LGM to present and that the range will continue to expand to higher latitudes with continued warming, but (iv continued global warming may exclude Trichodesmium spp. from some tropical regions by 2100 where temperature exceeds Topt.

  13. Low temperature CVD growth of ultrathin carbon films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the low temperature, large area growth of ultrathin carbon films by chemical vapor deposition under atmospheric pressure on various substrates. In particularly, uniform and continuous carbon films with the thickness of 2-5 nm were successfully grown at a temperature as low as 500 oC on copper foils, as well as glass substrates coated with a 100 nm thick copper layer. The characterizations revealed that the low-temperature-grown carbon films consist on few short, curved graphene layers and thin amorphous carbon films. Particularly, the low-temperature grown samples exhibited over 90% transmittance at a wavelength range of 400-750 nm and comparable sheet resistance in contrast with the 1000oC-grown one. This low-temperature growth method may offer a facile way to directly prepare visible ultrathin carbon films on various substrate surfaces that are compatible with temperatures (500-600oC used in several device processing technologies.

  14. Stringent Mitigation Policy Implied By Temperature Impacts on Economic Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, F.; Turner, D.

    2014-12-01

    Integrated assessment models (IAMs) compare the costs of greenhouse gas mitigation with damages from climate change in order to evaluate the social welfare implications of climate policy proposals and inform optimal emissions reduction trajectories. However, these models have been criticized for lacking a strong empirical basis for their damage functions, which do little to alter assumptions of sustained GDP growth, even under extreme temperature scenarios. We implement empirical estimates of temperature effects on GDP growth-rates in the Dynamic Integrated Climate and Economy (DICE) model via two pathways, total factor productivity (TFP) growth and capital depreciation. Even under optimistic adaptation assumptions, this damage specification implies that optimal climate policy involves the elimination of emissions in the near future, the stabilization of global temperature change below 2°C, and a social cost of carbon (SCC) an order of magnitude larger than previous estimates. A sensitivity analysis shows that the magnitude of growth effects, the rate of adaptation, and the dynamic interaction between damages from warming and GDP are three critical uncertainties and an important focus for future research.

  15. Suboptimal glycemic control in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nefs, Giesje; Pouwer, F; Denollet, J

    2012-01-01

    , clinical, lifestyle and psychological factors between 2005 and 2009. The Edinburgh Depression Scale was used to assess symptoms of depressed mood, anhedonia and anxiety. Suboptimal glycemic control was defined as HbA(1c) values ≥7%, with 29.8% of the sample (n=1718) scoring above this cut......-off. In univariate logistic regression analyses, anhedonia was significantly associated with suboptimal glycemic control (OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.09-1.52), while both depressed mood (OR 1.04, 0.88-1.22) and anxiety (OR 0.99, 0.83-1.19) were not. The association between anhedonia and glycemic control remained after...

  16. Light quality and temperature effects on antirrhinum growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattak, Abdul Mateen; Pearson, Simon

    2005-02-01

    An experiment was carried out to examine the effects of light quality on the growth and development of antirrhinum under three different temperatures 19 degrees C, 24 degrees C and 27 degrees C in glasshouses. Five different colour filters (i.e. 'Red absorbing', 'Blue absorbing', 'Blue and Red absorbing' and two 'partially Blue absorbing' materials) were tested, with one clear polythene as a control. Plant height, internode length and leaf area were significantly affected by the spectral filters as well as the temperature. Analysis of color filter's effect on presumed photoreceptors to exist indicated that antirrhinum plant height was regulated by the action of a blue acting photoreceptor (BAP) and not the phytochrome. There was no evidence for an effect of phytochrome or BAP on time to flowering, however, increasing temperature levels effectively decreased the time to flowering. To predict the effects of different spectral qualities and temperature, simple models were created from data on plant height, internode length and time to flowering. These models were then applied to simulate the potential benefits of spectral filters and temperature in manipulation of growth control and flowering in antirrhinum.

  17. Flooding, root temperature, physiology and growth of two Annona species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Maritza; Schaffer, Bruce; Davies, Frederick S

    2004-09-01

    The effects of root zone temperature (RZT) and flooding on physiology and growth of Annona glabra L. (pond apple) and A. muricata L. (soursop) were investigated. Trees planted in containers were exposed to RZTs of 5, 10, 20, 25 or 35 degrees C in controlled root temperature chambers. Trees at each RZT were either non-flooded (control) or continuously flooded. There were four replications over time for each treatment combination. Pond apple was more flood-tolerant than soursop. A combination of flooding and RZTs of 5 and 10 degrees C resulted in tree mortality of both species by Week 4. Only trees that appeared to develop morphological adaptations survived continuous flooding. In both species, net CO2 assimilation (A) decreased to nearly zero within 1 week following exposure to RZTs of 5 or 10 degrees C and became consistently negative over the remaining experimental period. Flooding reduced leaf chlorophyll index (measured with a SPAD meter), A and plant growth, and increased root electrolyte leakage from soursop. Optimum growth occurred at RZTs of 25 to 35 degrees C for non-flooded pond apple trees and at 20 to 25 degrees C for flooded trees. Soursop exhibited maximum growth at RZTs of 35 degrees C under non-flooded conditions and at 25 degrees C under flooded conditions.

  18. Size, growth, temperature and the natural mortality of marine fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gislason, Henrik; Daan, Niels; Rice, Jake C.

    2010-01-01

    The natural mortality of exploited fish populations is often assumed to be a species-specific constant independent of body size. This assumption has important implications for size-based fish population models and for predicting the outcome of size-dependent fisheries management measures...... such as mesh-size regulations. To test the assumption, we critically review the empirical estimates of the natural mortality, M (year(-1)), of marine and brackish water fish stocks and model them as a function of von Bertalanffy growth parameters, L-infinity (cm) and K (year(-1)), temperature (Kelvin...... conclude that natural mortality is significantly related to length and growth characteristics and recommend to use the empirical formula: ln(M) = 0.55) - 1.61ln(L) + 1.44ln(L-infinity) + ln(K), for estimating the natural mortality of marine and brackish water fish....

  19. Light quality and temperature effects on antirrhinum growth and development

    OpenAIRE

    Khattak, Abdul Mateen; Pearson, Simon

    2005-01-01

    An experiment was carried out to examine the effects of light quality on the growth and development of antirrhinum under three different temperatures 19 °C, 24 °C and 27 °C in glasshouses. Five different colour filters (i.e. ‘Red absorbing’, ‘Blue absorbing’, ‘Blue and Red absorbing’ and two ‘partially Blue absorbing’ materials) were tested, with one clear polythene as a control. Plant height, internode length and leaf area were significantly affected by the spectral filters as well as the te...

  20. Body temperatures in dinosaurs: what can growth curves tell us?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Maria Griebeler

    Full Text Available To estimate the body temperature (BT of seven dinosaurs Gillooly, Alleen, and Charnov (2006 used an equation that predicts BT from the body mass and maximum growth rate (MGR with the latter preserved in ontogenetic growth trajectories (BT-equation. The results of these authors evidence inertial homeothermy in Dinosauria and suggest that, due to overheating, the maximum body size in Dinosauria was ultimately limited by BT. In this paper, I revisit this hypothesis of Gillooly, Alleen, and Charnov (2006. I first studied whether BTs derived from the BT-equation of today's crocodiles, birds and mammals are consistent with core temperatures of animals. Second, I applied the BT-equation to a larger number of dinosaurs than Gillooly, Alleen, and Charnov (2006 did. In particular, I estimated BT of Archaeopteryx (from two MGRs, ornithischians (two, theropods (three, prosauropods (three, and sauropods (nine. For extant species, the BT value estimated from the BT-equation was a poor estimate of an animal's core temperature. For birds, BT was always strongly overestimated and for crocodiles underestimated; for mammals the accuracy of BT was moderate. I argue that taxon-specific differences in the scaling of MGR (intercept and exponent of the regression line, log-log-transformed and in the parameterization of the Arrhenius model both used in the BT-equation as well as ecological and evolutionary adaptations of species cause these inaccuracies. Irrespective of the found inaccuracy of BTs estimated from the BT-equation and contrary to the results of Gillooly, Alleen, and Charnov (2006 I found no increase in BT with increasing body mass across all dinosaurs (Sauropodomorpha, Sauropoda studied. This observation questions that, due to overheating, the maximum size in Dinosauria was ultimately limited by BT. However, the general high inaccuracy of dinosaurian BTs derived from the BT-equation makes a reliable test of whether body size in dinosaurs was ultimately

  1. Body temperatures in dinosaurs: what can growth curves tell us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebeler, Eva Maria

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the body temperature (BT) of seven dinosaurs Gillooly, Alleen, and Charnov (2006) used an equation that predicts BT from the body mass and maximum growth rate (MGR) with the latter preserved in ontogenetic growth trajectories (BT-equation). The results of these authors evidence inertial homeothermy in Dinosauria and suggest that, due to overheating, the maximum body size in Dinosauria was ultimately limited by BT. In this paper, I revisit this hypothesis of Gillooly, Alleen, and Charnov (2006). I first studied whether BTs derived from the BT-equation of today's crocodiles, birds and mammals are consistent with core temperatures of animals. Second, I applied the BT-equation to a larger number of dinosaurs than Gillooly, Alleen, and Charnov (2006) did. In particular, I estimated BT of Archaeopteryx (from two MGRs), ornithischians (two), theropods (three), prosauropods (three), and sauropods (nine). For extant species, the BT value estimated from the BT-equation was a poor estimate of an animal's core temperature. For birds, BT was always strongly overestimated and for crocodiles underestimated; for mammals the accuracy of BT was moderate. I argue that taxon-specific differences in the scaling of MGR (intercept and exponent of the regression line, log-log-transformed) and in the parameterization of the Arrhenius model both used in the BT-equation as well as ecological and evolutionary adaptations of species cause these inaccuracies. Irrespective of the found inaccuracy of BTs estimated from the BT-equation and contrary to the results of Gillooly, Alleen, and Charnov (2006) I found no increase in BT with increasing body mass across all dinosaurs (Sauropodomorpha, Sauropoda) studied. This observation questions that, due to overheating, the maximum size in Dinosauria was ultimately limited by BT. However, the general high inaccuracy of dinosaurian BTs derived from the BT-equation makes a reliable test of whether body size in dinosaurs was ultimately limited

  2. How two types of fluctuating temperature affect the growth of Fusarium solani

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith F. Jensen; Phillip E. Reynolds

    1969-01-01

    Growth of six isolates of Fusarium solani on potato dextrose agar was determined with (1) continually changing temperature programs, (2) programs consisting of two alternating constant temperatures, and (3) a constant temperature program. All programs had a mean of 70º F. Growth increased with an increase in temperature fluctuation of 10 or...

  3. Antiphase light and temperature cycles disrupt rhythmic plant growth : the Arabidopsis jetlag

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bours, R.M.E.H.

    2014-01-01

      Light and temperature are important determinants of plant growth and development. Plant elongation is stimulated by positively increasing differences between day and night temperature (+DIF, phased cycles). In contrast, a negative temperature difference (-DIF, antiphased cycles) reduces

  4. Nucleation and droplet growth from supersaturated vapor at temperatures below the triple point temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren

    2016-01-01

    temperature Ttr.p. crystallizes via a liquid droplet is an example of Ostwald's step rule. The homogeneous nucleation in the supersaturated gas is not to a crystal, but to a liquid-like critical nucleus. We have for the first time performed constant energy (NVE) Molecular Dynamics (MD) of homogeneous......In 1897 Ostwald formulated his step rule for formation of the most stable crystal state for a system with crystal polymorphism. The rule describes the irreversible way a system converts to the crystal with lowest free energy. But in fact the irreversible way a supercooled gas below the triple point...... below Ttr.p., but without a crystallization of the droplet for long times. The dissipation of the latent heat into the surrounding gas is affected by a traditional MD thermostat, with the consequence that droplet growth is different for (NVE) MD and constant temperature (NVT) MD....

  5. Temperature dependence of vegetative growth and dark respiration: a mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gent, M P; Enoch, H Z

    1983-03-01

    A mathematical model of the processes involved in carbon metabolism is described that predicts the influence of temperature on the growth of plants. The model assumes that the rate of production of dry matter depends both on the temperature and the level of nonstructural carbohydrate. The level of nonstructural carbohydrate is determined by the rates of photosynthesis, growth, and maintenance respiration. The model describes the rate of growth and dark respiration, and the levels of carbohydrate seen in vegetative growth of carnation and tomato. The model suggests that the growth of plants at low temperatures is limited by a shortage of respiratory energy, whereas at high temperatures growth is limited by the shortage of carbohydrate. Thermoperiodism, wherein a warm day and cool night results in faster growth than does constant temperature, is explained by the model as an increase in the level of nonstructural carbohydrate which promotes the rate of growth relative to the rate of maintenance respiration.

  6. On Suboptimal Solution of Antagonistic Matrix Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goryashko Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines resource allocation games such as Colonel Blotto and Colonel Lotto games with the goal to develop tractable method for building suboptimal solution in mixed strategies of these games without solving the relevant optimization problem. The foundation of proposed method lies in the specific combinatorial properties of the partition games. It turned out that as far as distribution of resource along battlefield is concerned that pure strategies participating in ε-optimal solution possessed specific structure. Numerical experiments showed that these specific structural peculiarities can be easily reproduced utilizing previously found combinatorial properties of partition. As a result, we get ε-optimal solution of partition games and support set mixed strategies can be computed in polynomial time.

  7. Temperature extremes: Effect on plant growth and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temperature is a primary factor affecting the rate of plant development. Warmer temperatures expected with climate change and the potential for more extreme temperature events will further impact plant productivity. Pollination is one of the most sensitive phenological stages to temperature extremes...

  8. Effects of Temperature Integration on Growth and Development of Roses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieleman, J.A.; Meinen, E.; Dueck, T.A.

    2005-01-01

    Dutch horticulture aims at a reduction of the energy use in greenhouses by 65% in 2010 compared to 1980. When temperature integration is applied, temperatures may be reduced, as long as they are compensated by higher temperatures within a pre-set time span. Applying temperature integration without

  9. Impact of temperature and nitrogen composition on the growth of GaAsPN alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Keisuke; Mugikura, Shun; Tanaka, Shunsuke; Goto, Masaya; Sekiguchi, Hiroto; Okada, Hiroshi; Wakahara, Akihiro

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents the impact of temperature and nitrogen-composition on the growth mode and crystallinity of GaAsPN alloys. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction results combined with transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that maintaining two-dimensional (2-D) growth required higher temperatures when nitrogen composition increased. Outside the 2-D growth windows, stacking faults and micro-twins were preferentially formed at {1 1 1} B planes rather than at the {1 1 1} A planes and anomalous growth was observed. The photoluminescence spectra of GaAsPN layers implies that the higher temperature growth is effective for reducing the nitrogen-related point defects.

  10. Temperature extremes: Effect on plant growth and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry L. Hatfield

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Temperature is a primary factor affecting the rate of plant development. Warmer temperatures expected with climate change and the potential for more extreme temperature events will impact plant productivity. Pollination is one of the most sensitive phenological stages to temperature extremes across all species and during this developmental stage temperature extremes would greatly affect production. Few adaptation strategies are available to cope with temperature extremes at this developmental stage other than to select for plants which shed pollen during the cooler periods of the day or are indeterminate so flowering occurs over a longer period of the growing season. In controlled environment studies, warm temperatures increased the rate of phenological development; however, there was no effect on leaf area or vegetative biomass compared to normal temperatures. The major impact of warmer temperatures was during the reproductive stage of development and in all cases grain yield in maize was significantly reduced by as much as 80−90% from a normal temperature regime. Temperature effects are increased by water deficits and excess soil water demonstrating that understanding the interaction of temperature and water will be needed to develop more effective adaptation strategies to offset the impacts of greater temperature extreme events associated with a changing climate.

  11. Low-Temperature and Rapid Growth of Large Single-Crystalline Graphene with Ethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao; Lin, Li; Sun, Luzhao; Zhang, Jincan; Rui, Dingran; Li, Jiayu; Wang, Mingzhan; Tan, Congwei; Kang, Ning; Wei, Di; Xu, H Q; Peng, Hailin; Liu, Zhongfan

    2017-11-10

    Future applications of graphene rely highly on the production of large-area high-quality graphene, especially large single-crystalline graphene, due to the reduction of defects caused by grain boundaries. However, current large single-crystalline graphene growing methodologies are suffering from low growth rate and as a result, industrial graphene production is always confronted by high energy consumption, which is primarily caused by high growth temperature and long growth time. Herein, a new growth condition achieved via ethane being the carbon feedstock to achieve low-temperature yet rapid growth of large single-crystalline graphene is reported. Ethane condition gives a growth rate about four times faster than methane, achieving about 420 µm min(-1) for the growth of sub-centimeter graphene single crystals at temperature about 1000 °C. In addition, the temperature threshold to obtain graphene using ethane can be reduced to 750 °C, lower than the general growth temperature threshold (about 1000 °C) with methane on copper foil. Meanwhile ethane always keeps higher graphene growth rate than methane under the same growth temperature. This study demonstrates that ethane is indeed a potential carbon source for efficient growth of large single-crystalline graphene, thus paves the way for graphene in high-end electronical and optoelectronical applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Energy expenditures & physical activity in rats with chronic suboptimal nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifshitz Fima

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sub-optimally nourished rats show reduced growth, biochemical and physiological changes. However, no one has assessed metabolic rate adaptations in rats subjected to chronic suboptimal nutrition (CSN. In this study energy expenditure (EE; kcal/100 g body weight and physical activity (PA; oscillations in weight/min/kg body weight were assessed in rats subjected to three levels of CSN. Results Body weight gain was diminished (76.7 ± 12.0 and 61.6 ± 11.0 g in rats fed 70 and 60% of the ad-libitum fed controls which gained more weight (148.5 ± 32.3 g. The rats fed 80% gained weight similarly to controls (136.3 ± 10.5 g. Percent Fat-free body mass was reduced (143.8 ± 8.7 and 142.0 ± 7.6 g in rats fed 70 and 60% of ad-libitum, but not in those fed 80% (200.8 ± 17.5 g as compared with controls (201.6 ± 33.4 g. Body fat (g decreased in rats fed 80% (19.7 ± 5.3, 70% (15.3 ± 3.5 and 60% (9.6 ± 2.7 of ad-libitum in comparison to controls (26.0 ± 6.7. EE and PA were also altered by CSN. The control rats increased their EE and PA during the dark periods by 1.4 ± 0.8 and 1.7 ± 1.1 respectively, as compared with light the period; whereas CSN rats fed 80 and 70% of ad-libitum energy intake had reduced EE and PA during the dark periods as compared with the light period EE(7.5 ± 1.4 and 7.8 ± 0.6 vs. 9.0 ± 1.2 and 9.7 ± 0.8; p Conclusion CSN rats adapt to mild energy restriction by reducing body fat, EE and PA mainly during the dark period while growth proceeds and lean body mass is preserved. At higher levels of energy restrictions there is decreased growth, body fat and lean mass. Moreover EE and PA are also reduced during both light and dark periods.

  13. Effects of suboptimal intra- uterine growth on preterm infants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1997-03-03

    Mar 3, 1997 ... neonatal period, infants who were born at home and also accepts referrals from outside hospitals. ... to the Baragwanath Hospital neonatal unit over a 4112- month period were enrolled as previously ..... need for mechanical ventilation (P -= 0.032) and the development of pneumothorax (P = 0.040).

  14. A simple equation for describing the temperature dependent growth of free-floating macrophytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, van Tj.; Roijackers, R.M.M.; Nes, van E.H.; Peeters, E.T.H.M.

    2006-01-01

    Temperature is one of the most important factors determining growth rates of free-floating macrophytes in the field. To analyse and predict temperature dependent growth rates of these pleustophytes, modelling may play an important role. Several equations have been published for describing

  15. The effects of temperature and relative humidity on the growth of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of temperature and relative humidity on the growth of three isolated fungi from rice ( Oryza sativa L.) seedlings in Dadin Kowa Irrigation Scheme, Dadin Kowa, Gombe. ... There were significant differences (P≤0.05) in the growth of these fungi at different temperature and relative humidity regimes. Keywords: ...

  16. The impact of atmospheric ammonia and temperature on growth and nitrogen metabolism of winter wheat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clement, J.M A M; Loorbach, J; Meijer, J; van Hasselt, P.R; Stulen, G

    The effect of atmospheric ammonia in combination with low and moderate growth temperature on growth and nitrogen metabolism of winter wheat plants (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Urban) was investigated. Plants were exposed to 0, 1000 and 2000 nl l(-1) NH3 for 1 week at moderate day/night temperatures

  17. Effect of seasonal changing temperature on the growth of phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Fan, Meng; Yuan, Xing; Zhu, Huaiping

    An non-autonomous nutrient-phytoplankton interacting model incorporating the effect of time-varying temperature is established. The impacts of temperature on metabolism of phytoplankton such as nutrient uptake, death rate, and nutrient releasing from particulate nutrient are investigated. The ecological reproductive index is formulated to present a threshold criteria and to characterize the dynamics of phytoplankton. The positive invariance, dissipativity, and the existence and stability of boundary and positive periodic solution are established. The analyses rely on the comparison principle, the coincidence degree theory and Lyapunov direct method. The effect of seasonal temperature and daily temperature on phytoplankton biomass are simulated numerically. Numerical simulation shows that the phytoplankton biomass is very robust to the variation of water temperature. The dynamics of the model and model predictions agree with the experimental data. Our model and analysis provide a possible explanation of triggering mechanism of phytoplankton blooms.

  18. Comparison of signaling interactions determining annual and perennial plant growth in response to low temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid eWingler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Low temperature inhibits plant growth despite the fact that considerable rates of photosynthetic activity can be maintained. Instead of lower rates of photosynthesis, active inhibition of cell division and expansion is primarily responsible for reduced growth. This results in sink limitation and enables plants to accumulate carbohydrates that act as compatible solutes or are stored throughout the winter to enable re-growth in spring. Regulation of growth in response to temperature therefore requires coordination with carbon metabolism, e.g. via the signaling metabolite trehalose-6-phosphate. The phytohormones gibberellins (GA and jasmonate (JA play an important role in regulating growth in response to temperature. Growth restriction at low temperature is mainly mediated by DELLA proteins, whose degradation is promoted by GA. For annual plants, it has been shown that the GA/DELLA pathway interacts with JA signaling and C-repeat binding factor (CBF dependent cold acclimation, but these interactions have not been explored in detail for perennials. Growth regulation in response to seasonal factors is, however, particularly important in perennials, especially at high latitudes. In autumn, growth cessation in trees is caused by shortening of the daylength in interaction with phytohormone signaling. In perennial grasses seasonal differences in the sensitivity to GA may enable enhanced growth in spring. This review provides an overview of the signaling interactions that determine plant growth at low temperature and highlights gaps in our knowledge, especially concerning the seasonality of signaling responses in perennial plants.

  19. Improvement in surface morphology of GaSb buffer layer by two-step high and low temperature growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Shigekazu; Tomabechi, Shuichi; Suzuki, Ryo; Matsukura, Yusuke; Tsunoda, Koji; Kon, Jun-ichi; Nishino, Hironori

    2017-11-01

    The surface morphology of GaSb was investigated by changing growth conditions such as thermal oxide desorption temperature, growth temperature, and growth step by solid source molecular beam epitaxy. At high temperature growth, the pits caused by the thermal oxide desorption remained in the GaSb buffer layer surface, while the surface was sufficiently flattened. At low temperature growth, the pits disappeared, while the surface was not enough flattened even in the case of step-flow mode growth. Since the pits disappeared at lower growth temperature regardless of the growth mode, this behavior might be explained by the Ga migration length depending on the growth temperature. By applying two-step high/low temperature growth, where both growth steps proceed in step-flow mode, flat, a pit-free GaSb buffer surface could be obtained.

  20. Seasonal changes in temperature and nutrient control of photosynthesis, respiration and growth of natural phytoplankton communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stæhr, P. A.; Sand-Jensen, K.

    2006-01-01

    1. To investigate the influence of elevated temperatures and nutrients on photosynthesis, respiration and growth of natural phytoplankton assemblages, water was collected from a eutrophic lake in spring, summer, autumn, winter and the following spring and exposed to ambient temperature and ambient...... cultures in seasons of low ambient nutrient availability. 3. Temperature stimulation of growth and metabolism was higher at low than high ambient temperature showing that long-term temperature acclimation of the phytoplankton community before the experiments was of great importance for the measured rates....... 4. Although we found distinct responses to relatively small temperature increases, the interaction between nutrient availability, time of the year and, thus, ambient temperature was responsible for most of the observed variability in phytoplankton growth, photosynthesis and respiration. 5. Although...

  1. Temperature and rainfall strongly drive temporal growth variation in Asian tropical forest trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlam, Mart; Baker, Patrick J; Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh; Zuidema, Pieter A

    2014-04-01

    Climate change effects on growth rates of tropical trees may lead to alterations in carbon cycling of carbon-rich tropical forests. However, climate sensitivity of broad-leaved lowland tropical trees is poorly understood. Dendrochronology (tree-ring analysis) provides a powerful tool to study the relationship between tropical tree growth and annual climate variability. We aimed to establish climate-growth relationships for five annual-ring forming tree species, using ring-width data from 459 canopy and understory trees from a seasonal tropical forest in western Thailand. Based on 183/459 trees, chronologies with total lengths between 29 and 62 years were produced for four out of five species. Bootstrapped correlation analysis revealed that climate-growth responses were similar among these four species. Growth was significantly negatively correlated with current-year maximum and minimum temperatures, and positively correlated with dry-season precipitation levels. Negative correlations between growth and temperature may be attributed to a positive relationship between temperature and autotrophic respiration rates. The positive relationship between growth and dry-season precipitation levels likely reflects the strong water demand during leaf flush. Mixed-effect models yielded results that were consistent across species: a negative effect of current wet-season maximum temperatures on growth, but also additive positive effects of, for example, prior dry-season maximum temperatures. Our analyses showed that annual growth variability in tropical trees is determined by a combination of both temperature and precipitation variability. With rising temperature, the predominantly negative relationship between temperature and growth may imply decreasing growth rates of tropical trees as a result of global warming.

  2. A modified von Bertalanffy growth model dependent on temperature and body size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoeun; Lim, Roktaek; Seo, Young-Il; Sheen, Dongwoo

    2017-10-12

    Fish growth models are widely used in fisheries as well in aquacultures and ecology. Water temperature is one of the most important factors determining the growth of fish. In the present study, we propose a growth model that includes the effect of water temperature on the growth in the von Bertalanffy growth model. Our model was applied to fit the growth data of bullhead (Cottus gobio), brown trout (Salmo trutta L.), juvenile salmon (Salmo salar), and Araucanian herring (Strangomera bentincki). The model reproduces the growth patterns of each species and fits a set of appropriate parameter values for each species. Moreover, the model reflects the seasonal growth rates quite well. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Ambiguity of large scale temperature reconstructions from artificial tree growth in millennial climate simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Bothe, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    The ambiguity of temperature reconstructions is assessed using pseudo tree growth series in the virtual reality of two simulations of the climate of the last millennium. The simple, process-based Vaganov-Shashkin-Lite (VS-Lite) code calculates tree growth responses controlled by a limited number of climatic parameters. Growth limitation by different ambient climate conditions allows for possible nonlinearity and non-stationarity in the pseudo tree growth series. Statistical reconstructions of temperature are achieved from simulated tree growth for random selections of pseudo-proxy locations by simple local regression and composite plus scaling techniques to address additional ambiguities in paleoclimate reconstructions besides the known uncertainty and shortcomings of the reconstruction methods. A systematic empirical evaluation shows that the interrelations between simulated target and reconstructed temperatures undergo strong variations with possibly pronounced misrepresentations of temperatures. Thus (i) c...

  4. Growth, temperature and density relationships of North Sea cod ( Gadus morhua )

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindorf, Anna; Jensen, Henrik; Schrum, Corinna

    2008-01-01

    This study presents an analysis of the relationship between ambient temperature, cod density, fishing mortality, prey fish biomass, and growth of North Sea cod (Gadus morhua) as estimated from survey catches during the period from 1983 to 2006. Growth of young cod was positively related to temper......This study presents an analysis of the relationship between ambient temperature, cod density, fishing mortality, prey fish biomass, and growth of North Sea cod (Gadus morhua) as estimated from survey catches during the period from 1983 to 2006. Growth of young cod was positively related...... to temperature; however, although temperature increased, distribution of 1-year-olds changed concurrently and no increase in length at age 1 occurred. Growth from age 1 to age 2 decreased as ambient biomass of sandeel and density of cod decreased, whereas growth of cod older than 2 years decreased...... with increasing density of cod and increased with increasing biomass of demersal fish prey. Though growth of juveniles was strongly positively correlated to ambient temperature, no indication of direct temperature limitation of growth of older North Sea cod was found....

  5. Toxin production and growth of pathogens subjected to temperature fluctuations simulating consumer handling of cold cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røssvoll, Elin; Rønning, Helene Thorsen; Granum, Per Einar; Møretrø, Trond; Hjerpekjøn, Marianne Røine; Langsrud, Solveig

    2014-08-18

    It is crucial for the quality and safety of ready-to-eat (RTE) foods to maintain the cold chain from production to consumption. The effect of temperature abuse related to daily meals and elevated refrigerator temperatures on the growth and toxin production of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus weihenstephanensis and Staphylococcus aureus and the growth of Listeria monocytogenes and Yersinia enterocolitica was studied. A case study with temperature loggings in the domestic environment during Easter and Christmas holidays was performed to select relevant time and temperature courses. A model for bacterial surface growth on food using nutrient agar plates exposed to variations in temperatures was used to simulate food stored at different temperatures and exposed to room temperature for short periods of time. The results were compared with predicted growth using the modeling tool ComBase Predictor. The consumers exposed their cold cuts to room temperatures as high as 26.5°C with an average duration of meals was 47 min daily for breakfast/brunch during the vacations. Short (≤ 2 h) daily intervals at 25°C nearly halved the time the different pathogens needed to reach levels corresponding to the levels associated with human infection or intoxication, compared with the controls continuously stored at refrigerator temperature. Although the temperature fluctuations affected growth of both B. weihenstephanensis and S. aureus, toxin production was only detected at much higher cell concentrations than what has been associated with human intoxications. Therefore, growth of L. monocytogenes and Y. enterocolitica was found to be the limiting factor for safety. In combination with data on temperature abuse in the domestic environment, modeling programs such as ComBase Predictor can be efficient tools to predict growth of some pathogens but will not predict toxin production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Exogenously Applied Plant Growth Regulators Enhance the Morpho-Physiological Growth and Yield of Rice under High Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahad, Shah; Hussain, Saddam; Saud, Shah; Hassan, Shah; Ihsan, Zahid; Shah, Adnan N; Wu, Chao; Yousaf, Muhammad; Nasim, Wajid; Alharby, Hesham; Alghabari, Fahad; Huang, Jianliang

    2016-01-01

    A 2-year experiment was conducted to ascertain the effects of exogenously applied plant growth regulators (PGR) on rice growth and yield attributes under high day (HDT) and high night temperature (HNT). Two rice cultivars (IR-64 and Huanghuazhan) were subjected to temperature treatments in controlled growth chambers and four different combinations of ascorbic acid (Vc), alpha-tocopherol (Ve), brassinosteroids (Br), methyl jasmonates (MeJA), and triazoles (Tr) were applied. High temperature severely affected rice morphology, and also reduced leaf area, above-, and below-ground biomass, photosynthesis, and water use efficiency, while increased the leaf water potential of both rice cultivars. Grain yield and its related attributes except number of panicles, were reduced under high temperature. The HDT posed more negative effects on rice physiological attributes, while HNT was more detrimental for grain formation and yield. The Huanghuazhan performed better than IR-64 under high temperature stress with better growth and higher grain yield. Exogenous application of PGRs was helpful in alleviating the adverse effects of high temperature. Among PGR combinations, the Vc+Ve+MejA+Br was the most effective treatment for both cultivars under high temperature stress. The highest grain production by Vc+Ve+MejA+Br treated plants was due to enhanced photosynthesis, spikelet fertility and grain filling, which compensated the adversities of high temperature stress. Taken together, these results will be of worth for further understanding the adaptation and survival mechanisms of rice to high temperature and will assist in developing heat-resistant rice germplasm in future.

  7. Effect of stress-induced grain growth during room temperature ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    -induced grain ... The TEM observations reveal that stress-induced grain growth during tensile deformation is significantly suppressed for the nc Ni–Co alloys rich in Co in sharp contrast to those poor in Co. We believe that sufficient solutes ...

  8. Water temperature and fish growth: otoliths predict growth patterns of a marine fish in a changing climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rountrey, Adam N; Coulson, Peter G; Meeuwig, Jessica J; Meekan, Mark

    2014-08-01

    Ecological modeling shows that even small, gradual changes in body size in a fish population can have large effects on natural mortality, biomass, and catch. However, efforts to model the impact of climate change on fish growth have been hampered by a lack of long-term (multidecadal) data needed to understand the effects of temperature on growth rates in natural environments. We used a combination of dendrochronology techniques and additive mixed-effects modeling to examine the sensitivity of growth in a long-lived (up to 70 years), endemic marine fish, the western blue groper (Achoerodus gouldii), to changes in water temperature. A multi-decadal biochronology (1952-2003) of growth was constructed from the otoliths of 56 fish collected off the southwestern coast of Western Australia, and we tested for correlations between the mean index chronology and a range of potential environmental drivers. The chronology was significantly correlated with sea surface temperature in the region, but common variance among individuals was low. This suggests that this species has been relatively insensitive to past variations in climate. Growth increment and age data were also used in an additive mixed model to predict otolith growth and body size later this century. Although growth was relatively insensitive to changes in temperature, the model results suggested that a fish aged 20 in 2099 would have an otolith about 10% larger and a body size about 5% larger than a fish aged 20 in 1977. Our study shows that species or populations regarded as relatively insensitive to climate change could still undergo significant changes in growth rate and body size that are likely to have important effects on the productivity and yield of fisheries. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Resource supply overrides temperature as a controlling factor of marine phytoplankton growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marañón, Emilio; Cermeño, Pedro; Huete-Ortega, María; López-Sandoval, Daffne C; Mouriño-Carballido, Beatriz; Rodríguez-Ramos, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    The universal temperature dependence of metabolic rates has been used to predict how ocean biology will respond to ocean warming. Determining the temperature sensitivity of phytoplankton metabolism and growth is of special importance because this group of organisms is responsible for nearly half of global primary production, sustains most marine food webs, and contributes to regulate the exchange of CO2 between the ocean and the atmosphere. Phytoplankton growth rates increase with temperature under optimal growth conditions in the laboratory, but it is unclear whether the same degree of temperature dependence exists in nature, where resources are often limiting. Here we use concurrent measurements of phytoplankton biomass and carbon fixation rates in polar, temperate and tropical regions to determine the role of temperature and resource supply in controlling the large-scale variability of in situ metabolic rates. We identify a biogeographic pattern in phytoplankton metabolic rates, which increase from the oligotrophic subtropical gyres to temperate regions and then coastal waters. Variability in phytoplankton growth is driven by changes in resource supply and appears to be independent of seawater temperature. The lack of temperature sensitivity of realized phytoplankton growth is consistent with the limited applicability of Arrhenius enzymatic kinetics when substrate concentrations are low. Our results suggest that, due to widespread resource limitation in the ocean, the direct effect of sea surface warming upon phytoplankton growth and productivity may be smaller than anticipated.

  10. Resource Supply Overrides Temperature as a Controlling Factor of Marine Phytoplankton Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marañón, Emilio; Cermeño, Pedro; Huete-Ortega, María; López-Sandoval, Daffne C.; Mouriño-Carballido, Beatriz; Rodríguez-Ramos, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    The universal temperature dependence of metabolic rates has been used to predict how ocean biology will respond to ocean warming. Determining the temperature sensitivity of phytoplankton metabolism and growth is of special importance because this group of organisms is responsible for nearly half of global primary production, sustains most marine food webs, and contributes to regulate the exchange of CO2 between the ocean and the atmosphere. Phytoplankton growth rates increase with temperature under optimal growth conditions in the laboratory, but it is unclear whether the same degree of temperature dependence exists in nature, where resources are often limiting. Here we use concurrent measurements of phytoplankton biomass and carbon fixation rates in polar, temperate and tropical regions to determine the role of temperature and resource supply in controlling the large-scale variability of in situ metabolic rates. We identify a biogeographic pattern in phytoplankton metabolic rates, which increase from the oligotrophic subtropical gyres to temperate regions and then coastal waters. Variability in phytoplankton growth is driven by changes in resource supply and appears to be independent of seawater temperature. The lack of temperature sensitivity of realized phytoplankton growth is consistent with the limited applicability of Arrhenius enzymatic kinetics when substrate concentrations are low. Our results suggest that, due to widespread resource limitation in the ocean, the direct effect of sea surface warming upon phytoplankton growth and productivity may be smaller than anticipated. PMID:24921945

  11. Compensatory growth of juvenile brown flounder Paralichthys olivaceus following low temperature treatment for different periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yinhui; Liu, Xiujia; Huang, Guoqiang; Wei, Liuzhi; Zhang, Xiumei

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the effects of low temperature (8.5°C) on the growth and feeding rates and feed conversion efficiency of juvenile P. olivaceus with an average initial weight of 3.87 ± 0.06 g (mean ± SE). Fish were exposed to 8.5°C for 0 (control), 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks, and then to 20°C for 10, 9, 8, 7 and 6 weeks, respectively. Low temperature clearly led to growth depression. The weight of fish exposed to low temperature for 1 week was restored to that of control, while that of fish exposed to low temperature longer was significantly decreased ( P growth rate, feeding rate and feed conversion efficiency of the fish were significantly lower ( P growth and average feeding rate were markedly higher ( P fish exposed to low temperature for 1 week was not significantly different from that of control ( P > 0.05). Feeding rate and feed conversion efficiency were reduced at low temperature in juvenile P. olivaceus. The compensatory growth of juvenile P. olivaceus may therefore be attributed to the improvement of feeding rate. Our results suggested that growth depression occurs when juvenile P. olivaceus are exposed to low temperature for more than one week.

  12. Effect of varying temperature on growth, morphology and soluble ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-16

    May 16, 2008 ... temperature severely affects cell morphology (cell size, cell types, formation of filaments/minicells and staining behavior of cells). ..... 185(2): 693-697. Hancock IC (1994). Analysis of cell wall constituents of Gram – positive bacteria. In: Chemical Methods in Prokaryotic systematics. Good fellow M, O'Donnel ...

  13. Growth of cuprate high temperature superconductor thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H-U Habermeier

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available   This paper reviews briefly the development of physical vapour deposition based HTS thin film preparation technologies to today’s state-of-the-art methods. It covers the main trends of in-situ process and growth control. The current activities to fabricate tapes for power applications as well as to tailor interfaces in cuprate are described. Some future trends in HTS thin film research, both for science as well as application driven activities are outlined.

  14. Adaptation and acclimation of growth and photosynthesis of five Antarctic red algae to low temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggert, A; Wiencke, C

    Temperature requirements for growth, photosynthesis and dark respiration were determined for five Antarctic red algal species. After acclimation, the stenothermal species Gigartina skottsbergii and Ballia callitricha grew at 0 or up to 5 degrees C, respectively; the eurythermal species Kallymenia

  15. Suboptimal light conditions influence source-sink metabolism during flowering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelies eChristiaens

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Reliance on carbohydrates during flower forcing was investigated in one early and one late flowering cultivar of azalea (Rhododendron simsii hybrids. Carbohydrate accumulation, invertase activity, and expression of a purported sucrose synthase gene (RsSUS was monitored during flower forcing under suboptimal (natural and optimal (supplemental light light conditions, after a cold treatment (7°C + dark to break flower bud dormancy. Post-production sucrose metabolism and flowering quality was also assessed. Glucose and fructose concentrations and invertase activity increased in petals during flowering, while sucrose decreased. In suboptimal light conditions RsSUS expression in leaves increased as compared to optimal light conditions, indicating that plants in suboptimal light conditions have a strong demand for carbohydrates. However, carbohydrates in leaves were markedly lower in suboptimal light conditions compared to optimal light conditions. This resulted in poor flowering of plants in suboptimal light conditions. Post-production flowering relied on the stored leaf carbon, which could be accumulated under optimal light conditions in the greenhouse. These results show that flower opening in azalea relies on carbohydrates imported from leaves and is source-limiting under suboptimal light conditions.

  16. Influence of soil temperature on growth traits of European beech seedlings

    OpenAIRE

    Štraus, Ines; Frederick, Peter C.; Hylton, Becky; Mrak, Tanja; Ferlan, Mitja; Heath, Julie; Železnik, Peter; Spalding, Marilyn; Kraigher, Hojka

    2014-01-01

    European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) is an economically and ecologically important forest tree species in Europe. Expected future temperature increases due to global climate change may significantly affect growth of beech trees and consequently influence carbon cycling in beech forests. We tested the hypothesis that soil temperature influences the growth of both belowground and aboveground parts of beech seedlings. One-year-old seedlings were transferred into rhizotrons and subjected ...

  17. [Effects of air temperature change on spring wheat growth at different altitudes in northwest arid area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong; Li, Feng-Min; Xiong, You-Cai; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Run-Yuan; Yang, Qi-Guo

    2009-04-01

    Based on the 1981-2006 observation data from agricultural meteorological stations at Minle (high altitude) and Zhangye (low altitude) in northwest arid area, the effects of air temperature change at the two altitudes on the growth and yield of spring wheat were studied. It was shown that during study period, the air temperature at the two altitudes had an increasing trend, and the increment was greater at high altitude than at low altitude. At high altitude, the growth duration of spring wheat shortened but the grain yield increased; while at low altitude, the growth duration shortened and the yield decreased. When the mean daily air temperature during spring wheat growth period increased by 1 degrees C, the growth duration shortened by 8.3 days at high altitude and by 3.8 days at low altitude. The growth duration and grain yield of spring wheat at high altitude had a slight increase when the maximum air temperature during growth period was below 30.4 degrees C, but decreased when the maximum air temperature was above 30.4 degrees C.

  18. Measurement of Temperature Fluctuations and Microscopic Growth Rates in a Silicon Floating Zone and Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Markus; Croell, Arne

    1999-01-01

    A silicon crystal growth experiment has been accomplished using the floating-zone technique under microgravity on a sounding rocket (TEXUS 36). Measurements of temperature fluctuations in the silicon melt zone due to time dependent thermocapillary convection (Marangoni convection) and an observation of the microscopic growth rate were simultaneously performed during the experiment. Temperature fluctuations of about 0.5 - 0.7 C with a frequency range growth rate fluctuates considerably around the average growth rate of 1 mm/min: Growth rates up to 3 to 4mm/min, close to zero mm/min, as well as negative values (backmelting) were observed. Dopant striations are clearly visible in the Sb-doped crystal. They were characterized by Spreading Resistance measurements and Differential Interference Contrast microscopy. The frequencies of temperature fluctuations, microscopic growth rates, and the dopant inhomogeneities correspond quite well, with main frequencies between 0.1 and 0.3 Hz. 3D numerical simulations were performed to predict the optimum position of the temperature sensor, and the characteristic temperature amplitudes and frequencies. At a position 3.4mm above the interface and 1.4mm inside the melt, equivalent to the sensor tip position in the experiment, temperature fluctuations up to 1.8 C and frequencies ? 0.25Hz were found in the simulations.

  19. High Growth Rate Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy at Low Temperature through Use of Uncracked Hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte, Kevin L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Simon, John D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ptak, Aaron J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Braun, Anna [Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

    2018-01-22

    We demonstrate hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) of GaAs with unusually high growth rates (RG) at low temperature and atmospheric pressure by employing a hydride-enhanced growth mechanism. Under traditional HVPE growth conditions that involve growth from Asx species, RG exhibits a strong temperature dependence due to slow kinetics at the surface, and growth temperatures >750 degrees C are required to obtain RG > 60 um/h. We demonstrate that when the group V element reaches the surface in a hydride, the kinetic barrier is dramatically reduced and surface kinetics no longer limit RG. In this regime, RG is dependent on mass transport of uncracked AsH3 to the surface. By controlling the AsH3 velocity and temperature profile of the reactor, which both affect the degree of AsH3 decomposition, we demonstrate tuning of RG. We achieve RG above 60 um/h at temperatures as low as 560 degrees C and up to 110 um/h at 650 degrees C. We incorporate high-RG GaAs into solar cell devices to verify that the electronic quality does not deteriorate as RG is increased. The open circuit voltage (VOC), which is a strong function of non-radiative recombination in the bulk material, exhibits negligible variance in a series of devices grown at 650 degrees C with RG = 55-110 um/h. The implications of low temperature growth for the formation of complex heterostructure devices by HVPE are discussed.

  20. Ambient temperature effects on growth of milkfish (Chanos chanos) at aquaculture scale in Blanakan, West Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    A'yun, Q.; Takarina, N. D.

    2017-07-01

    Growth and survival of fishes can be influenced by temperature [1]. Variation among size like weight and length could be the preference how temperature works on growth of fishes [2]. This could be key factor in determining in production as well as market demand since people like heavy and large fishes. The main purpose of this study was to determine the effects of temperature on the growth of milkfish (Chanos Chanos) on weight and length parameters in fish farms Blanakan. This study conducted to assess the optimal temperature for the growth of fish of different sizes to optimize the culture conditions for raising milkfishes in scale cultivation in Blanakan, West Java. Milkfishes were reared in the aquaculture Blanakan ponds because they can adapt very well. The weight and length of milkfishes were measured together with water temperature. The results showed the temperature min (tmin) and max (tmax) were ranged from 29-35 °C. Based on the result, there were significant differences in mean weight (p = 0.00) between temperature with the fish reared in tmax group having the lowest mean weight (99.87±11.51 g) and fish reared in tmin group having the highest mean weight (277.17±33.76 g). Likewise, the significant differences were also observed in mean length (p = 0.00) between temperature with the fish reared in tmax group having the lowest mean length (176.50±12.50 mm) and fish reared in tmin group having the highest mean length (183.60±23.86 mm). Therefore, this paper confirmed the significant effects of temperature on the fish growth reared in aquaculture ponds. More, maintaining aquaculture to lower temperature can be considered as way to keep growth of milkfish well.

  1. Development and validation of a combined temperature, water activity, pH model for bacterial growth rate Lactobacillus curvatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijtzes, T.; Rombouts, F.M.; Kant-Muermans, M.L.T.; Riet, K. van 't; Zwietering, M.H.

    2001-01-01

    A model was established to predict growth rate as a function of temperature, pH and water activity. The model is based on two, earlier developed models, one for growth rate as a function of temperature and water activity and the other for growth rate as a function of temperature and pH. Based on the

  2. Development and validation of a combined temperature, water activity, pH model for bacterial growth rate of Lactobacillus curvatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijtzes, T.; Rombouts, F.M.; Kant-Muermans, M.L.T.; Riet, van 't K.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2001-01-01

    A model was established to predict growth rate as a function of temperature, pH and water activity. The model is based on two, earlier developed models, one for growth rate as a function of temperature and water activity and the other for growth rate as a function of temperature and pH. Based on the

  3. Evidence that higher [CO2] increases tree growth sensitivity to temperature: a comparison of modern and paleo oaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven L. Voelker; Michael C. Stambaugh; J. Renée Brooks; Frederick C. Meinzer; Barbara Lachenbruch; Richard P. Guyette

    2017-01-01

    To test tree growth-sensitivity to temperature under different ambient CO2 concentrations, we determined stem radial growth rates as they relate to variation in temperature during the last deglacial period, and compare these to modern tree growth rates as they relate to spatial variation in temperature across the modern species distributional...

  4. The Averaged Face Growth Rates of lysozyme Crystals: The Effect of Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadarajah, Arunan; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1995-01-01

    Measurements of the averaged or macroscopic face growth rates of lysozyme crystals are reported here for the (110) face of tetragonal lysozyme, at three sets of pH and salt concentrations, with temperatures over a 4-22 C range for several protein concentrations. The growth rate trends with supersaturation were similar to previous microscopic growth rate measurements. However, it was found that at high super-saturations the growth rates attain a maximum and then start decreasing. No 'dead zone' was observed but the growth rates were found to approach zero asymptotically at very low super-saturations. The growth rate data also displayed a dependence on pH and salt concentration which could not be characterized solely by the super-saturation. A complete mechanism for lysozyme crystal growth, involving the formation of an aggregate growth unit, mass transport of the growth unit to the crystal interface and faceted crystal growth by growth unit addition, is suggested. Such a mechanism may provide a more consistent explanation for the observed growth rate trends than those suggested by other investigators. The nutrient solution interactions leading to the formation of the aggregate growth unit may, thus, be as important as those occurring at the crystal interface and may account for the differences between small molecule and protein crystal growth.

  5. Growth and Low Temperature Transport Measurements of Pure and Doped Bismuth Selenide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mlack, Jerome Thomas

    pressure vapor-solid growth. The growth method yields a variety of nanostructures, and materials analysis shows ordered structures of bismuth selenide in all cases. Low-temperature measurements of as-grown nanostructures indicate tunable carrier density in all samples. By doping the nanostructures...

  6. Effect of temperature on development and growth potential of axillary buds in roses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcelis-van Acker, C.A.M.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of temperature during axillary bud formation on axillary bud development and subsequent shoot growth was investigated. Growth potential of the axillary buds was studied either in situ, by pruning the parent shoot above the bud, or in isolation, by grafting the bud or by culturing the bud

  7. Temperatures and the growth and development of maize and rice: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Berta; Rasmussen, Anton; Porter, John R

    2014-02-01

    Because of global land surface warming, extreme temperature events are expected to occur more often and more intensely, affecting the growth and development of the major cereal crops in several ways, thus affecting the production component of food security. In this study, we have identified rice and maize crop responses to temperature in different, but consistent, phenological phases and development stages. A literature review and data compilation of around 140 scientific articles have determined the key temperature thresholds and response to extreme temperature effects for rice and maize, complementing an earlier study on wheat. Lethal temperatures and cardinal temperatures, together with error estimates, have been identified for phenological phases and development stages. Following the methodology of previous work, we have collected and statistically analysed temperature thresholds of the three crops for the key physiological processes such as leaf initiation, shoot growth and root growth and for the most susceptible phenological phases such as sowing to emergence, anthesis and grain filling. Our summary shows that cardinal temperatures are conservative between studies and are seemingly well defined in all three crops. Anthesis and ripening are the most sensitive temperature stages in rice as well as in wheat and maize. We call for further experimental studies of the effects of transgressing threshold temperatures so such responses can be included into crop impact and adaptation models. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The Effect of Temperature on Leaf and Rhizome Growth Rates in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth and reproduction in seagrass is affected by environmental parameters such as temperature, salinity, tidal current and nutrients. Following the current global warming trend, ocean temperatures in Tanzania are predicted to increase by 2-4oC from current levels of 27-28oC. Changes in climate are thus likely to affect ...

  9. Effects of light intensity and temperature on Cryptomonas ovata (Cryptophyceae) growth and nutrient uptake rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloern, James E.

    1977-01-01

    Specific growth rate of Cryptomonas ovata var. palustris Pringsheim was measured in batch culture at 14 light-temperature combinations. Both the maximum growth rate (μm) and optimum light intensity (Iopt) fit an empirical function that increases exponentially with temperature up to an optimum (Topt), then declines rapidly as temperature exceeds Topt. Incorporation of these functions into Steele's growth equation gives a good estimate of specific growth rate over a wide range of temperature and light intensity. Rates of phosphate, ammonium and nitrate uptake were measured separately at 16 combinations of irradiance and temperature and following a spike addition of all starved cells initially took up nutrient at a rapid rate. This transitory surge was followed by a period of steady, substrate-saturated uptake that persisted until external nutrient concentration fell. Substrate-saturated NO3−-uptake proceeded at very slow rates in the dark and was stimulated by both increased temperature and irradiance; NH4+-uptake apparently proceeded at a basal rate at 8 and l4 C and was also stimulated by increased temperature and irradiance. Rates of NH4−-uptake were much higher than NO3−-uptake at all light-temperature combinations. Below 20 C, PO4−3-uptake was more rapid in dark than in light, but was light enhanced at 26 C.

  10. Temperature-dependent subsurface growth during atomic layer deposition on polypropylene and cellulose fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jur, Jesse S; Spagnola, Joseph C; Lee, Kyoungmi; Gong, Bo; Peng, Qing; Parsons, Gregory N

    2010-06-01

    Nucleation and subsequent growth of aluminum oxide by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on polypropylene fiber substrates is strongly dependent on processing temperature and polymer backbone structure. Deposition on cellulose cotton, which contains ample hydroxyl sites for ALD nucleation and growth on the polymer backbone, readily produces a uniform and conformal coating. However, similar ALD processing on polypropylene, which contains no readily available active sites for growth initiation, results in a graded and intermixed polymer/inorganic interface layer. The structure of the polymer/inorganic layer depends strongly on the process temperature, where lower temperature (60 degrees C) produced a more abrupt transition. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images of polypropylene fibers coated at higher temperature (90 degrees C) show that non-coalesced particles form in the near-surface region of the polymer, and the particles grow in size and coalesce into a film as the number of ALD cycles increases. Quartz crystal microbalance analysis on polypropylene films confirms enhanced mass uptake at higher processing temperatures, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data also confirm heterogeneous mixing between the aluminum oxide and the polypropylene during deposition at higher temperatures. The strong temperature dependence of film nucleation and subsurface growth is ascribed to a relatively large increase in bulk species diffusivity that occurs upon the temperature-driven free volume expansion of the polypropylene. These results provide helpful insight into mechanisms for controlled organic/inorganic thin film and fiber materials integration.

  11. The effects of temperature and NaCl concentration on tetragonal lysozyme face growth rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Elizabeth; Pusey, Marc Lee

    1994-01-01

    Measurements were made of the (110) and (101) face growth rates of the tetragonal form of hen egg white lysozyme at 0.1M sodium acetate buffer, pH 4.0, from 4 to 22 C and with 3.0%, 5.0%, and 7.0% NaCl used as the precipitating salt. The data were collected at supersaturation ratios ranging from approximately 4 to approximately 63. Both decreasing temperature and increasing salt concentrations shifted plots of the growth rate versus C/C(sat) to the right, i.e. higher supersaturations were required for comparable growth rates. The observed trends in the growth data are counter to those expected from the solubility data. If tetragonal lysozyme crystal growth is by addition of ordered aggregates from the solution, then the observed growth data could be explained as a result of the effects of lowered temperature and increased salt concentration on the kinetics and equilibrium processes governing protein-protein interactions in solution. The data indicate that temperature would be a more tractable means of controlling the growth rate for tetragonal lysozyme crystals contrary to the usual practice in, e.g., vapor diffusion protein crystal growth, where both the precipitant and protein concentrations are simultaneously increased. However, the available range for control is dependent upon the protein concentration, with the greatest growth rate control being at the lower concentration.

  12. The effects of temperature and NaCl concentration on tetragonal lysozyme face growth rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Elizabeth; Lee Pusey, Marc

    1994-05-01

    Measurements were made of the (110) and (101) face growth rates of the tetragonal form of hen egg white lysozyme at 0.1M sodium acetate buffer, pH 4.0, from 4 to 22°C and with 3.0%, 5.0%, and 7.0% NaCl used as the precipitating salt. The data were collected at supersaturation ratios ranging from ˜4 to ˜63. Both decreasing temperature and increasing salt concentrations shifted plots of the growth rate versus C/ Csat to the right, i.e. higher supersaturations were required for comparable growth rates. The observed trends in the growth data are counter to those expected from the solubility data. If tetragonal lysozyme crystal growth is by addition of ordered aggregates from the solution, then the observed growth data could be explained as a result of the effects of lowered temperature and increased salt concentration on the kinetics and equilibrium processes governing protein-protein interactions in solution. The data indicate that temperature would be a more tractable means of controlling the growth rate for tetragonal lysozyme crystals contrary to the usual practice in, e.g., vapor diffusion protein crystal growth, where both the precipitant and protein concentrations are simultaneously increased. However, the available range for control is dependent upon the protein concentration, with the greatest growth rate control being at the lower concentration.

  13. Daily changes in temperature, not the circadian clock, regulate growth rate in Brachypodium distachyon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominick A Matos

    Full Text Available Plant growth is commonly regulated by external cues such as light, temperature, water availability, and internal cues generated by the circadian clock. Changes in the rate of growth within the course of a day have been observed in the leaves, stems, and roots of numerous species. However, the relative impact of the circadian clock on the growth of grasses has not been thoroughly characterized. We examined the influence of diurnal temperature and light changes, and that of the circadian clock on leaf length growth patterns in Brachypodium distachyon using high-resolution time-lapse imaging. Pronounced changes in growth rate were observed under combined photocyles and thermocycles or with thermocycles alone. A considerably more rapid growth rate was observed at 28°C than 12°C, irrespective of the presence or absence of light. In spite of clear circadian clock regulated gene expression, plants exhibited no change in growth rate under conditions of constant light and temperature, and little or no effect under photocycles alone. Therefore, temperature appears to be the primary cue influencing observed oscillations in growth rate and not the circadian clock or photoreceptor activity. Furthermore, the size of the leaf meristem and final cell length did not change in response to changes in temperature. Therefore, the nearly five-fold difference in growth rate observed across thermocycles can be attributed to proportionate changes in the rate of cell division and expansion. A better understanding of the growth cues in B. distachyon will further our ability to model metabolism and biomass accumulation in grasses.

  14. Physicochemical Parameters for Growth of the Sea Ice Bacteria Glaciecola punicea ACAM 611T and Gelidibacter sp. Strain IC158

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, D. S.; Greenhill, A. R.; Shadbolt, C. T.; Ross, T.; McMeekin, T. A.

    1999-01-01

    The water activity and pH ranges for growth of Glaciecola punicea (a psychrophile) were extended when this organism was grown at suboptimal rather than optimal temperatures. No such extension was observed for Gelidibacter sp. strain IC158 (a psychrotolerant bacterium) at analogous temperatures. Salinity and pH may be primary physicochemical parameters controlling bacterial community development in sea ice. PMID:10427082

  15. Growth trajectory influences temperature preference in fish through an effect on metabolic rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, Shaun S

    2014-11-01

    Most animals experience temperature variations as they move through the environment. For ectotherms, in particular, temperature has a strong influence on habitat choice. While well studied at the species level, less is known about factors affecting the preferred temperature of individuals; especially lacking is information on how physiological traits are linked to thermal preference and whether such relationships are affected by factors such feeding history and growth trajectory. This study examined these issues in the common minnow Phoxinus phoxinus, to determine the extent to which feeding history, standard metabolic rate (SMR) and aerobic scope (AS), interact to affect temperature preference. Individuals were either: 1) food deprived (FD) for 21 days, then fed ad libitum for the next 74 days; or 2) fed ad libitum throughout the entire period. All animals were then allowed to select preferred temperatures using a shuttle-box, and then measured for SMR and AS at 10 °C, estimated by rates of oxygen uptake. Activity within the shuttle-box under a constant temperature regime was also measured. In both FD and control fish, SMR was negatively correlated with preferred temperature. The SMR of the FD fish was increased compared with the controls, probably due to the effects of compensatory growth, and so these growth-compensated fish preferred temperatures that were on average 2.85 °C cooler than controls fed a maintenance ration throughout the study. Fish experiencing compensatory growth also displayed a large reduction in activity. In growth-compensated fish and controls, activity measured at 10 °C was positively correlated with preferred temperature. Individual fish prefer temperatures that vary predictably with SMR and activity level, which are both plastic in response to feeding history and growth trajectories. Cooler temperatures probably allow individuals to reduce maintenance costs and divert more energy towards growth. A reduction in SMR at cooler

  16. Temperature distribution and plant responses of birch (Betula pendula Roth.) at constant growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedlund, Henrik [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp (Sweden). Dept. of Agricultural Biosystems and Technology

    1999-06-01

    This thesis is about plant growth and development as influenced by temperature. An attempt to aggregate theories and methods in literature has been made. Experiments were performed on birch (Betula pendula Roth.) to study the requirements for determination of plant temperature and its distribution within the plant. Experiments have also included studies of the relationships between growth responses and temperature. Plant heat capacity has been measured in a separate study. Methods were used where the growth capacity and the plant state quantities were maintained constant. Leaf temperature was measured by remote sensing. The leaf and root temperature distributions were found to be constant during the whole experimental period. The distributions were in a range of 2-3 deg C for the leaves and in a range of 0.5-1.0 deg C for the roots. Leaves were increasingly colder relative the air, and roots were increasingly warmer relative the leaves with increasing air temperature. The growth capacity increased with an increase in plant mean temperature up to an optimum. The optimum growth capacity, at a photon flux density of 350 {mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, was 0.37{+-}0.01 g g{sup -1} d{sup -1} for a mean leaf temperature of 22.6{+-}0.6 deg C and a mean root temperature of 29.3{+-}0.3 deg C. The connection between growth response and plant temperature has been determined with a higher precision than has been found in literature. Since the difference between leaf and air temperature can be significant and varying, choosing air temperature as the connection between temperature and plant responses will conceal the dynamical behaviour of the plant under changing environmental conditions. In a determination of plant responses one ought to consider the significant difference between root and leaf temperatures, since both factors will affect the plant responses. The heat capacity of plants was linearly correlated to the specific water content of the plant material in a range of 0

  17. Temperature dependent growth, feeding, nutritional condition and aerobic metabolism of juvenile spiny lobster, Sagmariasus verreauxi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgibbon, Quinn P; Simon, Cedric J; Smith, Gregory G; Carter, Chris G; Battaglene, Stephen C

    2017-05-01

    We examined the effects of temperature on the growth, feeding, nutritional condition and aerobic metabolism of juvenile spiny lobster, Sagmariasus verreauxi, in order to determine if temperature acclimated aerobic scope correlates with optimum for growth and to establish the thermal tolerance window for this emerging aquaculture species. Juvenile lobsters (initial weight=10.95±0.47g) were reared (n=7) at temperatures from 11.0 to 28.5°C for 145days. All lobsters survived from 14.5 to 25.0°C while survival was reduced at 11.0°C (86%) and all lobsters died at 28.5°C. Lobster specific growth rate and specific feed consumption displayed a unimodal response with temperature, peaking at 21.5°C. Lobster standard, routine and maximum metabolic rates, and aerobic scope all increased exponentially up to maximum non-lethal temperature. Optimum temperature for growth did not correspond to that for maximum aerobic scope suggesting that aerobic scope is not an effective predictor of the thermal optimum of spiny lobsters. Plateauing of specific feed consumption beyond 21.5°C suggests that temperature dependent growth of lobsters is limited by capacity to ingest or digest sufficient food to meet increasing maintenance metabolic demands at high temperatures. The nutritional condition of lobsters was not influenced by temperature and feed conversion ratio was improved at lower temperatures. These findings add to a growing body of evidence questioning the generality of aerobic scope to describe the physiological thermal boundaries of aquatic ectotherms and suggest that feed intake plays a crucial role in regulating performance at thermal extremes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The dynamics of temperature and light on the growth of phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Fan, Meng; Liu, Rui; Wang, Xiaoyu; Yuan, Xing; Zhu, Huaiping

    2015-11-21

    Motivated by some lab and field observations of the hump shaped effects of water temperature and light on the growth of phytoplankton, a bottom-up nutrient phytoplankton model, which incorporates the combined effects of temperature and light, is proposed and analyzed to explore the dynamics of phytoplankton bloom. The population growth model reasonably captures such observed dynamics qualitatively. An ecological reproductive index is defined to characterize the growth of the phytoplankton which also allows a comprehensive analysis of the role of temperature and light on the growth and reproductive characteristics of phytoplankton in general. The model provides a framework to study the mechanisms of phytoplankton dynamics in shallow lake and may even be employed to study the controlled phytoplankton bloom. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Determination of plant growth rate and growth temperature range from measurement of physiological parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. S. Criddle; B. N. Smith; L. D. Hansen; J. N. Church

    2001-01-01

    Many factors influence species range and diversity, but temperature and temperature variability are always major global determinants, irrespective of local constraints. On a global scale, the ranges of many taxa have been observed to increase and their diversity decrease with increasing latitude. On a local scale, gradients in species distribution are observable with...

  20. Suboptimal Micronutrient Intake among Children in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Kaganov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Adequate dietary intake of micronutrients is not necessarily achieved even in resource-rich areas of the world wherein overeating is a public health concern. In Europe, population-based data suggests substantial variability in micronutrient intake among children. Two independent surveys of micronutrient consumption among European children were evaluated. Stratified by age, the data regarding micronutrient intake were evaluated in the context of daily requirements, which are typically estimated in the absence of reliable absolute values derived from prospective studies. The proportion of children living in Europe whose intake of at least some vitamins and trace elements are at or below the estimated average requirements is substantial. The most common deficiencies across age groups included vitamin D, vitamin E, and iodine. Specific deficiencies were not uniform across countries or by age or gender.  Micronutrient intake appears to be more strongly influenced by factors other than access to food. Substantial portions of European children may be at risk of reversible health risks from inadequate intake of micronutrients. Despite the growing health threat posed by excess intake of calories, adequate exposure to vitamins, trace elements, and other micronutrients may deserve attention in public health initiatives to optimize growth and development in the European pediatric population.

  1. Elevated temperature crack growth in aluminum alloys: Tensile deformation of 2618 and FVS0812 aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Yang; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    Understanding the damage tolerance of aluminum alloys at elevated temperatures is essential for safe applications of advanced materials. The objective of this project is to investigate the time dependent subcritical cracking behavior of powder metallurgy FVS0812 and ingot metallurgy 2618 aluminum alloys at elevated temperatures. The fracture mechanics approach was applied. Sidegrooved compact tension specimens were tested at 175, 250, and 316 C under constant load. Subcritical crack growth occurred in each alloy at applied stress intensity levels (K) of between about 14 and 25 MPa/m, well below K (sub IC). Measured load, crack opening displacement and displacement rate, and crack length and growth rate (da/dt) were analyzed with several continuum fracture parameters including, the C-integral, C (sub t), and K. Elevated temperature growth rate data suggest that K is a controlling parameter during time dependent cracking. For FVS0812, da/dt is highest at 175 C when rates are expressed as a function of K. While crack growth rate is not controlled by C (sub t) at 175 C, da/dt appears to better correlate with C (sub t) at higher temperatures. Creep brittle cracking at intermediate temperatures, and perhaps related to strain aging, is augmented by time dependent transient creep plasticity at higher temperatures. The C (sub t) analysis is, however, complicated by the necessity to measure small differences in the elastic crack growth and creep contributions to the crack opening displacement rate. A microstructural study indicates that 2618 and FVS0812 are likely to be creep brittle materials, consistent with the results obtained from the fracture mechanics study. Time dependent crack growth of 2618 at 175 C is characterized by mixed transgranular and intergranular fracture. Delamination along the ribbon powder particle boundaries occurs in FVS0812 at all temperatures. The fracture mode of FVS0812 changes with temperature. At 175 C, it is characterized as dimpled rupture

  2. Suboptimal palliative sedation in primary care: an exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pype, Peter; Teuwen, Inge; Mertens, Fien; Sercu, Marij; De Sutter, An

    2017-06-05

    Palliative sedation is a therapeutic option to control refractory symptoms in terminal palliative patients. This study aims at describing the occurrence and characteristics of suboptimal palliative sedations in primary care and at exploring the way general practitioners (GPs) experience suboptimal palliative sedation in their practice. We conducted a mixed methods study with a quantitative prospective survey in primary care and qualitative semi-structured interviews with GPs. The research team defined suboptimal palliative sedation as a time interval until deep sleep >1.5 h and/ or >2 awakenings after the start of the unconsciousness. Descriptive statistics were calculated on the quantitative data. Thematic analysis was used to analyse interview transcripts. We registered 63 palliative sedations in 1181 home deaths, 27 forms were completed. Eleven palliative sedations were suboptimal: eight due to the long time span until deep sleep; three due the number of unintended awakenings. GPs' interview analysis revealed two major themes: the shifting perception of failure and the burden of responsibility. Suboptimal palliative sedation occurs frequently in primary palliative care. Efficient communication towards family members is needed to prevent them from having unrealistic expectations and to prevent putting pressure on the GP to hasten the procedure. Sharing the burden of decision-making during the procedure with other health care professionals might diminish the heavy responsibility as perceived by GPs.

  3. Effect of moderate high temperature on the vegetative growth and potassium allocation in olive plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benlloch-González, María; Quintero, José Manuel; Suárez, María Paz; Sánchez-Lucas, Rosa; Fernández-Escobar, Ricardo; Benlloch, Manuel

    2016-12-01

    There is little information about the prolonged effect of a moderately high temperature on the growth of olive (Olea europaea L.). It has been suggested that when the temperature of the air rises above 35°C the shoot growth of olive is inhibited while there is any reference on how growth is affected when the soil is warmed. In order to examine these effects, mist-cuttings and young plants generated from seeds were grown under moderate high temperature (37°C) for 64 and 42days respectively. In our study, plant dry matter accumulation was reduced when the temperature of both the air and the root medium was moderately high. However, when the temperature of the root medium was 25°C, the inhibitory effect of air high temperature on plant growth was not observed. The exposure of both the aerial part and the root to moderate high temperature also reduced the accumulation of K(+) in the stem and the root, the water use efficiency and leaf relative water content. However, when only the aerial part was exposed to moderate high temperature, the accumulation of K(+) in the stem, the water use efficiency and leaf relative water content were not modified. The results from this study suggest that the olive is very efficient in regulating the water and potassium transport through the plant when only the atmosphere surrounding the aerial part is warmed up. However, an increase in the soil temperature decrease root K(+) uptake and its transport to the aerial parts resulting in a reduction in shoot water status and growth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of incubation temperature on growth and performance of the veiled chameleon (Chamaeleo calyptratus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Robin M

    2008-10-01

    I evaluated the effect of incubation temperature on phenotypes of the veiled chameleon, Chamaeleo calyptratus. I chose this species for study because its large clutch size (30-40 eggs or more) allows replication within clutches both within and among experimental treatments. The major research objectives were (1) to assess the effect of constant low, moderate, and high temperatures on embryonic development, (2) to determine whether the best incubation temperature for embryonic development also produced the "best" hatchlings, and (3) to determine how a change in incubation temperature during mid-development would affect phenotype. To meet these objectives, I established five experimental temperature regimes and determined egg survival and incubation length and measured body size and shape, selected body temperatures, and locomotory performance of lizards at regular intervals from hatching to 90 d, or just before sexual maturity. Incubation temperature affected the length of incubation, egg survival, and body mass, but did not affect sprint speed or selected body temperature although selected body temperature affected growth in mass independently of treatment and clutch. Incubation at moderate temperatures provided the best conditions for both embryonic and post-hatching development. The highest incubation temperatures were disruptive to development; eggs had high mortality, developmental rate was low, and hatchlings grew slowly. Changes in temperature during incubation increased the among-clutch variance in incubation length relative to that of constant temperature treatments. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Effect of Temperature Gradient Direction in the Catalyst Nanoparticle on CNTs Growth Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Shang-Bin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To improve the understanding on CNT growth modes, the various processes, including thermal CVD, MP-CVD and ECR-CVD, have been used to deposit CNTs on nanoporous SBA-15 and Si wafer substrates with C2H2 and H2 as reaction gases. The experiments to vary process parameter of ΔT, defined as the vector quantities of temperature at catalyst top minus it at catalyst bottom, were carried out to demonstrate its effect on the CNT growth mode. The TEM and TGA analyses were used to characterize their growth modes and carbon yields of the processes. The results show that ΔT can be used to monitor the temperature gradient direction across the catalyst nanoparticle during the growth stage of CNTs. The results also indicate that the tip-growth CNTs, base-growth CNTs and onion-like carbon are generally fabricated under conditions of ΔT > 0, <0 and ~0, respectively. Our proposed growth mechanisms can be successfully adopted to explain why the base- and tip-growth CNTs are common in thermal CVD and plasma-enhanced CVD processes, respectively. Furthermore, our experiments have also successfully demonstrated the possibility to vary ΔT to obtain the desired growth mode of CNTs by thermal or plasma-enhanced CVD systems for different applications.

  6. LOW-TEMPERATURE GRAPHENE GROWTH ON COPPER FOIL CATALYST BY CHEMICAL VAPOUR DEPOSITION (CVD METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasman Kasman

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Graphene growth at low temperatures (below 500 oC on copper catalyst by CVD method was studied. The goal of this study is to determine a minimum growth temperature for growing graphene with high quality. In this study, the catalyst used for growing graphene was copper foil (Sigma-Aldrich, code: 1001328641, 25 µm in thickness, 99.98% trace metals basis, cut into 2x1 cm2 in size  annealed at 900 oC , while the precursor used was poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA heated at 140 oC. In graphene growth, two different growth temperatures of 350 oC and 450 oC were varied. The graphene films grown on copper foil catalyst were characterised using SEM and Raman spectroscopy. While, the films transferred onto quartz/glass/grid substrates were characterised by using SEM, Raman spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, four point probe and TEM. Results of this study showed that the 450 oC-grown samples produce a better quality graphene film compared to the 350 oC-grown samples. In other words, the minimum temperature of graphene growth is at least 450 oC for a Cu foil, since this temperature has to be sufficiently high to activate carbon diffusion and rearrangement on the catalyst surface..

  7. Growth and temperature relationships for juvenile fish species in seagrass beds: implications of climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, D J; Poulos, D E; Poole, J; Feary, D A

    2014-01-01

    The effect of water temperature on growth responses of three common seagrass fish species that co-occur as juveniles in the estuaries in Sydney (34° S) but have differing latitudinal ranges was measured: Pelates sexlineatus (subtropical to warm temperate: 27-35°S), Centropogon australis (primarily subtropical to warm temperate: 24-37°S) and Acanthaluteres spilomelanurus (warm to cool temperate: below 32°S). Replicate individuals of each species were acclimated over a 7 day period in one of three temperature treatments (control: 22°C, low: 18°C and high: 26°C) and their somatic growth was assessed within treatments over 10 days. Growth of all three species was affected by water temperature, with the highest growth of both northern species (P. sexlineatus and C. australis) at 22 and 26°C, whereas growth of the southern ranging species (A. spilomelanurus) was reduced at temperatures higher than 18°C, suggesting that predicted increase in estuarine water temperatures through climate change may change relative performance of seagrass fish assemblages. © 2013 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  8. Seed Germination and Early Growth Responses of Hyssop, Sweet Basil and Oregano to Temperature Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajad MIJANI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this survey were to determine the effect of temperature on germination and seedling growth of Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis L., Sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L. and Oregano (Origanum vulgare L. (Lamiaceae family as well as comparing species regarding germination behavior and growth characteristics. Seeds were germinated on a temperature-gradient bar varying between 5 and 40 °C (with 5 °C intervals. Results indicated that the highest germination percentage of hyssop (92-98%, sweet basil (86-90% and oregano (74-77% occurred at 20-30 °C, 25-30 °C and 20-30 °C, respectively; therefore, moderate and warm temperatures are proper for germination of all species. In all species the maximum germination rate obtained at 30 °C. Among all species, Day 10 % of Sweet basil Germination had the lowest value, which indicates faster germination. The cardinal temperatures (base, optimum and ceiling or maximum were estimated by the segmented model. Base temperature (Tb was calculated for hyssop, sweet basil and oregano as 3.42, 5.70 and 5.46 °C, respectively. Optimal temperature (To calculated for all species was approximately 30°C, So warmer temperatures are much more proper for them. The species showed different maximum temperatures (Tm from 42.91 (Oregano to 48.05 °C (Hyssop. In Hyssop and Sweet basil optimum growth of seedlings were observed at 30°C while Oregano reached its best growth at 25°C. The difference between maximum and minimum temperatures of germination knowing as temperature range (TR index could show adaptation capability to broad sites for planting and domestication. Regarding this index Hyssop stood in the first place.

  9. The temperature-productivity squeeze: Constraints on brook trout growth along an Appalachian river continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, J. Todd; Thorne, David; Huntsman, Brock M.; Mazik, Patricia M.

    2014-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that brook trout growth rates are controlled by a complex interaction of food availability, water temperature, and competitor density. We quantified trout diet, growth, and consumption in small headwater tributaries characterized as cold with low food and high trout density, larger tributaries characterized as cold with moderate food and moderate trout density, and large main stems characterized as warm with high food and low trout density. Brook trout consumption was highest in the main stem where diets shifted from insects in headwaters to fishes and crayfish in larger streams. Despite high water temperatures, trout growth rates also were consistently highest in the main stem, likely due to competitively dominant trout monopolizing thermal refugia. Temporal changes in trout density had a direct negative effect on brook trout growth rates. Our results suggest that competition for food constrains brook trout growth in small streams, but access to thermal refugia in productive main stem habitats enables dominant trout to supplement growth at a watershed scale. Brook trout conservation in this region should seek to relieve the “temperature-productivity squeeze,” whereby brook trout productivity is constrained by access to habitats that provide both suitable water temperature and sufficient prey.

  10. Growth of Cronobacter spp. under dynamic temperature conditions occurring during cooling of reconstituted powdered infant formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandhai, M C; Breeuwer, P; Gorris, L G M; Zwietering, M H; Reij, M W

    2009-12-01

    Reconstituted infant formulae are excellent growth media for Cronobacter spp. (formerly Enterobacter sakazakii) and other microorganisms that may be present in such products. Immediate consumption or rapid cooling and storage at a low temperature are therefore recommended as control measures to prevent microbial growth. Placing a container filled with reconstituted liquid formula in the refrigerator, however, does not mean that the temperature of the liquid is directly the same as the set-point of the refrigerator. This study describes the temperature profiles and methods to predict lag time and possible growth of Cronobacter spp. during the cooling process in three types of containers. The overall heat transfer coefficients (alpha) were determined and were shown to have a very large variability in both household refrigerators and an air-ventilated refrigerator equipped with a fan. A mathematical model was built to predict the growth of Cronobacter spp. under dynamic temperature conditions using three models for the lag time. The various estimations for the lag time had a remarkably strong impact on the predicted growth. The assumption of a constant k-value (k = lag time x specific growth rate = lambda x micro = 2.88) fitted the experimental data best. Predictions taking into account the large variability in heat transfer showed that proliferation of Cronobacter spp. during cooling may be prevented by limiting the volume to be cooled to portion size only, or by reconstituting at temperatures of 25 degrees C or lower. The model may also be used to predict growth in other situations where dynamic temperature conditions exist.

  11. Increased Temperatures Have Dramatic Effects on Growth and Grain Yield of Three Maize Hybrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry L. Hatfield

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Rising temperatures under climate change are projected to have negative impacts on crop growth and production. These conclusions are not based on direct observations but on projected model results. A study conducted comparing normal seasonal temperatures (1980–2010 for Ames, IA, to a normal + 4°C environment with the same water vapor deficit evaluated the impacts of temperature on maize ( L. development and production. The rate of phenological development increased at higher temperatures; however, the relationship of leaf collar and leaf tip appearance to growing degree days was the same between temperature regimes. There was no effect on total leaf area or vegetative dry matter production, but grain yields decreased from 84 to 100% because of exposure to high nighttime temperatures and disruption of the pollination process as evidenced by the large reduction in kernels per ear. Projected increases in temperature will negatively affect grain production and threaten food security.

  12. Suboptimal Rate Adaptive Resource Allocation for Downlink OFDMA Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanam Sadr

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to study the performance of low complexity adaptive resource allocation in the downlink of OFDMA systems with fixed or variable rate requirements (with fairness consideration. Two suboptimal resource allocation algorithms are proposed using the simplifying assumption of transmit power over the entire bandwidth. The objective of the first algorithm is to maximize the total throughput while maintaining rate proportionality among the users. The proposed suboptimal algorithm prioritizes the user with the highest sensitivity to the subcarrier allocation, and the variance over the subchannel gains is used to define the sensitivity of each user. The second algorithm concerns rate adaptive resource allocation in multiuser systems with fixed rate constraints. We propose a suboptimal joint subchannel and power allocation algorithm which prioritizes the users with the highest required data rates. The main feature of this algorithm is its low complexity while achieving the rate requirements.

  13. Comparison of Simulated Stem Temperatures and Observed Air Temperatures with Observed Stem Growth in Forest Openings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian E. Potter; Terry Strong

    2002-01-01

    Phenology, the study of how plant or animal developmental stages relate to the organism's surrounding climate, is a well established discipline with roots dating back more than 2000 years (Hopp and Blair, 1973). For example, correlations are often noted between budbreak or first blossom and integrated air temperature (commonly referred to as heat sums.) The...

  14. High-Temperature Crystal-Growth Cartridge Tubes Made by VPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Richard; O'Dell, Scott; McKechnie, Timothy; Power, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Cartridge tubes for use in a crystal growth furnace at temperatures as high as 1,600 deg. C have been fabricated by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS). These cartridges consist mainly of an alloy of 60 weight percent molybdenum with 40 weight percent rhenium, made from molybdenum powder coated with rhenium. This alloy was selected because of its high melting temperature (approximately equal.2,550 C) and because of its excellent ductility at room temperature. These cartridges are intended to supplant tungsten/nickel-alloy cartridges, which cannot be used at temperatures above approximately equal 1,300 C.

  15. A general model for effects of temperature on ectotherm ontogenetic growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Wenyun; Moses, Melanie E; West, Geoffrey B; Hou, Chen; Brown, James H

    2012-05-07

    The temperature size rule (TSR) is the tendency for ectotherms to develop faster but mature at smaller body sizes at higher temperatures. It can be explained by a simple model in which the rate of growth or biomass accumulation and the rate of development have different temperature dependence. The model accounts for both TSR and the less frequently observed reverse-TSR, predicts the fraction of energy allocated to maintenance and synthesis over the course of development, and also predicts that less total energy is expended when developing at warmer temperatures for TSR and vice versa for reverse-TSR. It has important implications for effects of climate change on ectothermic animals.

  16. The potential impacts of increasing temperatures on old-growth forest biomass density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larjavaara, M.; Muller-Landau, H. C.

    2012-04-01

    Global atmospheric and climate change could alter forest carbon stores, potentially causing important positive or negative feedbacks on global change. For example, rising temperatures are likely to influence old-growth forest biomass density (biomass per unit area), and thereby could make old growth forests sources or sinks of carbon to the atmosphere, but the magnitude and direction of likely change continue to be debated. It is difficult if not impossible to run experiments on sufficiently large spatial and temporal scale to capture global change impacts on old-growth biomass in different forest types. Thus, models that capture the key physiological impacts of global change on forest carbon budgets are a critical tool for assessing impacts of climate and atmospheric change. The expected changes in temperatures are similar to spatial temperature variation observed currently and, therefore, models explaining current variation in old¬-growth forest biomass can be directly applied to predict expected equilibrium biomass after a transitional period lasting decades or centuries. In a recent paper (Larjavaara and Muller-Landau 2012. Temperature explains global variation in biomass among humid old-growth forests. Global Ecology and Biogeography), we developed a physiologically motivated model for global variation in old-growth forest biomass. We modelled annual GPP as a function of monthly average temperatures (minimum and maximum) and sun angle, and modelled plant biomass "maintenance cost" (including autotrophic respiration and construction required to maintain biomass) as a function of temperatures alone. We then used fitted models for GPP and maintenance cost to predict old-growth forest biomass density under different climates. We found that highest old-growth biomass is expected in maritime temperate climates in which temperatures remain between 5˚C and 25˚C for most of the year, and in which the ratio of GPP to maintenance cost is thus the highest. In tropical

  17. Global warming and coral reefs: modelling the effect of temperature on Acropora palmata colony growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabbe, M James C

    2007-08-01

    Data on colony growth of the branching coral Acropora palmata from fringing reefs off Discovery Bay on the north coast of Jamaica have been obtained over the period 2002-2007 using underwater photography and image analysis by both SCUBA and remotely using an ROV incorporating twin lasers. Growth modelling shows that while logarithmic growth is an approximate model for growth, a 3:3 rational polynomial function provides a significantly better fit to growth data for this coral species. Over the period 2002-2007, involving several cycles of sea surface temperature (SST) change, the rate of growth of A. palmata was largely proportional to rate of change of SST, with R(2)=0.935. These results have implications for the influence of global warming and climate change on coral reef ecosystems.

  18. Cloacal and surface temperatures of tom turkeys exposed to different rearing temperature regimes during the first 12 weeks of growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, S L; Strawford, M L; Noble, S D; Classen, H L; Crowe, T G

    2015-06-01

    Years of genetic selection have caused an increase in growth rate and market body mass in agricultural poultry species compared to earlier genetic strains, potentially altering their physiological requirements. The objective of this study was to expose Hybrid Converter tom turkeys on a weekly basis to the recommended rearing temperature regime (TCON: control) or 4°C below the recommended standard (TTRT: treatment) to determine their thermal responses. Once per week for 12 weeks, 12 turkeys were individually exposed to either TCON or TTRT for a 2-h period. Surface temperatures of the breast (TBREAST), wing (TWING), drumstick (TDRUM), head (THEAD), and shank (TSHANK) were measured at 20-min intervals using an infrared camera, while a thermal data logger measured the skin surface temperature under the wing (TLOGGER) at 30-s intervals. The cloacal temperature (TCORE) was measured using a medical thermometer at the start and end of the exposure period. Regardless of exposure temperature, the TBREAST (TCON: Ptemperatures. The data demonstrated that the degree of thermal response expressed is dependent on the location of measurement, age, and exposure temperature.

  19. Wood chip mulch thickness effects on soil water, soil temperature, weed growth, and landscape plant growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood chip mulches are used in landscapes to reduce soil water evaporation and competition from weeds. A study was conducted over a three-year period to determine soil water content at various depths under four wood chip mulch treatments and to evaluate the effects of wood chip thickness on growth of...

  20. Growth and survival of Apache Trout under static and fluctuating temperature regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recsetar, Matthew S.; Bonar, Scott A.; Feuerbacher, Olin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing stream temperatures have important implications for arid-region fishes. Little is known about effects of high water temperatures that fluctuate over extended periods on Apache Trout Oncorhynchus gilae apache, a federally threatened species of southwestern USA streams. We compared survival and growth of juvenile Apache Trout held for 30 d in static temperatures (16, 19, 22, 25, and 28°C) and fluctuating diel temperatures (±3°C from 16, 19, 22 and 25°C midpoints and ±6°C from 19°C and 22°C midpoints). Lethal temperature for 50% (LT50) of the Apache Trout under static temperatures (mean [SD] = 22.8 [0.6]°C) was similar to that of ±3°C diel temperature fluctuations (23.1 [0.1]°C). Mean LT50 for the midpoint of the ±6°C fluctuations could not be calculated because survival in the two treatments (19 ± 6°C and 22 ± 6°C) was not below 50%; however, it probably was also between 22°C and 25°C because the upper limb of a ±6°C fluctuation on a 25°C midpoint is above critical thermal maximum for Apache Trout (28.5–30.4°C). Growth decreased as temperatures approached the LT50. Apache Trout can survive short-term exposure to water temperatures with daily maxima that remain below 25°C and midpoint diel temperatures below 22°C. However, median summer stream temperatures must remain below 19°C for best growth and even lower if daily fluctuations are high (≥12°C).

  1. Impact of diurnal temperature fluctuations on larval settlement and growth of the reef coral Pocillopora damicornis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Jiang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Diurnal fluctuations in seawater temperature are ubiquitous on tropical reef flats. However, the effects of such dynamic temperature variations on the early stages of corals are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the responses of larvae and new recruits of Pocillopora damicornis to two constant temperature treatments (29 and 31 °C and two diurnally fluctuating treatments (28–31 and 30–33 °C with daily means of 29 and 31 °C, respectively simulating the 3 °C diel oscillations at 3 m depth on the Luhuitou fringing reef (Sanya, China. Results showed that the thermal stress on settlement at 31 °C was almost negated by the fluctuating treatment. Further, neither elevated temperature nor temperature fluctuations caused bleaching responses in recruits, while the maximum excitation pressure over photosystem II (PSII was reduced under fluctuating temperatures. Although early growth and development were highly stimulated at 31 °C, oscillations of 3 °C had little effects on budding and lateral growth at either mean temperature. Nevertheless, daytime encounters with the maximum temperature of 33 °C in fluctuating 31 °C elicited a notable reduction in calcification compared to constant 31 °C. These results underscore the complexity of the effects caused by diel temperature fluctuations on early stages of corals and suggest that ecologically relevant temperature variability could buffer warming stress on larval settlement and dampen the positive effects of increased temperatures on coral growth.

  2. Growth and photosynthesis of Chlorella strains from polar, temperate and tropical freshwater environments under temperature stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kok-Keong; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Poong, Sze-Wan; Wong, Chiew-Yen; Phang, Siew-Moi; Beardall, John

    2017-09-01

    Elevated temperatures as a consequence of global warming have significant impacts on the adaptation and survival of microalgae which are important primary producers in many ecosystems. The impact of temperature on the photosynthesis of microalgae is of great interest as the primary production of algal biomass is strongly dependent on the photosynthetic rates in a dynamic environment. Here, we examine the effects of elevated temperature on Chlorella strains originating from different latitudes, namely Antarctic, Arctic, temperate and tropical regions. Chlorophyll fluorescence was used to assess the photosynthetic responses of the microalgae. Rapid light curves (RLCs) and maximum quantum yield (F v/F m) were recorded. The results showed that Chlorella originating from different latitudes portrayed different growth trends and photosynthetic performance. The Chlorella genus is eurythermal, with a broad temperature tolerance range, but with strain-specific characteristics. However, there was a large overlap between the tolerance range of the four strains due to their "eurythermal adaptivity". Changes in the photosynthetic parameters indicated temperature stress. The ability of the four strains to reactivate photosynthesis after inhibition of photosynthesis under high temperatures was also studied. The Chlorella strains were shown to recover in terms of photosynthesis and growth (measured as Chl a) when they were returned to their ambient temperatures. Polar strains showed faster recovery in their optimal temperature compared to that under the ambient temperature from which they were isolated.

  3. Limit growth of ice crystals under different temperature oscillations levels in nile Tilapia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Salomon Chávez GUTIÉRREZ

    Full Text Available Abstract The degenerative effect of temperature fluctuations during storage time is a critical condition that needs to be quantitatively characterized in products where drip losses are appreciable. In this work, real storage conditions were reproduced using freezers modified to cause 3 levels of temperature fluctuation (± 0, ± 3, ± 5; ± 7 during storage of Tilapia (Oreochromis sp, at temperature of –18 °C. The fast frozen tilapia muscle (freezing cabinet was chosen to quantify the growth of ice crystals according to temperature fluctuations. The identification of crystals in the optical microscope as well as histological treatments and measurements using specific software has shown that the growth of ice crystals in the first days of storage follows an asymptote, whose final value is conditioned only by the level of temperature fluctuations regardless of initial diameter, which begins storage. It has also been found that the growth of crystals formed during rapid freezing rapidly develops according to temperature fluctuations to which the product has been subjected. This work also identified statistically significant differences in the equivalent diameter of crystals formed at the four proposed levels of temperature fluctuation with significance level of p < 0.05.

  4. Gene expression profile of Campylobacter jejuni in response to growth temperature variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stintzi, Alain

    2003-03-01

    The foodborne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni is the primary causative agent of gastroenteritis in humans. In the present study a whole genome microarray of C. jejuni was constructed and validated. These DNA microarrays were used to measure changes in transcription levels over time, as C. jejuni cells responded to a temperature increase from 37 to 42 degrees C. Approximately 20% of the C. jejuni genes were significantly up- or downregulated over a 50-min period after the temperature increase. The global change in C. jejuni transcriptome was found to be essentially transient, with only a small subset of genes still differentially expressed after 50 min. A substantial number of genes with a downregulated coexpression pattern were found to encode for ribosomal proteins. This suggests a short growth arrest upon temperature stress, allowing the bacteria to reshuffle their energy toward survival and adaptation to the new growth temperature. Genes encoding chaperones, chaperonins, and heat shock proteins displayed the most dramatic and rapid upregulation immediately after the temperature change. Interestingly, genes encoding proteins involved in membrane structure modification were differentially expressed, either up- or downregulated, suggesting a different protein membrane makeup at the two different growth temperatures. Overall, these data provide new insights into the primary response of C. jejuni to surmount a sudden temperature upshift, allowing the bacterium to survive and adapt its transcriptome to a new steady state.

  5. Identification of Gene Modules Associated with Low Temperatures Response in Bambara Groundnut by Network-Based Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Suresh Bonthala

    Full Text Available Bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L. Verdc. is an African legume and is a promising underutilized crop with good seed nutritional values. Low temperature stress in a number of African countries at night, such as Botswana, can effect the growth and development of bambara groundnut, leading to losses in potential crop yield. Therefore, in this study we developed a computational pipeline to identify and analyze the genes and gene modules associated with low temperature stress responses in bambara groundnut using the cross-species microarray technique (as bambara groundnut has no microarray chip coupled with network-based analysis. Analyses of the bambara groundnut transcriptome using cross-species gene expression data resulted in the identification of 375 and 659 differentially expressed genes (p<0.01 under the sub-optimal (23°C and very sub-optimal (18°C temperatures, respectively, of which 110 genes are commonly shared between the two stress conditions. The construction of a Highest Reciprocal Rank-based gene co-expression network, followed by its partition using a Heuristic Cluster Chiseling Algorithm resulted in 6 and 7 gene modules in sub-optimal and very sub-optimal temperature stresses being identified, respectively. Modules of sub-optimal temperature stress are principally enriched with carbohydrate and lipid metabolic processes, while most of the modules of very sub-optimal temperature stress are significantly enriched with responses to stimuli and various metabolic processes. Several transcription factors (from MYB, NAC, WRKY, WHIRLY & GATA classes that may regulate the downstream genes involved in response to stimulus in order for the plant to withstand very sub-optimal temperature stress were highlighted. The identified gene modules could be useful in breeding for low-temperature stress tolerant bambara groundnut varieties.

  6. Effect of water activity and temperature on the growth of Eurotium species isolated from animal feeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Mariana; Pardo, Alejandro; Pose, Graciela; Patriarca, Andrea

    Xerophilic fungi represent a serious problem due to their ability to grow at low water activities causing the spoiling of low and intermediate moisture foods, stored goods and animal feeds, with the consequent economic losses. The combined effect of water activity and temperature of four Eurotium species isolated from animal feeds was investigated. Eurotium amstelodami, Eurotium chevalieri, Eurotium repens and Eurotium rubrum were grown at 5, 15, 25, 37 and 45°C on malt extract agar adjusted with glycerol in the range 0.710-0.993 of water activities. The cardinal model proposed by Rosso and Robinson (2001) was applied to fit growth data, with the variable water activity at fixed temperatures, obtaining three cardinal water activities (a wmin , a wmax , a wopt ) and the specific growth rate at the optimum a w (μ opt ). A probabilistic model was also applied to define the interface between growth and no-growth. The cardinal model provided an adequate estimation of the optimal a w to grow and the maximum growth rate. The probabilistic model showed a good performance to fit growth/no-growth cases in the predicted range. The results presented here could be applied to predict Eurotium species growth in animal feeds. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Low-temperature solution growth of ZnO nanotube arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Woong Chae

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Single crystal ZnO nanotube arrays were synthesized at low temperature in an aqueous solution containing zinc nitrate and hexamethylenetetramine. It was found that the pH value of the reaction solution played an important role in mediating the growth of ZnO nanostructures. A change in the growth temperature might change the pH value of the solution and bring about the structure conversion of ZnO from nanorods to nanotubes. It was proposed that the ZnO nanorods were initially formed while the reaction solution was at a relatively high temperature (~90 °C and therefore enriched with colloidal Zn(OH2, which allowed a fast growth of ZnO nanocrystals along the [001] orientation to form nanorods. A decrease in the reaction temperature yielded a supersaturated solution, resulting in an increase in the concentration of OH− ions as well as the pH value of the solution. Colloidal Zn(OH2 in the supersaturated solution trended to precipitate. However, because of a slow diffusion process in view of the low temperature and low concentration of the colloidal Zn(OH2, the growth of the (001 plane of ZnO nanorods was limited and only occurred at the edge of the nanorods, eventually leading to the formation of a nanotube shape. In addition, it was demonstrated that the pH might impact the surface energy difference between the polar and non-polar faces of the ZnO crystal. Such a surface energy difference became small at high pH and hereby the prioritized growth of ZnO crystal along the [001] orientation was suppressed, facilitating the formation of nanotubes. This paper demonstrates a new strategy for the fabrication of ZnO nanotubes on a large scale and presents a more comprehensive understanding of the growth of tube-shaped ZnO in aqueous solution at low temperature.

  8. Population growth and development of Liposcelis pearmani (Psocoptera: Liposcelididae) at constant temperatures and relative humidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminatou, B A; Gautam, S G; Opit, G P; Talley, J; Shakya, K

    2011-08-01

    Psocids of genus Liposcelis are now considered serious pests of stored products. We investigated the effects of eight temperatures (22.5, 25.0, 27.5, 30.0, 32.5, 35.0, 37.5, and 40.0°C) and four relative humidities (43, 55, 63, and 75%) on population growth and development of the psocid Liposcelis pearmani Lienhard. L. pearmani did not survive at 37.5 and 40.0°C, at all relative humidities tested; at 43% RH, at all temperatures tested; and at 55% RH, at 32.5 and 35°C. The greatest population growth was recorded at 32.5°C and 75% RH (32-fold growth). L. pearmani males have two to four nymphal instars, and the percentages of males with two, three, and four instars were 17, 63, and 20%, respectively. Female L. pearmani have two to five instars, and the percentages of females with two, three, four, and five instars were 5, 39, 55, and 1%, respectively. We developed temperature-dependent development equations for male and female eggs, individual nymphal, combined nymphal, and combined immature stages. Based on 30-d population growth, L. pearmani cannot survive at temperatures >35.0°C; does not thrive at low relative humidities (55%), at temperatures above 25°C; and has a high optimum relative humidity for population growth (75%). Therefore, we expect it to have a more limited distribution compared with other Liposcelis species. These data provide a better understanding of how temperature and RH may influence L. pearmani population dynamics and can be used in population growth models to help develop effective management strategies for this psocid, and to predict its occurrence.

  9. Evidence that higher CO2 increases tree growth sensitivity to temperature: a comparison of modern and paleo oaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aim: To test the growth-sensitivity to temperature under different ambient CO2 concentrations, we determined paleo tree growth rates as they relate to variation in temperature during the last deglacial period, and compare these to modern tree growth rates as they relate to spatia...

  10. Metabolic efficiency in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in relation to temperature dependent growth and biomass yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhartsev, Maksim; Yang, Xuelian; Reuss, Matthias; Pörtner, Hans Otto

    2015-08-01

    Canonized view on temperature effects on growth rate of microorganisms is based on assumption of protein denaturation, which is not confirmed experimentally so far. We develop an alternative concept, which is based on view that limits of thermal tolerance are based on imbalance of cellular energy allocation. Therefore, we investigated growth suppression of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the supraoptimal temperature range (30-40°C), i.e. above optimal temperature (Topt). The maximal specific growth rate (μmax) of biomass, its concentration and yield on glucose (Yx/glc) were measured across the whole thermal window (5-40°C) of the yeast in batch anaerobic growth on glucose. Specific rate of glucose consumption, specific rate of glucose consumption for maintenance (mglc), true biomass yield on glucose (Yx/glc(true)), fractional conservation of substrate carbon in product and ATP yield on glucose (Yatp/glc) were estimated from the experimental data. There was a negative linear relationship between ATP, ADP and AMP concentrations and specific growth rate at any growth conditions, whilst the energy charge was always high (~0.83). There were two temperature regions where mglc differed 12-fold, which points to the existence of a 'low' (within 5-31°C) and a 'high' (within 33-40°C) metabolic mode regarding maintenance requirements. The rise from the low to high mode occurred at 31-32°C in step-wise manner and it was accompanied with onset of suppression of μmax. High mglc at supraoptimal temperatures indicates a significant reduction of scope for growth, due to high maintenance cost. Analysis of temperature dependencies of product formation efficiency and Yatp/glc revealed that the efficiency of energy metabolism approaches its lower limit at 26-31°C. This limit is reflected in the predetermined combination of Yx/glc(true), elemental biomass composition and degree of reduction of the growth substrate. Approaching the limit implies a reduction of the safety margin

  11. Physiological minimum temperatures for root growth in seven common European broad-leaved tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenker, Gabriela; Lenz, Armando; Körner, Christian; Hoch, Günter

    2014-03-01

    Temperature is the most important factor driving the cold edge distribution limit of temperate trees. Here, we identified the minimum temperatures for root growth in seven broad-leaved tree species, compared them with the species' natural elevational limits and identified morphological changes in roots produced near their physiological cold limit. Seedlings were exposed to a vertical soil-temperature gradient from 20 to 2 °C along the rooting zone for 18 weeks. In all species, the bulk of roots was produced at temperatures above 5 °C. However, the absolute minimum temperatures for root growth differed among species between 2.3 and 4.2 °C, with those species that reach their natural distribution limits at higher elevations also tending to have lower thermal limits for root tissue formation. In all investigated species, the roots produced at temperatures close to the thermal limit were pale, thick, unbranched and of reduced mechanical strength. Across species, the specific root length (m g(-1) root) was reduced by, on average, 60% at temperatures below 7 °C. A significant correlation of minimum temperatures for root growth with the natural high elevation limits of the investigated species indicates species-specific thermal requirements for basic physiological processes. Although these limits are not necessarily directly causative for the upper distribution limit of a species, they seem to belong to a syndrome of adaptive processes for life at low temperatures. The anatomical changes at the cold limit likely hint at the mechanisms impeding meristematic activity at low temperatures.

  12. Growth-temperature dependence of Er-doped GaN luminescent thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D. S.; Heikenfeld, J.; Steckl, A. J.

    2002-01-01

    Visible photoluminescence (PL) and electroluminescence (EL) emission has been observed from Er-doped GaN thin films grown on (111) Si at various temperatures from 100 to 750 °C in a radio-frequency plasma molecular beam epitaxy system. PL and EL intensities of green emission at 537 nm from GaN:Er films exhibited strong dependence on the growth temperature, with a maximum at 600 °C. Scanning electron and atomic force microscopy showed smooth surfaces at 600 °C and rough surfaces at 100 and 750 °C. X-ray diffraction indicated that the GaN:Er film structure was oriented with the c axis perpendicular to the substrate for all growth temperatures. The crystalline quality initially improves with an increase in growth temperature, and saturates at ˜500 °C. Considering both the luminescence and structural properties of the film, ˜600 °C seems to be the optimal temperature for growth of Er-doped GaN luminescent films on Si substrates.

  13. Changes in fatty acid branching and unsaturation of Streptomyces griseus and Brevibacterium fermentans as a response to growth temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suutari, M; Laakso, S

    1992-01-01

    Streptomyces griseus showed three different modes of changing fatty acids in response to temperature change. In Brevibacterium fermentans, two such responses were found. The responses involved changes in fatty acid branching, unsaturation, or chain length, depending on growth temperature range. Changes in unsaturation of branched-chain acids were characteristic at low growth temperatures. PMID:1637171

  14. Temperature-dependent respiration-growth relations in ancestral maize cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce N. Smith; Jillian L. Walker; Rebekka L. Stone; Angela R. Jones; Lee D. Hansen

    2001-01-01

    Shoots from 4- to 6-day old seedlings of seven ancestral or old cultivars of Zea mays L. were placed in a calorimeter. Dark metabolic heat rate (q) and CO2 production rate (RCO2) were measured at nine temperatures (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, and 45 °C). Temperature dependencies of q and RCO2 were used to model response of both growth and substrate carbon conversion...

  15. Sacral Nerve Stimulation for Constipation: Suboptimal Outcome and Adverse Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maeda, Yasuko; Lundby, Lilli; Buntzen, Steen

    2010-01-01

    Sacral nerve stimulation is an emerging treatment for patients with severe constipation. There has been no substantial report to date on suboptimal outcomes and complications. We report our experience of more than 6 years by focusing on incidents and the management of reportable events....

  16. Optimal and Suboptimal Noises Enhancing Mutual Information in Threshold System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Qiqing; Wang, Youguo

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the efficacy of noise enhancing information transmission in a threshold system. At first, in the frame of stochastic resonance (SR), optimal noise (Opt N) is derived to maximize mutual information (MI) of this nonlinear system. When input signal is discrete (binary), the optimal SR noise is found to have a finite distribution. In contrast, when input signal is continuous, the optimal SR noise is a constant one. In addition, suboptimal SR noises are explored as well with optimization methods when the types of noise added into the system are predetermined. We find that for small thresholds, suboptimal noises do not exist. Only when thresholds reach some level, do suboptimal noises come into effect. Meanwhile, we have discussed the impact of tails in noise distribution on SR effect. Finally, this paper extends the single-threshold system to an array of multi-threshold devices and presents the corresponding efficacy of information transmission produced by optimal and suboptimal SR noises. These results may be beneficial to quantization and coding.

  17. Suboptimal Utilisation of Resources in Sub-Saharan African Higher ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Suboptimal Utilisation of Resources in Sub-Saharan African Higher Education Institutions: the Case of Teaching Space at Makerere University. ... This means that the institutions need to evaluate their utilization of these resources—to pinpoint their need for the resources and potential for quality assurance. This paper reports ...

  18. When animals misbehave: analogs of human biases and suboptimal choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentall, Thomas R

    2015-03-01

    Humans tend to value rewards more if they have had to work hard to obtain them (justification of effort). Similarly they tend to persist in a task even when they would be better off beginning a new one (sunk cost). Humans also often give greater value to objects of good quality than the same objects together with objects of lesser quality (the less is more effect). Commercial gambling (lotteries and slot machines) is another example of suboptimal choice by humans because on average the rewards are less than the investment. In another example of a systematic bias, when humans try to estimate the probability of the occurrence of a low probability event, they often give too much weight to the results of a test, in spite of the fact that the known probability of a false alarm reduces the predictive value of the test (base rate neglect). In each of these examples, we have found that pigeons show a similar tendency to choose suboptimally. When one can show comparable findings of suboptimal choice in animals it suggests that whereas culture may reinforce certain suboptimal behavior, the behavior is likely to result from the overgeneralization of basic behavioral processes or predisposed heuristics that may have been appropriate in natural environments. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: "Tribute to Tom Zentall." Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Prevalence and predictors of sub-optimal medication adherence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the levels of adherence, prevalence and the predictors of suboptimal adherence were assessed in a sub-Saharan African setting. Methods: Three hundred and seventy (370) respondents with diagnoses of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or severe depression were randomly enrolled and interviewed at the ...

  20. Catalytic CVD Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes: Towards High Yield and Low Temperature Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrez, Arnaud; Seo, Jin Won; Smajda, Rita; Mionić, Marijana; Forró, László

    2010-01-01

    The catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) is currently the most flexible and economically attractive method for the growth of carbon nanotubes. Although its principle is simple, the precisely controlled growth of carbon nanotubes remains very complex because many different parameters influence the growth process. In this article, we review our recent results obtained on the synthesis of carbon nanotubes via CCVD. We discuss the role of the catalyst and the catalyst support. Our recent results obtained from the water assisted growth and the equimolar C2H2-CO2 reaction are also discussed. Both procedures lead to significantly enhanced carbon nanotube growth. In particular, the latter allows growing carbon nanotubes on diverse substrate materials at low temperatures. PMID:28883358

  1. Rearing temperature induces changes in muscle growth and gene expression in juvenile pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez de Paula, Tassiana; de Almeida, Fernanda Losi Alves; Carani, Fernanda Regina; Vechetti-Júnior, Ivan José; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Salomão, Rondinelle Arthur Simões; Mareco, Edson Assunção; Dos Santos, Vander Bruno; Dal-Pai-Silva, Maeli

    2014-03-01

    Pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus) is a fast-growing fish that is extensively used in Brazilian aquaculture programs and shows a wide range of thermal tolerance. Because temperature is an environmental factor that influences the growth rate of fish and is directly related to muscle plasticity and growth, we hypothesized that different rearing temperatures in juvenile pacu, which exhibits intense muscle growth by hyperplasia, can potentially alter the muscle growth patterns of this species. The aim of this study was to analyze the muscle growth characteristics together with the expression of the myogenic regulatory factors MyoD and myogenin and the growth factor myostatin in juvenile pacu that were submitted to different rearing temperatures. Juvenile fish (1.5 g weight) were distributed in tanks containing water and maintained at 24°C (G24), 28 °C (G28) and 32 °C (G32) (three replicates for each group) for 60 days. At days 30 and 60, the fish were anesthetized and euthanized, and muscle samples (n=12) were collected for morphological, morphometric and gene expression analyses. At day 30, the body weight and standard length were lower for G24 than for G28 and G32. Muscle fiber frequency in the 50 μm class was lower in G24. MyoD gene expression was higher in G24 compared with that in G28 and G32, and myogenin and myostatin mRNA levels were higher in G24 than G28. At day 60, the body weight and the standard length were higher in G32 but lower in G24. The frequency distribution of the muscle fibers was higher in G24, and that of the >50 μm class was lower in G24. MyoD mRNA levels were higher in G24 and G32, and myogenin mRNA levels were similar between G24 and G28 and between G24 and G32 but were higher in G28 compared to G32. The myostatin mRNA levels were similar between the studied temperatures. In light of our results, we conclude that low rearing temperature altered the expression of muscle growth-related genes and induced a delay in muscle growth in juvenile

  2. Consequences of complex environments: Temperature and energy intake interact to influence growth and metabolic rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahlschmidt, Zachary R; Jodrey, Alicia D; Luoma, Rachel L

    2015-09-01

    The field of comparative physiology has a rich history of elegantly examining the effects of individual environmental factors on performance traits linked to fitness (e.g., thermal performance curves for locomotion). However, animals live in complex environments wherein multiple environmental factors co-vary. Thus, we investigated the independent and interactive effects of temperature and energy intake on the growth and metabolic rate of juvenile corn snakes (Pantherophis guttatus) in the context of shifts in complex environments. Unlike previous studies that imposed constant or fluctuating temperature regimes, we manipulated the availability of preferred thermal microclimates (control vs. relatively warm regimes) for eight weeks and allowed snakes to behaviorally thermoregulate among microclimates. By also controlling for energy intake, we demonstrate an interactive effect of temperature and energy on growth-relevant temperature shifts had no effect on snakes' growth when energy intake was low and a positive effect on growth when energy intake was high. Thus, acclimation to relatively warm thermal options can result in increased rates of growth when food is abundant in a taxon in which body size confers fitness advantages. Temperature and energy also interactively influenced metabolic rate-snakes in the warmer temperature regime exhibited reduced metabolic rate (O2 consumption rate at 25 °C and 30 °C) if they had relatively high energy intake. Although we advocate for continued investigation into the effects of complex environments on other traits, our results indicate that warming may actually benefit important life history traits in some taxa and that metabolic shifts may underlie thermal acclimation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Speed over efficiency: locusts select body temperatures that favour growth rate over efficient nutrient utilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Gabriel A; Clissold, Fiona J; Mayntz, David

    2009-01-01

    Ectotherms have evolved preferences for particular body temperatures, but the nutritional and life-history consequences of such temperature preferences are not well understood. We measured thermal preferences in Locusta migratoria (migratory locusts) and used a multi-factorial experimental design...... to investigate relationships between growth/development and macronutrient utilization (conversion of ingesta to body mass) as a function of temperature. A range of macronutrient intake values for insects at 26, 32 and 38°C was achieved by offering individuals high-protein diets, high-carbohydrate diets...

  4. Scots pine responses to elevated temperature and carbon dioxide concentration: growth and wood properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpeläinen, Antti; Peltola, Heli; Ryyppö, Aija; Kellomäki, Seppo

    2005-01-01

    Growth and wood properties of 20-year-old Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) trees were studied for 6 years in 16 closed chambers providing a factorial combination of two temperature regimes (ambient and elevated) and two carbon dioxide concentrations ([CO2]) (ambient and twice ambient). The elevation of temperature corresponded to the predicted effect at the site of a doubling in atmospheric [CO2]. Annual height and radial growth and wood properties were analyzed during 1997-2002. Physical wood properties analyzed included early- and latewood widths and their proportions, intra-ring wood densities, early- and latewood density and mean fiber length. Chemical wood properties analyzed included concentrations of acetone-soluble extractives, lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose. There were no significant treatment effects on height growth during the 6-year study. Elevated [CO2] increased ring width by 66 and 47% at ambient and elevated temperatures, respectively. At ambient [CO2], elevated temperature increased ring width by 19%. Increased ring width in response to elevated [CO2] resulted from increases in both early- and latewood width; however, there was no effect of the treatments on early- and latewood proportions. Mean wood density, earlywood density and fiber length increased in response to elevated temperature. The chemical composition of wood was affected by elevated [CO2], which reduced the cellulose concentration, and by elevated temperature, which reduced the concentration of acetone-soluble extractives. Thus, over the 6-year period, radial growth was significantly increased by elevated [CO2], and some wood properties were significantly affected by elevated temperature or elevated [CO2], or both, indicating that climate change may affect the material properties of wood.

  5. Effects of temperature and salinity on the growth of Alexandrium (Dinophyceae) isolates from the Salish Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, Brian D; Moore, Stephanie K; Hay, Levi R; Anderson, Donald M; Trainer, Vera L

    2016-04-01

    Toxin-producing blooms of dinoflagellates in the genus Alexandrium have plagued the inhabitants of the Salish Sea for centuries. Yet the environmental conditions that promote accelerated growth of this organism, a producer of paralytic shellfish toxins, is lacking. This study quantitatively determined the growth response of two Alexandrium isolates to a range of temperatures and salinities, factors that will strongly respond to future climate change scenarios. An empirical equation, derived from observed growth rates describing the temperature and salinity dependence of growth, was used to hindcast bloom risk. Hindcasting was achieved by comparing predicted growth rates, calculated from in situ temperature and salinity data from Quartermaster Harbor, with corresponding Alexandrium cell counts and shellfish toxin data. The greatest bloom risk, defined at μ >0.25 d(-1) , generally occurred from April through November annually; however, growth rates rarely fell below 0.10 d(-1) . Except for a few occasions, Alexandrium cells were only observed during the periods of highest bloom risk and paralytic shellfish toxins above the regulatory limit always fell within the periods of predicted bloom occurrence. While acknowledging that Alexandrium growth rates are affected by other abiotic and biotic factors, such as grazing pressure and nutrient availability, the use of this empirical growth function to predict higher risk time frames for blooms and toxic shellfish within the Salish Sea provides the groundwork for a more comprehensive biological model of Alexandrium bloom dynamics in the region and will enhance our ability to forecast blooms in the Salish Sea under future climate change scenarios. © 2016 Phycological Society of America This article has been contributed to by US Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USA.

  6. Effect of Growth Temperature on Bamboo-shaped Carbon–Nitrogen (C–N Nanotubes Synthesized Using Ferrocene Acetonitrile Precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobal PramodSingh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This investigation deals with the effect of growth temperature on the microstructure, nitrogen content, and crystallinity of C–N nanotubes. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS study reveals that the atomic percentage of nitrogen content in nanotubes decreases with an increase in growth temperature. Transmission electron microscopic investigations indicate that the bamboo compartment distance increases with an increase in growth temperature. The diameter of the nanotubes also increases with increasing growth temperature. Raman modes sharpen while the normalized intensity of the defect mode decreases almost linearly with increasing growth temperature. These changes are attributed to the reduction of defect concentration due to an increase in crystal planar domain sizes in graphite sheets with increasing temperature. Both XPS and Raman spectral observations indicate that the C–N nanotubes grown at lower temperatures possess higher degree of disorder and higher N incorporation.

  7. [Effects of temperature on the growth and development of Aglossa dimidiata parasitized on Litsea coreana].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Xiao-Li; Yang, Mao-Fa; Huang, Li; Gou, Guang-Qian

    2012-11-01

    In order to reveal the effects of temperature on the growth and development of Aglossa dimidiata parasitized on Litsea coreana, a laboratory experiment was conducted to study the mean development duration, development rate, and survival rate of A. dimidiata at its different growth stages at 31 degrees C, 28 degrees C, 25 degrees C, 22 degrees C, and 19 degrees C, with the development threshold temperature and effective accumulated temperature for different growth stages calculated. Temperature had significant effects on the developmental duration. Except that the development duration of egg was shortened with increasing temperature, the development durations of larva, pupa, and immature A. dimidiata were the shortest at 25 degrees C, being 249.53 +/- 23.83, 12.94 +/- 1.27, and 273.00 +/- 24.19 days, respectively. There existed significant relationships between the development rates of A. dimidiata at its different growth stages and temperature, with positive linear relationship at egg stage, and quadratic relationship at larva, pupa, and immature stages. Temperature also had significant effects on the survival rate of A. dimidiata. The survival rates of A. dimidiata at its different growth stages were all the highest at 25 degrees C, being 94.0%, 73.8%, 91.3%, and 63.4% for the egg, larva, pupa, and immature A. dimidiata, respectively, followed by at 22 degrees C and 19 degrees C, and the lowest at 31 degrees C. No larva and pupa could survive at 31 degrees C, suggesting that A. dimidiata was not resistant to high temperature. The development threshold temperature for egg, larva, pupa, and immature A. dimidiata was 13.21 degrees C, 17.12 degrees C, 14.76 degrees C, and 16.47 degrees C, and the effective accumulated temperature was 117.94, 870.88, 149.70, and 1442.75 day-degree, respectively. The results coincided with the fact that the A. dimidiata reproduced 2 or 3 generations a year in Xifeng area of Guizhou, Southwest China.

  8. Plasma deposition of thin film silicon at low substrate temperature and at high growth rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkerk, A.D.

    2009-01-01

    To expand the range of applications for thin film solar cells incorporating hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H), the growth rate has to be increased 0.5 or less to several nm/s and the substrate temperature should be lowered to around 100 C. In

  9. Effect of temperature on microbial growth rate - thermodynamic analysis, the arrhenius and eyring-polanyi connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this work is to develop a new thermodynamic mathematical model for evaluating the effect of temperature on the rate of microbial growth. The new mathematical model is derived by combining the Arrhenius equation and the Eyring-Polanyi transition theory. The new model, suitable for ...

  10. Temperature acclimation of growth, photosynthesis and respiration in two mesophilic phytoplankton species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stæhr, P. A.; Birkeland, M. J.

    2006-01-01

    grown as nutrient-replete semicontinuous cultures for 2 weeks at 5, 15 and 25°C, during which growth rate was determined from changes in Chl a. Gross photosynthesis (GP) was measured as 14C assimilation at saturating light and respiration (R) was measured as O2 uptake along a temperature gradient from 0...

  11. Transient energy growth modulation by temperature dependent transport properties in a stratified plane Poiseuille flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinaldi, E.; Boersma, B.J.; Pecnik, R.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the effect of temperature dependent thermal conductivity ? and isobaric specific heat c_P on the transient amplification of perturbations in a thermally stratified laminar plane Poiseuille flow. It is shown that for decreasing thermal conductivity the maximum transient energy growth

  12. Effect of reactor temperature on direct growth of carbon nanomaterials on stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edzatty, A. N.; Syazwan, S. M.; Norzilah, A. H.; Jamaludin, S. B.

    2016-07-01

    Currently, carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) are widely used for various applications due to their extraordinary electrical, thermal and mechanical properties. In this work, CNMs were directly grown on the stainless steel (SS316) via chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Acetone was used as a carbon source and argon was used as carrier gas, to transport the acetone vapor into the reactor when the reaction occurred. Different reactor temperature such as 700, 750, 800, 850 and 900 °C were used to study their effect on CNMs growth. The growth time and argon flow rate were fixed at 30 minutes and 200 ml/min, respectively. Characterization of the morphology of the SS316 surface after CNMs growth using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) showed that the diameter of grown-CNMs increased with the reactor temperature. Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) was used to analyze the chemical composition of the SS316 before and after CNMs growth, where the results showed that reduction of catalyst elements such as iron (Fe) and nickel (Ni) at high temperature (700 - 900 °C). Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analysis showed that the nano-sized hills were in the range from 21 to 80 nm. The best reactor temperature to produce CNMs was at 800 °C.

  13. Temperature effect on the nucleation and growth of TiO2 colloidal nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Sasani Ghamsari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The nucleation and growth of sol-gel derived TiO2 colloidal nanoparticles have been studied using  experiment and theory as well. In this study, the temperature effect on the formation of TiO2 nanoparticles was discussed and some effective parameters such as the supply rate of solute (Q0, the mean volumic growth rate of stable nuclei during the nucleation period (u, the diffusion coefficient of [Ti]+4 ions and the nucleus size were determined. The formation of TiO2 nanoparticles in three different temperatures (60, 70 and 80°C was studied. The obtained results showed that the process temperature has a considerable impact on the nucleation and growth of TiO2 nanoparticles. It can be concluded that  increasing the temperature leads to a decrease of the supersaturation and an increase of the nucleus size, supply rate of monomer, nanoparticles density and growth rate as evident from LaMer diagram.

  14. Improving growth in juvenile turbot (Scophthalmus maximus Rafinesque) by rearing fish in switched temperature regimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imsland, A.K.; Schram, E.; Roth, B.; Schelvis-Smit, A.A.M.; Kloet, K.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of thermal history (16 and 20°C) on growth of juvenile turbot, Scophthalmus maximus (initial mean weight 72.6 g, n = 157) was studied. Fish were divided into four groups, two groups remaining at constant temperature (C16, C20), while fish in the other groups were transferred from either

  15. Temperature Effects on the Growth Rates and Photosynthetic Activities of Symbiodinium Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widiastuti Karim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Coral bleaching is caused by environmental stress and susceptibility to bleaching stress varies among types of coral. The physiological properties of the algal symbionts (Symbiodinium spp., especially extent of damage to PSII and its repair capacity, contribute importantly to this variability in stress susceptibility. The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between the growth rates and photosynthetic activities of six cultured strains of Symbiodinium spp. (clades A, B, C, D, and F at elevated temperature (33 °C. We also observed the recovery of photodamaged-PSII in the presence or absence of a chloroplast protein synthesis inhibitor (lincomycin. The growth rates and photochemical efficiencies of PSII (Fv/Fm decreased in parallel at high temperature in thermally sensitive strains, B-K100 (clade B followed by culture name and A-Y106, but not in thermally tolerant strains, F-K102 and D-K111. In strains A-KB8 and C-Y103, growth declined markedly at high temperature, but Fv/Fm decreased only slightly. These strains may reallocate energy from growth to the repair of damaged photosynthetic machineries or protection pathways. Alternatively, since recoveries of photo-damaged PSII at 33 °C were modest in strains A-KB8 and C-Y103, thermal stressing of other metabolic pathways may have reduced growth rates in these two strains. This possibility should be explored in future research efforts.

  16. Computer simulation of temperature-dependent growth of fractal and compact domains in diluted Ising models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Erik Schwartz; Fogedby, Hans C.; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1989-01-01

    A version of the two-dimensional site-diluted spin-(1/2 Ising model is proposed as a microscopic interaction model which governs solidification and growth processes controlled by vacancy diffusion. The Ising Hamiltonian describes a solid-fluid phase transition and it permits a thermodynamic...... temperature to be defined. The dynamics of the model are taken to involve (i) solid-fluid conversion and (ii) diffusion of vacancies in the fluid phase. By means of Monte Carlo computer-simulation techniques the solidification and growth processes following rapid thermal quenches below the transition...... probability measures of static fractal objects to the growth-probability distribution during formation of the fractal apply to the present model. The f(α) spectrum is found to be in the universality class of diffusion-limited aggregation. At finite temperatures, the fractal solid domains become metastable...

  17. The effect of housing temperature on the growth of CT26 tumor expressing fluorescent protein EGFP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuzhakova, Diana V.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Lapkina, Irina V.; Serebrovskaya, Ekaterina O.; Lukyanov, Sergey A.; Zagaynova, Elena V.

    2016-04-01

    To date, the effect of housing temperature on tumor development in the immunocompetent mice has been studied on poorly immunogenic cancer models. Standard housing temperature 20-26°C was shown to cause chronic metabolic cold stress and promote tumor progression via suppression of the antitumor immune response, whereas a thermoneutral temperature 30-31°C was more preferable for normal metabolism of mice and inhibited tumor growth. Our work represents the first attempt to discover the potential effect of housing temperature on the development of highly immunogenic tumor. EGFP-expressing murine colon carcinoma CT26 generated in Balb/c mice was used as a tumor model. No statistically significant differences were shown in tumor incidences and growth rates at 20°C, 25°C and 30°C for non-modified CT26. Maintaining mice challenged with CT26-EGFP cells at 30°C led to complete inhibition of tumor development. In summary, we demonstrated that the housing temperature is important for the regulation of growth of highly immunogenic tumors in mice through antitumor immunity.

  18. Growth and lipid accumulation in response to different cultivation temperatures in Nannochloropsis oculata for biodiesel production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Malakootian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microalgal lipid is a promising feedstock for biodiesel production. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of cultivation temperature on the growth and lipid accumulation properties of Nannochloropsis oculata microalgae. Methods: Nannochloropsis oculatacan grow in a wide range of temperatures (5 ~ 35°C. Late in the stationary growth phase of microalgae, biomass production and lipid accumulation were measured. The methanol-chloroform extraction method was used to extract total lipids from dried cells. The direct esterification method was used to measure fatty acids. Constituents were identified by gas chromatography. Results: The results show that the maximum specific growth rate at 20°C was 0.1569 day-1, and the maximum biomass production of microalgae at 25°C was 2.2667 g/L. The highest percentage of biomass conversion into lipid (35.71% occurred at 30°C. Maximum lipid productivity was seen at temperatures of 15°C, 20°C, and 25°C, but the analysis of fatty acids in the three temperatures shownare maximum accumulations of triglycerides in the microalgae cells at 20°C and 25°C. Conclusion: In the cultivation of Nannochloropsis oculata, the optimal temperature range for maximum efficiency in biodiesel production from lipids is 20°C to 25°C.

  19. Effects of photoperiod, growth temperature and cold acclimatisation on glucosinolates, sugars and fatty acids in kale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steindal, Anne Linn Hykkerud; Rødven, Rolf; Hansen, Espen; Mølmann, Jørgen

    2015-05-01

    Curly kale is a robust, cold tolerant plant with a high content of health-promoting compounds, grown at a range of latitudes. To assess the effects of temperature, photoperiod and cold acclimatisation on levels of glucosinolates, fatty acids and soluble sugars in kale, an experiment was set up under controlled conditions. Treatments consisted of combinations of the temperatures 15/9 or 21/15 °C, and photoperiods of 12 or 24h, followed by a cold acclimatisation period. Levels of glucosinolates and fatty acid types in leaves were affected by growth conditions and cold acclimatisation, being generally highest before acclimatisation. The effects of growth temperature and photoperiod on freezing tolerance were most pronounced in plants grown without cold acclimatisation. The results indicate that cold acclimatisation can increase the content of soluble sugar and can thereby improve the taste, whilst the content of unsaturated fatty and glucosinolates acids may decrease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Physical modelling of temperature fluctuations in a high aspect ratio model of the Czochralski crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, J.; Cramer, A.; Grants, I.; Eckert, S.; Gerbeth, G.

    2015-12-01

    A low temperature liquid metal model of the Czochralski (CZ) crystal growth process is considered experimentally for a high aspect ratio. Temperature fluctuations close to the edge of the model crystal are studied under the action of a rotating magnetic field (RMF) and/or rotation of the model crystal. A rotation of thermal structures is observed which loses its periodicity at sufficiently high strengths of the RMF. This finding is in qualitative agreement with previous findings in Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) cells. Opposing to that more generic case, the remaining amplitude of the temperature fluctuations stays significantly higher. I.e., the suppression of the fluctuations, which are detrimental to the growth of a mono-crystal, is weaker in the model under investigation.

  1. [Over-compensatory growth of Microcystis aeruginosa after high temperature stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hong-jie; Li, Dun-hai

    2010-07-01

    Two groups of Microcystis aeruginosa FACHB 905 cultures, 40 degrees C and 25 degrees c cultures were set in present study. Both of them were cultured for 5 and 10 days before transferred to fresh medium in same cell densities and then cultured under the same conditions at 25 degrees C. The algae which were cultured under 25 degrees C for all the time were set as the control. The growth, chlorophyll a concentration, Fv/Fm, net photosynthetic rate and respiration rate were determined after re-inoculation. The result showed that the high temperature treated groups have lower specific growth rate and lower Fv/Fm than those of control groups (p growth, the specific growth rate of 40 degrees C for 5 days group was 0.362, and it was significantly higher than that of control groups of 0.301 (p growth rate of 40 degrees c for 10 days group was 0.358, and there was no significant difference with control. 40 degrees C for 5 days group showed over-compensatory growth while 40 degrees C for 10 days group showed exact-compensatory growth. It implies that the over-compensatory growth characteristics of Microcysis aeruginosa is an endogenous biological factor that contributing the outbreak of blooms.

  2. Effect of different water temperatures on growth of aquatic plants Salvinia natans and Ceratophyllum demersum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadija Kadhem Hreeb

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effect of some different water temperatures on growth of aquatic plants (Salvinia natans and Ceratophyllum demersum. Methods: The aquatic plants were brought from Shatt Al-Arab River in 2016. Equal weights of aquatic plants were aquacultured in aquaria, and were exposed to three different temperatures ( 12, 22 and 32 °C. Results: The results showed that the two plants did not show significant differences with respect to their effects on pH and electrical conductivity values. Time and temperature did not affect the values of pH and electrical conductivity. The values of dissolved oxygen was significantly influenced with variation of time and temperature, while the two plants did not have significant differences on dissolved oxygen values, nitrate ion concentration and was not significantly influenced with variation of plant species or temperature or time. Plant species and temperature significantly affected phosphate ion concentration, while the time did not significantly influence the concentration of phosphate ion. Chlorophyll a content and biomass were significantly influenced with the variation of plant species, and temperature . Conclusions: Aquatic plants has a species specific respond to temperatures change in their environment. Water plant, Ceratophyllum demersum is more tolerant to temperatures change than Salvinia natans.

  3. Measurement of Temperature Fluctuations and Microscopic Growth Rates in a Silicon Floating Zone Under Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croell, Arne; Schweizer, Markus; Dold, P.; Kaiser, T.; Lichtensteiger, M.; Benz, K. W.

    1999-01-01

    USA Several microgravity experiments on sounding rockets and the Space Shuttle have shown that time-dependent thermocapillary (Marangoni) convection is the major cause for the formation of dopant striations in floating-zone grown semiconductor crystals, at least in small-scale systems not employing RF heating. To quantify this correlation, a silicon floating-zone experiment was performed during the TEXUS36 flight (February 7, 1998) in the monoellipsoid mirror furnace TEM02-ELLI. During the experiment, temperature fluctuations in the silicon melt zone and the microscopic growth rate were simultaneously measured. Temperature fluctuations of 0.5 C - 0.7 C with main frequencies between 0.1 Hz and 0.3 Hz were detectable. The microscopic growth rate fluctuated considerably around the average growth rate of 1 mm/min: rates from 4 mm/min to negative values (backmelting) were observed. Dopant striations are clearly visible in the Sb-doped crystal. They were characterized by Spreading Resistance measurements and Differential Interference Contrast microscopy. The frequencies associated with the dopant inhomogeneities correspond quite well with those of the temperature fluctuations and microscopic growth rates. 3D numerical simulations were performed to predict the optimum position of the temperature sensor, to evaluate characteristic temperature amplitudes and frequencies, and to give insight into the instability mechanisms of Marangoni convection in this configuration. The simulations were in good agreement with the experimental values, showing temperature fluctuations with frequencies ? 0.25 Hz and amplitudes up to 1.8 C at a position equivalent to that of the sensor tip in the experiment.

  4. Thermal preference of juvenile Dover sole (Solea solea in relation to thermal acclimation and optimal growth temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Schram

    Full Text Available Dover sole (Solea solea is an obligate ectotherm with a natural thermal habitat ranging from approximately 5 to 27°C. Thermal optima for growth lie in the range of 20 to 25°C. More precise information on thermal optima for growth is needed for cost-effective Dover sole aquaculture. The main objective of this study was to determine the optimal growth temperature of juvenile Dover sole (Solea solea and in addition to test the hypothesis that the final preferendum equals the optimal growth temperature. Temperature preference was measured in a circular preference chamber for Dover sole acclimated to 18, 22 and 28°C. Optimal growth temperature was measured by rearing Dover sole at 19, 22, 25 and 28°C. The optimal growth temperature resulting from this growth experiment was 22.7°C for Dover sole with a size between 30 to 50 g. The temperature preferred by juvenile Dover sole increases with acclimation temperature and exceeds the optimal temperature for growth. A final preferendum could not be detected. Although a confounding effect of behavioural fever on temperature preference could not be entirely excluded, thermal preference and thermal optima for physiological processes seem to be unrelated in Dover sole.

  5. Uptake of inorganic phosphate is a limiting factor for Saccharomyces cerevisiae during growth at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicent, Isabel; Navarro, Alfonso; Mulet, Jose M; Sharma, Sukesh; Serrano, Ramón

    2015-05-01

    The fermenting ability of Saccharomyces at low temperatures is crucial for the development of alcoholic beverages, but the key factors for the cold tolerance of yeast are not well known. In this report, we present the results of a screening for genes able to confer cold tolerance by overexpression in a laboratory yeast strain auxotrophic for tryptophan. We identified genes of tryptophan permeases (TAT1 and TAT2), suggesting that the first limiting factor in the growth of tryptophan auxotrophic yeast at low temperatures is tryptophan uptake. This fact is of little relevance to industrial strains which are prototrophic for tryptophan. Then, we screened for genes able to confer growth at low temperatures in tryptophan-rich media and found several genes related to phosphate uptake (PHO84, PHO87, PHO90 and GTR1). This suggests that without tryptophan limitation, uptake of inorganic phosphate becomes the limiting factor. We have found that overexpression of the previously uncharacterized ORF YCR015c/CTO1 increases the uptake of inorganic phosphate. Also, genes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis (NSG2) cause improvement of growth at 10°C, dependent on tryptophan uptake, while the gluconeogenesis gene PCK1 and the proline biosynthesis gene PRO2 cause an improvement in growth at 10°C, independent of tryptophan and phosphate uptake. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Thickness and Growth Temperature Dependence of Structure and Magnetism in FePt Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toney, Michael F

    2003-06-17

    We describe structural and magnetic measurements of polycrystalline, L1{sub 0} chemical-ordered Fe(55-60)Pt(45-40) films as a function of film thickness (from 3 to 13 nm) and growth temperature (270-370 C). With increasing film thickness, the coercivity increases from about 1 kOe up to 11 kOe (growth at 400 C), while for increasing growth temperature, the coercivity grows from 0.2 to 6 kOe for 4.3 nm thick films and 1.6 to 10 kOe for 8.5 nm thick films. There is a strong, nearly linear correlation between coercivity and the extent of L1{sub 0} chemical order. In all the films there is a mixture of L1{sub 0} and chemically disordered, fcc phases. The grain size in the L1{sub 0} phase increases with both film thickness and growth temperature (increasing chemical order), while in the fcc phase the grain size remains nearly constant and is smaller than in the L1{sub 0} phase. The films all contain twins and stacking faults. The relationship between the coercivity and the film structure is discussed and we give a possible mechanism for the lack of chemical order in the very thin films (lack of nucleation sites for the L1{sub 0} phase).

  7. Visually suboptimal bananas: How ripeness affects consumer expectation and perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symmank, Claudia; Zahn, Susann; Rohm, Harald

    2017-10-07

    One reason for the significant amount of food that is wasted in developed countries is that consumers often expect visually suboptimal food as being less palatable. Using bananas as example, the objective of this study was to determine how appearance affects consumer overall liking, the rating of sensory attributes, purchase intention, and the intended use of bananas. The ripeness degree (RD) of the samples was adjusted to RD 5 (control) and RD 7 (more ripened, visually suboptimal). After preliminary experiments, a total of 233 participants were asked to judge their satisfaction with the intensity of sensory attributes that referred to flavor, taste, and texture using just-about-right scales. Subjects who received peeled samples were asked after tasting, whereas subjects who received unpeeled bananas judged expectation and, after peeling and tasting, perception. Expected overall liking and purchase intention were significantly lower for RD 7 bananas. Purchase intention was still significantly different between RD 5 and RD 7 after tasting, whereas no difference in overall liking was observed. Significant differences between RD 5 and RD 7 were observed when asking participants for their intended use of the bananas. Concerning the sensory attributes, penalty analysis revealed that only the firmness of the RD 7 bananas was still not just-about-right after tasting. The importance that consumers attribute to the shelf-life of food had a pronounced impact on purchase intention of bananas with different ripeness degree. In the case of suboptimal bananas, the results demonstrate a positive relationship between the sensory perception and overall liking and purchase intention. Convincing consumers that visually suboptimal food is still tasty is of high relevance for recommending different ways of communication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mathematical models for growth in alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) embryos developing at different incubation temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardsley, W G; Ackerman, R A; Bukhari, N A; Deeming, D C; Ferguson, M W

    1995-08-01

    A variety of model-based (growth models) and model-free (cubic splines, exponentials) equations were fitted using weighted-nonlinear least squares regression to embryonic growth data from Alligator mississippiensis eggs incubated at 30 and 33 degrees C. Goodness of fit was estimated using a chi 2 on the sum of squared, weighted residuals, and run and sign tests on the residuals. One of the growth models used (Preece & Baines, 1978) was found to be superior to the classical growth models (exponential, monomolecular, logistic, Gompertz, von Bertalanffy) and gave an adequate fit to all longitudinal measures taken from the embryonic body and embryonic mass. However, measurements taken from the head could not be fitted by growth models but were adequately fitted by weighted least squares cubic splines. Data for the stage of development were best fitted by a sum of 2 exponentials with a transition point. Comparison of the maximum growth rates and parameter values, indicated that the growth data at 30 degrees C could be scaled to 33 degrees C to multiplying the time by a scaling factor of 1.2. This is equivalent to a Q10 of about 1.86 or, after solving the Arrhenius equation, an E++ of 46.9 kJmol-1. This may be interpreted as indicating a common rate-limiting step in development at the 2 temperatures.

  9. Temperature Shift Experiments Suggest That Metabolic Impairment and Enhanced Rates of Photorespiration Decrease Organic Acid Levels in Soybean Leaflets Exposed to Supra-Optimal Growth Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicher, Richard C

    2015-08-05

    Elevated growth temperatures are known to affect foliar organic acid concentrations in various plant species. In the current study, citrate, malate, malonate, fumarate and succinate decreased 40 to 80% in soybean leaflets when plants were grown continuously in controlled environment chambers at 36/28 compared to 28/20 °C. Temperature effects on the above mentioned organic acids were partially reversed three days after plants were transferred among optimal and supra-optimal growth temperatures. In addition, CO2 enrichment increased foliar malate, malonate and fumarate concentrations in the supra-optimal temperature treatment, thereby mitigating effects of high temperature on respiratory metabolism. Glycerate, which functions in the photorespiratory pathway, decreased in response to CO2 enrichment at both growth temperatures. The above findings suggested that diminished levels of organic acids in soybean leaflets upon exposure to high growth temperatures were attributable to metabolic impairment and to changes of photorespiratory flux. Leaf development rates differed among temperature and CO2 treatments, which affected foliar organic acid levels. Additionally, we report that large decreases of foliar organic acids in response to elevated growth temperatures were observed in legume species.

  10. Dyslipidemia is not associated with cardiovascular disease risk in an animal model of mild chronic suboptimal nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifshitz, Fima; Pintos, Patricia M; Lezón, Christian E; Macri, Elisa V; Friedman, Silvia M; Boyer, Patricia M

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies performed in an experimental model of nutritional growth retardation (NGR) have observed metabolic adaptation. We hypothesized that changes in lipid-lipoprotein profile, glucose, and insulin levels occur, whereas overall body growth is reduced.The aim of this study was to assess serum lipid-lipoprotein profile, hepatogram, insulinemia and glycemia, and CVD risk markers in rats fed a suboptimal diet. Weanling male rats were assigned either to control (C) or NGR group. In this 4-week study, C rats were fed ad libitum a standard diet, and NGR rats received 80% of the amount of food consumed by C. Zoometric parameters, body fat content, serum lipid-lipoprotein profile, hepatogram, insulinemia, and glycemia were determined, and the cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk markers homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance and homeostasis model assessment and β-cell function were calculated. Suboptimal food intake induced a significant decrease in body weight and length, which were accompanied by a reduction of 50% in body fat mass. Serum lipoproteins were significantly higher in NGR rats, with the exception of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, which remained unchanged. Nutritional growth retardation rats had decreased triglycerides compared with C rats. No significant differences were detected in liver function parameters. The CVD risk markers homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)-insulin resistance and homeostasis model assessment and β-cell function were significantly lower in NGR rats. Mild chronic suboptimal nutrition in weanling male rats led to growth retardation and changes in the lipid-lipoprotein profile, glucose, and insulin levels while preserving the integrity of liver function. These data suggest a metabolic adaptation during suboptimal food intake, which ensures substrates flux to tissues that require constant energy-in detriment to body growth. The CVD risk markers suggested that mild chronic food restriction of approximately 20% could

  11. Drastic reduction in the growth temperature of graphene on copper via enhanced London dispersion force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin-Ho; Li, Zhancheng; Cui, Ping; Fan, Xiaodong; Zhang, Hui; Zeng, Changgan; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2013-01-01

    London dispersion force is ubiquitous in nature, and is increasingly recognized to be an important factor in a variety of surface processes. Here we demonstrate unambiguously the decisive role of London dispersion force in non-equilibrium growth of ordered nanostructures on metal substrates using aromatic source molecules. Our first-principles based multi-scale modeling shows that a drastic reduction in the growth temperature, from ~1000°C to ~300°C, can be achieved in graphene growth on Cu(111) when the typical carbon source of methane is replaced by benzene or p-Terphenyl. The London dispersion force enhances their adsorption energies by about (0.5-1.8) eV, thereby preventing their easy desorption, facilitating dehydrogenation, and promoting graphene growth at much lower temperatures. These quantitative predictions are validated in our experimental tests, showing convincing demonstration of monolayer graphene growth using the p-Terphenyl source. The general trends established are also more broadly applicable in molecular synthesis of surface-based nanostructures.

  12. Predictive modeling of Pseudomonas fluorescens growth under different temperature and pH values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Dias dos Anjos Gonçalves

    Full Text Available Abstract Meat is one of the most perishable foods owing to its nutrient availability, high water activity, and pH around 5.6. These properties are highly conducive for microbial growth. Fresh meat, when exposed to oxygen, is subjected to the action of aerobic psychrotrophic, proteolytic, and lipolytic spoilage microorganisms, such as Pseudomonas spp. The spoilage results in the appearance of slime and off-flavor in food. In order to predict the growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens in fresh meat at different pH values, stored under refrigeration, and temperature abuse, microbial mathematical modeling was applied. The primary Baranyi and Roberts and the modified Gompertz models were fitted to the experimental data to obtain the growth parameters. The Ratkowsky extended model was used to determine the effect of pH and temperature on the growth parameter µmax. The program DMFit 3.0 was used for model adjustment and fitting. The experimental data showed good fit for both the models tested, and the primary and secondary models based on the Baranyi and Roberts models showed better validation. Thus, these models can be applied to predict the growth of P. fluorescens under the conditions tested.

  13. Toxin YafQ Reduces Escherichia coli Growth at Low Temperatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueju Zhao

    Full Text Available Toxin/antitoxin (TA systems reduce metabolism under stress; for example, toxin YafQ of the YafQ/DinJ Escherichia coli TA system reduces growth by cleaving transcripts with in-frame 5'-AAA-G/A-3' sites, and antitoxin DinJ is a global regulator that represses its locus as well as controls levels of the stationary sigma factor RpoS. Here we investigated the influence on cell growth at various temperatures and found that deletion of the antitoxin gene, dinJ, resulted in both reduced metabolism and slower growth at 18°C but not at 37°C. The reduction in growth could be complemented by producing DinJ from a plasmid. Using a transposon screen to reverse the effect of the absence of DinJ, two mutations were found that inactivated the toxin YafQ; hence, the toxin caused the slower growth only at low temperatures rather than DinJ acting as a global regulator. Corroborating this result, a clean deletion of yafQ in the ΔdinJ ΔKmR strain restored both metabolism and growth at 18°C. In addition, production of YafQ was more toxic at 18°C compared to 37°C. Furthermore, by overproducing all the E. coli proteins, the global transcription repressor Mlc was found that counteracts YafQ toxicity only at 18°C. Therefore, YafQ is more effective at reducing metabolism at low temperatures, and Mlc is its putative target.

  14. RHEED studies of Ag/Si(111) growth at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, Ulrich [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1996-01-02

    This thesis showed that it is possible to achieve well ordered growth at low temperatures when chaing fluxes during the course of the deposition. It was also demonstrated that nucleation theory fails to predict or explain at least part of the results, in particular when deposition takes place at an initially low rate, with presumably a relatively low nucleation density, followed by a change to a high flux rate. This points to an inherent lack of nucleation theory; alternative explanations are presented based on flux-independent growth as reported by Roos (Surf. Sci. 302 (1994) 37).

  15. High-Temperature Intergranular Crack Growth in Martensitic 2-1/4 Cr-1Mo Steel,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    between 48 and 55 HPam ) . Most importantly from figs 3 and 4. it can be seen that, as the final austenitising temperature prior to quenching decreases, the...cavitation (around carbides) occurred at all strass intensities greater than K - 40 HPam , and crack growth rates greater than da/dt - 3.10 -. ms , whereas...3 -1 . For the 1300-900 WQ condition, fine cavitation was obsarved for stress intensities between K - 42-55 HPam % and crack growth rates -5 -4 -1

  16. Mathematical model of the growth of a mollusk affected by a toxicant and by temperature fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurchenko, T.S.; Burtnaya, I.L.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt is made to model the effect of a gamma isomer of hexachloran (lindane) and of temperature fluctuations on the growth of bivalves. The model is based on an experimental study of the effect of the toxicant on Radix ovata and Viviparus viviparus, and also on the Putter-Bertalanffy-Vinberg models and the model of Zotin. Quite good agreements has been obtained between calculated and experimental data, and growth curves have been constructed for the weight increase of the animals when exposed to lindane concentrations not tested in the experiment.

  17. Genotype-temperature interaction in the regulation of development, growth, and morphometrics in wild-type, and growth-hormone transgenic coho salmon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mare Lõhmus

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The neuroendocrine system is an important modulator of phenotype, directing cellular genetic responses to external cues such as temperature. Behavioural and physiological processes in poikilothermic organisms (e.g. most fishes, are particularly influenced by surrounding temperatures. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By comparing the development and growth of two genotypes of coho salmon (wild-type and transgenic with greatly enhanced growth hormone production at six different temperatures, ranging between 8 degrees and 18 degrees C, we observed a genotype-temperature interaction and possible trend in directed neuroendocrine selection. Differences in growth patterns of the two genotypes were compared by using mathematical models, and morphometric analyses of juvenile salmon were performed to detect differences in body shape. The maximum hatching and alevin survival rates of both genotypes occurred at 12 degrees C. At lower temperatures, eggs containing embryos with enhanced GH production hatched after a shorter incubation period than wild-type eggs, but this difference was not apparent at and above 16 degrees C. GH transgenesis led to lower body weights at the time when the yolk sack was completely absorbed compared to the wild genotype. The growth of juvenile GH-enhanced salmon was to a greater extent stimulated by higher temperatures than the growth of the wild-type. Increased GH production significantly influenced the shape of the salmon growth curves. CONCLUSIONS: Growth hormone overexpression by transgenesis is able to stimulate the growth of coho salmon over a wide range of temperatures. Temperature was found to affect growth rate, survival, and body morphology between GH transgenic and wild genotype coho salmon, and differential responses to temperature observed between the genotypes suggests they would experience different selective forces should they ever enter natural ecosystems. Thus, GH transgenic fish would be expected to

  18. New Crystal-Growth Methods for Producing Lattice-Matched Substrates for High-Temperature Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boatner, L.A.

    2008-06-24

    This effort addressed the technical problem of identifying and growing, on a commercial scale, suitable single-crystal substrates for the subsequent deposition of epitaxial thin films of high temperature semiconductors such as GaN/AlN. The lack of suitable lattice-matched substrate materials was one of the major problem areas in the development of semiconducting devices for use at elevated temperatures as well as practical opto-electronic devices based on Al- and GaN technology. Such lattice-matched substrates are necessary in order to reduce or eliminate high concentrations of defects and dislocations in GaN/AlN and related epitaxial thin films. This effort concentrated, in particular, on the growth of single crystals of ZnO for substrate applications and it built on previous ORNL experience in the chemical vapor transport growth of large single crystals of zinc oxide. This combined expertise in the substrate growth area was further complemented by the ability of G. Eres and his collaborators to deposit thin films of GaN on the subject substrates and the overall ORNL capability for characterizing the quality of such films. The research effort consisted of research on the growth of two candidate substrate materials in conjunction with concurrent research on the growth and characterization of GaN films, i.e. the effort combined bulk crystal growth capabilities in the area of substrate production at both ORNL and the industrial partner, Commercial Crystal Growth Laboratories (CCL), Naples, Florida, with the novel thin-film deposition techniques previously developed in the ORNL SSD.

  19. Development temperature has persistent effects on muscle growth responses in gilthead sea bream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia de la serrana, Daniel; Vieira, Vera L A; Andree, Karl B; Darias, Maria; Estévez, Alicia; Gisbert, Enric; Johnston, Ian A

    2012-01-01

    Initially we characterised growth responses to altered nutritional input at the transcriptional and tissue levels in the fast skeletal muscle of juvenile gilthead sea bream. Fish reared at 21-22°C (range) were fed a commercial diet at 3% body mass d(-1) (non-satiation feeding, NSF) for 4 weeks, fasted for 4d (F) and then fed to satiation (SF) for 21d. 13 out of 34 genes investigated showed consistent patterns of regulation between nutritional states. Fasting was associated with a 20-fold increase in MAFbx, and a 5-fold increase in Six1 and WASp expression, which returned to NSF levels within 16h of SF. Refeeding to satiation was associated with a rapid (growth factors FGF6 and IGF1 increased 6.0 and 4.5-fold within 16 h and 24 h of refeeding respectively. The average growth in diameter of fast muscle fibres was checked with fasting and significant fibre hypertrophy was only observed after 13d and 21d SF. To investigate developmental plasticity in growth responses we used the same experimental protocol with fish reared at either 17.5-18.5°C (range) (LT) or 21-22°C (range) (HT) to metamorphosis and then transferred to 21-22°C. There were persistent effects of development temperature on muscle growth patterns with 20% more fibres of lower average diameter in LT than HT group of similar body size. Altering the nutritional input to the muscle to stimulate growth revealed cryptic changes in the expression of UNC45 and Hsp90α with higher transcript abundance in the LT than HT groups, whereas there were no differences in the expression of MAFbx and Six1. It was concluded that myogenesis and gene expression patterns during growth are not fixed, but can be modified by temperature during the early stages of the life cycle.

  20. Gill remodelling and growth rate of striped catfish Pangasianodon hypophthalmus under impact of hypoxia and temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phuong, Le My; Huong, Do Thi Thanh; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    2016-01-01

    Gill morphometric and gill plasticity of the air-breathing striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) exposed to different temperatures (present day 27 °C and future 33 °C) and different air saturation levels (92% and 35%) during 6 weeks were investigated using vertical sections to estimate th...... was almost eliminated in the 27 °C normoxic group, with other groups intermediate. In addition, elevated temperature had an astounding effect on growth with the 33 °C group growing nearly 8-fold faster than the 27 °C fish....

  1. Influence of growth media and temperature on bacterial adhesion to polystyrene surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Eliza Zeraik

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial adhesion to inert surfaces is a complex process influenced by environmental conditions. In this work, the influence of growth medium and temperature on the adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus luteus and Listeria monocytogenes to polystyrene surfaces was studied. Most bacteria demonstrated the highest adhesion when cultured in TSYEA, except S. marcescens, which showed to be positively influenced by the pigment production, favored in poor nutrient media (lactose and peptone agar. P. aeruginosa adhesion to polystyrene increased at low temperatures whatever the medium used. The culture medium influenced the surface properties of the bacteria as assessed by the MATS test.

  2. Physiological potential of Oryza sativa seeds treated with growth regulators at low temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Grohs

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The rapid and uniform establishment of rice crops is important for improving production. However, this condition is influenced by several factors, including the soil temperature when planting, which may delay seed germination and compromise the final stand. The aim of this study was to evaluate the behaviour of substances which have the effect of growth regulator when applied to the seeds of different rice cultivars under low-temperature conditions. The experiment was carried out in a completely randomised design with four replications in a bi-factorial scheme, where factor A was represented by the different products (gibberellic acid - AG3, tiamethoxam - TMX, Haf Plus® - HAF, and a control with water - TEST, and factor B by the irrigated rice cultivars (IRGA 424, IRGA 425, Puitá INTA CL, and Avaxi CL. In addition, the experiment was repeated at temperatures of 17 °C and 25 °C in order to simulate low-temperature conditions. The results showed that AG3 is effective in increasing seed vigour in the rice cultivars at both temperatures, with the AG3, TMX and HAF responsible for increasing germination percentage only at the temperature of 17 °C. The effect of the products is more pronounced at low temperatures, and is dependent on the cultivar; in cultivars which are sensitive to cold there is no effect from the products used.

  3. Growth temperature exerts differential physiological and transcriptional responses in laboratory and wine strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pizarra, Francisco J.; Jewett, Michael Christopher; Nielsen, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been widely used as a model for studying eukaryotic cells and mapping the molecular mechanisms of many different human diseases. Industrial wine yeasts, on the other hand, have been selected on the basis of their adaptation to stringent...... global insight into how growth temperature affects differential physiological and transcriptional responses in laboratory and wine strains of S. cerevisiae....... environmental conditions and the organoleptic properties that they confer to wine. Here, we used a two-factor design to study the responses of a standard laboratory strain, CEN.PK113-7D, and an industrial wine yeast strain, EC1118, to growth temperatures of 15 degrees C and 30 degrees C in nitrogen...

  4. Low Temperature Metal Free Growth of Graphene on Insulating Substrates by Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, R; Munuera, C; Martínez, J I; Azpeitia, J; Gómez-Aleixandre, C; García-Hernández, M

    2017-03-01

    Direct growth of graphene films on dielectric substrates (quartz and silica) is reported, by means of remote electron cyclotron resonance plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition r-(ECR-CVD) at low temperature (650°C). Using a two step deposition process- nucleation and growth- by changing the partial pressure of the gas precursors at constant temperature, mostly monolayer continuous films, with grain sizes up to 500 nm are grown, exhibiting transmittance larger than 92% and sheet resistance as low as 900 Ω·sq-1. The grain size and nucleation density of the resulting graphene sheets can be controlled varying the deposition time and pressure. In additon, first-principles DFT-based calculations have been carried out in order to rationalize the oxygen reduction in the quartz surface experimentally observed. This method is easily scalable and avoids damaging and expensive transfer steps of graphene films, improving compatibility with current fabrication technologies.

  5. Effect of agrowastes, pH and temperature variation on the growth of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of pH and temperature variations on the growth of Volvariella volvacea cultivated on various agricultural wastes singly and in various combinations was studied. A pH range of 5.5 to 8.5 recorded the maximum mycelia yield and the highest mycelia weight was recorded at pH 6.5. The mycelia yield decreased at pH ...

  6. Effects of Photoperiod and Temperature on Growth and Development in Clouded Salamander (Hynobius nebulosus) Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukita, Sayuri; Gouda, Mika; Ikeda, Sakiko; Ishibashi, Sakiko; Furuya, Tatsunori; Nakamura, Keiji

    2015-06-01

    Day length is one of the most important factors that organisms use to predict seasonal changes in their environment. Several amphibians regulate their growth and development in response to photoperiod. However, many studies have not focused on the ecological effects of the photoperiodic response on growth and development because they use tropical animals, animals from a commercial source or from unknown localities, or extreme light regimens for experiments. In the present study, we examined the effects of photoperiod on growth and development in the clouded salamander (Hynobius nebulosus) by raising larvae under different photoperiods and at different temperatures in the laboratory. The average larval period under a long-day photoperiod of L16:D8 was longer than that under L12:D12 at 15°C or 20°C, although the difference between the photoperiods was only significant for 15°C. Juveniles weighed more at metamorphosis under L16:D8 than those under L12:D12, irrespective of temperature, suggesting that a longer developmental period results in a heavier body weight. The head width of juveniles did not differ for different photoperiods at either temperature. However, the growth rate of the head width under L12:D12 was faster than that under L16:D8 at 15°C. Long day length appears to produce larger H. nebulosus juveniles in a relatively stable aquatic environment with a low population density. Thus, development may be accelerated when the day length becomes shorter as winter approaches, and larvae may have increased the growth rate of their head widths to compensate for the shorter growing period under shorter day lengths.

  7. Gas temperature measurements in a microwave plasma by optical emission spectroscopy under single-wall carbon nanotube growth conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, R K [Cummins Inc, 1900 McKinley Ave, MC 50180, Columbus, IN 47201 (United States); Anderson, T N; Lucht, R P; Fisher, T S; Gore, J P [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)], E-mail: rajesh.garg@cummins.com

    2008-05-07

    Plasma gas temperatures were measured via in situ optical emission spectroscopy in a microwave CH{sub 4}-H{sub 2} plasma under carbon nanotube (CNT) growth conditions. Gas temperature is an important parameter in controlling and optimizing CNT growth. The temperature has a significant impact on chemical kinetic rates, species concentrations and CNT growth rates on the substrate. H{sub 2} rotational temperatures were determined from the Q-branch spectrum of the d{sup 3}{pi}{sub u}(0){yields}a{sup 3}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}(0) transition. N{sub 2} rotational and vibrational temperatures were measured by fitting rovibrational bands from the N{sub 2} emission spectrum of the C {sup 3}{pi}{sub u} {yields} B {sup 3}{pi}{sub g} transition. The N{sub 2} rotational temperature, which is assumed to be approximately equal to the translational gas temperature, increases with an increase in input microwave plasma power and substrate temperature. The measured H{sub 2} rotational temperatures were not in agreement with the measured N{sub 2} rotational temperatures under the CNT growth conditions in this study. The measured N{sub 2} rotational temperatures compared with the H{sub 2} rotational temperatures suggest the partial equilibration of upper excited state due to higher, 10 Torr, operating pressure. Methane addition in the hydrogen plasma increases the gas temperature slightly for methane concentrations higher than 10% in the feed gas.

  8. Silicon enhances the growth of Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohlin under green light and low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peipei; Gu, Wenhui; Wu, Songcui; Huang, Aiyou; He, Linwen; Xie, Xiujun; Gao, Shan; Zhang, Baoyu; Niu, Jianfeng; Peng Lin, A.; Wang, Guangce

    2014-01-01

    Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohlin is an ideal model diatom; its complete genome is known, and it is an important economic microalgae. Although silicon is not required in laboratory and factory culture of this species, previous studies have shown that silicon starvation can lead to differential expression of miRNAs. The role that silicon plays in P. tricornutum growth in nature is poorly understood. In this study, we compared the growth rate of silicon starved P. tricornutum with that of normal cultured cells under different culture conditions. Pigment analysis, photosynthesis measurement, lipid analysis, and proteomic analysis showed that silicon plays an important role in P. tricornutum growth and that its presence allows the organism to grow well under green light and low temperature. PMID:24492482

  9. Suboptimal performance on neuropsychological tests in patients with suspected chronic toxic encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hout, MSE; Schmand, B; Wekking, EM; Hageman, G; Deelman, BG

    Suboptimal performance during neuropsychological testing can seriously complicate assessment in behavioral neurotoxicology. We present data on the prevalence of suboptimal performance in a group of Dutch patients with suspected chronic toxic encephalopathy (CTE) after long-term occupational exposure

  10. Suboptimal performance on neuropsychological tests in patients with suspected chronic toxic encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hout, Moniek S. E.; Schmand, Ben; Wekking, Ellie M.; Hageman, Gerard; Deelman, Betto G.

    2003-01-01

    Suboptimal performance during neuropsychological testing can seriously complicate assessment in behavioral neurotoxicology. We present data on the prevalence of suboptimal performance in a group of Dutch patients with suspected chronic toxic encephalopathy (CTE) after long-term occupational exposure

  11. A NEW APPROACH TO THE ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECTS OF DAY AND NIGHT TEMPERATURES ON PLANT GROWTH AND MORPHOGENESIS

    OpenAIRE

    Sysoyeva, M.I.; Kharkina, T.G.; E. F. Markovskaya

    2001-01-01

    Contradictory results on the effects of day and night temperatures on plant growth and development have been reported in the literature. This is partly due to the lack of unified approach to data analysis and interpretation of results. In the present paper a method for quantifying the effect of day and night temperatures, their difference (DIF) and average daily temperature (ADT) on plant growth and development is described. The proposed method is based on the model calculations and subsequen...

  12. Effect of temperature on growth and fatty acids profile of the biodiesel producing microalga Scenedesmus acutus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Sheekh, M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Description of the subject. The present study examined the effect of temperature (15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 °C on biomass, esterified fatty acids content and fatty acid productivity of Scenedesmus acutus. Objectives. This work aimed to study the effect of variation in temperature on lipid productivity and fatty acid profiles of S. acutus as a feedstock for biodiesel production. Method. The alga was grown under different temperatures and its biomass, as well as fatty acid content and composition, were determined. Results. The maximum growth rate of S. acutus was achieved at 30 °C , but there was no significant difference in biomass productivity at 25 and 30 °C (0.41 and 0.42 g·l-1·d-1, respectively. The highest fatty acid content (104.1 mg·g-1 CDW was recorded at low temperature (15 °C and decreased with increasing temperature. As a result of high biomass production, fatty acids productivity showed the highest values (41.27 and 42.10 mg·l-1·d-1 at 25 and 30 °C, respectively. The proportion of saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids increased from 13.72 to 23.79% and from 11.13 to 33.10% of total fatty acids when the incubation temperature was raised from 15 to 40 °C, respectively. The increase of temperature from 15 to 40 °C decreased the poly-unsaturated fatty acids from 75.15% to 43.10% of total fatty acids, respectively. Conclusions. The present study concluded that incubation temperature was a critical parameter for quantitative and qualitative fatty acid compositions of S. acutus. In addition, the type and proportion of individual fatty acids, which interfere with biodiesel quality, can be modified using different incubation temperatures in order to meet the biodiesel international standards.

  13. Improvement of Suboptimal Land Productivity Approach by Land and Plant Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marthen Pasang Sirappa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Assessment for increasing productivity of suboptimal land with using three kinds of organic fertilizer and six rice varieties had been conducted in the Debowae village, Waeapo district, Buru regency at 2011. Purpose of the assessment were to determine the effect of three types organic fertilizer and the use of six Inpara varieties to growth and productivity of rice in sub-optimal land. Study used a split plot design with three replications (farmers as replicates, where the main plot was three types of organic fertilizers (livestock manure, granular organic, and petroganic, while the subplot was 6 varieties Inpara (Inpara 1, Inpara 2, Inpara 3, Inpara 4, Inpara 5, and Indragiri. The soil types at the study site based on soil classification were Endoaquepts with soil fertility status was low. The study results showed that the use of organic manure combined with inorganic fertilizers, both from livestock manure, while granular organic and petrogranic, gave an average crop growth and yield better than the results obtained by farmers outside of the study. Average petroganic fertilizer had a better growth and higher crop yields compared to other organic fertilizers. The six varieties of rice swamps that were examined (Inpara 1, Inpara 2, Inpara 3, Inpara 4, Inpara 5, and Indragiri had the average growth and better yields than rice varieties used by farmers outside of the study (2.75 Mg ha-1. Varieties Inpara 4, Indragiri, Inpara 1 and Inpara 2 had average yield above 7 Mg ha-1, while Inpara 3 and Inpara 5 average above 4 Mg ha-1. Combination of granular organic fertilizer with Inpara 4 variety and petroganic with Indragiri variety had the best results (8.37 and 8.02 Mg ha-1, while the lowest yield (4.48 Mg ha-1 was reached at combination of livestock manure with Inpara 5 variety.

  14. Volume growth during uniaxial tension of particle-filled elastomers at various temperatures - Experiments and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilseng, Arne; H. Skallerud, Bjørn; H. Clausen, Arild

    2017-10-01

    A common presumption for elastomeric material behaviour is incompressibility, however, the inclusion of filler particles might give rise to matrix-particle decohesion and subsequent volume growth. In this article, the volumetric deformation accompanying uniaxial tension of particle-filled elastomeric materials at low temperatures is studied. An experimental set-up enabling full-field deformation measurements is outlined and novel data are reported on the significant volume growth accompanying uniaxial tension of two HNBR and one FKM compounds at temperatures of - 18 , 0, and 23 °C. The volumetric deformation was found to increase with reduced temperature for all compounds. To explain the observed dilatation, in situ scanning electron microscopy was used to inspect matrix-particle debonding occurring at the surface of the materials. A new constitutive model, combining the Bergström-Boyce visco-hyperelastic formulation with a Gurson flow potential function is outlined to account for the observed debonding effects in a numerical framework. The proposed model is shown to provide a good correspondence to the experimental data, including the volumetric response, for the tested FKM compound at all temperature levels.

  15. Temperature dependences of growth rates and carrying capacities of marine bacteria depart from metabolic theoretical predictions

    KAUST Repository

    Huete-Stauffer, Tamara Megan

    2015-09-11

    Using the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) framework, we evaluated over a whole annual cycle the monthly responses to temperature of the growth rates (μ) and carrying capacities (K) of heterotrophic bacterioplankton at a temperate coastal site. We used experimental incubations spanning 6oC with bacterial physiological groups identified by flow cytometry according to membrane integrity (live), nucleic acid content (HNA and LNA) and respiratory activity (CTC+). The temperature dependence of μat the exponential phase of growth was summarized by the activation energy (E), which was variable (-0.52 to 0.72 eV) but followed a seasonal pattern, only reaching the hypothesized value for aerobic heterotrophs of 0.65 eV during the spring bloom for the most active bacterial groups (live, HNA, CTC+). K (i.e. maximum experimental abundance) peaked at 4 × 106 cells mL-1 and generally covaried with μbut, contrary to MTE predictions, it did not decrease consistently with temperature. In the case of live cells, the responses of μand K to temperature were positively correlated and related to seasonal changes in substrate availability, indicating that the responses of bacteria to warming are far from homogeneous and poorly explained by MTE at our site. © FEMS 2015.

  16. Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase enhances the growth of Leuconostoc mesenteroides lactic acid bacteria at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Seitaro; Kawamoto, Jun; Sato, Satoshi B; Iki, Takashi; Watanabe, Itaru; Kudo, Kazuyuki; Esaki, Nobuyoshi; Kurihara, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can cause deterioration of food quality even at low temperatures. In this study, we investigated the cold-adaptation mechanism of a novel food spoilage LAB, Leuconostoc mesenteroides NH04 (NH04). L. mesenteroides was isolated from several spoiled cooked meat products at a high frequency in our factories. NH04 grew rapidly at low temperatures within the shelf-life period and resulted in heavy financial losses. NH04 grew more rapidly than related strains such as Leuconostoc mesenteroides NBRC3832 (NBRC3832) at 10°C. Proteome analysis of NH04 demonstrated that this strain produces a homolog of alkyl hydroperoxide reductase--AhpC--the expression of which can be induced at low temperatures. The expression level of AhpC in NH04 was approximately 6-fold higher than that in NBRC3832, which was grown under the same conditions. Although AhpC is known to have an anti-oxidative role in various bacteria by catalyzing the reduction of alkyl hydroperoxide and hydrogen peroxide, the involvement of AhpC in cold adaptation of food spoilage bacteria was unclear. We introduced an expression plasmid containing ahpC into NBRC3832, which grows slower than NH04 at 10°C, and found that expression of AhpC enhanced growth. These results demonstrated that AhpC, which likely increases anti-oxidative capacity of LAB, plays an important role in their rapid growth at low temperatures.

  17. Interaction of Temperature and Photoperiod Increases Growth and Oil Content in the Marine Microalgae Dunaliella viridis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soundarya Srirangan

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic marine microalgae like Dunaliella spp. have great potential as a feedstock for liquid transportation fuels because they grow fast and can accumulate high levels of triacylgycerides with little need for fresh water or land. Their growth rates vary between species and are dependent on environmental conditions. The cell cycle, starch and triacylglycerol accumulation are controlled by the diurnal light:dark cycle. Storage compounds like starch and triacylglycerol accumulate in the light when CO2 fixation rates exceed the need of assimilated carbon and energy for cell maintenance and division during the dark phase. To delineate environmental effects, we analyzed cell division rates, metabolism and transcriptional regulation in Dunaliella viridis in response to changes in light duration and growth temperatures. Its rate of cell division was increased under continuous light conditions, while a shift in temperature from 25 °C to 35 °C did not significantly affect the cell division rate, but increased the triacylglycerol content per cell several-fold under continuous light. The amount of saturated fatty acids in triacylglycerol fraction was more responsive to an increase in temperature than to a change in the light regime. Detailed fatty acid profiles showed that Dunaliella viridis incorporated lauric acid (C12:0 into triacylglycerol after 24 hours under continuous light. Transcriptome analysis identified potential regulators involved in the light and temperature-induced lipid accumulation in Dunaliella viridis.

  18. Temperature dependences of growth rates and carrying capacities of marine bacteria depart from metabolic theoretical predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huete-Stauffer, Tamara Megan; Arandia-Gorostidi, Nestor; Díaz-Pérez, Laura; Morán, Xosé Anxelu G

    2015-10-01

    Using the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) framework, we evaluated over a whole annual cycle the monthly responses to temperature of the growth rates (μ) and carrying capacities (K) of heterotrophic bacterioplankton at a temperate coastal site. We used experimental incubations spanning 6ºC with bacterial physiological groups identified by flow cytometry according to membrane integrity (live), nucleic acid content (HNA and LNA) and respiratory activity (CTC+). The temperature dependence of μ at the exponential phase of growth was summarized by the activation energy (E), which was variable (-0.52 to 0.72 eV) but followed a seasonal pattern, only reaching the hypothesized value for aerobic heterotrophs of 0.65 eV during the spring bloom for the most active bacterial groups (live, HNA, CTC+). K (i.e. maximum experimental abundance) peaked at 4 × 10(6) cells mL(-1) and generally covaried with μ but, contrary to MTE predictions, it did not decrease consistently with temperature. In the case of live cells, the responses of μ and K to temperature were positively correlated and related to seasonal changes in substrate availability, indicating that the responses of bacteria to warming are far from homogeneous and poorly explained by MTE at our site. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Effects of Temperature on Growth and Constituents of New Shoots in Tea Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anan, Toyomasa; Yamaguchi, Yuichi; Tamura, Yasuaki; Mizukami, Yuzo; Sawai, Yusuke

    The effects of air temperature on growth and constituents of new shoots in tea plants were examined. In the first crop season, new shoots of tea plants grown in a hothouse from September to April of the following year were compared with those of tea plants outdoors. The average temperature in the hothouse from September to April of the following year was about 16-19°C,and the average outdoor temperature was about 9-12°C. The results indicated that the coefficients of variation of the weights and numbers of immature leaves of new shoots grown in a hothouse were greater than those of new shoots grown outdoors. Therefore, the new shoots grown in a hothouse were more uneven than those grown outdoors. The catechin contents of new shoots grown in a hothouse were higher than those of new shoots grown outdoors, and total nitrogen contents of new shoots grown in a hothouse were lower than those of new shoots grown outdoors. In the next study, young tea plants were cultivated in a hothouse and outdoors over a period of one year. The average temperature in the hothouse was about 22-23°C, and that outdoors was about 16-17°C. The growth cycles in the hothouse were shorter than those outdoors, and the number of pluckings and the yield of new shoots grown in a hothouse were more than those of new shoots grown outdoors.

  20. Warming temperatures and smaller body sizes: synchronous changes in growth of North Sea fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudron, Alan R; Needle, Coby L; Rijnsdorp, Adriaan D; Marshall, C Tara

    2014-04-01

    Decreasing body size has been proposed as a universal response to increasing temperatures. The physiology behind the response is well established for ectotherms inhabiting aquatic environments: as higher temperatures decrease the aerobic capacity, individuals with smaller body sizes have a reduced risk of oxygen deprivation. However, empirical evidence of this response at the scale of communities and ecosystems is lacking for marine fish species. Here, we show that over a 40-year period six of eight commercial fish species in the North Sea examined underwent concomitant reductions in asymptotic body size with the synchronous component of the total variability coinciding with a 1-2 °C increase in water temperature. Smaller body sizes decreased the yield-per-recruit of these stocks by an average of 23%. Although it is not possible to ascribe these phenotypic changes unequivocally to temperature, four aspects support this interpretation: (i) the synchronous trend was detected across species varying in their life history and life style; (ii) the decrease coincided with the period of increasing temperature; (iii) the direction of the phenotypic change is consistent with physiological knowledge; and (iv) no cross-species synchrony was detected in other species-specific factors potentially impacting growth. Our findings support a recent model-derived prediction that fish size will shrink in response to climate-induced changes in temperature and oxygen. The smaller body sizes being projected for the future are already detectable in the North Sea. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Recent climate hiatus revealed dual control by temperature and drought on the stem growth of Mediterranean Quercus ilex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempereur, Morine; Limousin, Jean-Marc; Guibal, Frédéric; Ourcival, Jean-Marc; Rambal, Serge; Ruffault, Julien; Mouillot, Florent

    2017-01-01

    A better understanding of stem growth phenology and its climate drivers would improve projections of the impact of climate change on forest productivity. Under a Mediterranean climate, tree growth is primarily limited by soil water availability during summer, but cold temperatures in winter also prevent tree growth in evergreen forests. In the widespread Mediterranean evergreen tree species Quercus ilex, the duration of stem growth has been shown to predict annual stem increment, and to be limited by winter temperatures on the one hand, and by the summer drought onset on the other hand. We tested how these climatic controls of Q. ilex growth varied with recent climate change by correlating a 40-year tree ring record and a 30-year annual diameter inventory against winter temperature, spring precipitation, and simulated growth duration. Our results showed that growth duration was the best predictor of annual tree growth. We predicted that recent climate changes have resulted in earlier growth onset (-10 days) due to winter warming and earlier growth cessation (-26 days) due to earlier drought onset. These climatic trends partly offset one another, as we observed no significant trend of change in tree growth between 1968 and 2008. A moving-window correlation analysis revealed that in the past, Q. ilex growth was only correlated with water availability, but that since the 2000s, growth suddenly became correlated with winter temperature in addition to spring drought. This change in the climate-growth correlations matches the start of the recent atmospheric warming pause also known as the 'climate hiatus'. The duration of growth of Q. ilex is thus shortened because winter warming has stopped compensating for increasing drought in the last decade. Decoupled trends in precipitation and temperature, a neglected aspect of climate change, might reduce forest productivity through phenological constraints and have more consequences than climate warming alone. © 2016 John

  2. Test Standard Developed for Determining the Slow Crack Growth of Advanced Ceramics at Ambient Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung R.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    1998-01-01

    The service life of structural ceramic components is often limited by the process of slow crack growth. Therefore, it is important to develop an appropriate testing methodology for accurately determining the slow crack growth design parameters necessary for component life prediction. In addition, an appropriate test methodology can be used to determine the influences of component processing variables and composition on the slow crack growth and strength behavior of newly developed materials, thus allowing the component process to be tailored and optimized to specific needs. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, work to develop a standard test method to determine the slow crack growth parameters of advanced ceramics was initiated by the authors in early 1994 in the C 28 (Advanced Ceramics) committee of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). After about 2 years of required balloting, the draft written by the authors was approved and established as a new ASTM test standard: ASTM C 1368-97, Standard Test Method for Determination of Slow Crack Growth Parameters of Advanced Ceramics by Constant Stress-Rate Flexural Testing at Ambient Temperature. Briefly, the test method uses constant stress-rate testing to determine strengths as a function of stress rate at ambient temperature. Strengths are measured in a routine manner at four or more stress rates by applying constant displacement or loading rates. The slow crack growth parameters required for design are then estimated from a relationship between strength and stress rate. This new standard will be published in the Annual Book of ASTM Standards, Vol. 15.01, in 1998. Currently, a companion draft ASTM standard for determination of the slow crack growth parameters of advanced ceramics at elevated temperatures is being prepared by the authors and will be presented to the committee by the middle of 1998. Consequently, Lewis will maintain an active leadership role in advanced ceramics standardization within ASTM

  3. THE EFFECT OF LOW ROOT TEMPERATURE ON GROWTH AND LIPID-COMPOSITION OF LOW-TEMPERATURE TOLERANT ROOTSTOCK GENOTYPES FOR CUCUMBER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BULDER, HAM; DENNIJS, APM; SPEEK, EJ; VANHASSELT, PR; KUIPER, PJC

    1991-01-01

    In the framework of research directed to diminish energy consumption of glasshouse cucumber production, three low temperature tolerant rootstock genotypes for cucumber were compared. Firstly, growth at low root temperature of one Cucurbita ficifolia and two Sicyos angulatus genotypes was studied to

  4. The effect of temperature on growth and competition between Sphagnum species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeuwer, Angela; Heijmans, Monique M P D; Robroek, Bjorn J M; Berendse, Frank

    2008-05-01

    Peat bogs play a large role in the global sequestration of C, and are often dominated by different Sphagnum species. Therefore, it is crucial to understand how Sphagnum vegetation in peat bogs will respond to global warming. We performed a greenhouse experiment to study the effect of four temperature treatments (11.2, 14.7, 18.0 and 21.4 degrees C) on the growth of four Sphagnum species: S. fuscum and S. balticum from a site in northern Sweden and S. magellanicum and S. cuspidatum from a site in southern Sweden. In addition, three combinations of these species were made to study the effect of temperature on competition. We found that all species increased their height increment and biomass production with an increase in temperature, while bulk densities were lower at higher temperatures. The hollow species S. cuspidatum was the least responsive species, whereas the hummock species S. fuscum increased biomass production 13-fold from the lowest to the highest temperature treatment in monocultures. Nutrient concentrations were higher at higher temperatures, especially N concentrations of S. fuscum and S. balticum increased compared to field values. Competition between S. cuspidatum and S. magellanicum was not influenced by temperature. The mixtures of S. balticum with S. fuscum and S. balticum with S. magellanicum showed that S. balticum was the stronger competitor, but it lost competitive advantage in the highest temperature treatment. These findings suggest that species abundances will shift in response to global warming, particularly at northern sites where hollow species will lose competitive strength relative to hummock species and southern species.

  5. Mathematical modelling of temperature effect on growth kinetics of Pseudomonas spp. on sliced mushroom (Agaricus bisporus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarlak, Fatih; Ozdemir, Murat; Melikoglu, Mehmet

    2018-02-02

    The growth data of Pseudomonas spp. on sliced mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) stored between 4 and 28°C were obtained and fitted to three different primary models, known as the modified Gompertz, logistic and Baranyi models. The goodness of fit of these models was compared by considering the mean squared error (MSE) and the coefficient of determination for nonlinear regression (pseudo-R 2 ). The Baranyi model yielded the lowest MSE and highest pseudo-R 2 values. Therefore, the Baranyi model was selected as the best primary model. Maximum specific growth rate (r max ) and lag phase duration (λ) obtained from the Baranyi model were fitted to secondary models namely, the Ratkowsky and Arrhenius models. High pseudo-R 2 and low MSE values indicated that the Arrhenius model has a high goodness of fit to determine the effect of temperature on r max . Observed number of Pseudomonas spp. on sliced mushrooms from independent experiments was compared with the predicted number of Pseudomonas spp. with the models used by considering the B f and A f values. The B f and A f values were found to be 0.974 and 1.036, respectively. The correlation between the observed and predicted number of Pseudomonas spp. was high. Mushroom spoilage was simulated as a function of temperature with the models used. The models used for Pseudomonas spp. growth can provide a fast and cost-effective alternative to traditional microbiological techniques to determine the effect of storage temperature on product shelf-life. The models can be used to evaluate the growth behaviour of Pseudomonas spp. on sliced mushroom, set limits for the quantitative detection of the microbial spoilage and assess product shelf-life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 transcriptome: acclimation to temperature, salinity, oxidative stress and mixotrophic growth conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus eLudwig

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 is a unicellular, euryhaline cyanobacterium. It is a model organism for studies of cyanobacterial metabolism and has great potential for biotechnological applications. It exhibits an exceptional tolerance of high light irradiation and shows very rapid growth. The habitats from which this and closely related strains were isolated are subject to changes in several environmental factors, including light, nutrient supply, temperature, and salinity. In this study global transcriptome profiling via RNAseq has been used to perform a comparative and integrated study of global changes in cells grown at different temperatures, at different salinities and under mixotrophic conditions, when a metabolizable organic carbon source was present. Furthermore, the transcriptomes were investigated for cells that were subjected to a heat shock and that were exposed to oxidative stress. Lower growth temperatures caused relatively minor changes of the transcriptome; the most prominent changes affected fatty acid desaturases. A heat shock caused severe changes of the transcriptome pattern; transcripts for genes associated with major metabolic pathways declined and those for different chaperones increased dramatically. Oxidative stress, however, left the transcript pattern almost unaffected. When grown at high salinity, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 had increased expression of genes involved in compatible solute biosynthesis and showed increased mRNA levels for several genes involved in electron transport. Transcripts of two adjacent genes dramatically increased upon growth at high salinity; the respective proteins are putatively involved in coping with oxidative stress and in triggering ion channels. Only minor changes were observed when cells were grown at low salinity or when the growth medium was supplemented with glycerol. However, the transcriptome data suggest that cells must acclimate to excess reducing equivalents when a reduced C

  7. Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7002 Transcriptome: Acclimation to Temperature, Salinity, Oxidative Stress, and Mixotrophic Growth Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Marcus; Bryant, Donald A

    2012-01-01

    Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 is a unicellular, euryhaline cyanobacterium. It is a model organism for studies of cyanobacterial metabolism and has great potential for biotechnological applications. It exhibits an exceptional tolerance of high-light irradiation and shows very rapid growth. The habitats from which this and closely related strains were isolated are subject to changes in several environmental factors, including light, nutrient supply, temperature, and salinity. In this study global transcriptome profiling via RNAseq has been used to perform a comparative and integrated study of global changes in cells grown at different temperatures, at different salinities, and under mixotrophic conditions, when a metabolizable organic carbon source was present. Furthermore, the transcriptomes were investigated for cells that were subjected to a heat shock and that were exposed to oxidative stress. Lower growth temperatures caused relatively minor changes of the transcriptome; the most prominent changes affected fatty acid desaturases. A heat shock caused severe changes of the transcriptome pattern; transcripts for genes associated with major metabolic pathways declined and those for different chaperones increased dramatically. Oxidative stress, however, left the transcript pattern almost unaffected. When grown at high salinity, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 had increased expression of genes involved in compatible solute biosynthesis and showed increased mRNA levels for several genes involved in electron transport. Transcripts of two adjacent genes dramatically increased upon growth at high salinity; the respective proteins are putatively involved in coping with oxidative stress and in triggering ion channels. Only minor changes were observed when cells were grown at low salinity or when the growth medium was supplemented with glycerol. However, the transcriptome data suggest that cells must acclimate to excess reducing equivalents when a reduced C-source is present.

  8. Low-temperature catalyst activator: mechanism of dense carbon nanotube forest growth studied using synchrotron radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akito Takashima

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of the one-order-of-magnitude increase in the density of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs achieved by a recently developed thermal chemical vapor deposition process was studied using synchrotron radiation spectroscopic techniques. In the developed process, a Ti film is used as the underlayer for an Fe catalyst film. A characteristic point of this process is that C2H2 feeding for the catalyst starts at a low temperature of 450°C, whereas conventional feeding temperatures are ∼800°C. Photoemission spectroscopy using soft and hard X-rays revealed that the Ti underlayer reduced the initially oxidized Fe layer at 450°C. A photoemission intensity analysis also suggested that the oxidized Ti layer at 450°C behaved as a support for nanoparticle formation of the reduced Fe, which is required for dense CNT growth. In fact, a CNT growth experiment, where the catalyst chemical state was monitored in situ by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, showed that the reduced Fe yielded a CNT forest at 450°C. Contrarily, an Fe layer without the Ti underlayer did not yield such a CNT forest at 450°C. Photoemission electron microscopy showed that catalyst annealing at the conventional feeding temperature of 800°C caused excess catalyst agglomeration, which should lead to sparse CNTs. In conclusion, in the developed growth process, the low-temperature catalyst activation by the Ti underlayer before the excess Fe agglomeration realised the CNT densification.

  9. Temperature effect on bacterial growth rate: quantitative microbiology approach including cardinal values and variability estimates to perform growth simulation on/in food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Membré, J.M.; Leporq, B.; Vialette, M.; Mettler, E.; Perrier, L.; Thuault, D.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2005-01-01

    Temperature effect on growth rates of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens and Bacillus cereus, was studied. Growth rates were obtained in laboratory medium by using a binary dilutions method in which 15 optical density curves were generated to determine one

  10. Effects of temperature on embryonic and early larval growth and development in the rough-skinned newt (Taricha granulosa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Geoffrey D; Hopkins, Gareth R; Mohammadi, Shabnam; M Skinner, Heather; Hansen, Tyler; Brodie, Edmund D; French, Susannah S

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the effects of temperature on the growth and development of embryonic and early larval stages of a western North American amphibian, the rough-skinned newt (Taricha granulosa). We assigned newt eggs to different temperatures (7, 14, or 21°C); after hatching, we re-assigned the newt larvae into the three different temperatures. Over the course of three to four weeks, we measured total length and developmental stage of the larvae. Our results indicated a strong positive relationship over time between temperature and both length and developmental stage. Importantly, individuals assigned to cooler embryonic temperatures did not achieve the larval sizes of individuals from the warmer embryonic treatments, regardless of larval temperature. Our investigation of growth and development at different temperatures demonstrates carry-over effects and provides a more comprehensive understanding of how organisms respond to temperature changes during early development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The effect of covering and mulching on the soil temperature, growth and yield of tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosterna Edyta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available By improving the thermal and moisture conditions in the immediate vicinity of plants, plastic covers influenced the growth and development and increased the yield of vegetables. Soil mulching with organic material is one method of soil water protection and also helps maintain a constant soil temperature within the root system of crops. This study investigated the effect of plant covering and the type of straw applied to soil mulching (rye, corn, rape or buckwheat on the soil temperature, development of the plant and the yield of ‘Polfast’ F1 tomato. The effect of the straw was compared to a control plot without mulch. Soil temperature at a depth of 10 cm was higher in covered plots than in the plot without covers. The increase in soil temperature as a result of covering amounted to 1.3°C at 8:00 a.m. and 1.7°C at 2:00 p.m. Both in the morning and in the afternoon, the soil temperature in the plots without straw and without covers and under polypropylene fibre was higher than in the plots with straw. The application of covers resulted in higher aboveground parts of plants and higher leaf area compared to cultivation without covers. Irrespective of whether a covering was used, all of the types of straw investigated in the experiment caused the acceleration of growth and development of tomato plants. Simultaneous plant covering and soil mulching increased the total yield of fruits but did not have an influence on the share of marketable yield of the total yield.

  12. Gene and protein expression in response to different growth temperatures and oxygen availability in Burkholderia thailandensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clelia Peano

    Full Text Available Burkholderia thailandensis, although normally avirulent for mammals, can infect macrophages in vitro and has occasionally been reported to cause pneumonia in humans. It is therefore used as a model organism for the human pathogen B. pseudomallei, to which it is closely related phylogenetically. We characterized the B. thailandensis clinical isolate CDC2721121 (BtCDC272 at the genome level and studied its response to environmental cues associated with human host colonization, namely, temperature and oxygen limitation. Effects of the different growth conditions on BtCDC272 were studied through whole genome transcription studies and analysis of proteins associated with the bacterial cell surface. We found that growth at 37°C, compared to 28°C, negatively affected cell motility and flagella production through a mechanism involving regulation of the flagellin-encoding fliC gene at the mRNA stability level. Growth in oxygen-limiting conditions, in contrast, stimulated various processes linked to virulence, such as lipopolysaccharide production and expression of genes encoding protein secretion systems. Consistent with these observations, BtCDC272 grown in oxygen limitation was more resistant to phagocytosis and strongly induced the production of inflammatory cytokines from murine macrophages. Our results suggest that, while temperature sensing is important for regulation of B. thailandensis cell motility, oxygen limitation has a deeper impact on its physiology and constitutes a crucial environmental signal for the production of virulence factors.

  13. Thermo-elastic-plastic analysis for elastic component under high temperature fatigue crack growth rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohammed Ali Nasser

    The research project presents a fundamental understanding of the fatigue crack growth mechanisms of AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel, based on the comparison analysis between the theoretical and numerical modelling, incorporating research findings under isothermal fatigue loading for solid cylindrical specimen and the theoretical modelling with the numerical simulation for tubular specimen when subjected to cyclic mechanical loading superimposed by cyclic thermal shock.The experimental part of this research programme studied the fatigue stress-life data for three types of surface conditions specimen and the isothermal stress-controlled fatigue testing at 300 °C - 600 °C temperature range. It is observed that the highest strength is obtained for the polished specimen, while the machined specimen shows lower strength, and the lowest strength is the notched specimen due to the high effect of the stress concentration. The material behaviour at room and high temperatures shows an initial hardening, followed by slow extension until fully plastic saturation then followed by crack initiation and growth eventually reaching the failure of the specimen, resulting from the dynamic strain ageing occurred from the transformation of austenitic microstructure to martensite and also, the nucleation of precipitation at grain boundaries and the incremental temperature increase the fatigue crack growth rate with stress intensity factor however, the crack growth rate at 600 °C test temperature is less than 500 °C because of the creep-fatigue taking place.The theoretical modelling presents the crack growth analysis and stress and strain intensity factor approaches analysed in two case studies based on the addition of thermo-elastic-plastic stresses to the experimental fatigue applied loading. Case study one estimates the thermal stresses superimposed sinusoidal cyclic mechanical stress results in solid cylinder under isothermal fatigue simulation. Case study two estimates the

  14. Interventions via Social Influence for Emergent Suboptimal Restraint Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad KOBTI

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Although restraint use has increased primarily in developed countries, vehicle accident-related injuries and deaths continue to be a problem. Alongside lack of restraint use, studies involving suboptimal restraint use have gained recent popularity. In this study we investigate the use of social influence forinterventions to counter emerging suboptimal restraint use in groups of agents.A multi-agent simulation model is provided where dominant individuals use randomly assigned influence rates to repeatedly alter the knowledge of lessinfluential group members. Cultural influence is implemented via a cultural algorithm and used to simulate individuals affected by beliefs in the community. Objectives include investigating the emergence of patterns of restraint selection and use as well as interventions targeted at more influential agents. Results demonstrate that prominent patterns of behaviour similar to the influentialmembers of the groups do emerge. Furthermore, interventions targeted at influential group members outperform interventions targeted at a percentage of the population at large. Interventions succeed at some level both in the presence and absence of cultural influence.

  15. Optimal inference with suboptimal models: addiction and active Bayesian inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartenbeck, Philipp; FitzGerald, Thomas H B; Mathys, Christoph; Dolan, Ray; Wurst, Friedrich; Kronbichler, Martin; Friston, Karl

    2015-02-01

    When casting behaviour as active (Bayesian) inference, optimal inference is defined with respect to an agent's beliefs - based on its generative model of the world. This contrasts with normative accounts of choice behaviour, in which optimal actions are considered in relation to the true structure of the environment - as opposed to the agent's beliefs about worldly states (or the task). This distinction shifts an understanding of suboptimal or pathological behaviour away from aberrant inference as such, to understanding the prior beliefs of a subject that cause them to behave less 'optimally' than our prior beliefs suggest they should behave. Put simply, suboptimal or pathological behaviour does not speak against understanding behaviour in terms of (Bayes optimal) inference, but rather calls for a more refined understanding of the subject's generative model upon which their (optimal) Bayesian inference is based. Here, we discuss this fundamental distinction and its implications for understanding optimality, bounded rationality and pathological (choice) behaviour. We illustrate our argument using addictive choice behaviour in a recently described 'limited offer' task. Our simulations of pathological choices and addictive behaviour also generate some clear hypotheses, which we hope to pursue in ongoing empirical work. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Role of Temperature in the Growth of Silver Nanoparticles Through a Synergetic Reduction Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang XC

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study presents the role of reaction temperature in the formation and growth of silver nanoparticles through a synergetic reduction approach using two or three reducing agents simultaneously. By this approach, the shape-/size-controlled silver nanoparticles (plates and spheres can be generated under mild conditions. It was found that the reaction temperature could play a key role in particle growth and shape/size control, especially for silver nanoplates. These nanoplates could exhibit an intensive surface plasmon resonance in the wavelength range of 700–1,400 nm in the UV–vis spectrum depending upon their shapes and sizes, which make them useful for optical applications, such as optical probes, ionic sensing, and biochemical sensors. A detailed analysis conducted in this study clearly shows that the reaction temperature can greatly influence reaction rate, and hence the particle characteristics. The findings would be useful for optimization of experimental parameters for shape-controlled synthesis of other metallic nanoparticles (e.g., Au, Cu, Pt, and Pd with desirable functional properties.

  17. Low Temperature Flux Growth of 2H-SiC and Beta-Gallium Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N. B.; Choa, Fow-Sen; Su, Ching-Hua; Arnold, Bradley; Kelly, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    We present brief overview of our study on the low temperature flux growth of two very important novel wide bandgap materials 2H-SiC and Beta-gallium oxide (Beta-Ga2O3). We have synthesized and grown 5 millimeter to 1 centimeter size single crystals of Beta-gallium oxide (Beta-Ga2O3). We used a flux and semi wet method to grow transparent good quality crystals. In the semi-wet method Ga2O3 was synthesized with starting gallium nitrate solution and urea as a nucleation agent. In the flux method we used tin and other metallic flux. This crystal was placed in an alumina crucible and temperature was raised above 1050 degrees Centigrade. After a time period of thirty hours, we observed prismatic and needle shaped crystals of gallium oxide. Scanning electron microscopic studies showed step growth morphology. Crystal was polished to measure the properties. Bandgap was measured 4.7electronvolts using the optical absorption curve. Another wide bandgap hexagonal 2H-SiC was grown by using Si-Al eutectic flux in the graphite crucible. We used slight AlN also as the impurity in the flux. The temperature was raised up to 1050 degrees Centigrade and slowly cooled to 850 degrees Centigrade. Preliminary characterization results of this material are also reported.

  18. Crack growth behavior of warm-rolled 316L austenitic stainless steel in high-temperature hydrogenated water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang; Jin, Hyung-Ha; Kwon, Junhyun; Choi, Min-Jae; Hwang, Seong Sik; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the effects of warm rolling on the crack growth of 316L austenitic stainless steel, the crack growth rate was measured and the oxide structure was characterized in high-temperature hydrogenated water. The warm-rolled specimens showed a higher crack growth rate compared to the as-received specimens because the slip bands and dislocations produced during warm rolling served as paths for corrosion and cracking. The crack growth rate increased with the dissolved hydrogen concentration. This may be attributed to the decrease in performance and stability of the protective oxide layer formed on the surface of stainless steel in high-temperature water.

  19. Effect of temperature on the growth kinetics of Salmonella Enteritidis in cooked ham

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szczawińska Małgorzata Ewa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine a growth rate of Salmonella Enteritidis in cooked ham stored under different temperatures and to compare usefulness of the mathematical models for describing the microbiological data. The samples of cooked pork ham were inoculated with the mixture of three Salmonella Enteritidis strains and stored at 5°C, 10°C, 15°C for 21 d, and at 20°C and 25°C for 5 d. The number of salmonellae was determined at 10 periods of storage at each temperature. From each sample a series of decimal dilutions were prepared and plated onto Brilliant Green Agar. The plates were incubated at 37°C for 24-48 h under aerobic conditions. The colonies grown on culture media were counted, bacterial counts were multiplied by the appropriate dilutions, and number of bacteria (colony-forming units was calculated. The bacterial counts were transformed into logarithms and analysed using IBM SPSS Statistics 20. The experiment was performed in five replicates. The obtained growth curves of bacteria were fitted to primary growth models, namely Gompertz, logistic, and Baranyi models. The goodness-of-fit test was evaluated by calculating mean square error and Akaike’s criterion. Growth kinetics values from the modified Gompertz and logistic equations were calculated. It was found that in samples of ham stored at 5°C and 10°C for 21 d, the number of bacteria remained almost at the same level during storage. In samples stored at 15°C, 20°C, and 25°C growth of salmonellae was observed. It was found that logistic model gave in most cases the best fit to obtained microbiological data describing the behaviour of S. Enteritidis in cooked ham. The growth kinetics values calculated in this study from logistic equations can be used to predict potential S. Enteritidis growth in cooked ham stored at 15°C, 20°C, and 25°C.

  20. Development temperature has persistent effects on muscle growth responses in gilthead sea bream.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Garcia de la serrana

    Full Text Available Initially we characterised growth responses to altered nutritional input at the transcriptional and tissue levels in the fast skeletal muscle of juvenile gilthead sea bream. Fish reared at 21-22°C (range were fed a commercial diet at 3% body mass d(-1 (non-satiation feeding, NSF for 4 weeks, fasted for 4d (F and then fed to satiation (SF for 21d. 13 out of 34 genes investigated showed consistent patterns of regulation between nutritional states. Fasting was associated with a 20-fold increase in MAFbx, and a 5-fold increase in Six1 and WASp expression, which returned to NSF levels within 16h of SF. Refeeding to satiation was associated with a rapid (<24 h 12 to 17-fold increase in UNC45, Hsp70 and Hsp90α transcripts coding for molecular chaperones associated with unfolded protein response pathways. The growth factors FGF6 and IGF1 increased 6.0 and 4.5-fold within 16 h and 24 h of refeeding respectively. The average growth in diameter of fast muscle fibres was checked with fasting and significant fibre hypertrophy was only observed after 13d and 21d SF. To investigate developmental plasticity in growth responses we used the same experimental protocol with fish reared at either 17.5-18.5°C (range (LT or 21-22°C (range (HT to metamorphosis and then transferred to 21-22°C. There were persistent effects of development temperature on muscle growth patterns with 20% more fibres of lower average diameter in LT than HT group of similar body size. Altering the nutritional input to the muscle to stimulate growth revealed cryptic changes in the expression of UNC45 and Hsp90α with higher transcript abundance in the LT than HT groups, whereas there were no differences in the expression of MAFbx and Six1. It was concluded that myogenesis and gene expression patterns during growth are not fixed, but can be modified by temperature during the early stages of the life cycle.

  1. The Effect of Growth Temperature and V/III Flux Ratio of MOCVD Antimony Based Semiconductors on Growth Rate and Surface Morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramelan Ari Handono

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Epitaxial Alx Ga1-x Sb layers on GaSb and GaAs substrates have been grown by atmospheric pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition using TMAl, TMGa and TMSb. Nomarski microscope and a profiler were employed to examine the surface morphology and growth rate of the samples. We report the effect of growth temperature and V/III flux ratio on growth rate and surface morphology. Growth temperatures in the range of 520°C and 680°C and V/III ratios from 1 to 5 have been investigated. A growth rate activation energy of 0.73 eV was found. At low growth temperatures between 520 and 540°C, the surface morphology is poor due to antimonide precipitates associated with incomplete decomposition of the TMSb. For layers grown on GaAs at 580°C and 600°C with a V/III ratio of 3 a high quality surface morphology is typical, with a mirror-like surface and good composition control. It was found that a suitable growth temperature and V/III flux ratio was beneficial for producing good AlGaSb layers. Undoped AlGaSb grown at 580°C with a V/III flux ratio of 3 at the rate of 3.5 μm/hour shows p-type conductivity with smooth surface morphology

  2. Low temperature growth of carbon nanotubes with aligned multiwalls by microwave plasma-CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ajay; Das, Debajyoti

    2017-05-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MW-CNTs) have been prepared in a microwave-plasma enhanced CVD (MW-PECVD) tubular system at a low temperature ˜300 °C from CH4-H2 plasma with the addition of CO2 using as a week oxidant to selectively remove the amorphous carbon component and promote the CNT growth. CNTs are typically with outer diameter ˜20 nm, inner diameter ˜10 nm of several μm in length and are grown via the tip growth process, bearing Fe catalyst nano-particles at the tip. The presence of CO2 as a weak oxidant in the plasma may influence in reducing the size of the support catalyst nano-particles and narrowing the CNTs with aligned multiwalls.

  3. Low-temperature chemical vapor deposition growth of graphene from toluene on electropolished copper foils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Lee, Wi Hyoung; Piner, Richard; Kholmanov, Iskandar; Wu, Yaping; Li, Huifeng; Ji, Hengxing; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2012-03-27

    A two-step CVD route with toluene as the carbon precursor was used to grow continuous large-area monolayer graphene films on a very flat, electropolished Cu foil surface at 600 °C, lower than any temperature reported to date for growing continuous monolayer graphene. Graphene coverage is higher on the surface of electropolished Cu foil than that on the unelectropolished one under the same growth conditions. The measured hole and electron mobilities of the monolayer graphene grown at 600 °C were 811 and 190 cm(2)/(V·s), respectively, and the shift of the Dirac point was 18 V. The asymmetry in carrier mobilities can be attributed to extrinsic doping during the growth or transfer. The optical transmittance of graphene at 550 nm was 97.33%, confirming it was a monolayer, and the sheet resistance was ~8.02 × 10(3) Ω/□. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  4. Effect of deletion and overexpression of tryptophan metabolism genes on growth and fermentation capacity at low temperature in wine yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Malo, María; García-Rios, Estefani; Chiva, Rosana; Guillamon, José Manuel; Martí-Raga, María

    2014-01-01

    Low-temperature fermentations produce wines with greater aromatic complexity, but the success of these fermentations greatly depends on the adaptation of yeast cells to cold. Tryptophan has been previously reported to be a limiting amino acid during Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth at low temperature. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of the tryptophan metabolism on growth and fermentation performance during low-temperature wine fermentation. To this end, we constructed the deletion mutants of the TRP1 and TAT2 genes in a derivative haploid of a commercial wine strain, and the TAT2 gene was overexpressed in the prototroph and auxotroph (Δtrp1) backgrounds. Then we characterized growth and fermentation activity during wine fermentation at low and optimum temperatures. Our results partially support the role of this amino acid in cold yeast growth. Although deletion of TRP1 impaired amino acid uptake and the growth rate at low temperature in synthetic must, this growth impairment did not affect the fermentation rate. Deletion of TAT2 endorsed this strain with the highest nitrogen consumption capacity and the greatest fermentation activity at low temperature. Our results also evidenced reduced ammonium consumption in all the strains at low temperature. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  5. Investigation of the coupled effects of temperature and partial pressure on catalytic growth of carbon nanotubes using a modified growth rate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainal, M. T.; Mohd Yasin, M. F.; Wahid, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    An accurate modelling of catalytic growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is needed to model the physics of carbon adsorption and diffusion into the catalyst surface along with the catalyst deactivation. The model should be able to provide a physical response towards the change of temperature and partial pressure. Though the effects of temperature and partial pressure on the growth rate has been studied individually, the coupled effects of the two parameters has yet to be emphasized. A modified growth rate model that unified the terms from previously developed models successfully captured the essential physics during the growth and provided physical response towards the change of temperature and partial pressure. The model validation was done against a chemical vapour deposition (CVD) experiment that employed acetylene and cobalt as the carbon source and the catalyst respectively where the modified model managed to predict the CNT terminal length more accurately compared to the standard model with 5% maximum error. A comprehensive parametric study on the effects of temperature and partial pressure on the growth rate and terminal length successfully reveals the minimum partial pressure of 5 Torr for a given operating condition below which the growth rate is significantly low regardless of any increase of temperature. Three regions of growth in the partial pressure-temperature domain are identified based on the magnitude of terminal length. The model can serve as a guideline for the determination and optimisation of the baseline operating conditions in future experiments on catalytic growth of CNT, with emphasis on the CVD and flame synthesis techniques.

  6. Effect of growth temperature on photoluminescence and piezoelectric characteristics of ZnO nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Water, Walter [Institute of Electro-Optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Yunlin 632, Taiwan (China); Fang, T.-H. [Institute of Electro-Optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Yunlin 632, Taiwan (China); Institute of Mechanical and Electromechanical Engineering, National Formosa University, Yunlin 632, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: fang.tehua@msa.hinet.net; Ji, L.-W.; Lee, C.-C. [Institute of Electro-Optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Yunlin 632, Taiwan (China)

    2009-02-25

    ZnO nanowire arrays were synthesized on Au-coated silicon (1 0 0) substrates by using vapour-liquid-solid process in this work. The effect of growth temperatures on the crystal structure and the surface morphology of ZnO nanowires were investigated by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope. The absorption and optical characteristics of the nanowires were examined by Ultraviolet/Visible spectroscopy, and photoluminescence, respectively. The photoluminescence results exhibited ZnO nanowires had an ultraviolet and blue emission at 383 and 492 nm. Then a nanogenerator with ZnO nanowire arrays was fabricated and demonstrated Schottky-like current-voltage characteristics.

  7. Low-Temperature in Situ Growth of Graphene on Metallic Substrates and Its Application in Anticorrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Minmin; Du, Zehui; Yin, Zongyou; Zhou, Wenwen; Liu, Zhengdong; Tsang, Siu Hon; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong

    2016-01-13

    Metal or alloy corrosion brings about huge economic cost annually, which is becoming one area of growing concern in various industries, being in bulk state or nanoscale range. Here, single layer or few layers of graphene are deposited on various metallic substrates directly at a low temperature down to 400 °C. These substrates can be varied from hundreds-micrometer bulk metallic or alloy foils to tens of nanometer nanofibers (NFs). Corrosion analysis reveals that both graphene-grown steel sheets and NFs have reduced the corrosion rate of up to ten times lower than that of their bare corresponding counterparts. Moreover, such low-temperature in situ growth of graphene demonstrates stable and long-lasting anticorrosion after long-term immersion. This new class of graphene coated nanomaterials shows high potentials in anticorrosion applications for submarines, oil tankers/pipelines, and ruggedized electronics.

  8. Effect of Deforming Temperature and Strain on Abnormal Grain Growth of Extruded FGH96 Superalloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Chaoyuan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Based on the experiments of isothermal forging wedge-shaped samples, Deform-3D numerical simulation software was used to confirm the strain distribution in the wedge-shaped samples. The effect of deforming temperature and strain on abnormal grain growth(AGG in extruded FGH96 superalloy was examined. It is found that when the forging speed is 0.04 mm/s,the critical AGG occurring temperature is 1100℃,and the critical strain is 2%.AGG does not occur within 1000-1070℃,but still shows the feature of ‘critical strain’,and the region with strain of 5%-10% has the largest average grain size.AGG can be avoided and the uniform fine grains can be gained when the strain is not less than 15%.

  9. A multilevel analysis of fruit growth of two tomato cultivars in response to fruit temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okello, Robert C O; de Visser, Pieter H B; Heuvelink, Ep; Lammers, Michiel; de Maagd, Ruud A; Struik, Paul C; Marcelis, Leo F M

    2015-03-01

    Fruit phenotype is a resultant of inherent genetic potential in interaction with impact of environment experienced during crop and fruit growth. The aim of this study was to analyze the genetic and physiological basis for the difference in fruit size between a small ('Brioso') and intermediate ('Cappricia') sized tomato cultivar exposed to different fruit temperatures. It was hypothesized that fruit heating enhances expression of cell cycle and expansion genes, rates of carbon import, cell division and expansion, and shortens growth duration, whereas increase in cell number intensifies competition for assimilates among cells. Unlike previous studies in which whole-plant and fruit responses cannot be separated, we investigated the temperature response by varying fruit temperature using climate-controlled cuvettes, while keeping plant temperature the same. Fruit phenotype was assessed at different levels of aggregation (whole fruit, cell and gene) between anthesis and breaker stage. We showed that: (1) final fruit fresh weight was larger in 'Cappricia' owing to more and larger pericarp cells, (2) heated fruits were smaller because their mesocarp cells were smaller than those of control fruits and (3) no significant differences in pericarp carbohydrate concentration were detected between heated and control fruits nor between cultivars at breaker stage. At the gene level, expression of cell division promoters (CDKB2, CycA1 and E2Fe-like) was higher while that of the inhibitory fw2.2 was lower in 'Cappricia'. Fruit heating increased expression of fw2.2 and three cell division promoters (CDKB1, CDKB2 and CycA1). Expression of cell expansion genes did not corroborate cell size observations. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  10. Autotrophic growth of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers in freshwater sediment microcosms incubated at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yucheng; Ke, Xiubin; Hernández, Marcela; Wang, Baozhan; Dumont, Marc G; Jia, Zhongjun; Conrad, Ralf

    2013-05-01

    Both bacteria and archaea potentially contribute to ammonia oxidation, but their roles in freshwater sediments are still poorly understood. Seasonal differences in the relative activities of these groups might exist, since cultivated archaeal ammonia oxidizers have higher temperature optima than their bacterial counterparts. In this study, sediment collected from eutrophic freshwater Lake Taihu (China) was incubated at different temperatures (4°C, 15°C, 25°C, and 37°C) for up to 8 weeks. We examined the active bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers in these sediment microcosms by using combined stable isotope probing (SIP) and molecular community analysis. The results showed that accumulation of nitrate in microcosms correlated negatively with temperature, although ammonium depletion was the same, which might have been related to enhanced activity of other nitrogen transformation processes. Incubation at different temperatures significantly changed the microbial community composition, as revealed by 454 pyrosequencing targeting bacterial 16S rRNA genes. After 8 weeks of incubation, [(13)C]bicarbonate labeling of bacterial amoA genes, which encode the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A, and an observed increase in copy numbers indicated the activity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in all microcosms. Nitrosomonas sp. strain Is79A3 and Nitrosomonas communis lineages dominated the heavy fraction of CsCl gradients at low and high temperatures, respectively, indicating a niche differentiation of active bacterial ammonia oxidizers along the temperature gradient. The (13)C labeling of ammonia-oxidizing archaea in microcosms incubated at 4 to 25°C was minor. In contrast, significant (13)C labeling of Nitrososphaera-like archaea and changes in the abundance and composition of archaeal amoA genes were observed at 37°C, implicating autotrophic growth of ammonia-oxidizing archaea under warmer conditions.

  11. Transition metal doping of GaSe implemented with low temperature liquid phase growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Nuo; Sato, Youhei; Tanabe, Tadao; Maeda, Kensaku; Oyama, Yutaka

    2017-02-01

    Our group works on improving the conversion efficiencies of terahertz (THz) wave generation using GaSe crystals. The operating principle is based on difference frequency generation (DFG) which has the advantages such as high output power, a single tunable frequency, and room temperature operation. In this study, GaSe crystals were grown by the temperature difference method under controlled vapor pressure (TDM-CVP). It is a liquid phase growth method with temperature 300 °C lower than that of the Bridgman method. Using this method, the point defects concentration is decreased and the polytype can be controlled. The transition metal Ti was used to dope the GaSe in order to suppress free carrier absorption in the low frequency THz region. As a result, a deep acceptor level of 38 meV was confirmed as being formed in GaSe with 1.4 at% Ti doping. Compared with undoped GaSe, a decrease in carrier concentration ( 1014 cm-3) at room temperature was also confirmed. THz wave transmittance measurements reveal the tendency for the absorption coefficient to increase as the amount of dopant is increased. It is expected that there is an optimum amount of dopant.

  12. Preliminary data on growth and enzymatic abilities of soil fungus Humicolopsis cephalosporioides at different incubation temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elíades, Lorena Alejandra; Cabello, Marta N; Pancotto, Verónica; Moretto, Alicia; Rago, María Melisa; Saparrat, Mario C N

    2015-01-01

    Nothofagus pumilio (Poepp & Endl.) Krasser, known as "lenga" is the most important timber wood species in southernmost Patagonia (Argentina). Humicolopsis cephalosporioides Cabral & Marchand is a soil fungus associated with Nothofagus pumilio forests, which has outstanding cellulolytic activity. However, there is no information about the ability of this fungus to use organic substrates other than cellulose, and its ability to produce different enzyme systems, as well as its response to temperature. The aim of this study was to examine the role of H. cephalosporioides in degradation processes in N. pumilio forests in detail by evaluating the in vitro ability of four isolates of this fungus to grow and produce different lytic enzyme systems, and their response to incubation temperature. The ability of the fungi to grow and produce enzyme systems was estimated by inoculating them on agar media with specific substrates, and the cultures were incubated at three temperatures. A differential behavior of each strain in levels of growth and enzyme activity was found according to the medium type and/or incubation temperature. A intra-specific variability was found in H. cephalosporioides. Likewise a possible link between the saprotrophic role of this fungus in N. pumilio forests and the degradation of organic matter under stress conditions, such as those from frosty environments, was also discussed. Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of Growth Temperature on Lipid and Soluble Carbohydrate Synthesis by Fungi Isolated from Fellfield Soil in the Maritime Antarctic

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Richard N. Weinstein; Pedro O. Montiel; Keith Johnstone

    2000-01-01

    The effects of growth temperature on soluble carbohydrate and lipid content of Humicola marvinii, Geomyces pannorum and Mortierella elongata isolated from the Antarctic (Signy Island; 60° 43′S, 45° 38′W) were investigated...

  14. China suboptimal health cohort study: rationale, design and baseline characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youxin; Ge, Siqi; Yan, Yuxiang; Wang, Anxin; Zhao, Zhongyao; Yu, Xinwei; Qiu, Jing; Alzain, Mohamed Ali; Wang, Hao; Fang, Honghong; Gao, Qing; Song, Manshu; Zhang, Jie; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Wei

    2016-10-13

    Suboptimal health status (SHS) is a physical state between health and disease, characterized by the perception of health complaints, general weakness, chronic fatigue and low energy levels. SHS is proposed by the ancient concept of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) from the perspective of preservative, predictive and personalized (precision) medicine. We previously created the suboptimal health status questionnaire 25 (SHSQ-25), a novel instrument to measure SHS, validated in various populations. SHSQ-25 thus affords a window of opportunity for early detection and intervention, contributing to the reduction of chronic disease burdens. To investigate the causative effect of SHS in non-communicable chronic diseases (NCD), we initiated the China suboptimal health cohort study (COACS), a longitudinal study starting from 2013. Phase I of the study involved a cross-sectional survey aimed at identifying the risk/protective factors associated with SHS; and Phase II: a longitudinal yearly follow-up study investigating how SHS contributes to the incidence and pattern of NCD. (1) Cross-sectional survey: in total, 4313 participants (53.8 % women) aged from 18 to 65 years were included in the cohort. The prevalence of SHS was 9.0 % using SHS score of 35 as threshold. Women showed a significantly higher prevalence of SHS (10.6 % in the female vs. 7.2 % in the male, P differed significantly between subjects of SHS (SHS score ≥35) and those of ideal health (SHS score difference in prevalence of SHS might partly explain the gender difference of incidence of certain chronic diseases. The COACS will enable a thorough characterization of SHS and establish a cohort that will be used for longitudinal analyses of the interaction between the genetic, lifestyle and environmental factors that contribute to the onset and etiology of targeted chronic diseases. The study together with the designed prospective cohort provides a chance to characterize and evaluate the effect of SHS

  15. Inheritance of emergence time and seedling growth at low temperatures in four lines of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagles, H A

    1982-03-01

    The improvement of rate of seedling emergence and early seedling growth of maize (Zea mays L.) under cool conditions has been an objective of breeding programs in cool regions for many years. To study inheritance of emergence time, and to determine if differences in emergence time were due to differences in seedling growth, F1, F2 and backcross generations of a diallel cross of two rapidly emerging lines from CIMMYT Pool 5, 5-113 and 5-154, and two elite Corn Belt Dent lines, A619 and A632, were grown in controlled environment rooms at low temperatures.The lines from Pool 5 emerged significantly faster than A619 and A632 over a range of low temperature conditions. This difference occurred both when the lines themselves were tested and when the lines were tested as male and female parents in crosses. The Pool 5 lines converted a higher proportion of their original seed to new root and shoot tissue than did A619 and A632, indicating that they had a faster seedling growth rate. Primarily this was due to a faster loss of seed reserve, rather than a more efficient conversion process.A significant difference occurred between A619 and A632 for emergence time, but this was not due to a difference in seedling growth rate.Reciprocal differences occurred only in the F1 generation in crosses involving A619, and then marked effects could be attributed to the male parent. Reciprocal differences tended to disappear in the F2. This suggested that the genotype of the embryo and endosperm was of much greater importance than the genotype of the maternal parent in determining differences of time to emergence and seedling growth.Mid-parent heterosis occurred for time to emergence and seed loss, a measure of mean rate of utilization of seed reserve, in all crosses. High parent heterosis occurred in several crosses for these traits. High parent heterosis occurred in all crosses for efficiency of utilization of seed reserve.A generation means analysis indicated that both additive and

  16. Water activity and temperature effects on growth of Eurotium amstelodami, E. chevalieri and E. herbariorum on a sponge cake analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellana, M; Magrí, X; Sanchis, V; Ramos, A J

    1999-11-01

    Eurotium is a widespread storage fungal genus that has been frequently isolated from bakery products. The objective of this study was (i) to obtain a method for studying the growth of xerophilic fungi on bakery products, and (ii) to determine the effects of water activity (a(w)), temperature, isolate and their interactions on mycelial growth of Eurotium spp. on an analogue medium of sponge cake. Statistical analysis showed that there were intra-isolate differences (P<0.001) due to a(w), temperature, isolate, and two- and three-way interactions. Optimum growth of all isolates over a(w) x temperature range tested showed optima at 0.90 a(w) and 30 degrees C, with an interval of growth rate of 3.8-5.1 mm x d(-1). At 0.75 a(w), growth was less than 0.15 mm x d(-1), if there was any.

  17. Acid tolerance in Salmonella typhimurium induced by culturing in the presence of organic acids at different growth temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Fernández, Ana; Bernardo, Ana; López, Mercedes

    2010-02-01

    The influence of growth temperature and acidification of the culture medium up to pH 4.25 with acetic, citric, lactic and hydrochloric acids on the growth and subsequent acid resistance at pH 3.0 of Salmonella typhimurium CECT 443 was studied. The minimum pH value which allowed for S. typhimurium growth within the temperature range of 25-37 degrees C was 4.5 when the pH was reduced using citric and hydrochloric acids, and 5.4 and 6.4 when lactic acid and acetic acid were used, respectively. At high (45 degrees C) or low (10 degrees C) temperatures, the growth pH boundary was increased about 1 pH unit. The growth temperature markedly modified the acid resistance of the resulting cells. In all cases, D-values were lower for cells grown at 10 degrees C and significantly increased with increasing growth temperature up to 37 degrees C, at which D-values obtained were up to 10 times higher. Cells grown at 45 degrees C showed D-values similar to those found for cells grown at 25 degrees C. The growth of cells in acidified media, regardless of the pH value, caused an increase in their acid resistance at the four incubation temperatures, although the magnitude of the Acid Tolerance Response (ATR) observed depended on the growth temperature. Acid adapted cultures at 10 degrees C showed D-values ranging from 5.75 to 6.91 min, which turned out to be about 2 times higher than those corresponding to non-acid adapted cultures, while higher temperatures induced an increase in D-values of at least 3.5 times. Another finding was that, while at 10 and 45 degrees C no significant differences among the effect of the different acids tested in inducing an ATR were observed, when cells were grown at 25 and 37 degrees C citric acid generally turned out to be the acid which induced the strongest ATR. Results obtained in this study show that growth temperature is an important factor affecting S. typhimurium acid resistance and could contribute to find new strategies based on intelligent

  18. Elevated-temperature crack-growth studies of advanced titanium aluminides. Final report, September 1986-April 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkataraman, S.

    1987-09-01

    Ordered intermetallic titanium aluminide Ti Al alloyed with niobium possesses attractive high-temperature properties and moderate low temperature ductibility. Currently, its application is limited to static components in aircraft gas turbine engines. To extend their use to rotating components of turbine engines, better understanding of life limiting processes such as creep/fatigue crack growth and fracture is required. Phase I of this Air Force Small Business Innovative Research program involved investigation of fatigue crack growth in an alpha two titanium aluminide plus niobium alloy (titanium - 16 wt% aluminum - 10 wt% niobium) as a function of temperature and environment. Computer-automated fatigue-crack-growth tests were conducted in both air and vacuum environments at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1200 F (649 C). Two heat treatment conditions, namely, beta solution and alpha + beta solution resulted in coarse- and fine-grain materials, respectively, with varying alpha two morphology. Fractographic analyses were conducted for all test specimens.

  19. Gene expression profile indicates involvement of NO in Camellia sinensis pollen tube growth at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Junting; Wang, Weidong; Li, Dongqin; Shu, Zaifa; Ye, Xiaoli; Chang, Pinpin; Wang, Yuhua

    2016-10-18

    Nitric oxide (NO) functions as a critical signaling molecule in the low-temperature stress responses in plants, including polarized pollen tube growth in Camellia sinensis. Despite this, the potential mechanisms underlying the participation of NO in pollen tube responses to low temperature remain unclear. Here, we investigate alterations to gene expression in C. sinensis pollen tubes exposed to low-temperature stress and NO using RNA-Seq technology, in order to find the potential candidate genes related to the regulation of pollen tube elongation by NO under low-temperature stress. Three libraries were generated from C. sinensis cv. 'Longjingchangye' pollen tubes cultured at 25 °C (CsPT-CK) and 4 °C (CsPT-LT) or with 25 μM DEA NONOate (CsPT-NO). The number of unigenes found for the three biological replications were 39,726, 40,440 and 41,626 for CsPT-CK; 36,993, 39,070 and 39,439 for CsPT-LT; and 39,514, 38,298 and 39,061 for CsPT-NO. A total of 36,097 unique assembled and annotated sequences from C. sinensis pollen tube reads were found in a BLAST search of the following databases: NCBI non-redundant nucleotide, Swiss-prot protein, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, Cluster of Orthologous Groups of proteins, and Gene Ontology. The absolute values of log 2 Ratio > 1 and probability > 0.7 were used as the thresholds for significantly differential gene expression, and 766, 497 and 929 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found from the comparison analyses of the CK-VS-LT, CK-VS-NO and LT-VS-NO libraries, respectively. Genes related to metabolism and signaling pathways of plant hormones, transcription factors (TFs), vesicle polarized trafficking, cell wall biosynthesis, the ubiquitination machinery of the ubiquitin system and species-specific secondary metabolite pathways were mainly observed in the CK-VS-LT and CK-VS-NO libraries. Differentially expressed unigenes related to the inhibition of C. sinensis pollen tube growth under low

  20. Observed Effects of Vegetation Growth on Temperature in the Early Summer over the Northeast China Plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaxiang Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of vegetation on temperature is an emerging topic in the climate science community. Existing studies have mostly examined the effects of vegetation on daytime temperature (Tmax, whereas this study investigates the effects on nighttime temperature (Tmin. Ground measurements from 53 sites across northeastern China (NEC from 1982 to 2006 show that early summer (June Tmax and Tmin increased at mean rates of approximately 0.61 °C/10 year and 0.67 °C/10 year, respectively. Over the same period, the satellite-based Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI decreased by approximately 0.10 (accounting for 18% of the climatological NDVI for 1982–1991. It is highlighted that a larger increase in Tmax (Tmin co-occurred spatially with a larger (smaller decrease in NDVI. Deriving from such spatial co-occurrences, we found that the spatial variability of changes in Tmax (i.e., ΔTmax is negatively correlated with the spatial variability of changes in NDVI (i.e., ΔNDVI, while the spatial variability of changes in Tmin (i.e., ΔTmin is positively correlated (r2 = 0.10; p < 0.05 with that of ΔNDVI. Similarly, we detected significant positive correlations between the spatial variability of ΔNDVI and the change in surface latent heat flux (r2 = 0.16; p < 0.01 and in surface air specific humidity (r2 = 0.28; p < 0.001. These findings on the spatial co-occurrences suggest that the vegetation growth intensifies the atmospheric water vapor through evapotranspiration, which enhances the atmospheric downward longwave radiation and strengthens the greenhouse warming effects at night. Thereby, the positive correlation between ΔNDVI and ΔTmin is better understood. These results indicate that vegetation growth may not only exert effects on daytime temperature but also exert warming effects on nighttime temperature by increasing atmospheric water vapor and thus intensifying the local greenhouse effect. This study presents new observation evidence of the

  1. Feature-preserving surface mesh smoothing via suboptimal Delaunay triangulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhanheng; Yu, Zeyun; Holst, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A method of triangular surface mesh smoothing is presented to improve angle quality by extending the original optimal Delaunay triangulation (ODT) to surface meshes. The mesh quality is improved by solving a quadratic optimization problem that minimizes the approximated interpolation error between a parabolic function and its piecewise linear interpolation defined on the mesh. A suboptimal problem is derived to guarantee a unique, analytic solution that is significantly faster with little loss in accuracy as compared to the optimal one. In addition to the quality-improving capability, the proposed method has been adapted to remove noise while faithfully preserving sharp features such as edges and corners of a mesh. Numerous experiments are included to demonstrate the performance of the method.

  2. The effect of nest box temperature on kit growth rate and survival in the American mink (Neovison vison)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Toke Munk; Malmkvist, Jens

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigate the effect of nest box temperature and humidity on the growth and survival of approx. 700 mink litters. Surprisingly this study did not find any general biological explanatory temperature and/or humidity effects within days on the number of live born kits dying and kits...... growth. Instead parameters concerning litter composition did have significant effects on kit growth and survival. Litters with high number of Totborn and kit AliveD1 affected kit growth and kit viability negatively (increased number of live born kits dying), which indicates that factors acting...... on the female/litter prior to or during the parturition are an important determent of early kit growth and viability. The results indicate that females with large litters have less success by taken care of the kits compared to females with small litters. In addition litters with high mean growth were also...

  3. Physiology and genetics of Listeria monocytogenes survival and growth at cold temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yvonne C; Wiedmann, Martin

    2009-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that can cause serious invasive human illness in susceptible patients, notably immunocompromised, pregnant women, and adults > 65 years old. Most human listeriosis cases appear to be caused by consumption of refrigerated ready-to-eat foods that are contaminated with high levels of L. monocytogenes. While initial L. monocytogenes levels in contaminated foods are usually low, the ability of L. monocytogenes to survive and multiply at low temperatures allows it to reach levels high enough to cause human disease, particularly if contaminated foods that allow for L. monocytogenes growth are stored for prolonged times under refrigeration. In this review, relevant knowledge on the physiology and genetics of L. monocytogenes' ability to adapt to and multiply at low temperature will be summarized and discussed, including selected relevant findings on the physiology and genetics of cold adaptation in other Gram-positive bacteria. Further improvement in our understanding of the physiology and genetics of L. monocytogenes cold growth will hopefully enhance our ability to design successful intervention strategies for this foodborne pathogen.

  4. Δ12-fatty acid desaturase is involved in growth at low temperature in yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezaki, Satoshi; Iwama, Ryo; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Shiwa, Yuh; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Ohta, Akinori; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Ryouichi

    2017-06-17

    We investigated the role of FAD2, which was predicted to encode a fatty acid desaturase of the n-alkane-assimilating yeast Yarrowia lipolytica. Northern blot analysis suggested that FAD2 transcription was upregulated at low temperature or in the presence of n-alkanes or oleic acid. The FAD2 deletion mutant grew as well as the wild-type strain on glucose, n-alkanes, or oleic acid at 30 °C, but grew at a slower rate at 12 °C, when compared to the wild-type strain. The growth of the FAD2 deletion mutant at 12 °C was restored by the addition of 18:2, but not 18:1, fatty acids. The amount of 18:2 fatty acid in the wild-type strain was increased by the incubation at 12 °C and in the presence of n-octadecane. In contrast, 18:2 fatty acid was not detected in the deletion mutant of FAD2, confirming that FAD2 encodes the Δ12-fatty acid desaturase. These results suggest that Δ12-fatty acid desaturase is involved in the growth of Y. lipolytica at low temperature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Risk of Suboptimal Iodine Intake in Pregnant Norwegian Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helle Margrete Meltzer

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Pregnant women and infants are exceptionally vulnerable to iodine deficiency. The aims of the present study were to estimate iodine intake, to investigate sources of iodine, to identify predictors of low or suboptimal iodine intake (defined as intakes below 100 μg/day and 150 μg/day in a large population of pregnant Norwegian women and to evaluate iodine status in a sub-population. Iodine intake was calculated based on a validated Food Frequency Questionnaire in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort. The median iodine intake was 141 μg/day from food and 166 μg/day from food and supplements. Use of iodine-containing supplements was reported by 31.6%. The main source of iodine from food was dairy products, contributing 67% and 43% in non-supplement and iodine-supplement users, respectively. Of 61,904 women, 16.1% had iodine intake below 100 μg/day, 42.0% had iodine intake below 150 μg/day and only 21.7% reached the WHO/UNICEF/ICCIDD recommendation of 250 μg/day. Dietary behaviors associated with increased risk of low and suboptimal iodine intake were: no use of iodine-containing supplements and low intake of milk/yogurt, seafood and eggs. The median urinary iodine concentration measured in 119 participants (69 μg/L confirmed insufficient iodine intake. Public health strategies are needed to improve and secure the iodine status of pregnant women in Norway.

  6. Suboptimal Criterion Learning in Static and Dynamic Environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elyse H Norton

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Humans often make decisions based on uncertain sensory information. Signal detection theory (SDT describes detection and discrimination decisions as a comparison of stimulus "strength" to a fixed decision criterion. However, recent research suggests that current responses depend on the recent history of stimuli and previous responses, suggesting that the decision criterion is updated trial-by-trial. The mechanisms underpinning criterion setting remain unknown. Here, we examine how observers learn to set a decision criterion in an orientation-discrimination task under both static and dynamic conditions. To investigate mechanisms underlying trial-by-trial criterion placement, we introduce a novel task in which participants explicitly set the criterion, and compare it to a more traditional discrimination task, allowing us to model this explicit indication of criterion dynamics. In each task, stimuli were ellipses with principal orientations drawn from two categories: Gaussian distributions with different means and equal variance. In the covert-criterion task, observers categorized a displayed ellipse. In the overt-criterion task, observers adjusted the orientation of a line that served as the discrimination criterion for a subsequently presented ellipse. We compared performance to the ideal Bayesian learner and several suboptimal models that varied in both computational and memory demands. Under static and dynamic conditions, we found that, in both tasks, observers used suboptimal learning rules. In most conditions, a model in which the recent history of past samples determines a belief about category means fit the data best for most observers and on average. Our results reveal dynamic adjustment of discrimination criterion, even after prolonged training, and indicate how decision criteria are updated over time.

  7. High growth rate homoepitaxial diamond film deposition at high temperatures by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohra, Yogesh K. (Inventor); McCauley, Thomas S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The deposition of high quality diamond films at high linear growth rates and substrate temperatures for microwave-plasma chemical vapor deposition is disclosed. The linear growth rate achieved for this process is generally greater than 50 .mu.m/hr for high quality films, as compared to rates of less than 5 .mu.m/hr generally reported for MPCVD processes.

  8. Effects of temperature on domain-growth kinetics of fourfold-degenerate (2×1) ordering in Ising models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst-Madsen, Anders; Shah, Peter Jivan; Hansen, Torben

    1987-01-01

    Computer-simulation techniques are used to study the domain-growth kinetics of (2×1) ordering in a two-dimensional Ising model with nonconserved order parameter and with variable ratio α of next-nearest- and nearest-neighbor interactions. At zero temperature, persistent growth characterized...

  9. Recent climate warming forces contrasting growth responses of white spruce at treeline in Alaska through temperature thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin Wilmking; Glenn P. Juday; Valerie A. Barber; Harold S.J. Zald

    2004-01-01

    Northern and high-latitude alpine treelines are generally thought to be limited by available warmth. Most studies of tree-growth-climate interaction at treeline as well as climate reconstructions using dendrochronology report positive growth response of treeline trees to warmer temperatures. However, population-wide responses of treeline trees to climate remain largely...

  10. Effects of temperature and population density on von Bertalanffy growth parameters in Atlantic herring: a macro-ecological analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunel, T.P.A.; Dickey-Collas, M.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of temperature and population density on the growth of Atlantic herring Clupea harengus was studied using a comparative approach applied to 15 North Atlantic populations. The von Bertalanffy (VB) equation was applied to describe mean growth of individuals in each population, both averaged

  11. [Effects of day and night temperature difference on growth, development, yield and fruit quality of tomatoes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Li, Jia; Gao, Qing; Chen, Jin-xing

    2015-09-01

    Abstract: The effects of day and night temperature difference (DIF) on tomato's growth were studied in three precisely controlled units in phytotron. Set DIF as 6 °C (25/19 C), 8 °C (26/18 °C), 10 °C (27/17 °C) respectively, with the same diurnal mean temperature as 22 °C. The results showed that, different tomato varieties needed different suitable DIF at different growth stages. Before flouring, compared with DIF 6 °C , DIF 8 °C could significantly improve the growth and development of the wild currant tomato LA1781, increasing the plant height by 23.1%, fastening leaf development by 1-2 leaves, advancing flowers by 7 d. DIF 10 °C had similar effects with DIF 8 °C on LA1781. As to the cultured ordinary tomatoes LA2397 and LA0490, DIF 6 °C made the seedlings grow well, DIF 8 °C had no significant improved effects on seedlings, DIF 10 °C depressed the seedling's growth and flouring, decreasing the plant height by 12.0%-18.3%, lowering the leaf development by 2-3 leaves, delaying flouring by 2-4 d. But DIF 10 °C increased the dry aboveground mass of these three varieties by 25.2%-44.2%. After flouring, compared with DIF 6 °C, DIF 10 °C could significantly improve the yield and fruit quality of LA1781, increasing fruit number by 34.7%, yield per plant by 92.1%, single fruit mass by 40.0%, soluble sugar content by 16.3%, lycopene content by 95.6%. Compared with DIF 6 °C, LA2397 and LA0490 had higher yields and better fruit quality under DIF 8 °C, and lycopene content increased more than twice as that under DIF 6 °C. Under DIF 10 °C, yields of LA2397 and LA0490 slightly decreased (5.0%), soluble sugar contents of fruit decreased, but fruit size and lycopene content increased. The results showed that, DIF should not be very great in the seedling period of tomatoes, and a moderate DIF in flower and fruit periods could improve the yield and fruit quality, but a too high DIF would result in poor growth and yield reduction.

  12. Contrasting shrub species respond to early summer temperatures leading to correspondence of shrub growth patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijers, Stef; Pape, Roland; Löffler, Jörg; Myers-Smith, Isla H.

    2018-03-01

    The Arctic-alpine biome is warming rapidly, resulting in a gradual replacement of low statured species by taller woody species in many tundra ecosystems. In northwest North America, the remotely sensed normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), suggests an increase in productivity of the Arctic and alpine tundra and a decrease in productivity of boreal forests. However, the responses of contrasting shrub species growing at the same sites to climate drivers remain largely unexplored. Here, we test growth, climate, and NDVI relationships of two contrasting species: the expanding tall deciduous shrub Salix pulchra and the circumarctic evergreen dwarf shrub Cassiope tetragona from an alpine tundra site in the Pika valley in the Kluane Region, southwest Yukon Territories, Canada. We found that annual growth variability of both species at this site is strongly driven by early summer temperatures, despite their contrasting traits and habitats. Shrub growth chronologies for both species were correlated with the regional climate signal and showed spatial correspondence with interannual variation in NDVI in surrounding alpine and Arctic regions. Our results suggest that early summer warming represents a common driver of vegetation change for contrasting shrub species growing in different habitats in the same alpine environments.

  13. Growth of Cyanobacterium aponinum influenced by increasing salt concentrations and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winckelmann, Dominik; Bleeke, Franziska; Bergmann, Peter; Klöck, Gerd

    2015-06-01

    The increasing requirement of food neutral biofuels demands the detection of alternative sources. The use of non-arable land and waste water streams is widely discussed in this regard. A Cyanobacterium was isolated on the area of a possible algae production side near a water treatment plant in the arid desert region al-Wusta. It was identified as Cyanobacterium aponinum PB1 and is a possible lipid source. To determine its suitability of a production process using this organism, a set of laboratory experiments were performed. Its growth behavior was examined in regard to high temperatures and increasing NaCl concentrations. A productivity of 0.1 g L-1 per day was measured at an alga density below 0.75 g L-1. C. aponinum PB1 showed no sign of altered growth behavior in media containing 70 g L-1 NaCl or less. Detection of a negative effect of NaCl on the growth using Pulse-Amplitude-Modulation chlorophyll fluorescence analysis was not more sensitive than optical density measurement.

  14. Effect of low temperature on growth and ultra-structure of Staphylococcus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyango, Laura A; Dunstan, R Hugh; Gottfries, Johan; von Eiff, Christof; Roberts, Timothy K

    2012-01-01

    The effect of temperature fluctuation is an important factor in bacterial growth especially for pathogens such as the staphylococci that have to remain viable during potentially harsh and prolonged transfer conditions between hosts. The aim of this study was to investigate the response of S. aureus, S. epidermidis, and S. lugdunensis when exposed to low temperature (4°C) for prolonged periods, and how this factor affected their subsequent growth, colony morphology, cellular ultra-structure, and amino acid composition in the non-cytoplasmic hydrolysate fraction. Clinical isolates were grown under optimal conditions and then subjected to 4°C conditions for a period of 8 wks. Cold-stressed and reference control samples were assessed under transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to identify potential ultra-structural changes. To determine changes in amino acid composition, cells were fractured to remove the lipid and cytoplasmic components and the remaining structural components were hydrolysed. Amino acid profiles for the hydrolysis fraction were then analysed for changes by using principal component analysis (PCA). Exposure of the three staphylococci to prolonged low temperature stress resulted in the formation of increasing proportions of small colony variant (SCV) phenotypes. TEM revealed that SCV cells had significantly thicker and more diffuse cell-walls than their corresponding WT samples for both S. aureus and S. epidermidis, but the changes were not significant for S. lugdunensis. Substantial species-specific alterations in the amino acid composition of the structural hydrolysate fraction were also observed in the cold-treated cells. The data indicated that the staphylococci responded over prolonged periods of cold-stress treatment by transforming into SCV populations. The observed ultra-structural and amino acid changes were proposed to represent response mechanisms for staphylococcal survival amidst hostile conditions, thus maintaining the viability of the

  15. Effect of low temperature on growth and ultra-structure of Staphylococcus spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A Onyango

    Full Text Available The effect of temperature fluctuation is an important factor in bacterial growth especially for pathogens such as the staphylococci that have to remain viable during potentially harsh and prolonged transfer conditions between hosts. The aim of this study was to investigate the response of S. aureus, S. epidermidis, and S. lugdunensis when exposed to low temperature (4°C for prolonged periods, and how this factor affected their subsequent growth, colony morphology, cellular ultra-structure, and amino acid composition in the non-cytoplasmic hydrolysate fraction. Clinical isolates were grown under optimal conditions and then subjected to 4°C conditions for a period of 8 wks. Cold-stressed and reference control samples were assessed under transmission electron microscopy (TEM to identify potential ultra-structural changes. To determine changes in amino acid composition, cells were fractured to remove the lipid and cytoplasmic components and the remaining structural components were hydrolysed. Amino acid profiles for the hydrolysis fraction were then analysed for changes by using principal component analysis (PCA. Exposure of the three staphylococci to prolonged low temperature stress resulted in the formation of increasing proportions of small colony variant (SCV phenotypes. TEM revealed that SCV cells had significantly thicker and more diffuse cell-walls than their corresponding WT samples for both S. aureus and S. epidermidis, but the changes were not significant for S. lugdunensis. Substantial species-specific alterations in the amino acid composition of the structural hydrolysate fraction were also observed in the cold-treated cells. The data indicated that the staphylococci responded over prolonged periods of cold-stress treatment by transforming into SCV populations. The observed ultra-structural and amino acid changes were proposed to represent response mechanisms for staphylococcal survival amidst hostile conditions, thus maintaining the

  16. Root temperature effects on growth and bud break of Rosa hybrida in relation to cytokinin concentrations in xylem sap.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieleman, J.A.; Verstappen, F.W.A.; Kuiper, D.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of three divergent root temperatures (11°C, 20°C and 26°C) on growth and bud break of Rosa hybrida were studied. Root morphology was changed considerably with root temperature. Roots at 11°C were white, succulent, short and sparsely branched, whereas at 26°C roots were long, brown, thin

  17. Growth response and toxin concentration of cultured Pyrodinium bahamense var. compressum to varying salinity and temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedaria, Alice Ilaya; Luckas, Bernd; Reinhardt, Katrin; Azanza, Rhodora V

    2007-09-15

    The growth and toxin production of a Philippine Pyrodinium bahamense isolate in nutrient replete batch cultures were investigated under conditions affected by varying salinity, temperature and combined effects of salinity and temperature. Early exponential growth stage was reached after 7 days with a cell division rate of 0.26 div day(-1). The toxin content reached a peak of 298 fmol cell-1 at mid exponential phase and rapidly declined to 54 fmol cell-1 as it approached the death phase. Only three sets of toxins composed of STX, dcSTX and B1 were detected in which STX made up to 85-98 mol%toxincell-1. P. bahamense was able to grow in salinities and temperatures ranging from 26 per thousand to 36 per thousand and 23 to 36 degrees C, respectively. The optimum growth under varying salinity and temperature conditions was observed at 36 per thousand and 25 degrees C. Toxin content reached a peak of 376 fmol cell-1 at 25 degrees C and was lower (80-116 fmol cell-1) at higher temperatures (32-35 degrees C). Combined effects of salinity and temperature showed that P. bahamense was not able to grow at low salinity and temperature (i.e. below 26 per thousand-28 degrees C). Optimum growth was observed in higher salinities at all temperature conditions.

  18. Modelling of simultaneous effect of moisture and temperature on A. niger growth in solid-state fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamidi-Esfahani, Z.; Shojaosadati, S.A.; Rinzema, A.

    2004-01-01

    In the present work a two factorial design of experiments was applied to study the simultaneous effect of temperature and moisture on A. niger growth in the solid-state fermentation (SSF). The increase of water content to more than 55% at the temperatures 35 and 40degreesC decreases microorganism

  19. Effect of low temperature on dormancy breaking and growth after planting in lily bulblets regenerated in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langens-Gerrits, M.M.; Miller, W.B.; Croes, A.; Klerk, de G.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Lilies regenerating on scale segments may develop dormancy in vitro depending on the culture conditions. The dormancy is broken by storage for several weeks at a low temperature ( 5 degreesC). The effect of the low temperature on sprouting, time of leaf emergence and further bulb growth was studied.

  20. [Effects of different mulches on rhizosphere temperature, growth, and physiological properties of fluecured tobacco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhihong; Yi, Jianhua; Sun, Zaijun

    2006-11-01

    With greenhouse plastic film, rice straw plus greenhouse plastic film, soil-mulching plastic film, rice straw, rice straw plus sun-shading net, and sun-shading net as test mulches, this paper studied their effects on the rhizosphere temperature, growth, and physiological properties of flue-cured tobacco. The results showed that after mulching for 22 days, the accumulative rhizosphere temperature at the depth of 5 cm was the highest (424.75 degrees C) for greenhouse plastic film and the lowest (378.75 degrees C) for rice straw plus sun-shading net, while that at the depth of 15 cm was the highest (396.75 degrees C) for greenhouse plastic film and the lowest (368.31 degrees C) for sun-shading net. With the increase of accumulative rhizosphere temperature, the dry weight of above- and underground parts, photosynthesis, and root vigor of flue-cured tobacco tended to increase, and at the 10th day after mulches removal, root biomass had the largest increment in the treatment of soil-mulching plastic film and the smallest increment in the treatment of rice straw plus sun-shading net.

  1. Does the growth temperature of a prokaryote influence the purine content of its mRNAs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahale, Kiran Narasinha; Kempraj, Vivek; Dasgupta, Debjani

    2012-04-10

    The formation and breaking of hydrogen bonds between nucleic acid bases are dependent on temperature. The high G+C content of organisms was surmised to be an adaptation for high temperature survival because of the thermal stability of G:C pairs. However, a survey of genomic GC% and optimum growth temperature (OGT) of several prokaryotes revoked any direct relation between them. Significantly high purine (R=A or G) content in mRNAs is also seen as a selective response for survival among thermophiles. Nevertheless, the biological relevance of thermophiles loading their unstable mRNAs with excess purines (purine-loading or R-loading) is not persuasive. Here, we analysed the mRNA sequences from the genomes of 168 prokaryotes (as obtained from NCBI Genome database) with their OGTs ranging from -5 °C to 100 °C to verify the relation between R-loading and OGT. Our analysis fails to demonstrate any correlation between R-loading of the mRNA pool and OGT of a prokaryote. The percentage of purine-loaded mRNAs in prokaryotes is found to be in a rough negative correlation with the genomic GC% (r(2)=0.655, slope=-1.478, PGC% and bias against certain combinations of nucleotides drive the mRNA-synonymous (sense) strands of DNA towards variations in R-loading. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Pressure and temperature dependence of growth and morphology of Escherichia coli: Experiments and Stochastic Model

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Pradeep

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the growth of Escherichia coli E.coli, a mesophilic bacterium, as a function of pressure $P$ and temperature $T$. E.coli can grow and divide in a wide range of pressure (1-400atm) and temperature ($23-40^{\\circ}$C). For $T>30^{\\circ}$ C, the division time of E.coli increases exponentially with pressure and exhibit a departure from exponential behavior at pressures between 250-400 atm for all the temperatures studied in our experiments. For $T<30^{\\circ}$ C, the division time shows an anomalous dependence on pressure -- first decreases with increasing pressure and then increases upon further increase of pressure. The sharp change in division time is followed by a sharp change in phenotypic transition of E. Coli at high pressures where bacterial cells switch to an elongating cell type. We propose a model that this phenotypic changes in bacteria at high pressures is an irreversible stochastic process whereas the switching probability to elongating cell type increases with increasing press...

  3. Influence of temperature and exploitation period on fatigue crack growth parameters in different regions of welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivica Camagic

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of exploitation period and temperature on the fatigue crack growth parameters indifferent regions of a welded joint is analysed for new and exploited low-alloyed Cr-Mo steel A-387 Gr. B. The parent metal is a part of a reactor mantle which was exploited for over 40 years, and recently replaced with new material. Fatigue crack growth parameters, threshold value Kth, coefficient C and exponent m, have been determined, both at room and exploitation temperature. Based on testing results, fatigue crack growth resistance in different regions of welded joint is analysed in order to justify the selected welding procedure specification.

  4. The Effect of Temperature and Host Plant Resistance on Population Growth of the Soybean Aphid Biotype 1 (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, Ashley R; Nechols, James R; McCornack, Brian P; Margolies, David C; Sandercock, Brett K; Yan, Donglin; Murray, Leigh

    2017-02-01

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to evaluate direct and indirect effects of temperature on demographic traits and population growth of biotype 1 of the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura. Our objectives were to better understand how temperature influences the expression of host plant resistance, quantify the individual and interactive effects of plant resistance and temperature on soybean aphid population growth, and generate thermal constants for predicting temperature-dependent development on both susceptible and resistant soybeans. To assess indirect (plant-mediated) effects, soybean aphids were reared under a range of temperatures (15-30 °C) on soybean seedlings from a line expressing a Rag1 gene for resistance, and life history traits were quantified and compared to those obtained for soybean aphids on a susceptible soybean line. Direct effects of temperature were obtained by comparing relative differences in the magnitude of life-history traits among temperatures on susceptible soybeans. We predicted that temperature and host plant resistance would have a combined, but asymmetrical, effect on soybean aphid fitness and population growth. Results showed that temperature and plant resistance influenced preimaginal development and survival, progeny produced, and adult longevity. There also appeared to be a complex interaction between temperature and plant resistance for survival and developmental rate. Evidence suggested that the level of plant resistance increased at higher, but not lower, temperature. Soybean aphids required about the same number of degree-days to develop on resistant and susceptible plants. Our results will be useful for making predictions of soybean aphid population growth on resistant plants under different seasonal temperatures. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Variation in relative growth rate and growth traits in wild and cultivated Capsicum accessions grown under different temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, de E.A.M.; Marcelis, L.F.M.; Voorrips, R.E.

    2006-01-01

    Differences in environmental conditions are known to influence plant growth and growth-related traits. The aim of this study was to identify the variation in relative growth rate (RGR), and its underlying physiological and morphological traits, in a group of ten wild and cultivated Capsicum

  6. Effects of lighting and air movement on temperatures in reproductive organs of plants in a closed plant growth facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaya, Y.; Hirai, H.

    Temperature increases in plant reproductive organs such as anthers and stigmas could cause fertility impediments and thus produce sterile seeds under artificial lighting conditions without adequately controlled environments in closed plant growth facilities. There is a possibility such a situation could occur in Bioregenerative Life Support Systems under microgravity conditions in space because there will be little natural convective or thermal mixing. This study was conducted to determine the temperature of the plant reproductive organs as affected by illumination and air movement under normal gravitational forces on the earth and to make an estimation of the temperature increase in reproductive organs in closed plant growth facilities under microgravity in space. Thermal images of reproductive organs of rice and strawberry were captured using infrared thermography at air temperatures of 10 11 °C. Compared to the air temperature, temperatures of petals, stigmas and anthers of strawberry increased by 24, 22 and 14 °C, respectively, after 5 min of lighting at an irradiance of 160 W m-2 from incandescent lamps. Temperatures of reproductive organs and leaves of strawberry were significantly higher than those of rice. The temperatures of petals, stigmas, anthers and leaves of strawberry decreased by 13, 12, 13 and 14 °C, respectively, when the air velocity was increased from 0.1 to 1.0 ms-1. These results show that air movement is necessary to reduce the temperatures of plant reproductive organs in plant growth facilities.

  7. Low temperature growth and optical properties of ZnO nanowires using an aqueous solution method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Manh-Hung; Lee, Joon-Hyung; Kim, Jeong-Joo; Kim, Kyeong-Won; Norton, D P; Heo, Young-Woo

    2012-02-01

    ZnO nanowires were grown on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrates at a low temperature of 90 degrees C using an aqueous solution method. The ZnO seeds were coated on the ITO thin films by using a spin coater. ZnO nanowires were formed in an aqueous solution containing zinc nitrate hexahydrate (Zn(NO3)2 x 6H2O) and hexamethylenetetramine (C6H12N4). The pH value and concentration of the solution play an important role in the growth and morphologies of ZnO nanowires. The size of ZnO naonowires increased as the concentration of the solution increased. It was formed with a top surface of hexagonal and tapered shape at low and high pH values respectively. Additionally, the single crystalline structure and optical property of the ZnO nanowires were investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy.

  8. Influence of Light, Temperature, and Macronutrients on Growth and Scopolamine Biosynthesis in Duboisia species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Sophie Friederike; Rothauer, Andreas; Hagels, Hansjörg; Kayser, Oliver

    2017-07-01

    Scopolamine is used in the pharmaceutical industry as a precursor in the organic synthesis of different classes of important active substances and is extracted in large scale from field grown Duboisia plants. Previous research revealed that plant growth as well as production of scopolamine and its derivatives varies strongly depending on abiotic factors. However, only a small amount of systematic research has been done on the influence of environmental conditions on scopolamine and biomass production, so far. In order to extend knowledge in this field, plants of three different genotypes (wild type Duboisia myoporoides and hybrids of D. myoporoides and Duboisia leichhardtii) were grown in climate chambers under controlled conditions in order to systematically analyse the influence of temperature (20, 24, 28 °C), light (50-300 µmol/m2 × s, 12, 18, 24 h per day) and macronutrients (nitrogen, calcium, potassium) on growth and scopolamine biosynthesis. The data indicate that light intensity and daily exposure to light have a major impact on scopolamine production and plant development, whereas temperature only shows a minor influence. Nitrogen (N) positively affects biomass production with increasing levels up to 4 mM, but is negatively correlated with scopolamine content. Calcium (Ca) shows a negative influence on scopolamine biosynthesis at increased levels above 1 mM as well. Potassium (K) neither affects biomass nor scopolamine production within the tested concentration range (0.05-4 mM). All in all, it can be concluded that light intensity and nitrogen supply are especially important regulating variables that can be applied in a targeted manner for influencing scopolamine and biomass production. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Water temperature influences growth and gonad differentiation in European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax, L. 1758).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfuso, F; Guerrera, M C; Fortino, G; Fazio, F; Santulli, A; Piccione, G

    2017-01-15

    The effect of rearing temperature on gonad differentiation and growth was evaluated in sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). One control group (CG, n = 60) and two experimental groups (EG1, n = 30; EG2, n = 30) were selected. CG was reared at 15.0 °C during 10 days post-hatch (dph) and at 19.0 °C throughout the remaining larval and post-larval development. EG1 was exposed to 14.5 °C from 1 to 50 dph, followed by an increase to 20 °C until sampling (176 dph). EG2 was exposed to 14.5 °C from 1 to 37 dph, followed by an increase to 20 °C until sampling (226 dph); 30 fish from CG were randomly sampled at 176 dph (CG1, control for EG1) and 30 fish were sampled at 226 dph (CG2, control for EG2). Weight, total and fork length measurement, and gonad collection were performed. All biometric indices were higher in EG1 and EG2 than in CG1 and CG2, respectively. Histologic analysis reported 100% of undifferentiated gonads in CG1 and; EG1 reported 80% of undifferentiated gonads and 20% of gonads at early differentiation toward the male line. CG2 reported 34% of undifferentiated gonads, 10% of gonads at early differentiation toward the female line, 23% of gonads at early differentiation toward the male line, and 33% of gonads with intratesticular oocytes. EG2 reported 47% of gonads differentiated in testis, 33% gonads differentiated in ovary, and 20% of gonads with intratesticular oocytes. These results suggest that water temperature plays an important role in the process of gonad differentiation and growth of sea bass. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of Growth Rate on Elevated Temperature Plastic Flow and Room Temperature Fracture Toughness of Directionally Solidified NiAl-31Cr-3Mo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittenberger, J. Daniel; Raj, S. V.; Locci, I. E.; Salem, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    The eutectic system Ni-33Al-31Cr-3Mo was directionally solidified at rates ranging from 7.6 to 508 mm/h. Samples were examined for microstructure and alloy chemistry, compression tested at 1200 and 1300 K, and subjected to room temperature fracture toughness measurements. Lamellar eutectic grains were formed at 12.7 mm/h; however cellular structures with a radial eutectic pattern developed at faster growth rates. Elevated temperature compression testing between 10(exp -4) to 10(exp -7)/s did not reveal an optimum growth condition, nor did any single growth condition result in a significant fracture toughness advantage. The mechanical behavior, taken together, suggests that Ni-33Al-31Cr-3Mo grown at rates from 25.4 to 254 mm/h will have nominally equivalent properties.

  11. In situ measurements of high temperature growth of correlated systems: a materials by design scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hua

    There is great interest in developing new ways to use predictive theory to accelerate materials synthesis. We have previously shown that DFT +DMFT electronic structure calculations are successful at predicting gaps and ordered moments, even when correlations are very strong.[ 1 , 2 ] Building on these results, we set out to explore an even closer integration of theory and synthesis, aiming to discover new routes for doping Mott insulators and producing new superconductors. In situ high temperature high energy X-ray diffraction is used to determine the crystal structures of compounds just as they form from the growths, and the structural information is used as input for DFT +DMFT calculations that predict functionality, closing the synthesis loop by suggesting productive new directions. Using this approach, we have investigated the transition metal oxysulfide system Ba-Co-S-O and successfully discovered the new compound BaCoSO, and identified it as an interesting small gap Mott insulator by DFT +DMFT calculations even before any traditional crystal growth is attempted in the lab We acknowledge the Office of Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering for providing the NSSEFF funds that supported this research.

  12. Low-temperature growth of ZnO nanorods by chemical bath deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Sung-Hak; Choi, Seung-Kyu; Jang, Jae-Min; Kim, Jung-A; Jung, Woo-Gwang

    2007-09-15

    Aligned ZnO nanorod arrays were synthesized using a chemical bath deposition method at normal atmospheric pressure without any metal catalyst. A simple two-step process was developed for growing ZnO nanorods on a PET substrate at 90-95 degrees C. The ZnO seed precursor was prepared by a sol-gel reaction. ZnO nanorod arrays were fabricated on ZnO-seed-coated substrate. The ZnO seeds were indispensable for the aligned growth of ZnO nanorods. The ZnO nanorods had a length of 400-500 nm and a diameter of 25-50 nm. HR-TEM and XRD analysis confirmed that the ZnO nanorod is a single crystal with a wurtzite structure and its growth direction is [0001] (the c-axis). Photoluminescence measurements of ZnO nanorods revealed an intense ultraviolet peak at 378.3 nm (3.27 eV) at room temperature.

  13. High temperature growth kinetics and texture of surface-oxidised NiO for coated superconductor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kursumovic, A.; Tomov, R.; Huehne, R.; Glowacki, B.A.; Everts, J.E.; Tuissi, A.; Villa, E.; Holzapfel, B

    2003-03-15

    Thick NiO films were grown in air, on biaxially textured (0 0 1) Ni and as-rolled Ni tapes, at temperatures from 1050 to 1350 deg. C. Ni diffusion through the NiO film mainly contributes to the growth since is much faster than oxygen diffusion and occurs by a vacancy diffusion mechanism in the lattice at high temperatures. Parabolic growth kinetics were found for both NiO film thickness and grain growth, and compared with the literature data. Competitive growth of (1 1 1) and (0 0 1) oriented grains establishes the final NiO orientation at temperatures below 1250 deg. C, while at higher temperatures leakage diffusion at/towards grain boundaries, grain coarsening and (1 1 0) oriented grains disrupt the (1 0 0) texture. Hence, development of epitaxy of NiO on textured Ni tapes was found to be largely due to growth kinetics depending on both, time and temperature. We report here a systematic study of the microstructure and kinetics of formation of textured NiO substrate for application as a buffer layer in coated conductor technology.

  14. Predicting plant performance under simultaneously changing environmental conditions – the interplay between temperature, light and internode growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin eKahlen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant performance is significantly influenced by prevailing light and temperature conditions during plant growth and development. For plants exposed to natural fluctuations in abiotic environmental conditions it is however laborious and cumbersome to experimentally assign any contribution of individual environmental factors to plant responses. This study aimed at analyzing the interplay between light, temperature and internode growth based on model approaches. We extended the light-sensitive virtual plant model L-Cucumber by implementing a common Arrhenius function for appearance rates, growth rates and growth durations. For two greenhouse experiments, the temperature-sensitive model approach resulted in a precise prediction of cucumber mean internode lengths and number of internodes, as well as in accurately predicted patterns of individual internode lengths along the main stem. In addition, a system’s analysis revealed that environmental data averaged over the experimental period were not necessarily related to internode performance. Finally, the need for a species-specific parameterization of the temperature response function and related aspects in modelling temperature effects on plant development and growth is discussed.

  15. Treatment of KPC-producing Enterobacteriaceae: suboptimal efficacy of polymyxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, M S; de Assis, D B; Freire, M P; Boas do Prado, G V; Machado, A S; Abdala, E; Pierrotti, L C; Mangini, C; Campos, L; Caiaffa Filho, H H; Levin, A S

    2015-02-01

    Treatment of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae infections (KPC-EI) remains a challenge. Combined therapy has been proposed as the best choice, but there are no clear data showing which combination therapy is superior. Our aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of antimicrobial regimens for treating KPC-EI. This was a retrospective cohort study of KPC-EI nosocomial infections (based on CDC criteria) between October 2009 and June 2013 at three tertiary Brazilian hospitals. The primary outcomes were the 30-day mortality for all infections and the 30-day mortality for patients with bacteraemia. Risk factors for mortality were evaluated by comparing clinical variables of survivors and nonsurvivors. In this study, 118 patients were included, of whom 78 had bacteraemia. Catheter-related bloodstream infections were the most frequent (43%), followed by urinary tract infections (n = 27, 23%). Monotherapy was used in 57 patients and combined treatment in 61 patients. The most common therapeutic combination was polymyxin plus carbapenem 20 (33%). Multivariate analysis for all infections (n = 118) and for bacteremic infections (n = 78) revealed that renal failure at the end of treatment, use of polymyxin and older age were prognostic factors for mortality. In conclusion, polymyxins showed suboptimal efficacy and combination therapy was not superior to monotherapy. Copyright © 2014 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Robust Adaptive LCMV Beamformer Based On An Iterative Suboptimal Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiansheng Guo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The main drawback of closed-form solution of linearly constrained minimum variance (CF-LCMV beamformer is the dilemma of acquiring long observation time for stable covariance matrix estimates and short observation time to track dynamic behavior of targets, leading to poor performance including low signal-noise-ratio (SNR, low jammer-to-noise ratios (JNRs and small number of snapshots. Additionally, CF-LCMV suffers from heavy computational burden which mainly comes from two matrix inverse operations for computing the optimal weight vector. In this paper, we derive a low-complexity Robust Adaptive LCMV beamformer based on an Iterative Suboptimal solution (RAIS-LCMV using conjugate gradient (CG optimization method. The merit of our proposed method is threefold. Firstly, RAIS-LCMV beamformer can reduce the complexity of CF-LCMV remarkably. Secondly, RAIS-LCMV beamformer can adjust output adaptively based on measurement and its convergence speed is comparable. Finally, RAIS-LCMV algorithm has robust performance against low SNR, JNRs, and small number of snapshots. Simulation results demonstrate the superiority of our proposed algorithms.

  17. Predictors of Suboptimal Follow-up in Pediatric Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Leana; Schwartz, David D; Frugé, Ernest; Laufman, Larry; Holm, Suzanne; Kamdar, Kala; Harris, Lynnette; Brackett, Julienne; Unal, Sule; Tanyildiz, Gulsah; Bryant, Rosalind; Suzawa, Hilary; Dreyer, Zoann; Okcu, M Fatih

    2017-04-01

    Attendance to follow-up care after completion of cancer treatment is an understudied area. We examined demographic, clinical, and socioeconomic predictors of follow-up by pediatric cancer patients at a large center in 442 newly diagnosed patients using multivariable logistic regression analyses. Patients who did not return to clinic for at least 1000 days were considered lost to follow-up. Two hundred forty-two (54.8%) patients were lost. In multivariable analyses, the following variables were independent predictors of being lost to follow-up: treatment with surgery alone (odds ratio [OR]=6.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.1-14.9), older age at diagnosis (reference, 0 to 4; ages, 5 to 9: OR=1.8, 95% CI, 1.1-3; ages, 10 to 14: OR=3.3; CI, 1.8-6.1; and ages, 15 and above: OR=4.8; CI, 2.1-11.7), lack of history of stem cell transplantation (OR=2, 95% CI, 1.04-3.7) and lack of insurance (OR=3.4; CI, 1.2-9.2). Hispanic patients had the best follow-up rates (53.7%) compared to whites and blacks (P=0.03). Attendance to long-term follow-up care is suboptimal in childhood cancer survivors. Predictors that were associated with nonattendance can be used to design targeted interventions to improve follow-up care for survivors of pediatric cancer.

  18. Adaptive suboptimal second-order sliding mode control for microgrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incremona, Gian Paolo; Cucuzzella, Michele; Ferrara, Antonella

    2016-09-01

    This paper deals with the design of adaptive suboptimal second-order sliding mode (ASSOSM) control laws for grid-connected microgrids. Due to the presence of the inverter, of unpredicted load changes, of switching among different renewable energy sources, and of electrical parameters variations, the microgrid model is usually affected by uncertain terms which are bounded, but with unknown upper bounds. To theoretically frame the control problem, the class of second-order systems in Brunovsky canonical form, characterised by the presence of matched uncertain terms with unknown bounds, is first considered. Four adaptive strategies are designed, analysed and compared to select the most effective ones to be applied to the microgrid case study. In the first two strategies, the control amplitude is continuously adjusted, so as to arrive at dominating the effect of the uncertainty on the controlled system. When a suitable control amplitude is attained, the origin of the state space of the auxiliary system becomes attractive. In the other two strategies, a suitable blend between two components, one mainly working during the reaching phase, the other being the predominant one in a vicinity of the sliding manifold, is generated, so as to reduce the control amplitude in steady state. The microgrid system in a grid-connected operation mode, controlled via the selected ASSOSM control strategies, exhibits appreciable stability properties, as proved theoretically and shown in simulation.

  19. Epitaxial growth of higher transition-temperature VO2 films on AlN/Si

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana Slusar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the epitaxial growth and the mechanism of a higher temperature insulator-to-metal-transition (IMT of vanadium dioxide (VO2 thin films synthesized on aluminum nitride (AlN/Si (111 substrates by a pulsed-laser-deposition method; the IMT temperature is TIMT ≈ 350 K. X-ray diffractometer and high resolution transmission electron microscope data show that the epitaxial relationship of VO2 and AlN is VO2 (010 ‖ AlN (0001 with VO2 [101] ‖   AlN   [ 2 1 ̄ 1 ̄ 0 ] zone axes, which results in a substrate-induced tensile strain along the in-plane a and c axes of the insulating monoclinic VO2. This strain stabilizes the insulating phase of VO2 and raises TIMT for 10 K higher than TIMT single crystal ≈ 340 K in a bulk VO2 single crystal. Near TIMT, a resistance change of about four orders is observed in a thick film of ∼130 nm. The VO2/AlN/Si heterostructures are promising for the development of integrated IMT-Si technology, including thermal switchers, transistors, and other applications.

  20. Root Zone Cooling and Exogenous Spermidine Root-Pretreatment Promoting Lactuca sativa L. Growth and Photosynthesis in the High-temperature Season

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Jin; Lu, Na; Xu, Hongjia; Maruo, Toru; Guo, Shirong

    2016-01-01

    Root zone high-temperature stress is a major factor limiting hydroponic plant growth during the high-temperature season. The effects of root zone cooling (RZC; at 25?C) and exogenous spermidine (Spd) root-pretreatment (SRP, 0.1 mM) on growth, leaf photosynthetic traits, and chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics of hydroponic Lactuca sativa L. grown in a high-temperature season (average temperature > 30?C) were examined. Both treatments significantly promoted plant growth and photosynthesis...

  1. Effect of temperature on mycelial growth of Trichoderma, Sclerotinia minor and S. sclerotiorum, as well as on mycoparasitism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Victor Pessoni Fernandes Domingues

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Environmental conditions are very important for the biological control of plant diseases. In a previous study, isolates of Trichoderma asperellum (IBLF 897, IBLF 904 and IBLF 914 and T. asperelloides (IBLF 908 were selected as antagonists of S. minor and S. sclerotiorum, causal agents of lettuce drop, one of the most relevant diseases affecting the lettuce crop. In this subsequent study, the mycelial growth of these isolates and pathogens, as well as the mycoparasitism of isolate IBLF 914, was evaluated at different temperatures. The mycelial growth of the isolates of T. asperellum and T. asperelloides, as well as of S. minor and S. sclerotiorum, was evaluated at temperatures ranging from 7 to 42oC. The parasitism of propagules of S. minor and S. sclerotiorum by the isolate IBLF 914, as well as the number of lettuce seedlings surviving drop, was evaluated at 12, 17, 22, 27 and 32oC, in gerboxes containing substrate. S. minor and S. sclerotiorum showed mycelial growth at temperatures ranging from 7 to 27°C, but no growth occurred at 32 °C, and both pathogens had greater mycelial growth at 22°C. The isolates of Trichoderma grew at temperatures ranging from 12 to 37°C, with maximum growth at 27°C. The isolate IBLF 914 had mycoparasitism and reduced the disease in lettuce seedlings at temperatures ranging from 22 to 32°C. Since lettuce drop occurs when mild temperatures and high humidity prevail and the antagonist was more effective at higher temperatures, it is recommended that Trichoderma is applied in lettuce fields in Brazil also during warmer months of the year to reduce the inoculum remaining in the soil before planting the winter crop, which is more affected by the disease.

  2. Climate-growth analysis for a Mexican dry forest tree shows strong impact of sea surface temperatures and predicts future growth declines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brienen, R.J.W.; Lebrija Trejos, E.E.; Zuidema, P.A.; Martínez- Ramos, M.

    2010-01-01

    Tropical forests will experience relatively large changes in temperature and rainfall towards the end of this century. Little is known about how tropical trees will respond to these changes. We used tree rings to establish climate-growth relations of a pioneer tree, Mimosa acantholoba, occurring in

  3. Does temperature and oxygen affect duration of intramarsupial development and juvenile growth in the terrestrial isopod Porcellioscaber (Crustacea, Malacostraca)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváthová, Terézia; Antol, Andrzej; Czarnoleski, Marcin; Kramarz, Paulina; Bauchinger, Ulf; Labecka, Anna Maria; Kozłowski, Jan

    2015-01-01

    According to the temperature-size rule (TSR), ectotherms developing under cold conditions experience slower growth as juveniles but reach a larger size at maturity. Whether temperature alone causes this phenomenon is unknown, but oxygen limitation can play a role in the temperature-size relationship. Oxygen may become limited under warm conditions when the resulting higher metabolism creates a greater demand for oxygen, especially in larger individuals. We examined the independent effects of oxygen concentration (10% and 22% O2) and temperature (15 °C and 22 °C) on duration of ontogenic development, which takes place within the maternal brood pouch (marsupium), and juvenile growth in the terrestrial isopod common rough woodlouse (Porcellioscaber). Individuals inside the marsupium undergo the change from the aqueous to the gaseous environment. Under hypoxia, woodlice hatched from the marsupium sooner, but their subsequent growth was not affected by the level of oxygen. Marsupial development and juvenile growth were almost three times slower at low temperature, and marsupial development was longer in larger females but only in the cold treatment. These results show that temperature and oxygen are important ecological factors affecting developmental time and that the strength of the effect likely depends on the availability of oxygen in the environment.

  4. Does temperature and oxygen affect duration of intramarsupial development and juvenile growth in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber (Crustacea, Malacostraca?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terézia Horváthová

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available According to the temperature-size rule (TSR, ectotherms developing under cold conditions experience slower growth as juveniles but reach a larger size at maturity. Whether temperature alone causes this phenomenon is unknown, but oxygen limitation can play a role in the temperature-size relationship. Oxygen may become limited under warm conditions when the resulting higher metabolism creates a greater demand for oxygen, especially in larger individuals. We examined the independent effects of oxygen concentration (10% and 22% O2 and temperature (15 °C and 22 °C on duration of ontogenic development, which takes place within the maternal brood pouch (marsupium, and juvenile growth in the terrestrial isopod common rough woodlouse (Porcellio scaber. Individuals inside the marsupium undergo the change from the aqueous to the gaseous environment. Under hypoxia, woodlice hatched from the marsupium sooner, but their subsequent growth was not affected by the level of oxygen. Marsupial development and juvenile growth were almost three times slower at low temperature, and marsupial development was longer in larger females but only in the cold treatment. These results show that temperature and oxygen are important ecological factors affecting developmental time and that the strength of the effect likely depends on the availability of oxygen in the environment.

  5. Microstructural study of CMR films as a function of growth temperature as-deposited and annealed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawley, M.E.; Wu, X.D.; Arendt, C.D.; Adams, M.F.; Hundley; Hefner, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    The properties encompassed by the family of complex metal oxides span the spectrum from superconductors to insulating ferroelectrics. Included in this family are the new colossal magneto-resistive perovskites with potential applications in advanced high density magnetic data storage devices based on single or multilayer thin films units of these materials fabricated by vapor phase deposition (PVD) methods. The realization of this potential requires solving basic thin film materials problems requiring understanding and controlling the growth of these materials. Toward this end, we have grown La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} and La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0. 3}MnO{sub 3} on LaAIO{sub 3} single crystal substrates by pulsed laser and RF sputter deposition at 500 to 900 C and annealed at over 900 C for about 10 hours. The evolution of the microstructure of these films was studied by scanning probe microscopies and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results of SPM characterization showed that at the lower end of the growth temperature range, the as-grown films were polygranular with grain size increasing with temperature. The 500 C as-grown films appeared to be amorphous while the 750 C film grains were layered with terrace steps often one unit cell high. In contrast, films grown at 900 C consisted of coalesced islands with some 3-D surface crystals. After annealing, all films had coalesced into very large extended layered islands. The change in microstructure was reflected in a decreased resistivity of coalesced films over their unannealed granular precursors. Previous reported work on the growth of La{sub 0. 84}Sr{sub 0.16}MnO{sub 3} and La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}CoO{sub 3} grown demonstrated the sensitivity of the microstructure to substrate and deposition conditions. Films grown on an ``accidental`` vicinal surface grew by a step flow mechanism.

  6. Low temperature growth of diamond films on optical fibers using Linear Antenna CVD system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficek, M.; Drijkoningen, S.; Karczewski, J.; Bogdanowicz, R.; Haenen, K.

    2016-01-01

    It is not trivial to achieve a good quality diamond-coated fibre interface due to a large difference in the properties and composition of the diamond films (or use coating even) and the optical fibre material, i.e. fused silica. One of the biggest problems is the high temperature during the deposition which influences the optical fibre or optical fibre sensor structure (e.g. long-period gratings (LPG)). The greatest advantage of a linear antenna microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system (LA MW CVD) is the fact that it allows to grow the diamond layers at low temperature (below 300°C) [1]. High quality nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films with thicknesses ranging from 70 nm to 150 nm, were deposited on silicon, glass and optical fibre substrates [2]. Substrates pretreatment by dip-coating and spin coating process with a dispersion consisting of detonation nanodiamond (DND) in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) has been applied. During the deposition process the continuous mode of operation of the LA MW CVD system was used, which produces a continuous wave at a maximum power of 1.9 kW (in each antenna). Diamond films on optical fibres were obtained at temperatures below 350°C, providing a clear improvement of results compared to our earlier work [3]. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging to investigate the morphology of the nanocrystalline diamond films. The film growth rate, film thickness, and optical properties in the VIS-NIR range, i.e. refractive index and extinction coefficient will be discussed based on measurements on reference quartz plates by using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE).

  7. Gill size and temperature as governing factors in fish growth: a generalization of von Bertalanffy's growth formula

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pauly, D

    1979-01-01

    ... is demonstrated which further emphasizes the uniformity of growth patterns in fishes and which can be used to estimate growth parameters in certain stocks and assess the interrelationships between various species, particularly through the use of a newly developed "auximetric grid".

  8. Effect of Irrigation Timing on Root Zone Soil Temperature, Root Growth and Grain Yield and Chemical Composition in Corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejun Dong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available High air temperatures during the crop growing season can reduce harvestable yields in major agronomic crops worldwide. Repeated and prolonged high night air temperature stress may compromise plant growth and yield. Crop varieties with improved heat tolerance traits as well as crop management strategies at the farm scale are thus needed for climate change mitigation. Crop yield is especially sensitive to night-time warming trends. Current studies are mostly directed to the elevated night-time air temperature and its impact on crop growth and yield, but less attention is given to the understanding of night-time soil temperature management. Delivering irrigation water through drip early evening may reduce soil temperature and thus improve plant growth. In addition, corn growers typically use high-stature varieties that inevitably incur excessive respiratory carbon loss from roots and transpiration water loss under high night temperature conditions. The main objective of this study was to see if root-zone soil temperature can be reduced through drip irrigation applied at night-time, vs. daytime, using three corn hybrids of different above-ground architecture in Uvalde, TX where day and night temperatures during corn growing season are above U.S. averages. The experiment was conducted in 2014. Our results suggested that delivering well-water at night-time through drip irrigation reduced root-zone soil temperature by 0.6 °C, increase root length five folds, plant height 2%, and marginally increased grain yield by 10%. However, irrigation timing did not significantly affect leaf chlorophyll level and kernel crude protein, phosphorous, fat and starch concentrations. Different from our hypothesis, the shorter, more compact corn hybrid did not exhibit a higher yield and growth as compared with taller hybrids. As adjusting irrigation timing would not incur an extra cost for farmers, the finding reported here had immediate practical implications for farm

  9. Growth temperature dependence of optical modal gain and loss in GaN:Eu active medium on Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. H.; Steckl, A. J.; Rajagopal, P.; Roberts, J. C.; Piner, E.

    2006-06-01

    The dependence of optical modal gain and loss on GaN:Eu growth temperature is reported. GaN:Eu thin films were grown on Si substrates with AlGaN transition and cladding layers at temperatures ranging from 600°C to 850°C. The modal gain and loss in the GaN:Eu layer were a strong function of the optically active Eu atomic concentration and of the interface quality between the active layer and the top cladding layer, which in turn depended on the growth temperature. Optimum optical properties of maximum modal gain of ~ 100 cm-1 and minimum loss of ~ 46 cm-1 were obtained for growth at 800°C.

  10. Crack growth behavior of warm-rolled 316L austenitic stainless steel in high-temperature hydrogenated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), 50 UNIST-gil, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 44919 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Hyung-Ha; Kwon, Junhyun; Choi, Min-Jae; Hwang, Seong Sik [Nuclear Materials Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), 111, Daedeok-daero 989beon-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hyun, E-mail: kimjh@unist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), 50 UNIST-gil, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 44919 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the effects of warm rolling on the crack growth of 316L austenitic stainless steel, the crack growth rate was measured and the oxide structure was characterized in high-temperature hydrogenated water. The warm-rolled specimens showed a higher crack growth rate compared to the as-received specimens because the slip bands and dislocations produced during warm rolling served as paths for corrosion and cracking. The crack growth rate increased with the dissolved hydrogen concentration. This may be attributed to the decrease in performance and stability of the protective oxide layer formed on the surface of stainless steel in high-temperature water. - Highlights: • 316L Stainless steels were used for the study of crack growth behavior in PWR water. • Warm rolling was applied to simulate the irradiation hardening of stainless steels. • DH concentration was changed to see the effect on crack growth and oxide structure. • Warm-rolled stainless steels showed higher rates of corrosion and crack growth. • Higher DH concentration also promoted the rates of corrosion and crack growth.

  11. Ontogenetic patterns and temperature-dependent growth rates in early life stages of Pacific cod (Gadus macrocephalus)

    OpenAIRE

    Hurst, Thomas P.; Benjamin J. Laurel; Ciannelli, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    Pacific cod (Gadus macrocephalus) is an important component of fisheries and food webs in the North Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea. However, vital rates of early life stages of this species have yet to be described in detail. We determined the thermal sensitivity of growth rates of embryos, preflexion and postflexion larvae, and postsettlement juveniles. Growth rates (length and mass) at each ontogenetic stage were measured in three replicate tanks at four to five temperatures. Nonl...

  12. Determinants of suboptimal breast-feeding practices in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazir, Tabish; Akram, Dure-Samin; Nisar, Yasir Bin; Kazmi, Narjis; Agho, Kingsley E; Abbasi, Saleem; Khan, Amira M; Dibley, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    Exclusive breast-feeding is estimated to reduce infant mortality in low-income countries by up to 13 %. The aim of the present study was to determine the risk factors associated with suboptimal breast-feeding practices in Pakistan. A cross-sectional study using data extracted from the multistage cluster sample survey of the Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey 2006-2007. A nationally representative sample of households. Last-born alive children aged 0-23 months (total weighted sample size 3103). The prevalences of timely initiation of breast-feeding, bottle-feeding in children aged 0-23 months, exclusive breast-feeding and predominant breast-feeding in infants aged 0-5 months were 27·3 %, 32·1 %, 37·1 % and 18·7 %, respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated that working mothers (OR = 1·48, 95 % CI 1·16, 1·87; P = 0·001) and mothers who delivered by Caesarean section (OR = 1·95, 95 % CI 1·30, 2·90; P = 0·001) had significantly higher odds for no timely initiation of breast-feeding. Mothers from North West Frontier Province were significantly less likely (OR = 0·37, 95 % CI 0·23, 0·59; P feed their babies exclusively. Mothers delivered by traditional birth attendants had significantly higher odds to predominantly breast-feed their babies (OR = 1·96, 95 % CI 1·18, 3·24; P = 0·009). The odds of being bottle-fed was significantly higher in infants whose mothers had four or more antenatal clinic visits (OR = 1·93, 95 % CI 1·46, 2·55; P feeding practices. To gain the full benefits of breast-feeding for child health and nutrition, there is an urgent need to develop interventions to improve the rates of exclusive breast-feeding.

  13. The effects of temperature gradient and growth rate on the morphology and fatigue properties of MAR-M246(Hf)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, D. D.; Alter, W. S.; Hamilton, W. D.; Parr, R. A.

    1989-01-01

    MAR-M246(Hf) is a nickel based superalloy used in the turbopump blades of the Space Shuttle main engines. The effects are considered of temperature gradient (G) and growth rate (R) on the microstructure and fatigue properties of this superalloy. The primary dendrite arm spacings were found to be inversely proportional to both temperature gradient and growth rate. Carbide and gamma - gamma prime morphology trends were related to G/R ratios. Weibull analysis of fatigue results shows the characteristic life to be larger by a factor of 10 for the low gradient/fast rate pairing of G and R, while the reliability (beta) was lower.

  14. Effect of Temperature and pH on Formulating the Kinetic Growth Parameters and Lactic Acid Production of Lactobacillus bulgaricus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Aghababaie

    2014-09-01

    Results: Second order model for Xmax, μmax, P and K was significant but product formation parameters were almost constant. The optimum values of temperature and pH for attaining maximum biomass, maximum specific growth rate, and maximum acid production were obtained at 44 °C and 5.7, respectively. Conclusions: The attained empirical mathematical correlations of RSM alongside the kinetic equations could be used to determine growth conditions under predefined temperature and pH in the fermentation process. Keywords: Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Richards model, Response surface methodology, Lactic acid production, Luedeking-Piret model

  15. Remote and direct plasma regions for low-temperature growth of carbon nanotubes on glass substrates for display applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, M. K.; Ghafouri fard, H.; Koohsorkhi, J.; Khatami, S.; Mohajerzadeh, S.

    2011-03-01

    A novel method for growing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on glass substrates is introduced in this study. A two-stage plasma was used to achieve low-temperature and vertically aligned CNTs. Ni deposited on indium tin oxide/glass substrate was used as the catalyst and hydrogen and acetylene were used as gas feeds. In this investigation a new technique was developed to grow vertically aligned CNTs at temperatures below 400 °C while CNT growth by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition required high temperatures. Low-temperature growth of vertically aligned CNTs was suitable for the fabrication of micro-lens and self-oriented displays on glass substrates. Also, we have reported a new configuration for CNT-based display by means of controlling the refractive index of liquid crystal around the CNT by applying a proper voltage to the top and bottom array.

  16. Remote and direct plasma regions for low-temperature growth of carbon nanotubes on glass substrates for display applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabatabaei, M K; Ghafouri fard, H; Koohsorkhi, J; Khatami, S [Department of Electrical Engineering, AmirKabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohajerzadeh, S, E-mail: koohsorkhi@aut.ac.ir [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-03-23

    A novel method for growing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on glass substrates is introduced in this study. A two-stage plasma was used to achieve low-temperature and vertically aligned CNTs. Ni deposited on indium tin oxide/glass substrate was used as the catalyst and hydrogen and acetylene were used as gas feeds. In this investigation a new technique was developed to grow vertically aligned CNTs at temperatures below 400 deg. C while CNT growth by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition required high temperatures. Low-temperature growth of vertically aligned CNTs was suitable for the fabrication of micro-lens and self-oriented displays on glass substrates. Also, we have reported a new configuration for CNT-based display by means of controlling the refractive index of liquid crystal around the CNT by applying a proper voltage to the top and bottom array.

  17. Influence of Synthesis Temperature on the Growth and Surface Morphology of Co3O4 Nanocubes for Supercapacitor Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Rashmirekha; Dash, Barsha; Sarangi, Chinmaya Kumar; Subbaiah, Tondepu; Senanayake, Gamini; Minakshi, Manickam

    2017-01-01

    A facile hydrothermal route to control the crystal growth on the synthesis of Co3O4 nanostructures with cube-like morphologies has been reported and tested its suitability for supercapacitor applications. The chemical composition and morphologies of the as-prepared Co3O4 nanoparticles were extensively characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Varying the temperature caused considerable changes in the morphology, the electrochemical performance increased with rising temperature, and the redox reactions become more reversible. The results showed that the Co3O4 synthesized at a higher temperature (180 °C) demonstrated a high specific capacitance of 833 F/g. This is attributed to the optimal temperature and the controlled growth of nanocubes. PMID:29088061

  18. Applications of Optical Interferometer Techniques for Precision Measurements of Changes in Temperature, Growth and Refractive Index of Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami Reddy Bommareddi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Optical metrology techniques used to measure changes in thickness; temperature and refractive index are surveyed. Optical heterodyne detection principle and its applications for precision measurements of changes in thickness and temperature are discussed. Theoretical formulations are developed to estimate crystal growth rate, surface roughness and laser cooling/heating of solids. Applications of Michelson and Mach-Zehnder interferometers to measure temperature changes in laser heating of solids are described. A Mach-Zehnder interferometer is used to measure refractive index and concentration variations of solutions in crystal growth experiments. Additionally, fluorescence lifetime sensing and fluorescence ratio method are described for temperature measurement. For all the above techniques, uncertainty calculations are included.

  19. Salinity tolerance of cultured Eurasian perch, Perca fluviatilis L.: Effects on growth and on survival as a function of temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overton, Julia Lynne; Bayley, M.; Paulsen, Helge

    2008-01-01

    Eurasian perch is generally only considered to be a candidate for freshwater aquaculture even though wild populations are found in estuarine and brackish water habitats. Little knowledge exists on two issues a) the effect of temperature on the salinity tolerance of perch and b) the long......-term effects of brackish water on their overall growth performance. The present study addresses these two questions. Firstly, the effect of temperature (12, 15, 20 and 25°C) on perch survival of a salinity challenge at either 13 or 18‰ was determined. Survival was unaffected by 13‰ at the two lowest...... temperatures whereas higher temperature and higher salinities had a dramatic detrimental effect (at 25°C, 50% mortality was reach at 62h and 39h for 13‰ and 18‰, respectively). Secondly, we examined the effect of salinity on growth, which was assessed by measuring standard length and body weight at regular...

  20. Family Growth and Survival Response to Two Simulated Water Temperature Environments in the Sea Urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqing Chang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Heat tolerance is a target trait in the selective breeding of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus intermedius, as it plays an important role in the survival and growth of cultured S. intermedius during summer. We investigated family growth and survival response to two temperature treatments to evaluate the genotype by temperature interaction (GEI in the family selection of S. intermedius. Sea urchins from 11 families were exposed to two simulated water temperature environments—high temperature (HE and control temperature (CE—for 12 months, with each experiment divided into four periods (P1, stress-free period I; P2, stress-full high period; P3, stress-response period; and P4, stress-free period II based on the temperature changes and the survival. Test diameter (TD, body weight (BW, and survival rate (SR in HE and CE were measured monthly. Effects of family, temperature, and family-temperature interaction on TD, BW, SR, and specific growth rate (SGR for BW were examined. In CE, BW differed significantly between families in P2, P3, and P4, while TD differed significantly between families in P3 and P4 (p < 0.05. In HE, family had significant effects on BW in P4, and on TD in P3 and P4, while temperature had significant effects on SR, TD, and BW in P3 and P4 (p < 0.05. GEI effects were not significant for TD or BW; however, family ranking changes revealed the existence of GEI in SR. The GEI results indicate the necessity of applying family selection in CE and HE for SR, but not for TD or BW. These results may provide a guide for aquaculture and selective breeding of S. intermedius under temperature pressure.

  1. Phenotypic analysis of mutant and overexpressing strains of lipid metabolism genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: implication in growth at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Malo, María; Chiva, Rosana; Rozes, Nicolas; Guillamon, José Manuel

    2013-03-01

    The growing demand for wines with a more pronounced aromatic profile calls for low temperature alcoholic fermentations (10-15°C). However, there are certain drawbacks to low temperature fermentations such as reduced growth rate, long lag phase and sluggish or stuck fermentations. The lipid metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae plays a central role in low temperature adaptation. The aim of this study was to detect lipid metabolism genes involved in cold adaptation. To do so, we analyzed the growth of knockouts in phospholipids, sterols and sphingolipids, from the EUROSCARF collection S. cerevisiae BY4742 strain at low and optimal temperatures. Growth rate of these knockouts, compared with the control, enabled us to identify the genes involved, which were also deleted or overexpressed in a derivative haploid of a commercial wine strain. We identified genes involved in the phospholipid (PSD1 and OPI3), sterol (ERG3 and IDI1) and sphingolipid (LCB3) pathways, whose deletion strongly impaired growth at low temperature and whose overexpression reduced generation or division time by almost half. Our study also reveals many phenotypic differences between the laboratory strain and the commercial wine yeast strain, showing the importance of constructing mutant and overexpressing strains in both genetic backgrounds. The phenotypic differences in the mutant and overexpressing strains were correlated with changes in their lipid composition. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. The effect of changes in sea surface temperature on linear growth of Porites coral in Ambon Bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corvianawatie, Corry, E-mail: corvianawatie@students.itb.ac.id; Putri, Mutiara R., E-mail: mutiara.putri@fitb.itb.ac.id [Oceanography Study Program, Bandung Institute of Technology (ITB), Jl. Ganesha 10 Bandung (Indonesia); Cahyarini, Sri Y., E-mail: yuda@geotek.lipi.go.id [Research Center for Geotechnology, Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), Bandung (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    Coral is one of the most important organisms in the coral reef ecosystem. There are several factors affecting coral growth, one of them is changes in sea surface temperature (SST). The purpose of this research is to understand the influence of SST variability on the annual linear growth of Porites coral taken from Ambon Bay. The annual coral linear growth was calculated and compared to the annual SST from the Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature version 3b (ERSST v3b) model. Coral growth was calculated by using Coral X-radiograph Density System (CoralXDS) software. Coral sample X-radiographs were used as input data. Chronology was developed by calculating the coral’s annual growth bands. A pair of high and low density banding patterns observed in the coral’s X-radiograph represent one year of coral growth. The results of this study shows that Porites coral extents from 2001-2009 and had an average growth rate of 1.46 cm/year. Statistical analysis shows that the annual coral linear growth declined by 0.015 cm/year while the annual SST declined by 0.013°C/year. SST and the annual linear growth of Porites coral in the Ambon Bay is insignificantly correlated with r=0.304 (n=9, p>0.05). This indicates that annual SST variability does not significantly influence the linear growth of Porites coral from Ambon Bay. It is suggested that sedimentation load, salinity, pH or other environmental factors may affect annual linear coral growth.

  3. Modeling growth of three bakery product spoilage molds as a function of water activity, temperature and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagnas, Stéphane; Onno, Bernard; Membré, Jeanne-Marie

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of water activity, pH and storage temperature on the growth of Eurotium repens, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium corylophilum, isolated from spoiled bakery products. Moreover, the behaviors of these three mold species were compared to assess whether a general modeling framework may be set and re-used in future research on bakery spoilage molds. The mold growth was modeled by building two distinct Gamma-type secondary models: one on the lag time for growth and another one on the radial growth rate. A set of 428 experimental growth curves was generated. The effect of temperature (15-35 °C), water activity (0.80-0.98) and pH (3-7) was assessed. Results showed that it was not possible to apply the same set of secondary model equations to the three mold species given that the growth rate varied significantly with the factors pH and water activity. In contrast, the temperature effect on both growth rate and lag time of the three mold species was described by the same equation. The equation structure and model parameter values of the Gamma models were also compared per mold species to assess whether a relationship between lag time and growth rate existed. There was no correlation between the two growth responses for E. repens, but a slight one for A. niger and P. corylophilum. These findings will help in determining bakery product shelf-life and guiding future work in the predictive mycology field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Modelling the effect of temperature, water activity and pH on the growth of Serpula lacrymans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, S; Coroller, L; Debaets, S; Vasseur, V; Le Floch, G; Barbier, G

    2011-12-01

    To predict the risk factors for building infestation by Serpula lacrymans, which is one of the most destructive fungi causing timber decay in buildings. The growth rate was assessed on malt extract agar media at temperatures between 1.5 and 45°C, at water activity (a(w)) over the range of 0.800-0.993 and at pH ranges from 1.5 to 11.0. The radial growth rate (μ) and the lag phase (λ) were estimated from the radial growth kinetics via the plots radius vs time. These parameters were then modelled as a function of the environmental factors tested. Models derived from the cardinal model (CM) were used to fit the experimental data and allowed an estimation of the optimal and limit values for fungal growth. Optimal growth rate occurred at 20°C, at high a(w) level (0.993) and at a pH range between 4.0 and 6.0. The strain effect on the temperature parameters was further evaluated using 14 strains of S. lacrymans. The robustness of the temperature model was validated on data sets measured in two different wood-based media (Quercus robur L. and Picea abies). The two-step procedure of exponential model with latency followed by the CM with inflection gives reliable predictions for the growth conditions of a filamentous fungus in our study. The procedure was validated for the study of abiotic factors on the growth rate of S. lacrymans. This work describes the usefulness of evaluating the effect of physico-chemical factors on fungal growth in predictive building mycology. Consequently, the developed mathematical models for predicting fungal growth on a macroscopic scale can be used as a tool for risk assessment of timber decay in buildings. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. A temperature response function for modeling leaf growth and development of the African violet (Saintpaulia ionantha Wendl.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streck Nereu Augusto

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Response functions used in crop simulation models are usually different for different physiological processes and cultivars, resulting in many unknown coefficients in the response functions. This is the case of African violet (Saintpaulia ionantha Wendl., where a generalized temperature response for leaf growth and development has not been developed yet. The objective of this study was to develop a generalized nonlinear temperature response function for leaf appearance rate and leaf elongation rate in African violet. The nonlinear function has three coefficients, which are the cardinal temperatures (minimum, optimum, and maximum temperatures. These coefficients were defined as 10, 24, and 33ºC, based on the cardinal temperatures of other tropical species. Data of temperature response of leaf appearance rate and leaf elongation rate in African violet, cultivar Utah, at different light levels, which are from published research, were used as independent data for evaluating the performance of the nonlinear temperature response function. The results showed that a generalized nonlinear response function can be used to describe the temperature response of leaf growth and development in African violet. These results imply that a reduction in the number of input data required in African violet simulation models is possible.

  6. Effect of growth temperature on defects in epitaxial GaN film grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Kushvaha

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the effect of growth temperature on defect states of GaN epitaxial layers grown on 3.5 μm thick GaN epi-layer on sapphire (0001 substrates using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The GaN samples grown at three different substrate temperatures at 730, 740 and 750 °C were characterized using atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The atomic force microscopy images of these samples show the presence of small surface and large hexagonal pits on the GaN film surfaces. The surface defect density of high temperature grown sample is smaller (4.0 × 108 cm−2 at 750 °C than that of the low temperature grown sample (1.1 × 109 cm−2 at 730 °C. A correlation between growth temperature and concentration of deep centre defect states from photoluminescence spectra is also presented. The GaN film grown at 750 °C exhibits the lowest defect concentration which confirms that the growth temperature strongly influences the surface morphology and affects the optical properties of the GaN epitaxial films.

  7. Effect of growth temperature on defects in epitaxial GaN film grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushvaha, S. S., E-mail: kushvahas@nplindia.org; Pal, P.; Shukla, A. K.; Joshi, Amish G.; Gupta, Govind; Kumar, M.; Singh, S.; Gupta, Bipin K.; Haranath, D. [CSIR- National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi, India 110012 (India)

    2014-02-15

    We report the effect of growth temperature on defect states of GaN epitaxial layers grown on 3.5 μm thick GaN epi-layer on sapphire (0001) substrates using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The GaN samples grown at three different substrate temperatures at 730, 740 and 750 °C were characterized using atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The atomic force microscopy images of these samples show the presence of small surface and large hexagonal pits on the GaN film surfaces. The surface defect density of high temperature grown sample is smaller (4.0 × 10{sup 8} cm{sup −2} at 750 °C) than that of the low temperature grown sample (1.1 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2} at 730 °C). A correlation between growth temperature and concentration of deep centre defect states from photoluminescence spectra is also presented. The GaN film grown at 750 °C exhibits the lowest defect concentration which confirms that the growth temperature strongly influences the surface morphology and affects the optical properties of the GaN epitaxial films.

  8. Do homologous thermophilic-mesophilic proteins exhibit similar structures and dynamics at optimal growth temperatures? A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sohini; Sen, Srikanta

    2013-02-25

    Structure and dynamics both are known to be important for the activity of a protein. A fundamental question is whether a thermophilic protein and its mesophilic homologue exhibit similar dynamics at their respective optimal growth temperatures. We have addressed this question by performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a natural mesophilic-thermophilic homologue pair at their respective optimal growth temperatures to compare their structural, dynamical, and solvent properties. The MD simulations were done in explicit aqueous solvent under periodic boundary and constant pressure and temperature (CPT) conditions and continued for 10.0 ns using the same protocol for the two proteins, excepting the temperatures. The trajectories were analyzed to compare the properties of the two proteins. Results indicated that the dynamical behaviors of the two proteins at the respective optimal growth temperatures were remarkably similar. For the common residues in the thermophilic protein, the rms fluctuations have a general trend to be slightly higher compared to that in the mesophilic counterpart. Lindemann parameter values indicated that only a few residues exhibited solid-like dynamics while the protein as a whole appeared as a molten globule in each case. Interestingly, the water-water interaction was found to be strikingly similar in spite of the difference in temperatures while, the protein-water interaction was significantly different in the two simulations.

  9. Modeling Net Growth of Phaeocystis antarctica Based on Physiological and Optical Responses to Light and Temperature Co-limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany A. Moisan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Temperature and light are fundamental environmental variables which regulate phytoplankton growth rates when nutrients are in excess. For polar coastal oceans that are undergoing changes in sea ice cover and warming, light, and temperature are particularly important for bloom dynamics. Using colonial Phaeocystis antarctica cultures grown at steady-state, we assessed the combined effect of these two environmental controls on net growth rate (μn, chlorophyll-specific absorption of light (aph* (λ, and quantum yields for growth (ϕμ. Specific net growth rates (μn varied from 0.04 to 0.34 day−1 within a matrix of light and temperature ranging from 14 to 542 μmol quanta m−2 s−1 and −1.5 to 4°C. Values of aph* (λ varied significantly with light but only slightly with temperature. Values of ϕμ ranged from 0.003 to 0.09 mol C (mol quanta absorbed−1 with highest values at low light and 4°C. For excess irradiances or low temperatures where growth rate is inhibited, quantum yields were low. The low ϕμ values are attributed both to increased absorption by photoprotective pigments compared to photosynthetic pigments and thermodynamic control of dark reaction enzymes. The systematic changes in photophysiological properties of P. antarctica in relation to temperature and light were used to develop a series of nested light- and temperature-dependent models for μn, aph* (λ, and ϕμ. A model for aph* (300–700 nm was developed that takes into account the systematic changes in aph* (λ due to pigment packaging effects and cellular concentrations of chlorophylls and photoprotective pigments. Also, a model for ϕμ was developed based on a cumulative one-hit Poisson probability function. These model parameterizations for absorption and quantum yield are combined into an overall model of net growth that can be applied easily to P. antarctica bloom dynamics using remote sensing data for temperature, light, and chlorophyll a. Furthermore

  10. Global gene expression profiling related to temperature-sensitive growth abnormalities in interspecific crosses between tetraploid wheat and Aegilops tauschii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Ryusuke; Iehisa, Julio Cesar Masaru; Sakaguchi, Kouhei; Ohno, Ryoko; Yoshida, Kentaro; Takumi, Shigeo

    2017-01-01

    Triploid wheat hybrids between tetraploid wheat and Aegilops tauschii sometimes show abnormal growth phenotypes, and the growth abnormalities inhibit generation of wheat synthetic hexaploids. In type II necrosis, one of the growth abnormalities, necrotic cell death accompanied by marked growth repression occurs only under low temperature conditions. At normal temperature, the type II necrosis lines show grass-clump dwarfism with no necrotic symptoms, excess tillers, severe dwarfism and delayed flowering. Here, we report comparative expression analyses to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the temperature-dependent phenotypic plasticity in the triploid wheat hybrids. We compared gene and small RNA expression profiles in crown tissues to characterize the temperature-dependent phenotypic plasticity. No up-regulation of defense-related genes was observed under the normal temperature, and down-regulation of wheat APETALA1-like MADS-box genes, considered to act as flowering promoters, was found in the grass-clump dwarf lines. Some microRNAs, including miR156, were up-regulated, whereas the levels of transcripts of the miR156 target genes SPLs, known to inhibit tiller and branch number, were reduced in crown tissues of the grass-clump dwarf lines at the normal temperature. Unusual expression of the miR156/SPLs module could explain the grass-clump dwarf phenotype. Dramatic alteration of gene expression profiles, including miRNA levels, in crown tissues is associated with the temperature-dependent phenotypic plasticity in type II necrosis/grass-clump dwarf wheat hybrids.

  11. Effect of temperature on photosynthesis-light response and growth of four phytoplankton species isolated from a tidal freshwater river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, J.F.; Jones, R.C.

    2000-01-01

    Three cyanobacteria (Microcystis aeruginosa Kutz. emend. Elenkin, Merismopedia tenuissima Lemmermann, and Oscillatoria sp.) and one diatom (Aulacoseira granulata var. angustissima O. Mull. emend. Simonsen) were isolated from the tidal freshwater Potomac River and maintained at 23??C and 40 ??mol photons??m-2??s-1 on a 16:8 L:D cycle in unialgal culture. Photosynthetic parameters were determined in nutrient-replete cultures growing exponentially at 15, 20, 25, and 30??C by incubation with 14C at six light levels. P(B)(max) was strongly correlated with temperature over the entire range for the cyanobacteria and from 15 to 25??C for Aulacoseira, with Q10 ranging from 1.79 to 2.67. The ?? values demonstrated a less consistent temperature pattern. Photosynthetic parameters indicated an advantage for cyanobacteria at warmer temperatures and in light-limited water columns. P(B)(max) and I(k) values were generally lower than comparable literature and field values, whereas ?? was generally higher, consistent with a somewhat shade acclimated status of our cultures. Specific growth rate (??), as measured by chlorophyll change, was strongly influenced by temperature in all species. Oscillatoria had the highest ?? at all temperatures, joined at lower temperatures by Aulacoseira and at higher temperatures by Microcystis. Values of ?? for Aulacaseira were near the low end of the literature range for diatoms consistent with the light-limited status of the cultures. The cyanobacteria exhibited growth rates similar to those reported in other studies. Q10 for growth ranged from 1.71 for Aulacoseira to 4.16 for Microcystis. Growth rate was highly correlated with P(B)(max) for each species and the regression slope coefficients were very similar for three of the species.

  12. Validation of mathematical models for Salmonella growth in raw ground beef under dynamic temperature conditions representing loss of refrigeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Jennifer A; Schaffner, Donald W

    2014-07-01

    Temperature is a primary factor in controlling the growth of microorganisms in food. The current U. S. Food and Drug Administration Model Food Code guidelines state that food can be kept out of temperature control for up to 4 h without qualifiers, or up to 6 h, if the food product starts at an initial 41 °F (5 °C) temperature and does not exceed 70 °F (21 °C) at 6 h. This project validates existing ComBase computer models for Salmonella growth under changing temperature conditions modeling scenarios using raw ground beef as a model system. A cocktail of Salmonella serovars isolated from different meat products ( Salmonella Copenhagen, Salmonella Montevideo, Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Saintpaul, and Salmonella Heidelberg) was made rifampin resistant and used for all experiments. Inoculated samples were held in a programmable water bath at 4.4 °C (40 °F) and subjected to linear temperature changes to different final temperatures over various lengths of time and then returned to 4.4 °C (40 °F). Maximum temperatures reached were 15.6, 26.7, or 37.8 °C (60, 80, or 100 °F), and the temperature increases took place over 4, 6, and 8 h, with varying cooling times. Our experiments show that when maximum temperatures were lower (15.6 or 26.7 °C), there was generally good agreement between the ComBase models and experiments: when temperature increases of 15.6 or 26.7 °C occurred over 8 h, experimental data were within 0.13 log CFU of the model predictions. When maximum temperatures were 37 °C, predictive models were fail-safe. Overall bias of the models was 1.11. and accuracy was 2.11. Our experiments show the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Model Food Code guidelines for holding food out of temperature control are quite conservative. Our research also shows that the ComBase models for Salmonella growth are accurate or fail-safe for dynamic temperature conditions as might be observed due to power loss from natural disasters or during transport out of

  13. Factors associated with suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awachana Jiamsakul

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART plays an important role in treatment outcomes. It is crucial to identify factors influencing adherence in order to optimize treatment responses. The aim of this study was to assess the rates of, and factors associated with, suboptimal adherence (SubAdh in the first 24 months of ART in an Asian HIV cohort. Methods: As part of a prospective resistance monitoring study, the TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance Monitoring Study (TASER-M collected patients’ adherence based on the World Health Organization-validated Adherence Visual Analogue Scale. SubAdh was defined in two ways: (i 14 days. Time was divided into four intervals: 0–6, 6–12, 12–18 and 18–24 months. Factors associated with SubAdh were analysed using generalized estimating equations. Results: Out of 1316 patients, 32% ever reported 2 assessments per patient per year had an odds ratio (OR=0.7 (95% confidence interval (CI (0.55 to 0.90, p=0.006, compared to sites with ≤2 assessments per patient per year. Compared to heterosexual exposure, SubAdh was higher in injecting drug users (IDUs (OR=1.92, 95% CI (1.23 to 3.00, p=0.004 and lower in homosexual exposure (OR=0.52, 95% CI (0.38 to 0.71, p<0.001. Patients taking a nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor and protease inhibitor (NRTI+PI combination were less likely to report adherence <100% (OR=0.36, 95% CI (0.20 to 0.67, p=0.001 compared to patients taking an NRTI and non-nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI+NNRTI combination. SubAdh decreased with increasing time on ART (all p<0.001. Similar associations were found with adherence <95% as the outcome. Conclusions: We found that SubAdh, defined as either <100% and <95%, was associated with mode of HIV exposure, ART regimen, time on ART and frequency of adherence measurement. The more frequently sites assessed patients, the lower the SubAdh, possibly reflecting site resourcing for patient counselling. Although social

  14. Over-the-counter suboptimal dispensing of antibiotics in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukonzo JK

    2013-08-01

    : In Uganda, at least four in every ten individuals that visit a health-care facility are treated with an antibiotic. Antibiotics are largely given as over-the-counter drugs at community pharmacies. The number of antibiotic prescribed daily doses/1,000 antibiotic clients does not significantly differ between categories of health-care facilities except at community pharmacies, where lower doses are dispensed compared to other health-care facilities. Keywords: antibiotic, over-the-counter dispensing, suboptimal dosing, Uganda

  15. A system analysis of a suboptimal surgical experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richards Michael

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background System analyses of incidents that occur in the process of health care delivery are rare. A case study of a series of incidents that one of the authors experienced after routine urologic surgery is presented. We interpret the sequence of events as a case of cascading incidents that resulted in outcomes that were suboptimal, although fortunately not fatal. Methods A system dynamics approach was employed to develop illustrative models (flow diagrams of the dynamics of the patient's interaction with surgery and emergency departments. The flow diagrams were constructed based upon the experience of the patient, chart review, discussion with the involved physicians as well as several physician colleagues, comparison of our diagrams with those developed by the hospital of interest for internal planning purposes, and an iterative process with one of the co-authors who is a system dynamics expert. A dynamic hypothesis was developed using insights gained by building the flow diagrams. Results The incidents originated in design flaws and many small innocuous system changes that have occurred incrementally over time, which by themselves may have no consequence but in conjunction with some system randomness can have serious consequences. In the patient's case, the incidents that occurred in preoperative assessment and surgery originated in communication and procedural failures. System delays, communication failures, and capacity issues contributed largely to the subsequent incidents. Some of these issues were controllable by the physicians and staff of the institution, whereas others were less controllable. To the system's credit, some of the more controllable issues were addressed, but systemic problems like overcrowding are unlikely to be addressed in the near future. Conclusion This is first instance that we are aware of in the literature where a system dynamics approach has been used to analyze a patient safety experience. The

  16. A system analysis of a suboptimal surgical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Robert C; Cooke, David L; Richards, Michael

    2009-01-06

    System analyses of incidents that occur in the process of health care delivery are rare. A case study of a series of incidents that one of the authors experienced after routine urologic surgery is presented. We interpret the sequence of events as a case of cascading incidents that resulted in outcomes that were suboptimal, although fortunately not fatal. A system dynamics approach was employed to develop illustrative models (flow diagrams) of the dynamics of the patient's interaction with surgery and emergency departments. The flow diagrams were constructed based upon the experience of the patient, chart review, discussion with the involved physicians as well as several physician colleagues, comparison of our diagrams with those developed by the hospital of interest for internal planning purposes, and an iterative process with one of the co-authors who is a system dynamics expert. A dynamic hypothesis was developed using insights gained by building the flow diagrams. The incidents originated in design flaws and many small innocuous system changes that have occurred incrementally over time, which by themselves may have no consequence but in conjunction with some system randomness can have serious consequences. In the patient's case, the incidents that occurred in preoperative assessment and surgery originated in communication and procedural failures. System delays, communication failures, and capacity issues contributed largely to the subsequent incidents. Some of these issues were controllable by the physicians and staff of the institution, whereas others were less controllable. To the system's credit, some of the more controllable issues were addressed, but systemic problems like overcrowding are unlikely to be addressed in the near future. This is first instance that we are aware of in the literature where a system dynamics approach has been used to analyze a patient safety experience. The qualitative system dynamics analysis was useful in understanding the

  17. Factors associated with suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiamsakul, Awachana; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Ditangco, Rossana; Li, Patrick CK; Phanuphak, Praphan; Sirisanthana, Thira; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Kantipong, Pacharee; Lee, Christopher KC; Mustafa, Mahiran; Merati, Tuti; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Singtoroj, Thida; Law, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) plays an important role in treatment outcomes. It is crucial to identify factors influencing adherence in order to optimize treatment responses. The aim of this study was to assess the rates of, and factors associated with, suboptimal adherence (SubAdh) in the first 24 months of ART in an Asian HIV cohort. Methods As part of a prospective resistance monitoring study, the TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance Monitoring Study (TASER-M) collected patients’ adherence based on the World Health Organization-validated Adherence Visual Analogue Scale. SubAdh was defined in two ways: (i) 14 days. Time was divided into four intervals: 0–6, 6–12, 12–18 and 18–24 months. Factors associated with SubAdh were analysed using generalized estimating equations. Results Out of 1316 patients, 32% ever reported 2 assessments per patient per year had an odds ratio (OR)=0.7 (95% confidence interval (CI) (0.55 to 0.90), p=0.006), compared to sites with ≤2 assessments per patient per year. Compared to heterosexual exposure, SubAdh was higher in injecting drug users (IDUs) (OR=1.92, 95% CI (1.23 to 3.00), p=0.004) and lower in homosexual exposure (OR=0.52, 95% CI (0.38 to 0.71), p<0.001). Patients taking a nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor and protease inhibitor (NRTI+PI) combination were less likely to report adherence <100% (OR=0.36, 95% CI (0.20 to 0.67), p=0.001) compared to patients taking an NRTI and non-nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI+NNRTI) combination. SubAdh decreased with increasing time on ART (all p<0.001). Similar associations were found with adherence <95% as the outcome. Conclusions We found that SubAdh, defined as either <100% and <95%, was associated with mode of HIV exposure, ART regimen, time on ART and frequency of adherence measurement. The more frequently sites assessed patients, the lower the SubAdh, possibly reflecting site resourcing for patient counselling. Although social

  18. Effect of allyl isothiocyanate in headspace and modified atmosphere on Pseduomonas Aeruginosa growth in fresh catfish fillets under abuse temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a common spoilage microorganism on fresh catfish products, can grow rapidly at temperatures above 4 deg C during storage and transportation. Allyl isothiocyanate (AIT), an extract of horseradish oil, and modified atmosphere (MA) can be used to inhibit the growth of P. aerugin...

  19. Influence of temperature on bud break, shoot growth, flower bud atrophy and winter production of glasshouse roses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den G.A.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of temperature in the range 15-22 °C on growth, production, quality and flower bud atrophy ('blindness') of the rose cultivars Sweet Promise and Varlon was studied. The roses were grown in Dutch glasshouse soil under natural light conditions and studied from October until May

  20. Differential growth of Legionella pneumophila strains within a range of amoebae at various temperatures associated with in-premise plumbing

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential effect of in-premise plumbing temperatures (24, 32, 37 and 41 °C) on the growth of five different L. pneumophila strains within free-living amoebae (Acanthamoeba polyphaga, Hartmannella vermiformis and Naegleria fowleri) was examined. Compared to controls only fed E...

  1. Elevated growth temperatures alter hydraulic characteristics in trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings: implications for tree drought tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielle A. Way; Jean-Christophe Domec; Robert B. Jackson

    2013-01-01

    Although climate change will alter both soil water availability and evaporative demand, our understanding of how future climate conditions will alter tree hydraulic architecture is limited. Here, we demonstrate that growth at elevated temperatures (ambient +5 °C) affects hydraulic traits in seedlings of the deciduous boreal tree species Populus tremuloides, with the...

  2. Modelling growth and bacteriocin production by Pediococcus acidilactici PA003 as a function of temperature and pH value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Shan-na; Han, Ye; Zhou, Zhi-jiang

    2012-03-01

    To investigate the effect of pH and temperature on the cell growth and bacteriocin production of Pediococcus acidilactici PA003, a lactic acid bacterium isolated from traditionally fermented cabbage, the kinetic behaviour of P. acidilactici PA003 was simulated in vitro during laboratory fermentations by making use of MRS broth. Firstly, primary models were developed for cell growth, glucose consumption, lactic acid and bacteriocin production for a given set of environmental conditions. Based on primary models, further study was undertaken to fit secondary models to describe the influence of temperature and pH on microbial behaviour. The models were validated successfully for all components. The results from the cell yield coefficient for lactic acid production reflected the homofermentative nature of P. acidilactici PA003. Both cell growth and bacteriocin production were very much influenced by changes in temperature and pH. The optimal condition for specific growth rate and biomass concentration was almost the same at pH 6.5 and 35 °C. At 35 °C and pH 6.1, the maximal bacteriocin activity was also achieved. The kinetic models provide useful tools for elucidating the mechanisms of temperature and pH on the kinetic behaviour of P. acidilactici PA003. The information obtained in this paper may be very useful for the selection of suitable starter cultures for a particular fermentation process and is a first step in the optimization of food fermentation processes and technology as well.

  3. Impact of growth temperature and surface type on the resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms to disinfectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Marwan; Khelissa, Oussama; Ibrahim, Ali; Benoliel, Corinne; Heliot, Laurent; Dhulster, Pascal; Chihib, Nour-Eddine

    2015-12-02

    Biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus on food-contact-surfaces represents a significant risk for the public health. In this context, the present study investigates the relationship between the environmental conditions of biofilm formation and the resistance to disinfectants. Therefore, a static biofilm reactor, called NEC-Biofilm System, was established in order to study the effect of growth temperature (20, 30 and 37°C), and of the surface type (stainless steel and polycarbonate), on biofilm resistance to disinfectants. These conditions were selected to mimic the biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces of food processing industries. The antibiofilm assays were performed on biofilms grown during 24 h. The results showed that the growth temperature influenced significantly the biofilm resistance to disinfectants. These data also revealed that the growth temperature has a significant effect on the biofilm structure of both bacteria. Furthermore, the increase of the biofilm growth temperature increased significantly the algD transcript level in sessile P. aeruginosa cells, whereas the icaA one was not affected in S. aureus cells. Overall, our findings show that the biofilm structure and matrix cannot fully explain the biofilm resistance to disinfectant agents. Nevertheless, it underlines the intimate link between environmental conditions, commonly met in food sectors, and the biofilm resistance to disinfectants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Modification by gibberellin of the growth-temperature relationship in mutant and normal genotypes of several cereals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddart, J L; Lloyd, E J

    1986-03-01

    High-resolution growth measurements were conducted using a linear variable displacement transformer in conjunction with a temperature-programmed meristem-cooling collar. Chilling and rewarming profiles were determined for a range of Gramineae, in the presence and absence of varying concentrations of gibberellic acid (GA3). In wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings, the growth-constraining temperature (Pe) was progressively lowered by increasing GA3 concentration, with a difference of-4.8°C between controls and material treated with 10(-4) M GA3. Dwarf-5 maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings had a higher Pe than tall segregates and the difference was markedly reduced by exposure to a saturating concentration of GA3. A similar effect was observed with Tanginbozu dwarf rice (Oryza sativa L.). The growth ratetemperature responses of Rht3 gibberellin-insensitive dwarf wheat seedlings were unaffected by GA3 and the Pe values for these segregates were around 5° C higher than for normals. Slender (s1) barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) genotypes had Pe values of-7° C, compared with +4° C for wild-type material, and did not show positive hysteresis for growth rate during the rewarming phase. These studies indicate that GA3 modifies the thermal sensitivity of meristem function in Gramineae in a manner which enhances low-temperature growth.

  5. The effects of temperature and humidity on the growth of tin whisker and hillock from Sn5Nd alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Cai-Fu [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Liu, Zhi-Quan, E-mail: zqliu@imr.ac.cn [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Shang, Jian-Ku [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tin whiskers and hillocks grow from Sn5Nd alloy due to oxidation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Temperature and humidity can affect the oxidation and the growth diversities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Growth models of whiskers and hillocks were proposed upon microstructural study. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proposed models can explain the characteristics of whiskers and hillocks. - Abstract: The effects of exposure time, temperature and humidity on the growth of tin whisker and hillock from Sn5Nd alloy were investigated via scanning electron microscopy. It was found that tin whiskers grew from NdSn{sub 3} compound, while hillocks grew from the tin matrix around the NdSn{sub 3} compound, which was induced by the oxidation of NdSn{sub 3} compound by oxygen and water vapor in the ambient. More tin whiskers and/or hillocks were extruded from the substrate with longer exposure time, higher temperature and higher humidity. This resulted in the formation of various morphologies of tin extrusions at different storage conditions, including thread-like, spiral, flute-like, claw-like, sprout-like, chrysanthemum-like and rod-like whiskers, as well as hillocks. Tin whisker was extruded from the crack of the surface Nd(OH){sub 3} layer which serves as the mold of tin whisker growth. And the proposed growth models of tin whisker and hillock on Sn-Nd alloy can explain the diversity of the whisker morphology.

  6. Development of Predictive Models for the Growth Kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes on Fresh Pork under Different Storage Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ke; Hong, Sung-Sam; Wang, Jun; Chung, Mi-Ja; Deog-Hwan, Oh

    2015-05-01

    This study was conducted to develop a predictive model to estimate the growth of Listeria monocytogenes on fresh pork during storage at constant temperatures (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, and 35°C). The Baranyi model was fitted to growth data (log CFU per gram) to calculate the specific growth rate (SGR) and lag time (LT) with a high coefficient of determination (R(2) > 0.98). As expected, SGR increased with a decline in LT with rising temperatures in all samples. Secondary models were then developed to describe the variation of SGR and LT as a function of temperature. Subsequently, the developed models were validated with additional independent growth data collected at 7, 17, 27, and 37°C and from published reports using proportion of relative errors and proportion of standard error of prediction. The proportion of relative errors of the SGR and LT models developed herein were 0.79 and 0.18, respectively. In addition, the standard error of prediction values of the SGR and LT of L. monocytogenes ranged from 25.7 to 33.1% and from 44.92 to 58.44%, respectively. These results suggest that the model developed in this study was capable of predicting the growth of L. monocytogenes under various isothermal conditions.

  7. The joint influence of photoperiod and temperature during growth cessation and development of dormancy in white spruce (Picea glauca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jill A; El Kayal, Walid; Hart, Ashley T; Runcie, Daniel E; Arango-Velez, Adriana; Cooke, Janice E K

    2016-11-01

    Timely responses to environmental cues enable the synchronization of phenological life-history transitions essential for the health and survival of north-temperate and boreal tree species. While photoperiodic cues will remain persistent under climate change, temperature cues may vary, contributing to possible asynchrony in signals influencing developmental and physiological transitions essential to forest health. Understanding the relative contribution of photoperiod and temperature as determinants of the transition from active growth to dormancy is important for informing adaptive forest management decisions that consider future climates. Using a combination of photoperiod (long = 20 h or short = 8 h day lengths) and temperature (warm = 22 °C/16 °C and cool = 8 °C/4 °C day/night, respectively) treatments, we used microscopy, physiology and modeling to comprehensively examine hallmark traits of the growth-dormancy transition-including bud formation, growth cessation, cold hardiness and gas exchange-within two provenances of white spruce [Picea glauca (Moench) Voss] spanning a broad latitude in Alberta, Canada. Following exposure to experimental treatments, seedlings were transferred to favorable conditions, and the depth of dormancy was assessed by determining the timing and ability of spruce seedlings to resume growth. Short photoperiods promoted bud development and growth cessation, whereas longer photoperiods extended the growing season through the induction of lammas growth. In contrast, cool temperatures under both photoperiodic conditions delayed bud development. Photoperiod strongly predicted the development of cold hardiness, whereas temperature predicted photosynthetic rates associated with active growth. White spruce was capable of attaining endodormancy, but its release was environmentally determined. Dormancy depth varied substantially across experimental treatments suggesting that environmental cues experienced within one season could affect growth

  8. Impact of elevated temperature on the growth, survival and trophic dynamics of winter flounder larvae: a mesocosm study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, A. A.; Klein-MacPhee, G. [Rhode Island Univ., Narragansett, RI (United States)

    2000-12-01

    The impact of increased temperature on the growth, survival and trophic dynamics of winter flounder larvae was studied in a land-based mesocosm, in order to gain a better understanding of the factors controlling the recruitment of winter flounder, the dominant commercial fish in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. The investigation was prompted by a number of recent studies suggesting that the declining flounder population observed over the past 14 years was in some manner related to warmer winter temperatures which cause to increase the mortality of flounder larvae as well as predator activity. The paper describes the impact of increasing water temperature by three degrees relative to control systems in six enclosed mesocosms over a diatom post-winter-spring bloom period. The study focused on the effects of the altered temperature on food availability, abundance of active predators and the growth and survival of winter flounder larvae. It was observed that cooler temperature tended to prolong the incubation period of the larvae, resulting in hatching at a larger size in the cool mesocosm relative to the warm. Daily instantaneous growth and mortality rates showed a significant inverse relationship. The cumulative impact of warmer temperatures resulted in a 10 to 16 per cent decline of larvae surviving to metamorphosis (about six weeks). Increased temperature-mediated egg predation effects were also observed. It was concluded that chronic over-exploitation is associated with a long-term decline in winter flounder stock abundance despite production of good year-classes. Incorporation of the effect of warmer temperatures into fishing management plans, e. g. reducing fishing pressure following periods of successive warm winters, might be the most likely way to arrest declining stocks of winter flounder in the affected area. 34 refs., 4 tabs., 10 figs.

  9. Impact of growth temperature on exopolysaccharide production and probiotic properties of Lactobacillus paracasei strains isolated from kefir grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengoa, Ana A; Llamas, M Goretti; Iraporda, Carolina; Dueñas, M Teresa; Abraham, Analía G; Garrote, Graciela L

    2018-02-01

    EPS-producing LAB are widely used in the dairy industry since these polymers improve the viscosity and texture of the products. Besides, EPS might be responsible for several health benefits attributed to probiotic strains. However, growth conditions (culture media, temperature, pH) could modify EPS production affecting both technological and probiotic properties. In this work, the influence of growth temperature on EPS production was evaluated, as well as the consequences of these changes in the probiotic properties of the strains. All Lactobacillus paracasei strains used in the study showed changes in EPS production caused by growth temperature, evidenced by the appearance of a high molecular weight fraction and an increment in the total amount of produced EPS at lower temperature. Nevertheless, these changes do not affect the probiotic properties of the strains; L. paracasei strains grown at 20 °C, 30 °C and 37 °C were able to survive in simulated gastrointestinal conditions, to adhere to Caco-2 cells after that treatment and to modulate the epithelial innate immune response. The results suggest that selected L. paracasei strains are new probiotic candidates that can be used in a wide range of functional foods in which temperature could be used as a tool to improve the technological properties of the product. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Effects of increasng field temperature on growth, development and yield of spring wheat in semi-arid area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Wang, Run-yuan; Wang, He-ling; Zhao, Hong; Zhao, Fu-nian; Yang, Fu-lin; Lei, Jun

    2015-09-01

    A field infrared temperature-increasing simulation experiment was conducted to investi- gate the effects of air temperature increases (0, 1 and 2 °C ) on growth, development and yield of spring wheat at the Dingxi Arid Meteorology and Ecological Environment Experimental Station of the Institute of Arid Meteorology of China Meteorological Administration. The results showed that the growth period of spring wheat was shortened by 7-11 d when the temperature increased by 1-2 °C. The plant height and leaf area index increased at early growth stage, decreased after entering the jointing stage, and warming 2 °C had a higher effect than warming 1 °C. Warming treatment induced an obvious decrease in chlorophyll content, especially from late grain filling stage to milk ripe stage. Compared with the control, increasing temperature by 1-2 °C decreased the spring wheat yield by 25.4%-45.5%, mainly due to obvious decreases in number of grains and grain mass per panicle. Water consumption of 0-100 cm soil horizons increased with the increase of temperature, while the variation tendency of water consumption of 100-160 cm soil horizons was not obvious.

  11. Short Communication: Effects of temperature on growth, pigment composition and protein content of an Antarctic Cyanobacterium Nostoc commune

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RANJANA TRIPATHI

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Tripathi R, Dhuldhaj UP, Singh S. 2012. Short Communication: Effects of temperature on growth, pigment composition and protein content of an Antarctic Cyanobacterium Nostoc commune. Nusantara Bioscience 4: 134-137. Effect of temperature variation on biomass accumulation, pigment composition and protein content were studied for the cyanobacterium Nostoc commune, isolated from Antarctica. Results confirmed the psychrotrophic behavior (optimum growth temperature 25◦C of the cyanobacterium. Low temperature increased the duration of lag phase and exponential growth phase. Maximum increase in biomass was recorded on 24th day at 25◦C and on 12th day at 50C. The downshift from 25 to 5◦C had almost negligible effect on chl a content. Maximal protein content was recorded for cultures growing at 50C on 12th day. The carotenoids/chl a ratio was maximum (2.48 at 50C on 9th day. It remained almost constant for cultures growing at 5 and 350C. There was an induction in protein synthesis following downshift in temperature from 25 to 5◦C.

  12. Different transcriptional responses from slow and fast growth rate strains of Listeria monocytogenes adapted to low temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninoska eCordero

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes has become one of the principal foodborne pathogens worldwide. The capacity of this bacterium to grow at low temperatures has opened an interesting field of study in terms of the identification and classification of new strains of L. monocytogenes with different growth capacities at low temperatures. We determined the growth rate at 8 ºC of 110 strains of L. monocytogenes isolated from different food matrices. We identified a group of slow and fast strains according to their growth rate at 8 °C and performed a global transcriptomic assay in strains previously adapted to low temperature. We then identified shared and specific transcriptional mechanisms, metabolic and cellular processes of both groups; bacterial motility was the principal process capable of differentiating the adaptation capacity of L. monocytogenes strains with different ranges of tolerance to low temperatures. Strains belonging to the fast group were less motile, which may allow these strains to achieve a greater rate of proliferation at low temperature.

  13. High temperature stimulates acetic acid accumulation and enhances the growth inhibition and ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae under fermenting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Ji-Min; Yang, Kyung-Mi; Kim, Sae-Um; Blank, Lars M; Park, Jin-Byung

    2014-07-01

    Cellular responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to high temperatures of up to 42 °C during ethanol fermentation at a high glucose concentration (i.e., 100 g/L) were investigated. Increased temperature correlated with stimulated glucose uptake to produce not only the thermal protectant glycerol but also ethanol and acetic acid. Carbon flux into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle correlated positively with cultivation temperature. These results indicate that the increased demand for energy (in the form of ATP), most likely caused by multiple stressors, including heat, acetic acid, and ethanol, was matched by both the fermentation and respiration pathways. Notably, acetic acid production was substantially stimulated compared to that of other metabolites during growth at increased temperature. The acetic acid produced in addition to ethanol seemed to subsequently result in adverse effects, leading to increased production of reactive oxygen species. This, in turn, appeared to cause the specific growth rate, and glucose uptake rate reduced leading to a decrease of the specific ethanol production rate far before glucose depletion. These results suggest that adverse effects from heat, acetic acid, ethanol, and oxidative stressors are synergistic, resulting in a decrease of the specific growth rate and ethanol production rate and, hence, are major determinants of cell stability and ethanol fermentation performance of S. cerevisiae at high temperatures. The results are discussed in the context of possible applications.

  14. Suboptimal cytoreduction in ovarian carcinoma is associated with molecular pathways characteristic of increased stromal activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenqiu; Beach, Jessica A; Agadjanian, Hasmik; Jia, Dongyu; Aspuria, Paul-Joseph; Karlan, Beth Y; Orsulic, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Suboptimal cytoreductive surgery in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is associated with poor survival but it is unknown if poor outcome is due to the intrinsic biology of unresectable tumors or insufficient surgical effort resulting in residual tumor-sustaining clones. Our objective was to identify the potential molecular pathway(s) and cell type(s) that may be responsible for suboptimal surgical resection. By comparing gene expression in optimally and suboptimally cytoreduced patients, we identified a gene network associated with suboptimal cytoreduction and explored the biological processes and cell types associated with this gene network. We show that primary tumors from suboptimally cytoreduced patients express molecular signatures that are typically present in a distinct molecular subtype of EOC characterized by increased stromal activation and lymphovascular invasion. Similar molecular pathways are present in EOC metastases, suggesting that primary tumors in suboptimally cytoreduced patients are biologically similar to metastatic tumors. We demonstrate that the suboptimal cytoreduction network genes are enriched in reactive tumor stroma cells rather than malignant tumor cells. Our data suggest that the success of cytoreductive surgery is dictated by tumor biology, such as extensive stromal reaction and increased invasiveness, which may hinder surgical resection and ultimately lead to poor survival. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Growth and Characterization of alpha-PbO for Room Temperature Radiation Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Erin Leigh

    A global trading structure and high throughput of shipping containers into ports around the world increases the chance of nuclear terrorism via cargo containers. Harmless radioactive sources confuse and impede detection of the materials that pose a real threat, making spectroscopy difficult and requiring detectors with high resolution. The current methods that are used to check containers in ports have security flaws, and only 5% of all shipping containers are checked. The development of semiconductor gamma-ray detectors is one of the protocols being advanced to alleviate this risk because they can function at room temperature and they are cost effective, easily produced, and have high resolution. This dissertation has addressed the current lack of "perfect" room temperature detector materials by investigating alpha-PbO, a novel material in this field. This includes the development of a growth process for alpha-PbO thin films, as well as its structural and performance characterization as a detector material. Because we intend alpha-PbO to be a photoconductive detector, it should have certain properties. A photoconductive detector consists of a highly resistive material with a voltage bias across it. It absorbs incident gamma-rays, creating electron-hole pairs that provide a signal. To function well, it must have a high atomic number and a high density in order to absorb high-energy photons via the photoelectric effect. It should also have a large resistivity and a wide band gap to avoid large leakage currents at room temperature. Finally, it must have good charge carrier transport properties and detector resolution in order to be able to determine the characteristic energy peaks of the radiation-emitting source. We chose alpha-PbO because it has a very high Z and a very high density and a band gap in the correct range. It also has a rich history of use as a photoconductor that reaches back to the 1950s. Numerous methods have been used to grow thin films of alpha

  16. The effects of growth temperature on the methyl sterol and phospholipid fatty acid composition of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, L. L.

    1992-01-01

    Growth of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) at temperatures ranging from 30 to 50 degrees C resulted in changes to the whole cell lipid constituents. As temperature was lowered, the overall proportion of hexadecenoic acid (C16:1) increased, and the relative proportions of the delta 9, delta 10 and delta 11 C16:1 double bond positional isomers changed. Methyl sterol content also increased as the growth temperature was lowered. The highest amounts of methyl sterol were found in 30 degrees C cells and the lowest in 50 degrees C cells (sterol-phospholipid ratios of 0.077 and 0.013, respectively). The data are consistent with a membrane modulating role for the sterol produced by this prokaryotic organism.

  17. [Dynamics of seasonal plant growth in halophytic meadows taking into account the temperature factor and soil salinity level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pis'man, T I; Slosar', N A

    2012-01-01

    A mathematical model has been constructed to describe the growth dynamics of various plant communities of halophytic meadows depending on the temperature factor and degree of soil salinity. Field investigation of the yields of halophytic meadow plant communities were performed in the coastal area of Kurinka Lake in the Altaiskii district of the Republic of Khakasia in 2004 and 2006. The results of field investigations and model studies show that there is a correlation between plant growth and air temperature for plant communities growing on soils with the lowest and medium salinity levels. It was proven in model studies that for the plant communities that grow on highly saline (3.58%) soils, not only air temperature but also the salinity level of the soil should be taken into account.

  18. Effect of Different Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi on Growth and Physiology of Maize at Ambient and Low Temperature Regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoying Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of four different arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF on the growth and lipid peroxidation, soluble sugar, proline contents, and antioxidant enzymes activities of Zea mays L. was studied in pot culture subjected to two temperature regimes. Maize plants were grown in pots filled with a mixture of sandy and black soil for 5 weeks, and then half of the plants were exposed to low temperature for 1 week while the rest of the plants were grown under ambient temperature and severed as control. Different AMF resulted in different root colonization and low temperature significantly decreased AM colonization. Low temperature remarkably decreased plant height and total dry weight but increased root dry weight and root-shoot ratio. The AM plants had higher proline content compared with the non-AM plants. The maize plants inoculated with Glomus etunicatum and G. intraradices had higher malondialdehyde and soluble sugar contents under low temperature condition. The activities of catalase (CAT and peroxidase of AM inoculated maize were higher than those of non-AM ones. Low temperature noticeably decreased the activities of CAT. The results suggest that low temperature adversely affects maize physiology and AM symbiosis can improve maize seedlings tolerance to low temperature stress.

  19. Comparative growth rates of cultured marine dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium and the effects of temperature and light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Klueter

    Full Text Available Many dinoflagellate microalgae of the genus Symbiodinium form successful symbioses with a large group of metazoans and selected protists. Yet knowledge of growth kinetics of these endosymbionts and their ecological and evolutionary implications is limited. We used a Bayesian biphasic generalized logistic model to estimate key parameters of the growth of five strains of cultured Symbiodinium, S. microadriaticum (cp-type A194; strain 04-503, S. microadriaticum (cp-type A194; strain CassKB8, S. minutum (cp-type B184; strain Mf 1.05b.01.SCI.01, S. psygmophilum (cp-type B224; strain Mf 11.05b.01 and S. trenchii (cp-type D206; strain Mf 2.2b, grown in four different combinations of temperature and light. Growth kinetics varied among Symbiodinium strains and across treatments. Biphasic growth was especially evident for S. minutum and S. psygmophilum across all treatments. Monophasic growth was more common when final asymptotic densities were relatively low (~ 200 million cells ml-1. All species tended to grow faster and / or reached a higher asymptote at 26°C than at 18°C. The fastest growth was exhibited by S. minutum, with an approximate four-fold increase in estimated cell density after 60 days. The strongest effect of light was seen in S. trenchii, in which increasing light levels resulted in a decrease in initial growth rate, and an increase in asymptotic density, time when growth rate was at its maximum, final growth rate, and maximum growth rate. Results suggest that Symbiodinium species have different photokinetic and thermal optima, which may affect their growth-related nutritional physiology and allow them to modify their response to environmental changes.

  20. Influence of season, temperature, and photoperiod on growth of the land snail Helix aperta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benbellil-Tafoughalt, S.; Koene, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Growth strategies are often plastic and influenced by environmental conditions. Terrestrial gastropods are particularly affected by seasonal and climatic variables, and growth rate and size at maturity are key traits in their life history. Therefore, we investigated juvenile growth of Helix aperta

  1. Suboptimal care and maternal mortality among foreign-born women in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esscher, Annika; Binder-Finnema, Pauline; Bødker, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several European countries report differences in risk of maternal mortality between immigrants from low- and middle-income countries and host country women. The present study identified suboptimal factors related to care-seeking, accessibility, and quality of care for maternal deaths...... language and suboptimal interpreter system or usage. Inadequate care occurred more often among the foreign-born (p = 0.04), whereas delays in consultation/referral and miscommunication between health care providers where equally common between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: Suboptimal care factors, major...

  2. Cell cycle analysis of brain cells as a growth index in larval cod at different feeding conditions and temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael González-Quirós

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The percentage of cells dividing in a specific tissue of individual larvae can be estimated by analyzing DNA per cell by flow cytometry. An experimental test was carried out with cod (Gadus morhua larvae, with brain as the target tissue, to validate this technique as an appropriate growth index for larval fish. Standard length (SL, myotome height, and %S-phase (% of cells in the S-phase of the cell-division cycle variability were analyzed, with temperature (6 and 10°C, food level (high- and no-food and larval developmental stage (first feeding, pre-metamorphosis and post-metamorphosis as independent factors. Cod larvae grew faster (in SL and presented a higher %S-phase under high-food conditions. Larval SL increased with temperature in rearing and experimental tanks. However, there was a significant interaction between temperature and food in the %S-phase. There were no significant differences in the %S-phase between 6 and 10°C at high-food levels. We suggest that this result is a consequence of temperature-dependency of the duration of the cell cycle. In the absence of food, larvae at 10ºC had a lower %S-phase than larvae at 6°C, which may be related to increased metabolic costs with increasing temperature. Considering the effect of temperature, the mean % S-phase explained 74% of the variability in the estimated standard growth rate.

  3. Growth and lipid accumulation in three Chlorella strains from different regions in response to diurnal temperature fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weinan; Zou, Shanmei; He, Meilin; Fei, Cong; Luo, Wei; Zheng, Shiyan; Chen, Bo; Wang, Changhai

    2016-02-01

    It was economically feasible to screen strains adaptive to wide temperature fluctuation for outdoor cultivation without temperature control. In this research, three Chlorella strains from arctic glacier, desert soil and temperate native lake were isolated and identified. The growth, biochemical composition, lipid content and fatty acid composition of each strain cultured under the mode of diurnal temperature fluctuations were compared. All the three Chlorella strains showed desirable abilities of accumulating lipid under diurnal temperature fluctuations and their fatty acid profiles were suitable for biodiesel production, although the growth and biochemical composition were seemed to be region-specific. The highest lipid content was at 51.83±2.49% DW, 42.80±2.97% DW and 36.13±2.27% DW under different temperature fluctuation of 11 °C, 25 °C, 7 °C, respectively. The results indicated that the three Chlorella strains could be promising biodiesel feedstock for outdoor cultivation by the cultural mode of diurnal temperature fluctuations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of Genotype and Growth Temperature on the Contents of Tannin, Phytate and In Vitro Iron Availability of Sorghum Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gangcheng; Johnson, Stuart K.; Bornman, Janet F.; Bennett, Sarita J.; Singh, Vijaya; Simic, Azra; Fang, Zhongxiang

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been predicted that the global temperature will rise in the future, which means crops including sorghum will likely be grown under higher temperatures, and consequently may affect the nutritional properties. Methods The effects of two growth temperatures (OT, day/night 32/21°C; HT 38/21°C) on tannin, phytate, mineral, and in vitro iron availability of raw and cooked grains (as porridge) of six sorghum genotypes were investigated. Results Tannin content significantly decreased across all sorghum genotypes under high growth temperature (P ≤0.05), while the phytate and mineral contents maintained the same level, increased or decreased significantly, depending on the genotype. The in vitro iron availability in most sorghum genotypes was also significantly reduced under high temperature, except for Ai4, which showed a pronounced increase (P ≤0.05). The cooking process significantly reduced tannin content in all sorghum genotypes (P ≤0.05), while the phytate content and in vitro iron availability were not significantly affected. Conclusions This research provides some new information on sorghum grain nutritional properties when grown under predicted future higher temperatures, which could be important for humans where sorghum grains are consumed as staple food. PMID:26859483

  5. Tolerance to high soil temperature in foxtail millet (Setaria italica L.) is related to shoot and root growth and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aidoo, Moses Kwame; Bdolach, Eyal; Fait, Aaron; Lazarovitch, Naftali; Rachmilevitch, Shimon

    2016-09-01

    Roots play important roles in regulating whole-plant carbon and water relations in response to extreme soil temperature. Three foxtail millet (Setaria italica L.) lines (448-Ames 21521, 463-P1391643 and 523-P1219619) were subjected to two different soil temperatures (28 and 38 °C). The gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, root morphology and central metabolism of leaves and roots were studied at the grain-filling stage. High soil temperature (38 °C) significantly influenced the shoot transpiration, stomatal conductance, photosynthesis, root growth and metabolism of all lines. The root length and area were significantly reduced in lines 448 and 463 in response to the stress, while only a small non-specific reduction was observed in line 523 in response to the treatment. The shift of root metabolites in response to high soil temperature was also genotype specific. In response to high soil temperature, glutamate, proline and pyroglutamate were reduced in line 448, and alanine, aspartate, glycine, pyroglutamate, serine, threonine and valine were accumulated in line 463. In the roots of line 523, serine, threonine, valine, isomaltose, maltose, raffinose, malate and itaconate were accumulated. Root tolerance to high soil temperature was evident in line 523, in its roots growth potential, lower photosynthesis and stomatal conductance rates, and effective utilization and assimilation of membrane carbon and nitrogen, coupled with the accumulation of protective metabolites. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  6. High-Temperature Slow Crack Growth of Silicon Carbide Determined by Constant-Stress-Rate and Constant-Stress Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung H.; Salem, J. A.; Nemeth, N. N.

    1998-01-01

    High-temperature slow-crack-growth behaviour of hot-pressed silicon carbide was determined using both constant-stress-rate ("dynamic fatigue") and constant-stress ("static fatigue") testing in flexure at 1300 C in air. Slow crack growth was found to be a governing mechanism associated with failure of the material. Four estimation methods such as the individual data, the Weibull median, the arithmetic mean and the median deviation methods were used to determine the slow crack growth parameters. The four estimation methods were in good agreement for the constant-stress-rate testing with a small variation in the slow-crack-growth parameter, n, ranging from 28 to 36. By contrast, the variation in n between the four estimation methods was significant in the constant-stress testing with a somewhat wide range of n= 16 to 32.

  7. Effects of temperature and salinity on survival, growth and DNA methylation of juvenile Pacific abalone, Haliotis discus hannai Ino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ning; Liu, Xiao; Li, Junyuan; Mu, Wendan; Lian, Jianwu; Xue, Yanjie; Li, Qi

    2017-09-01

    Temperature and salinity are two of the most potent abiotic factors influencing marine mollusks. In this study, we investigated the individual and combined effects of temperature and salinity on the survival and growth of juvenile Pacific abalone, Haliotis discus hannai Ino, and also examined the DNA methylation alteration that may underpin the phenotypic variation of abalone exposed to different rearing conditions. The single-factor data showed that the suitable ranges of temperature and salinity were 16-28°C at a constant salinity of 32, and 24-40 at a constant temperature of 20°C, respectively. The two-factor data indicated that both survival and growth were significantly affected by temperature, salinity and their interaction. The optimal temperature-salinity combination for juveniles was 23-25°C and 30-36. To explore environment-induced DNA methylation alteration, the methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) technique was used to analyze the genomic methylation profiles of abalone reared in optimal and adverse conditions. Neither temperature nor salinity induced evident changes in the global methylation level, but 67 and 63 differentially methylated loci were identified in temperature and salinity treatments, respectively. The between-group eigen analysis also showed that both temperature and salinity could induce epigenetic differentiation in H. discus hannai Ino. The results of our study provide optimal rearing conditions for juvenile H. discus hannai Ino, and represent the first step toward revealing the epigenetic regulatory mechanism of abalone in response to thermal and salt stresses.

  8. Salinity and temperature effects on the growth and chlorophyll-a content of some planktonic aigae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Cristina Siqueira Sigaud

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of salinity (0-40 %o and temperature (11-36ºC, at 5ºC intervals variations on maximum growth rate (div d-1, maximum yield (logio cell number and chlorophyll-α content (pg cell-1 of four planktonic algae was examined under laboratory conditions. Phaeodactylum tricornutum grew over the entire range of experimental salinities, at 11-26 ºC. The highest maximum growth rates ( 1.6 div d-1 occurred between 9-30 %o and 16-26 ºC. Optimum salinity range for maximum yield (7.0 was found at 9-35 %c, under 16 ºC. Tetraselmis gracilis reproduced from 4 to 40 %o at 11-31 ºC, with the highest values of maximum growth rate ( 1.6 div d-1 and maximum yield (6.1 occurring at salinities between 14-40 %o at 11-21 ºC and 11-16 ºC, respectively. Minutocellus polymorphic and Chaetoceros sp grew between 9-40 %o and 11-31 ºC. Their highest maximum growth rates (2.1 and 2.6 div d-1, respectively were found at 31ºC, between 20-35 %o and 20-40 %o, respectively. The highest maximum yields for AT. polymorphic (7.2 were recorded between 16-21 ºC at 20-40 %o and for Chaetoceros sp (6.8, between 25-40 %o at 16-31ºC. Chlorophyll-a content per cell was not conspicuously associated to temperature and salinity for the four species. At low salinity extremes, when cell division was inhibited, an increase in the amount of chlorophyll-a per cell was detected.Estudou-se o efeito de variações de salinidade (0-40 %o e temperatura (11-36ºC, em intervalos de 5ºC sobre a taxa máxima de crescimento (div d-1, o rendimento máximo (logio nº cel ml"¹ e o conteúdo de clorofíla-a (pg cel-1 de quatro espécies de algas planctónicas, sob condições de laboratório. Phaeodactylum tricornutum cresceu em toda a amplitude de salinidade experimental e entre 11-26ºC. As mais altas taxas de crescimento (1.6 div d-1 foram obtidas entre 9-30 %o e 16-26ºC. O ótimo de salinidade para o rendimento máximo (7.0 foi observado entre 9- 35%o, à 16ºC. Tetraselmis gracilis se

  9. Patterns of marijuana and tobacco use associated with suboptimal self-rated health among US adult ever users of marijuana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Tsai

    2017-06-01

    In conclusion, among adult ever users of marijuana, current tobacco use is high and strongly associated with suboptimal SRH; regular marijuana smoking with or without current tobacco use is significantly associated with suboptimal SRH.

  10. From metabolome to phenotype: GC-MS metabolomics of developing mutant barley seeds reveals effects of growth, temperature and genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakimov, Bekzod; Rasmussen, Morten Arendt; Kannangara, Rubini Maya; Jespersen, Birthe Møller; Munck, Lars; Engelsen, Søren Balling

    2017-08-15

    The development of crop varieties tolerant to growth temperature fluctuations and improved nutritional value is crucial due to climate change and global population growth. This study investigated the metabolite patterns of developing barley seed as a function of genotype and growth temperature for ideal vegetable protein production and for augmented β-glucan production. Seeds from three barley lines (Bomi, lys3.a and lys5.f) were sampled eight times during grain filling and analysed for metabolites using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The lys3.a mutation disrupts a regulator gene, causing an increase in proteins rich in the essential amino acid lysine, while lys5.f carries a mutation in an ADP-glucose transporter gene leading to a significant increase in production of mixed-linkage β-glucan at the expense of α-glucan. Unique metabolic patterns associated with the tricarboxylic acid cycle, shikimate-phenylpropanoid pathway, mevalonate, lipid and carbohydrate metabolism were observed for the barley mutants, whereas growth temperature primarily affected shikimate-phenylpropanoid and lipid metabolism. The study applied recently developed GC-MS metabolomics methods and demonstrated their successful application to link genetic and environmental factors with the seed phenotype of unique and agro-economically important barley models for optimal vegetable protein and dietary fibre production.

  11. In situ high-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy study of bilayer graphene growth on 6H-SiC(0001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Yuya [Dept. Materials Science and Engineering, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Petrova, V.; Petrov, I. [Frederick-Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Kodambaka, S., E-mail: kodambaka@ucla.edu [Dept. Materials Science and Engineering, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Using in situ high-temperature (1395 K), ultra-high vacuum, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we investigated the growth of bilayer graphene on 6H-SiC(0001). From the STM images, we measured areal coverages of SiC and graphene as a function of annealing time and found that graphene grows at the expense of SiC. Graphene domains were observed to grow, at comparable rates, at (I) graphene-free SiC step edges, (II) graphene-SiC interfaces, and (III) the existing graphene domain edges. Based upon our results, we suggest that the rate-limiting step controlling bilayer graphene growth is the desorption of Si from the substrate. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Use of scanning tunneling microscopy at temperatures as high as 1395 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct observation of graphene formation on SiC surfaces at the growth temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of atomic-scale pathways for bilayer graphene growth.

  12. In vitro effect of substrate, temperature and photoperiod on Phakopsora pachyrhizi urediniospore germination and germ tube growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Maria Casa Blum

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In vitro experiments were conducted to assess the effects of substrate, temperature and time of exposure to temperature and photoperiod on P. pachyrhizi uredospore germination and germ tube growth. The following substrates were tested: water-agar and soybean leaf extract-agar at different leaf concentrations (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 g of leaves and 15g agar/L water, temperatures (10, 15, 20, 25, 30, and 35oC and times of exposure (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 hours to temperature and 12 different photoperiods. The highest germination and germ tube length was found for the soybean leaf extract agar. Maximum P. pachyrhizi uredospore germination was obtained at 21.8 and 22.3°C, and maximum germ tube growth at 21.4 and 22.1°C. The maximum uredospore germination was found at 6.4 hours exposure, while the maximum germ tube length was obtained at 7.7 h exposure. Regarding photoperiod, the maximum spore germination and the maximum uredospore germ tube length were found in the dark. Neither spore germination nor uredospore germ tube growth was completely inhibited by the exposure to continuous light.

  13. Effect of water activity and temperature on germination and growth of Penicillium digitatum, P. italicum and Geotrichum candidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, P; Usall, J; Teixidó, N; Viñas, I

    2003-01-01

    This study compares the effect of temperature (4-37 degrees C) and water activity (aw: 0.99-0.87) and their interactions on the germination rates, lag times prior to germination and mycelial growth 'in vitro' of Penicillium digitatum, P. italicum and Geotrichum candidum, the main postharvest pathogens affecting citrus fruits. Germination and growth were markedly influenced by temperature and aw. Generally, lag times were longer and germination and growth rates were slower when conditions of temperature and aw were far from optimum. All the studied species were able to germinate over a range of 4-30 degrees C at 0.995 aw, although in non-optimal conditions P. digitatum only reached 40-60% of germinated conidia. At low temperatures, P. italicum germinated and grew faster than P. digitatum and G. candidum, particularly at 0.95 aw. Penicillium italicum was also able to germinate and grow in the driest studied conditions (0.87 aw), while G. candidum did not germinate under 0.95 aw. Knowledge of the ecological requirements of these fungi is important in order to understand their behaviour in natural situations and to predict fungal spoilage on citrus fruits.

  14. Growth and Demography of the Solitary Scleractinian Coral Leptopsammia pruvoti along a Sea Surface Temperature Gradient in the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroselli, Erik; Zaccanti, Francesco; Mattioli, Guido; Falini, Giuseppe; Levy, Oren; Dubinsky, Zvy; Goffredo, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    The demographic traits of the solitary azooxanthellate scleractinian Leptopsammia pruvoti were determined in six populations on a sea surface temperature (SST) gradient along the western Italian coasts. This is the first investigation of the growth and demography characteristics of an azooxanthellate scleractinian along a natural SST gradient. Growth rate was homogeneous across all populations, which spanned 7 degrees of latitude. Population age structures differed between populations, but none of the considered demographic parameters correlated with SST, indicating possible effects of local environmental conditions. Compared to another Mediterranean solitary scleractinian, Balanophyllia europaea, zooxanthellate and whose growth, demography and calcification have been studied in the same sites, L. pruvoti seems more tolerant to temperature increase. The higher tolerance of L. pruvoti, relative to B. europaea, may rely on the absence of symbionts, and thus the lack of an inhibition of host physiological processes by the heat-stressed zooxanthellae. However, the comparison between the two species must be taken cautiously, due to the likely temperature differences between the two sampling depths. Increasing research effort on determining the effects of temperature on the poorly studied azooxanthellate scleractinians may shed light on the possible species assemblage shifts that are likely to occur during the current century as a consequence of global climatic change. PMID:22675495

  15. Creep Crack Growth Behavior of Alloys 617 and 800H in Air and Impure Helium Environments at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grierson, D. S.; Cao, G.; Brooks, P.; Pezzi, P.; Glaudell, A.; Kuettel, D.; Fischer, G.; Allen, T.; Sridharan, K.; Crone, W. C.

    2017-03-01

    The environmental degradation of intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) materials in impure helium has been identified as an area with major ramifications on the design of very high-temperature reactors (VHTR). It has been reported that in some helium environments, non-ductile failure is a significant failure mode for Alloy 617 with long-term elevated-temperature service. Non-ductile failure of intermediate exchangers can result in catastrophic consequences; unfortunately, the knowledge of creep crack initiation and creep crack growth (CCG) in candidate alloys is limited. Current codes and code cases for the candidate alloys do not provide specific guidelines for effects of impure helium on the high-temperature behavior. The work reported here explores creep crack growth characterization of Alloy 617 and Alloy 800H at elevated temperatures in air and in impure helium environments, providing information on the reliability of these alloys in VHTR for long-term service. Alloy 617 was found to exhibit superior CCG resistance compared to Alloy 800H. For Alloy 617 tested at 973 K (700 °C), a notable increase in the resistance to crack growth was measured in air compared to that measured in the helium environment; CCG results for Alloy 800H suggest that air and helium environments produce similar behavior. Testing of grain boundary-engineered (GBE) Alloy 617 samples revealed that, although the technique produces superior mechanical properties in many respects, the GBE samples exhibited inferior resistance to creep crack growth compared to the other Alloy 617 samples tested under similar conditions. Grain size is noted as a confounding factor in creep crack growth resistance.

  16. A new method to determine the energy saving night temperature for vegetative growth of Phalaenopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollet, B.; Kromwijk, J.A.M.; Vanhaecke, L.; Dambre, P.; Labeke, M.C.; Marcelis, L.F.M.; Steppe, K.

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the energy saving night temperature (i.e. a relatively cool night temperature without affecting photosynthetic activity and physiology) and a better understanding of low night temperature effects on the photosynthetic physiology of Phalaenopsis would improve their production in terms of

  17. Effects of temperature and thiiourea on the growth rate of cadmium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Result shows that the film thickness decreases with increasing substrate temperature; hence an increase in the substrate temperature produces a decrease in deposition rate, whereas the bath temperature increases the film thickness. It was observed that annealing led to improvement in the properties of the films.

  18. Influence of storage temperature on growth of Penicillium polonicum and Penicillium glabrum and potential for deterioration of frozen chicken nuggets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccomori, Fernanda; Wigmann, Évelin Francine; Bernardi, Angélica Olivier; Alcano-González, María de Jesús; Copetti, Marina Venturini

    2015-05-04

    The practice of freezing food is one of the main processes used by the industry to prolong the shelf life of foods. Its use has expanded in recent years due to the increased consumption of convenience products, many of which are sold in frozen form. The temperature at which these foods are maintained during marketing in supermarkets or stored in the consumer's home is critical to ensure microbiological stability of products. Temperature abuse can allow microbial growth, especially growth of filamentous psychrophilic fungi. Besides economic losses in the industrial sector due to the return of products and loss of confidence by consumers, the development of fungi in foods is a public health problem due to the possibility of mycotoxin production. The aim of this study was to assess the growth at temperatures of 5, 0, -5 and -18°C for two species of fungi involved in the deterioration of frozen chicken nuggets, Penicillium polonicum (33/12 NGT) and Penicillium glabrum (29/12 NGT), inoculated both in culture medium and in the food. The results demonstrated that P. polonicum was able to form microcolonies on potato dextrose agar plates at 0°C and form visible colonies on the surface of the frozen chicken nuggets kept at -5°C for 120 days, regardless of brand. For P. glabrum the limiting growth temperature was 5°C in the culture medium and 0°C on frozen chicken nuggets, regardless of the brand analyzed. Thus, it is essential to adhere to the storage temperatures recommended to ensure the stability and safety of this food product. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Climate change and agroecosystems: the effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 and temperature on crop growth, development, and yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streck Nereu Augusto

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The amount of carbon dioxide (CO2 of the Earths atmosphere is increasing, which has the potential of increasing greenhouse effect and air temperature in the future. Plants respond to environment CO2 and temperature. Therefore, climate change may affect agriculture. The purpose of this paper was to review the literature about the impact of a possible increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration and temperature on crop growth, development, and yield. Increasing CO2 concentration increases crop yield once the substrate for photosynthesis and the gradient of CO2 concentration between atmosphere and leaf increase. C3 plants will benefit more than C4 plants at elevated CO2. However, if global warming will take place, an increase in temperature may offset the benefits of increasing CO2 on crop yield.

  20. Growth and characterization of III-N ternary thin films by plasma assisted atomic layer epitaxy at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nepal, Neeraj; Anderson, Virginia R.; Hite, Jennifer K.; Eddy, Charles R.

    2015-08-31

    We report the growth and characterization of III-nitride ternary thin films (Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N, In{sub x}Al{sub 1−x}N and In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N) at ≤ 500 °C by plasma assisted atomic layer epitaxy (PA-ALE) over a wide stoichiometric range including the range where phase separation has been an issue for films grown by molecular beam epitaxy and metal organic chemical vapor deposition. The composition of these ternaries was intentionally varied through alterations in the cycle ratios of the III-nitride binary layers (AlN, GaN, and InN). By this digital alloy growth method, we are able to grow III-nitride ternaries by PA-ALE over nearly the entire stoichiometry range including in the spinodal decomposition region (x = 15–85%). These early efforts suggest great promise of PA-ALE at low temperatures for addressing miscibility gap challenges encountered with conventional growth methods and realizing high performance optoelectronic and electronic devices involving ternary/binary heterojunctions, which are not currently possible. - Highlights: • III-N ternaries grown at ≤ 500 °C by plasma assisted atomic layer epitaxy • Growth of InGaN and AlInN in the spinodal decomposition region (15–85%) • Epitaxial, smooth and uniform III-N film growth at low temperatures.

  1. Relationship Between Unusual High-Temperature Fatigue Crack Growth Threshold Behavior in Superalloys and Sudden Failure Mode Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telesman, Jack; Smith, Timothy M.; Gabb, Timothy P.; Ring, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    An investigation of high temperature cyclic fatigue crack growth (FCG) threshold behavior of two advanced nickel disk alloys was conducted. The focus of the study was the unusual crossover effect in the near-threshold region of these type of alloys where conditions which produce higher crack growth rates in the Paris regime, produce higher resistance to crack growth in the near threshold regime. It was shown that this crossover effect is associated with a sudden change in the fatigue failure mode from a predominant transgranular mode in the Paris regime to fully intergranular mode in the threshold fatigue crack growth region. This type of a sudden change in the fracture mechanisms has not been previously reported and is surprising considering that intergranular failure is typically associated with faster crack growth rates and not the slow FCG rates of the near-threshold regime. By characterizing this behavior as a function of test temperature, environment and cyclic frequency, it was determined that both the crossover effect and the onset of intergranular failure are caused by environmentally driven mechanisms which have not as yet been fully identified. A plausible explanation for the observed behavior is proposed.

  2. Water activity and temperature effects on growth and mycotoxin production by Alternaria alternata strains isolated from Malbec wine grapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendes, L P; Zachetti, V G L; Pereyra, A; Morata de Ambrosini, V I; Ramirez, M L

    2017-02-01

    To study the effects of water activity (a W ; 0·99, 0·98, 0·97, 0·96 and 0·95), temperature (15, 25 and 30°C), incubation time (7-28 days), and their interactions on mycelial growth and alternariol (AOH), alternariol monomethyl ether (AME) and tenuazonic acid (TA) mycotoxin production on a synthetic nutrient (SN) media similar to grape composition by three strains of Alternaria alternata isolated from wine grapes from Argentina. Interacting conditions of a W , temperature and time of incubation were used to examine growth and mycotoxin production. All strains were able to grow at 0·95 a W , but maximum growth rates were obtained at 0·99 a W and 25°C. Maximum levels of AOH, AME and TA were obtained at 0·99 a W and 25°C, but high amounts of TA were also obtained at 0·96 a W and 15 or 30°C. Production of AOH and AME was favoured over TA at 25°C. TA levels were more sustained than AOH and AME. The optimum and marginal conditions for growth and mycotoxin production by A. alternata on a SN media similar to grape composition were in agreement, but certain stressful conditions for growth evaluated also promote mycotoxin production. Temperature and a W conditions that allows growth and mycotoxin production are those normally found during wine grape ripeness in the field. Therefore, efforts should be made to prevent Alternaria presence and mycotoxin production in wine grapes. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Effect of Growth Temperature and Mn Incorporation on GaN:Mn Thin Films Grown by Plasma-Assisted MOCVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Mulyanti

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the growth of GaN:Mn thin films by plasma-assisted metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (PAMOCVD method is reported. The method used in this study, utilizes a microwave cavity as a cracking cell to produce nitrogen radicals, which in turn reduce the growth temperature. Trimethylgallium (TMGa, nitrogen (N2 and cyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (CpMnT were used as a source of Ga, N and Mn, respectively, while hydrogen gas was used as a carrier gas for both TMGa and CpMnT. The effect of growth temperature and Mn incorporation on structural properties and surface morphology of GaN:Mn films are presented. The growth of GaN:Mn thin films were conducted at varied growth temperature in range of 625 oC to 700 oC and the Mn/Ga molar fraction in the range of 0.2 to 0.5. Energy dispersive of X-ray (EDX and X-ray diffraction (XRD methods were used to analyze atomic composition and crystal structure of the grown films, respectively. The surface morphology was then characterized using both atomic force microscopy (AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM images. A systematic XRD analysis reveal that maximum Mn incorporation that still produces single phase GaN:Mn (0002 is 6.4 % and 3.2 % for the film grown at 650 oC and 700 oC, respectively. The lattice constant and full width at half maximum (FWHM of the single phase films depend on the Mn concentration. The decrease in lattice constant accompanied by the increase in FWHM is due to incorporation of substitutional Mn on the Ga sub-lattice. The maximum values of doped Mn atoms incorporated in the wurtzite structure of GaN:Mn as substitutional atoms on Ga sub-lattice are 2.0 % and 2.5 % at 650 oC and 700 oC, respectively. AFM and SEM images show that the film grown at lower growth temperature and Mn concentration has a better surface than that of film grown at higher growth temperature and Mn concentration.

  4. High temperature grain growth and oxidation of Fe-29Ni-17Co (Kovar{trademark}) alloy leads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, J.J.; Greulich, F.A.; Beavis, L.C.

    1993-12-31

    One important application for the Fe-29Ni-17Co (Kovar{trademark}) alloy in wire form is in brazed feed through assemblies which are integral parts of vacuum electronic devices. Since Cu metal brazes are performed at process temperatures of about 1100{degrees}C, there is opportunity for significant grain growth to occur during the brazing operation. Additional high temperature exposure includes decarburization of the Fe-29Ni-17Co alloy wire in wet hydrogen for 30 min. at 1000{degrees}C prior to the Cu brazing operation. Two approaches have been used to characterize grain growth in two lots of Fe-29Ni-17Co alloy: (1) a once-through processing study to study the effect of one-time-only device thermal processing on the resulting grain size, and (2) an isothermal grain growth study involving various times at 800--1100{degrees}C. The results of the once-through processing study indicate that acceptable grain sizes are obtained from both cold worked and mill-annealed wire lots following Cu brazing. The isothermal grain growth study indicates that the linear intercept distance for Fe-29Ni-17Co can be described with a power law function of time, and that thermal exposure must be controlled at temperatures in excess of 900{degrees}C in order to avoid excessive grain growth. A second study has characterized the oxidation kinetics of Fe-29Ni-17Co alloy wire in air at temperatures ranging from 550--700{degrees}C. This study indicates the parabolic growth law applies for this material, and between 550 and 700{degrees}C, oxidation in this alloy occurs at an activation energy of 27.9 kcal/mole. Other oxidation studies at higher temperatures ({ge}750{degrees}C) indicate an activation energy of 52.2 kcal/mole for oxidation of Fe-29Ni-17Co alloy at temperatures greater than 790{degrees}C. Quantitative point analyses of the oxide scale formed at 600{degrees}C suggest that a significant fraction of the scale is close to the stoichiometry of the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-type oxide.

  5. Influence of temperature and water activity on growth and patulin production by Byssochlamys nivea in apple juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, J O; Beuchat, L R

    1984-01-01

    The influence of temperature and water activity (aw) on growth and patulin production by Byssochlamys nivea in apple syrups was determined over a 44-day incubation period. The minimum aw at which the mold was capable of growing was 0.915 and 0.886 at 21 and 30 degrees C, respectively. Growth at 37 degrees C was observed at 0.871 aw. Minimum aw values for patulin production were 0.978, 0.968, and 0.959 at 21, 30 and 37 degrees C, respectively. PMID:6696417

  6. Population growth and development of the psocid Liposcelis rufa (Psocoptera: Liposcelididae) at constant temperatures and relative humidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, S G; Opit, G P; Giles, K L

    2010-10-01

    We investigated the effects of eight temperatures (22.5, 25.0, 27.5, 30.0, 32.5, 35.0, 37.5, and 40.0 degrees C) and four relative humidities (43, 55, 63, and 75%) on population growth and development of the psocid Liposcelis rufa Broadhead (Psocoptera: Liposcelididae). L. rufa did not survive at 43% RH, at all temperatures tested; at 55% RH, at the highest four temperatures; and at 63% RH and 40.0 degrees C. The greatest population growth was recorded at 35.0 degrees C and 75% RH (73-fold growth). At 40.0 degrees C, L. rufa populations declined or barely grew. L. rufa males have two to four nymphal instars, and the percentages of males with two, three, and four instars were 31, 54, and 15%, respectively. Female L. rufa have two to five instars, and the percentages of females with two, three, four, and five instars were 2, 44, 42, and 12%, respectively. The life cycle was shorter for males than females. We developed temperature-dependent developmental equations for male and female eggs, individual nymphal, combined nymphal, and combined immature stages. The ability of L. rufa to reproduce at a relative humidity of 55% and temperatures of 22.5-30.0 degrees C and at relative humidities of 63-75% and temperatures of 22.5-37.5 degrees C, in addition to being able to survive at 40.0 degrees C, suggests that this species would be expected to have a broader distribution than other Liposcelis species. These data provide a better understanding of L. rufa population dynamics and can be used to help develop effective management strategies for this psocid.

  7. Ocean acidification alleviates low-temperature effects on growth and photosynthesis of the red alga Neosiphonia harveyi (Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olischläger, Mark; Wiencke, Christian

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to examine interactive effects between ocean acidification and temperature on the photosynthetic and growth performance of Neosiphonia harveyi. N. harveyi was cultivated at 10 and 17.5 °C at present (~380 µatm), expected future (~800 µatm), and high (~1500 µatm) pCO2. Chlorophyll a fluorescence, net photosynthesis, and growth were measured. The state of the carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) was examined by pH-drift experiments (with algae cultivated at 10 °C only) using ethoxyzolamide, an inhibitor of external and internal carbonic anhydrases (exCA and intCA, respectively). Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of acetazolamide (an inhibitor of exCA) and Tris (an inhibitor of the acidification of the diffusive boundary layer) on net photosynthesis was measured at both temperatures. Temperature affected photosynthesis (in terms of photosynthetic efficiency, light saturation point, and net photosynthesis) and growth at present pCO2, but these effects decreased with increasing pCO2. The relevance of the CCM decreased at 10 °C. A pCO2 effect on the CCM could only be shown if intCA and exCA were inhibited. The experiments demonstrate for the first time interactions between ocean acidification and temperature on the performance of a non-calcifying macroalga and show that the effects of low temperature on photosynthesis can be alleviated by increasing pCO2. The findings indicate that the carbon acquisition mediated by exCA and acidification of the diffusive boundary layer decrease at low temperatures but are not affected by the cultivation level of pCO2, whereas the activity of intCA is affected by pCO2. Ecologically, the findings suggest that ocean acidification might affect the biogeographical distribution of N. harveyi.

  8. Implications of Changing Temperatures on the Growth, Fecundity and Survival of Intermediate Host Snails of Schistosomiasis: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinda, Chester; Chimbari, Moses; Mukaratirwa, Samson

    2017-01-13

    Climate change has been predicted to increase the global mean temperature and to alter the ecological interactions among organisms. These changes may play critical roles in influencing the life history traits of the intermediate hosts (IHs). This review focused on studies and disease models that evaluate the potential effect of temperature rise on the ecology of IH snails and the development of parasites within them. The main focus was on IH snails of schistosome parasites that cause schistosomiasis in humans. A literature search was conducted on Google Scholar, EBSCOhost and PubMed databases using predefined medical subject heading terms, Boolean operators and truncation symbols in combinations with direct key words. The final synthesis included nineteen published articles. The studies reviewed indicated that temperature rise may alter the distribution, optimal conditions for breeding, growth and survival of IH snails which may eventually increase the spread and/or transmission of schistosomiasis. The literature also confirmed that the life history traits of IH snails and their interaction with the schistosome parasites are affected by temperature and hence a change in climate may have profound outcomes on the population size of snails, parasite density and disease epidemiology. We concluded that understanding the impact of temperature on the growth, fecundity and survival of IH snails may broaden the knowledge on the possible effects of climate change and hence inform schistosomiasis control programmes.

  9. Implications of Changing Temperatures on the Growth, Fecundity and Survival of Intermediate Host Snails of Schistosomiasis: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chester Kalinda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Climate change has been predicted to increase the global mean temperature and to alter the ecological interactions among organisms. These changes may play critical roles in influencing the life history traits of the intermediate hosts (IHs. This review focused on studies and disease models that evaluate the potential effect of temperature rise on the ecology of IH snails and the development of parasites within them. The main focus was on IH snails of schistosome parasites that cause schistosomiasis in humans. A literature search was conducted on Google Scholar, EBSCOhost and PubMed databases using predefined medical subject heading terms, Boolean operators and truncation symbols in combinations with direct key words. The final synthesis included nineteen published articles. The studies reviewed indicated that temperature rise may alter the distribution, optimal conditions for breeding, growth and survival of IH snails which may eventually increase the spread and/or transmission of schistosomiasis. The literature also confirmed that the life history traits of IH snails and their interaction with the schistosome parasites are affected by temperature and hence a change in climate may have profound outcomes on the population size of snails, parasite density and disease epidemiology. We concluded that understanding the impact of temperature on the growth, fecundity and survival of IH snails may broaden the knowledge on the possible effects of climate change and hence inform schistosomiasis control programmes.

  10. The effect of Diel temperature and light cycles on the growth of nannochloropsis oculata in a photobioreactor matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburic, Bojan; Guruprasad, Supriya; Radford, Dale T; Szabó, Milán; Lilley, Ross McC; Larkum, Anthony W D; Franklin, Jim B; Kramer, David M; Blackburn, Susan I; Raven, John A; Schliep, Martin; Ralph, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    A matrix of photobioreactors integrated with metabolic sensors was used to examine the combined impact of light and temperature variations on the growth and physiology of the biofuel candidate microalgal species Nannochloropsis oculata. The experiments were performed with algal cultures maintained at a constant 20 °C versus a 15 °C to 25 °C diel temperature cycle, where light intensity also followed a diel cycle with a maximum irradiance of 1920 µmol photons m(-2) s(-1). No differences in algal growth (Chlorophyll a) were found between the two environmental regimes; however, the metabolic processes responded differently throughout the day to the change in environmental conditions. The variable temperature treatment resulted in greater damage to photosystem II due to the combined effect of strong light and high temperature. Cellular functions responded differently to conditions before midday as opposed to the afternoon, leading to strong hysteresis in dissolved oxygen concentration, quantum yield of photosystem II and net photosynthesis. Overnight metabolism performed differently, probably as a result of the temperature impact on respiration. Our photobioreactor matrix has produced novel insights into the physiological response of Nannochloropsis oculata to simulated environmental conditions. This information can be used to predict the effectiveness of deploying Nannochloropsis oculata in similar field conditions for commercial biofuel production.

  11. The effect of Diel temperature and light cycles on the growth of nannochloropsis oculata in a photobioreactor matrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Tamburic

    Full Text Available A matrix of photobioreactors integrated with metabolic sensors was used to examine the combined impact of light and temperature variations on the growth and physiology of the biofuel candidate microalgal species Nannochloropsis oculata. The experiments were performed with algal cultures maintained at a constant 20 °C versus a 15 °C to 25 °C diel temperature cycle, where light intensity also followed a diel cycle with a maximum irradiance of 1920 µmol photons m(-2 s(-1. No differences in algal growth (Chlorophyll a were found between the two environmental regimes; however, the metabolic processes responded differently throughout the day to the change in environmental conditions. The variable temperature treatment resulted in greater damage to photosystem II due to the combined effect of strong light and high temperature. Cellular functions responded differently to conditions before midday as opposed to the afternoon, leading to strong hysteresis in dissolved oxygen concentration, quantum yield of photosystem II and net photosynthesis. Overnight metabolism performed differently, probably as a result of the temperature impact on respiration. Our photobioreactor matrix has produced novel insights into the physiological response of Nannochloropsis oculata to simulated environmental conditions. This information can be used to predict the effectiveness of deploying Nannochloropsis oculata in similar field conditions for commercial biofuel production.

  12. Influence of culture media, pH and temperature on growth and bacteriocin production of bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, En; Fan, Lihua; Yan, Jinping; Jiang, Yueming; Doucette, Craig; Fillmore, Sherry; Walker, Bradley

    2018-01-24

    There has been continued interest in bacteriocins research from an applied perspective as bacteriocins have potential to be used as natural preservative. Four bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains of Lactobacillus curvatus (Arla-10), Enterococcus faecium (JFR-1), Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei (JFR-5) and Streptococcus thermophilus (TSB-8) were previously isolated and identified in our lab. The objective of this study was to determine the optimal growth conditions for both LAB growth and bacteriocins production. In this study, various growth conditions including culture media (MRS and BHI), initial pH of culture media (4.5, 5.5, 6.2, 7.4 and 8.5), and incubation temperatures (20, 37 and 44 °C) were investigated for LAB growth measured as optical density (OD), bacteriocin activity determined as arbitrary unit and viability of LAB expressed as log CFU ml-1. Growth curves of the bacteriocinogenic LAB were generated using a Bioscreen C. Our results indicated that Arla-10, JFR-1, and JFR-5 strains grew well on both MRS and BHI media at growth temperature tested whereas TSB-8 strain, unable to grow at 20 °C. LAB growth was significantly affected by the initial pH of culture media (p Bacteriocin activity was significantly different in MRS versus BHI (p bacteriocins was determined in MRS broth, pH 6.2 at 37 °C. This study provides useful information on potential application of bacteriocinogenic LAB in food fermentation processes.

  13. Effect of Using Suboptimal Alignments in Template-Based Protein Structure Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Kihara, Daisuke

    2010-01-01

    Computational protein structure prediction remains a challenging task in protein bioinformatics. In the recent years, the importance of template-based structure prediction is increasing due to the growing number of protein structures solved by the structural genomics projects. To capitalize the significant efforts and investments paid on the structural genomics projects, it is urgent to establish effective ways to use the solved structures as templates by developing methods for exploiting remotely related proteins that cannot be simply identified by homology. In this work, we examine the effect of employing suboptimal alignments in template-based protein structure prediction. We showed that suboptimal alignments are often more accurate than the optimal one, and such accurate suboptimal alignments can occur even at a very low rank of the alignment score. Suboptimal alignments contain a significant number of correct amino acid residue contacts. Moreover, suboptimal alignments can improve template-based models when used as input to Modeller. Finally, we employ suboptimal alignments for handling a contact potential in a probabilistic way in a threading program, SUPRB. The probabilistic contacts strategy outperforms the partly thawed approach which only uses the optimal alignment in defining residue contacts and also the reranking strategy, which uses the contact potential in reranking alignments. The comparison with existing methods in the template-recognition test shows that SUPRB is very competitive and outperform existing methods. PMID:21058297

  14. Isolation and mycelial growth of Diehliomyces microsporus: effect of culture medium and incubation temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Soares do Nascimento

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The false truffle is one of the main problems in the production of the Agaricus brasiliensis in Brazil and the control of this fungal competitor has been rather difficult due to difficulties in the isolation and cultivation of this pathogen. This experiment was conducted in three stages, the first consisting of the isolation of Diehliomyces microsporus starting from portions of the fruiting body and through the ascospores suspension; second, D. microsporus cultivated in vitro at 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35ºC in six different culture media (CSDA, OCDA, PCDA, ODA, PDA, CDA; third, D. microsporus was inoculated on sterilized compost for formation of the fruiting body. The colony formation from tissue of D. microsporus starting from portions of fruiting body was more efficient than germination of the ascospores. Compost medium (CDA allowed a larger diameter of the D. microsporus colony, followed by the medium made up of compost and potato mixture, favoring a denser composition. The largest mycelial growth speed of D. microsporus occurred when the culture was incubated at 28 and 30ºC. Incubation temperatures lower than 15ºC or above 35ºC inhibited the mycelial growth of D. microsporus completely. The fruiting bodies were obtained easily in sterilized compost and later inoculated along with mycelial competitor.A falsa trufa está sendo um dos principais problemas na produção do Agaricus brasiliensis cultivado no Brasil e o controle deste fungo competidor tem sido difícil, devido às dificuldades encontradas no isolamento e cultivo do patógeno. Este experimento foi conduzido em três etapas, sendo a primeira constituída pelo isolamento de Diehliomyces microsporus a partir de porções do ascostroma e através da suspensão de ascósporos; a segunda, o cultivo in vitro de D. microsporus nas temperaturas de 15, 20, 25, 30 e 35ºC e em seis meios de cultura (CTDA, ACDA, BCDA, ADA, BDA e CDA e a terceira pela inoculação de D. microsporus no composto

  15. Food Legumes and Rising Temperatures: Effects, Adaptive Functional Mechanisms Specific to Reproductive Growth Stage and Strategies to Improve Heat Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumari Sita

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ambient temperatures are predicted to rise in the future owing to several reasons associated with global climate changes. These temperature increases can result in heat stress- a severe threat to crop production in most countries. Legumes are well-known for their impact on agricultural sustainability as well as their nutritional and health benefits. Heat stress imposes challenges for legume crops and has deleterious effects on the morphology, physiology, and reproductive growth of plants. High-temperature stress at the time of the reproductive stage is becoming a severe limitation for production of grain legumes as their cultivation expands to warmer environments and temperature variability increases due to climate change. The reproductive period is vital in the life cycle of all plants and is susceptible to high-temperature stress as various metabolic processes are adversely impacted during this phase, which reduces crop yield. Food legumes exposed to high-temperature stress during reproduction show flower abortion, pollen and ovule infertility, impaired fertilization, and reduced seed filling, leading to smaller seeds and poor yields. Through various breeding techniques, heat tolerance in major legumes can be enhanced to improve performance in the field. Omics approaches unravel different mechanisms underlying thermotolerance, which is imperative to understand the processes of molecular responses toward high-temperature stress.

  16. Low-temperature growth of thin Pb layers and the quantum size effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmicker, D; Hibma, T; Edwards, K.A.; Howes, P.B.; Macdonald, J.E.; James, M.A; Breeman, M; Barkema, G.T.

    1997-01-01

    It is argued that the growth morphology of ultrathin metal films should fluctuate as a function of film thickness due to the quantum size effect. To verify this, the specularly reflected intensity of x-rays, electrons and He atoms has been measured during the growth of a thin Pb layer on top of an

  17. Morphological analysis of leaf growth of maize : responses to temperature and light intensity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, H.J.; Tijani-Eniola, H.; Struik, P.C.

    2000-01-01

    To increase understanding of the mechanisms involved in leaf-area expansion in the Poaceae, effects of environmental factors on leaf growth of the non-tillering species maize (Zea mays L.) were analysed quantitatively. A growth chamber experiment was carried out with maize cv. Luna including

  18. Effect of second phase particles topology on the onset temperature of abnormal grain growth in Fe - 3%Si steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoyka, V.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The relations between regimes of dynamic annealing, state of secondary particles system and the onset temperature of abnormal grain growth are investigated. Two distinguish types of Fe-3%Si grain-oriented steels, after one and two stage cold rolling, were studied. The second phase particles remain unaffected in first type of steel during the heat treatment. Vice versa, the increased density of second phases was observed after annealing in the second type of the investigated materials. It is shown that start/onset of abnormal grain growth strongly depends on both volume fraction of second phase particles and annealing temperature. Texture and magnetic properties of the investigated samples are investigated within the current study.

  19. A dynamic growth model of vegetative soya bean plants: model structure and behaviour under varying root temperature and nitrogen concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, J. T.; Wilkerson, G. G.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Gold, H. J.

    1990-01-01

    A differential equation model of vegetative growth of the soya bean plant (Glycine max (L.) Merrill cv. Ransom') was developed to account for plant growth in a phytotron system under variation of root temperature and nitrogen concentration in nutrient solution. The model was tested by comparing model outputs with data from four different experiments. Model predictions agreed fairly well with measured plant performance over a wide range of root temperatures and over a range of nitrogen concentrations in nutrient solution between 0.5 and 10.0 mmol NO3- in the phytotron environment. Sensitivity analyses revealed that the model was most sensitive to changes in parameters relating to carbohydrate concentration in the plant and nitrogen uptake rate.

  20. Modeling of microbial growth and ammonia consumption at different temperatures in the production of a polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA biopolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Ocampo-López

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of microbial growth and ammonia consumption at different temperatures was developed in the production of a polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA biopolymer in Pseudomona fluorescens in the range of 25–35 °C. A logistic model was employed to predict accurately the microbial growth limiting conditions of nitrogen. A new model based in a mixed mathematical equation comprising a logistic model, and a magnetic saturation model resulted appropriate to estimate the ammonia consumption under limiting conditions. Favorable conditions for PHA production in P. fluorescens were found at temperature of 30 °C, reaching the maximum biomass concentration of 2.83 g L−1, and consuming 99.9% of the initial ammonia, to produce 2.13 g L−1 of PHA. The proposed models could be useful to predict the behavior of a fermentation process to produce PHA in real time.

  1. Stretches of alternating pyrimidine/purines and purines are respectively linked with pathogenicity and growth temperature in prokaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David; Bohlin, J; Hardy, SP

    2009-01-01

    are a consequence of the chemical properties of purines and pyrimidines, a thorough statistical examination of the distributions of YR/RR stretches in sequenced prokaryotic chromosomes has to the best of our knowledge, not been undertaken. The aim of this study is to expand upon previous research by using...... regression analysis to investigate how AT content, habitat, growth temperature, pathogenicity, phyla, oxygen requirement and halotolerance correlated with the distribution of RR and YR stretches in prokaryotes. RESULTS: Our results indicate that RR and YR-stretches are differently distributed in prokaryotic......-tracts are associated with phylum, AT content, oxygen requirement, growth temperature and halotolerance. All associations described were statistically significant with p prokaryotes reveals a set of associations with environmental factors...

  2. Long-term warming of a subarctic heath decreases soil bacterial community growth but has no effects on its temperature adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rinnan, Riikka; Michelsen, Anders; Bååth, E

    2011-01-01

    We tested whether bacterial communities of subarctic heath soil are adapted to elevated temperature after experimental warming by open-top greenhouses for 7 or 17 years. The long-term warming by 1–2 °C significantly decreased bacterial community growth, by 28% and 73% after 7 and 17 years......, respectively. The decrease was most likely due to decreased availability of labile substrate under warming. However, we found no evidence for temperature adaptation of soil bacterial communities. The optimum temperature for bacterial growth was on average 25 °C, and the apparent minimum temperature for growth...

  3. Combined enhancements of temperature and UVB influence growth and phenolics in clones of the sexually dimorphic Salix myrsinifolia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nybakken, L.; Hoerkkae, R.; Julkunen-Tiitto, R. (Univ. of Eastern Finland. Dept. of Biology, Joensuu (Finland))

    2012-08-15

    Although several climatic factors are expected to change simultaneously in the future, the effect of such combined changes on plants have seldom been tested under field conditions. We report on a field experiment with dark-leaved willow, Salix myrsinifolia, subjected to enhancements in ultraviolet-A (UVA), UVB radiation and temperature, setup in Joensuu, Eastern Finland. S. myrsinifolia is a dioecious species, known as an important food plant for many herbivores. Cuttings of eight clones, four of each sex, of dark-leaved willow were planted in the field in spring 2009. In both 2009 and 2010, the total biomass increased significantly with temperature, and in 2010 there was an additive effect of UVB radiation. Both height and diameter increased with temperature in 2009, while the effect on height growth ceased in 2010. Males had greater diameter growth than females in 2010. Most phenolic compounds in the leaves decreased under enhanced temperature in both growing seasons. In 2010, four of six salicylates increased in response to enhanced temperature. Some quercetin derivatives increased under enhanced UVB radiation. Females had higher concentrations of chlorogenic acids than males, and while enhanced temperature reduced chlorogenic acid in females only, luteolins were reduced only in males. In summary, the combined enhancements gave no effects in addition to those that appeared under the single-factor treatments, except for the additive effect of UVB on temperature-increased biomass. The few gender-related differences found in response to climate change do not allow any marked expectations of future climate-induced changes in sex ratios. (Author)

  4. Tomato pollen respiration in relation to in vitro germination and pollen tube growth under favourable and stress-inducing temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapanos, I C; Akoumianakis, K A; Olympios, C M; Passam, Harold Christopher

    2010-09-01

    Tomato pollen germination, pollen tube growth and respiratory activity were recorded during incubation in a liquid medium for 7 h over a temperature range of 15-35 degrees C. Although the initial rate of respiration was highest at 30 degrees C, both at 30 degrees C and 35 degrees C respiration decreased after the first hour of incubation due to high temperature impairment of germination and pollen tube growth. The total per cent germination of pollen over the 7-h period was maximal at 15 degrees C whereas pollen tube length was maximal at 25 degrees C. Although the production of CO(2) measured at hourly intervals throughout the incubation period did not correlate to a statistically significant level with either the per cent pollen germination or the length of the pollen tubes alone, nevertheless from 2 h after the start of incubation, it closely correlated with the values for germination x pollen tube length, indicating that the respiratory activity of tomato pollen at a given time is a function of both the per cent germination and the pollen tube growth. We suggest therefore that the rate of respiration might be preferable to a simple germination test for the assessment of pollen germination ability since it expresses not only the pollen germination potential but also the growth vigour of the pollen tubes. In addition, where in vitro tests are designed to assess pollen germination-temperature interactions, they should employ a long incubation period (e.g. 7 h) to permit differences in sensitivity to temperature to be observed.

  5. Room temperature growth of biaxially aligned yttria-stabilized zirconia films on glass substrates by pulsed-laser deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Li Peng; Mazumder, J

    2003-01-01

    Room temperature deposition of biaxially textured yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) films on amorphous glass substrates was successfully achieved by conventional pulsed-laser deposition. The influence of the surrounding gases, their pressure and the deposition time on the structure of the films was studied. A columnar growth process was revealed based on the experimental results. The grown biaxial texture appears as a kind of substrate independence, which makes it possible to fabricate in-plane aligned YSZ films on various substrates.

  6. Effects of Recent Minimum Temperature and Water Deficit Increases on Pinus pinaster Radial Growth and Wood Density in Southern Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz-Besson, Cathy B; Lousada, José L; Gaspar, Maria J; Correia, Isabel E; David, Teresa S; Soares, Pedro M M; Cardoso, Rita M; Russo, Ana; Varino, Filipa; Mériaux, Catherine; Trigo, Ricardo M; Gouveia, Célia M

    2016-01-01

    Western Iberia has recently shown increasing frequency of drought conditions coupled with heatwave events, leading to exacerbated limiting climatic conditions for plant growth. It is not clear to what extent wood growth and density of agroforestry species have suffered from such changes or recent extreme climate events. To address this question, tree-ring width and density chronologies were built for a Pinus pinaster stand in southern Portugal and correlated with climate variables, including the minimum, mean and maximum temperatures and the number of cold days. Monthly and maximum daily precipitations were also analyzed as well as dry spells. The drought effect was assessed using the standardized precipitation-evapotranspiration (SPEI) multi-scalar drought index, between 1 to 24-months. The climate-growth/density relationships were evaluated for the period 1958-2011. We show that both wood radial growth and density highly benefit from the strong decay of cold days and the increase of minimum temperature. Yet the benefits are hindered by long-term water deficit, which results in different levels of impact on wood radial growth and density. Despite of the intensification of long-term water deficit, tree-ring width appears to benefit from the minimum temperature increase, whereas the effects of long-term droughts significantly prevail on tree-ring density. Our results further highlight the dependency of the species on deep water sources after the juvenile stage. The impact of climate changes on long-term droughts and their repercussion on the shallow groundwater table and P. pinaster's vulnerability are also discussed. This work provides relevant information for forest management in the semi-arid area of the Alentejo region of Portugal. It should ease the elaboration of mitigation strategies to assure P. pinaster's production capacity and quality in response to more arid conditions in the near future in the region.

  7. Tuber melanosporum spread within sub-optimal climatic zones is controlled by fruiting triggers and not mycorrhiza survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul W. Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Tuber melanosporum is the most valuable of all cultivatable truffle species. Farming of this species spans every continent with the exception of Antarctica. Tuber aestivum (syn. T. uncinatum and Tuber brumale are truffle species that have similar host plant preference and a similar affinity for calcareous soils as T. melanosporum, but occur over a broader geographic zone. The geographic limit of T. melanosporum is thought to be climatically dictated but it is not known whether this is due to an impact on mycorrhizal survival or climatically-derived fruiting triggers. Here, data is compiled from five cultivated research sites in the climatically sub-optimal conditions of the UK in order to address this question. Here we show: (iTuber melanosporum mycorrhiza can survive and grow in sub-optimal climatic conditions. (iiIt is climatically-derived fruiting triggers and not ectomycorrhiza survival that dictate the climatic preferences and geographic spread of T. melanosporum. (iiiImportant climatic parameters for potential fruiting triggers are sunshine hours, summer rainfall and summer temperatures.   The data presented here not only aid our understanding of the ecological parameters of T. melanosporum but also have a practical application for truffle cultivators in choosing suitable locations for a plantation.

  8. Cost Effective Growth of High Temperature Piezoelectrics for Adaptive Flow Control Actuators Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TRS Technologies, Inc. in collaboration with The Pennsylvania State University propose to develop new families of high temperature piezoelectric materials for...

  9. Critical thickness of GaN on AlN: impact of growth temperature and dislocation density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohi, P.; Martin, D.; Grandjean, N.

    2017-07-01

    Critical thickness and strain relaxation of c-plane GaN layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy on AlN were studied as a function of growth temperature and threading dislocation density (TDD). For this purpose we used AlN/sapphire templates and AlN single crystals with TDDs of ˜109 cm-2 and ˜103 cm-2, respectively. Whereas at high growth temperature (900 °C) the critical thickness for plastic relaxation is only 3 monolayers (MLs) for both substrates, this value drastically increases when decreasing the growth temperature. It reaches ˜30 MLs when GaN is deposited at 750 °C on AlN single crystals. We also observed that the strain relaxation rate strongly depends on TDD. These results exemplify the lack of efficient gliding planes in III-nitrides when grown along the c-axis, which, combined with low kinetics, allows for plastic relaxation to be frozen out. Achieving pseudomorphic GaN layers on AlN is of interest for two-dimensional electron gases based on AlN/GaN/AlN heterostructures lattice-matched to AlN single crystal substrates.

  10. Growth performance and survival of larval Atlantic herring, under the combined effects of elevated temperatures and CO2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Sswat

    Full Text Available In the coming decades, environmental change like warming and acidification will affect life in the ocean. While data on single stressor effects on fish are accumulating rapidly, we still know relatively little about interactive effects of multiple drivers. Of particular concern in this context are the early life stages of fish, for which direct effects of increased CO2 on growth and development have been observed. Whether these effects are further modified by elevated temperature was investigated here for the larvae of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus, a commercially important fish species. Over a period of 32 days, larval survival, growth in size and weight, and instantaneous growth rate were assessed in a crossed experimental design of two temperatures (10°C and 12°C with two CO2 levels (400 μatm and 900 μatm CO2 at food levels mimicking natural levels using natural prey. Elevated temperature alone led to increased swimming activity, as well as decreased survival and instantaneous growth rate (Gi. The comparatively high sensitivity to elevated temperature in this study may have been influenced by low food levels offered to the larvae. Larval size, Gi and swimming activity were not affected by CO2, indicating tolerance of this species to projected "end of the century" CO2 levels. A synergistic effect of elevated temperature and CO2 was found for larval weight, where no effect of elevated CO2 concentrations was detected in the 12°C treatment, but a negative CO2 effect was found in the 10°C treatment. Contrasting CO2 effects were found for survival between the two temperatures. Under ambient CO2 conditions survival was increased at 12°C compared to 10°C. In general, CO2 effects were minor and considered negligible compared to the effect of temperature under these mimicked natural food conditions. These findings emphasize the need to include biotic factors such as energy supply via prey availability in future studies on interactive

  11. Phase formation of hexagonal wurtzite ZnO through decomposition of Zn(OH)2 at various growth temperatures using CBD method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molefe, Fokotsa V.; Koao, Lehlohonolo F.; Dejene, Birhanu F.; Swart, Hendrik C.

    2015-08-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanophosphors were fabricated from zinc acetate dehydrate, thiourea and ammonia via the chemical bath deposition (CBD) method at various growth temperatures. TGA results showed the increase in thermal stability of ZnO with the increase in growth temperature. From DSC results we observed a decrease in melting temperatures due to the crystallization of the ZnO with the increase in growth temperature. The melting enthalpy values were too scattered to make definite conclusions. XRD indicated the decomposition of structure from Zn(OH)2 to hexagonal wurtzite ZnO. The estimated average particle sizes are in the range of 22 nm. The estimated average particle size fluctuated with an increase in the growth temperature. The SEM morphology showed the full formation of flakes-like at high growth temperature. At low growth temperature shows flakes-like morphology combined with some small spheres. The EDS results confirmed the presence of Zinc (Zn) and Oxygen (O) as the major products, and the ratio of the Zn to O increased with the increase in growth temperature. A red-shift in reflectance spectra was observed, which resulted in the decrease in the band gap energy of the ZnO with an increase in growth temperature. The temperature dependent PL spectra of the ZnO showed visible emission due to defects. The novelty in this study lies within the increase in the amount of weight loss observed from TGA and DSC analysis and another important aspect is the transformation of Zn(OH)2 to the well-known hexagonal wurtzite structure of ZnO with the increase in growth temperature. This study provides a simple and efficient approach for the synthesizing of the ZnO with flakes-like morphology.

  12. Population Growth and Development of the Psocid Liposcelis fusciceps (Psocoptera: Liposcelididae) at Constant Temperatures and Relative Humidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, S G; Opit, G P; Shakya, K

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the effects of seven temperatures (22.5, 25.0, 27.5, 30.0, 32.5, 35.0, and 37.5°C) and four relative humidities (43, 55, 63, and 75%) on population growth and development of the psocid Liposcelis fusciceps Badonnel (Psocoptera: Liposcelididae). Results demonstrated that L. fusciceps did not survive at 43% RH, at all temperatures tested. At 55% RH, L. fusciceps did not survive at the highest three temperatures and no psocids survived at 37.5°C and 63% RH. The highest population growth was recorded at 30.0°C and 75% RH where populations increased 16-fold from an initial population of five females. L. fusciceps males have two to four nymphal instars, and the percentages of males with two, three, and four instars were 28, 70, and 2%, respectively. Female L. fusciceps have two to five instars, and the percentages of females with two, three, four, and five instars were 2, 33, 63, and 2%, respectively. The total developmental time for males was shorter than females. We developed temperature-dependent development equations for male and female eggs, individual nymphal, combined nymphal, and combined immature stages. Based on 30-d population growth, L. fusciceps can survive and multiply at a relative humidity of 55% at 22.5-30.0°C, but does better at 27.5-32.5°C and a higher relative humidity of 75%. Relative humidities of ≤ 63% and temperatures of ≥ 32.5°C are detrimental to L. fusciceps. These data provide a better understanding of L. fusciceps population dynamics and can be used to develop effective management strategies for this psocid. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Influences of cyclic, high temperatures on juvenile channel catfish growth and feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effects of high summer temperatures on channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) are poorly understood, particularly for thermal regimes that mimic pond aquaculture conditions. Therefore, this study examined the effects of three cycling upper-range temperature regimes (23-27ºC, 27-31ºC, and 31-35ºC) cha...

  14. Investigation on temperature fields in industrial chilling of pork legs for PDO Parma ham production and coupled temperature/microbial growth simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Massimiliano; Cordioli, Matteo; Barbanti, Davide

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, temperature distribution within an industrial blast chiller with pork leg for Protected Designation of Origin Parma ham production was studied and the slowest cooling zone and the fastest cooling zone were recognized. Moreover, apparent heat transfer coefficients in both positions were calculated and resulted equal to 27.1 and 15.6 W m-2 °C-1, respectively. A finite element method model by distinguishing the three main components (skin, lean meat and bone) of the leg for the unsteady heat transfer during cooling was developed and validated against industrial chiller data. Good agreement between experimental and simulated data was obtained with RMSE value for thermal centre equal to 0.81 °C. Furthermore, in order to introduce CCP limit in the HACCP plan, a microbial growth model of the most important pathogens in meat was developed starting from the heat transfer model results. Temperature as well as pathogen growth were estimated in the case of different plant breakdowns. Defined CCP limit was represented by reaching 11 °C at 5 mm of depth within 2 h from the beginning of the cooling process, moreover a different cooling program was simulated and established as the alternative one.

  15. Effects of a higher incubation temperature between embryonic day 9 and 12 on growth and meat quality characteristics of turkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krischek, C; Gerken, M; Wicke, M

    2013-01-01

    1. The study investigated the influence of manipulating incubation temperature for a short period on the post-hatch development up to week 16 in male and female BUT Big 6 turkeys. 2. Eggs were incubated at a control temperature of 37·5°C and 55% RH until d 18 when transferred to a hatcher at 37·5°C and 85% RH. For a 4 d period between embryonic day 9 (ED 9) and 12, eggs were incubated at 38·5°C and 55% RH (HT). 3. Birds were slaughtered at 16 weeks of age to analyse meat quality parameters of the Musculus pectoralis superficialis (MPS). 4. Across both incubation treatments, the turkey males had significantly higher live and breast weights, but lower breast yields than the females. The sex of the animals only influenced the yellowness of the MPS with lower values in the males. 5. Temperature manipulation resulted in significantly decreased live weights of HT birds compared with the control animals across all ages in both sexes. No impact of incubation treatment on meat quality characteristics was found. 6. The results indicate a negative effect of higher incubation temperature on the post-hatch growth, possibly by influencing the mechanisms that regulate the hypertrophic growth of the muscle fibres.

  16. Vanadium dioxide thin films prepared on silicon by low temperature MBE growth and ex-situ annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homm, Pia; van Bilzen, Bart; Menghini, Mariela; Locquet, Jean-Pierre; Ivanova, Todora; Sanchez, Luis; Sanchis, Pablo

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) is a material that shows an insulator to metal transition (IMT) near room temperature. This property can be exploited for applications in field effect devices, electro-optical switches and nonlinear circuit components. We have prepared VO2 thin films on silicon wafers by combining a low temperature MBE growth with an ex-situ annealing at high temperature. We investigated the structural, electrical and optical characteristics of films with thicknesses ranging from 10 to 100 nm. We have also studied the influence of the substrate cleaning. The films grown with our method are polycrystalline with a preferred orientation in the (011) direction of the monoclinic phase. For the films produced on silicon with a native oxide, an IMT at around 75 °C is observed. The magnitude of the resistance change across the IMT decreases with thickness while the refractive index at room temperature corresponds with values reported in the literature for thin films. The successful growth of VO2 films on silicon with good electrical and optical properties is an important step towards the integration of VO2 in novel devices. The authors acknowledge financial support from the FWO project G052010N10 and EU-FP7 SITOGA project. PH acknowledges support from Becas Chile - CONICYT.

  17. Droughts and broad-scale climate variability reflected by temperature-sensitive tree growth in the Qinling Mountains, central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Na; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Qi; Bao, Guang

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between temperature and drought was investigated using the temperature-sensitive growth of Larix chinensis Beissn in the Qinling Mountains, central China. Extremely high tree-ring width index values (TRWI) agreed well with dry conditions defined by the dryness-wetness index (DWI) obtained from data in Chinese historical documents and climate-related papers between 1814 and 1956 (before the short of instrumental measurements); the reverse applied to extremely low TRWI values. The main severe drought epochs occurred from the late 1850s to the 1870s, the 1920s to 1930s and in the 2000s, whereas wet spells occurred from 1817-1827 and 1881-1886. The droughts in the 2000s exhibited a similar pattern as the ones from the 1920s to 1930s, with obviously an increasing temperature. The variation of tree growth agreed well with other reconstructed temperature series from nearby and remote regions, suggesting that Larix chinensis could respond to broad-scale climate variability. The longest cold interval, 1817-1827, could be associated with the influence of the Tambora eruption in 1815.

  18. Growth under elevated air temperature alters secondary metabolites in Robinia pseudoacacia L. seedlings in Cd- and Pb-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y H; Jia, X; Wang, W K; Liu, T; Huang, S P; Yang, M Y

    2016-09-15

    Plant secondary metabolites play a pivotal role in growth regulation, antioxidant activity, pigment development, and other processes. As the global climate changes, increasing atmospheric temperatures and contamination of soil by heavy metals co-occur in natural ecosystems, which alters the pH of rhizosphere soil and influences the bioavailability and mobility of metals. Elevated temperatures in combination with heavy metals are expected to affect plant secondary metabolites, but this issue has not been extensively examined. Here, we investigated secondary metabolites in Robiniapseudoacacia seedlings exposed to elevated temperatures using a passive warming device in combination with Cd- and Pb-contaminated soils. Heavy metals significantly stimulated the accumulation of saponins, phenolic compounds, and flavonoids in leaves and stems; alkaloid compounds increased in leaves and decreased in stems, and condensed tannins fluctuated. Elevated temperatures, alone and in combination with Cd and Pb, caused increases in secondary metabolites in the plant tissues. Phenolic compounds showed the greatest changes among the secondary metabolites and significant interactive effects of temperature and metals were observed. These results suggest that slightly elevated temperature could enhance protective and defense mechanisms of Robinia pseudoacacia seedlings exposed to heavy metals by stimulating the production of secondary metabolites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Exercising in the cold inhibits growth hormone secretion by reducing the rise in core body temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheldon, Adam; Savine, Richard L; Sönksen, Peter H; Holt, Richard I G

    2006-04-01

    Ambient temperature alters exercise induced GH secretion. It is unknown whether temperature affects GH secretion at exercise intensities above the anaerobic threshold when other factors may override the relationship seen at lower intensities. Cross-over study of ambient temperature on exercise induced GH in swimmers and rowers. St Thomas Hospital, London. Ten healthy men (age 21.7+/-0.8 yrs). Five swimmers and five rowers. Forty-minute exercise test at 105% of anaerobic threshold at room temperature (RT) and at 4 degrees C. Cutaneous and core body temperature. Serum GH concentration. Cutaneous body temperature increased during exercise at RT but decreased in the cold. Although core temperature rose in both settings, the rise was greater at RT (p=0.021). GH increased at both temperatures but the onset was delayed by the cold. Peak GH tended to be higher at RT (17.4+/-3.6 microg/L vs. 9.5+/-1.5 microg/L, p=0.07). Total GH secretion was greater at RT (353.3+/-99.1 microg min/L) than 4 degrees C (128.3+/-21.0 microg min/L), p=0.038. Change in core temperature correlated with log peak GH (r=0.66, p=0.039) and log incremental GH (r=0.67, p=0.032) when exercising at 4 degrees C. There was no difference between swimmers and rowers. Exercise at 4 degrees C reduces GH secretion during exercise at intensities above the anaerobic threshold. A change in core body temperature may be one mechanism by which exercise induces GH secretion. The difference in GH between swimmers and rowers during their respective events relates to the conditions under which they compete.

  20. Controlling Growth High Uniformity Indium Selenide (In2Se3) Nanowires via the Rapid Thermal Annealing Process at Low Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ya-Chu; Hung, Yu-Chen; Wang, Chiu-Yen

    2017-09-15

    High uniformity Au-catalyzed indium selenide (In2Se3) nanowires are grown with the rapid thermal annealing (RTA) treatment via the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. The diameters of Au-catalyzed In2Se3 nanowires could be controlled with varied thicknesses of Au films, and the uniformity of nanowires is improved via a fast pre-annealing rate, 100 °C/s. Comparing with the slower heating rate, 0.1 °C/s, the average diameters and distributions (standard deviation, SD) of In2Se3 nanowires with and without the RTA process are 97.14 ± 22.95 nm (23.63%) and 119.06 ± 48.75 nm (40.95%), respectively. The in situ annealing TEM is used to study the effect of heating rate on the formation of Au nanoparticles from the as-deposited Au film. The results demonstrate that the average diameters and distributions of Au nanoparticles with and without the RTA process are 19.84 ± 5.96 nm (30.00%) and about 22.06 ± 9.00 nm (40.80%), respectively. It proves that the diameter size, distribution, and uniformity of Au-catalyzed In2Se3 nanowires are reduced and improved via the RTA pre-treated. The systemic study could help to control the size distribution of other nanomaterials through tuning the annealing rate, temperatures of precursor, and growth substrate to control the size distribution of other nanomaterials. Graphical Abstract Rapid thermal annealing (RTA) process proved that it can uniform the size distribution of Au nanoparticles, and then it can be used to grow the high uniformity Au-catalyzed In2Se3 nanowires via the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. Comparing with the general growth condition, the heating rate is slow, 0.1 °C/s, and the growth temperature is a relatively high growth temperature, > 650 °C. RTA pre-treated growth substrate can form smaller and uniform Au nanoparticles to react with the In2Se3 vapor and produce the high uniformity In2Se3 nanowires. The in situ annealing TEM is used to realize the effect of heating rate on Au nanoparticle

  1. Fatigue Crack Growth Rate of Inconel 718 Sheet at Cryogenic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Douglas; Wright, Jonathan; Hastings, Keith

    2005-01-01

    Inconel 718 sheet material was tested to determine fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) at cryogenic conditions representative of a liquid hydrogen (LH2) environment at -423 degree F. Tests utilized M(T) and ESE(T) specimen geometries and environments were either cold gaseous helium or submersion in LH2. The test results support a significant improvement in the fatigue crack growth threshold at -423 degree F compared to -320 degree F or 70 degree F.

  2. Suboptimal asthma care for immigrant children: results of an audit study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klazinga Niek S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known on the scope and nature of ethnic inequalities in suboptimal asthma care for children. This study aimed to assess (1 ethnic differences in suboptimal asthma care for children with an asthma exacerbation who consulted a physician, and (2 ethnic differences in the nature of suboptimal care. Methods All children aged 6–16 years who during a period of six months consulted the paediatric department of the Academic Medical Centre-University of Amsterdam or one of the six regional primary care centres with an asthma exacerbation were included. Clinical guidelines were systematically converted to review criteria following the strategy as proposed by the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research. Based upon these review criteria and their experience experts of two multidisciplinary panels retrospectively assessed the quality of care and its (possible failure to prevent the occurrence of asthma exacerbation. Results Only a small number of children (n = 35 were included in the analysis as a result of which the ethnic differences in suboptimal care were not significant. However, the results do indicate immigrant children, in particular 'other non-Western' children (n = 11, more frequently to receive suboptimal care related to the asthma exacerbation when compared to ethnic Dutch children. Furthermore, we found the nature of suboptimal care to differ with under-prescribing in the 'other non-Western' group (n = 11, lack of information exchange between physicians in the Surinamese/Antillean group (n = 12 and lack of education, and counselling of patients and parents in the ethnic Dutch (n = 12 as the most relevant factor. Conclusion Ethnic inequalities in the scope and nature of suboptimal asthma care for children in the Netherlands seem to exist. For the non-western immigrant groups the results indicate the importance of the prescription behaviour of the medical doctor, as well as the supervision by one health care

  3. Thermal acclimation in American alligators: Effects of temperature regime on growth rate, mitochondrial function, and membrane composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Edwin R; Sirsat, Tushar S; Sirsat, Sarah K G; Kang, Gurdeep; Keereetaweep, Jantana; Aziz, Mina; Chapman, Kent D; Dzialowski, Edward M

    2017-08-01

    We investigated the ability of juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) to acclimate to temperature with respect to growth rate. We hypothesized that alligators would acclimate to cold temperature by increasing the metabolic capacity of skeletal muscles and the heart. Additionally, we hypothesized that lipid membranes in the thigh muscle and liver would respond to low temperature, either to maintain fluidity (via increased unsaturation) or to maintain enzyme reaction rates (via increased docosahexaenoic acid). Alligators were assigned to one of 3 temperature regimes beginning at 9 mo of age: constant warm (30°C), constant cold (20°C), and daily cycling for 12h at each temperature. Growth rate over the following 7 mo was highest in the cycling group, which we suggest occurred via high digestive function or feeding activity during warm periods and energy-saving during cold periods. The warm group also grew faster than the cold group. Heart and liver masses were proportional to body mass, while kidney was proportionately larger in the cold group compared to the warm animals. Whole-animal metabolic rate was higher in the warm and cycling groups compared to the cold group - even when controlling for body mass - when assayed at 30°C, but not at 20°C. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation capacity in permeabilized fibers of thigh muscle and heart did not differ among treatments. Membrane fatty acid composition of the brain was largely unaffected by temperature treatment, but adjustments were made in the phospholipid headgroup composition that are consistent with homeoviscous adaptation. Thigh muscle cell membranes had elevated polyunsaturated fatty acids in the cold group relative to the cycling group, but this was not the case for thigh muscle mitochondrial membranes. Liver mitochondria from cold alligators had elevated docosahexaenoic acid, which might be important for maintenance of reaction rates of membrane-bound enzymes. Copyright © 2016

  4. Growth and physiological responses of canola (Brassica napus) to three components of global climate change: temperature, carbon dioxide and drought

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qaderi, M.M.; Kurepin, L.V.; Reid, D.M. [Univ. of Calgary, Dept. of Biological Sciences, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    2006-12-15

    Elevated CO{sub 2} appears to be a significant factor in global warming, which will likely lead to drought conditions in many areas. Few studies have considered the interactive effects of higher CO{sub 2}, temperature and drought on plant growth and physiology. We grew canola (Brassica napus cv. 45H72) plants under lower (22/18 deg. C) and higher (28/24 deg. C) temperature regimes in controlled-environment chambers at ambient (370 {mu}mol mol-1) and elevated (740 {mu}mol mol-1) CO{sub 2} levels. One half of the plants were watered to field capacity and the other half at wilting point. In three separate experiments, we determined growth, various physiological parameters and content of abscisic acid (ABA), indole-3-acetic acid and ethylene. Drought-stressed plants grown under higher temperature at ambient CO{sub 2} had decreased stem height and diameter, leaf number and area, dry matter, leaf area ratio, shoot/root weight ratio, net CO{sub 2} assimilation and chlorophyll fluorescence. However, these plants had increased specific leaf weight, leaf weight ratio and chlorophyll concentration. Elevated CO{sub 2} generally had the opposite effect. and partially reversed the inhibitory effects of higher temperature and drought on leaf dry weight accumulation. This study showed that higher temperature and drought inhibit many processes but elevated CO{sub 2} partially mitigate some adverse effects. As expected, drought stress increased ABA but higher temperature inhibited the ability of plants to produce ABA in response to drought. (au)

  5. Effects of anodizing potential and temperature on the growth of anodic TiO2 and its photoelectrochemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapusta-Kołodziej, Joanna; Syrek, Karolina; Pawlik, Anna; Jarosz, Magdalena; Tynkevych, Olena; Sulka, Grzegorz D.

    2017-02-01

    Although nanoporous/nanotubular anodic TiO2 has been broadly investigated, there is still much to be learned about the fabrication, morphological characterization and applications of anodic TiO2 formed in the glycerol-based electrolyte. Nanoporous anodic titanium oxide (ATO) layers on Ti were prepared via a three-step anodization in a glycerol solution containing NH4F (0.38 wt%) and H2O (1.79 wt%). The effects of anodizing potential (30-70 V) and temperature (10-40 °C) on the growth and morphology of ATO layers were investigated in detail. The structural and morphological characterizations of received ATO layers were performed for the studied potentials and temperatures. Moreover, photoelectrochemical properties of formed TiO2 were studied as well. It has been shown, that the morphology of fabricated nanoporous ATO layers are strongly altered by anodizing temperature and potential. Particularly, an interesting finding is that the growth rate gradually increases up to 50 V independently of anodizing temperature and then decreases when anodizing potential increases to 70 V. Moreover, for all investigated anodizing temperatures, the structural features of ATO layers, such as the cell size, inner layer pore diameter, outer layer pore diameter, increase with increasing anodizing potential. The annealing of ATO samples synthesized at 20 °C revealed that the anatase grain size increases with increasing anodizing potential. It is noteworthy to mention that the highest photoconversion efficiency values were observed for samples synthesized at the anodizing temperature of 20 °C and 40 V.

  6. Predictive model for survival and growth of Salmonella typhimurium DT104 on chicken skin during temperature abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscar, T P

    2009-02-01

    To better predict risk of Salmonella infection from chicken subjected to temperature abuse, a study was undertaken to develop a predictive model for survival and growth of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 on chicken skin with native flora. For model development, chicken skin portions (2.14 cm2) were inoculated with 0.85 log of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 (ATCC 700408) and then stored at 5 to 50 degrees C for 8 h. Kinetic data from the storage trials were fit to a primary model to determine lag time (lamda), specific growth rate (micrro), and the 95% prediction interval (PI). Secondary models for lamda, mu, and PI as a function of storage temperature were developed and then combined with the primary model to create a tertiary model. Performance of the tertiary model was evaluated against dependent data, independent data for interpolation, and independent data for extrapolation to kosher chicken skin by using an acceptable prediction zone from -1 (fail-safe) to 0.5 (fail-dangerous) log per skin portion. Survival of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 on chicken skin was observed during 8 h of storage at 5 to 20 degrees C and at 50 degrees C, whereas growth was observed from 25 to 45 degrees C and was optimal at 40 degrees C with a lamda of 2.5 h and a mu of 1.1 log/h. Variation of pathogen growth, as assessed by PI, increased in a nonlinear manner as a function of temperature and was greater for growth conditions than no-growth conditions. The percentage of acceptable prediction errors was 82.6% for dependent data, 83.7% for independent data for interpolation, and 81.6% for independent data for extrapolation to kosher skin, which all exceeded the performance criterion of 70% acceptable predictions. Thus, it was concluded that the tertiary model provided valid predictions for survival and growth of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 from a low initial dose on both nonkosher and kosher chicken skin with native flora.

  7. Local Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes in Silicon Microsystems: The Effect of Temperature Distribution on Growth Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ta, Bao Q.; Haugen, Tormod B.; Hoivik, Nils; Halvorsen, Einar; Aasmundtveit, Knut E.

    2013-01-01

    Local synthesis and direct integration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into microsystems is a promising method for producing CNT-based devices in a single step, low-cost, and wafer-level, CMOS/MEMS-compatible process. In this report, the structure of the locally grown CNTs are studied by transmission imaging in scanning electron microscopy—S(T)EM. The characterization is performed directly on the microsystem, without any post-synthesis processing required. The results show an effect of temperature on the structure of CNTs: high temperature favors thin and regular structures, whereas low temperature favors “bamboo-like" structures. PMID:28811428

  8. Local Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes in Silicon Microsystems: The Effect of Temperature Distribution on Growth Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut E. Aasmundtveit

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Local synthesis and direct integration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs into microsystems is a promising method for producing CNT-based devices in a single step, low-cost, and wafer-level, CMOS/MEMS-compatible process. In this report, the structure of the locally grown CNTs are studied by transmission imaging in scanning electron microscopy—S(TEM. The characterization is performed directly on the microsystem, without any post-synthesis processing required. The results show an effect of temperature on the structure of CNTs: high temperature favors thin and regular structures, whereas low temperature favors “bamboo-like” structures.

  9. Growth anisotropy effect of bulk high temperature superconductors on the levitation performance in the applied magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, J., E-mail: jzheng@swjtu.edu.cn; Liao, X.L.; Jing, H.L.; Deng, Z.G.; Yen, F.; Wang, S.Y.; Wang, J.S.

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • The single-layer bulk HTSC with AGSBP obtains better levitation performance than that of MGSBP. • The double-layer bulk with AGSBP obtains better levitation performance than that of MGSBP too. • The double-layer bulk finding is contrast to MGSBP if pursuing high trapped field. • The optimization is highlighted by simple and easy operation, thus economical in the practice. -- Abstract: Growth anisotropies of bulk high temperature superconductors (HTSCs) fabricated by a top-seeded melt texture growth process, that is, different pinning effect in the growth sectors (GSs) and growth sector boundaries (GSBs), possess effect on the macro flux trapping and levitation performance of bulk HTSCs. Previous work (Physics Procedia, 36 (2012) 1043) has found that the bulk HTSC array with aligned GSB pattern (AGSBP) exhibits better capability for levitation and suppression of levitation force decay above a permanent magnet guideway (PMG) compared with misaligned GSB pattern (MGSBP). In this paper, we further examine this growth anisotropy effect on the maglev performance of a double-layer bulk HTSC. In contrast to reported trapped flux cases (Supercond. Sci. Technol. 19 (2006) S466), the two superposed bulk HTSCs with same AGSBP with PMG are found to show better maglev performance. These series of results are helpful and support a new way for the performance optimization of present HTS maglev systems.

  10. The effects of temperature and food availability on growth, flexibility in metabolic rates and their relationships in juvenile common carp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ling-Qing; Fu, Cheng; Fu, Shi-Jian

    2018-03-01

    Flexibility in phenotypic traits can allow organisms to handle environmental changes. However, the ecological consequences of flexibility in metabolic rates are poorly understood. Here, we investigated whether the links between growth and flexibility in metabolic rates vary between two temperatures. Common carp Cyprinus carpio were raised in three temperature treatments [the 18°C, 28°C and 28°C-food control (28°C-FC)] and fed to satiation of receiving food either once or twice daily for 4weeks. The morphology and metabolic rates (standard metabolic rate, SMR; maximum metabolic rate, MMR) were measured at the beginning and end of the experiment. The mean total food ingested by fish in the 28°C-FC treatment was the same as that by fish in the 18°C treatment at each food availability. The final SMR (not MMR and aerobic scope, AS=MMR-SMR) increased more in the 28°C and 28°C-FC treatments with twice-daily feedings than once-daily feedings. Fish in the 28°C treatment had a higher specific growth rate (SGR) than fish in the 28°C-FC and 18°C treatments at both food availabilities. However, no differences in feeding efficiency (FE) were found among the three treatments in fish fed twice daily. The flexibility in SMR was related to individual differences in SGR, not with food intake and FE; individuals who increased their SMR more had a smaller growth performance with twice-daily feedings at 28°C, but it did not exist at 18°C. Flexibility in SMR provides a growth advantage in juvenile common carp experiencing changes in food availability and this link is temperature-dependent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The effect of temperature and chitosan concentration during storage on the growth of chitosan nanoparticle produced by ionic gelation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handani, Wenny Rinda; Sediawan, Wahyudi Budi; Tawfiequrrahman, Ahmad; Wiratni, Kusumastuti, Yuni

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this research was to get the mechanism of nano size chitosan particle growth during storage by observing the effect of temperature and initial concentration of chitosan. The products were analyzed using PSA to have the average of particle radius. Nanochitosan solution was prepared by ionic gelation method. This method is described as an electrostatic interaction between positively charged amine with negatively charged polyanion, such as tripolyphosphate (TPP). Chitosan was dissolved in 1% acetic acid and was stirred for 30 minutes. Tween 80 was added to avoid agglomeration. TPP was prepared by dissolving 0.336 g into distilled water. The nano size chitosan was obtained by mixing TPP and chitosan solution dropwise while stirring for 30 minutes. This step was done at 15°C and ambient temperature (about 30°C) and chitosan concentration 0.2%, 0.4% and 0.6%. The results show that temperature during ionic gelation process (15°C and 30°C) does not affect the initial size of the nanoparticles produced as well as the growth of the nanoparticles during storage. On the other hand, initial chitosan concentration strongly affects initial size of the nanoparticles produced and the growth of the nanoparticles during storage. The concentration of chitosan at 0.2%, 0.4%, 0.6% gave initial size of nanoparticle chitosan of 175.3 nm, 337.9 nm, 643.3 nm respectively. On the other hand, the growth mechanism of chitosan nanoparticle depended on its radius(R). At R500 nm, it is controlled by diffusion in the liquid film around the particles.

  12. Threshold Responses of Aspen and Spruce Growth to Temperature May Presage a Regime Shift in the Boreal Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, A. H.; Duffy, P.; Mann, D. H.; Leonawicz, M.; Blumstein, M.; Pendall, E.

    2011-12-01

    Warming in boreal regions may eventually lead to the demise of evergreen coniferous forest and its replacement by either an open parkland of more drought-tolerant deciduous species like aspen, or by treeless steppe vegetation. We examined the possibility of warming-induced regime shifts in the boreal forest by quantifying the response of tree growth to climate on steep, south-facing bluffs in interior Alaska. These sites are the ecotone between forest and subarctic steppe vegetation, and represent the warmest, driest sites occupied by trees in the boreal forests of interior Alaska. We collected tree cores from aspen (Populus tremula) and white spruce (Picea glauca) at south-facing bluffs in interior Alaska (n=9 for white spruce, n=5 for aspen). Crossdated chronologies of detrended, standardized ring-widths were produced for each species at each site, and growth response to climate was quantified using generalized boosting models (spruce) and random forest regression (aspen). These analyses yielded three important insights into the potential for regime shifts in the warmer areas of the boreal forest. First, our results highlighted the surprising similarity in growth response of aspen and spruce. We expected to find that aspen would be more tolerant of warm, dry conditions than white spruce. In contrast, we found that the two species had broadly similar responses to climate, preferring cooler and wetter conditions. This finding suggests that a continued trend towards warmer and drier conditions is more likely to lead rapidly to the replacement of forest vegetation by steppe grassland, rather than the replacement of white spruce by aspen. Second, we identified strongly nonlinear responses to climate in both species; the use of analytical methods capable of detecting and describing nonlinear relationships between growth and climate thus proved to be critical. For both species, steep thresholds in growth response to temperature occurred, particularly in spring. Small

  13. Supplementing newborn intrauterine growth restricted piglets with a bolus of porcine colostrum raises rectal temperatures one degree Celsius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amdi, C; Jensen, L L; Oksbjerg, N; Hansen, C F

    2017-07-01

    Hyperprolific sows have increased litter sizes but also result in more piglets that have been exposed to intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). These IUGR piglets are likely to have a low rectal temperature and lower blood glucose levels compared with normal piglets at birth. Therefore, we hypothesized that a colostrum bolus at birth and/or heat from an external source would have a positive effect on blood glucose levels, rectal temperatures, and growth up to 8 h postpartum. In addition, liver glycogen and blood values at 8 h were investigated. Eighty-four piglets were classified at birth (time = 0) as IUGR based on their head morphology and randomly allocated to 1 of 4 treatments ( = 21) in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement: 1) with or without a porcine colostrum bolus (12 mL/kg BW at birth) and 2) with sow or isolated from sow with external heat. Piglets were removed from the sow before they had suckled and were numbered and dried, and initial whole-blood glucose, rectal temperature, and BW were recorded. Piglets in the 2 treatments isolated from sow were placed under a heating lamp (150 W) with a temperature range of 35 to 39°C. Rectal temperatures, glucose, and BW were measured again at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 h after birth, and a final plasma sample and organs (liver and brain) were removed at 8 h. There was a time × colostrum bolus interaction ( = 0.026) and a time × sow interaction ( piglets that were given a bolus had greater glucose levels after 1 h postpartum (time = 1 h) than piglets without a bolus at birth, but from time = 2 h and onward, there was no difference ( > 0.05). There was a time × colostrum bolus interaction ( piglets with a bolus had a greater rectal temperature compared with piglets without a bolus (37.5 vs. 36.6°C; piglets that had been isolated from the sow had a greater rectal temperature compared with the 2 treatments with sows (37.8 vs. 36.3°C; heat and a colostrum bolus increased rectal temperature by 1°C an hour after birth. However

  14. Growth temperature and genome size in bacteria are negatively correlated, suggesting genomic streamlining during thermal adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabath, Niv; Ferrada, Evandro; Barve, Aditya; Wagner, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Prokaryotic genomes are small and compact. Either this feature is caused by neutral evolution or by natural selection favoring small genomes-genome streamlining. Three separate prior lines of evidence argue against streamlining for most prokaryotes. We find that the same three lines of evidence argue for streamlining in the genomes of thermophile bacteria. Specifically, with increasing habitat temperature and decreasing genome size, the proportion of genomic DNA in intergenic regions decreases. Furthermore, with increasing habitat temperature, generation time decreases. Genome-wide selective constraints do not decrease as in the reduced genomes of host-associated species. Reduced habitat variability is not a likely explanation for the smaller genomes of thermophiles. Genome size may be an indirect target of selection due to its association with cell volume. We use metabolic modeling to demonstrate that known changes in cell structure and physiology at high temperature can provide a selective advantage to reduce cell volume at high temperatures.

  15. Temperature-dependent growth and photophysiology of prokaryotic and eukaryotic oceanic picophytoplankton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulk, Gemma; de Vries, Pablo; van de Poll, Willem H.; Visser, Ronald J. W.; Buma, Anita G. J.

    2012-01-01

    It is expected that climate change will expand the open oligotrophic oceans by enhanced thermal stratification. Because temperature defines the geographic distribution of picophytoplankton in open-ocean ecosystems and regulates photophysiological responses, it is important to understand how

  16. Temperature-driven growth of reduced graphene oxide/copper nanocomposites for glucose sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Wu, Zhong; Xu, Chen; Liu, Lei; Hu, Wenbin

    2016-12-01

    A one-spot method was developed for the synthesis of graphene sheet decorated with copper nanoparticles using different reduction temperatures via a molecular level mixing process. Here, we demonstrate that the reduction temperature is a crucial determinant of the properties of reduced graphene oxide (RGO)/metal composite and its electrocatalytic application in glucose sensing. To show this, we prepared a series of RGO/Cu composites at different reduction temperatures and examined the change rules of size, loading and dispersion of Cu particles, and the reduction extent of the RGO. Results showed that the Cu particle size increased with increasing reduction temperatures due to the Ostwald ripening process. Meanwhile, the Cu loading decreased with increasing reduction temperatures and the aggregation had not appeared in the high Cu loading situation. Additionally, the increasing reduction temperatures led to the decreasing concentrations of various oxygen-containing functional group of RGO with various degrees. The cyclic voltammogram showed that the RGO/metal composites fabricated under lower reduction temperatures exhibited higher electrocatalytic activity for glucose sensing, which was attributed to the higher surface area from larger loading of RGO/metal composites with smaller particle size. It can be concluded that the above factors play more significant roles in electrocatalytic efficiency than the decreased electron transfer rate between RGO and Cu within a certain range. These results highlight the importance of the reduction temperature influencing the properties of the RGO/metal composite and its application. We believe that these findings can be of great value in the further developing RGO/metal-based sensors for electrochemical detection of different analytes in emerging fields.

  17. Autotrophic Growth of Bacterial and Archaeal Ammonia Oxidizers in Freshwater Sediment Microcosms Incubated at Different Temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Yucheng; Ke, Xiubin; Hernández, Marcela; Wang, Baozhan; Dumont, Marc G.; Jia, Zhongjun; Conrad, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Both bacteria and archaea potentially contribute to ammonia oxidation, but their roles in freshwater sediments are still poorly understood. Seasonal differences in the relative activities of these groups might exist, since cultivated archaeal ammonia oxidizers have higher temperature optima than their bacterial counterparts. In this study, sediment collected from eutrophic freshwater Lake Taihu (China) was incubated at different temperatures (4°C, 15°C, 25°C, and 37°C) for up to 8 weeks. We e...

  18. Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase enhances the growth of Leuconostoc mesenteroides lactic acid bacteria at low temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    GOTO, Seitaro; Kawamoto, Jun; Sato, Satoshi B.; Iki, Takashi; WATANABE, Itaru; Kudo, Kazuyuki; Esaki, Nobuyoshi; Kurihara, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can cause deterioration of food quality even at low temperatures. In this study, we investigated the cold-adaptation mechanism of a novel food spoilage LAB, Leuconostoc mesenteroides NH04 (NH04). L. mesenteroides was isolated from several spoiled cooked meat products at a high frequency in our factories. NH04 grew rapidly at low temperatures within the shelf-life period and resulted in heavy financial losses. NH04 grew more rapidly than related strains such as Leuco...

  19. Growth and inactivation of Salmonella at low refrigerated storage temperatures and thermal inactivation on raw chicken meat and laboratory media: mixed effect meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smadi, Hanan; Sargeant, Jan M; Shannon, Harry S; Raina, Parminder

    2012-12-01

    Growth and inactivation regression equations were developed to describe the effects of temperature on Salmonella concentration on chicken meat for refrigerated temperatures (⩽10°C) and for thermal treatment temperatures (55-70°C). The main objectives were: (i) to compare Salmonella growth/inactivation in chicken meat versus laboratory media; (ii) to create regression equations to estimate Salmonella growth in chicken meat that can be used in quantitative risk assessment (QRA) modeling; and (iii) to create regression equations to estimate D-values needed to inactivate Salmonella in chicken meat. A systematic approach was used to identify the articles, critically appraise them, and pool outcomes across studies. Growth represented in density (Log10CFU/g) and D-values (min) as a function of temperature were modeled using hierarchical mixed effects regression models. The current meta-analysis analysis found a significant difference (P⩽0.05) between the two matrices - chicken meat and laboratory media - for both growth at refrigerated temperatures and inactivation by thermal treatment. Growth and inactivation were significantly influenced by temperature after controlling for other variables; however, no consistent pattern in growth was found. Validation of growth and inactivation equations against data not used in their development is needed. Copyright © 2012 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Study of oxide and α-Zr(O) growth kinetics from high temperature steam oxidation of Zircaloy-4 cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawarn, Tapan K., E-mail: sawarn@barc.gov.in; Banerjee, Suparna, E-mail: sup@barc.gov.in; Samanta, Akanksha, E-mail: akanksha@barc.gov.in; Rath, B.N., E-mail: bibhur@barc.gov.in; Kumar, Sunil, E-mail: sunilkmr@barc.gov.in

    2015-12-15

    Oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4 cladding of fuel pins of Indian pressurized heavy water reactors (IPHWRs) under a simulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA) condition was investigated. The kinetic rate constants for the oxide and oxygen stabilized α-Zr phase growth were established from the isothermal metal-steam reaction at high temperatures (900–1200 °C) with soaking periods in the range of 60–900 s. Oxide and α-Zr(O) layer thickness were measured to derive the respective growth rates. The observed rates obeyed a parabolic law and Arrhenius expressions of rate constants were established. Percentage equivalent clad reacted (%ECR) was calculated using Baker-Just equation. Hydrogen estimation was carried out on the oxidized samples using inert gas fusion technique. The hydrogen pick up was found to be in the range 10–30 ppm. The measured values of oxide and α-Zr(O) layer thickness were compared with the results obtained using OXYCON, an indigenously developed model. The model predicts the oxide growth reasonably well but under predicts the α-Zr(O) growth significantly at thickness values higher than 80 μm. - Highlights: • Steam oxidation kinetics of IPHWR fuel cladding material, Zircaloy-4 in the temperature range 900–1200 °C has been studied. • The growth kinetics of the oxide and α-Zr(O) were established from the microstructural analysis. • An indigenously developed model, OXYCON has been validated against the experimental data. • The hydrogen pick up in the cladding during oxidation was observed to be in the range 10–30 ppm.

  1. The effects of zinc bath temperature on the coating growth behavior of reactive steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jianhua, E-mail: super_wang111@hotmail.com [School of Mechanical Engineering, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, 411105 (China); Key Laboratory of Materials Design and Preparation Technology of Hunan Province, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, 411105 (China); Tu Hao; Peng Bicao; Wang Xinming; Yin, Fucheng [School of Mechanical Engineering, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, 411105 (China); Key Laboratory of Materials Design and Preparation Technology of Hunan Province, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, 411105 (China); Su Xuping, E-mail: xuping@xtu.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, 411105 (China); Key Laboratory of Materials Design and Preparation Technology of Hunan Province, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, 411105 (China)

    2009-11-15

    The purpose of this work is to identify the influence of zinc bath temperature on the morphology and the thickness of reactive steel (Fe-0.1 wt.%Si alloy) coatings. The Fe-0.1 wt.%Si samples were galvanized for 3 min at temperatures in the range of 450-530 deg. C in steps of 10 deg. C. The coatings were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-rays analysis. It was found that the coating thickness reaches the maximum at 470 deg. C and the minimum at 500 deg. C, respectively. When the reactive steel is galvanized at temperatures in the range of 450-490 deg. C, the coatings have a loose {zeta} layer on the top of a compact {delta} layer. With the increase of the galvanizing temperature, the {zeta} layer becomes looser. When the temperature is at 500 deg. C, the {zeta} phase disappears. With the increase of temperature, the coatings change to be a diffuse-{Delta} layer ({delta}+ liquid zinc).

  2. Two Liters a Day Keep the Doctor Away? Considerations on the Pathophysiology of Suboptimal Fluid Intake in the Common Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Florian; Guelinckx, Isabelle; Lemetais, Guillaume; Melander, Olle

    2017-01-01

    Suboptimal fluid intake may require enhanced release of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) or vasopressin for the maintenance of adequate hydration. Enhanced copeptin levels (reflecting enhanced vasopressin levels) in 25% of the common population are associated with enhanced risk of metabolic syndrome with abdominal obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, coronary artery disease, heart failure, vascular dementia, cognitive impairment, microalbuminuria, chronic kidney disease, inflammatory bowel disease, cancer, and premature mortality. Vasopressin stimulates the release of glucocorticoids which in turn up-regulate the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1). Moreover, dehydration upregulates the transcription factor NFAT5, which in turn stimulates SGK1 expression. SGK1 is activated by insulin, growth factors and oxidative stress via phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase, 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase PDK1 and mTOR. SGK1 is a powerful stimulator of Na+/K+-ATPase, carriers (e.g. the Na+,K+,2Cl- cotransporter NKCC, the NaCl cotransporter NCC, the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE3, and the Na+ coupled glucose transporter SGLT1), and ion channels (e.g. the epithelial Na+ channel ENaC, the Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ channel Orai1 with its stimulator STIM1, and diverse K+ channels). SGK1 further participates in the regulation of the transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-B NFκB, p53, cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB), activator protein-1, and forkhead transcription factor FKHR-L1 (FOXO3a). Enhanced SGK1 activity fosters the development of hypertension, obesity, diabetes, thrombosis, stroke, inflammation including inflammatory bowel disease and autoimmune disease, cardiac fibrosis, proteinuria, renal failure as well as tumor growth. The present brief review makes the case that suboptimal fluid intake in the common population may enhance vasopressin and glucocorticoid levels thus up-regulating SGK1 expression and favouring the development of SGK1 related

  3. Two Liters a Day Keep the Doctor Away? Considerations on the Pathophysiology of Suboptimal Fluid Intake in the Common Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Lang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Suboptimal fluid intake may require enhanced release of antidiuretic hormone (ADH or vasopressin for the maintenance of adequate hydration. Enhanced copeptin levels (reflecting enhanced vasopressin levels in 25% of the common population are associated with enhanced risk of metabolic syndrome with abdominal obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, coronary artery disease, heart failure, vascular dementia, cognitive impairment, microalbuminuria, chronic kidney disease, inflammatory bowel disease, cancer, and premature mortality. Vasopressin stimulates the release of glucocorticoids which in turn up-regulate the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1. Moreover, dehydration upregulates the transcription factor NFAT5, which in turn stimulates SGK1 expression. SGK1 is activated by insulin, growth factors and oxidative stress via phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase, 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase PDK1 and mTOR. SGK1 is a powerful stimulator of Na+/K+-ATPase, carriers (e.g. the Na+,K+,2Cl- cotransporter NKCC, the NaCl cotransporter NCC, the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE3, and the Na+ coupled glucose transporter SGLT1, and ion channels (e.g. the epithelial Na+ channel ENaC, the Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ channel Orai1 with its stimulator STIM1, and diverse K+ channels. SGK1 further participates in the regulation of the transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-B NFκB, p53, cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB, activator protein-1, and forkhead transcription factor FKHR-L1 (FOXO3a. Enhanced SGK1 activity fosters the development of hypertension, obesity, diabetes, thrombosis, stroke, inflammation including inflammatory bowel disease and autoimmune disease, cardiac fibrosis, proteinuria, renal failure as well as tumor growth. The present brief review makes the case that suboptimal fluid intake in the common population may enhance vasopressin and glucocorticoid levels thus up-regulating SGK1 expression and favouring the development of SGK1

  4. Suboptimal maternal and paternal mental health are associated with child bullying perpetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetgiri, Rashmi; Lin, Hua; Flores, Glenn

    2015-06-01

    This study examines associations between maternal and paternal mental health and child bullying perpetration among school-age children, and whether having one or both parents with suboptimal mental health is associated with bullying. The 2007 National Survey of Children's Health, a nationally-representative, random-digit-dial survey, was analyzed, using a parent-reported bullying measure. Suboptimal mental health was defined as fair/poor (vs. good/very good/excellent) parental self-reported mental and emotional health. Of the 61,613 parents surveyed, more than half were parents of boys and were white, 20% were Latino, 15% African American, and 7% other race/ethnicity. Suboptimal maternal (OR 1.4; 95% CI 1.1-1.8) and paternal (OR 1.5; 95% CI 1.1-2.2) mental health are associated with bullying. Compared with children with no parents with suboptimal mental health, children with only one or both parents with suboptimal mental health have higher bullying odds. Addressing the mental health of both parents may prove beneficial in preventing bullying.

  5. Impact of Temperature on the Growth and Development of Athetis dissimilis (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ting-Ting; Li, Li-Li; Men, Xing-Yuan; Lu, Zeng-Bin; Chen, Hao; Wang, Zhen-Ying; Sun, Ting-Lin; Yu, Yi

    2017-02-01

    Athetis dissimilis (Hampson) has emerged as a serious pest on corn in recent years in China. Understanding the population response of A. dissimilis to temperature will be beneficial for adopting control strategies for this pest. The impact of five constant temperatures (17, 21, 25, 29, and 33 °C) on the life table of A. dissimilis was studied using age-stage, two-sex life table method in the laboratory. The results showed that the developmental time of egg, larva, pupa, and adult decreased when temperature increased from 17 °C to 33 °C. The TPOP (total preoviposition period) decreased with temperature increasing from 17 °C to 29 °C, while the longest APOP (adult preoviposition period) occurred at 21 °C (3.57 d) and the shortest at 33 °C (2.15 d). The fecundity increased from 407.52 to 763.94 eggs as temperatures were raised from 17 to 25 °C, but decreased at temperatures from 25 °C to 33 °C. The intrinsic rate of increase (r), finite rate of increase (λ), and net reproductive rate (R0) increased as temperatures increased from 17 to 25 °C, then decreased when temperatures exceeded 25 °C. In contrast, the mean generation time (T) decreased as temperatures increased from 17 to 33 °C. Based on the estimated data, the highest female age-stage-specific fecundity (fx) and age-specific fecundity (mx) were 81.91 and 45.04 eggs, respectively, at 25 °C. The age-stage life expectancy (exj) of all stages decreased as the temperature increased. The reproductive value (vxj) increased gradually with age and stage. The developmental rates of A. dissimilis between 17 to 29 °C fit the linear equation y  = -0.01315 + 0.001303x, with a coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.9314. In conclusion, our finding clearly states that A. dissimilis has the greatest population increase at 25 °C, and this may help develop appropriate pest management strategies. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of

  6. Differential Listeria monocytogenes strain survival and growth in Katiki, a traditional Greek soft cheese, at different storage temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagkli, Dafni-Maria; Iliopoulos, Vassilios; Stergiou, Virginia; Lazaridou, Anna; Nychas, George-John

    2009-06-01

    Katiki Domokou is a traditional Greek cheese, which has received the Protected Designation of Origin recognition since 1994. Its microfloras have not been studied although its structure and composition may enable (or even favor) the survival and growth of several pathogens, including Listeria monocytogenes. The persistence of L. monocytogenes during storage at different temperatures has been the subject of many studies since temperature abuse of food products is often encountered. In the present study, five strains of L. monocytogenes were aseptically inoculated individually and as a cocktail in Katiki Domokou cheese, which was then stored at 5, 10, 15, and 20 degrees C. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to monitor strain evolution or persistence during storage at different temperatures in the case of the cocktail inoculum. The results suggested that strain survival of L. monocytogenes was temperature dependent since different strains predominated at different temperatures. Such information is of great importance in risk assessment studies, which typically consider only the presence or absence of the pathogen.

  7. The Effect of Temperature and Precipitation Conditions on the Growth and Development Dynamics of Five Cultivars of Processing Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jędrszczyk Elżbieta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cultivation of field tomato in Poland meets unfavorable temperature and precipitation conditions, which affect yield and quality. The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of temperature and precipitation conditions on the growth and development dynamics of five cultivars of processing tomato. The analysis took into account the key morphological characteristics of the plant, the inflorescence and fruit, which determine the suitability of the cultivar for processing. Analysis of the effect of meteorological elements on the stem development showed that stem length was most strongly influenced by precipitation – both total precipitation and frequency, rather than by temperature; the greater the rainfall, the more intensive stem elongation. High levels of precipitation limited gains in stem thickness. The number of flowers and fruits formed per inflorescence was negatively correlated with temperature. Excessive precipitation during the entire growing period led to formation of smaller fruits. The length and width of the fruit were negatively correlated with the frequency of precipitation in all stages, and with total precipitation during the period from planting to setting of the first fruits. A beneficial effect of temperature on the length and width of the fruit was noted during the entire growing period. The tomato fruit formed a thicker pericarp when precipitation was more frequent.

  8. Impact of phenolic substrate and growth temperature on the arthrobacter chlorophenolicus proteome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unell, Maria; Abraham, Paul E.; Shah, Manesh; Zhang, Bing; Ruckert, Christian; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Jansson, Janet K.

    2009-02-15

    We compared the Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus proteome during growth on 4-chlorophenol, 4-nitrophenol or phenol at 5 C and 28 C; both for the wild type and a mutant strain with mass spectrometry based proteomics. A label free workflow employing spectral counting identified 3749 proteins across all growth conditions, representing over 70% of the predicted genome and 739 of these proteins form the core proteome. Statistically significant differences were found in the proteomes of cells grown under different conditions including differentiation of hundreds of unknown proteins. The 4-chlorophenol-degradation pathway was confirmed, but not that for phenol.

  9. Population growth and development of the psocid Liposcelis brunnea (Psocoptera: Liposcelididae) at constant temperatures and relative humidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opit, G P; Throne, J E

    2009-06-01

    We studied the effects of temperature and relative humidity on population growth and development of the psocid Liposcelis brunnea Motschulsky. L. brunnea did not survive at 43% RH, but populations increased from 22.5 to 32.5 degrees C and 55-75% RH. Interestingly, we found population growth was higher at 63% RH than at 75% RH, and the greatest population growth was recorded at 32.5 degrees C and 63% RH. At 35 degrees C, L. brunnea nymphal survivorship was 33%, and populations declined or barely grew. L. brunnea males have two to four nymphal instars, and the percentages of males with two, three, and four instars were 13, 82, and 5%, respectively. Female L. brunnea have three to five instars, and the percentages of females with three, four, and five instars were 18, 78, and 4%, respectively. The life cycle was shorter for males than females. We developed temperature-dependent development equations for male and female eggs, individual nymphal, combined nymphal, and combined immature stages and nymphal survivorship. The ability of L. brunnea to multiply rather rapidly at 55% RH may allow it to thrive under conditions of low relative humidity where other Liposcelis species may not. These data give us a better understanding of L. brunnea population dynamics and can be used to help develop effective management strategies for this psocid.

  10. Latitudinal gradients in growth and spawning of sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax, and their relationship with temperature and photoperiod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinagre, C.; Ferreira, T.; Matos, L.; Costa, M. J.; Cabral, H. N.

    2009-02-01

    0-group Sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax, were captured in four estuarine nursery areas along the Portuguese coast, during the spring and summer of 2005. This coast has a North-South orientation which means that it is particularly suited for the investigation of latitudinal trends. Growth and hatch dates were estimated through otolith daily increment analysis. A clear latitudinal gradient in growth rates was detected. D. labrax mean growth rates were 0.48 mm d -1, 0.51 mm d -1, 0.56 mm d -1 and 0.61 mm d -1, from the Ria de Aveiro, the Mondego estuary, the Tagus estuary and the Mira estuary, respectively. A latitudinal gradient also existed in the spawning season of this species, particularly concerning its onset, which occurred earlier in the South. Analysis of sea surface temperature data from the adjacent coastal waters showed that spawning is not triggered by an increase in temperature, as has been argued in other coastal areas at higher latitudes. Photoperiod played a crucial role in the determination of spawning season at the Portuguese coast latitudinal range. The impact of future climate change on the observed patterns is also discussed.

  11. Plasma-enhanced low temperature growth of silicon nanowires and hierarchical structures by using tin and indium catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Linwei; O' Donnell, Benedict; Alet, Pierre-Jean; Cabarrocas, Pere Roca i [Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces (LPICM), Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Conesa-Boj, S; Peiro, F; Arbiol, J [MIND-IN2UB, Departement d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, E-08028 Barcelona, CAT (Spain)], E-mail: Linwei.Yu@polytechnique.edu, E-mail: Pere.roca@polytechnique.edu

    2009-06-03

    Plasma-enhanced low temperature growth (<300 deg. C) of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) and hierarchical structures via a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism are investigated. The SiNWs were grown using tin and indium as catalysts prepared by in situ H{sub 2} plasma reduction of SnO{sub 2} and ITO substrates, respectively. Effective growth of SiNWs at temperatures as low as 240 deg. C have been achieved, while tin is found to be more ideal than indium in achieving a better size and density control of the SiNWs. Ultra-thin (4-8 nm) silica nanowires, sprouting from the dendritic nucleation patterns on the catalyst's surface, were also observed to form during the cooling process. A kinetic growth model has been proposed to account for their formation mechanism. This hierarchical structure combines the advantages of the size and position controllability from the catalyst-on-top VLS-SiNWs and the ultra-thin size from the catalyst-on-bottom VLS-ScNWs.

  12. Fatigue delamination growth in woven glass/epoxy composite laminates under mixed-mode II/III loading conditions at cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Tomo; Miura, Masaya; Shindo, Yasuhide; Narita, Fumio

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the cryogenic delamination growth behavior in woven glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite laminates under mixed-mode II/III fatigue loading. Fatigue delamination tests were conducted with six-point bending plate (6PBP) specimens at room temperature, liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K) and liquid helium temperature (4 K), and the delamination growth rate data for various mixed-mode ratios of Modes II and III were obtained. The energy release rate was evaluated using the three-dimensional finite element method. In addition, the fatigue delamination growth mechanisms were characterized by scanning electron microscopic observations of the specimen fracture surfaces.

  13. The effect of sugar concentration and temperature on growth and volatile phenol production by Dekkera bruxellensis in wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barata, André; Pagliara, Daniela; Piccininno, Tiziana; Tarantino, Francesco; Ciardulli, Wilma; Malfeito-Ferreira, Manuel; Loureiro, Virgílio

    2008-11-01

    The wine spoilage yeast Dekkera bruxellensis was evaluated for the production of 4-ethylphenol under low concentrations (0.02-20 g L(-1)) of glucose and fructose in synthetic media. Measurable amounts of 4-ethylphenol were produced over 0.2 g L(-1) of each sugar. The yeast growth rate and amount of biomass formed increased from 0.2 to 20 g L(-1) of glucose or fructose, being accompanied by increasing production of 4-ethylphenol. In red wines, the production of 4-ethylphenol was only observed in the presence of growing populations of indigenous or inoculated strains of D. bruxellensis. The production rate of 4-ethylphenol varied between 22 and 93 mug day(-1) either with inoculated strains or wild populations in bottled wines. The production rate of 4-ethylphenol as a function of the increase in the number of cells varied from 349 to 1882 mug L(-1) per one log CFU mL(-1). The effect of temperature on cellular viability and 4-ethylphenol production was tested in red wines with indigenous or inoculated strains of D. bruxellensis. Incubation temperatures of 15, 20 and 25 degrees C allowed cellular growth and volatile phenol production. Increasing incubation temperatures to 36 degrees C induced full viability loss of 10 strains of D. bruxellensis within <12 h.

  14. Effect of dextrose, valine, glycine and thiamine on growth rate of Lactobacillus acidophillus incubated at various temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R Monadi Sefidan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In numerous studies the beneficial impacts of probiotics on human health have been documented. Hence, there is a strong trend for the production of such foods and dairy products in particular, by many of the food processing establishments. In this regard, one of the major perequisites is to recognize the optimum conditions affecting the growth of probiotic organisms. This study aimed to investigate the impact of various concentrations of dextrose, valine, glycine and thiamine as well as different incubation temperatures on growth rate of Lactobacillus acidophillus in steril milk. In order to locate the ideal temperature, L. acidophillus was incubated at 38 °C, 40 °C, 42 °C and 44 °C. Moreover, thiamine (0, 5, 10 and 15 ppm, dextrose (0, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1%, glycine and valine (0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 ppm was added to steril milk. The acidity of milk-as an indication of bacterial activity-was measured periodically during 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 h of incubation. In comparison with the other temperatures, the activity of L. acidophillus was found significantly (P < 0.05 higher at 42 °C. According to the results, addition of dextrose, valine, glycine did not accelerate the production of acidic components; however, it seems that these substances could enhance the potency of L. acidophillus to produce gas and proteolytic enzymes.

  15. Room-Temperature Curing and Grain Growth at High Humidity in Conductive Adhesives with Ultra-Low Silver Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersen, Sigurd R.; Redford, Keith; Njagi, John; Kristiansen, Helge; Helland, Susanne; Kalland, Erik; Goia, Dan V.; Zhang, Zhiliang; He, Jianying

    2017-07-01

    Isotropic conductive adhesives (ICAs) are alternatives to metallic solders as interconnects in solar modules and electronic devices, but normally require silver contents >25 vol.% and elevated curing temperatures to achieve reasonable conductivity. In this work, ICAs are prepared with a silver content of 1.0 vol.% by using polymer spheres coated with nanograined silver thin films as filler particles. In contrast to conventional ICAs, there are no organic lubricants on the silver surfaces to obstruct the formation of metallic contacts, and conductivity is achieved even when the adhesive is cured at room temperature. When exposed to long-term storage at 85°C and 85% relative humidity, the silver films undergo significant grain growth, evidenced by field-emission scanning electron microscopy observation of ion-milled cross-sections and x-ray diffraction. This has a positive effect on the electrical conductivity of the ICA through the widening of metallic contacts and decreased scattering of electrons at grain boundaries, and is explained by an electrochemical Ostwald ripening process. The effects of decoupling heat and humidity is investigated by storage at either 85°C or immersion in water. It is shown that the level of grain growth during the various post-curing treatments is dependent on the initial curing temperature.

  16. Effects of temperature, pH, water activity and CO2 concentration on growth of Rhizopus oligosporus NRRL 2710.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparringa, R A; Kendall, M; Westby, A; Owens, J D

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the effects of temperature, pH, water activity (aw) and CO2 concentration on the growth of Rhizopus oligosporus NRRL 2710. Hyphal extension rates from mycelial and spore inocula were measured on media with different aw (approximately 1.0, 0.98 and 0.96) and pH (3.5, 5.5 and 7.5) incubated at 30, 37 or 42 degrees C in atmospheres containing 0.03, 12.5 or 25% (v/v) CO2. The effects of environmental conditions on hyphal extension rate were modelled using surface response methodology. The rate of hyphal extension was very sensitive to pH, exhibiting a pronounced optimum at pH 5.5-5.8. The hyphal extension rate was less sensitive to temperature, aw or CO2, exhibiting maximum rates at 42 degrees C, a(w) approximately 1.0 and 0.03% (v/v) CO2. The fastest hyphal extension rate (1.7 mm h(-1)) was predicted to occur at 42 degrees C, pH 5.85, a(w) approximately 1.0 and 0.03% CO2. The present work is the first to model the simultaneous effects of temperature, pH, aw and CO2 concentration on mould growth. The information relates to tempe fermentation and to possible control of the microflora in Tanzanian cassava heap fermentations.

  17. Growth temperature regulation of some genes that define the superficial capsular carbohydrate composition of Escherichia coli K92.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navasa, Nicolás; Rodríguez-Aparicio, Leandro B; Ferrero, Miguel Ángel; Moteagudo-Mera, Andrea; Martínez-Blanco, Honorina

    2011-07-01

    We studied growth temperature as a factor controlling the expression of genes involved in capsular polymers of Escherichia coli K92. These genes are shown to be regulated by growth temperature. Expression levels of genes belonging to the kps cluster, responsible for polysialic acid (PA) biosynthesis, were significantly increased at 37 °C compared with at 19 °C, being up to 500-fold increased for neuE and neuS genes. Similarly, the genes for the nan operon, responsible for PA catabolism, also reached higher expression levels at 37 °C, although with slightly lower values (39-141-fold). In contrast, genes of the cps operon, which are implicated in colanic acid (CA) metabolism, were upregulated when the bacteria were grown at 19 °C, albeit to a much lesser extent (around twofold). This different regulation of genes involved in the biosynthesis of polysialic and CAs correlates with the reported maximal production temperatures for the two polymers. The results suggest that the metabolism of PA is predominantly regulated by changes in gene expression, while CA production may be regulated mainly by post-transcriptional processes such as phosphorylation-dephosphorylation reactions. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The inner membrane protein YhiM is necessary for Escherichia coli growth at high temperatures and low osmolarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, M A; Mann, M D; Evans, M A; Sparks-Thissen, R L

    2017-01-01

    To survive, Escherichia coli must be able to survive in rapidly changing environmental conditions including changes in temperature and osmolarity. We have studied the role of the inner membrane protein YhiM in changing environmental conditions. Our data indicate that YhiM is required for normal growth at 37 and 41 °C but not 21 °C. YhiM-deficient cells grown at high temperatures spend more time in lag phase and stop growing at lower cell densities in comparison with their wild-type counterparts. They also have growth defects in low NaCl medium at 37 °C and do not grow at all at 41 °C. The effects of low NaCl can be rescued by addition of KCl or sucrose to the low salt medium. Finally, YhiM-deficient cells fail to grow in dilute medium at 41 °C. These data suggest that YhiM may be important in protecting the cells from changes in temperature and osmolarity.

  19. The importance of ambient temperature to growth and the induction of flowering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Robertson Mcclung

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant development is exquisitely sensitive to the environment. Light quantity, quality, and duration (photoperiod have profound effects on vegetative morphology and flowering time. Recent studies have demonstrated that ambient temperature is a similarly potent stimulus influencing morphology and flowering. In Arabidopsis, ambient temperatures that are high, but not so high as to induce a heat stress response, confer morphological changes that resemble the shade avoidance syndrome. Similarly, these high but not stressful temperatures can accelerate flowering under short day conditions as effectively as exposure to long days. Photoperiodic flowering entails a series of external coincidences, in which environmental cycles of light and dark must coincide with an internal cycle in gene expression established by the endogenous circadian clock. It is evident that a similar model of external coincidence applies to the effects of elevated ambient temperature on both vegetative morphology and the vegetative to reproductive transition. Further study is imperative, because global warming is predicted to have major effects on the performance and distribution of wild species and strong adverse effects on crop yields. It is critical to understand temperature perception and response at a mechanistic level and to integrate this knowledge with our understanding of other environmental responses, including biotic and abiotic stresses, in order to improve crop production sufficiently to sustainably feed an expanding world population.

  20. Effects of Ambient Temperature on Growth Performance, Blood Metabolites, and Immune Cell Populations in Korean Cattle Steers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Kang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to cold may affect growth performance in accordance with the metabolic and immunological activities of animals. We evaluated whether ambient temperature affects growth performance, blood metabolites, and immune cell populations in Korean cattle. Eighteen Korean cattle steers with a mean age of 10 months and a mean weight of 277 kg were used. All steers were fed a growing stage-concentrate diet at a rate of 1.5% of body weight and Timothy hay ad libitum for 8 weeks. Experimental period 1 (P1 was for four weeks from March 7 to April 3 and period 2 (P2 was four weeks from April 4 to May 1. Mean (8.7°C and minimum (1.0°C indoor ambient temperatures during P1 were lower (p<0.001 than those (13.0°C and 6.2°C, respectively during P2. Daily dry matter feed intake in both the concentrate diet and forage groups was higher (p<0.001 during P2 than P1. Average daily weight gain was higher (p<0.001 during P2 (1.38 kg/d than P1 (1.13 kg/d. Feed efficiency during P2 was higher (p = 0.015 than P1. Blood was collected three times; on March 7, April 4, and May 2. Nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA were higher on March 7 than April 4 and May 2. Blood cortisol, glucose, and triglyceride concentrations did not differ among months. Blood CD4+, CD8+, and CD4+CD25+ T cell percentages were higher, while CD8+CD25+ T cell percentage was lower, during the colder month of March than during May, suggesting that ambient temperature affects blood T cell populations. In conclusion, colder ambient temperature decreased growth and feed efficiency in Korean cattle steers. The higher circulating NEFA concentrations observed in March compared to April suggest that lipolysis may occur at colder ambient temperatures to generate heat and maintain body temperature, resulting in lower feed efficiency in March.

  1. A multilevel analysis of fruit growth of two tomato cultivars in response to fruit temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okello, R.C.; Visser, de P.H.B.; Heuvelink, E.; Lammers, M.; Maagd, de R.A.; Struik, P.C.; Marcelis, L.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Fruit phenotype is a resultant of inherent genetic potential in interaction with impact of environment experienced during crop and fruit growth. The aim of this study was to analyze the genetic and physiological basis for the difference in fruit size between a small (‘Brioso’) and intermediate

  2. Adaptation of growth and respiration of three varieties of Caragana to environmental temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weili Yu; Lee D. Hansen; Wenying Fan; Wenyi Zhao; E. Durant McArthur

    2008-01-01

    Growth and respiratory characteristics of Caragana korshinskii from Wushen and two different seed sources of C. davazamcii from Helinger and Yijinhuole, all grown at the same conditions, were determined by measuring metabolic heat and CO2 production rates by isothermal calorimetry at 5 °C intervals from 10 to 40 °C. Substrate...

  3. Temperature and rainfall strongly drive temporal growth variation in Asian tropical forest trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlam, M.; Baker, P.J.; Bunyavejchewin, S.; Zuidema, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Climate change effects on growth rates of tropical trees may lead to alterations in carbon cycling of carbon-rich tropical forests. However, climate sensitivity of broad-leaved lowland tropical trees is poorly understood. Dendrochronology (tree-ring analysis) provides a powerful tool to study the

  4. Crop growth and nitrogen turnover under increased temperatures and low autumn and winter light intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Ingrid Kaag; Lægdsmand, Mette; Olesen, Jørgen E

    2010-01-01

    The rise in mean annual temperatures under the projected climate change will affect both soil organic matter turnover and cropping patterns in agriculture. Nitrogen (N) mineralization may be higher during autumn and winter and may increase the risk of nitrate leaching. Our study tested whether...... pots in November, December and February. Reference pots with bare soil were included. N mineralization clearly increased with higher temperatures with, respectively, 22% and 80% more N mineralized in bare soil at T+4 and T+8 than at T0 after 136 days. The ryegrass catch crop emptied the soil...... a soil cover of winter wheat or a ryegrass catch crop would be able to take up the extra N mineralized during autumn and winter under the low light conditions in Northern Europe, both at current average temperatures (T0) and at 4 °C (T+4) and 8 °C (T+8) above average. The crops were grown in pots...

  5. Chromium dioxide-low temperature thin film growth, structural and physical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, Pedro Miguel Fortunas Dias, 1975-

    2008-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Física, apresentada à Universidade de Lisboa através da Faculdade de Ciências, 2008 Magnetic materials exhibiting a high degree of spin polarization are being actively investigated for their potential use in spintronic devices. Among them, CrO2 is very attractive because it is a half-metal fully spin polarized at the Fermi level with a magnetic moment of 2 µB/f.u. and Curie temperature well above room temperature (RT). Therefore, much effort has been put into develo...

  6. Vacancy formation and strain in low-temperature Cu/Cu(100) growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voter, Arthur F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Uberuaga, Blas P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shim, Yunsic [UNIV. OF TOLEDO; Borovikov, Valery [UNIV. OF TOLEDO

    2008-01-01

    The development of compressive strain in metal thin films grown at low temperature has recently been revealed via X-ray diffraction and explained by the assumption that a large number of vacancies were incorporated into the growing films. The results of the molecular dynamics and parallel temperature-accelerated dynamics simulations suggest that the key factor responsible for the experimentally observed strain is an increased nanoscale surface roughness due to the suppression of thermally activated events combined with the effects of shadowing due to off-normal deposition conditions.

  7. Fatigue crack growth behavior of pressure vessel steels and submerged arc weldments in a high-temperature pressurized water environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, P. K.; Logsdon, W. A.; Begley, J. A.

    1989-10-01

    The fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) properties of SA508 C1 2a and SA533 Gr A C1 2 pressure vessel steels and the corresponding automatic submerged are weldments were developed in a high-temperature pressurized water (HPW) environment at 288 °C (550°F) and 7.2 MPa (1044 psi) at load ratios of 0.02 and 0.50. The HPW enviromment FCGR properties of these pressure vessel steels and submerged arc weldments were generally conservative, compared with the approrpriate American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section XI water environmental reference curve. The growth rate of fatigue cracks in the base materials, however, was considerably faster in the HPW environment than in a corresponding 288°C (550°F) base line air environment. The growth rate of fatigue cracks in the two submerged are weldments was also accelerated in the HPW environment but to a significantly lesser degree than that demonstrated by the corresponding base materials. In the air environment, fatigue striations were observed, independent of material and load ratio, while in the HPW environment, some intergranular facets were present. The greater environmental effect on crack growth rates displayed by the base materials, as compared with the weldments, was attributed to a different sulfide composition and morphology.

  8. Modeling Growth and Toxin Production of Toxigenic Fungi Signaled in Cheese under Different Temperature and Water Activity Regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camardo Leggieri, Marco; Decontardi, Simone; Bertuzzi, Terenzio; Pietri, Amedeo; Battilani, Paola

    2016-12-24

    The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro and model the effect of temperature (T) and water activity (aw) conditions on growth and toxin production by some toxigenic fungi signaled in cheese. Aspergillus versicolor, Penicillium camemberti, P. citrinum, P. crustosum, P. nalgiovense, P. nordicum, P. roqueforti, P. verrucosum were considered they were grown under different T (0-40 °C) and aw (0.78-0.99) regimes. The highest relative growth occurred around 25 °C; all the fungi were very susceptible to aw and 0.99 was optimal for almost all species (except for A. versicolor, awopt = 0.96). The highest toxin production occurred between 15 and 25 °C and 0.96-0.99 aw. Therefore, during grana cheese ripening, managed between 15 and 22 °C, ochratoxin A (OTA), penitrem A (PA), roquefortine-C (ROQ-C) and mycophenolic acid (MPA) are apparently at the highest production risk. Bete and logistic function described fungal growth under different T and aw regimes well, respectively. Bete function described also STC, PA, ROQ-C and OTA production as well as function of T. These models would be very useful as starting point to develop a mechanistic model to predict fungal growth and toxin production during cheese ripening and to help advising the most proper setting of environmental factors to minimize the contamination risk.

  9. Modeling Growth and Toxin Production of Toxigenic Fungi Signaled in Cheese under Different Temperature and Water Activity Regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Camardo Leggieri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro and model the effect of temperature (T and water activity (aw conditions on growth and toxin production by some toxigenic fungi signaled in cheese. Aspergillus versicolor, Penicillium camemberti, P. citrinum, P. crustosum, P. nalgiovense, P. nordicum, P. roqueforti, P. verrucosum were considered they were grown under different T (0–40 °C and aw (0.78–0.99 regimes. The highest relative growth occurred around 25 °C; all the fungi were very susceptible to aw and 0.99 was optimal for almost all species (except for A. versicolor, awopt = 0.96. The highest toxin production occurred between 15 and 25 °C and 0.96–0.99 aw. Therefore, during grana cheese ripening, managed between 15 and 22 °C, ochratoxin A (OTA, penitrem A (PA, roquefortine-C (ROQ-C and mycophenolic acid (MPA are apparently at the highest production risk. Bete and logistic function described fungal growth under different T and aw regimes well, respectively. Bete function described also STC, PA, ROQ-C and OTA production as well as function of T. These models would be very useful as starting point to develop a mechanistic model to predict fungal growth and toxin production during cheese ripening and to help advising the most proper setting of environmental factors to minimize the contamination risk.

  10. Robustness analysis of a constraint-based metabolic model links cell growth and proteomics of Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis under temperature perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wei; Chen, Zhen; Cao, Zhe; Wang, Quanhui; Zhang, Jiyuan; Bai, Xue; Wang, Rong; Liu, Siqi

    2013-04-05

    The integration of omic data with metabolic networks has been demonstrated to be an effective approach to elucidate the underlying metabolic mechanisms in life. Because the metabolic pathways of Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis (T. tengcongensis) are incomplete, we used a 1-(13)C-glucose culture to monitor intracellular isotope-labeled metabolites by GC/MS and identified the gap gene in glucose catabolism, Re-citrate synthase. Based on genome annotation and biochemical information, we reconstructed the metabolic network of glucose metabolism and amino acid synthesis in T. tengcongensis, including 253 reactions, 227 metabolites, and 236 genes. Furthermore, we performed constraint based modeling (CBM)-derived robustness analysis on the model to study the dynamic changes of the metabolic network. By perturbing the culture temperature from 75 to 55 °C, we collected the bacterial growth rates and differential proteomes. Assuming that protein abundance changes represent metabolic flux variations, we proposed that the robustness analysis of the CBM model could decipher the effect of proteome change on the bacterial growth under perturbation. For approximately 73% of the reactions, the predicted cell growth changes due to such reaction flux variations matched the observed cell growth data. Our study, therefore, indicates that differential proteome data can be integrated with metabolic network modeling and that robustness analysis is a strong method for representing the dynamic change in cell phenotypes under perturbation.

  11. Low-temperature growth of InGaN films over the entire composition range by MBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabien, Chloe A. M.; Gunning, Brendan P.; Alan Doolittle, W.; Fischer, Alec M.; Wei, Yong O.; Xie, Hongen; Ponce, Fernando A.

    2015-09-01

    The surface morphology, microstructural, and optical properties of indium gallium nitride (InGaN) films grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy under low growth temperatures and slightly nitrogen-rich growth conditions are studied. The single-phase InGaN films exhibit improved defect density, an absence of stacking faults, efficient In incorporation, enhanced optical properties, but a grain-like morphology. With increasing In content, we observe an increase in the degree of relaxation and a complete misfit strain relaxation through the formation of a uniform array of misfit dislocations at the InGaN/GaN interface for InGaN films with indium contents higher than 55-60%.

  12. Marine Phytoplankton Temperature versus Growth Responses from Polar to Tropical Waters – Outcome of a Scientific Community-Wide Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Philip W.; Rynearson, Tatiana A.; Armstrong, Evelyn A.; Fu, Feixue; Hayashi, Kendra; Hu, Zhangxi; Hutchins, David A.; Kudela, Raphael M.; Litchman, Elena; Mulholland, Margaret R.; Passow, Uta; Strzepek, Robert F.; Whittaker, Kerry A.; Yu, Elizabeth; Thomas, Mridul K.

    2013-01-01

    “It takes a village to finish (marine) science these days” Paraphrased from Curtis Huttenhower (the Human Microbiome project) The rapidity and complexity of climate change and its potential effects on ocean biota are challenging how ocean scientists conduct research. One way in which we can begin to better tackle these challenges is to conduct community-wide scientific studies. This study provides physiological datasets fundamental to understanding functional responses of phytoplankton growth rates to temperature. While physiological experiments are not new, our experiments were conducted in many laboratories using agreed upon protocols and 25 strains of eukaryotic and prokaryotic phytoplankton isolated across a wide range of marine environments from polar to tropical, and from nearshore waters to the open ocean. This community-wide approach provides both comprehensive and internally consistent datasets produced over considerably shorter time scales than conventional individual and often uncoordinated lab efforts. Such datasets can be used to parameterise global ocean model projections of environmental change and to provide initial insights into the magnitude of regional biogeographic change in ocean biota in the coming decades. Here, we compare our datasets with a compilation of literature data on phytoplankton growth responses to temperature. A comparison with prior published data suggests that the optimal temperatures of individual species and, to a lesser degree, thermal niches were similar across studies. However, a comparison of the maximum growth rate across studies revealed significant departures between this and previously collected datasets, which may be due to differences in the cultured isolates, temporal changes in the clonal isolates in cultures, and/or differences in culture conditions. Such methodological differences mean that using particular trait measurements from the prior literature might introduce unknown errors and bias into modelling

  13. Marine phytoplankton temperature versus growth responses from polar to tropical waters--outcome of a scientific community-wide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Philip W; Rynearson, Tatiana A; Armstrong, Evelyn A; Fu, Feixue; Hayashi, Kendra; Hu, Zhangxi; Hutchins, David A; Kudela, Raphael M; Litchman, Elena; Mulholland, Margaret R; Passow, Uta; Strzepek, Robert F; Whittaker, Kerry A; Yu, Elizabeth; Thomas, Mridul K

    2013-01-01

    "It takes a village to finish (marine) science these days" Paraphrased from Curtis Huttenhower (the Human Microbiome project) The rapidity and complexity of climate change and its potential effects on ocean biota are challenging how ocean scientists conduct research. One way in which we can begin to better tackle these challenges is to conduct community-wide scientific studies. This study provides physiological datasets fundamental to understanding functional responses of phytoplankton growth rates to temperature. While physiological experiments are not new, our experiments were conducted in many laboratories using agreed upon protocols and 25 strains of eukaryotic and prokaryotic phytoplankton isolated across a wide range of marine environments from polar to tropical, and from nearshore waters to the open ocean. This community-wide approach provides both comprehensive and internally consistent datasets produced over considerably shorter time scales than conventional individual and often uncoordinated lab efforts. Such datasets can be used to parameterise global ocean model projections of environmental change and to provide initial insights into the magnitude of regional biogeographic change in ocean biota in the coming decades. Here, we compare our datasets with a compilation of literature data on phytoplankton growth responses to temperature. A comparison with prior published data suggests that the optimal temperatures of individual species and, to a lesser degree, thermal niches were similar across studies. However, a comparison of the maximum growth rate across studies revealed significant departures between this and previously collected datasets, which may be due to differences in the cultured isolates, temporal changes in the clonal isolates in cultures, and/or differences in culture conditions. Such methodological differences mean that using particular trait measurements from the prior literature might introduce unknown errors and bias into modelling

  14. Incorporation of plant growth regulators into the priming solution improves sugar beet germination, emergence and seedling growth at low-temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govahi, Mostafa; Arvin, Mohammad Javad; Saffari, Ghazaleh

    2007-10-01

    In a series of experiments, impact of inclusion of plant growth regulators into the KNO3 priming solution on low temperature seed germination, emergence percentage and seedling growth of sugar beet was investigated. Seeds were primed in 3% KNO3 solution for 6 days at 25 degrees C in darkness containing one of the following: 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, or 1 mM acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) or 1, 3, 5 or 10 microM methyl jasmonated (MeJA). A non-primed treatment was also included in the experiment. Priming seeds in the presence or absence of plant growth regulators in general improved final germination percentage (FGP), germination rate (G50) and germination synchrony (G10-90) at 15 degrees C compared with non-primed seeds which had an FGP of 42%, G50 of 11.3 days and G10-90 of 11.7 days. Priming seeds in KNO3 solution containing 0.05 mM of ASA resulted in the highest germination percentage (89%), fastest germination rate (G50 = 5.3 days) and the most synchronous germination (G10-90 = 10.7 days). Emergence percentages were the highest for the seeds primed in the presence of 0.05 mM ASA (83%) and 3 microM MeJA (81%) while non-primed seeds had an emergence percentage of 40%. Fastest emergence rate (E50) were also obtained from seeds primed in KNO3 supplemented with 3 microM MeJA (E50 = 14.4 days) and 0.05 mM ASA (E50 = 14.4 days). Shoot fresh and dry weight of seedlings were significantly affected by treatments and priming in the presence of 0.05 mM ASA resulted in highest seedling shoot fresh and dry weight. These results indicate that priming seeds in 0.05 mM of ASA or 3 microM MeJA incorporated into the KNO3 solution can be more effective than KNO3 alone to improve low temperature germination performance of seeds and subsequent seedling growth.

  15. Bayesian prediction of bacterial growth temperature range based on genome sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dan Børge; Vesth, Tammi Camilla; Hallin, Peter Fischer

    2012-01-01

    Background: The preferred habitat of a given bacterium can provide a hint of which types of enzymes of potential industrial interest it might produce. These might include enzymes that are stable and active at very high or very low temperatures. Being able to accurately predict this based on a gen...... and psychrophilic adapted bacterial genomes....

  16. Growth and functioning of the microbial plankton community: effects of temperature, nutrients and light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brauer, V.S.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial plankton form the basis of the food web in aquatic habitats. Due to their vast abundances they influence the cycling of elements and the Earth’s climate at a global scale. This thesis aims at a better understanding of how environmental factors such as temperature and the availability of

  17. High day- and night-time temperatures affect grain growth dynamics in contrasting rice genotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shi, Wanju; Yin, Xinyou; Struik, Paul C.; Solis, Celymar; Xie, Fangming; Schmidt, Ralf C.; Huang, Min; Zou, Yingbin; Ye, Changrong; Jagadish, S.V.K.

    2017-01-01

    Rice grain yield and quality are predicted to be highly vulnerable to global warming. Five genotypes including heat-tolerant and susceptible checks, a heat-tolerant near-isogenic line and two hybrids were exposed to control (31 °C/23 °C, day/night), high night-time temperature (HNT; 31 °C/30 °C),

  18. Genomic expression dominance in the natural allopolyploid Coffea arabica is massively affected by growth temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardil, Amélie; de Almeida, Juliana Dantas; Combes, Marie Christine; Lashermes, Philippe; Bertrand, Benoît

    2011-11-01

    • Polyploidy occurs throughout the evolutionary history of many plants and considerably impacts species diversity, giving rise to novel phenotypes and leading to ecological diversification and colonization of new niches. Recent studies have documented dynamic changes in plant polyploid gene expression, which reflect the genomic and functional plasticity of duplicate genes and genomes. • The aim of the present study was to describe genomic expression dominance between a relatively recently formed natural allopolyploid (Coffea arabica) and its ancestral parents (Coffea canephora and Coffea eugenioides) and to determine if the divergence was environment-dependent. Employing a microarray platform designed against 15,522 unigenes, we assayed unigene expression levels in the allopolyploid and its two parental diploids. For each unigene, we measured expression variations among the three species grown under two temperature conditions (26-22°C (day-night temperatures) and 30-26°C (day-night temperatures)). • More than 35% of unigenes were differentially expressed in each comparison at both temperatures, except for C. arabica vs C. canephora in the 30-26°C range, where an unexpectedly low unigene expression divergence (< 9%) was observed. • Our data revealed evidence of transcription profile divergence between the allopolyploid and its parental species, greatly affected by environmental conditions, and provide clues to the plasticity phenomenon in allopolyploids. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  19. Optimisation of CO2 and Temperature in Terms of Crop Growth and Energy Use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieleman, J.A.; Meinen, E.; Marcelis, L.F.M.; Zwart, de H.F.; Henten, van E.J.

    2005-01-01

    In current greenhouse climate control, temperature set points follow a pre-set trajectory based on absolute or solar time parameters, adapted only to instantaneous and daily radiation. CO2 is supplied during a well defined period of the day until a maximum concentration is reached. However, the rate

  20. Growth rate and trapping efficacy of nematode-trapping fungi under constant and fluctuating temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, A.S.; Larsen, M.; Wolstrup, J.

    1999-01-01

    degrees C. Spores of each fungal isolate were added to faecal cultures containing eggs of Cooperia oncophora at a concentration of 6250 spores/g faeces. The cultures were incubated for 14 days at the same temperature regimes described above. Control faeces (without fungal material) were also cultured...

  1. Growth responses to dietary lysine at high and low ambient temperatures in male turkeys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldkamp, T.; Ferket, P.; Kwakkel, R.P.; Kogut, J.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    2003-01-01

    Several researchers have postulated that dietary lysine requirements for turkeys are dependent upon ambient temperature. To test and quantify this hypothesis, a factorial experiment was designed with four dietary lysine levels (75, 90, 105, and 120% of NRC lysine recommendations) from 1 d of age

  2. Not Noisy, Just Wrong: The Role of Suboptimal Inference in Behavioral Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Jeffrey M.; Ma, Wei Ji; Pitkow, Xaq; Latham, Peter E.; Pouget, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Behavior varies from trial to trial even when the stimulus is maintained as constant as possible. In many models, this variability is attributed to noise in the brain. Here, we propose that there is another major source of variability: suboptimal inference. Importantly, we argue that in most tasks of interest, and particularly complex ones, suboptimal inference is likely to be the dominant component of behavioral variability. This perspective explains a variety of intriguing observations, including why variability appears to be larger on the sensory than on the motor side, and why our sensors are sometimes surprisingly unreliable. PMID:22500627

  3. Frequency and predictors of suboptimal glycemic control in an African diabetic population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kibirige D

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Davis Kibirige,1 George Patrick Akabwai,2 Leaticia Kampiire,3 Daniel Ssekikubo Kiggundu,4 William Lumu5 1Department of Medicine/Diabetic and Hypertension Clinics, Our Lady of Consolota Hospital, Kisubi, 2Baylor College of Medicine, Children’s Foundation, 3Infectious Diseases Research Collaboration, Kampala, 4Nephrology Unit, Mulago National Referral and Teaching Hospital, Kampala, 5Department of Medicine and Diabetes/Endocrine Unit, Mengo Hospital, Mengo, Uganda Background: Persistent suboptimal glycemic control is invariably associated with onset and progression of acute and chronic diabetic complications in diabetic patients. In Uganda, studies documenting the magnitude and predictors of suboptimal glycemic control in adult ambulatory diabetic patients are limited. This study aimed at determining the frequency and predictors of suboptimal glycemic control in adult diabetic patients attending three urban outpatient diabetic clinics in Uganda. Methods: In this hospital-based cross-sectional study, eligible ambulatory adult diabetic patients attending outpatient diabetic clinics of three urban hospitals were consecutively enrolled over 11 months. Suboptimal glycemic control was defined as glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c level ≥7%. Multivariable analysis was applied to determine the predictors. Results: The mean age of the study participants was 52.2±14.4 years, and the majority of them were females (283, 66.9%. The median (interquartile range HbA1c level was 9% (6.8%–12.4%. Suboptimal glycemic control was noted in 311 study participants, accounting for 73.52% of the participants. HbA1c levels of 7%–8%, 8.1%–9.9%, and ≥10% were noted in 56 (13.24%, 76 (17.97%, and 179 (42.32% study participants, respectively. The documented predictors of suboptimal glycemic control were metformin monotherapy (odds ratio: 0.36, 95% confidence interval: 0.21–0.63, p<0.005 and insulin therapy (odds ratio: 2.41, 95% confidence interval: 1.41–4.12, p=0

  4. Influence of water activity and temperature on growth and fumonisin production by Fusarium proliferatum strains on irradiated wheat grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendoya, Eugenia; Monge, María Del Pilar; Chiacchiera, Stella Maris; Farnochi, María Cecilia; Ramirez, María Laura

    2018-02-02

    Wheat is the most important cereal consumed by the Argentine population. In previous studies performed in durum and common wheat grains in this country it has been observed fumonisin contamination as well as high incidence of Fusarium proliferatum. Fumonisins are toxic fungal metabolites, and consumption of fumonisin-contaminated maize has been epidemiologically associated with oesophageal cancer and neural tube defects in some human populations. Using irradiated wheat-grains, the effects of abiotic factors, temperature (15, 25, and 30°C) and water activity (a W ; 0.995, 0.98, 0.96, 0.94, 0.92, and 0.88), on mycelial growth and fumonisin biosynthesis were compared for three F. proliferatum strains isolated from wheat grains in Argentina. Although all isolates showed similar profiles of growth, the fumonisin production profiles were slightly different. Maximum growth rates were obtained at the highest a W (0.995) and 25°C, with growth decreasing as the a W of the medium was reduced. Maximum amounts of total fumonisins (FB 1 , FB 2 and FB 3 ) were produced at 0.995 a W and 15°C for 2 strains, and at 25°C and 0.995 a W for the third one. Fumonisins concentrations varied considerably depending on the a W and temperature interactions assayed. Studied strains showed different fumonisin production profiles. Two-dimensional profiles of a W by temperature interactions were developed from these data to identify areas where conditions indicate a significant risk of fumonisins accumulation on wheat. As a result, temperature and a W conditions that resulted in fumonisins production are those found during wheat grain development (especially milk and dough stages) in the field. This is the first study made using irradiated wheat grains and provides useful baseline data on conditions representing a low or a high risk for fumonisins contamination of wheat grains which is of concern because this cereal is destined mainly for human consumption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All

  5. Hafnium carbamates and ureates: new class of precursors for low-temperature growth of HfO2 thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Milanov, Andrian P; Barreca, Davide; Gasparotto, Alberto; Becker, Hans-Werner; Winter, Manuela; Fischer, Roland A; Devi, Anjana

    2009-04-21

    Novel volatile compounds of hafnium, namely tetrakis-N,O-dialkylcarbamato hafnium(iv) [Hf((i)PrNC(O)O(i)Pr)(4)] () and tetrakis-N,N,N'-trialkylureato hafnium(iv) [Hf((i)PrNC(O)N-(Me)Et)(4)] (), have been synthesized through the simple insertion reaction of isopropyl isocyanate into hafnium isopropoxide and hafnium ethylmethylamide, respectively; based on the promising thermal properties, compound has been evaluated as a precursor for metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) of HfO(2) thin films, which resulted in the growth of stoichiometric and crystalline layers with a uniform morphology at temperature as low as 250 degrees C.

  6. Influence of Thawing Methods and Storage Temperatures on Bacterial Diversity, Growth Kinetics, and Biogenic Amine Development in Atlantic Mackerel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Onyang, S.; Palmadottir, H.; Tomason, T.

    2016-01-01

    Limited knowledge is currently available on the influence of fish thawing and subsequent storage conditions on bacterial growth kinetics, succession, and diversity alongside the production of biogenic amines. This study aimed to address these factors during the thawing and subsequent storage of m...... amine producing bacteria, with the exception of the genus Proteus, which was 8.6% in fast-thawed mackerel during storage at ambient temperature. This suggests that the decarboxylation potential is dependent on both microbial load and microbial community structure....

  7. Low-temperature leaf photosynthesis of a Miscanthus germplasm collection correlates positively to shoot growth rate and specific leaf area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Xiurong; Kørup, Kirsten; Andersen, Mathias Neumann; Petersen, Karen Koefoed; Prade, Thomas; Jeżowski, Stanisław; Ornatowski, Szymon; Górynowicz, Barbara; Spitz, Idan; Lærke, Poul Erik; Jørgensen, Uffe

    2016-06-01

    The C4 perennial grass miscanthus has been found to be less sensitive to cold than most other C4 species, but still emerges later in spring than C3 species. Genotypic differences in miscanthus were investigated to identify genotypes with a high cold tolerance at low temperatures and quick recovery upon rising temperatures to enable them to exploit the early growing season in maritime cold climates. Suitable methods for field screening of cold tolerance in miscanthus were also identified. Fourteen genotypes of M. sacchariflorus, M. sinensis, M. tinctorius and M. × giganteus were selected and grown under warm (24 °C) and cold (14 °C) conditions in a controlled environment. Dark-adapted chlorophyll fluorescence, specific leaf area (SLA) and net photosynthetic rate at a photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) of 1000 μmol m(-2) s(-1) (A1000) were measured. Photosynthetic light and CO2 response curves were obtained from 11 of the genotypes, and shoot growth rate was measured under field conditions. A positive linear relationship was found between SLA and light-saturated phot