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Sample records for submit occupational radiation

  1. DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure November 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Analysis

    2011-11-11

    This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2010 occupational radiation dose data trended over the past 5 years, and includes instructions to submit successful ALARA projects.

  2. Occupation: nurse; occupational hazard: radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickson, K.

    1984-01-01

    The work of the occupational health nurses at the Pickering Generating Station is described. A staff of two nurses teach first aid and safety, practice an emergency plan, and monitor personnel for minimum health standards for radiation workers. Special attention is paid to problems which might be aggravated by radiation, such as skin complaints, respiratory diseases, emotional stability, or phobias regarding heights, plastic suits, or radiation itself. Procedures used in treating contaminated personnel are outlined

  3. Occupation: nurse; occupational hazard: radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickson, K

    1984-03-01

    The work of the occupational health nurses at the Pickering Generating Station is described. A staff of two nurses teach first aid and safety, practice an emergency plan, and monitor personnel for minimum health standards for radiation workers. Special attention is paid to problems which might be aggravated by radiation, such as skin complaints, respiratory diseases, emotional stability, or phobias regarding heights, plastic suits, or radiation itself. Procedures used in treating contaminated personnel are outlined.

  4. Radiation protection in occupational health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The document is a training manual for physicians entering the field of occupational medicine for radiation workers. Part 1 contains the general principles for the practice of occupational health, namely health surveillance and the role of the occupational physician in the workplace, and Part 2 provides the essential facts necessary to understand the basic principles of radiation physics, radiobiology, dosimetry and radiation effects which form the basis for occupational radiation health

  5. DOE 2012 occupational radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site.

  6. DOE 2011 occupational radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2011 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past five years.

  7. Occupational cancer and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brahams, D.

    1988-01-01

    There have been two High Court actions and seven inquests in the UK, with reference to the debate on occupational hazards of long term, low dose exposure. In July, 1987, two cases alleging that workers in the nuclear industry had contracted cancer due to their exposure to radiation at work had to be abandoned halfway through the trial after the judge had heard the medical evidence. A 57-year old man claimed that Hodgkin's disease had been caused by radiation while at work at Sellafield. However, medical opinion was that Hodgkin's disease had never been accepted as caused by radiation. In the second case a man who had died of stomach cancer at the age of 54 after working for UKAEA at Dounreay for 7 years, had received 190 mSv. The defendants' experts rated the likelihood of radiation as the cause at 3-6%; the plaintiffs' experts had suggested 30-50%. Seven inquest juries sitting in West Cumbria from 1983 to 1988 have brought in three verdicts of death caused by an industrial disease, three open verdicts, and one of natural causes. The men had all worked for BNFL at Sellafield for many years. (author)

  8. Occupational radiation risk to radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuettmann, W.

    1981-01-01

    A review is given of the most important publications dealing with attempts to estimate the occupational radiation risk to radiologists by comparing data on their mortality from leukemia and other forms of cancer with respective data for other physicians who were not occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. (author)

  9. Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snihs, J.O.

    1985-01-01

    An overview of occupational exposure is presented. Concepts and quantities used for radiation protection are explained as well as the ICRP system of dose limitation. The risks correlated to the limits are discussed. However, the actual exposure are often much lower than the limits and the average risk in radiation work is comparable with the average risk in other safe occupations. Actual exposures in various occupations are presented and discussed. (author)

  10. DOE 2010 occupational radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE.* The DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with DOE Part 835 dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past 5 years.

  11. Occupational applications of ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, P.

    1987-01-01

    A large population of workers are exposed to ultraviolet radiation in various occupational environments which often necessitates protection. Since ultraviolet radiation may create other environmental problems an occupational hazard- and protection evaluation can be complicated. Threshold Limit Values adopted by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) on ultraviolet radiation are used in most countries as guidelines for risk assessment and control measures. This review addresses the levels of ultraviolet radiation met in occupational environments, its measurement and evaluation, and discusses different protection methods. Ultraviolet lasers are beginning to find their way into industrial processes but are still limited in number and they will not be covered here. Emphasis is on broad band incoherent radiation in high risk environments such as welding, and on the evaluation of protective eyewear, see-through curtains and plastics. Other occupational risks associated with the emission of ultraviolet radiation are discussed

  12. Occupational radiation protection. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation can occur in a range of industries, medical institutions, educational and research establishments and nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Adequate radiation protection of workers is essential for the safe and acceptable use of radiation, radioactive materials and nuclear energy. In 1996, the Agency published Safety Fundamentals on Radiation Protection and the Safety of Radiation Sources (IAEA Safety Series No. 120) and International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing, Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (IAEA Safety Series No. 115), both of which were jointly sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the IAEA, the International Labour Organisation, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, the Pan American Health Organization and the World Health Organization. These publications set out, respectively, the objectives and principles for radiation safety and the requirements to be met to apply the principles and to achieve the objectives. The establishment of safety requirements and guidance on occupational radiation protection is a major component of the support for radiation safety provided by the IAEA to its Member States. The objective of the IAEA's occupational protection programme is to promote an internationally harmonized approach to the optimization of occupational radiation protection, through the development and application of guidelines for restricting radiation exposures and applying current radiation protection techniques in the workplace. Guidance on meeting the requirements of the Basic Safety Standards for occupational protection is provided in three interrelated Safety Guides, one giving general guidance on the development of occupational radiation protection programmes and two giving more detailed guidance on the monitoring and assessment of workers' exposure due to external radiation sources and from intakes of radionuclides, respectively. These Safety

  13. Occupational radiation protection. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation can occur in a range of industries, medical institutions, educational and research establishments and nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Adequate radiation protection of workers is essential for the safe and acceptable use of radiation, radioactive materials and nuclear energy. In 1996, the Agency published Safety Fundamentals on Radiation Protection and the Safety of Radiation Sources (IAEA Safety Series No. 120) and International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing, Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (IAEA Safety Series No. 115), both of which were jointly sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the IAEA, the International Labour Organisation, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, the Pan American Health Organization and the World Health Organization. These publications set out, respectively, the objectives and principles for radiation safety and the requirements to be met to apply the principles and to achieve the objectives. The establishment of safety requirements and guidance on occupational radiation protection is a major component of the support for radiation safety provided by the IAEA to its Member States. The objective of the IAEA's occupational protection programme is to promote an internationally harmonized approach to the optimization of occupational radiation protection, through the development and application of guidelines for restricting radiation exposures and applying current radiation protection techniques in the workplace. Guidance on meeting the requirements of the Basic Safety Standards for occupational protection is provided in three interrelated Safety Guides, one giving general guidance on the development of occupational radiation protection programmes and two giving more detailed guidance on the monitoring and assessment of workers' exposure due to external radiation sources and from intakes of radionuclides, respectively. These Safety

  14. Occupational radiation protection. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation can occur in a range of industries, medical institutions, educational and research establishments and nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Adequate radiation protection of workers is essential for the safe and acceptable use of radiation, radioactive materials and nuclear energy. In 1996, the Agency published Safety Fundamentals on Radiation Protection and the Safety of Radiation Sources (IAEA Safety Series No. 120) and International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing, Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (IAEA Safety Series No. 115), both of which were jointly sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the IAEA, the International Labour Organisation, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, the Pan American Health Organization and the World Health Organization. These publications set out, respectively, the objectives and principles for radiation safety and the requirements to be met to apply the principles and to achieve the objectives. The establishment of safety requirements and guidance on occupational radiation protection is a major component of the support for radiation safety provided by the IAEA to its Member States. The objective of the IAEA's occupational protection programme is to promote an internationally harmonized approach to the optimization of occupational radiation protection, through the development and application of guidelines for restricting radiation exposures and applying current radiation protection techniques in the workplace. Guidance on meeting the requirements of the Basic Safety Standards for occupational protection is provided in three interrelated Safety Guides, one giving general guidance on the development of occupational radiation protection programmes and two giving more detailed guidance on the monitoring and assessment of workers' exposure due to external radiation sources and from intakes of radionuclides, respectively. These Safety

  15. Occupational radiation protection. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation can occur in a range of industries, medical institutions, educational and research establishments and nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Adequate radiation protection of workers is essential for the safe and acceptable use of radiation, radioactive materials and nuclear energy. In 1996, the Agency published Safety Fundamentals on Radiation Protection and the Safety of Radiation Sources (IAEA Safety Series No. 120) and International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing, Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (IAEA Safety Series No. 115), both of which were jointly sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the IAEA, the International Labour Organisation, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, the Pan American Health Organization and the World Health Organization. These publications set out, respectively, the objectives and principles for radiation safety and the requirements to be met to apply the principles and to achieve the objectives. The establishment of safety requirements and guidance on occupational radiation protection is a major component of the support for radiation safety provided by the IAEA to its Member States. The objective of the IAEA's occupational protection programme is to promote an internationally harmonized approach to the optimization of occupational radiation protection, through the development and application of guidelines for restricting radiation exposures and applying current radiation protection techniques in the workplace. Guidance on meeting the requirements of the Basic Safety Standards for occupational protection is provided in three interrelated Safety Guides, one giving general guidance on the development of occupational radiation protection programmes and two giving more detailed guidance on the monitoring and assessment of workers' exposure due to external radiation sources and from intakes of radionuclides, respectively. These Safety

  16. Occupational safety meets radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severitt, S.; Oehm, J.; Sobetzko, T.; Kloth, M.

    2012-01-01

    The cooperation circle ''Synergies in operational Security'' is a joint working group of the Association of German Safety Engineers (VDSI) and the German-Swiss Professional Association for Radiation Protection (FS). The tasks of the KKSyS are arising from the written agreement of the two associations. This includes work on technical issues. In this regard, the KKSyS currently is dealing with the description of the interface Occupational Safety / Radiation Protection. ''Ignorance is no defense'' - the KKSyS creates a brochure with the working title ''Occupational Safety meets radiation protection - practical guides for assessing the hazards of ionizing radiation.'' The target groups are entrepreneurs and by them instructed persons to carry out the hazard assessment. Our aim is to create practical guides, simple to understand. The practical guides should assist those, who have to decide, whether an existing hazard potential through ionizing radiation requires special radiation protection measures or whether the usual measures of occupational safety are sufficient. (orig.)

  17. DOE 2013 occupational radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    The Office of Analysis within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (EHSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2013 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past five-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information has been analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site.

  18. Radiation protection: occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    The basis of the occupational exposure limit of 50 mSv recommended by the ICRP is questioned. New dosimetry at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the fact that the dose-response curve may be non-linear and that the relative risk model may be applicable, are some of the arguments advanced to support a reduction in the occupational exposure dose limits. 5 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  19. Occupational radiation exposure. Twelfth annual report, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, B.; McDonald, S.; Richardson, E.

    1982-08-01

    This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that is maintained in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Radiation Exposure Information and Reports System (REIRS). This report is usually published on an annual basis and is available at all NRC public document rooms. The bulk of the information contained in the report was extracted from annual statistical reports submitted by all NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.407. Four categories of licensees - operating nuclear power reactors, fuel fabricators and reprocessors, industrial radiographers, and manufacturers and distributors of specified quantities of byproduct materials - also submit personal identification and exposure information for terminating employees pursuant to 10 CFR 20.408, and some analysis of this data is also presented in this report

  20. Occupational radiation safety in mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stocker, H.

    1985-01-01

    The first International Conference on Occupational Radiation Safety in Mining was held three years ago in Golden, Colorado, U.S.A., and it provided an excellent forum for an exchange of information on the many scientific, technical and operational aspects of radiation safety in mining. I am aware of the broad spectrum of epidemiological, engineering and related studies which have been pursued during the past three years with a view to achieving further improvements in radiation protection and I expect that the information on these studies will contribute significantly to a wider understanding of subject, and in particular, the means by which radiation safety measures in mining can be optimized

  1. Occupational risk from radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz-Feuerhake, I.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, the author shows that a real and concrete elevation of cancer cases has to be expected in all groups of occupationally irradiated perons. The risk figure one should use for mortality is 0.1% per rem of whole body dose. The mean dose registered for these persons lies well below the maximum permissible dose. In Germany there are about 0.2 rem per year in medical people and below 0.5 rem per year in the nuclear industry. But there are risk groups working in situations with typical higher exposure. In medicine, these are for example nurses working with radium implants in radiotherapy units, technicians doing cardiac catheterization and cholangiogrammes, nurses and physicians holding very young patient during X-ray investigations. In the nuclear industry there are also high level and low level working areas. Highest doses are generally delivered to personnel who are engaged from outside for revision and cleaning procedures

  2. Radiation protection and occupational health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassels, B.M.; Carter, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper examines trends in occupational and public health standard setting including those which apply to radiation protection practices. It is the authors' contention that while regulators, unions and employees demand higher standards of radiation protection and industry attempts to comply with tight controls of radiation exposure in the workplace, these standards are out of step with standards applied to health away from the workplace, recreational activity and other areas of industrial hygiene. The ultimate goal of an improvement in the health of the nation's workforce may no longer be visible because it has been submerged beneath the predominating concern for one aspect of health in the workplace. 35 refs., 5 tabs

  3. Occupational radiation exposures in Cyprus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplanis, Prodromos A; Christofides, Stelios [Medical Physics Department, Nicosia General Hospital, 1450 Nicosia (Cyprus)

    1999-12-31

    For the first time ever the occupational radiation exposure data of all the radiation workers of Cyprus, as obtained by the personnel monitoring service of the Dosimetry Laboratory of the Medical Physics Department of the Ministry of Health, is published and compared with that of other countries. The presented data shows a systematic trend of improvement both with regards to the methodology of monitoring and data recording. The efforts of the past few years in educating and training the users of ionising radiation with regards to the importance of the personnel monitoring service and the hazards of ionising radiation, has paid off and this is evident from the doses recorded in the past three years which are compared favourably with those of other countries, as given by the UNSCEAR 1993 report. The introduction of extremity monitoring, promises even better improvement in the methodology of monitoring the doses received by personnel working in Interventional Radiology, as well as other groups whose hands, unavoidably, come close to radiation sources. (authors) 3 refs., 12 tabs.

  4. Occupational radiation exposure in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, K.; Cabanekova, H.

    2014-01-01

    Recently are 2 nuclear power plants in operation in the Slovak republic. Apart from nuclear facilities there are 450 licensed undertakings with monitored workers. The majority of the licensed undertakings are active in health care. In Slovak republic are five dosimetry services performing assessments on personal doses due to external exposure and two dosimetry services are approved to carry out monitoring of internal exposure. Dosemeters used for the monitoring of external individual exposure include: personal whole-body film dosemeters, thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLD) or optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSL) for measurements of beta and gamma radiation; TLD for measurements of neutron radiation and TLD for extremities. The measured operational dose quantities are Hp(10), Hp(3) and Hp(0.07). Approved dosimetry service reports the measured dose data to the employers and to the Central register of occupational doses (CROD). Annually are monitored about 12500 - 16200 active workers. Average effective doses per one monitored worker are presented. (author)

  5. Radiation hormesis at occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaharieva, E.; Georgieva, R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The aim of our work was to find appropriate biomarkers applicable in molecular epidemiological surveys of occupationally exposed individuals to prove radiation hormesis. Blood samples were taken from a group of irradiated persons, and from a control group. For each worker we estimated a parameter arbitrarily called by us 'mean annual dose' as a quotient of cumulated dose and length of service. DNA repair synthesis in leucocytes before and after in vitro exposure to a challenge dose of 2.0 Gy gamma rays was determined by the level of incorporation of radioactively labeled nucleotides, level of DNA damage in lymphocytes was analyzed by single cell gel electrophoresis and level of lipid peroxidation processes was evaluated by malonedialdehyde concentration in blood plasma. A significant decrease of potentially lethal damage in persons with 'mean annual dose' lower or equal to 5 mSv/y was found, compared to the control group. The highest repair capacity after a challenging dose of 2.0 Gy gamma rays as well as a significant decrease in the level of oxidative stress determined in the blood plasma was evaluated for persons from the same group. The present investigation of occupationally exposed workers showed that annual doses no higher than twice the natural radiation background exert positive effects on DNA damage and repair, increase cellular resistance and decrease oxidative stress

  6. Occupational radiation exposures at NRC-licensed facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, B.G.

    1980-01-01

    For the past ten years, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and its predecessor, the Atomic Energy Commission, have required certain licensees to routinely submit two types of occupational radiation exposure reports: termination and annual reports. Each licensee engaged in any one of the activities: (1) operation of nuclear power reactors, (2) industrial radiography, (3) fuel fabrication, processing and reprocessing, and (4) large supply of byproduct material, is required to submit an annual statistical report and a termination report for each monitored employee who ends his employment or work assignment. A new regulation now requires all NRC licensees to submit annual reports for the years 1978 and 1979. These reports have been collected, computerized and maintained by the Commission at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. They are useful to the NRC in the evaluation of the risk of radiation exposure associated with the related activities. (author)

  7. Monitoring occupational exposure to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Button, J.B.C. [Radiation Safety Consultancy, Engadine, NSW (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    A brief overview is presented of methods of monitoring occupational exposure to ionizing radiation together with reasons for such monitoring and maintaining dose histories of radiation occupationally exposed persons. The various Australian providers of external radiation monitoring services and the types of dosemeters they supply are briefly described together with some monitoring results. Biological monitoring methods, are used to determine internal radiation dose. Whole body monitors, used for this purpose are available at Australian Radiation Lab., ANSTO and a few hospitals. Brief mention is made of the Australian National Radiation Dose Register and its objectives. 8 refs., 9 tabs.

  8. Monitoring occupational exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Button, J.B.C.

    1997-01-01

    A brief overview is presented of methods of monitoring occupational exposure to ionizing radiation together with reasons for such monitoring and maintaining dose histories of radiation occupationally exposed persons. The various Australian providers of external radiation monitoring services and the types of dosemeters they supply are briefly described together with some monitoring results. Biological monitoring methods, are used to determine internal radiation dose. Whole body monitors, used for this purpose are available at Australian Radiation Lab., ANSTO and a few hospitals. Brief mention is made of the Australian National Radiation Dose Register and its objectives

  9. Radiation hormesis at occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgieva, R.; Rupova, I.; Zaharieva, E.; Acheva, A.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective: The idea in favour of the auspicious effect of low dose ionizing radiation in biological systems exists for years and serves as basis of the radiation hormesis hypothesis. The results in support of this phenomenon are not accepted as reliable by ICRP. The available epidemiological data could only suppose the presence of hormetic effect because of statistics limitations and relatively high spontaneous rate of the examined effects. The present work was aimed at finding appropriate biomarkers applicable in molecular epidemiological surveys of occupationally exposed individuals and/or population to prove radiation hormesis. Methods: Blood samples were taken from more than 400 NPP workers, divided in two groups: from the 'strict regimen' area (exposed) and from the administration staff (control). Two levels of evaluation were used: 1) molecular - spontaneous and induced DNA repair by UDS, protein synthesis evaluated radio-metrically, DNA damage by SCGE - all of them in white blood cells, concentration of malonedialdehyde in blood serum; and 2) cellular - the Ly-subsets by flow cytometry, using a FacScan analyzer and immunofluorescent stained mouse monoclonal antibodies. Results: A significant decrease of potentially lethal damage was found in persons with 'mean annual dose' lower or equal to 5 mSv/a, compared to the control group. The highest repair capacity after a challenging dose of 2,0 Gy gamma rays as well as a significant decrease in the level of oxidative stress was evaluated for persons from the same group. At doses below 200 mSv statistically different decrease of the index of CD3+4+, CD4+25+, CD4+62L+ lymphocyte populations and CD4/CD8 cell ratio was established, and increased levels of NK cells, CD57+8+ , CD8+28+ and CD8+38 were recorded. Conclusion: The present investigation showed that annual doses lower than twice the natural radiation background exert positive effects on DNA damage and repair, increase

  10. Occupational radiation exposures in Canada - 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashmore, J.P.; Fujimoto, K.R.; Wilson, J.A.; Grogan, D.

    1981-08-01

    This report is the third in a series of annual reports on Occupational Radiation Exposures in Canada. The data is derived from the Radiation Protection Bureau's National Dose Registry which includes dose records for radiation workers. The report presents average yearly doses by region and occupational category, dose distributions, and variation of average doses with time. Statistical data concerning investigations of high exposures reported by the National Dosimetry Services are included and individual cases are briefly summarized where the maximum permissible dose is exceeded. The decrease in the overall average doses established over the last 20 years appears to be changing. In some occupational categories a consistent upward trend is observed

  11. Occupational Radiation Protection in Severe Accident Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    protection job coverage during severe accident response. The IAEA defines a 'Severe Accident' as a beyond design basis accident comprising of accident conditions more severe than a design basis accident, involving significant core degradation. Preparation of the report The expert group met several times to share their experience and develop an interim (preliminary) report by the end of 2013. The content of the report is thus based on current reflections and action plans undertaken by the ISOE participating utilities and regulatory authorities to improve the emergency response plans in the event of a severe nuclear accident from the point of view of occupational radiation protection. A specific attention has been given to the analysis of past nuclear accidents (TMI-2, USA-1979; Chernobyl, USSR-1986 and Fukushima Daiichi, Japan-2011) and to the integration of the occupational radiation protection (ORP) lessons learned from these accidents into the various chapters of the report (See synthesis of these lessons learned in Appendix-1). To finalize the report, an international workshop was organized in 2014 to present and discuss the content of the interim version and share national experiences on best occupational RP management practices and protocols for optimum RP job coverage during severe accident, initial response and recovery efforts (see Appendix-2). The workshop notably allowed to improve and complete the report which has then be submitted to the ISOE Management Board for approval. This report comprises five main chapters. Chapter 2 provides essential information on radiation protection management and organisation. Chapter 3 establishes the goal of radiation protection training and exercises related to severe accident management. Chapter 4 discusses facility characteristics that must be considered when planning actions in response to a severe accident. Chapter 5 introduces an overall approach for the protection of workers / responders with its interpretation and

  12. 1996 report on occupational radiation exposures in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Statistics are provided on occupational radiation exposures of monitored workers in Canada. The information is based on the data in the National Dose Registry maintained by the Radiation Protection Bureau of Health Canada. The Registry is a centralized record-keeping system containing dose information on all monitored workers in Canada. It includes records from the National Dosimetry Services (NDS), as well as data submitted by nuclear power generating stations, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., uranium mines, and private dosimeter processing companies. About 80 percent of the records are from the NDS. 9 refs., 4 tabs

  13. Occupational radiation exposures in canada-1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, K.; Wilson, J.A.; Ashmore, J.P.; Grogan, D.

    1984-08-01

    This is the sixth in a series of annual reports on Occupational Radiation Exposures in Canada. The information is derived from the National Dose Registry of the Radiation Protection Bureau, Department of National Health and Welfare. As in the past this report presents by occupation: average yearly whole body doses by region, dose distributions, and variations of the average doses with time. The format has been changed to provide more detailed information regarding the various occupations. Statistical data concerning investigations of high exposures reported by the National Dosimetry Services are tabulated in summary form

  14. Degradation study of Durolon polycarbonate submitted to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, A.; Sciani, V.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of gamma radiation from a cobalt 60 source in the 27000 Durolon polycarbonate irradiated with doses between 0,2 and 1000 kGy at 25 0 C was analyzed. For this reason the samples was submitted to the mechanical assay of tension, deformation and hardness and optical assay of transmittance. The obtained results show a good mechanical stability of the polycarbonate, when it was submitted to gamma irradiation in doses up to 20 kGy. (C.G.C.). 05 refs., 04 figs

  15. Occupational radiation exposure risks: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besar, Idris [PUSPATI, Selangor (Malaysia)

    1984-06-01

    This paper presents a review of the health risk as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation. A comparison of occupational risk among workers exposed to radiological and nonradiological harms are also presented. This comparison shows that radiation workers exposed to the current nuclear industry average of 3.4 mSv. per year are among the safest of all industry groupings.

  16. Valuing the radiation detriment of occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robb, J.D.; Crick, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    The implications of changes in the radiation risk estimates on the valuation of radiation detriment for use in cost-benefit analysis are being considered at the National Radiological Protection Board. This paper discusses the pertinent factors that are currently being considered for further investigation. An example of relevance to occupational exposure is detailed. (author)

  17. Occupational radiation exposure risks: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idris Besar

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the health risk as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation. A comparison of occupational risk among workers exposed to radiological and nonradiological harms are also presented. This comparison shows that radiation workers exposed to the current nuclear industry average of 3.4 mSv. per year are among the safest of all industry groupings. (author)

  18. Occupational radiation exposures in Canada - 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, K.R.; Wilson, J.A.; Ashmore, J.P.; Grogan, D.

    1983-12-01

    This report is the fifth in a series of annual reports in Occupational Radiation Exposures in Canada. The data is derived from the Radiation Protection Bureau's National Dose Registry which contains dose records for radiation workers. The report presents average yearly doses by region and occupational category, dose distributions, and variation of average doses with time. Statistical data concerning investigations of high exposures reported by the National Dosimetry Services are included, and individual cases are briefly summarized where the maximum permissible dose is exceeded

  19. DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure, 2001 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2001-12-31

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its operations, including radiological, to ensure the safety and health of all DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures to levels that are “As Low As Reasonably Achievable” (ALARA). The 2001 DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides a summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE, and energy research.

  20. DOE 2011 Occupational Radiation Exposure report, _Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security. December 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derek Hagemeyer, Yolanda McCormick

    2012-12-12

    This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2011 occupational radiation dose data along with trends over the past 5 years, and provides instructions to submit successful as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) projects.

  1. Reducing occupational radiation exposures at LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lattanzi, D.; Neri, C.; Papa, C.; Paribelli, S.

    1980-01-01

    The occupational radiation doses received by nuclear power plant personnel during a period of several years of operation are briefly reviewed. Comparisons are made between the data for BWRs and PWRs in order to identify the more ''critical'' reactor type, from a radiological poin; of view. Attention is also devoted to GCRs. Furthermore the areas which contribute most to personnel doses are considered and briefly reviewed. The main steps to be taken in order to reduce occupational radiation exposures at LWRs are discussed. (H.K.)

  2. Occupational radiation exposure. Annual report No. 11 for 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, B.; McDonald, S.; Richardson, E.

    1981-01-01

    This report summarizes the information reported for calendar year 1978 by all NRC licensees to the Commission's centralized repository of personnel occupational radiation exposure information. The bulk of the information in the report is derived from annual reports that were required to be submitted by all NRC licensees pursuant to 10CFR 20.407. Previously only certain categories - commercial nuclear power reactors, industrial radiographers, fuel fabricators and processors and commercial distributors of byproduct materials - of NRC licensees had submitted such reports. The requirement of 10CFR 20.408 for the submission of termination reports continued to apply to only these four categories, and some analysis of the data contained in these reports is also presented. A brief description of personnel overexposures reported by NRC licensees is included as well

  3. Occupational health care of radiation exposed workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Rahim Rahman Hamzah

    1995-01-01

    The medical problems encountered by the earlier pioneer workers in radiation at the turn of the century are well known. In the 1928, the ICRP (International Committee for Radiological Protection) was instituted and the ALARA principle of radiation protection was evolved. Occupational health care is about maintaining the health and safety of workers in their workplaces. This involves using medical, nursing and engineering practices to achieve its objectives. In certain occupations, including those where workers are exposed to ionising radiation, some of these principles are enshrined in the legislation and would require statutory compliance. Occupational health care of radiation workers seek to prevent ill health arising from exposure to radiation by consolidating the benefits of exposures control and dosimetry. This is via health surveillance for spillages, contamination and exposures to unsealed sources of radiation. It is unlikely that can plan and hope to cater for a Chernobyl type of disaster. However, for the multitude of workers in industry exposed to radiation, control models are available. These are from the more in industrialize countries with a nuclear based energy industry, and where radioactive gadgetry are used in places ranging from factories and farms to construction sites. These models involve statutory requirements on the standard of work practices, assessment of fitness to work and the monitoring of both the worker and the workplace. A similar framework of activity is present in Malaysia. This will be further enhanced with the development of her general health and safety at work legislation. (author)

  4. Occupational radiation hazards during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devik, F.

    1979-01-01

    The general principles in teratology are discussed and it is pointed out that ionising radiation is only one of many agents with teratogenic effects. Human experience with radiation induced congenital malformations is insufficient to warrant conclusions about dose and effect. The teratogenic effects are then discussed in more detail and indications of radiation doses said to produce these are given. The question of a threshold dose is briefly discussed, as is the possibility of carcinogenesis. Finally precautions to be taken and the recommendations of the ICRP and the CEC are presented. (JIW)

  5. Occupational radiation protection legislation in Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadmor, J.; Schlesinger, T.; Lemesch, C.

    1980-01-01

    Various governmental agencies, including the Ministry of Health, the Ministry of Labor and the Israel AEC are responsible for the control of the use of radioactive materials and medical X-ray machines in Israel. Present legislation deals mainly with the legal aspects of the purchase, transport and possession of radioactive materials and the purchase and operation of medical X-ray machines. No legislation refers explicitly to the protection of the worker from ionizing (and non-ionizing) radiation. A special group of experts appointed by the Minister of Labor recently worked out a comprehensive draft law concerning all legal aspects of occupational radiation protection in Israel. Among the main chapters of the draft are: general radiation protection principles, national radiation protection standards, medical supervision of radiation workers, personal monitoring requirements. The present situation with regard to radiation hazard control in Israel and details of the proposed radiation protection law is discussed. (Author)

  6. Research priorities for occupational radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    The Subpanel on Occupational Radiation Protection Research concludes that the most urgently needed research is that leading to the resolution of the potential effects of low-level ionizing radiation. This is the primary driving force in setting appropriate radiation protection standards and in directing the emphasis of radiation protection efforts. Much has already been done in collecting data that represents a compendium of knowledge that should be fully reviewed and understood. It is imperative that health physics researchers more effectively use that data and apply the findings to enhance understanding of the potential health effects of low-level ionizing radiation and improve the risk estimates upon which current occupational radiation protection procedures and requirements depend. Research must be focused to best serve needs in the immediate years ahead. Only then will we get the most out of what is accomplished. Beyond the above fundamental need, a number of applied research areas also have been identified as national priority issues. If effective governmental focus is achieved on several of the most important national priority issues, important occupational radiation protection research will be enhanced, more effectively coordinated, and more quickly applied to the work environment. Response in the near term will be enhanced and costs will be reduced by: developing microprocessor-aided open-quotes smartclose quotes instruments to simplify the use and processing of radiation data; developing more sensitive, energy-independent, and tissue-equivalent dosimeters to more accurately quantify personnel dose; and developing an improved risk assessment technology base. This can lead to savings of millions of dollars in current efforts needed to ensure personnel safety and to meet new, more stringent occupational guidelines

  7. Non-occupational exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snihs, J.O.

    1985-01-01

    An overview of non-occupational exposure is presented. The special problems in connection with assessments of collective doses (time, geographical extension, cut-off, uncertainties) are discussed. Examples of methods and principles for monitoring and dose assessments used for various sources of radiation are given and data on public exposure are presented and discussed. (author)

  8. Occupational radiation hazards during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devik, F.

    1979-01-01

    X radiation is one of many agents which can be harmful to the embryo or the fetus. What measures of precaution are necessary to take for women who are exposed to radiation in their work and become pregnant, in order to prevent injury to the children. To answer this and other related questions, a brief review will be given of pertinent points in our knowledge about the developing embryo, and of what may be harmful in utero. (orig.) 891 AJ/orig. 892 BRE [de

  9. Occupational radiation protection legislation in Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadmor, J.; Schlesinger, T.; Lemesch, C.

    1980-01-01

    A committee of experts appointed by the Minister of Labour and Social Affairs has proposed a comprehensive draft regulation, concerning the legal aspects of occupational radiation protection in Israel. The first section of the proposed regulation sets forth guidelines for control in facilities where workers handle radioactive materials or radiation equipment. This includes the duties of the managers of such places to ensure adequate radiation protection and also the maximum recommended doses (whole body and individual organs) for radiation workers. The second section deals with the monitoring regulations for radiation workers who may be exposed to doses in excess of 500 mRem/y. The third section outlines the nature of the mechanical supervision required, i.e. routine and special examinations. Finally the committee also proposed six miscellaneous recommendations for radiation protection. (UK)

  10. Occupational diseases in uranium and ore miners, related to the radiation exposure in Czech Republic, in 2003-2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, T.

    2014-01-01

    Dozens cases of disease of former or present uranium and ore miners are submitted to judgment as occupational diseases every year in the Czech Republic. Patients or attending physicians suggest that these cases are caused by occupational ionizing radiation. Only a part of these cases is qualified as occupational disease. The term 'occupational disease' is rather juridical term which underlies the right to financial compensation. The causal association with exposure to ionizing radiation cannot be indisputably verified by expert medical opinion. Most diseases in uranium and ore miners, which are proposed as occupational disease, are malignant tumors. The majority of judged cases are lung cancers from radioactive agents. The lecture gives general information about all judged cases of occupational diseases in former uranium and ore miners in the Czech Republic in the years 2002 - 2013. In the period 2002-13 were 40-80 cases submitted to judgment as potential occupational disease every year. (authors)

  11. Radiation risk due to occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kargbo, A.A

    2012-04-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation occurs in many occupations. Workers can be exposed to both natural and artificial sources of radiation. Any exposure to ionizing radiation incurs some risk, either to the individual or to the individual's progeny. This dissertation investigated the radiation risk due to occupational exposure in industrial radiography. Analysis of the reported risk estimates to occupational exposure contained in the UNSCEAR report of 2008 in industrial radiography practice was done. The causes of accidents in industrial radiography include: Lack of or inadequate regulatory control, inadequate training, failure to follow operational procedures, human error, equipment malfunction or defect, inadequate maintenance and wilful violation have been identified as primary causes of accidents. To minimise radiation risks in industrial radiography exposure devices and facilities should be designed such that there is intrinsic safety and operational safety ensured by establishing a quality assurance programme, safety culture fostered and maintained among all workers, industrial radiography is performed in compliance with approved local rules, workers engaged have appropriate qualifications and training, available safe operational procedures are followed, a means is provided for detecting incidents and accidents and an analysis of the causes and lessons learned. (author)

  12. Radiation, chemicals, and occupational health research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    Radiation protection and its interplay with physical research programs are described. Differences and similarities between problems in health protection for chemicals and for radiation are discussed. The importance of dosimetry in radiation work and its relevance to chemicals are cited. A collaborative program between physical and biological scientists on the toxicity of metals is briefly described. It serves as an example of new research directed toward the development of fundamental concepts and principles as a basis for understanding and controlling occupational and population exposures to chemicals. 12 references, 4 figures

  13. Occupational radiation exposures in Canada - 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashmore, J.P.; Fujimoto, K.R.; Wilson, J.A.; Grogan, D.

    This 1978 report is the first in a series of annual reports on occupational radiation exposures in Canada. The data are derived from the Radiation Protection Bureau's National Dose Registry which includes dose records for radiation workers in Canada. The report presents average yearly doses by region and occupational category, dose distributions, and variation of average doses with time. Statistical data concerning investigations of overexposures are included and individual cases are briefly summarized where the maximum permissible dose is exceeded. The 1978 data indicate that the gradually decreasing trend of the last two decades may have changed. In a number of areas the overall average doses and the averages for some job categories have increasd over the corresponding values for 1977

  14. Occupational radiation exposures in Canada, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, K.R.; Wilson, J.A.; Ashmore, J.P.; Grogan, D.

    1983-12-01

    This report is the fourth in a series of annual reports on Occupational Radiation Exposures in Canada. The data is derived from the Radiation Protection Bureau's National Dose Registry which includes those records for radiation workers. The report presents average yearly doses by region and occupational category, dose distributions, and variation of average doses with time. Statistical data concerning investigations of high exposures reported by the National Dosimetry Services are included and individual cases are briefly summarized where the maximum permissible dose is exceeded. The decrease in the overall average doses established over the last 20 years appears to have resumed after an interruption during 1979 to 1980. A brief summary of extremity dose data is also included

  15. Occupational radiation exposures in Canada - 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashmore, J.P.; Fujimoto, K.R.; Wilson, J.A.; Grogan, D.

    1980-12-01

    This report is the second in a series of annual reports on Occupational Radiation Exposures in Canada. The data is derived from the Radiation Protection Bureau's National Dose Registry which includes dose records for radiation workers in Canada. The report presents average yearly doses by region and occupational category, dose distributions, and variation of average doses with time. Statistical data concerning investigations of high exposures are included and individual cases are briefly summarized where the maximum permissible dose is exceeded. The 1979 data indicate that the gradually decreasing trend of the last two decades may be changing. In a number of areas the overall average doses and the averages for some job categories have increased over the corresponding values for 1977 and 1978

  16. Occupational radiation exposure in Korea: 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Je Ho; Kwon, Jeong Wan; Lee, Jai Ki

    2005-01-01

    Dose distribution of Korean radiation workers classified by occupational categories was analyzed. Statistics of the Occupational Radiation Exposure(ORE) in 2002 of the radiation workers in diagnostic and dental radiology were obtained from the Korea Food and Drug Agency(KFDA) who maintains the database for individual radiation dose records. Corresponding statistics for the rest of radiation workers were obtained by processing the individual annual doses provided by the Korea RadioIsotope Association(KRIA) after deletion of individual information. The ORE distribution was classified in term of 28 occupational categories, annual individual dose levels, age groups and gender of 52733 radiation workers as of the year of 2002. The total collective dose was 66.4 man-Sv and resulting average individual ORE was 1.26 mSv. Around 80% of the workers were exposed to minimal doses less than 1.2 mSv. However, it appeared that the recorded doses exceeded 20 mSv for 43 workers in the industrial radiography and for 147 workers in the field of radiology. Particularly, recorded doses of 23 workers in radiology exceeded the annual dose limits of 50 mSv, which is extraordinary when the working environment is considered. It is uncertain whether those doses are real or caused by careless placing of dosimeters in the imaging rooms while the X-ray units are in operation. No one in the workforce of 16 operating nuclear power plant units was exposed over 20 mSv in 2002. Number of workers was the largest in their 30's of age and the mean individual dose was the highest in their 20's. Women were around 20% of the radiation workers and their average dose was around one half of that of man workers

  17. IAEA occupational radiation protection programme: current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deboodt, P.; Mrabit, K.

    2006-01-01

    As stated in Art.III.A.6 of its Statute, the International Atomic Energy Agency (commonly referred to as the Agency) is authorized to establish or adopt, in consultation and, where appropriate, in collaboration with the competent organs of the United Nations and with the specialized agencies concerned, standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property (including such standards for labour conditions), and to provide for the application of these standards to its own operation as well as to the operations making use of materials, services, equipment, facilities, and information made available by the Agency or at its request or under its control or supervision. The Agency s Occupational Radiation Protection Programme aims at harmonizing infrastructures for the control of radiation exposure of workers and for optimizing radiation protection in situation s of exposures due to external radiation and intakes of radionuclides from both artificial and natural sources of radiation. Under its regular and technical cooperation programmes, the Agency has been assigning high priority to both the establishment of safety standards for labour conditions and for the application of these standards through, Interalia, direct assistance under its technical cooperation (TC) programme, the rendering of services, the promotion of education and training, the fostering of information exchange and the coordination of research and development. The purpose of this paper is to present the current status and future IAEA activities in support of occupational radiation protection. (authors)

  18. European studies on occupational radiation exposure - ESOREX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrova, K.; Frasch, G.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The ESOREX project was initiated by the European Commission in 1997. The objectives of this European study are: to provide the European Commission and the national competent radiation protection authorities with reliable information on how personal radiation monitoring, reporting and recording of dosimetric results is organized in European countries; to collect reliable and directly comparable data on individual and collective radiation exposure in all occupational sectors where radiation workers are employed. The information about the monitoring of occupational radiation exposure, the levels of individual personal doses of workers in the different work sectors, the changes and trends of these doses over a period of several years and the international comparison of these data are useful information for many stakeholders. The survey consists of two parts. Part I surveys how radiation protection monitoring, recording and reporting is arranged within each of the 30 European countries. Part II collects doses from occupational exposure of classified workers in the participating countries. For each country, information is provided on the number of workers in defined work categories and how annual individual personal doses are distributed. The summary and the conclusions provide tentative recommendations for harmonizing modifications of some of the national monitoring, reporting and recording arrangements. In all ESOREX studies a beneficial, effective and extensive information base about thirty European states has been created. The studies resulted in country reports describing the legislative, administrative, organizational and technical aspects of the national dose monitoring and recording systems for occupationally radiation exposed workers. These reports are standardized, i.e. they have as far as possible an internationally comparable structure. The dose distributions of the radiation workers and the annual average and collective doses in the various work

  19. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1996 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1996-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety and Health publishes the DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE/DOE contractor managers in their management of radiological safety programs and to assist them in the prioritization of resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside the DOE and hope we have succeeded in making the report more useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of collective data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  20. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2000 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2000-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Safety and Health publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE and DOE contractor managers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE in making this report most useful to them. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  1. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2003 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2003-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Performance Assessment (EH-3) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE and DOE contractor managers and workers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE to make the report most useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and members of the public. DOE is defined to include the National Nuclear Security Administration sites. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  2. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2004 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2004-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Performance Assessment (EH-3) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE and DOE contractor managers and workers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE to make the report most useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors, as well as members of the public. DOE is defined to include the National Nuclear Security Administration sites. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  3. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1997 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1997-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety and Health publishes the DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE/DOE contractor managers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE and hope we have succeeded in making the report more useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  4. Eighth annual occupational radiation exposure report, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, B.G.

    1976-10-01

    This is a report by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the operation of the Commission's centralized repository of personnel occupational radiation exposure information. Annual reports were received from 387 covered licensees indicating that some 78,713 individuals, having an average exposure of 0.36 rems, were monitored for exposure to radiation during 1975 and that 21,601 individuals terminated their employment or work assignment with covered licensees in 1975. The number of personnel overexposures reported in 1975 decreased from previous years. The most significant overexposures which occurred in 1975 are summarized

  5. The occupational exposure of radiation workers, 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawasaki, S; Yamada, N; Sakurai, K [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine

    1975-03-01

    Because the medical use of x-rays and radioisotopes is gradually increasing for diagnosis and therapy, radiation workers, special doctors, nurses and radiological technicians have occupational exposure. Procedures for monitoring external exposure of personnel include the wearing of a filmbadge or a pocket chamber. The results of filmbadge monitoring in Yamaguchi University Hospital for the last 10 years were described. In 1964, the total number of filmbadges that radiation workers used during a 2 week period of radiological examination and therapy was 610. This has been increasing yearly, and in 1972 it was 1999. Radiological technicians generally had low occupational exposure, and about 90 per cent of their filmbadges were exposed to less than 10 mR. Approximately 65 per cent of the filmbadges that nurses used were less than 10 mR, but some nurses who worked in radium therapy at the isotope ward suffered large doses. Some nurses had occasionally exposure higher than 100 mR in radiological examination. Some doctors sustained an occupational exposure of more than 150 mR. From these data, some problems on radiation monitoring using a filmbadge were discussed.

  6. The occupational exposure of radiation workers, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Shoji; Yamada, Norimasa; Sakurai, Koh

    1975-01-01

    Because the medical use of x-rays and radioisotopes is gradually increasing for diagnosis and therapy, radiation workers, special doctors, nurses and radiological technicians have occupational exposure. Procedures for monitoring external exposure of personnel include the wearing of a filmbadge or a pocket chamber. The results of filmbadge monitoring in Yamaguchi University Hospital for the last 10 years were described. In 1964, the total number of filmbadges that radiation workers used during a 2 week period of radiological examination and therapy was 610. This has been increasing yearly, and in 1972 it was 1999. Radiological technicians generally had low occupational exposure, and about 90 per cent of their filmbadges were exposed to less than 10 mR. Approximately 65 per cent of the filmbadges that nurses used were less than 10 mR, but some nurses who worked in radium therapy at the isotope ward suffered large doses. Some nurses had occasionally exposure higher than 100 mR in radiological examination. Some doctors sustained an occupational exposure of more than 150 mR. From these data, some problems on radiation monitoring using a filmbadge were discussed. (author)

  7. Occupational radiation exposure and mortality study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppock, E.; Dobson, D.; Fair, M.

    1992-06-01

    An epidemiological cohort study of some 300,000 Canadians enrolled in the National Dose Registry (NDR) is being undertaken to determine if there is excess cancer or other causes of mortality among those workers who are occupationally exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation. The results of this study may provide better understanding of the dose-response relationship for low doses of ionizing radiation and aid in the verification of risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer mortality. The Department of National Health and Welfare (DNHW) is responsible for the Registry; this study is being carried out by the Bureau of Radiation and Medical Devices (BRMD) with financial assistance and co-operation of various agencies including Statistics Canada and the Atomic Energy Control Board

  8. Integrated occupational radiation exposure information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, H.W.

    1983-06-01

    The integrated (Occupational Radiation Exposure) data base information system has many advantages. Radiation exposure information is available to operating management in a more timely manner and in a more flexible mode. The ORE system has permitted the integration of scattered files and data to be stored in a more cost-effective method that permits easy and simultaneous access by a variety of users with different data needs. The external storage needs of the radiation exposure source documents are several orders of magnitude less through the use of the computer assisted retrieval techniques employed in the ORE system. Groundwork is being layed to automate the historical files, which are maintained to help describe the radiation protection programs and policies at any one point in time. The file unit will be microfilmed for topical indexing on the ORE data base

  9. Degradation studies on plasticized PVC films submited to gamma radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinhas Glória Maria

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly (vinyl chloride, PVC, is a rigid polymer and for several of its applications must be compounded with plasticizing agents. The plasticizers minimize the dipolar interactions, which exist between the polymer's chains, promoting their mobility. In this work we studied the properties of PVC/plasticizer systems submitted to different doses of gamma radiation. We have used four commercial plasticizers amongt them di(2-ethylhexyl phthalate, DEHP, which is present in a great number of commercial applications. The PVC/plasticizer systems have been studied as films made by the solvent evaporation technique. Irradiated and non-irradiated films have been characterized by viscosimetric analysis, mechanical essays and infrared spectroscopy. The results have shown that the rigid, non plasticized, PVC film presented the greatest degradation index, while among the plasticized films the one which presented the larger degradation index due to chain scission was the DEHP plasticized PVC.

  10. Degradation studies on plasticised PVC films submitted to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinhas, Gloria Maria; Souto-Maior, Rosa Maria; Lapa, Camila Maria; Almeida, Yeda Medeiros Bastos de

    2003-01-01

    Poly (vinyl chloride), PVC, is a rigid polymer and for several of its applications must be compounded with plasticizing agents. The plasticizers minimize the dipolar interactions, which exist between the polymer's chains, promoting their mobility. In this work we studied the properties of PVC/plasticizer systems submitted to different doses of gamma radiation. We have used four commercial plasticizers among them di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, DEHP, which is present in a great number of commercial applications. The PVC/plasticizer systems have been studied as films made by the solvent evaporation technique. Irradiated and non-irradiated films have been characterized by viscosimetric analysis, mechanical essays and infrared spectroscopy. The results have shown that the rigid, non plasticized, PVC film presented the greatest degradation index, while among the plasticised films the one which presented the larger degradation index due to chain scission was the DEHP plasticised PVC. (author)

  11. 1997 report on occupational radiation exposures in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This series of reports provides statistics on occupational radiation exposures of monitored workers in Canada. The information is based on the data in the National Dose Registry (NDR) maintained by the Radiation Protection Bureau of Health Canada. The Registry is a centralized record-keeping system containing dose information on all monitored workers in Canada. It includes records from the National Dosimetry Services, as well as data submitted by nuclear power generating stations, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., uranium mines and private dosimeter processing companies. Information for input into the NDR is received in a number of different physical forms. Data from the National Dosimetry Service are fed directly from the dosimeter reading stations into a computer. Most other dose records are submitted to the Registry in computer readable form. The report provides data on the two consecutive years prior to the year in which the data are extracted form the database. The data for the second year will be close to stable at the time of data extraction. Some changes may still occur, for which the most frequent causes are: 1. a high dose to a dosimeter is judged to be non-personal after investigation; 2. a job category of a worker is updated; or 3. dosimeters or data are returned late. The report therefore contains preliminary data on the second year, and more complete data on the first year

  12. Dosimetry for occupational exposure to cosmic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, D.T.; McAulay, I.R.; Schrewe, U.J.

    1997-01-01

    Aircraft crew and frequent flyers are exposed to elevated levels of cosmic radiation of galactic and solar origin and secondary radiation produced in the atmosphere, aircraft structure, etc. This has been recognised for some time and estimates of the exposure of aircraft crew have been made previously and included in, for example, UNSCEAR (United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation) publications. The recent increased interest has been brought about by several factors - the consideration that the relative biological effectiveness of the neutron component was being underestimated; the trend towards higher cruising altitudes for subsonic commercial aircraft and business jet aircraft; and most importantly, the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in Publication 60, and the revision of the Euratom Basic Safety Standards Directive (BSS). In 1992, the European Dosimetry Group (EURADOS) established a Working Group to consider the exposure to cosmic radiation of aircraft crew, and the scientific and technical problems associated with radiation protection dosimetry for this occupational group. The Working Group was composed of fifteen scientists (plus a corresponding member) involved in this field of study and with knowledge of radiation measurement at aviation altitudes. This paper is based on the findings of this Working Group. (author)

  13. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1996 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its radiological operations to ensure the health and safety of all DOE employees including contractors and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures and releases to levels that are ``As Low As Reasonably Achievable`` (ALARA). The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1996 provides summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE and precursor agency sites, and energy research. Collective exposure at DOE has declined by 80% over the past decade due to a cessation in opportunities for exposure during the transition in DOE mission from weapons production to cleanup, deactivation and decommissioning, and changes in reporting requirements and dose calculation methodology. In 1996, the collective dose decreased by 10% from the 1995 value due to decreased doses at five of the seven highest-dose DOE sites. For 1996, these sites attributed the reduction in collective dose to the completion of several decontamination and decommissioning projects, reduced spent fuel storage activities, and effective ALARA practices. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for managers in their management of radiological safety programs and commitment of resources.

  14. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1996 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its radiological operations to ensure the health and safety of all DOE employees including contractors and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures and releases to levels that are ''As Low As Reasonably Achievable'' (ALARA). The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1996 provides summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE and precursor agency sites, and energy research. Collective exposure at DOE has declined by 80% over the past decade due to a cessation in opportunities for exposure during the transition in DOE mission from weapons production to cleanup, deactivation and decommissioning, and changes in reporting requirements and dose calculation methodology. In 1996, the collective dose decreased by 10% from the 1995 value due to decreased doses at five of the seven highest-dose DOE sites. For 1996, these sites attributed the reduction in collective dose to the completion of several decontamination and decommissioning projects, reduced spent fuel storage activities, and effective ALARA practices. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for managers in their management of radiological safety programs and commitment of resources

  15. DOE 2008 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    A major priority of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to ensure the health, safety, and security of DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) provides the corporate-level leadership and strategic vision necessary to better coordinate and integrate health, safety, environment, security, enforcement, and independent oversight programs. One function that supports this mission is the DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program that provides collection, analysis, and dissemination of performance indicators, such as occupational radiation exposure information. This analysis supports corporate decision-making and synthesizes operational information to support continuous environment, safety, and health improvement across the DOE complex.

  16. DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podonsky, Glenn S. [US Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Health, Safety and Security

    2012-02-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. As an indicator of the overall amount of radiation dose received during the conduct of operations at DOE, the report includes information on collective total effective dose (TED). The TED is comprised of the effective dose (ED) from external sources, which includes neutron and photon radiation, and the internal committed effective dose (CED), which results from the intake of radioactive material into the body. The collective ED from photon exposure decreased by 23% between 2011 and 2012, while the neutron dose increased by 5%. The internal dose components of the collective TED decreased by 7%. Over the past 5-year period, 99.99% of the individuals receiving measurable TED have received doses below the 2 roentgen equivalent in man (rems) (20 millisievert [mSv]) TED administrative control level (ACL), which is well below the DOE regulatory limit of 5 rems (50 mSv) TED annually. The

  17. Controlling occupational radiation exposure. Alternatives to regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagan, L.A.; Squitieri, R.; Wildman, S.S.

    1980-01-01

    The principal strategy adopted for the control of occupational radiation exposure has been the establishment of standards expressed as maximum permissible exposures. The use of such standards is subject to a number of defects, among which is the neglect of the economic impact of imposing such standards. Furthermore, such standards carry the implication of a threshold for radiation effects, a concept now widely challenged. Lastly, the use of standards makes it impossible to evaluate the efficiency of the regulatory agency or to compare its performance with other similar agencies. An alternative to the use of standards, i.e. cost-benefit analysis, is discussed. The advantages of this technique meet many of the objections to the use of standards alone and allow health and safety resources to be allocated in a manner most likely to save the most lives. The greatest disadvantage of cost-benefit analysis has been the difficulty in evaluating the benefit side of the equation. Although the risks of radiation exposure are not known with precision, they are nevertheless well understood. Therefore, the application of cost-benefit analysis to occupational radiation exposure is rational. There are a number of barriers to reform in the use of standards and the adoption of cost-benefit analysis. These attitudinal and institutional constraints are discussed. The nature of private or market systems of control are discussed, i.e. the use of liability and insurance mechanisms. These also have shortcomings that require further development but are seen as potentially more efficient for both employer and employee than is the use of regulatory standards. (author)

  18. Health surveillance of persons occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation: Guidance for occupational physicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This Safety Report is intended mainly for occupational physicians, as well as for occupational health service personnel, to assist them in routine practice by specifying the features of work under radiation conditions, the general rules of radiological protection for occupational exposure and the organization of the medical surveillance of workers occupationally exposed to radiation. The Report is consistent with the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection presented in its Publication 60 (1990) and with the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources published by the IAEA in 1966. It supersedes Safety Series No.83 (Radiation Protection in Occupational Health: Manual for Occupational Physicians) published by the IAEA in 1987

  19. Occupational disease caused by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluepfel, H.U.

    1983-01-01

    The study investigates the course of the disease of persons whose occupational exposure to radiation had resulted in impairment of their professional ability and entitled them to damages under the current regulations. 35 receivers of damages were found who by answering the question form and partly giving permission to study their file at the insurance institution under the conditions of data protection made is possible to carry through this investigation. 14 receivers of damages were occupied in the technical industry, 21 in the sector of medicine. The radiation disease acknowledged as professional concerned in 30 cases the skin, in two cases the lungs and in one case each the haematopoietic system, the eyes and the pelvic organs. In 8 indemnified, acute radiation exposure had caused the disease, in 25 the time of exposure had ranged from one year to several decades. The investigation describes when and under what professional circumstances the radiation exposure took place, the course of the disease, what kind of diagnostic and therapeutical measures were carried through and what personal and professional consequences the indemnified sustained. It gives suggestions to set up a future, more effective documentation system on the basis of the experience gathered on the occasion of this investigation with the currently valid registration system, which is unsuitable for further scientific studies, and with the currently practised methods of after-care. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Aspects of ecological radiation endocrinology and occupational pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajtbembetov, B.M.

    1997-01-01

    The collection consists of works on radiation endocrinology and occupational pathology in different branches of industry - petroleum, mining, cotton, non-ferrous metallurgy as well as agriculture. Collection is intended for endocrinologists and occupational pathologists, for specialists of labour protection and occupational safety, for doctors examining of industrial and agricultural workers (author)

  1. Radiation dose assessment for occupationally exposed workers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-01-31

    Jan 31, 2017 ... with the legislation and safety requirements, has not yet been established. ... occupational exposure to ionising radiation such as X-rays. This study was hence ..... ionizing radiation), conventional X-ray machines or mobile.

  2. Occupational radiation exposure monitoring among radiation workers in Nepal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatt, Chhavi Raj; Shrestha, Shanta Lall; Khanal, Tara; Ween, Borgny

    2008-01-01

    Nepal was accepted as a member of the IAEA in 2007. Nepal is one of the world's least developed countries and is defined in Health Level IV. The population counted 26.4 millions in 2007. The health care sector increases with new hospitals and clinics, however, Nepal has no radiation protection authority or radiation protection regulation in the country until now. The radiation producing equipment in the health sector includes conventional X-ray and dental X-ray equipment, fluoroscopes, mammography, CT, catheterization laboratory equipment, nuclear medicine facilities, a few linear accelerators, Co 60 teletherapy and High Dose Rate brachytherapy sources. The situation regarding dosimetry service for radiation workers is unclear. A survey has been carried out to give an overview of the situation. The data collection of the survey was performed by phone call interviews with responsible staff at the different hospitals and clinics. Data about different occupationally exposed staff, use of personal radiation monitoring and type of dosimetry system were collected. In addition, it was asked if dosimetry reports were compiled in files or databases for further follow-up of staff, if needed. The survey shows that less of 25% of the procedures performed on the surveyed hospitals and clinics are performed by staff with personnel radiation monitoring. Radiation monitoring service for exposed staff is not compulsory or standardized, since there is no radiation protection authority. Nepal has taken a step forward regarding radiation protection, with the IAEA membership, although there are still major problems that have to be solved. An evaluation of the existing practice of staff dosimetry can be the first helpful step for further work in building a national radiation protection authority. (author)

  3. Occupational radiation exposure in Germany: many monitored persons = high exposure?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitschke, J.

    1996-01-01

    Natural radiation affects the entire population in Germany, and most of Germany's inhabitants are exposed to medical radiation in their lifetime. Occupational radiation exposure, however, is a kind of exposure affecting only a limited and well-defined group of the population, and this radiation exposure has been recorded and monitored as precisely as technically possible ever since the radiation protection laws made occupational radiation exposure monitoring a mandatory obligation. Official personal dosimetry applying passive dosemeters in fact does not offer direct protection against the effects of ionizing radiation, as dosemeter read-out and dose calculation is a post-exposure process. But it nevertheless is a rewarding monitoring duty under radiation protection law, as is shown by the radiation exposure statistics accumulated over decades: in spite of the number of monitored persons having been increasing over the years, the total exposure did not, due to the corresponding improvements in occupational radiation protection. (orig.) [de

  4. Occupational diseases in uranium and ore miners in connection with radiation exposure in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, T.

    2003-01-01

    Dozens cases of diseases are submitted to judgement as occupational diseases every year in the Czech Republic. Patients or attending physicians suggest that these cases are caused by occupational ionizing radiation. Only a part of these cases is qualified as occupational disease. The term 'occupational disease' is rather a juridical term which underlies the right to financial compensation. The causal association with exposure to ionizing radiation cannot be indisputably verified by expert medical opinion. Most diseases, which are proposed as occupational disease, are malignant tumors of the lungs. Total majority of judged cases are lung cancers from radioactive agents. In 2002, a total of 33 cases of lung cancer in former uranium or ore miners have been acknowledged as occupational diseases. The decision about occupational disease is derived from probabilistic approach based on estimation of probability of causation of irradiation on disease origin (methodical guideline No. 15 of Ministry of Health Bulletin, part 9, 1998). The presented paper gives a general information about all judged causes of occupational diseases in former uranium and ore miners in the Czech Republic in 2002. A total of 72 cases were submitted to judgement of conditions of disease origin to the National Radiation Protection Institute in 2002. 67 cases were lung cancers, 1 case was chronic myeloid leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, basaliom, cancer of larynx and cancer of nasal septum. The probability of causation was assessed as prevailing in 32 cases of lung cancer, borderline in 5 cases and low in other 30 cases of lung cancer. The probability of causation was prevailing in both cases of myeloid leukemia. (author)

  5. Monitoring and control of occupational radiation exposure in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, M.

    1997-01-01

    Occupational exposure is the most prominent example for the prolonged exposure to low level ionizing radiation characterized by low doses and dose rates. In this paper the occupational exposure in Switzerland is presented and the regulatory control of this exposure in the framework of the new radiation protection regulations is discussed. (author)

  6. Case study on the quality of tenders submitted by Occupational Health and Safety Professionals in the South African built environment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mphahlele, C

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of this paper: The purpose of the paper is to provide an overview of the current state of tenders submitted by Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) professionals in terms of functionality criteria. Design/methodology/approach: The research...

  7. DOE occupational radiation exposure. Report 1992--1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1992-1994 reports occupational radiation exposures incurred by individuals at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities from 1992 through 1994. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. This information is analyzed and trended over time to provide a measure of the DOE`s performance in protecting its workers from radiation. Occupational radiation exposure at DOE has been decreasing over the past 5 years. In particular, doses in the higher dose ranges are decreasing, including the number of doses in excess of the DOE limits and doses in excess of the 2 rem Administrative Control Level (ACL). This is an indication of greater attention being given to protecting these individuals from radiation in the workplace.

  8. DOE occupational radiation exposure. Report 1992--1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1992-1994 reports occupational radiation exposures incurred by individuals at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities from 1992 through 1994. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. This information is analyzed and trended over time to provide a measure of the DOE's performance in protecting its workers from radiation. Occupational radiation exposure at DOE has been decreasing over the past 5 years. In particular, doses in the higher dose ranges are decreasing, including the number of doses in excess of the DOE limits and doses in excess of the 2 rem Administrative Control Level (ACL). This is an indication of greater attention being given to protecting these individuals from radiation in the workplace

  9. Probabilistic induction of delayed health hazards in occupational radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad, M.H.M.; Abdel-Ghani, A.H.

    2003-01-01

    Occupational radiation workers are periodically monitored for their personal occupational dose. Various types of radiation measurement devices are used, mostly film badges and thermoluminescent dosimeters. Several thousand occupational radiation workers were monitored over a period of seven years (jan. 1995- Dec. 2001). These included atomic energy personnel, nuclear materials personnel, staff of mediology departments (diagnostic, therapeutic and nuclear medicine) and industrial occupational workers handling industrial radiography equipment besides other applications of radiation sources in industry. The probably of induction of health hazards in these radiation workers was assessed using the nominal probability coefficient adopted by the ICRP (1991) for both hereditary effects and cancer induction. In this treatise, data procured are presented and discussed inthe light of basic postulations of probabilistic occurrence of radiation induced delayed health effects

  10. Revision of the occupational health examination form for radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chang'an; Chen Erdong

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To revise the Occupational Health Examination Form for Radiation Workers, which is served as annex 3 of Management Regulations for Occupational Health Surveillance (Decree No.23 of Ministry of Health, P.R. China), so as to further improve and standardize the occupational health management for radiation workers. Methods: Based on corresponding laws, standards and general principles of occupational medicine. Results: The new version of the Form was established and passed auditing. Conclusion: The theoretical foundation, intention and methods of the revision process are briefly introduced. Requirements and necessary recommendations for implement the new Form are also described. (authors)

  11. Proceedings of radiation and occupational health Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng Kwan Hoong

    1995-07-01

    This book compiled the papers presented at this symposium. The were papers on policy of radiation safety regulations, radiation safety measures, radiation in medicine and radiation protection, radiation measurements, radon measurement, radiation in petroleum industry, radiation monitoring and non ionizing radiation safety

  12. Analysis of occupational doses of radiation workers in medical institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanaye, S.S.; Baburajan, Sujatha; Joshi, V.D.; Pawar, S.G.; Nalawade, S.K.; Raman, N.V.; Kher, R.K.

    2007-01-01

    Routine monitoring of occupational radiation workers is done for controlling the doses to the individuals and to demonstrate the compliance with occupational dose limits. One of the objective of personnel monitoring program is the assessment of the radiation safety of working area and trends of exposure histories of individuals or group of workers. Computerised dose registry of all monitored radiation workers along with their personnel data helps in analyzing these trends. This in turn helps the institutions in management of their radiation safety programs. In India, annual and life time occupational dose records are maintained as National Dose Registry in the Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. This paper presents analysis of occupational dose data of monitored radiation workers in medical institutions in India during last five years (i.e. 2002-2006)

  13. Occupational exposure to natural radiation in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, D.R.

    2002-01-01

    The mining, milling and processing of uranium and thorium bearing minerals may result in radiation doses to workers. A preliminary survey pilot program, that included six mines in Brazil (two coal mines, one niobium mine, one nickel mine, one gold mine and one phosphate mine), was launched in order to determine the need to control the radioactive exposure of the mine-workers. Our survey consisted of the collection and analysis of urine samples, complemented by feces and air samples. The concentrations of uranium, thorium and polonium were measured in these samples and compared to background data from family members of the workers living in the same dwelling and from residents from the general population of Rio de Janeiro. The results from the coal mines indicated that the inhalation of radon progeny may be a source of occupational exposure. The workers from the nickel, gold and phosphate mines that were visited do not require a program to control internal radiological doses. The niobium mine results showed that in some areas of the industry exposure to thorium and uranium might occur. (author)

  14. Administrative norms on radiofrequency radiation for occupationally exposed persons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxeboel, G.

    1982-01-01

    The report presents a proposal for administrative norms on radiofrequency (RF) radiation for occupationally exposed persons. The norms establish maximum allowable field exposure in a frequency range from 1 MHz too 300 GHz. (RF)

  15. Evaluation of diseases associated to occupational exposure to ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, Ileana Frometa

    1997-01-01

    A retrospective investigation of all cases of radiation workers with diseases and injuries, considered as occupational diseases caused by ionizing radiation is presented. The investigation includes all cases registered in the Institute of Occupational Health over five years period (1990-1995). The incidence of that diseases are studied, as well as the correlation between each type of source, time of exposure and annual average equivalent individual dose

  16. [Occupational risk related to optical radiation exposure in construction workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobba, F; Modenese, A

    2012-01-01

    Optical Radiation is a relevant occupational risk in construction workers, mainly as a consequence of the exposure to the ultraviolet (UV) component of solar radiation (SR). Available data show that UV occupational limits are frequently exceeded in these workers, resulting in an increased occupational risk of various acute and chronic effects, mainly to skin and to the eye. One of the foremost is the carcinogenic effect: SR is indeed included in Group 1 IARC (carcinogenic to humans). UV exposure is related to an increase of the incidence of basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma of the skin and cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). The incidence of these tumors, especially CMM, is constantly increasing in Caucasians in the last 50 years. As a conclusion, an adequate evaluation of the occupational risk related to SR, and adequate preventive measures are essential in construction workers. The role of occupational physicians in prevention is fundamental.

  17. The latest occupational radiation exposure data from U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Licensees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brock, T.

    2007-01-01

    This presentation summarizes the latest - 2005 occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System. The bulk of the information contained in the paper was compiled from the 2005 annual reports submitted by NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of U.S. regulations (10 CFR 20.2206). Those licensees subject to reporting include commercial nuclear power plants, industrial radiographers, fuel processors, independent spent fuel storage installations, manufacturers and distributors of by-product material, facilities for low-level waste disposal, and geologic repositories for high-level waste. The annual reports submitted by these licensees consist of radiation exposure records for each monitored individual. These records are analyzed for trends and presented in terms of collective dose and the distribution of doses by licensee category. (author)

  18. In vitro cell culture lethal dose submitted to gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Carolina S.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Rogero, Jose Roberto [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: carolina_sm@hotmail.com; Ikeda, Tamiko I.; Cruz, Aurea S. [Instituto Adolfo Lutz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro effect of gamma radiation in cell culture of mouse connective tissue exposed to different doses of gamma radiation and under several conditions. The cell viability was analyzed by neutral red uptake methodology. This assay was developed for establish a methodology to be used in the future in the study of resveratrol radioprotection. Resveratrol (3,4',5- trihydroxystilbene), a phenolic phytoalexin that occurs naturally in some spermatophytes, such as grapevines, in response to injury as fungal infections and exposure to ultraviolet light. In the wines this compound is found at high levels and is considered one of the highest antioxidant constituents. The intense antioxidant potential of resveratrol provides many pharmacological activities including cardioprotection, chemoprevention and anti-tumor effects. Our results demonstrated that {sup 60}Co gamma radiation lethal dose (LD50) on NCTC clone 929 cells was about 340Gy. (author)

  19. In vitro cell culture lethal dose submitted to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, Carolina S.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Rogero, Jose Roberto; Ikeda, Tamiko I.; Cruz, Aurea S.

    2009-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro effect of gamma radiation in cell culture of mouse connective tissue exposed to different doses of gamma radiation and under several conditions. The cell viability was analyzed by neutral red uptake methodology. This assay was developed for establish a methodology to be used in the future in the study of resveratrol radioprotection. Resveratrol (3,4',5- trihydroxystilbene), a phenolic phytoalexin that occurs naturally in some spermatophytes, such as grapevines, in response to injury as fungal infections and exposure to ultraviolet light. In the wines this compound is found at high levels and is considered one of the highest antioxidant constituents. The intense antioxidant potential of resveratrol provides many pharmacological activities including cardioprotection, chemoprevention and anti-tumor effects. Our results demonstrated that 60 Co gamma radiation lethal dose (LD50) on NCTC clone 929 cells was about 340Gy. (author)

  20. Assessment of illnesses associated with occupational exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frometa Suarez, I.

    1996-01-01

    The medical surveillance of occupationally exposed workers allows to assess their health condition and is supported by the performance of pre-employment and periodic medical researches that would lead to the discovery of deviations or disorders in organs and tissues specially sensitive to radiation damage as a result of working with ionizing radiation

  1. DOE Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure_2011 pamphlet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ORAU

    2012-08-08

    This pamphlet focusses on two HSS activities that help ensure radiation exposures are accurately assessed and recorded, namely: 1) the quality and accuracy of occupational radiation exposure monitoring, and 2) the recording, reporting, analysis, and dissemination of the monitoring results. It is intended to provide a short summary of two specific HSS programs that aid in the oversight of radiation protection activities at DOE. The Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) is in place to ensure that radiation exposure monitoring at all DOE sites is precise and accurate, and conforms to national and international performance and quality assurance standards. The DOE Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems (REMS) program provides for the collection, analysis, and dissemination of occupational radiation exposure information. The annual REMS report is a valuable tool for managing radiological safety programs and for developing policies to protect individuals from occupational exposure to radiation. In tandem, these programs provide DOE management and workers an assurance that occupational radiation exposures are accurately measured, analyzed, and reported.

  2. Radiation exams in occupational medical evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelsleichter, A.M.; Hunh, A.; Nandi, D.M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: In occupational medicine, medical care must be geared toward the prevention of worker health. However, occupational medical exams often seek only through rigorous screening, reduce absenteeism, and thus increase productivity. To meet this goal, many institutions include radiological examinations indiscriminately in their medical and expert evaluations, contrary to the principle of justification. Objective: To provide a reflection about the presence of radiological exams in occupational medical evaluations. Methodology: Literary review including legislation related to the research topic. Results: Portaria 453/98 ANVISA prohibits the performance of radiological examinations for employment or expert purposes, except in cases where the exam may bring a benefit to the health of the individual examined or to society. However, in some situations the Norma Regulamentadora number 7 of the Ministry of Labor and Employment provides for radiological exams as a parameter for monitoring occupational exposure. Article 168 of the Consolidation of Labor Laws also prescribes that additional examinations may be required, at the medical discretion, to determine the physical and mental fitness of the employee for the job. Conclusion: Although there are legal provisions that prohibit and others that allow radiological exams in medical occupational evaluations, companies and institutions should take into account that any radiological exam has a risk involved and should not request them in a compulsory and indiscriminate manner. Radiological exams are only permissible to elucidate the diagnostic hypothesis produced by clinical evaluation, in order to provide a real benefit for the individual

  3. Physiological quality of rice seed submitted to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Helen Lucia da Cruz; Tillmann, Maria Angela Andre; Meneghello, Geri Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the effects of the gamma radiation ( 60 Co) on the physiological quality of rice seeds. The research was carried out through three tests; in the first test rice seeds were irradiated at dosages of 0; 1; 2.5 and 5Gy, while for the second and third tests the seeds were subjected to accelerated aging before being irradiated. For the second test the seeds were divided into wet and dry and both groups subjected to accelerated aging previous to irradiation at dosages of 0; 1; 2.5 and 5Gy. For the third test the seeds were dried after being subjected to accelerated aging, and then irradiated at dosages of 0, 10, 25 and 50Gy. To assess the physiological effects of the gamma radiation, all seeds were tested for germination and their germination speed index recorded. Seedling growth was graded through the measurement of the lengths of the first leaf and seminal root system and total seedling dry weight, across all tests. The enzymatic activity of acid phosphatase and alpha-amylase was measured on dry seeds from the second test. The results from all tests indicate that the applied gamma radiation dosages did not cause any changes to the physiological quality of rice seeds. (author)

  4. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raddatz, C.T.

    1993-07-01

    This report summarizes the occupational radiation exposure information that has been reported to the NRC's Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS) by nuclear power facilities and certain other categories of NRC licensees during the years 1969 through 1991. The bulk of the data presented in the report was obtained from annual radiation exposure reports submitted in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR 20.407 and the technical specifications of nuclear power plants. Data on workers terminating their employment at certain NRC licensed facilities were obtained from reports submitted pursuant to 10 CFR 20.408. The 1991 annual reports submitted by about 436 licensees indicated that approximately 206,732 individuals were monitored, 182,334 of whom were monitored by nuclear power facilities. They incurred an average individual dose of 0.15 rem (cSv) and an average measurable dose of about 0.31 (cSv). Termination radiation exposure reports were analyzed to reveal that about 96,231 individuals completed their employment with one or more of the 436 covered licensees during 1991. Some 68,115 of these individuals terminated from power reactor facilities, and about 7,763 of them were considered to be transient workers who received an average dose of 0.52 rem (cSv)

  5. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raddatz, C.T.

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the occupational radiation exposure information that has been reported to the NRC's Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS) by nuclear power facilities and certain other categories of NRC 1 licensees during the years 1969 through 1989. The bulk of the data presented in the report was obtained from annual radiation exposure reports submitted in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR 20.407 and the technical specifications of nuclear power plants. Data on workers terminating their employment at certain NRC 1 licensed facilities were obtained from reports submitted pursuant to 10 CFR 20.408. The 1989 annual reports submitted by about 448 licensees indicated that approximately 216,294 individuals were monitored 111,000 of whom were monitored by nuclear power facilities. They incurred an average individual does of 0.18 rem (cSv) and an average measurable dose of 0.36 (cSv). Termination radiation exposure reports were analyzed to reveal that about 113,535 individuals completed their employment with one or more of the 448 covered licensees during 1989. Some 76,561 of these individuals terminated from power reactor facilities, and about 10, 344 of them were considered to be transient workers who received an average dose of 0.64 rem (cSv)

  6. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raddatz, C.T.

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes the occupational radiation exposure information that has been reported to the NRC's Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS) by nuclear power facilities and certain other categories of NRC licensees during the years 1969 through 1988. The bulk of the data presented in the report was obtained from annual radiation exposure reports submitted in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR 20.407 and the technical specifications of nuclear power plants. Data on workers terminating their employment at certain NRC licensed facilities were obtained from reports submitted pursuant to 10 CFR 20.408. The 1988 annual reports submitted by about 429 licensees indicated that approximately 220,048 individuals were monitored, 113,00 of whom were monitored by nuclear power facilities. They incurred an average individual dose of 0.20 rem (cSv) and an average measurable dose of 0.41 (cSv). Termination radiation exposure reports were analyzed to reveal that about 113,072 individuals completed their employment with one or more of the 429 covered licensees during 1988. Some 80,211 of these individuals terminated from power reactor facilities, and about 8,760 of them were considered to be transient workers who received an average dose of 0.27 rem (cSv). 17 refs., 11 figs., 29 tabs

  7. 76 FR 4258 - Occupational Radiation Protection; Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    ... instructions for submitting comments. E-mail: [email protected]hq.doe.gov . Include Docket Number HS- RM-09-835 and..., DC 20585. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Judith Foulke, (301) 903-5865, e-mail: [email protected]hq.doe... Concentration (DAC) for Workers from External Exposure during Immersion in a Cloud of Airborne Radioactive...

  8. Radiation dose evaluation in patients submitted to conventional radiological examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilly Junior, Joao G.

    1997-01-01

    This work presents the results of the evaluation of radiation dose delivered to the patients undergoing conventional radiological procedures. Based in the realized measurement some indicators are settled to quantitative appraisal of the radiological protection conditions offered to the population. Data assessment was done in the county of Curitiba, in Parana State, Brazil, from 12/95 to 04/96, in ten rooms of three different institutions, under 101 patients, adults with 70 ± 10 kg, during real examinations of chest PA, chest LAT and abdomen AP. (author)

  9. Occupational radiation dose in Indonesia 1981-1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiswara, E.; Ismono, A.

    1993-01-01

    Occupational radiation dose in Indonesia 1981-1986. This paper presents the occupational radiation dose in Indonesia during the period of 1981-1986. The highest collective dose accurated in 1983 was calculated to be 2.68 man-Sv, with the maximum mean dose per worker, who received dose more than zero, was around 11.07 mSv in the same year. In 1985, a relative collective dose from medical occupations of 1.88 man mSv for 10 6 population was estimated based on its total collective dose of 0.31 man-mSv. The total number of workers who received annual collective dose less than 5 mSv varied from 97.0% in 1981 to 99.5% in 1986. As a group, the industrial occupations has considerably higher risk in receiving a dose than others. (authors). 11 refs., 7 tabs

  10. Evaluation of contrast media submitted to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinho, Katia Elisa Prus; Gewehr, Pedro Miguel; Soboll, Danyel Scheidegger; Silva, Caroline Werner Pereira da; Barison, Andersson; Tilly Junior, Joao Gilberto

    2009-01-01

    Objective: the purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of ionizing radiation from x-rays and gamma rays on the molecular structure stability of several radiologic contrast media employed in diagnostic imaging by means of 1 H and 1 3C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Materials and methods: eight different types of iodinated contrast media (three ionic and five non-ionic) were exposed to x-rays and gamma rays irradiation. Subsequently, the 1 H and 1 3C{ 1 H} nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of these contrast media were collected. Results: the 1 H and 1 3C{ 1 H} nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of both ionic and non-ionic contrast media irradiated by x-rays or gamma rays demonstrated the absence of any alteration of the contrast media chemical composition. Conclusion: there is no problem in keeping contrast media inside examination rooms or close to radiological equipment. It is important to mention that, during the tests, the samples were directly irradiated, while in a radiology examination room, the irradiation is not direct and, therefore, radiation levels in these cases are much lower than those employed in the present study. (author)

  11. Stability evaluation of resveratrol submitted to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momesso, Roberta G.R.A.P.; Silva, Mariana L. da; Spencer, Patrick J.; Sousa, Jose M. de; Rogero, Jose R.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Lugao, Ademar B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: robertapassarelli@yahoo.com.br

    2009-07-01

    The polyphenol trans-resveratrol (trans-3, 4',5-trihydroxystilbene) is a natural phytoalexin, reported to exert different biological activities, such as antioxidant properties. In the attempt to make possible the topic administration of resveratrol it will be immobilized in a hydrogel matrix obtained by gamma radiation crosslinking process which can cause undesirable hydrolysis reactions in the active compound. The aim of this work was to verify the aqueous/ethanol resveratrol solution stability and antioxidant activity after irradiation at 20 kGy. The integrity and stability were compared with nature one by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) technique. The antioxidant activity was determined by the free radical scavenging method, using 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH.) as free radical. The results demonstrated the decomposition of resveratrol and reduction of antioxidant capacity after irradiation at 20 kGy dose. (author)

  12. Stability evaluation of resveratrol submitted to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momesso, Roberta G.R.A.P.; Silva, Mariana L. da; Spencer, Patrick J.; Sousa, Jose M. de; Rogero, Jose R.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Lugao, Ademar B.

    2009-01-01

    The polyphenol trans-resveratrol (trans-3, 4',5-trihydroxystilbene) is a natural phytoalexin, reported to exert different biological activities, such as antioxidant properties. In the attempt to make possible the topic administration of resveratrol it will be immobilized in a hydrogel matrix obtained by gamma radiation crosslinking process which can cause undesirable hydrolysis reactions in the active compound. The aim of this work was to verify the aqueous/ethanol resveratrol solution stability and antioxidant activity after irradiation at 20 kGy. The integrity and stability were compared with nature one by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) technique. The antioxidant activity was determined by the free radical scavenging method, using 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH.) as free radical. The results demonstrated the decomposition of resveratrol and reduction of antioxidant capacity after irradiation at 20 kGy dose. (author)

  13. Childhood cancer and occupational radiation exposure in parents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, N.; Zack, M.; Caldwell, G.G.; Fernbach, D.J.; Falletta, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that a parent's job exposure to radiation affeOR). its his or her child's risk of cancer, the authors compared this exposure during the year before the child's birth for parents of children with and without cancer. Parents of children with cancer were no more likely to have worked in occupations, industries, or combined occupations and industries with potential ionizing radiation exposure. Bone cancer and Wilms' tumor occurred more frequently among children of fathers in all industries with moderate potential ionizing radiation exposure. Children with cancer more often had fathers who were aircraft mechanics (odds ratio (OR)) . infinity, one-sided 95% lower limit . 1.5; P . 0.04). Although four of these six were military aircraft mechanics, only children whose fathers had military jobs with potential ionizing radiation exposure had an increased cancer risk (OR . 2.73; P . 0.01). Four cancer types occurred more often among children of fathers in specific radiation-related occupations: rhabdomyosarcoma among children whose fathers were petroleum industry foremen; retinoblastoma among children whose fathers were radio and television repairmen; central nervous system cancers and other lymphatic cancers among children of Air Force fathers. Because numbers of case fathers are small and confidence limits are broad, the associations identified by this study need to be confirmed in other studies. Better identification and gradation of occupational exposure to radiation would increase the sensitivity to detect associations

  14. Occupational radiation protection: Protecting workers against exposure to ionizing radiation. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-07-01

    Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation can occur in a range of industries, mining and milling; medical institutions, educational and research establishments and nuclear fuel cycle facilities. The term 'occupational exposure' refers to the radiation exposure incurred by a worker, which is attributable to the worker's occupation and committed during a period of work. According to the latest (2000) Report of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), an estimated 11 million workers are monitored for exposure to ionizing radiation. They incur radiation doses attributable to their occupation, which range from a small fraction of the global average background exposure to natural radiation up to several times that value. It should be noted that the UNSCEAR 2000 Report describes a downward trend in the exposure of several groups of workers, but it also indicates that occupational exposure is affecting an increasingly large group of people worldwide. The International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS), which are co-sponsored by, inter alia, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the International Labour Organization (ILO), the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the World Health Organization (WHO), establish a system of radiation protection which includes radiation dose limits for occupational exposure. Guidance supporting the requirements of the BSS for occupational protection is provided in three interrelated Safety Guides, jointly sponsored by the IAEA and the ILO. These Guides describe, for example, the implications for employers in discharging their main responsibilities (such as setting up appropriate radiation protection programmes) and similarly for workers (such as properly using the radiation monitoring devices provided to them). The IAEA i organized its first International Conference on Occupational Radiation Protection. The

  15. Impact of climate change on occupational exposure to solar radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandi, Carlo; Borra, Massimo; Militello, Andrea; Polichetti, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Occupational exposure to solar radiation may induce both acute and long-term effects on skin and eyes. Personal exposure is very difficult to assess accurately, as it depends on environmental, organisational and individual factors. The ongoing climate change interacting with stratospheric ozone dynamics may affect occupational exposure to solar radiation. In addition, tropospheric levels of environmental pollutants interacting with solar radiation may be altered by climate dynamics, so introducing another variable affecting the overall exposure to solar radiation. Given the uncertainties regarding the direction of changes in exposure to solar radiation due to climate change, compliance of outdoor workers with protective measures and a proper health surveillance are crucial. At the same time, education and training, along with the promotion of healthier lifestyles, are of paramount importance.

  16. Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation in Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shadrack, Anthony Kiti

    2008-01-01

    Full text: This project is based on studies of radiation doses received by radiation workers from sample of radiation facilities in Nairobi, Kenya, using TLD badges. Radiation doses received by workers during performance of a few types of radiological exposures and application of sealed and unsealed radionuclides have been measured at a number of x ray departments (diagnostic radiology), radiotherapy and nuclear medicine and training and research. Radiation dose measurements were based on thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) techniques, using the laboratory facilities of the National Radiation Protection Laboratory (NRPL) at KNH, in Nairobi, Kenya. Evaluation of doses from TLD badges exposed to X-rays and radioisotopes are discussed. Nuclear medicine recorded the highest dose as compared to Radiotherapy, Training and research and Diagnostic radiology. Age and gender have no relation with dose absorption. Yearly average dose seems to have been reducing from 2002 to 2005, representing an improvement in radiation protection. Overall, the results show that radiation workers in Kenya are working under safe environments since the doses received are within acceptable limits of radiation protection. The data presented in this research provides a database, which should serve as a useful reference for comparison with similar studies in the future. (author)

  17. Documentation of Occupational Accidents and Diseases caused by Ionising Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehringer, F.; Seitz, G.

    2004-01-01

    . One of the major goals of the institutions for statutory accident insurance is the prevention of occupational diseases. To perform a successful prevention work it is necessary not only to count the number of accidents or diseases in the various working fields but to look for details of the conditions of work and the human response to those conditions. The institutions for statutory accident insurance have engaged the institution for statutory accident insurance in the precision engineering and electrical industry to carry out documentation, in form of a data bank, for all cases of occupational diseases which could be caused by ionising radiation. Those are not only the cases which are accepted as occupational disease but also the cases where a suspicion of an occupational disease is announced but finally rejected. At the moment about 1700 cases are included in the data bank. For preserving the anonymity information to name and residence are deleted. Various data to one single case are linked by a case-specific key-number. Information to occupation and field of working, to details of a possible exposure to ionising radiation like kind of radiation, time and duration of radiation, exposure of the whole body or of parts of the body and whole body or organ doses are collected. Additional information refers to medical aspects like diagnosis and date of diagnosis. (Author)

  18. Cost benefit analysis for occupational radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caruthers, G.F.; Rodgers, R.C.; Donohue, J.P.; Swartz, H.M.

    1978-01-01

    In the course of system design, many decisions must be made concerning different aspects of that particular system. The design of systems and components in a nuclear power plant has the added faction of occupational exposure experienced as a result of that design. This paper will deal with the different methods available to factor occupational exposure into design decisions. The ultimate goal is to have exposures related to the design 'As Low As Reasonably Achievable' or ALARA. To do this an analysis should be performed to show that the cost of reducing exposures any further cannot be justified in a cost-benefit analysis. In this paper examples will be given that will show that it is possible to change to a design which would increase occupational exposure somewhat but would increase the benefit over the cost of the extra exposure received. It will also be shown that some changes in design or additional equipment could be justified due to a reduction in exposure while some changes could not be justified on a reduction in exposure aspect alone but are justified on a time saving aspect such as during a refueling outage. (author)

  19. Bacteriological evaluation of fresh chicken sausage submitted to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Alexandre

    2002-01-01

    Many developed countries have established a goal of self-sufficiency in food production, while many other obtain their principal foreign exchange through food exports. For these reasons, it is essential to eliminate losses in food products. It is no less important to prevent or combat food-transmitted diseases, principally across poultry and poultry derivatives, which play a major role in certain infections and is the focus of national public health goals in order to increase the international commerce. In tropical countries, perishable products represent the largest markets. The population lives in a constant battle against the deterioration of these foods. Such loss is enormous where the climate favors the proliferation of agents of decomposition and acceleration of putrification. Increasing the useful life of these perishable products will provide producers the option of commercializing them in low harvest season, thus achieving higher prices, and providing sensible growth to the agro-industrial market. Treatment of perishables with gamma radiation presently constitutes one of the most modern, safe, and efficient methods for increasing food preservation. The irradiation of foods can offer various special advantages such as: kill or sterilize pathogenic organisms in food, improving their quality and duration, reducing the level of toxics, slow or stop the aging of roots and tubers, disinfect products of animal and vegetable origin thus slowing their decomposition, increasing their shelf-life, and prolonging their conservation refrigeration. The practice of irradiating foods for the treatment of microorganisms has begun to gain momentum in Brazil, where roughly 25% of all food produced annually is lost to disease and insects activity, increased by lack of adequate storage treatments. Various countries have already adopted the method that, when practiced properly by qualified professionals, does not cause side effects other than the extension of useful life. In

  20. Occupational diseases in uranium and ore miners related to radiation exposure in the Czech Republic in 2002 - 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, T.

    2008-01-01

    Dozens cases of disease of former or present uranium and ore miners are submitted to judgment as occupational diseases every year in the Czech Republic. Patients or attending physicians suggest that these cases are caused by occupational ionizing radiation. Only a part of these cases is qualified as occupational disease, nevertheless they can cause many juridical problems. The term 'occupational disease' is rather juridical term which underlies the right to financial compensation. The causal association with exposure to ionizing radiation cannot be indisputably verified by expert medical opinion. Most diseases in uranium and ore miners, which are proposed as occupational disease, are malignant tumors. The majority of judged cases are lung cancers from radioactive agents. The poster gives general information about all judged cases of occupational diseases in former uranium and ore miners in the Czech Republic in the years 2002 -2007. It also provides short information about standards of professional radiation exposure assessment valid in the other countries. Most frequent diseases were lung cancers. Nevertheless the rate of lung cancers acknowledged as occupational disease decreases during the last two decades. Non-melanoma skin cancers are on the second place. The rate of skin cancers increases. We can explain this fact by better diagnostics and by new method which allows more precious assessment of the skin dose. The method is used since 2005. Leukemias are on the third place (1-2 cases in the year). (authors)

  1. Occupational diseases in uranium and ore miners related to radiation exposure in the Czech Republic in 2002 - 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, T.

    2009-01-01

    Dozens cases of disease of former or present uranium and ore miners are submitted to judgment as occupational diseases every year in the Czech Republic. Patients or attending physicians suggest that these cases are caused by occupational ionizing radiation. Only a part of these cases is qualified as occupational disease, nevertheless they can cause many juridical problems. The term 'occupational disease' is rather juridical term which underlies the right to financial compensation. The causal association with exposure to ionizing radiation cannot be indisputably verified by expert medical opinion. Most diseases in uranium and ore miners, which are proposed as occupational disease, are malignant tumors. The majority of judged cases are lung cancers from radioactive agents. The poster gives general information about all judged cases of occupational diseases in former uranium and ore miners in the Czech Republic in the years 2002-2007. It also provides short information about standards of professional radiation exposure assessment valid in the other countries. Most frequent diseases were lung cancers. Nevertheless the rate of lung cancers acknowledged as occupational disease decreases during the last two decades. Non-melanoma skin cancers are on the second place. The rate of skin cancers increases. We can explain this fact by better diagnostics and by new method which allows more precious assessment of the skin dose. The method is used since 2005. Leukemias are on the third place (1-2 cases in the year). (authors)

  2. Basic principles for occupational radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This Safety Guide sets forth the objectives of an adequate strategy for monitoring internal and external radiation exposures of workers. It covers individual monitoring, and workplace monitoring to the extent required for assessment and control of individual radiation doses. The responsibilities of authorities for organizing the monitoring of radiation workers are discussed, and brief descriptions are given of the rules governing the implementation of monitoring methods. The general principles to be considered in selecting instrumentation and appropriate monitoring techniques are described, as well as calibrating techniques, methods of record keeping and related aspects

  3. Occupational radiation doses during interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuraeni, N; Hiswara, E; Kartikasari, D; Waris, A; Haryanto, F

    2016-01-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is a type of fluoroscopy technique used in interventional radiology to clearly visualize blood vessels in a bony or dense soft tissue environment. The use of DSA procedures has been increased quite significantly in the Radiology departments in various cities in Indonesia. Various reports showed that both patients and medical staff received a noticeable radiation dose during the course of this procedure. A study had been carried out to measure these doses among interventionalist, nurse and radiographer. The results show that the interventionalist and the nurse, who stood quite close to the X-ray beams compared with the radiographer, received radiation higher than the others. The results also showed that the radiation dose received by medical staff were var depending upon the duration and their position against the X-ray beams. Compared tothe dose limits, however, the radiation dose received by all these three medical staff were still lower than the limits. (paper)

  4. Radiation and occupational health: opening address

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammad Taib Osman

    1995-01-01

    The part of address discusses the following issue: benefits of radiological protection in Malaysia, traceability and accountability as assurance of the validity of radiation measurement, Laboratory Accreditation Scheme, Atomic Energy Licensing Act

  5. Occupational radiation exposure in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloebel, B.; Muth, H.; Keller, K.D.; Hector, G.; Lehnen, H.

    1982-01-01

    In a large hospital (University Hospital, Homburg/Saar, 2000 beds) the use of radionuclides was determined with the aim of a balance of the radionuclide flow through the clinic and the resulting radiation exposure for the persons involved. (author)

  6. State Register of Sources of Ionizing Radiation and Occupational exposure

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    One of main tasks of Radiation Protection Centre is to collect, process, systematize, store and provide the data on sources of ionizing radiation and occupational exposures. The number of sources in 2002 is provided and compared with previous year. Distribution of workers according to the type of practice is compared with previous year. Distribution of sealed sources and x-ray machines according their use is presented.

  7. Risk of occupational radiation-induced cataract in medical workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snezana, Milacic

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was determination of criteria for recognition of a pre senile cataract as a professional disease in health care personnel exposed to small doses of ionizing radiation. Method: The study included 3240 health workers in medical centers of Serbia in the period 1992-2002. A total of 1560 workers were employed in the zone (group A) and 1680 out of ionizing radiation zone (group B). Among group A, two groups had been selected: 1. Group A-1: Health workers in the ionizing radiation zone who contracted lens cataract during their years of service while dosimetry could not reveal higher absorbed dose (A-1=115); 2. Group A-2: Health workers in the ionizing radiation zone with higher incidence of chromosomal aberrations and without cataract (A-2=100). Results: More significant incidence of cataract was found in group A, χ 2 =65.92; p<0.01. Radiation risk was higher in health workers in radiation zone than in others, relative risk is 4, 6. Elevated blood sugar level was found in higher percentage with health workers working in radiation zone who developed cataract. Conclusion: Low doses of radiation are not the cause of occupational cataract as individual occupational disease. X-ray radiation may be a significant cofactor of cataract in radiological technicians. (author)

  8. Radiation dose assessment for occupationally exposed workers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-01-31

    Jan 31, 2017 ... with the legislation and safety requirements, has not yet ... occupational exposure to ionising radiation such as X-rays. This study was hence ... of health care service delivery in Malawi (i.e. regional level, district level and ...

  9. Evaluation of illnesses associated with occupational exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frometa Suarez, I.

    1997-01-01

    A retrospective study by the Institute of Occupational Medicine is presented of all cases of pathological indications of ionizing radiation exposure during the period 1990-1995. It describes the incidence of theses diseases and their relationship with other factors. It has shown the predominance of pathologies of the haemolymphopoietic system in individuals who work in radiological diagnostics

  10. Occupational exposure to natural sources of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, T.; Sciocchetti, G.; Rannou, A.

    1993-01-01

    The most important natural sources of radiation are analyzed. The situation in France, Italy, and Spain concerning protection against natural radiation is described, including the identification of sources, and defined practices, organizations charged of national surveys and the responsibility of regulatory bodies and the role of operating management. The activities of the international organizations (ICRP, CEC and IAEA) are presented and discussed, and existing actions toward harmonization in the CEC, IAEA and other international programs is also discussed. (R.P.) 23 refs., 2 tabs

  11. Non-ionizing radiation: an occupational apathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Yusof Mohd Ali

    2000-01-01

    Non-ionizing radiation, NIR, is widely used in various modern applications to the extent that its presence is common in some work places. However, due to inability of human beings to detect its presence make the radiation 'invisible' to the workers most of the time. Of late it is known that the radiation can be hazardous to human health if the exposure received is excessively high. Such proven health effects has led international organizations, such as, IRPA establishing standard guidelines and maximum permissible limits to control its exposure. Recent studies reveal that some work places do indicate the presence of the radiation at levels far exceeding the IRPA recommended limits. It is, therefore, the objective of this paper to highlight such hazardous situations, magnitude of the hazards involved and ways and means how to overcome the hazard so that workers can take necessary precaution and action to minimize the health risk associated with the hazard. However, due to time and space constraint, only five types of the NIR are elaborated in this paper, namely ELF, RF and microwave, UV, IR and laser

  12. Influence of materials choice on occupational radiation exposure in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forty, C.B.A.; Firth, J.D.; Butterworth, G.J.

    1998-01-01

    In fission reactor plant, the radiation doses associated with inspection and maintenance of the primary cooling circuit account for a substantial fraction of the collective occupational radiation exposure (ORE). Similarly, it is anticipated that much of the ORE occurring during normal operation of ITER will arise from active deposits in the cooling loop. Using a number of calculation steps ranging from neutron activation analysis, mobilisation and transport modelling and Monte Carlo simulation, estimates for the gamma photon flux and radiation dose fields around a typical 'hot-leg' cooling pipe have been made taking SS316, OPTSTAB, MANET-II and F-82H steels as alternative candidate loop materials. (orig.)

  13. Remote after-effect of occupational radiation action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gus' kova, A K; Soldatova, V A; Denisova, E A; Gorbarenko, N I; Gribova, I A; Kirsanova, G I; L' vovskaya, E N

    1976-04-01

    Examination of medical roentgenologists and operators of accelerators and gamma-defectoscopes exposed for a long time to ionizing radiation and irradiated in total doses of 30 to 400 rad showed that the condition of their health was quite satisfactory. Cases of occupational diseases (chronic radiation sickness and local radiation affections) were single with the maximum total dose. There is a tendency to the increase of the number of cases of the vegetative-vascular dystony of a hypertensive type and in the group with a large dose of irradiation--a tendency to acceleration of involutional processes in the lens and in the cardiovascular system. No substantial shifts in the indices of the peripheral blood in all the occupational groups were revealed.

  14. Effects of the new radiation protection act on the radiation protection register and the monitoring of occupational radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frasch, G.

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of DIRECTIVE 2013/59 / EURATOM (EURATOM Basic Safety Standards) is via the new radiation protection law and brings in the monitoring of occupational radiation among others two significant new features and changes: - Introduction of a unique personal identifier, - update of the occupational categories. Both require technical and organizational changes in the data transmission of the licensees to the dosimetry services and the radiation protection register.

  15. Follow up on a workloaded interventional radiologist's occupational radiation doses - a study case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketner, D.; Ofer, A.; Engel, A.

    2004-01-01

    During many interventional procedures, patients' radiation doses are high, affecting radiologist's radiation doses. We checked occupational doses of a workloaded interventional radiologist during seven years

  16. Occupational radiation exposure to norms in a gold mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darko, E. O.; Tetteh, G. K.; Akaho, E. H. K.

    2005-01-01

    Preliminary studies have been conducted into the occupational radiation exposure to NORMS from surface and underground mining operations in a gold mine in the Ashanti Region of Ghana. A brief description of the methods and instrumentation is presented. The annual effective dose has been estimated to be 0.26 ± 0.11 mSv for surface mining and 1.83 ± 0.56 mSv for the underground mines using the ICRP dose calculation method. The results obtained are found to be within the allowable limit of 20 mSv per annum for occupational exposure control recommended by the ICRP. (authors)

  17. Lifetime attributable risk for cancer from occupational radiation exposure among radiologic technologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Eun Kyeong; Lee, Won Jin [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Medical radiation workers were among the earliest occupational groups exposed to external ionizing radiation due to their administration of a range of medical diagnostic procedures. Ionizing radiation is a confirmed human carcinogen for most organ sites. This study, therefore, was aimed to estimate lifetime cancer risk from occupational exposure among radiologic technologists that has been recruited in 2012-2013. Our findings showed a small increased cancer risk in radiologic technologists from their occupational radiation exposure in Korea. However, continuous dose monitoring and strict regulation on occupational safety at the government level should be emphasized to prevent any additional health hazards from occupational radiation exposure. Our findings showed a small increased cancer risk in radiologic technologists from their occupational radiation exposure in Korea. However, continuous dose monitoring and strict regulation on occupational safety at the government level should be emphasized to prevent any additional health hazards from occupational radiation exposure.

  18. Lifetime attributable risk for cancer from occupational radiation exposure among radiologic technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Eun Kyeong; Lee, Won Jin

    2016-01-01

    Medical radiation workers were among the earliest occupational groups exposed to external ionizing radiation due to their administration of a range of medical diagnostic procedures. Ionizing radiation is a confirmed human carcinogen for most organ sites. This study, therefore, was aimed to estimate lifetime cancer risk from occupational exposure among radiologic technologists that has been recruited in 2012-2013. Our findings showed a small increased cancer risk in radiologic technologists from their occupational radiation exposure in Korea. However, continuous dose monitoring and strict regulation on occupational safety at the government level should be emphasized to prevent any additional health hazards from occupational radiation exposure. Our findings showed a small increased cancer risk in radiologic technologists from their occupational radiation exposure in Korea. However, continuous dose monitoring and strict regulation on occupational safety at the government level should be emphasized to prevent any additional health hazards from occupational radiation exposure.

  19. Occupational cosmic radiation exposure and cancer in airline cabin crew.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojo, K.

    2013-03-15

    Cosmic radiation dose rates are considerably higher at cruising altitudes of airplanes than at ground level. Previous studies have found increased risk of certain cancers among aircraft cabin crew, but the results are not consistent across different studies. Despite individual cosmic radiation exposure assessment is important for evaluating the relation between cosmic radiation exposure and cancer risk, only few previous studies have tried to develop an exposure assessment method. The evidence for adverse health effects in aircrews due to ionizing radiation is inconclusive because quantitative dose estimates have not been used. No information on possible confounders has been collected. For an occupational group with an increased risk of certain cancers it is very important to assess if the risk is related to occupational exposure. The goal of this thesis was to develop two separate retrospective exposure assessment methods for occupational exposure to cosmic radiation. The methods included the assessment based on survey on flight histories and based on company flight timetables. Another goal was to describe the cancer incidence among aircraft cabin crew with a large cohort in four Nordic countries, i.e., Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Also the contribution of occupational as well as non-occupational factors to breast and skin cancer risk among the cabin crew was studied with case-control studies. Using the survey method of cosmic radiation exposure assessment, the median annual radiation dose of Finnish airline cabin crew was 0.6 milliSievert (mSv) in the 1960s, 3.3 mSv in the 1970s, and 3.6 mSv in the 1980s. With the flight timetable method, the annual radiation dose increased with time being 0.7 mSv in the 1960 and 2.1 mSv in the 1995. With the survey method, the median career dose was 27.9 mSv and with the timetable method 20.8 mSv. These methods provide improved means for individual cosmic radiation exposure assessment compared to studies where cruder

  20. Occupational cosmic radiation exposure and cancer in airline cabin crew

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojo, K.

    2013-03-01

    Cosmic radiation dose rates are considerably higher at cruising altitudes of airplanes than at ground level. Previous studies have found increased risk of certain cancers among aircraft cabin crew, but the results are not consistent across different studies. Despite individual cosmic radiation exposure assessment is important for evaluating the relation between cosmic radiation exposure and cancer risk, only few previous studies have tried to develop an exposure assessment method. The evidence for adverse health effects in aircrews due to ionizing radiation is inconclusive because quantitative dose estimates have not been used. No information on possible confounders has been collected. For an occupational group with an increased risk of certain cancers it is very important to assess if the risk is related to occupational exposure. The goal of this thesis was to develop two separate retrospective exposure assessment methods for occupational exposure to cosmic radiation. The methods included the assessment based on survey on flight histories and based on company flight timetables. Another goal was to describe the cancer incidence among aircraft cabin crew with a large cohort in four Nordic countries, i.e., Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Also the contribution of occupational as well as non-occupational factors to breast and skin cancer risk among the cabin crew was studied with case-control studies. Using the survey method of cosmic radiation exposure assessment, the median annual radiation dose of Finnish airline cabin crew was 0.6 milliSievert (mSv) in the 1960s, 3.3 mSv in the 1970s, and 3.6 mSv in the 1980s. With the flight timetable method, the annual radiation dose increased with time being 0.7 mSv in the 1960 and 2.1 mSv in the 1995. With the survey method, the median career dose was 27.9 mSv and with the timetable method 20.8 mSv. These methods provide improved means for individual cosmic radiation exposure assessment compared to studies where cruder

  1. Software for the IAEA Occupational Radiation Protection Standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mocaun, N.M.; Paul, F.; Griffith, R.V.; Gustafsson, M.; Webb, G.A.M.; Enache, A.

    2000-01-01

    The software version of International Basic Safety Standards (BSS) for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources, jointly sponsored by Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, International Atomic Energy Agency, International Labour Organization, Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, Pan American Health Organization and World Health Organization, was issued on diskette (SS115 software version) by IAEA in 1997. This Windows based software was written in Visual Basic and is designed to provide the user with a powerful and flexible retrieval system to access the 364 page BSS. The code enables the user to search the BSS, including 22 tables and 254 topics, directly through the 'contents' tree. Access is based on keywords, subjects index or cross referencing between portions of the document dealing with different aspects of the same issue or concept. Definitions of important terms used in the Standards can be found by accessing the Glossary. Text and data can be extracted using familiar copy, paste and print features. Publication of three Safety Guides on Occupational Radiation Protection, with co-sponsorship of the IAEA and International Labour Office, is planned for the second half of 1999. The same system will be used to provide these on diskette or CD-ROM (ORPGUIDE version 4.1). The new software will include the Safety Guides: Occupational Radiation Protection, Assessment of Occupational Exposure due to Intakes of Radionuclides, and Assessment of Occupational Exposure due to External Sources of Radiation, as well as the Bss and the Safety Fundamentals, Radiation Protection and the Safety of Radiation Sources. The capabilities of the new software have been expanded to include free form text search and cross referencing of the five documents which will comprise the guidance of the IAEA and its co-sponsors on Occupational Radiation Protection. It is envisioned that the

  2. Protection of persons occupationally exposed to radiation and of patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stieve, F.E.

    1976-01-01

    The experiences of the last ten years have shown that the measures of the First Radiation Protection Ordinance generally proved to be sufficient for the protection of the employed or of the patients. They had to be amended in so far as the exposure to radiation for those occupationally exposed can be reduced. This results in changes to the regulations so that certain groups of persons can also be effectively controlled. The recognition that medical supervision for radiation protection reasons is reasonable only if exposure has occurred should be additionally utilized in the regulations if the Euratom standards make this possible. The protection of patients attains some new rules which can be derived from handling and from therapeutical use. In this case too experience resulted in a more reasonable application of ionizing radiation and radioactive materials than was expected when the First Radiation Protection Ordinance was issued. (orig.) [de

  3. Occupational radiation exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and female breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelina, P.; Bliznakov, V.; Bairacova, A.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between past occupational radiation exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and cases of diagnosed and registered breast cancer [probability of causation - PC] among Bulgarian women who have used different ionizing radiation sources during their working experience. The National Institute of Health (NIH) in US has developed a method for estimating the probability of causation (PC) between past occupational radiation exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and cases of diagnosed cancer. We have used this method. A group of 27 women with diagnosed breast cancer has been studied. 11 of them are former workers in NPP - 'Kozloduy', and 16 are from other sites using different sources of ionizing radiation. Analysis was performed for 14 women, for whom full personal data were available. The individual radiation dose for each of them is below 1/10 of the annual dose limit, and the highest cumulative dose for a period of 14 years of occupational exposure is 50,21 mSv. The probability of causation (PC) values in all analyzed cases are below 1%, which confirms the extremely low probability of causation (PC) between past occupational radiation exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and occurring cases of breast cancer. (orig.)

  4. Occupational radiation exposures in research laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaccari, S.; Papotti, E.; Pedrazzi, G.

    2006-01-01

    Radioactive sources are widely used in many research activities at University centers. In particular, the activities concerning use of sealed form ( 57 Co in Moessbauer application) and unsealed form ( 3 H, 14 C, 32 P in radioisotope laboratories) are analyzed. The radiological impact of these materials and potential effective doses to researchers and members of the public were evaluated to show compliance with regulatory limits. A review of the procedures performed by researchers and technicians in the research laboratories with the relative dose evaluations is presented in different situations, including normal operations and emergency situations, for example the fire. A study of the possible exposure to radiation by workers, restricted groups of people, and public in general, as well as environmental releases, is presented. (authors)

  5. Occupational radiation exposures in research laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaccari, S.; Papotti, E. [Parma Univ., Health Physics (Italy); Pedrazzi, G. [Parma Univ., Dept. of Public Health (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    Radioactive sources are widely used in many research activities at University centers. In particular, the activities concerning use of sealed form ({sup 57}Co in Moessbauer application) and unsealed form ({sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 32}P in radioisotope laboratories) are analyzed. The radiological impact of these materials and potential effective doses to researchers and members of the public were evaluated to show compliance with regulatory limits. A review of the procedures performed by researchers and technicians in the research laboratories with the relative dose evaluations is presented in different situations, including normal operations and emergency situations, for example the fire. A study of the possible exposure to radiation by workers, restricted groups of people, and public in general, as well as environmental releases, is presented. (authors)

  6. Occupational radiation risks in conveyance of bulk phosphate and potash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grof, Y.; Even, O.; Schlesinger, T.; Margaliot, M.

    1996-01-01

    The issue of occupational ionizing radiation risks encountered in the conveyance and storage of Phosphates and Potash as loose cargo got very minor attention from the national health and occupational safety authorities in the world. In Israel, the Phosphates include an average 100- 150 ppm of Uranium in equilibrium with its daughters, while in Phosphates produced in most other countries the inaction reaches regularly only few ppm up to 50 ppm. Because of the high content of the Uranium in the Phosphate in Israel we must take into consideration the radiological implications involved in the handling of this mineral. The radiological implications of handling Potash are less significant but can not be neglected as we demonstrate bellow In this presentation we will estimate the occupational radiological risks involved in the storing and transportation of Phosphate and Potash. Note, that the main risk in working with Phosphate and Potash is the risk from the dust itself (authors)

  7. Occupational radiation risks in conveyance of bulk phosphate and potash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grof, Y; Even, O; Schlesinger, T; Margaliot, M [Israel Atomic Energy Commission, Yavne (Israel). Soreq Nuclear Research Center

    1996-12-01

    The issue of occupational ionizing radiation risks encountered in the conveyance and storage of Phosphates and Potash as loose cargo got very minor attention from the national health and occupational safety authorities in the world. In Israel, the Phosphates include an average 100- 150 ppm of Uranium in equilibrium with its daughters, while in Phosphates produced in most other countries the inaction reaches regularly only few ppm up to 50 ppm. Because of the high content of the Uranium in the Phosphate in Israel we must take into consideration the radiological implications involved in the handling of this mineral. The radiological implications of handling Potash are less significant but can not be neglected as we demonstrate bellow In this presentation we will estimate the occupational radiological risks involved in the storing and transportation of Phosphate and Potash. Note, that the main risk in working with Phosphate and Potash is the risk from the dust itself (authors).

  8. Occupational Radiation Dose for Medical Workers at a University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Nassef

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Occupational radiation doses for medical workers from the departments of diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiotherapy at the university hospital of King Abdul-Aziz University (KAU were measured and analysed. A total of 100 medical radiation workers were monitored to determine the status of their average annual effective dose. The analysis and the calibration procedures of this study were carried out at the Center for Radiation Protection and Training-KAU. The monitored workers were classified into subgroups, namely, medical staff/supervisors, technicians, and nurses, according to their responsibilities and specialties. The doses were measured using thermo luminescence dosimeters (TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti placed over the lead apron at the chest level in all types of workers except for those in the cath lab, for whom the TLD was placed at the thyroid protective collar. For nuclear medicine, a hand dosimeter was used to measure the hand dose distribution. The annual average effective doses for diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiotherapy workers were found to be 0.66, 1.56, and 0.28 mSv, respectively. The results of the measured annual dose were well below the international recommended dose limit of 20 mSv. Keywords: Occupational radiation dose, radiation workers, TLD, radiation protection

  9. Chicken Meat Submitted to Gamma Radiation and Packed with or without Oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Pelicia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects on gamma radiation levels on the physical and microbiological characteristics of chicken breast meat. A completely randomized experimental design in a 4x2x3 factorial arrangement was adopted. Treatments consisted of four radiation concentrations (0, 2, 4, or 8kGy, two package sealing methods (with or without vacuum, and three storage times (01, 07, or 14 days, with ten replicates each, totaling 240 chicken breast fillets. Packaging and radiation had no influence (p>0.05 on chicken breast meat pH, water retention capacity, or presence of Salmonella spp. Breast fillets not submitted to radiation and vacuum packed presented higher water retention capacity (p<0.05 than those radiated at 4kGy and vacuum packed. Drip loss in fillets radiated at 8kGy and not vacuum packed was higher (p<0.05 than in non-radiated and non-vacuum packed fillets; however, both were not different from the other treatments. Coliform presence increased with storage time in non-radiated samples; however, when these were vacuum-packed, their development was slower. The results of the present experiment suggest that the use of a low radiation dose (2kGy, combined with vacuum packing, may minimize the harmful effects of storage on chicken breast fillets.

  10. Medical examination of the workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Toshio

    1991-01-01

    The hazardous effects of ionizing radiation to man are well recognized, and they are divided into two groups, the stochastic effects (hereditary and carcinogenic effect) and non-stochastic effects (somatic effects such as depression of hematopoiesis, chronic dermatitis and cataracta). The basic framework of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is intended to prevent the occurrence of non-stochastic effects, by keeping doses below the relevant thresholds, and to ensure that all reasonable aspects are taken to reduce the incidence of stochastic effects. In Japan, the regulatory provisions of radiological protection of the workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation are based on the recommendation of ICRP adopted in 1977. According to these regulations, the dose equivalent limits of occupational exposure of man has been decided at 50 mSv/year. The monitoring of exposure to the individual and the procedure of medical examination of the workers are briefly described and discussed. (author)

  11. Application of the ALARA principle to individual occupational radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleinikov, V.E.

    1998-01-01

    Routine individual occupational radiation monitoring is necessary to ensure that exposure are kept as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) and that the authorized dose limits are not exceeded. The type and extend of the monitoring depend on the nature and magnitude of occupational radiation exposure. Optimal choice of the wearing time for individual dosimeters, T, has important consequences for achievement of the individual monitoring objects. The choice of T depends on individual dose distribution, the lower detection limit for the detector used, the lost of an information during period of monitoring, the cost of the measurements and the benefits associated with the results. The paper describes the application of quantitative optimization techniques to optimize the wearing time for individual dosimeters. It was shown how optimal wearing time for individual dosimeters depends on dose distribution, the lower detection limit, dose limit, fading and cost of the measurements. (author)

  12. European study of occupational radiation exposure - ESOREX -. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frasch, G.; Anatschkowa, E.

    1997-11-01

    The ESOREX-Project consists of several surveys executed in the Member States of the European Union, furthermore in Iceland, Norway and Switzerland. Its purpose is to survey in each of these countries 1. the administrative systems used to register individual occupational radiation exposure, 2. the numbers of occupationally radiation exposed persons and dose distributions for the year 1995. The study shall describe and compare the administrative structures of the various national registration systems and the quantity structures. It shall identify the differences between the states and analyze the possibilities for a European harmonization. In order to achieve the co-operation of the European states the European Commission and the BfS organized an international introductory workshop in Luxembourg in May, 1997. The proceedings reflect the presentations of the participants and the results of the discussions. (orig.) [de

  13. Evaluation of occupational radiation dose of extremities on hysterosalpingography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipov, D.; Kotowski, S.T.A.

    2017-01-01

    In the Hysterosalpingography (HSG) exam there is always a professional present with their hands very close to the radiation field. Based on CNEN, individuals occupationally exposed to radiation have equivalent dose limit values for the extremities (500 mSv / year). The objective of the study was to verify the equivalent dose in the hand region of an IOE (Occupationally Exposed Individual) that performs the HSG test and to compare it with the CNEN limit and with similar studies. A humanoid phantom was used to simulate the patient and an ionization chamber, which was placed in the place commonly occupied by the professional. The equivalent hand dose result (∼ 30 mSv / year) equals 6% of the CNEN annual dose limit, but is close to most studies using fluoroscopes. Therefore, the optimization of radiological protection is necessary to reduce these results

  14. National registry of workers occupational exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, P.G. da; Mota, H.C.; Alegre, S.

    1995-01-01

    The Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission started in 1987 a nationwide program in order to collect and maintain the radiation exposure records of the Brazilian workers. This data base consists of several files including: workers - personal data; institutions - section or department where the workers perform their activities; and annual doses - annual integrated doses and any relevant information regarding their exposures. The data base structure is introduced in the present work where its objectives are discussed taking into account the magnitude of the program as well as the difficulties of maintaining and the long term perspectives of a nationwide register of radiation occupational exposures. (author). 15 refs., 1 fig

  15. RADIOFREQUENCY AND MICROWAVE RADIATION HEALTH EFFECTS AND OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Damnjanović

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, there have been considerable discussion and concern about the possible hazards of RF/MW radiation. More recently, the growth and development in personal mobile communications have focused attention on the frequencies associated with this technology. A number of studies have examined the health effects of RF/MW electromagnetic fields (EMFs, originating from occupational exposure, hobbies, or residence near the radio or television transmitters. Particularly controversial are the biophysical mechanisms by which these RF fields may affect biological systems. General health effects reviews explore possible carcinogenic, reproductive and neurological effects. Health effects by exposure source have been observed in radar traffic devices, wireless communications with cellular phones, radio transmission, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Several epidemiological surveys have suggested associations with non-specific complaints such as headache, tiredness, sleep disturbance, loss of memory, and dizziness. These findings, which echo reports of illness associated with other types of radiofrequency (RF radiation, relate not only to the use of mobile phones, but also to residence near the mobile phone base stations and other settings involving occupational exposure. The biological effects suggest that some precautions are necessary, and preventive approaches are highly recommended. Further researches are required to give more information about the effects of microwave radiation on our health, especially in occupational setting and professionally exposed workers.

  16. Radiation protection standards for the occupational workers and the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minkin, S.C.; Dickson, R.L.; Halford, D.K.

    1987-01-01

    Federal Regulations concerning radiation protection standards have been undergoing significant changes within the last decade. In addition to these changes, a proliferation in the number of Federal radiation standards has also occurred. A tabulation of these regulations aids in the understanding of which current standards apply to the nuclear industry with respect to environmental contamination and exposure to workers, and the public. Furthermore, most of the current regulations, proposed revisions, and proposed new rulings fall into several major categories. A tabulation of these categories illustrates common public, occupational, and environmental needs for which the DOE, NRC, and EPA have developed their specific radiation standards. Finally, risk based systems for radiation protection have been proposed by the DOE, NRC, and EPA, although these agencies are not entirely consistent in the application of this methodology. 2 tables

  17. A computer system for occupational radiation exposure information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    A computerized occupational radiation exposure information system has been developed to maintain records for contractors at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. The system also allows indexing and retrieval of three million documents from microfilm, thus significantly reducing storage needs and costs. The users are linked by display terminals to the data base permitting them instant access to dosemetry and other radiation exposure information. Personnel dosemeter and bioassay results, radiation training, respirator fittings, skin contaminations and other radiation occurrence records are included in the data base. The system yields immediate analysis of radiological exposures for operating management and health physics personnel, thereby releasing personnel to use their time more effectively

  18. Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation in Jordanian medical institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Shakhrah, A. I; Hilow, M. H.

    1999-01-01

    This research survey analyses occupational radiation data 214 Jordanian medical workers during the five-year time period 1990-1994 with the objective of identifying any time dose trend and to determine if annual dose variations exist with regard to sex and job or work status. Comparison of radiation status in Joedanian medical field with that of other countries is a second objective of this study. Biological effects of radiation will, however, not be studied in this research. The statistical analysis of the collected data has shown existence of a decreasing annual dose time trend during the five-year period. This year-to-year variation amy indicate that Jordanian radiation workers are becoming more aware of radiation hazards and they have benefited reasonably from the radiation protection training programmes that were held during that period. These workers are then becoming well abiders by the regulations of the Jordanian radiation authorities. analysis of variance has shown as well that the three factors, which are working status, qualifications and sex, contribute significantly to explaining the variability in annual radiation dose. (authors). 10 refs 4 figs., 7 tabs

  19. Occupational radiation exposure in nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Full text: This symposium forms an essential part of the continuing tradition of subjecting nuclear energy to periodic review to assess the adequacy of radiation protection practices and experiences and to identify those areas needing further study and development. Specifically, the symposium focused on a review of statistical data on radiation exposure experience to workers in the nuclear fuel cycle through 1978. The technical sessions were concerned with occupational exposures: experienced in Member States; in research and development facilities; in nuclear power plants; in nuclear Fuel reprocessing facilities; in waste management facilities; and techniques to minimize doses. A critical review was made of internal and external exposures to the following occupational groups: uranium miners; mill workers; fuel fabricators; research personnel, reactor workers; maintenance staff; hot cell workers; reprocessing plant personnel; waste management personnel. In particular, attention was devoted to the work activities causing the highest radiation exposures and successful techniques which have been used to minimize individual and collective doses. Also there was an exchange of information on the trends of occupational exposure over the lifespan of individual nuclear power plants and other facilities in the nuclear fuel cycle. During the last session there was a detailed panel discussion on the conclusions and future needs highlighted during the symposium. While past symposia on nuclear power and its fuel cycle have presented data on occupational dose statistics, this symposium was the first to focus attention on the experience and trends of occupational exposure in recent years. The papers presented an authoritative account of the status of the levels and trends of the average annual individual dose as well as the annual collective dose for occupational workers in most of the world up to 1979. From the data presented it became evident that considerable progress has been

  20. The management of workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    In Canada, the regulation of radiation protection is a shared responsibility between the federal body (the Atomic Energy Control Board) and the appropriate provincial body (usually the Department of Health, or Department of Labour). The AECB is responsible, for example, for regulating the development, application and use of nuclear energy and radioisotopes, and the provinces are responsible for the regulation of all other forms of ionizing and non-ionizing radiations and for naturally-occurring radioactive material (NORM). Although there is consultation between the federal and provincial regulatory agencies, the division of jurisdictional authority has resulted in considerable differences in the approach towards implementation radiation protection programs in Canada. This is especially true in the management of workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. These differences have produced unwarranted discrepancies in operating procedures and practices in the allocation of resources and manpower, and in the requirements governing radiological training, personnel monitoring and medical surveillance. In light of the General Amendments to the AEC Regulations, the 1990 Recommendations of the ICRP, and the IAEA recommendations on safety culture, the ACRP has considered it timely to undertake a study to examine the feasibility of establishing a more coherent approach to harmonize radiation protection practices within Canada. This study comprised an examination of the regulatory approach used in several countries: a review of the nature of radiation safety programs in various types of licensed institutions and facilities in Canada; and a review of recommendations of internationally-recognized authorities in radiation protection

  1. Occupational radiation exposures at radioactive and nuclear facilities in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curti, A.; Pardo, G.; Melis, H.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of occupational radiation exposures at relevant radioactive and nuclear facilities in Argentina, for 1996. The facilities send this information to the Nuclear Regulatory Authority due to the requirements included in their operation licenses and authorizations. Dose distributions of 1891 workers and their parameters are presented. The analysis is performed for each type of the following practices: nuclear power plants, research reactors, radioisotope production, fuel fabrication, industrial irradiation and research in the nuclear fuel cycle. Trends of occupational exposure in different practices are analysed and the highest doses have been identified. Following the 1990 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 60), the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Argentina updated the dose limits for workers in 1995. The individual dose limits are 20 mSv per year averaged over five consecutive years (100 mSv in 5 years), not exceeding 50 mSv in a single year. To evaluate the occupational radiation exposure trend, without taking into account practices, an analysis of the distribution of individual doses accumulated in the period 1995/96, for all workers, is performed. Individual doses received during 1996 were all below 50 mSv and doses accumulated in the period 1995/96 were below 100 mSv. (author). 7 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs

  2. Effects upon health of occupational exposure to microwave radiation (radar)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinette, C.D.; Silverman, C.; Jablon, S.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of occupational experience with microwave radiation (radar) on the health of US enlisted Naval personnel were studied in cohorts of approximately 20,000 men with maximum opportunity for exposure (electronic equipment repair) and 20,000 with minimum potential for exposure (equipment operation) who served during the Korean War period. Potential exposure was assessed in terms of occupational duties, length of time in occupation and power of equipment at the time of exposure. Actual exposure to members of each cohort could not be established. Mortality by cause of death, hospitalization during military service, later hospitalization in Veterans Administration (VA) facilities, and VA disability compensation were the health indexes studied, largely through the use of automated record systems. No adverse effects were detected in these indexes that could be attributed to potential microwave radiation exposures during the period 1950-1954. Functional and behavioral changes and ill-defined conditions, such as have been reported as microwave effects, could not be investigated in this study but subgroups of the living study population can be identified for expanded follow-up

  3. Occupational radiation doses among diagnostic radiation workers in South Korea, 1996-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W. J.; Cha, E. S.; Ha, M.; Jin, Y. W.; Hwang, S. S.; Kong, K. A.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, K. Y.; Kim, H. J.

    2009-01-01

    This study details the distribution and trends of doses of occupational radiation among diagnostic radiation workers by using the national dose registry between 1996 and 2006 by the Korea Food and Drug Administration. Dose measurements were collected quarterly by the use of thermoluminescent dosemeter personal monitors. A total of 61 732 workers were monitored, including 18 376 radiologic technologists (30%), 13 762 physicians (22%), 9858 dentists (16%) and 6114 dental hygienists (9.9%). The average annual effective doses of all monitored workers decreased from 1.75 to 0.80 mSv over the study period. Among all diagnostic radiation workers, radiologic technologists received both the highest effective and collective doses. Male radiologic technologists aged 30-49 y composed the majority of workers receiving more than 5 mSv in a quarter. More intensive monitoring of occupational radiation exposure and investigation into its health effects on diagnostic radiation workers are required in South Korea. (authors)

  4. Controlling occupational radiation exposure at operating nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, H.W.; Oakes, T.W.; Shank, K.E.

    1977-01-01

    The historical development of the philosophy of keeping the radiation exposure of workers at light-water reactors as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) is presented. A review is made of some of the ALARA activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Energy Research and Development Administration, and various nuclear installations. Data compiled by the NRC show that routine and special maintenance at light-water reactors accounts for 72 percent of all occupational exposure at these sites. The role that Oak Ridge National Laboratory has taken in ALARA research is presented, with emphasis placed on a study of valve malfunctions at light-water reactors. The valve study indicates a trend toward decreasing valve reliability over the past few years. Finally a cost--benefit analysis of radiation dose reduction is discussed. The rationale for assigning a cost per man-rem based on the radiation exposure level that is encountered is presented

  5. Assessing risks from occupational exposure to low-level radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1989-06-01

    Currently, several epidemiological studies of workers who have been exposed occupationally to radiation are being conducted. These include workers in the United States, Great Britain, and Canada, involved in the production of both defense materials and nuclear power. A major reason for conducting these studies is to evaluate possible adverse health effects that may have resulted because of the radiation exposure received. The general subject of health effects resulting from low levels of radiation, including these worker studies, has attracted the attention of various news media, and has been the subject of considerable controversy. These studies provide a good illustration of certain other aspects of the statistician's role; namely, communication and adequate subject matter knowledge. A competent technical job is not sufficient if these other aspects are not fulfilled

  6. Nodular goiter after occupational accidental exposure to radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisarev, M.A. [Radiobiology, National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Human Biochemistry, Uninversity of Buenos Aires, School of Medicine, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Schnitman, M. [Center of Endocrinology and Metabolism, French Hospital C.Milstein, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-07-01

    In the present paper we present the consequences of an accidental occupational radiation exposure at a local hospital in Buenos Aires. Control at a local radiology service showed the lack of correct shielding in the X-ray equipment. The physicians and technicians (14 persons) exposed to radiation during 12 months were examined. The survey shows that: a) In 11 out of 14 radiation-exposed patients nodular goiter developed and an additional patient had diffuse goiter which means a goiter incidence of 85.7%; b) In 5 of the nodular goiter patients an increase in the size or the appearance of new nodules was observed along the follow-up period. No cancer was detected by FNA; c) Hypothyroidism was observed in 3/14 patients, and an additional patient had an abnormal TRH-TSH test, suggesting subclinical hypothyroidism; and d) Increased circulating antithyroid antibodies were found in one of the hypothyroid patients

  7. 1999 report on occupational radiation exposures in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sont, W.; Ashmore, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    The report provides statistics on occupational radiation exposures for use by regulatory authorities, organizations and private individuals. Out of a total of 125,883 monitored workers, 4 annual doses exceeded the regulatory limit of 50 mSv in 1998. Out of 43 specified job categories, 18 had a smaller annual average in 1998 than in 1997, 17 had a higher average, and 8 had the same average rounded to 0.01 mSv. The uranium mining job categories are not in this list because the conversion factor for radon progeny exposure to effective dose was changed from 10 to 5 mSv/WLM, precluding a valid comparison of the averages. In all categories of workers, from 1996 to 1997, 19 average annual doses went up, 33 went down, and 4 stayed the same. The figures reflect a sustained effort in keeping the occupational doses low. (author)

  8. Adaptive response induced by occupational exposures to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barquinero, J.F.; Caballin, M.R.; Barrios, L.; Murtra, P.; Egozcue, J.; Miro, R.; Ribas, M.

    1997-01-01

    We have found a significant decreased sensitivity to the cytogenetic effects of ionizing radiation (IR) and bleomycin (BLM) in lymphocytes from individuals occupationally exposed to IR when compared with a control population. These results suggest that occupational exposures to IR can induce adaptive response that can be detected by a subsequent treatment by IR or by BLM. However, no correlation between the results obtained with both treatments was observed. A great heterogeneity in the frequencies of chromatid aberrations induced by BLM was observed. The study of the influence of different harvesting times showed that there was no correlation with the frequencies of chromatid breaks. Our results indicate that the use of BLM to detect adaptive response has several difficulties at the individual level. (author)

  9. Study of poli (ethylene tereftalate) thin films submitted to radiations by using permeation and spectroscopic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, L.A.

    1986-06-01

    Properties of poly (ethylene terephthalate P.E.T. thin films submitted to electric discharges, electron, He + ion and proton beams were investigated using permeation technique, electronic paramagnetic resonance resonance (E.P.R.) and visible and infrared spectroscopies. Experimental apparatuses and procedures are described and the results of the analyses are presented and discussed. The existence of structural modifications in irradiated P.E.T. thin films is confirmed. It is shown that the kind of effects occuring in irradiated P.E.T. depends on the nature of the incident radiation. (author) [pt

  10. Detriment calculations resulting from occupational radiation exposures in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Ghani, A.H.

    2000-01-01

    The application of the nominal probability coefficient to evaluate the detriment after the annual occupational exposures of workers from radiation sources and radioactive material have been calculated for workers in medical practices, industrial applications, atomic energy activities and those involved in exploration and mining of radioactive ores and phosphates. The aim of detriment calculations is to provide a foresight for the future occurrence of stochastic effects among the exposed workers. The calculated detriment can be classified into three classes. The first includes workers in diagnostic radiology and atomic energy activities who received the higher doses and consequently represent the higher detriment. The second class comprises workers in radiotherapy and nuclear medicine whose detriment is for times lesser than that of the first class. The third one concerns workers in industrial applications and in exploration and mining of radioactive ores and phosphates, their detriments ten times lesser than that of the second class. The occupational radiation doses are endorsed by the united nation scientific committee on efects of atomic radiation (UNSCEAR) for the period january 1995 to december 1998

  11. Understanding of radiation protection in medicine. Pt. 2. Occupational exposure and system of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Hiroji; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki; Shimada, Yasuhiro

    1997-01-01

    Using a questionnaire we investigated whether radiation protection is correctly understood by medical doctors (n=140) and nurses (n=496). Although medical exposure is usually understood by medical doctors and dentists, their knowledge was found to be insufficient. Sixty-eight percent of medical doctors and 50% of dentists did not know about the system of radiation protection. Dose monitoring was not correctly carried out by approximately 20% of medical staff members, and medical personnel generally complained of anxiety about occupational exposure rather than medical exposure. They did not receive sufficient education on radiation exposure and protection in school. In conclusion, the results of this questionnaire suggested that they do not have adequate knowledge about radiation exposure and protection. The lack of knowledge about protection results in anxiety about exposure. To protect oneself from occupational exposure, individual radiation doses must be monitored, and medical practice should be reconsidered based on the results of monitoring. To eliminate unnecessary medical and occupational exposure and to justify practices such as radiological examinations, radiation protection should be well understood and appropriately carried out by medical doctors and dentists. Therefore, the education of medical students on the subject of radiation protection is required as is postgraduate education for medical doctors, dentists and nurses. (author)

  12. Occupational radiation exposure in Germany in 2011. Report of the radiation protection register

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frasch, Gerhard; Kammerer, Lothar; Karofsky, Ralf; Mordek, Else; Schlosser, Andrea; Spiesl, Josef

    2013-04-01

    In Germany, persons who are occupationally exposed to ionising radiation are monitored by several official dosimetry services that transmit the dose records about individual radiation monitoring to the Radiation Protection Register of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS). The purpose of the Radiation Protection Register is to supervise the keeping of the dose limits and to monitor the compliance with the radiation protection principle ''Optimisation'' by performing detailed annual statistical analyses of the monitored persons and their radiation exposure. The annual report of the Radiation Protection Register provides information about status and development of occupational radiation exposure in Germany. In 2011, about 350,000 workers were monitored with dosemeters for occupational radiation exposure. The number increased during the past five years continuously by 10 %. Only 19 % of the monitored persons received measurable personal doses. The average annual dose of these exposed workers was 0.58 mSv corresponding to 3 % of the annual dose limit of 20 mSv for radiation workers. In total, 7 persons exceeded the annual dose limit of 20 mSv, i.e. two cases per 100,000 monitored persons. The collective dose of the monitored persons decreased to 38.5 Person-Sv, the lowest value since the last fifty years of occupational dose monitoring. In 2010, 45 airlines calculated the route doses of 39,000 members of the aircraft crew personnel by using certified computer programmes for dose calculation and sent the accumulated monthly doses via the Federal Office for Civil Aviation (''Luftfahrt-Bundesamt, LBA'') to the BfS. The collective dose of the aircraft crew personnel is 83 person-Sv, and thus significantly higher than the total collective dose of the workers monitored with personal dosemeters (38.5 person-Sv). The annual average dose of aircraft crew personnel was 2.12 mSv and decreased compared to 2010 (2,30 mSv). In 2011, about 70,000 outside-workers were in

  13. Optimization of radiation protection in the control of occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    One of the three main principles on which protection against ionizing radiation is based is the principle of the optimization of radiological protection. The principle of the optimization of protection was first enunciated by the International Commission on Radiological Protection in the 1960s. A principal requirement for the optimization of protection and safety has been incorporated into the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (Basic Safety Standards) from the first edition in 1962 up to the current (1996) edition. The principle of optimization, that all reasonable efforts be made to reduce doses (social and economic factors being taken into account), necessitates considerable effort to apply in practice. The requirement of the Basic Safety Standards to apply the principle of optimization applies to all categories of exposure: occupational, public and medical. The categories of public and medical exposure are rather specific and are covered in other publications; this Safety Report concentrates on the application of the principle to what is probably the largest category, that of occupational exposure. This Safety Report provides practical information on how to apply the optimization of protection in the workplace. The emphasis throughout is on the integration of radiation protection into the more general system of work management, and on the involvement of management and workers in setting up a system of radiation protection and in its implementation. This Safety Report was drafted and finalized in three consultants meetings held in 1999 and 2000. The draft was sent for review and comment to a number of experts, which yielded valuable comments from a number of reviewers whose names are included in the list of contributors to drafting and review

  14. Optimization of radiation protection in the control of occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    One of the three main principles on which protection against ionizing radiation is based is the principle of the optimization of radiological protection. The principle of the optimization of protection was first enunciated by the International Commission on Radiological Protection in the 1960s. A principal requirement for the optimization of protection and safety has been incorporated into the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (Basic Safety Standards) from the first edition in 1962 up to the current (1996) edition. The principle of optimization, that all reasonable efforts be made to reduce doses (social and economic factors being taken into account), necessitates considerable effort to apply in practice. The requirement of the Basic Safety Standards to apply the principle of optimization applies to all categories of exposure: occupational, public and medical. The categories of public and medical exposure are rather specific and are covered in other publications. This Safety Report concentrates on the application of the principle to what is probably the largest category, that of occupational exposure. This Safety Report provides practical information on how to apply the optimization of protection in the workplace. The emphasis throughout is on the integration of radiation protection into the more general system of work management, and on the involvement of management and workers in setting up a system of radiation protection and in its implementation. This Safety Report was drafted and finalized in three consultants meetings held in 1999 and 2000. The draft was sent for review and comment to a number of experts, which yielded valuable comments from a number of reviewers whose names are included in the list of contributors to drafting and review

  15. Optimization of radiation protection in the control of occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    One of the three main principles on which protection against ionizing radiation is based is the principle of the optimization of radiological protection. The principle of the optimization of protection was first enunciated by the International Commission on Radiological Protection in the 1960s. A principal requirement for the optimization of protection and safety has been incorporated into the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (Basic Safety Standards) from the first edition in 1962 up to the current (1996) edition. The principle of optimization, that all reasonable efforts be made to reduce doses (social and economic factors being taken into account), necessitates considerable effort to apply in practice. The requirement of the Basic Safety Standards to apply the principle of optimization applies to all categories of exposure: occupational, public and medical. The categories of public and medical exposure are rather specific and are covered in other publications. This Safety Report concentrates on the application of the principle to what is probably the largest category, that of occupational exposure. This Safety Report provides practical information on how to apply the optimization of protection in the workplace. The emphasis throughout is on the integration of radiation protection into the more general system of work management, and on the involvement of management and workers in setting up a system of radiation protection and in its implementation. This Safety Report was drafted and finalized in three consultants meetings held in 1999 and 2000. The draft was sent for review and comment to a number of experts, which yielded valuable comments from a number of reviewers whose names are included in the list of contributors to drafting and review

  16. Occupational external radiation exposure in the GDR in 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothe, W.

    1980-01-01

    In 1976 a total of 36,794 occupationally exposed persons were monitored by the National Board of Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection, using film badges. The monthly over-exposures (more than 4 mGy) totalled 415. In 11 cases the monthly exposure exceeded 30 mGy and 6 annual exposure values were in the range of 50 to 120 mGy. An attempt has been made to assess the annual collective and annual per caput doses for the exposed population as a whole and some subgroups without completely summing up the individual exposure data. (author)

  17. Contribution of occupational epidemiologic studies to radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, S.

    1982-01-01

    Early evidence of health effects of occupational radiation exposure have made important contributions to the establishment of exposure standards, including those for internal emitters. Standards derived in this matter for radium body burdens and for air concentrations of radon and its daughters were especially influential. The body burden limits for plutonium and other bone-seeking radionuclides were based upon the radium standard. The exposure controls instituted as a consequence of those early limits have reduced the exposure of worker populations to the extent that the current, more sophisticated epidemiologic studies will probably not influence the revision of existing standards. The justification for conducting such studies is discussed. (author)

  18. Occupational radiation exposure in the GDR in 1973

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, W.; Larssen, A.; Rothe, W.

    1977-01-01

    In 1973 a total of 36,481 occupationally exposed persons were monitored by the central film badge service of the National Board of Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection. The monthly over-exposure (more than 0,4 rad) totalled 610. In 37 cases the quarterly dose (3 rad) was exceeded during one month and 29 of these records could be assessed as real over-exposures. Most of the over-exposure could be attributed to an insufficient application of safety regulations. The results were analysed according to type of institution as well as sex of employees. (author)

  19. Sensory evaluation of black beans submitted to gamma radiation from Cobalt-60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura, Neila Camargo de; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin; Spoto, Marta Helena Fillet; Arthur, Valter

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the sensory aspects of black beans submitted to gamma radiation from 60 Co. The study involved eight panelists, between 17 to 23 years old, who were selected and trained for the descriptive analysis of appearance, aroma, flavor and texture. The panelists analyzed alterations of appearance, aroma, flavor and texture of non-irradiated and irradiated black beans with doses 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10kGy. The results were analyzed by test F, ANOVA and the Tukey test (5%), with the use of computers and the sensory analysis software Compusense Five and SAS. The results showed that irradiated samples decreased the bitter flavor, accentuated color and brightness and samples non-irradiated dry texture. The radiation treatment is a good method for conservation of black beans in doses evaluated in this study.(author)

  20. Occupational radiation Exposure at Agreement State-Licensed Materials Facilities, 1997-2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

    2012-07-07

    The purpose of this report is to examine occupational radiation exposures received under Agreement State licensees. As such, this report reflects the occupational radiation exposure data contained in the Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS) database, for 1997 through 2010, from Agreement State-licensed materials facilities.

  1. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities, 1990: Twenty-third annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raddatz, C.T.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the occupational radiation exposure information that has been reported to the NRC's Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS) by nuclear power facilities and certain other categories of NRC licensees during the years 1969 through 1990. The bulk of the data presented in the report was obtained from annual radiation exposure reports submitted in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR 20.407 and the technical specifications of nuclear power plants. Data on workers terminating their employment at certain NRC licensed facilities were obtained from reports submitted pursuant to 10 CFR 20.408. The 1990 annual reports submitted by about 443 licensees indicated that approximately 214,568 individuals were monitored, 110,204 of whom were monitored by nuclear power facilities. They incurred an average individual dose of 0.19 rem (cSv) and an average measurable dose of about 0.36 (cSv). Termination radiation exposure reports were analyzed to reveal that about 113,361 individuals completed their employment with one or more of the 443 covered licensees during 1990. Some 77,633 of these individuals terminated from power reactor facilities, and about 11,083 of them were considered to be transient workers who received an average dose of 0.67 rem (cSv)

  2. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1992. Twenty-fifth annual report, Volume 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raddatz, C.T.

    1993-12-01

    This report summarizes the occupational radiation exposure information that has been reported to the NRC's Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS) by nuclear power facilities and certain other categories of NRC licensees during the years 1969 through 1992. The bulk of the data presented in the report was obtained from annual radiation exposure reports submitted in accordance with the requirements of 10CFR20.407 and the technical specifications of nuclear power plants. Data on workers terminating their employment at certain NRC licensed facilities were obtained from reports submitted pursuant to 10CFR20.408. The 1992 annual reports submitted by about 364 licensees indicated that approximately 204,365 individuals were monitored, 183,927 of whom were monitored by nuclear power facilities. They incurred an average individual dose of 0.16 rem (cSv) and an average measurable dose of about 0.30 (cSv). Termination radiation exposure reports were analyzed to reveal that about 74,566 individuals completed their employment with one or more of the 364 covered licensees during 1992. Some 71,846 of these individuals terminated from power reactor facilities, and about 9,724 of them were considered to be transient workers who received an average dose of 0.50 rem (cSv)

  3. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities, 1993. Volume 15, Twenty-six annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raddatz, C.T.

    1995-01-01

    This report the occupational radiation exposure information that has been reported to the NRC's Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS) by nuclear power facilities and certain other categories of NRC licensees during the years 1969 through 1993. The bulk of the data presented in the report was obtained from annual radiation exposure reports submitted in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR 20.407 and the technical specifications of nuclear power plants. Data on workers terminating their employment at certain NRC licensed facilities were obtained from reports submitted pursuant to 10 CFR 20.408. The 1993 annual reports submitted by about 360 licensees indicated that approximately 189,711 individuals were monitored, 169,872 of whom were monitored by nuclear power facilities. They incurred an average individual dose of 0.16 rem (cSv) and an average measured dose of about 0.31 (cSv). Termination radiation exposure reports were analyzed to reveal that about 99,749 individuals completed their employment with one or more of the 360 covered licensees during 1993. Some 91,000 of these individuals terminated from power reactor facilities, and about 12,685 of them were considered to be transient workers who received an average dose of 0.49 rem (cSv)

  4. Studies on chromosome aberrations in workers occupationally exposed to radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Hyung; Oh, Hyeon Joo; Shim, Sun Bo; Roh, Hye Won; Lee, Hai Yong [Korea Food and Drug Administration, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Soon Ja [Ewha Womens Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-06-01

    Cytogenetic assays for unstable chromosomes were performed on 54 medical radiation workers who are occupationally exposed to radiation and 42 controls. A total of 15,577 metaphase cells were scored. The frequencies of dicentrics and acentric chromosomes on controls were 0.52*10{sup -3} and 0.82*10{sup -2}, respectively. On radiation workers those were 2.28*10{sup -3} and 1.34*10{sup -2}, respectively. Though the frequencies of all types of chromosome aberrations in the workers were higher than those in the controls, the only significant difference was found in the case of dicentrics (P < 0.01). When we considered exposure dose of recent one year, duration of employment and smoking habit in radiation worker, a slight increase was shown in frequency of unstable chromosome aberrations on these workers, but no statistical differences were observed (P > 0.05) except exposure dose of recent one year (P < 0.05). These results could indicate that low level exposure to ionizing radiation can induce unstable chromosome aberrations in blood lymphocytes.

  5. Occupational radiation exposure in nuclear medicine department in Kuwait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnaaimi, M.; Alkhorayef, M.; Omar, M.; Abughaith, N.; Alduaij, M.; Salahudin, T.; Alkandri, F.; Sulieman, A.; Bradley, D. A.

    2017-11-01

    Ionizing radiation exposure is associated with eye lens opacities and cataracts. Radiation workers with heavy workloads and poor protection measures are at risk for vision impairment or cataracts if suitable protection measures are not implemented. The aim of this study was to measure and evaluate the occupational radiation exposure in a nuclear medicine (NM) department. The annual average effective doses (Hp[10] and Hp[0.07]) were measured using calibrated thermos-luminescent dosimeters (TLDs; MCP-N [LiF:Mg,Cu,P]). Five categories of staff (hot lab staff, PET physicians, NM physicians, technologists, and nurses) were included. The average annual eye dose (Hp[3]) for NM staff, based on measurements for a typical yearly workload of >7000 patients, was 4.5 mSv. The annual whole body radiation (Hp[10]) and skin doses (Hp[0.07]) were 4.0 and 120 mSv, respectively. The measured Hp(3), Hp(10), and Hp(0.07) doses for all NM staff categories were below the dose limits described in ICRP 2014 in light of the current practice. The results provide baseline data for staff exposure in NM in Kuwait. Radiation dose optimization measures are recommended to reduce NM staff exposure to its minimal value.

  6. Commercial airline crews. A new group of occupational radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    Aircrews on regular commercial flights are not generally regarded as occupationally exposed radiation workers. Although several studies have indicated that they may receive radiation doses in excess of the ICRP recommended limit for members of the public, the same is true of individuals living at ground level in one of the areas of abnormally high background gamma radiation; and in the past it has been general practice to avoid regarding either of these situations as coming within the radiation dose control practices of the venous regulatory agencies. Furthermore it must be recognized that in areas prone to high background radon levels. even greater unregulated radiation exposures of many individuals take place. ICRP 65 recommends an action level for correcting high radon concentrations in dwellings which comes in the range corresponding to effective doses of between 3 and 10 mSv/y but experience has shown that few homeowners voluntarily carry out remedial work even at these levels. An aircrew member living in a home with abnormally high radon levels may well experience lower effective dose rates whilst in flight than whilst relaxing at home. (author)

  7. Validation of an educative manual for patients with head and neck cancer submitted to radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Oliveira de Almeida Marques da Cruz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: develop the content and face validation of an educative manual for patients with head and neck cancer submitted to radiation therapy. Method: descriptive methodological research. The Theory of Psychometrics was used for the validation process, developed by 15 experts in the theme area of the educative manual and by two language and publicity professionals. A minimum agreement level of 80% was considered to guarantee the validity of the material. Results: the items addressed in the assessment tool of the educative manual were divided in three blocks: objectives, structure and format, and relevance. Only one item, related to the sociocultural level of the target public, obtained an agreement rate <80%, and was reformulated based on the participants' suggestions. All other items were considered appropriate and/or complete appropriate in the three blocks proposed: objectives - 92.38%, structure and form - 89.74%, and relevance - 94.44%. Conclusion: the face and content validation of the educative manual proposed were attended to. This can contribute to the understanding of the therapeutic process the head and neck cancer patient is submitted to during the radiation therapy, besides supporting clinical practice through the nursing consultation.

  8. Effect of ionizing radiation on the taste function of patients submitted to head and neck radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Amaro Ilidio Vespasiano; Galante, Celio

    2011-01-01

    Objective: to evaluate the effects of ionizing radiation on the taste function in patients submitted to radiotherapy in the head and neck region. Materials and methods: twenty patients diagnosed with head and neck tumors and undergoing treatment in the Division of Radiotherapy at Santa Casa de Misericordia de Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil, were selected. For their taste function testing, four solutions were manipulated with salt (NaCl), sugar (sucrose), citric acid (for acidity), and urea (for bitterness), at three different (low, medium and high) concentrations. Weekly tests were performed during the first three weeks of radiotherapy, with random administration of the solutions (three drops each) respecting the order of their concentration levels (low, medium and high). After the application of each solution, the patient reported which flavor he/she tasted. Results: a statistically significant difference was observed in the loss of taste function as the results in the 1st and 4th weeks of treatment were compared, with salty solution at the three concentration levels, with the sweet solution at low and medium concentrations, and with the sour and bitter solutions, only at low concentration. Conclusion: ionizing radiation alters the taste function of patients submitted to head and neck radiotherapy. (author)

  9. Effect of ionizing radiation on the taste function of patients submitted to head and neck radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Amaro Ilidio Vespasiano [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil); Galante, Celio [Santa Casa de Misericordia de Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Div. de Radioterapia; Manzi, Flavio Ricardo, E-mail: manzi@pucminas.b [Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Minas Gerais (PUC-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    Objective: to evaluate the effects of ionizing radiation on the taste function in patients submitted to radiotherapy in the head and neck region. Materials and methods: twenty patients diagnosed with head and neck tumors and undergoing treatment in the Division of Radiotherapy at Santa Casa de Misericordia de Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil, were selected. For their taste function testing, four solutions were manipulated with salt (NaCl), sugar (sucrose), citric acid (for acidity), and urea (for bitterness), at three different (low, medium and high) concentrations. Weekly tests were performed during the first three weeks of radiotherapy, with random administration of the solutions (three drops each) respecting the order of their concentration levels (low, medium and high). After the application of each solution, the patient reported which flavor he/she tasted. Results: a statistically significant difference was observed in the loss of taste function as the results in the 1st and 4th weeks of treatment were compared, with salty solution at the three concentration levels, with the sweet solution at low and medium concentrations, and with the sour and bitter solutions, only at low concentration. Conclusion: ionizing radiation alters the taste function of patients submitted to head and neck radiotherapy. (author)

  10. Comparative occupational radiation exposure between fixed and mobile imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Daniel E; Miller, Claire P; Moorehead, Pamela A; Kim, Ann H; Baele, Henry R; Wong, Virginia L; Jordan, David W; Kashyap, Vikram S

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular intervention exposes surgical staff to scattered radiation, which varies according to procedure and imaging equipment. The purpose of this study was to determine differences in occupational exposure between procedures performed with fixed imaging (FI) in an endovascular suite compared with conventional mobile imaging (MI) in a standard operating room. A series of 116 endovascular cases were performed over a 4-month interval in a dedicated endovascular suite with FI and conventional operating room with MI. All cases were performed at a single institution and radiation dose was recorded using real-time dosimetry badges from Unfors RaySafe (Hopkinton, Mass). A dosimeter was mounted in each room to establish a radiation baseline. Staff dose was recorded using individual badges worn on the torso lead. Total mean air kerma (Kar; mGy, patient dose) and mean case dose (mSv, scattered radiation) were compared between rooms and across all staff positions for cases of varying complexity. Statistical analyses for all continuous variables were performed using t test and analysis of variance where appropriate. A total of 43 cases with MI and 73 cases with FI were performed by four vascular surgeons. Total mean Kar, and case dose were significantly higher with FI compared with MI. (mean ± standard error of the mean, 523 ± 49 mGy vs 98 ± 19 mGy; P < .00001; 0.77 ± 0.03 mSv vs 0.16 ± 0.08 mSv, P < .00001). Exposure for the primary surgeon and assistant was significantly higher with FI compared with MI. Mean exposure for all cases using either imaging modality, was significantly higher for the primary surgeon and assistant than for support staff (ie, nurse, radiology technologist) beyond 6 feet from the X-ray source, indicated according to one-way analysis of variance (MI: P < .00001; FI: P < .00001). Support staff exposure was negligible and did not differ between FI and MI. Room dose stratified according to case complexity (Kar) showed statistically significantly

  11. Operating philosophy for maintaining occupational radiation exposures as low as is reasonably achievable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-09-01

    Both this guide and Regulatory Guide 8.8, ''Information Relevant to Maintaining Occupational Radiation Exposure as Low as is Reasonably Achievable (Nuclear Power Reactors),'' deal with the concept of ''as low as is reasonably achievable'' occupational exposures to radiation. This guide describes an operating philosophy that the NRC staff believes all specific licensees should follow to keep occupational exposures to radiation as low as is reasonably achievable. (auth)

  12. The data submitted by the United Kingdom to the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation for the 1977 report to the General Assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, F E; Webb, G A M

    1976-01-01

    The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) was established by the General Assembly in 1955 to report on the exposure of man to ionising radiation. In the subsequent twenty years the Committee has covered most aspects of the subject with repeated reviews of the levels of exposure from fallout due to weapons testing. The Committee is currently preparing a further report on doses from all sources and an evaluation of their biological effects. This is expected to be published in 1977. To aid it in compiling this report the Committee requested Member States of the UN to submit national data on a wide range of sources of exposure. The Board was asked by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office to collate the information requested from the United Kingdom. Data were available in the scientific literature on some topics, such as medical irradiation and environmental radioactivity. On some other topics, particularly occupational exposure, data have been collected but seldom publishe...

  13. Adaptive response induced by occupational exposures to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barquinero, J.F.; Caballin, M.R.; Barrios, L.; Egozcue, J.; Miro, R.; Ribas, M.

    1997-01-01

    We have found a significant decreased sensitivity to the cytogenetic effects of both ionizing radiation (IR) (2 Gy of γ rays) and bleomycin (BLM, 0,03 U/ml), in lymphocytes from individuals occupationally exposed to IR when compared with controls. These results suggest that occupational exposures to IR can induce adaptive response that can be detected by a subsequent treatment either by IR or by BLM. When a comparison is made between the cytogenetic effects of both treatments, no correlation was observed at the individual level. On the other hand, the individual frequencies of chromosome aberrations induced by a challenge dose of IR were negatively correlated with the occupationally received doses during the last three years. This correlation was not observed after the challenge treatment of BLM. Moreover, the individual frequencies of chromosome aberrations induced by IR treatment were homogeneous. This is not the case of the individual frequencies of chromatid aberrations induced by BLM, where a great heterogeneity was observed. (authors)

  14. Radiological interference from personal articles in occupational radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnakumar, P.; Jayan, M.P; Pawar, V.J; Patil, S.L; Selvamani, N.; Vedram; Sureshkumar, M.K.; Chinnaesakki, S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the presence of radioactivity in some personal articles worn on sacred thread and the related difficulties faced by health physicists during occupational radiation monitoring in nuclear facilities. In an incident, the portal monitor installed at the exit gate of a nuclear facility indicated contamination on self of a radiation worker while passing through it. The worker was therefore, subjected to thorough check for external contamination by the plant health physicist, using a pan-cake contamination monitor. All the clothing of the person was also checked for contamination. On further detailed examination, a dark brownish personal article hanging on a sacred thread from his neck was found to be the source of contamination. This presentation aims at giving information to the health physics community on the possibility of such interferences during personal monitoring in nuclear facilities

  15. [The occupational radiation-induced cataract in five industrial radiographers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzarti Mezni, A; Loukil, I; Hriz, N; Kallel, K; Mlaiki, N; Ben Jemaâ, A

    2012-04-01

    The industrial uses of ionizing radiation in Tunisia are expanding, especially in industry and most particularly in the nondestructive testing of welds. Thus workers operating in the non-destructive testing of welds may develop a radiation-induced cataract varying in time to onset depending on the dose. To describe the characteristics of the radiation-induced cataract in patients exposed to ionizing radiation, determine the risk factors of radiation-induced cataracts. This was an anamnestic, clinical, and environmental study of five cases of radiation-induced cataract in workers employed in non-destructive testing of welds. This series of five cases had a mean age of 30.2 years and 5.53 years of work experience, ranging from 14 months to 15 years. All the patients were male and industrial radiographers specialized in nondestructive testing of welds. The average duration of exposure to ionizing radiation was 5.53 years. None of the patients had worn protective gear such as eye goggles. The ophthalmic check-up for the five special industrial radiographers showed punctuate opacities in three cases, punctiform opacities in one eye in one case, and phacosclerosis with bilateral lens multiple crystalline stromal opacities in a case of micro-lens opacities in both eyes with opalescence of both eyes in one case. These cataracts had been declared as occupational diseases. The value of a specialized ophthalmologic surveillance among these workers and the early diagnosis of lens opacities must be emphasized. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of toxicity reduction of sodium dodecyl sulfate submitted to electron beam radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanelli, M. F.; Moraes, M. C. F.; Villavicencio, A. L. C. H.; Borrely, S. I.

    2004-09-01

    Surfactants, as detergent active substances, are an important source of pollution causing biological adverse effects to aquatic organisms. Several data have been showing ecological disturbance due to the high concentration of surfactants on receiving waters and on wastewater treatment plants. Ionizing radiation has been proved as an effective technology to decompose organic substances and few papers have included ecotoxicological aspects. This paper shows the reduction of acute toxicity of a specific surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), when diluted in distilled water and submitted to electron beam radiation. The study included two test-organisms, the marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri and the crustacean Daphnia similis. Radiation processing resulted in an important acute toxicity removal for both assays, which can be summarized between 70% and 96%, using 3.0, 6.0, 9.0 and 12.0 kGy as radiation doses. Nevertheless, lower doses demonstrated better effect than 9.0 and 12.0 kGy and the bacterium assay was more sensitive to SDS than crustacean assay.

  17. Work practices and occupational radiation dose among radiologic technologists in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Eun Shil; Lee, Won Jin; Ha, Mina; Hwang, Seung Sik; Lee, Kyoung Mu; Jeong, Mee Seon

    2013-01-01

    Radiologic technologists are one of the occupational groups exposed to the highest dose of radiation worldwide. In Korea, radiologic technologists occupy the largest group (about 33%) among medical radiation workers and they are exposed to the highest dose of occupational dose of radiation as well (1). Although work experience with diagnostic radiation procedure of U.S. radiologic technologists was reported roughly (2), few studies have been conducted for description of overall work practices and the change by calendar year and evaluation of related factors on occupational radiation dose. The aims of the study are to describe work practices and to assess risk factors for occupational radiation dose among radiologic technologists in Korea. This study showed the work practices and occupational radiation dose among representative sample of radiologic technologists in Korea. The annual effective dose among radiologic technologists in Korea remains higher compared with those of worldwide average and varied according to demographic factors, year began working, and duration of working

  18. Radiation exposure in medicare-occupational and medical exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozumi, Kunihiko

    2012-01-01

    Recent cases of the occupational and medical exposures are discussed in relation to the justification of practice, optimization of protection and effort to reduce the dose. Instances of the occupational exposure in doctors and nurses like 26.5 mSv/15 mo and 53.9 mSv/y, and of skin cancer were reported in newspapers of 1999-2004, which might have had been prevented by their self evaluation of daily and monthly exposed dose. For reasonably lowering the occupational dose and number of exposed stuff in the present law, the prior radiation protection measures are to be taken in consideration of social/economical factors to conduct beneficial radiation medicare without restriction of practice under safest conditions, protecting personal determinative hazard and preventing stochastic effect. Medical stuff must be equipped with personal dosimeter. Further, recent media also commented such cases as unwished abortions after careless X-CT of pregnant women, and risk of increased cancer prevalence (3.2% in Japan) due to medical exposure, etc (200-2010). The prevalence is calculated on the linear non-threshold (LNT) hypothesis and is probably overestimated, possibly causing patient's fear. There has been a history of proposal by IAEA (1996) of the guidance levels of the ordinary roentgenography and in vivo nuclear medical test, and introduction of the concept of dose constraint by ICRP (Pub. 60). The incident dose rate to the patient under fluoroscopy defined by Japan Medical Service Law (2001) is, as an air-kerma rate, 15,600 residents for their contamination as well as remains, and measured the ambient dose rate of cities nearby. (T.T.)

  19. Occupational radiation exposure in international recommendations on radiation protection: Basic standards under review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, W.

    1996-01-01

    The ICRP publication 60 contains a number of new recommendations on the radiological protection of occupationally exposed persons. The recommendations have been incorporated to a very large extent in the BSS, the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources, a publication elaborated by the IAEA in cooperation with many other international organisations, and in the Euratom Basic Safety Standards (EUR) to be published soon. However, there exist some considerable discrepancies in some aspects of the three publications. The ICRP committee has set up a task group for defining four general principles of occupational radiation protection, and a safety guide is in preparation under the responsibility of the IAEA. ''StrahlenschutzPraxis'' will deal with this subject in greater detail after publication of these two important international publications. The article in hand discusses some essential aspects of the recommendations published so far. (orig.) [de

  20. Occupational radiation doses in Portugal from 1994 to 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, J.G.; Martins, M.B.; Amaral, E.M.

    2000-01-01

    This work reports on the occupational radiation doses for external radiation received in 1994-1998 by the radiation workers monitored by the Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety Department (DPRSN) in Portugal. Individual monitoring for external radiation is carried out in Portugal by DPRSN since the 60s, and the workers are monitored on a monthly or quarterly bases. In 1995 DPRSN monitored approximately 8000 people and was the only laboratory carrying out this sort of activity in Portugal. In 1998 the number of monitored people increased to nearly 8500 from 860 facilities, which leads us to state that the results shown in this work are well representative of the universe of radiation workers in Portugal. Until 1996, the dose measurement procedure was based only on film dosimetry and the results reported for the 1994-1995 period were obtained with this methodology. Since 1996, thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) was gradually introduced and since then an effort has been made to transfer the monitored workers from film to TLD. In 1998, both film and TLD dosimetry systems were running simultaneously, with average numbers of 4500 workers monitored with film dosimetry, while 4000 were monitored with TLD. The data presented from 1996 to 1998 were obtained with both methodologies. This work reports the annual mean effective doses received from external radiation, for the monitored and exposed workers in the different fields of activity, namely, industry, research laboratories, health and mining. The distribution of the annual effective dose by dose intervals is also reported. The collective annual dose by field of activity is estimated and the contribution to the total annual collective dose is determined. The collective dose estimates for the period 1994 to 1998 demonstrated that the health sector is the most representative exposed group in Portugal. (author)

  1. Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation for crews of suborbital spacecraft : questions & answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Crewmembers on future suborbital commercial spaceflights will be occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation, principally from galactic cosmic radiation. On infrequent occasions, the sun or thunderstorms may also contribute significantly to the ioni...

  2. Evaluation of nectar of kiwi (Actinidia deliciosa) submitted to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harder, Marcia N C.; Toledo, Tais C.F. de; Ferreira, Andrea C.P.; Arthur, Valter

    2007-01-01

    The kiwi is an exotic fruit, it is pertaining the Actinidaceae family, possesses high nutritional value, being rich mainly in vitamin C and fibers, calcium, iron and phosphorus, what turns it a good nutritious option, presenting an important associated attribute the quality of the fruits and the flavor, what be comes it a fruit with great acceptance in the consuming markets, mainly children. The irradiation is an excellent method of conservation, as well as an accomplice to reinforce the action of other applied processes with the same purpose. The objective of this work was to formulate a sweetened drink, no alcoholic, starting from the kiwi (Actinidia deliciosa), to submit its at the gamma radiation for source of Co 60 with doses of: 0 (control); 0.5; 1.0 and 2.0 kGy in a tax of dose of 0.712 kGy/hour, and subsequent physiochemical and sensorial analyses for detection of possible alterations provoked by the radiation. It is possible to conclude that the radiation in the doses used did not promote significant alterations in the physiochemical and sensorial characteristics of the kiwi nectar. (author)

  3. Evaluation of nectar of kiwi (Actinidia deliciosa) submitted to gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harder, Marcia N C.; Toledo, Tais C.F. de; Ferreira, Andrea C.P.; Arthur, Valter [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Irradiacao de Alimentos e Radioentomologia]. E-mails: mnharder@cena.usp.br; tcftoled@cena.usp.br; andrea@dtr.com.br; arthur@cena.usp.br; Spoto, Marta H.F. [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz(ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: mhfspoto@esalq.usp.br

    2007-07-01

    The kiwi is an exotic fruit, it is pertaining the Actinidaceae family, possesses high nutritional value, being rich mainly in vitamin C and fibers, calcium, iron and phosphorus, what turns it a good nutritious option, presenting an important associated attribute the quality of the fruits and the flavor, what be comes it a fruit with great acceptance in the consuming markets, mainly children. The irradiation is an excellent method of conservation, as well as an accomplice to reinforce the action of other applied processes with the same purpose. The objective of this work was to formulate a sweetened drink, no alcoholic, starting from the kiwi (Actinidia deliciosa), to submit its at the gamma radiation for source of Co{sup 60} with doses of: 0 (control); 0.5; 1.0 and 2.0 kGy in a tax of dose of 0.712 kGy/hour, and subsequent physiochemical and sensorial analyses for detection of possible alterations provoked by the radiation. It is possible to conclude that the radiation in the doses used did not promote significant alterations in the physiochemical and sensorial characteristics of the kiwi nectar. (author)

  4. The direct and inverse problems of an air-saturated poroelastic cylinder submitted to acoustic radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick Ogam

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A wave-fluid saturated poroelastic structure interaction model based on the modified Biot theory (MBT and plane-wave decomposition using orthogonal cylindrical functions is developed. The model is employed to recover from real data acquired in an anechoic chamber, the poromechanical properties of a soft cellular melamine cylinder submitted to an audible acoustic radiation. The inverse problem of acoustic diffraction is solved by constructing the objective functional given by the total square of the difference between predictions from the MBT interaction model and diffracted field data from experiment. The faculty of retrieval of the intrinsic poromechanical parameters from the diffracted acoustic fields, indicate that a wave initially propagating in a light fluid (air medium, is able to carry in the absence of mechanical excitation of the specimen, information on the macroscopic mechanical properties which depend on the microstructural and intrinsic properties of the solid phase.

  5. Occupational radiation exposure in Germany in 2006. Report of the radiation protection register

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frasch, G.; Fritzsche, E.; Kammerer, L.; Karofsky, R.; Spiesl, J.; Stegemann, R.

    2008-06-01

    In Germany, persons occupationally exposed to radiation are monitored by several official dosimetric services who transmit their records about individual radiation doses to the Radiation Protection Register of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS). The number of dose recordings reported to the Radiation Protection Register has annually increased to more than three million records per year and thus accumulated to more than 34 million dose records at the end of 2006. The purpose of the Radiation Protection Register is to supervise the keeping of the dose limits by each radiation worker and to monitor the compliance with the radiation protection principle ''optimisation'' by performing detailed annual statistical analyses of the monitored persons and their radiation exposure. Amongst others, the annual report of the Radiation Protection Register provides information about status and development of occupational radiation exposure in Germany. In 2006, about 312,000 workers were monitored with dosimeters for occupational radiation exposure. About 18 % of the monitored persons received a measurable personal dose. The average annual dose of these exposed workers was 0.75 mSv. This value is the lowest average annual dose since dose monitoring for occupational worker was introduced. It remains below the dose limit of 1 mSv for the general public and amounts only 4 % of the annual dose limit of 20 mSv for radiation workers. Since 2003 aircraft crew personnel is subject to dose monitoring if it is employed in accordance with the German employment act and likely to receive an effective dose of at least 1 mSv per year from cosmic radiation during flight operation. This accounts for about 33.000 pilots and flight attendants. 45 airlines report the monthly accumulated dose values of their personnel via the Federal Office for Civil Aviation (''Luftfahrt-Bundesamt, LBA'') to the BfS. The collective dose of the aircraft crew personnel is 71 Person-Sv and thus

  6. Occupational exposure to microwave radiation in diathermia units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, M.A.; Ubeda, A.; Tellez, M.; Santa Olalla, I.

    2006-01-01

    The present study summarizes preliminary data addressed to complete the present knowledge on the microwave (M.V.)-exposure doses and conditions in workers exposed chronically to relatively high, though nonthermal, levels of that non ionizing radiations (N.I.R.). The obtained data are of direct application to radiation protection in occupational media provided that: 1) help to detect and eradicate practices and situations that result in overexposure; 2) they constitute a basis for the design and development of strategies for exposure control and minimization, and 3) they represent a dosimetric support necessary to properly interpret past and future epidemiologic and experimental data on potential health effects of chronic exposures to M.W. radiation at work. The described results will be extended through additional dosimetric recordings in other hospitals. The dosimetric data will be compared to the results of questionnaires among the electro-therapists working at the units studied. The objective is to identify potential relationships between exposure doses and specific diseases or level of risk perception among the investigated professional group. (authors)

  7. Occupational exposure to microwave radiation in diathermia units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, M.A.; Ubeda, A. [Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Servicio de Investigacion-BEM, Madrid (Spain); Tellez, M.; Santa Olalla, I. [Hospital La Paz, Servicio de Radiofisica y Radioproteccion, Madrid (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    The present study summarizes preliminary data addressed to complete the present knowledge on the microwave (M.V.)-exposure doses and conditions in workers exposed chronically to relatively high, though nonthermal, levels of that non ionizing radiations (N.I.R.). The obtained data are of direct application to radiation protection in occupational media provided that: 1) help to detect and eradicate practices and situations that result in overexposure; 2) they constitute a basis for the design and development of strategies for exposure control and minimization, and 3) they represent a dosimetric support necessary to properly interpret past and future epidemiologic and experimental data on potential health effects of chronic exposures to M.W. radiation at work. The described results will be extended through additional dosimetric recordings in other hospitals. The dosimetric data will be compared to the results of questionnaires among the electro-therapists working at the units studied. The objective is to identify potential relationships between exposure doses and specific diseases or level of risk perception among the investigated professional group. (authors)

  8. Epidemiological studies of groups with occupational exposure to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    The exposure of man to radiation and the resulting risk of carcinogenesis continues to be of concern to the public. In this context, there is often a tendency to carry out epidemiological studies concerning the induction of cancer in radiation workers and members of the public which are not supported by a statistically valid data base or whose results are misinterpreted or misused. To assist national authorities in evaluating radiological risks, the Nuclear Energy Agency has sponsored a critical review of the methodologies for, and the limitations of, these epidemiological studies, and of the precautions to be adopted in interpreting their results. Prepared by a consultant, Dr. Joan M. Davies, the review focuses on the problems encountered when carrying out epidemiological studies on groups of workers occupationally exposed to radiations, and using their results for radiological protection purposes. It is published under the responsibility of the Secretary General of the OECD, and does not necessarily reflect the views of Member Governments. The primary objective is to provide background material to be used by national authorities that have responsibilities in the field of radiological protection as well as by other persons interested in this subject

  9. Radiation protection in occupational exposure to microwave electrotherapy units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guardia, V.; Ferrer, S.; Alonso, O.; Almonacid, M.

    2012-01-01

    During the last years, electromagnetic emitters are more and more commonly used for therapeutic treatments in electrotherapy centers. This extended use has caused worries workers, who believe that microwave radiation radiation might have effects similar to those induced by radioactivity, even if the only effects recognised by international regulatory bodies concerning microwave exposure of humans are those of thermal origin. The present study aims to answer the existing concerns about electromagnetic exposure in electrotherapy facilities. After monitoring environmental values in an electrotherapy facility, we conclude that actions must be undertaken in order to reduce the exposure levels, as proposed by the current European guidelines, which should become legally binding for all EU state members within the current year. With the purpose of reducing potential risks of occupational overexposure, we are developing innovative fabrics for microwave shielding. These new materials are able to attenuate 85% of the microwave radiation. As these are light materials, they can be used in all kind of facilities, as wall covers, movable screens or even as personal protection, like lab clothes or gloves. (Author) 6 refs.

  10. Consideration on a limit for lifetime occupational radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellerer, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    Annual dose limits in occupational radiation exposure are merely a secondary constraint in addition to the primary rule of dose reduction and justification. The limits may, therefore, be reached only in rare, special cases. However, in principle, there might be cases in which the annual limit is continuously exhausted throughout a working life; a high total dose of 0.8 Sv could then be reached. In view of this possibility, there have been considerations of an added restriction by limiting the lifetime occupational dose to 0.4 Sv. The implications of such lifetime doses are considered, and it is shown that an exposure up to the maximum of 0.8 Sv will lead to the need for compensation, if a leukaemia were to occur in the exposed worker. A lifetime dose of 0.4 Sv equally spread over a working life will not lead to the critical value of the probability of causation in excess of 0.5. Nevertheless, it could cause such critical values when it is accumulated during shorter periods. More decisive than the probabilities of causation are, however, the absolute numbers of excess cases of leukaemia due to the occupational exposure. It is seen that less than one excess case would be expected if a group of 100 workers were all exposed to the maximum of 0.8 Sv. Since lifetime doses of 0.8 or 0.4 Sv will be accumulated in very few cases and only with special justification, there appears to be little need to introduce a further limit of lifetime exposure in addition to the current annual limit. (orig.)

  11. Ionizing radiation occupational exposure in the hemodynamics services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronchi, Claudia Carla

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the ionizing radiation occupational exposure in the hemodynamic services of two large scale hospitals (Hospital A and Hospital B) of the Sao Paulo city. The research looked into annual doses that 279 professionals of the hemodynamic services were exposed to between 1991 and 2002. The data analyzed was collected from the database of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN) for Hospital A, and from the Radiological Protection Department of Hospital B. Besides this, measures of hands and crystalline lens equivalent doses were performed during hemodynamic procedures of the physicians, assistant physicians and nursing assistants with TL dosimeters (CaSO 4 :Dy + Teflon R) produced at IPEN. The safety procedures adopted by the hospitals were verified with the aid of a specific questionnaire for the hemodynamic services. Finally, a profile of the professionals that work in cardiac catheterism laboratories of the hemodynamic services was delineated, considering the variables of individual monitoring time, age and sex. This study allowed for observation of the behavior of the professionals' annual doses of these hemodynamic services in relation to the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear and the Secretaria de Vigilancia Sanitaria limits. It showed that the annual doses of the same specialized occupations would vary from one hospital to another. It further showed the need of individual monitoring of the physicians' unprotected body parts (hands and crystalline lens) during the hemodynamic procedures. (author)

  12. On occupational-appointment demands on radiation hygiene for medical radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usol'tsev, V.I.; Kuzin, V.I.; Tselikov, N.V.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the work was to determine occupational requirements on radiation hygiene for medical radiologists. To solve the problem using questionnaire, personal conversations with doctors, analysis of basis control and examinations volume and character of work on radiation hygiene were studied in 510 medical radiologists. Occupational requirements for these specialists were worked out on the basis the obtained data. 4 refs

  13. Occupational Radiation Exposure Analysis of US ITER DCLL TBM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, Brad J; Cadwallader, Lee C; Dagher, Mohamad

    2007-08-01

    This report documents an Occupational Radiation Exposure (ORE) analysis that was performed for the US International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) Test Blanket Module (TBM). This analysis was performed with the QADMOD dose code for anticipated maintenance activities for this TBM concept and its ancillary systems. The QADMOD code was used to model the PbLi cooling loop of this TBM concept by specifying gamma ray source terms that simulated radioactive material within the piping, valves, heat exchanger, permeator, pump, drain tank, and cold trap of this cooling system. Estimates of the maintenance tasks that will have to be performed and the time required to perform these tasks where developed based on either expert opinion or on industrial maintenance experience for similar technologies. This report details the modeling activity and the calculated doses for the maintenance activities envisioned for the US DCLL TBM.

  14. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, B.G.

    1979-11-01

    An updated compilation is presented of occupational radiation exposures at commercial nuclear power reactors for the years 1969 through 1978. Data received from the 64 light water cooled reactors (LWRs) that had completed at least one year of commercial operation as of December 31, 1978 are included. This represents an increase of seven reactors over the number contained in last year's report. The total number of personnel monitored at LWRs during 1978 increased by approximately 12% to 76,121. The number of workers that received measurable doses, however, increased only 8% to 45,978. The total collective dose for 1978 is estimated to be 31,806 man-rems, a small decrease from last year's value of 32,511, which results in the average dose per worker decreasing slightly to 0.69 rems. The average collective dose per reactor also decreased, by approximately 15%, to a value of 497 man-rems

  15. Occupational radiation exposure of the personnel due to interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wucherer, M.; Schmidt, T.; Loose, R.

    2000-01-01

    Applications of interventional radiology continue to be on an upward trend, some countries reporting a 100% increase within 2-4 years, so that the resulting radiation exposure of both patients and personnel is an issue of increasing importance. Whereas those applications in general are of advantage for the patients, they mean just a further health hazard for the medical personnel. It is therefore necessary to exploit all available means to reduce the occupational doses. Modern interventional radiology systems offer a range of measures for this purpose, as e.g. last-image-hold, or pulsed modes. Special attention has to be given to the exposure of hand and head. Particularly the hand is closest to the useful beam, and it should be a mandatory requirement to wear film rings. (orig./CB) [de

  16. Occupational radiation exposure in the GDR in 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulheim, K.F.; Rothe, W.; Scheler, R.

    1982-01-01

    As in the previous year, the centralized monitoring of radiation workers for occupational exposure was carried out on the basis of film badges (38,781 persons), measurements with a whole-body counter and analyses of biosamples (351 persons in all). According to the film data, the monthly exposures exceeding 4 mGy totalled 682 including 48 doses higher than 10 mGy. Four workers received annual doses above 50 mGy, with the highest value being 1410 mGy. For the exposed population as a whole and some sub-groups, annual collective and mean annual doses have been given. In assessing internal exposure situation, use has been made of both data from the centralized monitoring program and those determined by some nuclear facilities themselves under the auspices of the SAAS. The results gave no indication of internal doses exceeding the annual limits of intake. (author)

  17. Occupational radiation exposure in the GDR in 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulheim, K.F.; Rothe, W.; Scheler, R.

    1982-01-01

    As in the previous year, the centralized monitoring of radiation workers for occupational exposure was carried out on the basis of film badges (38,178 persons), measurements with a whole-body counter (247 persons) and analyses of biosamples (318 persons). According to the film data, the monthly exposures exceeding 4 mGy totalled 610 including 92 doses higher than 10 mGy. Six workers received annual doses above 50 mGy, with the highest value being 123 mGy. For the exposed population as a whole and some sub-groups, annual collective and mean annual doses have been given. In assessing the internal exposure situation, use has been made of both data from the centralized monitoring program and those determined by some nuclear facilities themselves under the auspices of the SAAS. The results gave no indication of internal doses exceeding the annual limits of intake. (author)

  18. Occupational radiation exposure in upper Austrian water supplies and Spas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringer, W.; Simader, M.; Bernreiter, M.; Aspek, W.; Kaineder, H.

    2006-01-01

    The Council Directive 96/29/EURATOM lays down the basic safety standards for the protection of the workers and the general public against the dangers arising from ionising radiation, including natural radiation. Based on the directive and on the corresponding Austrian legislation a comprehensive study was conducted to determine the occupational radiation exposure in Upper Austrian water supplies and spas. The study comprises 45 water supplies and 3 spas, one of them being a radon spa. Most measurements taken were to determine the radon concentration in air at different workplaces (n = 184), but also measurements of the dose rate at dehumidifiers (n = 7) and gamma spectrometric measurements of back washing water (n = 4) were conducted. To determine the maximum occupational radon exposure in a water supply measurements were carried out in all water purification buildings and in at least half o f the drinking water reservoirs of the water supply. The results were combined with the respective working times in these locations (these data having been collected by means of a questionnaire). Where the calculated exposure was greater than 1 MBq h/m then all drinking water reservoirs of the concerned water suppl y were measured for their radon concentration to ensure a reliable assessment of the exposure. The results show that the radon concentrations in the water supplies were lower as expected, being in 55% of all measurement sites below 1000 Bq/m in 91% below 5000 Bq/m and with a maximum value of 38700 Bq/m.This leads to exposures that are below 2 MBq h/m (corresponding to approx. 6 mSv/a) in 42 water supplies. However, for the remaining three water supplies maximal occupational exposures due to radon of 2.8 MBq h/m (∼ 10 mSv/a), 15 MBq h/m (∼ 50 mSv/a), and 17 MBq h/m ( ∼ 56 mSv/a), respectively, were determined. In these water supplies remediation measures were proposed, based mainly on improved ventilation of and/or reduction of working time in the building

  19. Assessment of occupational exposure to radiofrequency fields and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, T. G.; Allen, S. G.; Blackwell, R. P.; Litchfield, I.; Mann, S. M.; Pope, J. M.; Van Tongeren, M. J. A.

    2004-01-01

    The use of personal monitors for the assessment of exposure to radiofrequency fields and radiation in potential future epidemiological studies of occupationally exposed populations has been investigated. Data loggers have been developed for use with a commercially available personal monitor and these allowed personal exposure records consisting of time-tagged measurements of electric and magnetic field strength to be accrued over extended periods of the working day. The instrumentation was worn by workers carrying out tasks representative of some of their typical daily activities at a variety of radio sites. The results indicated significant differences in the exposures of workers in various RF environments. A number of measures of exposure have been examined with a view to assessing possible exposure metrics for epidemiological studies. There was generally a good correlation between a given measure of electric field strength and the same measure of magnetic field strength. (authors)

  20. Role of American Nuclear Insurers in reducing occupational radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forbes, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    Since 1957 the nuclear insurance pools have provided liability and property insurance for the nation's nuclear power generating stations as mandated by the Price-Anderson Act. Although the insurance was originally structured to give financial protection to the insured in the event of a major accident, the potential for third-party claims arising from routine occupational exposure is becoming a more realistic pathway for a loss to the pools. In order to give maximum protection to the pools' assets, the Liability Engineering Department of American Nuclear Insurers (ANI) performs periodic inspections of the power plants. By concentrating on programs and management areas, ANI inspections complement regulatory inspections so that all major areas of common interest are reviewed. This paper presents the nature, results, and findings of those periodic inspections particularly in the general area of plant radiation protection

  1. Status of occupational radiation protection at end users in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhogora, W.E.; Mwalongo, D.; Lema, U.S.; Mboya, G.; Banzi, F.P.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: This paper presents the results of the national survey conducted by regulatory authority to assess the awareness on occupational radiation protection (ORP) at end using facilities in Tanzania. The survey was done by using a questionnaire, which addressed elements required for desirable ORP infrastructure at end users. The questions were mainly structured with closed questions such that the first response could be 'yes' or 'no'. The elements included compliance to authorization requirements, cooperation to ensure the safety of employees of another employer, availability of radiation safety officer (RSO) with adequate power to discharge his/her functions, availability of radiation protection programme (RPP) and desirable management structure. Others; were the availability of programmes on staff selection, information and training; workplace (WP) monitoring, coverage of individual monitoring for external radiation service (IMERS), intervention and emergencies and health insurance. Aspects on effective control of doses, provisional of administrative control, quality management system and occupational exposures from natural sources were not covered because they were presumed to be less familiar. Out of 270 questionnaires distributed, seventy four questionnaires (28%) were returned for analysis. The results indicated that 65% responded to questions as requested and therefore had a satisfactory general awareness on ORP. Other positive findings were good understanding on authorization details and related compliance (92%), availability of RPP and recognition of RSO as well as a supportive management structure (86%) and fully coverage by IMERS (72%). The shortcomings were observed in the following areas: absence of cooperation agreements to ensure the safety of employees of other employers (96%); absence of formal information and training programmes (72%); absence of work place monitoring programmes (96%); absence of interventions and emergency programmes (78

  2. Does occupational exposure to ionizing radiation induce adaptation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djurovic, B.; Selakovic, V.; Radjen, S.; Radakovic, S.; Spasic-Jokic, V.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Even the most of personnel occupationally exposed (OE) to ionizing radiation (IR) is exposed to very low doses (LD), some harmful effects can be noticed. IR can affect the cell structure in two ways: directly and indirectly-inducing radiolysis of water and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) similar to endogenously induced. In the low- LET exposure almost 70 % of absorbed energy is spent for ROS production. Over-production of ROS can cause oxidative stress. DNA is the main target of induced ROS. It is also experimentally showed that many important cell protective mechanisms, such is adaptation, are dependent of ROS concentration produced by low doses. The aim of this paper is to investigate if occupational exposure to LD induce over-production of ROS, and influence the activity of protective enzymes and radiosensitivity as well as induce adaptation. Our subjects were medical workers occupationally exposed to IR (44) and not-exposed (33), matched in gender, age, habits-dietary, alcohol consumption, smoking. Occupational exposure was calculated on the basis of individual TL-dose records. Besides the standard medical examination, micronucleus test, superoxide production and lipid peroxidation index, expressed as malonaldehyde (MDA) production, were performed by standard procedures as well as measurements of activity of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH). Half of each sample were put in a sterile plastic test-tube placed in a plexiglas container 15 x 15 cm, and irradiated by 60 Co source of γ-ray at room temperature. Employed radiation dose was 2 Gy, dose-rate 0.45 Gy/min and distance from the source 74 cm. All blood samples were frozen at -70 C degrees, and kept till analyses which were performed at the same time. Our results confirm: significantly higher incidence of micronuclei in OE (.31±10 vs 17±8, p=0.00) with significant increase after irradiation in each group and lack of differences in radiosensitivity between groups

  3. The impact of education on occupational radiation exposure reduction in a diagnostic radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetter, R.J.; Gray, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Patient load, number of radiographic exams, complexity of some exams, and associated potential occupational radiation exposure of medical personnel have increased significantly in the past decade. Efforts to reduce exposure through employee education and awareness have resulted in significant reduction in occupational exposure for most diagnostic radiographic areas at Mayo Clinic. This paper reviews trends in occupational radiation exposure from diagnostic x- rays at Mayo Clinic over the past ten years. Changes in employee radiation dose equivalents are correlated with patient workload, complexity of exams, increased interventional radiology and cardiology, and efforts to reduce employee radiation exposure

  4. Occupational Radiation Protection in Severe Accident Management. EG-SAM Interim Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    phases. In line with the agreed timeline for preparation, the expert group was motivated to develop an interim (preliminary) report before the end of 2013 (with a general perspective and discussion of specific severe accident management worker dose issues), and to finalize the report by organizing an international workshop in 2014 to address national experiences on best occupational RP management practices and protocols for optimum RP job coverage during severe accident, initial response and recovery efforts to identify good RP practices and RP lessons learned from previous reactor accidents, which will be submitted to the ISOE Management Board for approval. This interim report comprises six main chapters. Chapter 2 provides essential information on radiation protection management and organisation. Chapter 3 establishes the goal of radiation protection training and exercises related to severe accident management. Chapter 4 discusses facility characteristics that must be considered when planning actions in response to a severe accident. Chapter 5 provides for the interpretation and application of an overall approach for the protection of workers. Chapter 6 discusses radioactive materials, contamination controls and logistics during the emergency phase. Chapter 7 addresses key lessons learned from past accidents, including Chernobyl and Fukushima. (authors)

  5. Retrospective internal radiation exposure assessment in occupational epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neton, J.W.; Flora, J.T.; Spitz, H.B.; Taulbee, T.D.

    2000-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies of workers at U.S. Department of Energy facilities are being conducted by the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health to evaluate the health risk associated with exposure to sources of external and internal ionizing radiation. While exposure to external sources of radiation can be estimated from personal dosimeter data, reconstruction of exposure due to internally deposited radioactivity is more challenging because bioassay monitoring data is frequently less complete. Although comprehensive monitoring was provided for workers with the highest internal exposures, the majority of workers were monitored relatively infrequently. This monitoring was conducted to demonstrate compliance with regulations rather than to evaluate exposure for use in epidemiologic studies. Attributes of past internal monitoring programs that challenge accurate exposure assessment include: incomplete characterization of the workplace source term; a lack of timely measurements; insensitive and/or nonspecific bioassay measurements; and the presence of censored data. In spite of these limitations, many facilities have collected a large amount of worker and workplace monitoring information that can be used to evaluate internal exposure while minimizing worker misclassification. This paper describes a systematic approach for using the available worker and workplace monitoring data that can lead to either a qualitative or quantitative retrospective assessment of internal exposures. Various aspects of data analysis will be presented, including the evaluation of minimum detectable dose, the treatment of censored data, and the use of combinations of bioassay and workplace data to characterize exposures. Examples of these techniques applied to a cohort study involving chronic exposure scenarios to uranium are provided. A strategy for expressing exposure or dose in fundamental, unweighted units related to the quantity of radiation delivered to an organ will also

  6. Occupational radiation exposure and its health effects on interventional medical workers: study protocol for a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Seulki; Chung, Hwan Hoon; Cho, Sung Bum; Jin, Young Woo; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Ha, Mina; Bang, Ye Jin; Ha, Yae Won; Lee, Won Jin

    2017-12-15

    Although fluoroscopically guided procedures involve a considerably high dose of radiation, few studies have investigated the effects of radiation on medical workers involved in interventional fluoroscopy procedures. Previous research remains in the early stages and has not reached a level comparable with other occupational studies thus far. Furthermore, the study of radiation workers provides an opportunity to estimate health risks at low doses and dose rates of ionising radiation. Therefore, the objectives of this study are (1) to initiate a prospective cohort study by conducting a baseline survey among medical radiation workers who involve interventional fluoroscopy procedures and (2) to assess the effect of occupational radiation exposure and on the overall health status through an in-depth cross-sectional study. Intervention medical workers in Korea will be enrolled by using a self-administered questionnaire survey, and the survey data will be linked with radiation dosimetry data, National Health Insurance claims data, cancer registry and mortality data. After merging these data, the radiation organ dose, lifetime attributable risk due to cancer and the risk per unit dose will be estimated. For the cross-sectional study, approximately 100 intervention radiology department workers will be investigated for blood tests, clinical examinations such as ultrasonography (thyroid and carotid artery scan) and lens opacity, the validation of badge dose and biodosimetry. This study was reviewed and approved by the institutional review board of Korea University (KU-IRB-12-12-A-1). All participants will provide written informed consent prior to enrolment. The findings of the study will be disseminated through peer-reviewed scientific journals, conference presentations, and a report will be submitted to the relevant public health authorities in the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to help with the development of appropriate research and management policies.

  7. Consequences of the new radiation protection law on the radiation protection register and the occupational radiation protection; Auswirkungen des neuen Strahlenschutzgesetzes auf das Strahlenschutzregister und die berufliche Strahlenueberwachung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frasch, Gerhard

    2017-08-01

    The implementation of the guideline 2013/59/EURATOM has been performed in the new radiation protection law. The most important consequences of the new radiation protection law for the occupational radiation protection are the following: the introduction of an explicit personal indicator and the actualization of occupational categories for employees. These facts require technical and administrative reorganization in data transmission of the licensee to the regulatory monitoring executive and the radiation protection register.

  8. Cytogenetic monitoring of nuclear workers occupationally exposed to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griciene, B.; Slapsyte, G.; Mierauskiene, J.

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome aberration (CA) analysis using Giemsa techniques was performed in blood lymphocytes of 84 nuclear workers with cumulative doses of 1-632 mSv during employment periods of 1-25 y. The control group comprised 82 healthy male donors. An estimated CA frequency in the total radiation-exposed group was significantly higher when compared with the controls (2.27 vs. 1.76 CA/100 cells, p 0.05). However, significant increase in the total CA frequency was determined in workers with additional internal exposure (2.54 CA/100 cells, p < 0.05) and those with registered neutron doses (2.95 CA/100 cells, p < 0.01). No correlation was found between CA frequency and occupational exposure dose. Borderline significant correlation was found between duration of employment and total CA (r = 0.218, p = 0.046, Fig. 2) and chromosome-type aberration (r = 0.265, p = 0.015) frequency. (authors)

  9. Occupational radiation exposures at Canadian CANDU nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeSurf, J.E.; Taylor, G.F.

    1982-09-01

    In Canada, methods to reduce the radiation exposure to workers at nuclear power reactors have been studied and implemented since the early days of the CANDU reactor program. Close collaboration between the designers, the operators, and the manufacturers has reduced the total exposure at each station, the dose requirement to operate and maintain each successive station compared with earlier stations, and the average annual exposure per worker. Specific methods developed to achieve dose reduction include water chemistry; corrosion resistant materials; low cobalt materials; decontamination; hot filtration, improved equipment reliability, maintainability, and accessibility; improved shielding design and location; planning of work for low exposure; improved operating and maintenance procedures; removal of tritium from D 2 O systems and work environments; improved protective clothing; on-power refuelling; worker awareness and training; and many other small improvements. The 1981 occupational dose productivity factors for Pickering A and Bruce A nuclear generating stations were respectively 0.43 and 0.2 rem/MW(e).a

  10. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, B.G.; Hagemeyer, D.

    1989-08-01

    This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was extracted from the 1986 annual statistical reports submitted by six of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR section 20.407. Since there are no geologic repositories for high level waste currently licensed, only six categories will be considered in this report. These six categories of licensees also submit personal identification and exposure information for terminating employees pursuant to 10 CFR section 20.408, and some analysis of this ''termination'' data is also presented in this report. Annual report for 1986 were received from a total of 482 NRC licensees, 101 of whom were licensed nuclear power reactors. Compilations of the 482 reports indicated that some 227,652 individuals were monitored, 116,241 of whom received a measurable dose (Table 3.1). The collective dose incurred by these individuals was calculated to be 46,366 person-rems (person-cSv) which represents a decrease of 23% from the 1985 value. The number of workers receiving a measurable dose increased while the collective dose decreased slightly, causing the average measurable dose to decrease from 0.43 rem (cSv) to 0.40 rem (cSv). About 13% of the monitored individuals were found to have received doses greater than 0.50 rem (cSv), which is about the same as the value for 1985. 16 refs., 11 figs., 26 tabs

  11. Evaluation of occupant volume strength in conventional passenger railroad equipment : a thesis submitted by Michael E. Carolan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-31

    To ensure a level of occupant volume protection, passenger railway : equipment operating on mainline railroads in the United States must currently be : designed to resist an 800,000 pound compressive load applied statically to the : underframe. An al...

  12. Occupational radiation exposure at light water cooled power reactors. Annual report, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peck, L.J.

    1979-04-01

    This report presents an updated compilation of occupational radiation exposures at commercial light water cooled nuclear power reactors (LWRs) for the years 1969 through 1977. The information contained in this document was derived from reports submitted to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission in accordance with requirements of individual plant Technical Specifications, and in accordance with Part 20.407 of Title 10, Chapter 1, Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 20.407). An additional 4 LWRs completed a full calendar year of commercial operation for the first time in 1977. This report now encompasses data from 57 commercially operating U.S. nuclear power plants. The number of personnel monitored at LWRs increased approximately 10% in 1977, and the average collective dose to personnel (man-rems per reactor-year) increased 14% over the 1976 average. The average number of personnel receiving measurable exposure per reactor increased 11%, and the average exposure per individual in 1977 was 0.8 rem per person

  13. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors, 1981. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, B.G.

    1982-11-01

    This report presents an updated compilation of occupational radiation exposures at commercial nuclear power reactors for the years 1969 through 1981. This year's report contains data received from the 70 light water cooled reactors (LWRs) and one high temperature gas cooled reactor that had been declared to be in commercial operation for at least one full year as of December 31, 1981. This represents an increase of two reactors over the number contained in last year's report. The total number of personnel monitored at LWRs in 1981 was 124,504, a slight decrease from that found in 1980. The number of workers that received measurable doses during 1981 was 82,183 which is about 2000 more than that found in 1980. The total collective dose at LWRs for 1981 is estimated to be 54,142 man-rems, which is only about 350 man-rems more than that reported in 1980. The report also presents a summary and some analyses of the exposure data contained in the termination reports that have been submitted by nuclear power licensees to the Commission pursuant to 10 CFR Section 20.408. As of December 31, 1981, personal identification and exposure information had been collected and computerized for some 210,000 of these terminating reactor personnel

  14. Preliminary assays for lemongrass essential oil ecotoxicological test in D. similis and C. silvestrii submitted to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimiliani, Giovana T.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Rogero, Jose R.; Cruz, Aurea S.

    2011-01-01

    Pharmaceutical products are of great interest in ecotoxicological studies due to being found some of these products in the superficial waters and sediments, water and sewage treatment effluents. It was verified an increase of insect repellent chemical products in the aquatic environment because of the increase of diseases transmitted by mosquitoes like dengue. As these compounds show toxicity, the use of essential oils natural products with repellent properties is increasing and the literature about the impact in the aquatic environment is scarce. The hydric frame would suffer natural radiation and radiations from energy generation nuclear plants impacts fall out of tests and nuclear accidents. There is no universal definition of environmental protection and there are few studies on radiation effects in the aquatic environment. In this study was determined the lemon grass essential oil toxicity level as well as the lethal dose of ionizing radiation, LD 50 , in aquatic organisms. Cytotoxicity test was performed by in vitro neutral red uptake method in NCTC clone L929 cell line. In the LD 50 test aquatic organisms were submitted to gamma radiation. The essential oil of lemongrass Cymbopogon flexuosus showed cytotoxicity index IC 50 about 50μg.mL -1 . The LD 50 for Daphnia similis was 242 Gy and Ceriodaphnia silvestrii about 525 Gy. Studies will be continued with acute and chronic ecotoxicological tests of lemongrass essential oil in natural organisms and in organisms submitted to gamma radiation, utilizing the results obtained in this work. (author)

  15. Preliminary assays for lemongrass essential oil ecotoxicological test in D. similis and C. silvestrii submitted to gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimiliani, Giovana T.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Rogero, Jose R., E-mail: gtgimiliani@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cruz, Aurea S. [Instituto Adolfo Lutz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Culturas Celulares

    2011-07-01

    Pharmaceutical products are of great interest in ecotoxicological studies due to being found some of these products in the superficial waters and sediments, water and sewage treatment effluents. It was verified an increase of insect repellent chemical products in the aquatic environment because of the increase of diseases transmitted by mosquitoes like dengue. As these compounds show toxicity, the use of essential oils natural products with repellent properties is increasing and the literature about the impact in the aquatic environment is scarce. The hydric frame would suffer natural radiation and radiations from energy generation nuclear plants impacts fall out of tests and nuclear accidents. There is no universal definition of environmental protection and there are few studies on radiation effects in the aquatic environment. In this study was determined the lemon grass essential oil toxicity level as well as the lethal dose of ionizing radiation, LD{sub 50}, in aquatic organisms. Cytotoxicity test was performed by in vitro neutral red uptake method in NCTC clone L929 cell line. In the LD{sub 50} test aquatic organisms were submitted to gamma radiation. The essential oil of lemongrass Cymbopogon flexuosus showed cytotoxicity index IC{sub 50} about 50{mu}g.mL{sup -1}. The LD{sub 50} for Daphnia similis was 242 Gy and Ceriodaphnia silvestrii about 525 Gy. Studies will be continued with acute and chronic ecotoxicological tests of lemongrass essential oil in natural organisms and in organisms submitted to gamma radiation, utilizing the results obtained in this work. (author)

  16. Medical radiation exposure and its impact on occupational practices in Korean radiologic technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Seul Ki; Lee, Won Jin

    2016-01-01

    The use of radiology examinations in medicine has been growing worldwide. Annually an estimated 3.1 billion radiologic exams are performed. According to this expansion of medical radiation exposure, it has been hard to pay no attention to the effects of medical radiation exposures in the exposure from different types of radiation source. This study, therefore, was aimed to assess the association of medical and occupational radiation exposure in Korean radiologic technologists and evaluate necessity for its consideration in occupational studies. This study did not show the strong association between medical radiation exposure and occupational radiation exposure except several modalities with specific frequency. These results are preliminary but certainly meaningful for interpretation of epidemiologic finding, therefore, we need further evaluation specially for the repeatedly exposed imaging tests and high dose procedures that presented somewhat weak relationship in this study linked with health outcomes of radiation exposure. This study did not show the strong association between medical radiation exposure and occupational radiation exposure except several modalities with specific frequency. These results are preliminary but certainly meaningful for interpretation of epidemiologic finding, therefore, we need further evaluation specially for the repeatedly exposed imaging tests and high dose procedures that presented somewhat weak relationship in this study linked with health outcomes of radiation exposure.

  17. Medical radiation exposure and its impact on occupational practices in Korean radiologic technologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Seul Ki; Lee, Won Jin [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The use of radiology examinations in medicine has been growing worldwide. Annually an estimated 3.1 billion radiologic exams are performed. According to this expansion of medical radiation exposure, it has been hard to pay no attention to the effects of medical radiation exposures in the exposure from different types of radiation source. This study, therefore, was aimed to assess the association of medical and occupational radiation exposure in Korean radiologic technologists and evaluate necessity for its consideration in occupational studies. This study did not show the strong association between medical radiation exposure and occupational radiation exposure except several modalities with specific frequency. These results are preliminary but certainly meaningful for interpretation of epidemiologic finding, therefore, we need further evaluation specially for the repeatedly exposed imaging tests and high dose procedures that presented somewhat weak relationship in this study linked with health outcomes of radiation exposure. This study did not show the strong association between medical radiation exposure and occupational radiation exposure except several modalities with specific frequency. These results are preliminary but certainly meaningful for interpretation of epidemiologic finding, therefore, we need further evaluation specially for the repeatedly exposed imaging tests and high dose procedures that presented somewhat weak relationship in this study linked with health outcomes of radiation exposure.

  18. Validation of an educative manual for patients with head and neck cancer submitted to radiation therapy 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz, Flávia Oliveira de Almeida Marques; Ferreira, Elaine Barros; Vasques, Christiane Inocêncio; da Mata, Luciana Regina Ferreira; dos Reis, Paula Elaine Diniz

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: develop the content and face validation of an educative manual for patients with head and neck cancer submitted to radiation therapy. Method: descriptive methodological research. The Theory of Psychometrics was used for the validation process, developed by 15 experts in the theme area of the educative manual and by two language and publicity professionals. A minimum agreement level of 80% was considered to guarantee the validity of the material. Results: the items addressed in the assessment tool of the educative manual were divided in three blocks: objectives, structure and format, and relevance. Only one item, related to the sociocultural level of the target public, obtained an agreement rate manual proposed were attended to. This can contribute to the understanding of the therapeutic process the head and neck cancer patient is submitted to during the radiation therapy, besides supporting clinical practice through the nursing consultation. PMID:27305178

  19. Effects of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation on reproductive and child health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bienefeld, M.K.; McLaughlin, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    The evidence regarding the effects of occupational exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation on reproductive health is limited. However, exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation is associated with increased risk of adverse reproductive outcomes. The resulting uncertainty about the effects of occupational exposures has caused concern among some workers, therefore, we have designed a study to examine this question among Canadian medical radiation technologists. A short mailed questionnaire will be sent to all CAMRT members to obtain information about reproductive history, and a sample of respondents will receive a second questionnaire requesting information about other important exposures. Occupational dose records will be retrieved from the National Dose Registry. Using this information, relative risks for each outcome will be calculated for different radiation dose levels. This article provides a brief review of the literature on ionizing radiation exposure and reproductive outcomes, and an outline of the proposed study

  20. Structural characterization of annatto seeds (Bixa orellana) by transmission and scanning electron microscopy submitted to gamma radiation for dormancy break

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harder, Marcia N.C.; Nogueira, Neusa L.; Arthur, Valter; Rossi, Monica L.; Rodriguez, Adriana P.M. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: mnharder@cena.usp.br; nogueira@cena.usp.br; arthur@cena.usp.br; mnicalr@cena.usp.br; riana@cena.usp.br

    2007-07-01

    The annatto (Bixa orellana) is the only species of the Bixaceae family. From the seeds an important food colorant is obtained, bixin, for the industry and domestic use. More recently studies have focused more extensively in medicinal purpose of the species. Due to structural and physiologic characteristics, the seeds have low germination rate, around 30 %. The irradiation of seeds with gamma radiation can promote the increase and/or acceleration of germination, better plant development and productivity, among other aspects. The radiation doses used for this purpose should not cause genetic modifications in the organism, hence experimentation is needed to define the appropriate doses. Absence of research done annatto related to the use of the irradiation aiming at the increase of germination rates lead to the structural characterization of the annatto seeds submitted to gamma radiation through transmission (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The objective of this study was to verify the effect of radiation on the seeds structures during the process of dormancy break. Dry seeds and seeds immersed in distilled water for 24 hours were submitted to gamma radiation from source of Co{sup 60} type Gammacell-220 at CENA/USP, at doses 100 Gy. After irradiation the seeds were processed for TEM and SEM. Preliminary results, showed structural modifications in the seeds. (author)

  1. Validation of an educative manual for patients with head and neck cancer submitted to radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Flávia Oliveira de Almeida Marques da; Ferreira, Elaine Barros; Vasques, Christiane Inocêncio; Mata, Luciana Regina Ferreira da; Reis, Paula Elaine Diniz Dos

    2016-06-14

    develop the content and face validation of an educative manual for patients with head and neck cancer submitted to radiation therapy. descriptive methodological research. The Theory of Psychometrics was used for the validation process, developed by 15 experts in the theme area of the educative manual and by two language and publicity professionals. A minimum agreement level of 80% was considered to guarantee the validity of the material. the items addressed in the assessment tool of the educative manual were divided in three blocks: objectives, structure and format, and relevance. Only one item, related to the sociocultural level of the target public, obtained an agreement rate publicidade. Foi considerado o índice de concordância de, no mínimo, 80% para se garantir a validação do material. os itens abordados no instrumento de avaliação do manual educativo foram divididos em três blocos: objetivos, estrutura e apresentação, e relevância. Apenas um item, relacionado ao nível sociocultural do público-alvo, obteve índice de concordância publicidad. Fue considerado un índice de concordancia que fuese, por lo menos, de 80%, para garantizar la validación del material. los ítems abordados en el instrumento de evaluación del manual educativo fueron divididos en tres bloques: objetivos, estructura y presentación, y relevancia. Apenas un ítem, relacionado al nivel sociocultural del público-objetivo, obtuvo un índice de concordancia <80%, habiendo sido reformulado con base en las sugestiones de los participantes. Todos los otros ítems fueron considerados adecuados y/o totalmente adecuados en los tres bloques propuestos: objetivos (92,38%), estructura y presentación (89,74%), y relevancia (94,44%). el manual educativo propuesto fue considerado válido en lo que se refiere al contenido y a la apariencia. Se sugiere que puede contribuir para la comprensión del proceso terapéutico, al cual el paciente con cáncer de cabeza y cuello es sometido al

  2. The data submitted by the United Kingdom to the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation for the 1977 report to the General Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, F.E.; Webb, G.A.M.; Simmonds, J.R.

    1976-10-01

    The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) was established by the General Assembly in 1955 to report on the exposure of man to ionising radiation. In the subsequent twenty years the Committee has covered most aspects of the subject with repeated reviews of the levels of exposure from fallout due to weapons testing. The Committee is currently preparing a further report on doses from all sources and an evaluation of their biological effects. This is expected to be published in 1977. To aid it in compiling this report the Committee requested Member States of the UN to submit national data on a wide range of sources of exposure. The Board was asked by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office to collate the information requested from the United Kingdom. Data were available in the scientific literature on some topics, such as medical irradiation and environmental radioactivity. On some other topics, particularly occupational exposure, data have been collected but seldom published systematically

  3. Optimization of radiation protection (OPR) of workers in nuclear medicine department occupationally to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugrinska, Ana; Crcareva, Biljana; Andonovski, Boris

    2010-01-01

    Occupational radiation exposure of nuclear medicine personnel arise either from external irradiation during the handling or from the entry of radioactive substances in the body; the major source of external irradiation is the patient that has received a radiopharmaceutical for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. In this study we present the dosimetry monitoring of the personnel at the Institute of Pathophysiology and Nuclear Medicine in Skopje (IPNM) before and after the implementation the methods of ORP. Twenty-seven employees were optimized with standard TLD card, monthly, expressed as whole body personal dose in the period of use of dosimeter. Annual Effective Doses (AED) are presented for years: 2001, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008. In the year 2005, after measurement from Technical Service Organization, IPNM Radiation Protection Officer (RPO) designed and implemented new recommendation and modality such as: designation of areas, introducing ambiental dose measurements, classification of employees, personnel rotation, risk assessment, occupational dose constraints, education of personnel, compliance with written procedures and establishing the Programme for Radiation Protection (RP). ORP measures were applied during the year of 2006, so the results of 2001, 2004 and 2005 correspond to unopimized RP. We were evaluated three groups: radiopharmacy laboratory (RPL), nuclear medicine technologist (NMT) and medical doctors. The third group was further divided according to the AED in group with AED bellow 1.6 mSv (MD1), and group with AED above this level (MD2). The average AED in the NMT group for 2005 was 3.59 mSv, while in 2008 it was 1.8 mSv; for MD1 group in 2005 was 1.5 mSv and in MD2 was 3.0 mSv. The average AED in 2008 for MD1 was 1.1 mSv, while MD2 group comprised of only one subject with annual effective dose of 1.76 mSv. The most exposed groups were nuclear medicine technologists (NMT) and medical doctors routinely involved in everyday nuclear medicine

  4. Radiation Protection Concepts and Quantities for the Occupational Exposure to Cosmic Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, D.T.

    1999-01-01

    For the purposes of dose limitation and dose control, the harm, or detriment, of exposure to radiation is assessed by the quantity effective dose. Effective dose is evaluated by the application of factors to the averaged absorbed dose in the organs and tissues of the body. Radiation monitoring instruments are generally calibrated in terms of the quantity ambient dose equivalent which is defined in a simple spherical phantom. The relationship of these quantities is described. Requirements for the radiation protection of aircraft crew are given in the European Union Council Directive 96/29/EURATOM. There are requirements to assess the exposure of aircraft crew, to inform them of health risks, to reduce higher doses, and to control the dose to the foetus. There are no explicit dose limits, other than a dose objective to be applied to the exposure of the foetus, and no requirements for designation of areas or classification of workers. There are significant differences between the exposure condition of aircraft crew and workers in most other industries where there is occupational exposure to radiation. There are greater ranges of radiation types and energy, and there are different dose distributions and characteristics of the working populations. However, the field intensity is predictable and, with the exception of rare solar events, there is no risk of significant unexpected exposures. Dose assessment is anticipated to be by folding staff roster information with estimates of route doses, since there is little variability of dose rate within an aircraft. Route doses, which may be either an agreed average value for a given airport pairing and aircraft type, or be flight specific, will be closely linked to measured values. Requirements as to the accuracy of dose assessment should be applied which are broadly similar to those used in individual monitoring generally. (author)

  5. Analysis of the occupational doses of female radiation workers in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardasani, P B; Joshi, V D; Awari, J M; Kher, R K [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Radiation Protection Services Div.

    1994-04-01

    Basis for control of occupational exposures of women are same as that of men except for pregnant women. Analysis of annual and cumulative occupational doses of female radiation workers as a group has been done. The average annual dose data in the four broad categories and age wise dose distribution is presented. The average working period for female radiation workers is about 3 to 5 years which is same as that of all the radiation workers on our records. The average cumulative dose for female workers is about 3 mSv. (author). 4 refs., 4 tabs.

  6. Analysis of the occupational doses of female radiation workers in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardasani, P.B.; Joshi, V.D.; Awari, J.M.; Kher, R.K.

    1994-01-01

    Basis for control of occupational exposures of women are same as that of men except for pregnant women. Analysis of annual and cumulative occupational doses of female radiation workers as a group has been done. The average annual dose data in the four broad categories and age wise dose distribution is presented. The average working period for female radiation workers is about 3 to 5 years which is same as that of all the radiation workers on our records. The average cumulative dose for female workers is about 3 mSv. (author). 4 refs., 4 tabs

  7. An integrated framework for effective reduction of occupational radiation exposure in a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Hyun Moon; Hak, Soo Kim; Young, Ho Cho; Chang, Sun Kang

    1998-01-01

    For effective reduction of occupational radiation exposure in a nuclear power plant, it is necessary to identify repetitive high radiation jobs during maintenance and refueling operation and comprehensively assess them. An integrated framework for effective reduction of occupational radiation exposure is proposed in this study. The framework consists of three parts; data collection, statistical analysis, and ALARA findings. A PC-based database program, INSTORE, is used for data collection and reduction, and the Rank Sum Method is used in identifying high radiation jobs. As a case study, the data accumulated in Kori Units 3 and 4 have been analyzed. The results of this study show that the radiation job classifications of SG related work have much effect on annual ORE collective dose in Kori Units 3 and 4. As an example of ALARA findings, hence, the improvements for the radiation job classifications of SG related work are summarized

  8. Occupational Exposure to Diagnostic Radiology in Workers without Training in Radiation Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaona, Enrique; Enriquez, Jesus G. Franco

    2004-01-01

    The physicians, technicians, nurses, and others involved in radiation areas constitute the largest group of workers occupationally exposed to man-made sources of radiation. Personnel radiation exposure must be monitored for safety and regulatory considerations, this assessment may need to be made over a period of one month or several months. The purpose of this study was to carry out an exploratory survey of occupational exposures associated with diagnostic radiology. The personnel dosimeters used in this study were thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The reported number of monitored workers was 110 of different departments of radiology of the Mexican Republic without education in radiation safety, included general fluoscopic/radiographic imaging, computed tomography and mammography procedures. Physicians and X-ray technologist in diagnostic radiology receive an average annual effective dose of 2.9 mSv with range from 0.18 to 5.64 mSv. The average level of occupational exposures is generally similar to the global average level of natural radiation exposure. The annual global per capita effective dose due to natural radiation sources is 2.4 mSv (UNSCEAR 2000 Report). There is not significant difference between average occupational exposures and natural radiation exposure for p < 0.05

  9. Operating philosophy for maintaining occupational radiation exposures as low as is reasonable achievable - September 1975 (Rev. 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Both this guide and Regulatory Guide 8.8, Information Relevant to Maintaining Occupational Radiation Exposure as Low as is Reasonably Achievable (Nuclear Power Reactors), deal with the concept of as low as is reasonably achievable occupational exposures to radiation. This guide describes an operating philosophy that the NRC staff believes all specific licensees should follow to keep occupational exposures to radiation as low as reasonably achievable

  10. Conservation of jucara pulp (Euterpe edulis) submitted to gamma radiation, pasteurization, lyophilization and spray drying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Paula Porrelli Moreira da

    2013-01-01

    In Brazil there are unexplored fruit species, which represent an opportunity for producers to access special markets, where consumers appreciate the exotic character and presence of nutrients capable of preventing degenerative diseases. In this context, jucara palm (Euterpe edulis), native of the Atlantic Forest, has long been explored only for the removal of the stem, but currently the pulp of its fruit is becoming more popular. The intense purple color is due to the presence of anthocyanins, powerful antioxidants that act by inhibiting or decreasing the effects unleashed by free radicals. The pulp is highly perishable and its preservation is impossible at room temperature, lowering its market value in sales. In face of this, we need technologies that minimize nutritional and sensorial losses in order to produce healthy, tasty and long lasting foods. This study consists of five experiments with jucara pulp, which aimed to: evaluate the physico-chemical, mineral and lipid composition; realize the sensory characterization by Quantitative Descriptive Analysis (QDA); evaluate the physico-chemical and sensory conservation when submitted to radiation gamma, acidification and pasteurization, and dehydration by spray and freeze drying. The fruits have been obtained at Parque das Neblinas (Mogi das Cruzes/SP) and depulped at Agribusiness, Food and Nutrition Department (ESALQ/USP). Was verified that jucara pulp is excellent source of energy and minerals K, Fe, Co, Mg, Cu, Zn, Mn and Mo; rich in anthocyanins and fatty oils of good quality (palmitic, oleic and linoleic). The irradiation of pulp was performed at the Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN - Sao Paulo, SP) at doses 0,0, 2,5, 5,0, 7,5 and 10,0 kGy and stored at 6 degree C for 30 days (fortnightly assessments). That process was not promising for the conservation of the product at 6 degree C, because the degradation of anthocyanins and phenolic compounds was accelerated and the color changed from purple to

  11. Assessment of the hormonal state of medical personnel occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bliznakov, V.; Maleeva, A.; Mikhaylov, M.

    1982-01-01

    Testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) concentrations are assayed in 14 men against the background of occupational exposure of medical personnel to small - dose radiations. Low testosterone values, and elevated LH and FSH levels are established. A preliminary conclusion is made according to which in occupationally exposed men in the field of medicine there is a disturbance of hormonal secretion along the hypophysis - target gland axis. Twenty normal men of comparable age are studied for control purpose. (author)

  12. IAEA activities to improve occupational radiation protection in nuclear power plants in Central and Eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafsson, M.; Webb, G.A.M.; )

    1998-01-01

    The following aspects are highlighted: developing standards, ISOE (Information System on Occupational Exposure), providing assistance, and intercomparisons. By means of these coordinated efforts, the IAEA aims at improving occupational radiation protection in nuclear power plants in Central and Eastern Europe. The objective is not only transfer of knowledge and technology but also encouraging cooperation between health physicists in those countries as well as with health physicists in Western countries. (P.A.)

  13. National Standard for Limiting Occupational Exposure to Ionizing Radiation. NOHSC:1013(1995)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    The objectives of The National Standard for Limiting Occupational Exposure to Ionizing Radiation are to limit the risk to health arising from exposure to ionizing radiation in the workplace and to optimize radiation protection by setting common essential requirements for the control of exposure to radiation, including the specification of employer duties and employee duties. It serves to identify the provisions which are to be made in the regulations of States, Territories and the Commonwealth for the control of occupational exposure to radiation. It is recognised that legislation, including regulations, may already exist which covers all or part of the scope of this Standard. It is also recognised that it may not be appropriate to take up this Standard verbatim because of differing legislative frameworks and drafting conventions in each State and Territory and in the Commonwealth. However, it is expected that the implementation of the provisions contained in this Standard will be nationally consistent. This Standard deals only with occupational health and safety matters related to exposure to ionizing radiation; the appropriate authority should be consulted about other radiation control requirements which may apply. The complementary 'Recommendations for Limiting Exposure to Ionizing Radiation' - Guidance note NOHSC:3022(1995)- Radiation Health series no. 39 - describes the principles and practice on which this Standard is based and provides interpretive and reference material. It supersedes earlier recommendations of the NHMRC: Recommended Radiation Protection Standards for Individuals Exposed to Ionising Radiation, adopted in 1980, Australia's Radiation Protection Standards (1989) and the Interim on Australia's Radiation Protection Standards (1991). These revised Recommendations for application in Australia take into account the most recent recommendations of the ICRP, which were adopted after careful review of all available scientific evidence concerning the

  14. Occupational exposure to radio frequency/microwave radiation and the risk of brain tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Gabriele; Spallek, Jacob; Schüz, Joachim

    2006-01-01

    It is still under debate whether occupational exposure to radio frequency/microwave electromagnetic fields (RF/MW-EMF) contributes to the development of brain tumors. This analysis examined the role of occupational RF/MW-EMF exposure in the risk of glioma and meningioma. A population-based, case....... "High" exposure was defined as an occupational exposure that may exceed the RF/MW-EMF exposure limits for the general public recommended by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection. Multiple conditional logistic regressions were performed separately for glioma and meningioma...

  15. Occupational exposures in industrial application of radiation during 1999-2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanaye, S.S.; Baburajan, Sujatha; Pawar, S.G.; Nalawade, S.K.; Sapra, B.K.

    2012-01-01

    Application of radiation in industry, medicine and research sector has increase significantly over the years. In industry main applications are industrial radiography, industrial fluoroscopy, radiation processing, luminizing, nucleonic gauges. Since the strength of the source used is generally high compared to other applications as well as the operating conditions prevailing during the exposure, radiological protection plays important role in this sector. Analysis of dose data, available with National Occupational Dose Registry of RPAD, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, provides some insight into trends in occupational exposures received by industrial radiation workers. This helps in providing information on adequateness of radiation protection practices followed in the industry. This paper presents the trends in occupational exposure received by radiation workers in the industry during past 10 years (1999 to 2008). It is observed that there is a gradual increase in the occupational radiation workers during the period. The number of persons monitored as well as exposed is highest in industrial radiography compared to other sub-categories. Major contribution to collective dose is also from industrial radiography. The highest annual average as well as exposed average doses are contributed by industrial radiography. The monitored persons receiving dose d 5 mSv is 96.9% industry

  16. Medical and occupational radiation exposure reported by self-administered questionnaire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Osamu; Fujita, Shoichiro

    1977-01-01

    Affirmative response rates for diagnostic, therapeutic, and occupational ionizing radiation exposure were ascertained by surveying Hiroshima and Nagasaki aBCC-JNIH Adult Health Study subjects. Half reported diagnostic exposure since last visiting ABCC; 20%, within 3 months of interview. Rates were higher for A-bomb exposed than those not-in-city; possibly because of a higher disease rate or concern therefore among the A-bomb exposed group and/or A-bomb Survivors Medical Treatment Law handbooks' facilitating more examinations of the exposed. The rates did not differ among the A-bomb exposed groups. The respective Hiroshima and Nagasaki rates were 2.6%, and 1.6% for radiation therapy; and 0.5% and 0.2% for occupational exposure. Neither radiation therapy nor occupational exposure rates differed by A-bomb dose. (auth.)

  17. Measures to reduce occupational radiation exposure in PET facilities from nurses' point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazawa, Keiko; Takahashi, Juri; Mochiduki, Yoshikazu

    2006-01-01

    In parallel with the increase in the number of institutions having PET facilities, the number of nurse working in these facilities has also increased, and the issue of occupational radiation exposure has assumed ever greater importance. In our clinic, since nurses have started to administer FDG intravenous injections, their annual radiation exposure has amounted to 4.8 - 7.1 mSv. To reduce their annual radiation exposure to less than 5 mSv, we identified sources of increased exposure and considered countermeasures based on this information. By implementing countermeasures such as improvements in daily working conditions and ways to avoid various troubles, it was possible to reduce the annual radiation exposure of all nurses to less than 5 mSv. Our experience demonstrates that to provide a working environment with a minimum of occupational radiation exposure, educational training and enhancement of knowledge and technical skills are vital. (author)

  18. Monitoring and assessment of individual doses of occupationally exposed workers due to external radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitaw, S. T.

    2015-05-01

    Exposure to external radiation occurs in many occupations. Any exposure to ionizing radiation has the tendency to change the biochemical make-up of the human body which may result in biological health effects of ionizing radiation. This study reviews the monitoring and assessment of external radiation doses in industrial radiography using thermoluminescence and direct reading dosimeters. Poor handling procedures such as inadequate engineering control of equipment, safety culture, management, and inadequate assessment and monitoring of doses are the causes of most of the reported cases of exposure to external radiation in industrial radiography. Occupational exposure data in industrial radiography from UNSCEAR report 2008 was discussed and recommendations were made to regulatory authorities, operating organizations and radiographers. (au)

  19. Assessment of occupational exposure due to external sources of radiation. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation can occur in a range of industries, medical institutions, educational and research establishments and nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Adequate radiation protection of workers is essential for the safe and acceptable use of radiation, radioactive materials and nuclear energy. The three Safety Guides on occupational radiation protection are jointly sponsored by the IAEA and the International Labour Office. The Agency gratefully acknowledges the contribution of the European Commission to the development of the present Safety Guide. The present Safety Guide addresses the assessment of exposure due to external sources of radiation in the workplace. Such exposure can result from a number of sources within a workplace, and the monitoring of workers and the workplace in such situations is an integral part of any occupational radiation protection programme. The assessment of exposure due to external radiation sources depends critically upon knowledge of the radiation type and energy and the conditions of exposure. The present Safety Guide reflects the major changes over the past decade in international practice in external dose assessment

  20. Risk of cataract among medical staff in neurosurgical department occupationally exposed to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankova-Mileva, I.; Vassileva, J.; Djounova, J.

    2012-01-01

    In this study we present the risk of cataract among medical staff in neurosurgical department occupationally exposed to radiation compared to those of non-radiation workers. Cataract is the most common degenerative opacity of the crystalline lens developing with aging. Other risk factors for cataract are: infrared and ultraviolet radiation, systemic diseases (diabetes, hypertonic disease), eye diseases (glaucoma, high myopia), drugs (steroids), etc. High risk of developing cataract we find among staff occupationally exposed to radiation during operations - interventional cardiologists and neurosurgeons. This study includes 30 people between 33 and 60 years of age working in neurosurgical department and control group (the same amount and age of people not exposed to radiation in their work). After visual acuity measurement, the lens was examined by retroillumination method (red reflex) and using a bio microscope. The patients were asked for presence of ocular and systemic diseases, eye trauma, drug, alcohol and tobacco abuse and for how many years they work in this department. There was one case with cataract among neurosurgeons. The doctor doesn't have eye or systemic diseases, doesn't take any drugs and is not alcohol or tobacco abuser. In the control group there were two persons with subcapsular cataract but they have diabetes. Radiation is one of the risk factors for cataract. Continuing of this epidemiological survey will provide further knowledge on the potential risk of occupational radiation-induced cataract among neurosurgical staff and will contribute for optimization of radiation protection. (authors)

  1. Assessment of occupational exposure due to external sources of radiation. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation can occur in a range of industries, medical institutions, educational and research establishments and nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Adequate radiation protection of workers is essential for the safe and acceptable use of radiation, radioactive materials and nuclear energy. The three Safety Guides on occupational radiation protection are jointly sponsored by the IAEA and the International Labour Office. The Agency gratefully acknowledges the contribution of the European Commission to the development of the present Safety Guide. The present Safety Guide addresses the assessment of exposure due to external sources of radiation in the workplace. Such exposure can result from a number of sources within a workplace, and the monitoring of workers and the workplace in such situations is an integral part of any occupational radiation protection programme. The assessment of exposure due to external radiation sources depends critically upon knowledge of the radiation type and energy and the conditions of exposure. The present Safety Guide reflects the major changes over the past decade in international practice in external dose assessment

  2. Assessment of occupational exposure due to external sources of radiation. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation can occur in a range of industries, medical institutions, educational and research establishments and nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Adequate radiation protection of workers is essential for the safe and acceptable use of radiation, radioactive materials and nuclear energy. The three Safety Guides on occupational radiation protection are jointly sponsored by the IAEA and the International Labour Office. The Agency gratefully acknowledges the contribution of the European Commission to the development of the present Safety Guide. The present Safety Guide addresses the assessment of exposure due to external sources of radiation in the workplace. Such exposure can result from a number of sources within a workplace, and the monitoring of workers and the workplace in such situations is an integral part of any occupational radiation protection programme. The assessment of exposure due to external radiation sources depends critically upon knowledge of the radiation type and energy and the conditions of exposure. The present Safety Guide reflects the major changes over the past decade in international practice in external dose assessment

  3. Frequency of chromosomal aberrations in workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spasojevic-Tisma, V.; Joksic, G.; Ilic, Z.; Milanovic, S.; Djuric, J.; Tisma, J.; Celeketic, D.; Cuknic, O.; Perisic, J.; Milacic, S.; Cuknic, O.)

    2007-01-01

    Subjects occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation (external exposition) are examined for chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes in comparison to a control group. The average annual absorbed dose, measured by TLD dosimeters, for all three groups did not exceed 2mSv. Continuous exposure to small doses of ionizing radiation causes unstable aberrations in lymphocytes. In this research the largest number of found alterations are of acentric fragments and chromosomal breaks type. The highest occupational risk appears to be for subjects working in manufacturing of radio isotope technetium [sr

  4. Integration of radiation protection in occupational health and safety managementsystems - legal requirements and practical realization at the example of the Fraunhofer occupational health and safety management system FRAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambotte, S.; Severitt, S.; Weber, U.

    2002-01-01

    The protection of the employees, the people and the environment for the effects of radiation is regulated by numerous laws and rules set by the government and the occupational accident insurances. Primarily these rules apply for the responsibles, normally the employer, as well as for the safety officers. Occupational safety management systems can support these people to carry out their tasks and responsibilities effectively. Also, a systematic handling of the organisation secures that the numerous duties of documentation, time-checking of the proof-lists and dates are respected. Further more, the legal certainty for the responsibles and safety officers will be raised and the occupational, environment, radiation and health protection will be promoted. At the example of the Fraunhofer occupational safety management system (FrAM) it is demonstrated, how radiation protection (ionizing radiation) can be integrated in a progressive intranet supported management system. (orig.)

  5. Occupational radiation exposure at NRC-licensed facilities, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cool, W.S.

    1978-01-01

    By letter dated August 25, 1976, licensees of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission were requested to submit, as a voluntary one-time action, a statistical summary report of whole-body personnel monitoring results for their activities during 1975. This report presents these personnel monitoring data in the form of tables and log-probability plots that facilitate evaluation and comparison of the data. Licensee estimates of the effort (man-hours and total cost) expended in preparing the statistical summary report are also presented

  6. Workers radiation protection. Occupational exposure to ionizing radiations in France: 2015 results. 2016 Mission report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-06-01

    National results of the individual monitoring of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation are reported for all civilian and military activities subject to authorization or declaration (i.e. medical and veterinary activities, nuclear industry, defence, non-nuclear industry and research), as well as for activities concerned by the enhanced exposure to natural radiation. 365 830 workers within activities subject to authorization or declaration were monitored by passive dosimetry in 2015, which represents an increase by 1.7 % compared to 2014. The average individual dose in 2015 was very close to the value in 2014. Furthermore, 14 138 workers received more than 1 mSv (i.e. the legal dose limit for the public), and 2 606 workers received more than 5 mSv. 2 workers received more than 20 mSv (i.e. the dose limit for the workers in the French regulation). As a result, the collective dose increased from 56.3 to 61.9 man.Sv (10 %), thus reaching the same level as in the years 2009 to 2013. Important differences are noticed according to the occupational activities: the average dose in the medical and veterinary field (which represents 62.4 % of the monitored workers) and that in the research field (3.6 % of the monitored workers) are less than 0.4 mSv; the average doses are higher in the nuclear field and in the non-nuclear industry (representing together 30.1 % of the monitored workers), respectively 1.17 mSv and 1.38 mSv. Concerning internal dosimetry, 279 877 individual examinations have been performed in 2015, 52 % of which are radio-toxicological analysis of excreta and 48 % are direct body counting. In 2015, 2 workers had a committed effective dose greater than or equal to 1 mSv and the maximum dose was 3 mSv. Data or trends relative to workers exposed to natural radioactivity are also dealt with in this report (air crews, personnel subjected to radon exposure). In particular, results of aircrew dosimetry are reported: in 2015, the average individual dose of 19 565

  7. Workers radiation protection. Occupational exposure to ionizing radiations in France: 2015 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-06-01

    National results of the individual monitoring of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation are reported for all civilian and military activities subject to authorization or declaration (i.e. medical and veterinary activities, nuclear industry, defence, non-nuclear industry and research), as well as for activities concerned by the enhanced exposure to natural radiation. 365 830 workers within activities subject to authorization or declaration were monitored by passive dosimetry in 2015, which represents an increase by 1.7 % compared to 2014. The average individual dose in 2015 was very close to the value in 2014. Furthermore, 14 138 workers received more than 1 mSv (i.e. the legal dose limit for the public), and 2 606 workers received more than 5 mSv. 2 workers received more than 20 mSv (i.e. the dose limit for the workers in the French regulation). As a result, the collective dose increased from 56.3 to 61.9 man.Sv (10 %), thus reaching the same level as in the years 2009 to 2013. Important differences are noticed according to the occupational activities: the average dose in the medical and veterinary field (which represents 62.4 % of the monitored workers) and that in the research field (3.6 % of the monitored workers) are less than 0.4 mSv; the average doses are higher in the nuclear field and in the non-nuclear industry (representing together 30.1 % of the monitored workers), respectively 1.17 mSv and 1.38 mSv. Concerning internal dosimetry, 279 877 individual examinations have been performed in 2015, 52 % of which are radio-toxicological analysis of excreta and 48 % are direct body counting. In 2015, 2 workers had a committed effective dose greater than or equal to 1 mSv and the maximum dose was 3 mSv. Data or trends relative to workers exposed to natural radioactivity are also dealt with in this report (air crews, personnel subjected to radon exposure). In particular, results of aircrew dosimetry are reported: in 2015, the average individual dose of 19 565

  8. Workers radiation protection. Occupational exposure to ionizing radiations in France: 2016 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-06-01

    National results of the individual monitoring of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation are reported for all civilian and military activities subject to authorization or declaration (i.e. medical and veterinary activities, nuclear industry, defence, non-nuclear industry and research), as well as for activities concerned by the enhanced exposure to natural radiation. 372 262 workers within activities subject to authorization or declaration were monitored by passive dosimetry in 2015, which represents an increase by 1.8 % compared to 2015. The average individual dose in 2016 was very close to the value in 2015. Furthermore, 14 218 workers received more than 1 mSv (i.e. the legal dose limit for the public), and 2 703 workers received more than 5 mSv. 1 worker received more than 20 mSv (i.e. the dose limit for the workers in the French regulation). As a result, the collective dose increased from 61.9 to 63.2 man.Sv (2 %), thus reaching the same level as in the years 2009 to 2013. Important differences are noticed according to the occupational activities: the average dose in the medical and veterinary field (which represents 61.2 % of the monitored workers) and that in the research field (3.1 % of the monitored workers) are less than 0.35 mSv; the average doses are higher in the nuclear field and in the non-nuclear industry (representing together 30.5 % of the monitored workers), respectively 1.15 mSv and 1.36 mSv. Concerning internal dosimetry, 279 659 individual examinations have been performed in 2016, 54 % of which are radio-toxicological analysis of excreta and 46 % are direct body counting. In 2016, 5 workers had a committed effective dose greater than or equal to 1 mSv and the maximum dose was 19.4 mSv. Data or trends relative to workers exposed to natural radioactivity are also dealt with in this report (air-crews, personnel subjected to radon exposure). In particular, results of aircrew dosimetry are reported: in 2016, the average individual dose of 19 875

  9. Testicular cancer risk associated with occupational radiation exposure: a systematic literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousif, Lamya; Blettner, Maria; Hammer, Gael P; Zeeb, Hajo, E-mail: yousif@imbei.uni-mainz.d [Department of Epidemiology, Institute of Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics (IMBEI), University Medical Center, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Obere Zahlbacher Strasse 69, 55131 Mainz (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    Testicular cancer is a rare disease, affecting mainly young men aged 15-49. There have been some recent reports that it might be associated with radiation exposure. We have systematically reviewed this topic. English-language articles published between 1990 and 2008 studying the relationship between occupational radiation exposure and testicular cancer were included. Risk of bias was assessed using a modified version of the EPHPP checklist. For ionising radiation we subdivided study populations into occupational groups. No pooled analysis was performed due to the heterogeneity of studies. Seven case-control and 30 cohort studies were included in the review. For radiation workers, one incidence study showed a significant increase and four showed no effect. Eight mortality studies did not indicate an effect while four showed a non-significant increase. Incidence among persons with military exposure was not increased in two studies and non-significantly increased in another two. Among aircrew studies, one showed no effect against five with slight increases. Medical exposure studies showed no increases. For EMF exposure, three studies showed no effect, two reported a significant and four a non-significant increase in incidence. Overall, there was very limited evidence for associations between occupational ionising radiation and testicular cancer, while there were some positive associations for EMF. Testicular cancer mortality is generally low and was not associated with radiation. New incidence studies are recommended to investigate the association between radiation exposure and testicular cancer where exposure is better specified and individually estimated. (review)

  10. Persons occupationally exposed to radiation in the Federal Land Niedersachen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruschkowski, E. von; Kalmbach, U.

    1984-01-01

    The results of the physical radiation protection control according to section 62 of the ordinance on radiation protection (StrlSchVO) or section 40 of the roentgen ordinance (ROeV) for the report year 1982 are presented in table form. They show persons and plants under the legal obligation of being monitored events of excess radiation exposure, frequency distribution of the annual doses, survey of incorporation measurements and results of the first and following medical checks according to section 42 ROeV and section 71 StrlSchVO. In the year of report, no personnel contaminations occurred. (HSCH) [de

  11. A Review of the New European Technical Recommendations for Monitoring Individuals Occupationally Exposed to External Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijk, J.W.E. van; Alves, J.G.; Ambrosi, P.; Bartlett, D.T.; Currivan, L.; Fantuzzi, E.; Kamenopoulou, V.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the revised Technical Recommendations for Monitoring Individuals Occupationally Exposed to External Radiation as issued by the European Commission as Radiation Protection 160. These recommendations are aimed at all stakeholders in radiation protection dosimetry with an emphasis in the responsible technical staff of approved dosimetry services. This paper briefly touches each Chapter and ends with a more in depth section on the uncertainty evaluation of dose measurements. -- Highlights: ► Recommendations on all aspects of running an approved dosimetry service. ► Radiation protection framework. ► Metrology of personal dosimeters. ► QC and QA of individual monitoring

  12. Occupational radiation protection organisation, facility and design safety features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    There is no absolute standard or excellence in radiation protection. The concept of excellence implies a continuous search for improvement in performance and full utilization of available resources. Radiation protection requires the commitment of all plant staff, including higher levels of executive management. The improvements in performance must therefore be based primarily on management rather than technical factors and must be aimed at more effective use of investments already made in plant facilities

  13. Radon in the Workplace: the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Ionizing Radiation Standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Robert K

    2016-10-01

    On 29 December 1970, the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 established the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). This article on OSHA, Title 29, Part 1910.1096 Ionizing Radiation standard was written to increase awareness of the employer, the workforce, state and federal governments, and those in the radon industry who perform radon testing and radon mitigation of the existence of these regulations, particularly the radon relevant aspect of the regulations. This review paper was also written to try to explain what can sometimes be complicated regulations. As the author works within the Radon Division of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Radiation Protection, the exclusive focus of the article is on radon. The 1910.1096 standard obviously covers many other aspects of radiation and radiation safety in the work place.

  14. Occupational exposure of medical radiation workers in Lithuania, 1950-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samerdokiene, V.; Atkocius, V.; Kurtinaitis, J.; Valuckas, K.P.

    2008-01-01

    This study presents the summary of historical exposures, measurement practice and evolution of the recording of the individual doses of medical radiation workers during 1950-2003 in Lithuania. The aim of this study is to present occupational exposure of medical radiation workers in Lithuania since the earliest appearance period. Data from publications have been used for the earliest two periods prior to 1969; data from the archives of the largest hospitals, for the period 1970-1990 and data from Lithuanian Subdivision of Individual Dosimetry of Radiation Protection Center, for the period 1991-2003. The analysis of the data obtained from personal records allows to conclude that the average annual effective dose of Lithuanian medical radiation workers was greatly reduced in radiology, radiotherapy and nuclear medicine in all occupational categories from 1950 to 2003. During the last period 1991-2003 extremity doses clearly decreased and after 1994 were no longer present in Lithuania. (authors)

  15. Radiation measurements in Egyptian pyramids and tombs -- occupational exposure of workers and the public

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigu, J; Hussein, Mohamed I; Hussein, A Z

    2000-02-01

    A radiation survey of seven archaeological sites within Egyptian pyramids and tombs has been conducted in the Saggara area. Measurements were made of radon ({sup 222}Rn) and its short-lived decay products (progeny), as well as thoron ({sup 220}Rn) progeny and {gamma}-radiation. The results of these measurements have been used to calculate the maximum annual effective dose (MAD) and other important occupational radiation exposure variables. It was found that for the limited time to which occupational workers and visitors were exposed, their respective MAD values were lower than that recommended by the regulatory agency (i.e., 20 mSv per year for occupational workers and 1 mSv in a year for the public). However, it is shown that if the exposure times for occupational workers were to increase to 'normal' working schedules their MAD would be exceeded at three archaeological sites. Implementation of improved ventilation practices is recommended in those sites to reduce the exposure to occupational workers were their working schedules to be significantly increased. It is also recommended that further monitoring be conducted in the future to verify these results.

  16. Radiation measurements in Egyptian pyramids and tombs -- occupational exposure of workers and the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigu, J.; Hussein, Mohamed I.; Hussein, A.Z.

    2000-01-01

    A radiation survey of seven archaeological sites within Egyptian pyramids and tombs has been conducted in the Saggara area. Measurements were made of radon ( 222 Rn) and its short-lived decay products (progeny), as well as thoron ( 220 Rn) progeny and γ-radiation. The results of these measurements have been used to calculate the maximum annual effective dose (MAD) and other important occupational radiation exposure variables. It was found that for the limited time to which occupational workers and visitors were exposed, their respective MAD values were lower than that recommended by the regulatory agency (i.e., 20 mSv per year for occupational workers and 1 mSv in a year for the public). However, it is shown that if the exposure times for occupational workers were to increase to 'normal' working schedules their MAD would be exceeded at three archaeological sites. Implementation of improved ventilation practices is recommended in those sites to reduce the exposure to occupational workers were their working schedules to be significantly increased. It is also recommended that further monitoring be conducted in the future to verify these results

  17. Cytogenetic dosimetry in suspected cases of ionizing radiation occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramalho, Adriana T.; Costa, Maria Lucia P.; Oliveira, Monica S.; Silva, Francisco Cesar A. da

    2001-01-01

    Cytogenetic dosimetry is very useful in routine as well as in serious accident situations in which exposed individuals do not wear physical dosimeters. Since 1984, the technique of cytogenetic dosimetry has been used as a routine in our laboratory at IRD/CNEN to complement the data of physical dosimetry. In the period from 1984 to 2000, 138 cases of occupational overexposure of individual dosimeters were investigated by us. In total, only in 36 of the 138 cases investigated the overexposure was confirmed by cytogenetic dosimetry. The data indicates a total confirmation index of just 26% of the suspected cases.(author)

  18. Prevention of risks in relation with occupational exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    After remind the base notions in the field of ionizing radiation, this file evaluates the situation on the natural and occupational exposures: modes, sources, and exposure level, risk for health. It presents the principles of prevention allowing in a professional area (out of nuclear industry) to reduce and control these exposures. Some practical cases illustrate the radiation protection approach. references are given: regulatory benchmarks, useful links, books to consult. (N.C.)

  19. Assessment of health consequences of steel industry welders′ occupational exposure to ultraviolet radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Zamanian

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: This study showed that the time period of UV exposure in welders is higher than the permissible contact threshold level. Therefore, considering the outbreak of the eye and skin disorders in the welders, decreasing exposure time, reducing UV radiation level, and using personal protective equipment seem indispensable. As exposure to UV radiation can be linked to different types of skin cancer, skin aging, and cataract, welders should be advised to decrease their occupational exposures.

  20. Occupational exposures in industrial application of radiation during 1999-2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanaye, Suresh Shantaram; Baburajan, Sujatha; Pawar, Suresh Ganpat; Nalawade, Shailesh Krishna; Sapra, Balvinder Kaur

    2012-01-01

    Radiation sources are used in various industrial applications like industrial radiograph, industrial irradiation, industrial fluoroscopy, nucleonic gauges, well logging etc., Gamma, beta X-ray as well as neutron sources are used for various applications. Number of radiation workers in this field has increased over the years. Due to operating conditions prevailing during the exposure as well as the strength of the sources used in some of the applications, radiation protection plays an important role in this field. Analysis of doses received by radiation workers in industry provides information on trends of doses as well as adequateness of radiation protection practices followed in this sector. In India, National Occupational Dose Registry System (NODRS) of Radiological Physics and Advisory Division (RPAD), Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) maintains personnel dose information of monitored radiation workers in the country. Analysis of occupational dose data of industrial radiation workers for last 10 years, i.e., 1999-2008 has been presented in this paper. It is observed that even though there is an increase in monitored radiation workers, percentage of persons receiving radiation exposure has come down during this period. There is also a decrease in the average annual dose as well as the collective dose. Further analysis of sub-categories shows that industrial radiography operations are the main contributor for collective dose (about 77%) followed by well logging and industrial X-ray operations (about 8% each). Thus, in addition to industrial radiography attention is also to be given to operations in these areas. (author)

  1. Low Magnitude Occupational Radiation Exposures Are They Safe or Unsafe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravichandran, R.

    2013-01-01

    Man has always been exposed to ionizing radiation from natural sources and background exposure varies with the locations. No deleterious effects have been uniquely correlated, either they are not produced at low levels of exposure or their frequency is too low to be statistically observable. Direct source of information on radiation hazards in man is obviously based on follow up of population groups exposed to certain levels of radiation. Harmful effects of ionizing radiations are traced to documented exposures; for radiologists during 1920 s and 30 s, miners exposed to airborne radioactivity, workers in the radium industry, follow-up data of Japanese nuclear bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the Marshallese accident in 1954, and the victims of the limited number of accidents at nuclear installations including Chernobyl. Mostly these information are from situations involving higher doses and dose rates. Ionizing radiations have been used extensively on the peaceful applications of atomic energy in general and medical applications in particular have shown to outweigh benefits over the risks. Personnel, low magnitude of exposures are encountered during routine work in handling radiation sources. In the light of present knowledge there is need to reassess the quantum of actual risk instead of projected risk based on long time models. The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) described models for dose-response relationships and micro-dosimetric arguments for defining low doses. The definition of low doses could also be based on direct observations in experimental or epidemiological studies. Through measurement of cell damage or death using human lymphocytes, linear and quadratic terms have been fitted the response and low doses have been judged to be 20-40 mSv. Data derived from epidemiological studies, mainly the atomic bomb survivors, suggests that for solid tumours and leukaemia, 200 mSv could be considered the

  2. Evaluation of occupational and patient radiation doses in orthopedic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulieman, A.; Habiballah, B.; Abdelaziz, I.; Alzimami, K.; Osman, H.; Omer, H.; Sassi, S. A.

    2014-08-01

    Orthopedists are exposed to considerable radiation dose during orthopedic surgeries procedures. The staff is not well trained in radiation protection aspects and its related risks. In Sudan, regular monitoring services are not provided for all staff in radiology or interventional personnel. It is mandatory to measure staff and patient exposure in order to radiology departments. The main objectives of this study are: to measure the radiation dose to patients and staff during (i) Dynamic Hip Screw (Dhs) and (i i) Dynamic Cannula Screw (Dcs); to estimate the risk of the aforementioned procedures and to evaluate entrance surface dose (ESD) and organ dose to specific radiosensitive patients organs. The measurements were performed in Medical Corps Hospital, Sudan. The dose was measured for unprotected organs of staff and patient as well as scattering radiation. Calibrated Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-Gr-200) of lithium fluoride (LiF:Mg, Cu,P) were used for ESD measurements. TLD signal are obtained using automatic TLD Reader model (Plc-3). The mean patients doses were 0.46 mGy and 0.07 for Dhs and Dcs procedures, respectively. The mean staff doses at the thyroid and chest were 4.69 mGy and 1.21 mGy per procedure. The mean radiation dose for staff was higher in Dhs compared to Dcs. This can be attributed to the long fluoroscopic exposures due to the complication of the procedures. Efforts should be made to reduce radiation exposure to orthopedic patients, and operating surgeons especially those with high work load. Staff training and regular monitoring will reduce the radiation dose for both patients and staff. (Author)

  3. Evaluation of occupational and patient radiation doses in orthopedic surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulieman, A. [Salman bin Abdulaziz University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiology and Medical Imaging Department, P.O. Box 422, Alkharj (Saudi Arabia); Habiballah, B.; Abdelaziz, I. [Sudan Univesity of Science and Technology, College of Medical Radiologic Sciences, P.O. Box 1908, Khartoum (Sudan); Alzimami, K. [King Saud University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiological Sciences Department, P.O. Box 10219, 11433 Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Osman, H. [Taif University, College of Applied Medical Science, Radiology Department, Taif (Saudi Arabia); Omer, H. [University of Dammam, Faculty of Medicine, Dammam (Saudi Arabia); Sassi, S. A., E-mail: Abdelmoneim_a@yahoo.com [Prince Sultan Medical City, Department of Medical Physics, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-08-15

    Orthopedists are exposed to considerable radiation dose during orthopedic surgeries procedures. The staff is not well trained in radiation protection aspects and its related risks. In Sudan, regular monitoring services are not provided for all staff in radiology or interventional personnel. It is mandatory to measure staff and patient exposure in order to radiology departments. The main objectives of this study are: to measure the radiation dose to patients and staff during (i) Dynamic Hip Screw (Dhs) and (i i) Dynamic Cannula Screw (Dcs); to estimate the risk of the aforementioned procedures and to evaluate entrance surface dose (ESD) and organ dose to specific radiosensitive patients organs. The measurements were performed in Medical Corps Hospital, Sudan. The dose was measured for unprotected organs of staff and patient as well as scattering radiation. Calibrated Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-Gr-200) of lithium fluoride (LiF:Mg, Cu,P) were used for ESD measurements. TLD signal are obtained using automatic TLD Reader model (Plc-3). The mean patients doses were 0.46 mGy and 0.07 for Dhs and Dcs procedures, respectively. The mean staff doses at the thyroid and chest were 4.69 mGy and 1.21 mGy per procedure. The mean radiation dose for staff was higher in Dhs compared to Dcs. This can be attributed to the long fluoroscopic exposures due to the complication of the procedures. Efforts should be made to reduce radiation exposure to orthopedic patients, and operating surgeons especially those with high work load. Staff training and regular monitoring will reduce the radiation dose for both patients and staff. (Author)

  4. Chicken Meat Submitted to Gamma Radiation and Packed with or without Oxygen

    OpenAIRE

    Pelicia, K; Garcia, EA; Molino, AB; Santos, GC; Vieira Filho, JA; Santos, TA; Berto, DA

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects on gamma radiation levels on the physical and microbiological characteristics of chicken breast meat. A completely randomized experimental design in a 4x2x3 factorial arrangement was adopted. Treatments consisted of four radiation concentrations (0, 2, 4, or 8kGy), two package sealing methods (with or without vacuum), and three storage times (01, 07, or 14 days), with ten replicates each, totaling 240 chicken breast fillets. Packaging an...

  5. Effect on the insulation material of a MOSFET device submitted to a standard diagnostic radiation beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Magalhaes, C M S; Dos Santos, L A P; Souza, D do N; Maia, A F

    2010-01-01

    MOSFET electronic devices have been used for dosimetry in radiology and radiotherapy. Several communications show that due to the radiation exposure defects appear on the semiconductor crystal lattice. Actually, the structure of a MOSFET consists of three materials: a semiconductor, a metal and an insulator between them. The MOSFET is a quadripolar device with a common terminal: gate-source is the input; drain-source is the output. The gate controls the electrical current passing through semiconductor medium by the field effect because the silicon oxide acts as insulating material. The proposal of this work is to show some radiation effects on the insulator of a MOSFET device. A 6430 Keithley sub-femtoamp SourceMeter was used to verify how the insulating material layer in the structure of the device varies with the radiation exposure. We have used the IEC 61267 standard radiation X-ray beams generated from a Pantak industrial unit in the radiation energy range of computed tomography. This range was chosen because we are using the MOSFET device as radiation detector for dosimetry in computed tomography. The results showed that the behaviour of the electrical current of the device is different in the insulator and semiconductor structures.

  6. Notification of occupational lung cancer caused by ionizing radiation in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrncir, E.

    1997-01-01

    In the Czech Republic decisions on the occupational character of lung cancer which could be caused by ionizing radiation are based on the probability assessment. Cases are considered occupational when according to the calculation based especially on data of the patient's exposure there is at least 0.5 (in some cases even 0.4 - 0.5) probability (PC) that the disease was caused by professional exposition to alpha radiation of the radon decay products. Coefficients derived from epidemiological surveys carried out in miners of the uranium industry are used for this calculation. New surveys provide new data for calculations. The principle of assessment of the occupational character of lung cancer in working people should be unified on an international scale. (author)

  7. The burden of occupationally-related cutaneous malignant melanoma in Britain due to solar radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Lesley; J Hutchings, Sally

    2017-02-14

    Increasing evidence highlights the association of occupational exposure and cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). We estimated the burden of CMM and total skin cancer burden in Britain due to occupational solar radiation exposure. Attributable fractions (AF) and numbers were estimated for CMM mortality and incidence using risk estimates from the published literature and national data sources for proportions exposed. We extended existing methods to account for the exposed population age structure. The estimated total AF for CMM is 2.0% (95% CI: 1.4-2.7%), giving 48 (95% CI: 33-64) deaths in (2012) and 241 (95% CI: 168-325) registrations (in 2011) attributable to occupational exposure to solar radiation. Higher exposure and larger numbers exposed led to much higher numbers for men than women. Industries of concern are construction, agriculture, public administration and defence, and land transport. These results emphasise the urgent need to develop appropriate strategies to reduce this burden.

  8. Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation from the perspective of nursing professionals in hemodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Martins Gallo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify the security measures taken and the control of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation in units of hemodynamic, from the perspective of nursing, this quantitative descriptive study was developed during January and February, 2011. A check-list of binary responses (yes / no was made based on the legislation and updated literature and it was applied in four hospitals in the northern region of Paraná State. The analysis of the data showed that 29 employees have knowledge about occupational exposure and apply barrier methods effectively to minimize doses of ionizing radiation. The data also showed that employees are participating in ongoing updating on the subject, and that they claim that this participation has a positive effect so that the occupational exposure occurs consciously, and also, the workers did not refuse to participate in any action facing their individual protection.

  9. Transition in occupational radiation exposure monitoring methods in diagnostic and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loennroth, N.; Hirvonen-Kari, M.; Timonen, M.; Savolainen, S.; Kortesniemi, M.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation exposure monitoring is a traditional keystone of occupational radiation safety measures in medical imaging. The aim of this study was to review the data on occupational exposures in a large central university hospital radiology organisation and propose changes in the radiation worker categories and methods of exposure monitoring. An additional objective was to evaluate the development of electronic personal dosimeters and their potential in the digitised radiology environment. The personal equivalent dose of 267 radiation workers (116 radiologists and 151 radiographers) was monitored using personal dosimeters during the years 2006-2010. Accumulated exposure monitoring results exceeding the registration threshold were observed in the personal dosimeters of 73 workers (59 radiologists' doses ranged from 0.1 to 45.1 mSv; 14 radiographers' doses ranged from 0.1 to 1.3 mSv). The accumulated personal equivalent doses are generally very small, only a few angiography radiologists have doses >10 mSv per 5 y. The typical effective doses are -1 and the highest value was 0.3 mSv (single interventional radiologist). A revised categorisation of radiation workers based on the working profile of the radiologist and observed accumulated doses is justified. Occupational monitoring can be implemented mostly with group dosimeters. An active real-time dosimetry system is warranted to support radiation protection strategy where optimisation aspects, including improving working methods, are essential. (authors)

  10. Handbook of engineering control methods for occupational radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orn, M.K.

    1992-01-01

    Sources of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation are widely used in industrial, medical, military, and other applications. In the workplace, the task of assuring the safety of workers exposed to radiation sources is generally assigned to the safety professional, industrial hygienist, or an engineer in some other discipline. Rarely do employers outside the nuclear industry have the luxury of a staff health physicist in the workplace. Consultants may be called in to provide initial assessments of the hazards and to assist with complex problems, but the day-to-day problem solving is usually a function of the safety professional or other professional with the responsibility for safety. The primary purpose of this book is to provide a practical reference for safety professionals that addresses the application of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation protection standards and the quantitative methods for evaluating and designing engineering controls to meet those standards. Although the emphasis of this book is on control methods, it is necessary to understand the physical nature of the radiation exposure, its units of measure, and its biological effects in order to apply the appropriate control methods. Consequently, a brief treatment of these topics precedes the discussion of control methods for each type of radiation exposure

  11. Occupational radiation exposure in the GDR in 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulheim, K.F.; Rothe, W.; Scheler, R.

    1980-01-01

    In 1977, radiation workers were monitored for external and internal radiation exposure on the basis of film badges (37,348 persons), measurements with a whole-body counter (198 persons) and analyses of biosamples (174 persons). According to the film badge data, the monthly over-exposures (more than 4 mGy) totalled 253. In 6 cases the monthly exposure exceeded 30 mGy and the 9 highest annual exposure values were in the range of 50 to 120 mGy. Also, annual collective and annual per caput doses have been given for the exposed population as a whole and some subgroups. Based on model considerations, the internal radiation exposure situation resulting from unintentional intakes of radionuclides has been assessed in terms of committed dose equivalents to members of two selected groups of radiation workers: (a) persons with more-than-average internal contamination levels; (b) persons subjected to frequent individual monitoring. Except for some organ doses, the individual radiation exposure was below one-tenth the maximum permissible dose. (author)

  12. Initiatives to reduce the occupational radiation exposure of ABWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirasawa, Hajime; Urata, Hidehiro; Ueda, Taku; Yamamoto, Seiji; Yaita, Yumi

    2014-01-01

    Toshiba has carried out radiation exposure reduction by radiation level reduction, as reduction of reactor water activated corrosion products concentration, reduction of activated corrosion products deposition and radiation shielding, and exposure time reduction, as remote control and improvement of maintenance work procedures. Water chemistry has been mainly carried out reduction of reactor water activated corrosion products concentration and reduction of activated corrosion products deposition in radiation level reduction. The reduction measures of reactor water activated corrosion products concentration are mainly reduction of iron crud concentration and reduction of cobalt ion concentration. The activated corrosion products deposition are reduced by the means of water quality control and the surface treatment. Water quality control for reduction of activated corrosion products deposition moves to ultra low iron high nickel control from Ni/Fe ratio control. The surface treatments are adopted to the stainless steel piping and carbon steel piping. As a measure further to radiation exposure reduction for ABWR (Advanced Boiling Water Reactors), we report on the effect of generation amount reduction by the adoption of alternate material and the effect of deposition reduction by material change of piping and the adoption of advanced water quality control, etc. (author)

  13. Occupational radiation exposure in the GDR in 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulheim, K.F.; Rothe, W.; Scheler, R.

    1980-01-01

    In 1978, radiation workers were monitored for external and internal radiation exposure on the basis of film badges (37,980 persons), measurements with a whole-body counter (186 persons) and analyses of biosamples (144 persons). According to the film badge data, the monthly over-exposures (more than 4 mGy) totalled 427. In 13 cases the monthly exposure exceeded 30 mGy, 8 persons received annual doses in the range of 50 to 120 mGy, and the highest annual dose was above 250 mGy. Also, annual collective and annual per caput doses have been given for the exposed population as a whole and some subgroups. Based on model considerations, the internal radiation exposure situation resulting from unintentional intakes of radionuclides has been assessed in terms of committed dose equivalents to members of two selected groups of radiation workers: (a) persons with more-than-average internal contamination levels; (b) persons subjected to frequent individual monitoring. Except for some organ doses, the individual internal radiation exposure was well below one-tenth the maximum permissible dose. (author)

  14. Preconception paternal occupational radiation exposure and the risk of childhood leukaemia: a paradox within an enigma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, R.J. [Westlakes Research Institute, Cumbria (United Kingdom)

    1995-02-01

    A brief review is given of the evidence leading to the theory that preconception paternal occupational radiation exposure is a factor involved in the incidence of childhood leukaemia near nuclear facilities. Evidence is also presented which casts doubt on this theory (UK).

  15. [Paternal exposure to occupational electromagnetic radiation and sex ratio of the offspring: a meta-analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Shu-Hui; Liu, Yi-Ting; Liu, Yang

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the association between paternal exposure to occupational electromagnetic radiation and the sex ratio of the offspring. We searched various databases, including PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, OVID, Bioscience Information Service (BIOSIS), China National Knowledge Infrastructure, VIP Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals and Wanfang Database, for the literature relevant to the association of paternal exposure to occupational electromagnetic radiation with the sex ratio of the offspring. We conducted a meta-analysis on their correlation using Stata 11.0. There was no statistically significant difference in the sex ratio between the offspring with paternal exposure to occupational electromagnetic radiation and those without (pooled OR = 1.00 [95% CI: 0.95 -1.05], P = 0.875). Subgroup analysis of both case-control and cohort studies revealed no significant difference (pooled OR = 1.03 [95% CI: 0.99 -1.08], P = 0.104 and pooled OR = 0.98 [95% CI: 0.99 -1.08], P = 0.186, respectively). Paternal exposure to occupational electromagnetic radiation is not correlated with the sex ratio of the offspring.

  16. Family history and medical examination of occupationally exposed employees against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinemann, G.

    2000-01-01

    Searching for individual radiosensitivity could improve the quality of the medical examination of occupationally exposed employees and thus provide real protection of the individual against ionizing radiation. For this purpose genetic family history should be recorded by a skilled interviewer. (orig.) [de

  17. Health protection of persons occupationally exposed to ionising radiation in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavalic, M.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the health condition of workers occupationally exposed to ionising radiation. The results for 1406 workers exposed to ionising radiations, who were regularly examined in 2004, were analysed using Statistica 5.0. The analysis included workers' case histories, frequency of illnesses and causes of temporary or permanent work disability. Of 1406 workers, 16 (1.13%) were found permanently disabled; in 11 the cause of disability was lens opacity, in 2 persistent trombocitophenia, and in 2 malignant tumour. Twenty-four workers were temporarily disabled, of whom 5 due to pregnancy. Thrombocytopenia was found in 12 men and only one woman. Anaemia was found in 4 women; dicentric chromosomes were the cause of temporary disability in one person, and tuberculosis in one person. Medical examinations of Croatian workers confirm low occupational exposure to ionising radiation. With this type of radiation, the established lens impairments could not be characterised as occupational. The two malignant tumours however were recognised as occupational diseases.(author)

  18. Activities of Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimety/Brazil as Technical and Scientific Support Organization on Occupational Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Silva, F.C.A.; Ferreira, P.R.; Matta, L.E.C.; Peres, M.A.L.; Godoy, J.M.; Alencar, M.A.V.; Carlos, M.T.; Souza-Santos, D.; Leocadio, J.C.; Oliveira, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    There are, in Brazil, about 126,000 workers registered on National Dose Registry System (SRD/IRD) as occupationally exposed. They work on 4,000 radioactive installations, 20 nuclear fuel cycle installations and with 90,000 x-ray diagnostic devices. There are two main Regulatory Authorities to license and control these installations on nuclear and radioactive areas, and another Regulatory Authority that is responsible for safety and health protection of workers on their labour activities. Belonging to structure of the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN-Brazil) there is an Institute dedicated to radiation protection, dosimetry and metrology of ionizing radiation, that is the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD). This paper presents two main IRD activities related to occupational radiation protection that can be seen as example of technical and scientific support to Regulatory Authorities: the Radiation Overexposure Analysis that is performed by the Radiation Overexposure Analysis Group (GADE) and the Approval of Individual Monitoring Services and Calibration Laboratory of Equipment used in Radiation Protection that is performed by the Committee for the Evaluation of Essay and Calibration Services (CASEC). (author)

  19. Evaluation of occupational and patient radiation doses in orthopedic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulieman, A.; Alzimami, K.; Habeeballa, B.; Osman, H.; Abdelaziz, I.; Sassi, S.A.; Sam, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    This study intends to measure the radiation dose to patients and staff during (i) Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS) and (ii) Dynamic Cannula Screw (DCS) and to evaluate entrance surface Air kerma (ESAK) dose and organ doses and effective doses. Calibrated Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-GR200A) were used. The mean patients’ doses were 0.46 mGy and 0.07 mGy for DHS and DCS procedures, respectively. The mean staff doses at the thyroid and chest were 4.69 mGy and 1.21 mGy per procedure. The mean organ and effective dose for patients and staff were higher in DHS compared to DCS. Orthopedic surgeons were exposed to unnecessary radiation doses due to the lack of protection measures. The radiation dose per hip procedure is within the safety limit and less than the previous studies

  20. Occupational radiation exposure in work with radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiev, G.V.

    1975-01-01

    Radiation exposure to personnel dealing with radioactive materials is studied on a national scale. The survey covers any type of radiation work except for mining and milling of radioactive ore, fuel production, and nuclear reactor operation. Assessments are based on a decade's collection of personnel monitoring data obtained by film dosimetry techniques, as well as on data from systematic operational site monitoring. Statistical analysis indicated exposures based on personal records to follow a normal distribution pattern and, hence, arithmetic averages to be representative. Airborne concontrations of radioactive materials and aerosols in working areas are shown to follow a logarithmic normal distribution pattern, so that geometric means are representative. Radiation exposures are generally found to be well below annual maximum permissible doses for radiation workers. However, their distribution among employee groups is nonuniform. Group A, comprising about 700 subjects, received mean annual gonad doses of more than 1000 mrem; group B, about 670 subjects, had doses ranging from 100 to 500 mrem per year; and group C, 1610 subjects, received less than 100 mrem per year. Most of the radiation dose is accounted for by external radiation, which contributed 0.327 mrem to the genetically significant population dose (0.227 from exposure to males, and 0.025 mrem from exposure to females). Analysis of accidental exposures occurring over the period 1963-1973 indicated that the contribution of this source is substantial as compared to routine work (1.0:0.3). Based on the results obtained, a number of preventive measures are developed and introduced into practice to improve radiological safety in work with radioactive materials. (A.B.)

  1. [Occupational diseases caused by ionizing radiation in Poland, 1971-2006].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczyńska, Urszula; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila

    2008-01-01

    The whole spectrum of disorders of the hematopoietic tissue, eye and skin induced by ionizing radiation covers complex pathologies termed as a postirradiation syndrome, as well as various malignancies. The aim of this work is to present the data on incidence of occupational diseases with ionizing radiation as a causative agent. The work is based on the data compiled from "Occupational Diseases Reporting Forms" for the years 1971-2006 collected in the Central Register of Occupational Diseases. The incidence of certified occupational diseases with ionizing radiation as a causative agent is expressed in absolute numbers and the rate per 100 000 employees. The data comprise information on disease entities, gender, age, exposure duration and the branch of national economy. In total, 599 diseases (0.2% of all occupational diseases) were diagnosed as those induced by ionizong radiation. Annual incidence rates per 100,000 employees fell within the range of 0.0-0.7. Miners formed the major (51.9%) occupational group affected by ionizing radiation. They were followed by health care (34.3%) and construction (6.4%) workers. Cancers made over 50% of pathologies located at 28 sites. These included cancers of lung (59.2%), skin (10.0%) and hematopoietic tissue (8.7%). Almost all (99.35) diseases recorded in the mining industry were cancers. Non-cancer diseases were more frequent in health care workers, among them postradiation cataract occupied the first place. A great deal of reported cancer sites give rise to controversy in terms of the cause-effect association with ionizing radiation exposure and also due to incomplete data on exposure level. Postradiation cancers among health care workers have not been registered over recent years, which means that occupational exposure surveillance carried out for many years proves to be effective. Distant effects of exposure to ionizing radiation, revealed in workers of no longer existing uranium mine, appeared to be a particular problem

  2. Occupational Diseases Caused by Ionizing Radiation in Poland, 1971-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilczynska, U.; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N.

    2008-01-01

    The whole spectrum of disorders of the hematopoietic tissue, eye and skin induced by ionizing radiation covers complex pathologies termed as a postirradiation syndrome, as well as various malignancies. The aim of this work is to present the data on incidence of occupational diseases with ionizing radiation as a causative agent. The work is based on the data compiled from 'Occupational Diseases Reporting Forms' for the years 1971-2006 collected in the Central Register of Occupational Diseases. The incidence of certified occupational diseases with ionizing radiation as a causative agent is expressed in absolute numbers and the rate per 100 000 employees. The data comprise information on disease entities, gender, age, exposure duration and the branch of national economy. In total, 599 diseases (0.2% of all occupational diseases) were diagnosed as those induced by ionizing radiation. Annual incidence rates per 100 000 employees fell within the range of 0.0-0.7. Miners formed the major (51.9%) occupational group affected by ionizing radiation. They were followed by health care (34.3%) and construction (6.4%) workers. Cancers made over 50% of pathologies located at 28 sites. These included cancers of lung (59.2%), skin (10.0%) and hematopoietic tissue (8.7%). Almost all (99.35) diseases recorded in the mining industry were cancers. Non-cancer diseases were more frequent in health care workers, among them postradiation cataract occupied the first place. A great deal of reported cancer sites give rise to controversy in terms of the cause-effect association with ionizing radiation exposure and also due to incomplete data on exposure duration. Postradiation cancers among health care workers have not been registered over recent years, which means that occupational exposure surveillance carried out for many years proves to be effective. Distant effects of exposure to ionizing radiation, revealed in workers of no longer existing uranium mine, appeared to be a particular problem

  3. Chemical effects and their consequences for individuals occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvador, C.; Kahl, G.G.; Kühn, P.; Zottis, A.D.; Flôr, R.C.

    2017-01-01

    By legal determination, workers exposed to ionizing radiation should use individual dosimeters in the most exposed region of the body, designed to estimate the effective dose, as well as radiation protective clothing to minimize occupational exposures. Regarding dosimetry, in most cases it is perceived that the monthly values of exposure are within the limits of normality, however, even being below the limit can not rule out the possibility of damage that the low dose of ionizing radiation can cause. The objective of this article is to highlight the main chemical effects caused by exposure to ionizing radiation, especially biochemical damage in DNA, chromosomal aberrations and the correlation with the exposure of occupationally exposed individuals, as well as individuals from the public. A bibliographic search was carried out in indexed databases from February to April 2017 with the following descriptors: Radiation Ionizing, DNA Damage and Occupational Exposure. In the 'Science Direct' database were found 1205 articles, in the 'Scopus' 19 articles, in the 'Web of Science' 83 articles, in the 'PubMed' 22 articles and in the 'VHL' 60 articles related to the theme. It was concluded that exposure to ionizing radiation can affect the DNA molecule despite its repair mechanisms, which may result in genotoxicity. It has been reported a correlation between occupationally exposed individuals and chromosomal aberrations, demonstrating that even low doses of ionizing radiation can compromise the genetic material integrity of exposed workers, leading to the need for a periodic cytogenetic study for this group of workers

  4. Radiation nursery and occupational exposure: state-of-art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, J.A.C.; Huhn, A.; Viana, E.; Rosa, G.; Luz, K.R.; Derech, R.

    2015-01-01

    Documentary research with the aim to reflect on the state of the art in radiological nursing, on the nursing work and occupational hazards they are exposed, from articles produced in Brazil. The survey was conducted in the BVS, the study consisted of seven articles published from 2002 to 2012. Regarding the main variables studied in the articles, issues emerged related to working conditions and biosafety, performance of nurses, legislation, continuing education and difficulties and needs of nursing staff . It was noticed that is recent the interest in the field, but the work of nurses in radiological technologies must be grounded in current scientific knowledge and with proper technique, to the achievement of the desired clinical outcome and to promote their safety, the team and also the patient. (author)

  5. Occupational radiation exposure of Kolar mining workers in Karnataka State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, Umesh; Prasad, Vishva Linga; Ningappa, C.; Sannappa, J.

    2011-01-01

    Radon and its short lived decay products in dwellings and in atmosphere represent the main source of public exposure from the natural radiation. Radon, thoron and their progeny present in air contribute to nearly 50% of the average effective dose received by human beings from the natural radiation environment. Radon is a radioactive noble gas produced by the decay of uranium and thorium bearing minerals in rocks, soils and building materials having half life 3.82 days. UNSCEAR reported recently indicates that there is a remarkable coherence between the risk estimates developed from epidemiological studies from miners and residential case-control radon studies. The study area is around BGML at K.G.F. The study on the natural background radiation levels from the natural sources is important to evaluate the distribution of terrestrial radionuclides and radiation doses received by the population inhabitating around the study area. The data obtained from such study may be used locally to establish it and where the controls are needed. In the present study the most accurate Solid State Track Detector (SSNTD) method is used to determine the concentration of radon, thoron and their progeny. The maximum concentration of radon of 116.4 Bq.m -3 and gamma exposure rate of 765 n Gyh -1 have been observed in the dwellings at Champion place. The low concentration of radon and gamma exposure have been observed at Robersonpet and BGML nagar. (author)

  6. Improvement of NSSS design to reduce occupational radiation exposure (ORE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubourg, M.

    1985-05-01

    As a result of its R and D activities, FRAMATOME has initiated concrete measures to help to reduce personnel radiation exposure. These measures include reduction in the sources and quantity of activable products, and in the duration of personnel exposure during maintenance

  7. Thermoluminescent characterization of thin films of aluminium oxide submitted to beta and gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villagran, E.; Escobar A, L.; Camps, E.; Gonzalez, P.R.; Martinez A, L.

    2002-01-01

    By mean of the laser ablation technique, thin films of aluminium oxide have been deposited on kapton substrates. These films present thermoluminescent response (Tl) when they are exposed to beta and gamma radiation. The brilliance curves show two peaks between 112 C and 180 C. A dose-response relationship study was realized and the Tl kinetic parameters were determined using the computerized deconvolution of the brilliance curve (CGCD). The thin films of aluminium oxide have potential applications as ultra.thin radiation dosemeters. (Author)

  8. Hematologic status of mice submitted to sublethal total body irradiation with mixed neutron-gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herodin, F.; Court, L.

    1989-01-01

    The hematologic status of mice exposed to sublethal whole body irradiation with mixed neutron-gamma radiation (mainly neutrons) is studied. A slight decrease of the blood cell count is still observed below 1 Gy. The recovery of bone marrow granulocyte-macrophage progenitors seems to require more time than after pure gamma irradiation [fr

  9. Radiation dose response of N channel MOSFET submitted to filtered X-ray photon beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves Filho, Luiz C.; Monte, David S.; Barros, Fabio R.; Santos, Luiz A. P.

    2018-01-01

    MOSFET can operate as a radiation detector mainly in high-energy photon beams, which are normally used in cancer treatments. In general, such an electronic device can work as a dosimeter from threshold voltage shift measurements. The purpose of this article is to show a new way for measuring the dose-response of MOSFETs when they are under X-ray beams generated from 100kV potential range, which is normally used in diagnostic radiology. Basically, the method consists of measuring the MOSFET drain current as a function of the radiation dose. For this the type of device, it has to be biased with a high value resistor aiming to see a substantial change in the drain current after it has been irradiated with an amount of radiation dose. Two types of N channel device were used in the experiment: a signal transistor and a power transistor. The delivered dose to the device was varied and the electrical curves were plotted. Also, a sensitivity analysis of the power MOSFET response was made, by varying the tube potential of about 20%. The results show that both types of devices have responses very similar, the shift in the electrical curve is proportional to the radiation dose. Unlike the power MOSFET, the signal transistor does not provide a linear function between the dose rate and its drain current. We also have observed that the variation in the tube potential of the X-ray equipment produces a very similar dose-response.

  10. Behavior of Schistosoma mansoni-induced histopathological lesions in Biomphalaria glabrata submitted to ionizing radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azevedo Carine M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Present report demonstrates that repeated radiation of Schistosoma mansoni-infected Biomphalaria glabrata, totaling 15,000 rads, caused a sudden, albeit transient, suppression of cercarial shedding. Initially, sporocysts practically disappeared from the snail tissues. The more resistant developing cercariae presented nuclear clumping and vacuolation, before undergoing lysis. No host tissue reaction was evident at any time. Thirty-four days after the last irradiation, the snails resumed cercarial elimination. By that time numerous sporocysts and developing cercariae were detected, disseminated throughout snail tissues in a pattern similar to that of a highly malignant neoplasm, with no signs of host cellular reactions, which on the other hand were present in non-irradiated infected controls. The region of the ovo-testis was apparently destroyed after radiation, but returned to its normal appearance around 40 days after the last radiation. Ionizing radiation affected both host and parasite in S. mansoni-infected Biomphalaria glabrata, but the resulting impressive changes were soon reversed.

  11. Evaluation of the radiation doses in newborn patients submitted to CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Souza Santos, William; Caldas, Linda V.E.; Belinato, Walmir; Pereira Neves, Lucio; Perini, Ana Paula

    2015-01-01

    The number of computed tomography (CT) scans available to the population is increasing, as well as the complexity of such exams. As a result, the radiation doses are increasing as well. Considering the population exposed to CT exams, pediatric patients are considerably more sensitive to radiation than adults. They have a longer life expectancy than adults, and may receive a higher radiation dose than necessary if the CT scan settings are not adjusted for their smaller body size. As a result of these considerations, the risk of developing cancer is of great concern when newborn patients are involved. The objective of this work was to study the radiation doses on radiosensitive organs of newborn patients undergoing a whole body CT examination, utilizing Monte Carlo simulations. The novelty of this work is the use of pediatric virtual anthropomorphic phantoms, developed at the Department of Nuclear Energy at the Federal University of Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE). The CT equipment utilized during the simulations was a Discovery VCT GE PET/CT system, with a tube voltage of 140 kVp. The X-ray spectrum of this CT scanner was generated by the SRS-78 software, which takes into account the X-ray beam energy used in PET/CT procedures. The absorbed organ doses were computed employing the F6 tally (MeV/g). The results were converted to dose coefficients (mGy/100 mA) for all the structures, considering all employed beams. The highest dose coefficients values were obtained for the brain and the thyroid. This work provides useful information regarding the risks involving ionizing radiation in newborn patients, employing a new and reliable technique. (authors)

  12. Evaluation of the radiation doses in newborn patients submitted to CT examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Souza Santos, William; Caldas, Linda V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (IPENCNEN/SP), Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP, (Brazil); Belinato, Walmir [Departamento de Ensino, Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Bahia, Campus Vitoria da Conquista, Zabele, Av. Amazonas 3150, 45030-220 Vitoria da Conquista, BA, (Brazil); Pereira Neves, Lucio; Perini, Ana Paula [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, Caixa Postal 593, 38400-902, Uberlandia, MG, (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The number of computed tomography (CT) scans available to the population is increasing, as well as the complexity of such exams. As a result, the radiation doses are increasing as well. Considering the population exposed to CT exams, pediatric patients are considerably more sensitive to radiation than adults. They have a longer life expectancy than adults, and may receive a higher radiation dose than necessary if the CT scan settings are not adjusted for their smaller body size. As a result of these considerations, the risk of developing cancer is of great concern when newborn patients are involved. The objective of this work was to study the radiation doses on radiosensitive organs of newborn patients undergoing a whole body CT examination, utilizing Monte Carlo simulations. The novelty of this work is the use of pediatric virtual anthropomorphic phantoms, developed at the Department of Nuclear Energy at the Federal University of Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE). The CT equipment utilized during the simulations was a Discovery VCT GE PET/CT system, with a tube voltage of 140 kVp. The X-ray spectrum of this CT scanner was generated by the SRS-78 software, which takes into account the X-ray beam energy used in PET/CT procedures. The absorbed organ doses were computed employing the F6 tally (MeV/g). The results were converted to dose coefficients (mGy/100 mA) for all the structures, considering all employed beams. The highest dose coefficients values were obtained for the brain and the thyroid. This work provides useful information regarding the risks involving ionizing radiation in newborn patients, employing a new and reliable technique. (authors)

  13. Explanation of test and assessment of chromosomal aberrations on occupational health examinations for radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yumin; Fu Baohua; Han Lin; Wang Xi'ai; Zhao Fengling

    2012-01-01

    Test and Assessment of Chromosomal Aberrations on Occupational Health Examinations for Radiation Workers was formulated for standardizing analysis and outcome assessment of chromosomal aberrations on occupational health examinations for radiation workers. In order to provide experimental and theoretical basis for implementation and extension of this standard, this paper interpreted the standard comprehensively, including some existed problems that methods on detection and outcome assessment of chromosomal aberrations is not unified in different laboratories in China, and related criteria,laws and regulations at home and abroad are not fit for the detection of chromosomal aberrations for radiation workers very well; some introduction on methods of chromosomal slide preparation, discriminant analysis and outcome assessment of chromosomal aberration; and some influencing factors in the quality of chromosomal aberration detection. (authors)

  14. UDS in lymphocytes of occupationally radiation exposed persons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuschl, H.; Kovac, R.

    1982-01-01

    To determine a possible effect of low dose radiation on DNA repair processes, peripheral lymphocytes of mine workers exposed to 222 Rn in the thermal gallery of Badgastein (Austria) and employees of the Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf, exposed to varying doses of gamma radiation, were investigated. The capacity for unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) induced by in vitro UV irradiation was measured by autoradiography of isolated lymphocytes of exposed persons and unexposed controls. In all 222 Rn-exposed mine workers a significant increase of UDS above control values could be observed. Gamma irradiation 31 mrad had a significant effect on UDS, indicating a stimulation of DNA repair capability by chronic low dose exposure. (Author)

  15. Lymphocytic reactions in persons occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bliznakov, V.; Nikolov, A.

    1989-01-01

    The most frequent reasons for deviations of hematological indicies in radiological and X-ray personnel are discussed. The dynamics of lymphocyte count in individuals working in the city of Sofia is tabulated for a period of 12 years. The data show that the number of deviations from the norm (accepted as 1.929±0.908 g/l) reduced in time, which is one of the features of radiation syndrome. 24.23% of the persons investigated have had lymphocytosis. The following most common reasons for this are mentioned: increased cummulative radiation dose, focal infections, alergie, neurosis, tyreotoxicosis, virus infections, leucosis. The second and third investigations of such persons before applying any therapy are proposed in order to precisize the diagnosting

  16. Optimization of radiation protection for the control of occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esseyin, S.S.

    2012-04-01

    This project work provides practical information on how to apply the optimization of protection in the workplace. The principle of optimization states that, all reasonable efforts be made to reduce doses, social and economic factors being taken into account. The main objectives of this project work is to limit the risk to health arising from exposure to ionizing radiation in the workplace and to optimize radiation protection was achieved by setting common essential requirements for the control of exposure to radiation, including the specification of employer and employee duties. The acronym ALARA has been used in this project work as it brings to mind the twin concepts of dose reduction and reasonableness. The other main component of this project work is a general review of the means that are likely to be available in most workplaces to reduce exposure. These are divided into global means, which can be applied throughout an organization and those that are more jobs specific. Some of these global means are no more than would be expected in any well managed organization, such as an application of effective and efficient procedures for the management of work and provision for the education and training of workers. (author)

  17. Occupational radiation exposure and mortality: second analysis of the National Registry for Radiation Workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muirhead, C.R.; Goodill, A.A.; Haylock, R.G.E.; Vokes, J.; Little, M.P.; Jackson, D.A.; O'Hagan, J.A.; Thomas, J.M.; Kendall, G.M.; Silk, T.J.; Bingham, D.; Berridge, G.L.C.

    1999-01-01

    zero. For multiple myeloma there was an indication of an increasing trend in risk with external dose (p = 0.06), although the evidence for this trend disappeared after omitting workers monitored for exposure to internal emitters. The second NRRW analysis provides stronger inferences than the first on occupational radiation exposure and cancer mortality; the 90% confidence intervals for the risk per unit dose are tighter than before, and now exclude values which are greater than four times those seen among the Japanese A-bomb survivors, although they are also generally consistent with an observation of no raised risk. Furthermore, there is evidence, of borderline statistical significance, of an increasing risk for leukaemia excluding CLL, and, as with solid cancers, the data are consistent with the A-bomb findings. (author)

  18. Histomorphological study of submandibulary glands of rats submitted to low dosage of X-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, Claudia Maria; Onofre, Mirian Aparecida; Chan, Carolina; Cordeiro, Rita de Cassis Loiola; Raveli, Dirceu Barnabe

    1996-01-01

    The minimal dosage of X-ray that is likely to induce cellular alterations is unknown and there are just a few reports with low dosage in odontologic literature. The authors developed a histomorphological analysis of the submandibulary glands of rat that received low dosage of X radiation. The body of the animals was covered with a lead lamin leaving the cervical area uncovered. The submandibular glands were exposed to 1,80 Gy of X-radiation in a single dose. After 24, 48, 72 hours, 7, 14 and 21 days the glands were excised, fixed and prepared for analysis in light microscopy. Mild degenerative changes and nuclear pleomorfism, mainly on the first three experimental periods were observed. (author)

  19. Risk of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation among medical workers in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, Jan M.; Band, Pierre R.; Garner, Michael J.; Krewski, Daniel; Shilnikova, Natalia S.; Jiang, Huixia; Ashmore, Patrick J.; Sont, Willem N.; Fair, Martha E.; Letourneau, Ernest G.; Semenciw, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Medical workers are exposed to chronic low dose ionizing radiation from a variety of sources. Potential cancer risks associated with ionizing radiation exposures have been derived from cohorts experiencing acute high intensity exposure, most notably the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Since such extrapolations are subject to uncertainty, direct information on the risk associated with chronic low dose occupational exposure to ionizing radiation is needed. We examined possible associations with cancer incidence and mortality in a cohort of medical workers ascertained by the National Dose Registry of Canada (NDR). Data from the NDR were used to assess the exposure to ionizing radiation incurred between 1951 to 1987 inclusive in a cohort of 67,562 subjects classified as medical workers. Standardized mortality (SMRs) and incidence (SIRs) ratios were ascertained by linking NDR data with the data maintained by Statistics Canada in the Canadian Mortality and in the Canadian Cancer Incidence Databases respectively. Dosimetry information was obtained from the National Dosimetry Services of the Radiation Protection Bureau of Health Canada. There were 23,580 male and 43,982 female medical workers in the cohort. During the follow-up period, 1309 incident cases of cancer (509 in males, 800 in females) and 1,325 deaths (823 in males, 502 in females) were observed. Mortality from cancer and non-cancer causes was generally below expected compared to the Canadian population. Thyroid cancer incidence was significantly elevated in both males and females, with a combined SIR of 1.74 and 90% confidence interval (90% CI: 1.40-2.10). Our result of an increased risk of thyroid cancer among medical workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation confirms previous reports. Over the last 50 years, radiation protection measures have been effective in reducing occupational exposures of medical workers to ionizing radiation to current very low levels. (author)

  20. Licensee programs for maintaining occupational exposure to radiation as low as is reasonably achievable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, L.H.

    1983-06-01

    This report defines the concept of maintaining occupational exposures to radiation as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) and describes the elements necessary for specific licensees to implement, operate, and evaluate an effective ALARA program. Examples of cost-effectiveness analysis and optimization are provided. The rationale for providing more detailed guidance to specific licensees stems from the current recommendations provided by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, as well as from the increased regulatory emphasis on maintaining occupational exposures ALARA. The objective of this work is to provide the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with a basis for updating Regulatory Guide 8.10

  1. Minimally processed mixed salad submitted to gamma radiation: effects on bioactive compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirashima, Fabiana K.; Sabato, Susy F., E-mail: fmayumi@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lanfer-Marquez, Ursula M., E-mail: lanferum@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FCF/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas. Dept. de Alimentos e Nutricao Experimental

    2015-07-01

    High consumption of fruits and vegetables has been associated with a lowered incidence of oxidative stress-related diseases due to the presence of bioactive structures. Minimally processed products are a growing segment in food retail establishments because it is associated with practicality and convenience without significantly altering fresh-like characteristics. Low-dose of gamma radiation in combination with minimal processes has shown to be a promising strategy for extending shelf life and maintaining the organoleptic quality of fruits and vegetables. The objective of this study was to evaluate the levels of phenolic compounds, flavonoids, proanthocyanidins and antioxidant activity by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH•) free radical scavenging and Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) method in minimally processed mixed salad before and after different radiation doses. Samples of minimally processed mixed salad (with green and red cabbage and carrot) were purchased at local supermarket and irradiated with doses of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 kGy. Phenolic compounds, flavonoids, proanthocyanidins and antioxidant activity by DPPH• and ORAC were analyzed on the same extract prepared with MeOH. The results showed that bioactive compounds levels and antioxidant activity decreased significantly (p<0.05) with an increasing on radiation dose. Gamma-rays may affect these compounds and can cause degradation or oxidation, which can explain the drop on levels. Although the radiation has affected the bioactive contents, the process seems to be interesting to maintaining organoleptic characteristics and provide microbiological security at doses up to 2.0 kGy, according to studies conducted by our research group. (author)

  2. Minimally processed mixed salad submitted to gamma radiation: effects on bioactive compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirashima, Fabiana K.; Sabato, Susy F.; Lanfer-Marquez, Ursula M.

    2015-01-01

    High consumption of fruits and vegetables has been associated with a lowered incidence of oxidative stress-related diseases due to the presence of bioactive structures. Minimally processed products are a growing segment in food retail establishments because it is associated with practicality and convenience without significantly altering fresh-like characteristics. Low-dose of gamma radiation in combination with minimal processes has shown to be a promising strategy for extending shelf life and maintaining the organoleptic quality of fruits and vegetables. The objective of this study was to evaluate the levels of phenolic compounds, flavonoids, proanthocyanidins and antioxidant activity by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH•) free radical scavenging and Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) method in minimally processed mixed salad before and after different radiation doses. Samples of minimally processed mixed salad (with green and red cabbage and carrot) were purchased at local supermarket and irradiated with doses of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 kGy. Phenolic compounds, flavonoids, proanthocyanidins and antioxidant activity by DPPH• and ORAC were analyzed on the same extract prepared with MeOH. The results showed that bioactive compounds levels and antioxidant activity decreased significantly (p<0.05) with an increasing on radiation dose. Gamma-rays may affect these compounds and can cause degradation or oxidation, which can explain the drop on levels. Although the radiation has affected the bioactive contents, the process seems to be interesting to maintaining organoleptic characteristics and provide microbiological security at doses up to 2.0 kGy, according to studies conducted by our research group. (author)

  3. Occupational radiation protection in the mining and processing of raw materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    in several major areas. Three interrelated Safety Guides deal with occupational radiation protection. The first provides guidance on meeting the requirements for occupational radiation protection established in the BSS; the other two deal with the monitoring of occupational exposure to external sources of radiation and to intakes of radionuclides, respectively, and the assessment of doses. The present Safety Guide provides recommendations and guidance on meeting the requirements for the establishment of occupational radiation protection programmes in the mining and processing of raw materials. The 1983 edition of Radiation Protection of Workers in the Mining and Milling of Radioactive Ores (Safety Series No. 26) covered only administrative and practical aspects of radiation protection, and principally concerned uranium and thorium mines and processing facilities. The present Safety Guide includes provisions for the authorization of mining and processing activities, for inspection and compliance, and for necessary measures in the event of noncompliance with the conditions of authorization. In addition, more guidance is given for mines and processing facilities other than those exploiting uranium or thorium. The main purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide practical guidance for regulatory bodies on meeting the requirements for the radiation protection of workers involved in the mining and processing of raw materials. This Safety Guide will also be useful to employers, to licensees and registrants, to management bodies and their specialist advisers, and to health and safety committees concerned with occupational radiation protection. Workers and their representatives may also use it in support of safe working practices. The Safety Guide is intended to facilitate the preparation and adoption of national and local regulations and rules and working procedures for radiation protection in the mining and processing of raw materials

  4. Cytogenetic monitoring of personnel occupationally exposed to microwave radiation of GEM radar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera; Gajski, Goran; Brumen, Vlatka

    2008-01-01

    In the present study we analyzed and followed-up on the DNA damaging effects of microwave radiation of GEM radar equipment within microwave field of 10 μW/cm 2 to 10 mW/cm 2 in personnel occupationally exposed to frequency range of 1.5 GHz to 10.9 GHz. The single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE)/comet assay as a tool for the bio monitoring of individuals accidentally, environmentally or occupationally exposed to physical or chemical agents was used to evaluate possible genotoxic effect on peripheral human blood lymphocytes. The comet assay is a method that allows efficient determination of single strand breaks (SSB) and double-strand breaks (DSB), as well as alkali-labile sites in the DNA of single cells. The comet assay was carried out under alkaline conditions. We measured the baseline comet assay effect in whole blood samples. Parameter of the comet assay was studied in workers occupationally exposed to microwave radiation of GEM radar and in corresponding unexposed control subjects. It was found that in the subjects who were occupationally exposed to microwave radiation, the levels of DNA damage increased compare to control group and showed interindividual variations. As a measure of DNA damage tail length was used, calculated from the centre of the head and presented in micrometers (μm). Mean value of exposed group was 13.54±1.44 as opposed to control mean value that was 13.15±1.39. Differences between mean tail lengths were statistically significant (P<0.05, ANOVA). The results of this study indicate that individuals occupationally exposed to microwave frequency of GEM radar equipment may experience an increased genotoxic risk, emphasizing the importance of individual bio monitoring, limiting exposure and radiation safety programs. (author)

  5. Control of occupational exposure to cosmic radiation outside the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, Kazuaki; Kaneko, Masahito

    2000-01-01

    Japan is participating in the project of constructing ISS, International Space Station, and taking part of constructing JEM, Japan Experimental Module. It is expected that people working in this module upon completion should be controlled their exposure to cosmic radiation according to Japanese laws. Hence, the issue has been studied by a committee in NASDA, National Space Development Agency of Japan. In 1999, its interim report was released and public comments had been invited. In this presentation, following the introduction of the gist of the interim report as well as comments by the authors, countermeasures are proposed. (author)

  6. Cytogenetic studies in workers with chronic occupational radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grynszpan, D.

    1989-01-01

    The technique of chromosomal aberration detection on peripheral lymphocytes blood samples from monazite industry workers was used to study the cytogenetic effect of low chronic radiation doses. Cells from 51 workers and 21 controls were analysed. Cytogenetic data from individuals from different working areas were statistically compared among themselves and with the control group. The possible correlations between chromosomal aberration frequencies and cumulative external dose and working time were investigated. The influence of smoking was also tested. The link to the wives spontaneous abortions was analysed. Our results indicate possible biological effects on this sample of workers. (author)

  7. Failure to substantiate two cases of alleged occupational radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halnan, K.E.

    1988-01-01

    Outline report of two cases tried in Liverpool in July 1987. The first involved a case of Hodgkins disease in a man now 57 years who had worked for B.N.F.L. or its predecessors at Sellafield between 1954 and 1977. The second was a case of adenocarcinoma of the stomach in an employee working at Dounreay between 1958 and 1965. These cases came to court before the new revised calculations of radiation dosage from the Japanese atomic bombs had finally been agreed and published, and also before these had been taken into account by UNSCEAR. (U.K.)

  8. Radiation and occupational health: keynote address: the impact of radiation on health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrimpton, P.C.

    1995-01-01

    The part of address discusses the following issue: sources of exposure, effects of ionizing radiations, deterministic effects, stochastic effects, in utero exposure, recommendations of radiation protection: principles, practices, intervention, radiation protection in practices

  9. Occupational Exposure to Ionising Radiation in Greece (1994-1998)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenopoulou, V.; Drikos, G.; Dimitriou, P.

    2000-01-01

    This study was scheduled in order to analyse the individual annual dose information on classified workers in Greece, monitored and assessed by the central dosimetry service at the Greek Atomic Energy Commission for the years 1994-98. This service provides film badges to about 7500 workers all over the country on a monthly basis. Dose summaries were recorded and processed by the Dose Registry Information System, the database of which has been totally renewed since 1994. The statistical analysis provided refers to and deals with the mean annual dose, the collective dose, the distribution of the dose over the different specialities and the number of workers that have exceeded any of the established dose levels. Results concerning the annual dose summaries demonstrate a decrease in the collective and the mean individual dose to workers in the year 1995 and a slight but steady year-by-year increase thereafter during the period under consideration. This increasing tendency is discussed along with the increase in the ionising radiation applications, especially those in the medical sector, the change of the positioning of the film badge and the quality control measures provided by Greek law for radiation laboratories. (author)

  10. Assessment of medical occupational radiation doses in Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora, P.; Acuna, M.

    2011-01-01

    Participation of the Univ. of Costa Rica (UCR) in activities in an IAEA Regional Project RLA/9/066 through training, equipment and expert missions, has enabled to setting up of a national personal monitoring laboratory. Since 2007, the UCR has been in charge of monitoring around 1800 medical radiation workers of the Social Security System. Individual external doses are measured with thermoluminescent dosemeter using a Harshaw 6600 Plus reader. The service has accreditation with ISO/IEC 17025:2005. Distribution of monitored medical personnel is as follows: 83 % in diagnostic radiology, 6 % in nuclear medicine and 6 % in radiotherapy. Preliminary values for the 75 percentile of annual H p (10) in mSv are: radiology 0.37; interventional radiology 0.41; radiotherapy 0.53 and nuclear medicine 1.55. The service provided by the UCR in a steady and reliable way can help to implement actions to limit the doses received by the medical workers and optimise their radiation protection programs. (authors)

  11. Assessment of medical occupational radiation doses in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, P; Acuña, M

    2011-09-01

    Participation of the University of Costa Rica (UCR) in activities in an IAEA Regional Project RLA/9/066 through training, equipment and expert missions, has enabled to setting up of a national personal monitoring laboratory. Since 2007, the UCR has been in charge of monitoring around 1800 medical radiation workers of the Social Security System. Individual external doses are measured with thermoluminescent dosemeter using a Harshaw 6600 Plus reader. The service has accreditation with ISO/IEC 17025:2005. Distribution of monitored medical personnel is as follows: 83 % in diagnostic radiology, 6 % in nuclear medicine and 6 % in radiotherapy. Preliminary values for the 75 percentile of annual H(p)(10) in mSv are: radiology 0.37; interventional radiology 0.41; radiotherapy 0.53 and nuclear medicine 1.55. The service provided by the UCR in a steady and reliable way can help to implement actions to limit the doses received by the medical workers and optimise their radiation protection programs.

  12. Assessment of occupational exposures to external radiation - IAEA recommendation 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trousil, J; Plichta, J [CSOD, Praha (Czech Republic); Nikodemova, D [SOD, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    1996-12-31

    The IAEA recommendation contains the guidance on: (1) establishing monitoring programmes; (2) the interpretation of results; (3) records keeping; (4) quality assurance. The objectives for workplace monitoring including the recommended methods are also involved. The choice of personal dosemeter depends not only on the type of radiation but also on the method of interpretation what will be used: (1) photon dosemeters giving information only on the personal dose equivalent Hp(10) - mostly TL or RPL dosemeters are used; (2) photon dosemeter of discriminating type giving, in addition to Hp(10) and Hp(0.07), some indication of radiation type and effective energy and detection of electrons - data which must be known for E calculation -mostly film badge is used; (3) extremity dosemeters giving information on Hp(0.07) - mostly TL dosemeters are used; (4) neutron dosemeters giving information on Hp(10) -track-etch or albedo dosemeters are used. The monitoring service should have quality assurance testing which is an organization`s internal system of procedures and practices which assures the quality of its service. This process may be part of the approval performance testing which is a part of approved procedures carried out be the authoritative organization in regular intervals. The approved monitoring service should perform the dose records keeping which serve the protection of the workers and these data are the part of the Register of the Professional Exposures which is mostly organized by the authoritative body. (J.K.).

  13. Assessment of occupational exposures to external radiation - IAEA recommendation 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trousil, J.; Plichta, J.; Nikodemova, D.

    1995-01-01

    The IAEA recommendation contains the guidance on: (1) establishing monitoring programmes; (2) the interpretation of results; (3) records keeping; (4) quality assurance. The objectives for workplace monitoring including the recommended methods are also involved. The choice of personal dosemeter depends not only on the type of radiation but also on the method of interpretation what will be used: (1) photon dosemeters giving information only on the personal dose equivalent Hp(10) - mostly TL or RPL dosemeters are used; (2) photon dosemeter of discriminating type giving, in addition to Hp(10) and Hp(0.07), some indication of radiation type and effective energy and detection of electrons - data which must be known for E calculation -mostly film badge is used; (3) extremity dosemeters giving information on Hp(0.07) - mostly TL dosemeters are used; (4) neutron dosemeters giving information on Hp(10) -track-etch or albedo dosemeters are used. The monitoring service should have quality assurance testing which is an organization's internal system of procedures and practices which assures the quality of its service. This process may be part of the approval performance testing which is a part of approved procedures carried out be the authoritative organization in regular intervals. The approved monitoring service should perform the dose records keeping which serve the protection of the workers and these data are the part of the Register of the Professional Exposures which is mostly organized by the authoritative body. (J.K.)

  14. Physical-chemical characteristics of figs (Ficus carica) preready to submitted to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Lucia C.A.S.; Harder, Marcia N.C.; Arthur, Paula B.; Lima, Roberta B.; Modlo, Debora M.; Arthur, Valter

    2009-01-01

    Fig (Ficus carica) is the fruit of the fig tree, original of Mediterranean, has fleshy and succulent pulp, besides being sweetened slightly. It is very appreciated for dessert. The immature form (green) can be used for make a sweet home-made. The aim of the present work was irradiate samples of fruits of pre-ready green fig, seeking the increase of the useful shelf-life. The samples were washed, made hygienic and submitted the cooking by a period of 15 minutes, after the cooking they were put in an drainer to expect cooling the fruits and after that process they were wrapped in plastic sack of 15x30cm and sealed in a manual sealing and stored at 8 deg C in a OBD camera for 7 days. Later samples were irradiated with doses of: 0 (control); 1.0 and 2.0 kGy, under a rate of dose of 0.601 kGy/h, in a Gammacell-220 irradiator and stored by 24 hours to 8 deg C in OBD. Each treatment was consisted with 3 repetitions with 10 fruits each. The samples were appraised, immediately after the irradiation, as for the parameters pH, soluble solids content, color peel, color pulp, texture, chlorophyll A, chlorophyll B and total carotenoids. The statistical analysis of the results was accomplished, through outline entirely randomized by test F for variance analysis and when significant compared by Tuckey test. By the obtained results was concluded that there was not significant difference between the treatments and the control. After four days the samples presented microbiological contamination, they went desecrated. (author)

  15. Effects on physicochemical, microbiological and sensory characteristics of honey bee samples submitted to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bera, Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    Honey production in Brazil has increased considerably and gaining pro eminence on the international market, as a result many demands have become part of the productive honey chain. In addition to the analyses provided for the Brazilian legislation, international market demand products that meet the most stringent quality standards. Honey has interesting characteristics due to its constitution, but even so there are problems that can change some how your identity and quality. The application of gamma radiation is a viable proposal which promotes the reduction of bio burden without changing the constitution and most importantly the physicochemical properties, with smaller nutritional losses when compared to other treatments used in foods. This study beyond the physicochemical parameters required by Brazilian regulation also included other relevant analyses, including FT-IR ATR. Microbiological analyses were carried out on samples of pure honeys and subsequently inoculated microbial known loads to assess the action of gamma radiation in doses of 5 and 10 kGy. The triangular test was used to differentiate the irradiated and not irradiated. samples The major changes that have occurred in samples of honeys were mainly in concentrations of HMF (hydroxymethylfurfural) and diastase activity occurring a significant decrease in all analyzed samples. There was a reduction microbiological from the application of the 5 kGy, reaching absence with 10 kGy dose except Paenibacillus larvae. The sensory analysis conducted on samples of honey and honey irradiated with 5, 10 and 15 kGy doses, pointed out that there is no significant difference (5%) between irradiated and control samples. The application of gamma radiation in honeys proved a very useful method in microbiological decontamination, featuring few changes in the product at doses up to 10 kGy. (author)

  16. The problematic on the cancer development in occupationally exposed workers to ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouailhetas, Y.; Mezrahi, A.; Heilbron Filho, P.F.L.; Oliveira, S.M.V.

    1996-01-01

    Frequently and in an increasing perspective, the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission is inquired on the development of cancer in occupationally exposed workers to ionizing radiation. These workers try to compensate their state of ill health juridically. Taking into account that cancer is a probabilistic effect of radiation, it could be only detected by an increase in cases that normally occur in a particular population. Whether or not the occurrence of the illness is identified as having occupational origin misses scientific consistence. Regarding the probabilistic effect of low level radiation doses, radiation protection is founded on the linear dose-effect without threshold hypothesis. Thus, it could be call into a question: is it possible that the illness, presented by an individual, derives from occupational causes. If the answer is positive, the responsibility can be imputed, at first, to the employer and the link of causality turns out to be fundamented not any more in measurable objective facts but in social, economic, ethic and moral aspects, which arise from the radiological protection quality and measures offered by the employer. (author)

  17. Low power laser effects in cancer cells and fibroblasts submitted the ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Camila Ramos

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is considered a public health problem worldwide. According to Brazil's the National Cancer Institute (INCA), 576,000 new cases of cancer were estimated for 2015 in Brazil, representing the second leading cause of death. Radiotherapy may be a treatment to several of types of cancer, frequently using ionizing radiation to eradicate or prevent the proliferation of tumor cells. This treatment, however, can lead to death of non-tumor cells around in irradiated tissue. Given this, adjuvant therapies that can minimize the side effects of ionizing radiation are of extremely importance. In this context, low power laser (LPL) may be an alternative to modulate the response of healthy cells to ionizing radiation. In this study, cells of human gingival fibroblasts (FMM1) and breast cancer (MDAMB- 231) were exposed to gamma radiation at doses of 2.5 and 10 Gy. After twenty-four hours, cell were irradiated with LPL ( λ= 660 nm, 40 mW and total area of 0.04 cm²) with energy densities of 30, 60, 90, 120 and 150 J/cm². The cell viability was measured during four days, using the trypan blue technique. The influence of LPL on the cell cycle and on expression of the nuclear antigen of cellular proliferation (PCNA) was evaluated by flow cytometry. The expression of β-Galactosidase was the chosen method to assess cell senescence. Considering our adopted parameters, and focusing on the non-tumor cells, we have observed an increase in: 1) cell viability; 2) cell population in phases S and G 2 /M cell cycle; 3) PCNA expression with decrease in senescence. No alterations were observed in the cell viability, with greater population in phases S and G 2 /M cell cycle, while the number of senescent cells and the expression of PCNA were decreased. Therefore, we have concluded that the LPL promoted effects on both cell lineages, with increased cell viability on FMM1 cells, whether cancer cells maintained a decreased proliferation. (author)

  18. Occupational exposure of fathers to ionizing radiation and the risk of leukaemia in offspring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, J.R.; Clarke, E.A.; Anderson, T.W.; King, W.

    1992-08-01

    An epidemiologic study was performed to determine whether there was an association between childhood leukaemia and the occupational exposure of fathers in the nuclear industry to ionizing radiation prior to the child's conception. The study employed a case-control design. Children with cancer ('cases') and children who did not develop cancer ('controls') were compared with respect to their exposure history. The cases, which occurred from 1950 to 1988, consisted of children aged 0 to 14 years who died from or were diagnosed with leukaemia and were born to mothers who lived near an operating nuclear facility in Ontario. Eight controls were matched to each case according to date of birth and mother's residence. There were 112 cases and 890 controls (six controls died before the development of the associated case's leukaemia). Data on the occupational exposure of the 1002 fathers were obtained from the Canadian National Dose Registry (NDR) and examination of employer records. Links to the NDR were found for 95 fathers. For each father doses were obtained regarding whole body external dose, tritium dose, and (for uranium miners) internal exposures to the lungs due to radon and radon daughters. Radiation exposures were estimated (a) over the father's lifetime before the child's conception; (b) during the six months prior to the child's conception; (c) during the three months prior to the child's conception; and (d) over the father's lifetime, ending in the month of the child's diagnosis. There was no evidence of an elevated leukaemia risk in relation to any exposure period or exposure type, and there was no apparent gradient of effect with increasing radiation dose. It is concluded that there was no association between childhood leukaemia and the occupational exposure of fathers to ionizing radiation prior to conception or diagnosis. Odds ratios were close to 1.0 for all radiation dose categories and occupations except for uranium mining, which had a larger but not

  19. The data submitted by the United Kingdom to the United Nations Scientific Committee on the effects of atomic radiation for the 1977 report to the General Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, F.E.; Webb, G.A.M.; Simmonds, J.R.

    1976-10-01

    The subject is dealt with under the following headings: environmental radiation (natural sources; power production by nuclear fission for civil programmes and the nuclear fuel cycle; nuclear explosions; exposures due to nuclear research, the use of radioisotopes and other uses of atomic energy); medical radiation exposure (diagnostic radiology equipment; doses from specific x-ray procedures); occupational exposure (nuclear fuel cycle; research, industrial, medical and defence establishments); miscellaneous sources of radiation. (U.K.)

  20. Microbiological analysis of peach palm in natura submitted to 60Co radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Priscila V.; Araujo, Michel M.; Nunes, Thaise C.F.; Costa, Helbert S.F.; Villavicencio, Anna Lucia C.H.; Hojeije, Khalil Y.

    2009-01-01

    The palm tree (Bactris gasipaes Kunth) is a species with high potential benefits, because of the nutritional value of its fruits that could be used both in human and animals feeding and mainly for peach palm extraction. It represents a great source of dietary fiber and a moderate source of magnesium and iron. Food irradiation is a worldwide technology that aims to improve the product quality, in order to eliminate diverse microorganisms that can spoil the food. Radiation processing, in the recommended doses, causes very few chemical alterations and nutritional losses in foods, being considered insignificant and/or similar to other food treatments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of irradiation on microbiological counts of mesophilic aerobic in the peach palm in natura. Samples were irradiated with 1.0 and 1.5 kGy using a 60 Co multipurpose irradiator. Radiation treatment appeared to be a useful alternative to reduce microbial contamination in the samples analyzed. (author)

  1. Microbiological analysis of peach palm in natura submitted to {sup 60}Co radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Priscila V.; Araujo, Michel M.; Nunes, Thaise C.F.; Costa, Helbert S.F.; Villavicencio, Anna Lucia C.H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: priscilavsilva@gmail.com, e-mail: villavic@ipen.br; Hojeije, Khalil Y. [Floresta Industria e Comercio Ltda., Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The palm tree (Bactris gasipaes Kunth) is a species with high potential benefits, because of the nutritional value of its fruits that could be used both in human and animals feeding and mainly for peach palm extraction. It represents a great source of dietary fiber and a moderate source of magnesium and iron. Food irradiation is a worldwide technology that aims to improve the product quality, in order to eliminate diverse microorganisms that can spoil the food. Radiation processing, in the recommended doses, causes very few chemical alterations and nutritional losses in foods, being considered insignificant and/or similar to other food treatments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of irradiation on microbiological counts of mesophilic aerobic in the peach palm in natura. Samples were irradiated with 1.0 and 1.5 kGy using a {sup 60}Co multipurpose irradiator. Radiation treatment appeared to be a useful alternative to reduce microbial contamination in the samples analyzed. (author)

  2. Values of dose and individual of a individual thermoluminescent dosimeter submitted to x and gamma radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, Cassiana Viccari de; Pela, Carlos Alberto

    2001-01-01

    The individual monitoring provides information for the control of exposures, and estimates the dose received by individuals. This is an essential tool in personal dosimetry. It's based on a radiation protection concept, allowing an individual exposure control, besides guaranteeing that the dose restrictions will not be exceeded. Usually, the dose monitoring is performed by using an individual dosemeter placed on a representative position of the most exposed point on the thoracic surface. The dosemeter, which is analyzed in the present work, is made of three CaSO 4 -Dy thermoluminescent detectors, plastic filters, copper and copper-lead, mounted in an acrylic support. The dose received by on each detector, which forms the dosemeter, is related according to their energetic curve dependence. The dose amount is calculated from these curves by using an algorithm, and it was taken in to consideration the detector calibration and thermoluminescent responses, due to the x and g radiation exposure. That algorithm has the capacity to determine the energies that were irradiated the detector. Therefore, to aid the service in the moment of evaluate the dose received by the individual and where it is coming from. The algorithm has provided individual dose value H x , defined as operational quantity for photons adopted in the Brazilian Metric System. The algorithm can determine two dose values and such values have been analyzed according to the kind of irradiated energy on the dosimeter and it has shown that both values are within established limits by Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD). (author)

  3. Protection against occupational exposure to ionizing radiations: present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidelalde, E.

    2012-01-01

    In April 2012, it is expected the approval and publication of the Directive of the European Parliament ad Council on the minimum health and safety requirements regarding the exposure of workers to the risks arising rom physical agents (electromagnetic fields), replacing directive 2004/40/EC. The publication of new evidences related to exposure to electromagnetic radiation and its impact on health that have emerged in recent years has led to reconsideration by the Parliament, Council and European Commission, regarding to application of exposure limits for MRI clinical practice. The present review presents the principles governing the new Directive and some of the implications and actions to be taken on magnetic resonance imaging installations. (Author) 15 refs.

  4. Occupational standard for exposure to ultraviolet radiation (1989)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    The exposure limit (EL) values in this standard refer to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) in the spectral region between 180 and 400 nm and represents conditions under which it is believed that nearly all workers may be repeatedly exposed without adverse effect. The EL values for exposure of the eye or the skin may be used to evaluate potentially hazardous exposure from UVR. The limits do not apply to ultraviolet lasers. The values should be used as guides in the control of exposure to both pulsed and continuous sources of UVR where the exposure duration is not less than 0.1 μsec. The ELs are below levels used for UV exposures of patients as a part of medical treatment or for elective cosmetic purposes. They are intended as upper limits for non therapeutic and non cosmetic exposure. 2 refs., 2 tabs

  5. Present situation of occupational radiation exposure in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imabori, Akira

    1979-01-01

    The present situation of the radiation exposure of workers, including both employes and subcontractors, in the nuclear power plants in Japan, is presented. Twenty seven nuclear power reactors in operation and under construction are tabulated with the name, the owner, the electric output and the commissioning year of each plant. The results of exposure of the workers in these plants are shown, classifying the dose rate into less than 0.5 rem, 0.5 - 1.5 rem, 1.5 - 2.5 rem, 2.5 - 5 rem and more than 5 rem, and the workers into employes and subcontractors. It is noted that the exposure dose of the subcontractors occupies about 88% of all exposure dose, and the exposure is concentrated during regular inspection period. The exposure dose of about 80% of the workers is less than 0.5 rem, and no one was irradiated more than 5 rem in a year. The total exposure dose, which has especially the tendency of increasing with extended maintenance period and decreasing during plant operation period, shows also the trend of increasing with the lapse of operation years. As for the point of view of whole exposure dose, the value is 0.06 -- 0.43 man-rem/10 6 kWh in 1976 FY. It is considered to be necessary to grasp the total exposure dose of each worker wandering from one plant to another, and the central registration center for the workers in radioactive environment was established in 1978. The whole exposure dose data of each worker are stored in the central computer in this center. This system is highly appreciated in radiation exposure management. The total exposure dose is related to the rate of utilization of nuclear plants, and it is expected to decrease with the decrease of plant outage. (Nakai, Y.)

  6. Carcinogenic effectiveness of combined dust-and-radiation effect under experimental and occupational conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, Z.; Mikhajlov, M.; Todorov, A.

    1988-01-01

    Consideration is made of the latest reports, reflecting the statistically significant increase of the lung cancer among workers in underground working sites at cumulative exposure to radon decay products under 60 monthly working levels. The significance of the non-radiation components of the occupational environment, participating in the carcinogenic process together with the classical noxiousness are emphasized. The significance of the functional sufficiency of the immune and endocrine systems, the tobacco smoking and the role of the inflammation respiratory tract diseases , etc. is denoted. Inferences are made for the complexity and multiformity of the occupational carcinogenesis according to the intensity, classical mutagenic factors and multitude of noncarcinogenic components of the occupational environment. Paralelly to the sanitary-technical fool-proof rendering of the respective productions, the necessity of purposeful balneotherapeutic and medical treatment of the risk worker contingents is pointed out

  7. Aspects of the immune response against proteic antigens submitted to the effects of 60Co gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Janaina Baptista.

    2004-01-01

    Considering the effects of gamma radiation on proteins and the capacity of the immune system to recognize modified macromolecules, we decided to evaluate some immunological aspects of B10.PL mice exposed to native or irradiated ovalbumin and bothrops toxin-1 (BthTx-1). In order to evaluate possible structural modifications of the molecules after being irradiated ( 60 Co gamma rays), bothrops toxin-1 was analysed by electrophoresis, while ovalbumin was submitted to analytical size exclusion chromatography. The toxin was also analysed by ESI-mass spectrometry. Our results indicate that radiation promoted modifications on both the molecules. Aiming to compare the toxicity of the native and irradiated forms of the toxin, an in vitro cytotoxicity assay, using CHO cells, was performed. According to our results, the modified toxin was 5 folds less toxic than its native counterpart. Sera of animals immunized with the native and irradiated proteins were analyzed in order to evaluate levels of IgG, as well as to quantify specific isotopes. While the native proteins induced a predominant Th2 response, the irradiated molecules apparently promoted a switch towards a Th1 pattern. We also performed a cell proliferation assay with splenocytes from mice immunized with either the native or the irradiated proteins, cultured in the presence of the antigens. Our results indicate that both the forms of the proteins induced a similar proliferative response. These data indicate a potential use of detoxified proteins as antigens for immunization. (author)

  8. Evaluation of fruit productivity and quality in Hass avocado submitted to 60Co gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz T, E. De la; Ibanez P, J.; Mijares O, P.; Garcia A, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Evaluation of productivity, postharvest behavior and fruit quality was performed on four years Hass avocado trees irradiated with 60 Co gamma rays in doses of 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 Gy, established in the ''La Labor'' Experimental Center of the Centro de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnologias del Aguacate en el Estado de Mexico (CICTAMEX) at Temascaltepec Mexico. Productivity had a significant increase in the dose of 15 Gy being the average number of fruits nearly 400 % more than the control at fruit setting, being such difference reduced at fruit harvesting to 300 %. In regard to postharvest performance, the respiration index (mg CO 2 /kg/hr) did not show significant differences among treatments. Also others variables such as physiological weight losses, texture, maturity pattern, and sensorial tests (color, flavor, aroma, texture) were not different in regard to the control. This mean that radiation has altered productivity but not the quality and postharvest behavior of fruits. (Author)

  9. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1996: Twenty-ninth annual report. Volume 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, M.L.

    1998-02-01

    This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 1996 annual reports submitted by six of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. Since there are no geologic repositories for high level waste currently licensed, only six categories will be considered in this report. Annual reports for 1996 were received from a total of 300 NRC licensees, of which 109 were operators of nuclear power reactors in commercial operation. Compilations of the reports submitted by the 300 licensees indicated that 138,310 individuals were monitored, 75,139 of whom received a measurable dose. The collective dose incurred by these individuals was 21,755 person-cSv (person-rem) 2 which represents a 13% decrease from the 1995 value. The number of workers receiving a measurable dose also decreased, resulting in the average measurable dose of 0.29 cSv (rem) for 1996. The average measurable dose is defined to be the total collective dose (TEDE) divided by the number of workers receiving a measurable dose. These figures have been adjusted to account for transient reactor workers. Analyses of transient worker data indicate that 22,348 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient workers by multiple licensees. In 1996, the average measurable dose calculated from reported was 0.24 cSv (rem). The corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose of 0.29 cSv (rem)

  10. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1996: Twenty-ninth annual report. Volume 18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, M.L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Regulatory Applications; Hagemeyer, D. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1998-02-01

    This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 1996 annual reports submitted by six of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. Since there are no geologic repositories for high level waste currently licensed, only six categories will be considered in this report. Annual reports for 1996 were received from a total of 300 NRC licensees, of which 109 were operators of nuclear power reactors in commercial operation. Compilations of the reports submitted by the 300 licensees indicated that 138,310 individuals were monitored, 75,139 of whom received a measurable dose. The collective dose incurred by these individuals was 21,755 person-cSv (person-rem){sup 2} which represents a 13% decrease from the 1995 value. The number of workers receiving a measurable dose also decreased, resulting in the average measurable dose of 0.29 cSv (rem) for 1996. The average measurable dose is defined to be the total collective dose (TEDE) divided by the number of workers receiving a measurable dose. These figures have been adjusted to account for transient reactor workers. Analyses of transient worker data indicate that 22,348 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient workers by multiple licensees. In 1996, the average measurable dose calculated from reported was 0.24 cSv (rem). The corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose of 0.29 cSv (rem).

  11. INSTORE: a PC-based database program for occupational radiation exposure of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yeong Ho; Kang, Chang Sun; Mun, Ju Hyun; Kim, Hak Su

    1998-01-01

    Ensuring occupational radiation exposure (ORE) as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) has been one of very important requirements in a nuclear power plant. It is well known that about 70 percent of occupational dose has incurred from maintenance jobs in the outage period. To reduce occupational dose effectively, the high-dose jobs in the outage period should be identified with their dose reduction potentials and methods. In this study, a PC-based ORE database program, INSTORE, is developed to evaluate ORE doses in individual jobs, and the ORE data of Kori units 3 and 4 are assembled to the database. Based on customary job classification, radiation work is classified into 26 main jobs which comprise 61 detailed jobs, and occupational dose are assessed according to each detailed job. As a result, high-dose jobs are identified with dose reduction priority in terms of collective ORE dose. It is recommended that adequate dose reduction methods for these jobs should be prepared to improve their working conditions and procedures. (author)

  12. Evaluation of the diseases associated with occupational exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frometa Suarez, I.

    1998-01-01

    Medical monitoring of workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation enables evaluation of their state of health, as well as early detection of general or somatic diseases which are considered as a criterion of unfitness for work, and which may or may not be related to the exposure conditions. A retrospective study is presented of all the cases of workers suspected to be suffering from radiation-related diseases which were referred for specialized study to the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IMT) during 1990-95. The incidence of the diseases and affected tissues is described, as well as the relationship between the time of manifestation and the type of source, the exposure time and the recorded dose levels. Diseases of the haemolymphopoietic system predominated, being observed in individuals exposed to medical radiodiagnostic sources. (author)

  13. Analysis of medical occupational exposure to ionizing radiation on Taiwan during past two decades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, P.-S.; Li, S.-Y.

    1980-01-01

    From the time of inception of the centralized laboratory for personnel dosimetry service operated by the National Tsing Hua University on Taiwan of the Republic of China in 1960 till 1979 the data obtained was analyzed to find the yearly occupational exposure to ionizing radiation. During the 20 year monitoring period, analysis was performed with reference to (1) medical occupational exposure, (2) maximum and average yearly dose-equivalent, (3) range of dose-equivalent, (4) percentage of maximum permissible dose-equivalent, (5) number of workers, including sex and age, (6) detailed quarterly analysis for the years 1977 to 1979, (7) types of radiation sources, and (8) estimation of the genetically significant dose-equivalent. (H.K.)

  14. Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation from the perspective of nursing professionals in hemodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Martins Gallo; Fernanda Aparecida Camargo de Lima; Lúcia Margarete dos Reis; Edivaldo Cremer

    2013-01-01

    In order to identify the security measures taken and the control of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation in units of hemodynamic, from the perspective of nursing, this quantitative descriptive study was developed during January and February, 2011. A check-list of binary responses (yes / no) was made based on the legislation and updated literature and it was applied in four hospitals in the northern region of Paraná State. The analysis of the data showed that 29 employees have knowledge...

  15. Answers to questions about updated estimates of occupational radiation doses at Three Mile Island, Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-12-01

    The purpose of this question and answer report is to provide a clear, easy-to-understand explanation of revised radiation dose estimates which workers are likely to receive over the course of the cleanup at Three Mile Island, Unit 2, and of the possible health consequences to workers of these new estimates. We will focus primarily on occupational dose, although pertinent questions about public health and safety will also be answered

  16. Modification in the thermo mechanical behavior of biodegradable polyesters submitted to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mega, Veronica I; Fernandez, Victor; Eisenberg, Patricia; Hermida, Elida B

    2006-01-01

    The biopolymers poly(3- polyhydroxy butyrate) (PHB), poly(3-hydroxy butyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) and their mixtures with other biodegradables like polycaprolactone (PCL) are materials that can be used in the production of food packaging and in bioabsorbable medical applications because of their good processability, suitable mechanical properties and complete degradation in different environments. Radiation γ is an appropriate method for the sterilization of food packaging. It offers good storage stability and high microbiological safety. This work proposes to study the effect of radiation γ on the mechanical and thermal properties of sheets of PHB, PHBV and of a PHB-based commercial biodegradable mixture. The samples standardized for traction tests were irradiated in air, at a constant dosage rate of 10 kGy/h. The range of absorbed doses was from 10 to 179 kGy. The possible structural changes were evaluated by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy. The thermal properties were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and the mechanical properties were measured with a universal test machine. The ruling mechanism during the gamma irradiation of Biocycle 1000 (PHB), 1400-2 (PHB-PCL) and PHBV is chain scission. The decreased vitreous transition melting and crytallization temperatures of PHB and PHBV after increasing the dosage, are evidence of the reduction in average molecular weight due to this mechanism. A similar effect was observed in the mechanical properties of irradiated PHBV, Biocycle 1000 and 1400-2: decreased resistance to traction and in the percentage of elongation to fracture, while the tensile module remains almost constant. The tenacity of the Biocycle 1000 is reduced more than that for the PHBV, which is less crystalline; showing that the damage occurs mostly in the crystalline region. This behavior is repeated in the Biocycle 1400-2. For the doses used in food irradiation or in sterilization of food packaging (≤ 20

  17. Statutory and other compensation for radiation-induced occupational diseases in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCaig, R.H.; Webb, G.A.M.

    1995-01-01

    The statutory compensation scheme for occupational diseased in the UK is described, with particular reference to the prescription of diseases caused by exposure to ionising radiation. Only a small number of awards have been made under the statutory scheme. There also exists in UK a non statutory agreement between two of the major employers of radiation workers and their staff and trade unions. This provides an alternative to the statutory scheme or to legal action and is proving to be a satisfactory mechanism for settlements to be reached. (author)

  18. Reduction of acute toxicity of the pharmaceutical fluoxetine (Prozac) submitted to ionizing radiation to Vibrio fischeri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Dymes R.A.; Garcia, Vanessa S.G.; Vilarrubia, Anna C.S.; Borrely, Sueli I., E-mail: vanessagarcia@usp.br, E-mail: sborrely@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The constant use of pharmaceutical drugs by great part of the population and its continuous input into the environment creates a growing need of investigating its presence, behavior and the effects on aquatic biota, as well as new ways to treat wastewater containing such substances. The fluoxetine hydrochloride (FH) present in the drug Prozac is an active ingredient used in the treatment of depressive and anxiety disorders. Generally, these compounds enter the aquatic environment by sewage collectors systems after undergoing prior treatment in sewage treatment plants (STPs) or without any treatment. This study focused on evaluating the reduction of acute toxicity of the pharmaceutical FH, under its manipulated formula, for the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. It was also evaluated the acute toxicity of the aqueous solution containing the FH after its exposition to ionizing radiation from industrial electron accelerator. It was performed acute toxicity tests lasting 15 minutes, where the average EC (50) of the non-irradiated CF water solution was approximately 0.68 mg L-1. While the CF water solution irradiated with 1 kGy, 2.5 kGy, 7.5 kGy and 10 kGy, presented an average EC(50) 1.63 mg.L{sup -1}, 2.34 mg.L{sup -1}, 2.35 mg.L{sup -1} and 1.80 mg.L{sup -1}, respectively, showing a notable reduction of the acute toxicity for this organism. (author)

  19. Study of influence on harvesting point in Brazilian Tommy Atkins mangoes submitted to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabato, S.F.; Cruz, J.N.; Rela, P.R.; Broisler, P.O.

    2009-01-01

    Brazil is a great producer of tropical fruits including mangoes. Among several purposes gamma radiation can be applied as phytosanitary treatment. This is well studied in scientific papers and more recently demonstrated through commercial advances like bilateral protocols established between India and USA. The whole experiment evolved two parts where each of them used fruits from different maturity stages (stages 2 and 3). This experiment was carried out with around 300 fruits in each part of the study. The main objective was to get the experience close to commercial conditions. The irradiation was realized in Multipurpose Cobalt-60 source belonging to IPEN-CNEN/SP (developed in house by own technology). The absorbed doses were 0.2, 0.5 and 0.75 kGy. After irradiation all fruits were kept at 12 o C in acclimatized chamber during 14 days. After this period the fruits were brought to environmental conditions (25 deg. C) for around 14 more days of duration. These conditions were established to simulate the exportation conditions from Brazil to distant countries. Physical-chemical analysis (pH, titrable acidity, total soluble solids ( o Brix) and texture) as well as visual observation (mass loss, rotting, internal and skin color) were evaluated. The results from this experiment could demonstrate that the characteristics of the mangoes are more dependent on time and temperature storage rather than irradiation.

  20. Study of influence on harvesting point in Brazilian Tommy Atkins mangoes submitted to gamma radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabato, S. F.; Cruz, J. N.; Rela, P. R.; Broisler, P. O.

    2009-07-01

    Brazil is a great producer of tropical fruits including mangoes. Among several purposes gamma radiation can be applied as phytosanitary treatment. This is well studied in scientific papers and more recently demonstrated through commercial advances like bilateral protocols established between India and USA. The whole experiment evolved two parts where each of them used fruits from different maturity stages (stages 2 and 3). This experiment was carried out with around 300 fruits in each part of the study. The main objective was to get the experience close to commercial conditions. The irradiation was realized in Multipurpose Cobalt-60 source belonging to IPEN-CNEN/SP (developed in house by own technology). The absorbed doses were 0.2, 0.5 and 0.75 kGy. After irradiation all fruits were kept at 12 °C in acclimatized chamber during 14 days. After this period the fruits were brought to environmental conditions (25 °C) for around 14 more days of duration. These conditions were established to simulate the exportation conditions from Brazil to distant countries. Physical-chemical analysis (pH, titrable acidity, total soluble solids (°Brix) and texture) as well as visual observation (mass loss, rotting, internal and skin color) were evaluated. The results from this experiment could demonstrate that the characteristics of the mangoes are more dependent on time and temperature storage rather than irradiation.

  1. The influence of metformin as a radiosensitizer of cells submitted to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonçalves, Letícia S.; Pereira, Alline G.; Gerolis, Luanai G.L.; Filho, Jamilson N.R.; Neves, Maria J.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, due to the high prevalence of type 2 diabetes, the pharmacological therapy with metformin has become one of the most prescribed medications worldwide, with approximately 150 million people currently in use. Several studies have reflected the relevance of this fact, indicating that this extensively used drug may play another important role: it has been reported that metformin could be responsible for decreasing cancer incidence and mortality in diabetic patients. However, the mechanism by which its antineoplastic effect occurs remains unclear. The term cancer refers to not only one single disease, but to hundreds of them, grouped under the same name. Even in one specific organ, different types of malignant cells can possibly develop. Radiotherapy, one of the most effective ways to combat many cancers, is based on the formation of free radicals through the radiolysis of water molecules on the affected area, caused by ionizing irradiation. The objective of this work was to study if the treatment with metformin can influence the effect caused by ionizing radiation on cells, using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as an experimental model for cancer. In other words, this work aims to analyze if metformin acts as a radiosensitizer of tumor cells. This can represent a possible strategy as a therapeutic combination to be explored in the war against cancer. (author)

  2. The influence of metformin as a radiosensitizer of cells submitted to gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonçalves, Letícia S.; Pereira, Alline G.; Gerolis, Luanai G.L.; Filho, Jamilson N.R.; Neves, Maria J., E-mail: lsatlergoncalves@gmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizontge, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Radiobiologia

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, due to the high prevalence of type 2 diabetes, the pharmacological therapy with metformin has become one of the most prescribed medications worldwide, with approximately 150 million people currently in use. Several studies have reflected the relevance of this fact, indicating that this extensively used drug may play another important role: it has been reported that metformin could be responsible for decreasing cancer incidence and mortality in diabetic patients. However, the mechanism by which its antineoplastic effect occurs remains unclear. The term cancer refers to not only one single disease, but to hundreds of them, grouped under the same name. Even in one specific organ, different types of malignant cells can possibly develop. Radiotherapy, one of the most effective ways to combat many cancers, is based on the formation of free radicals through the radiolysis of water molecules on the affected area, caused by ionizing irradiation. The objective of this work was to study if the treatment with metformin can influence the effect caused by ionizing radiation on cells, using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as an experimental model for cancer. In other words, this work aims to analyze if metformin acts as a radiosensitizer of tumor cells. This can represent a possible strategy as a therapeutic combination to be explored in the war against cancer. (author)

  3. Evaluation of fungal burden of medicinal plants submitted to gamma radiation process after 30 days

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquino, Simone; Araujo, Michel M.; Villavicencio, A.L.C.H.; Goncalez, Edlayne; Reis, Tatiana A. dos; Correa, Benedito

    2007-01-01

    Forty samples of medicinal plants (Peumus boldus, Camellia sinensis, Maytenus ilicifolia and Cassia angustifolia), purchased from pharmacies and street market in the five cities of Sao Paulo State, were irradiated using a 60 Co gamma ray source (Gammacell) with a dose of 10.0 kGy, delivered at dose rate of 3.0 kGy/h. Nonirradiated samples were used as controls of fungal isolates. For fungal counts and identification in medicinal plants a serial dilutions from 10 -1 to 10 -6 of the samples were seeded in duplicates and plated using the method in Dichloran 18% Glycerol Agar (DG 18) and were counted after five days at 25 deg C. Mycological analysis of control samples revealed the presence of genera Aspergillus and Penicillium, which are known as toxigenic fungi. The process of gamma radiation was effective in reducing the number of colony forming units (cfu/g) in all irradiated samples of medicinal plants after 30 days, using the dose of 10.0 kGy and kept of veiled conditions. (author)

  4. Evaluation of fungal burden of medicinal plants submitted to gamma radiation process after 30 days

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquino, Simone; Araujo, Michel M.; Villavicencio, A.L.C.H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes]. E-mail: siaq06@hotmail.com; Goncalez, Edlayne; Reis, Tatiana A. dos; Correa, Benedito [Universidade de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biomedicas. Dept. de Microbiologia]. E-mail: correabe@usp.br

    2007-07-01

    Forty samples of medicinal plants (Peumus boldus, Camellia sinensis, Maytenus ilicifolia and Cassia angustifolia), purchased from pharmacies and street market in the five cities of Sao Paulo State, were irradiated using a {sup 60}Co gamma ray source (Gammacell) with a dose of 10.0 kGy, delivered at dose rate of 3.0 kGy/h. Nonirradiated samples were used as controls of fungal isolates. For fungal counts and identification in medicinal plants a serial dilutions from 10{sup -1} to 10{sup -6} of the samples were seeded in duplicates and plated using the method in Dichloran 18% Glycerol Agar (DG 18) and were counted after five days at 25 deg C. Mycological analysis of control samples revealed the presence of genera Aspergillus and Penicillium, which are known as toxigenic fungi. The process of gamma radiation was effective in reducing the number of colony forming units (cfu/g) in all irradiated samples of medicinal plants after 30 days, using the dose of 10.0 kGy and kept of veiled conditions. (author)

  5. Reduction of acute toxicity of the pharmaceutical fluoxetine (Prozac) submitted to ionizing radiation to Vibrio fischeri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Dymes R.A.; Garcia, Vanessa S.G.; Vilarrubia, Anna C.S.; Borrely, Sueli I.

    2011-01-01

    The constant use of pharmaceutical drugs by great part of the population and its continuous input into the environment creates a growing need of investigating its presence, behavior and the effects on aquatic biota, as well as new ways to treat wastewater containing such substances. The fluoxetine hydrochloride (FH) present in the drug Prozac is an active ingredient used in the treatment of depressive and anxiety disorders. Generally, these compounds enter the aquatic environment by sewage collectors systems after undergoing prior treatment in sewage treatment plants (STPs) or without any treatment. This study focused on evaluating the reduction of acute toxicity of the pharmaceutical FH, under its manipulated formula, for the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. It was also evaluated the acute toxicity of the aqueous solution containing the FH after its exposition to ionizing radiation from industrial electron accelerator. It was performed acute toxicity tests lasting 15 minutes, where the average EC (50) of the non-irradiated CF water solution was approximately 0.68 mg L-1. While the CF water solution irradiated with 1 kGy, 2.5 kGy, 7.5 kGy and 10 kGy, presented an average EC(50) 1.63 mg.L -1 , 2.34 mg.L -1 , 2.35 mg.L -1 and 1.80 mg.L -1 , respectively, showing a notable reduction of the acute toxicity for this organism. (author)

  6. Histomorphological study of parotid gland from young rats (Holtzman) submitted to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roslindo, E.B.

    1988-01-01

    A study was performed on rats to verify v the effects of ionizing radiation on the structure of the parotid glands of young rats. Thirty twenty five-day old rats - Rattus norvegicus, albinus, Holtzman - with a medium body weight of 54,20 g were equally distributed in two experimental groups: group I - irradiated; group II - control. After intraperitoneal anesthetics with sodium Pentobarbital in 3% gad been applied, the group I - rats were immobilized in a dorsal position on special surgery tables. The region of the parotid glands were irradiated with a dose of 300 R, this procedure was repeated every 48 hours up to an exposition of 1200 R. The Group II - animals received a simulated treatment as control. The following conclusions may be drawn through the methodology used: the group I - rats gained body weight uniformly after the 13th day, this was not equivalent to the control group; the critical phase of glandular disorganization determined by irradiation corresponded to the experimental period of 8 days, decreasing in the subsequent days; the serous acini and the streated ducts showed to be more radium sensitive even under the use of low fractionated doses; the parotid gland showed indications of gradual morphological recovery after the last exposition to X-rays. (author)

  7. Occupational radiation exposure in Central and Eastern European countries - ESOREX EAST -. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frasch, G.; Anatschkowa, E.

    1999-02-01

    On behalf of the European Commission, the BfS is currently executing a project entitled 'European Study of Occupational Radiation Exposure - ESOREX'. The project consists of several surveys executed in the Member States of the European Union, furthermore in Iceland, Norway and Switzerland. In each of these countries the - 1. administrative systems used to register individual occupational radiation exposure, - 2. numbers and dose distributions of occupationally radiation exposed persons in 1995 are surveyed. The aim is to describe and compare the administrative structures of the various national registration systems and the distributions of the workers and their doses. It shall identify the differences between the states and analyse the possibilities for a European harmonization. Because of the intention of numerous Central and Eastern European countries to join the European Community, the harmonization theme is also of considerable importance for these countries. The workshop served the preparing works to execute the ESOREX study also in ten Central and Eastern European countries. In order to establish the necessary contacts and to prepare the co-operation with the respective institutions of these states, the BfS organised, together with the State Office for Nuclear Safety of the Czech Republic, an international introductory workshop in Prague in September 1998. The proceedings reflect the presentations of the participants and the results of the discussions. (orig.) [de

  8. An evaluation of several methods for assessing the effects of occupational exposure to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1983-01-01

    Several methods for the analysis of occupational radiation exposure data, including procedures based on Cox's proportional hazards model, are presented and evaluated. Issues of interest include the contribution of an external control, the effective handling of highly skewed exposure data, and the potential for detecting effects in populations occupationally exposed to radiation. Expressions for evaluating the power of various procedures are derived and applied to data from the Hanford population in order to determine power curves for detecting leukemia effects, with both additive and multiplicative linear models being used. It is found that the introduction of an external control can increase power, although not when an overall adjustment factor must be estimated from the data or when death rates for the study population are substantially lower than those for the control population. It is also found that very little power is lost if exposures are grouped. Finally, the power calculations indicate, as expected, that in analyses of occupationally exposed populations, such as the Hanford workers, there is very little chance of detecting radiation effects at the levels of our current estimates. However, power is reasonably good for detecting effects that are 10 to 15 times larger

  9. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1995: Twenty-eighth annual report. Volume 17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, M.L.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 1995 annual reports submitted by six of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. Since there are no geologic repositories for high-level waste currently licensed, only six categories will be considered in this report. In 1995, the annual collective dose per reactor for light water reactor licensees (LWRs) was 199 person-cSv (person-rem). This is the same value that was reported for 1994. The annual collective dose per reactor for boiling water reactors (BWRs) was 256 person-cSv (person-rem) and, for pressurized water reactors (PWRs), it was 170 person-cSv (person-rem). Analyses of transient worker data indicate that 17,153 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient workers by multiple licensees. In 1995, the average measurable dose calculated from reported data was 0.26 cSv (rem). The corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose of 0.32 cSv (rem)

  10. UDS and SCE in lymphocytes of persons occupationally exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuschl, H.; Kovac, R.; Altmann, H.

    1983-03-01

    Unscheduled DNA synthesis induced by 'in vitro' UV-irradiation was investigated in lymphocytes of persons occupationally exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation (maximum registered radiation dose: 98 mrad/month). For radiation exposures >14 mrad/month, above background level, increased rates of UDS after in vitro UV-irradiation of lymphocytes were found. The bromodeoxyuridine differential chromatid labeling technique was applied to the examination of spontaneous and mytomycin C induced sister chromatid exchanges in the same population. No statistically significant difference could be determined in spontaneously occurring SCEs, while MMC induced SCEs were significantly reduced in persons exposed to radiation doses >14 mrad/month, thus indicating increased repair capability for DNA lesions inflicted by a second insult after protracted low dose irradiation. (Author) [de

  11. Indoor occupational exposure to radiation at the Silmet plant in Estonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustonen, R.; Markkanen, M; Oksanen, E.; Rajamaee, R.

    2000-01-01

    The main pathways of indoor occupational exposure to radiation at Silmet plant are inhaled thoron daughters, external radiation, and inhaled particulate radioactivity. The exposure time to receive 1 mSv effective dose from inhaled long-lived particulate radioactivity and from external gamma radiation is estimated at about 700 hours at Workplace 1 and about 160 hours at Workplace 2. The results for Workplace 2 represent radiologically the most extreme conditions found in the workplaces. The results show that the exposure of workers due inhalation of long-lived radionuclides and to external gamma radiation may well exceed 1 mSv per year and, therefore, continuous monitoring of doses of workers seems to be justified

  12. Radiation occupational health interventions offered to radiation workers in response to the complex catastrophic disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Terada, Hiroshi; Kunugita, Naoki; Okuda, Kengo; Svendsen, E.R.

    2015-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) 1 was severely damaged from the chain reaction of the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami on 11 March 2011, and the consequent meltdown and hydrogen gas explosions. This resulted in the worst nuclear accident since the Chernobyl accident of 1986. Just as in the case of Chernobyl, emergency workers were recruited to conduct a wide range of tasks, including disaster response, rescuing activities, NPP containment, and radiation decontamination. This paper describes the types and efficacy of the various occupational health interventions introduced to the Fukushima NPP radiation workers. Such interventions were implemented in order to prevent unnecessary radiation overexposure and associated adverse health effects and work injuries. Less than 1% of all emergency workers were exposed to external radiation of >100 mSv, and to date no death or health adversities from radiation have been reported for those workers. Several occupational health interventions were conducted, including setting of new regulatory exposure limits, improving workers' radiation dosimetry, administration of stable iodine, running an occupational health tracking system, and improving occupational medicine and preventative care. Those interventions were not only vital for preventing unnecessary radiation, but also for managing other general health issues such as mental health, heat illness and infectious disease. Long-term administration of the aforementioned occupational health interventions is essential to ensure the ongoing support and care for these workers, who were put under one of the most severe occupational health risk conditions ever encountered. (author)

  13. The Assessment of Primary DNA Damage in Medical Personnel Occupationally Exposed to Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopjar, N.; Garaj-Vrhovac, V.

    2003-01-01

    In physico-chemical interaction with cellular DNA ionizing radiation produces a variety of primary lesions, such as single-strand breaks (SSB), alkali-labile sites, double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-DNA and DNA-protein crosslinks, and damage to purine and pyrimidine bases. The effects of low-level exposure to ionising radiation are of concern to large number of people, including workers receiving radiation exposure on the job. It is very important to estimate absorbed doses from individuals occupationally exposed to ionising radiation for carrying out radioprotection procedures and restrict the hazards to human health. A wide range of methods is presently used for the detection of early biological effects of DNA-damaging agents in environmental and occupational settings. Currently, unstable chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes, in particularly dicentrics, are the most fully developed biological indicators of ionizing radiation exposure. This methodology usually complements data obtained by physical dosimetry. As a routine, it is used whenever the individual dosimeter shows an exposure to penetrating radiation above its limit of detection. One of the advantages of cytogenetic dosimetry is that this biological dosimeter can be assessed at any moment whereas physical dosimeters are not always present in the subject. During the last years, the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) or comet assay has gained widespread acceptance for genotoxicity testing. In molecular epidemiology studies DNA damage evaluated by the comet assay is utilized as a biomarker of exposure. The comet assay permits the detection of primary DNA damage and the study of repair kinetics at the level of single cells. The aim of the present study was to assess and quantificate the levels of DNA damage in peripheral blood leukocytes of medical workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation and corresponding unexposed control subjects. As a sensitive biomarker of exposure the

  14. A cytogenetic approach to the effects of low levels of ionizing radiations on occupationally exposed individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakeri, Farideh [National Radiation Protection Department, Iranian Nuclear Regulatory Authority, Nuclear Science and Research Institute-Agriculture, Medicine and Industry Research School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Graduate School of Science and Technology, Chiba University, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan)], E-mail: fzakeri@aeoi.org.ir; Hirobe, Tomohisa [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Chiba University, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Radiation Effect Mechanism Research Group, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2010-01-15

    The aim of the present study was to assess occupationally induced chromosomal damage in hospital workers exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation. Thirty-two interventional cardiologists, 36 nuclear medicine physicians and 33 conventional radiologists were included in this study, along with 35 healthy age- and sex-matched individuals as the control group. We used conventional metaphase chromosome aberration (CA) analysis, cytokinesis-block micronucleus (MN) assay as important biological indicators of ionizing radiation exposure. Occupational dosimetry records were collected over the last year (ranged from 0.25 to 48 mSv) and their whole life exposure (ranged from 1.5 to 147 mSv). The results showed significantly higher frequencies of dicentric and acentric CAs (p < 0.001) and MN (p < 0.01) in all exposed groups than in the controls. Taking all the confounding factors into account, no obvious trend of increased chromosomal damages as a function of either duration of employment, exposed dose, sex or age was observed. Interventional cardiologists had the highest rates of CA and MN frequencies between the worker groups, though the differences were not significant. These results indicate that long term exposure to low dose ionizing radiation could result in DNA damage. Hence, the personnel who work in the hospitals should carefully apply the radiation protection procedures.

  15. Control of occupational radiation exposures in TVA nuclear power plants - design and operating philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belvin, E.A.; Lyon, M.; Beasley, E.G. Jr.; Zobel, W.; Stone, G.F.

    1976-01-01

    TVA has some 21,000 MWe of nuclear generation in various phases of design, construction, or operation. When Browns Ferry was designed in the late 1960's, there were no guidelines available regarding implant radiation control features, so TVA relied on good engineering and health physics judgement in developing its design and operating criteria for radiation protection. After two years of operation at Browns Ferry, the authors experience shows that their design criteria were in most cases adequate or more than adequate. However, several areas present continuing problems relative to radiation and contamination control. In view of the recent NRC ALARA guidelines, they have instituted a program to ensure that the ALARA concept is made an integral part of their design and operating plans. Administrative documents were issued giving management support to the ALARA concept. A 4-member management audit team consisting of representatives from their design, operating, and radiation protection groups was established to review the effectiveness of radiation protection design features and operating activities on a plant-by-plant basis. Reports and recommendations from these audits are sent to top-level management staff. Their goal is to maintain an audit-appraisal system consisting of in-plant awareness of radiation and contamination conditions, assessment of trends in occupational radiation exposures, and feedback to their designers regarding problems encountered during operation and maintenance activities

  16. Relationship between radiation dose estimation in patients submitted to abdominal tomography examination and the body mass index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capaverde, Alexandre da S.; Pimentel, Juliana; Froner, Ana Paula P.; Silva, Ana Maria Marques da

    2014-01-01

    Because of the radiation dose in computed tomography (CT) is relatively high, it is important to have an estimate of the dose to which the patient is submitted, considering parameters and correction factors, so that the value is closer to the real. The objective of this study is to relate the estimated dose in patients undergoing abdominal CT with BMI (Body Mass Index) groups, considering the specific size of the anatomical region. The work developed in a hospital in Porto Alegre, Brazil, using 16 Siemens Somatom Emotion equipment. We selected 30 adult that underwent to CT of the abdomen in January 2014. Of these, 13 using dose reduction mechanism (Care Dose), (Sample 1) and the rest without this mechanism (Sample 2). Registered weight, height, CTDI vol (Computed Tomography Dose Index) and anteroposterior and lateral diameter at the umbilicus. BMI and the correction factor for the dose estimates were calculated, according to the specific size of the abdomen. It was determined the percentage change between the CTDI vol values provided by CT and the value of CTDI vol after application of the correction factor, plus the average percentage change for each BMI group. The mean percentage change was between 54% and 19% for sample 1 and between 35% and 10% for sample 2, the lowest to highest BMI group. There was a reduction in the medium average percent with the increasing of the BMI groups in both samples. A larger sample of individuals for verification of results is required

  17. Do the UK workplace Radon Action Levels reflect the radiation dose received by the occupants?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denman, A.R.; Parkinson, S.; Barker, S.P.; Marley, F.; Phillips, P.S.

    1999-01-01

    In the UK, Action Levels for radon have been established at 400 Bq m -3 for the workplace and 200 Bq m -3 for the home. We have estimated the dose received by occupants of rooms with radon levels near or above the Action Level, using hourly radon readings, and a questionnaire to record occupancy. In the workplace, results for 73 staff suggest that doses are lower than expected, partly due to part-time working and partly due to the mobility of staff. The 75% quantile for the series, corrected to a 37 hour week, is 5.2 mSv at 400 Bq m -3 . Compared to the current annual limit for radiation workers, the Action Level could be increased, but the current Action Level is compatible with the recent EEC Directive requiring a lower dose limit. However, when raised radon levels in the workplace were reduced by remediation in the series we studied, the dose reduction to staff was consistently around half of the radon level reduction. Although it would be appropriate to study more locations, this suggests an Action Level for remediated workplaces of 200 Bq m -3 . Finally, in a limited series of dose assessments in domestic properties, we found that doses could considerably exceed 5 mSv at the 200 Bq m -3 Action Level, primarily because the sample included an example of high occupancy, in our case several Asian wives in purdah, whose occupancy was almost total. (author)

  18. Magnitude estimate of occupational risks located in a radiative facility and its main health impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Alice dos Santos; Gerulis, Eduardo; Carneiro, Janete C.G.G.

    2014-01-01

    The work routine of Radiopharmacy Center (CR) personnel of the Institute of Energy Research and Nuclear (IPEN / CNEN-SP) includes singularities not exist in other professions. Relevant examples to this study can be cited: exposure to physical, chemical, biological hazards, to accidents and ergonomic risks. The objective of this study is to conduct a quantitative and qualitative evaluation of occupational exposure existing in the workplace and its impact on the health of occupationally exposed individuals (IOE's). The proposed methodology was based on systematic observation and a questionnaire to the managers of each practice held at CR. The evaluation process involved three steps: a) characterization of exposure; b) identification of the main points of exposure and possible routes of exposure; c) quantifying of exposure. Seventeen occupational agents related to the tasks of different groups of IOE's were identified. Ionizing radiation (physical risk) and the situations that cause stress (ergonomic risk) had the highest frequencies. According to the applied methodology risks was considered mostly acceptable. Quantification of exposure was basically referring to physical risk agent (Ionizing radiation), because it is a radioactive installation. Based on the records analyzed, not was observed health risks to workers arising from the activities undertaken

  19. Reliability of self-reported questionnaire on occupational radiation work of radiologic technologists in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Moon Jung [Graduate School of Public Health, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Eun Shil; Lee, Won Jin [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Self-completed questionnaires were used to obtain information on exposures and otherb factors necessary to evaluated disease risks. Although reliability of lifetime sun exposure of U.S. radiologic technologists and life-style factors, medical exams, and disease history of Korean nuclear power plants workers (2) were reported, few studies have evaluated the reliability of information obtained on radiation-related work in epidemiologic investigations. The aims of the study is to assess reliability of self-reported questionnaire for occupational radiation work in the radiologic technologists in Korea. Overall agreement and kappa regarding radiation work procedure, work practice, and work history were similar to those generally found for factors typically used in epidemiologic studies such as smoking (98% and 0.95) and alcohol consumption (88% and 0.67), and higher than physical activity (76% and 0.51).

  20. Review of NCRP radiation dose limit for embryo and fetus in occupationally-exposed women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    On the basis of the current review, the NCRP has decided to make no change in the current recommendation of its radiation dose limit to the unborn. The NCRP recommendation is restated here as follows: During the entire gestation period, the maximum permissible dose equivalent to the embryo-fetus from occupational exposure of the expectant mother should be 0.5 rem. Since the preparation of the 1971 report there has been no new evidence concerning teratogenic or carcinogenic effects of irradiation of the embryo-fetus that would justify a change in the limit in either direction. It is implicit in this position and recommendation that women who can reasonably be expected to be pregnant should not, in certain instances, be exposed to the same radiation environment as women who are not considered fertile or as men. This applies particularly to conditions where radiation workers can receive dose equivalents of 0.5 rem or more in short periods

  1. Reliability of self-reported questionnaire on occupational radiation work of radiologic technologists in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Moon Jung; Cha, Eun Shil; Lee, Won Jin

    2016-01-01

    Self-completed questionnaires were used to obtain information on exposures and otherb factors necessary to evaluated disease risks. Although reliability of lifetime sun exposure of U.S. radiologic technologists and life-style factors, medical exams, and disease history of Korean nuclear power plants workers (2) were reported, few studies have evaluated the reliability of information obtained on radiation-related work in epidemiologic investigations. The aims of the study is to assess reliability of self-reported questionnaire for occupational radiation work in the radiologic technologists in Korea. Overall agreement and kappa regarding radiation work procedure, work practice, and work history were similar to those generally found for factors typically used in epidemiologic studies such as smoking (98% and 0.95) and alcohol consumption (88% and 0.67), and higher than physical activity (76% and 0.51).

  2. Studies on occupational exposure to external radiation at Fukuoka University Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyauchi, Teiichi; Oshima, Yoshio; Ono, Yo

    1982-01-01

    This is a report of the yearly changes of exposure received by workers in radiological occupations at Fukuoka University Hospital from August 1973 to December 1980. The total number of the workers during this period involving diagnostic radiology, radiotherapy and the other related fields included 153 physicians, 27 technicians, 29 nurses and 16 assistants. Out of 225 workers, only two angiographers and two involved in intracavitary radiation therapy received more than 500 mrem of the annual exposure dose. The highest dose was 610 mrem. The exposure doses have gradually decreased each year. The exposure of the workers has remarkably decreased to almost negligible since a remote afterloading system was installed for intracavitary radiation therapy. In no worker was any somatic effect of radiation detected in the periodical physical examinations, even in the number of lymphocytes in the peripheral blood. (author)

  3. Studies on occupational exposure to external radiation at Fukuoka University Hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyauchi, Teiichi; Oshima, Yoshio; Ono, Yo [Fukuoka Univ. (Japan)

    1982-09-01

    This is a report of the yearly changes of exposure received by workers in radiological occupations at Fukuoka University Hospital from August 1973 to December 1980. The total number of the workers during this period involving diagnostic radiology, radiotherapy and the other related fields included 153 physicians, 27 technicians, 29 nurses and 16 assistants. Out of 225 workers, only two angiographers and two involved in intracavitary radiation therapy received more than 500 mrem of the annual exposure dose. The highest dose was 610 mrem. The exposure doses have gradually decreased each year. The exposure of the workers has remarkably decreased to almost negligible since a remote afterloading system was installed for intracavitary radiation therapy. In no worker was any somatic effect of radiation detected in the periodical physical examinations, even in the number of lymphocytes in the peripheral blood.

  4. Case-control study of congenital malformations and occupational exposure to low-level ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sever, L.E.; Gilbert, E.S.; Hessol, N.A.; McIntyre, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    In a case-control study, the authors investigated the association of parental occupational exposure to low-level external whole-body penetrating ionizing radiation and risk of congenital malformations in their offspring. Cases and controls were ascertained from births in two counties in southeastern Washington State, where the Hanford Site has been a major employer. A unique feature of this study was the linking of quantitative individual measurement of external whole-body penetrating ionizing radiation exposure of employees at the Hanford Site, using personal dosimeters, and the disease outcome, congenital malformations. The study population included 672 malformation cases and 977 matched controls from births occurring from 1957 through 1980. Twelve specific malformation types were analyzed for evidence of association with employment of the parents at Hanford and with occupational exposure to ionizing radiation. Two defects, congenital dislocation of the hip and tracheoesophageal fistula, showed statistically significant associations with employment of the parents at Hanford, but not with parental radiation exposure. Neural tube defects showed a significant association with parental preconception exposure, on the basis of a small number of cases. Eleven other defects, including Down syndrome, for which an association with radiation was considered most likely, showed no evidence of such an association. When all malformations were analyzed as a group, there was no evidence of an association with employment of the parents at Hanford, but the relation of parental exposure to radiation before conception was in the positive direction (one-tailed p value between 0.05 and 0.10). Given the number of statistical tests conducted, some or all of the observed positive correlations are likely to represent false positive findings. 30 references

  5. Cytogenetic Analysis In Blood Lymphocyte From Workers Occupationally Exposed To Low Levels Of Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahimah Abdul Rahim; Mohd Rodzi Ali; Noraisyah Mohd Yusof; Juliana Mahamad Napiah; Yahaya Talib; Shafii Khamis

    2016-01-01

    Whether it comes from the ground, the sky, or medical treatment, humans are constantly exposed to ionizing radiation from the world around them. This is a normal occurrence, and has always been the case. According to the IAEA International Basic Safety Standard, the radiation dose for public is not more than 1 mSv per year. That is just an average though, and the actual figure may fluctuate widely per person depending on where they live and the medical procedures they had that year. The international standard is to allow people who work with and around radioactive material (researchers, nuclear power plant workers, X-ray technicians and others) to have exposures of not more than 20 mSv total per year. The 20 mSv annual dose is considered to be safe and not significantly increase the risk for radiation-related health effects. Biological dosimetry based on the analysis of micronuclei in the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay can be used as an alternative method for scoring dicentric chromosomes in the field of radiation protection. Bio dosimetry is mainly performed, in addition to the physical dosimetry, with the aim of individual dose assessment. The aim of the present study was to perform a cytogenetic analysis in peripheral blood lymphocyte of 30 individuals occupationally exposed to low level of ionizing radiation and compare the result with 30 controls using CBMN assay. Number of bi-nucleated cell and micronuclei were scored and statistical analysis was done to see the effect of micronuclei with gender, age and occupation. In conclusion, scoring of micronuclei is a useful cytogenetic monitoring for radiation workers and assessment of genetic damage. (author)

  6. Occupational cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alderson, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book aims to review the occurrence and causes of occupational cancer and is aimed at assisting medical and safety staff, management and health and safety representatives. It is presented in the following chapters: 1) Epidemiological method 2) Agents causing occupationally induced cancer, including radiation 3) Occupations associated with risk of cancer 4) Aetiology of cancer 5) Control of occupationally induced cancer, research, prevention, legislation, national and international bodies, control of specific occupational carcinogens, including irradiation. (U.K.)

  7. Analysis of technologies and experiences for reducing occupational radiation dose and study for applying to regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Joo Hyun; Park, Moon Soo; Lee, Un Jang; Song, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Byeong Soo; Kim, Chong Uk [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-01-15

    To reduce Occupational Radiation Dose (ORD) effectively and enhance the radiological safety, the comprehensive assessment of the experiences to reduce ORD should be made by regulatory body as well as utilities. Hence, the objective of this study is to assess the experiences for reducing ORD from the regulatory viewpoint. With the research objective, the followings are performed in this research; analysis of occupational dose trends at domestic and foreign NPPs, identification of the effective technologies for reducing ORD, examination of the effects of the technologies for reducing ORD, derivation of the regulatory means for implementing he research results. From this study, the regulatory means for effective reduction of ORD are derived. Hence, the results can be utilized as a basic materials for ALARA requirements.

  8. Health status of grandchildren of subjects occupationally exposed to chronic radiation. Communication 4. Congenital developmental defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrushkina, N.P.; Musatkova, O.B.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the incidence and structure of cogenital developmental defects in the grandchildren of subjects occupationally exposed to chronic external gamma-irradiation. For 830 children only grandfather was exposed, for 259 only grandmother, and for 468 grandfather and grandmother. The mean equivalent doses for gonads by the moment of conception of future parents of the cohort examined ranged from 17.3 to 145.3 sSv. The incidence and structure of congenital developmental defects in 1557 grandchildren of occupationally exposed subjects differed from that in controls. Multifactorial analysis failed to establish the effect of grandparents' and parents' exposure on the development of diseases in the progeny. Factors other than radiation proved to be significant. 13 refs.; 1 tab

  9. Risk ratios for use in establishing dose limits for occupational exposure to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalf, P.E.; Winkler, B.C.

    1980-01-01

    Dose limits for occupational exposure to radiation may be established by comparing the associated mortality risk with apparently accepted levels of industrial mortality risk due to conventional hazards. Average levels of industrial mortality risk rates are frequently quoted and used in such comparisons. However, within particular occupations or industries certain groups of workers will be exposed to higher levels of risk than the average, again an apparently accepted situation. A study has been made of the ratios of maximum to average industrial mortality risk currently experienced in some South African industries. Such a ratio may be used to assess the acceptability of maximum individual-to-average exposures in particular groups of exposed individuals. (author)

  10. Evaluation of several methods for assessing the effects of occupational exposure to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1980-05-01

    The evaluation of health effects in populations occupationally exposed to low-level ionizing radiation is a matter of considerable current controversy. The analysis of data on such exposures presents a variety of problems resulting from the time dependent nature of the exposure data, certain selective biases found in working populations, and particularly limits imposed by the size of the populations, and the magnitudes of exposures received. In this paper, several methods of analysis are presented and evaluated using data from the Hanford plant for illustration. Questions of interest include whether or not to utilize an external control, and how to handle the highly skewed exposure data most effectively. Expressions for the power of various procedures are used not only to compare methods but also to evaluate the potential for detecting effects in occupationally exposed populations

  11. Occupational exposure to radiation in the United Kingdom and its contribution to the genetically effective dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binks, W; Marley, W G

    1960-12-01

    It is now the common practice in the United Kingdom for persons who are exposed occupationally to ionizing radiations to be subjected to continuous individual monitoring in order to ensure that the doses that they receive from sources external to the body do not exceed the levels which are regarded as acceptable. In the operation of large-scale monitoring services such as are provided by the Radiological Protection Service (R.P.S.) and by the establishments of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (U.K.A.E.A.) there is no satisfactory alternative to the use of photographic film, bearing in mind such aspects as simplicity, reliability, accuracy, cheapness, ease of postal transmission of the films in the special holders, and availability of a durable record of the dose received. The Radiological Protection Service provides a film badge service which is widely used by industry. This organization also provides film badges for about one-third of the occupationally exposed persons in National Health Service hospitals; for the remaining hospital workers the majority of establishments undertake their own monitoring arrangements. The United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority provides its own film badge services for all exposed workers. It is the purpose of this report to summarize the information obtained by the R.P.S. and the U.K.A.E.A. regarding the doses received by occupationally exposed persons. The total genetically effective dose received by the population from occupational exposure is also compared with that received from natural background radiation. This report also summarizes the measurements made by the R.P.S. and the U.K.A.E.A. to check the internal contamination of the body in cases where radioactivity has been ingested or inhaled.

  12. Occupational exposure to radiation in the United Kingdom and its contribution to the genetically effective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binks, W.; Marley, W.G.

    1960-01-01

    It is now the common practice in the United Kingdom for persons who are exposed occupationally to ionizing radiations to be subjected to continuous individual monitoring in order to ensure that the doses that they receive from sources external to the body do not exceed the levels which are regarded as acceptable. In the operation of large-scale monitoring services such as are provided by the Radiological Protection Service (R.P.S.) and by the establishments of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (U.K.A.E.A.) there is no satisfactory alternative to the use of photographic film, bearing in mind such aspects as simplicity, reliability, accuracy, cheapness, ease of postal transmission of the films in the special holders, and availability of a durable record of the dose received. The Radiological Protection Service provides a film badge service which is widely used by industry. This organization also provides film badges for about one-third of the occupationally exposed persons in National Health Service hospitals; for the remaining hospital workers the majority of establishments undertake their own monitoring arrangements. The United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority provides its own film badge services for all exposed workers. It is the purpose of this report to summarize the information obtained by the R.P.S. and the U.K.A.E.A. regarding the doses received by occupationally exposed persons. The total genetically effective dose received by the population from occupational exposure is also compared with that received from natural background radiation. This report also summarizes the measurements made by the R.P.S. and the U.K.A.E.A. to check the internal contamination of the body in cases where radioactivity has been ingested or inhaled

  13. Molecular markers for assessment of radiation-induced oxidant stress of occupationally exposed persons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankova, K.; Zaharieva, E.; Aneva, N.; Kazarska, O.; Boteva, R.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: The biological effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are mainly due to high creativity, oxygen - containing free radicals and molecules known as Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). After irradiation the cells accumulate ROS, which may induce destructive changes in all cell structures and macromolecules (membranes, DNA, RNA , proteins and enzymes) and result in abnormalities on cell and tissue level. The effects of ROS are particularly important in chronic oxidative stress induced by prolonged occupational exposure that can permanently disrupt cellular redox homeostasis, which increase the risk of oncogenic, neurodegenerative, cardiovascular and other diseases. This requires the study of the antioxidant status of the Kozloduy NPP personnel who are professionally exposed to low dose irradiation. Materials and methods: As an antioxidant status markers, changes in the levels of the ROS and the electrochemical potential at mitochondrial lymphocytes (both before and after their additional in vitro exposure to 3 Gy), as well as the antioxidant activity of blood plasma are analyzed. The study was conducted with spectral methods and includes 40 professionally exposed people from the Kozloduy NPP (mean age 44.3, and radiation exposure from 0,1 to 257,9 mSv) and 20 unexposed controls (mean age 46.5 years). Results: Statistical analysis of the data shows that chronic exposure to low doses IR as a result of occupation exposure does not lead to significant changes in the levels of the ROS, the antioxidant activity of plasma and mitochondrial electrochemical potential. More significant impact on these indicators proves the age of the respondents, which is explained by a decrease in the activity of the cellular reparative and antioxidant systems induced by the natural processes of aging. Results for occupational exposure and non-exposure persons were heterogeneous due to the individual radio sensitivity of the persons included in biomonitoring. Conclusion

  14. SARIS: a tool for occupational radiation protection improvement in a Nuclear Medicine Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Diaz, A.

    2015-01-01

    Self-assessment is an organization's internal process to review its current status. The IAEA has developed the SARIS system (Self-Assessment of the Regulatory Infrastructure for Safety) with the objective to improve and encourage the compliment of safety requirements and recommendations of the international safety standards. With the purpose to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the occupational radiation protection structure in the Nuclear Medicine Department (from 'Hermanos Ameijeiras' Hospital), we applied 3 questionnaires of the Occupational Radiation Protection Module of SARIS. During the answering phase we provided factual responses to questions, appended all necessary documentary evidence and avoided opinion that cannot be objectively supported by evidence. In the analysis phase we identified the strengths and weaknesses, the opportunities for improvement and the risks if action is not taken. We look the expert's opinion and made recommendations to prepare an action plan for improvement. The Cuban regulations have more strengths than weakness. The major weakness founded was: the documental evidence of the knowledge about the legislative safety responsibility of the management structure and workers could be improved. Upon completion of the self-assessment analysis phase, was developed an action plan, trying to cover all the discovered weakness, making emphasis in the improvement of all documental issue related to radiation safety responsibilities. Were defined the responsibilities and activities in the short, medium and long terms. The SARIS self-assessment tools let us to learn more about our organization and provided us the key elements for the organization's continuous development and improvement. (Author)

  15. Problem of medical follow-up and assessment of occupational disease in personnel handling radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klener, V.

    1983-01-01

    The long-term change in the health condition of 120 recorded cases of occupational disease owing to ionizing radiation in the years 1961 to 1981 was evaluated on the basis of the analysis of out-patient records in three regions of the Czech Socialist Republic. In the group the prevalent incidence was of carcinoma of the skin (86), alterations in blood formation (19), cataract (4) leukemia (2) and changes owing to single exposure usually with acute skin manifestations (9). Owing to the inadequate development of radiobiological knowledge and the lack of objective data on exposure, cases of transient leukopenia used to be put in direct relation with occupational exposure to ionizing radiation - this disorder always had a good long-term prognosis. At the present level of protection the determination of peripheral blood count made within preventive medical check-ups of personnel handling radiation sources has only partial significance and should be considered as complementary to the overall complex examination. (author)

  16. Germline mutations in people descendants occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation from Cesium 137

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Juliana Ferreira da

    2016-01-01

    The radiological accident in Goiania in 1987, resulted in a serious episode of human contamination, animal, plant and environmental were exposed to Cesium 137 chloride ( 137 CsCl) that caused contamination and accidental and occupational exposure to ionizing radiation. Ionizing radiation is one of the environmental components that causes most cellular stress in complex organisms. Exposure to ionizing radiation induces breaks in nucleic acids, especially, DNA double and single strand breaks. Chromosomal microarray analysis is an important tool for the detection and microdeletion and microduplications in the genomes. In this study we proposed to analyze the effect of exposure to RI on the formation of CNVs in an exposed human population occupationally to ionizing radiation from Cesium 137 during the accident in Goiania. The exposed group consisted of 07 families, of which at least one parent was occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation from Cesium 137, including a total of 25 individuals, do not know the absorbed dose of the military who were occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. 11 families with a group of individuals not exposed to IR was used as control were used including a total of 33 individuals with no history of exposure to RI. The genotyping microarray was conducted in CytoScan HD system (Affymetrix®) without then analyzes was performed in ChAS® software. The statistical tests used were: Shapiro-Wilk, Mann- Whitney U, Spearman correlation, discriminant function analysis, binomial test, χ 2 test. All analyzes were performed using the statistical package SPSS 21.0, with a significance level of 5% (p <0.05). The frequency of CNVs were estimated loss / generation, gain / generation and burden / generation, representing 3,9 x 10 -5 , 6,8 x 10 -6 and 4,6 x 10 -5 respectively for the exposed group. For the control group, the frequencies were 2,1 x 10 -5 , 5,9 x 10 -6 and 3,1 x 10 -5 respectively. Thus, the frequency of CNVs showed statistically

  17. Occupational diseases caused by ionizing radiation in medical personnel in the Czech Republic in 1974-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenclova, Z.; Pelclova, D.; Lebedova, J.; Urban, P.; Petrova, K.

    1999-01-01

    During 1974-1997, the incidence of occupational diseases caused by ionizing radiation in medical personnel was low (0 to 0.4 % of all notified occupational diseases, with a decreasing tendency over this period of time). There have been 136 cases of occupational diseases caused by ionizing radiation; in this, 111 cases occurred in the health care sector. Radiation dermatitis was the most frequent disease (88 cases). Physicians constituted the most affected occupational group in the 1991 - 1997 period. The age of the affected physicians lay in the range of 45 to 77. The personnel affected by radiation dermatitis had the shortest (5 years) as well as longest (46 years) exposure. Lung cancer caused by radioactive chemicals was only diagnosed in two persons in the health care sector during 1974 - 1997. It should be noted that the occupational diseases were caused by elevated exposures experienced in previous years or developed as a consequence of radiation accidents. In view of the present advanced level of protection against ionizing radiation, the numbers of this kind of disease is not expected to grow any further

  18. Assessing the health effects associated with occupational radiation exposure in Korean radiation workers: protocol for a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Songwon; Lim, Wan Young; Lee, Dal Nim; Kim, Jung Un; Cha, Eun Shil; Bang, Ye Jin; Lee, Won Jin; Park, Sunhoo; Jin, Young Woo

    2018-03-30

    The cancer risk of radiation exposure in the moderate-to-high dose range has been well established. However, the risk remains unclear at low-dose ranges with protracted low-dose rate exposure, which is typical of occupational exposure. Several epidemiological studies of Korean radiation workers have been conducted, but the data were analysed retrospectively in most cases. Moreover, groups with relatively high exposure, such as industrial radiographers, have been neglected. Therefore, we have launched a prospective cohort study of all Korean radiation workers to assess the health effects associated with occupational radiation exposure. Approximately 42 000 Korean radiation workers registered with the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission from 2016 to 2017 are the initial target population of this study. Cohort participants are to be enrolled through a nationwide self-administered questionnaire survey between 24 May 2016 and 30 June 2017. As of 31 March 2017, 22 982 workers are enrolled in the study corresponding to a response rate of 75%. This enrolment will be continued at 5-year intervals to update information on existing study participants and recruit newly hired workers. Survey data will be linked with the national dose registry, the national cancer registry, the national vital statistics registry and national health insurance data via personal identification numbers. Age-specific and sex-specific standardised incidence and mortality ratios will be calculated for overall comparisons of cancer risk. For dose-response assessment, excess relative risk (per Gy) and excess absolute risk (per Gy) will be estimated with adjustments for birth year and potential confounders, such as lifestyle factors and socioeconomic status. This study has received ethical approval from the institutional review board of the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (IRB No. K-1603-002-034). All participants provided written informed consent prior to enrolment. The findings

  19. Radiation occupational health interventions offered to radiation workers in response to the complex catastrophic disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Terada, Hiroshi; Okuda, Kengo; Svendsen, Erik Robert; Kunugita, Naoki

    2015-05-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) 1 was severely damaged from the chain reaction of the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami on 11 March 2011, and the consequent meltdown and hydrogen gas explosions. This resulted in the worst nuclear accident since the Chernobyl accident of 1986. Just as in the case of Chernobyl, emergency workers were recruited to conduct a wide range of tasks, including disaster response, rescuing activities, NPP containment, and radiation decontamination. This paper describes the types and efficacy of the various occupational health interventions introduced to the Fukushima NPP radiation workers. Such interventions were implemented in order to prevent unnecessary radiation overexposure and associated adverse health effects and work injuries. Less than 1% of all emergency workers were exposed to external radiation of >100 mSv, and to date no deaths or health adversities from radiation have been reported for those workers. Several occupational health interventions were conducted, including setting of new regulatory exposure limits, improving workers' radiation dosimetry, administration of stable iodine, running an occupational health tracking system, and improving occupational medicine and preventative care. Those interventions were not only vital for preventing unnecessary radiation, but also for managing other general health issues such as mental health, heat illness and infectious diseases. Long-term administration of the aforementioned occupational health interventions is essential to ensure the ongoing support and care for these workers, who were put under one of the most severe occupational health risk conditions ever encountered. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  20. Cytogenetic Follow-up Study of Population Occupationally Exposed to Nonionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garaj-Vrhovac, V.; Kasuba, V.; Vojvodic, S.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to analyse the results of a four year follow- up study of chromosome aberrations in a population occupationally exposed to microwave radiation. The study included a group of 30 healthy volunteers - radar technicians occupationally exposed to microwave radiation and a group of 30 healthy controls from the general population. The average duration of employment of the exposed subjects was 16 years. The chromosome aberrations assay was carried out on 48 h culture of lymphocytes. Microwave power density was measured with Raham model 4A (General Microwave Corporation, Farmingdale, NY) at different workplaces. The measurements of electromagnetic field power density distribution at different workplaces show that during an ordinary workday the examinees stay in zones with power density below 5 mW/cm 2 with a frequency range of 1250-1350 MHz. The chromosomal type of aberrations in the exposed group during the 4-year follow up study was predominantly higher than in the control group. The total percentage of chromosome aberrations for the exposed group in the first year of the study was 2.36%, in the second 1.43%, in the third 2.88%, and in the fourth year 2.60%, while for the control group was 1.39%. In every year of investigation in exposed group manifested dicentric chromosomes, while in last two years ring chromosome also detected. Mutagenic changes in the somatic cells detected in exposed subjects pointed to the fact that these cellular damages can be related to continuous occupational exposure to microwave radiation. (author)

  1. Optimization of radiation protection for the control of occupational exposures in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wortochi-Gordon, S.

    2009-06-01

    Investigation of the optimization of protection of occupational exposed workers (O.E.W.) in Ghana had been carried out across the three practices in the country namely medical applications, industrial radioisotope applications and research and education from 2002 to 2007. Annual effective doses and collective effective doses were estimated from dosimetry records from Radiation Protection Institute of those occupationally exposed from 2002 to 2007. The mean annual effective dose estimated for about 650 O.E.Ws per year ranged from 0.42±0.12mSv to 0.68±0.10mSv. The annual mean effective dose range is higher in comparison with the global values of 0.005mSv estimated by United Nations Scientific Committee on the effects of Atomic radiation (UNSCEAR 2008 Report). This implies that efforts should be made to institute ALARA culture in most practices in Ghana to be compatible with the global average. The collective effective dose for this same period estimated ranged from 0.26man.Sv to 0.47man.Sv. The annual mean collective effective dose range is much lower compared with other countries where large numbers of workers are occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. A reference monetary value of the man-sievert was estimated using the human capital approach which provided a basis for estimating the cost of averting a unit collective effective dose of 1 man.Sv. This value could not be used for quantitative optimization since the mean annual doses for all the practices were below 1mSv (au).

  2. A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF THE OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION EXPOSURE FROM MAINTAINING THE US ITER DCLL TBM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. J. Merrill; L. C. Cadwallader; M. Dagher

    2008-09-01

    This paper details an Occupational Radiation Exposure (ORE) analysis performed for the US International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) Test Blanket Module (TBM). This ORE analysis was performed with the QADMOD dose code for maintenance activities anticipated for the US DCLL TBM concept and its ancillary systems. Identification of the maintenance tasks that will have to be performed and estimates of the time required to perform these tasks were developed based on either expert opinion or on industrial maintenance experience for similar technologies. This paper details the modeling activity and the calculated doses for the maintenance activities envisioned for the US DCLL TBM.

  3. Cost-effectiveness considerations in reducing occupational radiation exposure in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, J.; Maccia, C.; Pages, P.

    1983-01-01

    This article outlines a method of applying the as-low-as-reasonably-achievable principle to occupational radiation exposures in nuclear power stations. A set of protective actions already taken at French pressurized-water reactors now in operation were selected, and their cost and effectiveness were assessed, allowing for the possible interdependence of protection and energy-production objectives. The usefulness of such quantitative evaluation is discussed with regard to the problem of using monetary values of the man-sievert in optimization procedures

  4. Occupational exposure to ultraviolet radiation and risk of non-melanoma skin cancer in a multinational European study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Surdu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies suggest that ambient sunlight plays an important role in the pathogenesis of non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC. However, there is ongoing controversy regarding the relevance of occupational exposure to natural and artificial ultraviolet radiation (UV radiation. OBJECTIVES: We investigated potential associations between natural and artificial UV radiation exposure at work with NMSC in a case-control study conducted in Hungary, Romania, and Slovakia. METHODS: Occupational exposures were classified by expert assessment for 527 controls and 618 NMSC cases (515 basal cell carcinoma, BCC. Covariate information was collected via interview and multiple logistic regression models were used to assess associations between UV exposure and NMSC. RESULTS: Lifetime prevalence of occupational exposure in the participants was 13% for natural UV radiation and 7% for artificial UV radiation. Significant negative associations between occupational exposure to natural UV radiation and NMSC were detected for all who had ever been exposed (odds ratio (OR 0.47, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.27-0.80; similar results were detected using a semi-quantitative metric of cumulative exposure. The effects were modified by skin complexion, with significantly decreased risks of BCC among participants with light skin complexion. No associations were observed in relation to occupational artificial UV radiation exposure. CONCLUSIONS: The protective effect of occupational exposure to natural UV radiation was unexpected, but limited to light-skinned people, suggesting adequate sun-protection behaviors. Further investigations focusing on variations in the individual genetic susceptibility and potential interactions with environmental and other relevant factors are planned.

  5. Current practice of the social insurance against occupational accidents in paying compensation for occupational diseases induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renz, K.; Seitz, G.

    1988-01-01

    The companies for social insurance against occupational accidents form part of the statutory accident insurance system, and are responsible for compensation of occupational accidents or diseases. The compensation practice adopted by them is determined by legal provisions, which are explained in this paper as a background to the discussion of individual cases and the relevant decisions. (orig.) [de

  6. Comparison of occupational radiation dose exposures in nuclear medicine and PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, S.A.; Binns, D.S.; Johnston, V.K.; Fawcett, M.F.; Greer, B.; Hicks, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: With the increasing use of high-dose 64 Ga, 201 TI and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET for scanning in oncology in our centre, a radiation dose survey was performed to determine the impact on staff exposure in a multi-modality department. This study was set up in part to counter 'radio-phobia' (the fear of working with radioactive patients) in allied health professionals. The patients were measured using a hand-held radiation monitor at various distances and times which replicate typical patient contact scenarios in the Diagnostic Imaging Department. An average exposure rate per hour was calculated and thus the relative radiation hazard was determined for staff who will interact with the patient outside of the hot laboratory. We present our findings from the survey and the implications these have on staff radiation exposure. In conclusion, these data suggest that emerging oncologic techniques such as PET, high-dose 67 Ga and high-dose 201 Tl do not represent a significantly greater occupational radiation hazard than conventional nuclear medicine procedures

  7. Protection of the skin against occupational and operational ultraviolet and thermal radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiskemann, A.

    1980-01-01

    When irradiation with short wave ultraviolet (UVB) exceed the threshold doses, the eye as well as the skin react with an acute inflammation. After chronic exposure to both radiations the skin is altered as a farmers skin. Thermal visible and infrared radiation may produce a local combustion or a livedo or a general hyperthermia. Many possibilities of an occupational exposition to natural or artificial optical radiation are listed. Until now no exposure limits have been recommended in the Federal Republic of Germany. The biologic effective radiant exposure can be calculated from the spectral distribution of the irradiance. The resulting value should be clearly lower than the threshold doses for the UV-keratoconjunctivitis and for the UV-erythema of the skin. Artificial light sources have to be closed exept the useful radiation beam. When this is impossible and in case of natural radiation, the skin must be shielded by clothing and/or by sunscreen preparations. Photosensitizers as tar products have to be kept away from the skin. (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 HIS [de

  8. Investigation of occupational radiation exposure during interventional cardiac catheterizations performed via radial artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goni, H.; Papadopoulou, D.; Yakoumakis, Em; Stratigis, N.; Benos, J.; Siriopoulou, V.; Makri, Tr; Georgiou, Ev

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the thyroid, sternum and hand radiation doses of radiologists who perform angiographies and angio-plasties via the radial artery. Staff radiation dose was estimated for 21 cardiac interventional catheterizations. Thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) were used to determine radiation dose for each procedure at the right and left wrist, at the sternum and the thyroid. A dose area product (DAP) meter was also attached to give a direct value in Gy cm 2 for each procedure. Staff radiation doses varied between 34 and 235 μGy per procedure at the left wrist, 28 and 172 μGy at the right wrist, 16 and 106 μGy at the level of the thyroid and 16 and 154 μGy at the level of the sternum. The DAP values varied between 25 and 167 Gy cm 2 . Radiation doses in this study are comparable to those reported in previous studies. Moreover, good correlation was found between the DAP values and the occupational dose measured with TLDs. (authors)

  9. Evaluation of cytogenetic damage in nuclear medicine personnel occupationally exposed to low-level ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garaj-Vrhovac, V.; Kopjar, N.; Poropat, M.

    2005-01-01

    Despite intensive research over the last few decades, there still remains considerable uncertainty as to the genetic impact of ionising radiation on human populations, particularly at low levels. The aim of this study was to provide data on genetic hazards associated with occupational exposure to low doses of ionising radiation in nuclear medicine departments. The assessment of DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes of medical staff was performed using the chromosome aberration (CA) test. Exposed subjects showed significantly higher frequencies of CA than controls. There were significant inter-individual differences in DNA damage within the exposed population, indicating differences in genome sensitivity. Age and gender were not confounding factors, while smoking enhanced the levels of DNA damage only in control subjects. The present study suggests that chronic exposure to low doses of ionising radiation in nuclear medicine departments causes genotoxic damage. Therefore, to avoid potential genotoxic effects, the exposed medical personnel should minimise radiation exposure wherever possible. Our results also point to the significance of biological indicators providing information about the actual risk to the radiation exposed individuals.(author)

  10. Effects of the new radiation protection act on the radiation protection register and the monitoring of occupational radiation exposure; Auswirkungen des neuen Strahlenschutzgesetzes auf das Strahlenschutzregister und die berufliche Strahlenueberwachung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frasch, G. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The implementation of DIRECTIVE 2013/59 / EURATOM (EURATOM Basic Safety Standards) is via the new radiation protection law and brings in the monitoring of occupational radiation among others two significant new features and changes: - Introduction of a unique personal identifier, - update of the occupational categories. Both require technical and organizational changes in the data transmission of the licensees to the dosimetry services and the radiation protection register.

  11. Health surveillance of medical personnel occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation sources: Biomonitoring and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumen, V.; Prlic, I.; Radalj, Z.; Horvat, D.; Cerovac, H.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present the complete results of periodical health surveillance of medical personnel occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation sources, conducted according to established law regulations in Croatia. The report comprises a total of 21 examinees (11 female, 10 male), mean age 43,19 ± 9,85 years, originating from different professional groups and working in a radiation zone 14,7 ± 8,27 years on the average. Within the framework of this study, the results of their biomonitoring, including haematological parameters (whole blood count), ophthalmological findings (fundus oculi), cytogenetic test (conventional structural chromosomal aberration analysis) and peripheral blood flow survey (capillaroscopy and dermothermometry) will be presented. Filmdosimetric data for the referred period will also be reported. (author)

  12. The health status of grandchildren of subjects occupationally exposed to chronic radiation. Communication 2. Morphofunctional parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrushkina, N.P.; Musatkova, O.B.

    1996-01-01

    The study was aimed at investigation of the parameters of physical development and specific features in the development of psychomotor habits and peripheral blood parameters in children aged 0 to 7 grandchildren of exposed individuals. A dynamic follow-up of physical and psychomotor development, as well as regular check-ups of peripheral blood were carried out in 877 grandchildren of test subjects occupationally exposed to chronic radiation before conception. Multifactorial analysis did not show a correlation between the deviations in the physical development of children in the studied cohort and exposure of their grandparents and/or parents. Factors other than radiation (poor health status of mother, gestosis) did influence the studied parameters. The mean levels of hemoglobin, red cells, platelets, and leukocytes in the test group were virtually the same as in controls and coincided with published data [ru

  13. Radiation levels in Cath Lab and occupational exposures during manual 192Ir intracoronary brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.D.; Shanta, A.; Tripathi, U.B.; Bhatt, B.C.

    2001-01-01

    Intracoronary brachytherapy is a new modality of radiation therapy and is being used to reduce the rate of restenosis after angioplasty. Clinical trials for evaluation of safety and efficacy of manually implanted 192 Ir seed ribbons are underway at various cardiology centres in India. 192 Ir emits high energy gamma rays (0.136 -1.06 MeV), which causes concern regarding safety of the personnel when these sources are manually used in the cardiac catheterization laboratory (Cath Lab) for intracoronary irradiation. Radiation levels in Cath Lab and exposures to personnel have been measured at 6 different cardiology centres in the country during 8 different clinical trials using radiation survey meter, personnel monitoring badges and pocket dosimeters. Activities of 192 Ir seed ribbons used in these clinical trials were in the range of 5.55 - 14.8 GBq. Measured radiation levels behind the mobile lead shields, at the top of lead shields, near the patient head, near the patient toes and at the main door of the Cath Lab were in the range of 2.6-20, 50-256, 385-450, 22-225 and 2-16 μSv/hr/3.7GBq, respectively. Measured effective doses to occupational workers were in range of 14-100 μSv/procedure/3.7GBq. Based on these measurements, user institutions have been advised to use lead glass mounted L-shaped mobile lead shields with proper orientation during clinical trials, avoid unwanted occupancy in the Cath Lab and around the patient during irradiation and use conveniently long forceps or tongs for implantation and removal of sources. (author)

  14. Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation as a risk factor for free-radicals mediated diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djurovic, B.; Spasic-Jokic, V.; Selakovic, V.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. It was experimentally showed, that the exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR) result in over-production of oxygen derived free radicals with inverse dose-rate effect. The oxidative stress that follows, especially cell membrane damage, was considered by Petkau, as crucial step in the induction of radiation injuries. From clinical research and practice with other unexposed patients is known that this type of cell damage can lead to an impairment of cellular function and can cause many free-radicals mediated diseases, such as atherosclerosis, damage of heart muscles, inflammatory and immuno-reactive lesions, senile dementia, cancer, etc. The aim of this paper is to investigate if occupational exposure to low doses of IR change the redox status of exposed personnel, and if so, is it the additional risk factor for free-radicals mediated diseases. Subjects: 77 medical workers, devided in two groups: 44 occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation (E), and 33 controls (C), matched in age, gender, habits-daitary, alcohol consumption, smoking and exposure time, were examined. Methods: Radiation dose accumulated over years was calculated on the basis of individual TL-dose records. Superoxide-anion and MDA production, as well as SOD (MnSOD, CuZnSOD) and GSH activity were determined in blood samples spectrophotometrically. Results: Significantly higher incidence of cataract, and higher, but not significant, incidence of cardiovascular diseases was noticed in exposed. Our results also confirmed significantly higher superoxide and MDA production (p=0.0049, 0.000028, respectively), as well as, increased activity of MnSOD and CuZnSOD (p0.0105, 0.001, respectively), and decreased level of GSH (p=0.0599) in exposed. Conclusions: Our results showed that low doses of IR could induce oxidative stress and for that reason could be considered as additional risk factor for free radical-mediated diseases. Further epidemiological studies are

  15. Natural background radiation induces cytogenetic radioadaptive response more effectively than occupational exposure in human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monfared, A.S.; Mozdarani, H.; Amiri, M.

    2003-01-01

    Ramsar, a city in the northern Iran, has the highest level of natural background radiation in the world. It has been clearly shown that low doses of ionising radiation can induce resistance to subsequent higher exposures. This phenomenon is termed radioadaptive response. We have compared induction of cytogenetic radioadaptive response by High Natural Background Radiation (HNBR) in Ramsar and X-ray occupational exposure as conditioning doses in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. 30 healthy control individuals, living in Ramsar but in normal background radiation areas, 15 healthy individuals from Talesh Mahalleh, a region with extraordinary high level of background radiation, and 7 X-ray radiographers working in Ramsar hospital located in normal natural background ionising radiation area were evaluated. Peripheral blood samples were prepared and exposed to challenge dose of 0 and 2 Gy. Lymphocytes were scored using analysis of metaphase, for the presence of chromosomal aberrations. An adaptive response was observed in HNBR and radiation workers groups in comparison with sham controls. A significant increase in adaptive response was observed in the HNBR group if compared with the occupationally exposed group. These findings indicate that both natural background radiation and occupational exposure could induce cytogenetic radioadaptive response and it is more significant regarding to natural background ionising radiation. (author)

  16. Minimization of the occupational doses during the liquidation of the radiation accident consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuryndina, Lidia; Stroganov, Anatoly; Kuryndin, Anton

    2008-01-01

    Full text: As known the accident on the Chernobylskaya npp is the heaviest one in the nuclear energy history. It showed how considerable can be radiation levels on the breakdown nuclear facility. Nevertheless Russian specialists on radiation protection worked out and successfully realized a conception of the working in such conditions during the liquidation of the accident consequences. The conception based out on using ALARA principle, included the methods of radiation fields structure analysis and allowed to minimize of the occupational doses at operations of the accident consequences liquidation. The main idea of the conception is in strongly dependence between the radiation dose of the personnel performing the liquidation operations and concrete sequence of these operations. Also it is necessary from time to time to receive the experimental information about radiation situation dynamics on the breakdown facility and to make variant calculations for optimizing for the successful implementation of such approach. The structure of these calculations includes variable fraction for the actual state of the facility before the accident and after one and not variable fraction depend on the geometric and protection characteristics of the facility. And the second part is more complicated and bigger. Therefore the most part of these calculations required for the any successful liquidation of the accident consequences can be made on the facility projecting stage. If it will be made the following tasks can be solved in case of the accident: 1) To estimate a distribution of the contamination source using the radiation control system indications; 2) To determine a contribution from each source to the dose rate for any contaminated area; 3) To estimate the radiation doses of the personnel participated in the accident consequences liquidation; 4) To select and to realize the sequence of the liquidation operations giving the minimal doses. The paper will overview the description

  17. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation in chromosome aberration detection in subjects occupationally exposed to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeljezic, D.; Garaj-Vrhovac, V.

    2005-01-01

    For more than two decades, chromosomal aberration analysis has been used to detect structural chromosomal aberrations as sensitive biodosimeters of occupational exposure to ionising radiation. Its use is also recommended by the World Health Organisation. Changes in chromosome structure detected by that method are considered to be early biomarkers of a possible malignant disease. Aberrations detected by the method are unstable and can be found in the lymphocytes of irradiated personnel only within a limited time after exposure. To detect stable chromosomal aberrations, which persist after exposure, multicolour fluorescent in situ hybridisation has to be used. Using DNA probes labelled with different fluorochromes, it dyes each pair of chromosomes with different colour. Due to the dynamic of unstable aberration formation, chromosomal aberration analysis is more suitable in genome damage assessment of recent exposures. On the other hand, fluorescence in situ hybridisation gives the information on chromosome instability caused by long-term occupational exposure to ionising radiation. Considering the high costs of fluorescence in situ hybridisation and the uncertainty of the result, it should be used in biodosimetry only when it is absolutely necessary.(author)

  18. Germline minisatellite mutations in workers occupationally exposed to radiation at the Sellafield nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawn, E Janet; Curwen, Gillian B; Rees, Gwen S; Jonas, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Germline minisatellite mutation rates were investigated in male workers occupationally exposed to radiation at the Sellafield nuclear facility. DNA samples from 160 families with 255 offspring were analysed for mutations at eight hypervariable minisatellite loci (B6.7, CEB1, CEB15, CEB25, CEB36, MS1, MS31, MS32) by Southern hybridisation. No significant difference was observed between the paternal mutation rate of 5.0% (37 mutations in 736 alleles) for control fathers with a mean preconceptional testicular dose of 9 mSv and that of 5.8% (66 in 1137 alleles) for exposed fathers with a mean preconceptional testicular dose of 194 mSv. Subgrouping the exposed fathers into two dose groups with means of 111 mSv and 274 mSv revealed paternal mutation rates of 6.0% (32 mutations in 536 alleles) and 5.7% (34 mutations in 601 alleles), respectively, neither of which was significantly different in comparisons with the rate for the control fathers. Maternal mutation rates of 1.6% (12 mutations in 742 alleles) for the partners of control fathers and 1.7% (19 mutations in 1133 alleles) for partners of exposed fathers were not significantly different. This study provides evidence that paternal preconceptional occupational radiation exposure does not increase the germline minisatellite mutation rate and therefore refutes suggestions that such exposure could result in a destabilisation of the germline that can be passed on to future generations. (paper)

  19. Occupational radiation exposure trends in the nuclear industry of NEA/IAEA Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilari, O.; Horan, J.R.; Franzen, F.L.

    1980-01-01

    After various introductory statements on current occupational radiation exposure trends in nuclear facilities, the authors briefly discuss the problems involved in the application of the ICRP principle of optimization of radiological protection to the design and, in particular, the operation of nuclear plants, with the aim of comparing present exposure trends. To assemble an adequate data base for supporting the technical studies required to optimize radiological protection, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency have launched a survey aimed at collecting information on the levels and trends of occupational radiation exposure in the nuclear industry. The features of this study, based on the answers of NEA/IAEA Member States to a questionnaire, are described. The first results of the survey, regarding the situation and time trends of the average individual dose equivalents and collective dose equivalents for different plant types and for several countries, are also given. A preliminary analysis of the data collected allows certain considerations to be made relating to the influence of size, age and plant type, as well as of different national practices in plant operation and maintenance. (author)

  20. Radiation in the workplace-a review of studies of the risks of occupational exposure to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakeford, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Many individuals are, or have been, exposed to ionising radiation in the course of their work and the epidemiological study of occupationally irradiated groups offers an important opportunity to complement the estimates of risks to health resulting from exposure to radiation that are obtained from other populations, such as the Japanese survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. Moreover, workplace exposure to radiation usually involves irradiation conditions that are of direct relevance to the principal concern of radiological protection: protracted exposure to low level radiation. Further, some workers have been exposed to radioactive material that has been inadvertently taken into the body, and the study of these groups leads to risk estimates derived directly from the experience of those irradiated by these 'internal emitters', intakes of α-particle-emitters being of particular interest. Workforces that have been the subject of epidemiological study include medical staff, aircrews, radium dial luminisers, underground hard-rock miners, Chernobyl clean-up workers, nuclear weapons test participants and nuclear industry workers. The first solid epidemiological evidence of the stochastic effects of irradiation came from a study of occupational exposure to medical x-rays that was reported in 1944, which demonstrated a large excess risk of leukaemia among US radiologists; but the general lack of dose records for early medical staff who tended to experience the highest exposures hampers the derivation of risks per unit dose received by medical workers. The instrument dial luminisers who inadvertently ingested large amounts of radium-based paint and underground hard-rock miners who inhaled large quantities of radon and its decay products suffered markedly raised excess risks of, respectively, bone and lung cancers; the miner studies have provided standard risk estimates for radon-induced lung cancer. The large numbers of nuclear industry

  1. Occupational radiation exposure history of Idaho Field Office Operations at the INEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horan, J.R.; Braun, J.B.

    1993-10-01

    An extensive review has been made of the occupational radiation exposure records of workers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) over the period of 1951 through 1990. The focus has been on workers employed by contractors and employees of the Idaho Field Operations Office (ID) of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) and does not include the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF), the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), or other operations field offices at the INEL. The radiation protection guides have decreased from 15 rem/year to 5 rem/year in 1990 for whole body penetrating radiation exposure. During these 40 years of nuclear operations (in excess of 200,000 man-years of work), a total of twelve individuals involved in four accidents exceeded the annual guidelines for exposure; nine of these exposures were received during life saving efforts on January 3, 1961 following the SL-1 reactor accident which killed three military personnel. These exposures ranged from 8 to 27 rem. Only one individual has exceeded the annual whole body penetrating radiation protection guidelines in the last 29 years

  2. Occupational radiation exposure history of Idaho Field Office Operations at the INEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horan, J.R.; Braun, J.B.

    1993-10-01

    An extensive review has been made of the occupational radiation exposure records of workers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) over the period of 1951 through 1990. The focus has been on workers employed by contractors and employees of the Idaho Field Operations Office (ID) of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) and does not include the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF), the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), or other operations field offices at the INEL. The radiation protection guides have decreased from 15 rem/year to 5 rem/year in 1990 for whole body penetrating radiation exposure. During these 40 years of nuclear operations (in excess of 200,000 man-years of work), a total of twelve individuals involved in four accidents exceeded the annual guidelines for exposure; nine of these exposures were received during life saving efforts on January 3, 1961 following the SL-1 reactor accident which killed three military personnel. These exposures ranged from 8 to 27 rem. Only one individual has exceeded the annual whole body penetrating radiation protection guidelines in the last 29 years.

  3. Occupational radiation injuries from ionising rays recorded in the Federal Republic of Germany during the period between 1953 and 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soffke, R.

    1986-01-01

    An evaluation of 218 occupational diseases, which were reported between 1953 and 1979 and officially recognised as being caused by ionising rays, showed these to be made up chiefly by skin disorders (61%, equally distributed over acute and chronic forms), even though considerable percentage shares were also calculated for haematological ailments (15%) and bronchial carcinomas developed by uranium miners. There was a total of 42 deaths, 32 of which were ascribed to uranium mining and 10 to haematological diseases. In all, the annual rate of occupational diseases attributed to ionising rays shows a tendency to decline, even though the number of individuals exposed to radiation is increasing. The incidence of radiation injuries was calculated to be in the order of 0.01% for persons at risk of occupational radiation exposure. (orig./EDB) [de

  4. Expression of blood serum proteins and lymphocyte differentiation clusters after chronic occupational exposure to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybkina, Valentina L.; Azizova, Tamara V.; Adamova, Galina V.; Teplyakova, Olga V.; Osovets, Sergey V.; Bannikova, Maria V. [Southern Urals Biophysics Institute, Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk Region (Russian Federation); Scherthan, Harry; Meineke, Viktor; Doerr, Harald [University of Ulm, Bundeswehr Institute of Radiobiology, Munich (Germany); Zurochka, Alexander V. [Immunology Institute, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15

    This study aimed to assess effects of chronic occupational exposure on immune status in Mayak workers chronically exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). The study cohort consists of 77 workers occupationally exposed to external gamma-rays at total dose from 0.5 to 3.0 Gy (14 individuals) and workers with combined exposure (external gamma-rays at total dose range 0.7-5.1 Gy and internal alpha-radiation from incorporated plutonium with a body burden of 0.3-16.4 kBq). The control group consists of 43 age- and sex-matched individuals who never were exposed to IR, never involved in any cleanup operations following radiation accidents and never resided at contaminated areas. Enzyme-linked immunoassay and flow cytometry were used to determine the relative concentration of lymphocytes and proteins. The concentrations of T-lymphocytes, interleukin-8 and immunoglobulins G were decreased in external gamma-exposed workers relative to control. Relative concentrations of NKT-lymphocytes, concentrations of transforming growth factor-β, interferon gamma, immunoglobulins A, immunoglobulins M and matrix proteinase-9 were higher in this group as compared with control. Relative concentrations of T-lymphocytes and concentration of interleukin-8 were decreased, while both the relative and absolute concentration of natural killers, concentration of immunoglobulins A and M and matrix proteinase-9 were increased in workers with combined exposure as compared to control. An inverse linear relation was revealed between absolute concentration of T-lymphocytes, relative and absolute concentration of T-helpers cells, concentration of interferon gamma and total absorbed dose from external gamma-rays in exposed workers. For workers with incorporated plutonium, there was an inverse linear relation of absolute concentration of T-helpers as well as direct linear relation of relative concentration of NKT-lymphocytes to total absorbed red bone marrow dose from internal alpha-radiation. In all, chronic

  5. Expression of blood serum proteins and lymphocyte differentiation clusters after chronic occupational exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybkina, Valentina L.; Azizova, Tamara V.; Adamova, Galina V.; Teplyakova, Olga V.; Osovets, Sergey V.; Bannikova, Maria V.; Scherthan, Harry; Meineke, Viktor; Doerr, Harald; Zurochka, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to assess effects of chronic occupational exposure on immune status in Mayak workers chronically exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). The study cohort consists of 77 workers occupationally exposed to external gamma-rays at total dose from 0.5 to 3.0 Gy (14 individuals) and workers with combined exposure (external gamma-rays at total dose range 0.7-5.1 Gy and internal alpha-radiation from incorporated plutonium with a body burden of 0.3-16.4 kBq). The control group consists of 43 age- and sex-matched individuals who never were exposed to IR, never involved in any cleanup operations following radiation accidents and never resided at contaminated areas. Enzyme-linked immunoassay and flow cytometry were used to determine the relative concentration of lymphocytes and proteins. The concentrations of T-lymphocytes, interleukin-8 and immunoglobulins G were decreased in external gamma-exposed workers relative to control. Relative concentrations of NKT-lymphocytes, concentrations of transforming growth factor-β, interferon gamma, immunoglobulins A, immunoglobulins M and matrix proteinase-9 were higher in this group as compared with control. Relative concentrations of T-lymphocytes and concentration of interleukin-8 were decreased, while both the relative and absolute concentration of natural killers, concentration of immunoglobulins A and M and matrix proteinase-9 were increased in workers with combined exposure as compared to control. An inverse linear relation was revealed between absolute concentration of T-lymphocytes, relative and absolute concentration of T-helpers cells, concentration of interferon gamma and total absorbed dose from external gamma-rays in exposed workers. For workers with incorporated plutonium, there was an inverse linear relation of absolute concentration of T-helpers as well as direct linear relation of relative concentration of NKT-lymphocytes to total absorbed red bone marrow dose from internal alpha-radiation. In all, chronic

  6. Cytogenetic and hematological studies in the workers occupationally exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakeri, F.; Honarjoo, M.; Rajab pour, M.; Zahadat, A.; Ahmad pour, M.J.; Asghari, K.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective: This study was aimed at detecting both the incidence of chromosomal aberrations and changes in the hematological parameters as biomarkers of possible radiation injury among workers occupationally exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation and detecting the dose-effect relationship. Methods: Samples of peripheral blood were collected from 38 male industrial radiographers exposed to ionizing radiation for 1-16 years and from 24 age- and sex-matched healthy blood donors without radiation history served as control group. All radiation workers were routinely monitored with film badge. Cytogenetic analysis in peripheral blood lymphocytes assessed by the conventional chromosome aberration assay and at least 200 metaphases for each person were scored. The collected blood samples were analyzed for hematological assay using an automatic analyzer Sysmex KX-21, where 14 different parameters were computerized. Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the frequencies of the unstable aberrations and hematological parameters between test and control groups. Dose-effect relationship and the influence of age and duration of employment was tested by regression analysis. Results and conclusion: The mean frequencies of dicentric and acentric chromosome aberrations were significantly higher in the exposed group than in the control group (P< 0.0005). No correlation between chromosomal aberrations and physical dose and age was observed in the exposed group. Also there is no clear relation between chromosome damage and duration of exposure. However, the increase in chromosome aberrations in the exposed group was not followed by a corresponding hematological depression. The average values of hematological indices were within the reference levels and did not show any significant differences with control group. A tendency of decreasing the absolute lymphocyte count within the referential levels was the only hematological effect in radiation

  7. Sperm quality and DNA damage in men from Jilin Province, China, who are occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, D D; Hao, J L; Guo, K M; Lu, C W; Liu, X D

    2016-03-22

    Long-term radiation exposure affects human health. Ionizing radiation has long been known to raise the risk of cancer. In addition to high doses of radiation, low-dose ionizing radiation might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, lens opacity, and some other non-cancerous diseases. Low- and high-dose exposures to ionizing radiation elicit different signaling events at the molecular level, and may involve different response mechanisms. The health risks arising from exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation should be re-evaluated. Health workers exposed to ionizing radiation experience low-dose radiation and have an increased risk of hematological malignancies. Reproductive function is sensitive to changes in the physical environment, including ionizing radiation. However, data is scarce regarding the association between occupational radiation exposure and risk to human fertility. Sperm DNA integrity is a functional parameter of male fertility evaluation. Hence, we aimed to report sperm quality and DNA damage in men from Jilin Province, China, who were occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. Sperm motility and normal morphology were significantly lower in the exposed compared with the non-exposed men. There was no statistically significant difference in sperm concentration between exposed and non-exposed men. The sperm DNA fragmentation index was significantly higher in the exposed than the non-exposed men. Chronic long-term exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation could affect sperm motility, normal morphology, and the sperm DNA fragmentation index in the Chinese population. Sperm quality and DNA integrity are functional parameters that could be used to evaluate occupational exposure to ionizing radiation.

  8. Occupational radiation protection around medical linear accelerators: measurements and semi-analytical approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donadille, L.; Derreumaux, S.; Mantione, J.; Robbes, I.; Trompier, F.; Amgarou, K.; Asselineau, B.; Martin, A.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: X-rays produced by high-energy (larger than 6 MeV) medical electron linear accelerators create secondary neutron radiation fields mainly by photonuclear reactions inside the materials of the accelerator head, the patient and the walls of the therapy room. Numerous papers were devoted to the study of neutron production in medical linear accelerators and resulting decay of activation products. However, data associated to doses delivered to workers in treatment conditions are scarce. In France, there are more than 350 external radiotherapy facilities representing almost all types of techniques and designs. IRSN carried out a measurement campaign in order to investigate the variation of the occupational dose according the different encountered situations. Six installations were investigated, associated with the main manufacturers (Varian, Elekta, General Electrics, Siemens), for several nominal energies, conventional and IMRT techniques, and bunker designs. Measurements were carried out separately for neutron and photon radiation fields, and for radiation associated with the decay of the activation products, by means of radiometers, tissue-equivalent proportional counters and spectrometers (neutron and photon spectrometry). They were performed at the positions occupied by the workers, i.e. outside the bunker during treatments, inside between treatments. Measurements have been compared to published data. In addition, semi-empirical analytical approaches recommended by international protocols were used to estimate doses inside and outside the bunkers. The results obtained by both approaches were compared and analysed. The annual occupational effective dose was estimated to about 1 mSv, including more than 50 % associated with the decay of activation products and less than 10 % due to direct exposure to leakage neutrons produced during treatments. (author)

  9. mFISH analysis of chromosome aberrations in workers occupationally exposed to mixed radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotnik, Natalia V.; Osovets, Sergey V.; Azizova, Tamara V. [Southern Urals Biophysics Institute (SUBI), Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk Region (Russian Federation); Scherthan, Harry [Bundeswehr Institute of Radiobiology Affiliated to the University of Ulm, Munich (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    We performed a study on the presence of chromosome aberrations in a cohort of plutonium workers of the Mayak production association (PA) with a mean age of 73.3 ± 7.2 years to see whether by multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) translocation analysis can discriminate individuals who underwent occupational exposure with internal and/or external exposure to ionizing radiation 40 years ago. All Mayak PA workers were occupationally exposed to chronic internal alpha-radiation due to incorporated plutonium-239 and/or to external gamma-rays. First, we obtained the translocation yield in control individuals by mFISH to chromosome spreads of age-matched individuals and obtained background values that are similar to previously published values of an international study (Sigurdson et al. in Mutat Res 652:112-121, 2008). Workers who had absorbed a total dose of >0.5 Gy external gamma-rays to the red bone marrow (RBM) displayed a significantly higher frequency of stable chromosome aberrations relative to a group of workers exposed to <0.5 Gy gamma-rays total absorbed RBM dose. Thus, the translocation frequency may be considered to be a biological marker of external radiation exposure even years after the exposure. In a group of workers who were internally exposed and had incorporated plutonium-239 at a body burden >1.48 kBq, mFISH revealed a considerable number of cells with complex chromosomal rearrangements. Linear associations were observed for translocation yield with the absorbed RBM dose from external gamma-rays as well as for complex chromosomal rearrangements with the plutonium-239 body burden. (orig.)

  10. Occupational radiation exposure in Germany in 2012. Report of the radiation protection register; Die berufliche Strahlenexposition in Deutschland 2012. Bericht des Strahlenschutzregisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frasch, Gerhard; Kammerer, Lothar; Karofsky, Ralf; Mordek, Else; Schlosser, Andrea; Spiesl, Josef

    2014-04-15

    In Germany, persons who are occupationally exposed to ionising radiation are monitored by several official dosimetry services that transmit the dose records about individual radiation monitoring to the Radiation Protection Register of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS). The purpose of the Radiation Protection Register is to supervise the keeping of the dose limits and to monitor the compliance with the radiation protection principle ''Optimisation'' by performing detailed annual statistical analyses of the monitored persons and their radiation exposure. The annual report of the Radiation Protection Register provides information about status and development of occupational radiation exposure in Germany. In 2012, about 350,000 workers were monitored with dosemeters for occupational radiation exposure. The number increased continuously by totally 10 % into the past five years. 19 % of the monitored persons received measurable personal doses. The average annual dose of these exposed workers was 0.52 mSv corresponding to 2.6 % of the annual dose limit of 20 mSv for radiation workers. In total, 2 persons exceeded the annual dose limit of 20 mSv, i.e. less than one case per 100,000 monitored persons. The collective dose of the monitored persons decreased to 27.9 Person-Sv, the lowest value since the last fifty years of occupational dose monitoring. 45 airlines calculated the route doses of 40,000 aircraft crew members by using certified computer programmes for dose calculation and sent the accumulated monthly doses via the Federal Office for Civil Aviation (''Luftfahrt-Bundesamt, LBA'') to the BfS. The collective dose of the aircraft crew personnel is 78.5 person- Sv, and thus significantly higher than the total collective dose of the workers monitored with personal dosemeters. The annual average dose of aircraft crew personnel was 1.96 mSv and decreased compared to 2011 (2.12 mSv) due to solar cycle. In 2012, about

  11. Health physics society position on draft environmental protection agency recommendations for federal radiation protection guidance for occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Specific recommendations of the Health Physics Society are presented. There should not be any occupational exposure to ionizing radiation without the expectation of an overall benefit from the activity causing the exposure. Such activities should be permitted only when exposure to workers is controlled under a comprehensive radiation protection program that includes several elements: adequate, practical standards; adequately trained and qualified staff; adequately designed, operated and maintained facilities and equipment; appropriate monitoring programs, dose assessment programs and occupational exposure records; appropriate methods and procedures for controlling exposures in conformance with both the applicable limits and the ALARA philosophy; and appropriate quality assurance and audit programs

  12. About the contribution of occupational health's services for risk factors evaluation, medical and dosimetric follow-up in the workers monitoring exposed to ionising radiations in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailloeuil, C.; Gonin, M.; Gerondal, M.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: French national regulation (31/03/2003) indicates principles of a global approach about the medical and dosimetric follow-up in the workers monitoring. Legislator insists on risks and expositions trace ability along all professional career and after. The aim of this French specific system is to institute medical clinic aspects in accordance with dosimetry and professional risks. The occupational practitioners are approved practitioners who have followed a specific training. The organisation guarantees that a worker will be followed by one specific practitioner in order to reinforce the quality and the traceability of follow up. Medical supervision is done at taking on and at least once a year. It means to identify and take care of risks and expositions at work stations. If necessary, biological measurements and recommendations about collective and individual protection equipments complete the estimation of risks. On the subject of emergency, first aid is delivered on sites by occupational health personnel, either for classic medical problem or for radiological accident. Furthermore, occupational health personnel assist outside emergency services with whom we have specific conventions. External dosimetric follow-up is done with radiation protection qualified expert of the company. The internal contamination supervision and internal dose evaluation are done by the occupational health services. Measurements either whole body counts or radio-toxicologic analysis are submitted to technical quality process. Beyond the respect of regulatory dose limits, the aim of the dosimetric follow-up is the contribution to the preparation of work places with strong dosimetric focus. Informations at workers are dispensed about every risks and every kinds of risks: ionising radiation health effects, ionising radiation and pregnancy, high exposition, chemical risks, work at heat, asbestos. All data are conserved 50 years after the exposure These data

  13. Radiation protection guidance to Federal agencies for occupational exposure. Recommendations approved by the President. Part II The President

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Lee M.

    1987-01-01

    This memorandum transmits recommendations that would update previous guidance to Federal agencies for the protection of workers exposed to ionizing radiation. These recommendations were developed cooperatively by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the Mine Safety and Health Administration, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Department of Commerce, the Department of Transportation, the Department of Health and Human Services, and the Environmental Protection Agency. In addition, the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD) of the States, and the Health Physics Society were consulted during the development of this guidance. These recommendations are based on consideration of (1) current scientific understanding of effects on health from ionizing radiation, (2) recommendations of international and national organizations involved in radiation protection, (3) proposed 'Federal Radiation Protection Guidance for Occupational Exposure' published on January 23, 1981 (46 FR 7836) and public comments on that proposed guidance, and (4) the collective experience of the Federal agencies in the control of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation. A summary of the considerations that led to these recommendations is provided

  14. Occupational burnout among radiation therapists in Australia: Findings from a mixed methods study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, N.; Wright, C.; Knight, K.; Baird, M.; Akroyd, D.; Adams, R.D.; Schneider, M.E.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Evidence demonstrates that health care professionals in the palliative care context are more burned out than other health professionals. The aims of this study were to examine: (1) occupational burnout levels among radiation therapists in Australia, (2) association between demographic factors on burnout and (3) radiation therapists' perceptions of burnout. Methods: A cross-sectional online survey including the Maslach Burnout Inventory was administered to Radiation Therapists in Australia. Data were analysed using SPSS Ver 20 and open ended comments were analysed thematically using Nvivo 10. Results: A total of 200 radiation therapists participated in the survey. RTs had a high mean (±SD) burnout score for emotional exhaustion (38.5 ± 8.2), depersonalisation (17.5 ± 4.7) and personal achievement (30.5.3 ± 4.3) compared to RTs and health workers in other studies. High levels of emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and low levels of personal achievement were present in 93% (186/200), 87% (174/200) and 61% (122/200) of participants respectively. RTs identified high workload and staff shortages, interpersonal conflict and technology as key sources of stress in the RT work environment. Conclusion: Australian RTs' level of burnout on all three stages of burnout exceed previously reported burnout levels for similar cohorts both locally and internationally. It is important that future interventions aimed at minimising or preventing stressors are identified and implemented in the radiation therapy work environment. - Highlights: • The burnout rate is higher among Australian RTs compared to studies in other countries. • Dealing with patients and their emotions were not a contributing factor to RTs' stress. • Challenging interpersonal relationships between staff was identified as one of the key stressors. • It is important that future interventions aimed at minimising or preventing stressors are recognised.

  15. Occupational burnout among radiation therapists in Australia: Findings from a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N; Wright, C; Knight, K; Baird, M; Akroyd, D; Adams, R D; Schneider, M E

    2017-08-01

    Evidence demonstrates that health care professionals in the palliative care context are more burned out than other health professionals. The aims of this study were to examine: (1) occupational burnout levels among radiation therapists in Australia, (2) association between demographic factors on burnout and (3) radiation therapists' perceptions of burnout. A cross-sectional online survey including the Maslach Burnout Inventory was administered to Radiation Therapists in Australia. Data were analysed using SPSS Ver 20 and open ended comments were analysed thematically using Nvivo 10. A total of 200 radiation therapists participated in the survey. RTs had a high mean (±SD) burnout score for emotional exhaustion (38.5 ± 8.2), depersonalisation (17.5 ± 4.7) and personal achievement (30.5.3 ± 4.3) compared to RTs and health workers in other studies. High levels of emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and low levels of personal achievement were present in 93% (186/200), 87% (174/200) and 61% (122/200) of participants respectively. RTs identified high workload and staff shortages, interpersonal conflict and technology as key sources of stress in the RT work environment. Australian RTs' level of burnout on all three stages of burnout exceed previously reported burnout levels for similar cohorts both locally and internationally. It is important that future interventions aimed at minimising or preventing stressors are identified and implemented in the radiation therapy work environment. Copyright © 2017 The College of Radiographers. All rights reserved.

  16. Principles and practices for keeping occupational radiation exposures at medical institutions as low as reasonably achievable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, A.

    1982-10-01

    This report is a companion document to Regulatory Guide 8.18, Information Relevant to Ensuring that Occupational Radiation Exposures at Medical Institutions Will Be As Low As Reasonably Achievable. Both documents have now been revised to incorporate many good suggestions received after the original documents were published for comment. This report is a compendium of good practices and helpful information derived from the experience of the radiological and health physics professions and is not be construed in any way as additional regulatory requirements of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The information presented, including comprehensive checklists of facilities, equipment, and procedures that should be considered for working with NRC-licensed materials in all types of hospital activities, is intended to aid the NRC licensee in fulfilling the philosophy of maintaining radiation exposures of employees, patients, visitors, and the public as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Each subsection of this report is designed to include the major radiation safety considerations pertaining to the respective hospital function. Thus, the busy health professional will neeed to read only a few pages of this document at any one time to obtain the information needed

  17. Occupational exposure from external radiation used in medical practices in Pakistan by film badge dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabeen, A.; Munir, M.; Khalil, A.; Masood, M.; Akhter, P.

    2010-01-01

    Occupational exposure data of workers due to external sources of radiation in various medical practices such as nuclear medicine (NM), radiotherapy and diagnostic radiology (DR) in Pakistan were collected and analysed. Whole-body doses of workers were measured by film badge dosimetry technique during 2003-2007. Annual average effective dose in NM, radio-therapy and DR varied in the range of 1.39-1.80, 1.05-1.45 and 1.22-1.71 mSv, respectively, during 2003-2007. These values are quite low and well below the annual limit of 20 mSv averaged over a period of 5 consecutive years. Nobody received the radiation dose >50 mSv in any single year over a period of 5 consecutive years; therefore, no overexposure case has been detected. Decreasing trend of annual average dose values in aforementioned categories of work during 2003-2007 indicates the improvement of radiation protection status in medical field in Pakistan. (authors)

  18. Assessment of Health Consequences of Steel Industry Welders’ Occupational Exposure to Ultraviolet Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanian, Zahra; Mortazavi, Saied Mohammad Javad; Asmand, Ebrahim; Nikeghbal, Kiana

    2015-01-01

    Background: Welding is among the most important frequently used processes in the industry with a wide range of applications from the food industry to aerospace and from precision tools to shipbuilding. The aim of this study was to assess the level of steel industry welders’ exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and to investigate the health impacts of these exposures. Methods: In this case–control study, we measured the intensity of UV at the workers’ wrist in Fars Steel Company through manufacture of different types of heavy metal structures, using UV-meter model 666230 made by Leybold Co., from Germany. Results: The population under the study comprised 400 people including 200 welders as the exposed group and 200 nonwelders as the unexposed group. The results of the questionnaire were analyzed using SPSS software, version 19. The average, standard deviation, maximum and minimum of the UV at the welders’ wrist were 0.362, 0.346, 1.27, and 0.01 μW/cm2, respectively. There was a significantly (P radiation level, and using personal protective equipment seem indispensable. As exposure to UV radiation can be linked to different types of skin cancer, skin aging, and cataract, welders should be advised to decrease their occupational exposures. PMID:26900437

  19. Assessment of Health Consequences of Steel Industry Welders' Occupational Exposure to Ultraviolet Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanian, Zahra; Mortazavi, Saied Mohammad Javad; Asmand, Ebrahim; Nikeghbal, Kiana

    2015-01-01

    Welding is among the most important frequently used processes in the industry with a wide range of applications from the food industry to aerospace and from precision tools to shipbuilding. The aim of this study was to assess the level of steel industry welders' exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and to investigate the health impacts of these exposures. In this case-control study, we measured the intensity of UV at the workers' wrist in Fars Steel Company through manufacture of different types of heavy metal structures, using UV-meter model 666230 made by Leybold Co., from Germany. The population under the study comprised 400 people including 200 welders as the exposed group and 200 nonwelders as the unexposed group. The results of the questionnaire were analyzed using SPSS software, version 19. The average, standard deviation, maximum and minimum of the UV at the welders' wrist were 0.362, 0.346, 1.27, and 0.01 μW/cm(2), respectively. There was a significantly (P radiation level, and using personal protective equipment seem indispensable. As exposure to UV radiation can be linked to different types of skin cancer, skin aging, and cataract, welders should be advised to decrease their occupational exposures.

  20. Review of occupational radiation exposures in all biennial shutdown maintenance of Kaiga generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murukan, E.K.; Vinod Kumar, T.; Austine, N.X.; Soumia Menon, M.; Girish Kumar, K.; Rao, M.M.L.N.; Venkataramana, K.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Kaiga generating station 1 and 2 consists of twin units of 220 M We pressurized heavy water reactors located in Karnataka, India. Major maintenance activities of one of the twin units are taken up once in two years (biennial shutdown) to execute system maintenance, system up gradation, surveillance and in-service inspection (ISI) jobs. BSDs are mandatory activities to comply with regulatory requirement to ensure the safety and reliability of plant system equipment. More than 65% of the station collective dose is contributed by biennial shutdown (BSD) jobs. It is observed that the man rem consumed during normal operation of the plant is less than 35% of the total man rem consumed. Since BSD jobs contributes significantly to station collective dose, an effective implementation of radiation protection programme specific to BSD is the key to control the occupational exposure. Various improvements in the field of radiation protection practices and process systems are adopted to achieve lowest collective dose at par with international standards. The key areas identified for application of various strategies to achieve ALARA were Man rem budgeting, Radiological condition monitoring, Radiation protection practices, Identification of critical jobs and Work groups, Work planning and execution, and Radioactive waste management. Review of collective doses of all the BSD jobs performed in the station since year 2004 and various measures incorporated to achieve ALARA exposures to plant personnel are briefly discussed in this paper. (author)

  1. Occupational radiation exposure in Germany in 2011. Report of the radiation protection register; Die berufliche Strahlenexposition in Deutschland 2011. Bericht des Strahlenschutzregisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frasch, Gerhard; Kammerer, Lothar; Karofsky, Ralf; Mordek, Else; Schlosser, Andrea; Spiesl, Josef

    2013-04-15

    In Germany, persons who are occupationally exposed to ionising radiation are monitored by several official dosimetry services that transmit the dose records about individual radiation monitoring to the Radiation Protection Register of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS). The purpose of the Radiation Protection Register is to supervise the keeping of the dose limits and to monitor the compliance with the radiation protection principle ''Optimisation'' by performing detailed annual statistical analyses of the monitored persons and their radiation exposure. The annual report of the Radiation Protection Register provides information about status and development of occupational radiation exposure in Germany. In 2011, about 350,000 workers were monitored with dosemeters for occupational radiation exposure. The number increased during the past five years continuously by 10 %. Only 19 % of the monitored persons received measurable personal doses. The average annual dose of these exposed workers was 0.58 mSv corresponding to 3 % of the annual dose limit of 20 mSv for radiation workers. In total, 7 persons exceeded the annual dose limit of 20 mSv, i.e. two cases per 100,000 monitored persons. The collective dose of the monitored persons decreased to 38.5 Person-Sv, the lowest value since the last fifty years of occupational dose monitoring. In 2010, 45 airlines calculated the route doses of 39,000 members of the aircraft crew personnel by using certified computer programmes for dose calculation and sent the accumulated monthly doses via the Federal Office for Civil Aviation (''Luftfahrt-Bundesamt, LBA'') to the BfS. The collective dose of the aircraft crew personnel is 83 person-Sv, and thus significantly higher than the total collective dose of the workers monitored with personal dosemeters (38.5 person-Sv). The annual average dose of aircraft crew personnel was 2.12 mSv and decreased compared to 2010 (2,30 mSv). In 2011

  2. Dosimetric methodology for extremities of individuals occupationally exposed to beta radiation using the optically stimulated luminescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, Teresa Cristina Nathan Outeiro

    2010-01-01

    A dosimetric methodology was established for the determination of extremity doses of individuals occupationally exposed to beta radiation, using Al 2 O 3 :C detectors and the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) reader system microStar, Landauer. The main parts of the work were: characterization of the dosimetric material Al 2 O 3 :C using the OSL technique; establishment of the dose evaluation methodology; dose rate determination of beta radiation sources; application of the established method in a practical test with individuals occupationally exposed to beta radiation during a calibration simulation of clinical applicators; validation of the methodology by the comparison between the dose results of the practical test using the OSL and the thermoluminescence (TL) techniques. The results show that both the OSL Al-2O 3 :C detectors and the technique may be utilized for individual monitoring of extremities and beta radiation. (author)

  3. Survey of studies of occupational populations exposed to low-level radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, S.

    1980-04-01

    Studies of occupational populations exposed to large doses of radiation, principally from the ingestion of radium by dial painters and inhalation of radon and its daughters by miners, have provided important information on the health effects of those radioisotopes. Studies of medical radiologists, military personnel exposed to nuclear tests, and factory workers exposed to thorium are in progress. Employees of DOE-contractor facilities and of naval shipyards are also under study. Personnel dosimetry data are generally available for the latter category of occupational populations. Reasons for conducting the studies include interest in exploring the verification at low exposure levels of results of studies of heavily exposed populations and the responsibility of the employer to maintain adequate surveillance of the health of his workers by conducting appropriate epidemiologic studies. The low level of exposure of workers in facilities where adequate personnel dosimetry records are available make it unlikely that the results of such studies can be used to provide health risk estimates in the near future

  4. Occupational radiation dose assessment for a non site specific spent fuel storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadley, J.; Eble, R.G. Jr.

    1997-01-01

    To expedite the licensing process of the non site specific Centralized Interim Storage Facility (CISF) the Department of Energy has completed a phase I CISF Topical Safety Analysis Report (TSAR). The TSAR will be used in licensing the phase I CISF if a site is designated. An occupational radiation does assessment of the facility operations is performed as part of the phase I CISF design. The first phase of the CISF has the capability to receive, transfer, and store SNF in dual-purpose cask/canister systems (DPC's). Currently there are five vendor technologies under consideration. The preliminary dose assessment is based on estimated occupational exposures using traditional power plant ISFSI and transport cask handling processes. The second step in the process is to recommend ALARA techniques to reduce potential exposures. A final dose assessment is completed implementing the ALARA techniques and a review is performed to ensure that the design is in compliance with regulatory criteria. The dose assessment and ALARA evaluation are determined using the following input information: Dose estimates from vendor SAR's; ISFSI experience with similar systems; Traditional methods of operations; Expected CISF cask receipt rates; and feasible ALARA techniques. 5 refs., 1 tab

  5. Occupational radiation exposure at Commercial Nuclear Power reactors 1983. Volume 5. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, B.G.

    1985-03-01

    This report presents an updated compilation of occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors for the years 1969 through 1983. The summary based on information received from the 75 light-water-cooled reactors (LWRs) and one high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). The total number of personnel monitored at LWRs in 1983 was 136,700. The number of workers that received measurable doses during 1983 and 85,600 which is about 1000 more than that found in 1982. The total collective dose at LWRs for 1983 is estimated to be 56,500 man-rems (man-cSv), which is about 4000 more man-rems (man-cSv) than that reported in 1982. This resulted in the average annual dose for each worker who received a measurable dose increasing slightly to 0.66 rems (cSv), and the average collective dose per reactor increasing by about 50 man-rems (man-cSv), and the average collective dose per reactor increasing by about 50 man-rems (man-cSv) to a value of 753 man-rems (man-cSv). The collective dose per megawatt of electricity generated by each reactor also increased slightly to an average value of 1.7 man-rems (man-cSv) per megawatt-year. Health implications of these annual occupational doses are discussed

  6. The development of occupational, public and environmental radiation protection legislation in Great Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bines, W.P.; Chandler, S.D.

    2000-01-01

    In Great Britain, legislation to protect workers exposed to ionising radiation has developed separately from, but largely in parallel with, legislation to protect the public and the environment. Occupational radiation protection started from a narrow and industry specific base in 1947. Over the succeeding years, and partly in response to the obligations arising from the United Kingdom's accession to the European Community, this narrow base has broadened. As the nuclear power industry developed in Great Britain so did a separate and rigorous regulatory regime for nuclear installations, starting with the Nuclear Installations (Licensing and Insurance) Act 1959. The 1959 Act was amended by the Nuclear Installations Act 1965. From 1974, all occupational health and safety legislation began to be brought under the umbrella of a new legal framework, the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act, which for the first time adopted an across-the board approach to all work activities and goal-setting, rather than prescriptive, legislation. The purpose of the Act was to provide one comprehensive and integrated system of law concerning health and safety (including the self-employed) and also public safety, so far as it was affected by work activities. The Act also provided for consultation with all interested parties during the development of legislation. The first across the board occupational radiation protection legislation, covering all uses and users of ionising radiation (including, for the first time, exposure to natural radiation), arrived with the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985 and supporting Approved Codes of Practice and non-statutory guidance. The need for some controls on the use of radioactive materials that went wider than simply the protection of workers was recognised in 1948, when the first Radioactive Substances Act was made. Although the 1948 Act was the first to mention radioactive waste specifically, it proved ineffective as a regulatory tool. The first

  7. Biological effect produced by ionizing radiations on occupational workers in Carlos Andrade Marin Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arias Pullaguari, Ines Yolanda

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the biological effects on occupational workers. In this study, have made a bibliographic review of the changes on skin of 217 professionals; between 21 and 70 years radiologists, X-ray technicians, radioisotope workers, nurses and others, which were exposed to ionizing radiation, in the departments of Diagnosis and Treatment of the Hospital Carlos Andrade Marin of the Quito city. From this universe 133 workers were excluded of the analysis. From the totality of lesions produced on the skin; the depilation constituted 40.18%, hyper pigmentation 19.34%, hypo pigmentation 9 %, capillary fragility 13.39%, erythema 13.39%, alopecia 5.37%. From the totality of lesions produced in blood: the leukopenia constituted 20.23% between all workers. The percentage method was used for statical calculation. A bibliographic update is done and the most relevant clinical aspects are reviewed. (The author)

  8. Statistical analyses of the data on occupational radiation expousure at JPDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Shohei; Anazawa, Yutaka; Matsuno, Kenji; Furuta, Toshishiro; Akiyama, Isamu

    1980-01-01

    In the statistical analyses of the data on occupational radiation exposure at JPDR, statistical features were obtained as follows. (1) The individual doses followed log-normal distribution. (2) In the distribution of doses from one job in controlled area, the logarithm of the mean (μ) depended on the exposure rate (γ(mR/h)), and the σ correlated to the nature of the job and normally distributed. These relations were as follows. μ = 0.48 ln r-0.24, σ = 1.2 +- 0.58 (3) For the data containing different groups, the distribution of doses showed a polygonal line on the log-normal probability paper. (4) Under the dose limitation, the distribution of the doses showed asymptotic curve along the limit on the log-normal probability paper. (author)

  9. Occupational radiation exposure in PWR: International comparison of some global indicators between 1975 and 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, J.; Benedittini, M.

    1987-09-01

    This report presents the main results of an international comparative study of occupational radiation exposure in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWRs). The comparison is based on some synthetic indicators concerning both collective and mean individual exposures assessed for the following countries: Belgium, United-States, France, Japan, Federal Republic of Germany, Sweden and Switzerland. Information has been gained from the published literature and when it was possible, through direct correspondence with power station operators or national regulatory authorities. It concerns 120 reactors totalizing more than 900 reactor operating years. For the comparison, only reactors which were installed after 1974 have been considered, in order to have more homogeneous data representative of modern operating plants. Indicators calculated for the comparison are the collective and mean individual doses per reactor expressed either on a calendar year basis (from 1975 to 1985) or on a number of operating year basis (up to 11 years) [fr

  10. Occupational radiation exposure in Austria - results of personnel monitoring using thermoluminescent dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duftschmid, K.E.

    1979-01-01

    The Institut fuer Strahlenschutz, Seibersdorf, can look back on more than two years of experience with the automated TLD personnel monitoring system for routine control and dose record keeping of currently about 10.000 persons per month. For more than 100.000 entries on monthly received doses have been stored so far in the Master File of the Institute's computer centre. This paper presents a survey of the statistical dose distribution in the various sectors of employment such as industry, research establishments, medical establishments and nuclear facilities, including data on the mean annual doses and the collective doses for the various sectors; information is also given on the number of cases where a dose has been in excess of the set level, and on the measured data. The data stored in the dose record keeping system allow a detailed assessment to be made of the occupational radiation exposure in Austria. (orig.) [de

  11. [Investigation of occupational hazards of ultraviolet radiation and protective measures for workers in electric welding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Gong, Man-man; Wang, Jiao; He, Li-hua; Wang, Sheng; Du, Wei-wei; Zhang, Long-lian; Lin, Sen; Dong, Xue-mei; Wang, Ru-gang

    2012-06-18

    To investigate and analyze the occupational hazards of ultraviolet radiation, protective measures and related factors for typical symptoms among workers in electric welding, and to provide basic information for revision of the occupational standards of UV. Questionnaires and physical examinations were used in this investigation. A total of 828 workers from four vehicle manufacturers in Beijing and Guangdong Province were selected. Corresponding analyses were conducted with SPSS 16.0 statistic software. The top three injuries of faces and hands were burning tingling (48.7% & 41.3%), itch of skin (39% & 34.9%) and pigmentation (31.9% & 24.5%).The major injuries of eyes were ophthalmodynia (61.5%) , photophobia and tearing (61.4%), and blurred vision (50.2%). The incidences of facial and hands burning tingling, hands flushing, hands macula and papula were significantly different between the welders and auxiliary workers (Pwelding masks (87.2%), gloves (84.3%) and glasses (65.9%). Except for UV cut cream, the usages of other protective equipments in the auxiliary workers were significantly lower than those in the welders (Pwelding, using argon arc welding and CO(2) gas shielded arc welding, not wearing welding masks, and not using UV cut cream was significantly associated with the increased risk of face burning tingling, and the ORs were 3.894 (6 h to 8 h), 2.665 (4 h to 6 h), 2.052, 1.765, 1.759, 1.833, respectively; working years might be a protective factor, and the OR was 0.440, respectively. The study suggested that the UV radiation produced during welding operations not only caused harm to welders, but also to the auxiliary workers. Protection should be strengthened,for example, wearing welding masks, glasses, etc. Meanwhile automatic welding machines should be adopted by the factories to reduce the exposure time for workers.

  12. Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation and electromagnetic fields in relation to the risk of thyroid cancer in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lope, Virginia; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Aragonés, Nuria; López-Abente, Gonzalo; Gustavsson, Per; Floderus, Birgitta; Dosemeci, Mustafa; Silva, Agustín; Pollán, Marina

    2006-08-01

    This study sought to ascertain the risk of thyroid cancer in relation to occupational exposure to ionizing radiation and extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELFMF) in a cohort representative of Sweden's gainfully employed population. A historical cohort of 2 992 166 gainfully employed Swedish male and female workers was followed up from 1971 through 1989. Exposure to ELFMF and ionizing radiation was assessed using three job exposure matrices based on industrial branch or occupational codes. Relative risks (RR) for male and female workers, adjusted for age and geographic area, were computed using log-linear Poisson models. Occupational ELFMF exposure showed no effect on the risk of thyroid cancer in the study. However, female workers exposed to high intensities of ionizing radiation registered a marked excess risk (RR 1.85, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.02-3.35]. This trend was not in evidence among the men. While the study confirms the etiologic role of ionizing radiation, with a higher incidence of thyroid cancer being recorded for the most-exposed female workers, our results do not support the possibility of occupational exposure to ELFMF being a risk factor for the development of thyroid cancer.

  13. First assessment of individual monitoring of medical workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation in Burkina Faso

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakoro, A.; Nobila Ouédraogo, Salimata Traoré

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the results of monitoring of medical workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation as a consequence of exposure to X-rays, from 2007 to 2010, in Burkina Faso. The radiation exposure monitoring was made with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) type 0110 and the reader used was Harshaw 4500. The medical establishments. subscribers were provided with personal dosimeters (measuring Hp (10) and Hp (0.07)) and dosimeters for background and workplace exposure (H*10) measurement. The dosimeters have been worn for periods of 2 months each. The number of establishments subscribed and workers monitored has gradually increased from 4 radiology establishments with 13 workers monitored at September 2007 to 23 subscribers with 121 workers monitored at the end of April 2010. 13 establishments were still working without monitoring. From September 2007 to April 2010, no individual annual dose limit has really been reached. 88.16% of the 2 months dose values of personal dosimeters were below 0.1mSv, the detection limit and 96.61% of Hp (10) bimonthly values were below 3.33mSv. The workplace exposure monitoring values were often low (varying from 0.00mSv to 40.45mSv). 87.08% of the values of H*(10) were below 3.33mSv, the upper limit of Hp (10) for a period of 2 months. Low values of individual dose have also been recorded despite of high values of workplace monitoring. This allowed to state that the workers monitored were not exposed to a major risk. Nevertheless, 13 TLD have been lost and 3 damaged by subscribers (out of 1504 TLD provided). 26 times (out of 240), background measurement and workplace exposure monitoring dosimeters have been placed at the improper location. Therefore, sensitization of the establishments using ionizing radiation should be reinforced and the national regulations should impose radiation monitoring (author)

  14. The assessment of occupational protection conditions in workplaces with high levels of exposure to natural radiation. Report from a technical committee meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Occupational exposure from natural radiation is, in the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) 2000 Report, estimated to contribute to more than 80 percent of the world-wide annual collective dose from occupational exposure, uranium mining excluded. The Agency's Radiation Safety Standards Series, the Requirements, and the Safety Guides (jointly sponsored by the Agency and the International Labour Office), address the control of occupational exposures from natural sources of radiation. In addition, some Safety Reports on specific issues are in the process of being finalized. Following upon recommendations to the Agency from its Member States to provide further guidance on the control of occupational exposure to natural radiation, a Technical Committee Meeting on Assessment of Occupational Radiation Protection Conditions in Workplaces with High Levels of Exposure to Natural Radiation was held in Vienna from 7 to 11 May 2001. The objective of the meeting was to produce an inventory of problem areas, make an assessment of the problem and propose a draft work plan for the Agency, This IAEA Working Material includes the report from the meeting, including the presentations made. Based on the recommendations made by the Technical Committee, a work plan is being initiated, implying that more attention will be paid to occupational exposure from natural radiation sources in the Occupational Radiation Protection programme

  15. Legislating for occupational exposure to sources of natural radiation- the UK approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higham, N.; Walker, S.; Thomas, G.

    2004-01-01

    Title VII of EC Directive 96/29/Euratom (the 1996 BSS Directive) for the first time requires Member States to take action in relation to work activities within which the presence of natural radiation sources leads to a significant increase in the exposure of workers or members of the public which cannot be disregarded from the radiation protection point of view. The UK in fact has had legal requirements relating to occupational exposure to natural radiation sources since 1985, in the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985, made to implement the bulk of the provisions of the previous BSS Directive (80/836/Euratom, as amended by 84/467/Euratom). The Ionising Radiations Regulations 1999, that implement the worker protection requirements of the 1996 Euratom BSS Directive, include similar provisions. The definition of radioactive substance includes any substance which contains one or more radionuclides whose activity cannot be disregarded for the purposes of radiation protection. This means that some low specific activity ores and sands fall within this definition and are therefore subject to relevant requirements of the Regulations. Further advice is given on circumstances in which this may apply. Radon is covered more explicitly by applying the regulations to any work carried out in an atmosphere containing radon 222 gas at a concentration in air, averaged over any 24 hour period, exceeding 400 Bq m-3 except where the concentration of the short-lived daughters of radon 222 in air averaged over any 8 hour working period does not exceed 6.24 x 10-7Jm-3. The Health and Safety Executive pursues a policy of raising awareness of the potential for exposure to radon in the workplace and targeting those employers likely to have a radon problem (based on the use of existing information on homes). The regulatory approach has been to seek remedial building measures so that the workplace is removed from control. HSE is able to offer advice about getting their workplace tested and

  16. Chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes in subjects occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation or chemical clastogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalic, H.; Radosevic-Stasic, B.

    2002-01-01

    To get an insight into genotoxic risk in some occupations, in this study the chromosome aberration analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes was made in 20 physicians and nurses exposed to a low dose of ionizing radiation in a hospital, 12 individuals working with X-rays in a cement factory and 19 technicians working with some chemical toxic agents in the laboratories of a medical school. The control group consisted of 14 sex- and age-matched unexposed persons living in the same district area. The data showed that the total number of chromosome aberrations in 200 scored metaphases in all examined groups were almost the same and inside the low-permitted values. In hospital workers, however, the percentage of acentric and dicentric fragments (1.63 ± 0.28 vs 0.31 ± 0.21 and 0.47 ± 0.18 vs 0.0, respectively) increased predominantly in contrast to cement-factory employees and laboratory workers, where a higher incidence of minutes (0.58 ± 0.19 vs 0.31 ± 0.2) or gaps (2.21 ± 0.37 vs 1.15 ± 1.15) was noticed. Moreover, in groups exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation (hospital and factory), a positive correlation was found between the total number of chromosome aberrations and the 6-year absorption dose or working period, suggesting an effect of cumulative dosage. (author)

  17. Occupational radiation protection experience in radioactive waste management at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramchandran, V.; Jauhri, G.S.

    2000-01-01

    Waste Management Facilities, Trombay (WMFT) comprises Radioactive Solid waste Management Site (RSMS), an Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP), and a Decontamination Centre (DC). Radioactive wastes from the plants and laboratories in Mumbai are handled here. The wastes are categorized and classified as per International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) guidelines. RSMS is a near surface disposal facility, where assorted beta gamma solid waste is disposed off in appropriate disposal facilities. ETP is a centralized low level liquid waste treatment facility, where liquid effluent is chemically treated to remove the radionuclides present in it, monitored for radioactivity, and discharged into the Mumbai Harbour Bay. In DC, plant and laboratory used clothings and personnel protective wears are decontaminated, monitored and sent for reuse. A comprehensive radiation monitoring programme is in place in these facilities from the beginning of radioactive waste management operations at BARC. The per capita radiation dose of the occupational workers and individual maximum dose has been low. Radioactivity release through liquid effluent from ETP has been kept well below Authorized Limits (AL). There has been no safety related unusual occurrences during the facility operation, that had any significant radiological impact. (author)

  18. Erythrocytes antioxygant parameters in works occupationally to law levels of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klucinski, P.; Martirosian, G.; Wojcik, A.; Grabowska-Bochenek, R.; Gminmski, J.; Mazur, B.; Hrycek, A.; Cieslik, P.

    2008-01-01

    It has been postulated that ionizing radiation generates reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS are annihilated by an intracellular enzymatic system composed mainly of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Workers of X-ray departments are occupationally exposed to long-term low levels of ionizing radiation, which may affect their antioxidant status. Erythrocyte activities of SOD, CAT and GPx were measured in 45 workers of X-ray departments and 30 persons who constituted the control group. Subgroups with respect to sex and cigarette smoking were selected. Colorimetric method was used for determination erythrocyte activities of SOD, CAT and GPx. A significant decrease of GPx, SOD and CAT activity in workers as compared to controls was observed. Lower activity of SOD and GPx in female and GPx in male subgroup was found. SOD was significantly more elevated in smoking workers than in the non-smoking staff. Moreover non-smoking employees showed lower SOD and GPx activity in comparison to the non-smoking control. GPx decrease was found in smoking workers in comparison to the smoking control. Additionally, smoking workers showed lower activity of GPx and CAT compared to non-smoking control. (author)

  19. Reduction of occupational radiation exposure to staff - a quality management approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crouch, J.

    2007-01-01

    Positron Emission. Tomography (PET) imaging has expanded in Australia in recent years and is a recognised technique to diagnose cancer, neurological and heart disease. The high-energy gamma rays (51 I KeV) produced from the annihilation reaction in PET and their increased penetration compared to Tc- 99 m (HOKeV) emissions results in a higher radiation exposure to staff compared to other types of imaging such as X-Ray, CT (computer tomography) and MR1 (magnetic resonance imaging) and general nuclear medicine. The project scope was to reduce the occupational radiation exposure to staff working within the imaging section of the WA PET/Cyclotron Service by utilising a continuous quality improvement, process. According to the Australian Council on Healthcare Standards (ACHS) continual quality improvement is critical for healthcare in Australia (The EQUIP Guide, 2002, p. 1-1 ). The continuous quality improvement approach selected is appropriate for the organisation and the PET imaging process based on the Evaluation and Quality Improvement Program (EQUIP) which is the recognised standard for the health care industry in Australia

  20. Evaluation of occupational radiation dose in nuclear medicine: radiopharmaceutical administration to scintiscanning exams of myocardial perfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, Cassio V.; Michelin, Charlie A.; Jakubiak, Rosangela R.; Lemes, Alyne O.; Silva, Juliana L.M.

    2013-01-01

    In nuclear medicine, workers directly involved in exams are constantly exposed to ionizing radiation. The procedure for administration of the radiopharmaceutical to the patient is one of the most critical times of exposure. In tests of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) administration of radiopharmaceutical repeats the steps of rest and cardiac stress. In this study, we used a Geiger -Mueller detector for measuring occupational radiation doses for during the administration of technetium- 99m - sestamibi in MPS tests. In the evaluation, discriminated the stages of examination and related professional experience time to doses measures at home. It were followed 110 procedures at home (55 conducted by professionals with over 5 years experience and 55 conducted by professionals with less than 1 year of experience) and 55 effort procedures. The results showed that the rest of the procedure time and dose are related to the experience of the worker. More experienced workers were faster (mean: 43 ± 16 vs 67 ± 25 seconds / procedure), and therefore received lower doses (mean 0.57 ± 0.16 versus 0.80 ± 0.24 μSv / procedure), both with statistical significance (p <0.001). In step effort, there were procedures lasting longer (mean: 19 ± 2 minutes / procedure), which resulted in higher doses (mean 3.0 ± 0.6 μSv / procedure)

  1. Problems with regard to occupational exposure of external personnel (section 15 of the German Radiation Protection Ordinance)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, W.

    2002-01-01

    The annual radiation dose to the group of external personnel working in nuclear facilities accounts for more than 39% of the total annual collective dose of all occupationally exposed persons in Germany. This is a fact causing problems for plant operators employing external personnel as well as the sending companies, with respect to compliance with the radiation protection regulations. The amended German Radiation Protection Ordinance does not really make things easier in this respect, but in fact is expected to aggravate the situation in the course of increasing globalisation in the industrial sector. (orig./CB) [de

  2. Association between sperm DNA integrity and seminal plasma antioxidant levels in health workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Dayanidhi; Salian, Sujith Raj; Kalthur, Guruprasad; Uppangala, Shubhashree; Kumari, Sandhya; Challapalli, Srinivas; Chandraguthi, Shrinidhi Gururajarao; Jain, Navya; Krishnamurthy, Hanumanthappa; Kumar, Pratap; Adiga, Satish Kumar

    2014-01-01

    There is a paucity of data regarding the association between occupational radiation exposure and risk to human fertility. Recently, we provided the first evidence on altered sperm functional characteristics, DNA damage and hypermethylation in radiation health workers. However, there is no report elucidating the association between seminal plasma antioxidants and sperm chromatin integrity in occupationally exposed subjects. Here, we assessed the seminal plasma antioxidants and lipid peroxidation level in 83 men who were occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation and then correlated with the sperm chromatin integrity. Flow cytometry based sperm chromatin integrity assay revealed a significant decline in αt value in the exposed group in comparison to the non-exposed group (P<0.0001). Similarly, both total and reduced glutathione levels and total antioxidant capacity in the seminal plasma were significantly higher in exposed group than the non-exposed group (P<0.01, 0.001 and 0.0001, respectively). However, superoxide dismutase level and malondialdehyde level, which is an indicator of lipid peroxidation in the seminal plasma, did not differ significantly between two groups. The total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and GSH level exhibited a positive correlation with sperm DNA integrity in exposed subjects. To conclude, this study distinctly shows that altered sperm chromatin integrity in radiation health workers is associated with increase in seminal plasma antioxidant level. Further, the increased seminal plasma GSH and TAC could be an adaptive measure to tackle the oxidative stress to protect genetic and functional sperm deformities in radiation health workers. - Highlights: • Seminal plasma antioxidants were measured in men occupationally exposed to radiation. • Sperm chromatin integrity was significantly affected in the exposed group. • Glutathione and total antioxidant capacity was significantly higher in exposed group. • Sperm DNA damage in exposed subjects

  3. Association between sperm DNA integrity and seminal plasma antioxidant levels in health workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Dayanidhi; Salian, Sujith Raj; Kalthur, Guruprasad; Uppangala, Shubhashree; Kumari, Sandhya [Division of Clinical Embryology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal University, Manipal 576104 (India); Challapalli, Srinivas [Department of Radiotherapy, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore (India); Chandraguthi, Shrinidhi Gururajarao [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal (India); Jain, Navya; Krishnamurthy, Hanumanthappa [National Centre for Biological Sciences, Bangalore (India); Kumar, Pratap [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal University, Manipal (India); Adiga, Satish Kumar, E-mail: satish.adiga@manipal.edu [Division of Clinical Embryology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal University, Manipal 576104 (India)

    2014-07-15

    There is a paucity of data regarding the association between occupational radiation exposure and risk to human fertility. Recently, we provided the first evidence on altered sperm functional characteristics, DNA damage and hypermethylation in radiation health workers. However, there is no report elucidating the association between seminal plasma antioxidants and sperm chromatin integrity in occupationally exposed subjects. Here, we assessed the seminal plasma antioxidants and lipid peroxidation level in 83 men who were occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation and then correlated with the sperm chromatin integrity. Flow cytometry based sperm chromatin integrity assay revealed a significant decline in αt value in the exposed group in comparison to the non-exposed group (P<0.0001). Similarly, both total and reduced glutathione levels and total antioxidant capacity in the seminal plasma were significantly higher in exposed group than the non-exposed group (P<0.01, 0.001 and 0.0001, respectively). However, superoxide dismutase level and malondialdehyde level, which is an indicator of lipid peroxidation in the seminal plasma, did not differ significantly between two groups. The total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and GSH level exhibited a positive correlation with sperm DNA integrity in exposed subjects. To conclude, this study distinctly shows that altered sperm chromatin integrity in radiation health workers is associated with increase in seminal plasma antioxidant level. Further, the increased seminal plasma GSH and TAC could be an adaptive measure to tackle the oxidative stress to protect genetic and functional sperm deformities in radiation health workers. - Highlights: • Seminal plasma antioxidants were measured in men occupationally exposed to radiation. • Sperm chromatin integrity was significantly affected in the exposed group. • Glutathione and total antioxidant capacity was significantly higher in exposed group. • Sperm DNA damage in exposed subjects

  4. Sensory evaluation of black beans submitted to gamma radiation from Cobalt-60; Avaliacao sensorial de feijao preto submetido a radiacao de Cobalto-60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, Neila Camargo de; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin; Spoto, Marta Helena Fillet, E-mail: sgcbraza@esalq.usp.b [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Agroindustria, Alimentos e Nutricao; Arthur, Valter [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Secao de Entomologia e Irradiacao de Alimentos

    2005-04-15

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the sensory aspects of black beans submitted to gamma radiation from {sup 60}Co. The study involved eight panelists, between 17 to 23 years old, who were selected and trained for the descriptive analysis of appearance, aroma, flavor and texture. The panelists analyzed alterations of appearance, aroma, flavor and texture of non-irradiated and irradiated black beans with doses 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10kGy. The results were analyzed by test F, ANOVA and the Tukey test (5%), with the use of computers and the sensory analysis software Compusense Five and SAS. The results showed that irradiated samples decreased the bitter flavor, accentuated color and brightness and samples non-irradiated dry texture. The radiation treatment is a good method for conservation of black beans in doses evaluated in this study.(author)

  5. The Usefulness Cytogenetic Biomarkers in Assessment of Occupational Exposure to Microwave Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garaj-Vrhovac, V.; Kopjar, N.

    2003-01-01

    technique based on the selection of individual cells in a heterogeneous cell population on the basis of nuclear morphology and shape of comets makes it suitable for rapid and sensitive in vivo human biomonitoring. Enumeration of MN provides an index of chromosome loss from the main nuclei indicating clastogenic and aneugenic impacts. On the other hand, chromatid breakage assay (bleomycin sensitivity test) seems to be a useful tool in predicting individual risk of cancer. All methods employed in the present study provide powerful techniques for successful biomonitoring of populations occupationally exposed to microwave radiation. (author)

  6. Application of the Alkaline comet assay in bio monitoring of medical personnel occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopjar, N.; Graj-Vrhovac, V.

    2002-01-01

    Ionising radiation is a ubiquitous environmental physical agent whose DNA damaging effects are fairly well established. The effects of low-level exposure to ionizing radiation are of concern to large number of people, including workers receiving radiation exposure on the job. Medical radiation workers are employees of hospitals, clinics and private offices where radiation is used in the process of delivering health care to humans. These workers can be categorised into two groups exposed employees who receive at least a minimum detectable exposure during a one-year period, and potentially exposed employees who work in the vicinity of radiation but whose exposures are below detectable limits. The exposure of patients and workers to radiation in medicine is a direct consequence of the use of radiation to improve the health of the individuals. Trends in radiation exposure of both patients and workers are effected not only by developments in radiation protection, but also by dose in the practice of medicine. It is very important to estimate absorbed doses from individuals occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation for carrying out radioprotection procedures and restrict the hazards to human health. The extent of health hazards is difficult to assess. Therefore, development of procedures that can be used to precisely identify health hazards in the exposed populations is a most significant approach towards establishing effective programs for disease prevention

  7. Contamination of occupational radiation exposure in nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Sebastian; Bruhn, Gerd; Artmann, Andreas; Sentuc, Florence-Nathalie; Tiessen, Olga

    2017-12-01

    In the precursor project of this study a simulation procedure was developed, consisting of a 3D-CAD model, a mathematical method for coordinate transformation, the software MicroShield and an empiric job model, to calculate the occupational exposure for definable jobs at the primary circuit. It was validated for inspection and maintenance jobs at PWRs of the second and third KWU/Siemens generation. With that the aptitude of this tool for prognosis of radiation exposure was demonstrated. Adhering contaminations within the primary circuit are considered as relevant sources, whereas activated core-near components are neglected. In this study, the model was extended by PWR of the so-called Convoy generation, which differ from older plants in the material composition and consequently in the relevant nuclide vectors. With information from a visit at a nuclear power plant and conversation with the staff, the model could be adjusted appropriately. The radionuclide Cobalt-60 is indeed less important compared to older plant-types, but it is still the dominant nuclide in facilities of the fourth KWU/Siemens generation, so that it is used as reference nuclide. Due to the contemporary planned final shut-down of the three Convoy plants (besides other), dismantling work was set into focus of simulation. Simulation was conducted and results compared for Convoy plants and for plants of the older generations two and three. Furthermore, by comparative simulations the question was answered if full system decontamination in Convoy plants before dismantling lead to benefits that justify this measure. The determined dose saving during unmounting works at the steam generators caused by the decontamination is remarkable. An abdication of decontamination at this location would lead to doses much higher than the occupational job dose during steam generator dismantling in a decontaminated generation 2 facility.

  8. Ionizing radiation as a source of both occupational and public exposure. Is there any difference between them? Conclusions for radiation protection practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassilev, G.

    2000-01-01

    The assessment of the radiation risk both from natural and occupational exposure is discussed, taking into account the values for the end of 20th century for Bulgaria. The natural background exposure in the country is in average of 2.3 mSv/a. The eternal exposure in different regions varies within the range of ±25%. The radon concentration in dwellings vary in wide range: from 2.5 to 250 Bq/m 3 at a geometrical mean of 22 Bq/m 3 (equilibrium equivalent concentration). Thus the natural exposure vary from 1.0 to 5 mSv/a. The occupational exposure in different fields is as follows: medicine - 1.0 mSv/a; science, education - 0.9 mSv/a; NPP workers - 2.0 mSv/a. Taking into account that this way the risk equalizes for each population group the following conclusions are made: necessity for rendering an account of the individual natural background exposure when occupational risk is assessed; building of an adequate national system for record and limitation of exposure my medical use of ionizing radiation; improvement of the system for limitation of the radon exposure; re-examination of dosimetry control for occupational exposure; reconsidering of the social compensation for radiation risk

  9. An assessment of annual whole-body occupational radiation exposure in Ireland (1996-2005)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colgan, P. A.; Currivan, L.; Fenton, D.

    2008-01-01

    Whole-body occupational exposure to artificial radiation sources in Ireland for the years 1996-2005 has been reviewed. Dose data have been extracted from the database of the Radiological Protection Inst. of Ireland, which contains data on >95% of monitored workers. The data have been divided into three sectors: medical, industrial and education/ research. Data on exposure to radon in underground mines and show caves for the years 2001-05 are also presented. There has been a continuous increase in the number of exposed workers from 5980 in 1996 to 9892 in 2005. Over the same time period, the number of exposed workers receiving measurable doses has decreased from 676 in 1996 to 189 in 2005 and the collective dose has also decreased from 227.1 to 110.3 man milli-sievert (man mSv). The collective dose to workers in the medical sector has consistently declined over the 10-y period of the study while that attributable to the industrial sector has remained reasonably static. In the education/research sector, the collective dose typically represents 5% or less of the total collective dose from all practices. Over the 10 y of the study, a total of 77914 annual dose records have been accumulated, but only 4040 ( 1 mSv and 21 of these exceeded 5 mSv. Most of the doses >1 mSv were received by individuals working in diagnostic radiology (which also includes interventional radiology) in hospitals and site industrial radiography. There has been only one instance of a dose above the annual dose limit of 20 mSv. Evaluating the data for the period 2001-05 separately, the average annual collective dose from the medical, industrial and educational/research sectors are ∼60, 70 and 2 man mSv with the average dose per exposed worker who received a measurable dose being 0.32, 0.79 and 0.24 mSv, respectively. Diagnostic radiology and site industrial radiography each represents >60% of the collective dose in their respective sectors. Available data on radon exposure in one underground

  10. Lead exposure in radiator repair workers: a survey of Washington State radiator repair shops and review of occupational lead exposure registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Stephen G

    2003-07-01

    Radiator repair workers in Washington State have the greatest number of very elevated (> or =60 microg/dL) blood lead levels of any other worker population. The goals of this study were to determine the number of radiator repair workers potentially exposed to lead; estimate the extent of blood lead data underreporting to the Occupational Lead Exposure Registry; describe current safety and health practices in radiator repair shops; and determine appropriate intervention strategies to reduce exposure and increase employer and worker awareness. Lead exposure in Washington State's radiator repair workers was assessed by reviewing Registry data and conducting a statewide survey of radiator repair businesses. This study revealed that a total of 226 workers in Washington State (including owner-operators and all employees) conduct repair activities that could potentially result in excessive exposures to lead. Approximately 26% of radiator repair workers with elevated blood lead levels (> or =25 microg/dL) were determined to report to Washington State's Registry. This study also revealed a lack of awareness of lead's health effects, appropriate industrial hygiene controls, and the requirements of the Lead Standard. Survey respondents requested information on a variety of workplace health and safety issues and waste management; 80% requested a confidential, free-of-charge consultation. Combining data derived from an occupational health surveillance system and a statewide mail survey proved effective at characterizing lead exposures and directing public health intervention in Washington State.

  11. Methodology to collect data on decommissioning costs and occupational radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrasch, P.; Roger, J.

    1993-01-01

    Decommissioning data collection has been, up to now, almost a national matter. The present joint study performed by NIS Ingenieurgesellschaft mbH, Hanau, and the Commissariat a l'energie atomique, Unite de declassement d'installations nucleaires, and coordinated by the Commission of the European Communities, is intended to identify a methodology allowing the collection of data which are useful to manage a decommissioning project, e.g. data on dismantling costs, occupational radiation exposure and waste arisings. A common structure for decommissioning tasks (called working packages) derived from those already in use at the abovementioned organizations has been established and the corresponding first series of data-collection sheets defined in order to cover data from LWRs, GCRs (UNGGs) and nuclear fuel cycle installations. Work focused on the cost of decommissioning tasks. The study is intended to be a first step towards an EC-wide usable data-base for data generated in the various ongoing and future decommissioning projects

  12. Strategy for assessing occupational radiation monitoring data from many facilities for use in epidemiologic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strom, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    The process of transforming occupational radiation monitoring data into a form useful for epidemiology is called dose assessment. A review of previous dose assessment activities is done as a background for development of standard dose assessment procedures for use at many facilities. The scientific issues identified include the accuracy, precision, and comparability of doses over time and across facilities, the use of internal monitoring results; neutron quality factors; minimum detection limits; the quality and validity of data; and the impact of uncertainty in the exposure variable on misclassification of workers with respect to that variable. The standard dose assessment procedures developed address these issues, and include a method for determining what data are available and what form they are in, illustrated by application to 36 facilities in the US Department of Energy 5-Rem Study. The standard procedures are illustrated and tested on external and uranium monitoring results from the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where data permitted inferences of doses and variances to total body, skin, and lung, but not bone or kidney

  13. A national survey of occupational radiation exposure among diagnostic radiologic technologists in South Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeeyoung; Cha, Eun Shil; Jeong, Meeseon; Lee, Won Jin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate representative occupational characteristics and radiation exposure for South Korean radiologic technologists. The authors conducted a national survey by stratified sampling of South Korean administrative districts and types of medical facilities. A total of 585 technologists were surveyed, and survey data were linked with dosimetry data from the National Dose Registry. A total of 73 % of radiologic technologists sampled were male, 62 % were younger than age 40 and 86.5 % began employment after 1990. The most frequent practices among radiologic technologists were diagnostic routine X-ray followed by computed tomography (CT) and portable X-ray. Male workers were more frequently involved in CT, portable X-ray and interventional radiology whereas female workers carried out most mammography procedures. The average annual effective dose was 2.3 mSv for male and 1.3 mSv for female workers. The dose was significantly higher for workers in the provinces and those who had recently started work. (authors)

  14. Uranium Mining and Norm in North America-Some Perspectives on Occupational Radiation Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Steven H; Chambers, Douglas B

    2017-07-01

    All soils and rocks contain naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). Many ores and raw materials contain relatively elevated levels of natural radionuclides, and processing such materials can further increase the concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides. In the U.S., these materials are sometimes referred to as technologically-enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (TENORM). Examples of NORM minerals include uranium ores, monazite (a source of rare earth minerals), and phosphate rock used to produce phosphate fertilizer. The processing of these materials has the potential to result in above-background radiation exposure to workers. Following a brief review of the sources and potential for worker exposure from NORM in these varied industries, this paper will then present an overview of uranium mining and recovery in North America, including discussion on the mining methods currently being used for both conventional (underground, open pit) and in situ leach (ISL), also referred to as In Situ Recovery (ISR), and the production of NORM materials and wastes associated with these uranium recovery methods. The radiological composition of the NORM products and wastes produced and recent data on radiological exposures received by workers in the North American uranium recovery industry are then described. The paper also identifies the responsible government agencies in the U.S. and Canada assigned the authority to regulate and control occupational exposure from these NORM materials.

  15. Strategy for assessing occupational radiation monitoring data from many facilities for use in epidemiologic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strom, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    A comprehensive strategy for dose assessment at US DOE facilities was developed. The strategy includes a determination of what data are available at each site, and what form they are in for the various times and types of monitoring. At the same time, information is gathered regarding the radiation hazards as a function of time, in order to judge the adequacy of monitoring. Information is collected on documentation of the personnel monitoring programs at each site. After this information is compiled and analyzed, site-specific data retrieval criteria and methods are finalized and meshed with general criteria and methods. Concurrently, Standard Assessment Procedures (SAP) are developed. Detailed steps are presented for the inference of annual doses from the kinds of occupational records found at DOE facilities, and when such inferences are too uncertain to be useful, guidance is provided for use of results in the control of confounding by undetermined exposures. The strategy was tested on a facility in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Health and Mortality Study, the Y-12 plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. 156 references, 53 figures, 45 tables

  16. Radioprotective effect of the extract of Ziziphus joazeiro and Anacardium occidentale on embryos of Biomphalaria glabrata submitted to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siqueira, Williams N.; Silva, Luanna R.S.; Silva, Edvane B.; Silva, Ronaldo C.; Lacerda, Laila B.N.; Silva, Hianna A.M.F.; Santos, Mariana L.O.; Sa, Jose L.F.; Melo, Ana M.M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Electromagnetic radiations are energies that can be classified as non-ionizing and ionizing. This type of energy is propagated by a material medium and the vacuum. The important characteristic of ionizing radiation is the localized release of large amounts of energy. The biological effects of radiation result principally from damage to DNA, which is the critical target. Given these harmful effects caused by radiation highlights the importance of acquiring knowledge about the radioprotective substance, because they act to protect the living tissue, decreasing the damage he caused by the effects of radiation. In this study we investigated the radioprotective effect of extract hydroalcoholic of Ziziphus joazeiro and Anacardium occidentale on embryos of Biomphalaria glabrata. The embryos of Biomphalaria glabrata pigmented were divided into 18 groups of 100 specimens. The experimental groups were exposed to the extracts at a concentration of 200 ppm and then irradiated. For irradiation, we used a source of 60 Co (Gammacell of Radionics Labs. Dose rate = 4.359 Gy/h). The viability of the embryos was examined using a stereoscopic microscope and statistical analysis was performed using the test Student-Newman-Keuls and χ 2 . Our results showed that the extracts of hydroalcoholic Ziziphus joazeiro showed radioprotective effect and that the aqueous extract of the bark of Anacardium occidentale exhibited a reduction in its embryotoxic effect. (author)

  17. Radioprotective effect of the extract of Ziziphus joazeiro and Anacardium occidentale on embryos of Biomphalaria glabrata submitted to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siqueira, Williams N.; Silva, Luanna R.S.; Silva, Edvane B. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear. Grupo de Estudos em Radioprotecao e Radioecologia; Silva, Ronaldo C. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Genetica; Lacerda, Laila B.N.; Silva, Hianna A.M.F.; Santos, Mariana L.O.; Sa, Jose L.F.; Melo, Ana M.M.A. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de de Biofisica e Radiobiologia. Lab. de Radiobiologia

    2011-07-01

    Electromagnetic radiations are energies that can be classified as non-ionizing and ionizing. This type of energy is propagated by a material medium and the vacuum. The important characteristic of ionizing radiation is the localized release of large amounts of energy. The biological effects of radiation result principally from damage to DNA, which is the critical target. Given these harmful effects caused by radiation highlights the importance of acquiring knowledge about the radioprotective substance, because they act to protect the living tissue, decreasing the damage he caused by the effects of radiation. In this study we investigated the radioprotective effect of extract hydroalcoholic of Ziziphus joazeiro and Anacardium occidentale on embryos of Biomphalaria glabrata. The embryos of Biomphalaria glabrata pigmented were divided into 18 groups of 100 specimens. The experimental groups were exposed to the extracts at a concentration of 200 ppm and then irradiated. For irradiation, we used a source of {sup 60}Co (Gammacell of Radionics Labs. Dose rate = 4.359 Gy/h). The viability of the embryos was examined using a stereoscopic microscope and statistical analysis was performed using the test Student-Newman-Keuls and {chi}{sup 2}. Our results showed that the extracts of hydroalcoholic Ziziphus joazeiro showed radioprotective effect and that the aqueous extract of the bark of Anacardium occidentale exhibited a reduction in its embryotoxic effect. (author)

  18. Simulation of the occupational radiation dose caused by contamination of primary circuit media in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artmann, Andreas; Bruhn, Gerd; Schneider, Sebastian [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Koeln (Germany); Strub, Erik [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Abt. Nuklearchemie

    2016-11-15

    The occupational radiation exposure of workers in NPPs during overall maintenance and refueling inspections and decommissioning is determined by numerous parameters. Radiation exposure caused by contamination of components may be minimised by the chemical operation mode and by applying systematic decontamination techniques. Data on occupational exposure in German NPPs as well as information about the radionuclide concentration in the coolant are available. The generic 3D model of the primary circuit presented is based on the analysis of technical documentation of German PWRs. Tasks are modeled as a combination of retention times at related local positions in the surroundings of work areas. The generic model allows the calculation of the resulting occupational doses generated by definable jobs and tasks. The KWU/Siemens- PWR generations are characterised by nuclide vectors, the thickness of shielding, and the material composition of components. It was possible to show that for a pre-Konvoi plant, the calculated occupational dose caused by a specific working task is close to measurements.

  19. Simulation of the occupational radiation dose caused by contamination of primary circuit media in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artmann, Andreas; Bruhn, Gerd; Schneider, Sebastian; Strub, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The occupational radiation exposure of workers in NPPs during overall maintenance and refueling inspections and decommissioning is determined by numerous parameters. Radiation exposure caused by contamination of components may be minimised by the chemical operation mode and by applying systematic decontamination techniques. Data on occupational exposure in German NPPs as well as information about the radionuclide concentration in the coolant are available. The generic 3D model of the primary circuit presented is based on the analysis of technical documentation of German PWRs. Tasks are modeled as a combination of retention times at related local positions in the surroundings of work areas. The generic model allows the calculation of the resulting occupational doses generated by definable jobs and tasks. The KWU/Siemens- PWR generations are characterised by nuclide vectors, the thickness of shielding, and the material composition of components. It was possible to show that for a pre-Konvoi plant, the calculated occupational dose caused by a specific working task is close to measurements.

  20. Occupational Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occupational health problems occur at work or because of the kind of work you do. These problems can include ... by exposure to radiation Exposure to germs in health care settings Good job safety and prevention practices ...

  1. Experimental study on the luminous radiation associated to the field emission of samples submitted to high RF fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maissa, S.; Junquera, T.; Fouaidy, M.; Le Goff, A.; Luong, M.; Tan, J.; Bonin, B.; Safa, H.

    1996-01-01

    Nowadays the accelerating gradient of the RF cavities is limited by the strong field emission (FE) of electrons stemming from the metallic walls. Previous experiments evidenced luminous radiations associated with electron emission on cathodes subjected to intense DC electric field. These observations led these authors to propose new theoretical models of the field emission phenomenon. The presented experimental study extends these previous DC works to the RF case. A special copper RF cavity has been developed equipped with an optical window and a removable sample. It has been designed for measuring both electron current and luminous radiation emitted by the sample, subjected to maximum RF electric field. The optical apparatus attached to the cavity permits to characterize the radiation in terms of intensity, glowing duration and spectral distribution. The results concerning different niobium or copper samples, whom top was either scratched or intentionally contaminated with metallic or dielectric particles are summarized. (author)

  2. Experimental study on the luminous radiation associated to the field emission of samples submitted to high RF fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maissa, S.; Junquera, T.; Fouaidy, M.; Le Goff, A.; Luong, M.; Tan, J.; Bonin, B.; Safa, H.

    1996-01-01

    The accelerating gradient of the RF cavities is limited by the strong field emission (FE) of electrons stemming from the metallic walls. Previous experiments evidenced luminous radiations associated with electron emission of cathodes subjected to intense DC electric field. These observations invoked the proposal of new theoretical models of the field emission phenomenon. This experimental study extends the previous DC works to the RF case. A special copper RF cavity has been developed equipped with an optical window and a removable sample. It has been designed for measuring both electron current and luminous radiation emitted by the sample, subjected to maximum RF electric field. The optical apparatus attached to the cavity permits to characterize the radiation in terms of intensity, glowing duration and spectral distribution. The results concerning different niobium or copper samples, whom top was either scratched or intentionally contaminated with metallic or dielectric particles are summarized. (author)

  3. Photodegradation of two tropical wood species: jatoba (Hymenaea courbaril) and tauari (Couratari oblongifolia) submitted to ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, J. de A.; Gonçalez, J.C.; Camargos, J.A.A.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to follow the process of photodegradation of the natural color of wood surface of two tropical species when exposed to ultraviolet radiation. It were used the wood of jatobá (Hymenaea courbaril) with reddish brown coloration, and tauari (Couratari oblongifolia) with yellowish olive coloration. Samples of these woods were subjected to four cycles of ultraviolet radiation (UV) amounting to a total of 168 hours of irradiation and at 350 nm of wave length. Changes of the woods natural color, indicative of the photodegradation process, was monitored by spectrocolorimetry. Both species underwent changes in color caused by photodegradation, since the irradiation caused darkening which was quantified by the intensity of reflected light. Tauari demonstrated greater resistance to UV radiation and jatobá showed greater tendency to redden up. Both species were classified as woods with very appreciable variation in color [pt

  4. Occupational exposures to ionising radiation in the region of Anatolia, Turkey for the period 1995-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenduez, H.; Zeyrek, C. T.; Aksu, L.; Isak, S.

    2004-01-01

    For this study, the individual annual dose information on classified workers who are occupationally exposed to extended radiation sources in Turkey, was assessed and analysed by the Ankara Nuclear Research and Training Centre dosimetry service at the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority for the years 1995-1999. The radiation workers monitored are divided into three main work sectors: conventional industry (8.24%), medicine (90.20%) and research-education (1.56%). The average annual dose for all workers in each particular sector was 0.14, 0.38 and 0.08 mSv, respectively, in 1995-1999. This paper contains the detailed analysis of occupational exposure. The statistical analysis provided includes the mean annual dose, the collective dose, the distributions of the dose over the different sectors and the number of workers who have exceeded any of the established dose levels. (authors)

  5. Problems of the inclusion of workplaces with enhanced radon and radon daughter concentrations into occupational radiation protection control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przyborowski, S.

    1993-01-01

    New international recommendations (ICRP-60) on inclusion of workplaces with enhanced radon and radon daughter concentrations into occupational control are expected. Based on present regulations in Germany the problems of their implementation into radiation protection practice will be discussed. For underground workplaces and workplaces in radon spas and waterworks problems may be exist in particular points, whereas inclusion of workplaces in buildings seems to be problematicly in general. (orig./HP) [de

  6. Chronic risk assessment for the use of radiation in occupationally exposed personnel (OEP) in the oral health area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores H, C.; Huerta F, M. R.; Sosa A, M. A.; Diaz de Leon M, L. V.

    2017-10-01

    There is a scientific discordance in the amounts of radiation used in radio-diagnosis and received in practice by the occupationally exposed personnel (OEP), with the exception of radiologists who follow the safety and hygiene measures recommended by the regulations. The objective of this study was to quantify the risk of the OEP in the dental area by the use of ionizing radiation chronically. A fundamental variable to take into account in the study was the number of films taken day/shift. A comparative study was carried out, n = 70 study subjects. The information was collected by occupational clinical history, biological and occupational monitoring. The average age was 19.6 years for E-1 and E-2 was 50 years. The radiation emission in the calibrated equipment was 1.578 (Lp). The risk is 2:1 E-1:E-2. As a result of the study was found that in most cases the OEP does not use protection measures, only the patient. (Author)

  7. Analysis of occupational doses of workers on the dose registry of the Federal Radiation Protection Service in 2000 and 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogundare, F.O.; Balogun, F.A.

    2003-01-01

    In 2000 and 2001 about 279 and 221 radiation workers, respectively, were monitored by the Federal Radiation Protection Service, University of Ibadan, in Nigeria. The distribution of the occupational doses shows that the majority of workers received doses below 4 mSv in each of the two years. The radiation workers in the two years are classified into two occupational categories: medicine and industry. The mean annual effective doses, collective doses and the collective dose distribution ratios for workers in each category and the entire monitored workers were calculated. The mean annual effective doses were compared with their corresponding worldwide values quoted by UNSCEAR. In each of the two years, a few workers in industry received doses higher than 50 mSv. The collective dose distribution ratio was found to be about 0.49, which is very close to the highest value of 0.5 in the range of values considered by UNSCEAR as normal for this parameter. This suggests that extra measures have to be taken, particularly in industry, to ensure that the proportion of workers at risk does not go outside this normal range. The occupational doses were also modelled by both the log-normal and Weibull distributions. Both distributions were found to describe the data in almost the same way. (author)

  8. Analysis of costs for compliance with Federal Radiation Protection Guidance for Occupational Exposure. Volume 2: case study analysis of the impacts of proposed radiation protection guidance for workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-11-01

    This report contains the writeups of case studies conducted in support of an effort to estimate costs and economic impacts of proposed Federal Radiation Protection Guidance for Occupational Exposures. The purpose of the case studies was to develop background information on representative organizations necessary to determine the impact of the proposed guidelines on selected industries. This information was used, together with other data, to estimate the aggregate costs of compliance with the proposed guidelines. The cost estimates are contained in a companion report

  9. Evaluation of scattered radiation emitted from X-ray security scanners on occupational dose to airport personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalah, Entesar; Fakhry, Angham; Mukhtar, Asma; Al Salti, Farah; Bader, May; Khouri, Sara; Al-Zahmi, Reem

    2017-01-01

    Based on security issues and regulations airports are provided with luggage cargo scanners. These scanners utilize ionizing radiation that in principle present health risks toward humans. The study aims to investigate the amount of backscatter produced by passenger luggage and cargo toward airport personnel who are located at different distances from the scanners. To approach our investigation a Thermo Electron Radeye-G probe was used to quantify the backscattered radiation measured in terms of dose-rate emitted from airport scanners, Measurements were taken at the entrance and exit positions of the X-ray tunnel at three different distances (0, 50, and 100 cm) for two different scanners; both scanners include shielding curtains that reduce scattered radiation. Correlation was demonstrated using the Pearson coefficient test. Measurements confirmed an inverse relationship between dose rate and distance. An estimated occupational accumulative dose of 0.88 mSv/y, and 2.04 mSv/y were obtained for personnel working in inspection of carry-on, and cargo, respectively. Findings confirm that the projected dose of security and engineering staff are being well within dose limits. - Highlights: • Backscattered radiation emitted from the airport security scanners is estimated. • Inverse relation observed between backscattered radiation and scanners distance. • Occupational dose for personnel inspecting the scanners were up to 2.04 mSv/y. • The projected dose of security and engineering staff are well within dose limits.

  10. Microbiological, physico-chemical, and sensorial modifications during the useful life of the shrimps (Penaeus brasiliensis e Penaeus Paulensis) submitted to gamma radiation