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  1. Suboptimal care and maternal mortality among foreign-born women in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esscher, Annika; Binder-Finnema, Pauline; Bødker, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several European countries report differences in risk of maternal mortality between immigrants from low- and middle-income countries and host country women. The present study identified suboptimal factors related to care-seeking, accessibility, and quality of care for maternal deaths...... language and suboptimal interpreter system or usage. Inadequate care occurred more often among the foreign-born (p = 0.04), whereas delays in consultation/referral and miscommunication between health care providers where equally common between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: Suboptimal care factors, major...

  2. Suboptimal care in stillbirths - a retrospective audit study.

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    Saastad, Eli; Vangen, Siri; Frøen, J Frederik

    2007-01-01

    Stillbirth rates have decreased radically over the last decades. One reason for this is improved perinatal care. The aim of this study was to explore whether sub-optimal factors in stillbirths were more frequent among non-western than western women. Population-based perinatal audit of 356 stillbirths after gestational week 23, in 2 Norwegian counties during 1998-2003 (4.2 per 1,000 deliveries); of these 31% were born to non-western women. By audit, the stillbirths were attributed to optimal or sub-optimal care factors. Multivariate methods were used to analyse the data. Sub-optimal factors were identified in 37% of the deaths. When compared to western women, non-western women had an increased risk of stillbirth (OR: 2.2; 95% CI: 1.3-3.8), and an increased risk of sub-optimal care (OR: 2.4; 95% CI: 1.5-3.9). More often, non-western women received sub-optimal obstetric care (plabour progression. A common failure in antenatal care for both groups was unidentified or inadequate management of intrauterine growth restriction or decreased fetal movements. Non-western women were less prone to attend the program for antenatal care or to take the consequences of recommendations from health professionals. Inadequate communication was documented in 47% of non-western mothers; an interpreter was used in 29% of these cases. Non-western women constituted a risk group for sub-optimal care factors in stillbirths. Possibilities for improvements include a reduction of language barriers, better identification and management of growth restriction for both origin groups, and adequate intervention in complicated vaginal births; with increased vigilance towards non-western women.

  3. Suboptimal palliative sedation in primary care: an exploration.

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    Pype, Peter; Teuwen, Inge; Mertens, Fien; Sercu, Marij; De Sutter, An

    2017-06-05

    Palliative sedation is a therapeutic option to control refractory symptoms in terminal palliative patients. This study aims at describing the occurrence and characteristics of suboptimal palliative sedations in primary care and at exploring the way general practitioners (GPs) experience suboptimal palliative sedation in their practice. We conducted a mixed methods study with a quantitative prospective survey in primary care and qualitative semi-structured interviews with GPs. The research team defined suboptimal palliative sedation as a time interval until deep sleep >1.5 h and/ or >2 awakenings after the start of the unconsciousness. Descriptive statistics were calculated on the quantitative data. Thematic analysis was used to analyse interview transcripts. We registered 63 palliative sedations in 1181 home deaths, 27 forms were completed. Eleven palliative sedations were suboptimal: eight due to the long time span until deep sleep; three due the number of unintended awakenings. GPs' interview analysis revealed two major themes: the shifting perception of failure and the burden of responsibility. Suboptimal palliative sedation occurs frequently in primary palliative care. Efficient communication towards family members is needed to prevent them from having unrealistic expectations and to prevent putting pressure on the GP to hasten the procedure. Sharing the burden of decision-making during the procedure with other health care professionals might diminish the heavy responsibility as perceived by GPs.

  4. Suboptimal asthma care for immigrant children: results of an audit study

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    Klazinga Niek S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known on the scope and nature of ethnic inequalities in suboptimal asthma care for children. This study aimed to assess (1 ethnic differences in suboptimal asthma care for children with an asthma exacerbation who consulted a physician, and (2 ethnic differences in the nature of suboptimal care. Methods All children aged 6–16 years who during a period of six months consulted the paediatric department of the Academic Medical Centre-University of Amsterdam or one of the six regional primary care centres with an asthma exacerbation were included. Clinical guidelines were systematically converted to review criteria following the strategy as proposed by the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research. Based upon these review criteria and their experience experts of two multidisciplinary panels retrospectively assessed the quality of care and its (possible failure to prevent the occurrence of asthma exacerbation. Results Only a small number of children (n = 35 were included in the analysis as a result of which the ethnic differences in suboptimal care were not significant. However, the results do indicate immigrant children, in particular 'other non-Western' children (n = 11, more frequently to receive suboptimal care related to the asthma exacerbation when compared to ethnic Dutch children. Furthermore, we found the nature of suboptimal care to differ with under-prescribing in the 'other non-Western' group (n = 11, lack of information exchange between physicians in the Surinamese/Antillean group (n = 12 and lack of education, and counselling of patients and parents in the ethnic Dutch (n = 12 as the most relevant factor. Conclusion Ethnic inequalities in the scope and nature of suboptimal asthma care for children in the Netherlands seem to exist. For the non-western immigrant groups the results indicate the importance of the prescription behaviour of the medical doctor, as well as the supervision by one health care

  5. Initiation of insulin glargine in patients with Type 2 diabetes in suboptimal glycaemic control positively impacts health-related quality of life. A prospective cohort study in primary care

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    Hajós, Tibor R S; Pouwer, F; de Grooth, R

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: To study prospectively the impact of initiating insulin glargine in suboptimally controlled insulin-naïve patients with Type 2 diabetes on health-related quality of life in relation to glycaemic control. METHODS: Insulin-naïve Dutch patients with Type 2 diabetes in suboptimal glycaemic...... completed self-report health-related quality of life measures, including emotional well-being (World Health Organization-5 well-being index), fear of hypoglycaemia (Hypoglycaemia Fear Survey) and diabetes symptom distress (Diabetes Symptom Checklist-revised). Data were analysed using generalized estimating...... of this observational study demonstrate combined glycaemic and health-related quality of life benefits of initiating insulin glargine in patients with Type 2 diabetes in routine primary care....

  6. Are theoretical perspectives useful to explain nurses' tolerance of suboptimal care?

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    Price, Lesley; Duffy, Kathleen; McCallum, Jacqueline; Ness, Valerie

    2015-10-01

    This paper explores two theoretical perspectives that may help nurse managers understand why staff tolerate suboptimal standards of care. Standards of care have been questioned in relation to adverse events and errors for some years in health care across the western world. More recently, the focus has shifted to inadequate nursing standards with regard to care and compassion, and a culture of tolerance by staff to these inadequate standards. The theories of conformity and cognitive dissonance are analysed to investigate their potential for helping nurse managers to understand why staff tolerate suboptimal standards of care. The literature suggests that nurses appear to adopt behaviours consistent with the theory of conformity and that they may accept suboptimal care to reduce their cognitive dissonance. Nurses may conform to be accepted by the team. This may be confounded by nurses rationalising their care to reduce the cognitive dissonance they feel. The investigation into the Mid Staffordshire National Health Service called for a change in culture towards transparency, candidness and openness. Providing insights as to why some nursing staff tolerate suboptimal care may provide a springboard to allow nurse managers to consider the complexities surrounding this required transformation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Self-care practices of Malaysian adults with diabetes and sub-optimal glycaemic control.

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    Tan, Ming Yeong; Magarey, Judy

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the self-care practices of Malaysian adults with diabetes and sub-optimal glycaemic control. Using a one-to-one interviewing approach, data were collected from 126 diabetic adults from four settings. A 75-item questionnaire was used to assess diabetes-related knowledge and self-care practices regarding, diet, medication, physical activity and self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG). Most subjects had received advice on the importance of self-care in the management of their diabetes and recognised its importance. Sixty-seven subjects (53%) scored below 50% in their diabetes-related knowledge. Subjects who consumed more meals per day (80%), or who did not include their regular sweetened food intakes in their daily meal plan (80%), or who were inactive in daily life (54%), had higher mean fasting blood glucose levels (p=0.04). Subjects with medication non-adherence (46%) also tended to have higher fasting blood glucose levels. Only 15% of the subjects practiced SMBG. Predictors of knowledge deficit and poor self-care were low level of education (p = practices among the majority of diabetic patients with sub-optimal glycaemic control. This study should contribute to the development of effective education strategies to promote health for adults with sub-optimal diabetes control.

  8. Physician, organizational, and patient factors associated with suboptimal blood pressure management in type 2 diabetic patients in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaars, Carel F; Denig, Petra; Kasje, Willeke N; Stewart, Roy E; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the quality of hypertension care in patients with type 2 diabetes in general practice and identify physician, organizational, and patient factors associated with suboptimal care. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Data from 895 randomly selected diabetic patients were extracted from

  9. Audit-based education to reduce suboptimal management of cholesterol in primary care: a before and after study.

    OpenAIRE

    de Lusignan, S; Belsey, J; Hague, N.; Dhoul, N; van Vlymen, J

    2006-01-01

    Statins are recommended for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, although they are often used in suboptimal doses and some patients may not receive lipid-lowering therapy. The Primary Care Data Quality (PCDQ) programme is an audit-based educational intervention.

  10. Consumer behaviour towards price-reduced suboptimal foods in the supermarket and the relation to food waste in households.

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    Aschemann-Witzel, Jessica; Jensen, Jacob Haagen; Jensen, Mette Hyldetoft; Kulikovskaja, Viktorija

    2017-09-01

    To combat food waste, supermarkets offer food items at a reduced price in-store when they are close to the expiration date or perceived as suboptimal. It is yet unknown, however, which considerations consumers engage in when deciding about the offer, and whether focusing particularly on the price during food purchase might be related to greater food waste at home. Knowledge about both the consumers' food purchase process for these price-reduced foods and the potential wastage of price-focused consumers can contribute to the assessment of whether or not offering suboptimal food at reduced prices in-store actually reduces food waste across the supply chain. We explore these questions in a mixed-method study including 16 qualitative accompanied shopping interviews and a quantitative online experimental survey with 848 consumers in Denmark. The interviews reveal that the consumers interviewed assess their ability to consume the price-reduced suboptimal food at home already while in the store. Consumers consider the relation between product-related factors of package unit, expiration date, and product quality, in interaction with household-related factors of freezing/storing, household size/demand, and possible meal/cooking. The survey shows that consumers who are more price-focused report lower food waste levels and lower tendency to choose the optimal food item first at home, than those who are not emphasizing the price-quality relation or do not search for price offers to the same extent. Higher age and high education also played a role, and the price-focus is lower in high-income groups and among single households. The findings allow deriving recommendations for retailers and policy makers to support both the marketability and the subsequent actual consumption of price-reduced suboptimal food, but they also raise questions for further research of this underexplored area. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Physician, organizational, and patient factors associated with suboptimal blood pressure mManagement in Type 2 diabetic patients in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaars, CF; Denig, P; Kasje, WN; Stewart, RE; Wolffenbuttel, BHR; Haaijer-Ruskamp, FM

    OBJECTIVE - To assess the quality of hypertension care in patients with type 2 diabetes in general practice and identify physician, organizational, and patient factors associated with suboptimal care. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Data from 895 randomly selected diabetic patients were extracted from

  12. Suboptimal Clinical Documentation in Young Children with Severe Obesity at Tertiary Care Centers

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    Cassandra C. Brady

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. The prevalence of severe obesity in children has doubled in the past decade. The objective of this study is to identify the clinical documentation of obesity in young children with a BMI ≥ 99th percentile at two large tertiary care pediatric hospitals. Methods. We used a standardized algorithm utilizing data from electronic health records to identify children with severe early onset obesity (BMI ≥ 99th percentile at age <6 years. We extracted descriptive terms and ICD-9 codes to evaluate documentation of obesity at Boston Children’s Hospital and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and Medical Center between 2007 and 2014. Results. A total of 9887 visit records of 2588 children with severe early onset obesity were identified. Based on predefined criteria for documentation of obesity, 21.5% of children (13.5% of visits had positive documentation, which varied by institution. Documentation in children first seen under 2 years of age was lower than in older children (15% versus 26%. Documentation was significantly higher in girls (29% versus 17%, p<0.001, African American children (27% versus 19% in whites, p<0.001, and the obesity focused specialty clinics (70% versus 15% in primary care and 9% in other subspecialty clinics, p<0.001. Conclusions. There is significant opportunity for improvement in documentation of obesity in young children, even years after the 2007 AAP guidelines for management of obesity.

  13. Audit-based education to reduce suboptimal management of cholesterol in primary care: a before and after study.

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    de Lusignan, S; Belsey, J; Hague, N; Dhoul, N; van Vlymen, J

    2006-12-01

    Statins are recommended for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, although they are often used in suboptimal doses and some patients may not receive lipid-lowering therapy. The Primary Care Data Quality (PCDQ) programme is an audit-based educational intervention. To report the PCDQ programme's effect on the cholesterol management in cardiovascular disease. Subjects and methods Anonymized general practice data from 99 practices; 5% (n = 29 915) had cardiovascular diagnoses. Mean cholesterol fell from 4.75 to 4.64 mmol l(-1); patients achieving cholesterol target (< 5 mmol l(-1)) rose from 45.3 to 53.2%. Coronary heart disease patients achieved better control (mean 4.57 mmol l(-1)) than those with stroke (4.87 mmol l(-1)) or peripheral vascular disease (4.93 mmol l(-1)). Statin prescribing increased from 57.5 to 62.7%. Patients with diabetes [odds ratio (OR) 2.06, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.91-2.21], prior myocardial infarction (MI) (OR 1.93, 95% CI 1.80-2.07), revascularization (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.33-1.73) and smokers (OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.23-1.39) were more likely to receive statins, whereas people aged 75+ (OR 0.48, 95% CI 0.45-0.50), females (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.86-0.94) and non-CHD-diagnosed (OR 0.36, 95% CI 0.34-0.38) were less likely. Diagnostic coding and number of patients who had their cholesterol measured and treated increased. There was no significant change in dosage used or inequity between the different groups prescribed statins.

  14. Lower Incidence of End-Stage Renal Disease but Suboptimal Pre-Dialysis Renal Care in Schizophrenia: A 14-Year Nationwide Cohort Study.

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    Hsu, Yueh-Han; Cheng, Jur-Shan; Ouyang, Wen-Chen; Lin, Chen-Li; Huang, Chi-Ting; Hsu, Chih-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is closely associated with cardiovascular risk factors which are consequently attributable to the development of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). However, no study has been conducted to examine ESRD-related epidemiology and quality of care before starting dialysis for patients with schizophrenia. By using nationwide health insurance databases, we identified 54,361 ESRD-free patients with schizophrenia and their age-/gender-matched subjects without schizophrenia for this retrospective cohort study (the schizophrenia cohort). We also identified a cohort of 1,244 adult dialysis patients with and without schizophrenia (1:3) to compare quality of renal care before dialysis and outcomes (the dialysis cohort). Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) for dialysis and death. Odds ratio (OR) derived from logistic regression models were used to delineate quality of pre-dialysis renal care. Compared to general population, patients with schizophrenia were less likely to develop ESRD (HR = 0.6; 95% CI 0.4-0.8), but had a higher risk for death (HR = 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.3). Patients with schizophrenia at the pre-ESRD stage received suboptimal pre-dialysis renal care; for example, they were less likely to visit nephrologists (OR = 0.6; 95% CI, 0.4-0.8) and received fewer erythropoietin prescriptions (OR = 0.7; 95% CI, 0.6-0.9). But they had a higher risk of hospitalization in the first year after starting dialysis (OR = 1.4; 95% CI, 1.0-1.8, P dialysis had higher risk for mortality than the general ESRD patients. A closer collaboration between psychiatrists and nephrologists or internists to minimize the gaps in quality of general care is recommended.

  15. Lower Incidence of End-Stage Renal Disease but Suboptimal Pre-Dialysis Renal Care in Schizophrenia: A 14-Year Nationwide Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueh-Han Hsu

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is closely associated with cardiovascular risk factors which are consequently attributable to the development of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease (ESRD. However, no study has been conducted to examine ESRD-related epidemiology and quality of care before starting dialysis for patients with schizophrenia. By using nationwide health insurance databases, we identified 54,361 ESRD-free patients with schizophrenia and their age-/gender-matched subjects without schizophrenia for this retrospective cohort study (the schizophrenia cohort. We also identified a cohort of 1,244 adult dialysis patients with and without schizophrenia (1:3 to compare quality of renal care before dialysis and outcomes (the dialysis cohort. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR for dialysis and death. Odds ratio (OR derived from logistic regression models were used to delineate quality of pre-dialysis renal care. Compared to general population, patients with schizophrenia were less likely to develop ESRD (HR = 0.6; 95% CI 0.4-0.8, but had a higher risk for death (HR = 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.3. Patients with schizophrenia at the pre-ESRD stage received suboptimal pre-dialysis renal care; for example, they were less likely to visit nephrologists (OR = 0.6; 95% CI, 0.4-0.8 and received fewer erythropoietin prescriptions (OR = 0.7; 95% CI, 0.6-0.9. But they had a higher risk of hospitalization in the first year after starting dialysis (OR = 1.4; 95% CI, 1.0-1.8, P < .05. Patients with schizophrenia undertaking dialysis had higher risk for mortality than the general ESRD patients. A closer collaboration between psychiatrists and nephrologists or internists to minimize the gaps in quality of general care is recommended.

  16. Educational intervention to reduce disease related to sub-optimal basic hygiene in Rwanda: initial evaluation and feasibility study.

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    Stone, Margaret A; Ndagijimana, Hormisdas

    2018-01-01

    Despite a global reduction in morbidity related to sub-optimal water, sanitation and hygiene, the incidence of such diseases remains a significant problem in sub-Saharan Africa. This study aimed to initially assess the potential effectiveness (primarily in terms of impact on morbidity) of a simple educational intervention delivered in Rwanda. Additionally, we sought to explore feasibility relating to the practicality of evaluating and implementing this type of intervention in a low- and middle-income country. Two districts in Northern Province were purposively selected; one was randomly allocated to receive the intervention, with the other acting as control. The intervention was based on an interactive DVD about basic hygiene. Baseline and follow-up data for incident cases of relevant morbidities were collected from health centre records. Changes were compared between the two districts using descriptive statistics and chi-squared tests. Qualitative data were obtained through observations, discussions and feedback and were analysed thematically. Cases of infection with intestinal worms and parasites were frequently recorded in both districts. For these morbidities, there was a 39% decrease in cases between baseline and follow-up in the intervention district (4995 reduced to 3069), compared to 13% (5002 reduced to 4356) in the control district (p evaluation and implementation, whilst also highlighting problems encountered and possible solutions, in particular, the potential advantages of training local personnel to deliver this type of intervention. This small-scale study has a number of acknowledged limitations which would need to be addressed in a larger study in order to confidently confirm the effectiveness of the intervention. It nevertheless provides evidence suggesting that the educational intervention is promising in terms of a potential impact on health and feasible to deliver and evaluate. These findings indicate that further evaluation and possibly early

  17. How common and what are the determinants of sub-optimal care for Parkinson's disease patients: the Milton Keynes community study.

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    Hu, Michele T M; Butterworth, Richard; Kumar, Vasantha; Cooper, Jonathan; Jones, Emma; Catterall, Lesley; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav

    2011-03-01

    Limited data currently exists within the UK addressing the level of Parkinson's disease (PD) healthcare provision. We investigated whether care for PD patients in a UK community met national guidelines, and the determinants of sub-optimal care for this patient group. 340 PD patients were identified from a population of 242,606 (crude prevalence 140 per 100,000 (95% CI 126-156 per 100,000), age-adjusted prevalence 199 per 100,000 (95% CI 178-221 per 100,000)). 248 out of 340 (73%) PD patients identified took part, completing rating scales assessing cognitive, non-motor and sociodemographic variables. 9% of patients had never seen a neurologist for their PD and 18.5% were sub-optimally managed; defined as (a) delay between initial diagnosis and first consultation by a specialist >1 year and (b) patients who had not had specialist PD review for >1 year. Older age, poor cognition and worse mobility were major factors in determining sub-optimal care whilst lower education level and tremor as initial symptom were more modest predictors. 20% of patients had been started on dopaminergic therapies including ergot-derived agonists by their GP prior to referral and less than a third had seen allied health professionals throughout their illness. Further work is required to test whether these findings are generalizable across the country and identify what can be done to ensure equal access to specialist care so that all PD patients have access to best practice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Patients with non-insulin depending diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome are suboptimal treated in Swiss primary care.

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    Schäfer, Hans Hendrik; de Villiers, Jacob Daniel; Lotze, Ulrich; Sivukhina, Elena; Burnier, Michel; Noll, Georg; Theus, Gian-Reto; Dieterle, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of complicated hypertension is increasing in America and Europe. This survey was undertaken to assess the status quo of primary care management of hypertension in patients with the high-risk comorbid diseases metabolic syndrome (MetS) and/or type 2 diabetes mellitus (non-insulin depending diabetes mellitus (NIDDM)). Data of anti-hypertensive treatment of 4594 Swiss patients were collected over 1 week. We identified patients with exclusively NIDDM (N = 95), MetS (N = 168), and both (N = 768). Target blood pressure (TBP) attainment, frequency of prescribed substance-classes, and correlations to comorbidities/end-organ damages were assessed. In addition, we analyzed the prescription of unfavorable beta-blockers (BB) and high-dose diuretics (Ds). In NIDDM, Ds (61%), angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) (40%), and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) (31%) were mostly prescribed, while in MetS, drugs prevalence was Ds (68%), ARBs (48%), and BB (41%). Polypharmacy in patients with MetS correlated with body mass index; older patients (>65 years) were more likely to receive dual-free combinations. TBP was attained in 25.2% of NIDDM and in 28.7% of MetS patients. In general, low-dose Ds use was more prevalent in NIDDM and MetS, however, overall, Ds were used excessively (NIDDM: 61%, MetS: 68%), especially in single-pill combination. Patients with MetS were more likely to receive ARBs, ACEIs, CCBs, and low-dose Ds than BBs and/or high-dose Ds. Physicians recognize DM and MetS as high-risk patients, but select inappropriate drugs. Because the majority of patients may have both, MetS and NIDDM, there is an unmet need to define TBP for this specific population considering the increased risk in comparison to patients with MetS or NIDDM alone.

  19. Care Aides' Relational Practices and Caring Contributions.

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    Andersen, Elizabeth A; Spiers, Jude

    2016-11-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ARTICLE INSTRUCTIONS 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded once you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. To obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Care Aides' Relational Practices and Caring Contributions" found on pages 24-30, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website listed above to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name; contact information; and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until October 31, 2019. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. ACTIVITY OBJECTIVES 1. Define the application of Swanson's Middle Range Theory of Caring in care aides' relational care practices for nursing home

  20. Suboptimal vitamin D status in a population-based study of Asian children: prevalence and relation to allergic diseases and atopy.

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    Tsung-Chieh Yao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: New evidence shows high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in many countries and some studies suggest a possible link between vitamin D status and allergic diseases. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of suboptimal vitamin D status in a population sample of Asian children and to investigate the relationship of vitamin D status with allergic diseases and atopy. METHODS: Children aged 5-18 years (N = 1315 in the Prediction of Allergies in Taiwanese CHildren (PATCH study were evaluated using questionnaires, anthropometric measurements, and serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OHD] and total and specific immunoglobulin E (IgE. RESULTS: The mean concentration of serum 25(OHD was 20.4 ng/mL (SD: 7.1 ng/mL. Vitamin D deficiency (defined as serum 25(OHD0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Low serum 25(OHD levels are remarkably common in this population sample of Asian children, suggesting that millions of children living in Taiwan may have suboptimal levels of vitamin D, which should be a matter of public health concern. Our results provides epidemiological evidence against the association of vitamin D status with various allergic diseases and atopy in Asian children.

  1. Decreasing handoff-related care failures in children's hospitals.

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    Bigham, Michael T; Logsdon, Tina R; Manicone, Paul E; Landrigan, Christopher P; Hayes, Leslie W; Randall, Kelly H; Grover, Purva; Collins, Susan B; Ramirez, Dana E; O'Guin, Crystal D; Williams, Catherine I; Warnick, Robin J; Sharek, Paul J

    2014-08-01

    Patient handoffs in health care require transfer of information, responsibility, and authority between providers. Suboptimal patient handoffs pose a serious safety risk. Studies demonstrating the impact of improved patient handoffs on care failures are lacking. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of a multihospital collaborative designed to decrease handoff-related care failures. Twenty-three children's hospitals participated in a quality improvement collaborative aimed at reducing handoff-related care failures. The improvement was guided by evidence-based recommendations regarding handoff intent and content, standardized handoff tools/methods, and clear transition of responsibility. Hospitals tailored handoff elements to locally important handoff types. Handoff-related care failures were compared between baseline and 3 intervention periods. Secondary outcomes measured compliance to specific change package elements and balancing measure of staff satisfaction. Twenty-three children's hospitals evaluated 7864 handoffs over the 12-month study period. Handoff-related care failures decreased from baseline (25.8%) to the final intervention period (7.9%) (P failures, observed over all handoff types. Compliance to critical components of the handoff process improved, as did provider satisfaction. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. Involving relatives in ICU patient care: critical care nursing challenges.

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    McConnell, Bridget; Moroney, Tracey

    2015-04-01

    To identify the barriers critical care nurses experience to relative involvement in intensive care unit patient care. Previous studies have discussed the experiences of relatives visiting an intensive care unit, the needs of relatives in the intensive care environment, critical care nurse and relative interaction, intensive care unit visiting policies and the benefits of including relatives in patient care. The barriers that critical care nurses experience to relative involvement in patient care have received minimal exploration. Critical care nurses were recruited for a mixed methods study. An explanatory mixed method design was used, with two phases. Phase 1 was Quantitative and Phase 2 was Qualitative. Data collection occurred over five months in 2012-2013. Phase 1 used an online questionnaire (n = 70), and semi-structured interviews (n = 6) were conducted in Phase 2. Phase 1 participants were 70 critical care nurses working in Australian intensive care units and six critical care nurses were recruited from a single Sydney intensive care unit for Phase 2. Through sequential data collection, Phase 1 results formed the development of Phase 2 interview questions. Participants reported various barriers to relative involvement in critically ill patient care. Factors related to the intensive care unit patient, the intensive care unit relative, the critical care nurse and the intensive care environment contributed to difficulties encompassing relative involvement. This study has identified that when considering relative involvement in patient care, critical care nurses take on a paternalistic role. The barriers experienced to relative involvement result in the individual critical care nurse deciding to include or exclude relatives from patient care. Knowledge of the barriers to relative involvement in critically ill patient care may provide a basis for improving discussion on this topic and may assist intensive care units to implement strategies to reduce barriers.

  3. Suboptimal medical care of patients with ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Renal Insufficiency: results from the Korea acute Myocardial Infarction Registry

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    Choi Joon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The clinical outcomes of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI are poor in patients with renal insufficiency. This study investigated changes in the likelihood that patients received optimal medical care throughout the entire process of myocardial infarction management, on the basis of their glomerular filtration rate (GFR. Methods This study analyzed 7,679 patients (age, 63 ± 13 years; men 73.6% who had STEMI and were enrolled in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR from November 2005 to August 2008. The study subjects were divided into 5 groups corresponding to strata used to define chronic kidney disease stages. Results Patients with lower GFR were less likely to present with typical chest pain. The average symptom-to-door time, door-to-balloon time, and symptom-to-balloon time were longer with lower GFR than higher GFR. Primary reperfusion therapy was performed less frequently and the results of reperfusion therapy were poorer in patients with renal insufficiency; these patients were less likely to receive adjunctive medical treatment, such as treatment with aspirin, clopidogrel, β-blocker, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitor/angiotensin-receptor blocker (ARB, or statin, during hospitalization and at discharge. Patients who received less intense medical therapy had worse clinical outcomes than those who received more intense medical therapy. Conclusions Patients with STEMI and renal insufficiency had less chance of receiving optimal medical care throughout the entire process of MI management, which may contribute to worse outcomes in these patients.

  4. Relating paternity to paternal care.

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    Sheldon, Ben C

    2002-03-29

    Intuition suggests, to most people, that parents should be selected to care for their offspring in relation to how certain they are of being the parents of those offspring. Theoretical models of the relationship between parental investment and certainty of parentage predict the two to be related only when some other assumptions are made, few of which can be taken for granted. I briefly review the models and their assumptions, and discuss two kinds of difficulty facing an empiricist wishing to test the models. The first is the problem of unmeasured (and immeasurable) variables. The second is the problem that even the most extensive models do not capture the complexity that can be demonstrated in real systems. I illustrate some of these problems, and some qualitative tests of the models, with experimental work on a population of the collared flycatcher. My conclusion is that although there are some cases where the models have qualitative support, we are a long way from understanding whether paternal care is commonly adjusted in relation to certainty of paternity.

  5. Development of Sub-optimal Airway Protocols for the International Space Station (ISS) by the Medical Operation Support Team (MOST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polk, James D.; Parazynski, Scott; Kelly, Scott; Hurst, Victor, IV; Doerr, Harold K.

    2007-01-01

    Airway management techniques are necessary to establish and maintain a patent airway while treating a patient undergoing respiratory distress. There are situations where such settings are suboptimal, thus causing the caregiver to adapt to these suboptimal conditions. Such occurrences are no exception aboard the International Space Station (ISS). As a result, the NASA flight surgeon (FS) and NASA astronaut cohorts must be ready to adapt their optimal airway management techniques for suboptimal situations. Based on previous work conducted by the Medical Operation Support Team (MOST) and other investigators, the MOST had members of both the FS and astronaut cohorts evaluate two oral airway insertion techniques for the Intubating Laryngeal Mask Airway (ILMA) to determine whether either technique is sufficient to perform in suboptimal conditions within a microgravity environment. Methods All experiments were conducted in a simulated microgravity environment provided by parabolic flight aboard DC-9 aircraft. Each participant acted as a caregiver and was directed to attempt both suboptimal ILMA insertion techniques following a preflight instruction session on the day of the flight and a demonstration of the technique by an anesthesiologist physician in the simulated microgravity environment aboard the aircraft. Results Fourteen participants conducted 46 trials of the suboptimal ILMA insertion techniques. Overall, 43 of 46 trials (94%) conducted were properly performed based on criteria developed by the MOST and other investigators. Discussion The study demonstrated the use of airway management techniques in suboptimal conditions relating to space flight. Use of these techniques will provide a crew with options for using the ILMA to manage airway issues aboard the ISS. Although it is understood that the optimal method for patient care during space flight is to have both patient and caregiver restrained, these techniques provide a needed backup should conditions not present

  6. A shooting approach to suboptimal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, David G.; Sheen, Jyh-Jong

    1991-01-01

    The shooting method is used to solve the suboptimal control problem where the control history is assumed to be piecewise linear. Suboptimal solutions can be obtained without difficulty and can lead to accurate approximate controls and good starting multipliers for the regular shooting method by increasing the number of nodes. Optimal planar launch trajectories are presented for the advanced launch system.

  7. Relational Climate and Health Care Costs: Evidence From Diabetes Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soley-Bori, Marina; Stefos, Theodore; Burgess, James F; Benzer, Justin K

    2018-01-01

    Quality of care worries and rising costs have resulted in a widespread interest in enhancing the efficiency of health care delivery. One area of increasing interest is in promoting teamwork as a way of coordinating efforts to reduce costs and improve quality, and identifying the characteristics of the work environment that support teamwork. Relational climate is a measure of the work environment that captures shared employee perceptions of teamwork, conflict resolution, and diversity acceptance. Previous research has found a positive association between relational climate and quality of care, yet its relationship with costs remains unexplored. We examined the influence of primary care relational climate on health care costs incurred by diabetic patients at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs between 2008 and 2012. We found that better relational climate is significantly related to lower costs. Clinics with the strongest relational climate saved $334 in outpatient costs per patient compared with facilities with the weakest score in 2010. The total outpatient cost saving if all clinics achieved the top 5% relational climate score was $20 million. Relational climate may contribute to lower costs by enhancing diabetic treatment work processes, especially in outpatient settings.

  8. Local and Transnational Care Relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, Karina Märcher; Olwig, Karen Fog

    2015-01-01

    as transnational family relations in which these women are embedded as au pairs, and the opportunities and restraints that they present. We use anthropological theory to conceptualize family and kinship in terms of notions and practices of relatedness. This offers a useful framework for elucidating the different...

  9. [The "relational" touch in care?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabay, Juliette; Hérisson, Brigitte

    2013-03-01

    Training in "relational" touch is offered by a nurse and a psychologist working in tandem, according to a theoretical-practical approach. This is based on nurses' experience, their impressions and interdisciplinarity. The carers are therefore supported in the (re)discovery of thisprecioussensewhichoffers a different way of communicating.

  10. [Alcohol-related problems in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Nobutaro

    2015-09-01

    The approach to treating alcohol-related problems in primary care settings needs: 1) to recognize the incidence of alcohol-related problems in primary care settings; 2) to know the way of screening; 3) to know how to help patients; and 4) to know enough about treating alcoholism to appropriately refer patients for additional help. This article looks research evidence about the incidence of alcohol-related problems in primary care and recognition of incidence and way of screening of alcohol-related problems by primary care physicians in Japan. Then this article describes evidence-based as well as author's experience-based approach to treat the alcohol-related health problems in primary care settings. In line with the newly introduced law to prevent the alcohol-related health problems and the anticipating introduction of new specialty of general medicine, early intervention to alcohol-related problems in primary care settings will be much appreciated. To do so, enough amounts of education and research are needed.

  11. Predicting relative need for urgent dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzzi, L; Spencer, A J; Jones, K; Roberts-Thomson, K F

    2009-09-01

    To develop prediction models of the relative need for care to differentiate between urgent and not urgent individuals presenting for emergency dental care. Data were collected from 839 adults presenting to public dental clinics across South Australia (SA) and New South Wales (NSW) for emergency dental care. Prediction of the urgency of emergency dental care was based on the assessment of two binary logistic regression models - Model 1: urgency of care=dental care were developed using binary logistic regression analysis. The models incorporated subjective oral health indicators (i.e., experience of pain or other oral symptoms) and measures of psychosocial impact of oral disorders (i.e., difficulty sleeping and being worried about the appearance/health of one's teeth or mouth). The cut-off point for the prediction of urgency was defined as a probability value > or =0.40 and > or =0.50 for Model 1 and Model 2 respectively. These cut-off values were chosen as they produced test results that were consistent with the proportions of patients falling into various urgency categories derived from dentist's assessment of urgency. Model 1's sensitivity was 58%, specificity 77% and positive predictive value (PPV) 59%. Model 2's sensitivity was 75%, specificity 65% and PPV 71%. These models of relative need may be useful tools for the screening of urgent dental care and for allocating priority among patients presenting for emergency dental care.

  12. Suboptimal glycemic control in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nefs, Giesje; Pouwer, F; Denollet, J

    2012-01-01

    , clinical, lifestyle and psychological factors between 2005 and 2009. The Edinburgh Depression Scale was used to assess symptoms of depressed mood, anhedonia and anxiety. Suboptimal glycemic control was defined as HbA(1c) values ≥7%, with 29.8% of the sample (n=1718) scoring above this cut......-off. In univariate logistic regression analyses, anhedonia was significantly associated with suboptimal glycemic control (OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.09-1.52), while both depressed mood (OR 1.04, 0.88-1.22) and anxiety (OR 0.99, 0.83-1.19) were not. The association between anhedonia and glycemic control remained after...

  13. Relational agency in elderly care work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuominen, Tiina; Fuglsang, Lars; Hasu, Mervi

    In this paper, we aim to understand how elderly care work is changing alongside the introduction of new co-creative frameworks and practices. The ideas of value co-creation and service co-production are expanding rapidly to new service areas also in the public sector. The elderly care context may...... the concept of ‘relational agency’ to discuss how the interests and capabilities of the workers and users to co-create value are relationally constructed, and how these agentic properties contribute to the manner in which value is co-created. We demonstrate the usefulness of this approach by analysing...

  14. [Traumatized relatives of intensive care patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niecke, A; Schneider, G; Hartog, C S; Michels, G

    2017-10-01

    Relatives are not only visitors in the intensive care unit, but provide support and care for patients at the end of life, and serve as an important source of information for clinicians. They are confronted, often unexpectedly and unprepared, with life-threatening illness, death and dying and life-threatening decisions to limit therapy. Thus, they are often substantially burdened themselves and are in need of support. It is undisputed that communication with relatives can have an adaptive or also traumatic influence on the experience gained.

  15. [Disclosing a care-related injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idoux, Bernard

    2015-06-01

    Despite an ethical and legal obligation, the information given to patients in the event of a care-related injury is still often poor. It is expected by patients but the situation is difficult for health professionals. In order to be beneficial for all parties, it requires professionals to have a certain amount of expertise and people skills to enable them to empathise and communicate. It should be included in initial and continuing training and in institutions' quality of care policies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Relational citizenship: supporting embodied selfhood and relationality in dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontos, Pia; Miller, Karen-Lee; Kontos, Alexis P

    2017-02-01

    We draw on findings from a mixed-method study of specialised red-nosed elder-clowns in a long-term care facility to advance a model of 'relational citizenship' for individuals with dementia. Relational citizenship foregrounds the reciprocal nature of engagement and the centrality of capacities, senses, and experiences of bodies to the exercise of human agency and interconnectedness. We critically examine elder-clown strategies and techniques to illustrate how relational citizenship can be supported and undermined at the micro level of direct care through a focus on embodied expressions of creativity and sexuality. We identify links between aesthetic enrichment and relational practices in art, music and imagination. Relational citizenship offers an important rethinking of notions of selfhood, entitlement, and reciprocity that are central to a sociology of dementia, and it also provides new ethical grounds to explore how residents' creative and sexual expression can be cultivated in the context of long-term care. © 2017 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  17. Effect of Using Suboptimal Alignments in Template-Based Protein Structure Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Kihara, Daisuke

    2010-01-01

    Computational protein structure prediction remains a challenging task in protein bioinformatics. In the recent years, the importance of template-based structure prediction is increasing due to the growing number of protein structures solved by the structural genomics projects. To capitalize the significant efforts and investments paid on the structural genomics projects, it is urgent to establish effective ways to use the solved structures as templates by developing methods for exploiting remotely related proteins that cannot be simply identified by homology. In this work, we examine the effect of employing suboptimal alignments in template-based protein structure prediction. We showed that suboptimal alignments are often more accurate than the optimal one, and such accurate suboptimal alignments can occur even at a very low rank of the alignment score. Suboptimal alignments contain a significant number of correct amino acid residue contacts. Moreover, suboptimal alignments can improve template-based models when used as input to Modeller. Finally, we employ suboptimal alignments for handling a contact potential in a probabilistic way in a threading program, SUPRB. The probabilistic contacts strategy outperforms the partly thawed approach which only uses the optimal alignment in defining residue contacts and also the reranking strategy, which uses the contact potential in reranking alignments. The comparison with existing methods in the template-recognition test shows that SUPRB is very competitive and outperform existing methods. PMID:21058297

  18. On Suboptimal Solution of Antagonistic Matrix Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goryashko Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines resource allocation games such as Colonel Blotto and Colonel Lotto games with the goal to develop tractable method for building suboptimal solution in mixed strategies of these games without solving the relevant optimization problem. The foundation of proposed method lies in the specific combinatorial properties of the partition games. It turned out that as far as distribution of resource along battlefield is concerned that pure strategies participating in ε-optimal solution possessed specific structure. Numerical experiments showed that these specific structural peculiarities can be easily reproduced utilizing previously found combinatorial properties of partition. As a result, we get ε-optimal solution of partition games and support set mixed strategies can be computed in polynomial time.

  19. Interventions via Social Influence for Emergent Suboptimal Restraint Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad KOBTI

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Although restraint use has increased primarily in developed countries, vehicle accident-related injuries and deaths continue to be a problem. Alongside lack of restraint use, studies involving suboptimal restraint use have gained recent popularity. In this study we investigate the use of social influence forinterventions to counter emerging suboptimal restraint use in groups of agents.A multi-agent simulation model is provided where dominant individuals use randomly assigned influence rates to repeatedly alter the knowledge of lessinfluential group members. Cultural influence is implemented via a cultural algorithm and used to simulate individuals affected by beliefs in the community. Objectives include investigating the emergence of patterns of restraint selection and use as well as interventions targeted at more influential agents. Results demonstrate that prominent patterns of behaviour similar to the influentialmembers of the groups do emerge. Furthermore, interventions targeted at influential group members outperform interventions targeted at a percentage of the population at large. Interventions succeed at some level both in the presence and absence of cultural influence.

  20. Optimal inference with suboptimal models: addiction and active Bayesian inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartenbeck, Philipp; FitzGerald, Thomas H B; Mathys, Christoph; Dolan, Ray; Wurst, Friedrich; Kronbichler, Martin; Friston, Karl

    2015-02-01

    When casting behaviour as active (Bayesian) inference, optimal inference is defined with respect to an agent's beliefs - based on its generative model of the world. This contrasts with normative accounts of choice behaviour, in which optimal actions are considered in relation to the true structure of the environment - as opposed to the agent's beliefs about worldly states (or the task). This distinction shifts an understanding of suboptimal or pathological behaviour away from aberrant inference as such, to understanding the prior beliefs of a subject that cause them to behave less 'optimally' than our prior beliefs suggest they should behave. Put simply, suboptimal or pathological behaviour does not speak against understanding behaviour in terms of (Bayes optimal) inference, but rather calls for a more refined understanding of the subject's generative model upon which their (optimal) Bayesian inference is based. Here, we discuss this fundamental distinction and its implications for understanding optimality, bounded rationality and pathological (choice) behaviour. We illustrate our argument using addictive choice behaviour in a recently described 'limited offer' task. Our simulations of pathological choices and addictive behaviour also generate some clear hypotheses, which we hope to pursue in ongoing empirical work. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Review: Factors Relating to Nurses' Caring Behaviors for Dying Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Prompahakul, Chuleeporn; Nilmanat, Kittikorn

    2011-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, caring for patients at the end of life becomes an indicator of the quality of care in a hospital. Nurses are the key people to provide care for dying patients, therefore caring behaviors of nurses could affect the quality of care. To attain and maintain the quality of care at the end of life, factors that contribute to nurses' caring behaviors for dying patients needs to be addressed.Purpose: The purpose of this article is to review factors relating to nurses' caring beh...

  2. Predictors of Suboptimal Follow-up in Pediatric Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Leana; Schwartz, David D; Frugé, Ernest; Laufman, Larry; Holm, Suzanne; Kamdar, Kala; Harris, Lynnette; Brackett, Julienne; Unal, Sule; Tanyildiz, Gulsah; Bryant, Rosalind; Suzawa, Hilary; Dreyer, Zoann; Okcu, M Fatih

    2017-04-01

    Attendance to follow-up care after completion of cancer treatment is an understudied area. We examined demographic, clinical, and socioeconomic predictors of follow-up by pediatric cancer patients at a large center in 442 newly diagnosed patients using multivariable logistic regression analyses. Patients who did not return to clinic for at least 1000 days were considered lost to follow-up. Two hundred forty-two (54.8%) patients were lost. In multivariable analyses, the following variables were independent predictors of being lost to follow-up: treatment with surgery alone (odds ratio [OR]=6.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.1-14.9), older age at diagnosis (reference, 0 to 4; ages, 5 to 9: OR=1.8, 95% CI, 1.1-3; ages, 10 to 14: OR=3.3; CI, 1.8-6.1; and ages, 15 and above: OR=4.8; CI, 2.1-11.7), lack of history of stem cell transplantation (OR=2, 95% CI, 1.04-3.7) and lack of insurance (OR=3.4; CI, 1.2-9.2). Hispanic patients had the best follow-up rates (53.7%) compared to whites and blacks (P=0.03). Attendance to long-term follow-up care is suboptimal in childhood cancer survivors. Predictors that were associated with nonattendance can be used to design targeted interventions to improve follow-up care for survivors of pediatric cancer.

  3. Optometry and ophthalmology relations in managed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettler, D L

    1999-02-01

    Optometrists and Ophthalmologists have a history of difficult professional relationships. This paper discusses common issues both professions face while working under managed care. Managed care initiatives may help to improve the ability of Optomotrists and Ophthalmologists to work together to treat the patient's eye problems.

  4. Outcome of the sub-optimal dialysis starter on peritoneal dialysis. Report from the French Language Peritoneal Dialysis Registry (RDPLF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobbedez, Thierry; Verger, Christian; Ryckelynck, Jean-Philippe; Fabre, Emmanuel; Evans, David

    2013-05-01

    This study was carried out to examine the association of sub-optimal dialysis initiation of peritoneal dialysis (PD) with all the possible outcomes on PD using survival analysis in the presence of competing risks. This was a retrospective cohort study based on the data of the French Language Peritoneal Dialysis Registry. We analysed 8527 incident patients starting PD between January 2002 and December 2010. The end of the observation period was 01 June 2011. Times from the start of PD to death, transplantation, transfer to haemodialysis (HD) and first peritonitis episode were calculated. The sub-optimal dialysis initiation was defined by a period of <30 days on HD before PD initiation. Among 8527 patients, there were 568 patients who started PD after <30 days on HD. There were 6562 events: 3078 deaths, 2136 transfers to HD, 1348 renal transplantations. When using a Fine and Gray model, sub-optimal dialysis start, early peritonitis and transplant failure were associated with a higher sub-distribution relative hazard of technique failure. There was no association between the sub-optimal dialysis start and the sub-distribution hazard of death or transplantation. In the multivariate analysis using a Fine and Gray regression model, the sub-optimal dialysis start was not associated with a higher sub distribution relative hazard of peritonitis. Sub-optimal dialysis initiation is neither associated with a higher risk of death nor with a lower risk of renal transplantation. Sub-optimal PD patients had a higher risk of transfer to HD.

  5. Frequency and predictors of suboptimal glycemic control in an African diabetic population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kibirige D

    2017-02-01

    .001. Conclusion: Suboptimal glycemic control was highly prevalent in this study population with an association to metformin monotherapy and insulin therapy. Strategies aimed at improving glycemic control in diabetes care in Uganda should be enhanced. Keywords: suboptimal glycemic control, frequency, predictors, Africa, Uganda

  6. Review: Factors Relating to Nurses’ Caring Behaviors for Dying Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuleeporn Prompahakul

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, caring for patients at the end of life becomes an indicator of the quality of care in a hospital. Nurses are the key people to provide care for dying patients, therefore caring behaviors of nurses could affect the quality of care. To attain and maintain the quality of care at the end of life, factors that contribute to nurses’ caring behaviors for dying patients needs to be addressed.Purpose: The purpose of this article is to review factors relating to nurses’ caring behaviors for dying patients from existing literature.Method: Relevant literature from electronic databases, including CINAHL, PubMed, Science direct, OVID, Proquest, and The Cochrane Library during the year 1990-2010, was examined, synthesized, and categorized systematically.Result: The results showed that factors related to a nurse’s caring behavior for a dying patient can be classified into three groups. These include; Nurse’s personal factors, Technological influencing factors and Environmental factors.Conclusion: The three factors related to nurses’ caring behaviors for dying patients in the current review could serve as a valuable database to implement in nursing practice, education and research, in order to achieve quality of end-of-life care.Key words: caring behavior, relating factor, dying patient

  7. Relatives' level of satisfaction with advanced cancer care in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustussen, Mikaela; Hounsgaard, Lise; Pedersen, Michael Lynge

    2017-01-01

    Palliative cancer care in Greenland is provided by health professionals at local level, the national Queen Ingrid's Hospital and at Rigshospitalet in Denmark. To improve and develop care for relatives of patients with advanced cancer, we conducted a mixed method study examining relatives' level...... from health professionals. They experienced a lack of security, worries about the future and a lack of support at home. The study showed a substantial level of dissatisfaction among relatives of patients with advanced cancer. We strongly recommend a focus on psychosocial care, more access...... to information and to include relatives in decision making and in the future planning of palliative care services. An assessment of relatives' needs is essential to develop an adequate palliative care in a range of settings....

  8. Social rights and employment rights related to family care: family care regimes in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frericks, Patricia; Jensen, Per H; Pfau-Effinger, Birgit

    2014-04-01

    In early welfare states, social rights predominantly derived from formal employment relations. Within the past two decades, however, some European countries have opened these social institutions to care work also. Cash-for-care and social entitlements for periods of at-home family caregiving have changed the characteristics of informal care work that family members traditionally provide to older relatives. Formerly based on unpaid kinship relations, it has changed towards new paid and more formalized forms of care work by family members. But it can be assumed that long-term care work by family members is constructed differently across welfare states. The paper is guided by the following research question: How do welfare-state policies differ in the degree to which their policies towards family care for senior citizens create social risks for the caring family members? We use the conceptual framework of "family care regimes" as our analytical framework for the comparative research. To do this, we compare care policies towards older care-needy people in the welfare states of the Netherlands, Germany and Denmark. The findings show that a common feature in all three countries is that the situation of family carers is to some degree being formalized: in all three countries a frail senior citizen can chose a family member as the care provider, and the welfare states support the family care providers. Still, the legal situation as well as the quality and level of social rights for family caregivers differ considerably among the three countries. It is shown that the institutional framework for senior care by family members in Germany and the Netherlands represents a family care regime that supports semi-formal family care, and that in Denmark it can be classified as a family care regime that supports formal family care. We show that these different types of family care regimes differ considerably in the social risks they pose to family carers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier

  9. Relatives' perceived quality of palliative care: comparisons between care settings in which patients die.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Dolf; Hofstede, Jolien M; de Veer, Anke J E; Raijmakers, Natasja J H; Francke, Anneke L

    2017-08-16

    Dying in the preferred setting is an indicator of good palliative care quality. Most people prefer to die at home. But does the quality of care as perceived by their relatives vary depending on the care setting that is the place of death? The aim is to compare (from the relatives perspective) whether there are perceived differences in the quality of palliative care between the settings in which people die. Multivariate linear regression analyses have been carried out using an existing dataset containing information collected using the relatives' version of the Consumer Quality Index (CQ-index) Palliative Care. The dataset includes 1368 relatives of patients with a wide variety of conditions who died in various locations: at home, in hospital, in residential care for the elderly, a hospice, palliative care unit or in another institution (e.g. institutions for people with intellectual disabilities or mental healthcare institutions). The relatives were the first contacts (family members or other people close to the patient) and they received the survey between 6 weeks and 6 months after the bereavement. Based on the raw data, differences between locations in terms of the perceived quality of care initially appeared inconsistent. The multivariate regression analyses however showed that relatives of people who died at home were generally the most positive about the palliative care that the patient and they themselves received when the patient was dying. The care provided by hospices also received a relatively good rating. In hospitals and in residential settings for care of the elderly, the care was rated less highly by the relatives. The quality of palliative care as experienced from the relatives' perspective is highest when the patient dies at home or in a hospice. This is an argument for letting people die at home, if they so wish, as far as possible and feasible.

  10. Suboptimal light conditions influence source-sink metabolism during flowering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelies eChristiaens

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Reliance on carbohydrates during flower forcing was investigated in one early and one late flowering cultivar of azalea (Rhododendron simsii hybrids. Carbohydrate accumulation, invertase activity, and expression of a purported sucrose synthase gene (RsSUS was monitored during flower forcing under suboptimal (natural and optimal (supplemental light light conditions, after a cold treatment (7°C + dark to break flower bud dormancy. Post-production sucrose metabolism and flowering quality was also assessed. Glucose and fructose concentrations and invertase activity increased in petals during flowering, while sucrose decreased. In suboptimal light conditions RsSUS expression in leaves increased as compared to optimal light conditions, indicating that plants in suboptimal light conditions have a strong demand for carbohydrates. However, carbohydrates in leaves were markedly lower in suboptimal light conditions compared to optimal light conditions. This resulted in poor flowering of plants in suboptimal light conditions. Post-production flowering relied on the stored leaf carbon, which could be accumulated under optimal light conditions in the greenhouse. These results show that flower opening in azalea relies on carbohydrates imported from leaves and is source-limiting under suboptimal light conditions.

  11. Evolving networks of relative care : alliance and exclusion

    OpenAIRE

    O'Brien, Valerie

    1999-01-01

    The chapter traces the processes involved through the decision-making, assessment and post-assessment stages of kinship Care. It examines the ways in which case management practices, derived primarily from an application of a traditional foster care approach, impact on the evolution of the kinship care networks. A process-oriented descriptive account of the evolution of the networks is presented. The multiple perspectives on issues offered by the birth parents, children, relatives and social ...

  12. Nosocomial bacteremia in neonates related to poor standards of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, Alejandro E; Munoz, Juan M; Galvan, Amparo; Gonzalez, Juan A; Medina, Humberto; Alpuche, Celia; Cortes, Gabriel; Ponce-de-Leon, Samuel

    2005-08-01

    In developing countries, intravenous liquids are mixed and administered by nurses, sometimes under suboptimal infection control conditions. We hypothesized that outbreaks of infusate-associated neonatal bacteremias are common, and we evaluated whether they can be detected by vigilant microbiologic surveillance of infusates. We studied intravenous infusates administered to neonates in a Mexican hospital where mixtures of infusates were prepared in hospital wards. The study was performed in 3 stages: stage 1, initial culturing of in-use infusates under basal conditions; stage 2, prospective culturing during a cluster of clinical sepsis; and stage 3, final culturing once the outbreak was controlled. In stage 1, 68 infusates were sterile, and 1 was contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus (1.45%), from 23 patients. In stage 2, of 182 infusates from 39 patients, 51 infusates (28%) were contaminated with Gram-negative rods. On the first day of stage 2, 11 of 15 infusates were contaminated with the same strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae, which continued to appear for 26 days. Another 4 strains of Gram-negative rods were also isolated during stage 2. The association between contaminated infusate and death was significant (odds ratio, 9.4; 95% confidence interval, 2-44.3; P < 0.001). Mixtures made by nurses were more likely contaminated than commercial preparations (odds ratio, 3.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-8.5; P = 0.037). In stage 3, there were 42 sterile infusates from 22 patients. Our study suggests that poor standards of care common in hospitals from developing countries sometimes result in outbreaks of sepsis and death for newborn patients.

  13. Improving person-centred care in nursing homes through dementia-care mapping: design of a cluster-randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, G. van de; Draskovic, I.; Adang, E.M.M.; Donders, R.; Post, A.; Zuidema, S.U.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effectiveness and efficiency of nursing-home dementia care are suboptimal: there are high rates of neuropsychiatric symptoms among the residents and work-related stress among the staff. Dementia-care mapping is a person-centred care method that may alleviate both the resident and the

  14. Improving person-centred care in nursing homes through dementia-care mapping : design of a cluster-randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Ven, Geertje; Draskovic, Irena; Adang, Eddy M M; Donders, Rogier A R T; Post, Aukje; Zuidema, Sytse U; Koopmans, Raymond T C M; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra J F J

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effectiveness and efficiency of nursing-home dementia care are suboptimal: there are high rates of neuropsychiatric symptoms among the residents and work-related stress among the staff. Dementia-care mapping is a person-centred care method that may alleviate both the resident and the

  15. Suboptimal provision of preventive healthcare due to expected enrollee turnover among private insurers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Bradley

    2010-04-01

    Many preventive healthcare procedures are widely recognized as cost-effective but have relatively low utilization rates in the US. Because preventive care is a present-period investment with a future-period expected financial return, enrollee turnover among private insurers lowers the expected return of this investment. In this paper, I present a simple theoretical model to illustrate the suboptimal provision of preventive healthcare that results from insurers 'free riding' off of the provision from others. I also provide an empirical test of this hypothesis using data from the Community Tracking Study's Household Survey. I use lagged market-level measures of employment-induced insurer turnover to identify variation in insurers' expectations and test for the effect of turnover on several different measures of medical utilization. As expected, I find that turnover has a significantly negative effect on the utilization of preventive services and has no effect on the utilization of acute services used as a control. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Treatment of KPC-producing Enterobacteriaceae: suboptimal efficacy of polymyxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, M S; de Assis, D B; Freire, M P; Boas do Prado, G V; Machado, A S; Abdala, E; Pierrotti, L C; Mangini, C; Campos, L; Caiaffa Filho, H H; Levin, A S

    2015-02-01

    Treatment of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae infections (KPC-EI) remains a challenge. Combined therapy has been proposed as the best choice, but there are no clear data showing which combination therapy is superior. Our aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of antimicrobial regimens for treating KPC-EI. This was a retrospective cohort study of KPC-EI nosocomial infections (based on CDC criteria) between October 2009 and June 2013 at three tertiary Brazilian hospitals. The primary outcomes were the 30-day mortality for all infections and the 30-day mortality for patients with bacteraemia. Risk factors for mortality were evaluated by comparing clinical variables of survivors and nonsurvivors. In this study, 118 patients were included, of whom 78 had bacteraemia. Catheter-related bloodstream infections were the most frequent (43%), followed by urinary tract infections (n = 27, 23%). Monotherapy was used in 57 patients and combined treatment in 61 patients. The most common therapeutic combination was polymyxin plus carbapenem 20 (33%). Multivariate analysis for all infections (n = 118) and for bacteremic infections (n = 78) revealed that renal failure at the end of treatment, use of polymyxin and older age were prognostic factors for mortality. In conclusion, polymyxins showed suboptimal efficacy and combination therapy was not superior to monotherapy. Copyright © 2014 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Caring as emancipatory nursing praxis: the theory of relational caring complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Marilyn A; Turkel, Marian C

    2014-01-01

    In the culture of health care, nurses are challenged to understand their values and beliefs as humanistic within complex technical and economically driven bureaucratic systems. This article outlines the language of social justice and human rights and the advance of a Theory of Relational Caring Complexity, which offers insights into caring as emancipatory nursing praxis. Recommendations provide knowledge of the struggle to balance economics, technology, and caring. As nurses practice from a value-driven, philosophical, and ethical social justice framework, they will find "their voice" and realize the full potential that the power of caring has on patient and organizational outcomes.

  18. Over-the-counter suboptimal dispensing of antibiotics in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukonzo JK

    2013-08-01

    : In Uganda, at least four in every ten individuals that visit a health-care facility are treated with an antibiotic. Antibiotics are largely given as over-the-counter drugs at community pharmacies. The number of antibiotic prescribed daily doses/1,000 antibiotic clients does not significantly differ between categories of health-care facilities except at community pharmacies, where lower doses are dispensed compared to other health-care facilities. Keywords: antibiotic, over-the-counter dispensing, suboptimal dosing, Uganda

  19. Sub-Optimal Treatment of Bacterial Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyan Song

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial biofilm is an emerging clinical problem recognized in the treatment of infectious diseases within the last two decades. The appearance of microbial biofilm in clinical settings is steadily increasing due to several reasons including the increased use of quality of life-improving artificial devices. In contrast to infections caused by planktonic bacteria that respond relatively well to standard antibiotic therapy, biofilm-forming bacteria tend to cause chronic infections whereby infections persist despite seemingly adequate antibiotic therapy. This review briefly describes the responses of biofilm matrix components and biofilm-associated bacteria towards sub-lethal concentrations of antimicrobial agents, which may include the generation of genetic and phenotypic variabilities. Clinical implications of bacterial biofilms in relation to antibiotic treatments are also discussed.

  20. Suboptimal Rate Adaptive Resource Allocation for Downlink OFDMA Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanam Sadr

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to study the performance of low complexity adaptive resource allocation in the downlink of OFDMA systems with fixed or variable rate requirements (with fairness consideration. Two suboptimal resource allocation algorithms are proposed using the simplifying assumption of transmit power over the entire bandwidth. The objective of the first algorithm is to maximize the total throughput while maintaining rate proportionality among the users. The proposed suboptimal algorithm prioritizes the user with the highest sensitivity to the subcarrier allocation, and the variance over the subchannel gains is used to define the sensitivity of each user. The second algorithm concerns rate adaptive resource allocation in multiuser systems with fixed rate constraints. We propose a suboptimal joint subchannel and power allocation algorithm which prioritizes the users with the highest required data rates. The main feature of this algorithm is its low complexity while achieving the rate requirements.

  1. Statin therapy reduces the likelihood of suboptimal blood pressure control among Ugandan adult diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lumu W

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available William Lumu,1 Leaticia Kampiire,2 George Patrick Akabwai,3 Daniel Ssekikubo Kiggundu,4 Davis Kibirige5 1Department of Medicine and Diabetes/Endocrine Unit, Mengo Hospital, 2Infectious Disease Research Collaboration, 3Baylor College of Medicine Children’s Foundation, 4Nephrology Unit, Mulago National Referral and Teaching Hospital, 5Department of Medicine, Uganda Martyrs Hospital Lubaga, Kampala, Uganda Background: Hypertension is one of the recognized risk factors of cardiovascular diseases in adult diabetic patients. High prevalence of suboptimal blood pressure (BP control has been well documented in the majority of studies assessing BP control in diabetic patients in sub-Saharan Africa. In Uganda, there is a dearth of similar studies. This study evaluated the prevalence and correlates of suboptimal BP control in an adult diabetic population in Uganda.Patients and methods: This was a cross-sectional study that enrolled 425 eligible ambulatory adult diabetic patients attending three urban diabetic outpatient clinics over 11 months. Data about their sociodemographic characteristics and clinical history were collected using pre-tested questionnaires. Suboptimal BP control was defined according to the 2015 American Diabetes Association standards of diabetes care guideline as BP levels ≥140/90 mmHg.Results: The mean age of the study participants was 52.2±14.4 years, with the majority being females (283, 66.9%. Suboptimal BP control was documented in 192 (45.3% study participants and was independently associated with the study site (private hospitals; odds ratio 2.01, 95% confidence interval 1.18–3.43, P=0.01 and use of statin therapy (odds ratio 0.5, 95% confidence interval 0.26–0.96, P=0.037.Conclusion: Suboptimal BP control was highly prevalent in this study population. Strategies to improve optimal BP control, especially in the private hospitals, and the use of statin therapy should be encouraged in adult diabetic patients

  2. Work-Related Depression in Primary Care Teams in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Andréa Tenório Correia; Lopes, Claudia de Souza; Susser, Ezra; Menezes, Paulo Rossi

    2016-11-01

    To identify work-related factors associated with depressive symptoms and probable major depression in primary care teams. Cross-sectional study among primary care teams (community health workers, nursing assistants, nurses, and physicians) in the city of São Paulo, Brazil (2011-2012; n = 2940), to assess depressive symptoms and probable major depression and their associations with job strain and other work-related conditions. Community health workers presented higher prevalence of probable major depression (18%) than other primary care workers. Higher odds ratios for depressive symptoms or probable major depression were associated with longer duration of employment in primary care; having a passive, active, or high-strain job; lack of supervisor feedback regarding performance; and low social support from colleagues and supervisors. Observed levels of job-related depression can endanger the sustainability of primary care programs. Public Health implications. Strategies are needed to deliver care to primary care workers with depression, facilitating diagnosis and access to treatment, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Preventive interventions can include training managers to provide feedback and creating strategies to increase job autonomy and social support at work.

  3. Dependent Interviewing and Sub-Optimal Responding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Eggs

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available With proactive dependent interviewing (PDI respondents are reminded of the answer they gave in the previous interview, before being asked about their current status. PDI is used in panel surveys to assist respondent recall and reduce spurious changes in responses over time. PDI may however provide scope for new errors if respondents falsely accept the previous information as still being an accurate description of their current situation. In this paper we use data from the German Labour Market and Social Security panel study, in which an error was made with the preload data for a PDI question about receipt of welfare benefit. The survey data were linked to individual administrative records on receipt of welfare benefit. A large proportion of respondents accepted the false preload. This behaviour seems mainly driven by the difficulty of the response task: respondents with a more complex history of receipt according to the records were more likely to confirm the false preload. Personality also seemed related to the probability of confirming. Predictors of satisficing, indicators of satisficing on other items in the survey, and characteristics of the survey and interviewer were not predictive of confirming the false preload.

  4. [The care of elderly patients by their relatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stähelin, H B; Bloch, F; Schlettwein-Gsell, D; Jeker, C; Bächi, M; Zierath, M

    1985-01-01

    New concepts are needed for the still increasing number of geriatric patients who require long term institutional care and for the often difficult situation of caregiving relatives. We investigated the possibility to integrate relatives of institutionalized patients in the nursing care. 323 geriatric patients were randomly selected and the relatives contacted. Only four (1%) had no relatives or friends. Of 86% of the patients it was possible to interview 343 relatives or close friends. Of those 147 (43%) were favorably disposed towards a cooperation in the care with the ward staff. Persons willing to cooperate were characterized by female sex, middle class status, good health, not too demanding jobs, and close contacts prior to institutionalization of their next of kin. In a second part 29 of 196 relatives were willing to take part in a pilot project. Unfortunately, for technical reasons only five patients could be hospitalized on the experimental ward in the given time. The practical experience demonstrated that relatives can cooperate on a part time basis with the nursing staff in the care of institutionalized geriatric patients. It is estimated that probably 12% of the geriatric patients in institutions have relatives willing and capable to take part in the nursing or other activities on the ward. Smaller nursing facilities appear more suitable than large geriatric clinics for this type of cooperation.

  5. Experiences of relatives caring for family members who attend ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... responsibilities in terms of care resources and relatives' experiences with regard to patients' behavioral changes. Nurse managers should to facilitate participative workshops and establish of family support groups. Keywords: Experiences, diagnosed with AIDS, antiretroviral therapy clinic, relatives of infected family ...

  6. Sub-optimal parenting is associated with schizotypic and anxiety personality traits in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giakoumaki, S G; Roussos, P; Zouraraki, C; Spanoudakis, E; Mavrikaki, M; Tsapakis, E M; Bitsios, P

    2013-05-01

    Part of the variation in personality characteristics has been attributed to the child-parent interaction and sub-optimal parenting has been associated with psychiatric morbidity. In the present study, an extensive battery of personality scales (Trait Anxiety Inventory, Behavioural Inhibition/Activation System questionnaire, Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised, Temperament and Character Inventory, Schizotypal Traits Questionnaire, Toronto Alexithymia Scale) and the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI) were administered in 324 adult healthy males to elucidate the effects of parenting on personality configuration. Personality variables were analysed using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and the factors "Schizotypy", "Anxiety", "Behavioural activation", "Novelty seeking" and "Reward dependence" were extracted. Associations between personality factors with PBI "care" and "overprotection" scores were examined with regression analyses. Subjects were divided into "parental style" groups and personality factors were subjected to categorical analyses. "Schizotypy" and "Anxiety" were significantly predicted by high maternal overprotection and low paternal care. In addition, the Affectionless control group (low care/high overprotection) had higher "Schizotypy" and "Anxiety" compared with the Optimal Parenting group (high care/low overprotection). These results further validate sub-optimal parenting as an important environmental exposure and extend our understanding on the mechanisms by which it increases risk for psychiatric morbidity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Sacral Nerve Stimulation for Constipation: Suboptimal Outcome and Adverse Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maeda, Yasuko; Lundby, Lilli; Buntzen, Steen

    2010-01-01

    Sacral nerve stimulation is an emerging treatment for patients with severe constipation. There has been no substantial report to date on suboptimal outcomes and complications. We report our experience of more than 6 years by focusing on incidents and the management of reportable events....

  8. Optimal and Suboptimal Noises Enhancing Mutual Information in Threshold System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Qiqing; Wang, Youguo

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the efficacy of noise enhancing information transmission in a threshold system. At first, in the frame of stochastic resonance (SR), optimal noise (Opt N) is derived to maximize mutual information (MI) of this nonlinear system. When input signal is discrete (binary), the optimal SR noise is found to have a finite distribution. In contrast, when input signal is continuous, the optimal SR noise is a constant one. In addition, suboptimal SR noises are explored as well with optimization methods when the types of noise added into the system are predetermined. We find that for small thresholds, suboptimal noises do not exist. Only when thresholds reach some level, do suboptimal noises come into effect. Meanwhile, we have discussed the impact of tails in noise distribution on SR effect. Finally, this paper extends the single-threshold system to an array of multi-threshold devices and presents the corresponding efficacy of information transmission produced by optimal and suboptimal SR noises. These results may be beneficial to quantization and coding.

  9. Suboptimal Utilisation of Resources in Sub-Saharan African Higher ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Suboptimal Utilisation of Resources in Sub-Saharan African Higher Education Institutions: the Case of Teaching Space at Makerere University. ... This means that the institutions need to evaluate their utilization of these resources—to pinpoint their need for the resources and potential for quality assurance. This paper reports ...

  10. When animals misbehave: analogs of human biases and suboptimal choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentall, Thomas R

    2015-03-01

    Humans tend to value rewards more if they have had to work hard to obtain them (justification of effort). Similarly they tend to persist in a task even when they would be better off beginning a new one (sunk cost). Humans also often give greater value to objects of good quality than the same objects together with objects of lesser quality (the less is more effect). Commercial gambling (lotteries and slot machines) is another example of suboptimal choice by humans because on average the rewards are less than the investment. In another example of a systematic bias, when humans try to estimate the probability of the occurrence of a low probability event, they often give too much weight to the results of a test, in spite of the fact that the known probability of a false alarm reduces the predictive value of the test (base rate neglect). In each of these examples, we have found that pigeons show a similar tendency to choose suboptimally. When one can show comparable findings of suboptimal choice in animals it suggests that whereas culture may reinforce certain suboptimal behavior, the behavior is likely to result from the overgeneralization of basic behavioral processes or predisposed heuristics that may have been appropriate in natural environments. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: "Tribute to Tom Zentall." Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Prevalence and predictors of sub-optimal medication adherence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the levels of adherence, prevalence and the predictors of suboptimal adherence were assessed in a sub-Saharan African setting. Methods: Three hundred and seventy (370) respondents with diagnoses of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or severe depression were randomly enrolled and interviewed at the ...

  12. Antiepileptic Drug Titration and Related Health Care Resource Use and Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Jesse; Kalilani, Linda; Song, Yan; Swallow, Elyse; Wild, Imane

    2018-02-27

    Unexpected breakthrough seizures resulting from suboptimal antiepileptic drug (AED) dosing during the titration period, as well as adverse events resulting from rapid AED titration, may influence the titration schedule and significantly increase health care resource use (HRU) and health care costs. To assess the relationship between AEDs, HRU, and costs during AED titration and maintenance. Practicing neurologists were recruited from a nationwide panel to provide up to 3 patient records each for this retrospective medical chart review. Patients with epilepsy who were aged ≥ 18 years and had initiated an AED between January 1, 2014, and January 1, 2016, were followed for 6 months from AED initiation. Titration duration was the time from AED initiation to the beginning of treatment maintenance as determined by the physician. Outcomes were epilepsy-specific HRU (hospitalizations, emergency department visits, outpatient visits, physician referral, laboratory testing/diagnostic imaging, and phone calls) and related costs that occurred during the titration or maintenance treatment periods. Of 811 patients, 156, 128, 125, 120, 114, 107, and 61 initiated the following AEDs: levetiracetam, lamotrigine, lacosamide, valproate, topiramate, carbamazepine, and phenytoin, respectively. Most patients (619/803 [77.1%] with complete AED data) received monotherapy. Baseline characteristics were similar across AEDs (mean [SD] age, 36.6 [14.4] years; 59.0% male). Kaplan-Meier estimates of titration duration ranged from 3.3 weeks (phenytoin) to 8.1 weeks (lamotrigine). From titration to maintenance, the overall incidence of HRU per person-month decreased 54.5%-89.3% for each HRU measure except outpatient visits (24.6% decrease). Total epilepsy-related costs decreased from $80.48 to $42.77 per person-month, or 46.9% from titration to maintenance. AED titration periods had higher HRU rates and costs than AED maintenance, suggesting that use of AEDs with shorter titration requirements

  13. Traditional Chinese medicine and new concepts of predictive, preventive and personalized medicine in diagnosis and treatment of suboptimal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Russell, Alyce; Yan, Yuxiang

    2014-02-13

    The premise of disease-related phenotypes is the definition of the counterpart normality in medical sciences. Contrary to clinical practices that can be carefully planned according to clinical needs, heterogeneity and uncontrollability is the essence of humans in carrying out health studies. Full characterization of consistent phenotypes that define the general population is the basis to individual difference normalization in personalized medicine. Self-claimed normal status may not represent health because asymptomatic subjects may carry chronic diseases at their early stage, such as cancer, diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis. Currently, treatments for non-communicable chronic diseases (NCD) are implemented after disease onset, which is a very much delayed approach from the perspective of predictive, preventive and personalized medicine (PPPM). A NCD pandemic will develop and be accompanied by increased global economic burden for healthcare systems throughout both developed and developing countries. This paper examples the characterization of the suboptimal health status (SHS) which represents a new PPPM challenge in a population with ambiguous health complaints such as general weakness, unexplained medical syndrome (UMS), chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), post-viral fatigue syndrome (PVFS) and chronic fatigue immune dysfunction syndrome (CFIDS). We applied clinical informatic approaches and developed a questionnaire-suboptimal health status questionnaire-25 (SHSQ-25) for measuring SHS. The validity and reliability of this approach were evaluated in a small pilot study and then in a cross-sectional study of 3,405 participants in China. We found a correlation between SHS and systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, plasma glucose, total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol among men, and a correlation between SHS and systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, triglycerides

  14. A system analysis of a suboptimal surgical experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richards Michael

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background System analyses of incidents that occur in the process of health care delivery are rare. A case study of a series of incidents that one of the authors experienced after routine urologic surgery is presented. We interpret the sequence of events as a case of cascading incidents that resulted in outcomes that were suboptimal, although fortunately not fatal. Methods A system dynamics approach was employed to develop illustrative models (flow diagrams of the dynamics of the patient's interaction with surgery and emergency departments. The flow diagrams were constructed based upon the experience of the patient, chart review, discussion with the involved physicians as well as several physician colleagues, comparison of our diagrams with those developed by the hospital of interest for internal planning purposes, and an iterative process with one of the co-authors who is a system dynamics expert. A dynamic hypothesis was developed using insights gained by building the flow diagrams. Results The incidents originated in design flaws and many small innocuous system changes that have occurred incrementally over time, which by themselves may have no consequence but in conjunction with some system randomness can have serious consequences. In the patient's case, the incidents that occurred in preoperative assessment and surgery originated in communication and procedural failures. System delays, communication failures, and capacity issues contributed largely to the subsequent incidents. Some of these issues were controllable by the physicians and staff of the institution, whereas others were less controllable. To the system's credit, some of the more controllable issues were addressed, but systemic problems like overcrowding are unlikely to be addressed in the near future. Conclusion This is first instance that we are aware of in the literature where a system dynamics approach has been used to analyze a patient safety experience. The

  15. A system analysis of a suboptimal surgical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Robert C; Cooke, David L; Richards, Michael

    2009-01-06

    System analyses of incidents that occur in the process of health care delivery are rare. A case study of a series of incidents that one of the authors experienced after routine urologic surgery is presented. We interpret the sequence of events as a case of cascading incidents that resulted in outcomes that were suboptimal, although fortunately not fatal. A system dynamics approach was employed to develop illustrative models (flow diagrams) of the dynamics of the patient's interaction with surgery and emergency departments. The flow diagrams were constructed based upon the experience of the patient, chart review, discussion with the involved physicians as well as several physician colleagues, comparison of our diagrams with those developed by the hospital of interest for internal planning purposes, and an iterative process with one of the co-authors who is a system dynamics expert. A dynamic hypothesis was developed using insights gained by building the flow diagrams. The incidents originated in design flaws and many small innocuous system changes that have occurred incrementally over time, which by themselves may have no consequence but in conjunction with some system randomness can have serious consequences. In the patient's case, the incidents that occurred in preoperative assessment and surgery originated in communication and procedural failures. System delays, communication failures, and capacity issues contributed largely to the subsequent incidents. Some of these issues were controllable by the physicians and staff of the institution, whereas others were less controllable. To the system's credit, some of the more controllable issues were addressed, but systemic problems like overcrowding are unlikely to be addressed in the near future. This is first instance that we are aware of in the literature where a system dynamics approach has been used to analyze a patient safety experience. The qualitative system dynamics analysis was useful in understanding the

  16. [Relatives in intensive care units: (Un)Satisfied needs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hönig, K; Gündel, H

    2016-03-01

    Relatives of patients in intensive care units (ICU) have important supportive care needs which are often unrecognized and rarely satisfactorily met. Description of stress factors and strains as well as supportive care needs, assessment of care needs, empirical evidence for care needs, satisfaction of care needs, options and efficacy of psychosocial support and communication recommendations for this special situation. Evaluation of literature review articles, discussion of basic qualitative and quantitative research findings, meta-analyses and expert recommendations. Relatives of ICU patients report a number of cognitive, emotional, social and pragmatic support needs. Important needs, such as maintenance of hope and security as well as sincere and needs-adjusted communication often remain unrecognized and are rarely satisfactorily met. The weighting and prioritization of support needs are modulated by sociodemographic and cultural factors. Psychoeducative interventions reduce the psychosocial distress of family members. Communicative strategies of healthcare professionals reduce the risk of posttraumatic stress disorders for family members, reduce anxiety and depression and improve participative decision making. Healthcare professionals in ICUs should be sensitized to the specific characteristics of these special situations. For healthcare professionals it is equally important to improve self-awareness regarding their own defense mechanisms and to refine communicative competence on accessibility and adequately address the reality of subjective experiences of family members. Psychosocial support services should be recommended and utilization should be encouraged.

  17. Intensive care nurses' practice related to experience and shift worked.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Rafael Celestino; Ferreira, Márcia de Assunção; Apostolidis, Thémis

    2016-06-01

    To analyse the social representations of nurses about intensive care practices comparing the variables 1) time since graduation and 2) shift worked. Qualitative field research using social representation theory. Individual interviews were conducted and lexical analysis was applied. Intensive Care Unit of a federal hospital with 21 clinical nurses. Day shift nurses are more pragmatic and operationally oriented because they deal directly with the general functioning of the unit. Less experienced nurses face difficulties dealing with intensive care contexts, but have a critical view of their practices, while more experienced nurses apply practical knowledge in their decision-making and actions. The relationship of proximity or distance from patients, mediated by technology, is related to the domains of knowledge that are required to manage technology and to the role technology plays in intensive care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Ethics and quality care in nursing homes: Relatives' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Rita; Sellevold, Gerd Sylvi; Egede-Nissen, Veslemøy; Sørlie, Venke

    2017-01-01

    A total of 71,000 people in Norway suffer from some form of dementia in 2013, of whom approximately 30,000 are in nursing homes. Several studies focus on the experiences of those who have close relatives and who are staying in a nursing home. Results show that a greater focus on cooperation between nursing staff and relatives is a central prerequisite for an increased level of care. Benefits of developing systematic collaboration practices include relief for nursing staff, less stress, and greater mutual understanding. Going through studies focusing on the experiences of nursing home patients' relatives, negative experiences are in the majority. In this study, relatives are invited to share positive experiences regarding the care of their loved ones; a slightly different perspective, in other words. The aim of the study is to investigate relatives of persons with dementia's experiences with quality care in nursing homes. The study is a part of a larger project called Hospice values in the care for persons with dementia and is based on a qualitative design where data are generated through narrative interviews. The chosen method of analysis is the phenomenological-hermeneutical method for the study of lived experiences. Participants and research context: Participants in the project were eight relatives of persons with dementia who were living in nursing homes, long-term residences. The sampling was targeted, enrolment happened through collective invitation. All relatives interested were included. Ethical considerations: The Norwegian Regional Ethics Committee and the Norwegian Social Science Data Services approve the study. Findings show that relatives have certain expectations as to how their loved ones ought to be met and looked after at the nursing home. The results show that in those cases where the expectations were met, the relatives' experiences were associated with engagement, inclusion and a good atmosphere. When the expectations were not met, the relatives

  19. [A research pathway in care and relational touch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourhis, Hélène

    2017-03-01

    Passionate about the relational dimension of care, this nurse-turned-researcher shares with us the key stages of her university career guided by the place of touch in the therapeutic relationship. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Research Gaps in Neonatal HIV-Related Care | Davies | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, both in South Africa and across sub-Saharan African, lack of boosted peri-partum prophylaxis for high-risk vertical transmission, loss to followup, and failure to initiate HIV-infected infants on antiretroviral therapy (ART) before disease progression are key remaining gaps in neonatal HIV-related care. In this issue of ...

  1. Care of the self and power relations: female nurses taking care of other women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabelo, Ana Renata Moura; Silva, Kênia Lara

    2016-01-01

    to analyze the care of self of female nurses and the power relations established by them in the care of other women. integrative review of literature published between 2005 and 2015. There were 25 publications in the sample. qualitative state of the art with reference domain of a liberating perspective, based on humanization, autonomy and empowerment as a risk reduction strategy in the practice of care to women. The findings suggest solidified power relations among female nurses and women, focused on professional domain concentrated on nurse education under the patriarchal and society's normalization discourse. Some studies consider the importance of understanding power in a capillary way, operating on the bodies of individuals. there is little discussion about the care of self of nurses and the effects on their professional practice, indicating gaps in knowledge in this field.

  2. Clinical audit of intra-partum care at secondary health facilities in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osungbade, K O; Oginni, S A; Olumide, E A A; Owoaje, E T

    2010-06-01

    Intra-partum care has a significant influence on birth outcomes. Gap however exists between evidence and practice. This study documented pattern of intra-partum monitoring among birth attendants in public secondary healthcare facilities and related findings to quality of care provided. Intra-partum monitoring records of vaginal examination, fetal heart and blood pressure were reviewed. Research assistants extracted information and documented same in appropriate section of Safe Motherhood Needs Assessment forms. Monitoring records were categorized into optimal and sub-optimal care. Proportions were calculated for parturients who received either optimal or sub-optimal care. Chi-square test of statistics was used to explore differences. Level of significance was p labour progressed. Intra-partum care provided by birth attendants was generally sub-optimal and use of the monitoring records to influence birth outcome is doubtful. Improvement in record keeping practices and skills in intra-partum monitoring for decision making, are suggested.

  3. Integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care and patient related outcomes: A critical review of evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Naveen Salins; Raghavendra Ramanjulu; Lipika Patra; Jayita Deodhar; Mary Ann Muckaden

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: World Health Organization and American Society of Clinical Oncology recommend early integration of specialist palliative care in patients with cancer. This paper focuses on critical review of evidence on integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care and patient-related outcomes. Methods: The question for the literature search was - Does integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care influences patient-related outcomes? 31 articles related to ...

  4. When the learning environment is suboptimal: exploring medical students' perceptions of "mistreatment".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Runye; Snell, Linda

    2014-04-01

    Despite widespread implementation of policies to address mistreatment, high rates of mistreatment during clinical training are reported, prompting the question of whether "mistreatment" means more to students than delineated in official codes of conduct. Understanding "mistreatment" from students' perspective and as it relates to the learning environment is needed before effective interventions can be implemented. The authors conducted focus groups with final-year medical students at McGill University Faculty of Medicine in 2012. Participants were asked to characterize "suboptimal learning experience" and "mistreatment." Transcripts were analyzed via inductive thematic analysis. Forty-one of 174 eligible students participated in six focus groups. Students described "mistreatment" as lack of respect or attack directed toward the person, and "suboptimal learning experience" as that which compromised their learning. Differing perceptions emerged as students debated whether "mistreatment" can be applied to negative learning environments as well as isolated incidents of mistreatment even though some experiences fell outside of the "official" label as per institutional policies. Whether students perceived "mistreatment" versus a "suboptimal learning experience" in negative environments appeared to be influenced by several key factors. A concept map integrating these ideas is presented. How students perceived negative situations during training appears to be a complex process. When medical students say "mistreatment," they may be referring to a spectrum, with incident-based mistreatment on one end and learning-environment-based mistreatment on the other. Multiple factors influenced how students perceived an environment-based negative situation and may provide strategies to improving the learning environment.

  5. Nursing curricula relating to care for disabled children: literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilkhani, Mahnaz; Glasper, Alan; Jarrett, Nikki

    2016-03-01

    To provide a literature review of nursing curricula relating to care for children with disabilities. Children with disabilities do not receive adequate attention in nursing curricula for children. The best approach to promoting the standard of care delivery to children with disabilities is to improve the quantity and quality of training among health professionals. We conducted the review using three databases, CINAHL, MEDLINE and ProQuest, between the years 1990 and 2015. The review commenced in 2012 and was updated in 2015. Seventy-eight studies were initially identified. Out of 78 retrieved articles, only six research articles contained all the keywords 'education', 'disability' and 'curriculum'; no articles contained all the keywords 'nursing education, 'children with disabilities' and 'curriculum'. Five themes have been generated from the literature review relating to disability content within nursing curricula, namely: overloaded curriculum, gaps in the contemporary curricula, lack of faculty expertise, problems with teaching methods and focus on the medical model. There was a paucity of evidence for the way that disability was presented in the nursing curricula for children. Improving the provision of care delivery to children with disabilities should be paid adequate attention in nursing curricula for children. Additionally, there is a need for policy-makers to identify the best coverage of nursing curricula, as well as the most effective nurse training methods that enhance knowledge and clinical skills relating to the care of children with disabilities. © 2015 International Council of Nurses.

  6. Visually suboptimal bananas: How ripeness affects consumer expectation and perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symmank, Claudia; Zahn, Susann; Rohm, Harald

    2017-10-07

    One reason for the significant amount of food that is wasted in developed countries is that consumers often expect visually suboptimal food as being less palatable. Using bananas as example, the objective of this study was to determine how appearance affects consumer overall liking, the rating of sensory attributes, purchase intention, and the intended use of bananas. The ripeness degree (RD) of the samples was adjusted to RD 5 (control) and RD 7 (more ripened, visually suboptimal). After preliminary experiments, a total of 233 participants were asked to judge their satisfaction with the intensity of sensory attributes that referred to flavor, taste, and texture using just-about-right scales. Subjects who received peeled samples were asked after tasting, whereas subjects who received unpeeled bananas judged expectation and, after peeling and tasting, perception. Expected overall liking and purchase intention were significantly lower for RD 7 bananas. Purchase intention was still significantly different between RD 5 and RD 7 after tasting, whereas no difference in overall liking was observed. Significant differences between RD 5 and RD 7 were observed when asking participants for their intended use of the bananas. Concerning the sensory attributes, penalty analysis revealed that only the firmness of the RD 7 bananas was still not just-about-right after tasting. The importance that consumers attribute to the shelf-life of food had a pronounced impact on purchase intention of bananas with different ripeness degree. In the case of suboptimal bananas, the results demonstrate a positive relationship between the sensory perception and overall liking and purchase intention. Convincing consumers that visually suboptimal food is still tasty is of high relevance for recommending different ways of communication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Mental illness related disparities in diabetes prevalence, quality of care and outcomes: a population-based longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emery Jonathan D

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health care disparity is a public health challenge. We compared the prevalence of diabetes, quality of care and outcomes between mental health clients (MHCs and non-MHCs. Methods This was a population-based longitudinal study of 139,208 MHCs and 294,180 matched non-MHCs in Western Australia (WA from 1990 to 2006, using linked data of mental health registry, electoral roll registrations, hospital admissions, emergency department attendances, deaths, and Medicare and pharmaceutical benefits claims. Diabetes was identified from hospital diagnoses, prescriptions and diabetes-specific primary care claims (17,045 MHCs, 26,626 non-MHCs. Both univariate and multivariate analyses adjusted for socio-demographic factors and case mix were performed to compare the outcome measures among MHCs, category of mental disorders and non-MHCs. Results The prevalence of diabetes was significantly higher in MHCs than in non-MHCs (crude age-sex-standardised point-prevalence of diabetes on 30 June 2006 in those aged ≥20 years, 9.3% vs 6.1%, respectively, P 1c, microalbuminuria, blood lipids was suboptimal in both groups, but was lower in MHCs (for all tests combined; adjusted OR 0.81, 95% CI 0.78 to 0.85, at one year; and adjusted rate ratio (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.84 to 0.88, during the study period. MHCs also had increased risks of hospitalisation for diabetes complications (adjusted RR 1.20, 95% CI 1.17 to 1.24, diabetes-related mortality (1.43, 1.35 to 1.52 and all-cause mortality (1.47, 1.42 to 1.53. The disparities were most marked for alcohol/drug disorders, schizophrenia, affective disorders, other psychoses and personality disorders. Conclusions MHCs warrant special attention for primary and secondary prevention of diabetes, especially at the primary care level.

  8. Factors related to the performance of Specialized Dental Care Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Christiane de Azevedo Machado

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Specialized Dental Care Centers (SDCC have the mission to expand access to public medium complexity dental care and support the primary health care actions at this level of complexity. However, it is necessary to ensure the quality of services and to evaluate such services continuously to identify weaknesses and strengths that support the processes of leadership/management. Nevertheless, there is a dearth of studies on the assessment of oral health in specialized care that may indicate which factors should be investigated. Therefore, this integrated literature review sought to explore the plethora of publications on the evaluation of SDCC in the LILACS and MEDLINE data bases in October 2013 to identify factors possibly related to the performance of such health services. Thus, 13 references were included in this review pointing to forms of organization and management of work processes related to the creation of healthcare networks (operation of regulation centers and setting up of health consortiums. They include the contextual characteristics of the places where SDCCs are located (population size, Family Health Strategy coverage, Municipal Human Development Index, governance, governing capacity were factors that influenced the SDCCs performance.

  9. Fatigue in Intensive Care Nurses and Related Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Sevim; Taşdemir, Nurten; Kurt, Aylin; İlgezdi, Ebru; Kubalas, Özge

    2017-10-01

    Fatigue negatively affects the performance of intensive care nurses. Factors contributing to the fatigue experienced by nurses include lifestyle, psychological status, work organization and sleep problems. To determine the level of fatigue among nurses working in intensive care units and the related factors. This descriptive study was conducted with 102 nurses working in intensive care units in the West Black Sea Region of Turkey. Data were collected between February and May 2014 using a personal information form, the Visual Analogue Scale for Fatigue (VAS-F), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index. The intensive care nurses in the study were found to be experiencing fatigue. Significant correlations were observed between scores on the VAS-F Fatigue and anxiety (p=0.01), depression (p=0.002), and sleep quality (pcare nurses' levels of fatigue. These results can be of benefit in taking measures which may be used to reduce fatigue in nurses, especially the fatigue related to work organization and social life.

  10. Research gaps in neonatal HIV-related care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary-Ann Davies

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The South African prevention of mother to child transmission programme has made excellentprogress in reducing vertical HIV transmission, and paediatric antiretroviral therapyprogrammes have demonstrated good outcomes with increasing treatment initiation inyounger children and infants. However, both in South Africa and across sub-Saharan African,lack of boosted peri-partum prophylaxis for high-risk vertical transmission, loss to followup,and failure to initiate HIV-infected infants on antiretroviral therapy (ART before diseaseprogression are key remaining gaps in neonatal HIV-related care. In this issue of the Southern African Journal of HIV Medicine, experts provide valuable recommendations for addressingthese gaps. The present article highlights a number of areas where evidence is lacking toinform guidelines and programme development for optimal neonatal HIV-related care.

  11. Research gaps in neonatal HIV-related care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary-Ann Davies

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The South African prevention of mother to child transmission programme has made excellentprogress in reducing vertical HIV transmission, and paediatric antiretroviral therapyprogrammes have demonstrated good outcomes with increasing treatment initiation inyounger children and infants. However, both in South Africa and across sub-Saharan African,lack of boosted peri-partum prophylaxis for high-risk vertical transmission, loss to followup,and failure to initiate HIV-infected infants on antiretroviral therapy (ART before diseaseprogression are key remaining gaps in neonatal HIV-related care. In this issue of the Southern African Journal of HIV Medicine, experts provide valuable recommendations for addressingthese gaps. The present article highlights a number of areas where evidence is lacking toinform guidelines and programme development for optimal neonatal HIV-related care.

  12. Factors Related to Burnout in the Neonatal Intensive Care Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-01

    During the 1970s other researchers such as Pines, Maslach , Kann(r, and Kafry began conducting research on burnout in the helping and social service...a more positive view of themselves and of their patients. Maslach and Pines (1977) looked at staff-client ratio in relation to burnout in child care...health professional. Twenty items measure the burnout syndrome as defined by Maslach and Pines ( Maslach , 1976; Maslach & Pines, 1977; Pines & Maslach

  13. Suboptimal performance on neuropsychological tests in patients with suspected chronic toxic encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hout, MSE; Schmand, B; Wekking, EM; Hageman, G; Deelman, BG

    Suboptimal performance during neuropsychological testing can seriously complicate assessment in behavioral neurotoxicology. We present data on the prevalence of suboptimal performance in a group of Dutch patients with suspected chronic toxic encephalopathy (CTE) after long-term occupational exposure

  14. Suboptimal performance on neuropsychological tests in patients with suspected chronic toxic encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hout, Moniek S. E.; Schmand, Ben; Wekking, Ellie M.; Hageman, Gerard; Deelman, Betto G.

    2003-01-01

    Suboptimal performance during neuropsychological testing can seriously complicate assessment in behavioral neurotoxicology. We present data on the prevalence of suboptimal performance in a group of Dutch patients with suspected chronic toxic encephalopathy (CTE) after long-term occupational exposure

  15. Palliative care for cancer patients in a primary health care setting:Bereaved relatives' experience, a qualitative group interview study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Mette Asbjørn; Olesen, Frede; Jensen, Anders Bonde

    2008-01-01

    care setting to explore barriers and facilitators for delivery of good palliative home care. Methods: Three focus group interviews with fourteen bereaved relatives in Aarhus County, Denmark. Results: Three main categories of experience were identified: 1) The health professionals' management, where...... a need to optimize was found. 2) Shared care, which was lacking. 3) The relatives' role, which needs an extra focus. Conclusion: Relatives experience insufficient palliative care mainly due to organizational and cultural problems among professionals. Palliative care in primary care in general needs......Background: Knowledge about the quality and organisation of care to terminally ill cancer patients with a relatives' view in a primary health care setting is limited. The aim of the study is to analyse experiences and preferences of bereaved relatives to terminally ill cancer patients in a primary...

  16. Health-related correlates of perceived discrimination in HIV care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Sheryl Thorburn; Bogart, Laura M; Delahanty, Douglas L

    2004-01-01

    Negative interactions with health care providers can have important implications for the health and health care of HIV-positive individuals. The purpose of this study was to examine perceptions of race-based and socioeconomic status (SES)-based discrimination during interactions with HIV treatment providers. We recruited 110 individuals (17% female, 51% white) living with HIV from an AIDS service organization in a midwestern city. Results indicated that the majority of participants had perceived discrimination in their interactions with providers when getting treatment for HIV. More specifically, 71% reported having experienced discrimination when receiving treatment for HIV based on their race or color, and 66% reported discrimination attributed to their socioeconomic status, position, or social class. However, participants indicated that they experienced discrimination infrequently. No significant racial/ethnic differences in reports of discrimination were observed. In addition, greater race-based and SES-based discrimination were each associated with greater levels of depression and posttraumatic stress symptoms, greater severity of AIDS-related symptoms, lower perceived general health, and less health care satisfaction. Greater SES-based discrimination was also related to lower adherence to antiretroviral medications. Our findings suggest that experiences with discrimination when getting treatment have important implications for the health and health care of HIV-positive individuals. It is important to note, however, that discrimination based on HIV status or sexual orientation was not assessed and may have affected the results. Studies that explore perceptions of discrimination based on other factors among HIV-positive individuals may improve understanding of the nature, extent, and consequences of discrimination in patient-provider interactions.

  17. Quality of reporting randomised controlled trials in major dental journals suboptimal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Dominic

    2011-01-01

    Hand searching of the most recent 24 issues of six high impact dental journals. RCTs involving only humans, from 24 issues of six leading specialty journals, covering a period up to July 2009 were included, including cluster randomised trials. Each article included in the study was assessed and scored independently by two observers, with any discrepancies being resolved by a third observer. In this study the modified CONSORT checklist was used to score each applicable item of data. The sum of the scores was converted to a percentage value for each trial. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Data regarding the publishing journal, country of origin of the trial, number of authors, involvement of statistician/epidemiologist, number of centres involved, ethics committee approval were subject to quantitative analysis. Ninety-five RCTs were identified with, according to the authors, generally suboptimal scores on quality reporting on key CONSORT areas. Significant differences in scores were found among the journals covering the named specialties. Overall there was a positive association between the quality score in studies with more authors, multicentre studies and studies in which a statistician/epidemiologist was involved. The overall quality of reporting RCTs in major dental journals was considered suboptimal in key CONSORT areas. This is very important as the reported results of RCTs can have an impact on future patient care.

  18. Integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care and patient related outcomes: A critical review of evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Salins

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: In adult oncology, there is evidence to suggest early specialist palliative care improves HRQOL, mood, treatment decision-making, health care utilization, advanced care planning, patient satisfaction, and end-of-life care. There is moderate evidence to support the role of early specialist palliative care intervention in improvement of symptoms, survival, and health-related communication. There is limited evidence at present to support role of early specialist palliative care interventions in pediatric and geriatric oncology. Qualitative studies on barriers and negative patient outcomes may provide useful insights toward restructuring early specialist palliative care interventions.

  19. Contributions of relational coordination to care management in accountable care organizations: Views of managerial and clinical leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundall, Thomas G; Wu, Frances M; Lewis, Valerie A; Schoenherr, Karen E; Shortell, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    The accountable care organization (ACO) is a new type of health care organization incentivized to improve quality of care, improve population health, and reduce the cost of care. An ACO's success in meeting these objectives depends greatly upon its ability to improve patient care management. Numerous studies have found relational coordination to be positively associated with key measures of organizational performance in health care organizations, including quality and efficiency. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (a) identify the extent to which ACO leaders are aware of the dimensions of relational coordination, and (b) identify the ways these leaders believe the dimensions influenced care management practices in their organization. We performed content analysis of interviews with managerial and clinical leaders from a diverse group of 11 ACOs to assess awareness of relational coordination and identify the ways that dimensions of relational coordination were perceived to influence development of care management practices. ACO leaders mentioned four relational coordination dimensions: shared goals, frequency of communication, timeliness of communication, and problem solving communication. Three dimensions - shared knowledge of team members' tasks, mutual respect, and accuracy of communication - were not mentioned. Our analysis identified numerous ways leaders believed the four mentioned dimensions contributed to the development of care management, including contributions to standardization of care, patient engagement, coordination of care, and care planning. We propose two hypotheses for future research on relational coordination and care management. If relational coordination is to have a beneficial influence on ACO performance, organizational leaders must become more aware of relational coordination and its various dimensions and become cognizant of relational coordination's influence on care management in their ACO. We suggest a number of means by which ACO

  20. Communication-related allegations against physicians caring for premature infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, J; Muniraman, H; Cascione, M; Ramanathan, R

    2017-10-01

    Maternal-fetal medicine physicians (MFMp) and neonatal-perinatal medicine physicians (NPMp) caring for premature infants and their families are exposed to significant risk for malpractice actions. Effective communication practices have been implicated to decrease litigious intentions but the extent of miscommunication as a cause of legal action is essentially unknown in this population. Analysis of communication-related allegations (CRAs) may help toward improving patient care and physician-patient relationships as well as decrease litigation risks. We retrospectively reviewed the Westlaw database, a primary online legal research resource used by United States lawyers and legal professionals, for malpractice cases against physicians involving premature infants. Inclusion criteria were: 22 to 36 weeks gestational age, cases related to peripartum events through infant discharge and follow-up, and legal records with detailed factual narratives. The search yielded 736 legal records, of which 167 met full inclusion criteria. A CRA was identified in 29% (49/167) of included cases. MFMp and/or NPMp were named in 104 and 54 cases, respectively. CRAs were identified in 26% (27/104) and 35% (19/54) of MFMp- and NPMp-named cases, respectively, with a majority involving physician-family for both specialties (81% and 74%, respectively). Physician-family CRAs for MFMp and NPMp most often regarded lack of informed consent (50% and 57%, respectively), lack of full disclosure (41% and 29%, respectively) and lack of anticipatory guidance (36% and 21%, respectively). This study of a major legal database identifies CRAs as significant causes of legal action against MFMp and NPMp involved in the care of high-risk women and infants delivered preterm. Physicians should be especially vigilant with obtaining genuine informed consent and maintaining open communication with families.

  1. Respiratory changes related to prematurity in neonatal intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francieli Cristina Krey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify respiratory clinical changes in preterm newborns hospitalized in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Methods: this is a documentary research with 145 medical records by an instrument with sociodemographic variables of preterm newborns and their mothers. Results: most of the newborn were male, 66.9% were born surgically, 64.8% were moderately premature, and the birth weights were between 1,500 and 2,500 grams. Among the respiratory changes, there were early respiratory dysfunction, hyaline membrane, and apnea. There was the prevalence of women in preterm labor (42.8%, water breaking (32.4% and pre-eclampsia (20.7% among others were found to be related to obstetric factors related to prematurity. Conclusion: a high incidence of preterm births was observed, with significant respiratory changes.

  2. When the Learning Environment Is Suboptimal: Exploring Medical Students’ Perceptions of “Mistreatment”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Despite widespread implementation of policies to address mistreatment, high rates of mistreatment during clinical training are reported, prompting the question of whether “mistreatment” means more to students than delineated in official codes of conduct. Understanding “mistreatment” from students’ perspective and as it relates to the learning environment is needed before effective interventions can be implemented. Method The authors conducted focus groups with final-year medical students at McGill University Faculty of Medicine in 2012. Participants were asked to characterize “suboptimal learning experience” and “mistreatment.” Transcripts were analyzed via inductive thematic analysis. Results Forty-one of 174 eligible students participated in six focus groups. Students described “mistreatment” as lack of respect or attack directed toward the person, and “suboptimal learning experience” as that which compromised their learning. Differing perceptions emerged as students debated whether “mistreatment” can be applied to negative learning environments as well as isolated incidents of mistreatment even though some experiences fell outside of the “official” label as per institutional policies. Whether students perceived “mistreatment” versus a “suboptimal learning experience” in negative environments appeared to be influenced by several key factors. A concept map integrating these ideas is presented. Conclusions How students perceived negative situations during training appears to be a complex process. When medical students say “mistreatment,” they may be referring to a spectrum, with incident-based mistreatment on one end and learning-environment-based mistreatment on the other. Multiple factors influenced how students perceived an environment-based negative situation and may provide strategies to improving the learning environment. PMID:24556767

  3. Medical student stories of participation in patient care-related activities: the construction of relational identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmington, Sally; McColl, Geoffrey

    2017-03-01

    Professional identity formation is acknowledged as one of the fundamental tasks of contemporary medical education. Identity is a social phenomenon, constructed through participation in everyday activities and an integral part of every learning interaction. In this paper we report from an Australian ethnographic study into how medical students and patients use narrative to construct their identities. The dialogic narrative analysis employed focused on the production of meaning through the use of language devices in a given context, and the juxtaposition of multiple perspectives. Two stories told by students about their participation in patient care-related activities reveal how identities are constructed in this context through depictions of the relationships between medical students, patients and clinical teachers. These students use the rhetorical functions of stories to characterise doctors and patients in certain ways, and position themselves in relation to them. They defend common practices that circumvent valid consent processes, justified by the imperative to maximise students' participation in patient care-related activities. In doing so, they identify patients as their adversaries, and doctors as allies. Both students are influenced by others' expectations but one reveals the active nature of identity work, describing subtle acts of resistance. These stories illustrate how practices for securing students' access to patients can influence students' emerging identities, with implications for their future disclosure and consent practices. We argue that more collaborative ways of involving medical students in patient care-related activities will be facilitated if students and clinical teachers develop insight into the relational nature of identity work.

  4. China suboptimal health cohort study: rationale, design and baseline characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youxin; Ge, Siqi; Yan, Yuxiang; Wang, Anxin; Zhao, Zhongyao; Yu, Xinwei; Qiu, Jing; Alzain, Mohamed Ali; Wang, Hao; Fang, Honghong; Gao, Qing; Song, Manshu; Zhang, Jie; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Wei

    2016-10-13

    Suboptimal health status (SHS) is a physical state between health and disease, characterized by the perception of health complaints, general weakness, chronic fatigue and low energy levels. SHS is proposed by the ancient concept of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) from the perspective of preservative, predictive and personalized (precision) medicine. We previously created the suboptimal health status questionnaire 25 (SHSQ-25), a novel instrument to measure SHS, validated in various populations. SHSQ-25 thus affords a window of opportunity for early detection and intervention, contributing to the reduction of chronic disease burdens. To investigate the causative effect of SHS in non-communicable chronic diseases (NCD), we initiated the China suboptimal health cohort study (COACS), a longitudinal study starting from 2013. Phase I of the study involved a cross-sectional survey aimed at identifying the risk/protective factors associated with SHS; and Phase II: a longitudinal yearly follow-up study investigating how SHS contributes to the incidence and pattern of NCD. (1) Cross-sectional survey: in total, 4313 participants (53.8 % women) aged from 18 to 65 years were included in the cohort. The prevalence of SHS was 9.0 % using SHS score of 35 as threshold. Women showed a significantly higher prevalence of SHS (10.6 % in the female vs. 7.2 % in the male, P differed significantly between subjects of SHS (SHS score ≥35) and those of ideal health (SHS score difference in prevalence of SHS might partly explain the gender difference of incidence of certain chronic diseases. The COACS will enable a thorough characterization of SHS and establish a cohort that will be used for longitudinal analyses of the interaction between the genetic, lifestyle and environmental factors that contribute to the onset and etiology of targeted chronic diseases. The study together with the designed prospective cohort provides a chance to characterize and evaluate the effect of SHS

  5. Collaboration between relatives of elderly patients and nurses and its relation to satisfaction with the hospital care trajectory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, Tove; Nyberg, Per; Hallberg, Ingalill Rahm

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Relatives are often involved in the care of frail elderly patients prior to admission and are thus important collaborative partners for nurses. They hold valuable knowledge, which may improve care planning for the benefit of the patient and the hospital care trajectory. Satisfaction...... among relatives may be an indicator of this. Aim: To investigate collaboration between relatives and nurses among those relatives reporting high versus low satisfaction with the hospital care trajectory. Further, the aim was to investigate the relationship between satisfaction with the hospital care...

  6. Sub-optimal asthma control in teenagers in the midland region of Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, I; Fitzpatrick, P

    2011-12-01

    Internationally, many children with asthma are not attaining achievable asthma control. To examine the prevalence of asthma in teenagers in four midland counties, their asthma control and the barriers, if any, to gaining control of asthma. International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Children (ISAAC) methodology was used in a survey of Junior Cycle Year 2 second-level students. The prevalence of "wheeze ever" was 49.8%, "wheeze in the last 12 months" was 32.6% and "asthma ever" was 23.5%. Of teenagers with current asthma, 96% had evidence of sub-optimal asthma control during the previous year. For the majority of the teenagers with asthma, treatment was not guideline concordant; infrequent lung function testing, insufficient review after acute care and poor use of written asthma action plans. Barriers included lack of awareness of need for treatment. If asthma guidelines are implemented fully, these children may experience better health.

  7. Feature-preserving surface mesh smoothing via suboptimal Delaunay triangulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhanheng; Yu, Zeyun; Holst, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A method of triangular surface mesh smoothing is presented to improve angle quality by extending the original optimal Delaunay triangulation (ODT) to surface meshes. The mesh quality is improved by solving a quadratic optimization problem that minimizes the approximated interpolation error between a parabolic function and its piecewise linear interpolation defined on the mesh. A suboptimal problem is derived to guarantee a unique, analytic solution that is significantly faster with little loss in accuracy as compared to the optimal one. In addition to the quality-improving capability, the proposed method has been adapted to remove noise while faithfully preserving sharp features such as edges and corners of a mesh. Numerous experiments are included to demonstrate the performance of the method.

  8. Integration of Early Specialist Palliative Care in Cancer Care and Patient Related Outcomes: A Critical Review of Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salins, Naveen; Ramanjulu, Raghavendra; Patra, Lipika; Deodhar, Jayita; Muckaden, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: World Health Organization and American Society of Clinical Oncology recommend early integration of specialist palliative care in patients with cancer. This paper focuses on critical review of evidence on integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care and patient-related outcomes. Methods: The question for the literature search was – Does integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care influences patient-related outcomes? 31 articles related to literature search review question were included in this paper. Results: Ten patient-related outcomes of early specialist palliative care in adult cancer care was studied. Studies by Temel et al. (2012), Bakitas et al. (2009), Zimmermann et al. (2014), Rugno et al. (2014), Lowery et al. (2013) and Walker et al. (2014) showed early specialist palliative care improves health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Studies by Pirl et al. (2012), Lowery et al. (2013), and Walker et al. (2014) showed early specialist palliative care improved mood depression and anxiety. Studies by Zimmermann et al. and Rugno et al. (2014) showed symptom control benefit of early specialist palliative care. Studies by Temel (2010), Bakitas (2015) and Rugno et al. (2014) showed survival improvement with early specialist palliative care. All these studies were carried in ambulatory palliative care setting. No survival benefit of palliative care intervention was seen in inpatient palliative care setting. The studies by Geer et al. (2012), Rugno et al. (2014), and Lowery et al. (2013) showed that early palliative care intervention positively influences treatment decision making. All the studies showed that palliative care intervention group received less intravenous chemotherapy in last few weeks of life. Studies by Yoong et al. and Temel et al. (2011) shows early specialist palliative care improves advanced care planning. Studies by Temel et al. (2010), Greer et al. (2012), McNamara et al. (2013), Hui et al. (2014

  9. Transnational caregiving: Part 1, caring for family relations across nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, V Erica

    2011-01-01

    This article concerns how globalization and the aging of the world's population are affecting the already complex issue of intergenerational transnational caregiving. Globalization has caused an increase in workforce mobility with large numbers of individuals seeking employment overseas. This, coupled with increased longevity globally, has resulted in many workers leaving their elderly parents in need of care in their home countries. This has spawned caregiving across national borders, or caring for family relations across nations. Currently in the United States, not enough emphasis is given to family caregiving. Data compiled by AARP and the National Alliance for Caregiving estimate the economic value for this group of family caregivers in 2007 to be $375 billion, accounting for 34-52 million family caregivers per given year. This does not include those families who are transnational caregivers. The seminal work in this emerging field has been done by social anthropologists Loretta Baldassar, Cora Velekoop Baldock, and Raelene Wilding, who have defined the components of transnational caregiving based on an ethnographic study using qualitative data to study nine immigrant communities in Western Australia. Although their research focused on caregiving from a distance, additional work has been added to the discussion by introducing the element of "care drain" and further cultural perspectives. Therefore, this research is an exploratory study on intergenerational transnational caregiving within the context of the changing world and its demographics. Within the context of globalization and global aging, the following questions are addressed: What is the significance of family caregiving? What is a transnational? How has technology changed "transnationalism" today? What are the elements that comprise transnational caregiving? How does culture play a role in transnational caregiving? What are some of the national initiatives undertaken by governments to aid in workforce

  10. Risk of Suboptimal Iodine Intake in Pregnant Norwegian Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helle Margrete Meltzer

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Pregnant women and infants are exceptionally vulnerable to iodine deficiency. The aims of the present study were to estimate iodine intake, to investigate sources of iodine, to identify predictors of low or suboptimal iodine intake (defined as intakes below 100 μg/day and 150 μg/day in a large population of pregnant Norwegian women and to evaluate iodine status in a sub-population. Iodine intake was calculated based on a validated Food Frequency Questionnaire in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort. The median iodine intake was 141 μg/day from food and 166 μg/day from food and supplements. Use of iodine-containing supplements was reported by 31.6%. The main source of iodine from food was dairy products, contributing 67% and 43% in non-supplement and iodine-supplement users, respectively. Of 61,904 women, 16.1% had iodine intake below 100 μg/day, 42.0% had iodine intake below 150 μg/day and only 21.7% reached the WHO/UNICEF/ICCIDD recommendation of 250 μg/day. Dietary behaviors associated with increased risk of low and suboptimal iodine intake were: no use of iodine-containing supplements and low intake of milk/yogurt, seafood and eggs. The median urinary iodine concentration measured in 119 participants (69 μg/L confirmed insufficient iodine intake. Public health strategies are needed to improve and secure the iodine status of pregnant women in Norway.

  11. Suboptimal Criterion Learning in Static and Dynamic Environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elyse H Norton

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Humans often make decisions based on uncertain sensory information. Signal detection theory (SDT describes detection and discrimination decisions as a comparison of stimulus "strength" to a fixed decision criterion. However, recent research suggests that current responses depend on the recent history of stimuli and previous responses, suggesting that the decision criterion is updated trial-by-trial. The mechanisms underpinning criterion setting remain unknown. Here, we examine how observers learn to set a decision criterion in an orientation-discrimination task under both static and dynamic conditions. To investigate mechanisms underlying trial-by-trial criterion placement, we introduce a novel task in which participants explicitly set the criterion, and compare it to a more traditional discrimination task, allowing us to model this explicit indication of criterion dynamics. In each task, stimuli were ellipses with principal orientations drawn from two categories: Gaussian distributions with different means and equal variance. In the covert-criterion task, observers categorized a displayed ellipse. In the overt-criterion task, observers adjusted the orientation of a line that served as the discrimination criterion for a subsequently presented ellipse. We compared performance to the ideal Bayesian learner and several suboptimal models that varied in both computational and memory demands. Under static and dynamic conditions, we found that, in both tasks, observers used suboptimal learning rules. In most conditions, a model in which the recent history of past samples determines a belief about category means fit the data best for most observers and on average. Our results reveal dynamic adjustment of discrimination criterion, even after prolonged training, and indicate how decision criteria are updated over time.

  12. Physicians' personal beliefs about weight-related care and their associations with care delivery: The U.S. National Survey of Energy Balance Related Care among Primary Care Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeves, Jeremy A; Liu, Benmei; Willis, Gordon; Lee, Richard; Smith, Ashley Wilder

    2015-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are major health risks in the United States (US) and primary care physicians (PCPs) are uniquely positioned to address them. However, their personal beliefs about weight-related care may influence their delivery of care. A nationally representative sample of 2022 physicians completed the National Survey of Energy Balance-Related Care among Primary Care Physicians. Physicians responded to questions regarding their beliefs and clinical practices associated with weight control including assessment, counselling, referral and follow-up for diet, physical activity, and weight. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine associations between physician characteristics and personal beliefs, and associations between personal beliefs and care delivery, adjusting for specialty, age, gender, race, region, urban/rural location, and patient population. Most physicians feel a responsibility (97%) to promote weight-related care, but over half (53%) have concerns about their effectiveness and almost two-thirds feel they lack effective strategies to help patients (63%). Demographics and medical specialty were associated with beliefs (female, Asian-American, Midwest and Southern location, and internal medicine physicians were more likely to have stronger positive beliefs about weight-related care). Personal beliefs about weight-related care were associated with the likelihood of its delivery. However, two practices, regular BMI assessment and referring patients for further evaluation and management, were less related to PCP beliefs than were other care practices. PCPs' beliefs may be important to their practice of weight-related care. Training in behavioural counselling, and providing physician's tools and resources may help to address their concerns about helping patients with weight-related care. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Investigating the prevalence, predictors, and prognosis of suboptimal statin use early after a non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Richard M; Yin, Peng; Hanson, Anita; FitzGerald, Richard; Morris, Andrew P; Stables, Rod H; Jorgensen, Andrea L; Pirmohamed, Munir

    High-potency statin therapy is recommended in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease but discontinuation, dose reduction, statin switching, and/or nonadherence occur in practice. To determine the prevalence and predictors of deviation from high-potency statin use early after a non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) and its association with subsequent major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) and all-cause mortality (ACM). A total of 1005 patients from a UK-based prospective NSTE-ACS cohort study discharged on high-potency statin therapy (atorvastatin 80 mg, rosuvastatin 20 mg, or 40 mg daily) were included. At 1 month, patients were divided into constant high-potency statin users, and suboptimal users incorporating statin discontinuation, dose reduction, switching statin to a lower equivalent potency, and/or statin nonadherence. Follow-up was a median of 16 months. There were 156 suboptimal (∼15.5%) and 849 constant statin users. Factors associated in multivariable analysis with suboptimal statin occurrence included female sex (odds ratio 1.75, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.14-2.68) and muscular symptoms (odds ratio 4.28, 95% CI 1.30-14.08). Suboptimal statin use was associated with increased adjusted risks of time to MACE (hazard ratio 2.10, 95% CI 1.25-3.53, P = .005) and ACM (hazard ratio 2.46, 95% CI 1.38-4.39, P = .003). Subgroup analysis confirmed that the increased MACE/ACM risks were principally attributable to statin discontinuation or nonadherence. Conversion to suboptimal statin use is common early after NSTE-ACS and is partly related to muscular symptoms. Statin discontinuation or non-adherence carries an adverse prognosis. Interventions that preserve and enhance statin utilization could improve post NSTE-ACS outcomes. Copyright © 2017 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Exploring Nurses’ Knowledge and Experiences Related to Trauma-Informed Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehudis Stokes

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Trauma-informed care is an emerging concept that acknowledges the lasting effects of trauma. Nurses are uniquely positioned to play an integral role in the advancement of trauma-informed care. However, knowledge related to trauma-informed care in nursing practice remains limited. The purpose of this article is to present the results of a qualitative study which explored nurses’ understandings and experiences related to trauma-informed care. Seven semistructured interviews were conducted with nurses and four categories emerged from the analysis: (a Conceptualizing Trauma and Trauma-Informed Care, (b Nursing Care and Trauma, (c Context of Trauma-Informed Care, and (d Dynamics of the Nurse–Patient Relationship in the Face of Trauma. These findings highlight important considerations for trauma-informed care including the complex dynamics of trauma that affect care, the need to push knowledge about trauma beyond mental health care, and noteworthy parallels between nursing care and trauma-informed care.

  15. Intensive Care Unit Delirium and Intensive Care Unit-Related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Annachiara; Pandharipande, Pratik P; Patel, Mayur B

    2017-12-01

    Delirium is one of the most common behavioral manifestations of acute brain dysfunction in the intensive care unit (ICU) and is a strong predictor of worse outcome. Routine monitoring for delirium is recommended for all ICU patients using validated tools. In delirious patients, a search for all reversible precipitants is the first line of action and pharmacologic treatment should be considered when all causes have been ruled out, and it is not contraindicated. Long-term morbidity has significant consequences for survivors of critical illness and for their caregivers. ICU patients may develop posttraumatic stress disorder related to their critical illness experience. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Palliative care for cancer patients in a primary health care setting: Bereaved relatives' experience, a qualitative group interview study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Anders

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge about the quality and organisation of care to terminally ill cancer patients with a relatives' view in a primary health care setting is limited. The aim of the study is to analyse experiences and preferences of bereaved relatives to terminally ill cancer patients in a primary care setting to explore barriers and facilitators for delivery of good palliative home care. Methods Three focus group interviews with fourteen bereaved relatives in Aarhus County, Denmark. Results Three main categories of experience were identified: 1 The health professionals' management, where a need to optimize was found. 2 Shared care, which was lacking. 3 The relatives' role, which needs an extra focus. Conclusion Relatives experience insufficient palliative care mainly due to organizational and cultural problems among professionals. Palliative care in primary care in general needs improvement and attention should be drawn to the "professionalization" of the relatives and the need to strike a balance between their needs, wishes and resources in end-of-life care and bereavement.

  17. Factors limiting and facilitating changes in caring for the intensive care unit patients' relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaforteza, Concha; García-Mozo, Ana; Amorós, Sylvia M; Pérez, Eva; Maqueda, Mónica; Delgado, Joaquina

    2015-03-01

    To explore how the intensive care unit (ICU) context influenced receptivity to change in clinical practice, in order to improve the care offered to patients' relatives. Families of critically ill patients have unmet needs that are not being addressed. Lack of attention to these needs is related more to the ICU context than to a lack of scientific evidence. Participatory action research (PAR), a qualitative study conducted in a Spanish ICU. Eleven participants agreed to represent their teams in all scheduled group discussions. Field diaries were kept by the principal investigator and discussion participants, and five in-depth interviews were conducted. Content analysis was performed. Four factors limited change: (1) Not acknowledging the legitimacy of scientific evidence regarding the families of critically ill patients. (2) Imbalanced power relationships between the members of multidisciplinary teams. (3) Lack of nurse participation in the information flows. (4) The organization of time and physical space in the unit. Three factors facilitated change: (1) A sense of individual and shared commitment. (2) Leadership in day-to-day matters. (3) A process based on reflection. PAR can lead to change in clinical practice, although the process is complex and requires substantial input of time and energy. Contextual factors limiting this change were structural whereas facilitating factors were circumstantial and depended upon individuals' characteristics. Professionals working at the bedside are capable of identifying, developing and introducing changes to the context in which they work. Knowing these factors and sharing the experience of a successful change process can help others design processes appropriate to their site. © 2014 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  18. Factors related to the provision of home-based end-of-life care among home-care nursing, home help, and care management agencies in Japan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Igarashi, Ayumi; Kurinobu, Takeshi; Ko, Ayako; Okamoto, Yuko; Matsuura, Shino; Feng, Mei; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko

    2015-01-01

    ...) care and consider strategies to deal with this process. This study aims to clarify institution-related factors associated with the provision of home-based EOL care cases, and to compare them among three different types of home-care agencies...

  19. Energy expenditures & physical activity in rats with chronic suboptimal nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifshitz Fima

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sub-optimally nourished rats show reduced growth, biochemical and physiological changes. However, no one has assessed metabolic rate adaptations in rats subjected to chronic suboptimal nutrition (CSN. In this study energy expenditure (EE; kcal/100 g body weight and physical activity (PA; oscillations in weight/min/kg body weight were assessed in rats subjected to three levels of CSN. Results Body weight gain was diminished (76.7 ± 12.0 and 61.6 ± 11.0 g in rats fed 70 and 60% of the ad-libitum fed controls which gained more weight (148.5 ± 32.3 g. The rats fed 80% gained weight similarly to controls (136.3 ± 10.5 g. Percent Fat-free body mass was reduced (143.8 ± 8.7 and 142.0 ± 7.6 g in rats fed 70 and 60% of ad-libitum, but not in those fed 80% (200.8 ± 17.5 g as compared with controls (201.6 ± 33.4 g. Body fat (g decreased in rats fed 80% (19.7 ± 5.3, 70% (15.3 ± 3.5 and 60% (9.6 ± 2.7 of ad-libitum in comparison to controls (26.0 ± 6.7. EE and PA were also altered by CSN. The control rats increased their EE and PA during the dark periods by 1.4 ± 0.8 and 1.7 ± 1.1 respectively, as compared with light the period; whereas CSN rats fed 80 and 70% of ad-libitum energy intake had reduced EE and PA during the dark periods as compared with the light period EE(7.5 ± 1.4 and 7.8 ± 0.6 vs. 9.0 ± 1.2 and 9.7 ± 0.8; p Conclusion CSN rats adapt to mild energy restriction by reducing body fat, EE and PA mainly during the dark period while growth proceeds and lean body mass is preserved. At higher levels of energy restrictions there is decreased growth, body fat and lean mass. Moreover EE and PA are also reduced during both light and dark periods.

  20. Robust Adaptive LCMV Beamformer Based On An Iterative Suboptimal Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiansheng Guo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The main drawback of closed-form solution of linearly constrained minimum variance (CF-LCMV beamformer is the dilemma of acquiring long observation time for stable covariance matrix estimates and short observation time to track dynamic behavior of targets, leading to poor performance including low signal-noise-ratio (SNR, low jammer-to-noise ratios (JNRs and small number of snapshots. Additionally, CF-LCMV suffers from heavy computational burden which mainly comes from two matrix inverse operations for computing the optimal weight vector. In this paper, we derive a low-complexity Robust Adaptive LCMV beamformer based on an Iterative Suboptimal solution (RAIS-LCMV using conjugate gradient (CG optimization method. The merit of our proposed method is threefold. Firstly, RAIS-LCMV beamformer can reduce the complexity of CF-LCMV remarkably. Secondly, RAIS-LCMV beamformer can adjust output adaptively based on measurement and its convergence speed is comparable. Finally, RAIS-LCMV algorithm has robust performance against low SNR, JNRs, and small number of snapshots. Simulation results demonstrate the superiority of our proposed algorithms.

  1. Adaptive suboptimal second-order sliding mode control for microgrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incremona, Gian Paolo; Cucuzzella, Michele; Ferrara, Antonella

    2016-09-01

    This paper deals with the design of adaptive suboptimal second-order sliding mode (ASSOSM) control laws for grid-connected microgrids. Due to the presence of the inverter, of unpredicted load changes, of switching among different renewable energy sources, and of electrical parameters variations, the microgrid model is usually affected by uncertain terms which are bounded, but with unknown upper bounds. To theoretically frame the control problem, the class of second-order systems in Brunovsky canonical form, characterised by the presence of matched uncertain terms with unknown bounds, is first considered. Four adaptive strategies are designed, analysed and compared to select the most effective ones to be applied to the microgrid case study. In the first two strategies, the control amplitude is continuously adjusted, so as to arrive at dominating the effect of the uncertainty on the controlled system. When a suitable control amplitude is attained, the origin of the state space of the auxiliary system becomes attractive. In the other two strategies, a suitable blend between two components, one mainly working during the reaching phase, the other being the predominant one in a vicinity of the sliding manifold, is generated, so as to reduce the control amplitude in steady state. The microgrid system in a grid-connected operation mode, controlled via the selected ASSOSM control strategies, exhibits appreciable stability properties, as proved theoretically and shown in simulation.

  2. End-of-life care in the intensive care unit: a patient-based questionnaire of intensive care unit staff perception and relatives' psychological response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartog, Christiane S; Schwarzkopf, Daniel; Riedemann, Niels C; Pfeifer, Ruediger; Guenther, Albrecht; Egerland, Kati; Sprung, Charles L; Hoyer, Heike; Gensichen, Jochen; Reinhart, Konrad

    2015-04-01

    Communication is a hallmark of end-of-life care in the intensive care unit. It may influence the impact of end-of-life care on patients' relatives. We aimed to assess end-of-life care and communication from the perspective of intensive care unit staff and relate it to relatives' psychological symptoms. Prospective observational study based on consecutive patients with severe sepsis receiving end-of-life care; trial registration NCT01247792. Four interdisciplinary intensive care units of a German University hospital. Responsible health personnel (attendings, residents and nurses) were questioned on the day of the first end-of-life decision (to withdraw or withhold life-supporting therapies) and after patients had died or were discharged. Relatives were interviewed by phone after 90 days. Overall, 145 patients, 610 caregiver responses (92% response) and 84 relative interviews (70% response) were analysed. Most (86%) end-of-life decisions were initiated by attendings and only 2% by nurses; 41% of nurses did not know enough about end-of-life decisions to communicate with relatives. Discomfort with end-of-life decisions was low. Relatives reported high satisfaction with decision-making and care, 87% thought their degree of involvement had been just right. However, 51%, 48% or 33% of relatives had symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety or depression, respectively. Predictors for depression and post-traumatic stress disorder were patient age and relatives' gender. Relatives' satisfaction with medical care and communication predicted less anxiety (p = 0.025). Communication should be improved within the intensive care unit caregiver team to strengthen the involvement of nurses in end-of-life care. Improved communication between caregivers and the family might lessen relatives' long-term anxiety. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Factors related to staff stress in HIV/AIDS related palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Prabha

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: Staff stress in HIV related palliative care has been identified as an important problem worldwide. This study aimed at estimating prevalence of staff stress and its correlates in a sample of palliative caregivers in HIV/AIDS in India. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-two participants (29 female and 23 male completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI, AIDS Contact Scale (ACS and AIDS Stress Scale (ASS and a semi-structured questionnaire. RESULTS: The majority (92% had average to high scores on at least one domain of MBI. High scores on the factors Emotional Exhaustion, Depersonalisation, and Personal Accomplishment were seen in 10%, 17% and 58% of the sample respectively. ASS score, severity of stress in dealing with persons living with AIDS and having considered leaving HIV related work were predictors of high Emotional Exhaustion scores. ASS score, ACS score and severity of stress with death of a person with AIDS were predictors of high Depersonalisation scores. Female gender was a predictor of a high Personal Accomplishment score. CONCLUSIONS: The study emphasises the need to address issues related to staff burnout in HIV palliative care.

  4. [The development of primary care related to regional governmental policies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-García, Manuel; Sánchez-Bayle, Marciano; Palomo, Luis

    2008-06-01

    To developed an evaluation of primary care (PC) from the analysis of the new differences in PC among the autonomous communities nowadays. Cross ecological study. Spain. The 17 autonomous communities. Indicators of service supplies, diagnostic and therapeutic resolution habilities, access to hospital diagnostic, relationship and access doctor-patient, effectiveness and efficiency, public budget in PC and patient noticed quality. In all the indicators, leftist regional Governments have obtained a better punctuation than conservative ones. The main differences are in relation to the percentage of overcrowded doctor quotas (more than 1500 inhabitants per family doctor, with a 27.4% of difference); in limited access to diagnostic proves from PC services (25.3%); in PC services supplies (17.1%) in infirmary staff per habitant (10.9%), in pharmacological waste increase (10.9%); in the PC expending per capita (10.3%) and in the percentage of people who think that PC has improved. By means of quarter weighting, the differences of punctuation obtained by the regions are from a maximum of 46 (Aragón) to a minimum of 26 (Canary Islands), with an average of 39.94%. Six years after finishing the health transferences, there are important differences in the development of the PC, and the conservative autonomous communities have the deepest deficient one.

  5. Fathers' birth experience in relation to midwifery care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildingsson, Ingegerd; Cederlöf, Linnea; Widén, Sara

    2011-09-01

    The aim was to identify the proportion of fathers having a positive experience of a normal birth and to explore factors related to midwifery care that were associated with a positive experience. Research has mainly focused on the father's supportive role during childbirth rather than his personal experiences of birth. 595 new fathers living in a northern part of Sweden, whose partner had a normal birth, were included in the study. Data was collected by questionnaires. Odds Ratios with 95% confidence interval and logistic regression analysis were used. The majority of fathers (82%) reported a positive birth experience. The strongest factors associated with a positive birth experience were midwife support (OR 4.0; 95 CI 2.0-8.1), the midwife's ongoing presence in the delivery room (OR 2.0; 1.1-3.9), and information about the progress of labour (OR 3.1; 1.6-5.8). Most fathers had a positive birth experience. Midwifery support, the midwife's presence and sufficient information about the progress of labour are important aspects in a father's positive birth experience. The role of the midwife during birth is important to the father, and his individual needs should be considered in order to enhance a positive birth experience. Copyright © 2010 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Adverse events related to emergency department care: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia S Stang

    Full Text Available To systematically review the literature regarding the prevalence, preventability, severity and types of adverse events (AE in the Emergency Department (ED.We systematically searched major bibliographic databases, relevant journals and conference proceedings, and completed reference reviews of primary articles. Observational studies (cohort and case-control, quasi-experimental (e.g. before/after studies and randomized controlled trials, were considered for inclusion if they examined a broad demographic group reflecting a significant proportion of ED patients and described the proportion of AE. Studies conducted outside of the ED setting, those examining only a subpopulation of patients (e.g. a specific entrance complaint or receiving a specific intervention, or examining only adverse drug events, were excluded. Two independent reviewers assessed study eligibility, completed data extraction, and assessed study quality with the Newcastle Ottawa Scale.Our search identified 11,624 citations. Ten articles, representing eight observational studies, were included. Methodological quality was low to moderate with weaknesses in study group comparability, follow-up, and outcome ascertainment and reporting. There was substantial variation in the proportion of patients with AE related to ED care, ranging from 0.16% (n = 9308 to 6.0% (n = 399. Similarly, the reported preventability of AE ranged from 36% (n = 250 to 71% (n = 24. The most common types of events were related to management (3 studies, diagnosis (2 studies and medication (2 studies.The variability in findings and lack of high quality studies on AE in the high risk ED setting highlights the need for research in this area. Further studies with rigorous, standardized outcome assessment and reporting are required.

  7. Relative influence of male and female care in determining nestling mass in a migratory songbird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk Stodola; Eric Linder; David A. Buehler; Kathlee Franzreb; Daniel Kim; Robert Cooper

    2010-01-01

    Biparental care is common in birds with the allocation of effort being highly variable between the sexes. In most songbird species, the female typically provides the most care in the breeding cycle with both parents providing care when provisioning young. Food provisioning should be directly related to offspring quality; however, the relative influence each parent has...

  8. Advance care planning: between tools and relational end-of-life care?

    OpenAIRE

    Borgstrom, Erica

    2015-01-01

    The way in which end-of-life care is delivered in the UK has changed dramatically over the last few years. Owing to the changes in systems and care practice promoted in the End of Life Care Strategy more people have access to higher quality care, including advance care planning and symptom management. Drawing on the ‘best practice’ at the time, the Strategy recommended the use of several tools to facilitate identifying dying patients, communicating and planning future care, and coordinating o...

  9. Illness Perceptions and Depression in Relation to Self-care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study explored the relationships between interpersonal communications assessed using the Interpersonal Processes of ... using the Revised Illness Perceptions Questionnaire; and self-care behaviour assessed using the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities questionnaire.

  10. Women and men's satisfaction with care related to induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makenzius, Marlene; Tydén, Tanja; Darj, Elisabeth; Larsson, Margareta

    2012-08-01

    To investigate satisfaction with abortion care among women and their male partners, and to identify factors associated with high overall contentment with the care received. A multi-centre cross-sectional questionnaire survey conducted in 2009 among 798 Swedish abortion-seeking women and 590 male partners was analysed with logistic regression. Overall care satisfaction was rated high by two-thirds (74%) of the women and half (52%) of the men. For women, factors associated with high overall satisfaction with care were: to be well treated by the health care staff (Odds Ratio [OR] = 11.78), sufficient pain relief (OR = 3.87), adequate information about the gynaecological examination (OR = 2.25), suitable contraceptive counselling (OR = 2.23), and ease of access to the clinic by phone (OR = 1.91). For men, the factors were to be well treated by the health care staff (OR = 5.32), and adequate information about the abortion procedure (OR = 2.64). Most women and half of the men were pleased with the attention they had received, but one in four women and half the men were not, or not completely, suggesting improvement is needed, especially with regard to men. For both women and men the human aspect of the care, namely, the consideration showed by the attending staff, appears to be the most important factor associated with satisfaction regarding abortion care.

  11. Are Staffing, Work Environment, Work Stressors, and Rationing of Care Related to Care Workers' Perception of Quality of Care? A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga, Franziska; Ausserhofer, Dietmar; Hamers, Jan P H; Engberg, Sandra; Simon, Michael; Schwendimann, René

    2015-10-01

    To describe care worker-reported quality of care and to examine its relationship with staffing variables, work environment, work stressors, and implicit rationing of nursing care. Cross-sectional study. National, randomly selected sample of Swiss nursing homes, stratified according to language region and size. A total of 4311 care workers of all educational backgrounds (registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, nurse aides) from 402 units in 155 nursing homes completed a survey between May 2012 and April 2013. Care worker-reported quality of care was measured with a single item; predictors were assessed with established instruments (eg, Practice Environment Scale-Nurse Working Index) adapted for nursing home use. A multilevel logistic regression model was applied to assess predictors for quality of care. Overall, 7% of care workers rated the quality of care provided as rather low or very low. Important factors related to better quality of care were higher teamwork and safety climate (odds ratio [OR] 6.19, 95% confidence interval [CI] 4.36-8.79); better staffing and resources adequacy (OR 2.94, 95% CI 2.08-4.15); less stress due to workload (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.55-0.93); less implicit rationing of caring, rehabilitation, and monitoring (OR 0.34, 95% CI 0.24-0.49); and less rationing of social care (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.69-0.92). Neither leadership nor staffing levels, staff mix, or turnover was significantly related to quality of care. Work environment factors and organizational processes are vital to provide high quality of care. The improvement of work environment, support in handling work stressors, and reduction of rationing of nursing care might be intervention points to promote high quality of care in nursing homes. Copyright © 2015 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The influence of caregiver depression on children in non-relative foster care versus kinship care placements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Antonio; O'Reilly, Amanda; Matone, Meredith; Kim, Minseop; Long, Jin; Rubin, David M

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about how the challenges faced by caregivers influence the variation in social, emotional, and behavioral (SEB) outcomes of youth placed in kinship versus non-relative foster care. This study examined SEB symptoms among youth in kinship and non-relative foster care settings, hypothesizing that changes in caregiver depression would modify children's change in behavior over time. Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) assessments of 199 children placed with kinship and non-relative foster care providers in a Mid-Atlantic city were conducted at time of placement and 6-12 months post-placement. Linear regression estimated CBCL change scores for youth across placement type and caregiver depression trajectories. Kinship caregivers were more likely to become depressed or remained depressed than non-relative foster caregivers. Youth in kinship care always exhibited better change in SEB outcomes than youth in non-relative foster care, but these positive outcomes were principally observed among families where caregivers demonstrated a reduction in depression over time or were never depressed. Adjusted change scores for non-relative foster care youth were always negative, with the most negative scores among youth whose caregivers became depressed over time. Caregiver well-being may modify the influence of placement setting on SEB outcomes for youth placed into out-of-home care. Findings lend to policy relevance for child welfare systems that seek kinship settings as a panacea to the challenges faced by youth, without allocating resources to address caregiver needs.

  13. Stability in center day care: Relations with children's well-being and problem behavior in day care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Schipper, J.C.; van IJzendoorn, M.H.; Tavecchio, L.W.C.

    2004-01-01

    Mothers and primary professional caregivers of 186 children, aged 6-30 months, participated in this study in which a new measure for daily stability in center day care was developed, describing staffing, grouping, and program features. Relative contributions of infants' daily experiences of care

  14. Determinants of suboptimal breast-feeding practices in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazir, Tabish; Akram, Dure-Samin; Nisar, Yasir Bin; Kazmi, Narjis; Agho, Kingsley E; Abbasi, Saleem; Khan, Amira M; Dibley, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    Exclusive breast-feeding is estimated to reduce infant mortality in low-income countries by up to 13 %. The aim of the present study was to determine the risk factors associated with suboptimal breast-feeding practices in Pakistan. A cross-sectional study using data extracted from the multistage cluster sample survey of the Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey 2006-2007. A nationally representative sample of households. Last-born alive children aged 0-23 months (total weighted sample size 3103). The prevalences of timely initiation of breast-feeding, bottle-feeding in children aged 0-23 months, exclusive breast-feeding and predominant breast-feeding in infants aged 0-5 months were 27·3 %, 32·1 %, 37·1 % and 18·7 %, respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated that working mothers (OR = 1·48, 95 % CI 1·16, 1·87; P = 0·001) and mothers who delivered by Caesarean section (OR = 1·95, 95 % CI 1·30, 2·90; P = 0·001) had significantly higher odds for no timely initiation of breast-feeding. Mothers from North West Frontier Province were significantly less likely (OR = 0·37, 95 % CI 0·23, 0·59; P feed their babies exclusively. Mothers delivered by traditional birth attendants had significantly higher odds to predominantly breast-feed their babies (OR = 1·96, 95 % CI 1·18, 3·24; P = 0·009). The odds of being bottle-fed was significantly higher in infants whose mothers had four or more antenatal clinic visits (OR = 1·93, 95 % CI 1·46, 2·55; P feeding practices. To gain the full benefits of breast-feeding for child health and nutrition, there is an urgent need to develop interventions to improve the rates of exclusive breast-feeding.

  15. Genotypic Variation in the Response to Suboptimal Temperature at Different Plant Densities in Cut Chrysanthemum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeg, van der A.; Carvalho, S.M.P.; Heuvelink, E.

    2009-01-01

    Energy efficiency of greenhouse cut chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat.) may be increased by breeding. In addition to breeding for cultivars with a shorter reaction time at suboptimal temperatures, an alternative approach would be to develop cultivars that are heavier at suboptimal

  16. Uses of ionizing radiation and medical-care-related problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smathers, J.B.

    1988-08-01

    The uses of ionizing radiation in medicine are currently undergoing changes due to at least four major influences: (1) the constantly changing public perception of the hazards of radiation, (2) continuing technical innovation and development in equipment, (3) the imposition of diagnosis-related group funding by government health-care funding agencies, and (4) an increase in the average age of the U.S. population. The combined effect of these influences will probably result in a major increase in biplanar fluoroscopic examinations to support nonsurgical approaches such as percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, percutaneous transluminal neuroembolism, and lithotripsy (the fracturing of kidney stones). As some of these examinations can result in 1.5 h of fluoroscopy, major doses to the patient and to the clinical staff can be expected. In addition, improved diagnostic techniques, such as using positron emission tomography (a combination of biochemistry and positron-emitting isotopes), can be expected to increase the number of small cyclotrons installed in medical centers. Counteracting these increases in radiation exposure is the development of digital radiography, which generally results in a lowering of the dose per diagnostic procedure. In the realm of therapeutic uses, one can expect higher-energy treatment accelerators, more patients being released from the hospital on therapeutic doses of isotopes, and a potential acceptance of neutron therapy as a cancer treatment modality. The latter treatment may take the form of boron capture therapy, 252Cf implant therapy, or external beam therapy using high-energy cyclotrons and the p,Be or the d,Be reaction to create the neutrons.

  17. Ethical issues related to caring for low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Mary S; Passmore, Denise; Cline, Genieveve; Maguire, Denise

    2014-09-01

    Currently preterm births are the leading causes of newborn deaths and newborn mortality in developed countries. Infants born prematurely remain vulnerable to many acute complications and long-term disabilities. There is a growing concern surrounding the moral and ethical implications of the complex and technological care being provided to extremely low birth weight infants in neonatal intensive care units in the developed nations. The purpose of this study was to describe the ethical and moral issues that neonatal intensive care nurses experience when caring for low birth weight preterm infants and their families. A phenomenological method design was used to describe the lived experiences of nurses with ethical and moral issues encountered in the neonatal intensive care unit. One-on-one, semi-structured interviews using open-ended questions were used to gather data from the participants. The setting for this study was a 97-bed neonatal intensive care. A total of 16 female nurses were interviewed. Approval to conduct the research study was obtained from the institutional review board of the hospital where the study was conducted. Formal signed consent was obtained from each participant. To ensure confidentiality, each participant was asked to choose a confederate name to be used in the interview and the transcriptions. The thematic analysis identified five recurring themes: (a) at the edge of viability, (b) infant pain and discomfort, (c) crucial decisions, (d) communicating with parents, and (e) letting go. Neonatal intensive care unit nurses indicated that they often had challenges to their own sense of morality as they struggled to protect the infant from pain and unnecessary discomfort, provide care to an infant and their family whom they thought was faced with a lifetime of challenges and poor health, accepting decisions made by parents, and feeling as if parents were not adequately informed about outcomes. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Contributions of Relational Coordination to Care Management in ACOs: Views of Managerial and Clinical Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundall, Thomas G.; Wu, Frances M.; Lewis, Valerie A.; Schoenherr, Karen E.; Shortell, Stephen M.

    2017-01-01

    Background The accountable care organization (ACO) is a new type of health care organization incentivized to improve quality of care, improve population health, and reduce the total cost of care. An ACO’s success in meeting these objectives will depend greatly upon its ability to improve patient care management. Numerous studies have found relational coordination to be positively associated with key measures of organizational performance in health care organizations, including quality and efficiency. Purpose The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) identify the extent to which ACO leaders are aware of the dimensions of relational coordination, and (2) identify the ways these leaders believe the dimensions influenced care management practices in their organization. Methodology/Approach We performed content analysis of interviews with managerial and clinical leaders from a diverse group of 11 ACOs to assess awareness of relational coordination and identify the ways that dimensions of relational coordination were perceived to influence development of care management practices. Findings ACO leaders mentioned four relational coordination dimensions: shared goals, frequency of communication, timeliness of communication, and problem solving communication. Three dimensions – shared knowledge of team members’ tasks, mutual respect, and accuracy of communication – were not mentioned. Our analysis identified numerous ways leaders believed the four mentioned dimensions contributed to the development of care management, including contributions to standardization of care, patient engagement, coordination of care, and care planning. Discussion We propose two hypotheses for future research on relational coordination and care management. Practice Implications If relational coordination is to have a beneficial influence on ACO performance, organizational leaders must become more aware of relational coordination and its various dimensions and become cognizant of relational

  19. The meaning of dignity in nursing home care as seen by relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehnsfeldt, Arne; Lindwall, Lillemor; Lohne, Vibeke; Lillestø, Britt; Slettebø, Åshild; Heggestad, Anne Kari T; Aasgaard, Trygve; Råholm, Maj-Britt; Caspari, Synnøve; Høy, Bente; Sæteren, Berit; Nåden, Dagfinn

    2014-08-01

    As part of an ongoing Scandinavian project on the dignity of care for older people, this study is based on 'clinical caring science' as a scientific discipline. Clinical caring science examines how ground concepts, axioms and theories are expressed in different clinical contexts. Central notions are caring culture, dignity, at-home-ness, the little extra, non-caring cultures versus caring cultures and ethical context - and climate. This study investigates the individual variations of caring cultures in relation to dignity and how it is expressed in caring acts and ethical contexts. Three assumptions are formulated: (1) the caring culture of nursing homes influences whether dignified care is provided, (2) an ethos that is reflected on and appropriated by the caregiver mirrors itself in ethical caring acts and as artful caring in an ethical context and (3) caring culture is assumed to be a more ontological or universal concept than, for example, an ethical context or ethical person-to-person acts. The methodological approach is hermeneutic. The data consist of 28 interviews with relatives of older persons from Norway, Denmark and Sweden. The principles of voluntariness, confidentiality and anonymity were respected during the whole research process. Three patterns were revealed: dignity as at-home-ness, dignity as the little extra and non-dignifying ethical context. Caring communion, invitation, at-home-ness and 'the little extra' are expressions of ethical contexts and caring acts in a caring culture. A non-caring culture may not consider the dignity of its residents and may be represented by routinized care that values organizational efficiency and instrumentalism rather than an individual's dignity and self-worth. An ethos must be integrated in both the organization and in the individual caregiver in order to be expressed in caring acts and in an ethical context that supports these caring acts. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Factors associated with suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awachana Jiamsakul

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART plays an important role in treatment outcomes. It is crucial to identify factors influencing adherence in order to optimize treatment responses. The aim of this study was to assess the rates of, and factors associated with, suboptimal adherence (SubAdh in the first 24 months of ART in an Asian HIV cohort. Methods: As part of a prospective resistance monitoring study, the TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance Monitoring Study (TASER-M collected patients’ adherence based on the World Health Organization-validated Adherence Visual Analogue Scale. SubAdh was defined in two ways: (i 14 days. Time was divided into four intervals: 0–6, 6–12, 12–18 and 18–24 months. Factors associated with SubAdh were analysed using generalized estimating equations. Results: Out of 1316 patients, 32% ever reported 2 assessments per patient per year had an odds ratio (OR=0.7 (95% confidence interval (CI (0.55 to 0.90, p=0.006, compared to sites with ≤2 assessments per patient per year. Compared to heterosexual exposure, SubAdh was higher in injecting drug users (IDUs (OR=1.92, 95% CI (1.23 to 3.00, p=0.004 and lower in homosexual exposure (OR=0.52, 95% CI (0.38 to 0.71, p<0.001. Patients taking a nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor and protease inhibitor (NRTI+PI combination were less likely to report adherence <100% (OR=0.36, 95% CI (0.20 to 0.67, p=0.001 compared to patients taking an NRTI and non-nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI+NNRTI combination. SubAdh decreased with increasing time on ART (all p<0.001. Similar associations were found with adherence <95% as the outcome. Conclusions: We found that SubAdh, defined as either <100% and <95%, was associated with mode of HIV exposure, ART regimen, time on ART and frequency of adherence measurement. The more frequently sites assessed patients, the lower the SubAdh, possibly reflecting site resourcing for patient counselling. Although social

  1. Factors associated with suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiamsakul, Awachana; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Ditangco, Rossana; Li, Patrick CK; Phanuphak, Praphan; Sirisanthana, Thira; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Kantipong, Pacharee; Lee, Christopher KC; Mustafa, Mahiran; Merati, Tuti; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Singtoroj, Thida; Law, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) plays an important role in treatment outcomes. It is crucial to identify factors influencing adherence in order to optimize treatment responses. The aim of this study was to assess the rates of, and factors associated with, suboptimal adherence (SubAdh) in the first 24 months of ART in an Asian HIV cohort. Methods As part of a prospective resistance monitoring study, the TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance Monitoring Study (TASER-M) collected patients’ adherence based on the World Health Organization-validated Adherence Visual Analogue Scale. SubAdh was defined in two ways: (i) 14 days. Time was divided into four intervals: 0–6, 6–12, 12–18 and 18–24 months. Factors associated with SubAdh were analysed using generalized estimating equations. Results Out of 1316 patients, 32% ever reported 2 assessments per patient per year had an odds ratio (OR)=0.7 (95% confidence interval (CI) (0.55 to 0.90), p=0.006), compared to sites with ≤2 assessments per patient per year. Compared to heterosexual exposure, SubAdh was higher in injecting drug users (IDUs) (OR=1.92, 95% CI (1.23 to 3.00), p=0.004) and lower in homosexual exposure (OR=0.52, 95% CI (0.38 to 0.71), p<0.001). Patients taking a nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor and protease inhibitor (NRTI+PI) combination were less likely to report adherence <100% (OR=0.36, 95% CI (0.20 to 0.67), p=0.001) compared to patients taking an NRTI and non-nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI+NNRTI) combination. SubAdh decreased with increasing time on ART (all p<0.001). Similar associations were found with adherence <95% as the outcome. Conclusions We found that SubAdh, defined as either <100% and <95%, was associated with mode of HIV exposure, ART regimen, time on ART and frequency of adherence measurement. The more frequently sites assessed patients, the lower the SubAdh, possibly reflecting site resourcing for patient counselling. Although social

  2. Impact of an intensive care unit diary on psychological distress in patients and relatives*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrouste-Orgeas, Maité; Coquet, Isaline; Périer, Antoine; Timsit, Jean-François; Pochard, Frédéric; Lancrin, Frédéric; Philippart, François; Vesin, Aurélien; Bruel, Cédric; Blel, Youssef; Angeli, Stéphanie; Cousin, Natalie; Carlet, Jean; Misset, Benoit

    2012-07-01

    To assess the impact of an intensive care unit diary on the psychological well-being of patients and relatives 3 and 12 months after intensive care unit discharge. Prospective single-center study with an intervention period between two control periods. Medical-surgical intensive care unit in a 460-bed tertiary hospital. Consecutive patients from May 2008 to November 2009 and their relatives. Study inclusion occurred after the fourth day in the intensive care unit. A diary written by both the patient's relatives and the intensive care unit staff. Patients and relatives completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Peritraumatic Dissociative Experiences Questionnaire 3 months after intensive care unit discharge, and completed the Impact of Events Scale assessing posttraumatic stress-related symptoms 12 months after intensive care unit discharge. Of the 378 patients admitted during the study period, 143 were included (48 in the prediary period, 49 in the diary period, and 46 in the postdiary period). In relatives, severe posttraumatic stress-related symptoms after 12 months varied significantly across periods (prediary 80%, diary 31.7%, postdiary 67.6%; pintensive care unit diary significantly affected posttraumatic stress-related symptoms in relatives and surviving patients 12 months after intensive care unit discharge.

  3. Relational coordination promotes quality of chronic care delivery in Dutch disease-management programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, Jane Murray; Nieboer, Anna Petra

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that relational coordination is positively associated with the delivery of hospital care, acute care, emergency care, trauma care, and nursing home care. The effect of relational coordination in primary care settings, such as disease-management programs, remains unknown. This study examined relational coordination between general practitioners and other professionals in disease-management programs and assessed the impact of relational coordination on the delivery of chronic illness care. Professionals (n = 188; response rate = 57%) in 19 disease-management programs located throughout the Netherlands completed surveys that assessed relational coordination and chronic care delivery. We used a cross-sectional study design. Our study demonstrated that the delivery of chronic illness care was positively related to relational coordination. We found positive relationships with community linkages (r = .210, p management support (r = .217, p management team members: practice nurses (M = 2.69 vs. 3.73; p management professionals with different disciplines is expected to improve chronic illness care delivery.

  4. 42 CFR 1001.201 - Conviction relating to program or health care fraud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conviction relating to program or health care fraud. 1001.201 Section 1001.201 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OIG AUTHORITIES PROGRAM INTEGRITY-MEDICARE AND STATE HEALTH CARE PROGRAMS...

  5. Physical activity-related and weather-related practices of child care centers from 2 states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Sarah C; Gillman, Matthew W; Mayhew, Meghan; Namenek Brouwer, Rebecca J; Benjamin Neelon, Sara E

    2015-02-01

    Young children's physical activity (PA) is influenced by their child care environment. This study assessed PA practices in centers from Massachusetts (MA) and Rhode Island (RI), compared them to best practice recommendations, and assessed differences between states and center profit status. We also assessed weather-related practices. Sixty percent of MA and 54% of RI directors returned a survey, for a total of 254. Recommendations were 1) daily outdoor play, 2) providing outdoor play area, 3) limiting fixed play structures, 4) variety of portable play equipment, and 5) providing indoor play area. We fit multivariable linear regression models to examine adjusted associations between state, profit status, PA, and weather-related practices. MA did not differ from RI in meeting PA recommendations (β = 0.03; 0.15, 0.21; P = .72), but MA centers scored higher on weather-related practices (β = 0.47; 0.16, 0.79; P = .004). For-profit centers had lower PA scores compared with nonprofits (β = -0.20; 95% CI: -0.38, -0.02; P = .03), but they did not differ for weather (β = 0.12; -0.19, 0.44; P = .44). More MA centers allowed children outside in light rain or snow. For-profit centers had more equipment—both fixed and portable. Results from this study may help inform interventions to increase PA in children.

  6. German nursing home professionals' knowledge and specific self-efficacy related to palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, David; Markett, Sebastian; Müller, Monika; Müller, Sigrun; Grützner, Felix; Rolke, Roman; Kern, Martina; Schmidt-Wolf, Gabriele; Radbruch, Lukas

    2013-07-01

    In Germany, more and more terminally ill patients spend their last days of life in nursing homes, and this presents a challenge for these institutions. Even though palliative care is a growing domain in health care, no quantitative in-depth evaluations of the status quo in nursing homes has been conducted so far in Germany, partly because of lacking measuring tools. This study used a new questionnaire to assess German health care professionals' theoretical knowledge of palliative care and their perceived self-efficacy. Both variables have been proven to be indicators for the quality of the implementation of palliative care in nursing homes. We used the Bonn Palliative Care Knowledge Test (Bonner Palliativwissenstest, BPW) questionnaire to measure knowledge of palliative care in the domains of medicine, care, and psychosocial care and to measure self-efficacy relating to palliative care. Care workers (N=130) in five nursing homes in the region of Aachen in western Germany answered the questionnaires. The results show low knowledge (on average 52.8% correct answers) and self-efficacy relating to palliative care, although work with dying people is their daily challenge. While general knowledge correlated with work experience, a negative correlation of specific self-efficacy with age and working experience was observed. Lower self-efficacy of care workers experienced in palliative care probably implies that the difficulty of palliative care skills is underestimated by inexperienced care workers. Palliative care training is urgently needed to improve knowledge and self-efficacy. Guidance to assist care professionals involved in palliative care in nursing homes needs to be developed and provided.

  7. Relating family satisfaction to the care provided in intensive care units: quality outcomes in Saudi accredited hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrous, Mohamed Saad

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to identify the satisfaction levels of the family members of patients in intensive care units. This is a cross-sectional analytical study. General intensive care units offer a variety of services to clinical and surgical patients. For the purpose of this study, a trained interviewer communicated with the families of patients, either before or after visiting hours. The study included 208 participants: 119 (57.2%) males and 89 (42.8%) females. Seventy-three (35.1%) of the patients attended a private hospital, and 135 (64.9%) attended a public hospital in the city of Al Madinah Al- Munawarah. All of the participants were either family members or friends of patients admitted to the intensive care units at the hospitals. The responses of both groups yielded low scores on the satisfaction index. However, a relatively high score was noted in response to questions 2, 6, and 10, which concerned the care that was extended by the hospital staff to their patients, the courteous attitude of intensive care unit staff members towards patients, and patients' satisfaction with the medical care provided, respectively. A very low score was obtained for item 11, which was related to the possibility for improvements to the medical care that the patients received. Overall, greater satisfaction with the services offered by the public intensive care units was reported compared to the satisfaction with the services offered by the private intensive care units. An overall low score on the satisfaction index was obtained, and further studies are recommended to assess the current situation and improve the satisfaction and quality of care provided by intensive care units.

  8. [World War II and current care provision: impact of war-related trauma on present professional care situations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, I; Zank, S

    2014-07-01

    This study represents the first empirical research into the impact of war-related trauma on present professional care situations in Germany. A total of 105 professional caregivers from North Rhine-Westphalia were questioned in a standardized form about the impact of war-related trauma on the daily work. Of the professional caregivers questioned 82%reported that they were already caring for a person suffering from post-war trauma and 77% stated that war-related trauma had an impact on the daily work. Altogether 63% reported that war-related trauma is highly significant for the daily work. The professional caregivers reported that there was often a lack of knowledge and awareness of the topic among colleagues. The study showed that there is a need for increasing awareness and providing further staff education and training regarding the treatment of people suffering from (war-related) trauma in order to ensure adequate care for those concerned.

  9. Maintaining Work: The Influence of Child Care Subsidies on Child Care-Related Work Disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forry, Nicole D.; Hofferth, Sandra L.

    2011-01-01

    With the passage of welfare reform, support for low-income parents to not only obtain but also maintain work has become imperative. The role of child care subsidies in supporting parents' job tenure has received little attention in the literature. This article examines the association between receiving a child care subsidy and experiencing a child…

  10. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of health care workers related to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The transgender population is stigmatised and they face a number of barriers when accessing health care. Additionally, they are subject to a number of health risks, such as increased risk of HIV infection, substance abuse and illicit use of cross gender hormones. Their health risks are further aggravated by a lack of targeted ...

  11. Thrombocytopenia in intensive care unit: is it related to acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One of the most common infections in mechanically ventilated patients in the intensive care unit is acquired pneumonia, which has a considerable mortality and morbidity. Low platelet count is considered one of the most common laboratory abnormal finding in ICU, and in this study we are trying to correlate it with ICU ...

  12. Suboptimal cytoreduction in ovarian carcinoma is associated with molecular pathways characteristic of increased stromal activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenqiu; Beach, Jessica A; Agadjanian, Hasmik; Jia, Dongyu; Aspuria, Paul-Joseph; Karlan, Beth Y; Orsulic, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Suboptimal cytoreductive surgery in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is associated with poor survival but it is unknown if poor outcome is due to the intrinsic biology of unresectable tumors or insufficient surgical effort resulting in residual tumor-sustaining clones. Our objective was to identify the potential molecular pathway(s) and cell type(s) that may be responsible for suboptimal surgical resection. By comparing gene expression in optimally and suboptimally cytoreduced patients, we identified a gene network associated with suboptimal cytoreduction and explored the biological processes and cell types associated with this gene network. We show that primary tumors from suboptimally cytoreduced patients express molecular signatures that are typically present in a distinct molecular subtype of EOC characterized by increased stromal activation and lymphovascular invasion. Similar molecular pathways are present in EOC metastases, suggesting that primary tumors in suboptimally cytoreduced patients are biologically similar to metastatic tumors. We demonstrate that the suboptimal cytoreduction network genes are enriched in reactive tumor stroma cells rather than malignant tumor cells. Our data suggest that the success of cytoreductive surgery is dictated by tumor biology, such as extensive stromal reaction and increased invasiveness, which may hinder surgical resection and ultimately lead to poor survival. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Comprehensiveness of HIV care provided at global HIV treatment sites in the IeDEA consortium: 2009 and 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristin Q Fritz

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The availability of viral load monitoring remains suboptimal and should be a focus for site capacity, particularly in East and Southern Africa, where the majority of those initiating on ART reside. However, the comprehensiveness of care provided increased over the past 5 years and was related to type of funding received (publicly funded and PEPFAR supported.

  14. 'I try to make a net around each patient': home care nursing as relational practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornsdottir, Kristin

    2017-05-24

    As a result of restructuring, home care is increasingly defined in a narrow, task-based way, undermining the holistic nature of practice. Recent practice theories can aid us in articulating the nature of this important, yet often invisible practice. My aim in this article was to enhance our knowledge and understanding of the nature of home care nursing practice. The approach was ethnographic, involving extensive fieldwork and formal interviews with members of five home care nursing teams and 15 older persons receiving care at home in a metropolitan area of Iceland. The study was approved by the National Bioethics Committee. As a net of services, home care was enacted through relational, but often invisible care practices, relating different actors - patient, family and health-care and social-care workers - in doing the work needed for the older persons to live comfortably at home. The work was collective in that it was shared by different actors and motivated by a common understanding that had developed and was preserved in conversations in the teams. Although the findings are limited in that they only reflect home care as practiced in one neighbourhood, they can be seen as providing important insights into what is needed for home care services to work. Home care practice can be understood as relational, aimed at creating a net of needed assistance. This work is a collective accomplishment of the teams and shaped by ideals and values shared among team members. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  15. Internal Medicine Residents' Beliefs, Attitudes, and Experiences Relating to Palliative Care: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, S; Mirza, R; Nissim, R; Ridley, J

    2017-05-01

    Internal medicine residents are frequently called upon to provide palliative care to hospitalized patients, but report feeling unprepared to do so effectively. Curricular development to enhance residents' palliative care skills and competencies requires an understanding of current beliefs, attitudes and learning priorities. We conducted a qualitative study consisting of semi-structured interviews with ten internal medicine residents to explore their understanding of and experiences with palliative care. All of the residents interviewed had a sound theoretical understanding of palliative care, but faced many challenges in being able to provide care in practice. The challenges described by residents were system-related, patient-related and provider-related. They identified several priority areas for further learning, and discussed ways in which their current education in palliative care could be enhanced. Our findings provide important insights to guide curricular development for internal medicine trainees. The top five learning priorities in palliative care that residents identified in our study were: 1) knowing how and when to initiate a palliative approach, 2) improving communication skills, 3) improving symptom management skills, 4) identifying available resources, and 5) understanding the importance of palliative care. Residents felt that their education in palliative care could be improved by having a mandatory rotation in palliative care, more frequent didactic teaching sessions, more case-based teaching from palliative care providers, opportunities to be directly observed, and increased support from palliative care providers after-hours.

  16. HIV/aids related home based care practices among primary health care workers in Ogun state, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Amoran

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV/AIDS is fast becoming a chronic disease with the advent of antiretroviral drugs, therefore making home based care key in the management of chronically ill HIV/AIDS patient. The objective of this study was to determine the perception and practice of health care workers on HIV/AIDS related home based care in the health facilities in Ogun state, Nigeria. Methods This study is an analytical cross-sectional study. A multistage cluster sampling technique was used to obtain a representative sample of the primary health care workers in Ogun state. An interviewer administered structured questionnaire was administered by trained health workers to elicit the required information. Result A total of 350 health care workers were interviewed, 70% of the respondents could adequately describe the components of home based care. Only 38.7% were aware of the National guideline on home based care practices and 17.1% believe that home based care will not significantly improve the prognosis of PLWAs. Few 19.1% had ever been trained or ever involved 16.6% in home based care practices. Only 20 [5.7%] are involved on a weekly basis, 16 [4.6%] monthly and 22 [6.3%] quarterly. Reasons given for non implementation of home based care are inadequate number of healthcare workers 45%, lack of political will 24.4%, lack of implementation by facility managers 14% and inadequate funds 16.6%. Factors that were significantly associated with the practice of home based care were perception of its relevance in improving prognosis [OR = 54.21, C.I = 23.22-129.52] and presence of a support group in the facility [OR = 4.80, C.I = 2.40-9.57]. There was however no statistically significant relationship between adequate knowledge of home based care [OR = 0.78, C.I = 0.39-1.54] and previous training on home based care (OR = 1.43, C.I = 0.66-3.06]. Conclusion The practice of home based care for HIV/AIDS among the study population is low

  17. High T-cell immune activation and immune exhaustion among individuals with suboptimal CD4 recovery after 4 years of antiretroviral therapy in an African cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colebunders Robert

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART partially corrects immune dysfunction associated with HIV infection. The levels of T-cell immune activation and exhaustion after long-term, suppressive ART and their correlation with CD4 T-cell count reconstitution among ART-treated patients in African cohorts have not been extensively evaluated. Methods T-cell activation (CD38+HLA-DR+ and immune exhaustion (PD-1+ were measured in a prospective cohort of patients initiated on ART; 128 patient samples were evaluated and subcategorized by CD4 reconstitution after long-term suppressive treatment: Suboptimal [median CD4 count increase 129 (-43-199 cells/μl], N = 34 ], optimal [282 (200-415 cells/μl, N = 64] and super-optimal [528 (416-878 cells/μl, N = 30]. Results Both CD4+ and CD8 T-cell activation was significantly higher among suboptimal CD4 T-cell responders compared to super-optimal responders. In a multivariate model, CD4+CD38+HLADR+ T-cells were associated with suboptimal CD4 reconstitution [AOR, 5.7 (95% CI, 1.4-23, P = 0.014]. T-cell exhaustion (CD4+PD1+ and CD8+PD1+ was higher among suboptimal relative to optimal (P P = 0.022]. Conclusion T-cell activation and exhaustion persist among HIV-infected patients despite long-term, sustained HIV-RNA viral suppression. These immune abnormalities were associated with suboptimal CD4 reconstitution and their regulation may modify immune recovery among suboptimal responders to ART.

  18. Unethical practices relating to cattle freedom, care and control ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In animal care, 40.0%, 31.3%, 30.0%, 12.5%, 7.5% and 5.0% were of the opinion that cattle could be respectively tired, hungry, sick, heady, injured and being in a strange environment might be the reasons for their refusal to obey the instruction of the handlers. In controlling the cattle for a direction, 85.7%, 10.4% and 3.9% ...

  19. Palliative care case managers in primary care: a descriptive study of referrals in relation to treatment aims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Plas, Annicka G M; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D; Francke, Anneke L; Jansen, Wim J J; Vissers, Kris C; Deliens, Luc

    2015-04-01

    Three important elements of the World Health Organization (WHO) definition of palliative care are: 1) it includes patients who may have cure or life prolongation as treatment aims besides palliative care; 2) it is not exclusively for cancer patients; and 3) it includes attention to the medical, psychological, social, and spiritual needs of the patients and their families. Case managers (nurses with expertise in palliative care) may assist generalist primary care providers in delivery of good palliative care. This study investigates the referral of patients to case managers in primary care with regard to the three elements mentioned: diagnosis, treatment aims, and needs as reflected in reasons given for referral. In this cross-sectional survey in primary care among case managers and referrers to case management, case managers completed questionnaires for 687 patients; referrers completed 448 (65%). Most patients referred have a combination of treatment aims (69%). Life expectancy and functional status of patients are lower for those with a treatment aim of palliation. Almost all (96%) of those referred are cancer patients. A need for psychosocial support is frequently given as a reason for referral (66%) regardless of treatment aim. Referrals to case managers reflect two of three elements of the WHO definition. Mainly, patients are referred for support complementary to medical care, and relatively early in their disease trajectory. However, most of those referred are cancer patients. Thus, to fully reflect the definition, broadening the scope to reach other patient groups is important.

  20. Models of care and delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens

    2014-01-01

    this diversity include differences in health policy, health insurance structures, case load and the prevalence of HIV-related morbidity. In clinical stable populations, the current trend is to gradually extend intervals between HIV-specific visits in a shared care model with GPs. A similar shared-model approach......Marked regional differences in HIV-related clinical outcomes exist across Europe. Models of outpatient HIV care, including HIV testing, linkage and retention for positive persons, also differ across the continent, including examples of sub-optimal care. Even in settings with reasonably good...... outcomes, existing models are scrutinized for simplification and/or reduced cost. Outpatient HIV care models across Europe may be centralized to specialized clinics only, primarily handled by general practitioners (GP), or a mixture of the two, depending on the setting. Key factors explaining...

  1. Patterns of marijuana and tobacco use associated with suboptimal self-rated health among US adult ever users of marijuana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Tsai

    2017-06-01

    In conclusion, among adult ever users of marijuana, current tobacco use is high and strongly associated with suboptimal SRH; regular marijuana smoking with or without current tobacco use is significantly associated with suboptimal SRH.

  2. Effects of Suboptimally Presented Erotic Pictures on Moral Judgments: A Cross-Cultural Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Vilar, Manuel; Arango, Olber Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has identified a set of core factors that influence moral judgments. The present study addresses the interplay between moral judgments and four factors: (a) incidental affects, (b) sociocultural context, (c) type of dilemma, and (d) participant’s sex. We asked participants in two different countries (Colombia and Spain) to judge the acceptability of actions in response to personal and impersonal moral dilemmas. Before each dilemma an affective prime (erotic, pleasant or neutral pictures) was presented suboptimally. Our results show that: a) relative to neutral priming, erotic primes increase the acceptance of harm for a greater good (i.e., more utilitarian judgments), b) relative to Colombians, Spanish participants rated causing harm as less acceptable, c) relative to impersonal dilemmas, personal dilemmas reduced the acceptance of harm, and d) relative to men, women were less likely to consider harm acceptable. Our results are congruent with findings showing that sex is a crucial factor in moral cognition, and they extend previous research by showing the interaction between culture and incidental factors in the making of moral judgments. PMID:27367795

  3. Effects of Suboptimally Presented Erotic Pictures on Moral Judgments: A Cross-Cultural Comparison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Olivera-La Rosa

    Full Text Available Previous research has identified a set of core factors that influence moral judgments. The present study addresses the interplay between moral judgments and four factors: (a incidental affects, (b sociocultural context, (c type of dilemma, and (d participant's sex. We asked participants in two different countries (Colombia and Spain to judge the acceptability of actions in response to personal and impersonal moral dilemmas. Before each dilemma an affective prime (erotic, pleasant or neutral pictures was presented suboptimally. Our results show that: a relative to neutral priming, erotic primes increase the acceptance of harm for a greater good (i.e., more utilitarian judgments, b relative to Colombians, Spanish participants rated causing harm as less acceptable, c relative to impersonal dilemmas, personal dilemmas reduced the acceptance of harm, and d relative to men, women were less likely to consider harm acceptable. Our results are congruent with findings showing that sex is a crucial factor in moral cognition, and they extend previous research by showing the interaction between culture and incidental factors in the making of moral judgments.

  4. Factors contributing to suboptimal rates of childhood vaccinations in Vermont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Catherine A; Velazco, Cristine S; Delaney, Thomas V; Bensimhon, Adam; Huang, Kuang-Ning; Jarvis, Paul R; Jolin, Jonathan S; Schaberg, Kurt B; Burke, Marianne; Finley, Christine; Carney, Jan K

    2015-12-01

    Childhood immunizations are invaluable in preventing contagious diseases. Nonetheless, vaccines have become increasingly controversial with growing numbers of caregivers refusing to vaccinate their children. The percentage of fully vaccinated children in Vermont is one of the lowest nationally. This study set out to determine Vermont caregivers' attitudes toward immunizations to better explain why the percentage of fully vaccinated children has fallen in Vermont. A survey regarding caregivers' health care knowledge about children, their vaccination concerns, and their children's vaccination status was sent to participants in the Vermont Women, Infants and Children's Program from two districts. In total, 83% (n = 379) of respondents reported their children received all recommended vaccinations for their age. Respondents who considered themselves highly knowledgeable regarding their children's health care and confident about the safety of vaccinations were significantly associated with reporting their children as being current on vaccinations and with their intent to continue vaccinations. Respondents indicated highest concern regarding the safety and number of vaccinations administered during one visit. Primary care providers were indicated as important resources for addressing concerns about vaccinations and health care knowledge of children. The results help to understand low vaccination rates in Vermont and can be used for targeting health campaigns to improve vaccination rates. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Sports-related injuries in primary health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarveld, Frank; Visser, Chantal A. N.; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; Backx, Frank J. G.

    Methods. Survey study conducted in 612 patients with sports-related injuries by 21 GP trainees in as many GP practices. Inclusion of study subjects took place between September 2007 and April 2009. Results. In total, 694 sports-related injuries were registered. The incidence of sports-related

  6. 45 CFR Appendix C to Part 84 - Guidelines Relating to Health Care for Handicapped Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guidelines Relating to Health Care for Handicapped... ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Pt. 84, App. C Appendix C to Part 84—Guidelines Relating to Health Care for Handicapped Infants (a...

  7. A criterion-related validity study of the nursing-care dependency (NCD) scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, A.; Buist, G.; Dassen, Th.W.N.

    The purpose of this study was to examine some aspects of the criterion-related validity of the Nursing-Care Dependency (NCD) scale. This 15-item counting scale has recently been developed for assessing the care dependency of demented or mentally handicapped in-patients. Its criterion-related

  8. Caring for Premature Life and Death: The Relational Dynamics of Detachment in a NICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Bo Kyeong

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on fieldwork in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in Chiang Mai during 2010 and 2012, I examine neonatal care as a contingent entanglement of technological and ethical relationships with vulnerable others. Along the continuum of universal antenatal and delivery care, neonatal medicine becomes a normative part of reproductive health care in Chiang Mai. As the NICU opens its door to sick newborns whose belonging to kinship and the nation-state is uncertain, neonatal care requires deliberate practices to incorporate them into life-sustaining connections. By tracing medical staff's effort to be accountable to their fragile patients, I show that withdrawing of intensive care is relational work that requires affective involvement and distancing through commensality, prosthetic extensions, and karmic network. This specific mode of care, which is premised on the combination of unconditional openness and careful detachment, offers insight into a possible enactment of hospitality within biomedical institutions.

  9. Nursing diagnoses related to psychiatric adult inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauenfelder, Fritz; van Achterberg, Theo; Müller Staub, Maria

    2018-02-01

    To detect the prevalence of NANDA-I diagnoses and possible relationships between those and patient characteristics such as gender, age, medical diagnoses and psychiatric specialty/setting. There is a lack on studies about psychiatric inpatient characteristics and possible relationships among these characteristics with nursing diagnoses. A quantitative-descriptive, cross-sectional, completed data sampling study was performed. The data were collected from the electronic patient record system. Frequencies for the social-demographic data, the prevalence of the NANDA-I diagnoses and the explanatory variables were calculated. In total, 410 nursing phenomena were found representing 85 different NANDA-I diagnoses in 312 patients. The NANDA-I diagnosis "Ineffective Coping" was the most frequently stated diagnosis followed by "Ineffective Health Maintenance," "Hopelessness" and "Risk for Other-Directed Violence". Men were more frequently affected by the diagnoses "Ineffective Coping," "Hopelessness," "Risk for Self-Directed Violence," "Defensive Coping" and "Risk for Suicide," whereas the diagnoses "Insomnia," "Chronic Confusion," "Chronic Low Self-Esteem" and "Anxiety" were more common in women. Patients under the age of 45 years were more frequently affected by "Chronic Low Self-Esteem" and "Anxiety" than older patients. "Ineffective Coping" was the most prevalent diagnosis by patients with mental disorders due to psychoactive substance use. Patients with schizophrenia were primarily affected by the diagnoses "Ineffective Coping," "Impaired Social Interaction" and "Chronic Low Self-Esteem." This study demonstrates the complexity and diversity of nursing care in inpatient psychiatric settings. Patients' gender, age and psychiatric diagnoses and settings are a key factor for specific nursing diagnosis. There are tendencies for relationships between certain nursing diagnosis and patient characteristics in psychiatric adult inpatients. This enhances the specific, extended

  10. Rootstock Sub-Optimal Temperature Tolerance Determines Transcriptomic Responses after Long-Term Root Cooling in Rootstocks and Scions of Grafted Tomato Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntatsi, Georgia; Savvas, Dimitrios; Papasotiropoulos, Vassilis; Katsileros, Anastasios; Zrenner, Rita M; Hincha, Dirk K; Zuther, Ellen; Schwarz, Dietmar

    2017-01-01

    450 and protein degradation, indicating that the sensitive cultivar showed more transcriptional adaptation to low temperature than the tolerant cultivar that did not show these changes. Mainly defense-related genes were highly differentially expressed between the tolerant and sensitive rootstock genotypes under sub-optimal temperature in the root environment. These results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of long-term sub-optimal temperature tolerance of tomato.

  11. Rootstock Sub-Optimal Temperature Tolerance Determines Transcriptomic Responses after Long-Term Root Cooling in Rootstocks and Scions of Grafted Tomato Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Ntatsi

    2017-06-01

    , biotic stress, cytochrome P450 and protein degradation, indicating that the sensitive cultivar showed more transcriptional adaptation to low temperature than the tolerant cultivar that did not show these changes. Mainly defense-related genes were highly differentially expressed between the tolerant and sensitive rootstock genotypes under sub-optimal temperature in the root environment. These results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of long-term sub-optimal temperature tolerance of tomato.

  12. Treatment of advanced colorectal cancer in a patient with cardiotoxic reactions to 5-fluorouracil and capecitabine using suboptimal doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioffi, Joseph H; Estes, Derek J; Florou, Vaia; Ardalan, Bach

    2017-11-27

    A 32-year-old female with stage IV colorectal cancer and metastasis to the liver experienced cardiotoxic reactions after treatment with 5-fluorouracil and its oral prodrug capecitabine even at two-thirds the recommended dose. After careful considerations, the decision was made to attempt capecitabine retrial at a further suboptimal dose with combination chemotherapy where she no longer experienced cardiac events. As a result, the liver tumour shrank and rectal mass stabilised, tumour markers dropped and she underwent surgical resection of both masses. Later there was local recurrence of disease near the previous liver tumour, so the suboptimal capecitabine therapy was restarted without complaint. The patient became a candidate for a NanoKnife procedure, offering a potentially curative therapy. This case report summarises a novel treatment strategy for those patients with advanced colorectal cancer who experience cardiotoxic reactions to fluoropyrimidines, the active agent of gold standard treatment. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Engagement and experience with cancer-related follow-up care among young adult survivors of childhood cancer after transfer to adult care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalda, Dava; Pierce, Lisa; Hobbie, Wendy; Ginsberg, Jill P; Brumley, Lauren; Wasik, Monika; Li, Yimei; Schwartz, Lisa A

    2016-04-01

    Young adult survivors (YAS) of childhood cancer require annual adult-focused, cancer-related follow-up given their risk for late effects of treatment. This study describes perception of and engagement with adult-focused, cancer-related follow-up care and general health care among YAS formally transferred to adult care from pediatric survivorship care. YAS transferred from pediatric survivorship care in the prior 1-5 years completed measures indicating engagement with cancer-related follow-up care, other health care utilization, content of communication by providers, quality of cancer-related care, and satisfaction with health care in the prior year. Eighty YAS (M age = 27.7 years, M time since diagnosis = 10.4 years) participated. Just over half of YAS surveyed (n = 44, 55%) endorsed continuing cancer-related follow-up care since transfer. Those with cancer-related follow-up endorsed seeing subspecialty survivorship providers (n = 16, 44%) and primary care providers (n = 22, 50%) or utilizing a shared care model (n = 6, 14%). About a third of YAS endorsed seeing subspecialists (n = 29, 36%) or using other support services (n = 22, 27%). YAS-perceived content of communication varied significantly depending on care model with less cancer-related content being discussed by primary care providers, though perceived quality of cancer-related care and satisfaction with health care was generally favorable. YAS report less than optimal engagement in cancer-related follow-up care and communication in their health care encounters. Young adult survivors should receive anticipatory guidance about expectations for delivery and content of adult-focused cancer-related follow-up care.

  14. Unmet Supportive Care Needs of Iranian Cancer Patients and its Related Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faranak Jabbarzadeh Tabrizi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Investigation of supportive care needs of cancer patients is important to implement any supportive care programs. There is no relevant studies investigated supportive care needs of Iranian cancer patients and factors affecting such needs. So, the aims of present study were to determine the unmet supportive care needs of Iranian cancer patients and its predictive factors. Methods: In this descriptive- correlational study 274 cancer patients in one referral medical center in North West of Iran participated. For data collection, demographic and cancer related information checklist and Supportive Care Needs Survey (SCNS was used. Logistic regression was used for data analysis of un-adjusted and adjusted Odds Ratios (ORs for patients needs and analysis of variables of study based on Backward LR procedure SPSS Ver.13. Results: More than fifty percent of participants reported unmet needs in 18 items of SCNS. Most frequent unmet needs were related to health system and information domains and most meet needs were related to sexuality and psychological domains. The result of logistic regression identified predictors of each domain of supportive care needs. The variable such as sex, age and living situation were most important predictors of unmet needs. Conclusion: The results showed that Iranian cancer patients have many supportive care needs in different domains. In general female cancer patients are at risk of more unmet supportive care needs. So, health care professionals should be more sensitive to fulfillment of supportive care needs of female.

  15. The relatives' perspective on advanced cancer care in Denmark. A cross-sectional survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Anna T; Ross, Lone; Petersen, Morten A

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve advanced cancer care, evaluations are necessary. An important element of such evaluations is the perspective of the patient's relatives who have the role of being caregivers as well as co-users of the health care system. The aims were to investigate the scale structure of the ...... of the FAMCARE scale, to investigate satisfaction with advanced cancer care from the perspective of the relatives of a representative sample of advanced cancer patients, and to investigate whether some sub-groups of relatives were more dissatisfied than others.......In order to improve advanced cancer care, evaluations are necessary. An important element of such evaluations is the perspective of the patient's relatives who have the role of being caregivers as well as co-users of the health care system. The aims were to investigate the scale structure...

  16. Mixed-method research protocol: defining and operationalizing patient-related complexity of nursing care in acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Evelyn; Kleinknecht-Dolf, Michael; Müller, Marianne; Kugler, Christiane; Spirig, Rebecca

    2017-06-01

    To define the concept of patient-related complexity of nursing care in acute care hospitals and to operationalize it in a questionnaire. The concept of patient-related complexity of nursing care in acute care hospitals has not been conclusively defined in the literature. The operationalization in a corresponding questionnaire is necessary, given the increased significance of the topic, due to shortened lengths of stay and increased patient morbidity. Hybrid model of concept development and embedded mixed-methods design. The theoretical phase of the hybrid model involved a literature review and the development of a working definition. In the fieldwork phase of 2015 and 2016, an embedded mixed-methods design was applied with complexity assessments of all patients at five Swiss hospitals using our newly operationalized questionnaire 'Complexity of Nursing Care' over 1 month. These data will be analysed with structural equation modelling. Twelve qualitative case studies will be embedded. They will be analysed using a structured process of constructing case studies and content analysis. In the final analytic phase, the quantitative and qualitative data will be merged and added to the results of the theoretical phase for a common interpretation. Cantonal Ethics Committee Zurich judged the research programme as unproblematic in December 2014 and May 2015. Following the phases of the hybrid model and using an embedded mixed-methods design can reach an in-depth understanding of patient-related complexity of nursing care in acute care hospitals, a final version of the questionnaire and an acknowledged definition of the concept. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Suboptimal evolutionary novel environments promote singular altered gravity responses of transcriptome during Drosophila metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz, Raul; Larkin, Oliver J; Hill, Richard J A; Lopez-Vidriero, Irene; van Loon, Jack J W A; Medina, F Javier

    2013-06-27

    Previous experiments have shown that the reduced gravity aboard the International Space Station (ISS) causes important alterations in Drosophila gene expression. These changes were shown to be intimately linked to environmental space-flight related constraints. Here, we use an array of different techniques for ground-based simulation of microgravity effects to assess the effect of suboptimal environmental conditions on the gene expression of Drosophila in reduced gravity. A global and integrative analysis, using "gene expression dynamics inspector" (GEDI) self-organizing maps, reveals different degrees in the responses of the transcriptome when using different environmental conditions or microgravity/hypergravity simulation devices. Although the genes that are affected are different in each simulation technique, we find that the same gene ontology groups, including at least one large multigene family related with behavior, stress response or organogenesis, are over represented in each case. These results suggest that the transcriptome as a whole can be finely tuned to gravity force. In optimum environmental conditions, the alteration of gravity has only mild effects on gene expression but when environmental conditions are far from optimal, the gene expression must be tuned greatly and effects become more robust, probably linked to the lack of experience of organisms exposed to evolutionary novel environments such as a gravitational free one.

  18. Parasitological and transcriptomic comparison of Strongyloides ratti infections in natural and in suboptimal permissive hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaleta, Tegegn G; Rödelsperger, Christian; Streit, Adrian

    2017-09-01

    The nematode genus Strongyloides consists of fairly species-specific small intestinal parasites of various vertebrates, among them the human pathogen S. stercoralis. Between the parthenogenetic parasitic generations these worms can also form single facultative sexual free-living generations. In addition to their primary hosts, several species can also live more or less well in other permissive hosts, which are sometimes not very closely related with the normal host. For example, S. stercoralis can also infect dogs and non-human primates. Here we compare the infection and reproductive success over time and the gene expression profiles as determined by quantitative sequencing of S. ratti parasitizing in its natural host rat and in the permissive host gerbil. We show that in gerbils fewer infective larvae successfully establish in the host, but those that do accomplish this survive and reproduce for longer and produced a higher proportion of males during the first two month of infection. Globally, the gene expression profiles in the two hosts are very similar. Among the relatively few differentially expressed genes, astacin-like and acetylcholinesterase genes are prominently represented. In the future it will be interesting to see if these changes in the suboptimal host are indeed ecologically sensible responses to the different host. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Family Relations and Elder Care Among Arabs in the North of Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayalon, Liat

    2018-01-01

    The study examined family relations and elder care, in light of the modernization processes that are taking place in the Arab sector. Interviews with 25 older adults, 27 family members, and 5 paid home care workers of an Arab origin were conducted. Qualitative analysis consisted of constant comparisons and contrasts of relevant themes. Most Arabs reported that intergenerational solidarity is very strong in the Arab sector. Whereas many older adults and a few of their family members tended to favor paid care, the majority of Arab family members and fewer older adults stated that family care is preferred. Finally, a third theme outlined the desired properties of care, which consists of a true mix between formal and informal care. The study points to two sources of tension between (a) older adults and their family members and (b) perspectives on care held by the National Insurance Institute and the Arab sector.

  20. Discovery of the Meanings, Expressions, and Practices Related to Malaria Care Among the Maasai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Cecily W; Mixer, Sandra J

    2016-07-01

    Although malaria is preventable and treatable, morbidity and mortality from this disease continue among the Maasai of Southern Kenya. Prior to this study, the Maasai's generic and professional malaria care/cure practices were largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to discover, describe, and systematically analyze meanings, expressions, and practices that promote culturally congruent malaria care among this population. The qualitative, ethnonursing research method was used to conduct in-depth examination of the Maasai ethnohistory and culture relevant to malaria care and analyze data from 48 interviews conducted in Maasailand. Guided by the "culture care theory," four themes were discovered related to Maasai community, traditional, spiritual, and professional care/cure practices. These significant findings filled a research gap and contribute to nursing knowledge and caring practice. These study findings have implications for culturally congruent malaria care education, practice, research, policy, and partnership with traditional and professional caregivers. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Anxiety and Related Symptoms among Critical Care Nurses in Albaha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Waled Amen Mohammed Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Background/objective: Nursing is considered an Angel of Mercy profession, but it is also one of the most stressful jobs compared to other health care sectors. The aim of this study was to determine the anxiety levels and related symptoms among critical care nurses in Albaha governmental hospitals. Methods: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study. It was conducted in Albaha at four governmental hospitals in the period from January to March 2015. Sixty nurses from critical care settings (in...

  2. The Pathophysiology and Care of Exercise Related Muscle Cramps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhay Kumar Pandey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cramps are major concerns to competing athletes occurring during or after exercise, are common yet, poorly understood phenomena. Pain alone is not object of treatment as serious musculophysiologic and metabolic disturbance of fluid and electrolyte deserve correction. Acute muscle pain and stiffness may cause soreness for longer time. Based on observations, two etiological theories are construed, i.e. the muscle fatigue theory and sodium-water deficit theory. Either has supporting and contradicting facts, but these are relevant to guide prevention and management interventions. Cramps may be different in kind based on different local and/or general causes. Occurrence of cramps in varied situations, environmental conditions and populations, suggests of pleural causal determinents. These include neuromuscular and fluid-electrolyte disturbance factors directly responsible under specific circumstances of individual sports person. Degree of conditioning to particular kind of physical exertion appears most significant factor. Prevention exercises target theorised physiology of muscle tendon and golgi organ receptors, toward delaying fatigability and cramp risk. Occurrence of cramps mostly in hot environments emphasizes support to dehydration-electrolyte imbalance theory. Maintenance of hydration and adequate electrolyte levels in cramp-prone individuals thus makes sense. Worth of variety of measures empirically employed for cramp relief can be judged by scientific understanding. Drugs found useful may not be the best match to pathophysiologic proprieties and thus irrational. The pathophysiological details and relevant clinical information is presented and discussed as first hand understanding for the sports persons and their care givers.

  3. Understanding and measuring AIDS-related stigma in health care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    monitoring and evaluation in Bhutan, India, Nepal, and Malawi. She has an MD from SUNY Upstate Medical Center in New York State and an MPH from ... involvement, HIV-related stigma, migration issues, and indicators development. Dr. Pulerwitz is trained as a behavioral scientist, and received her masters and doctoral ...

  4. Assessing organizational readiness for depression care quality improvement: relative commitment and implementation capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, Lisa V; Danz, Marjorie S; Crain, A Lauren; Glasgow, Russell E; Whitebird, Robin R; Solberg, Leif I

    2014-12-02

    Depression is a major cause of morbidity and cost in primary care patient populations. Successful depression improvement models, however, are complex. Based on organizational readiness theory, a practice's commitment to change and its capability to carry out the change are both important predictors of initiating improvement. We empirically explored the links between relative commitment (i.e., the intention to move forward within the following year) and implementation capability. The DIAMOND initiative administered organizational surveys to medical and quality improvement leaders from each of 83 primary care practices in Minnesota. Surveys preceded initiation of activities directed at implementation of a collaborative care model for improving depression care. To assess implementation capability, we developed composites of survey items for five types of organizational factors postulated to be collaborative care barriers and facilitators. To assess relative commitment for each practice, we averaged leader ratings on an identical survey question assessing practice priorities. We used multivariable regression analyses to assess the extent to which implementation capability predicted relative commitment. We explored whether relative commitment or implementation capability measures were associated with earlier initiation of DIAMOND improvements. All five implementation capability measures independently predicted practice leaders' relative commitment to improving depression care in the following year. These included the following: quality improvement culture and attitudes (p = 0.003), depression culture and attitudes (p commitment (p = 0.002) and prior depression quality improvement activities appeared to be associated with earlier participation in the DIAMOND initiative. The study supports the concept of organizational readiness to improve quality of care and the use of practice leader surveys to assess it. Practice leaders' relative commitment to depression care

  5. Growth in Career Academy Students' Experience, Knowledge, and Self- Confidence Related to Health Care Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loera, Gustavo,; Nakamoto, Jonathan; Boal, Ashley L.; Wendt, Staci J.; Beck, Cindy; Cherry, Carla

    2016-01-01

    A survey measure was developed to assess high school students' experience, knowledge, and self-confidence related to health care careers. In the fall and spring of one school year, the measure was administered to a diverse sample of 2,309 students participating in career academies focused on the health care industry. Confirmatory factor analyses…

  6. 77 FR 29235 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Standards Related to Reinsurance, Risk Corridors, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 45 CFR Part 153 RIN 0938-AR07 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Standards... ] entitled, ``Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Standards Related to Reinsurance, Risk Corridors... section 553(b) of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) (5 U.S.C. 553(b)). However, we can waive this...

  7. Self care and health related quality of life in chronic heart failure : A longitudinal analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessing, D.E.F.; Denollet, J.; Widdershoven, J.W.M.G.; Kupper, N.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Self-care is assumed to benefit health outcomes in patients with chronic heart failure (HF), but the evidence is conflicting for health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The aim of this study was to examine the association of (changes in) self-care with HRQOL while adjusting for

  8. Age-related macular degeneration: update for primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, D S

    2000-05-15

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of severe vision loss among the elderly. In this condition, central vision is lost, but peripheral vision almost always remains intact. Affected persons rarely require canes or guide dogs. The diagnosis of age-related macular degeneration is based on symptoms and ophthalmoscopic findings, and the disease can be classified into atrophic and exudative forms. The two currently proven treatments are laser photocoagulation and photodynamic therapy, but these measures are effective in only a small fraction of eyes with the exudative form of macular degeneration. Vision rehabilitation can help patients maximize their remaining vision and adapt so that they can perform activities of daily living. Families need encouragement in providing support and helping patients adjust to being partially sighted.

  9. Good relations with technology: Empirical ethics and aesthetics in care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pols, Jeannette

    2017-01-01

    This article is a written version of the lecture for the IPONS conference in Stockholm. The article starts from the claim that there is no such thing as technology, only different variations of technologies. These technologies, plural, all have their specific workings that we can only learn about by studying these empirically, by analysing the relations between people and their technologies. These relations are always unpredictable, as it is not given beforehand what values the participants pursue. Studying and understanding the workings of healthcare technology is a crucial task for nursing studies, as nurses are often key actors in making these devices work. The article hands the reader some tools to engage in the study of technologies in practice, using an empirical ethics approach. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Knowledge of Energy Balance Guidelines and Associated Clinical Care Practices: The U.S. National Survey of Energy Balance Related Care among Primary Care Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronk, Nicolaas P.; Krebs-Smith, Susan M.; Galuska, Deborah A.; Liu, Benmei; Kushner, Robert F.; Troiano, Richard P.; Clauser, Steven B.; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; Smith, Ashley Wilder

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess primary care physicians’ (PCPs) knowledge of energy balance related guidelines and the association with sociodemographic characteristics and clinical care practices. Method As part of the 2008 U.S. nationally representative National Survey of Energy Balance Related Care among Primary Care Physicians (EB-PCP), 1,776 PCPs from four specialties who treated adults (n=1,060) or children and adolescents (n=716) completed surveys on sociodemographic information, knowledge of energy balance guidelines, and clinical care practices. Results EB-PCP response rate was 64.5%. For PCPs treating children, knowledge of guidelines for healthy BMI percentile, physical activity, and fruit and vegetables intake was 36.5%, 27.0%, and 62.9%, respectively. For PCPs treating adults, knowledge of guidelines for overweight, obesity, physical activity, and fruit and vegetables intake was 81.4%, 81.3%, 70.9%, and 63.5%, respectively. Generally, younger, female physicians were more likely to exhibit correct knowledge. Knowledge of weight-related guidelines was associated with assessment of body mass index (BMI) and use of BMI-for-age growth charts. Conclusion Knowledge of energy balance guidelines among PCPs treating children is low, among PCPs treating adults it appeared high for overweight and obesity-related clinical guidelines and moderate for physical activity and diet, and was mostly unrelated to clinical practices among all PCPs. PMID:22609144

  11. Relational empathy and holistic care in persons with spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaVela, Sherri L; Heinemann, Allen W; Etingen, Bella; Miskovic, Ana; Locatelli, Sara M; Chen, David

    2017-01-01

    Describe perceptions of persons with SCI on their receipt of holistic care and relational empathy during health care encounters. Mailed survey. Individuals with SCI who received care from the largest suppliers of SCI care and rehabilitation (Veterans Health Administration and SCI Model Systems). Using a survey and administrative databases, we collected demographic and injury characteristics, health status, health conditions, and the main outcome: Consultation and Relational Empathy (CARE) measure. The sample included 450 individuals with SCI (124 Veterans and 326 civilians). Response rate was 39% (450/1160). Analyses were conducted on patients with complete data (n = 389). Veterans and civilians with SCI differed across many demographic characteristics, age at injury, and etiology, but mean CARE scores were equivalent. Fewer than half of the full SCI cohort had CARE scores above the normative value of 43. Having a recent pressure ulcer showed a trend for lower odds of having a normative or higher CARE score. Odds of having an above-normative CARE score were nearly 2 times greater for individuals with tetraplegia, and odds were higher for those with higher physical and mental health status. Higher physical and mental health status and tetraplegia were each independently associated with greater perceptions of holistic care and empathy in the therapeutic patient-provider relationship. Limited empathy, communication, and holistic care may arise when providers focus on disease/disease management, rather than on patients as individuals. Frequent health care use and secondary conditions may affect empathy and holistic care in encounters, making it essential to understand and employ efforts to improve the therapeutic relationship between patients with SCI and their providers.

  12. Role of relatives of ethnic minority patients in patient safety in hospital care: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rosse, Floor; Suurmond, Jeanine; Wagner, Cordula; de Bruijne, Martine; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2016-04-07

    Relatives of ethnic minority patients often play an important role in the care process during hospitalisation. Our objective was to analyse the role of these relatives in relation to the safety of patients during hospital care. Four large urban hospitals with an ethnic diverse patient population. On hospital admission of ethnic minority patients, 20 cases were purposively sampled in which relatives were observed to play a role in the care process. We used documents (patient records) and added eight cases with qualitative interviews with healthcare providers, patients and/or their relatives to investigate the relation between the role of relatives and patient safety. An inductive approach followed by selective coding was used to analyse the data. Besides giving social support, family members took on themselves the role of the interpreter, the role of substitutes of the patient and the role of care provider. The taking over of these roles can have positive and negative effects on patient safety. When family members take over various roles during hospitalisation of a relative, this can lead to a safety risk and a safety protection for the patient involved. Although healthcare providers should not hand over their responsibilities to the relatives of patients, optimising collaboration with relatives who are willing to take part in the care process may improve patient safety. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Treatment Effects of a Primary Care Intervention on Parenting Behaviors: Sometimes It's Relative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Anne; Lindhiem, Oliver; Kolko, David

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this brief report is to demonstrate the utility of quantifying parental discipline practices as relative frequencies in measuring changes in parenting behavior and relations to child behavior following intervention. We explored comparisons across methodological approaches of assessing parenting behavior via absolute and relative frequencies in measuring improvements in parent-reported disciplinary practices (increases in positive parenting practices in response to child behavior; decreases in inconsistent discipline and use of corporal punishment) and child behavior problems. The current study was conducted as part of a larger clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of a collaborative care intervention for behavior problems, ADHD, and anxiety in pediatric primary care practices (Doctor Office Collaborative Care; DOCC). Participants were 321 parent-child dyads (M child age = 8.00, 65 % male children) from eight pediatric practices that were cluster randomized to DOCC or enhanced usual care (EUC). Parents reported on their own discipline behaviors and child behavior problems. While treatment-related decreases in negative parenting were found using both the absolute and relative frequencies of parenting behaviors, results were different for positive parenting behaviors, which showed decreases when measured as absolute frequencies but increases when measured as relative frequencies. In addition, positive parenting was negatively correlated with child behavior problems when using relative frequencies, but not absolute frequencies, and relative frequencies of positive parenting mediated relations between treatment condition and outcomes. Our findings indicate that the methods used to measure treatment-related change warrant careful consideration.

  14. Medicaid spending on contraceptive coverage and pregnancy-related care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Objective Up to 50% of pregnancies are unintended in the United States, and the healthcare costs associated with pregnancy are the most expensive among hospitalized conditions. The current study aims to assess Medicaid spending on various methods of contraception and on pregnancy care including unintended pregnancies. Methods We analyzed Medicaid health claims data from 2004 to 2010. Women 14–49 years of age initiating contraceptive methods and pregnant women were included as separate cohorts. Medicaid spending was summarized using mean all-cause and contraceptive healthcare payments per patient per month (PPPM) over a follow-up period of up to 12 months. Medicaid payments were also estimated in 2008 per female member of childbearing age per month (PFCPM) and per member per month (PMPM). Medicaid payments on unintended pregnancies were also evaluated PFCPM and PMPM in 2008. Results For short-acting reversible contraception (SARC) users, all-cause payments and contraceptive payments PPPM were respectively $365 and $18.3 for oral contraceptive (OC) users, $308 and $19.9 for transdermal users, $215 and $21.6 for vaginal ring users, and $410 and $8.8 for injectable users. For long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) users (follow-up of 9–10 months), corresponding payments were $194 and $36.8 for IUD users, and $237 and $29.9 for implant users. Pregnancy cohort all-cause mean healthcare payments PPPM were $610. Payments PFCPM and PMPM for contraceptives were $1.44 and $0.54, while corresponding costs of pregnancies were estimated at $39.91 and $14.81, respectively. Payments PFCPM and PMPM for contraceptives represented a small fraction at 6.56% ($1.44/$21.95) and 6.63% ($0.54/$8.15), respectively of the estimated payments for unintended pregnancy. Conclusions This study of a large sample of Medicaid beneficiaries demonstrated that, over a follow-up period of 12 months, Medicaid payments for pregnancy were considerably higher than payments for either SARC or

  15. Medicaid spending on contraceptive coverage and pregnancy-related care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laliberté, François; Lefebvre, Patrick; Law, Amy; Duh, Mei Sheng; Pocoski, Jennifer; Lynen, Richard; Darney, Philip

    2014-03-03

    Up to 50% of pregnancies are unintended in the United States, and the healthcare costs associated with pregnancy are the most expensive among hospitalized conditions. The current study aims to assess Medicaid spending on various methods of contraception and on pregnancy care including unintended pregnancies. We analyzed Medicaid health claims data from 2004 to 2010. Women 14-49 years of age initiating contraceptive methods and pregnant women were included as separate cohorts. Medicaid spending was summarized using mean all-cause and contraceptive healthcare payments per patient per month (PPPM) over a follow-up period of up to 12 months. Medicaid payments were also estimated in 2008 per female member of childbearing age per month (PFCPM) and per member per month (PMPM). Medicaid payments on unintended pregnancies were also evaluated PFCPM and PMPM in 2008. For short-acting reversible contraception (SARC) users, all-cause payments and contraceptive payments PPPM were respectively $365 and $18.3 for oral contraceptive (OC) users, $308 and $19.9 for transdermal users, $215 and $21.6 for vaginal ring users, and $410 and $8.8 for injectable users. For long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) users (follow-up of 9-10 months), corresponding payments were $194 and $36.8 for IUD users, and $237 and $29.9 for implant users. Pregnancy cohort all-cause mean healthcare payments PPPM were $610. Payments PFCPM and PMPM for contraceptives were $1.44 and $0.54, while corresponding costs of pregnancies were estimated at $39.91 and $14.81, respectively. Payments PFCPM and PMPM for contraceptives represented a small fraction at 6.56% ($1.44/$21.95) and 6.63% ($0.54/$8.15), respectively of the estimated payments for unintended pregnancy. This study of a large sample of Medicaid beneficiaries demonstrated that, over a follow-up period of 12 months, Medicaid payments for pregnancy were considerably higher than payments for either SARC or LARC users. Healthcare payments for

  16. Altered Innate Immune Responses in Neutrophils from Patients with Well- and Suboptimally Controlled Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca S. M. Tang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Respiratory infections are a major cause of asthma exacerbations where neutrophilic inflammation dominates and is associated with steroid refractory asthma. Structural airway cells in asthma differ from nonasthmatics; however it is unknown if neutrophils differ. We investigated neutrophil immune responses in patients who have good (AGood and suboptimal (ASubopt asthma symptom control. Methods. Peripheral blood neutrophils from AGood (ACQ 0.75, n=7, and healthy controls (HC (n=9 were stimulated with bacterial (LPS (1 μg/mL, fMLF (100 nM, and viral (imiquimod (3 μg/mL, R848 (1.5 μg/mL, and poly I:C (10 μg/mL surrogates or live rhinovirus (RV 16 (MOI1. Cell-free supernatant was collected after 1 h for neutrophil elastase (NE and matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP- 9 measurements or after 24 h for CXCL8 release. Results. Constitutive NE was enhanced in AGood neutrophils compared to HC. fMLF stimulated neutrophils from ASubopt but not AGood produced 50% of HC levels. fMLF induced MMP-9 was impaired in ASubopt and AGood compared to HC. fMLF stimulated CXCL8 but not MMP-9 was positively correlated with FEV1 and FEV1/FVC. ASubopt and AGood responded similarly to other stimuli. Conclusions. Circulating neutrophils are different in asthma; however, this is likely to be related to airflow limitation rather than asthma control.

  17. Health professionals' quality of life in relation to end of life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linzitto, Juan P; Grance, Gladys

    2017-12-01

    Palliative care professionals are frequently exposed to stressful and demanding situations in the assistance of patients and their families, therefore research related to their quality of life is a relevant topic to provide evidence on interventions oriented to professional self-care. Research about professionals' quality of life is having a profuse development with core concepts being under review. Currently, burnout syndrome and compassion fatigue are considered relevant determinants of professionals' quality of life. Self-awareness-based interventions could bring positive influence on the context of a multidimensional approach to professionals' self-care. Self-care topics should be considered to be included in professional training programmes.

  18. Work-related factors influencing home care nurse intent to remain employed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourangeau, Ann E; Patterson, Erin; Saari, Margaret; Thomson, Heather; Cranley, Lisa

    Health care is shifting out of hospitals into community settings. In Ontario, Canada, home care organizations continue to experience challenges recruiting and retaining nurses. However, factors influencing home care nurse retention that can be modified remain largely unexplored. Several groups of factors have been identified as influencing home care nurse intent to remain employed including job characteristics, work structures, relationships and communication, work environment, responses to work, and conditions of employment. The aim of this study was to test and refine a model that identifies which factors are related to home care nurse intentions to remain employed for the next 5 years with their current home care employer organization. A cross-sectional survey design was implemented to test and refine a hypothesized model of home care nurse intent to remain employed. Logistic regression was used to determine which factors influence home care nurse intent to remain employed. Home care nurse intent to remain employed for the next 5 years was associated with increasing age, higher nurse-evaluated quality of care, having greater variety of patients, experiencing greater meaningfulness of work, having greater income stability, having greater continuity of client care, experiencing more positive relationships with supervisors, experiencing higher work-life balance, and being more satisfied with salary and benefits. Home care organizations can promote home care nurse intent to remain employed by (a) ensuring nurses have adequate training and resources to provide quality client care, (b) improving employment conditions to increase income stability and satisfaction with pay and benefits, (c) ensuring manageable workloads to facilitate improved work-life balance, and (d) ensuring leaders are accessible and competent.

  19. Suboptimal maternal and paternal mental health are associated with child bullying perpetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetgiri, Rashmi; Lin, Hua; Flores, Glenn

    2015-06-01

    This study examines associations between maternal and paternal mental health and child bullying perpetration among school-age children, and whether having one or both parents with suboptimal mental health is associated with bullying. The 2007 National Survey of Children's Health, a nationally-representative, random-digit-dial survey, was analyzed, using a parent-reported bullying measure. Suboptimal mental health was defined as fair/poor (vs. good/very good/excellent) parental self-reported mental and emotional health. Of the 61,613 parents surveyed, more than half were parents of boys and were white, 20% were Latino, 15% African American, and 7% other race/ethnicity. Suboptimal maternal (OR 1.4; 95% CI 1.1-1.8) and paternal (OR 1.5; 95% CI 1.1-2.2) mental health are associated with bullying. Compared with children with no parents with suboptimal mental health, children with only one or both parents with suboptimal mental health have higher bullying odds. Addressing the mental health of both parents may prove beneficial in preventing bullying.

  20. LAM add-on ADV combination therapy or ETV monotherapy for CHB patients with suboptimal response to ADV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hongyu; Ding, Feng; Chen, Jianyang; Zhang, Yimin; Xiang, Dairong; Lian, Jiangshan; Zeng, Linyan; Yu, Liang; Hu, Jianhua; Li, Yongtao; Lu, Yingfeng; Liu, Yuanchun; Zheng, Lin; Li, Lanjuan; Yang, Yida

    2015-01-01

    Among the available nucleos(t)ide analogues adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) is relatively cheap and widely used in rural area in China. However, there are insufficient data on recommendation for patients with suboptimal response to ADV after 48 weeks of treatment in order to reduce the resistance rate in the long term. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of LAM add-on combination therapy versus ETV monotherapy for patients with suboptimal response to ADV. 136 patients with suboptimal response to ADV were randomly assigned to the add-on LAM with ADV combination therapy (68 patients) group and the ETV monotherapy (68 patients) group. Patients in the add-on group were prescribed 100 mg LAM and 10 mg ADV per day, while the monotherapy group received 0.5 mg ETV per day for 48 weeks. Tests for liver and kidney function, HBV serum markers, HBV DNA load, were performed every 3 months. The mean patient age in LAM add-on group and ETV monotherapy was 38.59 ± 7.65 and 37.56 ± 8.67 years respectively. The HBV DNA undetectable rate in the LAM add-on group and the ETV group were not significant difference at week 4, 12 and 24 (P > 0.05). However, the HBV undetectable rate in the ETV group was higher than that in the LAM add-on group at week 36 and 48 (P = 0.043 for week 36 and P = 0.038 for week 48). There was no significant difference both for HBeAg loss and HBeAg seroconversion between two groups (P > 0.05) at 48 weeks. Meanwhile, our study also demonstrated that the mean eGFR levels in LAM add-on group was decreased from 99.6 ± 8.71 at baseline to 86.4 ± 9.83 at the end of 48 weeks, which was significantly higher than that in the ETV monotherapy group (P add-on group experienced eGFR reduction by 20-30% from baseline at 48 weeks. No patients developed hyposphosphatemia in our study. Our study clearly showed that switch to ETV monotherapy was the more effective and more safe than that of LAM add-on combination therapy for patients with suboptimal response

  1. Suboptimal Intake of Nutrients after Esophagectomy with Gastric Tube Reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkort, Elizabeth B.; Binnekade, Jan M.; de Haan, Rob J.; Busch, Olivier R. C.; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I.; Gouma, Dirk J.

    2012-01-01

    Esophagectomy with gastric tube reconstruction results in a variety of postoperative nutrition-related complaints that can impair nutritional intake and nutritional status. The aim of this study was to determine to what extent patients reached the recommended, intake of various nutrients at 6 and 12

  2. Medical Care Expenditure in Suicides From Non-illness-related Causes

    OpenAIRE

    Sohn, Jungwoo; Cho, Jaelim; Moon, Ki Tae; Suh, Mina; Ha, Kyoung Hwa; Kim, Changsoo; Shin, Dong Chun; Jung, Sang Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Several epidemiological studies on medical care utilization prior to suicide have considered the motivation of suicide, but focused on the influence of physical illnesses. Medical care expenditure in suicide completers with non-illness-related causes has not been investigated. Methods: Suicides motivated by non-illness-related factors were identified using the investigator’s note from the National Police Agency, which was then linked to the Health Insurance Review and Assessment d...

  3. Constipation in specialized palliative care: factors related to constipation when applying different definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erichsén, E; Milberg, A; Jaarsma, T; Friedrichsen, M

    2016-02-01

    For patients in palliative care, constipation is primarily a result of opioid treatment. Impacts from other factors related to constipation in palliative care are rarely studied. The aim was to identify factors related to constipation in patients in palliative care, and then to compare these factors between patients with different types of constipation and patients without constipation. Cross-sectional data on constipation was collected with a 26-item questionnaire from 485 patients in 38 specialist palliative care units in Sweden. Three different constipation groups were used; MC ONLY, PC ONLY, and MC & PC. Logistic regression analyses were used to calculate odds ratios. Patients with palliative care, such as; hard stool, cancer diagnosis, dissatisfaction with information, low fluid intake, hemorrhoids, bed restriction, hospitalization, and need of personal assistance for toilet visits.

  4. [Trauma-Informed Peer Counselling in the Care of Refugees with Trauma-Related Disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöller, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    Providing adequate culture-sensitive care for a large number of refugees with trauma-related disorders constitutes a major challenge. In this context, peer support and trauma-informed peer counselling can be regarded as a valuable means to complement the psychosocial care systems. In recent years, peer support and peer education have been successfully implemented e. g. in health care education, in psychiatric care, and in the treatment of traumatized individuals. Only little research data is available for traumatized refugees. However, results are encouraging. A program is presented which integrates trauma-informed peer educators (TIP) with migration background in the care of traumatized refugees. Peers' responsibility includes emotional support and understanding the refugees' needs, sensitizing for trauma-related disorders, providing psychoeducation, and teaching trauma-specific stabilization techniques under supervision of professional psychotherapists. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Tools for primary care management of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, Alice L; Munkholm, Pia; Andrews, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare systems throughout the world continue to face emerging challenges associated with chronic disease management. Due to the likely increase in chronic conditions in the future it is now vital that cooperation and support between specialists, generalists and primary health care physicians...... is conducted. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is one such chronic disease. Despite specialist care being essential, much IBD care could and probably should be delivered in primary care with continued collaboration between all stakeholders. Whilst most primary care physicians only have few patients currently...... affected by IBD in their caseload, the proportion of patients with IBD-related healthcare issues cared for in the primary care setting appears to be widespread. Data suggests however, that primary care physician's IBD knowledge and comfort in management is suboptimal. Current treatment guidelines for IBD...

  6. The importance of multidisciplinary teamwork and team climate for relational coordination among teams delivering care to older patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Hartgerink (Jacqueline); J.M. Cramm (Jane); T.J.E.M. Bakker (Ton); A.M. van Eijsden (A.); J.P. Mackenbach (Johan); A.P. Nieboer (Anna)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAim: To identify predictors of relational coordination among professionals delivering care to older patients. Background: Relational coordination is known to enhance quality of care in hospitals. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain poorly understood. Design: This cross-sectional

  7. Application of the tuning algorithm with the least squares approximation to the suboptimal control algorithm for integrating objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzishchin, V. F.; Merzlikina, E. I.; Van Va, Hoang

    2017-11-01

    The problem of PID and PI-algorithms tuning by means of the approximation by the least square method of the frequency response of a linear algorithm to the sub-optimal algorithm is considered. The advantage of the method is that the parameter values are obtained through one cycle of calculation. Recommendations how to choose the parameters of the least square method taking into consideration the plant dynamics are given. The parameters mentioned are the time constant of the filter, the approximation frequency range and the correction coefficient for the time delay parameter. The problem is considered for integrating plants for some practical cases (the level control system in a boiler drum). The transfer function of the suboptimal algorithm is determined relating to the disturbance that acts in the point of the control impact input, it is typical for thermal plants. In the recommendations it is taken into consideration that the overregulation for the transient process when the setpoint is changed is also limited. In order to compare the results the systems under consideration are also calculated by the classical method with the limited frequency oscillation index. The results given in the paper can be used by specialists dealing with tuning systems with the integrating plants.

  8. Modified Suboptimal Iterative Decoding for Regular Repeat- Accumulate Coded Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Thamer Nesr

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, two algorithms are suggested in order to improve the performance of systematic Repeat-Accumulate ( decoding. The first one is accomplished by the insertion of pilot symbols among the data stream that entering the encoder. The positions where pilots should be inserted are chosen in such a way that to improve the minimum Hamming distance and/or to reduce the error coefficients of the code. The second proposed algorithm includes the utilization of the inserted pilots to estimate scaling (correction factors. Two-dimensional correction factor was suggested in order to enhance the performance of traditional Minimum-Sum decoding of regular repeat accumulate codes. An adaptive method can be achieved for getting the correction factors by calculating the mean square difference between the values of received pilots and the a-posteriori data of bit and check node related to them which created by the minimum-sum ( decoder

  9. A window of opportunity: Subdominant predators can use suboptimal prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kelly A; McCord, Joshua S; White, Jennifer A

    2017-07-01

    Introduced species have been linked to declines of native species through mechanisms including intraguild predation and exploitative competition. However, coexistence among species may be promoted by niche partitioning if native species can use resources that the invasive species cannot. Previous research has shown that some strains of the aphid Aphis craccivora are toxic to a competitively dominant invasive lady beetle, Harmonia axyridis. Our objective was to investigate whether these aphids might be an exploitable resource for other, subdominant, lady beetle species. We compared larval development rate, survival, and adult weight of five lady beetle species in no-choice experiments with two different strains of A. craccivora, one of which is toxic to H. axyridis and one that is nontoxic. Two lady beetle species, Cycloneda munda and Coleomegilla maculata, were able to complete larval development when feeding on the aphid strain that is toxic to H. axyridis, experiencing only slight developmental delays relative to beetles feeding on the other aphid strain. One species, Coccinella septempunctata, also was able to complete larval development, but experienced a slight reduction in adult weight. The other two lady beetle species, Hippodamia convergens and Anatis labiculata, demonstrated generally low survivorship when consuming A. craccivora, regardless of aphid strain. All five species showed increased survival and/or development relative to H. axyridis on the "toxic" aphid strain. Our results suggest that this toxic trait may act as a narrow-spectrum defense for the aphids, providing protection against only some lady beetle enemies. For other less-susceptible lady beetles, these aphids have the potential to provide competitive release from the otherwise dominant H. axyridis.

  10. Not Noisy, Just Wrong: The Role of Suboptimal Inference in Behavioral Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Jeffrey M.; Ma, Wei Ji; Pitkow, Xaq; Latham, Peter E.; Pouget, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Behavior varies from trial to trial even when the stimulus is maintained as constant as possible. In many models, this variability is attributed to noise in the brain. Here, we propose that there is another major source of variability: suboptimal inference. Importantly, we argue that in most tasks of interest, and particularly complex ones, suboptimal inference is likely to be the dominant component of behavioral variability. This perspective explains a variety of intriguing observations, including why variability appears to be larger on the sensory than on the motor side, and why our sensors are sometimes surprisingly unreliable. PMID:22500627

  11. Recognition and behaviour of caregiver managers related to oral care in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Yumi; Shimoyama, Kasuhiro; Suzuki, Yoriko

    2009-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate the knowledge, practice and educational background of caregiver managers regarding oral health, how they cope with visiting activities, and to explore related factors to develop an appropriate working strategy for them in the community. The subjects were 102 caregiver managers, who voluntarily participated in a seminar organised by the M city government. The collected data were analysed to assess the relationship between the related factors of oral health, career and age, and the correlation amongst items of action process concerning oral health using Spearman's correlation coefficient and Fisher' s exact test with spss 14.0 for Windows. The results were as follows; (i) the mean length of careers of home-care staff and caregiver managers was 3.6 +/- 3.2 and 1.6 +/- 1.6 years respectively, (ii) 90.2% recognised the importance of oral care and 92.2% were interested in oral care, although 32.4% hesitated to provide oral care, (iii) the career of caregiver managers was not significantly related to recognition of concrete objectives of oral care, soft debris and symptoms of periodontal disease, but they recognised the effectiveness of oral care in prevention of aspiration pneumonia, (iv) there was a total of 11 significantly correlated items of knowledge, recognition and practice of oral care and (v) there was a total of 10 significantly correlated items amongst factors of action process. Results suggested that knowledge of oral care was related not only to the career but also to age and revealed a basic gap in the range of abilities between the respondent caregiver managers. Some did perform appropriate oral care and carried out the necessary processes.

  12. Relatives in end-of-life care--part 2: a theory for enabling safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlén, Joakim; Andershed, Birgitta; Berg, Christina; Frid, Ingvar; Palm, Carl-Axel; Ternestedt, Britt-Marie; Segesten, Kerstin

    2007-02-01

    To develop a goal-oriented praxis theory for enabling safety for relatives when an adult or older patient is close to end-of-life. This is the second part of a project focusing on the situation and needs of relatives in end-of-life care. Our interpretation of the existing corpus of knowledge pertaining to the needs of close relatives in this situation showed the significance of relatives' need for safety. The theory was developed step-by-step, through triangulation of critical review of empirical research in the field, our own clinical experiences from end-of-life care, renewed literature searches and theoretical reasoning. The foundation for the theory is taken from the ethical intention of the philosopher Paul Ricoeur. From this, the theory focuses on relatives in the context of end-of-life care with the goal of enabling safety. This is proposed by four aphorisms functioning as safety enablers and these are directed towards the professional's approach and attitude, the relative's concern for the patient, the specific situation for the relative and the patient's end-of-life period as a period in the life of the relative. Implications for end-of-life practice are considered and include aspects for promotion of just institutions in end-of-life care, the significance of negotiated partnership in end-of-life care, enabling safety for relatives living in existential and practical uncertainty in connection with end-of-life care and diversity of relatives' preferences as they live through this particular period.

  13. Adapting smartphone-based photoplethysmograpy to suboptimal scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Agundez, Augusto; Dutz, Tim; Goebel, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    Photoplethysmography (PPG) is an optical technique used to measure the heart rate (HR) and other cardiovascular variables by analyzing volume changes in the microvascular bed of tissue. At the moment, smartphone users can already measure their HR using PPG applications that use the smartphone's built-in camera. However, available applications are unreliable when artifacts are present, such as those caused by movement, finger pressure, or ambient light changes. This contribution aims to analyze the limitations of a smartphone-based PPG algorithm capable of measuring N-N intervals when such artifacts are present by comparing it to a 2-lead electrocardiography (ECG). By using a Bandpass filter and a zero-crossing detection algorithm on a PPG signal captured at 800  ×  600 pixels and 30 Hz, we have designed an approach capable of assessing N-N intervals when movement artifacts are present. An evaluation performed on n  =  31 users shows our algorithm is capable of measuring N-N intervals with an average relative error of 9.23 ms, when compared to a 2-lead ECG. Our approach proves the reliability of smartphone-based photoplethysmography to measure N-N intervals, even under the presence of movement artifacts, and opens the door for its future use in remote diagnosis scenarios.

  14. Multiple Suboptimal Solutions for Prediction Rules in Gene Expression Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamu Komori

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses mathematical and statistical aspects in analysis methods applied to microarray gene expressions. We focus on pattern recognition to extract informative features embedded in the data for prediction of phenotypes. It has been pointed out that there are severely difficult problems due to the unbalance in the number of observed genes compared with the number of observed subjects. We make a reanalysis of microarray gene expression published data to detect many other gene sets with almost the same performance. We conclude in the current stage that it is not possible to extract only informative genes with high performance in the all observed genes. We investigate the reason why this difficulty still exists even though there are actively proposed analysis methods and learning algorithms in statistical machine learning approaches. We focus on the mutual coherence or the absolute value of the Pearson correlations between two genes and describe the distributions of the correlation for the selected set of genes and the total set. We show that the problem of finding informative genes in high dimensional data is ill-posed and that the difficulty is closely related with the mutual coherence.

  15. Understanding posttraumatic stress disorder-related symptoms after critical care: the early illness amnesia hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granja, Cristina; Gomes, Ernestina; Amaro, Augusta; Ribeiro, Orquídea; Jones, Christina; Carneiro, António; Costa-Pereira, Altamiro

    2008-10-01

    To assess the factual and delusional memories reported by intensive care unit survivors and its relationship with the development of Posttraumatic Stress Syndrome (PTSS). Multicenter observational cohort study. Nine Portuguese intensive care units, as part of a multicenter study. Between January and June 2005, 1,174 patients were admitted across the nine intensive care units. Two hundred thirty-nine patients were excluded, 14 with 49, indicating a higher risk of developing posttraumatic stress disorder. A PTSS-14 score > 49 was significantly associated with not remembering the hospital stay before intensive care unit admission. Amnesia for the early period of critical illness (early amnesia) was positively associated with the level of posttraumatic stress disorder-related symptoms, which may be a proxy for severity of disease at the time of intensive care unit admission.

  16. Health care resource utilization and costs during episodes of care for type 2 diabetes mellitus-related comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candrilli, S D; Meyers, J L; Boye, K; Bae, J P

    2015-01-01

    To obtain costs of episodes of care for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM)-related comorbidities. Data from the MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounters Database were analyzed with the Medical Episode Grouper software, which uses proprietary algorithms to identify episodes of care. Episodes relevant to the T2DM population were examined, including: coronary artery disease with acute myocardial infarction, ventricular fibrillation, shock, and/or cardiac arrest (CAD episodes); cerebrovascular disease with stroke (CVD episodes); hypoglycemia; T2DM with complications (complication episodes); and renal failure. 45,350 CAD; 85,287 CVD; 29,886 hypoglycemia; 40,339 complication; and 211,673 renal failure episodes were identified. Mean (SD) episode durations were 15.2 (39.1), 25.5 (55.0), 5.9 (24.0), 21.2 (54.6), and 364.0 (0.0) days, respectively. Inpatient visits were the largest component of unadjusted costs for CAD, CVD, and complication episodes (93.4%, 78.3%, and 91.9%, respectively). Other ancillary care represented the largest component of unadjusted costs for hypoglycemia (53.3%) and renal failure (80.5%) episodes. Mean adjusted total costs were $16,435; $4558; $445; $5675; and $8765 for CAD, CVD, hypoglycemia, complication, and renal failure episodes, respectively. This study adds important information to the literature regarding costs of episodes of care for patients with T2DM in the US. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Elements of patient-health-care provider communication related to cardiovascular rehabilitation referral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhabib, Sanam; Chessex, Caroline; Murray, Judy; Grace, Sherry L

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular rehabilitation has been designed to decrease the burden of cardiovascular disease. This study described (1) patient-health-care provider interactions regarding cardiovascular rehabilitation and (2) which discussion elements were related to patient referral. This was a prospective study of cardiovascular patients and their health-care providers. Discussion utterances were coded using the Roter Interaction Analysis System. Discussion between 26 health-care providers and 50 patients were recorded. Cardiovascular rehabilitation referral was related to greater health-care provider interactivity (odds ratio = 2.82, 95% confidence interval = 1.01-7.86) and less patient concern and worry (odds ratio = 0.64, 95% confidence interval = 0.45-0.89). Taking time for reciprocal discussion and allaying patient anxiety may promote greater referral. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Ageism and Autonomy in Health Care: Explorations Through a Relational Lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard-Jones, Laura

    2017-03-01

    Ageism within the context of care has attracted increasing attention in recent years. Similarly, autonomy has developed into a prominent concept within health care law and ethics. This paper explores the way that ageism, understood as a set of negative attitudes about old age or older people, may impact on an older person's ability to make maximally autonomous decisions within health care. In particular, by appealing to feminist constructions of autonomy as relational, I will argue that the key to establishing this link is the concept of self-relations such as self-trust, self-worth and self-esteem. This paper aims to demonstrate how these may be impacted by the internalisation of negative attitudes associated with old age and care. In light of this, any legal or policy response must be sensitive to and flexible enough to deal with the way in which ageism impacts autonomy.

  19. Trauma Experiences, Maltreatment-Related Impairments, and Resilience among Child Welfare Youth in Residential Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin-Vezina, Delphine; Coleman, Kim; Milne, Lise; Sell, Jody; Daigneault, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to provide a description of the trauma experiences, trauma-related sequels, and resilience features of a sample of Canadian youth in residential care facilities, as well as to explore the impact of gender and of the number of different traumas experienced on trauma-related sequels and resilience features. A convenience…

  20. 76 FR 41929 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Standards Related to Reinsurance, Risk Corridors and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-15

    ... risk sharing protections against adverse selection--risk adjustment and risk corridors--are likely to... Affordable Care Act; Standards Related to Reinsurance, Risk Corridors and Risk Adjustment; Proposed Rule #0...; Standards Related to Reinsurance, Risk Corridors and Risk Adjustment AGENCY: Department of Health and Human...

  1. Stressors in the relatives of patients admitted to an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Angélica Adam; Weigel, Bruna Dorfey; Dummer, Claus Dieter; Machado, Kelly Campara; Tisott, Taís Montagner

    2016-09-01

    To identify and stratify the main stressors for the relatives of patients admitted to the adult intensive care unit of a teaching hospital. Cross-sectional descriptive study conducted with relatives of patients admitted to an intensive care unit from April to October 2014. The following materials were used: a questionnaire containing identification information and demographic data of the relatives, clinical data of the patients, and 25 stressors adapted from the Intensive Care Unit Environmental Stressor Scale. The degree of stress caused by each factor was determined on a scale of values from 1 to 4. The stressors were ranked based on the average score obtained. The main cause of admission to the intensive care unit was clinical in 36 (52.2%) cases. The main stressors were the patient being in a state of coma (3.15 ± 1.23), the patient being unable to speak (3.15 ± 1.20), and the reason for admission (3.00 ± 1.27). After removing the 27 (39.1%) coma patients from the analysis, the main stressors for the relatives were the reason for admission (2.75 ± 1.354), seeing the patient in the intensive care unit (2.51 ± 1.227), and the patient being unable to speak (2.50 ± 1.269). Difficulties in communication and in the relationship with the patient admitted to the intensive care unit were identified as the main stressors by their relatives, with the state of coma being predominant. By contrast, the environment, work routines, and relationship between the relatives and intensive care unit team had the least impact as stressors.

  2. Drug-related stigma and access to care among people who inject drugs in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Chiao-Wen; Lin, Chunqing; Thanh, Duong Cong; Li, Li

    2017-08-01

    There are considerable challenges faced by people with a history of injecting drug use (PWID) in Vietnam, including drug-related stigma and lack of access to healthcare. Seeking and utilising healthcare, as well as harm reduction programs for PWID, are often hampered by drug-related stigma. This study aimed to examine the impacts of drug-related stigma on access to care and utilisation of harm reduction programs among PWID in Vietnam. A cross-sectional study was conducted in two provinces in Vietnam, Phú Thọ and Vinh Phúc. The study participants completed the survey by using Audio Computer-Assisted Self-Interview between late 2014 and early 2015. Linear multiple regression models and logistic regression models were used to assess the relationship among drug-related stigma, access to care and utilisation of harm reduction programs, including methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) and needle exchange programs (NEP). A total of 900 PWID participated in this study. Drug-related stigma was significantly associated with lower level of access to care, but not with utilisation of MMT or NEP. Older age was positively associated with higher levels of access to care. Levels of education were positively correlated with access to care, as well as utilisation of MMT and NEP. This study underscores the need for future interventions to reduce drug-related stigma in society and in health-care settings to improve PWID's utilisation of care services. Special attention should be paid to younger PWID and those with lower levels of education. © 2017 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  3. Clinical Competence and Its Related Factors of Nurses in Neonatal Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirlashari, Jila; Qommi, Robabeh; Nariman, Shahin; Bahrani, Nasser; Begjani, Jamaloddin

    2016-12-01

    Introduction: Clinical competence of nurses working in the neonatal intensive care units together with advancements in medical science and technology increased the survival rate of newborns that need specialized care. To ensure the quality of care and provide the safety of patients, evaluating the clinical competence of nurses seems necessary. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical competence of nurses in the neonatal intensive care units. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 117 nurses working in the neonatal intensive care units of the hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences were selected by census method. The research tool was Development of Competency Inventory for Registered Nurses questionnaire which completed by self-assessment. The mean clinical competence scores of participants categorized into 3 levels: weak: 273. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 13 using the Pearson correlation coefficient, t-test and Chi-square test. Results: The highest levels of competence were related to critical thinking and research attitude and interpersonal relationships, and the lowest level was related to training and mentoring. There was a direct statistically significant relationship between marital status, employment status, level of interest in working in the neonatal intensive-care units and the clinical competence of nurses. Conclusion: Since the clinical competence of nurses in the Neonatal Intensive Care Units is vital, some variables such as interest in the nursing profession, employment status, the neonatal intensive theoretical and practical training courses and the amount of overtime working hours should be taken into consideration.

  4. Income-Related Inequalities in Access to Dental Care Services in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishide, Akemi; Fujita, Misuzu; Sato, Yasunori; Nagashima, Kengo; Takahashi, Sho; Hata, Akira

    2017-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to evaluate whether income-related inequalities in access to dental care services exist in Japan. Methods: The subjects included beneficiaries of the National Health Insurance (NHI) in Chiba City, Japan, who had been enrolled from 1 April 2014 to 31 March 2015. The presence or absence of dental visits and number of days spent on dental care services during the year were calculated using insurance claims submitted. Equivalent household income was calculated using individual income data from 1 January to 31 December 2013, declared for taxation. Results: Of the 216,211 enrolled subjects, 50.3% had dental care during the year. Among those with dental visits, the average number of days (standard deviation) spent on dental care services per year was 7.7 (7.1). Low income was associated with a decreased rate of dental care utilization regardless of age and sex. However, there was a significant inverse linear association between the number of days spent on dental care services and income levels for both sexes. Conclusions: There were income-related inequalities in access to dental care services, regardless of the age group or sex, within the Japanese universal health insurance system. PMID:28498342

  5. Secondary insults related to nursing interventions in neurointensive care: a descriptive pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyholm, Lena; Steffansson, Erika; Fröjd, Camilla; Enblad, Per

    2014-10-01

    The patients at a neurointensive care unit are frequently cared for in many ways, day and night. The aim of this study was to investigate the amount of secondary insults related to oral care, repositioning, endotracheal suctioning, hygienic measures, and simultaneous interventions at a neurointensive care unit with standardized care and maximum attention on avoiding secondary insults. The definition of a secondary insult was intracranial pressure > 20 mm Hg, cerebral perfusion pressure insult minutes did not have to be consecutive. The study included 18 patients, seven women and 11 men, aged 36-76 years with different neurosurgical diagnoses. The total number of nursing interventions analyzed was 1,717. The most common kind of secondary insults after a nursing measure was high intracranial pressure (n = 93) followed by low cerebral perfusion pressure (n = 43) and low systolic blood pressure (n = 14). Repositioning (n = 39) and simultaneous interventions (n = 32) were the nursing interventions causing most secondary insults. There were substantial variations between the patients; only one patient had no secondary insult. There were, overall, a limited number of secondary insults related to nursing interventions when a standardized management protocol system was applied to reduce the occurrence of secondary insults. Patients with an increased risk of secondary insults should be recognized, and their care and treatment should be carefully planned and performed to avoid secondary insults.

  6. Relational autonomy in the care of the vulnerable: health care professionals' reasoning in Moral Case Deliberation (MCD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, Kaja; Bremer, Anders; Materstvedt, Lars Johan; Tidefelt, Ulf; Svantesson, Mia

    2017-12-14

    In Moral Case Deliberation (MCD), healthcare professionals discuss ethically difficult patient situations in their daily practice. There is a lack of knowledge regarding the content of MCD and there is a need to shed light on this ethical reflection in the midst of clinical practice. Thus, the aim of the study was to describe the content of healthcare professionals' moral reasoning during MCD. The design was qualitative and descriptive, and data consisted of 22 audio-recorded inter-professional MCDs, analysed with content analysis. The moral reasoning centred on how to strike the balance between personal convictions about what constitutes good care, and the perceived dissonant care preferences held by the patient. The healthcare professionals deliberated about good care in relation to demands considered to be unrealistic, justifications for influencing the patient, the incapacitated patient's nebulous interests, and coping with the conflict between using coercion to achieve good while protecting human dignity. Furthermore, as a basis for the reasoning, the healthcare professionals reflected on how to establish a responsible relationship with the vulnerable person. This comprised acknowledging the patient as a susceptible human being, protecting dignity and integrity, defining their own moral responsibility, and having patience to give the patient and family time to come to terms with illness and declining health. The profound struggle to respect the patient's autonomy in clinical practice can be understood through the concept of relational autonomy, to try to secure both patients' influence and at the same time take responsibility for their needs as vulnerable humans.

  7. Ethical challenges related to elder care. High level decision-makers' experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kihlgren Mona

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few empirical studies have been found that explore ethical challenges among persons in high public positions that are responsible for elder care. The aim of this paper was to illuminate the meaning of being in ethically difficult situations related to elder care as experienced by high level decision-makers. Methods A phenomenological-hermeneutic method was used to analyse the eighteen interviews conducted with political and civil servant high level decision-makers at the municipality and county council level from two counties in Sweden. The participants worked at a planning and control as well as executive level and had both budget and quality of elder care responsibilities. Results Both ethical dilemmas and the meaning of being in ethically difficult situations related to elder care were revealed. No differences were seen between the politicians and the civil servants. The ethical dilemmas mostly concerned dealings with extensive care needs and working with a limited budget. The dilemmas were associated with a lack of good care and a lack of agreement concerning care such as vulnerable patients in inappropriate care settings, weaknesses in medical support, dissimilar focuses between the caring systems, justness in the distribution of care and deficient information. Being in ethically difficult situations was challenging. Associated with them were experiences of being exposed, having to be strategic and living with feelings such as aloneness and loneliness, uncertainty, lack of confirmation, the risk of being threatened or becoming a scapegoat and difficult decision avoidance. Conclusion Our paper provides further insight into the ethical dilemmas and ethical challenges met by high level decision-makers', which is important since the overall responsibility for elder care that is also ethically defensible rests with them. They have power and their decisions affect many stakeholders in elder care. Our results can be used to

  8. Sharing, caring, and surveilling: an actor-partner interdependence model examination of Facebook relational maintenance strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Bree

    2013-12-01

    Abstract Relational maintenance is connected to high quality friendships. Friendship maintenance behaviors may occur online via social networking sites. This study utilized an Actor-Partner Interdependence Model to examine how Facebook maintenance and surveillance affect friendship quality. Bryant and Marmo's (2012) Facebook maintenance scale was evaluated, revealing two factors: sharing and caring. Facebook surveillance was also measured. For friendship satisfaction and liking, significant positive actor and partner effects emerged for caring; significant negative actor, partner, and interaction effects emerged for sharing; and significant positive actor effects emerged for surveillance. For friendship closeness, significant positive actor effects emerged for caring and surveillance.

  9. The meaning of dignity in nursing home care as seen by relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhelm Rehnsfeldt, Arne; Lindwall, Lillemor; Høy, Bente

    2014-01-01

    Background: As part of an ongoing Scandinavian project on the dignity of care for older people, this study is based on ‘clinical caring science’ as a scientific discipline. Clinical caring science examines how groundconcepts, axioms and theories are expressed in different clinical contexts. Central...... culture is assumed to be a more ontological or universal concept than, for example, an ethical context or ethical person-to-person acts. Research design: The methodological approach is hermeneutic. The data consist of 28 interviews with relatives of older persons from Norway, Denmark and Sweden. Ethical...

  10. The phenomenon experienced by family members with a relative interned in the Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Comassetto, Isabel; UFAL; Enders, Bertha Cruz; UFRN

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the lived phenomenon of relatives having a patient hospitalized in the Intensive Care Unit. It was conducted using the phenomenological approach in the modality of the situated phenomenon. Ten family members of patients interned in intensive care unit of a private hospital in Natal, Rio Grande do Norte were interviewed from March to July of 2006. Five thematic categories emerged from the analysis that constituted the elements of the lived experience: Fe...

  11. Hidden consequences of success in pediatrics: parental health-related quality of life—results from the Care Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hatzmann, J.; Heymans, H.S.A.; Ferrer-i-Carbonell, A.; van Praag, B.M.S.; Grootenhuis, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT. The number of parents who care for a chronically ill child is increasing. Because of advances in medical care, parental caring tasks are changing. A detailed description of parental health-related quality of life will add to the understanding of the impact of caring for a chronically ill

  12. The nursing role during end-of-life care in the intensive care unit related to the interaction between patient, family and professional: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noome, Marijke; Beneken Genaamd Kolmer, Deirdre M; van Leeuwen, Evert; Dijkstra, Boukje M; Vloet, Lilian C M

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how intensive care unit (ICU) nurses describe their role during End-of-Life Care (EOLC) in the ICU, related to the interaction between patient, family and professionals (care triad). Three electronic databases, PubMed, CINAHL and EMBASE, and reference lists of included studies were searched for studies in English, Dutch or German between January 2002 and August 2015. Studies were included if they presented data about EOLC in the adult ICU, and the role of ICU nurses around EOLC. Quantitative and qualitative studies and opinion articles were extracted. Inductive content analysis was carried out to analyse and categorise the data. Twenty studies were included. Four categories emerged: care for the ICU patient, care for the family, environmental aspects of EOLC and organisational aspects of EOLC. Regarding the care triad, a gap exists between theoretical models and the actual care provided by ICU nurses during EOLC. The relational aspect of care, like aimed with care triad, is absent. The literature clearly indicates that the role of ICU nurses concerns care for the patient, family and environment. It described which care should be given, but it remains unclear how care should be given (attitude). Therefore, it is difficult for ICU nurses to provide this care. Further, it seems that care provided to family mainly consists of giving advice on how to care for the patient; care for family members themselves was only mentioned in a few studies. Therefore, it seems that family does not always receive adequate care yet, which may be helpful in preventing problems like depression, anxiety or post-traumatic stress disorder. It can be concluded that it is important for ICU nurses to be aware of the existing relationships; however, comparing the literature, care triad does not appear to be reached. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  13. Re-thinking HIV-Related Stigma in Health Care Settings: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Marilou

    2015-01-01

    People living with HIV (PLWH) continue to endure stigma and discrimination in the context of health care. This paper presents the findings of a qualitative study designed to (a) describe stigmatizing and discriminatory practices in health care settings, and (b) explore both symbolic and structural stigma from the perspectives of PLWH. For the purpose of this qualitative study, 21 semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted in the province of Quebec, Canada. The data were analyzed following the principles of thematic analysis. During analysis, three themes were identified, and relations between these themes were delineated to reflect the experiences of participants. The findings suggest that HIV-related stigma in health care settings is episodic in nature. The findings also suggest that HIV-related stigma is experienced through interactions with health care providers (symbolic stigma) and, finally, that it is applied systematically to manage risk in the context of health care (structural stigma). Copyright © 2015 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Multidisciplinary teams involved: detection of drug-related problems through continuity of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Yaiza Romero-Ventosa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To quantify Drug-Related problems (DRPs by establishing a Strategic Continuity of Care Program (e-Conecta- Concilia Program; e-CC focused on the drug therapy of patients within an Integrated Management Structure, in order to guarantee the therapeutical efficiency, safety and traceability of patients. Method: A prospective study at 8 months. The project included 22 Hospital Pharmacists and 12 Primary Care Pharmacists. Electronic clinical records were used, which can be accessed by all healthcare levels. Those interventions required in order to create a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP were carried out (creation of working groups, computing, meeting points, for coordination among pharmacists in different care levels through a common communication system. The working groups formed by pharmacists of both care levels established the following inclusion criteria: patients with chronic diseases and polymedicated, patients for whom drug-related problems (DRP had been detected, detection of any off-label use in Primary Care, or discrepancies in the standardization of medical prescriptions. Results: In the setting of the e-CC program, interventions were unified and discrepancies were identified. During this project, 245 drug-related problems were detected; the majority regarding inadequate dosing, regimen, or duration (24%, and involving Group B medications (33%, according to the ATC classification. Conclusions: The implementation of a Continuity of Care SOP between pharmacists allowed to detect and solve DRPs and discrepancies in patient pharmacotherapy, with a high rate of acceptance (84.1% of interventions

  15. A multicentre prospective evaluation of alcohol-related admissions to intensive care units in Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Ceri; Pugh, Richard; Battle, Ceri

    2017-08-01

    We conducted a prospective multicentre study in 13 Welsh intensive care units to assess what proportion of intensive care admissions relate to alcohol, and how outcomes among these patients compare with non-alcohol related admissions. Data were prospectively collected for one month between June and July 2015. Every intensive care admission was screened for alcohol associations based on ICD-10 criteria, using a pre-designed pro-forma. Follow-up data were collected at 60 days using a pre-existing database (WardWatcher; Critical Care Audit Ltd, England). Outcomes included: lengths of mechanical ventilation, intensive care units and hospital stay; intensive care units and hospital mortality. Alcohol contributed directly to 10% of all ICU admissions and to 11% of unplanned admissions. These patients were younger (52 vs. 66, p = 0.0011), more likely to be male (68% vs. 52%, p = 0.014) and had more prolonged ventilation (p = 0.019) There was no significant difference between the groups with respect to length of stay or mortality. Alcohol contributes to a significant proportion of ICU admissions in Wales, a Western European country with a relatively low number of ICU beds per capita. Strategies to address this impact should be explored.

  16. Towards a conceptual evaluation of transience in relation to palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Philip J; Dierckx de Casterlé, Bernadette; Schotsmans, Paul

    2007-07-01

    This paper is a report of a concept evaluation of transience and its relevance to palliative care. A qualitative study into palliative care patients' experiences of transition revealed a gap between current definitions of transition and their expression of the palliative care experience. Transience appears to offer a better definition but remains conceptually weak, with limited definition in a healthcare context. A qualitative conceptual evaluation of transience was undertaken using two case examples, interview data and the literature. Multiple sources were used to identify the literature (1966-2006), including a search on Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature Medline, and Ovid and Arts and Humanities Index using the keywords 'transience' and 'palliative care'. Thirty-one papers related to transience were retrieved. Analysis and synthesis formulated a theoretical definition of transience relative to palliative care. Transience is a nascent concept. Preconditions and outcomes of transience appear contextually dependent, which may inhibit its conceptual development. Transience depicts a fragile emotional state related to sudden change and uncertainty at end-of-life, exhibited as a feeling of stasis. Defining attributes would seem to include fragility, suddenness, powerlessness, impermanence, time, space, uncertainty, separation and homelessness. Transience is potentially more meaningful for palliative care in understanding the impact of end-of-life experiences for patients than current conceptualizations of transition as a process towards resolution. As a nascent concept, it remains strongly encapsulated within a framework of transition and further conceptual development is needed to enhance its maturity and refinement.

  17. Influence of sub-optimal temperature on tomato growth and yield : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeg, van der A.; Heuvelink, E.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of temperature on growth, development and yield of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) are reviewed with special emphasis on cultivar differences. The focus is on sub-optimal temperatures, above the level where chilling injury occurs. Temperature has a large effect on all aspects of

  18. Suboptimal decision making by children with ADHD in the face of risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lin; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Eichele, Heike

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Suboptimal decision making in the face of risk (DMR) in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be mediated by deficits in a number of different neuropsychological processes. We investigated DMR in children with ADHD using the Cambridge Gambling Task (CGT...

  19. High Current CD4+ T Cell Count Predicts Suboptimal Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasternak, Alexander O.; de Bruin, Marijn; Bakker, Margreet; Berkhout, Ben; Prins, Jan M.

    2015-01-01

    High levels of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) are necessary for achieving and maintaining optimal virological suppression, as suboptimal adherence leads to therapy failure and disease progression. It is well known that adherence to ART predicts therapy response, but it is unclear whether

  20. Indicators of suboptimal performance embedded in the Wechsler Memory Scale : Fourth Edition (WMS-IV)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, Z.; Hendriks, M.P.H.; Schmand, B.A.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Aldenkamp, A.P.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Recognition and visual working memory tasks from the Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition (WMS-IV) have previously been documented as useful indicators for suboptimal performance. The present study examined the clinical utility of the Dutch version of the WMS-IV (WMS-IV-NL) for the

  1. High current CD4+ T cell count predicts suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasternak, A.O.; de Bruin, M.; Bakker, M.; Berkhout, B.; Prins, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    High levels of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) are necessary for achieving and maintaining optimal virological suppression, as suboptimal adherence leads to therapy failure and disease progression. It is well known that adherence to ART predicts therapy response, but it is unclear whether

  2. State Space Formulas for a Solution of the Suboptimal Nehari Problem on the Unit Disc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curtain, Ruth F.; Opmeer, Mark R.

    We give state space formulas for a ("central") solution of the suboptimal Nehari problem for functions defined on the unit disc and taking values in the space of bounded operators in separable Hilbert spaces. Instead of assuming exponential stability, we assume a weaker stability concept (the

  3. Alcohol-related admissions to an inner city hospital intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marik, P; Mohedin, B

    1996-07-01

    We investigated the impact of alcohol-related medical emergencies on health care utilization in an inner city hospital medical intensive care unit (ICU). Data from 200 consecutive admissions to the medical ICU were collected prospectively. The major reason for each patient's admission to the ICU was recorded and the causal relationship between alcohol abuse and the admission diagnosis was determined. Clinical and demographic data as well as the insurance status and cost of goods and services delivered were determined for all patients. Twenty-one per cent of all the ICU admissions were directly alcohol-related, with a mean hospital charge of $52,527. The alcohol-withdrawal syndrome was the commonest alcohol-related admission, with a mean ICU stay of 5 days and a mean hospital charge of $21,336. Of the patients with non-alcohol related admission diagnoses, 61% had health insurance, compared to 42% for the patients with alcohol-related admission diagnoses (P alcohol-related admissions tended to be younger and male. In conclusion, we demonstrated that alcohol-related admissions are common in inner city hospital ICUs and consume considerable hospital resources. The treatment of these patients is costly, with hospitalization being essentially non-curative. In this era of health care reform, more effective primary and secondary preventative measures are required to control this pervasive health care problem.

  4. Expectations of relatives of Syrian patients in intensive care units in a state hospital in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevinç, Sibel; Ajghif, Mohammad; Uzun, Özge; Gülbil, Uğur

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe the personal experiences of relatives of Syrian patients in the intensive care unit in one hospital in Turkey. The concept of the intensive care unit can be particularly frightening for family members. Current recommendations for training Intensive care unit nurses should support a holistic approach to patient (and family) care, including explanations at a level that families can easily understand and allowing family members to see the patient at regular intervals. This qualitative study was conducted between June and August 2014 and included a study sample of 30 Syrian family members related to patients receiving treatment at a state hospital intensive care unit in Turkey. Data were collected by semi-structured interviews. We used percentages to represent descriptive data and conducted qualitative content analysis. Following data analysis, six themes arose: (1) communication-related difficulties, (2) difficulties receiving information regarding the patient's condition, (3) difficulties meeting personal needs, (4) difficulties communicating with other family members, (5) difficulties receiving support from other family members, and (6) unmet expectations from nurses and hospital administration. Syrian patient's relatives receiving treatment in an intensive care unit in Turkey experienced communication difficulties in terms of receiving information from health care personnel, informing other family members, receiving social support from other family members, and having various unmet expectations from nurses and hospital administration. The results of this study can be used to develop guidelines and predictions for scenarios that are likely to arise for patients' relatives from foreign countries who arrive to support patients who receive healthcare services in our increasingly global world. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Burnout and Engagement: Relative Importance of Predictors and Outcomes in Two Health Care Worker Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragoso, Zachary L; Holcombe, Kyla J; McCluney, Courtney L; Fisher, Gwenith G; McGonagle, Alyssa K; Friebe, Susan J

    2016-06-09

    This study's purpose was twofold: first, to examine the relative importance of job demands and resources as predictors of burnout and engagement, and second, the relative importance of engagement and burnout related to health, depressive symptoms, work ability, organizational commitment, and turnover intentions in two samples of health care workers. Nurse leaders (n = 162) and licensed emergency medical technicians (EMTs; n = 102) completed surveys. In both samples, job demands predicted burnout more strongly than job resources, and job resources predicted engagement more strongly than job demands. Engagement held more weight than burnout for predicting commitment, and burnout held more weight for predicting health outcomes, depressive symptoms, and work ability. Results have implications for the design, evaluation, and effectiveness of workplace interventions to reduce burnout and improve engagement among health care workers. Actionable recommendations for increasing engagement and decreasing burnout in health care organizations are provided. © 2016 The Author(s).

  6. Young adults' experiences of their parents caring for a relative with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Pik Yi; Lai, Claudia Kam Yuk; Chung, Ching Sum; Sham, Amy Kin Kwan; Yeung, Ching Lai

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the experiences and perceptions young adults had of family members who are caring for a relative with dementia. An exploratory qualitative study with semi-structured interviews was carried out and data were collected from 24 young adults recruited through purposive sampling. The participants had to have a close relative who was caring for an elderly family member with dementia. A content analysis approach was used for the verbatim transcription. The findings showed that caring for a relative with dementia was perceived as a time-consuming, exhausting and long-term task. The participants experienced stress and strain, although they were not the primary caregivers. Despite their negative perceptions of the task, they were willing to take on the responsibility of becoming a primary caregiver in the future. However, they intended to seek assistance in meeting their caregiving roles and responsibilities. Seeing how their close relative cared for a dependent older adult led them to reflect on what they would become in the future. Interestingly, although the participants expected their future offspring to take care of them when they became old, they did not want to be a burden to their children. Young adults are the caregivers of tomorrow. Knowing their perspective on caregiving is important if health professionals are to help them evolve into a caregiving role. It has implications for realizing the goal of aging in place. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016; 16: 873-879. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  7. Sub-optimal birth weight in newborns of a high socioeconomic status population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conceição Aparecida de Mattos Segre

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare sub-optimal birth weight (2,500 to 2,999 g term newborns to appropriate for gestational age (birth weight ≥ 3,000 g term newborns, regarding maternal data and newborn morbidity and mortality. Methods: Single term newborns, appropriate for gestational age from a high socioeconomic population (n = 1,242 with birth weight ranging from 2,500 to 2,999 g (Group I were compared to 4,907 newborns with birth weight ≥ than 3,000 g (Group II. Maternal and newborn characteristics were compared between the groups. The Mann-Whitney test, χ2 test and multivariate analysis were used. The significance level adopted was p < 0.05. Rresults: The frequency of sub-optimal birth weight newborns in the population studied was 20.2%. There was a significant association between sub-optimal birth weight and maternal weight before pregnancy and body mass index, maternal weight gain, height, smoking habit and hypertension. Newborns’ 1-minute Apgar score, neonatal hypoglycemia, jaundice, transient tachypnea, congenital pneumonia and hospital stay were significantly different between the groups (p < 0.05. A significant relationship could not be established with the 5-minute Apgar score and pulmonary hypertension in both groups. Neonatal mortality did not differ between the groups. Cconclusions: Socioeconomic status was not a risk factor for sub-optimal birth weight in the studied population. Genetic and environmental factors were associated to sub-optimal weight and neonatal diseases. According to these data, this group of newborns should receive special attention from the health team.

  8. Glycemic control and diabetes-related health care costs in type 2 diabetes; retrospective analysis based on clinical and administrative databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Degli Esposti L

    2013-05-01

    per person associated with the groups with good control, fair control, poor control, and very poor control was €219.28, €264.65, €513.18, and €564.79, respectively.Conclusion: Many patients showed suboptimal glycemic control. Lower levels of glycated hemoglobin were associated with lower diabetes-related health care costs. Integration of administrative databases and a laboratory database appears to be suitable for showing that appropriate management of diabetes can help to achieve better resource allocation.Keywords: diabetes mellitus, glycemic control, HbA1c, health expenditure

  9. Nurses' burnout and unmet nursing care needs of patients' relatives in a Turkish State Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekindal, Benian; Tekindal, Mustafa Agah; Pinar, Gul; Ozturk, Filiz; Alan, Sumeyra

    2012-02-01

    One of the biggest problems of work life today is burnout. With burnout, satisfaction of clients and service givers reduces. In this study, burnout levels of nurses working in the internal, surgical and intensive care units of a university hospital and the unmet needs of the patients' relatives related to nursing care were investigated. In the study, 225 nurses and 222 relatives of patients constituted the sample group of this study. Three separate forms were used in the study, namely, Nurse and Patient Relative Identification Form, the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Nursing Services Satisfaction Inventory. In the study, burnout levels of the nurses were found to be high. Conditions like younger ages, scarcity of experience in the profession, lower levels of education, having chosen the profession and the unit they work in not willingly and working in environments like intensive care increase the burnout and as a result, expectations of the relatives of patients from nursing care are not fully met. Some suggestions have been made to make some regulations to prevent the burnout of nurses and to increase the satisfaction of relatives. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Intersectional perspectives on family involvement in nursing home care: rethinking relatives' position as a betweenship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, Jessica; Emami, Azita; Eriksson, Lars E; Eriksson, Henrik

    2014-09-01

    This study seeks to understand, in the context of intersectional theory, the roles of family members in nursing home care. The unique social locus at which each person sits is the result of the intersection of gender, status, ethnicity and class; it is situational, shifting with the context of every encounter. A content analysis of 15 qualitative interviews with relatives of nursing home residents in Sweden was used to gain a perspective on the relationships between relatives and residents, relatives and the nursing home as an institution, and relatives and the nursing home staff. We sought to understand these relationships in terms of gendered notions of the family and the residents, which are handed down from generation to generation and thus condition who and how relatives should be involved in care, and the ways in which relationships change as care moves from home to nursing home. It requires knowledge and awareness that the nursing home culture is based on intersectional power structures in order for relatives to be involved in nursing home care in alternative and individual ways. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Surgical Care Required for Populations Affected by Climate-related Natural Disasters: A Global Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eugenia E; Stewart, Barclay; Zha, Yuanting A; Groen, Thomas A; Burkle, Frederick M; Kushner, Adam L

    2016-08-10

    Climate extremes will increase the frequency and severity of natural disasters worldwide.  Climate-related natural disasters were anticipated to affect 375 million people in 2015, more than 50% greater than the yearly average in the previous decade. To inform surgical assistance preparedness, we estimated the number of surgical procedures needed.   The numbers of people affected by climate-related disasters from 2004 to 2014 were obtained from the Centre for Research of the Epidemiology of Disasters database. Using 5,000 procedures per 100,000 persons as the minimum, baseline estimates were calculated. A linear regression of the number of surgical procedures performed annually and the estimated number of surgical procedures required for climate-related natural disasters was performed. Approximately 140 million people were affected by climate-related natural disasters annually requiring 7.0 million surgical procedures. The greatest need for surgical care was in the People's Republic of China, India, and the Philippines. Linear regression demonstrated a poor relationship between national surgical capacity and estimated need for surgical care resulting from natural disaster, but countries with the least surgical capacity will have the greatest need for surgical care for persons affected by climate-related natural disasters. As climate extremes increase the frequency and severity of natural disasters, millions will need surgical care beyond baseline needs. Countries with insufficient surgical capacity will have the most need for surgical care for persons affected by climate-related natural disasters. Estimates of surgical are particularly important for countries least equipped to meet surgical care demands given critical human and physical resource deficiencies.

  12. Medical Care Expenditure in Suicides From Non-illness-related Causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungwoo Sohn

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Several epidemiological studies on medical care utilization prior to suicide have considered the motivation of suicide, but focused on the influence of physical illnesses. Medical care expenditure in suicide completers with non-illness-related causes has not been investigated. Methods: Suicides motivated by non-illness-related factors were identified using the investigator’s note from the National Police Agency, which was then linked to the Health Insurance Review and Assessment data. We investigated the medical care expenditures of cases one year prior to committing suicide and conducted a case-control study using conditional logistic regression analysis after adjusting for age, gender, area of residence, and socioeconomic status. Results: Among the 4515 suicides motivated by non-illness-related causes, medical care expenditures increased in only the last 3 months prior to suicide in the adolescent group. In the younger group, the proportion of total medical expenditure for external injuries was higher than that in the older groups. Conditional logistic regression analysis showed significant associations with being a suicide completer and having a rural residence, low socioeconomic status, and high medical care expenditure. After stratification into the four age groups, a significant positive association with medical care expenditures and being a suicide completer was found in the adolescent and young adult groups, but no significant results were found in the elderly groups for both men and women. Conclusions: Younger adults who committed suicide motivated by non-illness-related causes had a higher proportion of external injuries and more medical care expenditures than their controls did. This reinforces the notion that suicide prevention strategies for young people with suicidal risk factors are needed.

  13. The acute psychobiological impact of the intensive care experience on relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Cobb, J M; Smith, P C; Ramchandani, P; Begen, F M; Padkin, A

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing awareness amongst critical care practitioners that the impact of intensive care medicine extends beyond the patient to include the psychological impact on close family members. Several studies have addressed the needs of relatives within the intensive care context but the psychobiological impact of the experience has largely been ignored. Such impact is important in respect to health and well-being of the relative, with potential to influence patient recovery. The current feasibility study aimed to examine the acute psychobiological impact of the intensive care experience on relatives. Using a mixed methods approach, quantitative and qualitative data were collected simultaneously. Six relatives of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) of a District General Hospital, were assessed within 48 h of admission. Qualitative data were provided from semi-structured interviews analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Quantitative data were collected using a range of standardised self-report questionnaires measuring coping responses, emotion, trauma symptoms and social support, and through sampling of diurnal salivary cortisol as a biomarker of stress. Four themes were identified from interview: the ICU environment, emotional responses, family relationships and support. Questionnaires identified high levels of anxiety, depression and trauma symptoms; the most commonly utilised coping techniques were acceptance, seeking support through advice and information, and substance use. Social support emerged as a key factor with focused inner circle support relating to family and ICU staff. Depressed mood and avoidance were linked to greater mean cortisol levels across the day. Greater social network and coping via self-distraction were related to lower evening cortisol, indicating them as protective factors in the ICU context. The experience of ICU has a psychological and physiological impact on relatives, suggesting the importance of

  14. International overview of high-level simulation education initiatives in relation to critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alinier, Guillaume; Platt, Alan

    2014-01-01

    The use of simulation in health care education has become very topical across all professions and specialties in order to improve patient safety and quality of care. In the last decade, the adoption of more realistic simulation-based teaching methodologies, which serves as a bridge between the acquisition and application of clinical skills, knowledge, and attributes, has been accompanied by the development of a multitude of international and national simulation societies. These serve as important exchange fora for educators, clinicians, researchers, and engineers who desire to learn and share their experience and knowledge around simulation-based education. Several countries have derived their own strategy in order to promote the use of such training methodology. Current key national strategies will be presented in this paper alongside a discussion of their expected impact. Various approaches have been adopted and each has their own place and the potential to be adopted by other nations depending on their political, economic or even geographic context. Within the critical care arena, simulation has generated considerable interest and there is a growing evidence base for its use as a learning and teaching strategy within this environment. A number of critical care-related associations and societies are now recognizing simulation as an appropriate pedagogical approach and acknowledging its potential to improve patient care and clinical outcomes. Its implementation should be carefully considered to ensure that developments are based on current best educational practice to maximize the efficiency of these educational interventions. © 2013 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  15. Social and relational identification as determinants of care workers’ motivation and wellbeing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirstien eBjerregaard

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of research in the field of health and social care indicates that the quality of the relationship between the person giving care and the person receiving it contributes significantly to the motivation and wellbeing of both. This paper examines how care workers’ motivation is shaped by their social and relational identification at work. Survey findings at two time points (T1, N = 643; T2, N = 1274 show that care workers’ motivation increases to the extent that incentives, the working context (of residential vs. domiciliary care, and the professionalization process (of acquiring vs. not acquiring a qualification serve to build and maintain meaningful identities within the organization. In this context care workers attach greatest importance to their relational identity with clients and the more they perceive this as congruent with their organizational identity the more motivated they are. Implications are discussed with regard to the need to develop and sustain a professional and compassionate workforce that is able to meet the needs of an ageing society.

  16. Social and relational identification as determinants of care workers’ motivation and well-being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerregaard, Kirstien; Haslam, S. Alexander; Morton, Thomas; Ryan, Michelle K.

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of research in the field of health and social care indicates that the quality of the relationship between the person giving care and the person receiving it contributes significantly to the motivation and well-being of both. This paper examines how care workers’ motivation is shaped by their social and relational identification at work. Survey findings at two time points (T1, N = 643; T2, N = 1274) show that care workers’ motivation increases to the extent that incentives, the working context (of residential vs. domiciliary care), and the professionalization process (of acquiring vs. not acquiring a qualification) serve to build and maintain meaningful identities within the organization. In this context care workers attach greatest importance to their relational identity with clients and the more they perceive this as congruent with their organizational identity the more motivated they are. Implications are discussed with regard to the need to develop and sustain a professional and compassionate workforce that is able to meet the needs of an aging society. PMID:26528196

  17. Guilt and shame--a semantic concept analysis of two concepts related to palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werkander Harstäde, Carina; Roxberg, Åsa; Andershed, Birgitta; Brunt, David

    2012-12-01

    The theoretical viewpoint of the study was based on the fundamental motive in caring science, the suffering person and his/her health and life situation, which according to the philosophy of palliative care also includes the next of kin. The latter often wish to participate in the care of their loved ones and it is thus important for them to be able to make decisions that can generate a meaningful participation. Unfulfilled obligations or wrong decisions, concerning their dying relative, can result in experiences of guilt and shame in relation to the care of the loved one. A semantic concept analysis can provide a deeper understanding of these concepts and create a deeper insight into what the concepts mean for the individual. The aim of the study was to elucidate the meaning of and the distinction between the concepts of guilt and shame. Semantic concept analysis based on Koort and Eriksson. The findings show that guilt and shame are two separate concepts. Guilt contains meaning dimensions of being the cause of and sin. Shame contains meaning dimensions of something that gives rise to shame and ability to experience shame. The synonyms for each concept do not overlap each other. The semantic analysis creates an understanding of the concepts ontologically and provides a basis for theoretical, contextual and clinical understanding and development. © 2012 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2012 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  18. Providing therapy to children and families in foster care: a systemic-relational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Catherine

    2011-12-01

    Foster care is a system created to protect children from an unsafe home environment yet multiple foster home placements, conflictual or nonexistent relationships between foster parents and birth parents, long, drawn out court battles, and living in an on-going state of not knowing when or if they will be going home are just some of the challenges many children in care are expected to manage. This paper presents a guide for therapists working with families involved in foster care. Utilizing ideas from the postmodern therapies and structural family therapy, suggestions will be provided about who needs to talk to whom about what, when to have these necessary conversations, and how to talk to people in a way that mobilizes adults to take action for the children, with the goal of minimizing postplacement trauma, strengthening and repairing relational bonds, and moving children out of foster care and into permanent homes as quickly as possible.

  19. Health workers coping with having a relative in palliative care for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavon, Aline Blaas; Muniz, Rosani Manfrin; Azevedo, Norlai Alves de; Cardoso, Daniela Habekost; Matos, Michele Rodrigues; Arrieira, Isabel Cristina Oliveira

    2016-03-01

    Objective To know the experience of health workers who are coping with having a relative in palliative care for cancer. Methodology A qualitative study conducted with four family members of cancer patients in palliative care. Data were collected by means of semi-structured interviews from November to December, 2014, at the home of the participants. The data were analysed using the operative proposal of Minayo. Results Two themes emerged, Health worker and family member coping with a cancer diagnosis and Health worker and family member coping with the proximity of death. Conclusions Being a family member and a health professional at the same time demanded greater involvement in care and caused distress since these workers witnessed the suffering of a family member with a terminal disease. However, their professional knowledge supported decision-making during the care process.

  20. Evaluation of patient perceptions and outcomes related to anticoagulation point-of-care testing in ambulatory care clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fermo JD

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, Prothrombin Time/International Normalized Ratio (PT/INR measurements have typically been used to monitor patients on warfarin through institutional laboratories via venous puncture. The Point-of-Care Testing (POCT device has revolutionized the patient care process by allowing for laboratory testing outside of the central laboratory. Objective: To analyze humanistic and clinical outcomes in patients currently treated with warfarin and monitored through a pharmacist-managed anticoagulation clinic using point-of-care testing (POCT device versus venipuncture within ambulatory care clinics at our institution. Methods: All patients currently treated with warfarin therapy who were managed by clinical pharmacists for anticoagulation monitoring at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC Family Medicine Center and University Diagnostic Center, were enrolled. Patients were asked to complete a satisfaction survey regarding their anticoagulation monitoring. In addition, data related to emergency department (ED visits, hospitalizations and percent of time in the INR therapeutic range for 6 months pre- and post-implementation of POCT device was collected. This information was obtained through an electronic patient information database, Oacis. Results: A total of 145 patients were included in the data collection from the two clinics. The majority (41% of these patients were taking warfarin for atrial fibrillation. Satisfaction surveys were completed by 86 (59 % of patients. The surveys revealed that POCT device was preferred over venipuncture in 95% of patients. Reasons for the preference included more face-to-face interaction, less wait time, less pain, less blood needed, and quicker results. Of the 145 patients who were included in the objective data analysis, no significant differences were found in the number of hospitalizations, ED visits, or percent of time in the INR therapeutic range pre- and post- implementation of POCT device

  1. Perspectives on care and communication involving incurably ill Turkish and Moroccan patients, relatives and professionals: a systematic literature review

    OpenAIRE

    de Graaff Fuusje M; Mistiaen Patriek; Devillé Walter LJM; Francke Anneke L

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Our aim was to obtain a clearer picture of the relevant care experiences and care perceptions of incurably ill Turkish and Moroccan patients, their relatives and professional care providers, as well as of communication and decision-making patterns at the end of life. The ultimate objective is to improve palliative care for Turkish and Moroccan immigrants in the Netherlands, by taking account of socio-cultural factors in the guidelines for palliative care. Methods A systema...

  2. Varicella-related Primary Health-care Visits, Hospitalizations and Mortality in Norway, 2008-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirinaviciute, Grazina; Kristensen, Erle; Nakstad, Britt; Flem, Elmira

    2017-11-01

    Norway does not currently implement universal varicella vaccination in childhood. We aimed to characterize health care burden of varicella in Norway in the prevaccine era. We linked individual patient data from different national registries to examine varicella vaccinations and varicella-coded primary care consultations, hospitalizations, outpatient hospital visits, deaths and viral infections of central nervous system in the whole population of Norway during 2008-2014. We estimated health care contact rates and described the epidemiology of medically attended varicella infection. Each year approximately 14,600 varicella-related contacts occurred within primary health care and hospital sector in Norway. The annual contact rate was 221 cases per 100,000 population in primary health care and 7.3 cases per 100,000 in hospital care. Both in primary and hospital care, the highest incidences were observed among children 1 year of age: 2,654 and 78.1 cases per 100,000, respectively. The annual varicella mortality was estimated at 0.06 deaths per 100,000 and in-hospital case-fatality rate at 0.3%. Very few (0.2-0.5%) patients were vaccinated against varicella. Among hospitalized varicella patients, 22% had predisposing conditions, 9% had severe-to-very severe comorbidities and 5.5% were immunocompromised. Varicella-related complications were reported in 29.3% of hospitalized patients. Varicella zoster virus was the third most frequent virus found among 16% of patients with confirmed viral infections of central nervous system. Varicella causes a considerable health care burden in Norway, especially among children. To inform the policy decision on the use of varicella vaccination, a health economic assessment of vaccination and mathematical modeling of vaccination impact are needed.

  3. The core of after death care in relation to organ donation - a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Anna; Flodén, Anne; Lennerling, Annette; Karlsson, Veronika; Nilsson, Madeleine; Fridh, Isabell

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how intensive and critical care nurses experience and deal with after death care i.e. the period from notification of a possible brain dead person, and thereby a possible organ donor, to the time of post-mortem farewell. Grounded theory, based on Charmaz' framework, was used to explore what characterises the ICU-nurses concerns during the process of after death and how they handle it. Data was collected from open-ended interviews. The core category: achieving a basis for organ donation through dignified and respectful care of the deceased person and the close relatives highlights the main concern of the 29 informants. This concern is categorised into four main areas: safeguarding the dignity of the deceased person, respecting the relatives, dignified and respectful care, enabling a dignified farewell. After death care requires the provision of intense, technical, medical and nursing interventions to enable organ donation from a deceased person. It is achieved by extensive nursing efforts to preserve and safeguard the dignity of and respect for the deceased person and the close relatives, within an atmosphere of peace and tranquillity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Situational awareness, relational coordination and integrated care delivery to hospitalized elderly in the Netherlands: A comparison between hospitals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hartgerink, Jacqueline; Cramm, Jane; Vos, Annemarie; Bakker, Ton; Steyerberg, Ewout; Mackenbach, Johan; Nieboer, Anna

    2014-01-01

    .... Therefore, this study aims to (i) provide insight into the underlying components 'relational coordination' and 'situational awareness' of integrated care delivery and the role of team and organizational context in integrated care delivery; and (ii...

  5. The evolution of Australian intensive care and its related costs: A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kelly; Taylor, Colman; Forde, Kevin; Hammond, Naomi

    2017-09-26

    To conduct a narrative review on the evolution of intensive care and the cost of intensive care services in Australia. A narrative review using a search of online medical databases and grey literature with keyword verification via Delphi-technique. Using Medical Subject Headings and keywords (intensive care, critical care, mechanical ventilation, renal replacement therapy, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, monitoring, staffing, cost, cost analysis) we searched MEDLINE, PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, Google and Google Scholar. The search yielded 30 articles from which we provide a narrative synthesis on the evolving intensive care practice in relation to key service elements and therapies. For the review of costs, we found five relevant publications and noted significant variation in methods used to cost ICU. Notwithstanding the limitations of the methods used to cost all publications reported staffing as the primary cost driver, representing up to 71% of costs. Intensive care is a highly specialised medical field, which has developed rapidly and plays an increasingly important role in the provision of hospital care. Despite the increasing importance of the specialty and the known resource intensity there is a paucity of data on the cost of providing this service. In Australia, staffing costs consistently represent the majority of costs associated with operating an ICU. This finding should be interpreted cautiously given the variation of methods used to cost ICU services and the limited number of available studies. Developing standardised methods to consistently estimate ICU costs which can be incorporated in research into the cost-effectiveness of alternate practice is an important step to ensuring cost-effective care. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Patients' experiences of postoperative intermediate care and standard surgical ward care after emergency abdominal surgery: a qualitative sub-study of the Incare trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Thordis; Vester-Andersen, Morten; Nielsen, Martin Vedel; Waldau, Tina; Møller, Ann Merete; Rosenberg, Jacob; Møller, Morten Hylander; Nystrup, Kristin Brønnum; Esbensen, Bente Appel

    2015-05-01

    To elicit knowledge of patient experiences of postoperative intermediate care in an intensive care unit and standard postoperative care in a surgical ward after emergency abdominal surgery. Emergency abdominal surgery is common, but little is known about how patients experience postoperative care. The patient population is generally older with multiple comorbidities, and the short-term postoperative mortality rate is 15-20%. Thus, vigilant surgeon and nursing attention is essential. The present study is a qualitative sub-study of a randomised trial evaluating postoperative intermediate care after emergency abdominal surgery, the InCare trial. A qualitative study with individual semi-structured interviews. We analysed interviews using Systematic Text Condensation. Eighteen patients (nine intervention/nine controls) were strategically sampled from the InCare trial. Data analysis resulted in three distinct descriptions of intermediate care; two of standard surgical ward care. Intermediate care was described as 'luxury service' or 'a life saver.' The latter description was prevalent among patients with a perceived complicated disease course. Intermediate care patients felt constrained by continuous monitoring of vital signs as they recovered from surgery. Standard surgical ward care was described as either 'ok - no more, no less' or 'suboptimal'. Experiencing suboptimal care was related to patient perceptions of heavy staff workloads, lack of staff availability and subsequent concerns about the quality of care. Postoperative intermediate care enhanced perceptions of quality of care, specifically in patients with a perceived complicated disease course. Patients were eager to contribute actively to their recovery; however, intermediate care patients felt hindered in doing so by continuous monitoring of vital signs. Intermediate care may increase patient perceptions of quality and safety of care. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Consumer perception and preference for suboptimal food under the emerging practice of expiration date based pricing in supermarkets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aschemann-Witzel, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    Consumers have been found to majorly prefer ‘optimal’ food over ‘suboptimal’ when purchasing food. To provide an incentive for consumers to select suboptimal food and thus decrease food waste in the supply chain, expiration date based pricing is suggested and increasingly applied. However......, individual preferences, and product-related factors. An online survey experiment among 842 Danish consumers realistically mimicked the current market context. Findings reveal that neither communicating budget saving or food waste avoidance nor the product being organic has an influence. However......, there is a gender effect when the practice is communicated as a food waste avoidance action. Consumer’s familiarity with the practice has a significant influence, as has the individual giving importance to the price criterion, age, and education. Food category differences are explored, showing that familiarity...

  8. A non-destructive selection method for faster growth at suboptimal temperature in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drijfhout, E.; Oeveren, J.C. van; Jansen, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    A non-destructive method has been developed to select common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) plants whose growth is less effected at a suboptimal temperature. Shoot weight was determined at a suboptimal (14°C) and optimal temperature (20°C), 38 days after sowing and accessions identified with a

  9. Is admittance to specialised palliative care among cancer patients related to sex, age and cancer diagnosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adsersen, Mathilde; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Jensen, Anders Bonde

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Specialised palliative care (SPC) takes place in specialised services for patients with complex symptoms and problems. Little is known about what determines the admission of patients to SPC and whether there are differences in relation to institution type. The aims of the study were...... to investigate whether cancer patients' admittance to SPC in Denmark varied in relation to sex, age and diagnosis, and whether the patterns differed by type of institution (hospital-based palliative care team/unit, hospice, or both). METHODS: This was a register-based study of adult patients living in Denmark...... who died from cancer in 2010-2012. Data sources were the Danish Palliative Care Database, Danish Register of Causes of Death and Danish Cancer Registry. The associations between the explanatory variables (sex, age, diagnosis) and admittance to SPC were investigated using logistic regression. RESULTS...

  10. Is admittance to specialised palliative care among cancer patients related to sex, age and cancer diagnosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adsersen, Mathilde; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Jensen, Anders Bonde

    2017-01-01

    /units. Patients with brain cancer were more often admitted to hospices, whereas patients with prostate cancer were more often admitted to hospital-based palliative care teams/units. CONCLUSION: It is unlikely that the variations in relation to sex, age and cancer diagnoses can be fully explained by differences...... to investigate whether cancer patients' admittance to SPC in Denmark varied in relation to sex, age and diagnosis, and whether the patterns differed by type of institution (hospital-based palliative care team/unit, hospice, or both). METHODS: This was a register-based study of adult patients living in Denmark...... who died from cancer in 2010-2012. Data sources were the Danish Palliative Care Database, Danish Register of Causes of Death and Danish Cancer Registry. The associations between the explanatory variables (sex, age, diagnosis) and admittance to SPC were investigated using logistic regression. RESULTS...

  11. Readmission to primary care : the role of community pharmacists post-discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ensing, H.T.

    2017-01-01

    Receiving care in multiple health care settings often means that patients obtain medication from different prescribers. Unfortunately, medication information is often poorly documented and poorly transferred between health care settings. These suboptimal transitions introduce the risk on

  12. Spaceflight-related suboptimal conditions can accentuate the altered gravity response of Drosophila transcriptome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herranz, R.; Benguría, A.; Laván, D.A.; López-Vidriero, I.; Gasset, G.; Javier Medina, F.; van Loon, J.J.W.A.; Marco, R.

    2010-01-01

    Genome-wide transcriptional profiling shows that reducing gravity levels during Drosophila metamorphosis in the International Space Station (ISS) causes important alterations in gene expression: a large set of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) are observed compared to 1g controls. However, the

  13. Catheter Related Blood Stream Infections In Patients Of The Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Coimbra de Castro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the prevalence of bloodstream infection associated with the Catheter related Blood stream infections in patients of the Intensive Care Unit, and the characteristics of its use and handling. Methods: Descriptive and transversal study with a sample of 88 participants. Data were collected through the observational method and the records in the medical records. The absolute and relative frequencies were used for data analysis. Results: 73.86% of the patients had central venous access in the subclavian vein, 100% used double lumen Catheter related Blood stream infections, 0.5% chlorhexidine solution for skin antisepsis, dressing coverage is performed mostly with Sterile gauze and tape, with a daily exchange. The rate of infection related to the use of the Catheter related Blood stream infections was (6.81%. The most infused pharmacological drugs were antimicrobials (69.32%. Conclusion: The study showed that care with central venous accesses is performed according to recommendations for prevention of bloodstream infection related to the use of these devices. The infection rate is close to the standards found in the literature. Key words: Central Venous Catheterization. Hospital Infection. Intensive care unit. Risk factors. Catheter-Related Infection..

  14. Disability and physical and communication-related barriers to health care related services among Florida residents: A brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Sarah E; Schumacher, Jessica R; Hall, Allyson; Marlow, Nicole M; Friedel, Claudia; Scheer, Danielle; Redmon, Susan

    2016-07-01

    Research has not fully characterized barriers to health care faced by persons with disabilities (PWD) which constitutes a critical gap given the increased risk of chronic illness faced by PWD. To understand the current barriers to seeking health care-related services for PWD in Florida. The study was based on a random-digit-dial telephone interview survey of respondents aged 18 and over (n = 1429). Multivariable logistic regression assessed the relationship between disability and physical and communication barriers. One thousand four hundred and twenty-nine Florida residents participated in the survey. Thirty-three percent of respondents (n = 471) reported having a disability. PWD were significantly older (mean age 68 vs. 61) and had lower levels of income and education than persons without disabilities (PWOD) (p barrier (Odds Ratio [OR] = 16.6 95% CI: 7.9, 34.9), a clinical experience barrier (OR = 13.9 95% CI: 6.9, 27.9) a communication and knowledge barrier (OR = 6.7 95% CI: 4.0, 11.3) and a barrier coordinating care (OR = 5.7 95% CI: 3.4, 9.6) compared to persons without disabilities (PWOD). PWD disproportionately face health care access difficulties that can impede the receipt of high quality care within and between provider visits. Efforts to reduce physical barriers and improve communication between providers and PWD may improve functional status and quality of life for these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Factors related to the high fall rate in long-term care residents with dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosse, Nienke M.; de Groot, Maartje H.; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Lamoth, Claudine J. C.

    Background: Falls in long-term care residents with dementia represent a costly but unresolved safety issue. The aim of the present study was to (1) determine the incidence of falls, fall-related injuries and fall circumstances, and (2) identify the relationship between patient characteristics and

  16. A Framework for Categorizing Social Interactions Related to End-of-Life Care in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bern-Klug, Mercedes

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Almost half of people age 85 and older who die annually in the United States die as nursing home residents, yet because it is not always clear who is close to death, not all residents who might benefit from end-of-life care receive it. The purpose of this study is to develop a framework for organizing social interactions related to…

  17. A Case for Relational Leadership and an Ethics of Care for Counteracting Bullying at Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Brigitte; Scherman, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    This paper attends to a theoretical exposition of relational leadership and ethics care as complementary approaches to educational leadership in counteracting bullying at schools. Schools constitute complex systems of activities, processes and dynamics. More specifically, a social system in schools is a web of interactions between the various…

  18. A case for relational leadership and an ethics of care for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper attends to a theoretical exposition of relational leadership and ethics care as complementary approaches to educational leadership in counteracting bullying at schools. Schools constitute complex systems of activities, processes and dynamics. More specifically, a social system in schools is a web of interactions ...

  19. 42 CFR 433.68 - Permissible health care-related taxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... linear regression, as described in paragraph (e)(2)(i) of this section, for the State's tax program, if... applied uniformly to all providers being taxed. (1) A health care-related tax will be considered to be... section. (1) Waiver of broad-based requirement only. This test is applied on a per class basis to a tax...

  20. Retention of Paid Related Caregivers: Who Stays and Who Leaves Home Care Careers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, A. E.; Matthias, Ruth E.; Kietzman, Kathryn; Furman, Walter

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The use of consumer-directed services is expected to grow in coming years, and paying family and friends is a key element of these home-based services. The goal of this study was to understand the careers of these "related workers" (family and friends) and their potential role in the long-term care workforce. Design and Methods:…

  1. Tracing Error-Related Knowledge in Interview Data: Negative Knowledge in Elder Care Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartmeier, Martin; Gruber, Hans; Heid, Helmut

    2010-01-01

    This paper empirically investigates elder care nurses' negative knowledge. This form of experiential knowledge is defined as the outcome of error-related learning processes, focused on how something is not, on what not to do in certain situations or on deficits in one's knowledge or skills. Besides this definition, we presume the existence of…

  2. Girls in residential care: From child maltreatment to trauma-related symptoms in emerging adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, E.; Lanctôt, N.; Paquette, G.; Collin-Vezina, D.; Lemieux, A.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined the association between child maltreatment and trauma-related symptoms in emerging adulthood - over and above the incidence of such symptoms and conduct problems during adolescence - among a sample of female adolescents in residential care. This study used data from a

  3. Case-control study of intrapartum care, cerebral palsy, and perinatal death.

    OpenAIRE

    Gaffney, G; Sellers, S; Flavell, V; Squier, M.; A Johnson

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the relation between suboptimal intrapartum obstetric care and cerebral palsy or death. DESIGN--Case-control study. SETTING--Oxford Regional Health Authority. SUBJECTS--141 babies who subsequently developed cerebral palsy and 62 who died intrapartum or neonatally, 1984-7. All subjects were born at term of singleton pregnancies and had no congenital anomaly. Two controls, matched for place and time of birth, were selected for each index case. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Ad...

  4. Interprofessional collaborative patient-centred care: a critical exploration of two related discourses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ann; Reeves, Scott

    2015-03-01

    There has been sustained international interest from health care policy makers, practitioners, and researchers in developing interprofessional approaches to delivering patient-centred care. In this paper, we offer a critical exploration of a selection of professional discourses related to these practice paradigms, including interprofessional collaboration, patient-centred care, and the combination of the two. We argue that for some groups of patients, inequalities between different health and social care professions and between professionals and patients challenge the successful realization of the positive aims associated with these discourses. Specifically, we argue that interprofessional and professional-patient hierarchies raise a number of key questions about the nature of professions, their relationships with one another as well as their relationship with patients. We explore how the focus on interprofessional collaboration and patient-centred care have the potential to reinforce a patient compliance model by shifting responsibility to patients to do the "right thing" and by extending the reach of medical power across other groups of professionals. Our goal is to stimulate debate that leads to enhanced practice opportunities for health professionals and improved care for patients.

  5. A Review of Lawsuits Related to Point-of-Care Emergency Ultrasound Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Stolz, Lori; O'Brien, Kathleen M.; Miller, Marc L.; Winters-Brown, Nicole D.; Blaivas, Michael; Adhikari, Srikar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: New medical technology brings the potential of lawsuits related to the usage of that new technology. In recent years the use of point-of-care (POC) ultrasound has increased rapidly in the emergency department (ED). POC ultrasound creates potential legal risk to an emergency physician (EP) either using or not using this tool. The aim of this study was to quantify and characterize reported decisions in lawsuits related to EPs performing POC ultrasound. ...

  6. A qualitative study exploring issues related to medication management in residential aged care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad Nizaruddin, Mariani; Omar, Marhanis-Salihah; Mhd-Ali, Adliah; Makmor-Bakry, Mohd

    2017-01-01

    Globally, the population of older people is on the rise. As families are burdened with the high cost of care for aging members, demand is increasing for medical care and nursing homes. Thus, medication management is crucial to ensure that residents in a care center benefit and assist the management of the care center in reducing the burden of health care. This study is aimed to qualitatively explore issues related to medication management in residential aged care facilities (RACFs). A total of 11 stakeholders comprising health care providers, administrators, caretakers and residents were recruited from a list of registered government, nongovernmental organization and private RACFs in Malaysia from September 2016 to April 2017. An exploratory qualitative study adhering to Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Studies was conducted. In-depth interview was conducted with consent of all participants, and the interviews were audio recorded for later verbatim transcription. Observational analysis was also conducted in a noninterfering manner. Three themes, namely medication use process, personnel handling medications and culture, emerged in this study. Medication use process highlighted an unclaimed liability for residents' medication by the RACFs, whereas personnel handling medications were found to lack sufficient training in medication management. Culture of the organization did affect the medication safety and quality improvement. The empowerment of the residents in their medication management was limited. There were unclear roles and responsibility of who manages the medication in the nongovernment-funded RACFs, although they were well structured in the private nursing homes. There are important issues related to medication management in RACFs which require a need to establish policy and guidelines.

  7. No improvement in suboptimal vitamin A status with a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of vitamin A supplementation in children with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Kelly A; Schall, Joan I; Kawchak, Deborah A; Green, Michael H; Ohene-Frempong, Kwaku; Zemel, Babette S; Stallings, Virginia A

    2012-10-01

    Suboptimal vitamin A status is prevalent in children with type SS sickle cell disease (SCD-SS) and is associated with hospitalizations and poor growth and hematologic status. The supplemental vitamin A dose that optimizes suboptimal vitamin A status in this population is unknown. The efficacy of Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) doses (based on age and sex) of vitamin A (300, 400, or 600 μg retinyl palmitate/d) or vitamin A + zinc (10 or 20 mg zinc sulfate/d) compared with placebo to optimize vitamin A status was assessed in children aged 2.0-12.9 y with SCD-SS and a suboptimal baseline serum retinol concentration (children (based on age and sex) failed to improve serum retinol values in either group (vitamin A: n = 23; vitamin A + zinc: n = 18) compared with placebo (n = 21). By 12 mo, the increase (±SD) in serum retinol (3.6 ± 2.8 μg/dL) in those taking 600 μg vitamin A/d was significantly different from the decrease (±SD; -2.8 ± 2.4 μg/dL) in those taking 300 μg/d, which possibly suggests a dose-response relation (P children did not improve serum retinol values in children with SCD-SS, which possibly suggests that higher doses are needed. However, the existence of alternative conclusions emphasizes the need for future research.

  8. Costing in Radiology and Health Care: Rationale, Relativity, Rudiments, and Realities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Geoffrey D

    2017-02-01

    Costs direct decisions that influence the effectiveness of radiology in the care of patients on a daily basis. Yet many radiologists struggle to harness the power of cost measurement and cost management as a critical path toward establishing their value in patient care. When radiologists cannot articulate their value, they risk losing control over how imaging is delivered and supported. In the United States, recent payment trends directing value-based payments for bundles of care advance the imperative for radiology providers to articulate their value. This begins with the development of an understanding of the providers' own costs, as well as the complex interrelationships and imaging-associated costs of other participants across the imaging value chain. Controlling the costs of imaging necessitates understanding them at a procedural level and quantifying the costs of delivering specific imaging services. Effective product-level costing is dependent on a bottom-up approach, which is supported through recent innovations in time-dependent activity-based costing. Once the costs are understood, they can be managed. Within the high fixed cost and high overhead cost environment of health care provider organizations, stakeholders must understand the implications of misaligned top-down cost management approaches that can both paradoxically shift effort from low-cost workers to much costlier professionals and allocate overhead costs counterproductively. Radiology's engagement across a broad spectrum of care provides an excellent opportunity for radiology providers to take a leading role within the health care organizations to enhance value and margin through principled and effective cost management. Following a discussion of the rationale for measuring costs, this review contextualizes costs from the perspectives of a variety of stakeholders (relativity), discusses core concepts in how costs are classified (rudiments), presents common and improved methods for measuring

  9. Hospital implementation of health information technology and quality of care: are they related?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Restuccia Joseph D

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, there has been considerable effort to promote the use of health information technology (HIT in order to improve health care quality. However, relatively little is known about the extent to which HIT implementation is associated with hospital patient care quality. We undertook this study to determine the association of various HITs with: hospital quality improvement (QI practices and strategies; adherence to process of care measures; risk-adjusted inpatient mortality; patient satisfaction; and assessment of patient care quality by hospital quality managers and front-line clinicians. Methods We conducted surveys of quality managers and front-line clinicians (physicians and nurses in 470 short-term, general hospitals to obtain data on hospitals’ extent of HIT implementation, QI practices and strategies, assessments of quality performance, commitment to quality, and sufficiency of resources for QI. Of the 470 hospitals, 401 submitted complete data necessary for analysis. We also developed measures of hospital performance from several publicly data available sources: Hospital Compare adherence to process of care measures; Medicare Provider Analysis and Review (MEDPAR file; and Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems HCAHPS® survey. We used Poisson regression analysis to examine the association between HIT implementation and QI practices and strategies, and general linear models to examine the relationship between HIT implementation and hospital performance measures. Results Controlling for potential confounders, we found that hospitals with high levels of HIT implementation engaged in a statistically significant greater number of QI practices and strategies, and had significantly better performance on mortality rates, patient satisfaction measures, and assessments of patient care quality by hospital quality managers; there was weaker evidence of higher assessments of patient care quality by

  10. Teamwork methods for accountable care: relational coordination and TeamSTEPPS®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittell, Jody Hoffer; Beswick, Joanne; Goldmann, Don; Wallack, Stanley S

    2015-01-01

    To deliver greater value in the accountable care context, the Institute of Medicine argues for a culture of teamwork at multiple levels--across professional and organizational siloes and with patients and their families and communities. The logic of performance improvement is that data are needed to target interventions and to assess their impact. We argue that efforts to build teamwork will benefit from teamwork measures that provide diagnostic information regarding the current state and teamwork interventions that can respond to the opportunities identified in the current state. We identify teamwork measures and teamwork interventions that are validated and that can work across multiple levels of teamwork. We propose specific ways to combine them for optimal effectiveness. We review measures of teamwork documented by Valentine, Nembhard, and Edmondson and select those that they identified as satisfying the four criteria for psychometric validation and as being unbounded and therefore able to measure teamwork across multiple levels. We then consider teamwork interventions that are widely used in the U.S. health care context, are well validated based on their association with outcomes, and are capable of working at multiple levels of teamwork. We select the top candidate in each category and propose ways to combine them for optimal effectiveness. We find relational coordination is a validated multilevel teamwork measure and TeamSTEPPS® is a validated multilevel teamwork intervention and propose specific ways for the relational coordination measure to enhance the TeamSTEPPS intervention. Health care systems and change agents seeking to respond to the challenges of accountable care can use TeamSTEPPS as a validated multilevel teamwork intervention methodology, enhanced by relational coordination as a validated multilevel teamwork measure with diagnostic capacity to pinpoint opportunities for improving teamwork along specific dimensions (e.g., shared knowledge

  11. Peptide Suboptimal Conformation Sampling for the Prediction of Protein-Peptide Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamiable, Alexis; Thévenet, Pierre; Eustache, Stephanie; Saladin, Adrien; Moroy, Gautier; Tuffery, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    The blind identification of candidate patches of interaction on the protein surface is a difficult task that can hardly be accomplished without a heuristic or the use of simplified representations to speed up the search. The PEP-SiteFinder protocol performs a systematic blind search on the protein surface using a rigid docking procedure applied to a limited set of peptide suboptimal conformations expected to approximate satisfactorily the conformation of the peptide in interaction. All steps rely on a coarse-grained representation of the protein and the peptide. While simple, such a protocol can help to infer useful information, assuming a critical analysis of the results. Moreover, such a protocol can be extended to a semi-flexible protocol where the suboptimal conformations are directly folded in the vicinity of the receptor.

  12. A convex programming framework for optimal and bounded suboptimal well field management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorini, Gianluca Fabio; Thordarson, Fannar Ørn; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2012-01-01

    are often convex, hence global optimality can be attained by a wealth of algorithms. Among these, the Interior Point methods are extensively employed for practical applications, as they are capable of efficiently solving large-scale problems. Despite this, management models explicitly embedding both systems...... without simplifications are rare, and they usually involve heuristic techniques. The main limitation with heuristics is that neither optimality nor suboptimality bounds can be guarantee. This paper extends the proof of convexity to mixed management models, enabling the use of Interior Point techniques...... to compute globally optimal management solutions. If convexity is not achieved, it is shown how suboptimal solutions can be computed, and how to bind their deviation from the optimality. Experimental results obtained by testing the methodology in a well field located nearby Copenhagen (DK), show...

  13. Suboptimal investments and M&A deals in emerging capital markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherkasova Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the efficiency of target-company investment decisions before and after Merger & Acquisition deals. We study whether M&A deals help to solve the problem of suboptimal investment after the acquisition. Using a sample of 145 target companies from BRICS countries that were acquired during the period 2004-2014, we outline those that had over- or underinvested before the deal and show that more than half the companies managed to optimize the investment level after the deal. We determine the key factors that improve the inefficiency of investment decisions and demonstrate that the industry and country have an impact on the degree of suboptimal investment.

  14. Analysis of needs of the critically ill relatives and critical care professional's opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Vallejo, A; Fernández, D; Pérez-Gutiérrez, A; Fernández-Fernández, M

    2016-12-01

    To describe the needs of the families of patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and the opinion of ICU professionals on aspects related to the presence of patient relatives in the unit. A prospective descriptive study was carried out between March and June 2015. Polyvalent ICU of León University Healthcare Complex (Spain). Two samples of volunteers were studied: one comprising the relatives emotionally closest to the primarily non-surgical patients admitted to the Unit for over 48hours, and the other composed of ICU professionals with over three months of experience in the ICU. One self-administered questionnaire was delivered to each relative and another to each professional. Sociodemographic data were collected. The variables in the questionnaire for relatives comprised the information received, closeness to the patient, safety of care, the support received, and comfort. In turn, the questionnaire for professionals addressed empathy and professional relationship with the family, visiting policy, and the effect of the family upon the patient. A total of 59% of the relatives (35/61) answered the questionnaire. Of these subjects, 91.4% understood the information received, though 49.6% received no information on nursing care. A total of 82.9% agreed with the visiting policy applied (95.2% were patient offspring; P<.05). Participation on the part of the professionals in turn reached 76.3% (61/80). A total of 59.3% would flexibilize the visiting policy, and 78.3% considered that the family afforded emotional support for the patient, with no destabilizing effect. On the other hand, 62.3% routinely informed the family, and 88% considered training in communication skills to be needed. Information was adequate, though insufficient in relation to nursing care. The professionals pointed to the need for training in communication skills. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  15. To show our humanness--relational and communicative competence in pediatric palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, David

    2002-01-01

    The death of a child is perhaps the worst tragedy a family ever has to endure. The communication that occurs among children, parents, and healthcare professionals at the end of a child's life must be grounded in caring, and compassionate relationships. These relationships require particular skills, knowledge and attitudes that are not fully addressed in many approaches to communication training currently available to practitioners. This essay proposes elements of a pedagogy for relational and communicative competence in pediatric palliative care that is rooted in ethical and ethnographic principles.

  16. [The experience of women care cargivers with chronic conditions of dependent relatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Marcos, Mercedes; De la Cuesta Benjumea, Carmen

    2016-02-01

    To describe the experience of women caregivers with chronic conditions who care for a dependent relative. Qualitative study based on constructivist grounded theory. Study conducted on two Health Areas urban of the Community of Madrid. Thirty nine women with a chronic condition who take care of dependent relatives were selected by means of purposive sampling. Data were collected through 23 semi-structured interviews and 2 focus groups between April 2010 and December 2011. Grounded theory procedures were used in the data analysis. To feel their life hampered describes the subjective experience of family caregivers with chronic conditions who take care of a dependent relative. When comparing their past life with the current life they become aware of the losses they have suffered over time. They feel less strong, sadder and less free; they worry about how to meet the demands of family care. The life they are leading makes them question the meaning of their own lives. This study shows the losses realized day by day by women caregivers with a chronic illness, which lead them to lose the meaning of their own lives. To know the experience of these women caregivers will help develop interventions and specific services that compensate for the losses they feel and help improve their quality of living. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Job satisfaction and work related variables in Chinese cardiac critical care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun-E; While, Alison; Li, Shu-Jun; Ye, Wen-Qin

    2015-05-01

    To explore critical care nurses' views of their job satisfaction and the relationship with job burnout, practice environment, coping style, social support, intention to stay in current employment and other work-related variables. Nurse shortage is a global issue, especially in critical care. Job satisfaction is the most frequently cited factor linked to nurses' turnover. A convenience sample of cardiac critical care nurses (n = 215; 97.7% response rate) from 12 large general hospitals in Shanghai was surveyed from December 2010 to March 2011. Over half of the sample reported satisfaction with their jobs. Nurses with 10-20 years of professional experience and those who had taken all their holiday entitlement reported higher levels of job satisfaction. The independent variables of practice environment, intention to stay, emotional exhaustion, personal accomplishment and positive coping style explained about 55% of the variance in job satisfaction. Chinese cardiac critical care nurses' job satisfaction was related to work related variables, which are amenable to managerial action. Our findings highlight the imperative of improving intrinsic and extrinsic rewards, together with the flexibility of work schedules to promote job satisfaction and staff retention. A clinical ladder system is needed to provide promotion opportunities for Chinese nurses. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Two Liters a Day Keep the Doctor Away? Considerations on the Pathophysiology of Suboptimal Fluid Intake in the Common Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Florian; Guelinckx, Isabelle; Lemetais, Guillaume; Melander, Olle

    2017-01-01

    Suboptimal fluid intake may require enhanced release of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) or vasopressin for the maintenance of adequate hydration. Enhanced copeptin levels (reflecting enhanced vasopressin levels) in 25% of the common population are associated with enhanced risk of metabolic syndrome with abdominal obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, coronary artery disease, heart failure, vascular dementia, cognitive impairment, microalbuminuria, chronic kidney disease, inflammatory bowel disease, cancer, and premature mortality. Vasopressin stimulates the release of glucocorticoids which in turn up-regulate the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1). Moreover, dehydration upregulates the transcription factor NFAT5, which in turn stimulates SGK1 expression. SGK1 is activated by insulin, growth factors and oxidative stress via phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase, 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase PDK1 and mTOR. SGK1 is a powerful stimulator of Na+/K+-ATPase, carriers (e.g. the Na+,K+,2Cl- cotransporter NKCC, the NaCl cotransporter NCC, the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE3, and the Na+ coupled glucose transporter SGLT1), and ion channels (e.g. the epithelial Na+ channel ENaC, the Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ channel Orai1 with its stimulator STIM1, and diverse K+ channels). SGK1 further participates in the regulation of the transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-B NFκB, p53, cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB), activator protein-1, and forkhead transcription factor FKHR-L1 (FOXO3a). Enhanced SGK1 activity fosters the development of hypertension, obesity, diabetes, thrombosis, stroke, inflammation including inflammatory bowel disease and autoimmune disease, cardiac fibrosis, proteinuria, renal failure as well as tumor growth. The present brief review makes the case that suboptimal fluid intake in the common population may enhance vasopressin and glucocorticoid levels thus up-regulating SGK1 expression and favouring the development of SGK1 related

  19. Sickness presenteeism predicts suboptimal self-rated health and sickness absence: a nationally representative study of the Swedish working population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Taloyan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Earlier studies have suggested that sickness presenteeism (SP may be a risk factor for future health problems. The purpose of the present study was to test this in a nationally representative prospective study of Swedish workers. METHODS: Prospective cohort with a representative sample of the Swedish working population surveyed in 2008 and 2010. Odds ratios (OR with 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated using logistic regression. RESULTS: Those who reported more than 7 days of SP had higher risk of suboptimal SRH compared to those who reported no SP (OR = 5.95; 95% CI 4.98-7.12, also after adjustment for confounders (OR = 1.64; 95% CI 1.30-2.06. Those who reported 1-7 days of SP also had an increased risk before and after adjustments. Inclusion of self-rated physical and psychological work capacity did not attenuate the associations, whereas of emotional exhaustion attenuated the ORs to non-significance for both outcomes, indicating that the health consequences associated with SP are largely related to mental health. CONCLUSION: The results strengthen earlier findings suggesting that SP can be a risk factor for future suboptimal general health and sickness absence, particularly through mental health problems. This indicates that asking about SP could yield important information for employers, occupational health practitioners and GPs, possibly leading to more timely intervention that could decrease the risk of future sickness absence and more serious health problems, especially in the mental domain. Further studies of the possible causal pathways between SP and future health development are also warranted, especially since going to work is often seen as desirable also for those with poor health.

  20. Sickness Presenteeism Predicts Suboptimal Self-Rated Health and Sickness Absence: A Nationally Representative Study of the Swedish Working Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taloyan, Marina; Aronsson, Gunnar; Leineweber, Constanze; Magnusson Hanson, Linda; Alexanderson, Kristina; Westerlund, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Background Earlier studies have suggested that sickness presenteeism (SP) may be a risk factor for future health problems. The purpose of the present study was to test this in a nationally representative prospective study of Swedish workers. Methods Prospective cohort with a representative sample of the Swedish working population surveyed in 2008 and 2010. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using logistic regression. Results Those who reported more than 7 days of SP had higher risk of suboptimal SRH compared to those who reported no SP (OR = 5.95; 95% CI 4.98–7.12), also after adjustment for confounders (OR = 1.64; 95% CI 1.30–2.06). Those who reported 1–7 days of SP also had an increased risk before and after adjustments. Inclusion of self-rated physical and psychological work capacity did not attenuate the associations, whereas of emotional exhaustion attenuated the ORs to non-significance for both outcomes, indicating that the health consequences associated with SP are largely related to mental health. Conclusion The results strengthen earlier findings suggesting that SP can be a risk factor for future suboptimal general health and sickness absence, particularly through mental health problems. This indicates that asking about SP could yield important information for employers, occupational health practitioners and GPs, possibly leading to more timely intervention that could decrease the risk of future sickness absence and more serious health problems, especially in the mental domain. Further studies of the possible causal pathways between SP and future health development are also warranted, especially since going to work is often seen as desirable also for those with poor health. PMID:22984547

  1. Two Liters a Day Keep the Doctor Away? Considerations on the Pathophysiology of Suboptimal Fluid Intake in the Common Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Lang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Suboptimal fluid intake may require enhanced release of antidiuretic hormone (ADH or vasopressin for the maintenance of adequate hydration. Enhanced copeptin levels (reflecting enhanced vasopressin levels in 25% of the common population are associated with enhanced risk of metabolic syndrome with abdominal obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, coronary artery disease, heart failure, vascular dementia, cognitive impairment, microalbuminuria, chronic kidney disease, inflammatory bowel disease, cancer, and premature mortality. Vasopressin stimulates the release of glucocorticoids which in turn up-regulate the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1. Moreover, dehydration upregulates the transcription factor NFAT5, which in turn stimulates SGK1 expression. SGK1 is activated by insulin, growth factors and oxidative stress via phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase, 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase PDK1 and mTOR. SGK1 is a powerful stimulator of Na+/K+-ATPase, carriers (e.g. the Na+,K+,2Cl- cotransporter NKCC, the NaCl cotransporter NCC, the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE3, and the Na+ coupled glucose transporter SGLT1, and ion channels (e.g. the epithelial Na+ channel ENaC, the Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ channel Orai1 with its stimulator STIM1, and diverse K+ channels. SGK1 further participates in the regulation of the transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-B NFκB, p53, cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB, activator protein-1, and forkhead transcription factor FKHR-L1 (FOXO3a. Enhanced SGK1 activity fosters the development of hypertension, obesity, diabetes, thrombosis, stroke, inflammation including inflammatory bowel disease and autoimmune disease, cardiac fibrosis, proteinuria, renal failure as well as tumor growth. The present brief review makes the case that suboptimal fluid intake in the common population may enhance vasopressin and glucocorticoid levels thus up-regulating SGK1 expression and favouring the development of SGK1

  2. Comparative Performance Analysis of G-RAKE Receivers with Suboptimal Finger Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. B. Baltzis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Generalized RAKE (G-RAKE reception reduces the total amount of interference and provides enhanced diversity by comprising extra fingers to collect information about interference and further using channel and impairment correlation estimates for fingers allocation. However, the hardware complexity and the excessive computational requirements of GRAKE receivers may restrict their application in real systems; thus, suboptimal solutions are commonly used. In this paper, we propose and evaluate three maximum likelihood G-RAKE structures for colored noise with suboptimal finger placement. In all implementations, the fingers are optimally distributed within a time window that spans from several chip periods before the first arriving multipath to several chip periods after the latest one. The first receiver has its fingers at integer multiples of the chip period while in the rest two structures the search window is segmented in halves and tenths of the chip duration. This work also extends earlier studies by thoroughly investigating the impact of fractionally spaced finger placement on system performance. Our analysis shows that a suboptimal finger allocation reduces hardware complexity with negligible performance loss. The impact of channel delay spread and processing gain on system performance is also investigated and gives interesting results.

  3. Weighted Implementation of Suboptimal Paths (WISP): An Optimized Algorithm and Tool for Dynamical Network Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wart, Adam T; Durrant, Jacob; Votapka, Lane; Amaro, Rommie E

    2014-02-11

    Allostery can occur by way of subtle cooperation among protein residues (e.g., amino acids) even in the absence of large conformational shifts. Dynamical network analysis has been used to model this cooperation, helping to computationally explain how binding to an allosteric site can impact the behavior of a primary site many ångstroms away. Traditionally, computational efforts have focused on the most optimal path of correlated motions leading from the allosteric to the primary active site. We present a program called Weighted Implementation of Suboptimal Paths (WISP) capable of rapidly identifying additional suboptimal pathways that may also play important roles in the transmission of allosteric signals. Aside from providing signal redundancy, suboptimal paths traverse residues that, if disrupted through pharmacological or mutational means, could modulate the allosteric regulation of important drug targets. To demonstrate the utility of our program, we present a case study describing the allostery of HisH-HisF, an amidotransferase from T. maritima thermotiga. WISP and its VMD-based graphical user interface (GUI) can be downloaded from http://nbcr.ucsd.edu/wisp.

  4. Sub-optimal MCV Cover Based Method for Measuring Fractal Dimension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolle, Charles Robert; McJunkin, Timothy R; Gorsich, D. I.

    2003-01-01

    A new method for calculating fractal dimension is developed in this paper. The method is based on the box dimension concept; however, it involves direct estimation of a suboptimal covering of the data set of interest. By finding a suboptimal cover, this method is better able to estimate the required number of covering elements for a given cover size than is the standard box counting algorithm. Moreover, any decrease in the error of the covering element count directly increases the accuracy of the fractal dimension estimation. In general, our method represents a mathematical dual to the standard box counting algorithm by not solving for the number of boxes used to cover a data set given the size of the box. Instead, the method chooses the number of covering elements and then proceeds to find the placement of smallest hyperellipsoids that fully covers the data set. This method involves a variant of the Fuzzy-C Means clustering algorithm, as well as the use of the Minimum Cluster Volume clustering algorithm. A variety of fractal dimension estimators using this suboptimal covering method are discussed. Finally, these methods are compared to the standard box counting algorithm and wavelet-decomposition methods for calculating fractal dimension by using one-dimensional cantor dust sets and a set of standard Brownian random fractal images.

  5. Quality of care in the intensive care unit from the perspective of patient's relatives: development and psychometric evaluation of the consumer quality index 'R-ICU'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensen, Ans; van Mol, Margo M; Menheere, Ilse; Nijkamp, Marjan D; Verhoogt, Ellen; Maris, Bea; Manders, Willeke; Vloet, Lilian; Verharen, Lisbeth

    2017-01-24

    The quality standards of the Dutch Society of Intensive Care require monitoring of the satisfaction of patient's relatives with respect to care. Currently, no suitable instrument is available in the Netherlands to measure this. This study describes the development and psychometric evaluation of the questionnaire-based Consumer Quality Index 'Relatives in Intensive Care Unit' (CQI 'R-ICU'). The CQI 'R-ICU' measures the perceived quality of care from the perspective of patients' relatives, and identifies aspects of care that need improvement. The CQI 'R-ICU' was developed using a mixed method design. Items were based on quality of care aspects from earlier studies and from focus group interviews with patients' relatives. The time period for the data collection of the psychometric evaluation was from October 2011 until July 2012. Relatives of adult intensive care patients in one university hospital and five general hospitals in the Netherlands were approached to participate. Psychometric evaluation included item analysis, inter-item analysis, and factor analysis. Twelve aspects were noted as being indicators of quality of care, and were subsequently selected for the questionnaire's vocabulary. The response rate of patients' relatives was 81% (n = 455). Quality of care was represented by two clusters, each showing a high reliability: 'Communication' (α = .80) and 'Participation' (α = .84). Relatives ranked the following aspects for quality of care as most important: no conflicting information, information from doctors and nurses is comprehensive, and health professionals take patients' relatives seriously. The least important care aspects were: need for contact with peers, nuisance, and contact with a spiritual counsellor. Aspects that needed the most urgent improvement (highest quality improvement scores) were: information about how relatives can contribute to the care of the patient, information about the use of meal-facilities in the hospital, and

  6. Overweight and obese adults have low intentions of seeking weight-related care: a cross-sectional survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, Jacqueline; Swinkels, Ilse C; De Bakker, Dinny H; Veenhof, Cindy; Seidell, Jaap C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of obesity is growing worldwide. Obesity guidelines recommend increasing the level of weight-related care for persons with elevated levels of weight-related health risk (WRHR). However, there seems to be a discrepancy between need for and use of weight-related care. The

  7. Overweight and obese adults have low intentions of seeking weight-related care: a cross-sectional survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, J.; Swinkels, I.C.; Bakker, D.H. de; Veenhof, C.; Seidell, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of obesity is growing worldwide. Obesity guidelines recommend increasing the level of weight-related care for persons with elevated levels of weight-related health risk (WRHR). However, there seems to be a discrepancy between need for and use of weight-related care. The

  8. Overweight and obese adults have low intentions of seeking weight-related care : A cross-sectional survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, Jacqueline; Swinkels, Ilse C.; De Bakker, Dinny H.; Veenhof, Cindy; Seidell, Jaap C.

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of obesity is growing worldwide. Obesity guidelines recommend increasing the level of weight-related care for persons with elevated levels of weight-related health risk (WRHR). However, there seems to be a discrepancy between need for and use of weight-related care. The

  9. Staff's person-centredness in dementia care in relation to job characteristics and job-related well-being: a cross-sectional survey in nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemse, B.M.; de Jonge, J.; Smit, D.; Visser, Q.; Depla, M.F.I.A.; Pot, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To explore the role of nursing staff's person-centredness caring for people with dementia in relation to their work environment and job-related well-being. Background: Given the development towards person-centred care and labour force issues, research has recently focused on the effect of

  10. Quantifying Unnecessary Normal Tissue Complication Risks due to Suboptimal Planning: A Secondary Study of RTOG 0126

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Kevin L., E-mail: kevinmoore@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Schmidt, Rachel [Department of Physics, Fort Hays State University, Hays, Kansas (United States); Moiseenko, Vitali [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Olsen, Lindsey A.; Tan, Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Xiao, Ying; Galvin, James [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Pugh, Stephanie [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Seider, Michael J. [Akron City Hospital, Akron, Ohio (United States); Dicker, Adam P. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bosch, Walter; Michalski, Jeff; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the frequency and clinical severity of quality deficiencies in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0126 protocol. Methods and Materials: A total of 219 IMRT patients from the high-dose arm (79.2 Gy) of RTOG 0126 were analyzed. To quantify plan quality, we used established knowledge-based methods for patient-specific dose-volume histogram (DVH) prediction of organs at risk and a Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model for grade ≥2 rectal complications to convert DVHs into normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs). The LKB model was validated by fitting dose-response parameters relative to observed toxicities. The 90th percentile (22 of 219) of plans with the lowest excess risk (difference between clinical and model-predicted NTCP) were used to create a model for the presumed best practices in the protocol (pDVH{sub 0126,top10%}). Applying the resultant model to the entire sample enabled comparisons between DVHs that patients could have received to DVHs they actually received. Excess risk quantified the clinical impact of suboptimal planning. Accuracy of pDVH predictions was validated by replanning 30 of 219 patients (13.7%), including equal numbers of presumed “high-quality,” “low-quality,” and randomly sampled plans. NTCP-predicted toxicities were compared to adverse events on protocol. Results: Existing models showed that bladder-sparing variations were less prevalent than rectum quality variations and that increased rectal sparing was not correlated with target metrics (dose received by 98% and 2% of the PTV, respectively). Observed toxicities were consistent with current LKB parameters. Converting DVH and pDVH{sub 0126,top10%} to rectal NTCPs, we observed 94 of 219 patients (42.9%) with ≥5% excess risk, 20 of 219 patients (9.1%) with ≥10% excess risk, and 2 of 219 patients (0.9%) with ≥15% excess risk. Replanning demonstrated the

  11. Patients' and relatives' experiences of transfer from intensive care unit to wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullinane, James P; Plowright, Catherine I

    2013-11-01

    This literature review looks at the evidence around transferring patients from intensive care units (ICU) to wards. The literature informs us that patients and their families experience problems when being transferred from an ICU environment and that this increases overall anxiety. The effects of surviving critical illness often have a profound psychological impact on patients and families This study examines the experiences of adult patients, and their families, following their transfer from the ICU to the ward. Five themes emerged from this literature review: physical responses, psychological responses, information and communication, safety and security, and the needs of relatives. This review reminds us that these problems can be reduced if information and communication around time of transfers were improved. As critical care nurses it is essential that we prepare patients and families for transfer to wards. © 2013 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  12. [Factors related to self-care in diabetes mellitus patients attended at emergency service in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquedano, Irasema Romero; dos Santos, Manoel Antônio; Teixeira, Carla Regina de Souza; Martins, Tatiane Aparecida; Zanetti, Maria Lúcia

    2010-12-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the self-care ability of individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus and to relate this capacity with some sociodemographic and clinical variables. Participants were 251 patients who attended the Emergency Service at the Mérida Regional Hospital in Yucatán, Mexico, in 2006. Data were obtained through directed home interviews, using a form, a questionnaire and the Self-Care Capacity Scale. Descriptive and correlation statistics were used for data analysis. The results showed 83 (33.5%) subjects with good and 168 (66.5%) subjects with regular ability. A directly proportional correlation was found between self-care ability and years of study (r = 0.124; p diabetes patients, and further research needs to be developed with a focus on other variables involved in the behavior adopted to benefit their health.

  13. Relation between safe use of medicines and Clinical Pharmacy Services at Pediatric Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Lucas Miyake; Silva, Daniella Matsubara da; Comarella, Larissa

    2016-12-01

    Clinical Pharmacy Services (CPS) are considered standard of care and they are endorsed by the Joint Commission International, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American College of Clinical Pharmacy. In Brazil, single experiences have been discreetly arising and the importance of these services to children and adolescents care has led to interesting results, but certainly are under reported. This short report aims to discuss the effect of implementing a bedside CPS at a Brazilian Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). This is a cross-sectional study conducted in a 12 bed PICU community hospital, from Campo Largo/Brazil. Subjects withcare professionals, who should attempt to use active and evidence-based strategies to reduce morbidity related to medications. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  14. Perspectives on care and communication involving incurably ill Turkish and Moroccan patients, relatives and professionals: a systematic literature review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, F.M. de; Mistiaen, P.; Devillé, W.L.J.M.; Francke, A.L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Our aim was to obtain a clearer picture of the relevant care experiences and care perceptions of incurably ill Turkish and Moroccan patients, their relatives and professional care providers, as well as of communication and decision-making patterns at the end of life. The ultimate

  15. Perspectives on care and communication involving incurably ill Turkish and Moroccan patients, relatives and professionals: a systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaff, F.M.; Mistiaen, P.; Devillé, W.L.J.M.; Francke, A.L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Our aim was to obtain a clearer picture of the relevant care experiences and care perceptions of incurably ill Turkish and Moroccan patients, their relatives and professional care providers, as well as of communication and decision-making patterns at the end of life. The ultimate

  16. Perspectives on care and communication involving incurably ill Turkish and Moroccan patients, relatives and professionals: a systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaff, F.M.; Mistiaen, P.; Deville, W.L.; Francke, A.L.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Background: Our aim was to obtain a clearer picture of the relevant care experiences and care perceptions of incurably ill Turkish and Moroccan patients, their relatives and professional care providers, as well as of communication and decision-making patterns at the end of life. The

  17. Factors related to home health-care transition in trisomy 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitase, Yuma; Hayakawa, Masahiro; Kondo, Taiki; Saito, Akiko; Tachibana, Takashi; Oshiro, Makoto; Ieda, Kuniko; Kato, Eiko; Kato, Yuichi; Hattori, Tetsuo; Hayashi, Seiji; Ito, Masatoki; Hyodo, Reina; Muramatsu, Yukako; Sato, Yoshiaki

    2017-10-01

    Trisomy 13 (T13) is accompanied by severe complications, and it can be challenging to achieve long-term survival without aggressive treatment. However, recently, some patients with T13 have been receiving home care. We conducted this study to investigate factors related to home health-care transition for patients with T13.We studied 28 patients with T13 born between January 2000 and December 2014. We retrospectively compared nine home care transition patients (the home care group) and 19 patients that died during hospitalization (the discharge at death group). The median gestational age of the patients was 36.6 weeks, with a median birth weight of 2,047 g. Currently, three patients (11%) have survived, and 25 (89%) have died. The home care group exhibited a significantly longer gestational age (38.9 vs. 36.3 weeks, p = 0.039) and significantly larger occipitofrontal circumference Z score (-0.04 vs. -0.09, p = 0.019). Congenital heart defects (CHD) was more frequent in the discharge at death group, with six patients in the home care group and 18 patients in the discharge at death group (67% vs. 95%, p = 0.047), respectively. Survival time was significantly longer in the home care group than in the discharge at death group (171 vs. 19 days, p = 0.012). This study has shown that gestational age, occipitofrontal circumference Z score at birth, and the presence of CHD are helpful prognostic factors for determining treatment strategy in patients with T13. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Daily Energy Expenditure and Its Relation to Health Care Costs in Patients Undergoing Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Jason; Abdulla, Rami Khoury; Yeow, Raymond; Aggarwal, Anshul; Boura, Judith; Wegner, James; Franklin, Barry A

    2017-02-15

    Our increasingly sedentary lifestyle is associated with a heightened risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and cardiovascular mortality. Using the recently developed heart rate index formula in 843 patients (mean ± SD age 62.3 ± 15.7 years) who underwent 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring, we estimated average and peak daily energy expenditure, expressed as metabolic equivalents (METs), and related these data to subsequent hospital encounters and health care costs. In this cohort, estimated daily average and peak METs were 1.7 ± 0.7 and 5.5 ± 2.1, respectively. Patients who achieved daily bouts of peak energy expenditure ≥5 METs had fewer hospital encounters (p = 0.006) and median health care costs that were nearly 50% lower (p care costs depending on whether they achieved ambulatory ECG monitoring (p = 0.005). Interestingly, patients who achieved ≥5 METs had lower and no significant difference in their health care costs, regardless of their body mass index (p = 0.46). Patients with previous percutaneous coronary intervention who achieved ≥5 METs had lower health care costs (p = 0.044) and fewer hospital encounters (p = 0.004) than those who achieved ambulatory ECG monitoring may provide useful information regarding health care utilization in patients with and without previous percutaneous coronary intervention, irrespective of body habitus. Our findings are the first to link lower intensities of peak daily energy expenditure, estimated from ambulatory ECG monitoring, with increased health care utilization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Review: Burden on Family Caregivers Caring for Patients with Schizophrenia and Its Related Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imas Rafiyah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Family caregiver is the most important person who cares for patient with schizophrenia. However when care is provided for long time, he/she may experiences the burden.Purpose: The purpose was to review concept and factors related to burden on family caregivers caring for patients with schizophrenia.Method: A literatures were searched from databases: Pubmed, CINAHL, and Science Direct. Key words used to retrieve literature include caregiver burden and schizophrenia. Searching was limited in English language, full text, and the year of publication from 2000 to 2009 was used.Results: Twenty two studies were reviewed in this paper. The result showed that the caregivers caring for patients with schizophrenia experience burden. Burden was defined as a negative impact of caring for the impaired person experienced by caregiver on their activity (objective burden or feeling (subjective burden that involves emotional, physical health, social life, and financial status. Factors related to burden on family caregiver were grouped into: 1 caregiver‟s factors included age, gender, educational level, income, health status, and spent time per day, knowledge of schizophrenia, culture, and coping; 2 patient‟s factors included age, clinical symptoms, and disability in daily life; 3 environmental factors included mental health service and social support.Conclusion: Definition of burden have quite same meaning and mostly factors focus on the patient‟s symptoms, demographic factors of caregiver, and time spent per day. Most of studies cannot be generalized due to small sample used in the study and that too conducted in western countries. For further research, the correlation between burden and resources of family caregiver should be investigated particularly in eastern country.Key words: burden on family caregiver, caring, schizophrenia.

  20. The relationships between the combination of person- and organization-related conditions and patients' perceptions of palliative care quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandsdalen, Tuva; Høye, Sevald; Rystedt, Ingrid; Grøndahl, Vigdis Abrahamsen; Hov, Reidun; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil

    2017-12-06

    Little is known about the combination of person- and organization- related conditions and the relationships with patients' perspectives of care quality. Such a combination could contribute knowledge reflecting the complexity of clinical practice, and enhance individualized care. The aim was to investigate the relationships between the combination of person- and organization-related conditions and patients' perceptions of palliative care quality. A cross-sectional study, including 191 patients in the late palliative phase (73% response rate) admitted to hospice inpatient care (n = 72), hospice day care (n = 51), palliative units in nursing homes (n = 30) and home care (n = 38), was conducted between November 2013 and December 2014, using the instrument Quality from the Patients' Perspective specific to palliative care (QPP-PC). Data were analysed, using analysis of covariance, to explore the amount of the variance in the dependent variables (QPP-PC) that could be explained by combination of the independent variables - Person- and organization-related conditions, - while controlling for differences in covariates. Patients scored the care received and the subjective importance as moderate to high. The combination of person- and organization - related conditions revealed that patients with a high sense of coherence, lower age (person - related conditions) and being in a ward with access to and availability of physicians (organization-related condition) might be associated with significantly higher scores for the quality of care received. Gender (women), daily contact with family and friends, and low health-related quality of life (person-related conditions) might be associated with higher scores for subjective importance of the aspects of care quality. Healthcare personnel, leaders and policy makers need to pay attention to person- and organization-related conditions in order to provide person-centered palliative care of high quality. Further studies from

  1. Power Relations and Health Care Communication in Older Adulthood: Educating Recipients and Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliassen, A Henry

    2016-12-01

    Unequal power relations lie just below the surface in much of today's discourse on health care communication with older adults. Focusing on pathologies or deficits tends to reinforce stereotypes of frailty and dependency, thus framing elders as a vulnerable group requiring special assistance. Implicit stereotyping frequently colors interactions of health care personnel with older clients and their families-interactions likely to affect elders' perceptions and health outcomes. Health care providers need to be attuned to the vast and growing diversity in today's older population, wherein many older adults are exemplars of what it takes to marshal resources and cope with multifaceted challenges. Thus, elders have the potential to teach medical personnel through narratives of resilience as well as tribulation. This potential can be fully realized, however, only in contexts where communication patterns characterized by paternalism, consumerism, and collaboration are mutually recognized and selectively challenged or implemented. Promising interventions to facilitate health care communication in older adulthood might well be directed toward (a) educating both recipients and providers to become more mindful of cues that evoke stereotypical thinking, (b) promoting an institutional culture that normalizes situationally appropriate assertive responses to stereotyping, and (c) formally ratifying older adults' life experience in the training of health care personnel. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. De-adoption and its 43 related terms: harmonizing low-value care terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnjidic, Danijela; Elshaug, Adam G

    2015-10-20

    Research into the prevalence and impact of low-value medical practices has evolved substantially over the past two decades. However, despite international efforts, many challenges still remain with regards to progress in this field, including limits in the capacity to identify and prioritize low-value care practices and to systematically appraise clinical and policy attempts at redressing low-value care. A recent article by Niven et al. in BMC Medicine consolidates the current literature and terminology on the de-adoption of clinical practices, advocating the use of de-adoption as an appropriate term to label low-value care and proposes a new synthesis model to facilitate efforts to reverse ineffective and harmful medical practices. We hope that this work will facilitate advances in low-value care research and policy, and shift focus towards establishing evidence for de-adopting low-value interventions, which is crucial since attempts to reduce low-value care interventions have shown mixed results. Please see related article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/13/255.

  3. How to justify avoidance of communications related to death anxiety in the health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariyar, Murat

    2015-08-01

    It might seem obvious that dealing with death anxiety in the health care system is desirable. Hence, there are either voices that demand more research on how this openness can be fostered or those who consider this topic unworthy of further investigations because of its triviality. The idea behind both deficient perspectives is that the health care system as a communication system can assume the position of a second-order observer who can account for his deficits. However, in terms of Luhmannian systems theory, external perturbations cannot force a functional system to reflect and change the structure of his communications in a certain way. The health care system as a communication system cannot do more than integrating the topic of death anxiety in terms of its functional perpetuation. For example, in hospitals, neither health care staff nor external counselors are able to address existential issues without being affected by functional and structural requirements of the hospital. We present an outline for the justification of the avoidance of death-anxiety related talk in the health care system by reference to systems theory and existential philosophy.

  4. A comprehensive, targeted approach to the clinical care of athletes following sport-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Michael W; Kontos, Anthony P; Reynolds, Erin; Murawski, Christopher D; Fu, Freddie H

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss risk and prognostic factors for concussion outcomes, review comprehensive approaches to assessment, and describe a new method for conceptualizing treatment for sport-related concussion using clinical experience. Based on the current literature of sport-related concussion and clinical experience, an approach for conceptualizing concussion care using clinical trajectories and targeted treatments was developed. A comprehensive approach to assessment and targeted treatments for sport-related concussion was developed using specific clinical trajectories. Sport-related concussions are heterogeneous and require an individualized clinical approach. The use of a comprehensive approach for assessing specific clinical trajectories following a sport-related concussion will help clinicians better conceptualize this injury. Clinicians can then match targeted treatment pathways to specific clinical trajectories to accelerate safe return to play for athletes following a sport-related concussion.

  5. A Pilot Evaluation of Psychosocial Support for Family Caregivers of Relatives with Dementia in Long-Term Care: The Residential Care Transition Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaugler, Joseph E; Reese, Mark; Sauld, Jill

    2015-01-01

    This multiple method pilot evaluation aimed to generate preliminary data on the effectiveness of the Residential Care Transition Module (RCTM). The RCTM is a six-session, 4-month psychosocial intervention designed to help families manage their emotional and psychological distress following residential care placement of a cognitively impaired relative. Seventeen family caregivers of relatives in a nursing home or assisted living memory care unit were randomly assigned to the RCTM treatment condition and 19 family caregivers were assigned to a usual care control group. Caregivers in the treatment condition reported significantly (p families following the placement transition. The findings suggest that the provision of skilled psychosocial support can help families manage emotional distress and crises in the months following a cognitively impaired relative's admission to residential long-term care. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Association of hypertension-related distress with lack of self-care among hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubova, Svetlana V; Martinez-Vega, Ingrid Patricia; Aguirre-Hernandez, Rebeca; Pérez-Cuevas, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Research on factors associated with poor adherence to self-care focuses primarily on psychiatric emotional disorders such as depression and anxiety, whereas non-psychiatric chronic-disease-related emotional distress has received little attention in hypertensive patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association of hypertension-related distress with the lack of self-care including low adherence to pharmacological treatment, lack of regular physical activity, low intake of fruits and vegetables and frequent intake of high-salt foods. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2014 in two family medical units affiliated with the Mexican Institute of Social Security. The study included 487 hypertensive patients >19 years of age. The conceptual framework for the study was based on the Health Promotion Model. The analysis included multiple Poisson regression models. We found that 21.1% of participants had hypertension-related distress. Low adherence to pharmacological treatment was identified in 45.8% of patients, whereas 46.8% lacked regular physical activity, 30.8% reported a low consumption of fruits and vegetables, and 54.6% frequently consumed foods high in salt content. Hypertension-related distress was associated with lack of regular physical activity and low intake of fruits and vegetables. These findings highlight the importance of addressing distress in order to improve self-care of hypertensive patients.

  7. Significances and meanings of the musical identity of patients and relatives receiving oncological palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Araujo de Silva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This phenomenological study was structured on Heidegger’s theoretical-philosophical framework, with the objective of unveiling the significances and meanings of the musical identity of patients and relatives under oncological palliative care. Individual interviews were performed with 12 clients (seven patients and five relatives staying at the support residence of the Maringa Female Network Against Cancer. A total of eight musical meetings were performed between January and February of 2011. I understood that the musical identity of the evidenced beings refers to the religious and country music styles, that their significances and meanings are connected to their spirituality and the significant events of their historicity, and that their mood and reflection intermediated by music can influence their musical choice. I gave evidence to the need to consider the music identity and empowerment in musical choices, which carries existential, social, cultural, spiritual and family aspects as qualifying elements of nursing in palliative care. Descriptors: Nursing Care; Oncology Nursing; Music; Music Therapy; Palliative Care.

  8. Relational Autonomy in Assisted Living: A Focus on Diverse Care Settings for Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Molly M; Ball, Mary M; Whittington, Frank J; Hollingsworth, Carole

    2012-04-01

    Consistent with Western cultural values, the traditional liberal theory of autonomy, which places emphasis on self-determination, liberty of choice, and freedom from interference by others, has been a leading principle in health care discourse for several decades. In context to aging, chronic illness, disability, and long-term care, increasingly there has been a call for a relational conception of autonomy that acknowledges issues of dependency, interdependence, and care relationships. Although autonomy is a core philosophy of assisted living (AL) and a growing number of studies focus on this issue, theory development in this area is lagging and little research has considered race, class, or cultural differences, despite the growing diversity of AL. We present a conceptual model of autonomy in AL based on over a decade of research conducted in diverse facility settings. This relational model provides an important conceptual lens for understanding the dynamic linkages between varieties of factors at multiple levels of social structure that shape residents' ability to maintain a sense of autonomy in this often socially challenging care environment. Social and institutional change, which is ongoing, as well as the multiple and ever-changing cultural contexts within which residents are embedded, are important factors that shape residents' experiences over time and impact resident-facility fit and residents' ability to age in place.

  9. Learning to deal constructively with troubled conscience related to care providers' perceptions of deficient teamwork in residential care of older people--a participatory action research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericson-Lidman, Eva; Strandberg, Gunilla

    2015-06-01

    Conscience can be perceived as an asset that helps care providers to provide good care, but it can also be a burden that generates stress of conscience (stress related to a troubled conscience). Participatory action research (PAR) has been shown to be successful in supporting care providers in residential care of older people to learn to deal with their troubled conscience in challenging and demanding care situations. The aim of the study was to describe an intervention process to assist care providers in residential care of older people to constructively deal with their troubled conscience related to perceptions of deficient teamwork. The study design was grounded in PAR. Nine enrolled nurses (ENs), two nursing aids (NAs), one Registered Nurse (RN) and their manager participated in 12 PAR sessions. All sessions were tape-recorded, and a domain analysis of the transcriptions was performed. Findings show that a PAR-based intervention can support care providers to understand, handle and take measures against deficient teamwork. Using troubled conscience as a driving force can increase the opportunities to improve quality of care in residential care for older people. During the PAR process, participants raised their awareness of the need to view the team in a wider sense and that the manager and the Registered Nurse should also be members of the team to improve team outcome. To improve clinical practice, we suggest that teams in residential care of older people should be enabled to share and reflect on challenging situations that generate troubled conscience. However, as shown in this study, care providers might need support in order to facilitate and promote sharing and reflecting on what their conscience tells them. © 2014 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  10. Helping foster parents understand the foster child's perspective: a relational learning framework for foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Wendy; Salmon, Karen

    2014-10-01

    The behaviour of children in foster care is influenced by a variety of factors including previous experiences of maltreatment and adverse parenting, as well as the impact of separation from birth parents and placement in care. These factors make it difficult for foster parents to accurately interpret the child's behavioural cues, a necessary precursor to sensitive parenting. The relational learning framework introduced in this article, drawing on attachment theory, facilitates the foster parents' access to some features of the child's mental representations, or internal working model, which may be pivotal in understanding the child's behaviour and therefore successfully managing it. Recent studies suggest that parents' ability to understand the child's psychological perspective, or mental state, is related to the child's cognitive and social development. This article presents a method to enhance the foster parents' understanding of the child's psychological perspective. The model is currently being evaluated for use with foster parents, mental health and social work practitioners. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Healing environments in cancer treatment and care. Relations of space and practice in hematological cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høybye, Mette Terp

    2013-01-01

    of the individual patient ’ s needs, values and experiences is key to developing the environment to support the patient quality of life. The present study holds implications for practice to inform design of future hospital environments for cancer treatment. The study points to the importance for being attentive...... these concepts, the study demonstrates how the hospital environment is a fl ow of relations between space and practice that changes and challenges a structural idea of design and healing. Patients ’ sense of healing changes with the experience of progression in treatment and the capacity of the hospital space...... to incite an experience of homeliness and care. Furthermore, cancer patients continuously challenge the use and limits of space by individual objects and practices of privacy and home. Discussion. Healing environments are complex relations between practices, space and care, where recognition...

  12. Relations between nursing data collection, diagnoses and prescriptions for adult patients at an intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho,Emilia Campos de; Martins,Fernanda Titareli Merizio; Dalri,Maria Célia Barcellos; Canini,Silvia Rita Marin da Silva; Laus,Ana Maria; Bachion,Maria Marcia; Rossi,Lidia Aparecida

    2008-01-01

    This descriptive, retrospective study aimed to analyze the relation between nursing data collection, diagnoses and prescriptions for 26 adult patients who were hospitalized at the intense care unit of a large teaching hospital for at least 24 hours. Through the analysis of medical records, 135 diagnoses and 421 nursing prescriptions were established, and 24 different diagnosis categories and 20 different items for prescriptions were identified. The most frequent diagnosis risk was that for in...

  13. Stress-related Psychological Disorders Among Surgical Care Nurses in Latvia

    OpenAIRE

    Kristaps Circenis; Kristaps Circenis; Liana Deklava

    2011-01-01

    Background: The subject of stress related psychological disorders is considered to be one of the mostcritical problems in the 21st century. Latvia’s social-economic situation is stressful and a lot of nurses stillneed to work more than one shift. There are no complete studies about surgical care nurses and operatingroom nurses burnout, depression, anxiety and compassion fatigue situation in Latvia.Aim and Objectives: Research aim was to find out burnout, depression, compassion fatigue and anx...

  14. Network of spaces and interaction-related behaviors in adult intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Mahbub; Boyle, Diane K; Crosser, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Using three spatial network measures of "space syntax", this correlational study describes four interaction-related behaviors among three groups of users in relation to visibility and accessibility of spaces in four adult intensive care units (ICUs) of different size, geometry, and specialty. Systematic field observations of interaction-related behaviors show significant differences in spatial distribution of interaction-related behaviors in the ICUs. Despite differences in unit characteristics and interaction-related behaviors, the study finds that when nurses and physicians "interact while sitting" they prefer spaces that help maintain a high level of environmental awareness; that when nurses "walk" and "interact while walking" they avoid spaces with better global access and visibility; and that everyone in ICUs "walk" more in spaces with higher control over neighboring spaces. It is argued that such consistent behavioral patterns occur due to the structural similarities of spatial networks over and above the more general functional similarities of ICUs.

  15. Psychological distress and quality of life of palliative cancer patients and their caring relatives during home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götze, Heide; Brähler, Elmar; Gansera, Lutz; Polze, Nina; Köhler, Norbert

    2014-10-01

    Palliative patients and their family caregivers were interviewed at the beginning of home care in personal interviews at home in regard to their psychological distress as well as their quality of life. Quality of life was collected with the palliative module EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL (patients) and the Short Form-8 Health Survey (caregivers). The psychological distress was assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the extent of social support with the Oslo 3-items social support scale. Two multiple regression models were employed to examine factors associated with psychological distress. Data from 106 palliative patients (39.6 % female) and their family caregivers (67.9 % female) were included in the analysis. Every fourth patient had clinically relevant anxiety levels and half of the palliative patients had clinically symptomatic depression scores. The main symptoms of the patients were: fatigue, loss of appetite, pain, and shortness of breath. Patients' and caregivers' anxiety and depression scores were significantly correlated (anxiety r = 0.386, depression r = 0.416). Thirty-three percent of caregivers suffered from high anxiety and 28 % from depression. Spousal caregivers had higher psychological distress than other caregivers. Other relevant factors for higher distress were high financial burden and low social support. There was hardly any family member receiving professional psychological support. In palliative patients, depressive symptoms should not be judged as a normal attendant of the terminal illness situation. Instead, patients should be referred to appropriate support services for pharmacological or psychological treatment. Spousal caregivers and caregivers who are socially not well integrated are in particular need of support. Attention to the financial burden of family caregivers is also very important. Due to the existing correlation between the psychological situation of palliative patients and their caring relatives, couples must

  16. The role of memories on health-related quality of life after intensive care unit care: an unforgettable controversy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orwelius, Lotti; Teixeira-Pinto, Armando; Lobo, Cristina; Costa-Pereira, Altamiro; Granja, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Decreased health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is a significant problem after an intensive care stay and is affected by several known factors such as age, sex, and previous health-state. The objective of this study was to assess the association between memory and self-reported perceived HRQoL of patients discharged from the intensive care unit (ICU). A prospective, multicenter study involving nine general ICUs in Portugal. All adult patients with a length of stay >48 hours were invited to participate in a 6-month follow-up after ICU discharge by answering a set of structured questionnaires, including EuroQol 5-Dimensions and ICU memory tool. A total of 313 (52% of the eligible) patients agreed to enter the study. The median age of patients was 60 years old, 58% were males, the median Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II) was 38, and the median length of stay was 8 days for ICU and 21 days for total hospital stay. Eighty-nine percent (n=276) of the admissions were emergencies. Seventy-eight percent (n=234) of the patients had memories associated with the ICU stay. Patients with no memories had 2.1 higher chances (P=0.011) of being in the bottom half of the HRQoL score (<0.5 Euro-Qol 5-Dimensions index score). Even after adjusting for pre-admission characteristics, having memories was associated with higher perceived HRQoL (adjusted odds ratio =2.1, P=0.022). This study suggests that most of the ICU survivors have memories of their ICU stay. For the ICU survivors, having memories of the ICU stay is associated with a higher perceived HRQoL 6 months after ICU discharge.

  17. Association of vaccine-related attitudes and beliefs between parents and health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergler, Michelle J; Omer, Saad B; Pan, William K Y; Navar-Boggan, Ann Marie; Orenstein, Walter; Marcuse, Edgar K; Taylor, James; DeHart, M Patricia; Carter, Terrell C; Damico, Anthony; Halsey, Neal; Salmon, Daniel A

    2013-09-23

    Health care providers influence parental vaccination decisions. Over 90% of parents report receiving vaccine information from their child's health care provider. The majority of parents of vaccinated children and children exempt from school immunization requirements report their child's primary provider is a good source for vaccine information. The role of health care providers in influencing parents who refuse vaccines has not been fully explored. The objective of the study was to determine the association between vaccine-related attitudes and beliefs of health care providers and parents. We surveyed parents and primary care providers of vaccinated and unvaccinated school age children in four states in 2002-2003 and 2005. We measured key immunization beliefs including perceived risks and benefits of vaccination. Odds ratios for associations between parental and provider responses were calculated using logistic regression. Surveys were completed by 1367 parents (56.1% response rate) and 551 providers (84.3% response rate). Parents with high confidence in vaccine safety were more likely to have providers with similar beliefs, however viewpoints regarding disease susceptibility and severity and vaccine efficacy were not associated. Parents whose providers believed that children get more immunizations than are good for them had 4.6 higher odds of holding that same belief compared to parents whose providers did not have that belief. The beliefs of children's health care providers and parents, including those regarding vaccine safety, are similar. Provider beliefs may contribute to parental decisions to accept, delay or forgo vaccinations. Parents may selectively choose providers who have similar beliefs to their own. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The relationship between intensive care units’ nurses and patients’ relatives: Trends for change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concha Zaforteza

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Study´s purpose: To find out which are ICU nurses’ expectations regarding their relationship with ICU patients’ relatives and how to care for them. Methods: This paper is part of a wider research project entitled “Factors that influence the relationship between ICU nurses and critically ill patient’s relatives”. This is a qualitative study based on a poststructuralist perspective. It was conducted in 3 Spanish public hospitals’ ICUs situated in the island of Mallorca. Data were collected through 8 participant observations and 6 semi-structured interviews. The observation descriptions and interviews’ transcriptions were analyzed through the codification of units of meaning. Rigour was assured by the triangulation of sources and methods and by reaching saturation of the main categories of analysis. Results: Nurses considered that their role as information givers is not sufficient and some wished to have a greater participation in the caring process of patient´s relatives. Some of them also wished to make the unit restrictive access more flexible. A certain resistance was shown towards the physician centralism in the process of providing information as well as towards the design of rules governing the relationship between professionals and relatives. Conclusions: We identified that ICU nurses attitude is intended for change, but different levels of commitment was observed regarding involvement in the care of ICU patient’s family.

  19. Heart failure patients’ experiences with continuity of care and its relation to medication adherence: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uijen Annemarie A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A growing number of health care providers are nowadays involved in heart failure care. This could lead to discontinuity and fragmentation of care, thus reducing trust and hence poorer medication adherence. This study aims to explore heart failure patients’ experiences with continuity of care, and its relation to medication adherence. Methods We collected data from 327 primary care patients with chronic heart failure. Experienced continuity of care was measured using a patient questionnaire and by reviewing patients’ medical records. Continuity of care was defined as a multidimensional concept including personal continuity (seeing the same doctor every time, team continuity (collaboration between care providers in general practice and cross-boundary continuity (collaboration between general practice and hospital. Medication adherence was measured using a validated patient questionnaire. The relation between continuity of care and medication adherence was analysed by using chi-square tests. Results In total, 53% of patients stated not seeing any care provider in general practice in the last year concerning their heart failure. Of the patients who did contact a care provider in general practice, 46% contacted two or more care providers. Respectively 38% and 51% of patients experienced the highest levels of team and cross-boundary continuity. In total, 14% experienced low levels of team continuity and 11% experienced low levels of cross-boundary continuity. Higher scores on personal continuity were significantly related to better medication adherence (p  Conclusions A small majority of patients that contacted a care provider in general practice for their heart failure, contacted only one care provider. Most heart failure patients experienced high levels of collaboration between care providers in general practice and between GP and cardiologist. However, in a considerable number of patients, continuity of care could still be

  20. Health-Related Quality of Life in Elderly Patients With Pressure Ulcers in Different Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebba Tosta de Souza, Diba Maria; Veiga, Daniela Francescato; Santos, Ivan Dunshee de Abranches Oliveira; Abla, Luiz Eduardo Felipe; Juliano, Yara; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure and compare health-related quality of life in elderly patients with pressure ulcers in different health care settings (home care acute care facility, and long-term care facility [LTCF]). Cross-sectional comparative study. One hundred ten elderly patients with (n = 36) and without (n = 74) pressure ulcers living in LTCFs, hospitals, or at home. The research setting included 1 tertiary and 2 community-based hospitals, 10 LTCFs, and 18 community health centers in Brazil. The Mini-Mental State Examination, Braden Scale for Predicting Pressure Sore Risk, and Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) were used to assess cognitive status, pressure ulcer risk, and health-related quality of life, respectively. Compared with those without pressure ulcers, elderly patients with pressure ulcers reported significantly lower (worse) SF-36 scores on physical functioning (P ulcers scored significantly higher (better) SF-36 scores on mental health (P = .046) and vitality (P = .009). Hospitalized patients without pressure ulcers had lower SF-36 scores on bodily pain (P = .007) and general health (P = .026) than those living in LTCFs or at home. Patients without pressure ulcers in LTCFs had significantly lower Mini-Mental State Examination scores (lower cognitive status) than those living in other settings (P = .001). Elderly patients with pressure ulcers who were hospitalized and living at home or in LTCFs reported low scores on physical functioning and role physical, and LTCF residents also reported low scores on social functioning and role emotional. This shows the need for an environment that includes health care professionals prepared to implement strategies for pressure ulcer prevention.

  1. [Factors related to lack of autonomous mobility during out-of-hospital emergency care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero García, Antonio; Morales Asencio, José Miguel; Trujillo Illescas, Juan Alfonso; Martí, Celia

    2016-10-01

    To explore the frequency of lack of autonomous mobility and factors related to it in patients requiring prehospital emergency services. Cross-sectional, observational, retrospective analysis. We identified a stratified random sample of patients attended by the public health emergency service of Andalusia in 2011. The sample included 280 patients with a mean age of 56 years; 63.9% were men. The majority were attended in homes and streets or other public spaces. Most were transported to a hospital in a mobile intensive care unit. The reasons for calling the service were most often related to chest pain or injuries. Loss of autonomous mobility was seen more often in men, when care was required in a public area, when there were injuries or altered vital signs, and when the patient required transport in a mobile intensive care unit. Dependence on others was significantly associated with the presence of a prior condition before the patient required transport (odds ratio [OR], 3.27; 95% CI, 1.60-6.33), the use of immobilization strategies (OR, 7.71; 95% CI, 1.7-34.96], and the use of ambulance transport (OR, 4.35; 95% CI, 1.63-11.60]. The following 2 variables were at the limit of significance: pain during the care process (OR, 1.13; 95% CI, 0.99-1.29) and age (OR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.97-1.01). The profile we identified for patients and situations in which patients cannot move autonomously during prehospital emergency care can be used to plan preventive strategies to ensure patient safety.

  2. Towards a relational model of decision-making in midwifery care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noseworthy, D Ann; Phibbs, Suzanne R; Benn, Cheryl A

    2013-07-01

    current individualistic ideas of autonomy and decision making do not fit within the context of decision-making in the midwife-woman relationship. This article critically explores current issues around decision-making and proposes a relational decision-making model for midwifery care. qualitative prenatal and postnatal interviews around decision-making within childbirth in general, and the third stage of labour in particular. eight midwife-woman pairs in urban settings in New Zealand. a range of relational, social and political factors that are not present within existing decision-making models were highlighted. The themes included ontological and philosophical influences on decision-making; uncertainty, vulnerability and relational trust; and socio-political and cultural influences. Inconsistencies in knowledge arising from social, cultural and familial considerations as well as identities, beliefs, values, conversations, and practices were found to produce uncertainties around potential courses of action, expected consequences and outcomes. 'Unplanned' birth experiences decreased client autonomy and increased vulnerability thereby intensifying relational trust within decision-making. The political context may also open up or close down possibilities for decision-making at both national and local levels. decision-making for women and midwives is influenced by complex human, contextual and political factors. This study supports a relational model of decision-making that is embedded in understandings of choice as 'entangled'. A relational model enables consideration of how factors such as identity projects, individual practices, the organisation of maternity care, local hospital cultures, medicalised childbirth, workforce shortages, funding cuts and poverty shape the way in which care decisions are made. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of 5 health care professionals’ratings of the clinical significance of drug related problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villesen, Christine; Hojsted, Jette; Kjeldsen, Lene Juel

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients have medicines reviews conducted by different health care professionals in different settings. Introducing a clinical panel to drug related problems (DRPs) to evaluate their clinical significance is common practice. The clinical panel discuss the potential consequences and come...... each profession. Take into account the profession and setting when clinical relevance of DRPs is discussed in the literature and when choosing a method for evaluating the clinical significance of DRPs.Acknowledgement Many thanks to Grünenthalfonden and Actavisfonden, participants in the project ‘Drug...... Related Problems in the Frontier between Primary and Secondary Health Care’.No conflict of interest....

  4. Quality and safety of hospital discharge: a study on experiences and perceptions of patients, relatives and care providers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, G.J.; Schoonhoven, L.; Plas, M. van der; Wollersheim, H.C.H.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify barriers experienced and perceived at discharge by physicians, nurses, patients and relatives. DESIGN: We developed questionnaires based on focus group interviews with hospital and community care providers, and individual interviews with patients and relatives. A survey was

  5. Experiences with late effects-related care and preferences for long-term follow-up care among adult survivors of childhood lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, Hanne C; Mellblom, Anneli V; Brekke, Mette; Finset, Arnstein; Fosså, Sophie D; Kiserud, Cecilie E; Ruud, Ellen; Loge, Jon H

    2017-08-01

    Given childhood cancer survivors' risk of treatment-induced late effects, long-term follow-up care is recommended. We explored experiences with late effects-related care and preferences for long-term follow-up care among adult survivors of childhood malignant lymphoma in Norway. We conducted five focus group interviews with 34 survivors (19 females; 21 Hodgkin/13 non-Hodgkin lymphoma survivors; mean age 39 years; mean time from diagnosis 26 years). Data was analyzed using principles of thematic analysis. Two main themes were identified: (1) the survivors' experiences with late effects-related care and (2) their preferences for long-term follow-up care. Most of the survivors were dissatisfied with their late effects-related care due to perceptions of poor coordination of healthcare needs in a fragmented system, combined with a perceived lack of knowledge of late effects among themselves and general practitioners (GPs). All survivors valued long-term follow-up care. Oncologists were the preferred care providers, but GPs were considered acceptable providers if they had sufficient knowledge of late effects and routine examinations, short waiting times, and improved GP-oncologist collaboration. Our results suggest that a shared care model of long-term follow-up care involving specialists, GPs, and the survivors themselves is likely to fulfill several of the currently unmet needs among adult survivors of childhood cancers. Improved patient education about late effects and follow-up care would aid self-management. The survivors' concerns regarding lack of sufficient knowledge of late effects among GPs suggest a need for improving access to, and dissemination of, information of late effects.

  6. [Care preferences and spatial mobility : Factors influencing care-related willingness to move of elderly people in partnerships in a rural area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudel, Miriam; Abraham, Martin; Görtler, Edmund

    2017-04-01

    The availability of local support and care infrastructures at the place of residence is an important issue for the elderly living in rural areas. Spatial mobility can be seen as a strategy to cope with a lack of local care facilities. This study analyzes the preferences of older people living in long-term relationships concerning support and care arrangements. Furthermore, it is analyzed how far and under which circumstances older couples are willing to relocate their place of residence in response to regional care infrastructures. Using a quasi-experimental survey design, inhabitants of a small rural community aged over 50 years were interviewed and confronted with descriptions of fictitious situations with randomized options for moving residence. A Tobit model estimation method is applied to examine the determinants of older couples' care-related willingness to move their residence.The results show that most people prefer either the support of their own partner or outpatient care. Residential care is especially preferred by people aged 75 years and above, whereas new forms of support, such as senior cooperatives, are evaluated as attractive especially by younger age groups. Thus, information and advisory campaigns should address the target group in question even at an early stage in older peoples' life course. Care-related willingness to move home of couples aged 50 years and more is significantly determined by local provision of support and care infrastructures. The expansion of any care infrastructure at older peoples' place of residence can significantly reduce their willingness to move. In particular an increased availability of outpatient care is associated with a comparatively large reduction in couples' likelihood to move. In this way local commitment to rural areas can be sustained and rural depopulation can be prevented. At an alternative place of residence assisted living and residential care in particular can significantly enhance the willingness to

  7. Age- and gender-related prevalence of multimorbidity in primary care: the swiss fire project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizza Alessandro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background General practitioners often care for patients with several concurrent chronic medical conditions (multimorbidity. Recent data suggest that multimorbidity might be observed more often than isolated diseases in primary care. We explored the age- and gender-related prevalence of multimorbidity and compared these estimates to the prevalence estimates of other common specific diseases found in Swiss primary care. Methods We analyzed data from the Swiss FIRE (Family Medicine ICPC Research using Electronic Medical Record project database, representing a total of 509,656 primary care encounters in 98,152 adult patients between January 1, 2009 and July 31, 2011. For each encounter, medical problems were encoded using the second version of the International Classification of primary Care (ICPC-2. We defined chronic health conditions using 147 pre-specified ICPC-2 codes and defined multimorbidity as 1 two or more chronic health conditions from different ICPC-2 rubrics, 2 two or more chronic health conditions from different ICPC-2 chapters, and 3 two or more medical specialties involved in patient care. We compared the prevalence estimates of multimorbidity defined by the three methodologies with the prevalence estimates of common diseases encountered in primary care. Results Overall, the prevalence estimates of multimorbidity were similar for the three different definitions (15% [95%CI 11-18%], 13% [95%CI 10-16%], and 14% [95%CI 11-17%], respectively, and were higher than the prevalence estimates of any specific chronic health condition (hypertension, uncomplicated 9% [95%CI 7-11%], back syndrome with and without radiating pain 6% [95%CI 5-7%], non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus 3% [95%CI 3-4%], and degenerative joint disease 3% [95%CI 2%-4%]. The prevalence estimates of multimorbidity rose more than 20-fold with age, from 2% (95%CI 1-2% in those aged 20–29 years, to 38% (95%CI 31-44% in those aged 80 or more years. The

  8. Client-nurse relationships in home-based palliative care: a critical analysis of power relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudshoorn, Abram; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; McWilliam, Carol

    2007-08-01

    To elicit an in-depth understanding of the sources of power and how power is exercised within client-nurse relationships in home-based palliative care. As in all social relations, power is present within client-nurse relationships. Although much research has focused on interpersonal relationships in nursing, the concept of power within the client-nurse relationship in palliative care settings has not been extensively investigated. Applying a critical lens, secondary qualitative data analysis was conducted. Seventeen nurse and 16 client transcripts from a primary study were selected for secondary data analysis. These 33 transcripts afforded theme saturation, which allowed for both commonalities and differences to be identified. Data analysis involved analytic coding. Study findings help make explicit the underlying power present in the context of home-based palliative care and how this power is used and potentially abused. In analysing the sources and exercise of power, the linkage between macro and micro levels of power is made explicit, as nurses functioned within a hierarchy of power. The findings suggest that educational/occupational status continues to be a source of power for nurses within the relationship. However, nurses also experience powerlessness within the home care context. For clients, being able to control one's own life is a source of power, but this power is over-shadowed by the powerlessness experienced in relationships with nurses. The exercise of power by clients and nurses creates experiences of both liberation and domination. Nurses who are willing to reflect on and change those disempowering aspects of the client-nurse relationship, including a harmful hierarchy, will ultimately be successful in the health promotion of clients in home-based palliative care. Additionally, it should be recognized that nurses work within a specific health system context and, therefore, their practice is influenced by policies and funding models implemented at

  9. [Interpersonal relations between health professional and pregnant adolescents: distances and approaches of integral and humanized care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Marta Maria Antonieta de Souza; Saunders, Claudia; Baião, Mirian Ribeiro

    2012-03-01

    This study presents an analysis of relations between health professionals and pregnant adolescents in the installations of the prenatal care program of a public hospital in Rio de Janeiro. It involves qualitative research based on an interpretive approach, with comprehensiveness and humanization of care in relationship dimensions as a theoretical benchmark. Based on two predefined themes - the interaction between subjects and educational dimension of health practices - 22 individual and group care sessions were observed, with the participation of 31 pregnant adolescents, 5 professionals and 2 nutrition interns. The interpretation of the data using content analysis created five categories. The results show the negative effect of the predominance of the biomedical dimension in the perception of health professionals about psychosocial and cultural aspects of teenage pregnancy. There was a failure to utilize the care session as a privileged space for the construction of collective and individual significance about pregnancy and teenage motherhood, albeit in the context studied there are professionals who are aware of the need for a broader view regarding the needs of pregnant adolescent.

  10. Helicobacter pylori related dyspepsia: prevalence and treatment outcomes at University Kebangsaan Malaysia-Primary Care Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Aziz Aznida

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optimum management of dyspepsia in primary care is a debatable subject. Testing for Helicobacter pylori (HP has been recommended in primary care as this strategy will cure most underlying peptic ulcer disease and prevent future gastro duodenal disease. Methods A total of 98 patients completed Modified Glasgow Dyspepsia Severity Score Questionnaire (MGDSSQ at initial presentation before undergoing the 13Carbon Urea Breath Test (UBT for HP. Those with positive UBT received Eradication Therapy with oral Omeprazole 20 mg twice daily, Clarithromycin 500 mg daily and Amoxycillin 500 mg twice daily for one week followed by Omeprazole to be completed for another 4 to 6 weeks. Those with negative UBT received empirical treatment with oral Omeprazole 20 mg twice daily for 4 to 6 weeks. Patients were assessed again using the MGDSSQ at the completion of treatment and one month after stopping treatment. Results The prevalence of dyspepsia at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia-Primary Care Centre was 1.12% (124/11037, out of which 23.5% (23/98 was due to HP. Post treatment assessment in both HP (95.7%, 22/23 and non HP-related dyspepsia (86.7%, 65/75 groups showed complete or almost complete resolution of dyspepsia. Only about 4.3% (1/23 in the HP related dyspepsia and 13.3% (10/75 in the non HP group required endoscopy. Conclusion The prevalence of dyspepsia due to HP in this primary care centre was 23.5%. Detection of HP related dyspepsia yielded good treatment outcomes (95.7%.

  11. Persisting stigma reduces the utilisation of HIV-related care and support services in Viet Nam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanh Duong Cong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seeking and utilisation of HIV prevention, treatment, care, and support services for people living with HIV is often hampered by HIV-related stigma. The study aimed to explore the perceptions and experiences regarding treatment, care, and support amongst people living with HIV in Viet Nam, where the HIV epidemic is concentrated among injecting drug users, sex workers, and men who have sex with men. Methods In-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted during September 2007 in 6 districts in Hai Phong with a very high HIV prevalence among injecting drug users. The information obtained was analysed and merged within topic areas. Illustrative quotes were selected. Results Stigma and discrimination against people living with HIV in the community and healthcare settings was commonly reported, and substantially hampered the seeking and the utilisation of HIV-related services. The informants related the high level of stigma to the way the national HIV preventive campaigns played on fear, by employing a “scare tactic” mainly focusing on drug users and sex workers, who were defined as “social evils” in the anti-drug and anti-prostitution policy. There was a strong exclusion effect caused by the stigma, with serious implications, such as loss of job opportunities and isolation. The support and care provided by family members was experienced as vital for the spirit and hope for the future among people living with HIV. Conclusions A comprehensive care and support programme is needed. The very high levels of stigma experienced seem largely to have been created by an HIV preventive scare tactic closely linked to the “social evil“ approach in the national policy on drug and prostitution. In order to reduce the stigma and create more effective interventions, this tactic will have to be replaced with approaches that create better legal and policy environments for drug users and sex workers.

  12. Wealth-related versus income-related inequalities in dental care use under universal public coverage: a panel data analysis of the Japanese Study of Aging and Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Keiko; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2016-01-12

    There is a substantial body of evidence of income-related inequalities in dental care use, attributed to the fact that dental care is often not covered by public health insurance. Wealth-related inequalities have also been shown to be greater than income-related inequalities. Japan is one of the exceptions, as the the universal pubic health insurance system has covered dental care. The aim of this study was therefore to compare wealth- and income-related inequalities in dental care use among middle-aged and older adults in Japan to infer the mechanisms of wealth-related inequalities in dental care use. Data were derived from the Japanese Study of Aging and Retirement, a survey of community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults living in five municipalities in eastern Japan. Of the participants in the second wave conducted in 2009, we analyzed 2581 residents. Dental care use was measured according to whether the participant had been seen by a dentist or a dental hygienist in the past year. The main explanatory variables were income and wealth (financial assets, real assets and total wealth). The need for dental care was measured using age, the use of dentures and chewing ability. The concentration indices for the distribution of actual and need-standardized dental care use were calculated. Among the respondents, 47.9% had received dental care in the past year. The concentration index of actual dental care use (CI) showed a pro-rich inequality for both income and wealth. The CIs for all three wealth measures were larger than that for income. A broadly comparable pattern was seen after need-standardization (income: 0.020, financial assets: 0.035, real assets: 0.047, total wealth: 0.050). The results showed that wealth-related inequalities in dental care use were greater than income-related inequalities in Japan, where most dental care is covered by the public health insurance system. This suggests that wealth-related inequalities in dental care use cannot be explained

  13. Characteristics influencing therapy switch behavior after suboptimal response to first-line treatment in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teter, Barbara; Agashivala, Neetu; Kavak, Katelyn; Chouhfeh, Lynn; Hashmonay, Ron; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca

    2014-06-01

    Factors driving disease-modifying therapy (DMT) switch behavior are not well understood. The objective of this paper is to identify patient characteristics and clinical events predictive of therapy switching in patients with suboptimal response to DMT. This retrospective study analyzed patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) and a suboptimal response to initial therapy with either interferon β or glatiramer acetate. Suboptimal responders were defined as patients with ≥1 MS event (clinical relapse, worsening disability, or MRI worsening) while on DMT. Switchers were defined as those who changed DMT within six to 12 months after the MS event. Of 606 suboptimal responders, 214 (35.3%) switched therapy. Switchers were younger at symptom onset (p = 0.012), MS diagnosis (p = 0.004), DMT initiation (p therapy switched sooner than patients who are older at the time of MS diagnosis and DMT initiation. © The Author(s) 2013.

  14. [Effects of chlorophyllin-iron on osmotic adjustment and activities of antioxidantive enzymes in cucumber seedlings under suboptimal temperature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Wang, Xiu-feng; Zhang, Fan-yang; Wei, Min; Shi, Qing-hua; Yang, Feng-juan; Li, Yan

    2014-12-01

    Cucumber cultivar 'Jinyan 4' was subjected to suboptimal temperature treatment of 18/12 degrees C (day/night) in the growth chambers. A solution culture experiment was conducted to study the effect of exogenously spraying 5 mg x L(-1) chlorophyllin-iron solution on plant growth, the content of proline, soluble sugar, MDA and activity of peroxidase in the leaves of cucumber seedling under suboptimal temperature. Application of chlorophyllin-iron showed prominent effects on mitigating the stress of suboptimal temperature on growth of the cucumber seedlings, significantly increasing the plant height, leaf area, shoot dry mass, the contents of soluble sugar and proline and the activities of SOD, POD, CAT and APX. Exogenously spraying chlorophyllin-iron could promote the accumulation of proline and soluble sugar, raise the activities of antioxidant enzymes, decrease the membrane lipid peroxidation and improve the adaptability of cucumber seedlings under suboptimal temperature.

  15. Frailty screening in older patients in primary care using routine care data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drubbel, I.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Primary care for frail older people is reported to be suboptimal. A transition toward proactive patient-centred care is needed. We investigated the effectiveness of U-PRIM, a frailty screening intervention based on routine care data, and of U-PRIM followed by U-CARE, a nurse-led

  16. Teaching care and cooperation with relatives: video as a learning tool in mental health work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiberg, Elsa; Holand, Unni; Olstad, Reidun; Lorem, Geir

    2012-08-01

    Empathy is crucial for establishing caring relationships and cooperation with relatives of people with severe mental illness. This study describes the use of video as a learning tool in a post-bachelor program. A focus group of students attended a video session. Based on a phenomenological descriptive analysis, we found two major themes: (1) Insight and empathy and (2) Developing clinical competence. The first theme relates to increased insight into specific family situations, which resulted in new-found engagement and ideas for cooperation. The second theme relates to how this increased insight was crucial for re-evaluating one's own practice, attitudes, and limitations. This study indicates that the use of video develops sensitivity, attitudes, and empathy in a classroom setting. Enhanced general competence activates clinical knowledge through an improved awareness of relatives' perspectives.

  17. A Suboptimal Scheme for Multi-User Scheduling in Gaussian Broadcast Channels

    KAUST Repository

    Zafar, Ammar

    2014-05-28

    This work proposes a suboptimal multi-user scheduling scheme for Gaussian broadcast channels which improves upon the classical single user selection, while considerably reducing complexity as compared to the optimal superposition coding with successful interference cancellation. The proposed scheme combines the two users with the maximum weighted instantaneous rate using superposition coding. The instantaneous rate and power allocation are derived in closed-form, while the long term rate of each user is derived in integral form for all channel distributions. Numerical results are then provided to characterize the prospected gains of the proposed scheme.

  18. Advancing adolescent capacity to consent to transgender-related health care in Colombia and the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Katherine; Reingold, Rebecca

    2013-05-01

    Many sexual and reproductive health care services, including gender reassignment treatment, facilitate reproductive autonomy and self-determination of gender identity. Individuals who are unable to refuse or consent to these services on their own behalf, such as adolescents, are at risk of violations of their rights to privacy and self-determination. This paper explores the issue of adolescent capacity to consent to transgender-related health care in Colombia and the United States (USA), focusing on the two countries' struggles to balance the rights of adolescents to make autonomous and confidential decisions with the rights of their parents. Unfortunately, many countries, including Colombia and the USA, have been slow to develop jurisprudence and legislation that explicitly protect transgender adolescents' capacity to consent to gender assignment treatment. Courts in Colombia, however, have developed jurisprudence that restricts parents' ability to make medical decisions on behalf of their infant intersex children, which lays a strong normative foundation for advancing adolescent capacity to consent to transgender-related health care. It is a strategy that may prove effective in other countries in the Americas, even those with different frameworks for adolescent medical decision-making capacity, such as the USA. Copyright © 2013 Reproductive Health Matters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Configurations of power relations in the Brazilian emergency care system: analyzing a context of visible practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velloso, Isabela; Ceci, Christine; Alves, Marilia

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we make explicit the changing configurations of power relations that currently characterize the Brazilian Emergency Care System (SAMU) team in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. The SAMU is a recent innovation in Brazilian healthcare service delivery. A qualitative case study methodology was used to explore SAMU's current organizational arrangements, specifically the power relations that have developed and that demonstrate internal team struggles over space and defense of particular occupational interests. The argument advanced in this paper is that these professionals are developing their work in conditions of exposure, that is, they are always being observed by someone, and that such observational exposure provides the conditions whereby everyday emergency care practices are enacted such that practice is shaped by, as well as shapes, particular, yet recognizable power relationships. Data were collected through the observation of the SAMU's work processes and through semi-structured interviews. Research materials were analyzed using discourse analysis. In the emergency care process of work, visibility is actually embedded in the disciplinary context and can thus be analyzed as a technique applied to produce disciplined individuals through the simple mechanisms elaborated by Foucault such as hierarchical surveillance, normalizing judgment, and the examination. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Self-care behaviors and activities for managing HIV-related anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemppainen, Jeanne K; Wantland, Dean; Voss, Joachim; Nicholas, Patrice; Kirksey, Kenn M; Corless, Inge B; Willard, Suzanne; Holzemer, William L; Robinson, Linda; Hamilton, Mary Jane; Sefcik, Elizabeth; Eller, Lucille Sanzero; Huang, Emily; Arudo, John; Moezzi, Shahnaz; Rivero-Mendez, Marta; Rosa, Maria; Human, Sarie; Cuca, Yvette; Lindgren, Terri; Portillo, Carmen J; Maryland, Mary

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify the baseline prevalence and effectiveness of anxiety self-management strategies in a convenience sample of persons living with HIV (PLWH; n = 343) in the United States, Puerto Rico, Kenya, and South Africa who reported HIV-related anxiety symptoms. Relationships between demographics and anxiety characteristics were determined, as was the effectiveness of self-care activities/behaviors to reduce anxiety. We found that the use of anxiety self-management strategies varied by gender and that ratings of effectiveness varied by country. Highest anxiety intensity scores were found in participants who were taking antiretroviral medications and who had undetectable viral loads. Forty-five percent of the persons with a diagnosis of AIDS reported anxiety symptoms. As HIV increases in areas of the world where self-care is the primary approach to managing HIV, additional research will be needed to address the effectiveness of cross-cultural differences in strategies for self-managing HIV-related anxiety. Copyright © 2012 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Intergovernmental relations and Long Term Care reforms: lessons from the Italian case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriele, Stefania; Tediosi, Fabrizio

    2014-05-01

    The article aims at analysing the reasons why Italy failed to reform Long Term Care (LTC) policies, focusing on an aspect which has been overlooked: the interplay between LTC policies and the intergovernmental multilevel relationships. In the Italian LTC system, the main central intervention has been the regularisation of migrant care work, while the automatic growth of the cash benefits has accompanied the care needs evolution. Therefore the only institutional change has been a "gradual transformation". The causes of the failure to reform LTC have been mainly related to a strong fragmentation of the policy field, the existence of a universalistic cash benefit, the fiscal constraint. We argue that a further obstacle to reform LTC policies has been the weak and uncertain legislative framework of federalism. The uncertainty on the allocation and distribution of resources and the delay to apply the equalisation mechanism based on needs engendered a lame federalism that contributed to hindering welfare innovations and to increasing the institutional fragmentation. The analysis is partly consistent with previous literature, although it places less emphasis on the role of the constituencies and the scarcity of resources in influencing decisions, focusing more on the implications of the failure to fully realise the federalist reform. This focus shows that to implement institutional change in the welfare system, it is important to take into account the features of the federal governance, the intergovernmental relations, and to address the challenges that are connected to them. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Multimodal multidisciplinary standardization of perioperative care: still a long way to go.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Jan

    2008-04-01

    The complexity of the perioperative care process has resulted in a suboptimal use of resources, quality problems and a relatively high incidence of errors. In an attempt to optimize resources, patient safety, and quality, multimodal, multidisciplinary standardization of the care process has become an increasingly recognized goal. The anaesthesiologist as perioperative clinician plays a pivotal role in the development and implementation of standardized perioperative care. Historically, however, a significant portion of perioperative care has relied upon anecdotal information that represents an amalgam of any individual anaesthesiologist's collective influences and experiences. Current status of standardized perioperative care and different factors that influence successful implementation of guidelines, fast track surgery programs and clinical pathways are described. Although recent literature indicates that standardization of perioperative care improves efficiency, quality, and patient satisfaction, implementation of standardized care is difficult since resistance is still enormous.

  3. Quality dementia care: Prerequisites and relational ethics among multicultural healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellevold, Gerd Sylvi; Egede-Nissen, Veslemøy; Jakobsen, Rita; Sørlie, Venke

    2017-01-01

    Many nursing homes appear as multicultural workplaces where the majority of healthcare providers have an ethnic minority background. This environment creates challenges linked to communication, interaction and cultural differences. Furthermore, the healthcare providers have varied experiences and understanding of what quality care of patients with dementia involves. The aim of this study is to illuminate multi-ethnic healthcare providers' lived experiences of their own working relationship, and its importance to quality care for people with dementia. The study is part of a greater participatory action research project: 'Hospice values in the care for persons with dementia'. The data material consists of extensive notes from seminars, project meetings and dialogue-based teaching. The text material was subjected to phenomenological-hermeneutical interpretation. Participants and research context: Participants in the project were healthcare providers working in a nursing home unit. The participants came from 15 different countries, had different formal qualifications, varied backgrounds and ethnic origins. Ethical considerations: The study is approved by the Norwegian Regional Ethics Committee and the Norwegian Social Science Data Services. The results show that good working relationships, characterized by understanding each other's vulnerability and willingness to learn from each other through shared experiences, are prerequisites for quality care. The healthcare providers further described ethical challenges as uncertainty and different understandings. The results are discussed in the light of Lögstrup's relational philosophy of ethics and the concepts of vulnerability, ethic responsibility, trust and openness of speech. The prerequisite for quality care for persons with dementia in a multicultural working environment is to create arenas for open discussions between the healthcare providers. Leadership is of great importance.

  4. Rest: A Health-Related Phenomenon and Concept in Caring Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asp, Margareta

    2015-01-01

    Rest is a health-related phenomenon. Researchers have explored the phenomenon of rest, but further concept development is recommended. The aim of my study was to develop and describe a concept of rest, from interviews with a total of 63 participants about their lived experiences of rest. I performed the developing process in two stages: first with descriptive phenomenology and second with a hermeneutic approach. The concept of rest is comprised of the essences of both rest and "non-rest," and there is a current movement between these two conditions in peoples' lives. The essence of rest is being in harmony in motivation, feeling, and action. The essence of non-rest is being in disharmony in motivation, feeling, and action. The essences reveal some meaning constituents. Health care professionals and researchers can use the concept as a frame of reference in health care praxis and in applied research.

  5. [Health care limits: representations and unconscious processes related to the population at the hospital emergency entrance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Marilene de Castilho; Carreteiro, Teresa Cristina; Fernandes, Maria Inês Assumpção

    2008-06-01

    This article presents some results from a study aimed at analyzing the limits and possibilities defined by inter-subjective and unconscious processes of solidarity, cooperation, and life care production in health services. A public hospital with an emergency department in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, was selected as a case study. The French school of psychosociology, oriented by the psychoanalytical clinical approach, the psychoanalytical theory on inter-subjective and group processes, and work psychodynamics provided the basis for the study's methodological strategies and analysis of the results. The study analyzed health professionals' psychological representations and unconscious processes related to emergency department users and their demands, and their consequences for the health care provided to this clientele. Some particularly important images such as "need" were used as a category that conceals the diversity of demand, in an unconscious process with multiple reductions: from denial of social suffering to denial of the patients' human condition.

  6. Cannabis in palliative medicine: improving care and reducing opioid-related morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Gregory T; Flanagan, Aaron M; Earleywine, Mitchell; Abrams, Donald I; Aggarwal, Sunil K; Grinspoon, Lester

    2011-08-01

    Unlike hospice, long-term drug safety is an important issue in palliative medicine. Opioids may produce significant morbidity. Cannabis is a safer alternative with broad applicability for palliative care. Yet the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) classifies cannabis as Schedule I (dangerous, without medical uses). Dronabinol, a Schedule III prescription drug, is 100% tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the most psychoactive ingredient in cannabis. Cannabis contains 20% THC or less but has other therapeutic cannabinoids, all working together to produce therapeutic effects. As palliative medicine grows, so does the need to reclassify cannabis. This article provides an evidence-based overview and comparison of cannabis and opioids. Using this foundation, an argument is made for reclassifying cannabis in the context of improving palliative care and reducing opioid-related morbidity.

  7. Direct care staff perspectives related to physical activity in mental health group homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Shari L

    2013-12-01

    Sedentary lifestyle is a modifiable risk factor that contributes to health disparities in individuals with serious mental illness. Direct care staff in mental health group homes were surveyed to determine barriers and resource needs related to conducting physical activity interventions with individuals. An investigator-designed survey was used. The most significant barriers cited by staff were individuals did not want to engage in physical activity and staff needed more information about how to conduct physical activity interventions. Resource needs cited by staff included engagement strategies to gain and maintain individual interest as well as resource acquisition. Direct care staff are well positioned to deliver physical activity interventions but need support and direction to engage individuals in safe and effective exercise. Mental health nurses are well placed to provide support and direction to staff for these interventions. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Electronic Health Record Alert-Related Workload as a Predictor of Burnout in Primary Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Megan E; Russo, Elise; Singh, Hardeep

    2017-07-05

    Electronic health records (EHRs) have been shown to increase physician workload. One EHR feature that contributes to increased workload is asynchronous alerts (also known as inbox notifications) related to test results, referral responses, medication refill requests, and messages from physicians and other health care professionals. This alert-related workload results in negative cognitive outcomes, but its effect on affective outcomes, such as burnout, has been understudied. To examine EHR alert-related workload (both objective and subjective) as a predictor of burnout in primary care providers (PCPs), in order to ultimately inform interventions aimed at reducing burnout due to alert workload. A cross-sectional questionnaire and focus group of 16 PCPs at a large medical center in the southern United States. Subjective, but not objective, alert workload was related to two of the three dimensions of burnout, including physical fatigue (p = 0.02) and cognitive weariness (p = 0.04), when controlling for organizational tenure. To reduce alert workload and subsequent burnout, participants indicated a desire to have protected time for alert management, fewer unnecessary alerts, and improvements to the EHR system. Burnout associated with alert workload may be in part due to subjective differences at an individual level, and not solely a function of the objective work environment. This suggests the need for both individual and organizational-level interventions to improve alert workload and subsequent burnout. Additional research should confirm these findings in larger, more representative samples.

  9. The impact of occupational stress on nurses' caring behaviors and their health related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarafis, Pavlos; Rousaki, Eirini; Tsounis, Andreas; Malliarou, Maria; Lahana, Liana; Bamidis, Panagiotis; Niakas, Dimitris; Papastavrou, Evridiki

    2016-01-01

    Nursing is perceived as a strenuous job. Although past research has documented that stress influences nurses' health in association with quality of life, the relation between stress and caring behaviors remains relatively unexamined, especially in the Greek working environment, where it is the first time that this specific issue is being studied. The aim was to investigate and explore the correlation amidst occupational stress, caring behaviors and their quality of life in association to health. A correlational study of nurses (N = 246) who worked at public and private units was conducted in 2013 in Greece. The variables were operationalized using three research instruments: (1) the Expanded Nursing Stress Scale (ENSS), (2) the Health Survey SF-12 and (3) the Caring Behaviors Inventory (CBI). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Contact with death, patients and their families, conflicts with supervisors and uncertainty about the therapeutic effect caused significantly higher stress among participants. A significant negative correlation was observed amidst total stress and the four dimensions of CBI. Certain stress factors were significant and independent predictors of each CBI dimension. Conflicts with co-workers was revealed as an independent predicting factor for affirmation of human presence, professional knowledge and skills and patient respectfulness dimensions, conflicts with doctors for respect for patient, while conflicts with supervisors and uncertainty concerning treatment dimensions were an independent predictor for positive connectedness. Finally, discrimination stress factor was revealed as an independent predictor of quality of life related to physical health, while stress resulting from conflicts with supervisors was independently associated with mental health. Occupational stress affects nurses' health-related quality of life negatively, while it can also be considered as an influence on patient outcomes.

  10. Use of health-related quality of life information in managed care formulary decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenchen Kenneth; Sause, Robert B; Zacker, Christopher

    2005-12-01

    The extent to which the increased volume of available health-related quality of life (HRQOL) information and heightened education has increased the acceptance and use of HRQOL remains unclear. Likewise, the value of HRQOL information in the formulary decision-making process continues to be undefined. To investigate the perceptions and use of HRQOL by managed care decision-makers in the formulary development process. A mail survey was sent to a nationwide sample of 108 Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy (AMCP) members who were involved in formulary management. Survey candidates were identified according to their job titles listed in the 1999-2000 AMCP membership directory. The survey process began in May 2000 and ended in August 2000. The main outcome measures included (a) managed care formulary decision-makers' assessment of HRQOL as a treatment outcome, (b) the existing role and future use of HRQOL information in formulary decisions, and (c) the level of understanding of HRQOL concepts and the benefits attributable to favorable HRQOL results. A response rate of 51.9% was obtained. Most of the respondents (>70%) believed that patients consider HRQOL as an important treatment outcome. Fewer respondents (43%) felt that payers view HRQOL outcomes as an important quality indicator. Most respondents (95%) considered HRQOL data in making formulary decisions, and many (73%) believe that HRQOL outcomes will play a more important role in future formulary decisions. Respondents indicated a better understanding of disease-specific and generic HRQOL measurements than utility measurement and interpretation of results. A minority of respondents (34%) would be willing to pay a higher price for a product with better HRQOL outcomes. When asked which factors would lead to increased use of HRQOL information, respondents indicated that health care cost savings and increased productivity were considered important (77% and 65%, respectively). A drug product with better HRQOL outcomes

  11. The relative safety of paternal, maternal, and traditional foster care placements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helton, Jesse J; Boutwell, Brian B; DiBernardo, Michael

    2017-08-01

    When children are placed into foster care the caseworker must give preference to an adult relative, many of whom are grandparents, over an unrelated caregiver. This kinship preference is based in evolutionary biology, which suggests that the imperative to care for a child should be greater for kin versus non-kin. However, not all kin are related to a child in the same way, and level of paternity uncertainty may influence level of care provided. For instance, maternal grandparents can be assured that they share genetic material with their grandchild, while paternal grandparents may not have the same level of certainty. Owing to the possibility of paternity uncertainty, we hypothesize that out-of-home placements with paternal grandparents will be at a greater risk of subsequent investigations than placements with maternal grandparents or with foster parents. We secured data on placements n=560 of children ages 1.5 to 17 following a maltreatment investigation from a merger of the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being NSCAW II and the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System NCANDS. Kaplan-Meier and multivariate Cox regression were used to examine the difference in time to the first new investigation by type of out-of-home placement while controlling for covariates. Consistent with our hypothesis, placements with paternal grandparents were at a higher risk of a subsequent investigations than placements with maternal grandparents or non-kin foster parents. Results suggest a need for further considerations of child safety in foster care based on genetic relatedness of caregivers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Palliative care case managers in primary care: a descriptive study of referrals in relation to treatment aims

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plas, A.G. van der; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.; Francke, A.L.; Jansen, W.J.; Vissers, K.C.P.; Deliens, L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Three important elements of the World Health Organization (WHO) definition of palliative care are: 1) it includes patients who may have cure or life prolongation as treatment aims besides palliative care; 2) it is not exclusively for cancer patients; and 3) it includes attention to the

  13. Palliative Care Case Managers in Primary Care: A Descriptive Study of Referrals in Relation to Treatment Aims

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Plas, A.G.M.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.; Francke, A.L.; Jansen, W.J.J.; Vissers, K.C.; Deliens, L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Three important elements of the World Health Organization (WHO) definition of palliative care are: 1) it includes patients who may have cure or life prolongation as treatment aims besides palliative care; 2) it is not exclusively for cancer patients; and 3) it includes attention to the

  14. Assessment of Drug Related Problems in Patients with Cardiovascular Diseases in a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javedh Shareef

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds: Drug related problems can be defined as any event (or circumstance involving the drug treatment, which interferes or potentially interferes with the patient in achieving an optimum outcome of medical care. The aim of the study was to identify drug therapy problems and to assess the pharmacist interventions in patients with cardiovascular diseases.Methods: The inpatient case records including drug history and other relevant details of the admitted patients under the cardiology department were collected and reviewed by the clinical pharmacist for drug related problems. In case if any drug related problem was identified, was discussed with the concerned physician and suitable interventions was provided and documented.Results: A total of 112 patient case sheets were reviewed during the study period, out of which 53 drug related problems were identified from 44 patients. The most common drug related problem was found to be drug Interactions (49.05% followed by Adverse Drug Reaction (18.86%, and failure to receive drugs (9.43%. The most frequent suggestions provided by the intervening pharmacist were cessation of drug (24.52%, followed by Change in frequency of administration (22.64%, change in drug dose (20.75%. The majority of level of significance of drug related problems was seen to have moderate significance in grade. The acceptance rate of recommendations and change in drug therapy was found to be high (96.21%.Conclusion: The current study highlights the importance of a pharmacist in a multidisciplinary team of routinely reviewing the drug therapy for identification and resolution of drug related problems which helps in achieving better therapeutic outcomes and improved patient care.

  15. Perceptions and abilities related to patient engagement in diabetes care among primary health care providers in Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre-Christensen, Ulla; Kragelund Nielsen, Karoline; Calopietro, Michael

    and nurses in Malaysia’s primary health care system. Summary of Work: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine non-specialist doctors and ten nurses working in primary health care clinics. Further, 12 key informants with specialist knowledge about diabetes care in Malaysia were interviewed......Background: Malaysia seeks to transform its public health sector to manage the growing number of people with diabetes. Patient engagement is a critical clinical competency for HCPs treating people with diabetes. We investigated perceptions of and ability to practice patient engagement among doctors....... The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Summary of Results: Three main themes emerged: 1) limitations in understanding barriers to self-care and treatment especially from a psychosocial perspective, 2) substantial variation in health care providers’ skills within patient engagement...

  16. Perspectives on care and communication involving incurably ill Turkish and Moroccan patients, relatives and professionals: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaff, Fuusje M; Mistiaen, Patriek; Devillé, Walter Ljm; Francke, Anneke L

    2012-09-18

    Our aim was to obtain a clearer picture of the relevant care experiences and care perceptions of incurably ill Turkish and Moroccan patients, their relatives and professional care providers, as well as of communication and decision-making patterns at the end of life. The ultimate objective is to improve palliative care for Turkish and Moroccan immigrants in the Netherlands, by taking account of socio-cultural factors in the guidelines for palliative care. A systematic literature review was undertaken. The data sources were seventeen national and international literature databases, four Dutch journals dedicated to palliative care and 37 websites of relevant national and international organizations. All the references found were checked to see whether they met the structured inclusion criteria. Inclusion was limited to publications dealing with primary empirical research on the relationship between socio-cultural factors and the health or care situation of Turkish or Moroccan patients with an oncological or incurable disease. The selection was made by first reading the titles and abstracts and subsequently the full texts. The process of deciding which studies to include was carried out by two reviewers independently. A generic appraisal instrument was applied to assess the methodological quality. Fifty-seven studies were found that reported findings for the countries of origin (mainly Turkey) and the immigrant host countries (mainly the Netherlands). The central themes were experiences and perceptions of family care, professional care, end-of-life care and communication. Family care is considered a duty, even when such care becomes a severe burden for the main female family caregiver in particular. Professional hospital care is preferred by many of the patients and relatives because they are looking for a cure and security. End-of-life care is strongly influenced by the continuing hope for recovery. Relatives are often quite influential in end-of-life decisions, such

  17. Perspectives on care and communication involving incurably ill Turkish and Moroccan patients, relatives and professionals: a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Graaff Fuusje M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our aim was to obtain a clearer picture of the relevant care experiences and care perceptions of incurably ill Turkish and Moroccan patients, their relatives and professional care providers, as well as of communication and decision-making patterns at the end of life. The ultimate objective is to improve palliative care for Turkish and Moroccan immigrants in the Netherlands, by taking account of socio-cultural factors in the guidelines for palliative care. Methods A systematic literature review was undertaken. The data sources were seventeen national and international literature databases, four Dutch journals dedicated to palliative care and 37 websites of relevant national and international organizations. All the references found were checked to see whether they met the structured inclusion criteria. Inclusion was limited to publications dealing with primary empirical research on the relationship between socio-cultural factors and the health or care situation of Turkish or Moroccan patients with an oncological or incurable disease. The selection was made by first reading the titles and abstracts and subsequently the full texts. The process of deciding which studies to include was carried out by two reviewers independently. A generic appraisal instrument was applied to assess the methodological quality. Results Fifty-seven studies were found that reported findings for the countries of origin (mainly Turkey and the immigrant host countries (mainly the Netherlands. The central themes were experiences and perceptions of family care, professional care, end-of-life care and communication. Family care is considered a duty, even when such care becomes a severe burden for the main female family caregiver in particular. Professional hospital care is preferred by many of the patients and relatives because they are looking for a cure and security. End-of-life care is strongly influenced by the continuing hope for recovery. Relatives are

  18. Perspectives on care and communication involving incurably ill Turkish and Moroccan patients, relatives and professionals: a systematic literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Our aim was to obtain a clearer picture of the relevant care experiences and care perceptions of incurably ill Turkish and Moroccan patients, their relatives and professional care providers, as well as of communication and decision-making patterns at the end of life. The ultimate objective is to improve palliative care for Turkish and Moroccan immigrants in the Netherlands, by taking account of socio-cultural factors in the guidelines for palliative care. Methods A systematic literature review was undertaken. The data sources were seventeen national and international literature databases, four Dutch journals dedicated to palliative care and 37 websites of relevant national and international organizations. All the references found were checked to see whether they met the structured inclusion criteria. Inclusion was limited to publications dealing with primary empirical research on the relationship between socio-cultural factors and the health or care situation of Turkish or Moroccan patients with an oncological or incurable disease. The selection was made by first reading the titles and abstracts and subsequently the full texts. The process of deciding which studies to include was carried out by two reviewers independently. A generic appraisal instrument was applied to assess the methodological quality. Results Fifty-seven studies were found that reported findings for the countries of origin (mainly Turkey) and the immigrant host countries (mainly the Netherlands). The central themes were experiences and perceptions of family care, professional care, end-of-life care and communication. Family care is considered a duty, even when such care becomes a severe burden for the main female family caregiver in particular. Professional hospital care is preferred by many of the patients and relatives because they are looking for a cure and security. End-of-life care is strongly influenced by the continuing hope for recovery. Relatives are often quite influential in

  19. [Health-related quality of life after mechanical ventilation in the intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schädler, D; Kaiser, L; Malchow, B; Becher, T; Elke, G; Frerichs, I; Küchler, T; Weiler, N

    2017-04-01

    It is unknown whether health related quality of life measured in German patients one year after mechanical ventilation in the intensive care unit is impaired or not. The aim of this study was to assess health related quality of life one year after inclusion into a randomized controlled trial for weaning from mechanical ventilation with the help of a questionnaire that has never been used in critically ill patients and to investigate whether health related quality of life scores differ between the study population and a general German population. We followed up with patients one year after inclusion into a randomized control trial investigating the effect of SmartCare/PS on total ventilation time compared to protocol-driven weaning (ASOPI trial, clinicaltrials.gov ID00445289). Health related quality of life was measured using the quality of life questionnaire C‑30 version 3.0 from the European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC). Mean differences of at least 10 score points in the quality of life scales were considered clinically significant. Of the 232 patients who were alive 90 days after study inclusion, 24 patients died one year after study inclusion and 64 patients were lost to follow-up. Of the remaining145 patients who were successfully contacted, 126 patients agreed to fill out the questionnaire. Questionnaires were sent back to the study site by 83 patients and these were analyzed. Health-related quality of life was significantly lower in five of the six functional scales (physical functioning, role functioning, cognitive functioning, social functioning, global health status) and in eight of the nine symptom scales (fatigue, pain, dyspnea, insomnia, appetite loss, constipation, diarrhea, financial difficulties) compared to the reference values of a German normal population. The EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire is suitable for the acquisition of the health-related quality of life in formerly critically ill patients. Health-related

  20. Relations between nursing data collection, diagnoses and prescriptions for adult patients at an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Emilia Campos; Martins, Fernanda Titareli Merizio; Dalri, Maria Célia Barcellos; Canini, Silvia Rita Marin da Silva; Laus, Ana Maria; Bachion, Maria Marcia; Rossi, Lidia Aparecida

    2008-01-01

    This descriptive, retrospective study aimed to analyze the relation between nursing data collection, diagnoses and prescriptions for 26 adult patients who were hospitalized at the intense care unit of a large teaching hospital for at least 24 hours. Through the analysis of medical records, 135 diagnoses and 421 nursing prescriptions were established, and 24 different diagnosis categories and 20 different items for prescriptions were identified. The most frequent diagnosis risk was that for infection, present in the medical records of 22 (84.60%) patients, with 175 prescriptions (42%) related to this diagnosis. The data the nurses collected were sufficient to establish the nursing diagnoses, and the majority of prescriptions (87.9%) were related to the diagnoses.

  1. [Fatigue-related risk: what are the consequences for professionals and health-care organizations?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventrucci, C; Zangheri, L; Fersini, F; Gnucci, V; Ingravallo, F

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have investigated the influence of fatigue on healthcare professionals' safety and clinical performances, showing associations between prolonged work shifts, sleep deprivation and both injuries and errors. Even in the absence of conclusive evidence, after the death of a girl under the care of two fatigued residents, New York State promulgated in 1989 rules to cap residents' duty hours, afterwards adopted by the Accrediting Council for Graduate Medical Education. Italian data on fatigue-related medical errors are still lacking, and no legal cases have raised public awareness of this topic. The authors explored medical-legal issues potentially arising from cases of fatigue-related errors, and proposed two interventions from a risk management perspective: 1. review of events reported through the incident reporting system in which at least one contributing factor was fatigue-related, and 2: root cause analysis of events and accidents reported during night shifts.

  2. Suboptimal inhaler medication adherence and incorrect technique are common among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, Krishna B; Percival, Matthew

    2016-02-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are routinely prescribed one or more inhaled medications. Adherence to inhaler medications and correct inhaler device technique are crucial to successful COPD management. The goals of this study were to estimate adherence and inhaler technique in a cohort of COPD patients. This was an observational study conducted on a sample of 150 COPD patients. Medication adherence was assessed using the Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS). Inhaler technique was assessed using standardized checklists. Clinical data were collected using a proforma. Of the 150 patients (mean age 70.3 years, 52% male), 58% reported suboptimal adherence (MARS ≤ 24). High adherence to therapy (MARS = 25) was associated with older age (p = 0.001), but not any of the other studied variables. Medication non-adherence was not associated with COPD exacerbations. Errors (≥ 1) in inhaler technique were common across all of the types of inhaler devices reportedly used by patients, with the highest proportion of errors among Turbuhaler users (83%) and the least proportion of errors among Handihaler users (50%). No clinical variables were associated with errors in inhaler technique. Suboptimal adherence and errors in inhaler technique are common among COPD patients. No clinical variables to assist in the prediction of medication non-adherence and poor inhaler technique were identifiable. Consequently, regular assessment of medication adherence and inhaler technique should be incorporated into routine clinical practice to facilitate improved health outcomes among patients with COPD. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Suboptimal Larval Habitats Modulate Oviposition of the Malaria Vector Mosquito Anopheles coluzzii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunho Suh

    Full Text Available Selection of oviposition sites by gravid females is a critical behavioral step in the reproductive cycle of Anopheles coluzzii, which is one of the principal Afrotropical malaria vector mosquitoes. Several studies suggest this decision is mediated by semiochemicals associated with potential oviposition sites. To better understand the chemosensory basis of this behavior and identify compounds that can modulate oviposition, we examined the generally held hypothesis that suboptimal larval habitats give rise to semiochemicals that negatively influence the oviposition preference of gravid females. Dual-choice bioassays indicated that oviposition sites conditioned in this manner do indeed foster significant and concentration dependent aversive effects on the oviposition site selection of gravid females. Headspace analyses derived from aversive habitats consistently noted the presence of dimethyl disulfide (DMDS, dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (sulcatone each of which unitarily affected An. coluzzii oviposition preference. Electrophysiological assays across the antennae, maxillary palp, and labellum of gravid An. coluzzii revealed differential responses to these semiochemicals. Taken together, these findings validate the hypothesis in question and suggest that suboptimal environments for An. coluzzii larval development results in the release of DMDS, DMTS and sulcatone that impact the response valence of gravid females.

  4. An Approach to Streaming Video Segmentation With Sub-Optimal Low-Rank Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenglong; Lin, Liang; Zuo, Wangmeng; Wang, Wenzhong; Tang, Jin

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates how to perform robust and efficient video segmentation while suppressing the effects of data noises and/or corruptions, and an effective approach is introduced to this end. First, a general algorithm, called sub-optimal low-rank decomposition (SOLD), is proposed to pursue the low-rank representation for video segmentation. Given the data matrix formed by supervoxel features of an observed video sequence, SOLD seeks a sub-optimal solution by making the matrix rank explicitly determined. In particular, the representation coefficient matrix with the fixed rank can be decomposed into two sub-matrices of low rank, and then we iteratively optimize them with closed-form solutions. Moreover, we incorporate a discriminative replication prior into SOLD based on the observation that small-size video patterns tend to recur frequently within the same object. Second, based on SOLD, we present an efficient inference algorithm to perform streaming video segmentation in both unsupervised and interactive scenarios. More specifically, the constrained normalized-cut algorithm is adopted by incorporating the low-rank representation with other low level cues and temporal consistent constraints for spatio-temporal segmentation. Extensive experiments on two public challenging data sets VSB100 and SegTrack suggest that our approach outperforms other video segmentation approaches in both accuracy and efficiency.

  5. Suboptimal and optimal order policies for fixed and varying replenishment interval with declining market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jonas C. P.; Wee, H. M.; Yang, P. C.; Wu, Simon

    2016-06-01

    One of the supply chain risks for hi-tech products is the result of rapid technological innovation; it results in a significant decline in the selling price and demand after the initial launch period. Hi-tech products include computers and communication consumer's products. From a practical standpoint, a more realistic replenishment policy is needed to consider the impact of risks; especially when some portions of shortages are lost. In this paper, suboptimal and optimal order policies with partial backordering are developed for a buyer when the component cost, the selling price, and the demand rate decline at a continuous rate. Two mathematical models are derived and discussed: one model has the suboptimal solution with the fixed replenishment interval and a simpler computational process; the other one has the optimal solution with the varying replenishment interval and a more complicated computational process. The second model results in more profit. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the two replenishment models. Sensitivity analysis is carried out to investigate the relationship between the parameters and the net profit.

  6. Rescue Procedures after Suboptimal Deep Brain Stimulation Outcomes in Common Movement Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M. Nagy

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation (DBS is a unique, functional neurosurgical therapy indicated for medication refractory movement disorders as well as some psychiatric diseases. Multicontact electrodes are placed in “deep” structures within the brain with targets varying depending on the surgical indication. An implanted programmable pulse generator supplies the electrodes with a chronic, high frequency electrical current that clinically mimics the effects of ablative lesioning techniques. DBS’s efficacy has been well established for its movement disorder indications (Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and dystonia. However, clinical outcomes are sometimes suboptimal, even in the absence of common, potentially reversible complications such as hardware complications, infection, poor electrode placement, and poor programming parameters. This review highlights some of the rescue procedures that have been explored in suboptimal DBS cases for Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and dystonia. To date, the data is limited and difficult to generalize, but a large majority of published reports demonstrate positive results. The decision to proceed with such treatments should be made on a case by case basis. Larger studies are needed to clearly establish the benefit of rescue procedures and to establish for which patient populations they may be most appropriate.

  7. Design Of Real-Time Implementable Distributed Suboptimal Control: An LQR Perspective

    KAUST Repository

    Jaleel, Hassan

    2017-09-29

    We propose a framework for multiagent systems in which the agents compute their control actions in real time, based on local information only. The novelty of the proposed framework is that the process of computing a suboptimal control action is divided into two phases: an offline phase and an online phase. In the offline phase, an approximate problem is formulated with a cost function that is close to the optimal cost in some sense and is distributed, i.e., the costs of non-neighboring nodes are not coupled. This phase is centralized and is completed before the deployment of the system. In the online phase, the approximate problem is solved in real time by implementing any efficient distributed optimization algorithm. To quantify the performance loss, we derive upper bounds for the maximum error between the optimal performance and the performance under the proposed framework. Finally, the proposed framework is applied to an example setup in which a team of mobile nodes is assigned the task of establishing a communication link between two base stations with minimum energy consumption. We show through simulations that the performance under the proposed framework is close to the optimal performance and the suboptimal policy can be efficiently implemented online.

  8. Is there a difference between center and home care providers' training, perceptions, and practices related to obesity prevention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juhee; Shim, Jae Eun; Wiley, Angela R; Kim, Keunsei; McBride, Brent A

    2012-11-01

    To compare the obesity related training, practices, and perceptions of home child care providers and center care providers. A self-administered survey was collected from child care providers who attended local child care training workshops in east central Illinois from March 2009 to August 2010. Study results were based on responses from 88 home care providers and 94 center providers. The survey questions addressed child care providers' training in the prior year, their obesity prevention practices including written policies, their perceptions of influences on children's health, and factors determining food menu selection. Paired t tests and Chi-square tests were used to compare the difference by child care type. 81.9% of home care providers and 58.6% of center care providers received nutrition training, while 66.7 and 43.0% of these providers received physical activity training, respectively. Nutrition content, guidelines or state regulations, and food availability were the most important factors that influenced both types of care providers' food service menus. Both care provider types perceived they have less influence on children's food preferences, eating habits, and weight status compared to the home environment. However, home care providers perceived a smaller discrepancy between the influences of child care and home environments compared to center care providers. Compared to center providers, home care providers were more likely to have had training, be involved with health promotion activities, and rate their influence higher on children's health behaviors. Findings underscore the need for obesity prevention efforts in both types of child care settings.

  9. Factors Relating to Access to Dental Care for Indigenous South Australians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kelly; Keeler, Ngara; Morris, Chris; Brennan, David; Roberts-Thompson, Kaye; Jamieson, Lisa

    2016-02-01

    To explore and document self-reported factors contributing to Indigenous Australians' attendance and non-attendance at South Australian public dental clinics. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with people (18 males and 26 females) referred for oral care through the Aboriginal Liaison Program of the South Australian Dental Service. Thematic analysis was performed on 44 transcribed conversations and a conceptual model developed. Persons completing all recommended treatment reported high self-efficacy, health literacy, social cohesion and previous use of dental services and presence of a health advocate. Those completing some recommended treatment reported achieving desired oral health outcome of relief of pain or system-level barriers to completion. Those reporting accessing no dental treatment in contrast reported varied and complex barriers to dental care. Differences in both individual and health service-related factors were evident. Individual-level factors related to health literacy, self-efficacy, and social control. Service factors related to availability of an advocate, service delivery, and culture. Practical service-level changes may alleviate the effects of individual-level factors.

  10. Patients' experience of outsourcing and care related to magnetic resonance examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakol Olofsson, Parvin; Aspelin, Peter; Bergstrand, Lott; Blomqvist, Lennart

    2014-11-01

    Outsourcing radiological examinations from public university hospitals affects the patient, who has to attend a different clinic or hospital for the radiological examination. We currently have a limited understanding of how patients view outsourcing and their care related to MR examinations. To examine the experiences of patients who are sent to private radiology units when their referrals for MR examinations are outsourced from a university hospital, as well as to explore factors which influence patient satisfaction regarding the quality of care related to the MR examination. A group of patients (n = 160) referred for MR examinations and either examined at a university hospital or at an external private unit were interviewed. The interview was designed as a verbal questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Student's t test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Pearson's correlation. Sixty-nine percent of the patients could neither choose nor influence the location at which they were examined. For those who could, aspects that influenced the patient's choice of radiology department were: short waiting time 79% (127/160), ease of traveling to the radiology department 68% (110/160), and short distance to their home or work 58% (93/160). For 40% (60/160) of the patients, a short time in the waiting room was related to a positive experience of the MR examination. If patients were informed about outsourcing and could also choose where to have their examination, key factors contributing to patient satisfaction could be met even when MR examinations are outsourced.

  11. Difficult conversations in health care: cultivating relational learning to address the hidden curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, David M; Meyer, Elaine C; Truog, Robert D; Solomon, Mildred Z

    2007-09-01

    The authors describe the philosophy and pedagogical approach of an innovative educational program, grounded in principles of relational learning and designed to improve the preparedness of health care professionals for engaging in challenging conversations with patients and families. The Program to Enhance Relational and Communication Skills (PERCS) is a project of The Institute for Professionalism and Ethical Practice at Children's Hospital Boston, developed in collaboration with Education Development Center, Inc. The one-day workshop is interdisciplinary in its structure, includes practitioners with varying levels of professional experience, uses trained actors to portray patients and family members, and involves learners in improvised case scenarios. The program responds to several developments in contemporary health care: medical education reform, changing definitions of professional competence, and calls for greater attention to qualities of compassion, trust, and respect in practitioners' relationships with patients and families. The program's pedagogy responds to these developments by creating a safe climate for relational learning, by enacting emotionally challenging and ethically salient case scenarios, and by integrating patient and family perspectives in novel and substantive ways. By creating a curriculum and learning environment that explicitly embraces the moral experience of learners, the program's developers aim to exert a countercultural influence on the dehumanizing effects of the hidden curriculum.

  12. Patients' Perspectives on Information and Communication About Sexual and Relational Issues in Rheumatology Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helland, Ylva; Dagfinrud, Hanne; Haugen, Mona-Iren; Kjeken, Ingvild; Zangi, Heidi

    2017-06-01

    Men and women with rheumatic diseases report a significantly negative impact on multiple areas of life, including sexuality. Research indicates that patients want to discuss sexual issues with health professionals (HPs) in rheumatology care but these issues are rarely addressed in consultations. The objective of the present study was to explore patients' experiences of communication with HPs about disease-related sexual issues, their perceptions of the relevance of these issues in rheumatology care and their preferences for how these topics should be handled. A qualitative design was used and 18 semi-structured interviews were performed, including eight women and ten men with inflammatory rheumatic joint diseases, aged 29-62 years. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed thematically. Four main themes were derived from the interviews: (i) relevance of sexual issues; (ii) vital conditions for communication; (iii) individual preferences in mode and timing of information and communication; and (iv) benefits of information and communication. The participants expressed that, although sexual issues are relevant, necessary conditions for good communication are largely lacking. HPs' knowledge, experience and personal skills, as well as having sufficient time were essential. HPs lack of initiating sexual topics contributed to uncertainty about whether their sexual challenges were disease related and whether it was a legitimate topic to discuss in rheumatology care. Patients wanted HPs to possess knowledge about possible disease-related challenges in sexual life and intimate relationships, and to facilitate communication about these aspects. There is a need to develop practice guidelines to enable HPs to integrate sexual issues as an aspect of healthcare delivery in a patient-friendly manner. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Advancing an Ethic of Embodied Relational Sexuality to Guide Decision-Making in Dementia Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorovich, Alisa; Kontos, Pia

    2016-12-07

    Sexuality and intimacy are universal needs that transcend age, cognitive decline, and disability; sexuality is a fundamental aspect of the human experience. However, supporting sexuality in long-term residential care presents ethical challenges as this setting is both a home environment for residents and a workplace for health practitioners. This is particularly complex in the case of residents with dementia given the need to balance protection from harm and freedom of self-determination. Despite such complexity, this challenge has received limited critical theoretical attention. The dominant approach advocated to guide ethical reasoning is the bioethical four principles approach. However, the application of this approach in the context of dementia and long-term care may set the bar for practitioners' interference excessively high, restricting assentual (i.e., voluntary) sexual expression. Furthermore, it privileges cognitive and impartial decision-making, while disregarding performative, embodied, and relational aspects of ethical reasoning. With an interest in addressing these limitations, we explicate an alternative ethic of embodied relational sexuality that is grounded in a model of citizenship that recognizes relationality and the agential status of embodied self-expression. This alternative ethic broadens ethical reasoning from the exclusive duty to protect individuals from harm associated with sexual expression, to the duty to also uphold and support their rights to experience the benefits of sexual expression (e.g., pleasure, intimacy). As such it has the potential to inform the development of policies, organizational guidelines, and professional curricula to support the sexuality of persons with dementia, and thereby ensure more humane practices in long-term residential care settings. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Classifying Chinese Questions Related to Health Care Posted by Consumers Via the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Haihong; Na, Xu; Hou, Li; Li, Jiao

    2017-06-20

    In question answering (QA) system development, question classification is crucial for identifying information needs and improving the accuracy of returned answers. Although the questions are domain-specific, they are asked by non-professionals, making the question classification task more challenging. This study aimed to classify health care-related questions posted by the general public (Chinese speakers) on the Internet. A topic-based classification schema for health-related questions was built by manually annotating randomly selected questions. The Kappa statistic was used to measure the interrater reliability of multiple annotation results. Using the above corpus, we developed a machine-learning method to automatically classify these questions into one of the following six classes: Condition Management, Healthy Lifestyle, Diagnosis, Health Provider Choice, Treatment, and Epidemiology. The consumer health question schema was developed with a four-hierarchical-level of specificity, comprising 48 quaternary categories and 35 annotation rules. The 2000 sample questions were coded with 2000 major codes and 607 minor codes. Using natural language processing techniques, we expressed the Chinese questions as a set of lexical, grammatical, and semantic features. Furthermore, the effective features were selected to improve the question classification performance. From the 6-category classification results, we achieved an average precision of 91.41%, recall of 89.62%, and F1 score of 90.24%. In this study, we developed an automatic method to classify questions related to Chinese health care posted by the general public. It enables Artificial Intelligence (AI) agents to understand Internet users' information needs on health care.

  15. A Study on the Relationship between Children and Care-givers from the Viewpoint of Relational Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    小林, 浩之; 上野, ひろ美

    2008-01-01

    In this essay, we examined how the relations between children and their care-givers had affected the children' s development from the viewpoint of relational analysis. First of all, we discussed Takashi Kujiraoka' s theory on children' s development, which he has been eagerly developing in the light of their reciprocal relations with their care-givers. This essay is indebted to Kujiraoka' s standpoint of practical researches in early childhood education. We also discussed the potential which ...

  16. HIV-Related Stigma and Overlapping Stigmas Towards People Living With HIV Among Health Care Trainees in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Anne C; Girard, Todd; McShane, Kelly E; Margolese, Shari; Hart, Trevor A

    2017-08-01

    HIV continues to be a stigmatized disease, despite significant advances in care and concerted effort to reduce discrimination, stereotypes, and prejudice. Living with HIV is often associated with a multitude of overlapping and intersecting experiences which can, in and of themselves, also be stigmatized, and which may exacerbate HIV-related stigma. The consequences of these stigmatizing experiences are particularly impactful when the stigmatizing individual is a health care provider, as this can influence access to and quality of care. The current study empirically investigates a model of overlapping stigmas (homophobia, racism, sexism, stigma against injection drug use and stigma against sex work) potentially held by health care provider trainees in Canada to determine how these constructs overlap and intersect, and to assess whether HIV-related stigma may have unique attributes. Understanding overlapping stigmas can help inform targeted, stigma-informed training for health care trainees in order to provide effective, compassionate care for people living with HIV.

  17. Self care ability of women with diabetes who suffered from peripheral neuropathy and its related needs based on Orem’s self-care model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    khosravan SH

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Diabetes is associated with many complications that one of these complications is neuropathy. This disease is more common in women. In cases of self-care deficit and not meeting its related needs, the disease can lead to complications and even death. This study was done to determine the self care ability of diabetes women with peripheral neuropathy and its related need based on Orem self care model. Materials and Method: This cross - sectional study was conducted on women with diabetic peripheral neuropathy who referred to diabetes clinic in one of the hospitals in Gonabad in 2014. 120 patients were selected by convenience sampling. Patients’ neuropathy was determined by Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument and Toronto Clinical Neuropathy Score. Then, data were gathered through using self care needs assessment questionnaire and self care ability questionnaire based on Orem self care model. Data analysis was done through using descriptive statistical test and chi-square test with in SPSS 17. Results: The self care ability of 71.7 percent of patients was weak (33.72 ± 8.48 and according to needs assessment and in domains of knowledge, attitude and performance, 10.8, 0.8 and 52.5 percent of subjects were weak respectively. Conclusion: According to the findings, the self care ability of diabetic women with peripheral neuropathy was weak. The domain of performance was weaker than attitude and knowledge domains concerning the self care ability. Therefore, it is recommended to design and implement of necessary measures for improving the patients’ self care ability based on their needs.

  18. Non-symptom-related factors contributing to delay in seeking medical care by patients with heart failure: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravely, Shannon; Tamim, Hala; Smith, Judy; Daly, Tamara; Grace, Sherry L

    2011-09-01

    Delay in seeking timely medical care by patients with acute coronary syndrome and stroke has been well established in the literature, but less is known about delay in care-seeking behavior by patients with heart failure (HF). The purpose of this narrative review was to synthesize the literature regarding non-symptom-related factors that contribute to delay in seeking medical care for HF symptoms. A literature search of Scopus, Medline, and Pubmed was conducted for published articles from database inception to July 2009. Available evidence has shown that non-symptom-related factors, such as HF severity, HF history, age, and ethnocultural background, were related to delay in certain studies; however, null results have also been reported. Other non-symptom-related factors, such as male gender, initial contact with a primary care physician, arriving in the emergency department by means other than ambulance, and patient responses such as self-care, low anxiety, and hopelessness, may play a role in longer delay. Although this review identified several non-symptom-related factors that may be implicated in care-seeking delay, health care professionals should be vigilant in identifying all high-risk individuals and educating them about warning signs of HF. Moreover, access to outpatient chronic disease management programs that may have potential to reduce care-seeking delay behavior should be explored. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Barrieres and facilitating factors related to use of early warning scores among acute care nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, John Asger; Rasmussen, Lars S; Rydahl Hansen, Susan

    2017-01-01

    to patients with an elevated EWS, and 3) call for the medical emergency team. METHODS: Focus groups were conducted with nurses from medical and surgical acute care wards, and content analysis was used to identify barriers and facilitating factors in relation to the research questions. RESULTS: Adherence...... was problematic, since many nurses found the team to have negative attitudes. CONCLUSION: EWS reduces complex clinical conditions to a single number, with the inherent risk to overlook clinical cues and subtle changes in patients' condition. The study showed that identifying and treating deteriorating patients...

  20. Family relationships and advance care planning: do supportive and critical relations encourage or hinder planning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerner, Kathrin; Carr, Deborah; Moorman, Sara

    2013-03-01

    The effectiveness of advance care planning (ACP) may depend on family members' understanding of patient preferences. However, we know of no studies that explore the association between family relationship dynamics and ACP. ACP includes a living will, durable power of attorney for health care (DPAHC) appointment, and discussions. We evaluated the effects of three aspects of family relations--general family functioning, support and criticism from spouse, and support and criticism from children--on both overall ACP and specific DPAHC designations. Using multinomial logistic regression models and data from a sample of 293 older adults, we estimated the effects of family relationship quality on the likelihood of completing ACP and appointing a spouse or adult child as DPAHC. Analyses controlled for demographic and health characteristics. Better overall family functioning increased the odds of ACP. Higher levels of spousal support increased the odds of holding informal discussions, whereas spousal criticism reduced the odds of naming one's spouse as DPAHC. Both criticism and emotional support from children increased the odds that a child was named as DPAHC. Family dynamics affect ACP in complex ways and should be considered when patients and their families discuss end-of-life care and make DPAHC designations.

  1. Health-related quality of life and the perceived palliative care needs among oral cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C V Deepan Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Survival rate is the only outcome measure for cancer management which fails to recognize the impact of on health-related quality of life (HRQoL. Optimizing QoL before a timely, dignified, and peaceful death is the primary aim of good palliative care. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess the HRQoL of oral cancer patients and explore whether there is a need for professional palliative services to focus on social, psychological, and spiritual well-being. Materials and Methods: A mixed methodological approach was adopted. A validated closed-ended questionnaire was used to assess the HRQoL, and in-depth interviews were conducted to assess the palliative care needs. The study encompassed of 876 participants, among which 317 consented for administration of questionnaire and 12 participants consented for interview. Karl Pearson's coefficient test was used to find the association between the well-being score and demographic factors. Results: The general well-being of these patients was compromised. Elderly participants experienced bad (31% general well-being. Semi-skilled (7% and unskilled workers (5% experienced bad general well-being while unemployed (13% and retired (13% experienced good general well-being in majority. Conclusions: HRQoLs are low in oral cancer patients, and early referral for palliative care might increase the QoL.

  2. Knowledge on health and back care education related to physical activity and exercise in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miñana-Signes, V; Monfort-Pañego, M

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between the specific level of knowledge on health and back care-related physical activity practice and exercise with low back pain (LBP) in adolescents. This is a cross-sectional study. The sample consisted of a total of 576 adolescents aged 13-18 years (mean age 15.5, SD 1.4). Self-reported questionnaires were used to record specific knowledge on health and back care and LBP in healthy adolescents. The prevalence of LBP was 46.3% [95% confidence interval (CI) 44.9-47.8]. Students with LBP scored slightly higher than non-sufferers, getting non-significant values. The level of specific knowledge increased with age (F = 7.308; p = 0.002). Stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that older girls group (>16 years old) was significantly associated with LBP odds ratio (OR) 2.9 (95% CI 1.77-4.74; p = 0.000). High school students have a low level of specific knowledge. Back care education in the school curriculum is recommended.

  3. To achieve safe and respectful maternity care in tertiary level hospitals in Nepal, relatives are a valued addition to the provision of maternity care

    OpenAIRE

    Sapkota, Sabitri; T Sayami, Jamuna; Manadhar, Maiya; Erlandsson, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The White Ribbon Alliance for safe motherhood believes respectful maternity care is the universal right of every childbearing woman. Methods: NHRC in 2012 approved an inquiry of respectful care at facility-based childbirth. Individual-, focus group interviews and content analysis was used for gathering and analysis of data. Findings: The participating women and the SBAs shared similar views, and this was that together the SBAs and relatives ensured the women remained within the ...

  4. Malnutrition is related to functional impairment in older adults receiving home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesswetter, E; Pohlhausen, S; Uhlig, K; Diekmann, R; Lesser, S; Heseker, H; Stehle, P; Sieber, C C; Volkert, D

    2013-04-01

    The aims of this work were (a) to provide a detailed description of the association between nutritional (Mini Nutritional Assessment; MNA®) and functional status in a sample of older adults receiving home care, using both questionnaire- and performance-based functional methods, and (b) to investigate the impact of different MNA subscales on this association. Multi-centre, cross-sectional. Home care. 296 persons ≥65 years in need of care (80.7±7.7 y). Nutritional status was determined by the MNA and functional status by two questionnaires (Instrumental and Basic Activities of Daily Living; IADL, ADL) and three performance tests (handgrip strength, HGS; Short Physical Performance Battery, SPPB; Timed 'Up and Go' Test, TUG). A categorical and a covariance analytical approach were used to test for differences in functional status between MNA groups (well nourished, risk of malnutrition, malnourished). In addition, functional parameters were correlated with total MNA, a modified MNA version (modMNA), where functional items were excluded, and MNA subscales ('functionality', 'general assessment', 'anthropometry', 'dietary assessment', and 'subjective assessment'). 57% of the participants were at risk of malnutrition and 12% malnourished. 35% reported severe limitations in IADL, 18% in ADL. 40%, 39% and 35% had severe limitations in HGS, SPPB and TUG; 9%, 28% and 34% were not able to perform the tests. Functional status deteriorated significantly from the well nourished to the malnourished group in all functional measures. The modMNA was weak but still significantly related to all functional parameters except TUG. The subscale 'functionality' revealed strongest correlations with functional measures. All other MNA subscales showed only weak or no associations. More than one half of the seniors receiving home care were at nutritional risk and poor functional level, respectively. Malnutrition according to MNA was significantly associated to both questionnaire- and

  5. Cardiovascular Health and Related Health Care Use of Moluccan-Dutch Immigrants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim R de Back

    Full Text Available Studies regularly show a higher incidence, prevalence and mortality of cardiovascular disease among immigrant groups from low-income countries. Despite residing in the Netherlands for over 60 years, the Moluccan-Dutch cardiovascular disease profile and health care use are still unknown. We aimed to compare (a the clinical prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and (b the use of health care services by cardiovascular disease patients of 5,532 Moluccan-Dutch to an age-sex matched control group of 55,320 native Dutch.We performed a cross-sectional analysis of data of the Achmea health insurance company for the period of 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2010. We collected information on health care use, including diagnostic information. Linear and logistic regression models were used for comparison.Moluccans had a higher clinical prevalence of ischemic heart diseases (odds ratio 1.26; 95% confidence interval 1.03-1.56, but tended to have a lower prevalence of cerebrovascular accidents (0.79; 0.56-1.11 and cardiac failure (0.67; 0.44-1.03. The clinical prevalence of cardiovascular diseases together tended to be lower among Moluccans (0.90; 0.80-1.00. Consultation of medical specialists did not differ. Angiotensin II inhibitors (1.42; 1.09-1.84, antiplatelet agents (1.27; 1.01-1.59 and statins (1.27; 1.00-1.60 were prescribed more frequently to Moluccans, as were cardiovascular agents in general (1.27; 0.94-1.71.The experience of Moluccans in the Netherlands suggests that, in the long run, cardiovascular risk and related health care use of ethnic minority groups may converge towards that of the majority population.

  6. Parent Health Literacy and “Obesogenic” Feeding and Physical Activity-related Infant Care Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, H. Shonna; Sanders, Lee M.; Rothman, Russell L.; Shustak, Rachel; Eden, Svetlana K.; Shintani, Ayumi; Cerra, Maria E.; Cruzatte, Evelyn F.; Perrin, Eliana M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between parent health literacy and “obesogenic” infant care behaviors. Study design Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from a cluster randomized controlled trial of a primary care-based, early childhood obesity prevention program (Greenlight). English and Spanish-speaking parents of 2 month old children enrolled (n=844). The primary predictor variable was a parent health literacy (Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (STOFHLA); adequate>=23; lowobesogenic behaviors: (1) feeding content (more formula than breastmilk, sweet drinks, early solid food introduction) and feeding style-related behaviors (pressuring to finish, laissez-faire bottle propping/television [TV] watching while feeding, non-responsiveness in letting child decide amount to eat); and (2) physical activity (tummy time, TV). Multivariate logistic regression analyses (binary, proportional odds models) performed adjusting for child sex, out of home care, WIC status, parent age, race/ethnicity, language, number of adults/children in home, income, and site. Results 11.0% of parents were categorized as having low health literacy. Low health literacy significantly increased the odds of a parent reporting that they feed more formula than breast milk (AOR=2.0 [95%CI:1.2–3.5]), immediately feed when their child cries (AOR=1.8[1.1–2.8]), bottle prop (AOR=1.8 [1.002–3.1]), any infant TV watching (AOR=1.8 [1.1–3.0]), and inadequate tummy time (obesogenic infant care behaviors. These behaviors may be modifiable targets for low health literacy-focused interventions to help reduce childhood obesity. PMID:24370343

  7. Infection-related health care utilization among people with and without multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnands, José Ma; Kingwell, Elaine; Zhu, Feng; Zhao, Yinshan; Fisk, John D; Evans, Charity; Marrie, Ruth Ann; Tremlett, Helen

    2017-10-01

    Little is known about infection risk in multiple sclerosis (MS). We examined infection-related health care utilization in people with and without MS. Using population-based health administrative data from British Columbia, Canada, people with MS were followed from their first demyelinating claim (1996-2013) until death, emigration, or study end (2013). Infection-related hospital, physician, and prescription data of MS cases were compared with sex-, age-, and geographically matched controls using adjusted regression models. Sex and age differences (18-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60+ years) were explored. Relative to 35,837 controls, 7179 MS cases were over twice as likely to be hospitalized for infection (adjusted odds ratio: 2.39; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.16-2.65), had 41% more physician visits (adjusted rate ratio (aRR): 1.41; 95% CI: 1.36-1.47), and filled 57% more infection-related prescriptions (aRR: 1.57; 95% CI: 1.49-1.65). Utilization was disproportionately higher in MS men than women and was elevated across all ages. MS cases had nearly twice as many physician visits and two to three times more hospitalizations for pneumonia, urinary system infections, and skin infections (aRRs ranged from 1.6 to 3.3) and over twice as many hospitalizations for intestinal infections (aRR = 2.6) and sepsis (aRR = 2.2). Infection-related health care utilization was increased in people with MS across all age groups, with a higher burden for men.

  8. Health-related quality of life of patients of Brazilian primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascef, Bruna de Oliveira; Haddad, João Paulo Amaral; Álvares, Juliana; Guerra, Augusto Afonso; Costa, Ediná Alves; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis; Guibu, Ione Aquemi; Costa, Karen Sarmento; Karnikowski, Margô Gomes de Oliveira; Soeiro, Orlando Mario; Leite, Silvana Nair; Silveira, Micheline Rosa

    2017-11-13

    To analyze the Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) of patients of the primary health care of the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) and its associated factors. This is a cross-sectional study with data from the Pesquisa Nacional sobre Acesso, Utilização e Promoção do Uso Racional de Medicamentos - Serviços, 2015 (PNAUM - National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines - Services, 2015). Data were collected with a questionnaire that included the EuroQol 5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) instrument. Patients from the five regions of Brazil were interviewed. Multiple linear regression was used to analyze their Health-Related Quality of Life and its associated factors. Of the total of 8,590 patients, the most frequent dimensions were pain/discomfort (50.7%) and anxiety/depression (38.8%). About 10% of the patients reported extreme problems in these dimensions. The following factors were significantly associated with a worse quality of life: being female; having arthritis, osteoarthritis, or rheumatism; cerebrovascular accident; heart disease; depression; health self-assessment as poor or very poor; drinking alcoholic beverages once or more per month; dieting to lose weight, avoiding salt consumption, and reducing fat intake. Significant association was observed between a better quality of life and: living in the North and Southeast regions of Brazil; practicing physical activities; and having a higher educational level. No association was observed with factors related to the health services. The Health-Related Quality of Life of patients was influenced by demographic and socioeconomic factors that were related to health conditions and lifestyle, being useful to guide specific actions for promoting health and the integral care to patients of the Brazilian Unified Health System.

  9. Health-related quality of life of patients of Brazilian primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna de Oliveira Ascef

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze the Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL of patients of the primary health care of the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS and its associated factors. METHODS This is a cross-sectional study with data from the Pesquisa Nacional sobre Acesso, Utilização e Promoção do Uso Racional de Medicamentos – Serviços, 2015 (PNAUM – National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines – Services, 2015. Data were collected with a questionnaire that included the EuroQol 5 Dimensions (EQ-5D instrument. Patients from the five regions of Brazil were interviewed. Multiple linear regression was used to analyze their Health-Related Quality of Life and its associated factors. RESULTS Of the total of 8,590 patients, the most frequent dimensions were pain/discomfort (50.7% and anxiety/depression (38.8%. About 10% of the patients reported extreme problems in these dimensions. The following factors were significantly associated with a worse quality of life: being female; having arthritis, osteoarthritis, or rheumatism; cerebrovascular accident; heart disease; depression; health self-assessment as poor or very poor; drinking alcoholic beverages once or more per month; dieting to lose weight, avoiding salt consumption, and reducing fat intake. Significant association was observed between a better quality of life and: living in the North and Southeast regions of Brazil; practicing physical activities; and having a higher educational level. No association was observed with factors related to the health services. CONCLUSIONS The Health-Related Quality of Life of patients was influenced by demographic and socioeconomic factors that were related to health conditions and lifestyle, being useful to guide specific actions for promoting health and the integral care to patients of the Brazilian Unified Health System.

  10. Counterbalancing work-related stress? Work engagement among intensive care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mol, Margo M C; Nijkamp, Marjan D; Bakker, Jan; Schaufeli, Wilmar B; Kompanje, Erwin J O

    2017-05-20

    Working in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is increasingly complex and is also physically, cognitively and emotionally demanding. Although the negative emotions of work-related stress have been well studied, the opposite perspective of work engagement might also provide valuable insight into how these emotional demands may be countered. This study focused on the work engagement of ICU professionals and explored the complex relationship between work engagement, job demands and advantageous personal resources. This was a cross-sectional survey study among ICU professionals in a single-centre university hospital. Work engagement was measured by the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, which included items about opinions related to the respondent's work environment. Additionally, 14 items based on the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy were included to measure empathic ability. A digital link to the questionnaire was sent in October 2015 to a population of 262 ICU nurses and 53 intensivists. The overall response rate was 61% (n=193). Work engagement was negatively related both to cognitive demands among intensivists and to emotional demands among ICU nurses. No significant relationship was found between work engagement and empathic ability; however, agreeableness, conscientiousness, and emotional stability were highly correlated with work engagement. Only the number of hours worked per week remained as a confounding factor, with a negative effect of workload on work engagement after controlling for the effect of weekly working hours. Work engagement counterbalances work-related stress reactions. The relatively high workload in ICUs, coupled with an especially heavy emotional burden, may be acknowledged as an integral part of ICU work. This workload does not affect the level of work engagement, which was high for both intensivists and nurses despite the known high job demands. Specific factors that contribute to a healthy and successful work life among ICU professionals need

  11. Associations between job demands, work-related strain and perceived quality of care: a longitudinal study among hospital physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, Tanya; Schneider, Anna; Spieß, Erika; Angerer, Peter; Weigl, Matthias

    2016-12-01

    Drawing on a sample of hospital physicians, we attempted to determine prospective associations between three job demands, work-related strain and perceived quality of care. Longitudinal follow-up study with with a 1-year time lag. Physicians of two acute-care hospitals in Germany (one general urban and one children's hospital). Ninety-five physicians filled out a standardized questionnaire. Physicians' evaluations of quality of care at both waves. Our results support the hypothesis that job demands directly influence quality of care irrespective of strain. Specifically, high social stressors (β = -0.15, P = 0.036) and time pressure (β = -0.19, P = 0.031) were associated with decreased quality of care over time. We additionally observed reversed effects from quality of care at baseline to time pressure at follow-up (β = -0.35, P = 0.006). Contrary to expectations, physicians' work-related strain did not mediate the job demands-quality of care-relationship, nor were strain-to-stressor effects observed. Our results corroborate that hospital work environments with high demands have a direct impact on physician-perceived quality of care. In turn, poor care practices contribute to increased job demands. Our findings also emphasize that further understanding is required of how physicians' workplace conditions affect job demands, well-being, and quality of care, respectively.

  12. Factors Affecting Anxiety and Depression Symptoms in Relatives of Intensive Care Unit Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köse, Işıl; Zincircioğlu, Çiler; Öztürk, Yasemin Kılıç; Çakmak, Meltem; Güldoğan, Evin Aydın; Demir, Hafize Fisun; Şenoglu, Nimet; Erbay, Rıza Hakan; Gonullu, Mustafa

    2016-10-01

    To determine the incidences of anxiety and depression in relatives of patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) and to investigate the relationships between psychological symptoms and demographic features of the patients and their relatives. Relatives of 78 ICU patients were enrolled in the study. Sociodemographic features of patients and their relatives were recorded. The Turkish version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was used to assess anxiety and depression. Twenty-eight (35.9%) cases with anxiety and 56 (71.8%) cases with depression were identified. The mean anxiety and depression scores were 9.49 ± 4.183 and 9.40 ± 4.286, respectively. Anxiety (P = .028) and concomitant anxiety with depression (P = .035) were more frequent among family members of young patients. The relationship to the patient, especially being a spouse, was significantly associated with symptoms (anxiety, P = .009; depression, P = .019; and both, P = .005). Spouses and family members of relatively young patients had higher rates of anxiety and depression. In contrast to the literature, depression was more common than anxiety among the relatives of ICU patients. Further research is needed on the impact of cultural and regional differences on anxiety and depression rates in family members of ICU patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. [Factors related to the psychological stress response of nurses working in emergency and critical care centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uda, Kazu; Morioka, Ikuharu

    2011-01-01

    This questionnaire survey was performed in order to reveal the characteristics of work-related stressors on nurses working in emergency and critical care centers (emergency nurses) and factors related to their stress responses. There were 347 subjects who replied to the survey: 199 emergency nurses and 148 nurses working in internal medicine departments (control group) in 11 hospitals in the Kinki and Tokai areas of Japan. The work-related stressor scores among the emergency nurses were significantly higher than those in the control group for 6 out of 8 factors: work difficulties, patient life-support duties, relationships with patients and their families, dealing with patient death, relationships with doctors and technical innovation. The work-related stressor score was significantly lower among the emergency nurses for one factor: lack of communication. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between the stress response and the other factors such as work-related stressors, individual and situational factors, non-work factors and social support. Risk factors related to the stress response of the emergency nurses were: perceived stress due to work difficulties, negative lifestyles and desiring a career change. Important aspects of mental health support for emergency nurses are: strengthening technical support, such as holding study sessions to reduce work difficulties, as well as adjusting the working environment to improve individual lifestyles.

  14. A Comparison of the Relative Impact of Structural and Dynamic Child Care Quality on Child Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Cutler, Jared

    2001-01-01

    Child care researchers divide child care quality into two separate categories: structural child care quality (adult-child ratios, class size, amount of physical space, etc.) and dynamic child care quality (number and quality of teacher-child relationships). A consensus has emerged in the child care literature that structural child care quality has no direct effect on children's developmental outcomes (e.g., language development, social development, school readiness) . Rather, structural child...

  15. [A PhD completed. Oral health care and oral health-related quality of life of frail and care-dependent older people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesten, D

    2017-11-01

    When older people become frail, they often give up making dental visits, while their oral health care and oral health deteriorate. Open interviews and questionnaires were used to explore why frail older people change their oral health care behaviour and which (frailty-related) factors contribute to this change. These are mainly motivation-related factors. There seems to be a turning point where frail older people discontinue their oral health care routines and stop caring whether or not they loose teeth, because the perceived efforts no longer outweigh the perceived benefits of making dental visits and upkeep of oral hygiene. The use of standard questionnaires such as the validated Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index-NL to measure oral health-related quality of life is limited, because they do not provide personal context required to interpret the outcomes. From a pre-frail stage (oral) care providers should monitor specific factors that might negatively affect oral health and oral health care behaviour, like chronic pain or diminished mobility, dexterity, cognition, will to live, energy and social support.

  16. Multidisciplinary program for stress-related disease in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Ekvall Hansson

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Eva Ekvall Hansson1, Eva Håkansson2, Annelie Raushed2, Anders Håkansson1 1Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö/General Practice, Malmö, Sweden; 2Primary Health Care Malmö, SwedenObjective: To describe a multidisciplinary program, given by an occupational therapist and a physiotherapist, for patients with stress-related disease in primary health care and to measure the effect of this program in terms of self-perceived health, degree of burnout, physical activity, symptoms, recreational activities, and psychological and physical well-being.Method: Retrospective study.Results: At measures after three months, the thirteen patients included in this study had improved in self-estimated health, measured with EuroQol-5D Visual Analogue Scale (p = 0.000, and in degree of burnout, measured with the Shirom–Melamed Burnout Questionnaire (p = 0.001. There was also a decrease in presence of headache, in physical activity and in satisfaction with leisure time, although not statistically significant. After six months, the improvements remained for all measures except physical activity. The patients were also satisfied with the program to a high degree, measured with Client Satisfaction Questionnaire (median 3.7.Conclusion: This descriptive study shows that a stress-management program, provided by a team including an occupational therapist and a physiotherapist in primary health care, is both feasible and effective in terms of self-estimated health, degree of burnout, and patient satisfaction. Keywords: stress-related health, burnout, occupational therapy, physiotherapy

  17. Factors Related to Rejection of Care and Behaviors Directed towards Others: A Longitudinal Study in Nursing Home Residents with Dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galindo Garre, F.; Volicer, L.; van der Steen, J.T.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to analyze factors related to rejection of care and behaviors directed towards others in nursing home residents with dementia. Methods: The relationship of lack of understanding, depression, psychosis and pain with rejection of care and behaviors directed towards

  18. Factors Related to Rejection of Care and Behaviors Directed towards Others: A Longitudinal Study in Nursing Home Residents with Dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galindo-Garre, F.; Volicer, L.; Steen, J.T. van der

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to analyze factors related to rejection of care and behaviors directed towards others in nursing home residents with dementia. METHODS: The relationship of lack of understanding, depression, psychosis and pain with rejection of care and behaviors directed towards

  19. Effects of a Psychological Intervention in a Primary Health Care Center for Caregivers of Dependent Relatives: A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Sanchez, Emiliano; Patino-Alonso, Maria C.; Mora-Simon, Sara; Gomez-Marcos, Manuel A.; Perez-Penaranda, Anibal; Losada-Baltar, Andres; Garcia-Ortiz, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess, in the context of Primary Health Care (PHC), the effect of a psychological intervention in mental health among caregivers (CGs) of dependent relatives. Design and Methods: Randomized multicenter, controlled clinical trial. The 125 CGs included in the trial were receiving health care in PHC. Inclusion criteria: Identifying…

  20. The diverse impact of advance care planning: a long-term follow-up study on patients' and relatives' experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Pernille; Neergaard, Mette Asbjørn; Brogaard, Trine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Advance care planning (ACP) is a process of discussing and recording patients' preferences for future care, aiming to guide healthcare decisions at the end of life (EOL). AIM: To explore nuances in the long-term impact of ACP by studying patient and relative experiences. DESIGN: A qua...

  1. Exploration of patient evaluations of health care quality in 12 different European countries in relation to health system performance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerssens, J.J.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Sixma, H.J.; Boerma, W.G.W.; Eijk, I. van der

    2003-01-01

    Background: Large differences between countries exist in the use, costs, quality, accessibility etc. of health services. Also large differences exist between countries in patient evaluations of their health care system. But how do patient evaluations relate to health care performance? Aim: This

  2. End of life care and decision making: Opinions and experiences of the general public, bereaved relatives, and professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.J.H. Raijmakers (Natasja)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractEnd-of-life care aims to improve quality of life of patients and their relatives facing problems associated with life-threatening illness in the last days of life. End-of-life decision-making is an important aspect of end-of-life care that can have a significant impact on the process of

  3. Dementia-Related Work Activities of Home Care Nurses and Aides: Frequency, Perceived Competence, and Continuing Education Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Debra G.; Kosteniuk, Julie G.; O'Connell, Megan E.; Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina; Stewart, Norma J.; Karunanayake, Chandima

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of the specific dementia learning needs of home care staff is needed to plan relevant continuing education (CE) programs and supports. The study's objective was to examine frequency and perceived competence in performing 20 dementia-related work activities, and identify CE priorities among home care staff. A cross-sectional survey…

  4. 45 CFR 61.9 - Reporting civil judgments related to the delivery of a health care item or service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reporting civil judgments related to the delivery of a health care item or service. 61.9 Section 61.9 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION HEALTHCARE INTEGRITY AND PROTECTION DATA BANK FOR FINAL ADVERSE INFORMATION ON HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS, SUPPLIERS AND...

  5. Decision Trajectories in Dementia Care Networks: Decisions and Related Key Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen-van de Ven, Leontine; Smits, Carolien; Oldewarris, Karen; Span, Marijke; Jukema, Jan; Eefsting, Jan; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra

    2017-10-01

    This prospective multiperspective study provides insight into the decision trajectories of people with dementia by studying the decisions made and related key events. This study includes three waves of interviews, conducted between July 2010 and July 2012, with 113 purposefully selected respondents (people with beginning to advanced stages of dementia and their informal and professional caregivers) completed in 12 months (285 interviews). Our multilayered qualitative analysis consists of content analysis, timeline methods, and constant comparison. Four decision themes emerged-managing daily life, arranging support, community living, and preparing for the future. Eight key events delineate the decision trajectories of people with dementia. Decisions and key events differ between people with dementia living alone and living with a caregiver. Our study clarifies that decisions relate not only to the disease but to living with the dementia. Individual differences in decision content and sequence may effect shared decision-making and advance care planning.

  6. Provision of protein and energy in relation to measured requirements in intensive care patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allingstrup, Matilde Jo; Esmailzadeh, Negar; Knudsen, Anne Wilkens

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Adequacy of nutritional support in intensive care patients is still a matter of investigation. This study aimed to relate mortality to provision, measured requirements and balances for energy and protein in ICU patients. DESIGN: Prospective observational cohort study of 113 ICU...... patients in a tertiary referral hospital. RESULTS: Death occurred earlier in the tertile of patients with the lowest provision of protein and amino acids. The results were confirmed in Cox regression analyses which showed a significantly decreased hazard ratio of death with increased protein provision......, also when adjusted for baseline prognostic variables (APACHE II, SOFA scores and age). Provision of energy, measured resting energy expenditure or energy and nitrogen balance was not related to mortality. The possible cause-effect relationship is discussed after a more detailed analysis of the initial...

  7. [The Computer Competency of Nurses in Long-Term Care Facilities and Related Factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ya-Ping; Kuo, Huai-Ting; Li, I-Chuan

    2016-12-01

    It is important for nurses who work in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) to have an adequate level of computer competency due to the multidisciplinary and comprehensive nature of long-term care services. Thus, it is important to understand the current computer competency of nursing staff in LTCFs and the factors that relate to this competency. To explore the computer competency of LTCF nurses and to identify the demographic and computer-usage characteristics that relate significantly to computer competency in the LTCF environment. A cross-sectional research design and a self-report questionnaire were used to collect data from 185 nurses working at LTCFs in Taipei. The results found that the variables of the frequency of computer use (β = .33), age (β = -.30), type(s) of the software used at work (β = .28), hours of on-the-job training (β = -.14), prior work experience at other LTCFs (β = -.14), and Internet use at home (β = .12) explain 58.0% of the variance in the computer competency of participants. The results of the present study suggest that the following measures may help increase the computer competency of LTCF nurses. (1) Nurses should be encouraged to use electronic nursing records rather than handwritten records. (2) On-the-job training programs should emphasize participant competency in the Excel software package in order to maintain efficient and good-quality of LTC services after implementing of the LTC insurance policy.

  8. Antibiotic-Related Adverse Drug Reactions at a Tertiary Care Hospital in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Young Jung

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs are any unwanted/uncomfortable effects from medication resulting in physical, mental, and functional injuries. Antibiotics account for up to 40.9% of ADRs and are associated with several serious outcomes. However, few reports on ADRs have evaluated only antimicrobial agents. In this study, we investigated antibiotic-related ADRs at a tertiary care hospital in South Korea. Methods. This is a retrospective cohort study that evaluated ADRs to antibiotics that were reported at a 2400-bed tertiary care hospital in 2015. ADRs reported by physicians, pharmacists, and nurses were reviewed. Clinical information reported ADRs, type of antibiotic, causality assessment, and complications were evaluated. Results. 1,277 (62.8% patients were considered antibiotic-related ADRs based on the World Health Organization-Uppsala Monitoring Center criteria (certain, 2.2%; probable, 35.7%; and possible, 62.1%. Totally, 44 (3.4% patients experienced serious ADRs. Penicillin and quinolones were the most common drugs reported to induce ADRs (both 16.0%, followed by third-generation cephalosporins (14.9%. The most frequently experienced side effects were skin manifestations (45.1% followed by gastrointestinal disorders (32.6%. Conclusion. Penicillin and quinolones are the most common causative antibiotics for ADRs and skin manifestations were the most frequently experienced symptom.

  9. Cervical collar-related pressure ulcers in trauma patients in intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, H W Wietske; Schoonhoven, L Lisette; Galer, A Anju; Shortridge-Baggett, L Lillie M

    2014-01-01

    The application of a cervical collar (C-collar) in trauma patients can be life-saving. Previous studies, however, describe development of pressure ulcers related to C-collars. To retrospectively compare collar-related pressure ulcers (CRPUs) occurring in trauma patients admitted to the intensive care unit wearing a C-collar before and after implementation of preventive interventions and to identify risk factors for CRPU development. Retrospective chart review of 88 trauma patients admitted to the intensive care unit before (2006) and after (2008) implementation of preventive interventions; early C-collar removal (<24 hours) and an occipital foam ring. Data were collected in the first 14 days of admission on pressure ulcer incidence, risk factors, and preventive interventions. The incidence of CRPUs was 1.1%. Although risk factors were present in the sample, it was impossible to identify significant risk factors for CRPU development and explore the effect of preventive interventions. The incidence of CRPUs in this study was low. CRPUs, however, should never be accepted as an inevitable complication of cervical immobilization. To identify trauma patients at risk and to apply effective preventive interventions for CRPU development, further research is needed.

  10. Factors of human capital related to project success in health care work units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhonen, Marjo; Paasivaara, Leena

    2011-03-01

    To explore factors of human capital related to project success that employees expect from nurse managers. Human capital refers to those resources that managers working with projects possess, such as abilities, knowledge and qualities of character. The data were collected by open interviews (n=14) with nurses, public health nurses and nurse managers working in primary health care and a hospital. Data analysis was carried out using qualitative content analysis. The main factors of human capital related to project success proved to be as follows: (1) management of enthusiastic project culture, (2) management of regeneration and (3) management of emotional intelligence. Future research is needed on the kind of means nurse managers use in human capital management in projects and how they see their possibilities in managing human capital. Human capital management skills should be underlined as an important competence area when recruiting a nurse manager. The success of health care projects cannot be improved only through education or by training of nurse managers; in addition, projects need nurse managers who understand workplace spirituality and have high emotional intelligence. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Can care staff accurately assess health-related quality of life of care home residents? A secondary analysis of data from the OPERA trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Ben; Petrou, Stavros; Underwood, Martin; Madan, Jason

    2017-04-27

    To compare assessments of health-related quality of life outcomes of care home residents reported by residents and care staff acting as proxies. Linear regression and bivariate modelling of paired assessments from care home residents and care staff. 78 care homes in 2 regions in England. 556 care home residents aged 65 years or older and care staff. EQ-5D utility scores and responses to individual EQ-5D dimensions. The depression status, cognitive function, physical function, activities of daily living, social engagement, pain and dementia diagnosis of care home residents all predicted discrepancies in EQ-5D reporting. For residents with no depressive symptoms, care staff underestimated residents' mean EQ-5D utility score by 0.134 (95% CI 0.097 to 0.171) and for those with severe depressive symptoms they overstated mean utility scores by 0.222 (95% CI 0.104 to 0.339). With increasing levels of pain in residents the care staff progressively estimated EQ-5D utilities above self-reported values; by 0.236 (95% CI 0.003 to 0.469) in those with the second highest pain scores. For those with no cognitive impairment, proxies overstated mean utility scores by 0.097 (95% CI 0.049 to 0.146), while for those with severe cognitive impairment they underestimated mean utility scores by 0.192 (95% CI 0.143 to 0.241). Care home residents and staff appear to differ fundamentally in their assessment of the health-related quality of life, as measured by the EQ-5D, of residents with different levels of depression, pain and/or cognitive impairment. This could lead to interventions evaluated using proxy-based quality-adjusted life year estimates being wrongly rejected on cost-effectiveness grounds and may also make it difficult for carers to act as advocates with health and social care professionals for certain groups of residents. A more resident-focussed approach to assessment of health-related quality of life is needed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission

  12. Relation between psychotic symptoms, parental care and childhood trauma in severe mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalan, Ana; Angosto, Virxina; Díaz, Aida; Valverde, Cristina; de Artaza, Maider Gonzalez; Sesma, Eva; Maruottolo, Claudio; Galletero, Iñaki; Bustamante, Sonia; Bilbao, Amaia; van Os, Jim; Gonzalez-Torres, Miguel Angel

    2017-05-01

    A relation between different types of parental care, trauma in childhood and psychotic symptoms in adulthood has been proposed. The nature of this association is not clear and if it is more related to psychotic disorders per se or to a cluster of symptoms such as positive psychotic symptoms remains undefined. We have analysed the presence of childhood trauma using the CTQ scale and types of parental care using the PBI scale in three groups of subjects: borderline personality disorder patients (n=36), first psychotic episode patients (n=61) and healthy controls (n=173). Positive psychotic symptomatology was assessed with the CAPE scale. General linear models were used to study the relation between positive psychotic symptomatology and variables of interest. BPD patients had the highest rate of any kind of trauma, followed by FEP patients. We found a positive relationship between psychotic symptomatology and the existence of trauma in childhood in all groups. Moreover, an affectionless control rearing style was directly associated with the existence of trauma. Furthermore, subjects with trauma presented less probability of having an optimal parenting style in childhood. The relation between psychotic symptoms and trauma remained statistically significant after adjusting for other variables including parental rearing style. There seems to be a link between trauma in childhood and psychotic symptomatology across different populations independently of psychiatric diagnosis. Taking into account that there is an association between trauma and psychosis and that trauma is a modifiable factor, clinicians should pay special attention to these facts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Network of Spaces and Interaction-Related Behaviors in Adult Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahbub Rashid

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Using three spatial network measures of “space syntax”, this correlational study describes four interaction-related behaviors among three groups of users in relation to visibility and accessibility of spaces in four adult intensive care units (ICUs of different size, geometry, and specialty. Systematic field observations of interaction-related behaviors show significant differences in spatial distribution of interaction-related behaviors in the ICUs. Despite differences in unit characteristics and interaction-related behaviors, the study finds that when nurses and physicians “interact while sitting” they prefer spaces that help maintain a high level of environmental awareness; that when nurses “walk” and “interact while walking” they avoid spaces with better global access and visibility; and that everyone in ICUs “walk” more in spaces with higher control over neighboring spaces. It is argued that such consistent behavioral patterns occur due to the structural similarities of spatial networks over and above the more general functional similarities of ICUs.

  14. Thinking critically about health and human-animal relations: Therapeutic affect within spaces of care farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Richard

    2017-11-28

    This article draws on a more-than-representational approach to reconsider how geographers engage with ideas of 'health'. Health can be understood as the constant reshaping of an individual's capacity to affect and be affected, the way in which a body's powers to act are dynamically augmented or diminished by different affective relations. The article also addresses calls for health geography to engage with the more-than-human. The article mobilises a qualitative study of 'care farming' within England and Wales to highlight the generative potential of human-animal relations in (re)shaping the diverse affective relations gathered together to produce new bodily capacities. The article demonstrates how animal presence and agency can break down barriers, allowing people to navigate and negotiate adverse contexts and access support in a manner and space in which they feel comfortable. Additionally, human-animal relations are shown to produce affective experiences that act to re-place identities, understandings, and ways of 'being-with' the world that can enact what different actants may become. Human-animal relations matter for health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A mobile user-interface for elderly care from the perspective of relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warpenius, Erika; Alasaarela, Esko; Sorvoja, Hannu; Kinnunen, Matti

    2015-03-01

    As the number of elderly people rises, relatives' care-taking responsibilities increase accordingly. This creates a need for developing new systems that enable relatives to keep track of aged family members. To develop new mobile services for elderly healthcare we tried to identify the most wanted features of a mobile user-interface from the perspective of relatives. Feature mapping was based on two online surveys: one administered to the relatives (N = 32) and nurses (N = 3) of senior citizens and the other to nursing students (N = 18). Results of the surveys, confirmed by face-to-face interviews of the relatives (N = 8), indicated that the most valued features of the mobile user-interface are Accident Reporting (e.g. falling), Alarms (e.g. fire-alarm), Doctor Visits and evaluation of the General Condition of the Senior. The averaged importance ratings of these features were 9.2, 9.0, 8.6 and 8.5, respectively (on a scale from 0 to 10). Other important considerations for the user-interface development are aspiration to simplicity and ease-of-use. We recommend that the results are taken into account, when designing and implementing mobile services for elderly healthcare.

  16. Integrating Mental Health into General Health Care: Lessons From HIV

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mental health, or “skills transfer” to PPs is essential.18 In HIV care settings, counselors .... Depression is a risk factor for suboptimal adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy. JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune. Deficiency Syndromes ...

  17. Oral hygiene and mouth care for older people in acute hospitals: part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Ben J

    2017-10-31

    The oral health of older people in acute hospitals has rarely been studied. Hospital admission provides a prime opportunity for identification and rectification of problems, and oral health promotion. This two-part article explores oral hygiene and mouth care provision for older adults in acute hospitals. The first article presents the findings of a literature review exploring oral and dental disease in older adults, the importance of good oral health and mouth care, and the current situation. Searches of electronic databases and the websites of relevant professional health service bodies in the UK were undertaken to identify articles and guidelines. The literature shows a high prevalence of oro-dental disease in this population, with many known detrimental effects, combined with suboptimal oral hygiene and mouth care provision in acute hospitals. Several guidelines exist, although the emphasis on oral health is weaker than other aspects of hospital care. Older adults admitted to acute hospitals have a high burden of oro-dental disease and oral and mouth care needs, but care provision tends to be suboptimal. The literature is growing, but this area is still relatively neglected. Great potential exists to develop oral and mouth care in this context. The second part of this article explores clinical recommendations. ©2012 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.

  18. The social relations of health care and household resource allocation in neoliberal Nicaragua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesler Laura E

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the transition to neoliberalism, Nicaragua's once-critically acclaimed health care services have substantially diminished. Local level social formations have been under pressure to try to bridge gaps as the state's role in the provision of health care and other vital social services has decreased. This paper presents a case study of how global and national health policies reverberated in the social relations of an extended network of female kin in a rural community during late 2002 - 2003. Methods The qualitative methods used in this ethnographic study included semi-structured interviews completed during bi-weekly visits to 51 households, background interviews with 20 lay and professional health practitioners working in the public and private sectors, and participant-observation conducted in the region's government health centers. Interviews and observational field notes were manually coded and iteratively reviewed to identify and conceptually organize emergent themes. Three households of extended kin were selected from the larger sample to examine as a case study. Results The ongoing erosion of vital services formerly provided by the public sector generated considerable frustration and tension among households, networks of extended kin, and neighbors. As resource allocations for health care seeking and other needs were negotiated within and across households, longstanding ideals of reciprocal exchange persisted, but in conditions of poverty, expectations were often unfulfilled, exposing the tension between the need for social support, versus the increasingly oppositional positioning of social network members as sources of competition for limited resources. Conclusions In compliance with neoliberal structural adjustment policies mandated by multilateral and bilateral agencies, government-provided health care services have been severely restricted in Nicaragua. As the national safety net for health care has been eroded

  19. Catheter-related infection in Irish intensive care units diagnosed with HELICS criteria: a multi-centre surveillance study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Conrick-Martin, I

    2013-03-01

    Catheter-related infection (CRI) surveillance is advocated as a healthcare quality indicator. However, there is no national CRI surveillance programme or standardized CRI definitions in Irish intensive care units (ICUs).

  20. Home care for the elderly: the role of relatives, friends and neighbors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalwij, Adriaan; Pasini, G.; Wu, Mingqin

    2014-01-01

    We use data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe to examine the hours of home care received by the elderly. The existing empirical literature has mostly examined informal home care from children and formal home care. We identify two additional informal home care providers,

  1. Work-related Mental Consequences: Implications of Burnout on Mental Health Status Among Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathanasiou, Ioanna V.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Burnout can create problems in every aspect of individual’s’ human life. It may have an adverse effect on interpersonal and family relations and can lead to a general negative attitude towards life. Aim: The purpose of this study is to investigate whether burnout is associated with the mental health status of health care providers. Material and Methods: The sample in this study consisted of 240 health care employees. The Greek version of Maslach’s Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used for measuring burnout levels and the Greek version of the Symptoms Rating Scale for Depression and Anxiety (SRSDA) questionnaire was used to evaluate health care providers’ mental health status. Descriptive statistics were initially generated for sample characteristics. Normality was checked by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and data was processed with parametric tests. General linear models with MBI dimensions as independent variables and SRSDA subscales as dependent variables were used to determine the relation between burnout and mental health status. Statistics were processed with SPSS v. 17.0 (SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA). Statistical significance was set at p=0.05. Results: The average age of the sample is 40.00±7.95 years. Regarding gender the percentage of men is 21.40% (N=49) and of women is 78.60% (N=180). Overall the professional burnout of health care workers is moderate. The mean score for emotional exhaustion is 26.41, for personal accomplishment 36.70 and for depersonalization 9.81. The mean for each subscale of SRSDA is 8.23±6.79 for Depression Beck-21, 3.96±4.26 for Depression Beck-13, 4.91±4.44 for Melancholia, 6.32±4.35 for Asthenia and 6.36±4.72 for Anxiety. The results of general linear models with the MBI dimensions as independent variables and the SRSDA subscales as dependent variables are shown that emotional exhaustion and personal accomplishment are statistically correlated with all subscales of SRSDA, while depersonalization is not correlated

  2. Work-related Mental Consequences: Implications of Burnout on Mental Health Status Among Health Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathanasiou, Ioanna V

    2015-02-01

    Burnout can create problems in every aspect of individual's' human life. It may have an adverse effect on interpersonal and family relations and can lead to a general negative attitude towards life. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether burnout is associated with the mental health status of health care providers. The sample in this study consisted of 240 health care employees. The Greek version of Maslach's Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used for measuring burnout levels and the Greek version of the Symptoms Rating Scale for Depression and Anxiety (SRSDA) questionnaire was used to evaluate health care providers' mental health status. Descriptive statistics were initially generated for sample characteristics. Normality was checked by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and data was processed with parametric tests. General linear models with MBI dimensions as independent variables and SRSDA subscales as dependent variables were used to determine the relation between burnout and mental health status. Statistics were processed with SPSS v. 17.0 (SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA). Statistical significance was set at p=0.05. The average age of the sample is 40.00±7.95 years. Regarding gender the percentage of men is 21.40% (N=49) and of women is 78.60% (N=180). Overall the professional burnout of health care workers is moderate. The mean score for emotional exhaustion is 26.41, for personal accomplishment 36.70 and for depersonalization 9.81. The mean for each subscale of SRSDA is 8.23±6.79 for Depression Beck-21, 3.96±4.26 for Depression Beck-13, 4.91±4.44 for Melancholia, 6.32±4.35 for Asthenia and 6.36±4.72 for Anxiety. The results of general linear models with the MBI dimensions as independent variables and the SRSDA subscales as dependent variables are shown that emotional exhaustion and personal accomplishment are statistically correlated with all subscales of SRSDA, while depersonalization is not correlated with any SRSDA subscale. Burnout appears to implicate

  3. Course of symptoms and health-related quality of life during specialized pre-dialysis care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Goeij, Moniek C M; Ocak, Gurbey; Rotmans, Joris I; Eijgenraam, Jan-Willem; Dekker, Friedo W; Halbesma, Nynke

    2014-01-01

    Concerns are present on the limited value of renal function alone in defining the optimal moment to start dialysis. Disease-related symptoms and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) may have additional clinical value in defining this moment, but little is known about how these parameters change during pre-dialysis care. The aims of our study were to describe the course of symptoms and HRQOL during pre-dialysis care and to investigate their association with poor health outcomes. In the prospective PREPARE-2 cohort, incident patients starting specialized pre-dialysis care were included when referred to one of the 25 participating Dutch outpatient clinics (2004-2011). In the present analysis, 436 patients with data available on symptoms and HRQOL were included. Clinical data, symptoms (revised illness perception questionnaire), and HRQOL (short form-36 questionnaire; physical and mental summary score) were collected every 6-month interval. A time-dependent Cox proportional hazard model was used to associate symptoms and HRQOL with the combined poor health outcome (i.e. starting dialysis, receiving a kidney transplant, and death). All symptoms increased, especially fatigue and loss of strength, and both the physical and mental summary score decreased over time, with the most pronounced change during the last 6-12 months of follow-up. Furthermore, each additional symptom (adjusted HR 1.04 (95% CI, 1.00-1.09)) and each 3-point lower physical and mental summary score (adjusted HR 1.04 (1.02-1.06) and 1.04 (1.02-1.06) respectively) were associated with a higher risk of reaching the combined poor health outcome within the subsequent 6 months. The number of symptoms increased and both the physical and mental HRQOL score decreased during pre-dialysis care and these changes were associated with starting dialysis, receiving a kidney transplant, and death. These results may indicate that symptoms and HRQOL are good markers for the medical condition and disease stage of pre

  4. Relationship among health-related quality of life, depression and awareness of home care services in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, Ülkü; Bayrak Kahraman, Burcu; Kaynak, İlknur; Görgülü, Ümit

    2016-11-01

    The present descriptive study was carried out to determine the relationship between health-related quality of life, depression and awareness of home care services among elderly patients. Patients aged 65 years or older staying at the surgery and internal medicine clinics were included in the study. The "Patient Introduction Form," "Short Form-36 Quality of Life Questionnaire" and "Geriatric Depression Scale" were utilized in the collection of data. In the present study, it was determined that only approximately half of elderly patients (54.9%) knew the concept of home care, most of them had not previously received home care and requested home care related to medical care. The mean scores were lower in some areas of the quality of life questionnaire in some factors that could influence home care awareness. These factors were determined as: female sex, history of falling, chronic illness, functionally, moderately or severely dependent, no previous receipt of home care and wishing to receive home care. The home care requirement of elderly patients can be influenced by many physiological, psychological and social factors that can affect their quality of life. Thus, it is of utmost importance that medical professionals evaluate the quality of life of elderly individuals and its influencing factors. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016; 16: 1211-1219. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  5. Feature-preserving surface mesh smoothing via suboptimal Delaunay triangulation ☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhanheng; Yu, Zeyun; Holst, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A method of triangular surface mesh smoothing is presented to improve angle quality by extending the original optimal Delaunay triangulation (ODT) to surface meshes. The mesh quality is improved by solving a quadratic optimization problem that minimizes the approximated interpolation error between a parabolic function and its piecewise linear interpolation defined on the mesh. A suboptimal problem is derived to guarantee a unique, analytic solution that is significantly faster with little loss in accuracy as compared to the optimal one. In addition to the quality-improving capability, the proposed method has been adapted to remove noise while faithfully preserving sharp features such as edges and corners of a mesh. Numerous experiments are included to demonstrate the performance of the method. PMID:23580890

  6. Suboptimal Rayleigh damping coefficients in seismic analysis of viscously-damped structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Danguang; Chen, Genda; Wang, Zuocai

    2014-12-01

    An optimization method for the consistent evaluation of two Rayleigh damping coefficients is proposed. By minimizing an objective function such as an error term of the peak displacement of a structure, the two coefficients can be determined with response spectral analysis. The optimization method degenerates into the conventional method used in current practices when only two modes of vibration are included in the objective function. Therefore, the proposed method with all significant modes included for simplicity in practical applications results in suboptimal damping coefficients. The effects of both spatial distribution and frequency content of excitations as well as structural dynamic characteristics on the evaluation of Rayleigh damping coefficients were investigated with a five-story building structure. Two application examples with a 62-story high-rise building and a 840 m long cable-stayed bridge under ten earthquake excitations demonstrated the accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed method to account for all of the above effects.

  7. A similar correction mechanism in slow and fluent readers after suboptimal landing positions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eGagl

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present eye movements study investigated the optimal viewing position (OVP and inverted-optimal viewing position (I-OVP effects in slow readers. The basis of these effects is a phenomenon called corrective re-fixations, which describes a short saccade from a suboptimal landing position (word beginning or end to the center of the word. The present study found corrective re-fixations in slow readers, which was evident from the I-OVP effects in first fixation durations, the OVP effect in number of fixations and the OVP effect in re-fixation probability. The main result is that slow readers, despite being characterized by a fragmented eye movement pattern during reading, nevertheless share an intact mechanism for performing corrective re-fixations. This correction mechanism is not linked to linguistic processing, but to visual and oculomotor processes, which suggests the integrity of oculomotor and visual processes in slow readers.

  8. [Refusal of application to care in Alzheimer's disease and related diseases: establishment of a mobile unit hospital extra].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collignon, Julien; Rouch, Isabelle; Gonthier, Régis; Corbin-Seguin, Aude; Combe, Lorraine; Trombert-Paviot, Béatrice; Laurent, Bernard; Girtanner, Chantal

    2013-03-01

    Refusal of care and support in these patients with Alzheimer's disease and related illnesses at home is a cause of accelerated loss of autonomy and increases the risk of a crisis with early institutionalization. Factors contributing to the denial of care are poorly understood and very few epidemiological data exist. we compared age, diagnosis, level of severity of the disease, the type of behavioral, family status of 101 patients living in denial of care and support as seen by a mobile home (group UPEPc) to 136 control patients seen at the memory clinic (group CM). Patients living in denial of care appear to significantly low age [82/80.5, prefusing home care is specific and it is important to educate GPs conditions that favor an obstacle to medicalization. The advantage of a mobile extramural to analyze risk factors for refusal of care and propose alternatives should be further investigated.

  9. Gender-related needs and preferences in cancer care indicate the need for an individualized approach to cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, Hester; de Graeff, Alexander; Wynia, Klaske; de Heus, Miriam; Kruitwagen, Cas L J J; Woltjer, Gerda T G J; Teunissen, Saskia C C M; Voest, Emile E

    2010-01-01

    Improving quality of care for cancer patients requires insight into their specific wishes, needs, and preferences concerning cancer care. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of gender on cancer patients' needs and preferences. Data were obtained from 386 questionnaires assessing cancer patients' preferences for health care. Multivariate regression analyses were performed with data obtained from medical oncology patients treated in seven Dutch hospitals, using the scales of the questionnaire as dependent variables. Patients rated safety, expertise, performance, and attitude of physicians and nurses highest on their list of preferences. There were significant differences between male and female patients concerning preferences in health care in 15 of the 21 scales and in two of the eight single items. Without exception, women found the care aspects mentioned in these scales and items more important than men. Multivariate regression analysis showed that, of all the patient- and disease-related factors, gender was the most important independent predictor of patient preferences. Gender impacts cancer patients' needs and preferences and should be taken into account for optimal cancer care. Cancer care might be tailored toward gender, for example, with regard to the means and extent of communication, manner and extent of support, counseling and rehabilitation, consultation length, and physician assignment. The results of this study may guide health care professionals and organizations to develop a gender-specific health care approach to further improve cancer patient-centered care.

  10. Subtypes of type I IFN differentially enhance cytokine expression by suboptimally stimulated CD4(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillyer, Philippa; Raviv, Nataly; Gold, Doria M; Dougherty, Danielle; Liu, Jie; Johnson, Teresa R; Graham, Barney S; Rabin, Ronald L

    2013-12-01

    Human type I interferons (IFNs) include IFN-β and 12 subtypes of IFN-α. During viral infection, infiltrating memory CD4(+) T cells are exposed to IFNs, but their impact on memory T-cell function is poorly understood. To address this, we pretreated PBMCs with different IFNs for 16 h before stimulation with Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B and measured cytokine expression by flow cytometry. IFN-α8 and -α10 most potently enhanced expression of IFN-γ, IL-2, and IL-4. Potency among the subtypes differed most at doses between 10 and 100 U/mL. While enhancement of IL-2 and IL-4 correlated with the time of preincubation with type I IFN, IFN-γ production was enhanced best when IFN-α was added immediately preceding or simultaneously with T-cell stimulation. Comparison of T-cell responses to multiple doses of Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B and to peptide libraries from RSV or CMV demonstrated that IFN-α best enhanced cytokine expression when CD4(+) T cells were suboptimally stimulated. We conclude that type I IFNs enhance Th1 and Th2 function with dose dependency and subtype specificity, and best when T-cell stimulation is suboptimal. While type I IFNs may beneficially enhance CD4(+) T-cell memory responses to vaccines or viral pathogens, they may also enhance the function of resident Th2 cells and exacerbate allergic inflammation. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. Improvement of Suboptimal Land Productivity Approach by Land and Plant Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marthen Pasang Sirappa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Assessment for increasing productivity of suboptimal land with using three kinds of organic fertilizer and six rice varieties had been conducted in the Debowae village, Waeapo district, Buru regency at 2011. Purpose of the assessment were to determine the effect of three types organic fertilizer and the use of six Inpara varieties to growth and productivity of rice in sub-optimal land. Study used a split plot design with three replications (farmers as replicates, where the main plot was three types of organic fertilizers (livestock manure, granular organic, and petroganic, while the subplot was 6 varieties Inpara (Inpara 1, Inpara 2, Inpara 3, Inpara 4, Inpara 5, and Indragiri. The soil types at the study site based on soil classification were Endoaquepts with soil fertility status was low. The study results showed that the use of organic manure combined with inorganic fertilizers, both from livestock manure, while granular organic and petrogranic, gave an average crop growth and yield better than the results obtained by farmers outside of the study. Average petroganic fertilizer had a better growth and higher crop yields compared to other organic fertilizers. The six varieties of rice swamps that were examined (Inpara 1, Inpara 2, Inpara 3, Inpara 4, Inpara 5, and Indragiri had the average growth and better yields than rice varieties used by farmers outside of the study (2.75 Mg ha-1. Varieties Inpara 4, Indragiri, Inpara 1 and Inpara 2 had average yield above 7 Mg ha-1, while Inpara 3 and Inpara 5 average above 4 Mg ha-1. Combination of granular organic fertilizer with Inpara 4 variety and petroganic with Indragiri variety had the best results (8.37 and 8.02 Mg ha-1, while the lowest yield (4.48 Mg ha-1 was reached at combination of livestock manure with Inpara 5 variety.

  12. A PROCEDURE FOR DETERMINING OPTIMAL FACILITY LOCATION AND SUB-OPTIMAL POSITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.K. Dan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: This research presents a methodology for determining the optimal location of a new facility, having physical flow interaction of various degrees with other existing facilities in the presence of barriers impeding the shortest flow-path as well as the sub-optimal iso-cost positions. It also determines sub-optimal iso-cost positions with additional cost or penalty for not being able to site it at the computed optimal point. The proposed methodology considers all types of quadrilateral barrier or forbidden region configurations to generalize and by-pass such impenetrable obstacles, and adopts a scheme of searching through the vertices of the quadrilaterals to determine the alternative shortest flow-path. This procedure of obstacle avoidance is novel. Software has been developed to facilitate computations for the search algorithm to determine the optimal and iso-cost co-ordinates. The test results are presented.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Die navorsing behandel ‘n procedure vir die bepaling van optimum stigtingsposisie vir ‘n onderneming met vloei vanaf ander bestaande fasiliteite in die teenwoordigheid van ‘n verskeidenheid van randvoorwaardes. Die prodedure lewer as resultaat suboptimale isokoste-stigtingsplekke met bekendmaking van die koste wat onstaan a.g.v. afwyking van die randvoorwaardlose optimum oplossingskoste, die prosedure maak gebruik van ‘n vindingryke soekmetode wat toegepas word op niersydige meerkundige voorstellings vir die bepaling van korste roetes wat versperring omseil. Die prosedure word onderskei deur programmatuur. Toetsresultate word voorgehou.

  13. Patients’ experience of outsourcing and care related to magnetic resonance examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspelin, Peter; Bergstrand, Lott; Blomqvist, Lennart

    2014-01-01

    Background Outsourcing radiological examinations from public university hospitals affects the patient, who has to attend a different clinic or hospital for the radiological examination. We currently have a limited understanding of how patients view outsourcing and their care related to MR examinations. Aim Aim. To examine the experiences of patients who are sent to private radiology units when their referrals for MR examinations are outsourced from a university hospital, as well as to explore factors which influence patient satisfaction regarding the quality of care related to the MR examination. Methods A group of patients (n = 160) referred for MR examinations and either examined at a university hospital or at an external private unit were interviewed. The interview was designed as a verbal questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Student’s t test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Pearson’s correlation. Results Sixty-nine percent of the patients could neither choose nor influence the location at which they were examined. For those who could, aspects that influenced the patient’s choice of radiology department were: short waiting time 79% (127/160), ease of traveling to the radiology department 68% (110/160), and short distance to their home or work 58% (93/160). For 40% (60/160) of the patients, a short time in the waiting room was related to a positive experience of the MR examination. Conclusion Conclusion. If patients were informed about outsourcing and could also choose where to have their examination, key factors contributing to patient satisfaction could be met even when MR examinations are outsourced. PMID:25142133

  14. Unhealthy Substance Use Behaviors as Symptom-Related Self-Care in HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brion, John M.; Rose, Carol Dawson; Nicholas, Patrice K.; Sloane, Rick; Voss, Joachim G.; Corless, Inge B.; Lindgren, Teri G.; Wantland, Dean J.; Kemppainen, Jeanne K.; Sefcik, Elizabeth F.; Nokes, Kathleen M.; Kirksey, Kenn M.; Eller, Lucille Sanzero; Hamilton, Mary Jane; Holzemer, William L.; Portillo, Carmen J.; Mendez, Marta Rivero; Robinson, Linda M.; Moezzi, Shanaz; Rosa, Maria; Human, Sarie; Maryland, Mary; Arudo, John; Ros, Ana Viamonte; Nicholas, Thomas P.; Cuca, Yvette; Huang, Emily; Bain, Catherine; Tyer-Viola, Lynda; Zang, Sheryl M.; Shannon, Maureen; Peters-Lewis, Angelleen

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of symptoms in HIV disease can be associated with HIV disease itself, comorbid illness, and/or antiretroviral therapy. Unhealthy substance use behaviors, particularly substance-use behaviors including heavy alcohol intake, marijuana use, other illicit drug use, and cigarette smoking, are engaged in by many HIV-positive individuals, often as a way to manage disease-related symptoms. This study is a secondary data analysis of baseline data from a larger randomized-controlled trial of an HIV/AIDS Symptom Management Manual. In the present study, the prevalence and characteristics of unhealthy substance use behaviors in relation to HIV/AIDS symptoms are examined. Subjects were recruited from a variety of settings which provide HIV/AIDS care and treatment. The mean age of the sample (n=775) was 42.8 years (SD=9.6) and nearly thirty-nine percent (38.5%) of the sample was female. The racial demographics of the sample were: 28% African American, 28% Hispanic, 21% White/Caucasian, 16% African from Kenya or South Africa, 1% Asian, and 5% self-described as “Other.” The mean number of years living with HIV was reported to be 9.1 years (SD=6.6).Specific self-reported unhealthy substance-use behaviors were use of marijuana (n= 111; 14.3%), cigarette smoking (n=355; 45.8%), heavy alcohol use (n= 66; 8.5%), and illicit drugs (n= 98; 12.6%). A subset of individuals who identified high levels of specific symptoms also reported significantly higher substance use behaviors including amphetamine and injection drug use in addition to heavy alcohol use, cigarette smoking, and marijuana use. Implications for clinical practice include assessment of self-care behaviors, screening for substance abuse, and education of persons related to self-management across the trajectory of HIV disease. PMID:21352430

  15. Hospitalisations and costs relating to ambulatory care sensitive conditions in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sheridan, A

    2012-03-08

    BACKGROUND: Ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs) are conditions for which the provision of timely and effective outpatient care can reduce the risks of hospitalisation by preventing, controlling or managing a chronic disease or condition. AIMS: The aims of this study were to report on ACSCs in Ireland, and to provide a baseline for future reference. METHODS: Using HIPE, via Health Atlas Ireland, inpatient discharges classified as ACSCs using definitions from the Victorian ACSC study were extracted for the years 2005-2008. Direct methods of standardisation allowed comparison of rates using the EU standard population as a comparison for national data, and national population as comparison for county data. Costs were estimated using diagnosis-related groups. RESULTS: The directly age-standardised discharge rate for ACSC-related discharges increased slightly, but non-significantly, from 15.40 per 1,000 population in 2005 to 15.75 per 1,000 population in 2008. The number of discharges increased (9.5%) from 63,619 in 2005 to 69,664 in 2008, with the estimated associated hospital costs increasing (31.5%) from 267.8 million in 2005 to 352.2 million in 2008. Across the country, there was considerable variation in the discharge rates for the Top-10 ACSCs for the years 2005-2008. Significantly lower rates of hospitalisation were observed in more urban areas including Cork, Dublin and Galway. The most common ACSC in 2008 was diabetes with complications (29.8%). CONCLUSIONS: The variation in rates observed indicates the scope of reducing hospitalisations and associated costs for ACSCs, across both adult\\'s and children\\'s services and particularly in relation to diabetes complications.

  16. Epidemiology of Australian Influenza-Related Paediatric Intensive Care Unit Admissions, 1997-2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlena C Kaczmarek

    Full Text Available Influenza virus predictably causes an annual epidemic resulting in a considerable burden of illness in Australia. Children are disproportionately affected and can experience severe illness and complications, which occasionally result in death.We conducted a retrospective descriptive study using data collated in the Australian and New Zealand Paediatric Intensive Care (ANZPIC Registry of influenza-related intensive care unit (ICU admissions over a 17-year period (1997-2013, inclusive in children <16 years old. National laboratory-confirmed influenza notifications were used for comparison.Between 1997 and 2013, a total of 704 influenza-related ICU admissions were recorded, at a rate of 6.2 per 1,000 all-cause ICU admissions. Age at admission ranged from 0 days and 15.9 years (median = 2.1 years, with 135 (19.2% aged <6 months. Pneumonia/pneumonitis and bronchiolitis were the most common primary diagnoses among influenza-related admissions (21.9% and 13.6%, respectively. More than half of total cases (59.2% were previously healthy (no co-morbidities recorded, and in the remainder, chronic lung disease (16.7% and asthma (12.5% were the most common co-morbidities recorded. Pathogen co-detection occurred in 24.7% of cases, most commonly with respiratory syncytial virus or a staphylococcal species. Median length of all ICU admissions was 3.2 days (range 2.0 hours- 107.4 days and 361 (51.3% admissions required invasive respiratory support for a median duration of 4.3 days (range 0.2 hours- 107.5 days. There were 27 deaths recorded, 14 (51.9% in children without a recorded co-morbidity.Influenza causes a substantial number of ICU admissions in Australian children each year with the majority occurring in previously healthy children.

  17. Social capital in a lower socioeconomic palliative care population: a qualitative investigation of individual, community and civic networks and relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Joanne M; DiGiacomo, Michelle; Currow, David C; Davidson, Patricia M

    2014-01-01

    Lower socioeconomic populations live and die in contexts that render them vulnerable to poorer health and wellbeing. Contexts of care at the end of life are overwhelmingly determined by the capacity and nature of formal and informal networks and relations to support care. To date, studies exploring the nature of networks and relations of support in lower socioeconomic populations at the end of life are absent. This qualitative study sought to identify the nature of individual, community and civic networks and relations that defined the contexts of care for this group. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 16 patients and 6 informal carers who identified that they had social and economic needs and were from a lower socioeconomic area. A social capital questionnaire identifying individual, community and civic networks and relations formed the interview guide. Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed and analysed using framework analysis. Participants identified that individual and community networks and relations of support were mainly inadequate to meet care needs. Specifically, data revealed: (1) individual (informal caregivers) networks and relations were small and fragile due to the nature of conflict and crisis; (2) community trust and engagement was limited and shifted by illness and caregiving; (3) and formal care services were inconsistent and provided limited practical support. Some transitions in community relations for support were noted. Levels of civic and government engagement and support were overall positive and enabled access to welfare resources. Networks and relations of support are essential for ensuring quality end of life care is achieved. Lower socioeconomic groups are at a distinct disadvantage where these networks and relations are limited, as they lack the resources necessary to augment these gaps. Understanding of the nature of assets and limitations, in networks and relations of support, is necessary to inform

  18. What components of chronic care organisation relate to better primary care for coronary heart disease patients? An observational study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lieshout, J. van; Frigola Capell, E.; Ludt, S.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Wensing, M.J.P.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Cardiovascular risk management (CVRM) received by patients shows large variation across countries. In this study we explored the aspects of primary care organisation associated with key components of CVRM in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: 273

  19. AmbCare--A Relational Database for Implementing a Community Pharmacy Ambulatory Care Teaching Program: A Descriptive Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magarian, Edward O.; Peterson, Charles D.

    1995-01-01

    An IBM-compatible information storage and retrieval software program was developed to support an eight-week community pharmacy ambulatory care clerkship for entry-level Doctor of Pharmacy students. The program helps evaluate and identify patients for health and medication problems, perform patient risk-factor assessment, monitor drug therapy,…

  20. Personalized Primary Care for Older People: An evaluation of a multicomponent nurse-led care program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijenberg, N.

    2013-01-01

    Providing optimal care for the increasing number of frail older people with complex care needs is a major challenge in primary care. The current approach is reactive and does not meet the needs of older patients, resulting in unnecessary loss of daily functioning, suboptimal quality of life and high

  1. Coordinating Systems of Care Using Health Information Technology: Development of the ADHD Care Assistant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Thomas J.; Michel, Jeremy; Mayne, Stephanie; Miller, Jeffrey; Blum, Nathan J.; Grundmeier, Robert W.; Guevara, James P.; Fiks, Alexander G.

    2016-01-01

    Perhaps the two principal venues for the delivery of mental health services are schools and primary care practices. Unfortunately, these systems of care are poorly connected, which may result in care that is fragmented and suboptimal. This article describes the development and implementation of an electronic health record portal, known as the ADHD…

  2. Is admittance to specialised palliative care among cancer patients related to sex, age and cancer diagnosis? A nation-wide study from the Danish Palliative Care Database (DPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsersen, Mathilde; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Jensen, Anders Bonde; Neergaard, Mette Asbjoern; Sjøgren, Per; Groenvold, Mogens

    2017-03-23

    Specialised palliative care (SPC) takes place in specialised services for patients with complex symptoms and problems. Little is known about what determines the admission of patients to SPC and whether there are differences in relation to institution type. The aims of the study were to investigate whether cancer patients' admittance to SPC in Denmark varied in relation to sex, age and diagnosis, and whether the patterns differed by type of institution (hospital-based palliative care team/unit, hospice, or both). This was a register-based study of adult patients living in Denmark who died from cancer in 2010-2012. Data sources were the Danish Palliative Care Database, Danish Register of Causes of Death and Danish Cancer Registry. The associations between the explanatory variables (sex, age, diagnosis) and admittance to SPC were investigated using logistic regression. In the study population (N = 44,548) the overall admittance proportion to SPC was 37%. Higher odds of overall admittance to SPC were found for women (OR = 1.23; 1.17-1.28), younger patients (palliative care teams/units, whereas higher admission of younger patients was more pronounced for hospital-based palliative care teams/units. Patients with brain cancer were more often admitted to hospices, whereas patients with prostate cancer were more often admitted to hospital-based palliative care teams/units. It is unlikely that the variations in relation to sex, age and cancer diagnoses can be fully explained by differences in need. Future research should investigate whether the groups having the lowest admittance to SPC receive sufficient palliative care elsewhere.

  3. Models of care and delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Lundgren

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Marked regional differences in HIV-related clinical outcomes exist across Europe. Models of outpatient HIV care, including HIV testing, linkage and retention for positive persons, also differ across the continent, including examples of sub-optimal care. Even in settings with reasonably good outcomes, existing models are scrutinized for simplification and/or reduced cost. Outpatient HIV care models across Europe may be centralized to specialized clinics only, primarily handled by general practitioners (GP, or a mixture of the two, depending on the setting. Key factors explaining this diversity include differences in health policy, health insurance structures, case load and the prevalence of HIV-related morbidity. In clinical stable populations, the current trend is to gradually extend intervals between HIV-specific visits in a shared care model with GPs. A similar shared-model approach with community clinics for injecting drug-dependent persons is also being implemented. Shared care models require oversight to ensure that primary responsibility is defined for the persons overall health situation, for screening of co-morbidities, defining indication to treat comorbidities, prescription of non-HIV medicines, etc. Intelligent bioinformatics platforms (i.e. generation of alerts if course of care deviates from a prior defined normality are being developed to assist in providing this oversight and to provide measure of quality. Although consensus exists to assess basic quality indicators of care, a comprehensive set of harmonized indicators are urgently needed to define best practise standards via benchmarking. Such a tool will be central to guide ongoing discussions on restructuring of models, as quality of care should not be compromised in this process.

  4. Health-related quality of life after prolonged pediatric intensive care unit stay.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Conlon, Niamh P

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the long-term health-related quality of life (HRQOL) outcomes for patients requiring at least 28 days of pediatric intensive care. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort and prospective follow-up study. SETTING: A 21-bed pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) in a university-affiliated, tertiary referral pediatric hospital. PATIENTS: One hundred ninety-three patients who spent 28 days or longer in the PICU between January 1, 1997 and December 31, 2004. INTERVENTIONS: Quality of life was measured using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (Peds QL 4.0) parent-proxy version at 2 to 10 yrs after discharge. The PedsQL 4.0 is a modular measure of HRQOL, which is reliable in children aged 2 to 18 yrs. It generates a total score and physical, emotional, social, school, and psychosocial subscores. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Of the 193 patients, 41 died during their PICU admission and 27 died between PICU discharge and follow-up. Quality of life questionnaires were posted to parents of 108 of the 125 survivors and 70 were returned completed. Forty children (57.1%) had scores indicating a normal quality of life, whereas 30 (42.9%) had scores indicating impaired HRQOL. Of these, 14 (20%) had scores indicating poor quality of life with ongoing disabling health problems requiring hospitalization or the equivalent. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that, while long PICU stay is associated with significant mortality, the long-term HRQOL is normal for the majority of surviving children.

  5. Psychological Distress Mediates the Association between Food Insecurity and Suboptimal Sleep Quality in Latinos with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez-Millán, Angela; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael; Segura-Pérez, Sofia; Damio, Grace; Chhabra, Jyoti; Osborn, Chandra Y; Wagner, Julie

    2016-10-01

    Evidence increasingly indicates that poor sleep quality is a major public health concern. Household food insecurity (HFI) disproportionately affects Latinos and is a novel risk factor for poor sleep quality. Psychological distress may be a potential mechanism through which HFI affects sleep quality. Sleep, food insecurity, and distress are linked to type 2 diabetes mellitus. We examined the relations between HFI, psychological distress, and sleep quality and tested whether psychological distress mediates the relation between HFI and sleep in people with diabetes mellitus. Latinos with type 2 diabetes mellitus (n = 121) who completed baseline assessments for the CALMS-D (Community Health Workers Assisting Latinos Manage Stress and Diabetes) stress management intervention trial completed the US Household Food Security Survey, and measures of depressive symptoms [Personal Health Questionnaire Depression Scale (PHQ-8)], anxiety symptoms [Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS)-short], diabetes distress [Problem Areas in Diabetes Questionnaire (PAID-5)], and sleep quality [Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI)]. Psychological distress was operationalized with the PHQ-8, PROMIS-short, and PAID-5 scales. We used unadjusted and adjusted indirect effect tests with bias-corrected bootstrapped 95% CIs on 10,000 samples to test both relations between variables and potential mediation. Mean age was 61 y, 74% were women, and 67% were food insecure. Experiencing HFI was associated with both greater psychological distress and worse sleep quality (P sleep quality with and without adjustment for age, education, income, marital status, and employment status. Household food insecurity is a common and potent household stressor that is associated with suboptimal sleep quality through psychological distress. Efforts to improve food security and decrease psychological distress may yield improved sleep in this high-risk population. The CALMS-D stress management

  6. Medical care in adolescents and young adult cancer survivors: what are the biggest access-related barriers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Theresa H.M.; Tao, Li; DeRouen, Mindy C.; Wu, Xiao-Cheng; Prasad, Pinki; Lynch, Charles F.; Shnorhavorian, Margarett; Zebrack, Brad J.; Chu, Roland; Harlan, Linda C.; Smith, Ashley W.; Parsons, Helen M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors experience barriers to utilizing healthcare, but the determinants of cancer-related medical care of AYAs has not been fully explored. Methods We studied factors associated with medical care utilization among 465 AYA cancer survivors in the AYA Health Outcomes and Patient Experience Study (AYA HOPE), a cohort of 15 to 39 year-olds recently diagnosed with germ cell cancer, lymphoma, sarcoma, or acute lymphocytic leukemia. Descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression methods were used. Results Most AYA cancer survivors (95%), who were 15–35 months post diagnosis, received medical care in the past 12 months and 17% were undergoing cancer treatment. In multivariate analyses, compared with AYAs with no cancer-related medical visits in the previous year, AYAs receiving cancer-related care were more likely to currently have health insurance (odds ratio (OR) = 4.9; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.7–13.8) or have had health insurance in the past year (OR= 4.0; 95% CI: 0.99–16.3). Cancer recurrence, lacking employment and negative changes in self-reported general health were associated with ongoing cancer treatment versus other cancer-related medical care. 11% of all AYAs and 25% of AYAs who did not receive medical care in the past 12-months lost health insurance between the initial and follow-up surveys. Conclusion AYA cancer survivors with health insurance were much more likely to receive cancer-related medical care than those without insurance. Implications for Cancer Survivors Despite the need for post-treatment medical care, lacking health insurance is a barrier to receiving any medical care among AYAs. PMID:24408440

  7. Testing and comparing two self-care-related instruments among older Chinese adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Guo

    Full Text Available The study aimed to test and compare the reliability and validity, including sensitivity and specificity of the two self-care-related instruments, the Self-care Ability Scale for the Elderly (SASE, and the Appraisal of Self-care Agency Scale-Revised (ASAS-R, among older adults in the Chinese context.A cross-sectional design was used to conduct this study. The sample consisted of 1152 older adults. Data were collected by a questionnaire including the Chinese version of SASE (SASE-CHI, the Chinese version of ASAS-R (ASAS-R-CHI and the Exercise of Self-Care Agency scale (ESCA. Homogeneity and stability, content, construct and concurrent validity, and sensitivity and specificity were assessed.The Cronbach's alpha (α of SASE-CHI was 0.89, the item-to-total correlations ranged from r = 0.15 to r = 0.81, and the test-retest correlation coefficient (intra-class correlation coefficient, ICC was 0.99 (95% CI, 0.99-1.00; P<0.001. The Cronbach's α of ASAS-R-CHI was 0.78, the item-to-total correlations ranged from r = 0.20 to r = 0.65, and the test-retest ICC was 0.95 (95% CI, 0.92-0.96; P<0.001. The content validity index (CVI of SASE-CHI and ASAS-R-CHI was 0.96 and 0.97, respectively. The findings of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses (EFA and CFA confirmed a good construct validity of SASE-CHI and ASAS-R-CHI. The Pearson's rank correlation coefficients, as a measure of concurrent validity, between total score of SASE-CHI and ESCA and ASAS-R-CHI and ESCA were assessed to 0.65 (P<0.001 and 0.62 (P<0.001, respectively. Regarding ESCA as the criterion, the area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC curve for the cut-point of SASE-CHI and ASAS-R-CHI were 0.93 (95% CI, 0.91-0.94 and 0.83 (95% CI, 0.80-0.86, respectively.There is no significant difference between the two instruments. Each has its own characteristics, but SASE-CHI is more suitable for older adults. The key point is that the users can choose the most appropriate scale

  8. Intensive care delirium - effect on memories and health-related quality of life - a follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Helle; Tønnesen, Else K; Videbech, Poul

    2013-01-01

    after intensive care unit. Interviews were repeated after two and six months and supplemented with Short Form-36 and the Barthel Index. RESULTS: Delirium was detected in 60% of the patients in our study, and delirious patients had significantly fewer factual memories and more memories of delusion than...... than half of the patients in intensive care unit experience delirium, which is associated with fewer factual memories and more memories of delusions. Short Form-36 might not be sensitive to delirium-related outcomes. Future research should include the development of better assessment tools to determine......AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effects of delirium in the intensive care unit on health-related quality of life, healthcare dependency and memory after discharge and to explore the association between health-related quality of life and memories, patient diaries and intensive care unit...

  9. Empirical and normative ethics: a synthesis relating to the care of older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonasson, Lise-Lotte; Liss, Per-Erik; Westerlind, Björn; Berterö, Carina

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to synthesize the concepts from empirical studies and analyze, compare and interrelate them with normative ethics. The International Council of Nurses (ICN) and the Health and Medical Service Act are normative ethics. Five concepts were used in the analysis; three from the grounded theory studies and two from the theoretical framework on normative ethics. A simultaneous concept analysis resulted in five outcomes: interconnectedness, interdependence, corroboratedness, completeness and good care are all related to the empirical perspective of the nurse's interaction with the older patient, and the normative perspective, i.e. that found in ICN code and SFS law. Empirical ethics and normative ethics are intertwined according to the findings of this study. Normative ethics influence the nurse's practical performance and could be supporting documents for nurses as professionals.

  10. Using fieldwork in analyzing ethical issues related to IT in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balka, Ellen; Reidl, Christine; Wagner, Ina

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes how an understanding of everyday conflicts that have ethical implications - what we call 'situated ethics'- can be explored through ethnographic field techniques in healthcare settings. Our approach to ethics is followed by findings from two ethnographic case studies focussing on issues arising as information technologies such as electronic patient records and automatic drug dispensing machines are introduced into varied health sector workplaces. By close and careful observation of these technologies in use and by incorporating narrative accounts from different perspectives the complexity and entangledness of real life occurrences are revealed. Our data suggest that several types of ethical issues (e.g., issues related to intellectual property, literacy, standardization, transparency, work ethics, and equitable allocation of resources) can be identified through fieldwork, and can have an impact on identification of everyday ethics in healthcare.

  11. Secondary Traumatic Stress and Health Professional Care to Traumatized Families: a Relational Look

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Lidia Casillas-Cárdenas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, society faces the secondary traumatic stress in work settings, transmitted through the intervention process the social worker, serving human social suffering of the families. This phenomenon is reflected as burnout or contagion of emotions similar to those suffered by subjects treated, characterized by pain, anguish and fear behaviors, and is associated with the cost of care. The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the emergence of relationships that emerge in the process of social intervention, as simultaneous complex relationships that keep reciprocity between the life of the social worker, the suffering of the treated subject and labor dynamics, where a frame is shared favoring meanings recirculation secondary traumatic stress. Previous advances show complex triadic relations, which only have interconnection through professional speaking at a given time and space.

  12. Recurring alcohol-related care between 1998 and 2007 among people treated for an alcohol-related disorder in 1997: A register study in Stockholm County

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kåreholt Ingemar

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inpatient care for alcohol intoxication is increasing in Sweden, especially among young women. Since it is well known that alcohol disorder is a chronic relapsing illness, this study examines the extent to which people return for more care. Method All inpatients with alcohol-related diagnoses in Stockholm County during 1997 were followed prospectively to 2007 through registers. The proportion reappearing for the same diagnosis, other alcohol-related inpatient, or outpatient care each year after baseline, as well as the number of years the inpatients reappeared were calculated (n = 2735. Three diagnoses were examined separately; alcohol dependence, harmful use of alcohol, and alcohol intoxication. Results Three out of five inpatients with an alcohol diagnoses reappeared for more alcohol-related inpatient care during the following decade. The proportion returning was largest the year after baseline and then decreased curvilinearly over time. The inclusion of outpatient care increased proportions, but did not change patterns. Of those with an alcohol dependence diagnosis at baseline 42 percent returned for more alcohol-related inpatient care the first, 28 percent the fifth, and 25 percent the tenth year. Corresponding proportions for harmful use and intoxication were smaller. One in five among those with an alcohol dependence returned for more than five of the ten years. Ordered logistic regressions confirmed that besides diagnosis, age and gender were independently related to the number of years returning to care. Conclusions While middle-aged males with alcohol dependence were in a revolving door, young female inpatients with intoxication diagnosis returned to a comparably lower degree.

  13. Analysis of contributing factors associated to related patients safety incidents in Intensive Care Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Delgado, M C; Merino de Cos, P; Sirgo Rodríguez, G; Álvarez Rodríguez, J; Gutiérrez Cía, I; Obón Azuara, B; Alonso Ovies, Á

    2015-01-01

    To explore contributing factors (CF) associated to related critical patients safety incidents. SYREC study pos hoc analysis. A total of 79 Intensive Care Departments were involved. The study sample consisted of 1.017 patients; 591 were affected by one or more incidents. The CF were categorized according to a proposed model by the National Patient Safety Agency from United Kingdom that was modified. Type, class and severity of the incidents was analyzed. A total 2,965 CF were reported (1,729 were associated to near miss and 1,236 to adverse events). The CF group more frequently reported were related patients factors. Individual factors were reported more frequently in near miss and task related CF in adverse events. CF were reported in all classes of incidents. The majority of CF were reported in the incidents classified such as less serious, even thought CF patients factors were associated to serious incidents. Individual factors were considered like avoidable and patients factors as unavoidable. The CF group more frequently reported were patient factors and was associated to more severe and unavoidable incidents. By contrast, individual factors were associated to less severe and avoidable incidents. In general, CF most frequently reported were associated to near miss. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  14. SIADH-related hyponatremia in hospital day care units: clinical experience and management with tolvaptan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De las Peñas, Ramón; Ponce, Santiago; Henao, Fernando; Camps Herrero, Carlos; Carcereny, Enric; Escobar Álvarez, Yolanda; Rodríguez, César A; Virizuela, Juan Antonio; López López, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Hyponatremia (Na ˂ 135 mmol/l) is the most frequent electrolyte disorder in clinical practice, and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) is the commonest cause of hyponatremia in cancer patients. Correcting hyponatremia in these patients can reduce morbidity and mortality, increase the response to anti-cancer agents, and help reduce hospital length of stay and costs. Tolvaptan is an oral medication used to treat SIADH-related hyponatremia patients that needs to be initiated at hospital so patients can have their serum sodium monitored. If tolvaptan could be initiated in hospital day care units (DCUs), performing the same tests, hospitalization could be avoided, quality of life improved, and costs reduced. This is the first publication where a panel of oncologists are sharing their experience and making some recommendations with the use of tolvaptan to treat SIADH-related hyponatremia in DCU after collecting and examining 35 clinical cases with these type of patients. The conclusion from this retrospective observational analysis is that the use of tolvaptan in DCU is safe and effective in the therapeutic management of SIADH-related hyponatremia.

  15. Discovery, screening and evaluation of a plasma biomarker panel for subjects with psychological suboptimal health state using (1)H-NMR-based metabolomics profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jun-Sheng; Xia, Xiao-Tao; Wu, Yan-Fei; Zhao, Lei; Xiang, Huan; Du, Guan-Hua; Zhang, Xiang; Qin, Xue-Mei

    2016-09-21

    Individuals in the state of psychological suboptimal health keep increasing, only scales and questionnaires were used to diagnose in clinic under current conditions, and symptoms of high reliability and accuracy are destitute. Therefore, the noninvasive and precise laboratory diagnostic methods are needed. This study aimed to develop an objective method through screen potential biomarkers or a biomarker panel to facilitate the diagnosis in clinic using plasma metabolomics. Profiles were based on H-nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR) metabolomics techniques combing with multivariate statistical analysis. Furthermore, methods of correlation analysis with Metaboanalyst 3.0 for selecting a biomarker panel, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) drug intervention for validating the close relations between the biomarker panel and the state and the receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC curves) analysis for evaluation of clinical diagnosis ability were carried out. 9 endogenous metabolites containing trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), glutamine, N-acetyl-glycoproteins, citrate, tyrosine, phenylalanine, isoleucine, valine and glucose were identified and considered as potential biomarkers. Then a biomarker panel consisting of phenylalanine, glutamine, tyrosine, citrate, N-acetyl-glycoproteins and TMAO was selected, which exhibited the highest area under the curve (AUC = 0.971). This study provided critical insight into the pathological mechanism of psychological suboptimal health and would supply a novel and valuable diagnostic method.

  16. Social and relational identification as determinants of care workers' motivation and well-being

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bjerregaard, Kirstien; Haslam, S Alexander; Morton, Thomas; Ryan, Michelle K

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of research in the field of health and social care indicates that the quality of the relationship between the person giving care and the person receiving it contributes significantly...

  17. Health literacy: varying relations with control over care and number of GP visits.

    OpenAIRE

    Heide, I.; Heijmans, M.; Schuit, A.J.; Uiters, E.; Rademakers, J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In chronic care, patients are expected to exert a certain degree of control over the care for their condition, for instance by fulfilling care tasks in their home environment. Health literacy is considered relevant in this regard, especially critical health literacy. The aim of this study was to examine to what extent functional, interactive and critical health literacy are associated with patients’ perceived control over care and with the frequency of GP visits. Methods: Data f...

  18. Health literacy: varying relations with control over care and number of GP visits.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, I. van der; Heijmans, M.; Schuit, A.J.; Uiters, E.; Rademakers, J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In chronic care, patients are expected to exert a certain degree of control over the care for their condition, for instance by fulfilling care tasks in their home environment. Health literacy is considered relevant in this regard, especially critical health literacy. The aim of this

  19. Relational autonomy in informed consent (RAIC) as an ethics of care approach to the concept of informed consent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuji, Peter I

    2017-07-28

    The perspectives of the dominant Western ethical theories, have dominated the concepts of autonomy and informed consent for many years. Recently this dominant understanding has been challenged by ethics of care which, although, also emanates from the West presents a more nuanced concept: relational autonomy, which is more faithful to our human experience. By paying particular attention to relational autonomy, particularity and Process approach to ethical deliberations in ethics of care, this paper seeks to construct a concept of informed consent from the perspective of ethics of care which is here called relational autonomy-in-informed consent (RAIC). Thus, providing a broader theoretical basis for informed consent beyond the usual theoretical perspectives that are particularly Western. Care ethics provides such a broader basis because it appeals to a global perspective that encompasses lessons from other cultures, and this will help to enrich the current ideas of bioethics principles of autonomy and informed consent. This objective will be achieved by exploring the ethics of care emphasis on relationships based on a universal experience of caring; and by contrasting its concept of autonomy as relational with the understanding of autonomy in the approaches of the dominant moral theories that reflect rational, individualistic, and rights-oriented autonomy of the American liberalism.

  20. Oncology nurses' perceptions of their relations with family members in an ambulatory cancer care setting: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobchuk, Michelle; Udod, Sonia

    2011-01-01

    Trends signal an increasing prevalence of people living through and beyond a cancer diagnosis with an enhanced reliance on ambulatory cancer care services and family caregiving. Despite this trend, there has been limited focus on nurses' experiences with providing support to families who care for patients in the community. For oncology nurses in ambulatory care settings, job satisfaction has decreased significantly as they are concerned with their ability to consistently provide safe and quality care to patients and their family. Although other studies indicated that the lack of time and limited resources are regrettably accepted aspects of nurses' work environments, our mixed methods small-scale study addressed how work environments still can meet the growing need for enhanced support and relations among nurses, patients, and families in ambulatory cancer care.

  1. Provision of protein and energy in relation to measured requirements in intensive care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allingstrup, Matilde Jo; Esmailzadeh, Negar; Wilkens Knudsen, Anne; Espersen, Kurt; Hartvig Jensen, Tom; Wiis, Jørgen; Perner, Anders; Kondrup, Jens

    2012-08-01

    Adequacy of nutritional support in intensive care patients is still a matter of investigation. This study aimed to relate mortality to provision, measured requirements and balances for energy and protein in ICU patients. Prospective observational cohort study of 113 ICU patients in a tertiary referral hospital. Death occurred earlier in the tertile of patients with the lowest provision of protein and amino acids. The results were confirmed in Cox regression analyses which showed a significantly decreased hazard ratio of death with increased protein provision, also when adjusted for baseline prognostic variables (APACHE II, SOFA scores and age). Provision of energy, measured resting energy expenditure or energy and nitrogen balance was not related to mortality. The possible cause-effect relationship is discussed after a more detailed analysis of the initial part of the admission. In these severely ill ICU patients, a higher provision of protein and amino acids was associated with a lower mortality. This was not the case for provision of energy or measured resting energy expenditure or energy or nitrogen balances. The hypothesis that higher provision of protein improves outcome should be tested in a randomised trial. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  2. Job Burnout, Job Satisfaction, and Related Factors among Health Care Workers in Golestan Province, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Mohammad Javad; Heidari, Alireza; Etemad, Koorosh; Gashti, Ashrafi Babazadeh; Jafari, Nahid; Honarvar, Mohammad Reza; Ariaee, Mohammad; Lotfi, Mansureh

    2016-09-01

    Burnout causes physical and emotional tireness, job dissatisfaction, resulting in reduced efficiency and a feeling of alienation from colleagues. Also, job satisfaction has a major impact on job-related behaviors, such as turnover intention, absenteeism, and job performance. The aim of this study was to determine job burnout, job satisfaction rate, and related factors among health care workers in Golestan Province in Iran. This cross-sectiona